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Sample records for punica granatum peel

  1. Anticoccidial activity of fruit peel of Punica granatum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahad, Shazia; Tanveer, Syed; Malik, Tauseef Ahmad; Nawchoo, Irshad Ahmad

    2018-03-01

    In the interests of food safety and public health, plants and their compounds are now re-emerging as an alternative approach to treat parasitic diseases. Here, we studied the anticoccidial effect of different solvent extracts of the fruit peel of Punica granatum-a commercial waste from pomegranate juice industries. The hope underlying these experiments was to find a sustainable natural product for controlling coccidiosis. The plant extracts were prepared using solvents of different polarity. Acute oral toxicity study was first carried out to see the safety of crude extracts. A high dose of crude extracts (300 mg/kg body weight) was tested for possession of anticoccidial activity against experimentally induced coccidial infection in broiler chicken. Activity was measured in comparison to the reference drug amprolium on the basis of oocyst output reduction, mean weight gain of birds and feed conversion ratio. Oocyst output was measured using Mc-Masters counting technique. Acute oral toxicity study showed that crude extracts of P. granatum are safe up to dosage of 2000 mg/kg body weight. LD 50 was not determined as mortalities were not recorded in any of the five groups of chicken. For anticoccidial activity crude methanolic extract (CME) of the fruit peel of P. granatum showed the maximum effect as evident by oocyst output reduction (92.8 ± 15.3), weight gain of birds (1403.0 ± 11.9 g) and feed conversion ratio (1.66 ± 0.04), thereby affirming the presence of alcohol soluble active ingredients in the plant. We also tested different doses (100-400 mg/kg body weight) of the CME of the fruit peel of P. granatum, the most active extract on E. tenella and observed a dose dependent effect. From the present study it can be concluded that alcoholic extract of the fruit peel of P. granatum has significant potential to contribute to the control of coccidian parasites of chicken. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. "Rhetoric to Reality"- Efficacy of Punica Granatum Peel Extract on Oral Candidiasis: An in vitro Study.

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    Madugula, Preethi; Reddy, Sudhakara; Koneru, Jyothirmai; Rao, Atla Srinivasa; Sruthi, Rayapureddi; Dalli, Divya Teja

    2017-01-01

    Global usage of synthetic drugs inadvertently has resulted in deleterious effects and antimicrobial resistance. Phytoextarcts with therapeutic properties appear to be appropriate substitutes for synthetic drugs. Punica granatum (Pomegranate) is a fruit rich in nutraceuticals and therapeutic properties that has lead to its widespread use as folk-medicine for treating innumerable diseases. To determine the in vitro antifungal efficacy of Punica granatum peel extract against the oral Candida compared with clotrimazole. An in vitro study was carried out on 60 saliva samples collected from patients confirmed by clinical and mycological examination as oral candidiasis and subjected to culture on Saborauds Dextrose Agar (SDA) medium and incubated at 37°C for 48 hours. The cultured Candida species were subjected to antifungal susceptibility test by agar well diffusion method. Punica granatum peel extract (Group-I), Ethanol (Group-II Negative control), Clotrimazole (Group-III-Positive control) were inoculated in wells and incubated. Zones of inhibitions were measured with a digital Vernier's callipers and subjected to statistical analysis. ANOVA (analysis of variance) was performed to compare inhibition zones and concentrations of all the three groups. Antifungal efficacy of Punica granatum group and Clotrimazole group were statistically significant with p-value Punica granatum approximated with that of the clotrimazole. The present research was just a venture to usual clinical approach. The results of the study reveal that MIC of peel extract of Punica granatum approximated with that of the clotrimazole. Hence, peel extract of Punica granatum may be used as a substitute for antifungal agents in clinical trials with standardization so as to minimize the deleterious effects for patient compliance.

  3. “Rhetoric to Reality”- Efficacy of Punica Granatum Peel Extract on Oral Candidiasis: An in vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sudhakara; Koneru, Jyothirmai; Rao, Atla Srinivasa; Sruthi, Rayapureddi; Dalli, Divya Teja

