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Sample records for pure argon large

  1. Evidence for Argon Content in Pure Oxygen from Thermal Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steur, Peter P. M.; Yang, Inseok; Pavese, Franco

    2017-02-01

    Since many years it is known that argon impurities in oxygen change the temperature of the oxygen triple point by +12 K{\\cdot }mol^{-1} (positive, while most impurities decrease the temperature) without any effect on the melting range of this transition, for the impurity concentrations usually encountered in nominally pure gases. It has been hypothesized that thermal measurements on the α -β solid-to-solid transition at 23.8 K or the β -γ solid-to-solid transition at 43.8 K may give reliable evidence regarding the argon content. However, such measurements require very long times for full completion of each transition (with prohibitive costs if liquid helium is used) and for the α -β solid-to-solid transition the heat pulse method cannot be applied reliably. The availability of closed-cycle refrigerators permits the first obstacle to be surmounted. The automatic system earlier developed at INRIM during the EU Multicells project and used extensively for the project on the isotopic effect in neon is perfectly suited for such measurements. Thus, the uncertainties of the temperature measurements are similar to those obtained previously (of the order of 0.1 mK or less). Three argon-in-oxygen mixtures were prepared gravimetrically and certified at KRISS, just as was previously done for the work on the neon isotopic compositions. Results of continuous-current measurements on the α -β solid-to-solid transition, along with the triple-point data obtained with the heat pulse method, are presented for one cell with a known doped argon content, to be compared with similar data from a cell with oxygen of very high purity. In addition, some preliminary data for the β -γ solid-to-solid transition are given. The measurements on the mixture with the highest argon content, about 1002 μmol{\\cdot } mol^{-1}, imply a (linear) sensitivity of (116 ± 7) K{\\cdot }mol^{-1} for the α -β transition. This sensitivity may be different at much lower argon contents, and follow

  2. Prediction of the thermophysical properties of pure neon, pure argon, and the binary mixtures neon-argon and argon-krypton by Monte Carlo simulation using ab initio potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrabad, A E; Laghaei, R; Deiters, U K

    2004-10-01

    Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations were used to test the ability of intermolecular pair potentials derived ab initio from quantum mechanical principles, enhanced by Axilrod-Teller triple-dipole interactions, to predict the vapor-liquid phase equilibria of pure neon, pure argon, and the binary mixtures neon-argon and argon-krypton. The interaction potentials for Ne-Ne, Ar-Ar, Kr-Kr, and Ne-Ar were taken from literature; for Ar-Kr a different potential has been developed. In all cases the quantum mechanical calculations had been carried out with the coupled-cluster approach [CCSD(T) level of theory] and with correlation consistent basis sets; furthermore an extrapolation scheme had been applied to obtain the basis set limit of the interaction energies. The ab initio pair potentials as well as the thermodynamic data based on them are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental data; the only exception is neon. It is shown, however, that in this case the deviations can be quantitatively explained by quantum effects. The interaction potentials that have been developed permit quantitative predictions of high-pressure phase equilibria of noble-gas mixtures.

  3. LArGe. A liquid argon scintillation veto for GERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heisel, Mark

    2011-04-13

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for possible applications in the GERDA experiment. GERDA searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge, by operating naked germanium detectors submersed into 65 m{sup 3} of liquid argon. Similarly, LArGe runs Ge-detectors in 1 m{sup 3} (1.4 tons) of liquid argon, which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors, to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. This work adresses the design, construction, and commissioning of LArGe. The background suppression efficiency has been studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 10{sup 3} have been achieved. First background data of LArGe (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12-4.6).10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.y) (90% c.l.), which is at the level of the Gerda phase I design goal. Furthermore, for the first time we measure the natural {sup 42}Ar abundance (in parallel to Gerda), and have indication for the 2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay in natural germanium. (orig.)

  4. Development of cryogenic installations for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Adamowski, M; Geynisman, M; Hentschel, S; Montanari, D; Nessi, M; Norris, B

    2015-01-01

    A proposal for a very large liquid argon (68,000 kg) based neutrino detector is being studied. To validate the design principles and the detector technology, and to gain experience in the development of the cryostats and the cryogenic systems needed for such large experiments, several smaller scale installations will be developed and implemented, at Fermilab and CERN. The cryogenic systems for these installations will be developed, constructed, installed and commissioned by an international engineering team. These installations shall bring the required cooling power under specific conditions to the experiments for the initial cool-down and the long term operation, and shall also guarantee the correct distribution of the cooling power within the cryostats to ensure a homogeneous temperature distribution within the cryostat itself. The cryogenic systems shall also include gaseous and liquid phase argon purification devices to be used to reach and maintain the very stringent purity requirements needed for these...

  5. Large area liquid argon detectors for interrogation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, Charles; Kane, Steve; Firestone, Murray I.; Smith, Gregory [Adelphi Technology LLC, Purdue Technology Center, 5225 Exploration Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46241 (United States); Gozani, Tsahi; Brown, Craig; Kwong, John; King, Michael J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, 520 Almanor Avenue, Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Nikkel, James A.; McKinsey, Dan [Physics Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Measurements of the efficiency, pulse shape, and energy and time resolution of liquid argon (LAr) detectors are presented. Liquefied noble gas-based (LNbG) detectors have been developed for the detection of dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. However, the same qualities that make LNbG detectors ideal for these applications, namely their size, cost, efficiency, pulse shape discrimination and resolution, make them promising for portal screening and the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). Two 18-liter prototype detectors were designed, fabricated, and tested, one with pure LAr and the other doped with liquid Xe (LArXe). The LArXe detector presented the better time and energy resolution of 3.3 ns and 20% at 662 KeV, respectively. The total efficiency of the detector was measured to be 35% with 4.5% of the total photons detected in the photopeak.

  6. Large Area Pico-second Photodetectors (LAPPD) in Liquid Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan; Lappd Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Large Area Pico-second Photodetector (LAPPD) project has recently produced the first working devices with a small form factor and pico-second timing resolution. A number of current and proposed neutrino and dark matter experiments use liquid argon as a detector medium. A flat photodetector with excellent timing resolution will help with background suppression and improve the overall sensitivity of the experiment. We present the research done and some preliminary results to customize the LAPPD devices to work in a cryogenic environment. Argonne National Laboratory (LDRD) and DOE.

  7. Development of membrane cryostats for large liquid argon neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, D; Gendotti, A; Geynisman, M; Hentschel, S; Loew, T; Mladenov, D; Montanari, C; Murphy, S; Nessi, M; Norris, B; Noto, F; Rubbia, A; Sharma, R; Smargianaki, D; Stewart, J; Vignoli, C; Wilson, P; Wu, S

    2015-01-01

    A new collaboration is being formed to develop a multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be located at the Surf Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. In the present design, the detector will be located inside cryostats filled with 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon (less than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination). To qualify the membrane technology for future very large-scale and underground implementations, a strong prototyping effort is ongoing: several smaller detectors of growing size with associated cryostats and cryogenic systems will be designed and built at Fermilab and CERN. They will take physics data and test different detector elements, filtration systems, design options and installation procedures. In addition, a 35 ton prototype is already operational at Fermilab and will take data with single-phase detector in early 2016. After the prototyping phase, the multi-kton detector will be constructed. After commissioning, it will detect and study ne...

  8. Effect of oxygen impurities on atmospheric-pressure surface streamer discharge in argon for large gap arc breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashish; Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-10-01

    We report the results of a computational study that investigates the effect of impurities (molecular oxygen) on the development of argon surface streamers at atmospheric-pressure conditions. A continuous surface streamer has been proposed as a low-voltage mechanism to generate a conductive bridge for arc breakdown of a large interelectrode gap at high pressures. The streamer discharge model is based on the self-consistent, multispecies, continuum description of the plasma. Below a threshold voltage, no streamer discharge is observed and charge is localized only in the vicinity of the anode in the form of a localized corona. Above this voltage threshold in pure argon, a continuous conductive streamer successfully bridges the gap between two electrodes indicating high probability of transition to the arc. For small oxygen impurities (less than 5%), the threshold voltage is found to decrease by a few hundred volts compared to the threshold voltage in pure argon while the streamer induction time increases. No noticeable changes in the streamer conductivity is obtained for low impurities of oxygen in the above range. An increase of the oxygen density above the 5% impurity level causes a significant decrease in the continuous streamer conductivity and leads to a decrease in the probability of transition to arc.

  9. Fast-imaging and spectroscopic analysis of atmospheric argon streamers for large gap arc breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachuilo, Michael; Stefani, Francis; Bengtson, Roger; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2014-10-01

    A non-equilibrium plasma source has been developed to assist in the low-voltage arc breakdown of large electrode gaps. The source consists of a dielectric embedded wire helically wound around a confining cylindrical quartz chamber. Annular electrodes cap the ends of the quartz chamber. An argon feed gas is used to provide a uniform environment and exhausts to ambient atmospheric conditions. A negative polarity 50 kV trigger pulse is applied to the embedded trigger wire to initiate the arc breakdown. Application of the trigger pulse produces a localized coronal discharges along the inner surface of the quartz tube. The corona provides seed electrons through which streamers propagate from one of the main discharge electrode along the quartz surface until it reaches the opposite electrode to bridge the gap. Once the gap is bridged a spark over occurs and robust arc discharge is formed in the chamber volume. Fast imaging of the streamer propagation establishes its velocity in the range of ~ 100 km/s. Spectroscopy of the streamer discharge in atmospheric argon has been conducted and electron temperature and number density estimated from a collision radiative model. Argon spectrum is dominated by neutral argon lines in the 650--950 nm range, and singly ionized argon lines are observed in the ultra-violet to near UV (300--400 nm). Research was performed in connection with AFOSR Contract FA9550-11-1-0062.

  10. Attenuation of vacuum ultraviolet light in pure and xenon-doped liquid argon - an approach to an assignment of the near-infrared emission from the mixture

    CERN Document Server

    Neumeier, A; Himpsl, A; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Schönert, S; Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    Results of transmission experiments of vacuum ultraviolet light through a 11.6 cm long cell filled with pure and xenon-doped liquid argon are described. Pure liquid argon shows no attenuation down to the experimental short-wavelength cut-off at 118nm. Based on a conservative approach, a lower limit of 1.10 m for the attenuation length of its own scintillation light could be derived. Adding xenon to liquid argon at concentrations on the order of parts per million leads to strong xenon-related absorption features which are used for a tentative assignment of the recently found near-infrared emission observed in electron-beam excited liquid argon-xenon mixtures. Two of the three absorption features can be explained by perturbed xenon transitions and the third one by a trapped exciton (Wannier-Mott) impurity state. A calibration curve connecting the equivalent width of the absorption line at 140 nm with xenon concentration is provided.

  11. WA105: A large demonstrator of a liquid argon dual phase TPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelli, L.; Murphy, S.; WA105 Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The Liquid argon technology has been chosen for the DUNE underground experiment for the study of neutrino oscillations, neutrino astrophysics and proton decay. This detector has excellent tracking and calorimetric capabilities much superior to currently operating neutrino detectors. WA105 is a large demonstrator of the dual-phase liquid argon TPC based on the GLACIER design, with a 6×6×6 m3 (appr. 300t) active volume. Its construction and operation test scalable solutions for the crucial aspects of this detector: ultra-high argon purity in non-evacuable tanks, long drifts, very high drift voltages, large area MPGD, cold preamplifiers. The TPC will be built inside a tank based on industrial LNG technology. Electrons produced in the liquid argon are extracted in the gas phase. Here, a readout plane based on Large Electron Multipliers (LEM’s) provides amplification before the charge collection onto an anode plane with strip readout. This highly cost effective solution provides excellent imaging capabilities with equal charge sharing on both views. PMTs located at the bottom of the tank containing the liquid argon provide the readout of the scintillation light. This demonstrator is an industrial prototype of the design proposed for a large underground detector. WA105 is under construction at CERN and will be exposed to a charged particle beam (0.5 - 20 GeV/c) in the North Area in 2018. The data will provide necessary calibration of the detector performances and benchmark sophisticated reconstruction algorithms. This project is a crucial milestone for the long baseline neutrino program DUNE.

  12. LArGe - Active background suppression using argon scintillation for the GERDA $0\

    CERN Document Server

    Agostini, M; Budjáš, D; Cattadori, C; Gangapshev, A; Gusev, K; Heisel, M; Junker, M; Klimenko, A; Lubashevskiy, A; Pelczar, K; Schönert, S; Smolnikov, A; Zuzel, G

    2015-01-01

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the GERDA experiment. Similar to GERDA, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m$^3$, 1.4 tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The scintillation signals are used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times $10^3$ have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12$-$4.6)$\\cdot 10^{-2}$ cts/(keV$\\cdot$kg$\\cdot$y) (90% C.L.), which is at the level of GERDA Phase I. Fu...

  13. ArgonCube: a novel, fully-modular approach for the realization of large-mass liquid argon TPC neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, C; Asaadi, J; Auger, M; Barbato, F; Bay, F; Bishai, M; Bleiner, D; Borgschulte, A; Bremer, J; Cavus, E; Chen, H; De Geronimo, G; Ereditato, A; Fleming, B; Goldi, D; Hanni, R; Kose, U; Kreslo, I; La Mattina, F; Lanni, F; Lissauer, D; Luthi, M; Lutz, P; Marchionni, A; Mladenov, D; Nessi, M; Noto, F; Palamara, O; Raaf, J L; Radeka, V; Rudolph Von Rohr, Ch; Smargianaki, D; Soderberg, M; Strauss, Th; Weber, M; Yu, B; Zeller, G P; Zeyrek, M; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2015-01-01

    The Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber is a prime candidate detector for future neutrino oscillation physics experiments, underground neutrino observatories and proton decay searches. A large international project based on this technology is currently being considered at the future LBNF facility in the United States on the very large mass scale of 40 kton. In this document, following the long standing R&D work conducted over the last years in several laboratories in Europe and in the United States, we intend to propose a novel Liquid Argon TPC approach based on a fully-modular, innovative design, the ArgonCube. The related R&D work will proceed along two main directions; one aimed at on the assessment of the proposed modular detector design, the other on the exploitation of new signal readout methods. Such a strategy will provide high performance while being cost-effective and robust at the same time. According to our plans, we will firstly realize a detector prototype hosted in a cryostat that is a...

  14. LArGe: active background suppression using argon scintillation for the GERDA 0νββ-experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, M.; Budjas, D.; Schoenert, S. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Barnabe-Heider, M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Cattadori, C. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan (Italy); INFN, Milan (Italy); Gangapshev, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Institut for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gusev, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Joint Institut for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); National Research Center Kurchatov Institut, Moscow (Russian Federation); Heisel, M.; Smolnikov, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Junker, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Klimenko, A.; Lubashevskiy, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Joint Institut for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Pelczar, K. [Jagellonian University, Cracow (Poland); Zuzel, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Jagellonian University, Cracow (Poland)

    2015-10-15

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the GERDA experiment. Similar to GERDA, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m{sup 3}, 1.4tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The scintillation signals are used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 10{sup 3} have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12 - 4.6) x 10{sup -2} cts/(keV kg year) (90 % C.L.), which is at the level of GERDA Phase I. Furthermore, for the first time we monitor the natural {sup 42}Ar abundance (parallel to GERDA), and have indication for the 2νββ-decay in natural germanium. These results show the effectivity of an active liquid argon veto in an ultra-low background environment. As a consequence, the implementation of a liquid argon veto in GERDA Phase II is pursued. (orig.)

  15. Solar neutrino detection in a large volume double-phase liquid argon experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Franco, D; Agnes, P; Agostino, L; Bottino, B; Davini, S; De Cecco, S; Fan, A; Fiorillo, G; Galbiati, C; Goretti, A M; Hungerford, E V; Ianni, Al; Ianni, An; Jollet, C; Marini, L; Martoff, C J; Meregaglia, A; Pagani, L; Pallavicini, M; Pantic, E; Pocar, A; Renshaw, A L; Rossi, B; Rossi, N; Suvorov, Y; Testera, G; Tonazzo, A; Wang, H; Zavatarelli, S

    2015-01-01

    The direct search for dark matter WIMP particles through their interaction with nuclei at the "neutrino floor" sensitivity, where neutrino-induced coherent scattering on nuclei starts contributing to the background, requires detectors capable of collecting exposures of the order of 1~ktonne yr free of background resulting from beta and gamma decays and cosmogenic and radiogenic neutrons. The same constraints are required for precision measurements of solar neutrinos elastically scattering on electrons. Two-phase liquid argon time projection chambers (LAr TPCs) are prime candidates for the ambitious program to explore the nature of dark matter. The large target, high scintillation light yield and good spatial resolution in all three cartesian directions concurrently allows a high precision measurement of solar neutrino fluxes. We studied the cosmogenic and radiogenic backgrounds affecting solar neutrino detection in a 300 tonne (100 tonne fiducial) LAr TPC operating at LNGS depth (3,800 meters of water equival...

  16. Solar neutrino detection in a large volume double-phase liquid argon experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, D.; Giganti, C.; Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Bottino, B.; Canci, N.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Jollet, C.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Pocar, A.; Razeti, M.; Renshaw, A. L.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Suvorov, Y.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Wang, H.; Zavatarelli, S.

    2016-08-01

    Precision measurements of solar neutrinos emitted by specific nuclear reaction chains in the Sun are of great interest for developing an improved understanding of star formation and evolution. Given the expected neutrino fluxes and known detection reactions, such measurements require detectors capable of collecting neutrino-electron scattering data in exposures on the order of 1 ktonne-yr, with good energy resolution and extremely low background. Two-phase liquid argon time projection chambers (LAr TPCs) are under development for direct Dark Matter WIMP searches, which possess very large sensitive mass, high scintillation light yield, good energy resolution, and good spatial resolution in all three cartesian directions. While enabling Dark Matter searches with sensitivity extending to the ``neutrino floor'' (given by the rate of nuclear recoil events from solar neutrino coherent scattering), such detectors could also enable precision measurements of solar neutrino fluxes using the neutrino-electron elastic scattering events. Modeling results are presented for the cosmogenic and radiogenic backgrounds affecting solar neutrino detection in a 300 tonne (100 tonne fiducial) LAr TPC operating at LNGS depth (3,800 meters of water equivalent). The results show that such a detector could measure the CNO neutrino rate with ~15% precision, and significantly improve the precision of the 7Be and pep neutrino rates compared to the currently available results from the Borexino organic liquid scintillator detector.

  17. Aspects of Pure Quantum Chromodynamics on Large Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Ian John

    1987-09-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. We use Monte Carlo methods to study pure quantum chromodynamics on a four-dimensional Euclidean spacetime lattice consisting of 32^4 points. The features we investigate are relevant to hadron spectroscopy. We take values of the bare coupling beta equal to 6.29, 6.585 and 6.88 in order to monitor the approach towards the continuum limit of the lattice system. To exploit the available Monte Carlo configurations as far as possible, we study correlation functions of extended operators whose overlap with the required lattice state is enhanced. Through the correlations of improved quarkonium operators and also through those of extended Polyakov lines we study the potential between static triplet and antitriplet colour charges (which represent a heavy quark and antiquark). The resulting string tensions do not vary with beta according to the expectations of asymptotic scaling, and consequently it is not possible to confirm that our lattices exhibit continuum behaviour. With similar methods we investigate the potential between two static octet colour charges, the potential between sextet and antisextet colour charges and also the energies of static quark and antiquark systems which have E_{u} and A_{1u} excitations of the gluon field. We also calculate the masses of glueballs with J^{PC} of 0 ^{++} and 2^{++ } using these extended operator techniques. The 32^4 lattice configurations are supplemented by additional configurations of a 10 ^4 lattice at beta = 6.0 and a 20^4 lattice at beta = 6.2 for a study of the spin-dependent corrections to the non-relativistic potential between a heavy quark and antiquark. One of the two spin-orbit potentials, V_1, is found to have long range behaviour, whilst the other, V_2, and the tensor and scalar spin-spin potentials (V _3 and V_4 respectively) are short range. The pattern of this behaviour is consistent with scalar confinement and a vector Coulomb

  18. Growth and characterization of nanocrystalline SrTiO x films: room temperature deposition using RF sputtering system in a pure argon environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrak, T.; Goldenberg, E.

    2017-05-01

    We report a comprehensive description of the structure, optical and electrical properties of as-deposited and annealed SrTiO x (STO) thin films. Nanocrystalline STO films were deposited on p-type Si (1 0 0) and UV-grade fused silica substrates by RF magnetron sputtering at room temperature in a pure argon environment. Well adhered and transparent films with very smooth surfaces were obtained. As-deposited films showed 70% transparency in the visible spectrum, transparency increased to 77% after annealing at 700 °C. The direct and indirect optical band gaps were found to be 2.88 eV and 2.44 eV, for as-deposited films. For annealed films, indirect band gap increased to 2.57 eV while the direct optical band gap value remained constant. Upon annealing, the refractive indices (n) of the films decreased from 2.36 to 2.32. Ag/STO/p-Si device structures were also fabricated and characterized by current-voltage, capacitance-voltage and dielectric measurements. The calculated values are compared with experimental data from the literature and discussed in terms of device performances. A butterfly loop-type hysteresis curve was observed for the voltage-dependent capacitance measurement in annealed thin film devices. Dielectric constants were calculated as 31.7 and 57.4 for as-deposited and annealed films at 100 kHz, respectively. Charge storage capacity was found to be  >4.5 µC cm-2 for as-deposited and 3.5 µC cm-2 for annealed films.

  19. A Power Interruption Technique for Investigation of Temperature Difference in Stabilized Low Direct-Current Arc Burning in Pure Argon on Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. M. Kuzmanovi(c); J. J. Savovi(c); D. P. Rankovi(c); M. Stoiljkovi(c); A. Anti(c)-Jovanovi(c); M.S. Pavlovi(c); M. Marinkovi(c)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Plasma of argon stabilized arc column, in a current range 3-11 A, is investigated using emission spectrometric diagnostic techniques. Temperatures are evaluated using several methods: argon line to adjacent recombinational continuum intensity ratio, absolute emissivity of argon fine, measurement of electron number density, and power interruption. Electron number density is evaluated from absolute emissivity of recombinational continuum. The difference between electron Te and heavy particle Th temperature ranged from 4500 K for 3 A to 2300 K for 11 A arc current. By comparing the present with the previously obtained results, using the same arc device but with the introduction of water aerosol, it is concluded that water aerosol reduces the difference Te - Th and brings plasma closer to the partial thermodynamic equilibrium state.

  20. MicroBooNE and the Road to Large Liquid Argon Neutrino Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiorgi, G.

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPC's) provide a promising technology for multi-kiloton scale detectors aiming to address-among other pressing particle physics questions-the possibility of short and long baseline electron neutrino and antineutrino appearance. MicroBooNE, a 170 ton LArTPC under construction, is the next necessary step in a phased R&D effort toward construction and stable operation of larger-scale LArTPC's. This development effort also leans heavily on the ArgoNeuT and LAr1 LArTPC R&D experiments at Fermilab. In addition to advancing the LArTPC technology, these projects also provide unique physics opportunities. For example, Micro-BooNE will be located in the Booster Neutrino Beamline at Fermilab, at ∼470 m from neutrino production. Thus, in addition to measuring a suite of low energy neutrino cross sections on argon, MicroBooNE will investigate the anomalous low energy excess seen by the MiniBooNE experiment. Furthermore, the neutrino beam energy and relatively short baseline provide MicroBooNE with sensitivity to high-∼m2 neutrino oscillations. These proceedings summarize the role of the MicroBooNE detector in the US LArTPC R&D program, present its physics reach, and briefly discuss the physics potential of a dedicated near-future neutrino oscillation program at the Booster Neutrino Beamline, as a way to maximize the physics output of the Fermilab LArTPC R&D projects.

  1. O arco TIG a 100 A e argônio puro é um arco especial? Is the 100-A TIG arc with pure argon special?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louriel O. Vilarinho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Partindo da afirmação de que um melhor entendimento dos mecanismos físicos que regem os processos de soldagem pode ser traduzido em maiores níveis de consistência e produtividade destes processos, resta, então, investigar e estudar tais mecanismos. Dentre as diversas abordagens para a caracterização física do processo, o estudo do arco elétrico procura destacar a estabilidade do processo com base nos fenômenos envolvidos. De forma específica para a soldagem a arco, onde alta qualidade é requerida, o processo TIG se destaca. Focando-se mais ainda neste processo, um conjunto de parâmetros chama a atenção: corrente de 100 A e gás de proteção argônio puro. Estes valores atribuem ao arco uma característica especial de transição sob diferentes pontos de vista (característica estática, regime laminar-turbulento, dimensões do arco e queda de tensão anódica. Estas características são apresentadas e discutidas. Espera-se que esta discussão seja lançada como um desafio aos leitores da Revista Soldagem & Inspeção para que contribuam com seus pontos de vista e/ou mais informações, procurando consolidar o conhecimento do arco elétrico em processo não-consumível e que possa, ao final, reverter em resultados tecnológicos para melhor uso do processo.By stating that an improved understanding of the physical mechanisms controlling process performance can usually be translated into higher levels of consistency and productivity for that process, it is expected to investigate these mechanisms. Among the various approaches for process physical characterisation, the electric-arc study unveils the process stability from the related phenomena. Specifically for arc welding, which high quality levels are required, the TIG process outstands. Further looking into this process, a parameter set calls the attention: 100-A current and pure argon as shielding gas. These values attribute to the arc special transitional characteristics, such

  2. Organic depth profiling of a nanostructured delta layer reference material using large argon cluster ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J L S; Ninomiya, S; Matsuo, J; Gilmore, I S; Seah, M P; Shard, A G

    2010-01-01

    Cluster ion beams have revolutionized the analysis of organic surfaces in time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and opened up new capabilities for organic depth profiling. Much effort has been devoted to understanding the capabilities and improving the performance of SF(5)(+) and C(60)(n+), which are successful for many, but not all, organic materials. Here, we explore the potential of organic depth profiling using novel argon cluster ions, Ar(500)(+) to Ar(1000)(+). We present results for an organic delta layer reference sample, consisting of ultrathin "delta" layers of Irganox 3114 (approximately 2.4 nm) embedded between thick layers of Irganox 1010 (approximately 46 or 91 nm). This indicates that, for the reference material, major benefits can be obtained with Ar cluster ions, including a constant high sputtering yield throughout a depth of approximately 390 nm, and an extremely low sputter-induced roughness of <5 nm. Although the depth resolution is currently limited by an instrumental artifact, and may not be the best attainable, these initial results strongly indicate the potential to achieve high depth resolution and suggest that Ar cluster ions may have a major role to play in the depth profiling of organic materials.

  3. Power Consideration for Pulsed Discharges in Potassium Seeded Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Sheng-Guo; HE Jun-Jia; LIU Ke-Fu

    2007-01-01

    Minimization of energy consumed in plasma generation is critical for applications, in which a large volume of plasmas is needed. We suggest that a high electron density atmospheric pressure plasmas can be generated by pulsed discharges in potassium seeded argon at an elevated temperature with a very small power input. The ionization efficiency and power budget of pulsed discharges in such plasmas are analytically studied. The results show that ionization efficiency of argon, especially at small reduced electric field E/N (the ratio of the electric field to the gas number density), is improved effectively in the presence of small amount of potassium additives. Power input of pulsed discharge to sustain a prescribed average level of ionization in potassium seeded argon is three orders of magnitude lower than that in pure argon. Further, unlike in pure argon, it is found that very short high-voltage pulses with very high repetition rates are unnecessary in potassium seeded argon. A pulse with 100ns of pulse duration, 5kHz of repetition rate, and 2Td (1 Td = 1 ×10-21 Vm2) of E/N is enough to sustain an electron density of 10l9m-3 in 1 atm 1500 K Ar+0.1% K mixture, with a very small power input of about 0.08 × 104 W/m3.

  4. Pure crystal orientation and anisotropic charge transport in large-area hybrid perovskite films.

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, N; Li, F; Turedi, B; Sinatra, L; Sarmah, SP; Parida,, B.; Saidaminov, MI; Murali, B; Burlakov, VM; Goriely, Alain; Mohammed, OF; Wu, T; Bakr, OM

    2016-01-01

    Controlling crystal orientations and macroscopic morphology is vital to develop the electronic properties of hybrid perovskites. Here we show that a large-area, orientationally pure crystalline (OPC) methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) hybrid perovskite film can be fabricated using a thermal-gradient-assisted directional crystallization method that relies on the sharp liquid-to-solid transition of MAPbI3 from ionic liquid solution. We find that the OPC films spontaneously form periodic microa...

  5. Pure crystal orientation and anisotropic charge transport in large-area hybrid perovskite films

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Namchul; LI Feng; Turedi, Bekir; Sinatra, Lutfan; Sarmah, Smritakshi P.; Parida, Manas R.; Saidaminov, Makhsud I.; Murali, Banavoth; Burlakov, Victor M.; Goriely, Alain; Mohammed, Omar F; Wu, Tom; Bakr, Osman M.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling crystal orientations and macroscopic morphology is vital to develop the electronic properties of hybrid perovskites. Here we show that a large-area, orientationally pure crystalline (OPC) methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) hybrid perovskite film can be fabricated using a thermal-gradient-assisted directional crystallization method that relies on the sharp liquid-to-solid transition of MAPbI3 from ionic liquid solution. We find that the OPC films spontaneously form periodic microa...

  6. Attenuation measurements of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumeier, A. [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Dandl, T.; Himpsl, A. [Physik-Department E12, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Hofmann, M. [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); KETEK GmbH, Hofer Straße 3, 81737 München (Germany); Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Schönert, S. [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ulrich, A., E-mail: andreas.ulrich@ph.tum.de [Physik-Department E12, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-11-11

    The attenuation of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon in the context of its application in large liquid noble gas detectors has been studied. Compared to a previous publication several technical issues concerning transmission measurements in general are addressed and several systematic effects were quantitatively measured. Wavelength-resolved transmission measurements have been performed from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near-infrared region. On the current level of sensitivity with a length of the optical path of 11.6 cm, no xenon-related absorption effects could be observed, and pure liquid argon is fully transparent down to the short wavelength cut-off of the experimental setup at 118 nm. A lower limit for the attenuation length of pure liquid argon for its own scintillation light has been estimated to be 1.10 m based on a very conservative approach.

  7. Attenuation measurements of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Neumeier, A; Himpsl, A; Hofmann, M; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Schönert, S; Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    The attenuation of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon in the context of its application in large liquid noble gas detectors has been studied. Compared to a previous publication several technical issues concerning transmission measurements in general are addressed and several systematic effects were quantitatively measured. Wavelength-resolved transmission measurements have been performed from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near-infrared region. On the current level of sensitivity with a length of the optical path of 11.6 cm, no xenon-related absorption effects could be observed, and pure liquid argon is fully transparent down to the short wavelength cut-off of the experimental setup at 118 nm. A lower limit for the attenuation length of pure liquid argon for its own scintillation light has been estimated to be 1.10 m based on a very conservative approach.

  8. Experimental and Theoretical Estimation of Excited Species Generation in Pulsed Electron Beam-Generated Plasmas Produced in Pure Argon, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Their Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    efficiency i (-) Oxygen molecules (O2) a1X3 3.8 x 103 1.27 mkm 0.98 b1X3 12 762 1.63 c1 +A,3+A3 0.09 243-306 4.70 B3X3 5 x10-7...published in the 20th centuries: argon NIFS -DATA-72, National Institute for Fusion Science (Jpn), ISSN 0915-6364. 34. C. Yamabe, S. J. Buckman and A. V...contribution of the b1 family of states. DS 6 is the peak observed at 15.8 eV. DS 7 is associated with a state at 17.3 eV. DS 8 is for c1  states

  9. Structure analysis of large argon clusters from gas-phase electron diffraction data: some recent results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, van de B.W.

    1999-01-01

    An up-to-date overview of recent developments in the structure elucidation of large ArN-clusters (103

  10. Towards the large N limit of pure Nu = 1 super Yang-Mills theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldacena, J; Nuñez, C

    2001-01-22

    We find the gravity solution corresponding to a large number of Neveu-Schwarz or D5-branes wrapped on a two sphere so that we have pure Nu = 1 super Yang-Mills in the IR. The supergravity solution is smooth, it shows confinement, and it breaks the U(1)(R) chiral symmetry in the appropriate way. When the gravity approximation is valid the masses of glueballs are comparable to the masses of Kaluza-Klein (KK) states on the 5-brane, but if we could quantize strings on this background it looks like we should be able to decouple the KK states.

  11. Large-volume excitation of air, argon, nitrogen and combustible mixtures by thermal jets produced by nanosecond spark discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyan, Sergey; Hayashi, Jun; Salmon, Arthur; Stancu, Gabi D.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2017-04-01

    This work presents experimental observations of strong expanding thermal jets following the application of nanosecond spark discharges. These jets propagate in a toroidal shape perpendicular to the interelectrode axis, with high velocities of up to 30 m s‑1 and over distances of the order of a cm. Their propagation length is much larger than the thermal expansion region produced by the conventional millisecond sparks used in car engine ignition, thus greatly improving the volumetric excitation of gas mixtures. The shape and velocity of the jets is found to be fairly insensitive to the shape of the electrodes. In addition, their spatial extent is found to increase with the number of nanosecond sparks and with the discharge voltage, and to decrease slightly with the pressure between 1 and 7 atm at constant applied voltage. Finally, this thermal jet phenomenon is observed in experiments conducted with many types of gas mixtures, including air, nitrogen, argon, and combustible CH4/air mixtures. This makes nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges particularly attractive for aerodynamic flow control or plasma-assisted combustion because of their ability to excite large volumes of gas, typically about 100 times the volume of the discharge.

  12. Seeking large-scale magnetic fields in a pure-disk dwarf galaxy NGC 2976

    CERN Document Server

    Drzazga, R T; Heald, G H; Elstner, D; Gallagher, J S

    2016-01-01

    It is still unknown how magnetic field-generation mechanisms could operate in low-mass dwarf galaxies. Here, we present a detailed study of a nearby pure-disk dwarf galaxy NGC 2976. Unlike previously observed dwarf objects, this galaxy possesses a clearly defined disk. For the purpose of our studies, we performed deep multi-frequency polarimetric observations of NGC 2976 with the VLA and Effelsberg radio telescopes. Additionally, we supplement them with re-imaged data from the WSRT-SINGS survey. The magnetic field morphology discovered in NGC 2976 consists of a southern polarized ridge. This structure does not seem to be due to just a pure large-scale dynamo process (possibly cosmic-ray driven) at work in this object, as indicated by the RM data and dynamo number calculations. Instead, the field of NGC 2976 is modified by past gravitational interactions and possibly also by ram pressure inside the M 81 galaxy group environment. The estimates of total (7 muG) and ordered (3 muG) magnetic field strengths, as we...

  13. Adaptive fuzzy decentralised control for stochastic nonlinear large-scale systems in pure-feedback form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Shaocheng; Xu, Yinyin; Li, Yongming

    2015-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of adaptive fuzzy decentralised output-feedback control for a class of uncertain stochastic nonlinear pure-feedback large-scale systems with completely unknown functions, the mismatched interconnections and without requiring the states being available for controller design. With the help of fuzzy logic systems approximating the unknown nonlinear functions, a fuzzy state observer is designed estimating the unmeasured states. Therefore, the nonlinear filtered signals are incorporated into the backstepping recursive design, and an adaptive fuzzy decentralised output-feedback control scheme is developed. It is proved that the filter system converges to a small neighbourhood of the origin based on appropriate choice of the design parameters. Simulation studies are included illustrating the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  14. Pure laparoscopic radical heminephrectomy for a large renal-cell carcinoma in a horseshoe kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebouças, Rafael B; Monteiro, Rodrigo C; Souza, Thiago N; Barbosa, Paulyana F; Pereira, George G; Britto, Cesar A

    2013-01-01

    Horseshoe Kidneys are the most common renal fusion anomaly. When surgery is contemplated for renal-cell carcinoma in such kidneys, aberrant vasculature and isthmusectomy are the major issues to consider. We describe a case of a pure laparoscopic radical heminephrectomy with hand-sewn management of the isthmus for a 11 cm tumour in a horseshoe kidney. A 47-year-old man complaining of palpable left flank mass for two months. Magnetic resonance of the abdomen revealed a 11 cm renal mass arising from the left moiety of an incidentally discovered horseshoe kidney. Preoperative CT angiography revealed a dominant anterior renal artery feeding the upper and midpole, with two other arteries feeding the lower pole and isthmus. The patient was placed in a modified flank position. A four-port transperitoneal technique was used, the colon was reflected. Renal pedicle was dissected and the renal arteries and renal vein were secured with polymer clips. The kidney was fully mobilized and a Satinsky clamp was placed on the isthmus for its division. A running 2-0 vicryl hand-sewn was used for parenchyma hemostasis. The specimen was extracted intact in a plastic bag through an inguinal incision. The operative time was 220 minutes, and the estimated blood loss was 200 mL. There were no immediate or delayed complications. The patient resumed oral intake on postoperative day 1 and was discharged on postoperative day 2. Pathologic examination of the specimen confirmed a 11 cm organ-confined chromophobe renal-cell carcinoma, with negative margins. Laparoscopic oncologic surgery in patients with horseshoe kidneys can be technically challenging. The presence of a large cancer in a horseshoe kidney should not preclude a purely laparoscopic approach. With the aid of a Satinsky clamp, the isthmus can be sharply divided and sutured in a fashion similar to the open technique. To our knowledge, this report represents the largest cancer (11 cm) removed laparoscopically in the context of a

  15. Assembly of large purely inorganic Ce-stabilized/bridged selenotungstates: from nanoclusters to layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Chao; Qin, Chao; Li, Yang-Guang; Zang, Hong-Ying; Shao, Kui-Zhan; Su, Zhong-Min; Wang, En-Bo

    2015-05-01

    A versatile one-pot strategy was used to synthesize two large, purely inorganic selenotungstates, nanocluster K(6)Na(16) [Ce(6)Se(6)W(67)O(230) (OH)(6) (H(2)O)(17)]⋅47 H(2)O (1) and layer K(9)Na(5) Ce(H(2)O)(4) [Ce(6)Se(10)W(51)O(187) (OH)(7) (H(2)O)(18)]⋅45H(2)O(2), by combining cerium centers and SeO(3) (2-) heteroanion templates. Compound 1 displays a Ce-stabilized hexameric nanocluster with one rhombus-like {W(4)O(15) (OH)(3)} unit in the center, whereas compound 2 is the first example of a Ce-bridged layer selenotungstate network based on linkage of the unusual {Ce(6)Se(10)W(51)O(187) (OH)(7) (H(2)O)(18)} clusters and additional Ce(H(2)O)(4) fragments via Ce-O-Se bridges. The compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analyses, powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Moreover, the electrochemical property of compound 1 was also investigated. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Pure crystal orientation and anisotropic charge transport in large-area hybrid perovskite films

    KAUST Repository

    Cho, Nam Chul

    2016-11-10

    Controlling crystal orientations and macroscopic morphology is vital to develop the electronic properties of hybrid perovskites. Here we show that a large-area, orientationally pure crystalline (OPC) methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) hybrid perovskite film can be fabricated using a thermal-gradient-assisted directional crystallization method that relies on the sharp liquid-to-solid transition of MAPbI3 from ionic liquid solution. We find that the OPC films spontaneously form periodic microarrays that are distinguishable from general polycrystalline perovskite materials in terms of their crystal orientation, film morphology and electronic properties. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the film is strongly oriented in the (112) and (200) planes parallel to the substrate. This film is structurally confined by directional crystal growth, inducing intense anisotropy in charge transport. In addition, the low trap-state density (7.9 × 1013 cm−3) leads to strong amplified stimulated emission. This ability to control crystal orientation and morphology could be widely adopted in optoelectronic devices.

  17. Pure crystal orientation and anisotropic charge transport in large-area hybrid perovskite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Namchul; Li, Feng; Turedi, Bekir; Sinatra, Lutfan; Sarmah, Smritakshi P.; Parida, Manas R.; Saidaminov, Makhsud I.; Murali, Banavoth; Burlakov, Victor M.; Goriely, Alain; Mohammed, Omar F.; Wu, Tom; Bakr, Osman M.

    2016-11-01

    Controlling crystal orientations and macroscopic morphology is vital to develop the electronic properties of hybrid perovskites. Here we show that a large-area, orientationally pure crystalline (OPC) methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) hybrid perovskite film can be fabricated using a thermal-gradient-assisted directional crystallization method that relies on the sharp liquid-to-solid transition of MAPbI3 from ionic liquid solution. We find that the OPC films spontaneously form periodic microarrays that are distinguishable from general polycrystalline perovskite materials in terms of their crystal orientation, film morphology and electronic properties. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the film is strongly oriented in the (112) and (200) planes parallel to the substrate. This film is structurally confined by directional crystal growth, inducing intense anisotropy in charge transport. In addition, the low trap-state density (7.9 × 1013 cm-3) leads to strong amplified stimulated emission. This ability to control crystal orientation and morphology could be widely adopted in optoelectronic devices.

  18. Pure Laparoscopic Radical Heminephrectomy for a Large Renal-Cell Carcinoma in a Horseshoe Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael B Reboucas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Horseshoe Kidneys are the most common renal fusion anomaly. When surgery is contemplated for renal-cell carcinoma in such kidneys, aberrant vasculature and isthmusectomy are the major issues to consider. We describe a case of a pure laparoscopic radical heminephrectomy with hand-sewn management of the isthmus for a 11 cm tumour in a horseshoe kidney. Presentation A 47-year-old man complaining of palpable left flank mass for two months. Magnetic resonance of the abdomen revealed a 11 cm renal mass arising from the left moiety of an incidentally discovered horseshoe kidney. Preoperative CT angiography revealed a dominant anterior renal artery feeding the upper and midpole, with two other arteries feeding the lower pole and isthmus. The patient was placed in a modified flank position. A four-port transperitoneal technique was used, the colon was reflected. Renal pedicle was dissected and the renal arteries and renal vein were secured with polymer clips. The kidney was fully mobilized and a Satinsky clamp was placed on the isthmus for its division. A running 2-0 vicryl hand-sewn was used for parenchyma hemostasis. The specimen was extracted intact in a plastic bag through an inguinal incision. Results The operative time was 220 minutes, and the estimated blood loss was 200 mL. There were no immediate or delayed complications. The patient resumed oral intake on postoperative day 1 and was discharged on postoperative day 2. Pathologic examination of the specimen confirmed a 11 cm organ-confined chromophobe renal-cell carcinoma, with negative margins. Discussion Laparoscopic oncologic surgery in patients with horseshoe kidneys can be technically challenging. The presence of a large cancer in a horseshoe kidney should not preclude a purely laparoscopic approach. With the aid of a Satinsky clamp, the isthmus can be sharply divided and sutured in a fashion similar to the open technique. To our knowledge, this report represents the largest

  19. Attenuation of vacuum ultraviolet light in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Neumeier, A; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Schönert, S; Dandl, T; Heindl, T; Ulrich, A; Wieser, J

    2015-01-01

    The transmission of liquid argon has been measured, wavelength resolved, for a wavelength interval from 118 to 250 nm. The wavelength dependent attenuation length is presented for pure argon. It is shown that no universal wavelength independent attenuation length can be assigned to liquid argon for its own fluorescence light due to the interplay between the wavelength dependent emission and absorption. A decreasing transmission is observed below 130 nm in both chemically cleaned and distilled liquid argon and assigned to absorption by the analogue of the first argon excimer continuum. For not perfectly cleaned argon a strong influence of impurities on the transmission is observed. Two strong absorption bands at 126.5 and 141.0 nm with approximately 2 and 4 nm width, respectively, are assigned to traces of xenon in argon. A broad absorption region below 180 nm is found for unpurified argon and tentatively attributed to the presence of water in the argon sample.

  20. Argon in action

    CERN Document Server

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few days, the SPS has been accelerating argon ions, which have started to be sent to the NA61/SHINE experiment. This operating mode, using a new type of ion, required a number of modifications to the accelerator.   Picture 1: a “super-cycle” of the SPS, featuring a proton cycle for the LHC, followed by an argon ion cycle for the North Area. Today, the accelerators are once again juggling particles and even performing completely new tricks. The SPS is supplying beams of argon ions for the first time, at energies never before achieved for this type of beam. They are destined for the NA61/SHINE experiment (see box) located in the North Area, which began receiving the beams on 11 February. Argon ions have a relatively large mass, as they consist of 40 nucleons, so they can be used in a similar way to lead ions. The main difficulty in accelerating them lies in the SPS, where the variation in acceleration frequency is limited. “The SPS was designed for a...

  1. Growth of microscopic cones on titanium cathodes of sputter-ion pumps driven by sorption of large argon quantities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcelli, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso-porcelli@saes-group.com [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria, 16, 20133 Milano, Italy and SAES Getters S.p.A., viale Italia, 77, 20020 Lainate, Milan (Italy); Siviero, Fabrizio; Bongiorno, Gero A. [SAES Getters S.p.A., viale Italia, 77, 20020 Lainate, Milan (Italy); Michelato, Paolo [INFN-LASA, via fratelli Cervi, 201, 20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy); Pagani, Carlo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria, 16, 20133 Milano, Italy and INFN-LASA, via fratelli Cervi, 201, 20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Microscopic cones have been observed on titanium cathodes of sputter-ion pumps (SIPs) after pump operation. The cones were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis. Size and morphology of these cones are clearly correlated with the nature and the relative amount of each gas species pumped by each SIP during its working life. In particular, their growth was found to be fed by sputtering mechanisms, mostly during Ar pumping, and to be driven by the electromagnetic field applied to the Penning cells of each SIP. Experimental findings suggest that the formation and extent of such conic structures on cathode surfaces might play a leading role in the onset of phenomena typically related to the functioning of SIPs, e.g., the so-called argon instability.

  2. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Adamowski, M; Dvorak, E; Hahn, A; Jaskierny, W; Johnson, C; Jostlein, H; Kendziora, C; Lockwitz, S; Pahlka, B; Plunkett, R; Pordes, S; Rebel, B; Schmitt, R; Stancari, M; Tope, T; Voirin, E; Yang, T

    2014-01-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  3. The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamowski, M.; Carls, B.; Dvorak, E.; Hahn, A.; Jaskierny, W.; Johnson, C.; Jostlein, H.; Kendziora, C.; Lockwitz, S.; Pahlka, B.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Rebel, B.; Schmitt, R.; Stancari, M.; Tope, T.; Voirin, E.; Yang, T.

    2014-07-01

    The Liquid Argon Purity Demonstrator was an R&D test stand designed to determine if electron drift lifetimes adequate for large neutrino detectors could be achieved without first evacuating the cryostat. We describe here the cryogenic system, its operations, and the apparatus used to determine the contaminant levels in the argon and to measure the electron drift lifetime. The liquid purity obtained by this system was facilitated by a gaseous argon purge. Additionally, gaseous impurities from the ullage were prevented from entering the liquid at the gas-liquid interface by condensing the gas and filtering the resulting liquid before returning to the cryostat. The measured electron drift lifetime in this test was greater than 6 ms, sustained over several periods of many weeks. Measurements of the temperature profile in the argon, to assess convective flow and boiling, were also made and are compared to simulation.

  4. Purely posterior midline approach resection for large intra- and extra-spinal dumbbell tumors extending into the thoracic cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo ZHANG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the surgical technique and effect of purely posterior midline approach resection for large intra- and extra-spinal dumbbell tumors that extended into the thoracic cavity.  Methods Retrospectively analyze 12 cases of large intra- and extra-spinal dumbbell tumors that extended into the thoracic cavity and were resected through posterior midline approach. The clinical features and common surgical approaches of dumbbell tumors in literature were introduced to explore the advantages of purely posterior midline approach.  Results There were 12 patients (5 males and 7 females with the age between 34-58 years old (average 45 years old. Eleven cases underwent first operation and one case underwent reoperation. There were 4 Eden type Ⅱ tumors, 5 Eden type Ⅲ tumors, and 3 Eden type Ⅳtumors with average size 4.50 cm × 4.00 cm × 3.00 cm. All cases were achieved total resection by purely posterior midline approach and one case received spinal fixation at the same time, with operation time ranged from 120-315 min (average 195 min and average blood loss of 205 ml. Postoperative pathological findings included schwannoma in 9 patients, neurofibroma in one patient, meningioma in one patient and cavernous hemangioma in one patient. The follow-up period was 6-26 months (average 18 months after operation, and all patients recovered well. Preoperative symptoms like root pain, spinal cord compression were relieved to various degrees. Neither new neurological defects nor tumor recurrence was found.  Conclusions Most of the intra- and extra-spinal dumbbell tumors that extend into thoracic cavity are schwannoma. Correctly preoperative radiographic assessment, purely posterior midline approach with piecemeal resection in the intercostal space can achieve total tumor resection in most cases without thoracotomy or assisted incision. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.03.005

  5. Proteomic analysis of pure human airway gland mucus reveals a large component of protective proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Soo Joo

    Full Text Available Airway submucosal glands contribute to innate immunity and protect the lungs by secreting mucus, which is required for mucociliary clearance and which also contains antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-proteolytic and anti-oxidant proteins. We stimulated glands in tracheal trimmings from three lung donors and collected droplets of uncontaminated mucus as they formed at the gland orifices under an oil layer. We analyzed the mucus using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Analysis identified 5486 peptides and 441 proteins from across the 3 samples (269-319 proteins per subject. We focused on 269 proteins common to at least 2 0f 3 subjects, of which 102 (38% had protective or innate immunity functions. While many of these have long been known to play such roles, for many others their cellular protective functions have only recently been appreciated in addition to their well-studied biologic functions (e.g. annexins, apolipoproteins, gelsolin, hemoglobin, histones, keratins, and lumican. A minority of the identified proteins are known to be secreted via conventional exocytosis, suggesting that glandular secretion occurs via multiple mechanisms. Two of the observed protective proteins, major vault protein and prohibitin, have not been observed in fluid from human epithelial cultures or in fluid from nasal or bronchoalveolar lavage. Further proteomic analysis of pure gland mucus may help clarify how healthy airways maintain a sterile environment.

  6. On the existence of pure-strategy equilibria in large games

    OpenAIRE

    Carmona, Guilherme; Podczeck, Konrad

    2008-01-01

    Over the years, several formalizations and existence results for games with a continuum of players have been given. These include those of Schmeidler (1973), Rashid (1983), Mas-Colell (1984), Khan and Sun (1999) and Podczeck (2007a). The level of generality of each of these existence results is typically regarded as a criterion to evaluate how appropriate is the corresponding formalization of large games. In contrast, we argue that such evaluation is pointless. In fact, we show that, in a pre...

  7. Large-scale Ice Discharge Events in a Pure Ice Sheet Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, K.; Legrand, P.; Papa, B. D.; Mysak, L. A.; Wang, Z.

    2004-05-01

    Sediment cores in the North Atlantic show evidence of periodic large-scale ice discharge events between 60 ka and 10 ka BP. These events occurred with a typical period between 5 kyr and 10 kyr. During each event, a significant amount of ice was discharged from the Hudson Bay region through the Hudson Strait and into the North Atlantic. This input of freshwater through the melting of icebergs is thought to have strongly affected the Atlantic thermohaline circulation. One theory is that these periodic ice discharge events represent an internal oscillation of the ice sheet under constant forcing. A second theory requires some variable external forcing on an unstable ice sheet to produce a discharge event. Using the ice sheet model of Marshall, an attempt is made to simulate periodic large-scale ice discharge events within the framework of the first theory. In this case, ice sheet surges and large-scale discharge events occur as a free oscillation of the ice sheet. An analysis of the activation of ice surge events and the thermodynamic controls on these events is also made.

  8. Numerical study of large-N phase transition of smeared Wilson loops in 4D pure YM theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lohmayer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In Euclidean four-dimensional SU(N) pure gauge theory, eigenvalue distributions of Wilson loop parallel transport matrices around closed spacetime curves show non-analytic behavior (a 'large-N phase transition') at a critical size of the curve. We focus mainly on an observable composed of traces of the Wilson loop operator in all totally antisymmetric representations, which is regularized with the help of smearing. By studying sequences of square Wilson loops on a hypercubic lattice with standard Wilson action, it is shown that this observable has a nontrivial continuum limit as a function of the physical size of the loop. We furthermore present (preliminary) numerical results confirming that, for large N, the N dependence in the critical regime is governed by the universal exponents 1/2 and 3/4 as expected (Burgers universality).

  9. Resonance broadening of argon lines in a micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma jet (argon μAPPJ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipa, A. V.; Ionikh, Yu. Z.; Chekishev, V. M.; Dünnbier, M.; Reuter, S.

    2015-06-01

    Optical emission from atmospheric pressure micro-jet operating with pure argon (argon μAPPJ) flow has been detected with a moderate resolution spectrometer. Large broadening of the several argon (Ar) lines has been observed in the near infrared spectral region. This effect was attributed to resonance broadening of the s2 (Paschen notation) level in 3p54s configuration. In the present work, corresponding line profiles are suggested for plasma diagnostics. For this, a general case of resonance broadening coefficient of noble gases is discussed. As broadening reflects the Ar density, and the static gas pressure of the jet is in equilibrium with the ambient, the local gas temperature can be inferred. An estimation of gas temperature from the width of the 750 nm Ar line is in agreement with rotational temperature of OH radicals determined from the A2Σ+ → X2Π (0, 0) band. At low temperatures (300-600 K) and at partial Ar pressure near atmospheric, the resonance width of the suggested lines is very sensitive to small temperature variations. High temperature sensitivity and large width make the resonance broadened lines very attractive for diagnostics of low temperature discharges at elevated pressure, e.g., as they are used in plasma-medicine.

  10. Competition Between Two Large-Amplitude Motion Models: New Hybrid Hamiltonian Versus Old Pure-Tunneling Hamiltonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, Isabelle; Hougen, Jon T.

    2017-06-01

    In this talk we report on our progress in trying to make the hybrid Hamiltonian competitive with the pure-tunneling Hamiltonian for treating large-amplitude motions in methylamine. A treatment using the pure-tunneling model has the advantages of: (i) requiring relatively little computer time, (ii) working with relatively uncorrelated fitting parameters, and (iii) yielding in the vast majority of cases fits to experimental measurement accuracy. These advantages are all illustrated in the work published this past year on a gigantic v_{t} = 1 data set for the torsional fundamental band in methyl amine. A treatment using the hybrid model has the advantages of: (i) being able to carry out a global fit involving both v_{t} = 0 and v_{t} = 1 energy levels and (ii) working with fitting parameters that have a clearer physical interpretation. Unfortunately, a treatment using the hybrid model has the great disadvantage of requiring a highly correlated set of fitting parameters to achieve reasonable fitting accuracy, which complicates the search for a good set of molecular fitting parameters and a fit to experimental accuracy. At the time of writing this abstract, we have been able to carry out a fit with J up to 15 that includes all available infrared data in the v_{t} = 1-0 torsional fundamental band, all ground-state microwave data with K up to 10 and J up to 15, and about a hundred microwave lines within the v_{t} = 1 torsional state, achieving weighted root-mean-square (rms) deviations of about 1.4, 2.8, and 4.2 for these three categories of data. We will give an update of this situation at the meeting. I. Gulaczyk, M. Kreglewski, V.-M. Horneman, J. Mol. Spectrosc., in Press (2017).

  11. Search for WIMPs in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, C

    2011-01-01

    Our group from the University of Zurich is performing R&D work towards the design of a large liquid argon detector to detect Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). This project is developed within the DARWIN Collaboration funded by ASPERA to prepare a proposal for the next generation of WIMP searches using noble liquids. We are performing R&D to detect the VUV light from recoiling argon nuclei. Results obtained with one ton of liquid argon (ArDM prototype) and prospects using a monoenergetic neutron source are discussed.

  12. Do Blended Virtual Learning Communities Enhance Teachers' Professional Development More than Purely Virtual Ones? A Large Scale Empirical Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzat, U.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines whether a mixture of virtual and real-life interaction--in contrast to purely virtual interaction--among some members of online communities for teachers is beneficial for all teachers' professional development in the whole community. Earlier research indicated that blended communities tend to face fewer trust and free rider…

  13. Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure, radio-frequency glow discharges operated with argon added ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen-Ting; Li, Guo; Li, He-Ping; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Wang, Hua-Bo; Zeng, Shi; Gao, Xing; Luo, Hui-Ying

    2007-06-01

    Rf, atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas with bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, thin film deposition, disinfection and sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics are presented for the rf APGD plasmas generated with pure argon or argon-ethanol mixture as the plasma-forming gas and using water-cooled, bare copper electrodes. The experimental results show that the breakdown voltage can be reduced significantly when a small amount of ethanol is added into argon, probably due to the fact that the Penning ionization process is involved, and a pure α-mode discharge can be produced more easily with the help of ethanol. The uniformity of the rf APGDs of pure argon or argon-ethanol mixtures using bare metallic electrodes is identified with the aid of the intensified charge coupled device images.

  14. Argon Diffusion Measured in Rhyolite Melt at 100 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldon, N.; Edwards, P. M.; Watkins, J. M.; Lesher, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    Argon diffusivity (D_{Ar} ) controls the rate and length scale of argon exchange between melt and gas phases and is used as a parameter to model noble gas fractionation during magma degassing. D_{Ar} may also be useful in geochronology to estimate the distribution of excess (non-radiogenic) atmospheric argon in lavas. Our measurements of D_{Ar} in molten anhydrous rhyolite near 1000 °C and 100 MPa add to the existing dataset. Using a rapid-quench cold seal pressure apparatus we exposed cylindrical charges drilled from a Miocene rhyolite flow near Buck Mtn., CA to a pure argon atmosphere resulting in a gradually lengthening argon concentration gradient between the saturated surface and the argon poor interior. Argon concentration was measured by electron microprobe along radial transects from the center to the surface of bisected samples. D_{Ar} was calculated for each transect by fitting relative argon concentration (as a function of distance from the surface) to Green's function (given each experiment's specific temperature, pressure and runtime). Variability (σ = 1.202{μm }^{2} /s) was smaller than in previous studies, but still greater than what is likely due to analytical or experimental uncertainty. We observed a symmetric geometric bias in the distribution of argon in our samples, possibly related to advective redistribution of argon accompanying the deformation of cylindrical charges into spheroids driven by surface tension. Average diffusivity, D_{Ar} = 4.791{μm }^{2} /s, is close to the predicted value, D_{Ar} = {μm }^{2} /s ( σ_{ \\bar{x} } = 1.576 {μm }^{2} /s), suggesting that Behrens and Zhang's (2001) empirical model is valid for anhydrous rhyolite melts to relatively higher temperatures and lower pressures. Behrens, H. and Y. Zhang (2001). "Ar diffusion in hydrous silicic melts: implications for volatile diffusion mechanisms and fractionation." Earth and Planetary Science Letters 192: 363-376.