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Global usage of synthetic drugs inadvertently has resulted in deleterious effects and antimicrobial resistance. Phytoextarcts with therapeutic properties appear to be appropriate substitutes for synthetic drugs. Punica granatum (Pomegranate) is a fruit rich in nutraceuticals and therapeutic properties that has lead to its widespread use as folk-medicine for treating innumerable diseases. Aim To determine the in vitro antifungal efficacy of Punica granatum peel extract against the oral Candida compared with clotrimazole. Materials and Methods An in vitro study was carried out on 60 saliva samples collected from patients confirmed by clinical and mycological examination as oral candidiasis and subjected to culture on Saborauds Dextrose Agar (SDA) medium and incubated at 37°C for 48 hours. The cultured Candida species were subjected to antifungal susceptibility test by agar well diffusion method. Punica granatum peel extract (Group-I), Ethanol (Group-II Negative control), Clotrimazole (Group-III-Positive control) were inoculated in wells and incubated. Zones of inhibitions were measured with a digital Vernier’s callipers and subjected to statistical analysis. ANOVA (analysis of variance) was performed to compare inhibition zones and concentrations of all the three groups. Results Antifungal efficacy of Punica granatum group and Clotrimazole group were statistically significant with p-value Punica granatum approximated with that of the clotrimazole. Conclusion The present research was just a venture to usual clinical approach. The results of the study reveal that MIC of peel extract of Punica granatum approximated with that of the clotrimazole. Hence, peel extract of Punica granatum may be used as a substitute for antifungal agents in clinical trials with standardization so as to minimize the deleterious effects for patient compliance. PMID:28274059

  4. Pomegranate (Punica granatum) peel is effective in a murine model of experimental Cryptosporidium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mathal, Ebtisam M; Alsalem, Afaf M

    2012-07-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, a major health issue for neonatal calves, is caused by the parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, which is highly resistant to drug treatments. To date, many anti-parasitic drugs have been tested, but only a few have been shown to be partially effective in treating cryptosporidiosis. Previous studies have indicated that pomegranate (Punica granatum) possesses anti-plasmodium, anti-cestode, and anti-nematode activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of P. granatum peel on suckling mice infected with experimental C. parvum. At 4days of age, 72 neonatal albino mice were randomly divided into five groups: G1: healthy controls, G2: infected/untreated controls, G3: uninfected/distilled water-treated, G4: uninfected/P. granatum peel-treated, and G5: infected/P. granatum peel-treated. Mice were experimentally-infected by oral administration of 1×10(3)C. parvum oocysts per animal. On day 7 post-inoculation (pi), treated mice received an aqueous suspension of P. granatum peel orally (3g/kg body weight). The presence of diarrhea, oocyst shedding, and weight gain/loss, and the histopathology of ileal sections were examined. Infected mice treated with the P. granatum peel suspension showed improvement in all parameters examined. Additionally, these mice did not exhibit any clinical symptoms and no deaths occurred. Oocyst shedding was very significantly reduced in the P. granatum-treated mice by day 14 pi (Pgranatum-treated mice was significantly higher than that of the infected/untreated controls throughout the study (Pgranatum-treated mice on day 14 pi showed visible improvement in comparison with the infected/untreated controls, including renewed brush borders, reduced numbers of C. parvum trophozoites, and reduced lymphatic infiltration. On day 28 pi, tissues of the P. granatum-treated mice were very similar to those of healthy control mice. These results suggest that P. granatum peel is a promising anti-coccidial therapeutic

  5. A Review on Antihyperglycemic and Antihepatoprotective Activity of Eco-Friendly Punica granatum Peel Waste

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    Middha, Sushil Kumar; Usha, Talambedu; Pande, Veena

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, pomegranate (Punica granatum) is entitled as a wonder fruit because of its voluminous pharmacological properties. In 1830, P. granatum fruit was first recognized in United States Pharmacopeia; the Philadelphia edition introduced the rind of the fruit, the New York edition the bark of the root and further 1890 edition the stem bark was introduced. There are significant efforts and progress made in establishing the pharmacological mechanisms of peel (pericarp or rind) and the individual constituents responsible for them. This review provides an insight on the phytochemical components that contribute too antihyperglycemic, hepatoprotective, antihyperlipidemic effect, and numerous other effects of wonderful, economic, and eco-friendly pomegranate peel extract (PP). PMID:23878603

  6. Effect ofPunica granatum peel extract on learning and memory in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shalini Adiga; Prabhav Trivedi; Ravichandra V; Debashree Deb; Forum Mehta

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate potential memory enhancing effect ofPunica granatum peel extract on rats.Methods: Healthy adult male albino rats of Wistar strain were used. Each group of6 rats were administered either distilled water or50mg/kg of extract or100 mg/kg of extract for 15days and subjected to passive avoidance test or T-maze test. In the next phase rats were administered distilled water or100 mg/kg of extract for15 days and the rats were given injection diazepam before subjecting them to the tests.Results:The overall performance was better in test groups compared to control groups. Among the test groups,100 mg/kg rats performed better than50mg/kg. The effect on spatial learning parameters like mean number of alternations and mean percentage bias was more marked compared to retention testing parameters like latency. 100 mg/kg Punica extract treated group also improved performance of diazepam treated rats. Conclusions:There is a definite trend of memory improvement byPunica granatum peel with effects being more marked on spatial learning tendency and long term memory than on retention capacity.