  15. Thermophysical properties of argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaques, A.

    1988-02-01

    The entire report consists of tables of thermodynamic properties (including sound velocity, thermal conductivity and diffusivity, Prandtl number, density) of argon at 86 to 400/degree/K, in the form of isobars over 0.9 to 100 bars. (DLC)

  16. Effect of argon during diamond deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, D.C.; Mengui, U.A.; Contin, A.; Trava-Airoldi, V.J.; Baldan, M.R.; Corat, E.J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais

    2014-07-01

    The effect of argon content upon the growth rate and the properties of diamond thin films grown with different grains sizes is explored. An argon-free and argon-rich gas mixture of methane and hydrogen is used in a hot filament chemical vapor deposition reactor. Characterization of the films is accomplished by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution x-ray diffraction. An extensive comparison of the growth rate values obtained in this study with those found in the literature suggests that there are distinct common trends for microcrystalline and nanocrystalline diamond growth, despite a large variation in the gas mixture composition. Included is a discussion of the possible reasons for these observations. (author)

  17. Pressure broadening of acetylene rotational Raman lines by argon

    OpenAIRE

    Ceruti, M; Frenkel, D.; Mctaque, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropic interaction between acetylene and argon has been studied by observing the density dependence of the acetylene pure rotational Raman line broadening. The observed cross sections are approximately twice that predicted from the known polarizabilities and acetylene molecular quadrupole moment. An empirical atom-atom anisotropic potential adequately parametrizes the results.

  18. Pressure broadening of acetylene rotational Raman lines by argon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceruti, M.; Frenkel, D.; McTaque, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropic interaction between acetylene and argon has been studied by observing the density dependence of the acetylene pure rotational Raman line broadening. The observed cross sections are approximately twice that predicted from the known polarizabilities and acetylene molecular quadrupole m

  19. Future liquid Argon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, A

    2013-01-01

    The Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber offers an innovative technology for a new class of massive detectors for rare-event detection. It is a precise tracking device that allows three-dimensional spatial reconstruction with mm-scale precision of the morphology of ionizing tracks with the imaging quality of a "bubble chamber", provides $dE/dx$ information with high sampling rate, and acts as high-resolution calorimeter for contained events. First proposed in 1977 and after a long maturing process, its holds today the potentialities of opening new physics opportunities by providing excellent tracking and calorimetry performance at the relevant multi-kton mass scales, outperforming other techniques. In this paper, we review future liquid argon detectors presently being discussed by the neutrino physics community.

  20. Modeling Electronegative Impurity Concentrations in Liquid Argon Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Li, Yichen; Thorn, Craig; Qian, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Achieving long electron lifetime is crucial to reach the high performance of large Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) envisioned for next generation neutrino experiments. We have built up a quantitative model to describe the impurity distribution and transportation in a cryostat. Henrys constants of Oxygen and water, which describe the partition of impurities between gas argon and liquid argon, have been deduced through this model with the measurements in BNL 20-L LAr test stand. These results indicate the importance of the gas purification system and prospects on large LArTPC detectors will be discussed.

  1. Performance study of the effective gain of the double phase liquid Argon LEM Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Cantini, C; Gendotti, A; Horikawa, S; Periale, L; Murphy, S; Natterer, G; Regenfus, C; Resnati, F; Sergiampietri, F; Rubbia, A; Viant, T; Wu, S

    2014-01-01

    The Large Electron Multipliers (LEMs) are key components of double phase liquid argon TPCs. The drifting charges after being extracted from the liquid are amplified in the LEM positioned half a centimeter above the liquid in pure argon vapor at 87 K. The LEM is characterised by the size of its dielectric rim around the holes, the thickness of the LEM insulator, the diameter of the holes as well as their geometrical layout. The impact of those design parameters on the amplification were checked by testing seven different LEMs with an active area of 10$\\times$10 cm$^2$ in a double phase liquid argon TPC of 21 cm drift. We studied their response in terms of maximal reachable gain and impact on the collected charge uniformity as well as the long term stability of the gain. We show that we could reach maximal gains of around 150 which corresponds to a signal-to-noise ratio ($S/N$) of about 800 for a minimal ionising particle (MIP) signal on 3 mm readout strips. We could also conclude that the dielectric surfaces i...

  2. Improved installation prototype for measurement of low argon-37 activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomov, Sergei; Dubasov, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    On-site Inspection (OSI) is a key element of verification of State Parties' compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). An on-site inspection is launched to establish whether or not a nuclear explosion has been carried out. One of the most significant evidence of n underground nuclear explosion (UNE) is detection above background concentrations of argon-37 in near surface air. Argon-37 is formed in large amounts at interaction of neutrons of UNE with the potassium which is a part of the majority of rocks. Its estimated contents for the 100th days after explosion with a energy of 1000 t of TNT near a surface can vary from 1 to 1000 mBq/m3. The background concentrations of argon-37 in subsoil air vary 1 do100 mBq/m3. Traditionally, for argon-37 activity measurement the gas-proportional counters are used. But at Khlopin Radium institute the developments of the new type of highly sensitive and low-background installation capable to provide the required range of measurements of the argon-37 concentration are conducted. The liquid scintillation method of the registration of the low-energetic argon-37 electrons is the basic installation principle and as scintillator, the itself condensed air argon sample is used. Registration of scintillations of liquid argon is made by means of system from 3 PMT which cathodes are cooled near to the temperature of liquid nitrogen together with the measuring chamber in which placed the quartz glass ampule, containing the measured sample of the liquefied argon. For converse the short wavelength photons (λ = 127 nm) of liquid argon scintillations to more long-wave, corresponding to the range of PMT sensitivity, the polymer film with tetra-phenyl-butadiene (TPB) is provided. Even the insignificant impurities of nitrogen, oxygen and others gaseous in the liquid argon samples can to cause the quenching of scintillation, especially their slow components. To account this effect and it influence on change of registration

  3. Electromagnetic probes of a pure-glue initial state in nucleus-nucleus collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovchenko, V.; Karpenko, Iu. A.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Satarov, L. M.; Mishustin, I. N.; Kämpfer, B.; Stoecker, H.

    2016-08-01

    Partonic matter produced in the early stage of ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions is assumed to be composed mainly of gluons, and quarks and antiquarks are produced at later times. To study the implications of such a scenario, the dynamical evolution of a chemically nonequilibrated system is described by ideal (2+1)-dimensional hydrodynamics with a time dependent (anti)quark fugacity. The equation of state interpolates linearly between the lattice data for the pure gluonic matter and the lattice data for the chemically equilibrated quark-gluon plasma. The spectra and elliptic flows of thermal dileptons and photons are calculated for central Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider energy of √{sN N}=2.76 TeV. We test the sensitivity of the results to the choice of equilibration time, including also the case where the complete chemical equilibrium of partons is reached already at the initial stage. It is shown that a suppression of quarks at early times leads to a significant reduction of the yield of the thermal dileptons, but only to a rather modest suppression of the pT distribution of direct photons. It is demonstrated that an enhancement of photon and dilepton elliptic flows might serve as a promising signature of the pure-glue initial state.

  4. Studies of Electron Avalanche Behavior in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J G; Jackson, K H; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J A; Peskov, Vladimir; Wenzel, W A

    2002-01-01

    Electron avalanching in liquid argon is being studied as a function of voltage, pressure, radiation intensity, and the concentrations of certain additives, especially xenon. The avalanches produced in an intense electric field at the tip of a tungsten needle are initiated by ionization from a moveable americium (241Am) gamma ray source. Photons from xenon excimers are detected as photomultiplier signals in coincidence with the current pulse from the needle. In pure liquid argon the avalanche behavior is erratic, but the addition of even a small amount of xenon (>100ppm) stabilizes the performance. Similar attempts with neon (30%) as an additive to argon have been unsuccessful. Tests with higher energy gamma rays (57Co) yield spectra and other performance characteristics quite similar to those using the 241Am source. Two types of signal pulses are commonly observed: a set of pulses that are sensitive to ambient pressure, and a set of somewhat smaller pulses that are not pressure dependent.

  5. Depleted argon from underground sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, H.O.; /Princeton U.; Alton, A.; /Augustana U. Coll.; Calaprice, F.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; /Princeton U.; Kendziora, C.; /Fermilab; Loer, B.; /Princeton U.; Montanari, D.; /Fermilab; Mosteiro, P.; /Princeton U.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Argon is a powerful scintillator and an excellent medium for detection of ionization. Its high discrimination power against minimum ionization tracks, in favor of selection of nuclear recoils, makes it an attractive medium for direct detection of WIMP dark matter. However, cosmogenic {sup 39}Ar contamination in atmospheric argon limits the size of liquid argon dark matter detectors due to pile-up. The cosmic ray shielding by the earth means that Argon from deep underground is depleted in {sup 39}Ar. In Cortez Colorado a CO{sub 2} well has been discovered to contain approximately 500ppm of argon as a contamination in the CO{sub 2}. In order to produce argon for dark matter detectors we first concentrate the argon locally to 3-5% in an Ar, N{sub 2}, and He mixture, from the CO{sub 2} through chromatographic gas separation. The N{sub 2} and He will be removed by continuous cryogenic distillation in the Cryogenic Distillation Column recently built at Fermilab. In this talk we will discuss the entire extraction and purification process; with emphasis on the recent commissioning and initial performance of the cryogenic distillation column purification.

  6. Persistent anemia in a patient with diffuse large B cell lymphoma: pure red cell aplasia associated with latent Epstein-Barr virus infection in bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hwa Jung; Kim, Seok Jin; Lee, Ji Hye; Lee, Goeun; Lee, Kyung A; Choi, Chul Won; Kim, Byung Soo; Kim, Jun Suk

    2007-09-01

    We report a case of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), which was initially suspected as a result of bone marrow involvement of diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Persistent anemia without an obvious cause was observed in a 47-yr-old man diagnosed with relapsed diffuse large B cell lymphoma. The bone marrow study showed only erythroid hypoplasia without the evidence of bone marrow involvement with lymphoma cells, thus PRCA was suggested. However, parvovirus infection was excluded as a potential cause of PRCA because of negative IgM anti-parvovirus B19 antibody and negative parvovirus PCR in the serum. Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of bone marrow was suggested by in situ hybridization with EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) that showed a strong positive expression in bone marrow cells. Thus, PRCA was thought to be associated with latent EBV infection in bone marrow cells. Although the finding of unexplained anemia is a possible predictor of bone marrow involvement with lymphoma cells, PRCA as a result of a viral infection including EBV should be considered in lymphoma patients. This is the first report of the occurrence of PRCA associated with latent EBV infection in a patient with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  7. Modeling of the Flow, Temperature and Concentration Fields in an Arc Plasma Reactor with Argon-Nitrogen Atmosphere

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fudolig, Agustin M; Nogami, Hiroshi; Yagi, Jun-ichiro

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical formulation was developed for describing the flow behavior, temperature profile and concentration fields in pure or mixed argon and nitrogen arc plasmas impinging on a metal target inside a reactor...

  8. An HTML5-Based Pure Website Solution for Rapidly Viewing and Processing Large-Scale 3D Medical Volume Reconstruction on Mobile Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Jingna; Wu, Yi; Li, Ying; Mo, Xuemei; Chen, Wei; Xie, Bing; Qiu, Mingguo

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to propose a pure web-based solution to serve users to access large-scale 3D medical volume anywhere with good user experience and complete details. A novel solution of the Master-Slave interaction mode was proposed, which absorbed advantages of remote volume rendering and surface rendering. On server side, we designed a message-responding mechanism to listen to interactive requests from clients (Slave model) and to guide Master volume rendering. On client side, we used HTML5 to normalize user-interactive behaviors on Slave model and enhance the accuracy of behavior request and user-friendly experience. The results showed that more than four independent tasks (each with a data size of 249.4 MB) could be simultaneously carried out with a 100-KBps client bandwidth (extreme test); the first loading time was <12 s, and the response time of each behavior request for final high quality image remained at approximately 1 s, while the peak value of bandwidth was <50-KBps. Meanwhile, the FPS value for each client was ≥40. This solution could serve the users by rapidly accessing the application via one URL hyperlink without special software and hardware requirement in a diversified network environment and could be easily integrated into other telemedical systems seamlessly.

  9. An HTML5-Based Pure Website Solution for Rapidly Viewing and Processing Large-Scale 3D Medical Volume Reconstruction on Mobile Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Qiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to propose a pure web-based solution to serve users to access large-scale 3D medical volume anywhere with good user experience and complete details. A novel solution of the Master-Slave interaction mode was proposed, which absorbed advantages of remote volume rendering and surface rendering. On server side, we designed a message-responding mechanism to listen to interactive requests from clients (Slave model and to guide Master volume rendering. On client side, we used HTML5 to normalize user-interactive behaviors on Slave model and enhance the accuracy of behavior request and user-friendly experience. The results showed that more than four independent tasks (each with a data size of 249.4 MB could be simultaneously carried out with a 100-KBps client bandwidth (extreme test; the first loading time was <12 s, and the response time of each behavior request for final high quality image remained at approximately 1 s, while the peak value of bandwidth was <50-KBps. Meanwhile, the FPS value for each client was ≥40. This solution could serve the users by rapidly accessing the application via one URL hyperlink without special software and hardware requirement in a diversified network environment and could be easily integrated into other telemedical systems seamlessly.

  10. Proton Scattering on Liquid Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouabid, Ryan; LArIAT Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    LArIAT (Liquid Argon In A Test-beam) is a liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) positioned in a charged particle beamline whose primary purpose is to study the response of LArTPC's to charged particle interactions. This previously unmeasured experimental data will allow for improvement of Monte Carlo simulations and development of identification techniques, important for future planned LArTPC neutrino experiments. LArIAT's beamline is instrumented to allow for the identification of specific particles as well as measurement of those particles' incoming momenta. Among the particles present in the beamline, the analysis presented here focuses on proton-Argon interactions. This study uses particle trajectories and calorimetric information to identify proton-Argon interaction candidates. We present preliminary data results on the measurement of the proton-Argon cross-section. Liquid Argon In A Test Beam. The work is my analysis made possible through the efforts of LArIAT detector, data, and software.

  11. Study of Neutron-Induced Ionization in Helium and Argon Chamber Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Indurthy, D; Harris, D; Kopp, S; Proga, M; Zwaska, R M

    2004-01-01

    Ion chambers used to monitor the secondary hadron and tertiary muon beam in the NuMI neutrino beamline will be exposed to background particles, including low energy neutrons produced in the beam dump. To understand these backgrounds, we have studied Helium- and Argon-filled ionization chambers exposed to intense neutron fluxes from PuBe neutron sources ($E_n=1-10$ MeV). The sources emit about 10$^8$ neutrons per second. The number of ion pairs in the chamber gas volume per incident neutron is derived. While limited in precision because of a large gamma ray background from the PuBe sources, our results are consistent with the expectation that the neutrons interact purely elastically in the chamber gas.

  12. Behavior of Excited Argon Atoms in Inductively Driven Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hebner, G A

    1999-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the two lowest energy argon excited states, 1s sub 5 and 1s sub 4 , in inductively driven plasmas containing argon, chlorine and boron trichloride. The behavior of the two energy levels with plasma conditions was significantly different, probably because the 1s sub 5 level is metastable and the 1s sub 4 level is radiatively coupled to the ground state but is radiation trapped. The argon data is compared with a global model to identify the relative importance of processes such as electron collisional mixing and radiation trapping. The trends in the data suggest that both processes play a major role in determining the excited state density. At lower rfpower and pressure, excited state spatial distributions in pure argon were peaked in the center of the discharge, with an approximately Gaussian profile. However, for the highest rfpowers and pressures investigated, the spatial distributions tended to flatten in the center of the disch...

  13. Optical emission spectroscopy of argon and hydrogen-containing plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) on neutral argon is applied to investigate argon, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas. The spectra are analyzed using an extensive collisional-radiative model (CRM), from which the electron density and the electron temperature (or mean energy) can be calculated. The CRM also yields insight into the importance of different excited species and kinetic processes. The OES measurements are performed on pure argon plasmas at intermediate pressure. Besides, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas are investigated using argon as a trace gas. Especially for the gas mixture discharges, CRMs for low and high pressure differ substantially. The commonly used line-ratio technique is found to lose its sensitivity for gas mixture discharges at higher pressure. A solution using absolutely calibrated line intensities is proposed. The effect of radiation trapping and the shape of the electron energy distribution function on the results are discussed in detail, as they have been found to significantly influence the results. This work was supported by the Ruhr University Research School PLUS, funded by Germany's Excellence Initiative [DFG GSC 98/3].

  14. ArgonCube: a Modular Approach for Liquid Argon TPC Neutrino Detectors for Near Detector Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Auger, M; Sinclair, JR

    2017-01-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPCs) are an ideal detector candidate for future neutrino oscillation physics experiments, underground neutrino observatories and proton decay searches. A large international project based on this technology is currently under consideration at the future LBNF/DUNE facility in the United States. That particular endeavor would be on the very large mass scale of 40~kt. Following diverse and long standing R\\&D work conducted over several years, with contributions from international collaborators, we propose a novel LAr TPC based on a fully-modular, innovative design, ArgonCube. ArgonCube will demonstrate that LAr TPCs are a viable detector technology for high-energy and high-multiplicity environments, such as the DUNE near detector. Necessary R\\&D work is proceeding along two main pathways; the first, aimed at the demonstration of modular detector design and the second, at the exploration of new signal readout methods. This two-pronged approach has provided a hig...

  15. Comparing two basic subtypes in OCD across three large community samples: a pure compulsive versus a mixed obsessive-compulsive subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Stephanie; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Kawohl, Wolfram; Müller, Mario; Rössler, Wulf; Hengartner, Michael P; Castelao, Enrique; Vandeleur, Caroline; Angst, Jules; Preisig, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Due to its heterogeneous phenomenology, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been subtyped. However, these subtypes are not mutually exclusive. This study presents an alternative subtyping approach by deriving non-overlapping OCD subtypes. A pure compulsive and a mixed obsessive-compulsive subtype (including subjects manifesting obsessions with/without compulsions) were analyzed with respect to a broad pattern of psychosocial risk factors and comorbid syndromes/diagnoses in three representative Swiss community samples: the Zurich Study (n = 591), the ZInEP sample (n = 1500), and the PsyCoLaus sample (n = 3720). A selection of comorbidities was examined in a pooled database. Odds ratios were derived from logistic regressions and, in the analysis of pooled data, multilevel models. The pure compulsive subtype showed a lower age of onset and was characterized by few associations with psychosocial risk factors. The higher social popularity of the pure compulsive subjects and their families was remarkable. Comorbidities within the pure compulsive subtype were mainly restricted to phobias. In contrast, the mixed obsessive-compulsive subtype had a higher prevalence and was associated with various childhood adversities, more familial burden, and numerous comorbid disorders, including disorders characterized by high impulsivity. The current comparison study across three representative community surveys presented two basic, distinct OCD subtypes associated with differing psychosocial impairment. Such highly specific subtypes offer the opportunity to learn about pathophysiological mechanisms specifically involved in OCD.

  16. Index of refraction, Rayleigh scattering length, and Sellmeier coefficients in solid and liquid argon and xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Emily; Butcher, Alistair; Monroe, Jocelyn; Nikkel, James A.

    2017-09-01

    Large liquid argon detectors have become widely used in low rate experiments, including dark matter and neutrino research. However, the optical properties of liquid argon are not well understood at the large scales relevant for current and near-future detectors. The index of refraction of liquid argon at the scintillation wavelength has not been measured, and current Rayleigh scattering length calculations disagree with measurements. Furthermore, the Rayleigh scattering length and index of refraction of solid argon and solid xenon at their scintillation wavelengths have not been previously measured or calculated. We introduce a new calculation using existing data in liquid and solid argon and xenon to extrapolate the optical properties at the scintillation wavelengths using the Sellmeier dispersion relationship.

  17. Attainable superheat of argon-helium, argon-neon solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidakov, Vladimir G; Kaverin, Aleksey M; Andbaeva, Valentina N

    2008-10-16

    The method of lifetime measurement has been used to investigate the kinetics of spontaneous boiling-up of superheated argon-helium and argon-neon solutions. Experiments were made at a pressure of p = 1.5 MPa and concentrations up to 0.33 mol% in the range of nucleation rates from 10 (4) to 10 (8) s (-1) m (-3). The homogeneous nucleation regime has been distinguished. With good agreement between experimental data and homogeneous nucleation theory in temperature and concentration dependences of the nucleation rate, a systematic underestimation by 0.25-0.34 K has been revealed in superheat temperatures over the saturated line attained by experiment as compared with theoretical values calculated in a macroscopic approximation. The revealed disagreement between theory and experiment is connected with the dependence of the properties of new-phase nuclei on their size.

  18. Argon isotope fractionation induced by stepwise heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieloff, Mario; Falter, Martina; Buikin, Alexei I.; Korochantseva, Ekaterina V.; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Altherr, Rainer

    2005-03-01

    Noble gas isotopes are widely used to elucidate the history of the rocks in which they have been trapped, either from distinct reservoirs or by accumulation following radioactive decay. To extract noble gases from their host rocks, stepwise heating is the most commonly used technique to deconvolve isotopically different components, e.g., atmospheric, in situ radiogenic, or excess radiogenic from mantle or crustal reservoirs. The accurate determination of the isotopic composition of these different components is of crucial importance, e.g., for ages obtained by 40Ar- 39Ar stepheating plateaus. However, diffusion theory-based model calculations predict that the stepwise thermal extraction process from mineral phases induces isotope fractionation and, hence, adulterates the original composition. Such effects are largely unconsidered, as they are small and a compelling experimental observation is lacking. We report the first unequivocal evidence for significant mass fractionation of argon isotopes during thermal extraction, observed on shungite, a carbon-rich Precambrian sedimentary rock. The degree of fractionation, as monitored by 38Ar/ 36Ar and 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios, very well agrees with theoretical predictions assuming an inverse square root dependence of diffusion coefficient and atomic mass, resulting in easier extraction of lighter isotopes. Hence, subatmospheric 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios obtained for argon extracted at low temperatures may not represent paleoatmospheric argon. Shungite argon resembles modern atmospheric composition, but constraints on the timing of trapping appear difficult to obtain, as shungites are multicomponent systems. In 40Ar- 39Ar stepwise heating, the isotope fractionation effect could cause systematic underestimations of plateau ages, between 0.15 and 0.4% depending on age, or considerably higher if samples contain appreciable atmospheric Ar. The magnitude of this effect is similar to the presently achieved uncertainties of this increasingly

  19. Optical readout of liquid argon ionisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, N. J. C.; Lightfoot, P. K.; Barker, G. J.; Ramachers, Y. A.; Mavrokoridis, K.

    2011-07-01

    Reading out the charge from a very large liquid argon detector, such as proposed for next generation proton decay and long baseline neutrino detectors, represents a significant challenge. Current proposals suggest using wires in the liquid or a two-phase approach that can provide some gain via amplification in the gas phase. We present here work on an alternative new approach in which the charge is read out by optical means following generation of electroluminescence, such as in a THGEM (Thick Gas Electron Multiplier) mounted within the liquid. This has the potential for significant advantages by providing both simpler readout electronics and significant charge gain, without the need for the complexities of dual phase operation. Tests with a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) mounted above a THGEM, all submerged in liquid argon, have allowed first demonstration of the technique. Sensitivity to 5.9 keV 55Fe gamma events was observed with an estimated gain of 150 photoelectrons per drifted electron. We review the concepts and results.

  20. Liquid Argon Barrel Cryostat Arrived

    CERN Multimedia

    Pailler, P

    Last week the first of three cryostats for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter arrived at CERN. It had travelled for 46 days over several thousand kilometers from Japan to CERN. During three years it has been fabricated by Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. at Harima, close to Kobe, under contract from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the U.S.. This cryostat consists of two concentric cylinders made of aluminium: the outer vacuum vessel with a diameter of 5.5 m and a length of 7 m, and the inner cold vessel which will contain the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter immersed in liquid argon. The total weight will be 270 tons including the detectors and the liquid argon. The cryostat is now located in building 180 where it will be equipped with 64 feed-throughs which serve for the passage of 122,880 electrical lines which will carry the signals of the calorimeter. After integration of the calorimeter, the solenoidal magnet of ATLAS will be integrated in the vacuum vessel. A final cold test of the cryostat inc...

  1. Thermodynamic diagrams for high temperature plasmas of air, air-carbon, carbon-hydrogen mixtures, and argon

    CERN Document Server

    Kroepelin, H; Hoffmann, K-U

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamic Diagrams for High Temperature Plasmas of Air, Air-Carbon, Carbon-Hydrogen Mixtures, and Argon provides information relating to the properties of equilibrium gas plasmas formed from hydrocarbons, from air without argon, from pure argon, and from mixtures of air and carbon at various compositions, temperatures and pressures. The data are presented in graphical rather than tabular form to provide a clearer picture of the plasma processes investigated. This book is composed of four chapters, and begins with the introduction to the characteristics of plasmas, with emphasis on their th

  2. Index of refraction, Rayleigh scattering length, and Sellmeier coefficients in solid and liquid argon and xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Grace, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Like all the noble elements, argon and xenon are scintillators, \\emph{i.e.} they produce light when exposed to radiation. Large liquid argon detectors have become widely used in low background experiments, including dark matter and neutrino research. However, the index of refraction of liquid argon at the scintillation wavelength has not been measured and current Rayleigh scattering length calculations disagree with measurements. Furthermore, the Rayleigh scattering length and index of refraction of solid argon and solid xenon at their scintillation wavelengths have not been previously measured or calculated. We introduce a new calculation using previously measured data in liquid and solid argon and xenon to extrapolate the optical properties at the scintillation wavelengths using the Sellmeier dispersion relationship. As a point of validation, we compare our extrapolated index of refraction for liquid xenon against the measured value and find agreement within the uncertainties. This method results in a Rayle...

  3. Composing Experimental Environment of PRIDE Argon cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Seonho; Jang, Yongkuk; Cho, Il Je [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In PRIDE depleted Uranium feed material and a depleted Uranium mixed with some surrogate material are used for performing engineering scale Pyroprocessing. PRIDE has to maintain inert atmosphere because of the characteristic of Electrolytic Reduction technology, Electro refining technology, Electrowinning technology. The impurity concentration of the Argon cell has to be under 50 ppm(Oxygen, moisture). Atmospheric pressure changes and temperature changes can affect the Argon cell's impurity concentration. In this paper, how to compose the Argon cell impurity concentration under 50 ppm to make the exact optimal experimental environment(Oxygen, moisture) will be introduced. Composing the exact optimal experimental environment by supplying Argon gas have been introduced in this paper. Continuously supplying Argon gas which is heavier than the Oxygen through the bottom of the Argon cell the oxygen eventually discharged through the high vent fan and lower the impurity concentration of Oxygen.

  4. The scintillation of liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Heindl, T; Hofmann, M; Krücken, R; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Wieser, J; Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    A spectroscopic study of liquid argon from the vacuum ultraviolet at 110 nm to 1000 nm is presented. Excitation was performed using continuous and pulsed 12 keV electron beams. The emission is dominated by the analogue of the so called 2nd excimer continuum. Various additional emission features were found. The time structure of the light emission has been measured for a set of well defined wavelength positions. The results help to interpret literature data in the context of liquid rare gas detectors in which the wavelength information is lost due to the use of wavelength shifters.

  5. Structural determination of argon trimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiguo Xie

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rare gas clusters are model systems to investigate structural properties at finite size. However, their structures are difficult to be determined with available experimental techniques because of the strong coupling between the vibration and the rotation. Here we experimentally investigated multiple ionization and fragmentation dynamics of argon trimer by ultrashort intense laser fields and reconstructed their structures with Coulomb explosion technique. The measured structure distribution was compared with our finite-temperature ab initio calculations and the discrepancy was discussed. The present study provides a guidance for the development of theoretical methods for exploring the geometric structure of rare gas clusters.

  6. Discovery of underground argon with low level of radioactive 39Ar and possible applications to WIMP dark matter detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Galbiati, C

    2007-01-01

    We report on the first measurement of 39Ar in argon from underground natural gas reservoirs. The gas stored in the US National Helium Reserve was found to contain a low level of 39Ar. The ratio of 39Ar to stable argon was found to be <=4x10-17 (84% C.L.), less than 5% the value in atmospheric argon (39Ar/Ar=8x10-16). The total quantity of argon currently stored in the National Helium Reserve is estimated at 1000 tons. 39Ar represents one of the most important backgrounds in argon detectors for WIMP dark matter searches. The findings reported demonstrate the possibility of constructing large multi-ton argon detectors with low radioactivity suitable for WIMP dark matter searches.

  7. Persistent γδ T large granular lymphocytosis in a patient with refractory pure red cell aplasia, celiac disease, and chronic hepatitis B infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sreedharanunni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The disorders of large granular lymphocytes include reactive proliferation as well as indolent or aggressive neoplasms of cytotoxic T cells, γδ T cells, and natural killer (NK cells. They are associated with autoimmune and infectious disorders and have varied immunophenotypic features. We report a case, which highlights this complex association of autoimmune and infectious diseases with large granular lymphocytosis, the overlapping spectrum of large granular lymphocyte leukemias, and γδ T cell lymphomas as well as the difficulties in the diagnosis and management of these indolent T cell lymphomas in the usual clinical settings.

  8. Persistent γδ T large granular lymphocytosis in a patient with refractory pure red cell aplasia, celiac disease, and chronic hepatitis B infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedharanunni, S; Sachdeva, Mus; Prakash, G; Das, R

    2016-01-01

    The disorders of large granular lymphocytes include reactive proliferation as well as indolent or aggressive neoplasms of cytotoxic T cells, γδ T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells. They are associated with autoimmune and infectious disorders and have varied immunophenotypic features. We report a case, which highlights this complex association of autoimmune and infectious diseases with large granular lymphocytosis, the overlapping spectrum of large granular lymphocyte leukemias, and γδ T cell lymphomas as well as the difficulties in the diagnosis and management of these indolent T cell lymphomas in the usual clinical settings.

  9. Pure Parsimony Xor Haplotyping

    CERN Document Server

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Dondi, Riccardo; Pirola, Yuri; Rizzi, Romeo

    2010-01-01

    The haplotype resolution from xor-genotype data has been recently formulated as a new model for genetic studies. The xor-genotype data is a cheaply obtainable type of data distinguishing heterozygous from homozygous sites without identifying the homozygous alleles. In this paper we propose a formulation based on a well-known model used in haplotype inference: pure parsimony. We exhibit exact solutions of the problem by providing polynomial time algorithms for some restricted cases and a fixed-parameter algorithm for the general case. These results are based on some interesting combinatorial properties of a graph representation of the solutions. Furthermore, we show that the problem has a polynomial time k-approximation, where k is the maximum number of xor-genotypes containing a given SNP. Finally, we propose a heuristic and produce an experimental analysis showing that it scales to real-world large instances taken from the HapMap project.

  10. Pure parsimony xor haplotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Della Vedova, Gianluca; Dondi, Riccardo; Pirola, Yuri; Rizzi, Romeo

    2010-01-01

    The haplotype resolution from xor-genotype data has been recently formulated as a new model for genetic studies. The xor-genotype data is a cheaply obtainable type of data distinguishing heterozygous from homozygous sites without identifying the homozygous alleles. In this paper, we propose a formulation based on a well-known model used in haplotype inference: pure parsimony. We exhibit exact solutions of the problem by providing polynomial time algorithms for some restricted cases and a fixed-parameter algorithm for the general case. These results are based on some interesting combinatorial properties of a graph representation of the solutions. Furthermore, we show that the problem has a polynomial time k-approximation, where k is the maximum number of xor-genotypes containing a given single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). Finally, we propose a heuristic and produce an experimental analysis showing that it scales to real-world large instances taken from the HapMap project.

  11. Argon purge gas cooled by chill box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Cooling argon purge gas by routing it through a shop-fabricated chill box reduces charring of tungsten inert gas torch head components. The argon gas is in a cooled state as it enters the torch and prevents buildup of char caused by the high concentrations of heat in the weld area during welding operations.

  12. Hybrid opto-digital signal processing in 112 Gbit/s DP-16QAM and DP-QDB transmission for long-haul large-Aeff pure-silica-core fiber links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asif, Rameez; Ahmad, Ramshah; Basir, Rabeea

    2016-01-01

    By means of numerical simulations, we demonstrated that all-optical signal processing methods (XPM-suppressor module and in-line nonlinear equalization) significantly increase the system performance of digital nonlinear compensation (digital backward propagation) and improve the system performanc...... in five-channel 112 Gbit/s DP-16QAM and DP-QDB transmission over 2400 km large- effective-area pure-silica-core fiber ((Formula presented.)-PSCF). The system performance is quantified with the help of Q-factor (dB) for both dispersion-managed and nondispersion-managed fiber links....

  13. Argon metastable dynamics and lifetimes in a direct current microdischarge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanović, Ilija; Kuschel, Thomas; Schröter, Sandra; Böke, Marc

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we study the properties of a pulsed dc microdischarge with the continuous flow of argon. Argon metastable lifetimes are measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and are compared with calculated values which yield information about excitation and de-excitation processes. By increasing the gas flow-rate about 5 times from 10 to 50 sccm, the Arm lifetime increases from 1 to 5 μs due to the reduction of metastable quenching with gas impurities. Optical emission spectroscopy reveals nitrogen and water molecules as the main gas impurities. The estimated N2 density [N2] = 0.1% is too low to explain the measured metastable lifetimes. Water impurity was found to be the main de-excitation source of argon metastable atoms due to high quenching coefficients. The water impurity level of [H2O] = 0.15% to 1% is sufficient to bring calculated metastable lifetimes in line with experiments. The maximum value of water content in the discharge compared to the argon atoms is estimated to approximately 6%, due to the large surface to volume ratio of the microdischarge. The current pulse releases the water molecules from the electrode surface and they are either re-adsorbed in the time between 0.4 ms for [H2O] = 1% and 2.6 ms for [H2O] = 0.15% or pumped out of the discharge with the speed equal to the gas flow-rate. Depending on its partial pressure, the water impurity re-adsorption time is of the order of magnitude or less then the argon gas residence time.

  14. Argon metastable dynamics and lifetimes in a direct current microdischarge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanović, Ilija [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Kuschel, Thomas; Schröter, Sandra; Böke, Marc [Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Institute for Experimental Physics II, Universitätsstraße 150, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2014-09-21

    In this paper we study the properties of a pulsed dc microdischarge with the continuous flow of argon. Argon metastable lifetimes are measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and are compared with calculated values which yield information about excitation and de-excitation processes. By increasing the gas flow-rate about 5 times from 10 to 50 sccm, the Ar{sup m} lifetime increases from 1 to 5 μs due to the reduction of metastable quenching with gas impurities. Optical emission spectroscopy reveals nitrogen and water molecules as the main gas impurities. The estimated N₂ density [N₂]=0.1% is too low to explain the measured metastable lifetimes. Water impurity was found to be the main de-excitation source of argon metastable atoms due to high quenching coefficients. The water impurity level of [H₂O]=0.15% to 1% is sufficient to bring calculated metastable lifetimes in line with experiments. The maximum value of water content in the discharge compared to the argon atoms is estimated to approximately 6%, due to the large surface to volume ratio of the microdischarge. The current pulse releases the water molecules from the electrode surface and they are either re-adsorbed in the time between 0.4 ms for [H₂O]=1% and 2.6 ms for [H₂O]=0.15% or pumped out of the discharge with the speed equal to the gas flow-rate. Depending on its partial pressure, the water impurity re-adsorption time is of the order of magnitude or less then the argon gas residence time.

  15. Producing 30 Tons of Underground Argon for the Next Generation Dark Matter Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Thomas; DarkSide Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The DarkSide-20k experiment seeks to collect and purify 10s of tons of argon gas derived from the Doe Canyon CO2 well in southwestern Colorado, which has been shown to have a 39 Ar concentration of 0.73% of that found in argon collected from the atmosphere. Building upon the work of the DarkSide-50 collaboration, the DarkSide-20k experiment is building and installing a plant capable of producing 100 kg/day of 99.9% pure argon from the same underground source. To achieve this rate, the next generation plant (named Urania) will need to be able to mitigate minor contaminants in the well gas that hampered the previous generation plant. In this talk we will describe the new extraction plant, the identification of the minor contaminates, and how these contaminates are being mitigated.

  16. Effect of Welding Parameters on GTA Weld Shape for Pure Iron Plate under Ar-O2 Mixed Shielding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanping LU; H.Fujii; K.Nogi

    2006-01-01

    Weld shape variation for different welding parameters is investigated on pure iron plate under gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding with argon-oxygen mixed shielding. Results showed that small addition of oxygen to the argon base shielding gas can effectively adjust the oxygen adsorption to the molten pool. An inward Marangoni convection occurs on the pool surface when the oxygen content in the weld pool is over the critical value,80×10-6, for pure iron plate under Ar-0.3%O2 mixed shielding. Low oxygen content in the weld pool changes the inward Marangoni to an outward direction under the Ar-0.1%O2 shielding. The GTA weld shape depends to a large extent on the pattern and strength of the Marangoni convection on the pool surface, which is determined by the content of surface active element, oxygen, in the weld pool and the welding parameters.The strength of the Marangoni convection on the liquid pool is a product of the temperature coefficient of the surface tension (dσ/dT) and the temperature gradient (dT/dr) on the pool surface. Different welding parameters will change the temperature distribution and gradient on the pool surface, and therefore, affect the strength of Marangoni convection and the weld shape.

  17. Sixth form pure mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Plumpton, C

    1968-01-01

    Sixth Form Pure Mathematics, Volume 1, Second Edition, is the first of a series of volumes on Pure Mathematics and Theoretical Mechanics for Sixth Form students whose aim is entrance into British and Commonwealth Universities or Technical Colleges. A knowledge of Pure Mathematics up to G.C.E. O-level is assumed and the subject is developed by a concentric treatment in which each new topic is used to illustrate ideas already treated. The major topics of Algebra, Calculus, Coordinate Geometry, and Trigonometry are developed together. This volume covers most of the Pure Mathematics required for t

  18. Low-pressure equilibrium binary argon-methane gas mixture adsorption on exfoliated graphite: Experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albesa, Alberto; Russell, Brice; Vicente, José Luis; Rafti, Matías

    2016-04-01

    Adsorption equilibrium measurements of pure methane, pure argon, and binary mixtures over exfoliated graphite were carried for different initial compositions, temperatures, and total pressures in the range of 0.1-1.5 Torr using the volumetric static method. Diagrams for gas and adsorbed phase compositions were constructed for the conditions explored, and isosteric heats of adsorption were calculated. Experimental results were compared with predictions obtained with Monte Carlo simulations and using the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST).

  19. Measurement of ionization and electron transport in methane-argon mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquijo, J. de; Alvarez, I.; Basurto, E.; Cisneros, C. [Centro de Ciencias Fisicas, UNAM, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    1999-07-21

    We used a pulsed Townsend technique to measure the effective ionization coefficients, electron drift velocities and positive ion drift velocities in methane-argon mixtures over the combined density-normalized electric field intensity, E/N, range from 0.05 to 700x10{sup -17} V cm{sup 2}. The mixture studied contained 0.5, 3, 25, 50 and 75% CH{sub 4}, including pure methane and pure argon. We found a well defined dependence of the effective ionization coefficient on the amount of CH{sub 4} in the mixture at low E/N, while at the higher E/N end, all the curves merged into a single one. The electron drift velocities in the mixture show a pronounced negative differential conductivity region, the maxima and minima of which depend on the mixture ratio. (author)

  20. Opacity of Shock-Generated Argon Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王藩侯; 陈敬平; 周显明; 李西军; 经福谦; 孟续军; 孙永盛

    2001-01-01

    Argon plasmas with uniform density and temperature are generated by a planar shock wave through argon gas. The opacities of argon plasma, covering the thermodynamic states at temperatures of 1.4-2.2eV and in densities of 0.0083- 0.015 g/cm3, are investigated by measuring the emitted radiance versus time at several visible wavelengths. Comparison of the measured opacities with those calculated demonstrates that the average atom model can be used well to describe the essential transport behaviour of photons in argon plasma under the abovementioned thermodynamic condition. A simplified and self-consistent method to deduce the reflectivity R(λ) at the baseplate surface is applied. It demonstrates that the values of R(λ) are all around 0.4 in the experiments, which are basically in agreement with those given by Erskine previously (1994 J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat.Transfer 51 97).

  1. Clinical periodontics with the argon laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, R. L.

    1995-04-01

    The argon laser has proven to be a valuable tool for the thermodynamic debridement of the periodontal lesion, incisions and tissue fusion. Illustrations of clinical applications and discussion of laser parameters will be provided.

  2. Numerical Analysis of Amirkabir Plasma Focus (APF) Device for Neon and Argon Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknam Sharak, M.; Goudarzi, S.; Raeisdana, A.; Jafarabadi, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper the experimental results in different working conditions in Amirkabir Plasma Focus (APF) Device have been compared with the numerical results of a two-dimensional simulation code based on Lee's model. The experiments were done with pure Neon and Argon as operating gases over a wide range of working conditions (gas pressures and discharge voltages). It is observed that by a proper choice for values of the efficiency factors, comparison between numerical and experimental results shows a good agreement.

  3. Argon Laser Photoablation for Postburn Conjunctival Pigmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Joon Ahn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an ocular burn injury from boiling water which resulted in conjunctival pigmentation, 1 week following injury. For cosmetic purposes, 2 sessions of argon laser photoablation were performed. One month after laser treatment, conjunctival pigmentation had been successfully removed and the patient was very satisfied with the results. Argon laser photoablation may be an effective way to remove postburn conjunctival pigmentation.

  4. Bayesian Method to Estimate Pure Premium in Reinsurance of the Extremely Large Losses%贝叶斯方法估计极端损失再保险纯保费

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴永; 王晓园

    2011-01-01

    为了提高预测极端损失的精确性,采用贝叶斯方法并利用Winbugs软件计算极端事件发生的概率及条件期望,得到极端损失的后验经验分布和一个精确的区间估计,基于此,保险公司可以估计出更加公平的再保险纯保费.%In order to improve predictive precision of extremely large losses, the paper proposed a Bayesian method. In the paper, it adopted WinBUGS package to calculate the probability and conditional expectation of this event, not only obtained a empirical posterior distribution but also a precise interval estimate. Based on the above, it makes the insurance company be able to estimate fairly pure premium in reinsurance.

  5. Space-charge effects in liquid argon ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherfoord, J. P.; Walker, R. B.

    2015-03-01

    We have uniformly irradiated liquid argon ionization chambers with betas from high-activity 90Sr sources. The radiation environment is similar to that in the liquid argon calorimeters which are part of the ATLAS detector installed at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We measured the resulting ionization current over a wide range of applied potential for two different source activities and for three different chamber gaps. These studies provide operating experience at exceptionally high ionization rates. In particular they indicate a stability at the 0.1% level for these calorimeters over years of operation at the full LHC luminosity when operated in the normal mode at an electric field E = 1.0 kV / mm. We can operate these chambers in the normal mode or in the space-charge limited regime and thereby determine the transition point between the two. This transition point is parameterized by a positive argon ion mobility of μ+ = 0.08 ± 0.02mm2 / V s at a temperature of 88.0±0.5 K and at a pressure of 1.02±0.02 bar. In the space-charge limited regime the ionization currents are degraded and show signs of instability. At the highest electric fields in our study (6.7 kV/mm) the ionization current is still slowly rising with increasing electric field.

  6. Large grain cavities from pure niobium ingot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Yorktown, VA; Kneisel, Peter [Williamsburg, VA; Cameiro, Tadeu [McMurray, PA

    2012-03-06

    Niobium cavities are fabricated by the drawing and ironing of as cast niobium ingot slices rather than from cold rolled niobium sheet. This method results in the production of niobium cavities having a minimum of grain boundaries at a significantly reduced cost as compared to the production of such structures from cold rolled sheet.

  7. Potassium-argon/argon-40-argon-39 geochronology of Cenozoic alkali basalts from the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Quanshu; SHI Xuefa; YANG Yaomin; WANG Kunshan

    2008-01-01

    Based on the isotopic chronologic results of Cenozoic alkali basalts from the South China Sea,the characteristics of volcanic activi-ty of the South China Sea after spreading were studied.The potassium - argon ages of eight alkali basalt samples from the South China Sea,and the argon - argon ages of two samples among them are reported.Apparent ages of the whole rock are 3.80 to 7.91 Ma with an average value of 5.43 Ma (potassium- argon,whole rock),and there is little difference among samples at the same location,e.g.,4.76~5.78 Ma for location S04-12.The argon - argon ages for the two samples are 6.06 and 4.71 Ma,which lie within the age scope of potassium - argon method.The dating results indicate that rock-forming age is from late Miocene to Pli-ocene,which is consistent with erupting event for alkali basalts from adjacent regions of the South China Sea.Volcanic activities occur after the cessation of spreading of the South China Sea,which are controlled by lithospheric fault and the spreading center formed during the spreading period of the South China Sea.These dating results,combined with geochemical characteristics of these basalts,the published chronological data for the South China Sea and its adjacent regions,and the updated geophysical data near Hainan Island,suggest that after the cessation of spreading of the South China Sea,there occur widely distributing magmatic activities which primarily is alkali basalt,and the volcanic activity continues to Quaternary.The activity may be relative to Hainan mantle plume originated from core/mantle boundary.

  8. Rehabilitation of pure alexia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi; Ólafsdóttir, Rannveig Rós; Arendt, Ida-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Acquired reading problems caused by brain injury (alexia) are common, either as a part of an aphasic syndrome, or as an isolated symptom. In pure alexia, reading is impaired while other language functions, including writing, are spared. Being in many ways a simple syndrome, one would think...... that pure alexia was an easy target for rehabilitation efforts. We review the literature on rehabilitation of pure alexia from 1990 to the present, and find that patients differ widely on several dimensions like alexia severity, and associated deficits. Many patients reported to have pure alexia...... in the reviewed studies, have associated deficits like agraphia or aphasia and thus do not strictly conform to the diagnosis. Few studies report clear and generalisable effects of training, none report control data, and in many cases the reported findings are not supported by statistics. We can, however...

  9. Rehabilitation of pure alexia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi; Ólafsdóttir, Rannveig Rós; Arendt, Ida-Marie

    2013-01-01

    that pure alexia was an easy target for rehabilitation efforts. We review the literature on rehabilitation of pure alexia from 1990 to the present, and find that patients differ widely on several dimensions like alexia severity, and associated deficits. Many patients reported to have pure alexia......Acquired reading problems caused by brain injury (alexia) are common, either as a part of an aphasic syndrome, or as an isolated symptom. In pure alexia, reading is impaired while other language functions, including writing, are spared. Being in many ways a simple syndrome, one would think...... in the reviewed studies, have associated deficits like agraphia or aphasia and thus do not strictly conform to the diagnosis. Few studies report clear and generalisable effects of training, none report control data, and in many cases the reported findings are not supported by statistics. We can, however...

  10. Argon Collection And Purification For Proliferation Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achey, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hunter, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-09

    In order to determine whether a seismic event was a declared/undeclared underground nuclear weapon test, environmental samples must be taken and analyzed for signatures that are unique to a nuclear explosion. These signatures are either particles or gases. Particle samples are routinely taken and analyzed under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) verification regime as well as by individual countries. Gas samples are analyzed for signature gases, especially radioactive xenon. Underground nuclear tests also produce radioactive argon, but that signature is not well monitored. A radioactive argon signature, along with other signatures, can more conclusively determine whether an event was a nuclear test. This project has developed capabilities for collecting and purifying argon samples for ultra-low-background proportional counting. SRNL has developed a continuous gas enrichment system that produces an output stream containing 97% argon from whole air using adsorbent separation technology (the flow diagram for the system is shown in the figure). The vacuum swing adsorption (VSA) enrichment system is easily scalable to produce ten liters or more of 97% argon within twelve hours. A gas chromatographic separation using a column of modified hydrogen mordenite molecular sieve has been developed that can further purify the sample to better than 99% purity after separation from the helium carrier gas. The combination of these concentration and purification systems has the capability of being used for a field-deployable system for collecting argon samples suitable for ultra-low-background proportional counting for detecting nuclear detonations under the On-Site Inspection program of the CTBTO verification regime. The technology also has applications for the bulk argon separation from air for industrial purposes such as the semi-conductor industry.

  11. An investigation of CO2 splitting using nanosecond pulsed corona discharge: effect of argon addition on CO2 conversion and energy efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, M. S.; Yanallah, K.; Allen, R. W. K.; Pontiga, F.

    2017-03-01

    The plasma chemical splitting of carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce carbon monoxide (CO) in a pulsed corona discharge was investigated from both an experimental and a numerical standpoint. High voltage nanosecond pulses were applied to a stream of pure CO2 and its mixture with argon, and the gaseous products were identified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Due to the shape of pulses, the process of CO2 splitting was found to proceed in two phases. The first phase is dominated by ionization, which generates a high electron density. Then, during the second phase, direct electron impact dissociation of CO2 contributes to a large portion of CO production. Conversion and energy efficiency were calculated for the tested conditions. The conversions achieved are comparable to those obtained using other high pressure non-thermal discharges, such as dielectric barrier discharge. However, the energy efficiencies were considerably higher, which are favorable to industrial applications that require atmospheric conditions and elevated gas flow rates.

  12. Trapping cold ground state argon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, P D; Barker, P F

    2014-10-31

    We trap cold, ground state argon atoms in a deep optical dipole trap produced by a buildup cavity. The atoms, which are a general source for the sympathetic cooling of molecules, are loaded in the trap by quenching them from a cloud of laser-cooled metastable argon atoms. Although the ground state atoms cannot be directly probed, we detect them by observing the collisional loss of cotrapped metastable argon atoms and determine an elastic cross section. Using a type of parametric loss spectroscopy we also determine the polarizability of the metastable 4s[3/2](2) state to be (7.3±1.1)×10(-39)  C m(2)/V. Finally, Penning and associative losses of metastable atoms in the absence of light assisted collisions, are determined to be (3.3±0.8)×10(-10)  cm(3) s(-1).

  13. Pure-tone Audiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapul, A. A.; Zubova, E. I.; Torgaev, S. N.; Drobchik, V. V.

    2017-08-01

    The research focuses on a pure-tone audiometer designing. The relevance of the study is proved by high incidence of an auditory analyser in older people and children. At first, the article provides information about subjective and objective audiometry methods. Secondly, we offer block-diagram and basic-circuit arrangement of device. We decided to base on STM32F407VG microcontroller and use digital pot in the function of attenuator. Third, we implemented microcontroller and PC connection. C programming language is used for microcontroller’s program and PC’s interface. Fourthly, we created the pure-tone audiometer prototype. In the future, we will implement the objective method ASSR in addition to pure-tone audiometry.

  14. Application of the Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state to argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zudkevitch, David; Kaufmann, Thomas G.

    1965-05-01

    The coefficients of the Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state have been developed for argon. Employing these coefficients, the volumetric behavior of argon has been predicted with an average deviation of 0.241% for 597 smoothed and experimental data points in the superheated region. At temperatures below the critical two sets of C0 's, one for the liquid and one for the vapor, were needed to relate the vapor pressure to the densities of saturated argon. Using the experimental data of Holst(l8) and Wilson(28), the reliability of the BWR coefficients were demonstrated by predicting the phase behavior of the argon-nitrogen system down to -326°F, Further improvement of the results was obtained when another set of C0 's were developed by equating the pure component vapor and liquid fugacities along the vapor pressure curves. In calculating enthalpy deviations from the ideal state the original BWR expression was modified to include explicitly the temperature dependence of the coefficient C0 . Predicted values of enthalpy deviations obtained with this expression showed good agreement with values from Din's compilation.

  15. Speed-of-Sound Measurements in (Argon + Carbon Dioxide) over the Temperature Range from (275 to 500) K at Pressures up to 8 MPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegge, Robin; McLinden, Mark O; Perkins, Richard A; Richter, Markus; Span, Roland

    2016-08-01

    The speed of sound of two (argon + carbon dioxide) mixtures was measured over the temperature range from (275 to 500) K with pressures up to 8 MPa utilizing a spherical acoustic resonator. The compositions of the gravimetrically prepared mixtures were (0.50104 and 0.74981) mole fraction carbon dioxide. The vibrational relaxation of pure carbon dioxide led to high sound absorption, which significantly impeded the sound-speed measurements on carbon dioxide and its mixtures; pre-condensation may have also affected the results for some measurements near the dew line. Thus, in contrast to the standard operating procedure for speed-of-sound measurements with a spherical resonator, non-radial resonances at lower frequencies were taken into account. Still, the data show a comparatively large scatter, and the usual repeatability of this general type of instrument could not be realized with the present measurements. Nonetheless, the average relative combined expanded uncertainty (k = 2) in speed of sound ranged from (0.042 to 0.056)% for both mixtures, with individual state-point uncertainties increasing to 0.1%. These uncertainties are adequate for our intended purpose of evaluating thermodynamic models. The results are compared to a Helmholtz energy equation of state for carbon capture and storage applications; relative deviations of (-0.64 to 0.08)% for the (0.49896 argon + 0.50104 carbon dioxide) mixture, and of (-1.52 to 0.77)% for the (0.25019 argon + 0.74981 carbon dioxide) mixture were observed.

  16. ICARUS and status of liquid argon technology

    CERN Document Server

    Menegolli, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    ICARUS T600 is the largest liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) detector ever realized. It operates underground at the LNGS laboratory in Gran Sasso. It has been smoothly running since summer 2010, collecting data with the CNGS (Cern to Gran Sasso) beam and with cosmic particles. Liquid Argon TPCs are indeed 'electronic bubble chambers', providing a completely uniform imaging calorimetry with unprecedented accuracy on such massive volumes. ICARUS T600 is internationally considered as a milestone towards the realization of the next generation of massive detectors (tens of ktons) for neutrino and rare event physics. Results will be presented on the data collected so far with the detector.

  17. Improved hybrid Monte Carlo-fluid model for the electrical characteristics in an analytical radio-frequency glow discharge in argon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaerts, A.; Gijbels, R.; W. Goedheer,

    2001-01-01

    An improved hybrid Monte Carlo-fluid model for electrons, argon ions and fast argon atoms, is presented for the rf Grimm-type glow discharge. In this new approach, all electrons, including the large slow electron group in the bulk plasma, are treated with the Monte Carlo model. The calculation

  18. Dahlbeck and Pure Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Jim

    2016-01-01

    This article responds to Johan Dahlbeck's "Towards a pure ontology: Children's bodies and morality" ["Educational Philosophy and Theory," vol. 46 (1), 2014, pp. 8-23 (EJ1026561)]. His arguments from Nietzsche and Spinoza do not carry the weight he supposes, and the conclusions he draws from them about pedagogy would be…

  19. Dahlbeck and Pure Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Jim

    2016-01-01

    This article responds to Johan Dahlbeck's "Towards a pure ontology: Children's bodies and morality" ["Educational Philosophy and Theory," vol. 46 (1), 2014, pp. 8-23 (EJ1026561)]. His arguments from Nietzsche and Spinoza do not carry the weight he supposes, and the conclusions he draws from them about pedagogy would be…

  20. Observation of room temperature ferromagnetism in pure La{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qiang; Gao, Daqiang; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Zhaolong; Zhang, Zhipeng; Rao, Jinwei; Xue, Desheng [Lanzhou University, Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of MOE, Lanzhou (China)

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, we report the observation of intrinsic room temperature ferromagnetism in pure La{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. Magnetism measurement indicates that all of the samples exhibit room temperature ferromagnetism and the saturation magnetization for the samples decreases with the increase in annealing temperature from 700 to 1,000 C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy identifies the presence of oxygen vacancies in the La{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. The fitting results of the O 1s spectrum indicate that the variation of the oxygen vacancy concentration is in complete agreement with the change of the saturation magnetization. It is also found that the saturation magnetization of the La{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles can be tuned by post-annealing in argon or oxygen atmosphere. These results suggest that the oxygen vacancies are largely responsible for the room temperature ferromagnetism in pure La{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. (orig.)

  1. First results from a Dark Matter search with liquid Argon at 87 K in the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Benetti, P; Adamo, F; Baibussinov, B; Baldo-Ceolin, M; Belluco, M; Calaprice, F; Calligarich, E; Cambiaghi, M; Carbonara, F; Cavanna, F; Centro, Sandro; Cocco, A G; Di Pompeo, F; Ferrari, N; Fiorillo, G; Galbiati, C; Gallo, V; Grandi, L; Ianni, A; Mangano, G; Meng, G; Montanari, C; Palamara, O; Pandola, L; Pietropaolo, F; Raselli, G L; Rossella, M; Rubbia, C; Szelc, A M; Ventura, Sandro; Vignoli, C; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2007.08.002

    2008-01-01

    A new method of searching for dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP) has been developed with the direct detection of the low energy nuclear recoils observed in a massive target (ultimately many tons) of ultra pure Liquid Argon at 87 K. A high selectivity for Argon recoils is achieved by the simultaneous observation of both the VUV scintillation luminescence and of the electron signal surviving columnar recombination, extracted through the liquid-gas boundary by an electric field. First physics results from this method are reported, based on a small 2.3 litre test chamber filled with natural Argon and an accumulated fiducial exposure of about 100 kg x day, supporting the future validity of this method with isotopically purified 40Ar and for a much larger unit presently under construction with correspondingly increased sensitivities.

  2. Pure red cell aplasia and associated thymoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Rosu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pure red cell aplasia is a rare cause of anemia, caused by an absence of red blood cell precursors in the bone marrow. It is usually a paraneoplastic syndrome, associated most commonly with large-cell granular lymphocyte leukemia but also thymoma. For patients who present both pure red cell aplasia and thymoma, thymectomy leads to an initial remission of the aplasia in 30% of cases. However, sustained remission may require the addition of medications such as corticosteroids, cyclospo­rine, or cyclophosphamide. We present a case of pure red cell aplasia associated with a thymoma in an otherwise healthy 80 year-old woman.

  3. Positive and negative pulsed corona in argon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuizen, E.M. van; Rutgers, W.R.; Ebert, U.

    2002-01-01

    Photographs are obtained of corona discharges in argon at atmospheric pressure using a high resolution, intensified CCD camera. Positive and negative polarity is applied at the curved electrode in a point-plane gap and a plane-plane gap with a protruding point. Branching is observed in the positive

  4. Thermal decomposition of barium valerate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres, P.; Norby, Poul; Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of barium valerate (Ba(C4H9CO2)(2)/Ba-pentanoate) was studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and hot-stage optical microscopy. Melting takes place in two different steps, at 200 degrees C and 280...

  5. 46 CFR 151.50-36 - Argon or nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Argon or nitrogen. 151.50-36 Section 151.50-36 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-36 Argon or nitrogen. (a) A cargo tank that contains argon or nitrogen and that has a maximum allowable working pressure of 172 kPa...

  6. Pulse Shape Discrimination in liquid argon and its implications for Dark Matter searches using depleted argon

    CERN Document Server

    Kryczynski, Pawel

    2012-01-01

    A brief outline of Dark Matter detection experiments using liquid argon technology is presented. The Pulse Shape background discrimination method (PSD) is described and the example of its use in 2.3 l R&D detector is given. Methods of calculating sensitivity of a Dark Matter detector are discussed and used to estimate the possible improvement of sensitivity after introduction of isotopically depleted liquid argon.

  7. Argon laser versus erbium:YAG laser in the treatment of xanthelasma palpebrarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader, Mona; Alashry, Shereen Ezzelregal

    2014-01-01

    Background Xanthelasma palpebrarum is the most common of the xanthomas with asymptomatic, symmetrical, bilateral, soft, yellow, polygonal papules around the eyelids. Though it is a benign lesion causing no functional disturbance, it is esthetically annoying. The surgical laser offers an extremely elegant and powerful solution to this problem. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of erbium:YAG and argon lasers in the treatment of xanthelasma lesions. Patients and methods Forty patients were included in the study. Twenty patients (15 patients were bilateral with 30 eyes either in the upper or lower lid and 5 patients were unilateral) were treated with erbium:YAG laser. Another 20 patients (10 patients were bilateral with 20 eyes and 10 patients were unilateral) were treated with argon laser. Results In the majority of treated patients (either treated with erbium:YAG or argon laser), xanthelasma lesions were completely disappeared or significantly decreased in size. Two patients showed pigmentary changes in the form of hypopigmentation with erbium:YAG laser (one case), another case showed hyperpigmentation. No intraoperative complication was observed. No significant scar or recurrence was observed. Conclusion Argon laser in xanthelasma is an easy, effective, and safe method of treatment for small lesions and YAG laser is more better for large lesions than argon laser. PMID:25892929

  8. Measurement of the attenuation length of argon scintillation light in the ArDM LAr TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Calvo, J; Crivelli, P; Daniel, M; DiLuise, S; Gendotti, A; Horikawa, S; Molina-Bueno, L; Montes, B; Mu, W; Murphy, S; Natterer, G; Ngyuen, K; Periale, L; Quan, Y; Radics, B; Regenfus, C; Romero, L; Rubbia, A; Santorelli, R; Sergiampietri, F; Viant, T; Wu, S

    2016-01-01

    We report on a measurement of the attenuation length for the scintillation light in the tonne size liquid argon target of the ArDM dark matter experiment. The data was recorded in the first underground operation of the experiment in single-phase operational mode. The results were achieved by comparing the light yield spectra from 39-Ar and 83m-Kr to a description of the ArDM setup with a model of full light ray tracing. A relatively low value close to 0.5 m was found for the attenuation length of the liquid argon bulk to its own scintillation light. We interpret this result as a presence of optically active impurities in the liquid argon which are not filtered by the installed purification systems. We also present analyses of the argon gas employed for the filling and discuss cross sections in the vacuum ultraviolet of various molecules in respect to purity requirements in the context of large liquid argon installations.

  9. Purely Functional Structured Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Obua, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The idea of functional programming has played a big role in shaping today's landscape of mainstream programming languages. Another concept that dominates the current programming style is Dijkstra's structured programming. Both concepts have been successfully married, for example in the programming language Scala. This paper proposes how the same can be achieved for structured programming and PURELY functional programming via the notion of LINEAR SCOPE. One advantage of this proposal is that m...

  10. Purely Cortical Anaplastic Ependymoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Ramalho Romero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. It may occur outside the ventricular structures, representing the extraventicular form, or without any relationship of ventricular system, called ectopic ependymona. Less than fifteen cases of ectopic ependymomas were reported and less than five were anaplastic. We report a rare case of pure cortical ectopic anaplastic ependymoma.

  11. Performance of the Electronic Readout of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, H; Aleksa, M; Aperio Bella, L; Archambault, JP; Arfaoui, S; Arnaez, O; Auge, E; Aurousseau, M; Bahinipati, S; Ban, J; Banfi, D; Barajas, A; Barillari, T; Bazan, A; Bellachia, F; Beloborodova, O; Benchekroun, D; Benslama, K; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Bernat, P; Bernier, R; Besson, N; Binet, S; Blanchard, JB; Blondel, A; Bobrovnikov, V; Bohner, O; Boonekamp, M; Bordoni, S; Bouchel, M; Bourdarios, C; Bozzone, A; Braun, HM; Breton, D; Brettel, H; Brooijmans, G; Caputo, R; Carli, T; Carminati, L; Caughron, S; Cavalleri, P; Cavalli, D; Chareyre, E; Chase, RL; Chekulaev, SV; Chen, H; Cheplakov, A; Chiche, R; Citterio, M; Cojocaru, C; Colas, J; Collard, C; Collot, J; Consonni, M; Cooke, M; Copic, K; Costa, GC; Courneyea, L; Cuisy, D; Cwienk, WD; Damazio, D; Dannheim, D; De Cecco, S; De La Broise, X; De La Taille, C; de Vivie, JB; Debennerot, B; Delagnes, E; Delmastro, M; Derue, F; Dhaliwal, S; Di Ciaccio, L; Doan, O; Dudziak, F; Duflot, L; Dumont-Dayot, N; Dzahini, D; Elles, S; Ertel, E; Escalier, M; Etienvre, AI; Falleau, I; Fanti, M; Farooque, T; Favre, P; Fayard, Louis; Fent, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, A; Fournier, D; Fournier, L; Fras, M; Froeschl, R; Gadfort, T; Gallin-Martel, ML; Gibson, A; Gillberg, D; Gingrich, DM; Göpfert, T; Goodson, J; Gouighri, M; Goy, C; Grassi, V; Gray, J; Guillemin, T; Guo, B; Habring, J; Handel, C; Heelan, L; Heintz, H; Helary, L; Henrot-Versille, S; Hervas, L; Hobbs, J; Hoffman, J; Hostachy, JY; Hoummada, A; Hrivnac, J; Hrynova, T; Hubaut, F; Huber, J; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Iengo, P; Imbert, P; Ishmukhametov, R; Jantsch, A; Javadov, N; Jezequel, S; Jimenez Belenguer, M; Ju, XY; Kado, M; Kalinowski, A; Kar, D; Karev, A; Katsanos, I; Kazarinov, M; Kerschen, N; Kierstead, J; Kim, MS; Kiryunin, A; Kladiva, E; Knecht, N; Kobel, M; Koletsou, I; König, S; Krieger, P; Kukhtin, V; Kuna, M; Kurchaninov, L; Labbe, J; Lacour, D; Ladygin, E; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lamarra, D; Lampl, W; Lanni, F; Laplace, S; Laskus, H; Le Coguie, A; Le Dortz, O; Le Maner, C; Lechowski, M; Lee, SC; Lefebvre, M; Leonhardt, K; Lethiec, L; Leveque, J; Liang, Z; Liu, C; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Loch, P; Lu, J; Ma, H; Mader, W; Majewski, S; Makovec, N; Makowiecki, D; Mandelli, L; Mangeard, PS; Mansoulie, B; Marchand, JF; Marchiori, G; Martin, D; Martin-Chassard, G; Martin dit Latour, B; Marzin, A; Maslennikov, A; Massol, N; Matricon, P; Maximov, D; Mazzanti, M; McCarthy, T; McPherson, R; Menke, S; Meyer, JP; Ming, Y; Monnier, E; Mooshofer, P; Neganov, A; Niedercorn, F; Nikolic-Audit, I; Nugent, IM; Oakham, G; Oberlack, H; Ocariz, J; Odier, J; Oram, CJ; Orlov, I; Orr, R; Parsons, JA; Peleganchuk, S; Penson, A; Perini, L; Perrodo, P; Perrot, G; Perus, A; Petit, E; Pisarev, I; Plamondon, M; Poffenberger, P; Poggioli, L; Pospelov, G; Pralavorio, P; Prast, J; Prudent, X; Przysiezniak, H; Puzo, P; Quentin, M; Radeka, V; Rajagopalan, S; Rauter, E; Reimann, O; Rescia, S; Resende, B; Richer, JP; Ridel, M; Rios, R; Roos, L; Rosenbaum, G; Rosenzweig, H; Rossetto, O; Roudil, W; Rousseau, D; Ruan, X; Rudert, A; Rusakovich, N; Rusquart, P; Rutherfoord, J; Sauvage, G; Savine, A; Schaarschmidt, J; Schacht, P; Schaffer, A; Schram, M; Schwemling, P; Seguin Moreau, N; Seifert, F; Serin, L; Seuster, R; Shalyugin, A; Shupe, M; Simion, S; Sinervo, P; Sippach, W; Skovpen, K; Sliwa, R; Soukharev, A; Spano, F; Stavina, P; Straessner, A; Strizenec, P; Stroynowski, R; Talyshev, A; Tapprogge, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, GF; Teuscher, R; Tikhonov, Yu; Tocut, V; Tompkins, D; Thompson, P; Tisserant, S; Todorov, T; Tomasz, F; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Trinh, Thi N; Trochet, S; Trocme, B; Tschann-Grimm, K; Tsionou, D; Ueno, R; Unal, G; Urbaniec, D; Usov, Y; Voss, K; Veillet, JJ; Vincter, M; Vogt, S; Weng, Z; Whalen, K; Wicek, F; Wilkens, H; Wingerter-Seez, I; Wulf, E; Yang, Z; Ye, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zarzhitsky, P; Zerwas, D; Zhang, H; Zhang, L; Zhou, N; Zimmer, J; Zitoun, R; Zivkovic, L

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS detector has been designed for operation at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. ATLAS includes electromagnetic and hadronic liquid argon calorimeters, with almost 200,000 channels of data that must be sampled at the LHC bunch crossing frequency of 40 MHz. The calorimeter electronics calibration and readout are performed by custom electronics developed specifically for these purposes. This paper describes the system performance of the ATLAS liquid argon calibration and readout electronics, including noise, energy and time resolution, and long term stability, with data taken mainly from full-system calibration runs performed after installation of the system in the ATLAS detector hall at CERN.

  12. Purely tetrahedral quadruple systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Lijun

    2006-01-01

    An oriented tetrahedron is a set of four vertices and four cyclic triples with the property that any ordered pair of vertices is contained in exactly one of the cyclic triples. A tetrahedral quadruple system of order n (briefly TQS(n)) is a pair (X,B), where X is an nelement set and B is a set of oriented tetrahedra such that every cyclic triple on X is contained in a unique member of B. A TQS(n) (X, B) is pure if there do not exist two oriented tetrahedra with the same vertex set. In this paper, we show that there is a pure TQS(n) if and only if n≡2,4(mod 6),n>4,or n≡1,5(mod 12). One corollary is that there is a simple two-fold quadruple system of order n if and only if n≡2,4 (mod 6) and n>4, or n≡1, 5 (mod 12).Another corollary is that there is an overlarge set of pure Mendelsohn triple systems of order n for n≡1,3(mod 6),n>3, or n≡0,4 (mod 12).

  13. Featares of T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia with pure red cell aplasia%T大颗粒淋巴细胞白血病伴纯红细胞再生障碍特征与治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建宁; 傅行财; 孟庆奇; 宋敏; 候艳秋; 张柳波; 包红雨

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To explore the clinical features and treatment of T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia(T-LGLL) associated with pure red cell aplasia(PRCA).Methods:Two cases of T-LGLL with PRCA were reported and the related articles were reviewed.Results:Two elder female patients had indolent process,mainly presenting with anemia.Clinic examination showed no lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly.The patients had no recurrent infections and rheumatoid arthritis.Peripheral blood smear showed predominance of mature lymphocytic cells,with most showing characteristic large granular lymphocytic morphology.Flowcytometric immunophenotypic analyses were done and peripheral lymphocytes showed abnormal immunophenotypes which were compatible with T-LGLL.Clonality could be proven on detecting gene rearrangement of T-cell recepter γchain.Bone marrow aspirate smears showed markedly decreased erythroid series.Conclusion:T-LGLL is a rare disease.The clinic characteristics of Asian patients were markedly different from Western patients.Especially,Asian patients had more anemia attributing to a high incidence of PRCA.The findings suggested that T-LGLL with PRCA may be prognostic of a good response to immunosuppression.%目的:探讨T-大颗粒淋巴细胞白血病(T-LGLL)伴纯红细胞再生障碍(PRCA)的临床特征与治疗.方法:报告2例T-LGLL合并PRCA并结合文献进行复习.结果:患者为老年女性,临床进展缓慢,主要表现为贫血,无淋巴结和肝脾肿大,无反复感染和类风湿性关节炎表现,血涂片以大颗粒淋巴细胞为主,免疫分型符合T-LGLL,TCRγ基因重排阳性,骨髓红系细胞明显减少.结论:T-LGLL为少见疾病,亚洲患者临床特征与西方患者有明显差异,尤其是合并PRCA的发生率高,对免疫抑制剂治疗反应良好.

  14. A G/NARRLI Effort. Measuring the Ionization Yield of Low-Energy Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Tenzing Henry Yatish [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Liquid argon has long been used for particle detection due to its attractive drift properties, ample abundance, and reasonable density. The response of liquid argon to lowenergy O(102 -1044 eV) interactions is, however, largely unexplored. Weakly interacting massive particles such as neutrinos and hypothetical dark-matter particles (WIMPs) are predicted to coherently scatter on atomic nuclei, leaving only an isolated low-energy nuclear recoil as evidence. The response of liquid argon to low-energy nuclear recoils must be studied to determine the sensitivity of liquid argon based detectors to these unobserved interactions. Detectors sensitive to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering may be used to monitor nuclear reactors from a distance, to detect neutrinos from supernova, and to test the predicted behavior of neutrinos. Additionally, direct detection of hypothetical weakly interacting dark matter would be a large step toward understanding the substance that accounts for nearly 27% of the universe. In this dissertation I discuss a small dual-phase (liquid-gas) argon proportional scintillation counter built to study the low-energy regime and several novel calibration and characterization techniques developed to study the response of liquid argon to low-energy O(102 -104 eV) interactions.

  15. PURE DRIVE GT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    在2004年奥林匹克赛事中,中国的李婷,孙甜甜取得了中国网球第一个金牌一女子双打冠军。忘记不了当时李婷挥动着她的BABOLAT(百保力)网拍Pure Drive Zylon 360°激动地拥抱着孙甜甜吵闹着,幸福地哭着的情景。

  16. Pure de Sitter Supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bergshoeff, Eric A; Kallosh, Renata; Van Proeyen, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Using superconformal methods we derive an explicit de Sitter supergravity action invariant under spontaneously broken local ${\\cal N}=1$ supersymmetry. The supergravity multiplet interacts with a nilpotent goldstino multiplet. We present a complete locally supersymmetric action including the graviton and the fermionic fields, gravitino and goldstino, no scalars. In the global limit when supergravity multiplet decouples, our action reproduces the Volkov-Akulov theory. In the unitary gauge where goldstino vanishes we recover pure supergravity with the positive cosmological constant. The classical equations of motion, with all fermions vanishing, have a maximally symmetric solution: de Sitter space.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of electron back diffusion in argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmilović, M.; Stojanović, V.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    1999-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulation was applied to study the back-diffusion of electrons in argon at low and moderate values of E/N from 10Td to 10 kTd. Simulations were performed for gaps of 1 cm and for pressures corresponding to the breakdown voltages taken from experimental Paschen curves. Effects of inelastic collisions, ionization, reflection of electrons and anisotropic scattering as well as anisotropic initial and reflected angular distributions of electrons were included. A complete and detailed set of electron scattering cross sections that describes well electron transport in argon was used. We found a very good agreement of the results of simulations with the experimental data for well defined initial conditions, and with several models available in the literature.(A.V. Phelps and Z.LJ. Petrović), Plasma Sources Sci. Tehnol. 8, R21 (1999). While effect of reflection may be large, for realistic values of reflection coefficient and for realistic secondary electron productions the effect may be neglected for the accuracy required in gas discharge modeling.

  18. Argon gas flow through glass nanopipette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Tomohide; Nishimoto, Kiwamu; Goto, Tadahiko; Ogawa, Shuichi; Iwata, Futoshi; Takakuwa, Yuji

    2016-12-01

    We have observed the flow of argon gas through a glass nanopipette in vacuum. A glass nanopipette with an inner diameter of 100 nm and a shank length of 3 mm was set between vacuum chambers, and argon gas was introduced from the top of the nanopipette to the bottom. The exit pressure was monitored with an increase in entrance pressure in the range of 50-170 kPa. Knudsen flow was observed at an entrance pressure lower than 100 kPa, and Poiseuille flow was observed at an entrance pressure higher than 120 kPa. The proposed pressure-dependent gas flow method provides a means of evaluating the glass nanopipette before using it for various applications including nanodeposition to surfaces and femtoinjection to living cells.

  19. ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Module Zero

    CERN Multimedia

    1993-01-01

    This module was built and tested with beam to validate the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter design. One original design feature is the folding. 10 000 lead plates and electrodes are folded into an accordion shape and immersed in liquid argon. As they cross the folds, particles are slowed down by the lead. As they collide with the lead atoms, electrons and photons are ejected. There is a knock-on effect and as they continue on into the argon, a whole shower is produced. The electrodes collect up all the electrons and this signal gives a measurement of the energy of the initial particle. The M0 was fabricated by French institutes (LAL, LAPP, Saclay, Jussieu) in the years 1993-1994. It was tested in the H6/H8 beam lines in 1994, leading to the Technical Design Report in 1996.

  20. Abnormal epidermal changes after argon laser treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, R.A.; Knobler, R.M.; Aberer, E.; Klein, W.; Kocsis, F.; Ott, E. (Univ. of Vienna (Austria))

    1991-02-01

    A 26-year-old woman with a congenital port-wine stain on the forehead was treated three times at 2-month intervals with an argon laser. Six months after the last treatment, moderate blanching and mild scaling confined to the treated area was observed. A biopsy specimen of the treated area revealed a significant decrease in ectatic vessels. However, epidermal changes similar to those of actinic keratosis with disorganized cell layers and marked cytologic abnormalities were seen. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes for a defect in DNA repair was negative. Multiple, argon laser-induced photothermal effects may be responsible for the changes observed in our case and may lead to premalignant epidermal transformation.

  1. Explanation of the memory effect in argon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Vidosav

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory effect - the long time variation of the electrical breakdown time delay on the relaxation time td (τ was observed in argon 24 hours after relaxation times and explained by the long-lived metastable states remaining from the preceding glow. However, the quenching processes reducing the effective lifetime of metastable states several orders of magnitude below that relevant for the time scale of observation were neglected. By applying approximate gas phase models it was found that the early afterglow kinetics up to hundreds of milliseconds is dominated by the decay of molecular argon ions Ar2+ and the approximate value of their ambipolar diffusion coefficient is determined. After that, nitrogen atoms present as impurities and recombined on the cathode surface and/or field emission determine the breakdown time delay down to the cosmic rays and natural radioactivity level.

  2. LIQUID ARGON CALORIMETER PERFORMANCE AT HIGH RATES

    CERN Document Server

    Kukhtin, V; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The performance of the ATLAS liquid argon endcap and forward calorimeters has been projected at the planned high luminosity LHC option HL-LHC by exposing small calorimeter modules of the electromagnetic, hadronic, and forward calorimeters to high intensity proton beams at IHEP/Protvino accelerator. The results of HV current and of pulse shape analysis, and also the dependence of signal amplitude on beam intensity are presented.

  3. An impact hypothesis for Venus argon anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaula, W. M.; Newman, W. I.

    1997-03-01

    The Ar-36+38 argon-excess anomally of Venus has been hypothesized to have its origin in the impact of an outer solar system body of about 100-km diameter. A critical evaluation is made of this hypothesis and its competitors; it is judged that its status must for the time being remain one of 'Sherlock Holmes' type, in that something so improbable must be accepted when all alternatives are eliminated.

  4. Nokia PureView oversampling technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuori, Tero; Alakarhu, Juha; Salmelin, Eero; Partinen, Ari

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes Nokia's PureView oversampling imaging technology as well as the product, Nokia 808 PureView, featuring it. The Nokia PureView imaging technology is the combination of a large, super high resolution 41Mpix with high performance Carl Zeiss optics. Large sensor enables a pixel oversampling technique that reduces an image taken at full resolution into a lower resolution picture, thus achieving higher definition and light sensitivity. One oversampled super pixel in image file is formed by using many sensor pixels. A large sensor enables also a lossless zoom. If a user wants to use the lossless zoom, the sensor image is cropped. However, up-scaling is not needed as in traditional digital zooming usually used in mobile devices. Lossless zooming means image quality that does not have the digital zooming artifacts as well as no optical zooming artifacts like zoom lens system distortions. Zooming with PureView is also completely silent. PureView imaging technology is the result of many years of research and development and the tangible fruits of this work are exceptional image quality, lossless zoom, and superior low light performance.

  5. Pressure broadening calculations for OH in collisions with argon: Rotational, vibrational, and electronic transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdigian, Paul J.

    2017-03-01

    Collisional parameters describing both the pressure-induced broadening and shifting of isolated lines in the spectrum of the hydroxyl radical in collisions with argon have been determined through quantum scattering calculations using accurate potential energy surfaces describing the OH(X2 Π , A2Σ+)-Ar interactions. These calculations have been carried for pure rotational, vibrational, and electronic transitions. The calculated pressure broadening coefficients are in good agreement with the available measurements in the microwave, infrared, and ultraviolet spectral regions. Computed pressure broadening coefficients as a function of temperature are reported for these three types of transitions.

  6. Experimental characterization of an argon laminar plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlois-Bertrand, Emilie; De Izarra, Charles, E-mail: charles.de_izarra@univ-orleans.fr [Groupe de Recherche sur l' Energetique des Milieux Ionises, UMR6606 Universite d' Orleans - CNRS, Faculte des Sciences, Site de Bourges, rue Gaston Berger, BP 4043, 18028 BOURGES Cedex (France)

    2011-10-19

    This paper deals with a dc laminar pure argon plasma jet operating at atmospheric pressure in ambient air that was experimentally studied in order to obtain temperature and velocity. Plasma jet temperature was evaluated by optical emission spectroscopy and the plasma jet velocity was determined by various methods using a pressure sensor. It is shown that the maximum plasma jet temperature is 15 000 K and the maximum plasma jet velocity is 250 m s{sup -1} at the plasma jet centre. Finally, a study of the ambient air amount entrained into the plasma jet is presented.

  7. Pure word deafness and pure anarthria in a patient with frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, O; Suzuki, K; Endo, K; Fujii, T; Mori, E

    2007-04-01

    A 66-year-old right-handed man developed pure anarthria following pure word deafness. In addition to language disorders, his behavior gradually changed and finally included violence against his wife. Brain magnetic resonance imagings revealed atrophy of the left perisylvian area, which included the inferior half of the precentral gyrus and the upper portion of the superior temporal gyrus, consistent with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). It has been documented as either a disorder of expressive language or as an impaired understanding of word meaning. Unlike with pure anarthria, pure word deafness is not included in the clinical diagnostic current criteria for FTD. However, a large variety of language symptoms can appear in FTD according to the distribution of pathological changes in the frontotemporal cortices. This case suggests that pure word deafness could be a prodomal symptom of FTD.

  8. Variation in the terrestrial isotopic composition and atomic weight of argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, John Karl

    2014-01-01

    The isotopic composition and atomic weight of argon (Ar) are variable in terrestrial materials. Those variations are a source of uncertainty in the assignment of standard properties for Ar, but they provide useful information in many areas of science. Variations in the stable isotopic composition and atomic weight of Ar are caused by several different processes, including (1) isotope production from other elements by radioactive decay (radiogenic isotopes) or other nuclear transformations (e.g., nucleogenic isotopes), and (2) isotopic fractionation by physical-chemical processes such as diffusion or phase equilibria. Physical-chemical processes cause correlated mass-dependent variations in the Ar isotope-amount ratios (40Ar/36Ar, 38Ar/36Ar), whereas nuclear transformation processes cause non-mass-dependent variations. While atmospheric Ar can serve as an abundant and homogeneous isotopic reference, deviations from the atmospheric isotopic ratios in other Ar occurrences limit the precision with which a standard atomic weight can be given for Ar. Published data indicate variation of Ar atomic weights in normal terrestrial materials between about 39.7931 and 39.9624. The upper bound of this interval is given by the atomic mass of 40Ar, as some samples contain almost pure radiogenic 40Ar. The lower bound is derived from analyses of pitchblende (uranium mineral) containing large amounts of nucleogenic 36Ar and 38Ar. Within this interval, measurements of different isotope ratios (40Ar/36Ar or 38Ar/36Ar) at various levels of precision are widely used for studies in geochronology, water–rock interaction, atmospheric evolution, and other fields.

  9. Pure laparoscopic augmentation ileocystoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebouças, Rafael B; Monteiro, Rodrigo C; Souza, Thiago N S de; Aragão, Augusto J de; Burity, Camila R T; Nóbrega, Júlio C de A; Oliveira, Natália S C de; Abrantes, Ramon B; Dantas Júnior, Luiz B; Cartaxo Filho, Ricardo; Negromonte, Gustavo R P; Sampaio, Rafael da C R; Britto, Cesar A

    2014-01-01

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is an acute neuropathy that rarely compromises bladder function. Conservative management including clean intermittent catheterization and pharmacotherapy is the primary approach for hypocompliant contracted bladder. Surgical treatment may be used in refractory cases to improve bladder compliance and capacity in order to protect the upper urinary tract. We describe a case of pure laparoscopic augmentation ileocystoplasty in a patient affected by Guillain-Barre syndrome. A 15-year-old female, complaining of voiding dysfunction, recurrent urinary tract infection and worsening renal function for three months. A previous history of Guillain-Barre syndrome on childhood was related. A voiding cystourethrography showed a pine-cone bladder with moderate post-void residual urine. The urodynamic demonstrated a hypocompliant bladder and small bladder capacity (190 mL) with high detrusor pressure (54 cmH2O). Nonsurgical treatments were attempted, however unsuccessfully.

  10. FORMATION OF CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES USING ACETYLENE, ARGON-ACETYLENE AND ARGON-HYDROGEN-ACETYLENE PLASMAS

    OpenAIRE

    Marcinauskas, Liutauras; Grigonis, Alfonsas; Valincius, Vitas

    2013-01-01

    The amorphous carbon films were deposited on silicon-metal substrates by plasma jet chemical vapor deposition (PJCVD) and plasma enchanted CVD (PECVD). PJCVD carbon films have been prepared at atmospheric pressure in argon-acetylene and argon-hydrogen-acetylene plasma mixtures. The films deposited in Ar-C2H2 plasma are attributed to graphite-like carbon films. The formation of the nanocrystalline graphite was obtained in Ar-H2-C2H2 plasma. Addition of the hydrogen gas lead to the ...

  11. The liquid argon TPC for the ICARUS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Arneodo, F

    1997-01-01

    The ICARUS project aims at the realisation of a large liquid argon TPC to be run at the Underground Laboratories of Gran Sasso in Italy. An intense R&D; activity has put on firm grounds this new detector technology and experimentally confirmed its feasibility on a few ton scale. Based on these solid achievements, the collaboration is now confident of being able to build and safely operate a multi-kton detector. The reseach program of the experiment involves the systematic study of a wide spectrum of physical phenomena covering many orders of magnitude in the energy deposited in the detector: from the few MeV of solar neutrino interactions, to the about one GeV of the proton decay and atmospheric neutrinos, up to the higher energies of neutrinos from accelerators.

  12. Electron Neutrino Classification in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Płoński, Piotr; Sulej, Robert; Zaremba, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos are one of the least known elementary particles. The detection of neutrinos is an extremely difficult task since they are affected only by weak sub-atomic force or gravity. Therefore large detectors are constructed to reveal neutrino's properties. Among them the Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) detectors provide excellent imaging and particle identification ability for studying neutrinos. The computerized methods for automatic reconstruction and identification of particles are needed to fully exploit the potential of the LAr-TPC technique. Herein, the novel method for electron neutrino classification is presented. The method constructs a feature descriptor from images of observed event. It characterizes the signal distribution propagated from vertex of interest, where the particle interacts with the detector medium. The classifier is learned with a constructed feature descriptor to decide whether the images represent the electron neutrino or cascade produced by photons. The proposed ap...

  13. Pure Laparoscopic Augmentation Ileocystoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael B. Rebouças

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Guillain-Barre syndrome is an acute neuropathy that rarely compromises bladder function. Conservative management including clean intermittent catheterization and pharmacotherapy is the primary approach for hypocompliant contracted bladder. Surgical treatment may be used in refractory cases to improve bladder compliance and capacity in order to protect the upper urinary tract. We describe a case of pure laparoscopic augmentation ileocystoplasty in a patient affected by Guillain-Barre syndrome. Presentation A 15-year-old female, complaining of voiding dysfunction, recurrent urinary tract infection and worsening renal function for three months. A previous history of Guillain-Barre syndrome on childhood was related. A voiding cystourethrography showed a pine-cone bladder with moderate post-void residual urine. The urodynamic demonstrated a hypocompliant bladder and small bladder capacity (190mL with high detrusor pressure (54 cmH2O. Nonsurgical treatments were attempted, however unsuccessfully. The patient was placed in the exaggerated Trendelenburg position. A four-port transperitoneal technique was used. A segment of ileum approximately 15-20cm was selected and divided with its pedicle. The ileal anastomosis and creation of ileal U-shaped plate were performed laparoscopically, without staplers. Bladder mobilization and longidutinal cystotomy were performed. Enterovesical anastomosis was done with continuous running suture. A suprapubic cystostomy was placed through a 5mm trocar. Results The total operative time was 335 min. The blood loss was minimal. The patient developed ileus in the early days, diet acceptance after the fourth day and was discharged on the seventh postoperative day. The urethral catheter was removed after 2 weeks. At 6-month follow-up, a cystogram showed a significant improvement in bladder capacity. The patient adhered well to clean intermittent self-catheterization and there was no report for febrile infections

  14. Argon diffusion from biotite at high temperature and pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈道公; 贾命命; 李彬贤; 陆全明; 谢鸿森; 侯渭

    1995-01-01

    t The experiments of argon diffusion dynamics for biotite were carried out at 700 -1000℃ and 0.5 - 2,0 GPa and the diffusion coefficient and activation energy using different models have been calculated. The results indicate that the pressure does affect the argon diffusion and its effect is opposite to that of temperature. When p increases, the activation energy increases and diffusion coefficient decreases. The relation between pressure, closure temperature and cooling rate has been obtained. It is postulated that in low T and high p conditions, the argon diffusion from the environment to the system could occur and incur the appearance of the external argon in minerals.

  15. Argon laser treatment of central serous chorioretinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting- Bing Fang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the efficacy of the argon laser photocoagulation treatment of central serous chorioretinopathy(CSC. METHODS: The treatment groups: 18 patients(18 eyes, argon laser photocoagulation and oral jolethin, vitamin B1, inosine and venoruton tablets. Control group: 18 patients(18 eyes, oral lecithin complex iodine, vitamin B1, inosine, venoruton tablets. Foveal thickness and neuroepithelial layer detachment range were measured by optical coherence tomography(OCTbefore treatment, after 1 month and 3 months post-operation to compare the decline in value of foveal thickness and neuroepithelial layer detachment range of the two groups. RESULTS: After 1 month of treatment, the decline in value of the center foveal thickness: the value of treatment group was 256±72μm; the value of the control group was 82±57μm, and the difference of the two groups, P <0.05; the decline in value of neuroepithelial layer detachment range: the value of the treatment group was 3 548±168μm, the value of the control group was 1 520±143μm, And the difference of the two groups, P<0.05. After three months of treatment, the decline in value of the center foveal thickness: the value of treatment group was 383±75μm, the value of the control group was 312±67 μm, and the difference of the two groups, P<0.05; decline in value of neuroepithelial layer detachment range: the value of the treatment group was 4 908±172μm, the value of the control group was 4 211±153μm, and the difference of the two groups, P <0.05. The differences were statistically significant between the treatment and the control groups(two independent samples t-test. CONCLUSION:Argon laser photocoagulation treatment of CSC is an effective treatment method and can significantly shorten the course.

  16. Measurement of electron attachment coefficient in oxygen and oxygen-argon mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, B.; Nakamura, Y. [Keio University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    We analyzed the electron arrival time signal measured in pure oxygen and in dilute oxygen-argon mixtures by using a double shutter electron drift tube with variable drift distance and derived the density normalized attachment coefficient for respective gases. The present attachment coefficient determined for pure oxygen agreed well with previously reported values and we confirmed that the present apparatus was useful in determining electron attachment coefficient even if there were no ionization, when there will be no steady state current growth and, hence, the steady state Townsend (SST) method can not be applied in principle. The measured attachment coefficients in the mixtures agreed very well with the calculation using our latest cross section set for the oxygen molecule and that `II be a confirmation for the validity of the cross section set. 11 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, T. [Fermilab; Escobar, C. O. [Campinas State U.; Lippincott, W. H. [Fermilab; Rubinov, P. [Fermilab

    2016-03-03

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 $\\mu$m < $\\lambda$; < 1.5$\\mu$m). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  18. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, T; Lippincott, W H; Rubinov, P

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 $\\mu$m < $\\lambda$; < 1.5$\\mu$m). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  19. Typical pure nonequilibrium steady states and irreversibility for quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnai, Takaaki; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2016-07-01

    It is known that each single typical pure state in an energy shell of a large isolated quantum system well represents a thermal equilibrium state of the system. We show that such typicality holds also for nonequilibrium steady states (NESS's). We consider a small quantum system coupled to multiple infinite reservoirs. In the long run, the total system reaches a unique NESS. We identify a large Hilbert space from which pure states of the system are to be sampled randomly and show that the typical pure states well describe the NESS. We also point out that the irreversible relaxation to the unique NESS is important to the typicality of the pure NESS's.

  20. Typical pure nonequilibrium steady states and irreversibility for quantum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnai, Takaaki; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2016-07-01

    It is known that each single typical pure state in an energy shell of a large isolated quantum system well represents a thermal equilibrium state of the system. We show that such typicality holds also for nonequilibrium steady states (NESS's). We consider a small quantum system coupled to multiple infinite reservoirs. In the long run, the total system reaches a unique NESS. We identify a large Hilbert space from which pure states of the system are to be sampled randomly and show that the typical pure states well describe the NESS. We also point out that the irreversible relaxation to the unique NESS is important to the typicality of the pure NESS's.

  1. Infrared spectra and electronic structure calculations for NN complexes with U, UN, and NUN in solid argon, neon, and nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lester; Wang, Xuefeng; Gong, Yu; Kushto, Gary P; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Gagliardi, Laura

    2014-07-17

    Reactions of laser-ablated U atoms with N2 molecules upon codeposition in excess argon or neon at 4 K gave intense NUN and weak UN absorptions. Annealing produced progressions of new absorptions for the UN2(N2)1,2,3,4,5 and UN(N2)1,2,3,4,5,6 complexes. The neon-to-argon matrix shift decreases with increasing NN ligation and therefore the number of noble gas atoms left in the primary coordination sphere around the NUN molecule. Small matrix shifts are observed when the secondary coordination layers around the primary UN2(N2)1,2,3,4,5 and UN(N2)1,2,3,4,5,6 complexes are changed from neon-to-argon to nitrogen. Electronic structure, energy, and frequency calculations provide support for the identification of these complexes and the characterization of the N≡U≡N and U≡N core molecules as terminal uranium nitrides. Codeposition of U with pure nitrogen produced the saturated U(NN)7 complex, which UV irradiation converted to the NUN(NN)5 complex with slightly lower frequencies than found in solid argon.

  2. Performance of a liquid argon accordion hadronic calorimeter prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gingrich, D.M. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Greeniaus, G. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Kitching, P. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Olsen, B. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Pinfold, J.L. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Rodning, N.L. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Boos, E. [Alma-Ata (Kazakhstan); Schaoutnikov, B.O. [Alma-Ata (Kazakhstan); Aubert, B. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Bazan, A. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Beaugiraud, B. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Boniface, J. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Colas, J. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Jezequel, S. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Leflour, T. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Maire, M. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Rival, F. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Stipcevic, M. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Thion, J. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; VanDenPlas, D. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Wingerter-Seez, I. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Zolnierowski, Y.P. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules; Chmeissani, M. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Fernandez, E. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Garrido, L. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Martinez, M. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Padilla, C. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Gordon, H.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); RD3 Colla...

    1995-02-15

    A liquid argon hadronic calorimeter using the ``accordion`` geometry and the electrostatic transformer readout scheme has been tested at CERN, together with a liquid argon accordion electromagnetic prototype. The results obtained for pions on the linearity, the energy resolution and the uniformity of the calorimeter response are well within the requirements for operation at the LHC. ((orig.))

  3. Comparison of Diode and Argon Laser Lesions in Rabbit Retina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhang; Xiaoxin Li; Bin Li; Jiping Da

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the histological alteration of retina with various spot intensities between diode and argon lasers in order to instruct the clinical use of 810 nm diode laser.Methods: Transpupillary retinal photocoagulations were performed on 42 eyes of 27pigmented rabbits. Histopathologic alteration of lesions in different intensities and different time intervals after irradiation produced by diode and argon laser was observed and compared using light microscopy. Areas of various lesions measured by image analysis system (CMIAS) were compared quantitatively.Results: Histopathologically, two-week-old grade 2 lesions produced by diode laser induced the disappearance of outer nuclear cells. More than a half of all showed reduction in number of outer nuclear layer cells in argon. Fibroblasts appeared in the diode grade 3lesions 5 days after irradiation. CMIAS data showed that all the areas of diode lesions immediately after photocoagulation were to be larger than those of argon laser lesions in the same spot intensity (P < 0.05). However, twenty-four hours after photocoagulation, the area of the diode lesions increased less than that of the argon laser lesions (8%vs.23%).Conclusion: The acute histological effect caused by 810 nm diode laser and argon green laser is similar,while the expansion of lesion area 24 hours after photocoagulation was less with the diode laser compared to the argon. This may be the first report in the literature regarding quantitative analysis of the delayed reaction of argon green lasers.

  4. Stopping Power of Solid Argon for Helium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Bøttiger, Jørgen; Grauersen, O.

    1981-01-01

    By means of the Rutherford-backscattering method, the stopping cross section of solid argon has been measured for 0.5–3 MeV helium ions to an accuracy of not, vert, similar3%. The results agree within the experimental accuracies with our earlier measurements for gaseous argon over the energy region...

  5. Visual processing in pure alexia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrfelt, Randi; Habekost, Thomas; Gerlach, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Whether pure alexia is a selective disorder that affects reading only, or if it reflects a more general visual disturbance, is highly debated. We have investigated the selectivity of visual deficits in a pure alexic patient (NN) using a combination of psychophysical measures, mathematical modelling...

  6. Table-top setup for investigating the scintillation properties of liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Heindl, T; Fedenev, A; Hofmann, M; Krücken, R; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Wieser, J; Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    The spectral and temporal light emission properties of liquid argon have been studied in the context of its use in large liquid rare-gas detectors for detecting Dark Matter particles in astronomy. A table-top setup has been developed. Continuous and pulsed low energy electron beam excitation is used to stimulate light emission. A spectral range from 110 to 1000 nm in wavelength is covered by the detection system with a time resolution on the order of 1 ns.

  7. Injection of photoelectrons into dense argon gas

    CERN Document Server

    Borghesani, A F

    2010-01-01

    The injection of photoelectrons in a gaseous or liquid sample is a widespread technique to produce a cold plasma in a weakly--ionized system in order to study the transport properties of electrons in a dense gas or liquid. We report here the experimental results of photoelectron injection into dense argon gas at the temperatureT=142.6 K as a function of the externally applied electric field and gas density. We show that the experimental data can be interpreted in terms of the so called Young-Bradbury model only if multiple scattering effects due to the dense environment are taken into account when computing the scattering properties and the energetics of the electrons.

  8. Commissioning of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Rezaie, Erfan

    ATLAS, a multi-purpose detector built at the LHC at CERN, requires an extensive commissioning campaign to be ready for proton-proton collisions. In this work, we focus on the commissioning of the liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters, with emphasis on commissioning with cosmic rays. First we outline one phase of the commissioning work, which involves testing of the front-end electronics of the two endcap calorimeters. We then describe two cosmic ray generators as input to a Monte-Carlo simulation of cosmic rays in ATLAS, and compare their results. Finally, we explain a technique developed for this work which uses information from the Tile calorimeters to predict the timing of cosmic rays within the LAr calorimeters, because cosmic rays occur randomly in time whereas the electronics are clocked at [Special characters omitted.] . The results from this analysis tool are compared to default tools, using both simulated and real cosmic ray data in the calorimeters.

  9. Merging of high speed argon plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, A.; Messer, S.; Brockington, S.; Wu, L.; Witherspoon, F. D. [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 22180 (United States); Elton, R. [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Formation of an imploding plasma liner for the plasma liner experiment (PLX) requires individual plasma jets to merge into a quasi-spherical shell of plasma converging on the origin. Understanding dynamics of the merging process requires knowledge of the plasma phenomena involved. We present results from the study of the merging of three plasma jets in three dimensional geometry. The experiments were performed using HyperV Technologies Corp. 1 cm Minirailguns with a preionized argon plasma armature. The vacuum chamber partially reproduces the port geometry of the PLX chamber. Diagnostics include fast imaging, spectroscopy, interferometry, fast pressure probes, B-dot probes, and high speed spatially resolved photodiodes, permitting measurements of plasma density, temperature, velocity, stagnation pressure, magnetic field, and density gradients. These experimental results are compared with simulation results from the LSP 3D hybrid PIC code.

  10. Electron Impact Induced VUV Emission from Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. A.; Malone, C. P.; Johnson, P. V.

    2011-10-01

    Emission intensity and spectra are important tools for diagnosing plasma properties such as electron temperature and neutral density. In order to properly interpret emissions from low-density plasmas, accurate cross sections are needed, particularly low energy electron-impact cross sections. Of interest are the cross sections for Argon, a common species used in industrial and lighting applications. In this paper, we present recent measurements of electron-impact induced VUV emissions from Ar using a magnetically collimated monoenergetic beam of electrons and a 0.2m spectrometer. Specifically, we present emission excitation functions for both Ar I(1048 Å) and Ar I(1066 Å) emissions. Similarities and differences between current results and previously published emission results will be discussed. Also discussed will be the relation to recent electron energy loss results.

  11. Structural characteristics of copper/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared by microwave plasma-assisted deposition processes from methane-argon and acetylene-argon gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiery, F.; Pauleau, Y.; Grob, J.J.; Babonneau, D

    2004-11-01

    Copper/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (Cu/a-C:H) composite films have been deposited on silicon substrates by a hybrid technique combining microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and sputter-deposition from methane-argon and acetylene-argon gas mixtures. The major objective of this work was to investigate the effect of the carbon gas precursor on the structural characteristics of Cu/a-C:H composite films deposited at ambient temperature. The major characteristics of CH{sub 4}-argon and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-argon plasmas were analyzed by Langmuir probe measurements. The composition of films was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, energy recoil detection analyses and nuclear reaction analyses. The carbon content in the films was observed to vary in the range 20-77 at.% and 7.5-99 at.% as the CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} concentrations in the gas phase increased from 10 to 100%, respectively. The atom number ratio H/C in the films was scattered approximately 0.4 whatever the carbon gas precursor used. The crystallographic structure and the size of copper crystallites incorporated in the a-C were determined by X-ray diffraction techniques. The copper crystallite size decreased from 20 nm in pure copper films to less than 5 nm in Cu/a-C:H films containing more than 40 at.% of carbon. Grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed to investigate the size distribution and distance of copper crystallites as functions of the deposition parameters. The structural characteristics of copper crystallites were dependent on the hydrocarbon gas precursor used. The crystallite size and the width of the size distribution were homogeneous in films deposited from CH{sub 4}. Copper crystallites with an anisotropic shape were found in films deposited from C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The major radicals formed in the plasma and condensed on the surface of growing films, namely CH and C{sub 2}H radicals for films produced from CH{sub 4} and C

  12. Comparison of Diesel Engine Characteristic Using Pure Coconut Oil, Pure Palm Oil, and Pure Jatropha Oil as Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman K. Reksowardojo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Diesel engine can be operated on either pure plant oil (PPO oil or biodiesel. Biodiesel production process is expensive due to many stages of processes, while PPO has a lower cost of production, lower energy consumption, and simpler process. There are several potential biofuel resources in Indonesia such as coconut, palm, and jatropha. They are tropical plants with large amonts of their quantity. Experiment was conducted in 17 hours engine running test (endurance test with various operating cycle conditions. Test fuels are pure coconut oil (PCO, pure palm oil (PPaO, pure jatropha oil (PJO, and diesel fuel (DF as a datum. Each PPO blends with diesel fuel with composition 50%-volume. As a result, PCO has higher BSFC (10% before endurance test in comparison with diesel fuel, also PPaO (13% and PJO (27% show a similar condition. Surprisingly, all PPO have BSFC almost similar with DF after endurance test due to decreasing of engine components friction. On the other hand, PPO produces more uncompleted combustion than DF. Phosporus content has major responsibility of deposit growth. PCO, PPaO, and PJO result more engine deposits in comparison with DF, which accounts for 139,7%, 232,9%, and 288,9% respectively. Based on wear analysis, PCO has the best antiwear property among test fuels, whereas the worst is DF.

  13. Argon laser induced changes to the carbonate content of enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziglo, M.J. [Orthodontic Graduate Program, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Private Practice, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Nelson, A.E., E-mail: aenelson@dow.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Alberta (Canada); Heo, G.; Major, P.W. [Orthodontic Graduate Program, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Argon laser irradiation can be used to cure orthodontic brackets onto teeth in significantly less time than conventional curing lights. In addition, it has been shown that the argon laser seems to impart a demineralization resistance to the enamel. The purpose of this study was to use surface science techniques to ascertain if this demineralization resistance is possibly a result of a decrease in the carbonate content of enamel. Eleven mandibular third molars previously scheduled for extraction were collected and used in the present study. The teeth were sectioned in two and randomly assigned to either the argon laser (457-502 nm; 250 mW cm{sup -2}) or the control (no treatment) group. The sections assigned to the argon laser group were cured for 10 s and analyzed. To exaggerate any potential changes the experimental sections were then exposed to a further 110 s of argon laser irradiation. Surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The results showed no statistically significant change in the carbonate content of enamel after argon laser irradiation (p > 0.05). Thus, it is suggested that any demineralization resistance imparted to the enamel surface by argon laser irradiation is not due to alterations in carbonate content.

  14. First test of a high voltage feedthrough for liquid Argon TPCs connected to a 300 kV power supply

    CERN Document Server

    Cantini, C; Bueno, L Molina; Murphy, S; Radics, B; Regenfus, C; Rigaut, Y-A; Rubbia, A; Sergiampietri, F; Viant, T; Wu, S

    2016-01-01

    Voltages above a hundred kilo-volt will be required to generate the drift field of future very large liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers. The most delicate component is the feedthrough whose role is to safely deliver the very high voltage to the cathode through the thick insulating walls of the cryostat without compromising the purity of the argon inside. This requires a feedthrough that is typically meters long and carefully designed to be vacuum tight and have small heat input. Furthermore, all materials should be carefully chosen to allow operation in cryogenic conditions. In addition, electric fields in liquid argon should be kept below a threshold to reduce risks of discharges. The combination of all above requirements represents significant challenges from the design and manufacturing perspective. In this paper, we report on the successful operation of a feedthrough satisfying all the above requirements. The details of the feedthrough design and its manufacturing steps are provided. Very high voltages...

  15. Low-frequency fluctuations in a pure toroidal magnetized plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Sharma; R Singh; D Bora

    2009-12-01

    A magnetized, low- plasma in pure toroidal configuration is formed and extensively studied with ion mass as control parameter. Xenon, krypton and argon plasmas are formed at a fixed toroidal magnetic field of 0.024 T, with a peak density of ∼ 1011 cm-3, ∼ 4 × 1010 cm-3 and ∼ 2 × 1010 cm−3 respectively. The experimental investigation of time-averaged plasma parameter reveals that their profiles remain insensitive to ion mass and suggests that saturated slab equilibrium is obtained. Low-frequency (LF) coherent fluctuations ( < ci) are observed and identified as flute modes. Here ci represents ion cyclotron frequency. Our results indicate that these modes get reduced with ion mass. The frequency of the fluctuating mode decreases with increase in the ion mass. Further, an attempt has been made to discuss the theory of flute modes to understand the relevance of some of our experimental observations.

  16. RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Frank R.; Shanks, Howard R.

    1982-10-12

    A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  17. Exploring the simplest purely baryonic decay processes

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, C Q; Rodrigues, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    We propose to search for purely baryonic decay processes at the LHCb experiment. In particular, we concentrate on the decay $\\Lambda_b^0\\to p\\bar pn$, which is the simplest purely baryonic decay mode, with solely spin-1/2 baryons involved. We predict its decay branching ratio to be ${\\cal B}(\\Lambda_b^0\\to p\\bar pn)=(2.0^{+0.3}_{-0.2})\\times 10^{-6}$, which is sufficiently large to make the decay mode accessible to LHCb. Though not considered in general, purely baryonic decays could shed light on the puzzle of the baryon number asymmetry in the universe by means of a better understanding of the baryonic nature of our matter world. As such, they constitute a yet unexplored class of decay processes worth investigating. Our study can be extended to the purely baryonic decays of $\\Lambda_b^0\\to p\\bar p \\Lambda$, $\\Lambda_b^0\\to \\Lambda \\bar p\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda_b^0\\to \\Lambda\\bar \\Lambda\\Lambda$, as well as other similar anti-triplet $b$-baryon decays, such as $\\Xi_b^{0,-}$.

  18. Practical reactor production of {sup 41}Ar from argon clathrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, J.R. E-mail: jmercer@pharmacy.ualberta.ca; Duke, M.J.M.; McQuarrie, S.A

    2000-06-01

    The radionuclide {sup 41}Ar has many ideal properties as a gas flow tracer. However, the modest cross-section of {sup 40}Ar for thermal neutron activation makes preparation of suitable activities of {sup 41}Ar technically difficult particularly for low flux reactors. Argon can however be trapped in a molecular complex called a clathrate that can then be irradiated. We prepared argon clathrate and explored its irradiation and stability characteristics. Argon clathrate can be used to provide gigabecquerel quantities of {sup 41}Ar even with low power reactors.

  19. Background studies for a ton-scale argon dark matter detector (ArDM)

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufmann, L

    2006-01-01

    The ArDM project aims at operating a large noble liquid detector to search for direct evidence of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) as Dark Matter in the universe. Background sources relevant to ton-scale liquid and gaseous argon detectors, such as neutrons from detector components, muon-induced neutrons and neutrons caused by radioactivity of rock, as well as the internal $^{39}Ar$ background, are studied with simulations. These background radiations are addressed with the design of an appropriate shielding as well as with different background rejection potentialities. Among them the project relies on event topology recognition, event localization, density ionization discrimination and pulse shape discrimination. Background rates, energy spectra, characteristics of the background-induced nuclear recoils in liquid argon, as well as the shielding performance and rejection performance of the detector are described.

  20. Commissioning and Charge Readout Calibration of a 5 Ton Dual Phase Liquid Argon TPC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2098555

    Dual phase time projection chambers with amplification of ionization electrons provide a novel technique for measuring and analyzing rare events with excellent spatial resolution and great calorimetric properties. This thesis describes the commissioning of the WA105 3 x 1 x 1 m3 dual phase liquid argon detector, built to demonstrate the performance of this kind of detector on large scales in order to determine the viability of giant dual phase time projection chambers in long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The properties of the insulation and the main tank vessel are described and analyzed, such as the pressure, temperature and argon purity requirements during operation in order to guarantee stable conditions and good event tracking. As signals are induced due to electrons from ionizing radiation, crosstalk is caused by capacitive couplings between strips of the charge readout plane and in the electronics of the data acquisition. These induced signals are studied and compared to capacitance and pu...

  1. Performance of liquid argon neutrino detectors with enhanced sensitivity to scintillation light

    CERN Document Server

    Sorel, M

    2014-01-01

    Scintillation light is used in liquid argon neutrino detectors to provide a trigger signal, veto information against cosmic rays, and absolute event timing. In this work, we discuss additional opportunities offered by detectors with enhanced sensitivity to scintillation light, that is with light collection efficiencies of about $10^{-3}$. We focus on two key detector performance indicators for neutrino oscillation physics: calorimetric neutrino energy reconstruction and neutrino/antineutrino separation in a non-magnetized detector. Our simulations indicate that a neutrino energy resolution as good as 3.3\\% RMS for 4 GeV electron neutrino charged-current interactions can in principle be obtained in a large detector of this type, by using both charge and light information. By exploiting muon capture in argon and scintillation light information to veto muon decay electrons, we also obtain muon neutrino identification efficiencies of about 50\\%, and muon antineutrino misidentification rates at the few percent lev...

  2. Metastable decay of argon clusters after photoionisation at high excess energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steger, H.; Vries, J. de; Kamke, W.; Hertel, I.V. (Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Fakultaet fuer Physik)

    1991-08-01

    Recently Maerk and collaborators reported the metastable emission of large fractions from argon and neon cluster ions after electron impact ionisation at high excess energies. The decay was interpreted as the result of an intra-cluster excitation of a metastable state by one of the electrons involved in the ionisation process. Here we report the first direct observation of such a correlated two electron process during photoionisation of argon clusters using synchrotron radiation and the TPEPICO technique. We observe at least two distinct maxima of the metastable TPEPICO spectrum at around 27 eV and 28.5 eV, the former being consistent with the previously reported energetic threshold for electron impact ionisation. (orig.).

  3. Commissioning of the ArDM experiment at the Canfranc underground laboratory: first steps towards a tonne-scale liquid argon time projection chamber for Dark Matter searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, J.; Cantini, C.; Crivelli, P.; Daniel, M.; Di Luise, S.; Gendotti, A.; Horikawa, S.; Montes, B.; Mu, W.; Murphy, S.; Natterer, G.; Nguyen, K.; Periale, L.; Quan, Y.; Radics, B.; Regenfus, C.; Romero, L.; Rubbia, A.; Santorelli, R.; Sergiampietri, F.; Viant, T.; Wu, S.

    2017-03-01

    The Argon Dark Matter (ArDM) experiment consists of a liquid argon (LAr) time projection chamber (TPC) sensitive to nuclear recoils, resulting from scattering of hypothetical Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) on argon targets. With an active target mass of 850 kg ArDM represents an important milestone towards developments for large LAr Dark Matter detectors. Here we present the experimental apparatus currently installed underground at the Laboratorio Subterráneo de Canfranc (LSC), Spain. We show data on gaseous or liquid argon targets recorded in 2015 during the commissioning of ArDM in single phase at zero E-field (ArDM Run I). The data confirms the overall good and stable performance of the ArDM tonne-scale LAr detector.

  4. Study of nuclear recoils in liquid argon with monoenergetic neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Regenfus, C; Amsler, C; Creus, W; Ferella, A; Rochet, J; Walter, M

    2012-01-01

    For the development of liquid argon dark matter detectors we assembled a setup in the laboratory to scatter neutrons on a small liquid argon target. The neutrons are produced mono-energetically (E_kin=2.45 MeV) by nuclear fusion in a deuterium plasma and are collimated onto a 3" liquid argon cell operating in single-phase mode (zero electric field). Organic liquid scintillators are used to tag scattered neutrons and to provide a time-of-flight measurement. The setup is designed to study light pulse shapes and scintillation yields from nuclear and electronic recoils as well as from {\\alpha}-particles at working points relevant to dark matter searches. Liquid argon offers the possibility to scrutinise scintillation yields in noble liquids with respect to the populations of the two fundamental excimer states. Here we present experimental methods and first results from recent data towards such studies.

  5. A Study of the Residual 39Ar Content in Argon from Underground Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, J; Galbiati, C; Goretti, A; Guray, G; Hohman, T; Holtz, D; Ianni, A; Laubenstein, M; Loer, B; Love, C; Martoff, C J; Montanari, D; Mukhopadhyay, S; Nelson, A; Rountree, S D; Vogelaar, R B; Wright, A

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of argon from underground sources with significantly less 39Ar than atmospheric argon was an important step in the development of direct-detection dark matter experiments using argon as the active target. We report on the design and operation of a low background detector with a single phase liquid argon target that was built to study the 39Ar content of the underground argon. Underground argon from the Kinder Morgan CO2 plant in Cortez, Colorado was determined to have less than 0.65% of the 39Ar activity in atmospheric argon.