  7. Characterization and lead(II) ions removal of modified Punica granatum L. peels.

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    Ay, Çiğdem; Özcan, Asiye Safa; Erdoğan, Yunus; Özcan, Adnan

    2017-04-03

    The aim of the present study was to enhance the biosorption capacity of a waste biomass of Punica granatum L. peels (PGL) using various chemical modification agents. Among these agents, hexamethylenediamine (HMDA) indicated the best performance with regard to the improvement of lead(II) ions removal from aqueous solution. The characterization of HMDA-modified P. granatum L. peels (HMDA-PGL) was achieved by using elemental analysis, FT-IR, thermogravimetric (TG) analysis and zeta potential measurement techniques. Based on FT-IR study, the chemical modification of P. granatum L. peels take place with its carboxyl, carbonyl, hydroxyl, etc. groups and these groups are responsible for the biosorption of lead(II) ions onto modified biomass. Biosorption equilibrium and kinetic data fitted well the Langmuir isotherm and the pseudo-second-order kinetic models, respectively. The highest biosorption capacity obtained from Langmuir isotherm model was 371.36 mg g -1 . Biosorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature according to the thermodynamic results and it quickly reached the equilibrium within 60 minutes. The validity of kinetic models used in this study can be quantitatively tested by using a normalized standard deviation Δq(%).

  8. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activities of Punica Granatum Peel Extracts Against Oral Pathogens

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    Sh. Abdollahzadeh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Punica granatum has been used for many years in folk medicine due to several purposes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of methanolic extract of Punica granatum peel (MEPGP against Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus,Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguinis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Actynomyces viscosus, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Candida albicans.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, the mentioned oral organisms were cultured in blood agar and mueller-hinton media and then paper disks containing MEPGP at concentrations of 4 mg/ml, 8 mg/ml and 12 mg/ml were inserted on medias. The antimicrobialactivity was evaluated by agar disk diffusion method. The effects of three different concentrations of MEPGP against microorganisms were compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests.Results: All concentrations of MEPGP had antibacterial activity against S. aureus and S.epidermidis. Only at concentration of 8 mg/ml and 12 mg/ml MEPGP was effective against L. acidophilus, S. mutans and S. salivarius. Furthermore; no concentrations ofMEPGP inhibited A. viscosus and C. albicans.Conclusion: This study suggests that MEPGP might be used as an antibacterial agent in controlling oral infections.

  9. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activities of Punica Granatum Peel Extracts Against Oral Pathogens

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    Abdollahzadeh, Sh.; Mashouf, RY.; Mortazavi, H.; Moghaddam, MH.; Roozbahani, N.; Vahedi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Punica granatum has been used for many years in folk medicine due to several purposes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of methanolic extract of Punica granatum peel (MEPGP) against Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguinis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Actynomyces viscosus, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, the mentioned oral organisms were cultured in blood agar and mueller-hinton media and then paper disks containing MEPGP at concentrations of 4 mg/ml, 8 mg/ml and 12 mg/ml were inserted on medias. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated by agar disk diffusion method. The effects of three different concentrations of MEPGP against microorganisms were compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Results: All concentrations of MEPGP had antibacterial activity against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Only at concentration of 8 mg/ml and 12 mg/ml MEPGP was effective against L. acidophilus, S. mutans and S. salivarius. Furthermore; no concentrations of MEPGP inhibited A. viscosus and C. albicans. Conclusion: This study suggests that MEPGP might be used as an antibacterial agent in controlling oral infections. PMID:21998800

  10. Antioxidant Activity of Some Extracts from GAMMA Irradiated Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Peel and Seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, I.A; Afify, S.A; Hasanin, F.R; El Sahy, K.M