  6. Liquid argon calorimeter performance at high rates

    CERN Document Server

    Seifert, F; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The expected increase of luminosity at HL-LHC by a factor of ten with respect to LHC luminosities has serious consequences for the signal reconstruction, radiation hardness requirements and operations of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters in the endcap, respectively forward region. Small modules of each type of calorimeter have been built and exposed to a high intensity proton beam of 50 GeV at IHEP/Protvino. The beam is extracted via the bent crystal technique, offering the unique opportunity to cover intensities ranging from $10^6$ p/s up to $10^{12}$ p/s. This exceeds the deposited energy per time expected at HL-LHC by more than a factor of 100. The correlation between beam intensity and the read-out signal has been studied. The data show clear indications of pulse shape distortion due to the high ionization build-up, in agreement with MC expectations. This is also confirmed from the dependence of the HV currents on beam intensity.

  7. Electron avalanches in liquid argon mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.G.; Dardin, S.M.; Kadel, R.W.; Kadyk, J.A.; Wenzel, W.B.; Peskov, V.

    2004-03-19

    We have observed stable avalanche gain in liquid argon when mixed with small amounts of xenon in the high electric field (>7 MV/cm) near the point of a chemically etched needle in a point-plane geometry. We identify two gain mechanisms, one pressure dependent, and the other independent of the applied pressure. We conclude that the pressure dependent signals are from avalanche gain in gas bubbles at the tip of the needle, while the pressure independent pulses are from avalanche gain in liquid. We measure the decay time spectra of photons from both types of avalanches. The decay times from the pressure dependent pulses decrease (increase) with the applied pressure (high voltage), while the decay times from the pressure independent pulses are approximately independent of pressure or high voltage. For our operating conditions, the collected charge distribution from avalanches is similar for 60 keV or 122 keV photon sources. With krypton additives, instead of Xe, we measure behavior consistent with only the pressure dependent pulses. Neon and TMS were also investigated as additives, and designs for practical detectors were tested.

  8. Liquid Argon Calorimeter performance at High Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Seifert, F; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The expected increase of luminosity at HL-LHC by a factor of ten with respect to LHC luminosities has serious consequences for the signal reconstruction, radiation hardness requirements and operations of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters in the endcap, respectively forward region. Small modules of each type of calorimeter have been built and exposed to a high intensity proton beam of 50 GeV at IHEP/Protvino. The beam is extracted via the bent crystal technique, offering the unique opportunity to cover intensities ranging from $10^6$ p/s up to $3\\cdot10^{11}$ p/s. This exceeds the deposited energy per time expected at HL-LHC by more than a factor of 100. The correlation between beam intensity and the read-out signal has been studied. The data show clear indications of pulse shape distortion due to the high ionization build-up, in agreement with MC expectations. This is also confirmed from the dependence of the HV currents on beam intensity.

  9. Size Determination of Argon Clusters from a Rayleigh Scattering Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI An-Le; ZHAI Hua-Jin; LIU Bing-Chen; LI Zhong; NI Guo-Yuan; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2000-01-01

    Argon clusters are produced in the process of adiabatic expansion of a high backing pressure gas into vacuum through a nozzle. The cluster size is determined by a Rayleigh scattering measurement. The scattered signal measured is proportional to the 2.78th power of gas stagnation pressure. The average cluster sizes vary from 100 to more than 12000 atoms/cluster with the argon gas backing pressures ranging between 3 to 45 atm.

  10. Effective pure states for bulk quantum computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knill, E.; Chuang, I.; Laflamme, R.

    1997-11-01

    In bulk quantum computation one can manipulate a large number of indistinguishable quantum computers by parallel unitary operations and measure expectation values of certain observables with limited sensitivity. The initial state of each computer in the ensemble is known but not pure. Methods for obtaining effective pure input states by a series of manipulations have been described by Gershenfeld and Chuang (logical labeling) and Corey et al. (spatial averaging) for the case of quantum computation with nuclear magnetic resonance. We give a different technique called temporal averaging. This method is based on classical randomization, requires no ancilla qubits and can be implemented in nuclear magnetic resonance without using gradient fields. We introduce several temporal averaging algorithms suitable for both high temperature and low temperature bulk quantum computing and analyze the signal to noise behavior of each.

  11. Argon-krypton ion laser as light source for medical photocoagulation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, Wojciech; Warda, Piotr; Kasprzak, Jan; Kesik, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Photocoagulators are one of the most popular laser devices in medicine. Due to different kind of interaction of particular wavelength range of laser light with live tissues, sources of laser radiation which can cover as much as possible of visible spectrum are still very wanted (see [1,2]). In last years it also can be observed the intensive developing works on new photocoagulation technique called "micropulse coagulation" [3,4]. The most critical feature of lasers for micropulse coagulation is the possibility of fast switching between two selected laser power values. It seems that the good proposal for these applications can be ion laser filled with argon-krypton mixture. Authors previously have indicated the possibility of improvement of generation conditions in this type of laser in presence of buffer gases [5,6] and with use developed by authors pulse supply regime [7,8]. These improvements allow to obtain output power values of most important argon and krypton laser lines in laser filled with mixture of both gases, similar to values available in laser filled with pure gases. Presented in this paper the following researches are concerned on verification of possibilities of use of the developed laser system in photocoagulation with possibility of use of the laser system in micropulse coagulation technique.

  12. Measurements of Argon-39 at the U20az underground nuclear explosion site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, J I; Aalseth, C E; Alexander, T R; Back, H O; Bellgraph, B J; Bowyer, T W; Chipman, V; Cooper, M W; Day, A R; Drellack, S; Foxe, M P; Fritz, B G; Hayes, J C; Humble, P; Keillor, M E; Kirkham, R R; Krogstad, E J; Lowrey, J D; Mace, E K; Mayer, M F; Milbrath, B D; Misner, A; Morley, S M; Panisko, M E; Olsen, K B; Ripplinger, M D; Seifert, A; Suarez, R

    2017-07-26

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory reports on the detection of (39)Ar at the location of an underground nuclear explosion on the Nevada Nuclear Security Site. The presence of (39)Ar was not anticipated at the outset of the experimental campaign but results from this work demonstrated that it is present, along with (37)Ar and (85)Kr in the subsurface at the site of an underground nuclear explosion. Our analysis showed that by using state-of-the-art technology optimized for radioargon measurements, it was difficult to distinguish (39)Ar from the fission product (85)Kr. Proportional counters are currently used for high-sensitivity measurement of (37)Ar and (39)Ar. Physical and chemical separation processes are used to separate argon from air or soil gas, yielding pure argon with contaminant gases reduced to the parts-per-million level or below. However, even with purification at these levels, the beta decay signature of (85)Kr can be mistaken for that of (39)Ar, and the presence of either isotope increases the measurement background level for the measurement of (37)Ar. Measured values for the (39)Ar measured at the site ranged from 36,000 milli- Becquerel/standard-cubic-meter-of-air (mBq/SCM) for shallow bore holes to 997,000 mBq/SCM from the rubble chimney from the underground nuclear explosion. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Vacuum sorption pumping at cryogenic temperatures of argon and oxygen on molecular sieves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perona, J.J.; Gibson, M.R.; Byers, C.H.

    1988-01-01

    Cryosorption pumping is a method of excavating enclosed volumes by adsorbing gas on a deep bed of solid sorbent (typically a zeolite) at cryogenic temperatures. Modeling the dynamic behavior of these systems for air pumping requires information on two major constituents of air, oxygen and argon, which had not been previously studied, as well as data on a nonadsorbing specie, helium. Deep beds of Davison 4A molecular sieves were subjected to a metered flow of pure gas and the pressure history of the experiment was monitored, using computer data acquisition techniques. Particle size variations is the major variable in determining the mechanism of the process. The data acquired in the current study compare favorably with previous experiments. Previously developed models for the dynamic sorption behavior of deep beds under vacuum for two extreme conditions, micropore and micropore control were tested in this study. The sorption behavior of argon clearly fit into the category of macropore controlled sorption, indicating that these species are adsorbed primarily on the surface of the zeolite crystals, much like the theoretical and experimental results for N/sub 2/ cryosorption on the same sieves of Crabb. On the other hand oxygen sorption is most likely micropore controlled, and may be molded by the method of Praznick. 11 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Effects of argon gas flow rate on laser-welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Yasuko; Nomoto, Rie; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the rate of argon gas flow on joint strength in the laser-welding of cast metal plates and to measure the porosity. Two cast plates (Ti and Co-Cr alloy) of the same metal were abutted and welded together. The rates of argon gas flow were 0, 5 and 10 L/min for the Co-Cr alloy, and 5 and 10 L/min for the Ti. There was a significant difference in the ratio of porosity according to the rate of argon gas flow in the welded area. Argon shielding had no significant effect on the tensile strength of Co-Cr alloy. The 5 L/min specimens showed greater tensile strength than the 10 L/min specimens for Ti. Laser welding of the Co-Cr alloy was influenced very little by argon shielding. When the rate of argon gas flow was high, joint strength decreased for Ti.

  15. Measurement of neutrino interactions in gaseous argon with T2K

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    The T2K near-detector, ND280, employs three large argon gas TPCs (Time Projection Chambers) for particle tracking and identification. The gas inside the TPCs can be used as an active target to study the neutrino interactions in great detail. The low density of the gas leads to very low track energy thresholds, allowing the reconstruction of very low momentum tracks, e.g. protons with kinetic energies down to $\\mathcal{O}$(1 MeV). Since different nuclear interaction models vary considerably in their predictions of those low momentum track multiplicities, this makes neutrino interactions on gases a powerful probe to test those models. The TPCs operate with an argon-based gas mixture (95% by volume) and have been exposed to the T2K neutrino beam since the beginning of the experiment in 2010. Due to the low total mass of the gas, neutrino argon interactions happen only rarely, compared to the surrounding scintillator-based detectors. We expect about 600 such events in the recorded data so far (about 200 in the fi...

  16. The observation of unusual resonance channels in the electron attachment to mixed argon-oxygen clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltin, M.; Grill, V.; Märk, T. D.

    1992-01-01

    An additional electron attachment resonance peak, not observable in pure oxygen cluster anions, has been found at an energy of about 11.5 eV for both the stoichiometric Ar m(O 2) n- and the nonstoichiometric Ar m(O 2) n-1 O - cluster anions (produced by electron attachment to mixed argon-oxygen clusters). Two possible competing mechanisms are proposed to explain the appearance of these resonance peaks, i.e. the multiple-collision electron-scavenging mechanism and the core-excited resonance attachment mechanism. From the peak-width analysis it follows that in Ar m(O 2) 2- the first mechanism is dominant, while in Ar m(O 2) n-1 O - the second mechanism seems to be the only one occurring.

  17. Relativity of pure states entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Zyczkowski, K; Zyczkowski, Karol; Bengtsson, Ingemar

    2002-01-01

    Entanglement of any pure state of an N times N bi-partite quantum system may be characterized by the vector of coefficients arising by its Schmidt decomposition. We analyze various measures of entanglement derived from the generalized entropies of the vector of Schmidt coefficients. For N >= 3 they generate different ordering in the set of pure states and for some states their ordering depends on the measure of entanglement used. This odd-looking property is acceptable, since these incomparable states cannot be transformed to each other with unit efficiency by any local operation. In analogy to special relativity the set of pure states equivalent under local unitaries has a causal structure so that at each point the set splits into three parts: the 'Future', the 'Past' and the set of noncomparable states.

  18. "Pure" cutaneous histiocytosis-X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, S L; Botero, F; Hurwitz, S; Pearson, H A

    1981-11-15

    The case histories of two young children who experienced skin rashes involving various areas of the body are reported. The diagnosis of pure cutaneous histiocytosis-X was established after extensive studies revealed no other organ involvement. The patients were treated with oral corticosteroids. Currently, both children are in good health, show no evidence of disease, and have been followed over a four-to-five-year period. Therapy with corticosteroids may not be indicated with pure cutaneous histiocytosis-X unless there is evidence of extracutaneous dissemination or rapid progression of the disease.

  19. Pure Spinors for General Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Fre', Pietro

    2008-01-01

    We show the equivalence of the different types of pure spinor constraints geometrically derived from the Free Differential Algebras of N=2 d=10 supergravities. Firstly, we compute the general solutions of these constraints, using both a G_2 and an SO(8) covariant decomposition of the 10d chiral spinors. Secondly, we verify that the number of independent degrees of freedom is equal to that implied by the Poincare' pure spinor constraints so-far used for superstrings, namely twenty two. Thirdly, we show the equivalence between the FDA type IIA/B constraints among each other and with the Poincare' ones.

  20. New argon-argon (40Ar/39Ar) radiometric age dates from selected subsurface basalt flows at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Mary K.; Turrin, Brent D.; Champion, Duane E.; Swisher, Carl C.

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, collected samples for 12 new argon-argon radiometric ages from eastern Snake River Plain olivine tholeiite basalt flows in the subsurface at the Idaho National Laboratory. The core samples were collected from flows that had previously published paleomagnetic data. Samples were sent to Rutgers University for argon-argon radiometric dating analyses.

  1. Communication: Trapping a proton in argon: Spectroscopy and theory of the proton-bound argon dimer and its solvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, D. C.; Mauney, D. T.; Leicht, D.; Marks, J. H.; Tan, J. A.; Kuo, J.-L.; Duncan, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Ion-molecule complexes of the form H+Arn are produced in pulsed-discharge supersonic expansions containing hydrogen and argon. These ions are analyzed and mass-selected in a reflectron spectrometer and studied with infrared laser photodissociation spectroscopy. Infrared spectra for the n = 3-7 complexes are characterized by a series of strong bands in the 900-2200 cm-1 region. Computational studies at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level examine the structures, binding energies, and infrared spectra for these systems. The core ion responsible for the infrared bands is the proton-bound argon dimer, Ar-H+-Ar, which is progressively solvated by the excess argon. Anharmonic vibrational theory is able to reproduce the vibrational structure, identifying it as arising from the asymmetric proton stretch in combination with multiple quanta of the symmetric argon stretch. Successive addition of argon shifts the proton vibration to lower frequencies, as the charge is delocalized over more ligands. The Ar-H+-Ar core ion has a first solvation sphere of five argons.

  2. Characterization of atmospheric pressure microplasma produced from argon and a mixture of argon–ethylenediamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashir, M., E-mail: ranabashir77@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Kroto Research Institute, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Rees, Julia M.; Bashir, S. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Zimmerman, William B. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Kroto Research Institute, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-27

    A non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma generated from pure argon (Ar) and a mixture of argon–ethylenediamine vapors (Ar/EDA) has been characterized in this study. A sinusoidal power supply operating at 30 kHz was used to excite microplasma in a rectangular borosilicate glass capillary (4×0.4 mm{sup 2}). The monomer EDA was mixed with Ar in order to perform plasma polymerization inside the microchannel. The analyses were made by measuring spectroscopic and electrical parameters of the discharge. The effects of EDA mixing on plasma parameters such as electron, excitation and rotational temperatures during the process of surface coating of the microchannel were investigated. These parameters play an important role in the deposition process. The plasma temperatures estimated through spectroscopic measurement were found in the sequence T{sub e}>T{sub exc}>T{sub vib}>T{sub rot}, which indicated the non-thermal characteristics of the proposed DBD microplasma. The parameters of the Ar discharge were also numerically computed using plasma simulations. The numerical predictions of electron temperature (2D simulations) and electron density (3D simulations) were found to be in close agreement to those estimated through experiments. - Highlights: • An atmospheric pressure microplasma was generated in a borosilicate glass capillary. • A pure argon and a mixture of argon–ethylenediamine plasmas were characterized. • Characterization was performed by emission spectrometry and electrical measurements. • Plasma parameters were also predicted by numerical simulations. • The sequence of estimated plasma temperatures indicated its non-thermal behaviour.

  3. Transient electromagnetic behaviour in inductive oxygen and argon-oxygen plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, A. R.; Herdrich, G.; Kim, M.; Dally, B.

    2016-12-01

    In order to develop inductive electric propulsion as a flexible, throttleable technology for future space operations, a greater understanding of discharge transitions within the inductive plasma generator discharge chamber is required. This paper presents a non-intrusive method to determine the conditions under which transitions between the capacitive, low inductive, and high inductive regimes occur with greater accuracy, as well as determining the proportion of a single discharge cycle the plasma spends in either capacitive or inductive regime. Such a method allows a more robust method of classification of inductive discharges than previously available and can be applied to numerous gases. This approach presents an advantage over previous methods which relied on strongly radiating or thermally reactive gases to exhibit certain behaviour (due to the restriction of classical diagnostics on such high power sources) before a transition could be confirmed. This paper presents results from the proposed method applied to a pure oxygen plasma as well as two combinations of argon and oxygen (at 1:1 and 3:2 Ar:O2 volumetric ratios) in order to assess the tunability of electromagnetic regime transitions through modifications of gas composition rather than mechanical alterations. Transitions to the higher inductive mode were observed for much lower input powers for the argon-oxygen blends, as was expected, allowing final discharge conditions to occupy the inductive regime for 94% and 85% of a single discharge cycle for the 3:2 and 1:1 Ar:O2 mixtures, respectively. Pure oxygen achieved a maximum inductive proportion of 71% by comparison.

  4. Limited streamer chambers for the Large Volume Detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anzivino, G.; Bianco, S.; Casaccia, R.; Cindolo, F.; Daniello, L.; Felici, M. De; Enorini, M.; Fabbri, D.; Fabbri, F.L.; Giardoni, M.; Laakso, I.; Lindozzi, M.; Pallante, E.; Passamonti, L.; Russo, V.; Ventura, M.; Votano, L.; Zallo, A.; Bari, G.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Contin, A.; Papa, C. Del; Iacobucci, G.; Maccarrone, G.; Mencarini, D.; Kania, R.; Sartorelli, G.; Qazi, N.I.; Sarwar, S.; Mao, C.S.; Wu, Y.R.

    1991-01-01

    The tracking system of the Large Volume Detector, an underground experiment to study muons and nutrino astronomy, will use ~15000 limited streamer chambers. We describe a comparison between the standard binary mixture (30% argon + 70% isobutane) and a low-hydrocarbon ternary mixture (2% argon + 10%

  5. Limited streamer chambers for the Large Volume Detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anzivino, G.; Bianco, S.; Casaccia, R.; Cindolo, F.; Daniello, L.; Felici, M. De; Enorini, M.; Fabbri, D.; Fabbri, F.L.; Giardoni, M.; Laakso, I.; Lindozzi, M.; Pallante, E.; Passamonti, L.; Russo, V.; Ventura, M.; Votano, L.; Zallo, A.; Bari, G.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Contin, A.; Papa, C. Del; Iacobucci, G.; Maccarrone, G.; Mencarini, D.; Kania, R.; Sartorelli, G.; Qazi, N.I.; Sarwar, S.; Mao, C.S.; Wu, Y.R.

    1991-01-01

    The tracking system of the Large Volume Detector, an underground experiment to study muons and nutrino astronomy, will use ~15000 limited streamer chambers. We describe a comparison between the standard binary mixture (30% argon + 70% isobutane) and a low-hydrocarbon ternary mixture (2% argon + 10%

  6. Spectroscopic diagnostics of electron temperature and energy conversion efficiency of laser-sustained plasma in flowing argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, J.; Krier, H.; Chen, X.

    1988-08-01

    Laser sustained plasmas are often formed during laser materials interaction. The University's 10 kW CW CO2 laser has been used to study argon plasmas for the application to laser supported propulsion and laser materials processing. The spectroscopic diagnostic method has been applied to study laser-sustained plasmas in 1 atmosphere pure argon gas flow with an f/7 on-axis laser focusing scheme. High flow speeds of 2 to 10 m/sec are achieved. Plasma electron temperatures distributions are determined from the 415.8 nm Ar1 line and its adjacent continuum intensities. Plasma core temperatures as high as 20,000 K are reported. The total absorption of the incident laser power and the radiation loss by the plasma are calculated from the temperature distribution. Results indicated that up to 86 percent of the incident laser power can be absorbed and nearly 60 percent of the incident laser power can be retained by the flowing argon gas to provide thrust. Further research is called for in the Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) technique for diagnostics of the downstream mixing zone and the plasma outer region. Experiments over a wider range of operating conditions, as well as multiple plasma testings, are required to find the optimum operating scheme.

  7. Pure robotic retrocaval ureter repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok k. Hemal

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To demonstrate the feasibility of pure robotic retrocaval ureter repair. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 33 year old female presented with right loin pain and obstruction on intravenous urography with the classical "fish-hook" appearance. She was counseled on the various methods of repair and elected to have a robot assisted repair. The following steps are performed during a pure robotic retrocaval ureter repair. The patient is placed in a modified flank position, pneumoperitoneum created and ports inserted. The colon is mobilized to expose the retroperitoneal structures: inferior vena cava, right gonadal vein, right ureter, and duodenum. The renal pelvis and ureter are mobilized and the renal pelvis transected. The ureter is transposed anterior to the inferior vena cava and a pyelopyelostomy is performed over a JJ stent. RESULTS: This patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. The catheter and drain tube were removed on day 1. Her JJ stent was removed at 6 weeks postoperatively. The postoperative intravenous urography at 3 months confirmed normal drainage of contrast medium. CONCLUSION: Pure robotic retrocaval ureter is a feasible procedure; however, there does not appear to be any great advantage over pure laparoscopy, apart from the ergonomic ease for the surgeon as well the simpler intracorporeal suturing.

  8. Evolution of Martian atmospheric argon: Implications for sources of volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Kevin S.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    We have examined processes affecting isotopes of argon (36Ar, 38Ar, 40Ar) in order to determine important atmospheric sources and sinks. Our simple model for argon evolution incorporates production of radiogenic argon in the mantle, outgassing of all argon species by extrusive and intrusive volcanism, and loss to space by knock-on sputtering above the exobase. Sputtering has been shown previously to be an important loss process for atmospheric species, especially isotopes of noble gases, which have few other mechanisms of escape. The integrated evolution of argon (36Ar, 38Ar, and 40Ar, respectively) is modeled in terms of these variables: (1) the planetary concentration of potassium, (2) the fraction of juvenile argon released catastrophically during the first 600 Myr., (3) potential variation in the time-history of sputtering loss from that suggested by Luhmann et al. [1992], and (4) the volume of total outgassing to the surface as compared to outgassing contributed by volcanic release. Our results indicate that Mars has lost between 85-95% of 36Ar and 70-88% of outgassed 40Ar. Due to this substantial loss, the planet must have outgassed the equivalent of between 10 and 100 times the total volume of gases released by extrusive and intrusive volcanics. This indicates that volcanic outgassing, alone, is insufficient to explain the present-day abundances of 36Ar and 40Ar in the Martian atmosphere. Similar calculations for 20Ne suggest outgassed volumes of between 100 and 1800 times in excess of that due to volcanism. This results in a distinct Ne/Ar elemental fractionation, with a preference for outgassing argon, of the order of 10 to 17. Although the results must be evaluated within the model uncertainties, the results are compelling in that they unequivocally show the existence of additional sources of atmospheric volatiles and helps define a means to identify them.

  9. Needleless Electrospinning of Pure and Blended Chitosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmelsmann, Nils; Homburg, Sarah Vanessa; Ehrmann, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Chitosan is a biopolymer with bactericidal, fungicidal, hemostatic and other interesting properties. It can be used, e.g., in medical products, as a filter medium, in biotechnological purposes etc. For these possible applications, nanofiber mats with a large inner surface will be most efficient. This is why in a recent project, the electrospinning properties of pure chitosan as well as chitosan blended with poly(ethylene oxide) were investigated. Using a needleless nanospinning process, the technology under examination can be upscaled from lab to industrial scale, enabling direct transfer of the gained experiences to the intended application.

  10. The Spectroscopic Detectability of Argon in the Lunar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, J W; Gladstone, G R; Shull, J M; Parker, Joel Wm.

    1999-01-01

    Direct measurements of the abundance of argon in the lunar atmosphere were made in 1973 by instruments placed on the Moon during the Apollo 17 mission, but the total daytime abundance is unknown due to instrument saturation effects; thus, until we are able to return to the Moon for improved direct measurements, we must use remote sensing to establish the daytime abundance. In this paper, we present a complete analysis of the potential for measuring argon in the lunar atmosphere via emission-line or absorption-line observations. We come to the surprising conclusion that the lower limit established by the in situ lunar argon measurements implies that any absorption-line measurement of argon in the lower, dayside lunar atmosphere requires analysis in the optically-thick regime. In light of this result, we present the results of our EUVS sounding rocket observations of the lunar occultation of Spica, which provide a new upper limit on the abundance of argon in the daytime lunar atmosphere. We also re-analyze a re...

  11. Irradiation damage simulation of Zircaloy-4 using argon ions bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dequan Peng; Xinde Bai; Feng Pan

    2008-01-01

    To simulate irradiation damage, argon ion was implanted in the Zircaloy-4 with the fluence ranging from 1×1016 to 1×1017 cm-2, using accelerating implanter at an extraction voltage of 190 kV and liquid nitrogen temperature. Then the influence of argon ion implantation on the aqueous corrosion behavior of Zircaloy-4 was studied. The valence states of elements in the surface layer of the samples wcrc analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Transmission clcctron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine the microstructure of the argon-implanted samples. The potentiodynamic polarization technique was employed to evaluate the aqueous corrosion resistance of implanted Zircaloy-4 in 1 mol/L H2SO4 solution. It is found that there appear bubbles on the surface of the samples when the argon flucncc is 1×1016 cm-2. The microstructure of argon-implanted samples changes from amor-phous to partial amorphous, then to polycrystallinc, and again to amorphous. The corrosion resistance of implanted samples linearly declines with the increase of flucnce approximately, which is attributed to the linear increase of the irradiation damage.

  12. The Molecular Pathway of Argon-Mediated Neuroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Ulbrich

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The noble gas argon has attracted increasing attention in recent years, especially because of its neuroprotective properties. In a variety of models, ranging from oxygen-glucose deprivation in cell culture to complex models of mid-cerebral artery occlusion, subarachnoid hemorrhage or retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in animals, argon administration after individual injury demonstrated favorable effects, particularly increased cell survival and even improved neuronal function. As an inert molecule, argon did not show signs of adverse effects in the in vitro and in vivo model used, while being comparably cheap and easy to apply. However, the molecular mechanism by which argon is able to exert its protective and beneficial characteristics remains unclear. Although there are many pieces missing to complete the signaling pathway throughout the cell, it is the aim of this review to summarize the known parts of the molecular pathways and to combine them to provide a clear insight into the cellular pathway, starting with the receptors that may be involved in mediating argons effects and ending with the translational response.

  13. Characteristics of Knock in Hydrogen-Oxygen-Argon SI Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killingsworth, N; Rapp, V; Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Chen, J; Dibble, R

    2010-02-23

    A promising approach for improving the efficiency of internal combustion engines is to employ a working fluid with a high specific heat ratio such as the noble gas argon. Moreover, all harmful emissions are eliminated when the intake charge is composed of oxygen, nonreactive argon, and hydrogen fuel. Previous research demonstrated indicated thermal efficiencies greater than 45% at 5.5 compression ratio in engines operating with hydrogen, oxygen, and argon. However, knock limits spark advance and increasing the efficiency further. Conditions under which knock occurs in such engines differs from typical gasoline fueled engines. In-cylinder temperatures using hydrogen-oxygen-argon are higher due to the high specific heat ratio and pressures are lower because of the low compression ratio. Better understanding of knock under these conditions can lead to operating strategies that inhibit knock and allow operation closer to the knock limit. In this work we compare knock with a hydrogen, oxygen, and argon mixture to that of air-gasoline mixtures in a variable compression ratio cooperative fuels research (CFR) engine. The focus is on stability of knocking phenomena, as well as, amplitude and frequency of the resulting pressure waves.

  14. A Measurement of the Absorption of Liquid Argon Scintillation Light by Dissolved Nitrogen at the Part-Per-Million Level

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, B J P; Conrad, J M; Ignarra, C M; Katori, T; Toups, M

    2013-01-01

    We report on a measurement of the absorption length of scintillation light in liquid argon due to dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million (ppm) level. We inject controlled quantities of nitrogen into a high purity volume of liquid argon and monitor the light yield from an alpha source. The source is placed at different distances from a cryogenic photomultiplier tube assembly. By comparing the light yield from each position we extract the absorption cross section of nitrogen. We find that nitrogen absorbs argon scintillation light with strength of $\\left(1.51\\pm 0.15\\right)\\times10^{-4} \\;\\mathrm{cm^{-1} ppm^{-1}}$, corresponding to an absorption cross section of $\\left(4.99 \\pm 0.51 \\right)\\times10^{-21}\\;\\mathrm{cm^{2} molecule^{-1}}$. We obtain the relationship between absorption length and nitrogen concentration over the 0 to 50 ppm range and discuss the implications for the design and data analysis of future large liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) detectors. Our results indicate that for a ...

  15. A Measurement of the Absorption of Liquid Argon Scintillation Light by Dissolved Nitrogen at the Part-Per-Million Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B. J.P. [MIT, LNS; Chiu, C. S. [MIT, LNS; Conrad, J. M. [MIT, LNS; Ignarra, C. M. [MIT, LNS; Katori, T. [MIT, LNS; Toups, M. [MIT, LNS

    2013-07-24

    Here we report on a measurement of the absorption length of scintillation light in liquid argon due to dissolved nitrogen at the part-per-million (ppm)level. We inject controlled quantities of nitrogen into a high purity volume of liquid argon and monitor the light yield from an alpha source.The source is placed at different distances from a cryogenic photomultiplier tube assembly. By comparing the light yield from each position we extract the absorption cross section of nitrogen. We find that nitrogen absorbs argon scintillation light with strength of (1.51±0.15) × 10$-$4 cm$-$1ppm$-$1, correspondingto an absorption cross section of (4.99±0.51) × 10$-$21 cm2 molecule$-$1.We obtain the relationship between absorption length and nitrogenconcentration over the 0 to 50 ppm range and discuss the implicationsfor the design and data analysis of future large liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC)detectors. Our results indicate that for a current-generation LArTPC, wherea concentration of 2 parts per million of nitrogen is expected, the attenuationlength due to nitrogen will be 30±3 meters.

  16. Re-estimation of argon isotope ratios leading to a revised estimate of the Boltzmann constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Podesta, Michael; Mark, Darren F.; Dymock, Ross C.; Underwood, Robin; Bacquart, Thomas; Sutton, Gavin; Davidson, Stuart; Machin, Graham

    2017-10-01

    In 2013, NPL, SUERC and Cranfield University published an estimate for the Boltzmann constant (de Podesta et al 2013 Metrologia 50 354-76) based on a measurement of the limiting low-pressure speed of sound in argon gas. Subsequently, an extensive investigation by Yang et al (2015 Metrologia 52 S394-409) revealed that there was likely to have been an error in the estimate of the molar mass of the argon used in the experiment. Responding to Yang et al (2015 Metrologia 52 S394-409), de Podesta et al revised their estimate of the molar mass (de Podesta et al 2015 Metrologia 52 S353-63). The shift in the estimated molar mass, and of the estimate of k B, was large:  -2.7 parts in 106, nearly four times the original uncertainty estimate. The work described here was undertaken to understand the cause of this shift and our conclusion is that the original samples were probably contaminated with argon from atmospheric air. In this work we have repeated the measurement reported in de Podesta et al (2013 Metrologia 50 354-76) on the same gas sample that was examined in Yang et al (2015 Metrologia 52 S394-409) and de Podesta et al (2015 Metrologia 52 S353-63). However in this work we have used a different technique for sampling the gas that has allowed us to eliminate the possibility of contamination of the argon samples. We have repeated the sampling procedure three times, and examined samples on two mass spectrometers. This procedure confirms the isotopic ratio estimates of Yang et al (2015 Metrologia 52 S394-409) but with lower uncertainty, particularly in the relative abundance ratio R 38:36. Our new estimate of the molar mass of the argon used in Isotherm 5 in de Podesta et al (2013 Metrologia 50 354-76) is 39.947 727(15) g mol-1 which differs by  +0.50 parts in 106 from the estimate 39.947 707(28) g mol-1 made in de Podesta et al (2015 Metrologia 52 S353-63). This new estimate of the molar mass leads to a revised estimate of the Boltzmann constant of k B

  17. Manifolds of interconvertible pure states

    OpenAIRE

    Sinolecka, Magdalena M.; Zyczkowski, Karol; Kus, Marek

    2001-01-01

    Local orbits of a pure state of an N x N bi-partite quantum system are analyzed. We compute their dimensions which depends on the degeneracy of the vector of coefficients arising by the Schmidt decomposition. In particular, the generic orbit has 2N^2 -N-1 dimensions, the set of separable states is 4(N-1) dimensional, while the manifold of maximally entangled states has N^2-1 dimensions.

  18. Manifolds of interconvertible pure states

    CERN Document Server

    Sinolecka, M M; Kus, M; Sinolecka, Magdalena M.; Zyczkowski, Karol; Kus, Marek

    2002-01-01

    Local orbits of a pure state of an N x N bi-partite quantum system are analyzed. We compute their dimensions which depends on the degeneracy of the vector of coefficients arising by the Schmidt decomposition. In particular, the generic orbit has 2N^2 -N-1 dimensions, the set of separable states is 4(N-1) dimensional, while the manifold of maximally entangled states has N^2-1 dimensions.

  19. Multimedia programming with pure data

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    A quick and comprehensive tutorial book for media designers to jump-start interactive multimedia production with computer graphics, digital audio, digital video, and interactivity, using the Pure Data graphical programming environment.An introductory book on multimedia programming for media artists/designers who like to work on interactivity in their projects, digital art/design students who like to learn the first multimedia programming technique, and audio-visual performers who like to customize their performance sets

  20. Scintillation time dependence and pulse shape discrimination in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Lippincott, W H; Gastler, D; Hime, A; Kearns, E; McKinsey, D N; Nikkel, J A; Stonehill, L C

    2008-01-01

    Using a single-phase liquid argon detector with a signal yield of 4.85 photoelectrons per keV of electronic-equivalent recoil energy (keVee), we measure the scintillation time dependence of both electronic and nuclear recoils in liquid argon down to 5 keVee. We develop two methods of pulse shape discrimination to distinguish between electronic and nuclear recoils. Using one of these methods, we measure a background and statistics-limited level of electronic recoil contamination to be $7.6\\times10^{-7}$ between 60 and 128 keV of nuclear recoil energy (keVr) for a nuclear recoil acceptance of 50% with no nuclear recoil-like events above 72 keVr. Finally, we develop a maximum likelihood method of pulse shape discrimination using the measured scintillation time dependence and predict the sensitivity to WIMP-nucleon scattering in three configurations of a liquid argon dark matter detector.

  1. Liquid Argon Calorimetry with LHC-Performance Specifications

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD-3 Liquid Argon Calorimetry with LHC-Performance Specifications \\\\ \\\\Good electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry will play a central role in an LHC detector. Among the techniques used so far, or under development, the liquid argon sampling calorimetry offers high radiation resistence, good energy resolution (electromagnetic and hadronic), excellent calibration stability and response uniformity. Its rate capabilities, however, do not yet match the requirements for LHC. \\\\ \\\\The aim of this proposal is to improve the technique in such a way that high granularity, good hermiticity and adequate rate capabilities are obtained, without compromising the above mentioned properties. To reach this goal, we propose to use a novel structure, the $^{\\prime\\prime}$accordion$^{\\prime\\prime}$, coupled to fast preamplifiers working at liquid argon temperature. Converter and readout electrodes are no longer planar and perpendicular to particles, as usual, but instead they are wiggled around a plane containing particles. ...

  2. On the Electric Breakdown in Liquid Argon at Centimeter Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Auger, M; Ereditato, A; Goeldi, D; Janos, S; Kreslo, I; Luethi, M; von Rohr, C Rudolf; Strauss, T; Weber, M S

    2015-01-01

    We present a study on the dependence of electric breakdown discharge parameters on electrode geometry and the breakdown field in liquid argon near its boiling point. The measurements were performed with a spherical cathode and a planar anode at distances ranging from 0.1 mm to 10.0 mm. A detailed study of the time evolution of the breakdown volt-ampere characteristics was performed for the first time. It revealed a slow streamer development phase in the discharge. The results of a spectroscopic study of the visible light emission of the breakdowns complement the measurements. The light emission from the initial phase of the discharge is attributed to electro-luminescence of liquid argon following a current of drifting electrons. These results contribute to set benchmarks for breakdown-safe design of ionization detectors, such as Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC).

  3. The Simulation of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Archambault, J P; Carli, T; Costanzo, D; Dell'Acqua, A; Djama, F; Gallas, M; Fincke-Keeler, M; Khakzad, M; Kiryunin, A; Krieger, P; Leltchouk, M; Loch, P; Ma, H; Menke, S; Monnier, E; Nairz, A; Niess, V; Oakham, G; Oram, C; Pospelov, G; Rajagopalan, S; Rimoldi, A; Rousseau, D; Rutherfoord, J; Seligman, W; Soukharev, A; Strízenec, P; Tóth, J; Tsukerman, I; Tsulaia, V; Unal, G; Grahn, K J

    2008-01-01

    In ATLAS, all of the electromagnetic calorimetry and part of the hadronic calorimetry is performed by a calorimeter system using liquid argon as the active material, together with various types of absorbers. The liquid argon calorimeter consists of four subsystems: the electromagnetic barrel and endcap accordion calorimeters; the hadronic endcap calorimeters, and the forward calorimeters. A very accurate geometrical description of these calorimeters is used as input to the Geant 4-based ATLAS simulation, and a careful modelling of the signal development is applied in the generation of hits. Certain types of Monte Carlo truth information ("Calibration Hits") may, additionally, be recorded for calorimeter cells as well as for dead material. This note is a comprehensive reference describing the simulation of the four liquid argon calorimeteter components.

  4. A therapeutic experience on Port Wine hemangiomas with Argon Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahvash M

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Port wine stains are benign but cosmetically devasting congenital angiomas. The argon laser is a therapeutic device newly applied to this condition. Our program was begun 6 years ago. From the beginning, the study was conceived as a clinical investigation of both the port wine stain and its argon laser therapy. A total of 218 patients with port wine stains have been studied and many aspects of their clinical condition detailed. Employing the Argon laser, test spots have been carried out in patients and the results have been analyzed with clinical aspects of the lesions. Altogether, 501 treatments were performed in 218 patients. Good to excellent results were obtained in 81 patients. Moderate Result was obtained in 31 weak result in 65 patients. Most common complication were hyperpigmentation and depressed scar.

  5. Developing Detectors for Scintillation Light in Liquid Argon for DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Bruce [Fermilab

    2016-12-22

    The Deep Underground Neutrino experiment will conduct a broad program of physics research by studying a beam of neutrinos from Fermilab, atmospheric neutrinos, neutrinos from potential supernovae, and potential nucleon decay events. In pursuit of these studies, the experiment will deploy four 10kt fiducial mass liquid argon time projection chambers underground in Lead, South Dakota. Liquid argon time projection chambers allow high-resolution tracking and energy measurements. A precise timing signal is needed to provide the necessary time stamp to localize events in the drift direction. As liquid argon is a natural scintillator, a photon detection system will be deployed to provide such a signal, especially for non-beam events. In the baseline design for the single-phase time projection chamber, the detectors are contained within the anode plane assemblies. The design of two prototypes utilizing wavelength shifters and light guides are presented, and aspects of the research and development program are discussed.

  6. Convolutional neural networks applied to neutrino events in a liquid argon time projection chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciarri, R.; Adams, C.; An, R.; Asaadi, J.; Auger, M.; Bagby, L.; Baller, B.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Bay, F.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bolton, T.; Bugel, L.; Camilleri, L.; Caratelli, D.; Carls, B.; Fernandez, R. Castillo; Cavanna, F.; Chen, H.; Church, E.; Cianci, D.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Convery, M.; Crespo-Anad?n, J. I.; Del Tutto, M.; Devitt, D.; Dytman, S.; Eberly, B.; Ereditato, A.; Sanchez, L. Escudero; Esquivel, J.; Fleming, B. T.; Foreman, W.; Furmanski, A. P.; Garvey, G. T.; Genty, V.; Goeldi, D.; Gollapinni, S.; Graf, N.; Gramellini, E.; Greenlee, H.; Grosso, R.; Guenette, R.; Hackenburg, A.; Hamilton, P.; Hen, O.; Hewes, J.; Hill, C.; Ho, J.; Horton-Smith, G.; James, C.; de Vries, J. Jan; Jen, C. -M.; Jiang, L.; Johnson, R. A.; Jones, B. J. P.; Joshi, J.; Jostlein, H.; Kaleko, D.; Karagiorgi, G.; Ketchum, W.; Kirby, B.; Kirby, M.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kreslo, I.; Laube, A.; Li, Y.; Lister, A.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Lockwitz, S.; Lorca, D.; Louis, W. C.; Luethi, M.; Lundberg, B.; Luo, X.; Marchionni, A.; Mariani, C.; Marshall, J.; Caicedo, D. A. Martinez; Meddage, V.; Miceli, T.; Mills, G. B.; Moon, J.; Mooney, M.; Moore, C. D.; Mousseau, J.; Murrells, R.; Naples, D.; Nienaber, P.; Nowak, J.; Palamara, O.; Paolone, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pate, S. F.; Pavlovic, Z.; Porzio, D.; Pulliam, G.; Qian, X.; Raaf, J. L.; Rafique, A.; Rochester, L.; von Rohr, C. Rudolf; Russell, B.; Schmitz, D. W.; Schukraft, A.; Seligman, W.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Sinclair, J.; Snider, E. L.; Soderberg, M.; S?ldner-Rembold, S.; Soleti, S. R.; Spentzouris, P.; Spitz, J.; St. John, J.; Strauss, T.; Szelc, A. M.; Tagg, N.; Terao, K.; Thomson, M.; Toups, M.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tufanli, S.; Usher, T.; Van de Water, R. G.; Viren, B.; Weber, M.; Weston, J.; Wickremasinghe, D. A.; Wolbers, S.; Wongjirad, T.; Woodruff, K.; Yang, T.; Zeller, G. P.; Zennamo, J.; Zhang, C.

    2017-03-01

    We present several studies of convolutional neural networks applied to data coming from the MicroBooNE detector, a liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC). The algorithms studied include the classification of single particle images, the localization of single particle and neutrino interactions in an image, and the detection of a simulated neutrino event overlaid with cosmic ray backgrounds taken from real detector data. These studies demonstrate the potential of convolutional neural networks for particle identification or event detection on simulated neutrino interactions. We also address technical issues that arise when applying this technique to data from a large LArTPC at or near ground level.

  7. Phase-I Trigger Readout Electronics Upgrade for the ATLAS Liquid-Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00452211; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) scheduled for the Long Shut-down period of 2019-2020 (LS2), referred to as Phase-I upgrade, will increase the instantaneous luminosity to about three times the design value. Since the current ATLAS trigger system does not allow sucient increase of the trigger rate, an improvement of the trigger system is required. The Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeter read-out will therefore be modi ed to use digital trigger signals with a higher spatial granularity in order to improve the identi cation effciencies of electrons, photons, tau, jets and missing energy, at high background rejection rates at the Level-1 trigger.

  8. Convolutional Neural Networks Applied to Neutrino Events in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, R; An, R; Asaadi, J; Auger, M; Bagby, L; Baller, B; Barr, G; Bass, M; Bay, F; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bolton, T; Bugel, L; Camilleri, L; Caratelli, D; Carls, B; Fernandez, R Castillo; Cavanna, F; Chen, H; Church, E; Cianci, D; Collin, G H; Conrad, J M; Convery, M; Crespo-Anadón, J I; Del Tutto, M; Devitt, D; Dytman, S; Eberly, B; Ereditato, A; Sanchez, L Escudero; Esquivel, J; Fleming, B T; Foreman, W; Furmanski, A P; Garvey, G T; Genty, V; Goeldi, D; Gollapinni, S; Graf, N; Gramellini, E; Greenlee, H; Grosso, R; Guenette, R; Hackenburg, A; Hamilton, P; Hen, O; Hewes, J; Hill, C; Ho, J; Horton-Smith, G; James, C; de Vries, J Jan; Jen, C -M; Jiang, L; Johnson, R A; Jones, B J P; Joshi, J; Jostlein, H; Kaleko, D; Karagiorgi, G; Ketchum, W; Kirby, B; Kirby, M; Kobilarcik, T; Kreslo, I; Laube, A; Li, Y; Lister, A; Littlejohn, B R; Lockwitz, S; Lorca, D; Louis, W C; Luethi, M; Lundberg, B; Luo, X; Marchionni, A; Mariani, C; Marshall, J; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Meddage, V; Miceli, T; Mills, G B; Moon, J; Mooney, M; Moore, C D; Mousseau, J; Murrells, R; Naples, D; Nienaber, P; Nowak, J; Palamara, O; Paolone, V; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Pavlovic, Z; Porzio, D; Pulliam, G; Qian, X; Raaf, J L; Rafique, A; Rochester, L; von Rohr, C Rudolf; Russell, B; Schmitz, D W; Schukraft, A; Seligman, W; Shaevitz, M H; Sinclair, J; Snider, E L; Soderberg, M; Söldner-Rembold, S; Soleti, S R; Spentzouris, P; Spitz, J; John, J St; Strauss, T; Szelc, A M; Tagg, N; Terao, K; Thomson, M; Toups, M; Tsai, Y -T; Tufanli, S; Usher, T; Van de Water, R G; Viren, B; Weber, M; Weston, J; Wickremasinghe, D A; Wolbers, S; Wongjirad, T; Woodruff, K; Yang, T; Zeller, G P; Zennamo, J; Zhang, C

    2016-01-01

    We present several studies of convolutional neural networks applied to data coming from the MicroBooNE detector, a liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC). The algorithms studied include the classification of single particle images, the localization of single particle and neutrino interactions in an image, and the detection of a simulated neutrino event overlaid with cosmic ray backgrounds taken from real detector data. These studies demonstrate the potential of convolutional neural networks for particle identification or event detection on simulated neutrino interactions. We also address technical issues that arise when applying this technique to data from a large LArTPC at or near ground level.

  9. Development of ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Read-out Electronics for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Newcomer, Mitchel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider will provide a 5-7 times greater instantaneous and total luminosities than assumed in the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters and their read-out system. An improved trigger system with higher acceptance rate and longer latency and a better radiation tolerance require an upgrade of the read-out electronics. Concepts for the future read-out of the 183.000 calorimeter channels at 40-80 MHz and 16 bit dynamic range, and the development of radiation tolerant, low noise, low power and high-bandwidth electronic components will be presented.

  10. Convolutional neural networks applied to neutrino events in a liquid argon time projection chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciarri, R.; Adams, C.; An, R.; Asaadi, J.; Auger, M.; Bagby, L.; Baller, B.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Bay, F.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bolton, T.; Bugel, L.; Camilleri, L.; Caratelli, D.; Carls, B.; Castillo Fernandez, R.; Cavanna, F.; Chen, H.; Church, E.; Cianci, D.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Convery, M.; Crespo-Anadón, J. I.; Del Tutto, M.; Devitt, D.; Dytman, S.; Eberly, B.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero Sanchez, L.; Esquivel, J.; Fleming, B. T.; Foreman, W.; Furmanski, A. P.; Garvey, G. T.; Genty, V.; Goeldi, D.; Gollapinni, S.; Graf, N.; Gramellini, E.; Greenlee, H.; Grosso, R.; Guenette, R.; Hackenburg, A.; Hamilton, P.; Hen, O.; Hewes, J.; Hill, C.; Ho, J.; Horton-Smith, G.; James, C.; de Vries, J. Jan; Jen, C.-M.; Jiang, L.; Johnson, R. A.; Jones, B. J. P.; Joshi, J.; Jostlein, H.; Kaleko, D.; Karagiorgi, G.; Ketchum, W.; Kirby, B.; Kirby, M.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kreslo, I.; Laube, A.; Li, Y.; Lister, A.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Lockwitz, S.; Lorca, D.; Louis, W. C.; Luethi, M.; Lundberg, B.; Luo, X.; Marchionni, A.; Mariani, C.; Marshall, J.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Meddage, V.; Miceli, T.; Mills, G. B.; Moon, J.; Mooney, M.; Moore, C. D.; Mousseau, J.; Murrells, R.; Naples, D.; Nienaber, P.; Nowak, J.; Palamara, O.; Paolone, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pate, S. F.; Pavlovic, Z.; Porzio, D.; Pulliam, G.; Qian, X.; Raaf, J. L.; Rafique, A.; Rochester, L.; von Rohr, C. Rudolf; Russell, B.; Schmitz, D. W.; Schukraft, A.; Seligman, W.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Sinclair, J.; Snider, E. L.; Soderberg, M.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Soleti, S. R.; Spentzouris, P.; Spitz, J.; St. John, J.; Strauss, T.; Szelc, A. M.; Tagg, N.; Terao, K.; Thomson, M.; Toups, M.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tufanli, S.; Usher, T.; Van de Water, R. G.; Viren, B.; Weber, M.; Weston, J.; Wickremasinghe, D. A.; Wolbers, S.; Wongjirad, T.; Woodruff, K.; Yang, T.; Zeller, G. P.; Zennamo, J.; Zhang, C.

    2017-03-01

    We present several studies of convolutional neural networks applied to data coming from the MicroBooNE detector, a liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC). The algorithms studied include the classification of single particle images, the localization of single particle and neutrino interactions in an image, and the detection of a simulated neutrino event overlaid with cosmic ray backgrounds taken from real detector data. These studies demonstrate the potential of convolutional neural networks for particle identification or event detection on simulated neutrino interactions. We also address technical issues that arise when applying this technique to data from a large LArTPC at or near ground level.

  11. Development of ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter front-end electronics for the HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.

    2017-01-01

    The high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider will provide 5–7 times greater luminosities than assumed in the original detector design. An improved trigger system requires an upgrade of the readout electronics of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter. Concepts for the future readout of the 182,500 calorimeter cells at 40–80 MHz and 16-bit dynamic range and the developments of radiation-tolerant, low-noise, low-power, and high-bandwidth front-end electronic components, including preamplifiers and shapers, 14-bit ADCs, and 10-Gb/s laser diode array drivers, are presented in this paper.

  12. Development of ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Front-end Electronics for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Tiankuan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider will provide 5-7 times greater luminosities than assumed in the original detector design. An improved trigger system requires an upgrade of the readout electronics of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter. Concepts for the future readout of the 182,500 calorimeter channels at 40-80 MHz and 16-bit dynamic range and the developments of radiation-tolerant, low-noise, low-power, and high-bandwidth front-end electronic components, including preamplifiers and shapers, 14-bit ADCs, and 10-Gb/s laser diode array drivers, are presented.

  13. Filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses of different wavelengths in argon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    XIEXING QI; WENBIN LIN

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the filaments formed by the ultrashort laser pulses with different wavelengths of 400 nm, 586 nm and 800 nm propagating in argon. Numerical results show that, when the input power or the ratio of the input power to the critical power is given, the pulse with 400 nm wavelength has the largest on-axis intensity, as well as the narrowest filament and the most stable beam radius. These results indicate that the pulse with shorter wavelength is more suitable for the long-range propagation in argon.

  14. Measurement of Longitudinal Electron Diffusion in Liquid Argon

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yichen; Thorn, Craig; Qian, Xin; Diwan, Milind; Joshi, Jyoti; Kettell, Steve; Morse, William; Rao, Triveni; Stewart, Jim; Tang, Wei; Viren, Brett

    2015-01-01

    We report the measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion coefficients in liquid argon for electric fields between 100 and 2000 V/cm with a gold photocathode as a bright electron source. The measurement principle, apparatus, and data analysis are described. Our results, which are consistent with previous measurements in the region between 100 to 350 V/cm [1] , are systematically higher than the prediction of Atrazhev-Timoshkin[2], and represent the world's best measurement in the region between 350 to 2000 V/cm. The quantum efficiency of the gold photocathode, the drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion coefficients in gas argon are also presented.

  15. Rotational spectrum and dynamics of tetrahydrofuran-argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melandri, S.; Favero, P.G.; Caminati, W. [Dipartimento di Chimica ' G. Ciamician' dell' Universita, Via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Lopez, J.C.; Alonso, J.L. [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    1998-12-15

    The jet-cooled rotational spectrum of the tetrahydrofuran-argon molecular complex has been investigated by millimeter-wave absorption and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopies. The argon atom is located nearly over the oxygen atom, almost perpendicularly to the COC plane. Each rotational transition is split in two component lines due to the residual pseudorotational effects of the ring in the complex. The splitting between the two vibrational sublevels has been calculated to be 111.345(44) MHz. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved000.

  16. The Erosion of Frozen Argon by Swift Helium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Bøttiger, Jørgen; Graversen, O.

    1981-01-01

    The temperature, energy, and thickness dependence of the erosion rates of frozen argon films when irradiated with 0.1–3 MeV helium ions have been measured. The erosion yields Y are much too high to be explained by the concentional collisional cascade-sputtering theory and are furthermore unequivo......The temperature, energy, and thickness dependence of the erosion rates of frozen argon films when irradiated with 0.1–3 MeV helium ions have been measured. The erosion yields Y are much too high to be explained by the concentional collisional cascade-sputtering theory and are furthermore...

  17. Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Bagby, L F; James, C C; Jones, B J P; Jostlein, H; Lockwitz, S; Naples, D; Raaf, J L; Rameika, R; Schukraft, A; Strauss, T; Weber, M S; Wolbers, S A

    2014-01-01

    We characterized a sample of metal-oxide resistors and measured their breakdown voltage in liquid argon by applying high voltage (HV) pulses over a 3 second period to simulate the electric breakdown in a HV-divider chain. All resistors had higher breakdown voltages in liquid argon than their vendor ratings in air at room temperature. Failure modes range from full destruction to coating damage. In cases where breakdown was not catastrophic, subsequent breakdown voltages were lower in subsequent measuring runs. One resistor type withstands 131\\,kV pulses, the limit of the test setup.

  18. Attosecond-correlated dynamics of two electrons in argon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Sharma; N Camus; B Fischer; M Kremer; A Rudenko; B Bergues; M Kuebel; N G Johnson; M F Kling; T Pfeifer; J Ullrich; R Moshammer

    2014-01-01

    In this work we explored strong field-induced decay of doubly excited transient Coulomb complex Ar** → Ar2++2. We measured the correlated two-electron emission as a function of carrier envelop phase (CEP) of 6 fs pulses in the non-sequential double ionization (NSDI) of argon. Classical model calculations suggest that the intermediate doubly excited Coulomb complex loses memory of its formation dynamics. We estimated the ionization time difference between the two electrons from NSDI of argon and it is 200 ± 100 as (N Camus et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 073003 (2012)).

  19. Imaging of hydrogen halides photochemistry on argon and ice nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poterya, V., E-mail: poterya@jh-inst.cas.cz; Lengyel, J.; Pysanenko, A.; Svrčková, P.; Fárník, M., E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz [J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry v.v.i., Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Dolejškova 3, 18223 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-21

    The photodissociation dynamics of HX (X = Cl, Br) molecules deposited on large Ar{sub N} and (H{sub 2}O){sub N}, N{sup ¯}≈ 10{sup 2}–10{sup 3}, clusters is investigated at 193 nm using velocity map imaging of H and Cl photofragments. In addition, time-of-flight mass spectrometry after electron ionization complemented by pickup cross section measurements provide information about the composition and structure of the clusters. The hydrogen halides coagulate efficiently to generate smaller (HX){sub n} clusters on Ar{sub N} upon multiple pickup conditions. This implies a high mobility of HX molecules on argon. On the other hand, the molecules remain isolated on (H{sub 2}O){sub N}. The photodissociation on Ar{sub N} leads to strong H-fragment caging manifested by the fragment intensity peaking sharply at zero kinetic energy. Some of the Cl-fragments from HCl photodissociation on Ar{sub N} are also caged, while some of the fragments escape the cluster directly without losing their kinetic energy. The images of H-fragments from HX on (H{sub 2}O){sub N} also exhibit a strong central intensity, however, with a different kinetic energy distribution which originates from different processes: the HX acidic dissociation followed by H{sub 3}O neutral hydronium radical formation after the UV excitation, and the slow H-fragments stem from subsequent decay of the H{sub 3}O. The corresponding Cl-cofragment from the photoexcitation of the HCl·(H{sub 2}O){sub N} is trapped in the ice nanoparticle.

  20. Argon Partitioning Between Metal and Silicate Liquids in the Laser-Heated DAC to 25 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhifd, M. A.; Jephcoat, A. P.

    2003-12-01

    The accretion of the Earth from primordial material and its subsequent segregation into core and mantle are fundamental problems in terrestrial and solar system science. Many of the questions about the process, although well developed as model scenarios over the last few decades, are still open and much debated, and include, for example, whether the core is, or was, a reservoir for the noble (rare) gases. In the present study we use for the first time the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (LHDAC) to study the Ar partitioning at high-pressure and temperature between metal and silicate liquids. Little work has been reported on noble gas partitioning at pressure since a single multi-anvil experiment to 10 GPa (Matsuda et al., 1993). We used either compacted glass powders simulating that of a model C1 chondrite and iron metal, or pure metal alloys (pure Fe, FeNiCo alloy, FeSi). Thermal insulation from the diamonds was achieved with solid argon as pressure medium. The samples were heated by a multimode YAG laser for an average of 15 minutes and temperatures were determined spectro-radiometrically with a fit to a grey-body Planck function. Samples recovered after the runs were analysed by electron microprobe with spatial resolution near 1 μ m. The argon melts by conductive heating from the molten sample dissolving into the metal/silicate melt. Preliminary results on Ar solubility at lower pressures show good agreement with data reported by White et al. (1986) for Ar solubility in sanidine (KAlSi3O8). With sanidine melt, Ar solubility increases up to around 5-6 GPa where it reaches about 2.5 wt%, and remains roughly constant to higher pressures, suggesting that a threshold concentration is reached. Similar behavior is observed for a mix of C1-chondrite composition and iron and the results imply that the solubility of Ar is intimately related to liquid structure at high pressure. We also present results on Ar solubility into pure silicate liquids of varying composition in

  1. The effect of pure state structure on nonequilibrium dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, C M; Stein, D L [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States)], E-mail: newman@cims.nyu.edu, E-mail: daniel.stein@nyu.edu

    2008-06-18

    Motivated by short-range Ising spin glasses, we review some rigorous results and their consequences for the relation between the number/nature of equilibrium pure states and nonequilibrium dynamics. Two of the consequences for spin glass dynamics following an instantaneous deep quench to a temperature with broken spin flip symmetry are: (1) almost all initial configurations lie on the boundary between the basins of attraction of multiple pure states; (2) unless there are uncountably many pure states with almost all pairs having zero overlap, there can be no equilibration to a pure state as time t {yields} {infinity}. We discuss the relevance of these results to the difficulty of equilibration of spin glasses. We also review some results concerning the 'nature versus nurture' problem of whether the large-t behavior of both ferromagnets and spin glasses following a deep quench is determined more by the initial configuration (nature) or by the dynamics realization (nurture)

  2. Universality in pure gravity mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Jason L.; Olive, Keith A. [University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Ibe, Masahiro [University of Tokyo, ICRR, Kashiwa (Japan); University of Tokyo, Kavli IPMU, TODIAS, Kashiwa (Japan); Yanagida, Tsutomu T. [University of Tokyo, Kavli IPMU, TODIAS, Kashiwa (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    If low-energy supersymmetry is realized in nature, the apparent discovery of a Higgs boson with mass around 125 GeV suggests a supersymmetric mass spectrum in the TeV or multi-TeV range. Multi-TeV scalar masses are a necessary component of supersymmetric models with pure gravity mediation or in any model with strong moduli stabilization. Here, we show that full scalar mass universality remains viable as long as the ratio of Higgs vevs, tan{beta}, is relatively small (

  3. Toxicological evaluation of pure hydroxytyrosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auñon-Calles, David; Canut, Lourdes; Visioli, Francesco

    2013-05-01

    Of all the phenolic constituents of olives and extra virgin olive oil, hydroxytyrosol is currently being actively exploited as a potential supplement or preservative to be employed in the nutraceutical, cosmeceutical, and food industry. In terms of safety profile, hydroxytyrosol has only been investigated as the predominant part of raw olive mill waste water extracts, due to the previous unavailability of appropriate quantities of the pure compound. We report the toxicological evaluation of hydroxytyrosol and, based on the results, propose a No Observed Adverse Effects Level (NOAEL) of 500mg/kg/d.

  4. Synthesis of Enantiomerically Pure Anthracyclinones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achmatowicz, Osman; Szechner, Barbara

    The anthracycline antibiotics are among the most important clinical drugs used in the treatment of human cancer. The search for new agents with improved therapeutic efficacy and reduced cardiotoxicity stimulated considerable efforts in the synthesis of new analogues. Since the biological activity of anthracyclines depends on their natural absolute configuration, various strategies for the synthesis of enantiomerically pure anthracyclinones (aglycones) have been developed. They comprise: resolution of racemic intermediate, incorporation of a chiral fragment derived from natural and non-natural chiral pools, asymmetric synthesis with the use of a chiral auxiliary or a chiral reagent, and enantioselective catalysis. Synthetic advances towards enantiopure anthracyclinones reported over the last 17 years are reviewed.

  5. Pure Electric and Pure Magnetic Resonances in Near-Infrared Metal Double-Triangle Metamaterial Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zhi-Shen; PAN Jian; CHEN Zhuo; ZHAN Peng; MIN Nai-Ben; WANG Zhen-Lin

    2011-01-01

    @@ We experimentally and numerically investigate the optical properties of metamaterial arrays composed of double partially-overlapped metallic nanotriangles fabricated by an angle-resolved nanosphere lithography.We demonstrate that each double-triangle can be viewed as an artificial magnetic element analogous to the conventional metal split-ring-resonator.It is shown that under normal-incidence conditions,individual double-triangle can exhibit a strong local magnetic resonance,but the collective response of the metamaterial arrays is purely electric because magnetic resonances of the two double-triangles in a unit cell having opposite openings are out of phase.For oblique incidences the metamaterial arrays are shown to support a pure magnetic response at the same frequency band.Therefore,switchable electric and magnetic resonances are achieved in double-triangle arrays.Moreover,both the electric and magnetic resonances axe shown to allow for a tunability over a large spectral range down to near-infrared.%We experimentally and numerically investigate the optical properties of metamaterial arrays composed of double partially-overlapped metallic nanotriangles fabricated by an angle-resolved nanosphere lithography. We demonstrate that each double-triable can be viewed as an artificial magnetic element analogous to the conventional metal split-ring-resonator. It is shown that under normal-incidence conditions, individual double-triangle can exhibit a strong local magnetic resonance, but the collective response of the metamaterial arrays is purely electric because magnetic resonances of the two double-triangles in a unit cell having opposite openings are out of phase.For oblique incidences the metamaterial arrays are shown to support a pure magnetic response at the same frequency band. Therefore, switchable electric and magnetic resonances are achieved in double-triangle arrays.Moreover, both the electric and magnetic resonances are shown to allow for a tunability over

  6. Pure dysarthria due to an insular infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, Akiyuki; Tanaka, Saiko; Kamitsukasa, Ikuo

    2010-06-01

    Cortical infarction presenting with pure dysarthria is rarely reported. Previous studies have reported pure dysarthria due to cortical stroke at the precentral gyrus or middle frontal gyrus. We report a 72-year-old man who developed pure dysarthria caused by an acute cortical infarction in the insular cortex. The role of the insula in language has been difficult to assess clinically because of the rarity of pure insular strokes. Our patient showed pure dysarthria without aphasia, indicating that pure dysarthria can be the sole manifestation of insular infarctions.

  7. An homeopathic cure to pure Xenon large diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Azevedo, C D R; Freitas, E.D.C.; Gonzalez-Diaz, D.; Monrabal, F.; Monteiro, C.M.B.; Santos, J. M. F. Dos; Veloso, J.F.C.A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J

    2016-01-01

    The NEXT neutrinoless double beta decay experiment will use a high- pressure gas electroluminescence-based TPC to search for the decay of Xe-136. One of the main advantages of this technology is the possibility to reconstruct the topology of events with energies close to Qbb. The rejection potential associated to the topology reconstruction is limited by our capacity to prop- erly reconstruct the original path of the electrons in the gas. This reconstruction is limited by different factors that include the geometry of the detector, the density of the sensors in the tracking plane and the separation among them, etc. Ultimately, the resolution is limited by the physics of electron diffusion in the gas. In this paper we present a series of molecular additives that can be used in Xenon gas at very low partial pressure to reduce both longitudinal and transverse diffusion. We will show the results of different Monte-Carlo simulations of electron transport in the gas mixtures from wich we have extracted the value of...

  8. A purely reflective large wide-field telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Terebizh, V Yu

    2007-01-01

    The design of a fast three-mirror telescope with flat field of view 3 degree in diameter is proposed. The telescope does not include auxiliary lenses. As an example, we consider an f/1.25 reflector with the 8.4-m entrance pupil diameter and 6.5-m effective aperture. The RMS diameter of a star image varies from 0''.13 on the optical axis up to 0''.19 at the edge of the field (6.7-9.8 mcm); the corresponding range of the D_80 diameter is 0''.18-0''.27 (9.3-13.5 mcm). All three mirrors are even aspheres of low orders (6th for the primary and tertiary mirrors, and 8th -- for the secondary mirror) with zero conic constant. Deviations of the optical surfaces from the nearest (in some sense) spheres are 1.73 mm, 0.07 mm, and 0.55 mm for the primary, secondary and tertiary mirrors, respectively. The length of the telescope is 7.34 m.

  9. Laser-induced vibrational dynamics of ozone in solid argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Amstrup, B.; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1997-01-01

    We consider the vibrational dynamics, induced by an intense infrared laser pulse, in an ozone molecule with isotopic substitution, that is, (OOO)-O-16-O-16-O-18 and compare the dynamics in the gas phase and in solid ar on. not perturbed by argon on a time-scale of a few picoseconds and selective...

  10. Human-chromosome alterations induced by argon laser treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simi, S.; Colella, C. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa (Italy). Lab. di Mutagenesi e Differenziamento); Agati, G.; Fusi, F. (Florence Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Farmacologia); Corsi, M.F.; Pratesi, R. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Florence (Italy). Lab. di Elettronica Quantistica); Tocco, G.A. (Naples Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Istologia ed Embrilogia)

    1984-07-01

    The possible occurrence of genetic damage arising from exposure of human cells to visible laser light has been evaluated in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes. Aneuploidy and chromosome aberrations have been observed after exposure to an argon laser. These findings appear of special interest in view of the possible role of these chromosome alterations in carcinogenesis.

  11. A 2-Dimensional Fluid Model for an Argon Rf Discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, J. D. P.; W. J. Goedheer,

    1993-01-01

    A fluid model for an argon rf discharge in a cylindrical discharge chamber is presented. The model contains the particle balances for electrons and ions and the electron energy balance. A nonzero autobias voltage is obtained by imposing the condition that the time-averaged current toward the powered

  12. Thermal decomposition of Yttrium(III) isovalerate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Yue, Zhao; Tang, Xiao;

    2016-01-01

    The thermal behaviour of yttrium(III) isovalerate (Y(C4H9CO2)3) was studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, FTIR-spectroscopy, hot-stage optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction with a laboratory Cu-tube source as well as with a synchrotron radiation source...

  13. Thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) valerate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Yue, Zhao; Tang, Xiao;

    2014-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) valerate (Y(C4H9CO2)3) was studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, in-situ synchrotron diffraction and hot-stage microscopy as well as room temperature optical microscopy. Melting...

  14. Characterising argon-bomb balloons for high-speed photography

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Olivier, M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A method to optimise the geometry, explosive charge mass and volume of an argon bomb for specific lighting requirements has been proposed. The method is specifically aimed at applications that require photographic diagnostics with ultra-high speed...

  15. Influence of Blowing of Argon on the Cleanness of Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pribulová

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of steel components are controlled by the chemical composition and mechanical treatment to which thesteel is submitted. Non-metallic inclusions have a very high influence on the steel quality but secondary metallurgy enables to reduce their content in the steel. Possibilities of secondary metallurgy are relatively extensive but financial situation in Slovak foundries does not enable to make investments in secondary metallurgy in the near future. Accessible means for influencing of steel quality is injection of an inert gas .Main goal of experiments described in the article was verify the influence of blowing of argon into the steel in an electric inductionfurnace on its cleanness. Duration and flow-rate of argon blowing have a very clearly influence on the final content of non-metallicinclusions. Minimum time of argon blowing necessary for reducing of content of non-metallic inclusions in one tonne electric inductionfurnace was more then 6 minutes and recommended argon flow rate was 10 litters per minute.

  16. Study of Liquid Argon Dopants for LHC Hadron Calorimetry

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Hadron calorimetry based on the Liquid Argon Ionisation Chamber technique is one of the choice techniques for LHC-experimentation. A systematic study of the effect of selected dopants on Liquid Argon (LAr) will be carried out with the aim to achieve an improvement on: \\item (i)~``Fast Liquid Argon'' search and study of dopants to increase the drift velocity. It has been already shown that CH&sub4. added at a fraction of one percent increases the drift velocity by a factor of two or more. \\item (ii)~``Compensated Liquid Argon'' search and study of dopants to increase the response to densely ionising particles, resulting in improved compensation, such as photosensitive dopants. \\end{enumerate}\\\\ \\\\ Monitoring of the parameters involved in understanding the response of a calorimeter is essential. In case of doped LAr, the charge yield, the non-saturated drift velocity and the electron lifetime in the liquid should be precisely and simultaneously monitored as they all vary with the level of dopant concentrati...

  17. 21 CFR 874.4490 - Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. 874.4490 Section 874.4490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Argon laser for otology, rhinology, and laryngology. (a) Identification. The argon laser device for...

  18. Cryogenic separation of an oxygen-argon mixture in natural air samples for the determination of isotope and molecular ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keedakkadan, Habeeb Rahman; Abe, Osamu

    2015-04-30

    The separation and purification of oxygen-argon mixtures are critical in the high-precision analysis of Δ(17) O and δ(O2 /Ar) for geochemical applications. At present, chromatographic methods are used for the separation and purification of oxygen-argon mixtures or pure oxygen, but these methods require the use of high-purity helium as a carrier gas. Considerable interest has been expressed in the development of a helium-free cryogenic separation of oxygen-argon mixtures in natural air samples. The precise and simplified cryogenic separation of oxygen-argon mixtures from natural air samples presented here was made possible using a single 5A (30/60 mesh) molecular sieve column. The method involves the trapping of eluted gases using molecular sieves at liquid nitrogen temperature, which is associated with isotopic fractionation. We tested the proposed method for the determination of isotopic fractionations during the gas exchange between water and atmospheric air at equilibrium. The dependency of fractionation was studied at different water temperatures and for different methods of equilibration (bubbling and stirring). Isotopic and molecular fractionations during gas desorption from molecular sieves were studied for different amounts and types of molecular sieves. Repeated measurements of atmospheric air yielded a reproducibility (±SD) of 0.021 ‰, 0.044 ‰, 15 per meg and 1.9 ‰ for δ(17) O, δ(18) O, Δ(17) O and δ(O2 /Ar) values, respectively. We applied the method to determine equilibrium isotope fractionation during gas exchange between air and water. Consistent δ(18) O and Δ(17) O results were obtained with the latest two studies, whereas there was a significant difference in δ(18) O values between seawater and deionized water. We have revised a helium-free, cryogenic separation of oxygen-argon mixtures in natural air samples for isotopic and molecular ratio analysis. The use of a single 13X (1/8" pellet) molecular sieve yielded the smallest isotopic

  19. Attachment cooling of electrons in oxygen-argon and SF6-argon mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeva, Natalia; Kim, Sung Jin; Park, Gan Young; Lee, Jae Koo

    2004-09-01

    In e-beam sustained plasma different electron temperature can be obtained. Thus, in plasma of capacitive RF discharges in inert gases typical electron temperature is of the order of 2-3 eV. At certain conditions, in plasma of electronegative gases electron temperature can approach ion/neutral temperature. We consider e-beam sustained plasma of electronegative gases and their mixtures with argon where the main mechanism of plasma neutralization is connected with electron-molecule attachment. In such plasma, due to retardation of fast electrons of e-beam secondary electrons are created which loose their energy due to attachment. It is shown, that at certain conditions (in dependence of the e-beam intensity and spectrum of secondary electrons) electron temperature can obtain the values comparable or even less than temperature of neutral component. The effect can be explained by the increase of attachment rate coefficient with the increase of electron temperature (mean electron energy). Such a dependence leads to attachment of the fastest plasma electrons and selective loss of electrons whose energy exceeds the mean electron energy and, as a result, to effective electron cooling. The theoretical and numerical analysis of the problem has been conducted. The numerical results obtained using ELENDIF code are compared with Particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulations under similar conditions.

  20. Conversion of an atomic to a molecular argon ion and low pressure argon relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    M, N. Stankov; A, P. Jovanović; V, Lj Marković; S, N. Stamenković

    2016-01-01

    The dominant process in relaxation of DC glow discharge between two plane parallel electrodes in argon at pressure 200 Pa is analyzed by measuring the breakdown time delay and by analytical and numerical models. By using the approximate analytical model it is found that the relaxation in a range from 20 to 60 ms in afterglow is dominated by ions, produced by atomic-to-molecular conversion of Ar+ ions in the first several milliseconds after the cessation of the discharge. This conversion is confirmed by the presence of double-Gaussian distribution for the formative time delay, as well as conversion maxima in a set of memory curves measured in different conditions. Finally, the numerical one-dimensional (1D) model for determining the number densities of dominant particles in stationary DC glow discharge and two-dimensional (2D) model for the relaxation are used to confirm the previous assumptions and to determine the corresponding collision and transport coefficients of dominant species and processes. Project supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia (Grant No. ON171025).

  1. (Not so) pure Lovelock Kasner metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Camanho, Xián O; Molina, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational interaction is expected to be modified for very short distances. This is particularly important in situations in which the curvature of spacetime is large in general, such as close to the initial cosmological singularity. The gravitational dynamics is then captured by the higher curvature terms in the action, making it difficult to reliably extrapolate any prediction of general relativity. In this note we review pure Lovelock equations for Kasner-type metrics. These equations correspond to a single $N$th order Lovelock term in the action in $d=2N+1,\\,2N+2$ dimensions, and they capture the relevant gravitational dynamics when aproaching the big-bang singularity within the Lovelock family of theories. These are classified in several isotropy types. Some of these families correspond to degenerate classes of solutions, such that their dynamics is not completely determined by the equations of pure Lovelock gravity. Instead, these Kasner solutions become sensitive to the subleading terms in the Lo...

  2. ABSOLUTELY E-PURE MODULES AND E-PURE SPLIT MODULES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Hangyu

    2011-01-01

    We first introduce the concepts of absolutely E-pure modules and Epure split modules. Then, we characterize the IF rings in terms of absolutely E-pure modules. The E-pure split modules are also characterized.

  3. The monitoring and data quality assessment of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Simard, O; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudo-rapidity region |η|< 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.5<|η|<4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform response without azimuthal gaps. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; while a classic parallel-plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative design based on cylindrical electrodes with thin liquid argon gaps is employed for the coverage at low angles, where the particle flux is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats maintained at about 88.5K. The approximately 200K cells are read out via front-end boards housed in on-detector crates that also contain monitoring, calibration, trigg...

  4. The monitoring and data quality assessment of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Simard, O

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton ($pp$) collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudo-rapidity region $|\\eta|< 3.2$, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range $1.5 < |\\eta| < 4.9$. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform response without azimuthal gaps. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; while a classic parallel-plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative design based on cylindrical electrodes with thin liquid argon gaps is employed at low angles, where the particle flux is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats maintained at about 88.5~K. The 182,468 cells are read out via front-end boards housed in on-detector crates that also contain monitoring, calibration, trigger and t...

  5. Status of the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter and its Performance after Three Years of LHC Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Lampl, W; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo- rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.5-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at approximately 89 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three-year period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and s...

  6. Status of the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter and its Performance after Three Years of LHC Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Lampl, W; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions pro- duced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo- rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.5-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterised by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform az- imuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as pas- sive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical elec- trodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at approximately 89 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three-year period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic ra...

  7. Status of the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter and its Performance after three years of LHC operation

    CERN Document Server

    De La Torre, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo-rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at 87 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beam...

  8. Status of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter; Performance after 2 years of LHC operation

    CERN Document Server

    AbouZeid, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo-rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at about 87 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LH...

  9. A simple but accurate potential for the naphthalene-argon complex: applications to collisional energy transfer and matrix isolated IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, F; Falvo, Cyril; Parneix, Pascal

    2013-01-21

    An explicit polarizable potential for the naphthalene-argon complex has been derived assuming only atomic contributions, aiming at large scale simulations of naphthalene under argon environment. The potential was parametrized from dedicated quantum chemical calculations at the CCSD(T) level, and satisfactorily reproduces available structural and energetic properties. Combining this potential with a tight-binding model for naphthalene, collisional energy transfer is studied by means of dedicated molecular dynamics simulations, nuclear quantum effects being accounted for in the path-integral framework. Except at low target temperature, nuclear quantum effects do not alter the average energies transferred by the collision or the collision duration. However, the distribution of energy transferred is much broader in the quantum case due to the significant zero-point energy and the higher density of states. Using an ab initio potential for the Ar-Ar interaction, the IR absorption spectrum of naphthalene solvated by argon clusters or an entire Ar matrix is computed via classical and centroid molecular dynamics. The classical spectra exhibit variations with growing argon environment that are absent from quantum spectra. This is interpreted by the greater fluxional character experienced by the argon atoms due to vibrational delocalization.

  10. Pure optical dynamical color encryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosso, Fabian; Tebaldi, Myrian; Fredy Barrera, John; Bolognini, Néstor; Torroba, Roberto

    2011-07-01

    We introduce a way to encrypt-decrypt a color dynamical phenomenon using a pure optical alternative. We split the three basic chromatic channels composing the input, and then each channel is processed through a 4f encoding method and a theta modulation applied to the each encrypted frame in every channel. All frames for a single channel are multiplexed. The same phase mask is used to encode all the information. Unlike the usual procedure we do not multiplex the three chromatic channels into a single encoding media, because we want to decrypt the information in real time. Then, we send to the decoding station the phase mask and the three packages each one containing the multiplexing of a single channel. The end user synchronizes and decodes the information contained in the separate channels. Finally, the decoding information is conveyed together to bring the decoded dynamical color phenomenon in real-time. We present material that supports our concepts.

  11. 76 FR 69284 - Pure Magnesium From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Pure Magnesium From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on pure magnesium from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... USITC Publication 4274 (October 2011), entitled Pure Magnesium from China: Investigation No....

  12. Hologram of a pure state black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shubho R.; Sarkar, Debajyoti

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we extend the Hamilton-Kabat-Lifschytz-Lowe (HKLL) holographic smearing function method to reconstruct (quasi)local anti-de Sitter bulk scalar observables in the background of a large anti-de Sitter black hole formed by null shell collapse (a "pure state" black hole), from the dual conformal field theory which is undergoing a sudden quench. In particular, we probe the near horizon and subhorizon bulk locality. First, we construct local bulk operators from the conformal field theory in the leading semiclassical limit, N →∞ . Then, we look at effects due to the finiteness of N , where we propose a suitable coarse-graining prescription involving early and late time cutoffs to define semiclassical bulk observables which are approximately local, their departure from locality being nonperturbatively small in N . Our results have important implications on the black hole information problem.

  13. Hologram of a pure state black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Shubho R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we extend the HKLL holographic smearing function method to reconstruct (quasi)local AdS bulk scalar observables in the background of a large AdS black hole formed by null shell collapse (a "pure state" black hole), from the dual CFT which is undergoing a sudden quench. In particular, we probe the near horizon and sub-horizon bulk locality. First we construct local bulk operators from the CFT in the leading semiclassical limit, $N\\rightarrow\\infty$. Then we look at effects due to the finiteness of $N$, where we propose a suitable coarse-graining prescription involving early and late time cut-offs to define semiclassical bulk observables which are approximately local; their departure from locality being non-perturbatively small in $N$. Our results have important implications on the black hole information problem.

  14. Dual Target Search is Neither Purely Simultaneous nor Purely Successive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Kyle R; Menneer, Tamaryn; Nomani, Mohammad S; Stroud, Michael J; Donnelly, Nick

    2017-08-31

    Previous research shows that visual search for two different targets is less efficient than search for a single target. Stroud, Menneer, Cave and Donnelly (2012) concluded that two target colours are represented separately based on modeling the fixation patterns. Although those analyses provide evidence for two separate target representations, they do not show whether participants search simultaneously for both targets, or first search for one target and then the other. Some studies suggest that multiple target representations are simultaneously active, while others indicate that search can be voluntarily simultaneous, or switching, or a mixture of both. Stroud et al.'s participants were not explicitly instructed to use any particular strategy. These data were revisited to determine which strategy was employed. Each fixated item was categorised according to whether its colour was more similar to one target or the other. Once an item similar to one target is fixated, the next fixated item is more likely to be similar to that target than the other, showing that at a given moment during search, one target is generally favoured. However, the search for one target is not completed before search for the other begins. Instead, there are often short runs of one or two fixations to distractors similar to one target, with each run followed by a switch to the other target. Thus, the results suggest that one target is more highly weighted than the other at any given time, but not to the extent that search is purely successive.

  15. The ATLAS Liquid Argon calorimeter: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Henric; ATLAS LArg Collaboration

    2009-04-01

    The various cryostats with the ATLAS LArg calorimeter are installed in the ATLAS cavern since several years. Following this, an effort to install and commission the front end read-out electronics (infrastructure, crates, boards) has been ongoing and is converging, in time for LHC start. After the mechanical installation of the LArg calorimeter 99.9 % of the read-out channels were working, hence great care was taken to assure the same high level of quality after the installation of the read-out electronics. Following cautious procedures and with continuous testing-campaigns of the electronics at each step of the installation advancement, the result is a fully commissioned calorimeter with its readout and a small number of non-functional channels.

  16. Performance of the lead/liquid argon shower counter system of the mark II detector at SPEAR

    CERN Document Server

    Abrams, G S; Breidenbach, M; Briggs, D D; Carithers, W C; Dieterle, W E; Dorfan, J M; Eaton, M W; Hanson, G; Hitlin, D G; Jenni, Peter; Lankford, A J; Lüth, V; Pang, C Y; Vella, E N

    1980-01-01

    The shower counter system of the SLAC-LBL Mark II detector is a large lead-liquid argon system of the type pioneered by Willis and Radeka (1974); however, it differs in most details and is much larger than other such detectors currently in operation. It contains, for example, 8000 liters of liquid argon and 3000 channels of low noise electronics, which is about eight times the size of the system of Willis et al. in the CERN ISR. The authors report, with little reference to design, on the operation and performance of the Mark II system during approximately a year and a half of operation at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's e/sup +/-e/sup -/ facility, SPEAR. The design and construction of the system have previously been described, Abrams et al. (1978) and a detailed discussion of all aspects-design, construction, operation, and performance-is in preparation. (8 refs).

  17. Study of SiPM custom arrays for scintillation light detection in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervi, T.; Babicz, M. E.; Bonesini, M.; Falcone, A.; Kose, U.; Nessi, M.; Menegolli, A.; Pietropaolo, F.; Raselli, G. L.; Rossella, M.; Torti, M.; Zani, A.

    2017-03-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) technique has been established as one of the most promising for the next generation of experiments dedicated to neutrino and rare-event physics. LAr-TPCs have the fundamental feature to be able to both collect the charge and the scintillation light produced after the passage of a ionizing particle inside the Argon volume. Scintillation light is traditionally detected by large surface Photo-Multiplier Tubes (PMTs) working at cryogenic temperature. Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPMs) are semiconductor-based devices with performances comparable to the PMT ones, but with very small active areas. For this reason we built a prototype array composed by SiPMs connected in different electrical configurations. We present results on preliminary tests made with four SiPMs, connected both in parallel and in series configurations, deployed into a 50 liters LAr-TPC exposed to cosmic rays at CERN.

  18. Decryption of pure-position permutation algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晓宇; 陈刚; 张亶; 王肖虹; 董光昌

    2004-01-01

    Pure position permutation image encryption algorithms, commonly used as image encryption investigated in this work are unfortunately frail under known-text attack. In view of the weakness of pure position permutation algorithm,we put forward an effective decryption algorithm for all pure-position permutation algorithms. First, a summary of the pure position permutation image encryption algorithms is given by introducing the concept of ergodic matrices. Then, by using probability theory and algebraic principles, the decryption probability of pure-position permutation algorithms is verified theoretically; and then, by defining the operation system of fuzzy ergodic matrices, we improve a specific decryption al-gorithm. Finally, some simulation results are shown.

  19. On the plasma chemistry of a cold atmospheric argon plasma jet with shielding gas device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Winter, Jörn; Bösel, André; Reuter, Stephan; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    A novel approach combining experimental and numerical methods for the study of reaction mechanisms in a cold atmospheric \\text{Ar} plasma jet is introduced. The jet is operated with a shielding gas device that produces a gas curtain of defined composition around the plasma plume. The shielding gas composition is varied from pure {{\\text{N}}2} to pure {{\\text{O}}2} . The density of metastable argon \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) in the plasma plume was quantified using laser atom absorption spectroscopy. The density of long-living reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), namely {{\\text{O}}3} , \\text{N}{{\\text{O}}2} , \\text{NO} , {{\\text{N}}2}\\text{O} , {{\\text{N}}2}{{\\text{O}}5} and {{\\text{H}}2}{{\\text{O}}2} , was quantified in the downstream region of the jet in a multipass cell using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The jet produces a turbulent flow field and features guided streamers propagating at several \\text{km}~{{\\text{s}}-1} that follow the chaotic argon flow pattern, yielding a plasma plume with steep spatial gradients and a time dependence on the \\text{ns} scale while the downstream chemistry unfolds within several seconds. The fast and highly localized electron impact reactions in the guided streamer head and the slower gas phase reactions of neutrals occurring in the plasma plume and experimental apparatus are therefore represented in two separate kinetic models. The first electron impact reaction kinetics model is correlated to the LAAS measurements and shows that in the guided streamer head primary reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are dominantly generated from \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) . The second neutral species plug-flow model hence uses an \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) source term as sole energy input and yields good agreement with the RONS measured by FTIR spectroscopy.

  20. Classical Solutions of SU(3) Pure Yang-Mills Theory

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Regular classical solutions of pure SU(3) gauge theories, in Minkowsky spacetime, are computed in the Landau gauge. The classical fields have an intrinsic energy scale and produce quark confinement if interpreted in the sense of a nonrelativistic potential. Moreover, the quark propagator in the background of these fields vanishes at large positive and negative time and space separations.

  1. Multi-Ton Argon and Xenon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Ricardo; Balascuta, Septimiu; Alton, Drew; Aprile, Elena; Giboni, Karl-Ludwig; Haruyama, Tom; Lang, Rafael; Melgarejo, Antonio Jesus; Ni, Kaixuan; Plante, Guillaume; Choi, Bin [et al.

    2009-01-01

    There is a wide range of astronomical evidence that the visible stars and gas in all galaxies, including our own, are immersed in a much larger cloud of non-luminous matter, typically an order of magnitude greater in total mass. The existence of this ''dark matter'' is consistent with evidence from large-scale galaxy surveys and microwave background measurements, indicating that the majority of matter in the universe is non-baryonic. The nature of this non-baryonic component is still totally unknown, and the resolution of the ''dark matter puzzle'' is of fundamental importance to cosmology, astrophysics, and elementary particle physics. A leading explanation, motivated by supersymmetry theory, is the existence of as yet undiscovered Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), formed in the early universe and subsequently clustered in association with normal matter. WIMPs could, in principle, be detected in terrestrial experiments by their collisions with ordinary nuclei, giving observable low energy (< 100 keV) nuclear recoils. The predicted low collision rates require ultra-low background detectors with large (0.1-10 ton) target masses, located in deep underground sites to eliminate neutron background from cosmic ray muons. The establishment of the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory for large-scale experiments of this type would strengthen the current leadership of US researchers in this and other particle astrophysics areas. We propose to detect nuclear recoils by scintillation and ionization in ton-scale liquid noble gas targets, using techniques already proven in experiments at the 0.01-0.1 ton level. The experimental challenge is to identify these events in the presence of background events from gammas, neutrons, and alphas.

  2. Upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters for the High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, Tom; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The increased particle flux at the high luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), with instantaneous luminosities of up to 7.5 times the original design value, will have an impact on many sub-systems of the ATLAS detector. This contribution highlights the particular impacts on the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter system, together with an overview of the various upgrade plans leading up to the HL-LHC. The higher luminosities are of particular importance for the forward calorimeters (FCal), where the expected increase in the ionization load poses a number of problems that can degrade the FCal performance such as beam heating and space-charge effects in the liquid argon gaps and high-voltage drop due to increased current drawn over the current-limiting resistors. A proposed FCal replacement as a way to counter some of these problems is weighed against the risks associated with the replacement. To further mitigate the effects of increased pile-up, the installation of a high-granularity timing detector...

  3. The ATLAS Liquid Argon Electromagnetic EndCap Calorimeter Construction and tests

    CERN Document Server

    Rodier, S; Del Peso, J

    2003-01-01

    This thesis has been carried out within the ATLAS collaboration. ATLAS is one of the two multipurpose experiments approved for data taking at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The main goals of this experiment are, to find the Higgs boson, the missing piece in the otherwise so succesful Standard Model of Particle Physics, and to look for physics beyond the Standard Model up to a scale of 1TeV. For this purpose, electromagnetic (EM) calorimetry play a key role. The ATLAS Collaboration has chosen a Liquid Argon (LAr) option with lead as passive material. The liquid Argon Calorimeter is divided into two main subdetectors, the barrel and the end caps (EC). The design and construction of the LAr EM EC calorimeter is the responsability of the groups at Centre de Physique de Marseille (CPPM) and the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (UAM)following the guideline developed by the research and development working, group 3 for LHC detectors (RD3). The sharing of responsabilities is such that CPPM provides spacers an...

  4. Upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters for the High-Luminosity LHC arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, Thomas G.

    The increased particle flux at the high luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), with instantaneous luminosities of up to 7.5 times the original design value, will have an impact on many sub-systems of the ATLAS detector. This contribution highlights the particular impacts on the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter system, together with an overview of the various upgrade plans leading up to the HL-LHC. The higher luminosities are of particular importance for the forward calorimeters (FCal), where the expected increase in the ionization load poses a number of problems that can degrade the FCal performance such as beam heating and space-charge effects in the liquid argon gaps and high-voltage drop due to increased current drawn over the current-limiting resistors. A proposed FCal replacement as a way to counter some of these problems is weighed against the risks associated with the replacement. To further mitigate the effects of increased pile-up, the installation of a high-granularity timing detector...

  5. Electronic Readout of the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter: Calibration and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Majewski, S; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter is a key detector component in the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The LHC is a proton-proton collider with a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. The machine has been operated at energies of 900 GeV and 2.36 TeV in 2009 and is expected to reach the energy of 7 TeV in 2010. The LAr calorimeter is designed to provide precision measurements of electrons, photons, jets and missing transverse energy. It consists of a set of sampling calorimeters with liquid argon as active medium kept into three separate cryostats. The LAr calorimeters are read out via a system of custom electronics. The electronic readout of the ATLAS LAr calorimeters is divided into a Front End (FE) system of boards mounted in custom crates directly on the cryostat feedthroughs, and a Back End (BE) system of VME-based boards located in an off-detector underground counting room where there is no radiation. The FE system includes Front End boards (FEBs), which perform the readout and dig...

  6. Investigation of forbidden transitions in argon ions. [in laboratory plasma for solar corona simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1976-01-01

    An attempt has been made to observe the visible forbidden argon coronal lines at 553.6 nm (Ar X), 691.7 nm (Ar XI), 847.6 nm (Ar XIII), and 441.2 nm (Ar XIV) in a deuterium-argon plasma produced in a large theta pinch. The electron temperature (250 eV) and the electron density (5 by 10 to the 16th power per cu cm) were measured by Thomson scattering of ruby laser radiation. This temperature is adequate to produce ionization stages up to Ar XIV, as was verified by photographic observation of Ar XIV lines. No line corresponding to the coronal lines was observed from the high-temperature plasma, but lines with wavelengths very nearly identical to those of two of the forbidden transitions were observed; these lines were due to allowed transitions of Ar II in a cooler portion of the plasma. Calculation of rate coefficients in the Coulomb-Born approximation shows that for laboratory experiments, electron collisions are much more important than radiative decay in depopulating the upper state of the forbidden lines.

  7. First principles study of inert-gas (helium, neon, and argon) interactions with hydrogen in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiang-Shan; Hou, Jie; Li, Xiang-Yan; Wu, Xuebang; Liu, C. S.; Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N.

    2017-04-01

    We have systematically evaluated binding energies of hydrogen with inert-gas (helium, neon, and argon) defects, including interstitial clusters and vacancy-inert-gas complexes, and their stable configurations using first-principles calculations. Our calculations show that these inert-gas defects have large positive binding energies with hydrogen, 0.4-1.1 eV, 0.7-1.0 eV, and 0.6-0.8 eV for helium, neon, and argon, respectively. This indicates that these inert-gas defects can act as traps for hydrogen in tungsten, and impede or interrupt the diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten, which supports the discussion on the influence of inert-gas on hydrogen retention in recent experimental literature. The interaction between these inert-gas defects and hydrogen can be understood by the attractive interaction due to the distortion of the lattice structure induced by inert-gas defects, the intrinsic repulsive interaction between inert-gas atoms and hydrogen, and the hydrogen-hydrogen repelling in tungsten lattice.

  8. A pressurized argon gas TPC as DUNE near detector

    CERN Document Server

    Martin-Albo, J

    2016-01-01

    DUNE is a new international experiment for neutrino physics and nucleon decay searches. It will consist of two detectors, about 1300 km apart, exposed to a multi-megawatt neutrino beam that will be built at Fermilab. One of the two detectors will be installed several hundred meters downstream of the neutrino production point with the primary role of characterising the energy spectrum and composition of the beam as well as performing precision measurements of neutrino cross sections. For the design of this so-called near detector, the DUNE Collaboration is considering, among other technologies, a pressurized argon gas time projection chamber. Such a detector, thanks to its low density and low detection thresholds, would allow the detailed measurement in argon of nuclear effects at the neutrino interaction vertex, which are considered at present one of the most important sources of systematic uncertainty for neutrino oscillation measurements.

  9. Opacity measurements in shock-generated argon plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erskine, D.

    1993-07-01

    Dense plasmas having uniform and constant density and temperature are generated by passage of a planar shock wave through gas. The opacity of the plasma is accurately measured versus wavelength by recording the risetime of emitted light. This technique is applicable to a wide variety of species and plasma conditions. Initial experiments in argon have produced plasmas with 2 eV temperatures, 0.004--0.04 g/cm{sup 3} densities, and coupling parameters {Gamma} {approximately}0.3--0.7. Measurements in visible light are compared with calculations using the HOPE code. An interesting peak in the capacity at 400 nm is observed for the first time and is identified with the 4s-5p transition in excited neutral argon atoms.

  10. Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagby, L. F. [Fermilab; Gollapinni, S. [Kansas State U.; James, C. C. [Fermilab; Jones, B. J.P. [MIT; Jostlein, H. [Fermilab; Lockwitz, S. [Fermilab; Naples, D. [Pittsburgh U.; Raaf, J. L. [Fermilab; Rameika, R. [Fermilab; Schukraft, A. [Fermilab; Strauss, T. [Bern U., LHEP; Weber, M. S. [Bern U., LHEP; Wolbers, S. A. [Fermilab

    2014-11-07

    We characterized a sample of metal-oxide resistors and measured their breakdown voltage in liquid argon by applying high voltage (HV) pulses over a 3 second period. This test mimics the situation in a HV-divider chain when a breakdown occurs and the voltage across resistors rapidly rise from the static value to much higher values. All resistors had higher breakdown voltages in liquid argon than their vendor ratings in air at room temperature. Failure modes range from full destruction to coating damage. In cases where breakdown was not catastrophic, subsequent breakdown voltages were lower in subsequent measuring runs. One resistor type withstands 131 kV pulses, the limit of the test setup.

  11. Metal oxide morphology in argon-assisted glancing angle deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorge, J. B.; Taschuk, M. T.; Wakefield, N. G.; Sit, J. C.; Brett, M. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2V4 (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2V4 (Canada) and NRC National Institute for Nanotechnology, Edmonton, AB T6G 2M9 (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Glancing angle deposition (GLAD) is a thin film deposition technique capable of fabricating columnar architectures such as posts, helices, and chevrons with control over nanoscale film features. Argon bombardment during deposition modifies the GLAD process, producing films with new morphologies which have shown promise for sensing and photonic devices. The authors report modification of column tilt angle, film density, and specific surface area for 12 different metal oxide and fluoride film materials deposited using Ar-assisted GLAD. For the vapor flux/ion beam geometry and materials studied here, with increasing argon flux, the column tilt increases, film density increases, and specific surface area decreases. With a better understanding of the nature of property modification and the mechanisms responsible, the Ar-assisted deposition process can be more effectively targeted towards specific applications, including birefringent thin films or photonic crystal square spirals.

  12. Measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yichen, E-mail: yichen@bnl.gov [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 Pennsylvania St., Building 510E, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Tsang, Thomas [Instrumentation Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 N. Technology St., Building 535B, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Thorn, Craig; Qian, Xin; Diwan, Milind; Joshi, Jyoti; Kettell, Steve; Morse, William [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 Pennsylvania St., Building 510E, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Rao, Triveni [Instrumentation Division, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 N. Technology St., Building 535B, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Stewart, James; Tang, Wei; Viren, Brett [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 Pennsylvania St., Building 510E, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    We report the measurement of longitudinal electron diffusion coefficients in liquid argon for electric fields between 100 and 2000 V/cm with a gold photocathode as a bright electron source. The measurement principle, apparatus, and data analysis are described. In the region between 100 and 350 V/cm, our results show a discrepancy with the previous measurement [1]. In the region between 350 and 2000 V/cm, our results represent the world's best measurement. Over the entire measured electric field range, our results are systematically higher than the calculation of Atrazhev‐Timoshkin [2]. The quantum efficiency of the gold photocathode, the drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion coefficients in gas argon are also presented.

  13. Readiness of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter for LHC Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, A A; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Adorisio, C; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahmed, H; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Aktas, A; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Aliyev, M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amorós, G; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anjos, N; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonelli, S; Antunovic, B; Anulli, F; Aoun, S; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Archambault, J P; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, T; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Arutinov, D; Asai, M; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Asner, D; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Atoian, G; Auerbach, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Austin, N; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Ay, C; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baccaglioni, G; Bacci, C; Bach, A; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Baranov, S P; Baranov, S; Barashkou, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baron, S; Baroncelli, A; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; BarreiroGuimarães da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Barros, N; Bartoldus, R; Bartsch, D; Bastos, J; Bates, R L; Bathe, S; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Bazalova, M; Beare, B; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Becerici, N; Bechtle, P; Beck, G A; Beck, H P; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Bedajanek, I; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednár, P; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Ben Ami, S; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendel, M; Benedict, B H; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benincasa, G P; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernardet, K; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertin, A; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bitenc, U; Black, K M; Blair, R E; 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Zitoun, R; Zivkovic, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter has been operating continuously since August 2006. At this time, only part of the calorimeter was readout, but since the beginning of 2008, all calorimeter cells have been connected to the ATLAS readout system in preparation for LHC collisions. This paper gives an overview of the liquid argon calorimeter performance measured in situ with random triggers, calibration data, cosmic muons, and LHC beam splash events. Results on the detector operation, timing performance, electronics noise, and gain stability are presented. High energy deposits from radiative cosmic muons and beam splash events allow to check the intrinsic constant term of the energy resolution. The uniformity of the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter response along eta (averaged over phi) is measured at the percent level using minimum ionizing cosmic muons. Finally, studies of electromagnetic showers from radiative muons have been used to cross-check the Monte Carlo simulation. The performance results obtained u...

  14. Treatment of facial vascular lesions with an argon laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanczyk, Jacek; Golebiowska, Aleksandra; Michalska, I.

    1996-03-01

    Two-hundred-ninety-six patients with various vascular lesions of the face have been treated with argon laser LAK-1 in the Department of Dermatology Warsaw Medical Academy since April 1992. The diagnosis of the treated lesions was port-wine stains, multiple telangiectasiae and small, most often induced by trauma hemangioma cavernosum of the lip. Best results were achieved in the patients with small hemangiomas cavernosum of the lip and multiple telangiectasiae on the face. Cure rate in this group was 100%. In 112 port-wine stain cases fading of 50 - 75% comparing with the adjacent skin was achieved. With stress, the argon laser therapy is a method of choice for the treatment of hemangioma cavernosum, port-wine stains and multiple teleagiectasiae of the face.

  15. Detection of Cherenkov light emission in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonello, M.; Arneodo, F.; Badertscher, A.; Baiboussinov, B.; Baldo Ceolin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bekman, B.; Benetti, P.; Bernardini, E.; Bischofberger, M.; Borio di Tigliole, A.; Brunetti, R.; Bueno, A.; Calligarich, E.; Campanelli, M.; Carpanese, C.; Cavalli, D.; Cavanna, F. E-mail: flavio.cavanna@aquila.infn.it; Cennini, P.; Centro, S.; Cesana, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, D.; Chen, D.B.; Chen, Y.; Cieslik, C.; Cline, D.; Dai, Z.; De Vecchi, C.; Dabrowska, A.; Dolfini, R.; Felcini, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferri, F.; Ge, Y.; Gibin, D.; Gigli Berzolari, A.; Gil-Botella, I.; Graczyk, K.; Grandi, L.; Guglielmi, A.; He, K.; Holeczek, J.; Huang, X.; Juszczak, C.; Kielczewska, D.; Kisiel, J.; Kozlowski, T.; Laffranchi, M.; Lagoda, J.; Li, Z.; Lu, F.; Ma, J.; Markiewicz, M.; Matthey, C.; Mauri, F.; Mazza, D.; Meng, G.; Messina, M.; Montanari, C.; Muraro, S.; Navas-Concha, S.; Nurzia, G.; Otwinowski, S.; Ouyang, Q.; Palamara, O.; Pascoli, D.; Periale, L.; Piano Mortari, G.B.; Piazzoli, A.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Polchlopek, W.; Rancati, T.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rico, J.; Rondio, E.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.; Scannicchio, D.; Segreto, E.; Seo, Y.; Sergiampietri, F.; Sobczyk, J.; Stepaniak, J.; Szarska, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Terrani, M.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wang, H.; Woo, J.; Xu, G.; Xu, Z.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Q.; Zhen, S.; Zipper, W

    2004-01-11

    Detection of Cherenkov light emission in liquid argon has been obtained with an ICARUS prototype, during a dedicated test run at the Gran Sasso Laboratory external facility. Ionizing tracks from cosmic ray muons crossing the detector active volume have been collected in coincidence with visible light signals from a photo-multiplier (PMT) immersed in liquid argon. A 3D reconstruction of the tracks has been performed exploiting the ICARUS imaging capability. The angular distributions of the tracks triggered by the PMT signals show an evident directionality. By means of a detailed Monte Carlo simulation we show that the geometrical characteristics of the events are compatible with the hypothesis of Cherenkov light emission as the main source of the PMT signals.

  16. Infrared spectrum of the chloromethylene hydroperoxide cation in solid argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mohua; Zhou, Mingfei

    2013-07-01

    Infrared spectrum of the chloromethylene hydroperoxide cation, HC(Cl)OOH+ in solid argon is reported. The cation is produced by co-condensation of dichloromethane and dioxygen mixtures with high-frequency discharged argon at 4 K followed by visible light excitation. On the basis of isotopic substitutions as well as quantum chemical frequency calculations, absorptions at 3452.7, 3052.0, 1499.6, 976.9, 855.4 and 956.1 cm-1 are assigned to the O-H, C-H, Cdbnd O, C-Cl and O-O stretching and out-of-plane CH wagging vibrations of the chloromethylene hydroperoxy cation. The cation was predicted to have a singlet ground state with planar Cs symmetry.

  17. Trimming of a Migrated Biliary Nitinol Stent Using Argon Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Matsubayashi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Metallic stent migration is a well-known complication which cannot always be managed by removal or repositioning, especially in case of uncovered stent. We report a patient who developed obstructive jaundice due to migration of an expandable metallic stent (EMS inserted in the lower bile duct. Trimming of the EMS using argon plasma was performed, with the power setting of 60 W and 2.0 l/min of argon flow. The distal part of the EMS was removed and mechanical cleaning using balloon catheter was performed for remnant EMS. Without additional stent insertion, jaundice was relieved in a few days. No complication was recognized during the procedure and no recurrence of jaundice in the rest of his life.

  18. Bringing Planctomycetes into pure culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Maria Lage

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Planctomycetes have been known since the description of Planctomyces bekefii by Gimesi at the beginning of the twentieth century (1924, although the first axenic cultures were only obtained in the 1970s. Since then, eleven genera with fourteen species have been validly named and five candidatus genera belonging to the anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox bacteria have also been discovered. However, Planctomycetes diversity is much broader than these numbers indicate, as shown by environmental molecular studies. In recent years the authors have attempted to isolate and cultivate additional strains of Planctomycetes. This paper provides a summary of the isolation work that was carried out to obtain in pure culture Planctomycetes from several environmental sources. The following strains and planctomycetes have been successfully isolated: two freshwater strains from the sediments of an aquarium, which were described as a new genus and species, Aquisphaera giovannonii; several Rhodopirellula strains from the sediments of a water treatment recycling tank of a marine fish farm; and more than 140 planctomycetes from the biofilm community of macroalgae. This collection comprises several novel taxa that are being characterized and described. Improvements in the isolation methodology were made in order to optimize and enlarge the number of Planctomycetes isolated from the macroalgae. The existence of an intimate and an important relationship between planctomycetes and macroalgae reported before by molecular studies is therefore supported by culture dependent methods.

  19. Isomerically Pure Tetramethylrhodamine Voltage Reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Parker E; Kulkarni, Rishikesh U; Al-Abdullatif, Sarah H; Miller, Evan W

    2016-07-27

    We present the design, synthesis, and application of a new family of fluorescent voltage indicators based on isomerically pure tetramethylrhodamines. These new Rhodamine Voltage Reporters, or RhoVRs, use photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) as a trigger for voltage sensing, display excitation and emission profiles in the green to orange region of the visible spectrum, demonstrate high sensitivity to membrane potential changes (up to 47% ΔF/F per 100 mV), and employ a tertiary amide derived from sarcosine, which aids in membrane localization and simultaneously simplifies the synthetic route to the voltage sensors. The most sensitive of the RhoVR dyes, RhoVR 1, features a methoxy-substituted diethylaniline donor and phenylenevinylene molecular wire at the 5'-position of the rhodamine aryl ring, exhibits the highest voltage sensitivity to date for red-shifted PeT-based voltage sensors, and is compatible with simultaneous imaging alongside green fluorescent protein-based indicators. The discoveries that sarcosine-based tertiary amides in the context of molecular-wire voltage indicators prevent dye internalization and 5'-substituted voltage indicators exhibit improved voltage sensitivity should be broadly applicable to other types of PeT-based voltage-sensitive fluorophores.

  20. Measurement of scintillation efficiency for nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Gastler, D; Hime, A; Stonehill, L C; Seibert, S; Klein, J; Lippincott, W H; McKinsey, D N; Nikkel, J A

    2010-01-01

    The scintillation light yield of liquid argon from nuclear recoils relative to electronic recoils has been measured as a function of recoil energy from 10 keVr up to 250 keVr. The scintillation efficiency, defined as the ratio of the nuclear recoil scintillation response to the electronic recoil response, is 0.25 \\pm 0.02 + 0.01(correlated) above 20 keVr.

  1. Monte Carlo Simulation of Argon in Nano-Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Min; YANG Chun; GUO Zeng-Yuan

    2000-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are performed to investigate the thermodynamic properties of argon confined in nano-scale cubes constructed of graphite walls. A remarkable depression of the system pressures is observed. The simulations reveal that the length-scale of the cube, the magnitude of the interaction between the fluid and the graphite wall and the density of the fluid exhibit reasonable effects on the thermodynamic property shifts of the luid.

  2. Investigation of Non-Equilibrium Argon and Hydrogen Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Christopher Gifford

    1987-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations are made into non-equilibrium argon and hydrogen partially -ionized plasmas characteristic of glow discharge devices such as thyratrons and discharge tubes. For an argon plasma, the development and use of a collisional-radiative, steady -state, three-energy-level model is presented and experimental measurements on pulsed argon plasmas are briefly mentioned. Two different theoretical argon plasma models are discussed; the first is numerically solved using a non-Maxwellian electron distribution function, while the second is solved analytically, including atom-atom inelastic collisions, assuming Maxwellian electron and atom distribution functions. For a hydrogen plasma, experimental measurements using fluorescence and laser-induced fluorescence have been made in a modified hydrogen thyratron over a wide current density range (from 100 to 8,000 A/cm('2)) for the atomic hydrogen population densities n = 2,3,4. A pronounced rise in the atomic hydrogen excited state populations is observed after the end of the current pulse. A new method to measure the time-resolved electron density has been developed and results are presented. A time-dependent model for atomic hydrogen plasmas typical of a thyratron has been constructed, and preliminary results are shown. This model includes ten atomic energy levels (n = 1 to n = 9 and the continuum), takes into account energy balance with an externally supplied current density and assumes a Maxwellian electron distribution function. Implications of these measurements and theoretical analysis upon the operation of thyratrons are discussed. (Copies available exclusively from Micrographics Department, Doheny Library, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 -0182.).

  3. Liquid Argon Hadronic EndCap Production Database

    CERN Document Server

    Oram, C J; Wielers, M

    2004-01-01

    This document describes the contents of the Liquid Argon Hadronic EndCap (HEC) Production Database. At the time of the PRR (Production Readiness Review), the groups responsible for the production of the LAr HEC components and modules were required to provide a detailed plan as to what data should be stored in the production database and how the data should be accessed, displayed and queried in all reasonable foreseeable circumstances. This document describes the final database.

  4. The use of argon beam coagulation in pressure sore reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Donald W; Lewis, Victor L

    2009-12-01

    Pressure sores are a significant source of physical and financial burden for debilitated patients. When conservative measures fail, surgical reconstruction with myocutaneous flaps may be the last hope for cure and/or improved quality of life in these patients. Adequate haemostasis is an integral component of these reconstructive procedures, as bleeding and haematoma formation can lead to increased morbidity. This study was designed to investigate the use of argon beam coagulation in patients undergoing bony debridement and subsequent pressure sore reconstruction with myocutaneous flaps. The clinical records of 34 patients undergoing pressure sore reconstruction with the use of argon beam coagulation from 2004 to 2006 at an academic institution were reviewed and outcomes were assessed. Reconstruction was performed by a single surgeon on 34 patients (31 men, three women; mean age 41+/-15 years), with a total of 41 pressure sores. Thirteen (32.5%) patients had evidence of osteomyelitis preoperatively and five (12.5%) had previous coccygectomies secondary to infection. Twenty-six (65%) of the pressure sores were treated with hamstring V-Y musculocutaneous flaps, 10 (25%) with gluteal flaps, and four (10%) with tensor fascia lata flaps. Overall, suture line dehiscence occurred in six (15%) cases, flap failure and pressure sore recurrence occurred in six (15%) cases, an abscess developed in one (2.5%) case, and a sinus tract with a superficial wound developed in one (2.5%) case. There were no complications related to haemostasis, including excessive bleeding or haematoma formation. Argon beam coagulation is an efficacious tool for achieving adequate haemostasis during pressure sore reconstruction, particularly when significant bony debridement is involved. The use of argon beam coagulation does not result in an increased complication or recurrence rate when compared with conventional electrocautery methods.

  5. Argon laser photocoagulation of cyclodialysis clefts after cataract surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, B. [Univ. of Lund, Dept. of Ophthalmology, Lund (Sweden)

    1995-06-01

    Three patients with cyclodialysis clefts, hypotony and hypotonic retinopathy subsequent to cataract surgery were treated with argon laser photocoagulation. The hypotony was reversed in each patient and their visual acuity was normalized. Laser photocoagulation is a noninvasive treatment that can be repeated easily and safely. The complications of the treatment are minor. A hypertensive episode commonly occurs in the early postoperative period. (au) 8 refs.

  6. Scalable classification by clustering: Hybrid can be better than Pure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Shengchun; He Zengyou; Xu Xiaofei

    2007-01-01

    The problem of scalable classification by clustering in large databases was discussed. Clustering based classification method first generates clusters using clustering algorithms . To classify new coming data points , it finds the k nearest clusters of the data point as neighbors , and assign each data point to the dominant class of these neighbors . Existing algorithms incorporated class information in making clustering decisions and produced pure clusters (each cluster associated with only one class) . We presented hybrid cluster based algorithms , which produce clusters by unsupervised clustering and allow each cluster associated with multiple classes . Experimental results show that hybrid cluster based algorithms outperform pure ones in both classification accuracy and training speed.

  7. Metal clusters on supported argon layers; Metallcluster auf dielektrischen Substraten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, Bernhard

    2011-10-21

    The deposition of small sodium clusters on supported Ar(001)-surfaces is simulated. Theoretical description is achieved by a hierarchical model consisting of time-dependent DFT and molecular dynamics. The valence electrons of the sodium atoms are considered by Kohn-Sham-Scheme with self interaction correction. The interaction of argon atoms and sodium ions is described by atom-atom potentials whereas the coupling to the QM electrons is done by local pseudo-potentials. A decisive part of the model is the dynamical polarizability of the rare-gas atoms. The optional metal support is considered by the method of image charges. The influence of the forces caused by image charges and the influence of the number of argon monolayers on structure, optical response and deposition dynamics of Na{sub 6} and Na{sub 8} is investigated. There is very little influence on cluster structure and only a small shift of the cluster perpendicular to the surface. Concerning optical response the position of the Mie plasmon peak stays robust whereas the details of spectral fragmentation react very sensitively to changes. The forces caused by image charges of the metal support play only a little role with the dynamics of deposition while the thickness of the argon surface strongly influences the dissipation. (orig.)

  8. Bacteria Inactivation Using DBD Plasma Jet in Atmospheric Pressure Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guimin; ZHANG Guanjun; SHI Xingmin; MA Yue; WANG Ning; LI Yuan

    2009-01-01

    A coaxial dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet Was designed,which can be operated in atmospheric pressure argon under an intermediate frequency sinusoidal resonant power supply,and an atmospheric pressure glow-like discharge Was achieved.Two kinds of typical bacteria,i.e.,the Staphylococcus aureus(S.aurens)and Escherichia coil(E.coil),were employed to study the bacterial inactivation mechanism by means of the non-thermal plasma.The killing log value (KLV)of S.aureus reached up to 5.38 with a treatment time of 90 s and that of E.coil up to 5.36 with 60 s,respectively.According to the argon emission spectra of the plasma jet and the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the two bacteria before and after the plasma treatment.it is concluded that the reactive species in the argon plasma played a major role in the bacterial inactivation,while the heat,electric field and UV photons had little effect.

  9. Isotopic fractionation of argon during stepwise release from shungite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rison, W.

    1980-05-01

    It is noted that in previous attempts to determine the Ar-40/Ar-36 ratio in the ancient atmosphere, the only direct measurement yielding a value below the atmospheric value of today is for argon released at low temperatures from a pre-Cambrian shungite. In the present work, a low value for Ar-40/Ar-36 in gas released from a type I shungite at low temperatures is confirmed. Attention is given to a study of the accompanying Ar-38/Ar-36 ratios and the enhanced ratio of Ar-40/Ar-36 for the fractions released at high temperatures which shows that the effect observed is a result of the stepwise heating and the argon diffusion mobilized thereby. It is suggested that the low Ar-40/Ar-36 obtained in the past is from the same source rather than reflecting the isotropic composition of the pre-Cambrian atmosphere, and that the type I shungite may exhibit simple volume diffusion over macroscopic dimensions as glasses do. It is concluded that if this is so, the diffusion parameters obtained from the data would imply rapid exchange with the atmosphere for any argon initially trapped in the veins of the material.

  10. Cryogenic Tests of the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Fabre, C; Chalifour, M; Gonidec, A; Passardi, Giorgio

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter consists of the barrel and two end-cap detectors housed in three independent cryostats filled with a total volume of 78 m3 of liquid argon. During cool-down the temperature differences in the composite structure of the detectors must be kept within strict limits to avoid excessive mechanical stresses and relative displacements. During normal operation the formation of gas bubbles, which are detrimental to the functioning of the detector, must be prevented and temperature gradients of less than 0.7 K across the argon bath are mandatory due to the temperature dependence of the energy measurements. Between April 2004 and May 2005 the barrel (120 t) and one end-cap (219 t) underwent qualification tests at the operating temperature of 87.3 K using a dedicated test facility at ground level. These tests provided a validation of the cooling methods to be adopted in the final underground configuration. In total 6.9 GJ and 15.7 GJ were extracted from the calorimeters and a temperature...

  11. Free electron lifetime achievements in liquid Argon imaging TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baibussinov, B; Ceolin, M Baldo; Centro, S; Cieslik, K; Farnese, C; Fava, A; Gibin, D; Guglielmi, A; Meng, G; Pietropaolo, F; Varanini, F; Ventura, S [INFN, Sezione di Padova via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Calligarich, E [INFN, Sezione di Pavia via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Rubbia, C, E-mail: Carlo.Rubbia@cern.c [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso dell' INFN I-67010 Assergi (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    A key feature for the success of the liquid Argon imaging TPC (LAr-TPC) technology is the industrial purification against electro-negative impurities, especially Oxygen and Nitrogen remnants, which have to be continuously kept at an exceptionally low level by filtering and recirculating liquid Argon. Improved purification techniques have been applied to a 120 liters LAr-TPC test facility in the INFN-LNL laboratory. Through-going muon tracks have been used to determine the free electron lifetime in liquid Argon against electro-negative impurities. The short path length here observed (30 cm) is compensated by the high accuracy in the observation of the specific ionization of cosmic ray muons at sea level as a function of the drift distance. A free electron lifetime of tau {approx} (21.4{sup +7.3}{sub -4.3}) ms, namely > 15.8 ms at 90% C.L. has been observed over several weeks under stable conditions, corresponding to a residual Oxygen equivalent of {approx} 15 ppt (part per trillion). At 500 V/cm, the free electron speed is 1.5 mm/mus. In a LAr-TPC a free electron lifetime in excess of 15 ms corresponds for instance to an attenuation of less than 20% after a drift path of 5 m, opening the way to the operation of the LAr-TPC with exceptionally long drift distances.

  12. Tin LPP plasma control in the argon cusp source

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2016-03-01

    The argon cusp plasma has been introduced [1,2] for 500W class tin LPP exhaust control in view of its high power handling, predicted low tin back-scatter from a beam dump, and avoidance of hydrogen usage. The physics of tin ion control by a plasma is first discussed. Experimentally, cusp stability and exhaust disc geometry have previously been proved at full scale [2], the equivalent of 300W-500W usable EUV. Here we verify operation of the plasma barrier that maintains a high argon density next to the collector, for its protection, and a low density in the long path toward the intermediate focus, for efficiency. A pressure differential of 2Pa has been demonstrated in initial work. Other aspects of tin LPP plasma control by the cusp have now been demonstrated using tin ions from a low Hz 130mJ CO2 laser pulse onto a solid tin surface at the cusp center. Plasma is rejected at the design to match a specified exhaust power is discussed. In view of this work, argon cusp exhaust control appears to be very promising for 500W class tin LPP sources.

  13. Vacuum ultraviolet radiation emitted by microwave driven argon plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinho, S.; Felizardo, E.; Henriques, J.; Tatarova, E.

    2017-04-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation emitted by microwave driven argon plasmas has been investigated at low-pressure conditions (0.36 mbar). A classical surface-wave sustained discharge at 2.45 GHz has been used as plasma source. VUV radiation has been detected by emission spectroscopy in the 30-125 nm spectral range. The spectrum exhibits atomic and ionic argon emissions with the most intense spectral lines corresponding to the atomic resonance lines, at 104.8 nm and 106.7 nm, and to the ion lines, at 92.0 nm and 93.2 nm. Emissions at lower wavelengths were also detected, including lines with no information concerning level transitions in the well-known NIST database (e.g., the atomic line at 89.4 nm). The dependence of the lines' intensity on the microwave power delivered to the launcher was investigated. The electron density was estimated to be around 1012 cm-3 using the Stark broadening of the hydrogen Hβ line at 486.1 nm. The main population and loss mechanisms considered in the model for the excited argon atom and ion states emitting in the VUV range are discussed. The experimental results were compared to self-consistent model predictions, and a good agreement was obtained.

  14. Readiness of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter for LHC collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Dos Santos Pedrosa, F. Baltasar; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S. P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baron, S.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Barros, N.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bastos, J.; Bates, R. L.; Bathe, S.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Becerici, N.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Bedajanek, I.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednár, P.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G. P.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bocci, A.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, J. R. A.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bosteels, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. 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M.; Mehdiyev, R.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meirose, B.; Melamed-Katz, A.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meng, Z.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Merkl, D.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messina, A. M.; Messmer, I.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, T. C.; Meyer, W. T.; Miao, J.; Micu, L.; Middleton, R. P.; Migas, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikuž, M.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, W. J.; Mills, C. M.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Minaenko, A. A.; Miñano, M.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Mir, L. M.; Mirabelli, G.; Misawa, S.; Miscetti, S.; Misiejuk, A.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Mladenov, D.; Moa, T.; Mockett, P.; Moed, S.; Moeller, V.; Mönig, K.; Möser, N.; Mohn, B.; Mohr, W.; Mohrdieck-Möck, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Molina-Perez, J.; Moloney, G.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montesano, S.; Monticelli, F.; Moore, R. W.; Herrera, C. 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O.; Osculati, B.; Osuna, C.; Otec, R.; P Ottersbach, J.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, S.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozone, K.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padhi, S.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pajchel, K.; Pal, A.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panes, B.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Panuskova, M.; Paolone, V.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Park, S. J.; Park, W.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, S. I.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passardi, G.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Patwa, A.; Pauly, T.; Peak, L. S.; Pecsy, M.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Peng, H.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perez, K.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Perrodo, P.; Persembe, S.; Perus, P.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Pfeifer, B.; Phan, A.; Phillips, A. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccinini, M.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Ping, J.; Pinto, B.; Pirotte, O.; Pizio, C.; Placakyte, R.; Plamondon, M.; Plano, W. G.; Pleier, M.-A.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poffenberger, P.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomarede, D. M.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Popule, J.; Portell Bueso, X.; Porter, R.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospichal, P.; Pospisil, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Potter, K. P.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Preda, T.; Pretzl, K.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Prichard, P. M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Puigdengoles, C.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qi, M.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qian, Z.; Qin, Z.; Qing, D.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rahm, D.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammes, M.; Ratoff, P. N.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renkel, P.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richards, R. A.; Richter, D.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rieke, S.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Riu, I.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E. R.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Rodriguez, D.; Rodriguez Garcia, Y.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosselet, L.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rottländer, I.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sanchis Lozano, M. A.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, D.; Santos, J.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A. Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmid, P.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schumacher, J.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, C.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjoelin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Sluka, T.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Sospedra Suay, L.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stahl, T.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S. N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavropoulos, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Suchkov, S. I.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sviridov, Yu. M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, R. P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Tevlin, C. M.; Thadome, J.; Thananuwong, R.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Tobias, J.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomasz, F.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tovey, S. N.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiafis, I.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Villate, J.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O. V.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaques, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogt, H.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, S. M.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Webel, M.; Weber, J.; Weber, M. D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zilka, B.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-12-01

    The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter has been operating continuously since August 2006. At this time, only part of the calorimeter was readout, but since the beginning of 2008, all calorimeter cells have been connected to the ATLAS readout system in preparation for LHC collisions. This paper gives an overview of the liquid argon calorimeter performance measured in situ with random triggers, calibration data, cosmic muons, and LHC beam splash events. Results on the detector operation, timing performance, electronics noise, and gain stability are presented. High energy deposits from radiative cosmic muons and beam splash events allow to check the intrinsic constant term of the energy resolution. The uniformity of the electromagnetic barrel calorimeter response along η (averaged over φ) is measured at the percent level using minimum ionizing cosmic muons. Finally, studies of electromagnetic showers from radiative muons have been used to cross-check the Monte Carlo simulation. The performance results obtained using the ATLAS readout, data acquisition, and reconstruction software indicate that the liquid argon calorimeter is well-prepared for collisions at the dawn of the LHC era.

  15. Influence of nitrogen admixture to argon on the ion energy distribution in reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering of chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breilmann, W.; Maszl, C.; Hecimovic, A.; von Keudell, A.

    2017-04-01

    Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of metals is of paramount importance for the deposition of various oxides, nitrides and carbides. The addition of a reactive gas such as nitrogen to an argon HiPIMS plasma with a metal target allows the formation of the corresponding metal nitride on the substrate. The addition of a reactive gas introduces new dynamics into the plasma process, such as hysteresis, target poisoning and the rarefaction of two different plasma gases. We investigate the dynamics for the deposition of chromium nitride by a reactive HiPIMS plasma using energy- and time-resolved ion mass spectrometry, fast camera measurements and temporal and spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy. It is shown that the addition of nitrogen to the argon plasma gas significantly changes the appearance of the localized ionization zones, the so-called spokes, in HiPIMS plasmas. In addition, a very strong modulation of the metal ion flux within each HiPIMS pulse is observed, with the metal ion flux being strongly suppressed and the nitrogen molecular ion flux being strongly enhanced in the high current phase of the pulse. This behavior is explained by a stronger return effect of the sputtered metal ions in the dense plasma above the racetrack. This is best observed in a pure nitrogen plasma, because the ionization zones are mostly confined, implying a very high local plasma density and consequently also an efficient scattering process.

  16. K-Ar age of young volcanic rocks and excess argon--Binary mixing model and quantitative study of excess argon effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A binary mixing model for excess argon is suggested in the note. According to this model and the data of excess argon component obtained in our experiment , a quantitative study of the effect of excess argon on real K-Ar age of young volcanic rocks is done. The result indicates that the effect of 5% excess argon component in samples on K-Ar age of the samples more than 2 Ma is less than 7.36% and can lead K-Ar age of 0.5 Ma samples to increase by 32.4%, while 1% excess argon component leads K-Ar age of 0.5 Ma samples to increase by 6.26%. Therefore, when pre-processed excess argon component is ≤1%, K-Ar age of the samples more than 0.5 Ma should be credible. On this basis we suggest a principal opinion for evaluation of previous K-Ar dating results and propose that the matrix is used to determine K-Ar age of young volcanic rocks. For the samples less than 0.2 Ma, in the case of high excess argon content, even if only 1% excess argon component exists in their matrix, it can also greatly affect their K-A age. Thus it must be careful to treat the dating result.

  17. Pure variation and organic stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosanvallon, Jérôme

    2012-09-01

    The fundamental problem posed by Darwin distinguishes his theory from any transformism of the past as well as any evolutionism to come: since variation is inherent to the living, it is a question of explaining, not at all why the living varies, but instead why the living does not vary in all directions to the point of constituting a continuum of forms varying ad infinitum. What limits and stabilizes this intrinsically unlimited variation, allowing certain forms to subsist and multiply to the detriment of others, is natural selection. This double principle of intrinsic variation/extrinsic selection constitutes a vector for the unification of reality that underlies Jean-Jacques Kupiec's ontophylogenesis as well as Deleuze and Guattari's global philosophy of Nature. Therefore, everything would potentially tend to incessantly vary. The work of Kupiec and others identifies an intrinsic random variation within ontogenesis itself. For Deleuze and Guattari, it is nothing but the figure, already selected by the organic stratum, of a more fundamental or pure variation. But, in fact, nothing really varies incessantly: everything undergoes a selective pressure according to which nothing subsists as such except what manages to endure through invariance (physical stratum) or reproduction (organic stratum). Thus, organic stratification only retains from variation what ensures and augments this reproduction. In this sense, every organism stratifies, i.e. submits to its imperative of subsistence and reproduction, a body without organs that varies in itself and always tends to escape the organism, for better (intensifications of life) or worse (cancerous pathologies). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Performance of a SensL-30035-16P Silicon Photomultiplier array at liquid argon temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Catalanotti, S; Covone, G; Incecco, M D; Fiorillo, G; Korga, G; Rossi, B; Walker, S

    2015-01-01

    Next generation multi-ton scale noble liquid experiments have the unique opportunity to discover dark matter particles at the TeV scale, reaching the sensitivity of 10^-48 cm2 in the WIMP nucleon scattering cross-section. A prerequisite will be the reduction of radiogenic background sources to negligible levels. This is only possible if ultra pure high efficiency photosensors are available for the scintillation light readout. Current experiments (e.g. Xenon, LUX, Darkside, ArDM) use cryogenic PMTs as photosensors. An attractive alternative is represented by silicon photomultiplier arrays (SiPM arrays), which show unrivalled performances in single photon detection. This paper reports on the performance of the SensL-30035-16P SiPM array and a custom made cryogenic front-end board at the liquid argon temperature.

  19. Tame Kernels of Pure Cubic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Yun CHENG

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we study the p-rank of the tame kernels of pure cubic fields.In particular,we prove that for a fixed positive integer m,there exist infinitely many pure cubic fields whose 3-rank of the tame kernel equal to m.As an application,we determine the 3-rank of their tame kernels for some special pure cubic fields.

  20. Dissipation-induced pure Gaussian state

    CERN Document Server

    Koga, Kei

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides some necessary and sufficient conditions for a general Markovian Gaussian master equation to have a unique pure steady state. The conditions are described by simple matrix equations, thus they can be easily applied to the so-called environment engineering for pure Gaussian state preparation. In particular, it is shown that for any given pure Gaussian state we can actually construct a dissipative process yielding that state as the unique steady state.

  1. Optical Readout of a Two Phase Liquid Argon TPC using CCD Camera and TGEMs

    CERN Document Server

    Mavrokoridis, K; Carroll, J; Lazos, M; McCormick, K J; Smith, N A; Touramanis, C; Walker, J

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study into the use of CCDs to image secondary scintillation light generated by Thick Gas Electron Multipliers (TGEMs) in a two phase LAr TPC. A Sony ICX285AL CCD chip was mounted above a double TGEM in the gas phase of a 40 litre two-phase LAr TPC with the majority of the camera electronics positioned externally via a feedthrough. An Am-241 source was mounted on a rotatable motion feedthrough allowing the positioning of the alpha source either inside or outside of the field cage. Developed for and incorporated into the TPC design was a novel high voltage feedthrough featuring LAr insulation. Furthermore, a range of webcams were tested for operation in cryogenics as an internal detector monitoring tool. Of the range of webcams tested the Microsoft HD-3000 (model no:1456) webcam was found to be superior in terms of noise and lowest operating temperature. In ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure 1 ppm pure argon gas, the TGEM gain was approximately 1000 and using a 1 msec...

  2. Temporal evolution of electron beam generated Argon plasma in pasotron device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Neha; Pal, U. N.; Prakash, Ram; Choyal, Y.

    2016-10-01

    The plasma- assisted slow wave oscillator (PASOTRON) is a high power microwave source in which the electron beam in the interaction region is confined by the background plasma. The plasma is generated by impact ionization of background gas with the electron beam. A model has been developed for temporal evolution of Argon plasma in pasotron device. In this model, we consider electron beam of energy E interacting with Argon gas. The resulting ionization creates quasi neutral argon plasma composed of argon Ar atoms, singly ionized ions Ar+1and electrons having energy from 0 to E. Electron impact excitation, ionization, radiative decay, radiative recombination and three body recombination processes are considered in this model. Population of ground and excited states of argon atom, ground state of argon ion as well as the population of electron energy groups is calculated by solving time dependent rate equations. Temporal evolution of electron beam generated plasma is given.

  3. Pure Nuclear Fusion Bomb Propulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Winterberg, F.

    2008-01-01

    Recent progress towards the non-fission ignition of thermonuclear micro-explosions raises the prospect for a revival of the nuclear bomb propulsion idea, both for the fast transport of large payloads within the solar system and the launch into earth orbit without the release of fission products into the atmosphere. To reach this goal three areas of research are of importance: 1)Compact thermonuclear ignition drivers. 2)Fast ignition and deuterium burn. 3)Space-craft architecture involving mag...

  4. Data Reduction Processes Using FPGA for MicroBooNE Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jinyuan

    2010-05-26

    MicroBooNE is a liquid Argon time projection chamber to be built at Fermilab for an accelerator-based neutrino physics experiment and as part of the R&D strategy for a large liquid argon detector at DUSEL. The waveforms of the {approx}9000 sense wires in the chamber are continuously digitized at 2 M samples/s - which results in a large volume of data coming off the TPC. We have developed a lossless data reduction scheme based on Huffman Coding and have tested the scheme on cosmic ray data taken from a small liquid Argon time projection chamber, the BO detector. For sense wire waveforms produced by cosmic ray tracks, the Huffman Coding scheme compresses the data by a factor of approximately 10. The compressed data can be fully recovered back to the original data since the compression is lossless. In addition to accelerator neutrino data, which comes with small duty cycle in sync with the accelerator beam spill, continuous digitized waveforms are to be temporarily stored in the MicroBooNE data-acquisition system for about an hour, long enough for an external alert from possible supernova events. Another scheme, Dynamic Decimation, has been developed to compress further the potential supernova data so that the storage can be implemented within a reasonable budget. In the Dynamic Decimation scheme, data are sampled at the full sampling rate in the regions-of-interest (ROI) containing waveforms of track-hits and are decimated down to lower sampling rate outside the ROI. Note that unlike in typical zerosuppression schemes, in Dynamic Decimation, the data in the pedestal region are not thrown away but kept at a lower sampling rate. An additional factor of 10 compression ratio is achieved using the Dynamic Decimation scheme on the BO detector data, making a total compression rate of approximate 100 when the Dynamic Decimation and the Huffman Coding functional blocks are cascaded. Both of the blocks are compiled in low-cost FPGA and their silicon resource usages are low.

  5. Effects of argon gas flow rate and guide shell on oxygen concentration in Czochralski silicon growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    φ200 mm silicon single crystals were grown in the φ450 mm hot zone of a Czochralski (CZ) furnace. By modifying the pattern and the velocity of the argon flow, the silicon single crystals with different oxygen concentrations were obtained. Through numerical simulation, the velocity of the argon gas flow was plotted for the first time. The experiment results were analyzed and the optimum condition of the argon flow with the lowest oxygen concentration was obtained.

  6. Collection efficiency of photoelectrons injected into near- and supercritical argon gas

    CERN Document Server

    Borghesani, A F

    2012-01-01

    Injection of photoelectrons into gaseous or liquid dielectrics is a widely used technique to produce cold plasmas in weakly ionized systems for investigating the transport properties of electrons. We report measurements of the collection efficiency of photoelectrons injected into dense argon gas for $T=152.7 $K, close to the critical temperature $T_{c}\\approx 150.9 $K, and for $T=200.0 $K. The high-field data agree with the Young-Bradbury model and with previous measurements below $T_{c}$ and at an intermediate temperature above $T_c .$ The effective, density-dependent electron-atom momentum transfer scattering cross section can be deduced. However, the weak-field data near $T_{c}$ show large deviations from the theoretical model. We show that the electron behavior at weak field is influenced by electrostriction effects that are only important near the critical point.

  7. Development of ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters Readout Electronics for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00388354; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider will provide 5-7 times greater instantaneous and total luminosities than assumed in the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters and their readout system. An improved trigger system with a higher acceptance rate of 1 MHz and a longer latency of up to 60 micro-seconds together with a better radiation tolerance require an upgrade of the readout electronics. Concepts for the future readout of the 182,500 calorimeter channels at 40/80 MHz and 16 bit dynamic range, and the development of low-noise, low-power and high-bandwidth electronic components will be presented. These include ASIC developments towards radiation-tolerant low-noise pre-amplifiers, analog-to-digital converters up to 14 bits and low-power optical links providing transfer rates of at least 10 Gb/s per fiber.

  8. Development of ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters Readout Electronics for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00388354; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will provide 5-7 times greater instantaneous and total luminosities than assumed in the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters and their readout system. The improved trigger system has a higher acceptance rate of 1 MHz and a longer latency of up to 60 micro-seconds. This requires an upgrade of the readout electronics, a better radiation tolerance is also required. This paper will present concepts for the future readout of the 182,468 calorimeter channels at 40 or 80 MHz with a 16 bit dynamic range. Progress of the development of low-noise, low-power and high-bandwidth electronic components will be presented. These include radiation-tolerant preamplifiers, analog-to-digital converters (ADC) up to 14 bits and low-power optical links providing transfer rates of at least 10 Gbps per fiber.

  9. Monitoring and data quality assessment of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliot, Frederic; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Matthew; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Giunta, Michele; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Grybel, Kai; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageboeck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Heisterkamp, Simon; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le, Bao Tran; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire, Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Losty, Michael; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Moeller, Victoria; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petteni, Michele; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pizio, Caterina; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savard, Pierre; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R~Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Christopher; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wright, Michael; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    The liquid argon calorimeter is a key component of the ATLAS detector installed at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The primary purpose of this calorimeter is the measurement of electrons and photons. It also provides a crucial input for measuring jets and missing transverse momentum. An advanced data monitoring procedure was designed to quickly identify issues that would affect detector performance and ensure that only the best quality data are used for physics analysis. This article presents the validation procedure developed during the 2011 and 2012 LHC data-taking periods, in which more than 98% of the proton–proton luminosity recorded by ATLAS at a centre-of-mass energy of 7–8 TeV had calorimeter data quality suitable for physics analysis.

  10. The Expansion Postponement in Pure Type Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋方敏

    1997-01-01

    The expansion postponement problem in Pure Type Systems is an open problem raised by R.Pollack in 1992.In this paper,the author presents a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for this problem and a set of sufficient conditions for it.The author also gives some properties for pure typ systems without the expansion rule.

  11. Measuring the entanglement of bipartite pure states

    CERN Document Server

    Sancho, J M

    2000-01-01

    The problem of the experimental determination of the amount of entanglement of a bipartite pure state is addressed. We show that measuring a single observable does not suffice to determine the entanglement of a given unknown pure state of two particles. Possible minimal local measuring strategies are discussed and a comparison is made on the basis of their best achievable precision.

  12. Fundamentals of the pure spinor formalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, J.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents recent developments within the pure spinor formalism, which has simplified amplitude computations in perturbative string theory, especially when spacetime fermions are involved. Firstly the worldsheet action of both the minimal and the non-minimal pure spinor formalism is derive

  13. Extreme ultraviolet fluorescence spectroscopy of pure and core-shell rare gas clusters at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroedter, Lasse

    2013-08-15

    The interaction of rare gas clusters with short-wavelength radiation of free-electron lasers (FELs) has been studied extensively over the last decade by means of electron and ion time-of-flight spectroscopy. This thesis describes the design and construction of a fluorescence spectrometer for the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range and discusses the cluster experiments performed at FLASH, the Free-electron LAser in Hamburg. Fluorescence of xenon and of argon clusters was studied, both in dependence on the FEL pulse intensity and on the cluster size. The FEL wavelength was set to the giant 4d-resonance of xenon at 13.5 nm and the FEL pulse intensity reached peak values of 2.7.10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. For xenon clusters, charge states of at least 11+ were identified. For argon, charge states up to 7+ were detected. The cluster-size dependent study revealed a decrease of the fluorescence yield per atom with increasing cluster size. This decrease is explained with the help of a geometric model. It assumes that virtually the entire fluorescence yield stems from shells of ions on the cluster surface, whereas ions in the cluster core predominantly recombine non-radiatively with electrons. However, the detailed analysis of fluorescence spectra from clusters consisting of a core of Xe atoms and a surrounding shell of argon atoms shows that, in fact, a small fraction of the fluorescence signal comes from Xe ions in the cluster core. Interestingly, these ions are as highly charged as the ions in the shells of a pure Xe cluster. This result goes beyond the current understanding of charge and energy transfer processes in these systems and points toward the observation of ultrafast charging dynamics in a time window where mass spectrometry is inherently blind. (orig.)

  14. Pure Nuclear Fusion Bomb Propulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Winterberg, F

    2008-01-01

    Recent progress towards the non-fission ignition of thermonuclear micro-explosions raises the prospect for a revival of the nuclear bomb propulsion idea, both for the fast transport of large payloads within the solar system and the launch into earth orbit without the release of fission products into the atmosphere. To reach this goal three areas of research are of importance: 1)Compact thermonuclear ignition drivers. 2)Fast ignition and deuterium burn. 3)Space-craft architecture involving magnetic insulation and GeV electrostatic potentials

  15. Effects of argon flow on impurities transport in a directional solidification furnace for silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zaoyang; Liu, Lijun; Ma, Wencheng; Kakimoto, Koichi

    2011-03-01

    A global simulation including coupled oxygen and carbon transport was carried out to study the argon flow effects on the impurities transport in a directional solidification furnace for silicon solar cells. The simulation is based on a fully coupled calculation of the thermal and flow fields in a furnace including argon gas flow and melt convection. Five chemical reactions are considered in the impurity transport model. The effects of both the argon flow rate and the furnace pressure were examined. It was found that the argon flow has an important effect on the silicon melt convection, which will further influence the evaporation characteristic of SiO at the melt free surface. The amount of SiO carried away by the argon flow increases with increase in the argon flow rate while the CO gas can be prevented from being transported to the melt free surface. There exists a peak value for the concentration of impurities in the furnace chamber regarding argon flow rate due to the correlation among SiO evaporated, reacted and taken away. The pressure also influences the impurity transport in the furnace by modifying the pattern of argon flow. The numerical results demonstrate a method to control the oxygen and carbon transport in a directional solidification furnace by adjusting the argon flow rate and the furnace pressure.

  16. Influence of argon laser curing on resin bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinoura, K; Miyazaki, M; Onose, H

    1993-04-01

    Light cured resin composites are usually cured with halogen lamps whose light output decreases with time and distance to the resin surface. This study compared bond strengths of resins to tooth structure cured with either an argon laser or a conventional halogen light. The enamel and dentin of bovine incisors were ground on the buccal surface with wet #600 grit SiC paper. A 4 x 2 mm mold was placed on the tooth surface and Scotchbond 2/Silux and Clearfil Photobond/Photo Clearfil A were placed into the molds and cured using a Quick Light or an argon laser for exposure times of 10, 20, and 30 seconds, and distances of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm from the resin surface. The intensity of the Quick Light was measured as 510 mW/cm2 at 470 +/- 15 nm and the intensity of the argon laser was adjusted to 510 mW/cm2 before curing. Shear bond tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min were performed after 24 hours of storage in water. The bond strengths obtained with the halogen lamp and the laser were not significantly different at the same exposure times and at 0.0 or 0.5 mm from the resin surface. The laser cured bond strengths did not decrease with increasing distance whereas there was a significant decrease in halogen bond strengths at distances greater than 0.5 mm for both resins. The use of the laser might provide a clinical advantage in cases where the curing light source cannot be brought into proximity to the surface of the resin.

  17. Episodic growth of Mt. Shasta, CA, documented by argon geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, A. T.; Christiansen, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    eruptive focus shifted 1.5 km north (Misery Hill) between 50-35 ka, erupting silicic andesite and mafic dacite onto all sectors of the volcano. Flank vents directly south and north erupted domes and lavas 20-15 ka. At ~11 ka a voluminous episode began with the subplinian Red Banks pumice followed shortly by Shastina andesite/dacite lavas, domes, and pyroclastic flows, and soon after by Black Butte flank dacites. Existing 14C geochronology, and stratigraphic studies of the deposits show no eruptive breaks and constrain the episode to have lasted less than a few hundred years. Subsequent Holocene eruptions all issued from the modern summit (Hotlum cone), producing at least 10 large lava flows directed toward the NE sector, along with pyroclastic and debris flows, and a summit dome. Preliminary argon geochronology in progress dates summit lavas at 8.8, 5.8 and 4.7 ka.

  18. Non-universalities in pure gravity mediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Jason L.; Olive, Keith A. [University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Ibe, Masahiro [University of Tokyo, ICRR, Kashiwa (Japan); University of Tokyo, Kavli IPMU (WPI), TODIAS, Kashiwa (Japan); Yanagida, Tsutomu T. [University of Tokyo, Kavli IPMU (WPI), TODIAS, Kashiwa (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    The simplest model of pure gravity mediation contains only two free parameters: the gravitino mass and tan{beta}. Scalar masses are universal at some high energy renormalization scale and gaugino masses are determined through anomalies and depend on the gravitino mass and the gauge couplings. This theory requires a relatively large gravitino mass (m{sub 3/2}>or similar 300 TeV) and a limited range in tan{beta}{approx_equal}1.7-2.5. Here we generalize the theory to allow for non-universality in the Higgs soft masses. This introduces zero, one or two new free parameters associated with Higgs soft masses. This generalization allows us to greatly increase the allowed range in tan{beta} and it allows one to find viable solutions with lower m{sub 3/2}. The latter is important if we hope to find a low energy signal from gluinos. Some special cases of these non-universalities are suggestive of Higgs bosons as Nambu-Goldstone bosons or a partial no-scale structure for the Higgs doublets. Thus, we probe signatures at the weak scale and structures at the GUT and/or Planck scale. (orig.)

  19. Electron Acoustic Waves in Pure Ion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderegg, F.; Affolter, M.; Driscoll, C. F.; O'Neil, T. M.; Valentini, F.

    2012-10-01

    Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) are the low-frequency branch of near-linear Langmuir (plasma) waves: the frequency is such that the complex dielectric function (Dr, Di) has Dr= 0; and ``flattening'' of f(v) near the wave phase velocity vph gives Di=0 and eliminates Landau damping. Here, we observe standing axisymmetric EAWs in a pure ion column.footnotetextF. Anderegg, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 095001 (2009). At low excitation amplitudes, the EAWs have vph˜1.4 v, in close agreement with near-linear theory. At moderate excitation strengths, EAW waves are observed over a range of frequencies, with 1.3 v vphvph.footnotetextF. Valentini et al., arXiv:1206.3500v1. Large amplitude EAWs have strong phase-locked harmonic content, and experiments will be compared to same-geometry simulations, and to simulations of KEENfootnotetextB. Afeyan et al., Proc. Inertial Fusion Sci. and Applications 2003, A.N.S. Monterey (2004), p. 213. waves in HEDLP geometries.

  20. Photoionization Dynamics in Pure Helium Droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterka, Darcy S.; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Wang, Chia C.; Poisson,Lionel; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2007-02-04

    The photoionization and photoelectron spectroscopy of pure He droplets are investigated at photon energies between 24.6 eV (the ionization energy of He) and 28 eV. Time-of-flight mass spectra and photoelectron images were obtained at a series of molecular beam source temperatures and pressures to assess the effect of droplet size on the photoionization dynamics. At source temperatures below 16 K, the photoelectron images are dominated by fast electrons produced via direct ionization of He atoms, with a small contribution from very slow electrons with kinetic energies below 1 meV arising from an indirect mechanism. The fast photoelectrons have as much as 0.5 eV more kinetic energy than those from atomic He at the same photon energy. This result is interpreted and simulated within the context of a 'dimer model', in which one assumes vertical ionization from two nearest neighbor He atoms to the attractive region of the He2+ potential energy curve. Possible mechanism for the slow electrons, which were also seen at energies below IE(He), are discussed, including vibrational autoionizaton of Rydberg states comprising an electron weakly bound to the surface of a large HeN+ core.

  1. Non-universalities in pure gravity mediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jason L.; Ibe, Masahiro; Olive, Keith A.; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2013-10-01

    The simplest model of pure gravity mediation contains only two free parameters: the gravitino mass and tan β. Scalar masses are universal at some high energy renormalization scale and gaugino masses are determined through anomalies and depend on the gravitino mass and the gauge couplings. This theory requires a relatively large gravitino mass ( m 3/2≳300 TeV) and a limited range in tan β≃1.7-2.5. Here we generalize the theory to allow for non-universality in the Higgs soft masses. This introduces zero, one or two new free parameters associated with Higgs soft masses. This generalization allows us to greatly increase the allowed range in tan β and it allows one to find viable solutions with lower m 3/2. The latter is important if we hope to find a low energy signal from gluinos. Some special cases of these non-universalities are suggestive of Higgs bosons as Nambu-Goldstone bosons or a partial no-scale structure for the Higgs doublets. Thus, we probe signatures at the weak scale and structures at the GUT and/or Planck scale.

  2. Non-Universalities in Pure Gravity Mediation

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Jason L; Ibe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T

    2013-01-01

    The simplest model of pure gravity mediation contains only two free parameters: the gravitino mass and \\tan\\beta. Scalar masses are universal at some high energy renormalization scale and gaugino masses are determined through anomalies and depend on the gravitino mass and the gauge couplings. This theory requires a relatively large gravitino mass (m_{3/2}\\gtrsim 300\\,TeV) and a limited range in \\tan \\beta \\simeq 1.7--2.5. Here we generalize the theory to allow for non-universality in the Higgs soft masses. This introduces zero, one or two new free parameters associated with Higgs soft masses. This generalization allows us to greatly increase the allowed range in \\tan \\beta and it allows one to find viable solutions with lower m_{3/2}. The latter is important if we hope to find a low energy signal from gluinos. Some special cases of these non-universalities are suggestive of Higgs bosons as Nambu-Goldstone bosons or a partial no-scale structure for the Higgs doublets. Thus, we probe signatures at the weak scal...

  3. Guiding of positive streamers in nitrogen, argon and N$_{2}$-O$_{2}$ mixtures by very low $n_{e}$ laser-induced pre-ionization trails

    CERN Document Server

    Nijdam, S

    2016-01-01

    In previous work we have shown that positive streamers in pure nitrogen can be guided by a laser-induced trail of low electron density. Here we show more detailed results from such measurements. We show the sensitivity of this laser-guiding on pressure p and found that the maximum delay between the laser pulse and voltage pulse for guiding scales with something between $1/p$ and $1/p^{2}$. We also show that when we use a narrower laser beam the laser guiding occurs less frequent and that when we move the laser beam away from the symmetry axis, guiding hardly is observed. Finally we show that laser guiding can also occur in pure argon.

  4. Efficient factorization with a single pure qubit and $log N$ mixed qubits

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, S.; Plenio, M. B.

    2000-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that Shor's quantum algorithm for the efficient factorization of a large number $N$ requires a pure initial state. Here we demonstrate that a single pure qubit together with a collection of $log_2 N$ qubits in an arbitrary mixed state is sufficient to implement Shor's factorization algorithm efficiently.

  5. Electrical and spectroscopic characterization of a surgical argon plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Sandra; Bibinov, Nikita; Neugebauer, Alexander; Awakowicz, Peter

    2013-01-01

    For electrosurgical procedures, the argon plasma coagulation (APC) discharge is a well-established atmospheric-pressure plasma tool for thermal haemostasis and devitalization of biological tissue. To characterize this plasma source, voltage-current measurements, microphotography, optical emission spectroscopy and numerical simulation are applied. Two discharge modes are established during the operation of the APC plasma source. A short transient spark discharge is ignited within the positive half period of the applied high voltage after a streamer channel connects the APC probe and the counter-electrode. During the second phase, which continues under negative high voltage, a glow discharge is stabilized in the plasma channel.

  6. Study of a Novel Concept for a Liquid Argon Calorimeter \

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD33 \\\\ \\\\ The development of a fast, highly granular and compact electromagnetic liquid argon calorimeter prototype is proposed as a generic R\\&D project for a novel concept of calorimetry in proton-proton and electron-positron collider detectors: the $^{\\prime$Thin Gap Turbine$^{\\prime}$ (TGT). The TGT calorimeter has a modular construction, is flexible in its longitudinal and transverse granularity, and offers a uniform energy response and resolution, independent of the production angle of incident particles. An important aspect of the project is the development of fast, radiation-hard front-end electronics which is operating in the cold.

  7. Liquid Argon TPC Signal Formation, Signal Processing and Hit Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baller, Bruce [Fermilab

    2017-03-11

    This document describes the early stage of the reconstruction chain that was developed for the ArgoNeuT and MicroBooNE experiments at Fermilab. These experiments study accelerator neutrino interactions that occur in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber. Reconstructing the properties of particles produced in these interactions requires knowledge of the micro-physics processes that affect the creation and transport of ionization electrons to the readout system. A wire signal deconvolution technique was developed to convert wire signals to a standard form for hit reconstruction, to remove artifacts in the electronics chain and to remove coherent noise.

  8. Optical fiber read-out for liquid argon scintillation light

    CERN Document Server

    Csáthy, J Janicskó; Kratz, J; Schönert, S; Wiesinger, Ch

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we describe the performance of a light detector for Ar scintillation light made of wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibers connected to Silicon-Photomultipliers (SiPM). The setup was conceived to be used as anti-Compton veto for high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors operated directly in liquid Argon (LAr). Background suppression efficiencies for different radioactive sources were measured in a test cryostat with about 800 kg LAr. This work was part of the R\\&D effort for the GERDA experiment.

  9. Dimerization of argon and the properties of its small clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, S. V.; Serov, S. A.; Ostrovskii, G. M.

    2016-12-01

    Statistical thermodynamic means are used to study the bound state of a small cluster AN (2 ≤ N ≤ 5) of Lennard-Jones particles in a spherical cavity. The statistical sum is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. For the dimer, integration is reduced to quadratures. The integration region contains only phase space points corresponding to the bound cluster state. Dimerization constant 2A = A2 is calculated via the probability of finding a molecule in the bound state using the example of argon.

  10. Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macheret, S. O.; Shneider, M. N.

    2013-10-01

    Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon was performed in the "forward-back" approximation. The kinetic model was found to adequately describe the left branch of the Paschen curve, and the important role of ionization by fast ions and atoms near the cathode, as well as the increase in secondary emission coefficient in strong electric fields described in the literature, was confirmed. The modeling also showed that the electron energy distribution function develops a beam of high-energy electrons and that the runaway effect, i.e., the monotonic increase of the mean electron energy with the distance from the cathode, occurs at the left branch of the Paschen curve.

  11. The abundances of neon, sulfur, and argon in planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, S. C.; Lacy, J. H.; Townes, C. H.; Aller, L. H.; Geballe, T. R.; Baas, F.

    1981-01-01

    New infrared observations of Ne II, Ar III, and S IV are used in optical observations of other ionization states of the considered elements to evaluate the abundances of neon, argon, and sulfur in 18 planetary nebulae. Attention is also given to one or more of the infrared lines in 18 other nebulae. It is pointed out that S IV was detected in approximately 90% of the observed objects, while Ar III was found in about 80%, and Ne II in roughly one-third. It is noted that optical observations typically include only a limited region of the nebula, while the infrared measurements frequently involve integration over the entire nebular image.

  12. Bootstrapping Pure Quantum Gravity in AdS3

    CERN Document Server

    Bae, Jin-Beom; Lee, Sungjay

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional pure quantum gravity with negative cosmological constant is supposed to be dual to the extremal conformal field theory of central charge $c=24k$ in two dimensions. We employ the conformal bootstrap method to analyze the extremal CFTs, and find numerical evidence for the non-existence of the extremal CFTs for sufficiently large central charge ($k \\ge 20$). We also explore near-extremal CFTs, a small modification of extremal ones, and find similar evidence for their non-existence for large central charge. This indicates, under the assumption of holomorphic factorization, the pure gravity in the weakly curved AdS$_3$ do not exist as a consistent quantum theory.

  13. Fabrication of porous boron-doped diamond electrodes by catalytic etching under hydrogen–argon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Chao [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li, Cuiping, E-mail: licp226@126.com [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li, Mingji, E-mail: limingji@163.com [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li, Hongji [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organic Solar Cells and Photochemical Conversion, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Dai, Wei [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); School of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wu, Yongheng [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Yang, Baohe [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communicate Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); School of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Porous BDD was prepared by hydrogen–argon plasma etching with Ni nanoparticles as a catalyst. • With the increase of etching time, the pore size increases and the pore density decreases. • The etching of BDD is independent of the crystal orientation. • The porous BDD electrode exhibited much higher special capacitance than that of pristine BDD. - Abstract: Porous boron-doped diamond (BDD) was prepared by hydrogen–argon plasma etching using electrodeposited Ni nanoparticles as a catalyst. The etching process and formation mechanism of porous BDD were investigated by changing the etching time from 30 s to 300 s. Pores were produced due to the C atoms around Ni nanoparticles are easy to react with hydrogen plasma and form methane. With the increase of etching time, the pore size increased, the pore density decreased, and the pore depth first increased and then maintained unchanged. The sp{sup 2}-bonded graphitic carbons existing on the surface of BDD increase with increasing etching time due to the increase of surface area. No preferential etching was observed due to the high energy of argon plasma. The electrochemical behaviors of the pristine and porous BDD electrodes were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge–discharge (GCD) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results showed that the porous BDD electrode exhibited high specific capacitance, which is attributed to its high electrical conductivity and large specific surface area. The highest specific capacitance of porous BDD electrode is 9.55 mF cm{sup −2}, which is 22 times higher than that of pristine BDD electrode. The specific capacitance retention of the porous BDD electrode reduced to 98.2% of the initial capacitance after 500 cycles and then increased to 120.0% after 10,000 cycles. For the first 500 cycles, the reduction of capacitance can be attributed to the dissolution of Ni nanoparticles that attached on the

  14. Conformal pure radiation with parallel rays

    CERN Document Server

    Leistner, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We define pure radiation metrics with parallel rays to be n-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian metrics that admit a parallel null line bundle K and whose Ricci tensor vanishes on vectors that are orthogonal to K. We give necessary conditions in terms of the Weyl, Cotton and Bach tensors for a pseudo-Riemannian metric to be conformal to a pure radiation metric with parallel rays. Then we derive conditions in terms of tractor calculus that are equivalent to the existence of a pure radiation metric with parallel rays in a conformal class. We also give an analogous result for n-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian pp-waves.

  15. A prototype liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber for the study of UV laser multi-photonic ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, B; Ereditato, A; Haug, S; Hanni, R; Hess, M; Janos, S; Juget, F; Kreslo, I; Lehmann, S; Lutz, P; Mathieu, R; Messina, M; Moser, U; Nydegger, F; Schutz, H U; Weber, M S; Zeller, M

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design, realization and operation of a prototype liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) detector dedicated to the development of a novel online monitoring and calibration system exploiting UV laser beams. In particular, the system is intended to measure the lifetime of the primary ionization in LAr, in turn related to the LAr purity level. This technique could be exploited by present and next generation large mass LAr TPCs for which monitoring of the performance and calibration plays an important role. Results from the first measurements are presented together with some considerations and outlook.

  16. Crossed-beam time-of-flight study of metastable helium in collisions with helium, neon and argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiering, K.B.; Ryan, S.R. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA). Dept. of Physics); Wing, W.H. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA). Dept. of Physics; Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA). Optical Sciences Center)

    1982-11-14

    Absolute velocity-resolved total integral cross sections have been measured for collisions of helium singlet (2/sup 1/S/sub 0/) and triplet (2/sup 3/S/sub 1/) metastable (He*) atoms with ground-state helium, neon, and argon atoms in the thermal velocity range of 1.0-3.5x10/sup 5/ cms/sup -1/. Additional measurements on the He*-Ne system with a large input aperture at the detector to suppress the sensitivity of the apparatus to elastic scattering failed to show the previously predicted sharply rising velocity structure in the inelastic excitation transfer cross sections.

  17. Crossed-beam time-of-flight study of metastable helium in collisions with helium, neon, and argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiering, K.B.

    1981-01-01

    Absolute total integral velocity-resolved cross sections have been measured for collisions of helium singlet (2/sup 1/S/sub 0/) and triplet (2/sup 3/S/sub 1/) metastables with ground-state helium, neon, and argon in the thermal velocity range of 1.0 to 3.5 x 10/sup 5/ cm/sec. Additional measurements on the He/sup +/-Ne system with a large input acceptance angle at the detector failed to show previously predicted sharply-rising velocity structure in the inelastic transfer cross sections. The measurements were taken with a crossed-beam time-of-flight apparatus.

  18. a Crossed-Beam Time-Of Study of Metastable Helium in Collisions with Helium, Neon, and Argon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiering, Kenneth Barratt

    Absolute total integral velocity-resolved cross sections have been measured for collisions of helium singlet (2('1)S(,0)) and triplet (2('3)S(,1)) metastables with ground-state helium, neon, and argon in the thermal velocity range of 1.0-3.5 x 10('5) cm/sec. Additional measurements on the He*-Ne system with a large input acceptance angle at the detector failed to show previously predicted sharply -rising velocity structure in the inelastic transfer cross sections. The measurements were taken with a crossed-beam time-of-flight apparatus.

  19. Prediction of Underground Argon Content for Dark Matter Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, D -M; Spaans, J; Koppang, M; Hime, A; Keller, C; Gehman, C M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the use of physical models to evaluate the production of $^{39}$Ar and $^{40}$Ar underground. Considering both cosmogenic $^{39}$Ar production and radiogenic $^{40}$Ar production in situ and from external sources, we can derive the ratio of $^{39}$Ar to $^{40}$Ar in underground sources. We show for the first time that the $^{39}$Ar production underground is dominated by stopping negative muon capture on $^{39}$K and ($\\alpha,n)$ induced subsequent $^{39}$K(n,p)$^{39}$Ar reactions. The production of $^{39}$Ar is shown as a function of depth. We demonstrate that argon depleted in $^{39}$Ar can be obtained only if the depth of the underground resources is greater than 500 m.w.e. below the surface. The depletion factor depends strongly on both radioactivity level and potassium content in the rock. We measure the radioactivity concentration and potassium concentration in the rock for a potential site of an underground argon source in South Dakota. Depending on the probability of $^{39...

  20. Transpupillary argon laser cyclophotocoagulation in the treatment of traumatic glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D D; Moster, M R

    1999-10-01

    A patient with traumatic glaucoma who underwent transpupillary argon laser cyclophotocoagulation for management of uncontrolled intraocular pressure (IOP) despite maximally tolerated medical therapy is discussed. In this patient, pars plana vitrectomy, lensectomy, and removal of 180 degrees of necrotic iris had been performed after a blunt trauma with a bungee cord. Six weeks after surgery, the patient presented with an IOP of 40 mmHg despite therapy with three aqueous suppressants. The patient refused further surgical intervention and opted for transpupillary argon laser cyclophotocoagulation (TALC). The laser setting was 1,000 mW, with a 50-micron spot size for 0.1 second. A total of 293 laser exposures through a Goldmann contact lens was administered to all visible ciliary processes over 180 degrees where iris structures were absent. Ten weeks after TALC, the patient's IOP remained controlled with medications at 16 mmHg, and visual acuity had improved to 20/25 with an aphakic contact lens. In selected patients whose ciliary processes are visible with indirect gonioscopy due to the defect in the iris, TALC may be an effective alternative cyclodestructive procedure to lower IOP when conventional medical or laser treatments are not successful.

  1. Converging of Argon Cluster Ion Beams with a Glass Capillary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Kazuhiro; Iuchi, Kensuke; Izumi, Motoki; Moritani, Kousuke; Inui, Norio; Mochiji, Kozo

    We have investigated the converging behavior of argon gas cluster ion beam passed through a glass capillary. The gas cluster ions are attractive as a projectile for SIMS from the view point of minimization of the damages. The cluster ion beam of 5 keV consisting of 500˜3000 argon atoms was injected in the capillary. The inner diameters of the capillary at the inlet and outlet were 0.8 mm and 9.6˜140 μm, respectively. Ion current from the outlet of the all the capillaries were detected. We obtained the converging factor of 2˜7, which depended on the incident ion current. The kinetic energy of the incident ions was found to be reduced by 20˜30% by passing through the capillary. Contrary, the velocity of the ions was not changed. These facts suggest that the cluster becomes 20˜30% smaller in mass by passing through the capillary. As far as we know, this is the first report on the study of the converging of cluster ions by using a glass capillary.

  2. Thermal decomposition of lanthanum(III) butyrate in argon atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Yue, Zhao; Xiao, Tang

    2013-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of La(C3H7CO2)3·xH2O (x≈0.82) was studied in argon during heating at 5K/min. After the loss of bound H2O, the anhydrous butyrate presents at 135°C a phase transition to a mesophase, which turns to an isotropic liquid at 180°C. The decomposition of the anhydrous butyrate ...... is associated to a solidification process. The final decomposition to La2O3 takes place via two intermediate products: La2O(C3H7CO2)4 and La2O2CO3 with release of CO2 and the symmetrical ketone C3H7COC3H7.......The thermal decomposition of La(C3H7CO2)3·xH2O (x≈0.82) was studied in argon during heating at 5K/min. After the loss of bound H2O, the anhydrous butyrate presents at 135°C a phase transition to a mesophase, which turns to an isotropic liquid at 180°C. The decomposition of the anhydrous butyrate...

  3. Equal channel angular pressing of pure aluminium—an analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Saravanan; R M Pillai; B C Pai; M Brahmakumar; K R Ravi

    2006-12-01

    Equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) is a novel technique for producing ultra fine grain structures in submicron level by introducing a large amount of shear strain into the materials without changing the billet shape or dimensions. This process is well suited for aluminium alloys and is capable of producing ultra fine grain structures with grain sizes falling between 200 and 500 nm. The present study attempts to apply ECAP technique to 99.5% pure aluminium and characterize the resulting aluminium by optical metallography, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and hardness measurement. ECAP of 99.5% pure aluminium produces ultrafine grain structure of about 620 nm after 8 passes. Despite an increase in the hardness from 23 to 47 BHN up to 6 passes, it decreases slightly for seventh and eighth passes. The results are compared with the already existing results available on pure aluminium. Analysis of the results of this investigation with those available in the literature has revealed that the number of passes essential to achieve a homogeneous microstructure in pure Al increases, while the ultimate equilibrium grain size obtained becomes finer with decreasing purity.

  4. Atomic model of liquid pure Fe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using a θ-θX-ray diffractometer, the liquid structure of pure Fewas investigated and the diffraction intensity, structure factor, pair distribution function as well as the coordination number and atomic distance were obtained. The experimental results showed that there was also a pre-peak on the curve of the structure factor of liquid pure Fe. The pre-peak is a mark of medium-range order in melts. According to the characteristics of pre-peak, an atomic model of liquid pure Fe is constructed, namely, the structure of liquid pure Fe is a combination of clusters consisting of bcc cells with shared vertexes and other atoms with random dense atom distribution.

  5. Towards a liquid Argon TPC without evacuation filling of a 6$m^3$ vessel with argon gas from air to ppm impurities concentration through flushing

    CERN Document Server

    Curioni, A; Gendotti, A; Knecht, L; Lussi, D; Marchionni, A; Natterer, G; Resnati, F; Rubbia, A; Coleman, J; Lewis, M; Mavrokoridis, K; McCormick, K; Touramanis, C

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a successful experimental test of filling a volume of 6 $m^3$ with argon gas, starting from normal ambient air and reducing the impurities content down to few parts per million (ppm) oxygen equivalent. This level of contamination was directly monitored measuring the slow component of the scintillation light of the Ar gas, which is sensitive to $all$ sources of impurities affecting directly the argon scintillation.

  6. Ful distil ation argon producing crud argon column on operating experience%全精馏制氩粗氩塔操作经验浅谈

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马光显

    2015-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the ful distil ation argon recovery process in the crude argon column in air separation system of cooling,heating and put some matters needing attention in use.%简要介绍了全精馏制氩过程中粗氩塔在空分系统降温、升温及投用中的一些注意事项。

  7. Entropy product measure for multipartite pure states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Wancang; LIU Dan; PAN Feng; LONG Guilu

    2006-01-01

    An entanglement measure for multipartite pure states is formulated using the product of the von Neumann entropy of the reduced density matrices of the constituents.Based on this new measure, all possible ways of the maximal entanglement of the triqubit pure states are studied in detail and all types of the maximal entanglement have been culate the degree of entanglement, and an improvement is given in the area near the zero entropy.

  8. Diphenylhydantoin-induced pure red cell aplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusia, Usha; Malhotra, Purnima; Joshi, Panul

    2006-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia is an uncommon complication of diphenylhydantoin therapy. It has not been reported in Indian literature. Awareness of the entity helps in establishing the cause of anaemia in these patients and alerts the physicians to the need of comprehensive haematological monitoring in these patients. A case of 58-year-old male who developed pure red cell aplasia following three months of diphenylhydantoin therapy is reported here.

  9. Expander Graphs in Pure and Applied Mathematics

    OpenAIRE

    Lubotzky, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Expander graphs are highly connected sparse finite graphs. They play an important role in computer science as basic building blocks for network constructions, error correcting codes, algorithms and more. In recent years they have started to play an increasing role also in pure mathematics: number theory, group theory, geometry and more. This expository article describes their constructions and various applications in pure and applied mathematics.

  10. Dark fermentation on biohydrogen production: Pure culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Duu-Jong; Show, Kuan-Yeow; Su, Ay

    2011-09-01

    Biohydrogen is regarded as an attractive future clean energy carrier due to its high energy content and environmental-friendly conversion. While biohydrogen production is still in the early stage of development, there have been a variety of laboratory- and pilot-scale systems developed with promising potential. This work presents a review of literature reports on the pure hydrogen-producers under anaerobic environment. Challenges and perspective of biohydrogen production with pure cultures are also outlined.

  11. Study of electron recombination in liquid argon with the ICARUS TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoruso, S.; Antonello, M.; Aprili, P.; Arneodo, F.; Badertscher, A.; Baiboussinov, B.; Baldo Ceolin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bekman, B.; Benetti, P.; Bischofberger, M.; Borio di Tigliole, A.; Brunetti, R.; Bruzzese, R.; Bueno, A.; Buzzanca, M.; Calligarich, E.; Campanelli, M.; Carbonara, F.; Carpanese, C.; Cavalli, D.; Cavanna, F.; Cennini, P.; Centro, S.; Cesana, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, D.; Chen, D.B.; Chen, Y.; Cieslik, K.; Cline, D.; Cocco, A.G.; Dai, Z.; De Vecchi, C.; Dabrowska, A.; Di Cicco, A.; Dolfini, R.; Ereditato, A.; Felcini, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferri, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galli, S.; Ge, Y.; Gibin, D.; Gigli Berzolari, A.; Gil-Botella, I.; Graczyk, K.; Grandi, L.; Guglielmi, A.; He, K.; Holeczek, J.; Huang, X.; Juszczak, C.; Kielczewska, D.; Kisiel, J.; Kozlowski, T.; Laffranchi, M.; Lagoda, J.; Li, Z.; Lu, F.; Ma, J.; Mangano, G.; Markiewicz, M.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Matthey, C.; Mauri, F.; Meng, G.; Messina, M.; Montanari, C.; Muraro, S.; Navas-Concha, S.; Otwinowski, S.; Ouyang, Q.; Palamara, O.; Pascoli, D.; Periale, L.; Piano Mortari, G.B.; Piazzoli, A.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.; Polopek, W.; Rancati, T.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.L.; Rico, J.; Rondio, E.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rubbia, C.; Sala, P.R. E-mail: paola.sala@cern.ch; Santorelli, R.; Scannicchio, D.; Segreto, E.; Seo, Y.; Sergiampietri, F.; Sobczyk, J.; Spinelli, N.; Stepaniak, J.; Sulej, R.; Szarska, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Terrani, M.; Velotta, R.; Ventura, S.; Vignoli, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, X.; Woo, J.; Xu, G.; Xu, Z.; Zalewska, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Q.; Zhen, S.; Zipper, W

    2004-05-11

    Electron recombination in liquid argon (LAr) is studied by means of charged particle tracks collected in various ICARUS liquid argon TPC prototypes. The dependence of the recombination on the particle stopping power has been fitted with a Birks functional dependence. The simulation of the process of electron recombination in Monte Carlo calculations is discussed. A quantitative comparison with previously published data is carried out.

  12. Characterising the light output from Argon bombs by two simultaneous diagnostic techniques

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Olivier, M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The light output from Argon-bombs was investigated by means of ultra high speed photography (Cordin Model 550-32 camera) and locally developed photodiode sensors. Tubes of various sizes were inflated with Argon gas, and were detonated on one side...

  13. High-pressure gas hydrates of argon: compositions and equations of state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manakov, Andrey Yu; Ogienko, Andrey G; Tkacz, Marek; Lipkowski, Janusz; Stoporev, Andrey S; Kutaev, Nikolay V

    2011-08-11

    Volume changes corresponding to transitions between different phases of high-pressure argon gas hydrates were studied with a piston-cylinder apparatus at room temperature. Combination of these data with the data taken from the literature allowed us to obtain self-consistent set of data concerning the equations of state and compositions of the high-pressure hydrates of argon.

  14. Rehabilitation of pure alexia: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starrfelt, Randi; Ólafsdóttir, Rannveig Rós; Arendt, Ida-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Acquired reading problems caused by brain injury (alexia) are common, either as a part of an aphasic syndrome, or as an isolated symptom. In pure alexia, reading is impaired while other language functions, including writing, are spared. Being in many ways a simple syndrome, one would think that pure alexia was an easy target for rehabilitation efforts. We review the literature on rehabilitation of pure alexia from 1990 to the present, and find that patients differ widely on several dimensions, such as alexia severity and associated deficits. Many patients reported to have pure alexia in the reviewed studies, have associated deficits such as agraphia or aphasia and thus do not strictly conform to the diagnosis. Few studies report clear and generalisable effects of training, none report control data, and in many cases the reported findings are not supported by statistics. We can, however, tentatively conclude that Multiple Oral Re-reading techniques may have some effect in mild pure alexia where diminished reading speed is the main problem, while Tacile-Kinesthetic training may improve letter identification in more severe cases of alexia. There is, however, still a great need for well-designed and controlled studies of rehabilitation of pure alexia. PMID:23808895

  15. The effect on the ultrastructure of dental enamel of excimer-dye, argon-ion and CO2 lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamara, J; Phakey, P P; Orams, H J; Rachinger, W A

    1992-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the ultrastructural changes that occur in dental enamel irradiated with pulsed excimer-dye, continuous-wave (CW) argon-ion and CW CO2 lasers. The pulsed excimer-dye laser produced deep craters, rough damaged surfaces with underlying porosity and amorphous vitrified material. The vitrification of the enamel indicated that the temperature in these areas must have been at least in the range 1280 to 1600 degrees C. The CW argon-ion laser irradiation produced a changed non-cratered surface with inter-crystalline porosity and a mixture of small and some large irregularly packed recrystallized enamel crystals. The CW CO2 laser produced shallow craters, surface crazing and lifting off the removal of the surface layer to expose the underlying roughened enamel. The ultrastructure revealed inter- and intra-crystalline porosity, a mixture of small but variable size irregularly packed recrystallized enamel crystals and also well packed large crystals which indicated further grain growth. The porosity in lased enamel was overall very similar to that seen in enamel heated in an electric furnace to a temperature of 600 degrees C. The presence of recrystallized enamel crystals indicated a temperature rise of approximately 1000 degrees C and the grain growth indicated that a temperature > or = 1000 degrees C existed for some time after the laser irradiation. In general the excimer-dye laser produced most surface destruction because of its higher power density and shorter interaction time and the argon-ion laser produced least damage. These results indicated that the lasers used in this study require much more refinement before they can find therapeutic application to dental enamel, and this may well be the case for other lasers being investigated for clinical dental practise.

  16. Enhancing ion yields in time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry: a comparative study of argon and water cluster primary beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheraz née Rabbani, Sadia; Razo, Irma Berrueta; Kohn, Taylor; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Vickerman, John C

    2015-02-17

    Following from our previous Letter on this topic, this Article reports a detailed study of time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) positive ion spectra generated from a set of model biocompounds (arginine, trehalose, DPPC, and angiotensin II) by water cluster primary ion beams in comparison to argon cluster beams over a range of cluster sizes and energies. Sputter yield studies using argon and water beams on arginine and Irganox 1010 have confirmed that the sputter yields using water cluster beams lie on the same universal sputtering curve derived by Seah for argon cluster beams. Thus, increased ion yield using water cluster beams must arise from increased ionization. The spectra and positive ion signals observed using cluster beams in the size range from 1,000 to 10,000 and the energy range 5-20 keV are reported. It is confirmed that water cluster beams enhance proton related ionization over against argon beams to a significant degree such that enhanced detection sensitivities from 1 μm(2) in the region of 100 to 1,000 times relative to static SIMS analysis with Ar2000 cluster beams appear to be accessible. These new studies show that there is an unexpected complexity in the ionization enhancement phenomenon. Whereas optimum ion yields under argon cluster bombardment occur in the region of E/n ≥ 10 eV (where E is the beam energy and n the number of argon atoms in the cluster) and fall rapidly when E/n < 10 eV; for water cluster beams, ion yields increase significantly in this E/n regime (where n is the number of water molecules in the cluster) and peak for 20 keV beams at a cluster size of 7,000 or E/n ∼3 eV. This important result is explored further using D2O cluster beams that confirm that in this low E/n regime protonation does originate to a large extent from the water molecules. The results, encouraging in themselves, suggest that for both argon and water cluster beams, higher energy beams, e.g., 40 and 80 keV, would enable larger

  17. Teeming stream protection using an argon shroud during casting of steel ingots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao-jie; Bao, Yan-ping; Wang, Min; Zhang, Le-chen

    2017-01-01

    Two kinds of argon shroud protection devices with two different basic structures were designed and investigated. Industrial experiments and numerical simulations were used to examine the protection effect, and the mechanism of air entrapment during the casting of steel ingots was analyzed. The influence of the structure of the argon shroud protection device on the protection effect was investigated. An argon shroud protection device mounted to the nozzle holder on the bottom of the ladle does not provide a good protection effect because air can easily flow into the teeming system and cause reoxidation of molten steel during teeming. By contrast, an argon shroud protection device seated on the top of the central trumpet provides an excellent protection effect, where air has little chance of flowing into the teeming system during casting. The feasibilities of the argon shroud protection devices are discussed.

  18. Management of Liver Cancer Argon-helium Knife Therapy with Functional Computer Tomography Perfusion Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbo; Shu, Shengjie; Li, Jinping; Jiang, Huijie

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the change in blood perfusion of liver cancer following argon-helium knife treatment with functional computer tomography perfusion imaging. Twenty-seven patients with primary liver cancer treated with argon-helium knife and were included in this study. Plain computer tomography (CT) and computer tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging were conducted in all patients before and after treatment. Perfusion parameters including blood flows, blood volume, hepatic artery perfusion fraction, hepatic artery perfusion, and hepatic portal venous perfusion were used for evaluating therapeutic effect. All parameters in liver cancer were significantly decreased after argon-helium knife treatment (p liver tissue, but other parameters kept constant. CT perfusion imaging is able to detect decrease in blood perfusion of liver cancer post-argon-helium knife therapy. Therefore, CTP imaging would play an important role for liver cancer management followed argon-helium knife therapy.

  19. Simulation of argon response and light detection in the DarkSide-50 dual phase TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnes, P.; et al.

    2017-07-18

    A Geant4-based Monte Carlo package named G4DS has been developed to simulate the response of DarkSide-50, an experiment operating since 2013 at LNGS, designed to detect WIMP interactions in liquid argon. In the process of WIMP searches, DarkSide-50 has achieved two fundamental milestones: the rejection of electron recoil background with a power of ~10^7, using the pulse shape discrimination technique, and the measurement of the residual 39Ar contamination in underground argon, ~3 orders of magnitude lower with respect to atmospheric argon. These results rely on the accurate simulation of the detector response to the liquid argon scintillation, its ionization, and electron-ion recombination processes. This work provides a complete overview of the DarkSide Monte Carlo and of its performance, with a particular focus on PARIS, the custom-made liquid argon response model.

  20. Giant Seebeck effect in pure fullerene thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hirotaka; Abe, Ryo; Ito, Mitsuhiro; Tomatsu, Yasuyuki; Fujiwara, Fumiya; Matsubara, Ryosuke; Yoshimoto, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Masakazu

    2015-12-01

    The small thermal conductivity of molecular solids is beneficial for their thermoelectric applications. If Seebeck coefficients were sufficiently large to compensate for the relatively small electrical conductivity, these materials would be promising candidates for thermoelectric devices. In this work, the thermoelectric properties of C60 were studied by in situ measurements under ultrahigh vacuum after the deposition of a pure C60 thin film. An exceptionally large Seebeck coefficient of more than 150 mV/K was observed as a steady-state thermoelectromotive force. Even considering several extreme but realistic conditions, conventional semiclassical thermoelectric theories cannot explain this giant Seebeck effect.

  1. Nitridation in Photon-Assisted Process Using Argon Excimer Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshikawa, Kiyohiko; Amari, Kouichi; Ishimura, Sou; Katto, Masahito; Yokotani, Atsushi; Kurosawa, Kou

    2006-05-01

    We attempted silicon nitridation that continuously deposits silicon with monosilane (SiH4) and nitrides the silicon with ammonia (NH3) at a low temperature using a vacuum ultraviolet excimer lamp. We used an argon excimer lamp (λ=126 nm, h ν=9.8 eV) so that SiH4 and NH3 can absorb photons and dissociate. Nitrogen exists only near the film surface at a low temperature, and its concentration increases at a high temperature. This photon-assisted process is very feasible for the nitridation of semiconductor devices and flat panel displays in the near future, because it is a low-temperature and low-damage process.

  2. Nanotextured Shrink Wrap Superhydrophobic Surfaces by Argon Plasma Etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolie M. Nokes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a rapid, simple, and scalable approach to achieve superhydrophobic (SH substrates directly in commodity shrink wrap film utilizing Argon (Ar plasma. Ar plasma treatment creates a stiff skin layer on the surface of the shrink film. When the film shrinks, the mismatch in stiffness between the stiff skin layer and bulk shrink film causes the formation of multiscale hierarchical wrinkles with nano-textured features. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images confirm the presence of these biomimetic structures. Contact angle (CA and contact angle hysteresis (CAH measurements, respectively, defined as values greater than 150° and less than 10°, verified the SH nature of the substrates. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability to reliably pattern hydrophilic regions onto the SH substrates, allowing precise capture and detection of proteins in urine. Finally, we achieved self-driven microfluidics via patterning contrasting superhydrophilic microchannels on the SH Ar substrates to induce flow for biosensing.

  3. The ATLAS liquid Argon calorimeters read-out system

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A; Fayard, L; La Marra, D; Léger, A; Matricon, P; Perrot, G; Poggioli, L; Prast, J; Riu, I; Simion, S

    2004-01-01

    The calorimetry of the ATLAS experiment takes advantage of different detectors based on the liquid Argon (LAr) technology. Signals from the LAr calorimeters are processed by various stages before being delivered to the Data Acquisition system. The calorimeter cell signals are received by the front-end boards, which digitize a predetermined number of samples of the bipolar waveform and sends them to the Read-Out Driver (ROD) boards. The ROD board receives triggered data from 1028 calorimeter cells, and determines the precise energy and timing of the signals by processing the discrete samplings of the pulse. In addition, it formats the digital stream for the following elements of the DAQ chain, and performs monitoring. The architecture and functionality of the ATLAS LAr ROD board are discussed, along with the final design of the Processing Unit boards housing the Digital Signal Processors (DSP). (9 refs).

  4. Nanotextured Shrink Wrap Superhydrophobic Surfaces by Argon Plasma Etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokes, Jolie M; Sharma, Himanshu; Tu, Roger; Kim, Monica Y; Chu, Michael; Siddiqui, Ali; Khine, Michelle

    2016-03-14

    We present a rapid, simple, and scalable approach to achieve superhydrophobic (SH) substrates directly in commodity shrink wrap film utilizing Argon (Ar) plasma. Ar plasma treatment creates a stiff skin layer on the surface of the shrink film. When the film shrinks, the mismatch in stiffness between the stiff skin layer and bulk shrink film causes the formation of multiscale hierarchical wrinkles with nano-textured features. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images confirm the presence of these biomimetic structures. Contact angle (CA) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) measurements, respectively, defined as values greater than 150° and less than 10°, verified the SH nature of the substrates. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability to reliably pattern hydrophilic regions onto the SH substrates, allowing precise capture and detection of proteins in urine. Finally, we achieved self-driven microfluidics via patterning contrasting superhydrophilic microchannels on the SH Ar substrates to induce flow for biosensing.

  5. Photodegradation Mechanisms of Tetraphenyl Butadiene Coatings for Liquid Argon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, B J P; Conrad, J M; Pla-Dalmau, A

    2013-01-01

    We report on studies of degradation mechanisms of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings of the type used in neutrino and dark matter liquid argon experiments. Using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry we have detected the ultraviolet-blocking impurity benzophenone (BP). We monitored the drop in performance and increase of benzophenone concentration in TPB plates with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, and demonstrate the correlation between these two variables. Based on the presence and initially exponential increase in the concentration of benzophenone observed, we propose that TPB degradation is a free radical-mediated photooxidation reaction, which is subsequently confirmed by displaying delayed degradation using a free radical inhibitor. Finally we show that the performance of wavelength-shifting coatings of the type envisioned for the LBNE experiment can be improved by 10-20%, with significantly delayed UV degradation, by using a 20% admixture of 4-tert-Butylcatechol.

  6. Argon plasma coagulation for treatment of hemorrhagic radiation gastroduodenitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Shu-Ji; Aoyama, Nobuo; Shirasaka, Daisuke; Inoue, Takashi; Kuroda, Kohei; Ebara, Shigeyuki; Tamura, Takao; Miyamoto, Masaki; Kasuga, Masato [Kobe Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine

    2002-01-01

    A 79-year-old man who had received radiotherapy for portal vein thrombosis due to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) 5 months earlier, showed progressive anemia and melena. Endoscopy on admission revealed diffuse bleeding from multiple telangiectasias on the anterior wall of the antrum and bulbus. We treated this patient with a new non-contact hemostatic method: the argon plasma coagulator (APC). The melena stopped after the first session and the hemoglobin level remained stable for 7 months. No delayed complications have been observed. Gastrointestinal bleeding from chronic radiation gastroduodenitis is rarely reported compared with radiation proctitis. This case demonstrates that APC is effective for hemostasis of diffuse bleeding from radiation gastroduodenitis, just as for radiation protitis. (author)

  7. A Thermodynamic Model for Argon Plasma Kernel Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Keck

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasma kernel formation of argon is studied experimentally and theoretically. The experiments have been performed in a constant volume cylindrical vessel located in a shadowgraph system. The experiments have been done in constant pressure. The energy of plasma is supplied by an ignition system through two electrodes located in the vessel. The experiments have been done with two different spark energies to study the effect of input energy on kernel growth and its properties. A thermodynamic model employing mass and energy balance was developed to predict the experimental data. The agreement between experiments and model prediction is very good. The effect of various parameters such as initial temperature, initial radius of the kernel, and the radiation energy loss have been investigated and it has been concluded that initial condition is very important on formation and expansion of the kernel.

  8. Image Segmentation in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Płoński, Piotr; Sulej, Robert; Zaremba, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) detectors provide excellent imaging and particle identification ability for studying neutrinos. An efficient and automatic reconstruction procedures are required to exploit potential of this imaging technology. Herein, a novel method for segmentation of images from LAr-TPC detectors is presented. The proposed approach computes a feature descriptor for each pixel in the image, which characterizes amplitude distribution in pixel and its neighbourhood. The supervised classifier is employed to distinguish between pixels representing particle's track and noise. The classifier is trained and evaluated on the hand-labeled dataset. The proposed approach can be a preprocessing step for reconstructing algorithms working directly on detector images.

  9. Liquid argon TPC signal formation, signal processing and reconstruction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baller, B.

    2017-07-01

    This document describes a reconstruction chain that was developed for the ArgoNeuT and MicroBooNE experiments at Fermilab. These experiments study accelerator neutrino interactions that occur in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber. Reconstructing the properties of particles produced in these interactions benefits from the knowledge of the micro-physics processes that affect the creation and transport of ionization electrons to the readout system. A wire signal deconvolution technique was developed to convert wire signals to a standard form for hit reconstruction, to remove artifacts in the electronics chain and to remove coherent noise. A unique clustering algorithm reconstructs line-like trajectories and vertices in two dimensions which are then matched to create of 3D objects. These techniques and algorithms are available to all experiments that use the LArSoft suite of software.

  10. Thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) hexanoate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Suarez Guevara, Maria Josefina; Attique, Fahmida;

    2015-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of yttrium(III) hexanoate (Y(C5H11CO2)3)·xH2O in argon was studied by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction at a laboratory Cu-tube source and in-situ experiments at a synchrotron radiation source as well as hot...... into Y2O2CO3 with release of CO2 and 6-undecanone between 280°C and 490°C. A side reaction appears to yield elemental carbon and volatile decane (C10H22). Y2O2CO3 is converted to Y2O3 with release of CO2 between 500°C and 975°C....

  11. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigier, Jean-François; Laplace, Annabelle; Renard, Catherine; Miguirditchian, Manuel; Abraham, Francis

    2016-06-01

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl2 (30-70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10-4.0, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl3 precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO2 powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation.

  12. Flush-mounted probe diagnostics for argon glow discharge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Liang, E-mail: xld02345@mail.ustc.edu.cn; Cao, Jinxiang; Liu, Yu; Wang, Jian; Du, Yinchang; Zheng, Zhe; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Pi [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Jin; Li, Xiao; Qin, Yongqiang; Zhao, Liang [Science and Technology on Space Physics Laboratory, Beijing 100076 (China)

    2014-09-15

    A comparison is made between plasma parameters measured by a flush-mounted probe (FP) and a cylindrical probe (CP) in argon glow discharge plasma. Parameters compared include the space potential, the plasma density, and the effective electron temperature. It is found that the ion density determined by the FP agrees well with the electron density determined by the CP in the quasi-neutral plasma to better than 10%. Moreover, the space potential and effective electron temperature calculated from electron energy distribution function measured by the FP is consistent with that measured by the CP over the operated discharge current and pressure ranges. These results present the FP can be used as a reliable diagnostic tool in the stable laboratory plasma and also be anticipated to be applied in other complicated plasmas, such as tokamaks, the region of boundary-layer, and so on.

  13. Grid pattern Argon Laser photocoagulation for diabetic diffuse macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karkhane R

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine the effect of Grid pattern laser photocoagulation on diabetic diffuse macular edema with assessment of visual outcome. Patients & Methods: The author reviewed the medical records of 84 eyes of 62 patients with diabetic diffuse macular edema treated with Grid pattern green Argon laser photocoagulation in Farabi Eye Hospital between the years 1992-1995, the follow-up period was 16-48 months (average 24.55±6.42, median 28 mounths. Results: Visual acuity was improved in 11.9%; unchanged in 65.4% and worsened in 22.7% of eyes. Conclusion: In assessing long-term visual outcome, Grid laser photocoagulation is an effective modality in maintaining or improving visual acuity.

  14. Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macheret, S. O.; Shneider, M. N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, D-414 Engineering Quadrangle, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Kinetic modeling of the Townsend breakdown in argon was performed in the “forward-back” approximation. The kinetic model was found to adequately describe the left branch of the Paschen curve, and the important role of ionization by fast ions and atoms near the cathode, as well as the increase in secondary emission coefficient in strong electric fields described in the literature, was confirmed. The modeling also showed that the electron energy distribution function develops a beam of high-energy electrons and that the runaway effect, i.e., the monotonic increase of the mean electron energy with the distance from the cathode, occurs at the left branch of the Paschen curve.

  15. Argon plasma immersion ion implantation of polystyrene films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondyurin, A. [Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics (A28), University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)], E-mail: kond@mailcity.com; Gan, B.K.; Bilek, M.M.M.; McKenzie, D.R.; Mizuno, K. [Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics (A28), University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Wuhrer, R. [Microstructural Analysis Unit, University of Technology Sydney, P.O. Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia)

    2008-04-15

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII), using bias voltages of 5, 10, 15 and 20 kV in an argon plasma and fluences in the range of 2 x 10{sup 14}-2 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, was applied to 100 nm polystyrene films coated on silicon wafer substrates. The etching kinetics and structural changes induced in the polystyrene films were investigated with ellipsometry, Raman and FTIR spectroscopies, optical and scanning electron microscopies, atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements. Effects such as carbonisation, oxidation and cross-linking were observed and their dependence on the applied bias voltage is reported. Variations in the etching rate during the PIII process and its relationship to carbonisation of the modified surface layer are explored.

  16. Photoionisation studies of homogeneous argon and krypton clusters using TPEPICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamke, W.; Vries, J. de; Krauss, J.; Kaiser, E.; Kamke, B.; Hertel, I.V. (Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Fakultaet fuer Physik)

    1989-12-01

    The photoionisation threshold region of homogeneous argon and krypton clusters Ar{sub n} and Kr{sub n} for n up to 24 formed in a free jet expansion has been studied in detail, using the threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) time of flight technique. Measurements performed at a variety of different expansion conditions (nozzle temperature and stagnation pressure) demonstrate that fragmentation of larger clusters contributes substantially to the shape of the TPEPICO spectra even for the smallest clusters and at all photon energies higher than about 200 meV to 400 meV above the ionisation threshold. The determination of ionisation potentials for these cluster ions is discussed and careful estimates are given and compared with recent theoretical values. (orig.).

  17. Studies on argon collisions with smooth and rough tungsten surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhgibesov, M S; Leu, T S; Cheng, C H; Utkin, A V

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate argon scattering behaviors on the smooth and rough tungsten surfaces. Current work deals with numerical simulation of nanoscale heat transfer process accompanying with rarefied gas-solid substrate interactions using molecular dynamics (MD) method. Taking into account that this method is very time consuming, MD simulation using CUDA capable Graphic Cards is implemented. The results found that imperfection of the surface significantly influences on gas atom's momentum change upon collision. However, the energy exchange rate remains unchanged regardless to the surface roughness. This finding is in contrast with the results in extant literatures. We believed the results found in this paper are important for both numerical and theoretical analyses of rarefied gas flow in micro- and nano-systems where the choice of boundary conditions significantly influences flow.

  18. Atmospheric dispersion of argon-41 from anuclear research reactor: measurement and modeling of plume geometry and gamma radiation field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Bent; Astrup, Poul; Drews, Martin

    2003-01-01

    An atmospheric dispersion experiment was conducted using a visible tracer along with the routine release of argon-41 from the BR1 research reactor in Mol, Belgium. Simultaneous measurements of plume geometry and radiation fields for argon-41 decay were performed as well as measurements of the argon...

  19. Atmospheric dispersion of argon-41 from anuclear research reactor: measurement and modeling of plume geometry and gamma radiation field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Bent; Astrup, Poul; Drews, Martin

    2003-01-01

    An atmospheric dispersion experiment was conducted using a visible tracer along with the routine release of argon-41 from the BR1 research reactor in Mol, Belgium. Simultaneous measurements of plume geometry and radiation fields for argon-41 decay were performed as well as measurements of the argon...

  20. Effect of Argon Plasma Treatment on Tribological Properties of UHMWPE/MWCNT Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitturi Naresh Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE is widely used in artificial joints in the replacement of knee, hip and shoulder that has been impaired as a result of arthritis or other degenerative joint diseases. The UHMWPE made plastic cup is placed in the joint socket in contact with a metal or ceramic ball affixed to a metal stem. Effective reinforcement of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs in UHMWPE results in improved mechanical and tribological properties. The hydrophobic nature of the nanocomposites surface results in lesser contact with biological fluids during the physiological interaction. In this project, we investigate the UHMWPE/MWCNTs nanocomposites reinforced with MWCNTs at different concentrations. The samples were treated with cold argon plasma at different exposure times. The water contact angles for 60 min plasma-treated nanocomposites with 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 wt % MWCNTs were found to be 55.65°, 52.51°, 48.01°, 43.72°, and 37.18° respectively. Increasing the treatment time of nanocomposites has shown transformation from a hydrophobic to a hydrophilic nature due to carboxyl groups being bonded on the surface for treated nanocomposites. Wear analysis was performed under dry, and also under biological lubrication, conditions of all treated samples. The wear factor of untreated pure UHMWPE sample was reduced by 68% and 80%, under dry and lubricated conditions, respectively, as compared to 2 wt % 60 min-treated sample. The kinetic friction co-efficient was also noted under both conditions. The hardness of nanocomposites increased with both MWCNTs loading and plasma treatment time. Similarly, the surface roughness of the nanocomposites was reduced.

  1. Spectroscopic studies of cryogenic fluids: Benzene in argon and helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, R.; Bernstein, E. R.

    1987-09-01

    Energy shifts and bandwidths of the 610 vibronic feature of the 1B2u←1A1g optical absorption spectrum of benzene dissolved in supercritical argon and helium, and in liquid argon are reported as a function of pressure, temperature, and density. Benzene/Ar solutions display red shifts of the 610 transition with increasing density but the dependence is found to be nonlinear at high densities. Benzene/He solutions evidence blue shifts of the 610 transition as a function of increasing density which also becomes nonlinear at high densities. Only small spectral shifts are recorded if the density is kept constant and pressure and temperature are varied simultaneously. In addition, a small density independent temperature effect on the transition energy shift is identified. Experimental results are compared to dielectric (Onsager-Böttcher and Wertheim) and quantum statistical mechanical (Schweizer-Chandler) theories of solvent effects on solute absorption energy. Reasonably good agreement between experiment and theory is found only for the benzene/Ar system at relatively low densities. The theory fails to predict energy shifts for both the benzene/He and high density benzene/Ar systems. This result is different from the findings for the benzene/N2 and benzene/C3H8 solutions and can be interpreted qualitatively in terms of competition between dispersive attractive and repulsive interactions as a function of density. The failure of the theory to describe these transition energy shifts is attributed to the omission of explicit repulsive interactions terms in the theoretical models employed.

  2. Structural anatomy of pure and hemianopic alexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, A P; Spitsyna, G; Plant, G T; Wise, R J S

    2006-09-01

    The two most common types of acquired reading disorder resulting from damage to the territory of the dominant posterior cerebral artery are hemianopic and pure alexia. Patients with pronounced hemianopic alexia have a right homonymous hemianopia that encroaches into central or parafoveal vision; they read individual words well, but generate inefficient reading saccades when reading along a line of text. Patients with pure alexia also often have a hemianopia but are more disabled, making frequent errors on individual words; they have sustained damage to a brain region that supports efficient word identification. To investigate the differences in lesion site between hemianopic alexia and pure alexia groups, as rehabilitative techniques differ between the two conditions. High-resolution magnetic resonance images were obtained from seven patients with hemianopic alexia and from six patients with pure alexia caused by a left occipital stroke. The boundary of each lesion was defined and lesion volumes were then transformed into a standard stereotactic space so that regional comparisons could be made. The two patient groups did not differ in terms of damage to the medial left occipital lobe, but those with pure alexia had additional lateral damage to the posterior fusiform gyrus and adjacent tissue. Clinicians will be able to predict the type of reading disorder patients with left occipital lesions have from simple tests of reading speed and the distribution of damage to the left occipital lobe on brain imaging. This information will aid management decisions, including recommendations for reading rehabilitation.

  3. Pure plate bending in couple stress theories

    CERN Document Server

    Hadjesfandiari, Ali R; Dargush, Gary F

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the pure bending of plates within the framework of modified couple stress theory (M-CST) and consistent couple stress theory (C-CST). In this development, it is demonstrated that M-CST does not describe pure bending of a plate properly. Particularly, M-CST predicts no couple-stresses and no size effect for the pure bending of the plate into a spherical shell. This contradicts our expectation that couple stress theory should predict some size effect for such a deformation pattern. Therefore, this result clearly demonstrates another inconsistency of indeterminate symmetric modified couple stress theory (M-CST), which is based on considering the symmetric torsion tensor as the curvature tensor. On the other hand, the fully determinate skew-symmetric consistent couple stress theory (C-CST) predicts results for pure plate bending that tend to agree with mechanics intuition and experimental evidence. Particularly, C-CST predicts couple-stresses and size effects for the pure bending of the ...

  4. Performance of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter after three years of LHC operation and plans for a future upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Nikiforou, N; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo-rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at 87 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beam...

  5. Performance of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter after three years of LHC operation and plans for a future upgrade.

    CERN Document Server

    Strizenec, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudorapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a parallel plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at 88.5 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beams. Since then...

  6. Simulation of Liquid Argon Flow along a Nanochannel: Effect of Applied Force%液氩沿纳米级微通道流动的模拟:外力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Chun-Yang; El-Harbawi Mohanad

    2009-01-01

    Liquid argon flow along a nanochannel is studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in this work. Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) is used as the MD simulator. The effects of reduced forces at 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 on argon flow on system energy in the form of system potential energy, pressure and velocity profile are described. Output in the form of three-dimensional visualization of the system at steady-state condition using Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD) is provided to describe the dynamics of the argon atoms. The equilibrium state is reached after 16000 time steps. The effects on system energy, pressure and velocity profile due to reduced force of 2.0 (F2) are clearly distinguishable from the other two lower forces where sufficiently high net force along the direction of the nanochannel for F2 renders the attractive and repulsive forces between the argon atoms virtually non-existent. A reduced force of 0.5 (F0.5) provides liquid argon flow that approaches Poiseuille (laminar) flow as clearly shown by the n-shaped average velocity profile. The extension of the present MD model to a more practical application affords scientists and engineers a good option for simulation of other nanofluidic dynamics processes.

  7. A study of argon, neon and helium based gas mixtures for improving the spatial resolution in time projection chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alber, T. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, D-80805, Muenchen (Germany)); Eckardt, V. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, D-80805, Muenchen (Germany)); Fessler, H. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, D-80805, Muenchen (Germany)); Schoenfelder, S. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, D-80805, Muenchen (Germany)); Seyboth, P. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, D-80805, Muenchen (Germany))

    1994-09-15

    For large TPCs in future experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, CERN) and at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC, Brookhaven) it is of great interest to optimize the gas characteristics and the readout geometry for the planned application. For this a large number of argon, neon and helium based gases with CH[sub 4], C[sub 2]H[sub 6] and CO[sub 2] admixtures as quenchers were studied. The drift velocity and the transverse and longitudinal electron diffusion were measured for drift field strengths between 70 and 200 V/cm. Improvements of the readout chambers were tested. Effects on the spatial and the two-track resolution are discussed. ((orig.))

  8. Modelling the effect of arbitrary P-T-t histories on argon diffusion in minerals using the MacArgon program for the Apple Macintosh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Gordon S.; Baldwin, Suzanne L.

    1996-03-01

    Argon diffusion in mineral grains has been numerically modelled using P-T-t histories that may be relevant to multiply metamorphosed orogenic terranes and for rocks that have resided at high ambient temperatures in the Earth's crust for long durations. The MacArgon program generates argon concentration profiles in minerals assuming argon loss occurs via volume diffusion. It can be run on an Apple Macintosh computer, with arbitrary P-T-t histories used as input. Finite-difference equations are used in the calculation of 40Ar∗ concentration profiles across individual diffusion domains. The associated MacSpectrometer generates model spectra after a P-T-t history has been specified. The form of model {40Ar }/{39Ar } apparent age spectra suggests that considerable caution needs to be exercised in the use of the closure temperature concept and in the interpretation of the significance of plateaux observed in many {40Ar }/{39Ar } apparent age spectra, particularly in cases involving metamorphic rocks, where complex P-T-t histories might apply. Although modelled spectra cannot be directly compared to experimentally determined {40Ar }/{39Ar } age spectra, especially when hydrous phases are involved or in cases where loss of argon has not occurred via volume diffusion, they do provide insight into theoretically expected age spectra for samples that have experienced complex P-T-t histories. MacArgon can be obtained by e-mail from MacArgon artemis.earth.monash.edu.au with enquiries to gordonartemis.earth.monash.edu.au

  9. Phase equilibrium in argon films stabilized by homogeneous surfaces and thermodynamics of two-stage melting transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ustinov, E. A., E-mail: eustinov@mail.wplus.net [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 26 Polytechnicheskaya, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-21

    Freezing of gases adsorbed on open surfaces (e.g., graphite) and in narrow pores is a widespread phenomenon which is a subject of a large number of publications. Modeling of the gas/liquid–solid transition is usually accomplished with a molecular simulation technique. However, quantitative analysis of the gas/liquid–solid coexistence and thermodynamic properties of the solid layer still encounters serious difficulties. This is mainly due to the effect of simulation box size on the lattice constant. Since the lattice constant is a function of loading and temperature, once the ordering transition has occurred, the simulation box size must be corrected in the course of simulation according to the Gibbs–Duhem equation. A significant problem is also associated with accurate prediction of the two-dimensional liquid–solid coexistence because of a small difference in densities of coexisting phases. The aim of this study is thermodynamic analysis of the two-dimensional phase coexistence in systems involving crystal-like free of defects layers in narrow slit pores. A special attention was paid to the determination of triple point temperatures. It is shown that intrinsic properties of argon monolayer adsorbed on the graphite surface are similar to those of isolated monolayer accommodated in the slit pore having width of two argon collision diameters. Analysis of the latter system is shown to be clearer and less time-consuming than the former one, which has allowed for explanation of the experimentally observed two-stage melting transition of argon monolayer on graphite without invoking the periodic surface potential modulation and orientational transition.

  10. Dynamic recrystallization behavior of commercial pure aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui-zhong; ZHANG Xin-ming; CHEN Ming-an; LIU Zi-juan

    2006-01-01

    The flow stress feature and microstructure evolvement of a commercial pure aluminum were investigated by compression on Gleeble-1500 dynamic materials test machine. Optical microscopy (OM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied to analyze the deformation microstructure of the commercial pure aluminum.The results show that the flow stress tends to be constant after a peak value and the dynamic recovery occurs when the deformation temperatures is 220 ℃ with the strain rate of 0.01 s-1; while the dynamic recrystallization occurs when the deformation temperature is higher than 380 ℃, and the flow stress exhibits a single peak at 460 ℃ with different strain rates from 0.001 s-1 to 1 s-1, and continuous dynamic recrystallization and geometric dynamic recrystallization occur during the hot compression of the commercial pure aluminum.

  11. Conclusive discrimination among N equidistant pure states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roa, Luis; Hermann-Avigliano, Carla; Salazar, R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Concepcion, Barrio Universitario, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile); Klimov, A. B. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, 44420 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2011-07-15

    We find the allowed complex overlaps for N equidistant pure quantum states. The accessible overlaps define a petal-shaped area on the Argand plane. Each point inside the petal represents a set of N linearly independent pure states and each point on its contour represents a set of N linearly dependent pure states. We find the optimal probabilities of success of discriminating unambiguously in which of the N equidistant states the system is. We show that the phase of the involved overlap plays an important role in the probability of success. For a fixed overlap modulus, the success probability is highest for the set of states with an overlap with phase equal to zero. In this case, if the process fails, then the information about the prepared state is lost. For states with a phase different from zero, the information could be obtained with an error-minimizing measurement protocol.

  12. Tissue gas and blood analyses of human subjects breathing 80% argon and 20% oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrigan, D. J.; Wells, C. H.; Guest, M. M.; Hart, G. B.; Goodpasture, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Eight human volunteers, individually studied in a hyperbaric chamber, breathed: (1) air at 1 ATA; (2) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min; (3) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (4) 100% O2 at 1 ATA for 30 min; (5) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (6) 100% O2 at 2 ATA for 60 min; and (7) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon tensions were measured in muscle and subcutaneous tissue by mass spectroscopic analyses. Venous blood obtained at regular intervals was analyzed for coagulation and fibrinolytic factors. Inert gas narcosis was not observed. After breathing argon for 30 min, muscle argon tensions were almost three times the subcutaneous tensions. Argon wash-in mirrored nitrogen wash-out. Argon wash-in and wash-out had no effect on tissue PO2 or PCO2. Coagulation and fibrinolytic changes usually associated with vascular bubbles were absent.

  13. Tissue gas and blood analyses of human subjects breathing 80% argon and 20% oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrigan, D. J.; Wells, C. H.; Guest, M. M.; Hart, G. B.; Goodpasture, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Eight human volunteers, individually studied in a hyperbaric chamber, breathed: (1) air at 1 ATA; (2) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min; (3) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (4) 100% O2 at 1 ATA for 30 min; (5) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (6) 100% O2 at 2 ATA for 60 min; and (7) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon tensions were measured in muscle and subcutaneous tissue by mass spectroscopic analyses. Venous blood obtained at regular intervals was analyzed for coagulation and fibrinolytic factors. Inert gas narcosis was not observed. After breathing argon for 30 min, muscle argon tensions were almost three times the subcutaneous tensions. Argon wash-in mirrored nitrogen wash-out. Argon wash-in and wash-out had no effect on tissue PO2 or PCO2. Coagulation and fibrinolytic changes usually associated with vascular bubbles were absent.

  14. Pure neuritic leprosy: Current status and relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Narasimha Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure neuritic leprosy has always been an enigma due to its clinical and management ambiguities. Although only the Indian Association of Leprologist's classification recognizes 'pure neuritic leprosy' as a distinct sub group of leprosy, cases nonetheless are reported from various countries of Asia, Africa, South America and Europe, indicating its global relevance. It is important to maintain pure neuritic leprosy as a subgroup as it constitutes a good percentage of leprosy cases reported from India, which contributes to more than half of global leprosy numbers. Unfortunately, a high proportion of these patients present with Grade 2 disability at the time of initial reporting itself due to the early nerve involvement. Although skin lesions are absent by definition, when skin biopsies were performed from the skin along the distribution of the affected nerve, a proportion of patients demonstrated leprosy pathology, revealing sub-clinical skin involvement. In addition on follow-up, skin lesions are noted to develop in up to 20% of pure neuritic leprosy cases, indicating its progression to manifest cutaneous disease. Over the decades, the confirmation of diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy has been subjective, however, with the arrival and use of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS for nerve imaging, we have a tool not only to objectively measure and record the nerve thickening but also to assess the morphological alterations in the nerve including echo texture, fascicular pattern and vascularity. Management of pure neuritic leprosy requires multidrug therapy along with appropriate dose of systemic corticosteroids, for both acute and silent neuritis. Measures for pain relief, self-care of limbs and physiotherapy are important to prevent as well as manage disabilities in this group of patients.

  15. Pure neuritic leprosy: Current status and relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P Narasimha; Suneetha, Sujai

    2016-01-01

    Pure neuritic leprosy has always been an enigma due to its clinical and management ambiguities. Although only the Indian Association of Leprologist's classification recognizes 'pure neuritic leprosy' as a distinct sub group of leprosy, cases nonetheless are reported from various countries of Asia, Africa, South America and Europe, indicating its global relevance. It is important to maintain pure neuritic leprosy as a subgroup as it constitutes a good percentage of leprosy cases reported from India, which contributes to more than half of global leprosy numbers. Unfortunately, a high proportion of these patients present with Grade 2 disability at the time of initial reporting itself due to the early nerve involvement. Although skin lesions are absent by definition, when skin biopsies were performed from the skin along the distribution of the affected nerve, a proportion of patients demonstrated leprosy pathology, revealing sub-clinical skin involvement. In addition on follow-up, skin lesions are noted to develop in up to 20% of pure neuritic leprosy cases, indicating its progression to manifest cutaneous disease. Over the decades, the confirmation of diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy has been subjective, however, with the arrival and use of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) for nerve imaging, we have a tool not only to objectively measure and record the nerve thickening but also to assess the morphological alterations in the nerve including echo texture, fascicular pattern and vascularity. Management of pure neuritic leprosy requires multidrug therapy along with appropriate dose of systemic corticosteroids, for both acute and silent neuritis. Measures for pain relief, self-care of limbs and physiotherapy are important to prevent as well as manage disabilities in this group of patients.

  16. Minimal covariant observables identifying all pure states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmeli, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.carmeli@gmail.com [D.I.M.E., Università di Genova, Via Cadorna 2, I-17100 Savona (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy); Heinosaari, Teiko, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku (Finland); Toigo, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.toigo@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-09-02

    It has been recently shown by Heinosaari, Mazzarella and Wolf (2013) [1] that an observable that identifies all pure states of a d-dimensional quantum system has minimally 4d−4 outcomes or slightly less (the exact number depending on d). However, no simple construction of this type of minimal observable is known. We investigate covariant observables that identify all pure states and have minimal number of outcomes. It is shown that the existence of this kind of observables depends on the dimension of the Hilbert space.

  17. Cryogenic System for the Test Facilities of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, J; Chalifour, M; Haug, F; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    1998-01-01

    To perform cold tests on the different modules of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter, a cryogenic system has been constructed and is now operated at the CERN North Experimental Area. Three different test cryostats will house the modules, which can also be exposed to particle beams for calibration purposes. The three cryostats share a common liquid argon and liquid nitrogen distribution system. The system is rather complex since it has to allow operations of the three cryostats at the same time. Liquid nitrogen is used as cold source for both the cool-down of the cryostats and for normal operation of the cryostats filled with liquid argon.

  18. Surface compositional changes in GaAs subjected to argon plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surdu-Bob, C.C.; Sullivan, J.L.; Saied, S.O.; Layberry, R.; Aflori, M

    2002-12-30

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been employed to study surface compositional changes in GaAs (1 0 0) subjected to argon plasma treatment. The experimental results have been explained in terms of predicted argon ion energies, measured ion densities and etch rates. A model is proposed for the processes taking place at the surface of GaAs in terms of segregation, sputtering and surface relaxation. Stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) code has also been employedan aid to identification of the mechanisms responsible for the compositional changes. Argon plasma treatment induced surface oxidation at very low energies and sputtering and surface damage with increasing energy.

  19. Wetting and evaporation of argon nanodroplets on smooth and rough substrates: Molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Wang, Baohe; Chen, Yonggang; Zhao, Zongchang

    2016-10-01

    Wetting and evaporation behaviors of argon nanodroplets on smooth and rough substrates are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Effects of interaction energy between solid and argon atoms on wetting and evaporation and differences between nanodroplets on smooth and rough substrates have been investigated. The results show that for both smooth and rough substrates, as the interaction energy between solid and argon atoms increases, the contact angle and total evaporation increase. For rough substrates, the variations of contact angle and contact radius during evaporation progress are much more complex and the total evaporation is much larger than that of smooth substrates.

  20. Multiple-diffusion flame synthesis of pure anatase and carbon-coated titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Memon, Nasir

    2013-09-01

    A multi-element diffusion flame burner (MEDB) is useful in the study of flame synthesis of nanomaterials. Here, the growth of pure anatase and carbon-coated titanium dioxide (TiO2) using an MEDB is demonstrated. Hydrogen (H2), oxygen (O2), and argon (Ar) are utilized to establish the flame, whereas titanium tetraisopropoxide is used as the precursor for TiO2. The nanoparticles are characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, with elemental mapping (of C, O, and Ti), X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The growth of pure anatase TiO2 nanoparticles occurs when Ar and H2 are used as the precursor carrier gas, while the growth of carbon-coated nanoparticles ensues when Ar and ethylene (C2H4) are used as the precursor carrier gas. A uniform coating of 3-5nm of carbon is observed around TiO2 particles. The growth of highly crystalline TiO2 nanoparticles is dependent on the gas flow rate of the precursor carrier and amorphous particles are observed at high flow rates. Carbon coating occurs only on crystalline nanoparticles, suggesting a possible growth mechanism of carbon-coated TiO2 nanoparticles. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  1. Are all maximally entangled states pure?

    CERN Document Server

    Cavalcanti, D; Terra-Cunha, M O

    2005-01-01

    In this Letter we study if all maximally entangled states are pure through several entanglement monotones. Our conclusions allow us to generalize the idea of monogamy of entanglement. Then we propose a polygamy of entanglement, which express that if a general multipartite state is maximally entangled it is necessarily factorized by any other system.

  2. Implicit Reading in Chinese Pure Alexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Chunlei; Zhu, Renjing; Xu, Mingwei; Luo, Benyan; Weng, Xuchu

    2010-01-01

    A number of recent studies have shown that some patients with pure alexia display evidence of implicit access to lexical and semantic information about words that they cannot read explicitly. This phenomenon has not been investigated systematically in Chinese patients. We report here a case study of a Chinese patient who met the criteria for pure…

  3. Pure science and the problem of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Heather

    2014-06-01

    How should we understand scientific progress? Kuhn famously discussed science as its own internally driven venture, structured by paradigms. He also famously had a problem describing progress in science, as problem-solving ability failed to provide a clear rubric across paradigm change--paradigm changes tossed out problems as well as solving them. I argue here that much of Kuhn's inability to articulate a clear view of scientific progress stems from his focus on pure science and a neglect of applied science. I trace the history of the distinction between pure and applied science, showing how the distinction came about, the rhetorical uses to which the distinction has been put, and how pure science came to be both more valued by scientists and philosophers. I argue that the distinction between pure and applied science does not stand up to philosophical scrutiny, and that once we relinquish it, we can provide Kuhn with a clear sense of scientific progress. It is not one, though, that will ultimately prove acceptable. For that, societal evaluations of scientific work are needed.

  4. Binomial Squares in Pure Cubic Number Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lemmermeyer, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Let K = Q(\\omega) with \\omega^3 = m be a pure cubic number field. We show that the elements\\alpha \\in K^\\times whose squares have the form a - \\omega form a group isomorphic to the group of rational points on the elliptic curve E_m: y^2= x^3 - m.

  5. Nigeria Journal of Pure and Applied Physics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigeria Journal of Pure and Applied Physics (NJPAP) is a journal dedicated to the ... Variations of surface temparature with solar activity at two stations in the tropics ... Activation energy of psuedobinary alloy of Al-Bi-Se mixed systems · EMAIL ...

  6. Evolution of Pure States into Mixed States

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, J

    1993-01-01

    In the formulation of Banks, Peskin and Susskind, we show that one can construct evolution equations for the quantum mechanical density matrix $\\rho$ with operators which do not commute with hamiltonian which evolve pure states into mixed states, preserve the normalization and positivity of $\\rho$ and conserve energy. Furthermore, it seems to be different from a quantum mechanical system with random sources.

  7. Pure Gravitational Back-Reaction Observables

    CERN Document Server

    Tsamis, N C

    2013-01-01

    After discussing the various issues regarding and requirements on pure quantum gravitational observables in homogeneous-isotropic conditions, we construct a composite operator observable satisfying most of them. We also expand it to first order in the loop counting parameter and suggest it as a physical quantifier of gravitational back-reaction in an initially inflating cosmology.

  8. A fatal case of pure metaphyseal chondroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binesh, Fariba; Moghadam, Reza Nafisi; Abrisham, Jalil

    2013-08-23

    The chondroblastoma (CB) is a rare cartilaginous tumour; it represents less than 1% of all bone tumours. It is mostly localised at the level of the epiphysis of long bones. We report a fatal case of pure metaphyseal CB of the tibia in a 9-year-old boy whose pulmonary metastases developed soon after operative therapy of the primary tumour.

  9. MRI of autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K; Nielsen, J E; Fallentin, E

    1997-01-01

    We examined 16 patients with autosomal dominant pure spastic paraplegia (HSP) and 15 normal controls matched for age and sex using MRI of the brain and spinal cord. Images were assessed qualitatively by two independent radiologists, blinded to the clinical diagnosis. Areas of the brain and corpus...

  10. Numerical and experimental study of transferred arcs in argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bini, R [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Via Bonardi 9, 20133 Milan (Italy); Monno, M [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Via Bonardi 9, 20133 Milan (Italy); Boulos, M I [Centre de Recherche en Energie, Plasma et Electrochimie (CREPE), Department de Genie Chimique Universite de Sherbrooke, 2500 Boul. Universite, Sherbrooke, J1K1R2 (Canada)

    2006-08-07

    The bidimensional model of the electric arc is enhanced with the plasma-electrodes interaction to predict the properties and the energy distribution of an argon arc operating with current intensities between 100 and 200 A and electrode gaps of 10 and 20 mm. An adaptive numerical insulation is applied to the cathode, to properly simulate its thermionic emission mechanism and overcome the dependence on empirical distributions of the current density at its tip. The numerical results are quantitatively compared with the data obtained from calorimetric and spectroscopical measurements, performed on a device which generates a transferred arc between a water cooled copper anode and a thoriated tungsten cathode enclosed in a stainless steel chamber. The calculation of the heat fluxes towards the electrodes permits to determine the amount of power delivered to each component of the arc system (the anode, the cathode assembly and the chamber) and to evaluate the overall efficiency of the process for different configurations. The agreement between theory and data, over the range of parameters investigated, is sensible both in the temperature profiles and in the energy distributions. In such configurations, the conduction from the hot gas is the most relevant term in the overall heat transferred to the anode, but it is the electron transfer which rules the heat transfer in the arc attachment zone. The arc attachment radius is also dependent on the process parameters and increases with the arc current (from approximately 5 mm at 100 A to 7 mm at 200 A) and the arc length. However the maximum heat flux reached on the axis decreases increasing the gap between the electrodes, although more power is delivered to the anode due to the radial spreading of the plasma. A 10 mm 200 A argon arc releases to the anode about 2.6 kW, which corresponds to 75% of the total arc power available. If the arc is extended to 20 mm the power transferred rises by nearly 350 W, but the overall

  11. Deformation and recrystallization textures in commercially pure aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    1986-01-01

    The deformation and recrystallization textures of commercially pure aluminum (99.6 pct) containing large intermetallic particles (FeAl3) are measured by neutron diffraction, and the orientation distribution functions (ODF’s) are calculated. Sample parameters are the initial grain size (50 and 350....... Thereby the particles can have a randomizing effect on the textural development during recrystallization. In specimens deformed at medium degrees of deformation the randomizing effect of particles is maximum. At lower and higher degrees of deformation the effect of particles is less as other nucleation...

  12. Optimal reconstruction of a pure qubit state with local measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Bagán, E; Monras, A; Muñoz-Tàpia, R

    2003-01-01

    We analyse the reconstruction of an unknown pure qubit state. We derive the optimal guess that can be inferred from any set of measurements on N identical copies of the system with the fidelity as a figure of merit. We study in detail the estimation process with individual von Neumann measurements and demonstrate that they are very competitive as compared to (complicated) collective measurements. We compute the expressions of the fidelity for large $N$ and show that individual measurement schemes can perform optimally in the asymptotic regime.

  13. Purely infinite simple reduced C*-algebras of one-relator separated graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Ara, Pere

    2012-01-01

    Given a separated graph $(E,C)$, there are two different C*-algebras associated to it, the full graph C*-algebra $C^*(E,C)$, and the reduced one $C^*_{\\text{red}} (E,C)$. For a large class of separated graphs $(E,C)$, we prove that $C^*_{\\text{red}} (E,C)$ either is purely infinite simple or admits a faithful tracial state. The main tool we use to show pure infiniteness of reduced graph C*-algebras is a generalization to the amalgamated case of a result on purely infinite simple free products due to Dykema.

  14. Measuring Muon-Neutrino Charged-Current Differential Cross Sections with a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitz, Joshua B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2011-01-01

    More than 80 years after its proposed existence, the neutrino remains largely mysterious and elusive. Precision measurements of the neutrino's properties are just now beginning to take place. Such measurements are required in order to determine the mass of the neutrino, how many neutrinos there are, if neutrinos are different than anti-neutrinos, and more. Muon-neutrino charged-current differential cross sections on an argon target in terms of the outgoing muon momentum and angle are presented. The measurements have been taken with the ArgoNeuT Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) experiment. ArgoNeuT is the first LArTPC to ever take data in a low energy neutrino beam, having collected thousands of neutrino and anti-neutrino events in the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. The results are relevant for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments searching for non-zero $\\theta_{13}$, CP-violation in the lepton sector, and the sign of the neutrino mass hierarchy, among other things. Furthermore, the differential cross sections are important for understanding the nature of the neutrino-nucleus interaction in general. These measurements represent a significant step forward for LArTPC technology as they are among the first neutrino physics results with such a device.

  15. Poster for IPRD10-Siena: Monitoring and Data Quality Assessment for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Simard, O; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    As previously submitted by the Atlas Liquid Argon Speakers Committee: The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider, in full operation since fall 2009, is expected to collect an unprecedented wealth of data at a completely new energy scale. In particular, its Liquid Argon (LAr) electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters will play an essential role in measuring final states with electrons and photons and in contributing to the measurement of jets and missing transverse energy. The ATLAS LAr calorimeter is a system of three sampling calorimeters with LAr as sensitive medium. It is composed by 182,468 readout channels and covers a pseudorapidity region up to 4.9. Efficient monitoring will be crucial from the earliest data taking onward and at multiple levels of the electronic readout and triggering systems. Detection of serious data integrity issues along the read-out chain during data taking will be essential so that quick actions can be taken. Moreover, by providing essential information about the performance...

  16. Comparison of hydrogen storage properties of pure Mg and milled pure Mg

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Myoung Youp Song; Young Jun Kwak; Seong Ho Lee; Hye Ryoung Park

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen storage properties of pure Mg were studied at 593 K under 12 bar H2. In order to increase the hydriding and dehydriding rates, pure Mg was ground under hydrogen atmosphere (reactive mechanical grinding, RMG) and its hydrogen storage properties were subsequently investigated. Pure Mg absorbed hydrogen very slowly. At the number of cycles () of 1, pure Mg absorbed 0.05 wt% H for 5 min, 0.08 wt% H for 10 min and 0.29 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H2. Activation was completed at the fifth cycle. At = 6, pure Mg absorbed 1.76 wt% H for 5 min, 2.17 wt% H for 10 min and 3.40 wt% H for 60 min. The activation of pure Mg after RMG was completed at the sixth cycle. At = 7, pure Mg after RMG absorbed 2.57 wt% H for 5 min, 3.21 wt% H for 10 min and 4.15 wt% H for 60 min.

  17. Bronchoscopic electrocauterization versus argon plasma coagulation as a palliative management for patients with bronchogenic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amgad A. Farhat

    2015-01-01

    It was concluded that, therapeutic bronchoscopic intervention either by electrocautery or argon plasma coagulation is a safe and effective method for palliative management of patients with central malignant airway obstruction.

  18. Optimal cytoreduction with neutral argon plasma energy in selected patients with ovarian and primitive peritoneal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Marie Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a deadly disease for which optimal cytoreduction to microscopic disease has shown the best correlation with survival. Electrically neutral argon plasma technology is a novel surgical tool to allow aggressive cytoreduction in selected patients with EOC, primary peritoneal cancer, and tubal cancer. We conducted a prospective feasibility study of the use of neutral argon plasma technology to complete cytoreductive surgery in order to assess its ability to obtain optimal cytoreduction. Six patients had their surgery completed with the neutral argon plasma device. None of the patients would have had optimal surgery unless the device had been available. All patients had cytoreduction to less than 5 mm to 10 mm without additional morbidity. One patient had complete cytoreduction, and two had residual disease of less than 2 mm. Electrically neutral plasma argon technology is a useful technology to maximize cytoreduction and to reduce tumour burden in selected cases of EOC.

  19. Microwave Spectrum and Molecular Structure of the ARGON-CIS-1,2-DICHLOROETHYLENE Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Mark D.; Leung, Helen O.; Nelson, Craig J.; Yoon, Leonard H.

    2016-06-01

    The non-planar molecular structure of the complex formed between the argon atom and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene is determined via analysis of its microwave spectrum. Spectra of the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopologues are observed in natural abundance and the nuclear quadrupole splitting due to the two chlorine nuclei is fully resolved. In addition, the complete quadrupole coupling tensor for the cis-1,2-dichloroethylene molecule, including the single non-zero off-diagonal element, has been determined. Unlike the argon-cis-1,2-difluoroethylene and the argon-vinyl chloride complexes, tunneling between the two equivalent non-planar configurations of argon-cis-1,2-dichloroethylene is not observed.

  20. Simulations of argon accident scenarios in the ATLAS experimental cavern a safety analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Balda, F

    2002-01-01

    Some characteristic accidents in the ATLAS experimental cavern (UX15) are simulated by means of STAR-CD, a code using the "Finite-Volume" method. These accidents involve different liquid argon leaks from the barrel cryostat of the detector, thus causing the dispersion of the argon into the Muon Chamber region and the evaporation of the liquid. The subsequent temperature gradients and distribution of argon concentrations, as well as their evolution in time are simulated and discussed, with the purpose of analysing the dangers related to asphyxiation and to contact with cryogenic fluids for the working personnel. A summary of the theory that stands behind the code is also given. In order to validate the models, an experimental test on a liquid argon spill performed earlier is simulated, showing that the program is able to output reliable results. At the end, some safety-related recommendations are listed.

  1. Performance of the Signal Vacuum Cables of the Liquid Argon Calorimeter Endcap Cryostat Signal Feedthroughs

    CERN Document Server

    Axen, D A; Dowling, A; Dowling, A S; Fincke-Keeler, M; Hodges, T; Holness, F; Ince, T; Keeler, Richard K; Langstaf, R; Lefebvre, M; Lenckowski, M; Lindner, J; MacDonald, R; McDonald, R; Muzzeral, E; Poffenberger, P R; Van Uytven, J; Vowles, G; Wiggins, W

    2003-01-01

    This note presents of brief summary of the design specification and the performance under test of the signal vacuum cables which are used in the signal feedthroughs of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter endcap cryostats.

  2. Self-assembled heterogeneous argon/neon core-shell clusters studied by photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundwall, M; Pokapanich, W; Bergersen, H; Lindblad, A; Rander, T; Ohrwall, G; Tchaplyguine, M; Barth, S; Hergenhahn, U; Svensson, S; Björneholm, O

    2007-06-01

    Clusters formed by a coexpansion process of argon and neon have been studied using synchrotron radiation. Electrons from interatomic Coulombic decay as well as ultraviolet and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to determine the heterogeneous nature of the clusters and the cluster structure. Binary clusters of argon and neon produced by coexpansion are shown to exhibit a core-shell structure placing argon in the core and neon in the outer shells. Furthermore, the authors show that 2 ML of neon on the argon core is sufficient for neon valence band formation resembling the neon solid. For 1 ML of neon the authors observe a bandwidth narrowing to about half of the bulk value.

  3. Vacuum ultraviolet argon excimer laser excited by optical-field-induced ionized electrons produced in an argon-filled hollow fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubodera, Shoichi; Kaku, Masanori; Katto, Masahito

    2011-10-01

    Short-wavelength lasers in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral region between 100 and 200 nm have not yet been developed to the same degree as visible and infrared lasers. We have demonstrated the production of argon excimers via an optical-field-induced ionization (OFI) process by using a high-intensity infrared laser. We here report optical amplification of argon excimers at the wavelength of 126 nm by producing an extended OFI plasma inside an argon-filled hollow fiber with an inner diameter of 250 microns with a length of 5.0 cm. A gain-length product of 4.3 through the use of single-pass amplification with VUV optics was observed, indicating a small signal gain coefficient of 0.86 cm-1 with an uncertainty of 0.03. It was found that the hollow fiber served to extend the OFI plasma length and to guide the excitation of the infrared laser and the produced VUV emissions at 126 nm, but did not affect the OFI plasma conditions to produce argon excimer molecules. Short-wavelength lasers in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral region between 100 and 200 nm have not yet been developed to the same degree as visible and infrared lasers. We have demonstrated the production of argon excimers via an optical-field-induced ionization (OFI) process by using a high-intensity infrared laser. We here report optical amplification of argon excimers at the wavelength of 126 nm by producing an extended OFI plasma inside an argon-filled hollow fiber with an inner diameter of 250 microns with a length of 5.0 cm. A gain-length product of 4.3 through the use of single-pass amplification with VUV optics was observed, indicating a small signal gain coefficient of 0.86 cm-1 with an uncertainty of 0.03. It was found that the hollow fiber served to extend the OFI plasma length and to guide the excitation of the infrared laser and the produced VUV emissions at 126 nm, but did not affect the OFI plasma conditions to produce argon excimer molecules. Part of this work has been supported by

  4. Free electron lifetime achievements in Liquid Argon Imaging TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Baibussinov, B; Calligarich, E; Centro, S; Cieslik, K; Farnese, C; Fava, A; Gibin, D; Guglielmi, A; Meng, G; Pietropaolo, F; Rubbia, C; Varanini, F; Ventura, S

    2010-01-01

    A key feature for the success of the Liquid Argon TPC technology is the industrial purification against electro-negative impurities, especially Oxygen and Nitrogen remnants, which have to be initially and continuously kept at an exceptional purity. New purification techniques have been applied to a 120 litres LAr-TPC test facility in the INFN-LNL laboratory. Through-going muon tracks have been used to monitor the LAr purity. The short path length used (30 cm) is compensated by the high accuracy in the observation of the specific ionization of cosmic rays muons at sea level. A free electron lifetime of (21.4+7.3-4.3) ms, namely > 15.8 ms at 90 % C.L. has been observed under stable conditions over several weeks, corresponding to about 15 ppt (part per trillion) of Oxygen equivalent. At 500 V/cm, where the electron speed is approximately of 1.5 mm/us, the free electron lifetime >15 ms corresponds to an attenuation <15 % for a drift path of 5 m, opening the way to reliable operation of LAr TPC for exceptionall...

  5. Using History To Teach Scientific Method: The Case of Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, Carmen J.

    1998-10-01

    The history of science is full of stories that exhibit scientific methodology to an exemplary degree. Such stories can be vehicles for the teaching of scientific thought to non-science majors in general-education science courses, particularly if they do not involve much technical background and are told in ordinary language. This paper illustrates the kind of lessons that can be gleaned from such stories by examining the discovery of argon, an episode replete with examples of how scientists pursue knowledge. Lord Rayleigh's use of multiple methods to determine the density of nitrogen; his persistent tracking down of a small but real anomaly in those measurements; his and William Ramsay's eventual realization that the anomaly was due to a previously unknown but relatively plentiful component of the atmosphere, an inert, monatomic gas; and Ramsay's subsequent successful search for other members of the inert gas family all illustrate the scientific approach to knowledge. This story can be presented to students in Rayleigh's words, annotated to supply background material and to pose questions.

  6. Liquid argon scintillation light studies in LArIAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryczynski, Pawel [Fermilab

    2016-10-12

    The LArIAT experiment is using its Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) in the second run of data-taking at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. The goal of the experiment is to study the response of LArTPCs to charged particles of energies relevant for planned neutrino experiments. In addition, it will help to develop and evaluate the performance of the simulation, analysis, and reconstruction software used in other LAr neutrino experiments. Particles from a tertiary beam detected by LArIAT (mainly protons, pions and muons) are identified using a set of beamline detectors, including Wire Chambers, Time of Flight counters and Cherenkov counters, as well as a simplified sampling detector used to detect muons. In its effort towards augmenting LArTPC technology for other neutrino experiments, LArIAT also takes advantage of the scintillating capabilities of LAr and is testing the possibility of using the light signal to help reconstruct calorimetric information and particle ID. In this report, we present results from these studies of the scintillation light signal to evaluate detector performance and calorimetry.

  7. Ab interno sclerostomy with a high-powered argon endolaser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, G J; Williams, G A; Mieler, W F; Radius, R L

    1988-10-15

    We used a high-energy argon blue-green laser (15-W maximum power output) to create full-thickness sclerostomies from the region of the anterior chamber angle to the subconjunctival space in pigmented rabbits using an ab interno approach. One to four laser pulses delivered through a 300-micron noncontact fiberoptic probe produced patent sclerostomies in all 20 eyes treated using 0.1-second pulse duration and 5 to 14 W of power. No intraoperative complications were encountered. Intraocular pressure, measured in 12 animals, decreased an average of 12 mm Hg in the treated eye relative to the fellow eye on the first postoperative day. The drop in intraocular pressure was associated with formation of a functioning filtration bleb. Intraocular pressure returned to preoperative levels in ten of 12 (83%) of the animals by the fourth postoperative day, and there was an associated flattening of the filtration bleb. Histologic and radioautographic analysis indicated that the effect of the laser was focal. Tissue damage and cellular proliferative response were limited to within approximately 200 micron of the wound margin.

  8. Uranium (III) precipitation in molten chloride by wet argon sparging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigier, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.vigier@ec.europa.eu [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Laplace, Annabelle [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Renard, Catherine [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Miguirditchian, Manuel [CEA, Nuclear Energy Division, Radiochemistry & Processes Department, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Abraham, Francis [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, Univ. Lille Nord de France, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2016-06-15

    In the context of pyrochemical processes for nuclear fuel treatment, the precipitation of uranium (III) in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%) at 705 °C is studied. First, this molten chloride is characterized with the determination of the water dissociation constant. With a value of 10{sup −4.0}, the salt has oxoacid properties. Then, the uranium (III) precipitation using wet argon sparging is studied. The salt is prepared using UCl{sub 3} precursor. At the end of the precipitation, the salt is totally free of solubilized uranium. The main part is converted into UO{sub 2} powder but some uranium is lost during the process due to the volatility of uranium chloride. The main impurity of the resulting powder is calcium. The consequences of oxidative and reductive conditions on precipitation are studied. Finally, coprecipitation of uranium (III) and neodymium (III) is studied, showing a higher sensitivity of uranium (III) than neodymium (III) to precipitation. - Highlights: • Precipitation of Uranium (III) is quantitative in molten salt LiCl-CaCl{sub 2} (30–70 mol%). • The salt is oxoacid with a water dissociation constant of 10{sup −4.0} at 705 °C. • Volatility of uranium chloride is strongly reduced in reductive conditions. • Coprecipitation of U(III) and Nd(III) leads to a consecutive precipitation of the two elements.

  9. TPEPICO studies near ionization threshold of argon and krypton clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, J.; Vries, J. de; Steger, H.; Kaiser, E.; Kamke, B.; Kamke, W. (Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Fakultaet fuer Physik Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Freiburger Materialforschungszentrum)

    1991-01-01

    Single photon ionization of argon- and krypton clusters has been studied in the region between threshold and the ionization potential of the corresponding atom. Synchrotron radiation from the electron storage ring BESSY is used to ionize the clusters; threshold-photoelectron-photoion-coincidence (TPEPICO)-time-of-flight technique is used to detect ions correlated with the emission of zero-kinetic-energy-electrons. The spectra of the clusters in the range of n=2 to 15 are discussed in view of the extensive fragmentation taking place in these systems. In order to characterize the properties of the clusters a method using scaling laws is applied. The principles and the deduction of Hagena's scaling parameter {Gamma}{sup *} are briefly reviewed. Using {Gamma}{sup *} an experimentally derived mean cluster size for molecular beams can be assigned. This allows one to clearly demonstrate the systematic variations of the measured spectra due to cluster fragmentation. As a general feature it is observed that, in the range studied, the peak in the measured ionization rate for a cluster ion (fragment) of a given size shifts to higher photon energies as the mean cluster size is increased. (orig.).

  10. Nonthermal atmospheric argon plasma jet effects on Escherichia coli biomacromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh Colagar, Abasalt; Memariani, Hamed; Sohbatzadeh, Farshad; Valinataj Omran, Azadeh

    2013-12-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric plasma jet, a promising technology based on ionized gas at low temperatures, can be applied for disinfection of contaminated surfaces. In this study, Escherichia coli cells and their macromolecules were exposed to the nonthermal atmospheric argon plasma jet for different time durations. Total protein, genomic DNA, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels of E. coli were assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining; agarose gel electrophoresis; and measurement of absorbance at 534 nm, respectively. After exposure, the spectroscopic results of liquid samples indicated that the survival reduction of E. coli can reach to 100 % in an exposure time of 600 s. Moreover, inactivation zones of E. coli, DNA degradation, and MDA levels were significantly increased. Additionally, banding patterns of total protein were changed and amino acid concentrations increased following ninhydrin test. The experimental results suggest that the nonthermal plasma could serve as an effective instrument for both sterilizing E. coli and degrading macromolecules from the surface of the objects being sterilized.

  11. Installation of signal feedthroughs on an ATLAS liquid-argon calorimeter end-cap cryostat

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The liquid-argon calorimeters used for hadronic energy measurements in the end-cap regions of the ATLAS detector are housed in cryostats to maintain the argon at the very low temperature required. The cryostats are equipped with signal feedthroughs, through which pass the electrical lines carrying signals from the calorimeters. Photos 01, 02, 03: Installation of the signal feedthroughs on the first of the two end-cap cryostats.

  12. Detection of scintillation light in coincidence with ionizing tracks in a liquid argon time projection chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Cennini, P; Rubbia, Carlo; Sergiampietri, F; Bueno, A G; Campanelli, M; Goudsmit, P; Rubbia, André; Periale, L; Suzuki, S; Chen, C; Chen, Y; He, K; Huang, X; Li, Z; Lu, F; Ma, J; Xu, G; Xu, Z; Zhang, C; Zhang, Q; Zheng, S; Cavanna, F; Mazza, D; Piano Mortari, G; Petrera, S; Rossi, C; Mannocchi, G; Picchi, P; Arneodo, F; De Mitri, I; Palamara, O; Cavalli, D; Ferrari, A; Sala, P R; Borio di Tigliole, A A; Cesana, A; Terrani, M; Zavattari, C; Baibusinov, S; Bettini, A; Carpanese, C; Centro, Sandro; Favaretto, D; Pascoli, D; Pepato, Adriano; Pietropaolo, F; Ventura, Sandro; Benetti, P; Calligarich, E; Campo, S; Coco, S; Dolfini, R; Ghedi, B; Gigli-Berzolari, A; Mauri, F; Mazzone, L; Montanari, C; Piazzoli, A; Rappoldi, A; Raselli, G L; Rebuzzi, D; Rossella, M; Scannicchio, D A; Torre, P; Vignoli, C; Cline, D; Otwinowski, S; Wang, H; Woo, J

    1999-01-01

    A system to detect light from liquid argon scintillation has been implemented in a small, ICARUS-like, liquid argon time projection chamber. The system, which uses a VUV-sensitive photomultiplier to collect the light, has recorded many ionizing tracks from cosmic-rays in coincidence with scintillation signals. Our measurements demonstrate that scintillation light detection can provide an effective method for absolute time measurement of events and eventually a useful trigger signal. (19 refs).

  13. TPB-coated Light Guides for Liquid Argon TPC Light Detection Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ignarra, C M

    2013-01-01

    Light detection systems in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) require the detection of the 128 nm light produced during argon scintillation. Most detectors use Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) to shift the wavelength of the light into a range visible to Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs). These proceedings summarize characterizations of light-guides coated with a matrix of TPB in UV transmitting acrylic which are more compact than existing LArTPC light collection systems.

  14. Optically Forbidden Excitations of 3s Electron of Argon by Fast Electron Impact

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱林繁; 成华东; 刘小井; 田鹏; 苑震生; 李文斌; 徐克尊

    2003-01-01

    The electron energy loss spectrum of argon in the energy region of 24.5-30.5eV was measured at 2.5 keV impact energy. The line profile parameters of the optically forbidden excitations of 3s-1ns (n = 4-6) and 3s-1nd (n = 3-7) of argon, I.e.,Eγ,Г,q and p,were determined.

  15. Effect of Ginkgo biloba on the lesions induced by retinal argon laser photocoagulation in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clairambault, P.; Pairault, C.; Droy-Lefaix, M.T.; Magnier, B.; Magnier, M.

    1986-01-09

    In rabbits, retinal argon laser photocoagulation disrupts the arrangement of cell layers and produces interstitial edema. Photochemical and thermal energy is released with production of free oxygenated radicals that are responsible for destruction of cell membranes. Retinal argon laser photocoagulation in rabbits was used as a pharmacologic model to evaluate the protective effect of EGB 761 against membrane lesions and edema. As a strong free radicals scavengers, EGB 761 confirms its protective action on cells membranes and its anti-edema effect.

  16. Configurational Entropy,Diffusivity and Potential Energy Landscape in Liquid Argon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yong-Ping; MA Cong-Xiao; LI Jia-Yun; LI Cong; WANG Dan; LI Mei-Li; SUN Min-Hua

    2009-01-01

    The configurational entropy, diffusion coefficient, dynamics and thermodynamics fragility indices of liquid argon are calculated using molecular dynamics simulations at two densities. The relationship between dynamics and thermodynamics properties is studied. The diffusion coefficient depends linearly on configurational entropy, which is consistent with the hypothesis of Adam-Gibbs. The consistence of dynamics and thermodynamics fragility indices demonstrates that dynamical behaviour is governed by thermodynamics behaviour in glass transition of liquid argon.

  17. Spectra in the vacuum ultraviolet region of CO in gaseous and solid phases and dispersed in solid argon at 10 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H-C [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsinn-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Chen, H-Ki [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsinn-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Cheng, B-M [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsinn-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Y-P [Department of Applied Chemistry, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Ogilvie, J F [Escuela de Quimica, Universidad de Costa Rica, Ciudad Universitaria Rodrigo Facio, San Pedro de Montes de Oca, San Jose 2060 (Costa Rica)

    2005-10-28

    With radiation in the region 104-170 nm from a synchrotron and dispersed with a grating monochromator at spectral resolution 0.02-0.03 nm, we measured absorption spectra of {sup 12}C{sup 16}O in the gaseous phase at 303 K and in the solid phase at 10 K, and dispersed in solid argon at molar ratios Ar:CO = 10, 50 and 250 and at 10 K. We assign observed spectral features to transitions to electronic states A {sup 1}{pi}, B {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}, C {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +} and E {sup 1}{pi} from the ground state X {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}. Vibrational progressions are discernible for all these systems of CO in the gaseous phase, but for only the system A-X for CO in the pure solid phase of CO or a dispersion in solid argon; for all condensed phases, multiple series of features are deducible in this vibrational structure.

  18. Influence of temperature on the ionization coefficient and ignition voltage of the Townsend discharge in an argon-mercury vapor mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, G. G.; Fisher, M. R.; Kristya, V. I.

    2017-02-01

    The kinetics of main types of charged and excited particles present in a low-current discharge in an argon-mercury vapor mixture used in gas-discharge illuminating lamps has been investigated in a wide interval of the reduced electric field strength and temperature. Mechanisms behind the production and loss of ions and metastable atoms have been discovered, and the temperature dependences of their contributions to maintaining their balance have been determined. It has been shown that, when the discharge is initiated in the lamp and the mercury content in the mixture is low, the ionization coefficient exceeds that in pure argon, which is almost exclusively due to the Penning reaction. The influence of this reaction grows with a reduction of the electric field strength in the interelectrode gap. The dependences of the discharge ignition voltage on the interelectrode gap (Paschen curves) for different temperatures of the mixture have been calculated, and the nonmonotonicity of the temperature dependence of the ignition voltage has been explained.

  19. Results from the first use of low radioactivity argon in a dark matter search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A. K.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Bottino, B.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Bussino, S.; Cadeddu, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cadoni, M.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Carlini, M.; Catalanotti, S.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; Crippa, L.; D’Angelo, D.; D’Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Deo, M.; De Vincenzi, M.; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Di Pietro, G.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Forster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Giganti, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Granato, F.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B. R.; Herner, K.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; James, I.; Jollet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C. L.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kubankin, A.; Li, X.; Lissia, M.; Lombardi, P.; Luitz, S.; Ma, Y.; Machulin, I. N.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S. M.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meyers, P. D.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Montanari, D.; Monte, A.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B. J.; Muratova, V. N.; Musico, P.; Napolitano, J.; Nelson, A.; Odrowski, S.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Pugachev, D. A.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A. L.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Sangiorgio, S.; Savarese, C.; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D. A.; Shields, E.; Singh, P. N.; Skorokhvatov, M. D.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stanford, C.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Trinchese, P.; Unzhakov, E. V.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wojcik, M. M.; Xiang, X.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zec, A.; Zhong, W.; Zhu, C.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-04-01

    Liquid argon is a bright scintillator with potent particle identification properties, making it an attractive target for direct-detection dark matter searches. The DarkSide-50 dark matter search here reports the first WIMP search results obtained using a target of low-radioactivity argon. DarkSide-50 is a dark matter detector, using a two-phase liquid argon time projection chamber, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The underground argon is shown to contain 39 Ar at a level reduced by a factor ( 1.4 ± 0.2 ) × 10 3 relative to atmospheric argon. We report a background-free null result from ( 2616 ± 43 ) kg d of data, accumulated over 70.9 live days. When combined with our previous search using an atmospheric argon, the 90% C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section, based on zero events found in the WIMP search regions, is 2.0 × 10 - 44 cm 2 ( 8.6 × 10 - 44 cm 2 , 8.0 × 10 - 43 cm 2 ) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV / c 2 ( 1 TeV / c 2 , 10 TeV / c 2 ).

  20. Condensed argon isentropic compression with ultrahigh magnetic field pressure: Experimental design. Post-shot report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykov, A.I.; Boriskov, G.V.; Dolotenko, M.I. [All-Russian Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    This report continues the series of work devoted to experimental study of a high-dense condensed argon state. Remember that according to work of Kwon et. al., hexagonal close-packed structure is profitable in terms of energy rather than face-centered argon structure (stable with zero pressure). What is most interesting and intriguing here is the issue of possible argon metallization, when it is compressed up to the densities more than 9.17 g/cm{sup 3}. In the experiment of 1995 (the arrangement and data are described in a cited reference) the authors recorded appearance of conductivity in argon, which is non-conductive in the initial state, when it is compressed more than a factor of four. The peak value of argon specific conductivity recorded in this experiment did not exceed 10 (Ohm x cm){sup {minus}1}. This value of conductivity is characteristic of semiconductors, but not metals, which have 10{sup 4} (Ohm x cm){sup {minus}1}. At this stage of the work the main attention is paid to recording of argon conductive state and studying the possibilities of multiframed radiography of the sample in the compressed state.

  1. Results from the first use of low radioactivity argon in a dark matter search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Alexander, T.; Alton, A. K.; Arisaka, K.; Back, H. O.; Baldin, B.; Biery, K.; Bonfini, G.; Bossa, M.; Bottino, B.; Brigatti, A.; Brodsky, J.; Budano, F.; Bussino, S.; Cadeddu, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cadoni, M.; Calaprice, F.; Canci, N.; Candela, A.; Cao, H.; Cariello, M.; Carlini, M.; Catalanotti, S.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; Crippa, L.; D'Angelo, D.; D'Incecco, M.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Deo, M.; De Vincenzi, M.; Derbin, A.; Devoto, A.; Di Eusanio, F.; Di Pietro, G.; Edkins, E.; Empl, A.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Fomenko, K.; Forster, G.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Giganti, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Granato, F.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Guan, M.; Guardincerri, Y.; Hackett, B. R.; Herner, K.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; James, I.; Jollet, C.; Keeter, K.; Kendziora, C. L.; Kobychev, V.; Koh, G.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kubankin, A.; Li, X.; Lissia, M.; Lombardi, P.; Luitz, S.; Ma, Y.; Machulin, I. N.; Mandarano, A.; Mari, S. M.; Maricic, J.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Meyers, P. D.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Montanari, D.; Monte, A.; Montuschi, M.; Monzani, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Mount, B. J.; Muratova, V. N.; Musico, P.; Napolitano, J.; Nelson, A.; Odrowski, S.; Orsini, M.; Ortica, F.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Parmeggiano, S.; Pelczar, K.; Pelliccia, N.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Pordes, S.; Pugachev, D. A.; Qian, H.; Randle, K.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Reinhold, B.; Renshaw, A. L.; Romani, A.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Rountree, D.; Sablone, D.; Saggese, P.; Saldanha, R.; Sands, W.; Sangiorgio, S.; Savarese, C.; Segreto, E.; Semenov, D. A.; Shields, E.; Singh, P. N.; Skorokhvatov, M. D.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Stanford, C.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Tatarowicz, J.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Trinchese, P.; Unzhakov, E. V.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, B.; Wada, M.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wojcik, M. M.; Xiang, X.; Xu, J.; Yang, C.; Yoo, J.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zec, A.; Zhong, W.; Zhu, C.; Zuzel, G.; DarkSide Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Liquid argon is a bright scintillator with potent particle identification properties, making it an attractive target for direct-detection dark matter searches. The DarkSide-50 dark matter search here reports the first WIMP search results obtained using a target of low-radioactivity argon. DarkSide-50 is a dark matter detector, using a two-phase liquid argon time projection chamber, located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The underground argon is shown to contain 39Ar at a level reduced by a factor (1.4 ±0.2 )×103 relative to atmospheric argon. We report a background-free null result from (2616 ±43 ) kg d of data, accumulated over 70.9 live days. When combined with our previous search using an atmospheric argon, the 90% C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section, based on zero events found in the WIMP search regions, is 2.0 ×10-44 cm2 (8.6 ×10-44 cm2 , 8.0 ×10-43 cm2 ) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV /c2 (1 TeV /c2 , 10 TeV /c2 ).

  2. Measurement of Ar resonance and metastable level number densities in argon containing plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebrandt, Marcel; Hillebrand, Bastian; Spiekermeier, Stefan; Bibinov, Nikita; Böke, Marc; Awakowicz, Peter

    2017-09-01

    The resonance 1s_4~({\\hspace{0pt}}^3P_1), ~1s_2~({\\hspace{0pt}}^1P_1) and metastable 1s_5~({\\hspace{0pt}}^3P_2), ~1s_3~({\\hspace{0pt}}^3P_0) level number densities of argon are determined by means of the branching fraction method in an inductively coupled plasma at 5 Pa and 10 Pa in argon with admixture of hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. The 1s_5~({\\hspace{0pt}}^3P_2) densities are compared to laser absorption spectroscopy measurements to evaluate the reliability of the branching fraction method and its limitations. The results are in good agreement and the use of a compact, low cost, low resolution spectrometer (Δλ = 1.3 nm) is sufficient to reliably determine the first four excited states of argon in argon-hydrogen and argon-oxygen mixtures. The addition of nitrogen results in unreliable densities, as the observed argon lines overlap with emission of the N_2(B^3\\Pi_g-A^3Σ_u^+) transition.

  3. Low radioactivity argon dark matter search results from the DarkSide-50 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Agnes, P; Albuquerque, I F M; Alexander, T; Alton, A K; Arisaka, K; Back, H O; Baldin, B; Biery, K; Bonfini, G; Bossa, M; Bottino, B; Brigatti, A; Brodsky, J; Budano, F; Bussino, S; Cadeddu, M; Cadonati, L; Cadoni, M; Calaprice, F; Canci, N; Candela, A; Cao, H; Cariello, M; Carlini, M; Catalanotti, S; Cavalcante, P; Chepurnov, A; Cocco, A G; Covone, G; Crippa, L; D'Angelo, D; D'Incecco, M; Davini, S; De Cecco, S; De Deo, M; De Vincenzi, M; Derbin, A; Devoto, 25 A; Di Eusanio, F; Di Pietro, G; Edkins, E; Empl, A; Fan, A; Fiorillo, G; Fomenko, K; Forster, G; Franco, D; Gabriele, F; Galbiati, C; Giganti, C; Goretti, A M; Granato, F; Grandi, L; Gromov, M; Guan, M; Guardincerri, Y; Hackett, B R; Herner, K; Hungerford, E V; Ianni, Al; Ianni, An; James, I; Jollet, C; Keeter, K; Kendziora, C L; Kobychev, V; Koh, G; Korablev, D; Korga, G; Kubankin, A; Li, X; Lissia, M; Lombardi, P; Luitz, S; Ma, Y; Machulin, I N; Mandarano, A; Mari, S M; Maricic, J; Marini, L; Martoff, C J; Meregaglia, A; Meyers, P D; Miletic, T; Milincic, R; Montanari, D; Monte, A; Montuschi, M; Monzani, M; Mosteiro, P; Mount, B J; Muratova, V N; Musico, P; Napolitano, J; Nelson, A; Odrowski, S; Orsini, M; Ortica, F; Pagani, L; Pallavicini, M; Pantic, E; Parmeggiano, S; Pelczar, K; Pelliccia, N; Perasso, S; Pocar, A; Pordes, S; Pugachev, D A; Qian, H; Randle, K; Ranucci, G; Razeto, A; Reinhold, B; Renshaw, A L; Romani, A; Rossi, B; Rossi, N; Rountree, D; Sablone, D; Saggese, P; Saldanha, R; Sands, W; Sangiorgio, S; Savarese, C; Segreto, E; Semenov, D A; Shields, E; Singh, P N; Skorokhvatov, M D; Smallcomb, M; Smirnov, O; Sotnikov, A; Stanford, C; Suvorov, Y; Tartaglia, R; Tatarowicz, J; Testera, G; Tonazzo, A; Trinchese, P; Unzhakov, E V; Vishneva, A; Vogelaar, B; Wada, M; Walker, S; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Watson, A W; Westerdale, S; Wilhelmi, J; Wojcik, M M; Xiang, X; Xu, J; Yang, C; Yoo, J; Zavatarelli, S; Zec, A; Zhong, W; Zhu, C; Zuzel, G

    2015-01-01

    The DarkSide-50 dark matter search reports the first results obtained using a target of low-radioactivity argon extracted from underground sources. The experiment is located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and uses a two-phase time projection chamber as a detector. A total of 155 kg of low radioactivity argon has been obtained, and we have determined that underground argon is depleted in Ar-39 by a factor (1.4 +- 0.2) x 10^3 relative to atmospheric argon. The underground argon was also found to contain (2.05 +- 0.13) mBq/kg of Kr-85. We found no evidence for dark matter in the form of WIMPs in 70.9 live-days of data with a fiducial mass of (36.9 +- 0.6) kg. When combined with our preceding search with an atmospheric argon target, we set a 90 % C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 2.0 x 10^-44 cm^2 (8.6 x 10^-44 cm^2, 8.0 x 10^-43 cm^2 ) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c^2 (1 TeV/c^2 , 10 TeV/c^2 ).

  4. Effect of Argon Laser on Enamel Demineralization around Orthodontic Brackets: An In Vitro Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirfarhang Miresmaeili

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effect of argon laser irradiation on development and progress of enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets.Fifty caries-free, intact human premolars were randomly assigned to one of the following five equal groups: Groups 1 (control and 2: The brackets were bonded using conventional halogen light for 40s and argon laser for 10s, respectively. Teeth in group 3 were lased with argon laser for 10s before bracket bonding with halogen light. Group 4 was the same as group 3 except that brackets were also bonded with argon laser. In group 5 samples were bonded conventionally, immersed in an artificial caries solution for two days and then irradiated for 10s with argon laser. All samples were subjected to demineralization by artificial caries solution for 10 days. After bracket removal, samples were buccolingually sectioned and evaluated by polarized light microscopy. Decalcified lesion depth in each section was measured by a trained examiner in a blind fashion. Data were analyzed in SPSS 14 using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc test.The control group showed the greatest mean lesion depth while group 5 revealed the lowest. The laser-treated groups had significantly lower mean lesion depth compared with the control group (P<0.05 except for group 4 (P=0.192.Argon laser irradiation for 10s before or during bracket bonding can increase caries resistance of intact and demineralized enamel.

  5. Black Hole Attractors and Pure Spinors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Jonathan P.; Maloney, Alexander; Tomasiello, Alessandro

    2006-02-21

    We construct black hole attractor solutions for a wide class of N = 2 compactifications. The analysis is carried out in ten dimensions and makes crucial use of pure spinor techniques. This formalism can accommodate non-Kaehler manifolds as well as compactifications with flux, in addition to the usual Calabi-Yau case. At the attractor point, the charges fix the moduli according to {Sigma}f{sub k} = Im(C{Phi}), where {Phi} is a pure spinor of odd (even) chirality in IIB (A). For IIB on a Calabi-Yau, {Phi} = {Omega} and the equation reduces to the usual one. Methods in generalized complex geometry can be used to study solutions to the attractor equation.

  6. New Perspective of High-Pure Silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The discovery in the middle of 1950s of the semi-con ducting properties of crystalline silicon has led to the impetu ous development of electric power facilities, the sun-power industry, and particularly, the microelectronic industry. The increasing demand for the high-pure silicon requires the production of synthetic crystals. The raw material for the syn thetic crystals, the so-called technical, or metallurgical silicon, is obtained from quartzite and quartz of superior quality by means of carbon-thermal reduction of silicon using an electric arc discharge. The complexity of the technological process, high cost of the related facilities, worsening environmental pollution, and narrow-mindedness of a raw material company are attributed to the rise in price of the final product-silicon plates, resulting in the fall in the production of high-pure silicon, normally used in sun storage batteries.

  7. Performance of broiler fed pure glycerine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dássia Daiane Oliveira

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments evaluated the pure glycerin in broiler chicken diets. Experiment 1 was a metabolism test using total feces sampling method with 96 male chickens aging from 17 to 25 d when animals were fed on two treatments: diet1 = no glycerin and diet2 = 60g/kg of glycerin. The apparent metabolized energy measured 4015 kcal/kg and the apparent metabolized corrected for nitrogen balance was 3911 kcal/kg. Experiment 2 evaluated weight gains, feed intake and feed conversion in 480 chicks at 6, 20 and 34 d old fed on diets with 0, 40, 80 and 120 g/kg of glycerin. The results indicate that pure glycerin in chicken diets, as a source of energy must take into consideration the age of the animals and it may be added up to 120 g/kg, from 20 to 41 d of age.

  8. Pure and doped boron nitride nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Terrones

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available More than ten years ago, it was suggested theoretically that boron nitride (BN nanotubes could be produced. Soon after, various reports on their synthesis appeared and a new area of nanotube science was born. This review aims to cover the latest advances related to the synthesis of BN nanotubes. We show that these tubes can now be produced in larger amounts and, in particular, that the chemistry of BN tubes appears to be very important to the production of reinforced composites with insulating characteristics. From the theoretical standpoint, we also show that (BN-C heteronanotubes could have important implications for nanoelectronics. We believe that BN nanotubes (pure and doped could be used in the fabrication of novel devices in which pure carbon nanotubes do not perform very efficiently.

  9. The pure relationship and below replacement fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Hall

    2003-12-01

    interest from demographers. Despite the fact that researchers have extensively modeled recent demographic changes such as skyrocketing divorce rates, rising common-law union formation, delayed childbearing, and the decline to belowreplacement fertility levels, our understanding of the causes of these trends, and the possible connections between them remains theoretically fragmented and incomplete. The goal of this paper is to advance our understanding in this area by exploring the insights on modern family formation of prominent sociologist Anthony Giddens. Specifically, this study examines whether Giddens’ “pure relationship” concept can shed light on the trend toward very low fertility. The results of this inquiry suggest that couples in both marriages and common-law unions who conform to key aspects of Giddens pure relationship are more likely to have uncertain or below-replacement fertility intentions, and less likely to embrace above-replacement fertility goals.

  10. Compact objects in pure Lovelock theory

    CERN Document Server

    Dadhich, Naresh; Chilambwe, Brian

    2016-01-01

    For static fluid interiors of compact objects in pure Lovelock gravity (involving ony one $N$th order term in the equation) we establish similarity in solutions for the critical odd and even $d=2N+1, 2N+2$ dimensions. It turns out that in critical odd $d=2N+1$ dimensions, there can exist no bound distribution with a finite radius, while in critical even $d=2N+2$ dimensions, all solutions have similar behavior. For exhibition of similarity we would compare star solutions for $N =1, 2$ in $d=4$ Einstein and $d=6$ in Gauss-Bonnet theory respectively. We also obtain the pure Lovelock analogue of the Finch-Skea model.

  11. Development of Soybean Highly Pure Powdered Lecithin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guihua; Gu Keren; Liang Shaohua

    2002-01-01

    This project makes use ofCondensed Soybean Phospholipids (CSP) toproduce highly pure powdered soybean lecithin.In the production technology, the first step is tode-oil by continuous y delivered mater al, higheffective mixing CSP with acetone and circularextraction. The second step is to centrifugallyseparate the lecithin miscellaneous liquid intomiscellaneous oil and solid-state lecithin withacetone. Then the mixing oil can be separatedinto crude oil and acetone by vaporization andcondensation. If the acetone contains too muchwater, it should be rectified for use circularly.Solid state lecithin with acetone can be madeinto highly pure powdered soybean lecithin(acetone insoluble matter >95% ) under thefollowing conditions: vacuum 750mmHg,temperature 60℃, time 20 minutes. Theproduction not only reaches the domestic andoversea quality index, but also has favorablehydrophilic property, which makes it becomenatural food additive and sanitarian nurture.

  12. Photoionizaton of Pure and Doped Helium Nanodroplets

    CERN Document Server

    Mudrich, M

    2014-01-01

    Helium nanodroplets, commonly regarded as the "nearly ideal spectroscopic matrix", are being actively studied for more than two decades now. While they mostly serve as cold, weakly perturbing and transparent medium for high-resolution spectroscopy of embedded molecules, their intrinsic quantum properties such as microscopic superfluidity still are subject-matter of current research. This article reviews recent work on pure and doped He nanodroplets using PI spectroscopy, an approach which has greatly advanced in the past years. While the notion of the ideal spectroscopic matrix mostly no longer holds in this context, photoionization techniques provide detailed insights into the photo-physical properties of pure and doped He nanodroplets and their relaxation dynamics following electronic excitation. Exploiting nowadays available high laser fields, even highly ionized states of matter on the nanoscale can be formed. Our particular focus lies on recent experimental progress including fs time-resolved spectroscop...

  13. How Pure Components Control Polymer Blend Miscibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ronald; Lipson, Jane; Higgins, Julia

    2012-02-01

    We present insight into some intriguing relationships revealed by our recent studies of polymer mixture miscibility. Applying our simple lattice-based equation of state, we discuss some of the patterns observed over a sample of experimental blends. We focus on the question of how much key information can one determine from a knowledge of just the pure components only, and further, on the role of separate enthalpic and entropic contributions to the miscibility behavior. One interesting correlation connects the value of the difference in pure component energetic parameters with that of the mixed segment interactions, suggesting new possibilities for predictive modeling. We also show how in some cases these two parameter groupings act as separate controls determining the entropy and enthalpy of mixing. Also discussed are the different patterns exhibited for UCST-type and LCST-type blends, these being revealed in some cases by simple examination of the underlying microscopic parameters.

  14. Pure Sensory Stroke due to Lenticulocapsular Hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨益阶; 王国瑾; 潘松青

    2003-01-01

    @@ Pure sensory stroke (PSS) caused by lenticulo-capsular hemorrhage is rare. In this article, we re-ported 4 patients with PSS due to lenticulocapsularhemorrhage, including 3 men and 1 woman (mean age,58 years; range, 54 to 65 years), whose lesions couldbe identified by head computed tomographic (CT)scan and clinical findings correlated with the radio-logical lesions. All patients except 1 had hyperten-sion.

  15. Acquired pure red cell aplasia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata R Dafale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired Pure Red Cell Aplasia (PRCA is a rare occurrence in children.This is a case of an eight year old girl child who developed acquired PRCA secondary to long term intake of sodium Valproate. This case is reported to review the causes of PRCA in children and to reconsider the use of drugs of longer duration in children and adults.

  16. Pure waterjet drilling of articular bone

    OpenAIRE

    Biskup, Christian; Dunnen, Steven den; Kraaij, Gert; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical application of waterjet technology for machining tough human tissues, such as articular bone, has advantages, as it produces clean sharp cuts without tissue heating. Additionally, water supply is possible via flexible tubing, which enables minimally invasive surgical access. This pilot study investigates whether drilling bony tissue with pure waterjets is feasible. Water pressures between 20 and 120 MPa with an orifice of 0.6 mm were used to create waterjets to drill blind boring...

  17. Les Problemes de l'alexie pure (Problems of Pure Alexia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremin, Helgard

    1976-01-01

    This article reviews studies done on alexia and describes experiments designed to distinguish qualitatively between pure alexia (marked by the absence of oral and written problems) and other forms of alexia. (Text is in French.) (CLK)

  18. Improving Resolution of Confocal Laser Induced Fluorescence in Argon Helicon Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderholm, Mark; Vandervort, Robert; Scime, Earl; McKee, John; McCarren, Dustin

    2014-10-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) provides measurements of flow speed, temperature and when absolutely calibrated, density of ions or neutrals in a plasma. Traditionally, laser induced fluorescence requires two ports on a plasma device. One port is used for laser injection and the other is used for fluorescence emission collection. Traditional LIF is tedious and time consuming to align. These difficulties motivate the development of an optical configuration that requires a single port and remains fully aligned at all times; confocal LIF. Our confocal optical design employs a single two inch diameter lens to both inject the laser light and collect the stimulated emission from an argon plasma. A dichroic mirror is used to separate the injected laser light from the collected emission. The measurement location is scanned radially by manually adjusting the final focusing lens position. In the initial version of the confocal optical system, measurements were poorly resolved radially because they were integrated over a fairly large path length (~4 cm) centered at the focal point. Here we present collected data from a modified configuration that significantly improves the special resolution of confocal measurements. The confocal measurements are compared to traditional, two-port, LIF measurements over the same radial range.

  19. Phase - I Trigger Readout Electronics upgrade for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Dinkespiler, Bernard; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) scheduled for shut-down period of 2018-2019, referred to as Phase-I upgrade, will increase the instantaneous luminosity to about three times the design value. Since the current ATLAS trigger system does not allow sufficient increase of the trigger rate, an improvement of the trigger system is required. The Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeter read-out will therefore be modified to use digital trigger signals with a higher spatial granularity in order to improve the identification efficiencies of electrons, photons, tau, jets and missing energy, at high background rejection rates at the Level-1 trigger. The new trigger signals will be arranged in 34000 so-called Super Cells which achieves 5-10 times better granularity than the trigger towers currently used and allows an improved background rejection. The readout of the trigger signals will process the signal of the Super Cells at every LHC bunch-crossing at 12-bit precision and a frequency of 40 MHz. The data will be tr...

  20. Anode-Coupled Readout for Light Collection in Liquid Argon TPCs

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Z; Bugel, L; Collin, G H; Conrad, J M

    2015-01-01

    This paper will discuss a new method of signal read-out from photon detectors in ultra-large, underground liquid argon time projection chambers. In this design, the signal from the light collection system is coupled via capacitive plates to the TPC wire-planes. This signal is then read out using the same cabling and electronics as the charge information. This greatly benefits light collection: it eliminates the need for an independent readout, substantially reducing cost; It reduces the number of cables in the vapor region of the TPC that can produce impurities; And it cuts down on the number of feed-throughs in the cryostat wall that can cause heat-leaks and potential points of failure. We present experimental results that demonstrate the sensitivity of a LArTPC wire plane to photon detector signals. We also simulate the effect of a 1 $\\mu$s shaping time and a 2 MHz sampling rate on these signals in the presence of noise, and find that a single photoelectron timing resolution of $\\sim$30 ns can be achieved.

  1. Rise of an argon bubble in liquid steel in the presence of a transverse magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, K.; Kumar, P.; Vanka, S. P.; Thomas, B. G.

    2016-09-01

    The rise of gaseous bubbles in viscous liquids is a fundamental problem in fluid physics, and it is also a common phenomenon in many industrial applications such as materials processing, food processing, and fusion reactor cooling. In this work, the motion of a single argon gas bubble rising in quiescent liquid steel under an external magnetic field is studied numerically using a Volume-of-Fluid method. To mitigate spurious velocities normally generated during numerical simulation of multiphase flows with large density differences, an improved algorithm for surface tension modeling, originally proposed by Wang and Tong ["Deformation and oscillations of a single gas bubble rising in a narrow vertical tube," Int. J. Therm. Sci. 47, 221-228 (2008)] is implemented, validated and used in the present computations. The governing equations are integrated by a second-order space and time accurate numerical scheme, and implemented on multiple Graphics Processing Units with high parallel efficiency. The motion and terminal velocities of the rising bubble under different magnetic fields are compared and a reduction in rise velocity is seen in cases with the magnetic field applied. The shape deformation and the path of the bubble are discussed. An elongation of the bubble along the field direction is seen, and the physics behind these phenomena is discussed. The wake structures behind the bubble are visualized and effects of the magnetic field on the wake structures are presented. A modified drag coefficient is obtained to include the additional resistance force caused by adding a transverse magnetic field.

  2. Construction and test of a fine-grained liquid argon preshower prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, R; Pinfold, J L; Rodning, N L; Boos, E; Zhautykov, B O; Aubert, Bernard; Bazan, A; Beaugiraud, B; Boniface, J; Colas, Jacques; Eynard, G; Jézéquel, S; Le Flour, T; Linossier, O; Nicoleau, S; Rival, F; Sauvage, G; Thion, J; Van den Plas, D; Wingerter-Seez, I; Zitoun, R; Zolnierowski, Y; Chmeissani, M; Fernández, E; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Padilla, C; Gordon, H A; Radeka, V; Rahm, David Charles; Stephani, D; Baisin, L; Berset, J C; Chevalley, J L; Gianotti, F; Gildemeister, O; Marin, C P; Nessi, Marzio; Poggioli, Luc; Richter, W; Vuillemin, V; Baze, J M; Gosset, L G; Lavocat, P; Lottin, J P; Mansoulié, B; Meyer, J P; Renardy, J F; Schwindling, J; Teiger, J; Collot, J; de Saintignon, P; Dzahini, D; Hostachy, J Y; Hoummada, A; Laborie, G; Mahout, G; Hervás, L; Chekhtman, A; Cousinou, M C; Dargent, P; Dinkespiler, B; Etienne, F; Fassnacht, P; Fouchez, D; Martin, L; Miotto, A; Monnier, E; Nagy, E; Olivetto, C; Tisserant, S; Battistoni, G; Camin, D V; Cavalli, D; Costa, G; Cozzi, L; Fedyakin, N N; Ferrari, A; Mandelli, L; Mazzanti, M; Perini, L; Resconi, S; Sala, P R; Beaudoin, G; Depommier, P; León-Florián, E; Leroy, C; Roy, P; Augé, E; Chase, Robert L; Chollet, J C; de La Taille, C; Fayard, Louis; Fournier, D; Hrisoho, A T; Merkel, B; Noppe, J M; Parrour, G; Pétroff, P; Schaffer, A C; Seguin-Moreau, N; Serin, L; Tisserand, V; Vichou, I; Canton, B; David, J; Genat, J F; Imbault, D; Le Dortz, O; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schwemling, P; Eek, L O; Lund-Jensen, B; Söderqvist, J; Lefebvre, M; Robertson, S

    1997-01-01

    A separate liquid argon preshower detector consisting of two layers featuring a fine granularity of 2.5~10$^{\\mathrm{-3}}$ was studied by the RD3 collaboration. A prototype covering approximately 0.8 in pseudo-rapidity and 9 degrees in azimuth was built and tested at CERN in July 94. CMOS and GaAs VLSI preamplifiers were designed and tested for this occasion. The combined response of this detector and an accordion electromagnetic calorimeter prototype to muons, electrons and photons is presented. For minimum ionizing tracks a signal-to-noise ratio of 4.5 per preshower layer was measured. Above 150~GeV the space resolution for electrons is better than 250~$\\mu$m in both directions. The precision on the electromagnetic shower direction, determined together with the calorimeter, is better than 4 mrad above 50~GeV. It is concluded that the preshower detector would adequately fulfil its role for future operation at CERN Large Hadron Collider.

  3. The Trigger Readout Electronics for the Phase-1 Upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid-Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Wolff, Robert; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) scheduled for the shut-down period of 2018-2019 (Phase-I upgrade), will increase the instantaneous luminosity to about three times the design value. Since the current ATLAS trigger system does not allow a corresponding increase of the trigger rate, an improvement of the trigger system is required. The new trigger signals from the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter will be arranged in 34000 so-called Super Cells which achieve 5-10 times better granularity than the current system; this improves the background rejection capabilities through more precise energy measurements, and the use of shower shapes to discriminate electrons and photons from jets. The new system will process the signal of the Super Cells at every LHC bunch-crossing at 12-bit precision and a frequency of 40 MHz. The data will be transmitted to the back-end using a custom serializer and optical converter with 5.12 Gb/s. To verify the full functionality, a demonstrator set-up has been installed on the A...

  4. Phase-I Trigger Readout Electronics Upgrade for the ATLAS Liquid-Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Camplani, Alessandra; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) scheduled for shut-down period of 2018-2019, referred to as Phase-I upgrade, will increase the instantaneous luminosity to about three times the design value. Since the current ATLAS trigger system does not allow sufficient increase of the trigger rate, an improvement of the trigger system is required. The Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeter read-out will therefore be modified to use digital trigger signals with a higher spatial granularity in order to improve the identification efficiencies of electrons, photons, tau, jets and missing energy, at high background rejection rates at the Level-1 trigger. The new trigger signals will be arranged in 34000 so-called Super Cells which achieves 5-10 times better granularity than the trigger towers currently used and allows an improved background rejection. The readout of the trigger signals will process the signal of the Super Cells at every LHC bunch-crossing at 12-bit precision and a frequency of 40 MHz. The data will be tr...

  5. Two Dimensional LIF Measurements and Potential Structure of Ion Beam Formation in an Argon Helicon Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Evan; Scime, Earl; Good, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    We report 2-dimensional, spatially resolved observations of ion beam formation in an expanding helicon plasma. Previous studies found that a current free double layer (CFDL) spontaneously arises at low pressure, below 1 mT. We use Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), a non-perturbative diagnostic to measure the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDFs) of argon ions both parallel and perpendicular to the background magnetic field. We report ion beam formation as a function of the expansion chamber magnetic field (0-108 G). The ion beam appears peaked in the center of the expansion chamber and decays over a few centimeters radially. We also report the potential structure of the plasma obtained with a planar Langmuir probe. To obtain meaningful Langmuir probe measurements, averages of tens of current-voltage are needed to reduce the effects of large electrostatic fluctuations that arise in plasmas that generate ion beams. We report the dependence of density, electron temperature, and floating potential on radial and axial position in the expansion plume. NSF Award PHYS-1360278.

  6. Global empirical potentials from purely rotational measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Dattani, Nikesh S; Sun, Ming; Johnson, Erin R; Roy, Robert J Le; Ziurys, Lucy M

    2014-01-01

    The recent advent of chirped-pulse FTMW technology has created a plethora of pure rotational spectra for molecules for which no vibrational information is known. The growing number of such spectra demands a way to build empirical potential energy surfaces for molecules, without relying on any vibrational measurements. Using ZnO as an example, we demonstrate a powerful technique for efficiently accomplishing this. We first measure eight new ultra-high precision ($\\pm2$ kHz) pure rotational transitions in the $X$-state of ZnO. Combining them with previous high-precision ($\\pm50$ kHz) pure rotational measurements of different transitions in the same system, we have data that spans the bottom 10\\% of the well. Despite not using any vibrational information, our empirical potentials are able to determine the size of the vibrational spacings and bond lengths, with precisions that are more than three and two orders of magnitude greater, respectively, than the most precise empirical values previously known, and the mo...

  7. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  8. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L

    2016-01-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schroedinger's purely affine theory [21], where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  9. Influence of Additive Gas on Electrical and Optical Characteristics of Non-equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Argon Plasma Jet%Influence of Additive Gas on Electrical and Optical Characteristics of Non-equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Argon Plasma Jet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    费小猛; Shin-ichi KURODA; Yuki KONDO; Tamio MORI; Katsuhiko HOSOI

    2011-01-01

    Electrical and optical properties of an argon plasma jet were characterized. In particular, effects of an additive gas, namely nitrogen or oxygen, on these properties were studied in detail. The plasma jet was found to be of a glow-like discharge, which scarcely changed upon the injection of an additive gas, either directly or through a glass capillary. Optical emission spectroscopy characterization revealed that excited argon atoms were the predominant active species in this plasma jet. Metastable argon atoms were highly quenched, and N2(C3yIu) became the main energy carrier following nitrogen injection. When oxygen was added to the afterglow zone through a glass capillary, no significant quenching effect was observed and the number of oxygen atoms decreased with the increase in oxygen concentration. Finally, to demonstrate an application of this plasma jet, a high-density polyethylene surface was treated with argon, argon/nitrogen, and argon/oxygen plasmas.

  10. Variations for Pure Cu Melt Viscosity with Different Atmospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿红霞; 耿浩然; 薛宪营; 郁可; 刘建同

    2003-01-01

    The viscosity of Cu melt is obtained to be in the ranges from 2.418 to 3.039mPa.s under vacuum atmosphere (2Pa), from 2.907 to 3.425mPa.s under nitrogen gas atmosphere and from 3.352 to 4.015mPa.s under argon gas atmosphere. The activation energy is estimated to be 0.224, 0.162 and 0.150eV for the vacuum atmosphere (2 Pa), nitrogen gas atmosphere and argon gas atmosphere, respectively. The results reflect the essential structural change in the Cu melt by using different atmospheres.

  11. Scintillation light from cosmic-ray muons in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittington, Denver Wade [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Physics Dept.; Mufson, S. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Astronomy Dept.; Howard, B. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Physics Dept.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the results of an experiment to directly measure the time-resolved scintillation signal from the passage of cosmic-ray muons through liquid argon. Scintillation light from these muons is of value to studies of weakly-interacting particles in neutrino experiments and dark matter searches. The experiment was carried out at the TallBo dewar facility at Fermilab using prototype light guide detectors and electronics developed for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. Two models are presented for the time structure of the scintillation light, a phenomenological model and a physically-motivated model. Both models find tT = 1:52 ms for the decay time constant of the Ar 2 triplet state. These models also show that the identification of the “early” light fraction in the phenomenological model, FE 25% of the signal, with the total light from singlet decays is an underestimate. The total fraction of singlet light is FS 36%, where the increase over FE is from singlet light emitted by the wavelength shifter through processes with long decay constants. The models were further used to compute the experimental particle identification parameter Fprompt, the fraction of light coming in a short time window after the trigger compared with the light in the total recorded waveform. The models reproduce quite well the typical experimental value 0.3 found by dark matter and double b-decay experiments, which suggests this parameter provides a robust metric for discriminating electrons and muons from more heavily ionizing particles.

  12. Alternating current electrical properties of Argon plasma treated jute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Masroor Anwer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature plasma (LTP treatment, a kind of environment friendly surface modification technique, was applied to biodegradable and environment friendly jute fibre with the use of nonpolymerizing gas, namely argon, at various discharge power levels and exposure times with a definite flow rate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM microphotographs reveal that the roughness of the fibre surfaces increases with the increase of discharge power and exposure time. This is caused due to the bombardment of high energetic ions on the fibre surface and the fibres become sputtered. The capacitance and the electrical conductance of raw and LTP treated jute fibre were measured as a function of frequency at room temperature. The dielectric constant, conductivity, dielectric loss-tangent and the surface morphology of raw and LTP treated jute as a function of frequency were studied at room temperature. It was observed that for all the samples the dielectric constant almost constant at lower frequencies and then decreases gradually in the high frequency region. In addition, dielectric constant increases with the increase of plasma treatment time as well as discharge power. It is also observed for all the samples that the conductivity increases as the frequency increases with a lower slope in the low frequency region and with a higher slope in the higher frequency region. In addition, the conductivity decreases with the increase of plasma exposure time as well as discharge power. The conductivity increases with frequency due to the hopping mechanism of electrons. The dependence of the dielectric loss-tangent with frequency at different treatment times and discharge powers for all the jute samples show small relaxation peaks in the very low frequency region. The dielectric loss-tangent decreases with the increase of both plasma treatment time and discharge power. In addition, the relaxation peaks are shifted to the higher frequency region as the plasma treatment

  13. Phonon induced pure dephasing process of excitonic state in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tongyun; Han, Peng; Wang, Xinke; Feng, Shengfei; Sun, Wenfeng; Ye, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yan

    2016-04-01

    We present a theoretical study on the pure dephasing process of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots induced by lattice vibrations using continuum model calculations. By solving the time dependent Liouville-von Neumann equation, we present the ultrafast Rabi oscillations between excitonic state and virtual state via exciton-phonon interaction and obtain the pure dephasing time from the fast decayed envelope of the Rabi oscillations. The interaction between exciton and longitudinal optical phonon vibration is found to dominate the pure dephasing process and the dephasing time increases nonlinearly with the reduction of exciton-phonon coupling strength. We further find that the pure dephasing time of large quantum dots is more sensitive to temperature than small quantum dots.

  14. Pure Gauge Configurations and Tachyon Solutions to String Field Theories Equations of Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Aref'eva, I Ya; Grigoryev, D A; Khromov, P N; Maltsev, M V; Medvedev, P B

    2009-01-01

    In constructions of analytical solutions to open string field theories pure gauge configurations parameterized by wedge states play an essential role. These pure gauge configurations are constructed as perturbation expansions and to guaranty that these configurations are asymptotical solutions to equations of motions one needs to study convergence of the perturbation expansions. We demonstrate that for the large parameter of the perturbation expansion these pure gauge truncated configurations give divergent contributions to the equation of motion on the subspace of the wedge states. We perform this demonstration numerically for the pure gauge configurations related to tachyon solutions for the bosonic and the NS fermionic SFT. By the numerical calculations we also show that the perturbation expansions are cured by adding extra terms. These terms are nothing but the terms necessary to make valued the Sen conjectures.

  15. Pure transperitoneal laparoscopic correction of retrocaval ureter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Guo-qing; XU Li-wei; LI Xin-de; LI Gong-hui; YU Yan-lan; YU Da-min; ZHANG Zhi-gen

    2012-01-01

    Background Retrocaval ureter is a rare congenital abnormality.Operative repair is always suggested in cases of significant functional obstruction.Laparoscopic procedures have been employed as the minimally invasive therapeutic option for retrocaval ureter.However,the laparoscopic techniques for retrocaval ureter might be technically challenging to some surgeons.The aim of this article was to present our experience and surgical techniques of pure transperitoneal laparoscopic pyelopyelostomy and ureteroureterostomy in nine patients with retrocaval ureter.Methods A total of nine patients of retrocaval ureter underwent pure laparoscopic pyelopyelostomy or ureteroureterostomy.The operation was performed with the patients placed in the 70-degree lateral decubitus position via a three port transperitoneal approach with two 10-mm and one 5-mm ports.The distal part of the dilated renal pelvis was transected at the ureteropelvic junction and the ureter was relocated anterior to the inferior vena cava.The tension-free pyeloureteral or ureteroureteral anastomosis was completed with the intracorporal freehand suturing and in situ knot-tying techniques combined with interrupted and continuous fashion.A double J ureteral stent was inserted in an antegrade manner during laparoscopy.Intravenous urography or computerized tomography and renal ultrasonography were performed after 3 months postoperatively.Results All operations were completed laparoscopically,and no open conversion was required.The mean operative time was 135 minutes (range,70-250 minutes),with minimal blood loss (less than 60 ml).No intra-operative complications or significant bleeding occurred.All patients presented mild postoperative pain and quick convalescence.The symptoms disappeared and hydronephrosis decreased substantially after surgery.Conclusions Pure transperitoneal laparoscopic correction for retrocaval ureter was associated with an excellent outcome,minimal invasiveness and short hospital stay.It is

  16. Pure spinor equations to lift gauged supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Dario; Tomasiello, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca, and INFN, sezione di Milano-Bicocca,I-20126 Milano (Italy)

    2014-01-31

    We rewrite the equations for ten-dimensional supersymmetry in a way formally identical to a necessary and sufficient G-structure system in N=2 gauged supergravity, where all four-dimensional quantities are replaced by combinations of pure spinors and fluxes in the internal space. This provides a way to look for lifts of BPS solutions without having to reduce or even rewrite the ten-dimensional action. In particular this avoids the problem of consistent truncation, and the introduction of unphysical gravitino multiplets.

  17. Are all maximally entangled states pure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, D.; Brandão, F. G. S. L.; Terra Cunha, M. O.

    2005-10-01

    We study if all maximally entangled states are pure through several entanglement monotones. In the bipartite case, we find that the same conditions which lead to the uniqueness of the entropy of entanglement as a measure of entanglement exclude the existence of maximally mixed entangled states. In the multipartite scenario, our conclusions allow us to generalize the idea of the monogamy of entanglement: we establish the polygamy of entanglement, expressing that if a general state is maximally entangled with respect to some kind of multipartite entanglement, then it is necessarily factorized of any other system.

  18. Purely cubic action for string field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, G. T.; Lykken, J.; Rohm, R.; Strominger, A.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that Witten's (1986) open-bosonic-string field-theory action and a closed-string analog can be written as a purely cubic interaction term. The conventional form of the action arises by expansion around particular solutions of the classical equations of motion. The explicit background dependence of the conventional action via the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin operator is eliminated in the cubic formulation. A closed-form expression is found for the full nonlinear gauge-transformation law.

  19. Synthesis of highly phase pure BSCCO superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorris, S.E.; Poeppel, R.B.; Prorok, B.C.; Lanagan, M.T.; Maroni, V.A.

    1995-11-21

    An article and method of manufacture (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor are disclosed. The superconductor is manufactured by preparing a first powdered mixture of bismuth oxide, lead oxide, strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. A second powdered mixture is then prepared of strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. The mixtures are calcined separately with the two mixtures then combined. The resulting combined mixture is then subjected to a powder in tube deformation and thermal processing to produce a substantially phase pure (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor. 5 figs.

  20. Quantum correlations support probabilistic pure state cloning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roa, Luis, E-mail: lroa@udec.cl [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Alid-Vaccarezza, M.; Jara-Figueroa, C. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Klimov, A.B. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Guadalajara, Avenida Revolución 1500, 44420 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2014-02-01

    The probabilistic scheme for making two copies of two nonorthogonal pure states requires two auxiliary systems, one for copying and one for attempting to project onto the suitable subspace. The process is performed by means of a unitary-reduction scheme which allows having a success probability of cloning different from zero. The scheme becomes optimal when the probability of success is maximized. In this case, a bipartite state remains as a free degree which does not affect the probability. We find bipartite states for which the unitarity does not introduce entanglement, but does introduce quantum discord between some involved subsystems.