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the antioxidant activity of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) peel and seed (obtained as waste from juice extraction) using different solvents as diethyl ether, ethyl acetate, ethanol 50 ⁒, ethanol 80⁒: methanol 50⁒, methanol 80⁒ and distilled water. The measurements of the antioxidant activity of all extracts were carried out using a radical scavenging activity against 2,2 ' ,-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), β-Carotene⁒linoleic acid bleaching and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). Moreover, the effect of gamma irradiation at dose levels of 3, 6 and 9 kGy on, antioxidant activity of the best pomegranate peel and seed samples that possessed highest antioxidant activity was investigated. Results showed that ethanolic 50⁒ peel extract had a higher total phenolic contents (TPC) and total flavonoid contents (TFC) in both peel and seed, (9323.17 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE) 100 g -1 , 2998.05 mg quercetin equivalent (QE) 100 g -1 and 352.09 mg GAE 100 g -1 ,106.78 mg QE 100 g -1 dry weight (DW), respectively than other extracts. Ethanolic 50⁒ extracts showed higher antioxidant activity than other peel and seed extracts. In addition, ethanolic 50⁒ extract of irradiated pomegranate peel and seed at dose level of 6 kGy extract had higher TPC, TFC and antioxidant activity compared to other doses. Thus, ethanolic 50⁒ extract of irradiated pomegranate peel and seed at 6 kGy may be considered as a good source of natural compounds with-antioxidant activity which could be suitable as potential ingredient for food products.

  11. In vitro Evaluation of Antioxidant Potential of Isolated Compounds and Various Extracts of Peel of Punica granatum L.

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    Jacob, Janani; Lakshmanapermalsamy, P; Illuri, Ramanaiah; Bhosle, Damaji; Sangli, Gopala Krishna; Mundkinajeddu, Deepak

    2018-01-01

    Punica granatum L. ( Lythraceae ) peel has been proven to exhibit widespread pharmacological application against multitude of diseases due to the presence of bioactive principles. The objective is to isolate the bioactive compounds from the pericarp of P. granatum and to evaluate the antioxidant activity of various extracts. Dried peel of P. granatum was extracted with aqueous acetone and chromatographed on Diaion HP-20. Enriched fractions were rechromatographed on Sephadex LH-20 and purified on preparative high-performance liquid chromatography to identify individual compounds. The dried peel was extracted with different solvents to evaluate the antioxidant activity of the extracts. On the chemical investigation, three compounds were isolated and characterized as punicalagin, 2,3-(S)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-D-glucose, and punicalin, using various spectroscopic techniques. Results indicate that the isolated compounds have possessed antioxidant activity, and aqueous, methanol, and aqueous acetone extract showed significant scavenging of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radicals. In vitro antioxidant activity of Punica granatum extracts was evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) assayDried peel of P. granatum was extracted with different solvents to evaluate the antioxidant activity of the extractsAqueous acetone extract was found to be most active and chromatographed further to afford punicalagin, 2,3-(S)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-D-glucose, and punicalinThe presence of antioxidant properties of three compounds in the peel of P. granatum has been demonstrated. Abbreviations Used: HPLC: High-performance liquid chromatography; HHDP: Hexahydroxydiphenoyl; DPPH: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl; ABTS: 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid); UV: Ultraviolet; PDA: Photodiode array; LC: Liquid chromatography; NMR: Nuclear magnetic resonance; MHz

  12. Chemical analysis of Punica granatum fruit peel and its in vitro and in vivo biological properties.

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    Barathikannan, Kaliyan; Venkatadri, Babu; Khusro, Ameer; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Agastian, Paul; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Choi, Han Sung; Kim, Young Ock

    2016-07-30

    The medical application of pomegranate fruits and its peel is attracted human beings. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro α-Glucosidase inhibition, antimicrobial, antioxidant property and in vivo anti-hyperglycemic activity of Punica granatum (pomegranate) fruit peel extract using Caenorhabditis elegans. Various invitro antioxidant activity of fruit peel extracts was determined by standard protocol. Antibacterial and antifungal activities were determined using disc diffusion and microdilution method respectively. Anti-hyperglycemic activity of fruit peel was observed using fluorescence microscope for in vivo study. The ethyl acetate extract of P. granatum fruit peel (PGPEa) showed α-Glucosidase inhibition upto 50 % at the concentration of IC50 285.21 ± 1.9 μg/ml compared to hexane and methanol extracts. The total phenolic content was highest (218.152 ± 1.73 mg of catechol equivalents/g) in ethyl acetate extract. PGPEa showed more scavenging activity on 2,2-diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) with IC50 value 302.43 ± 1.9 μg/ml and total antioxidant activity with IC50 294.35 ± 1.68 μg/ml. PGPEa also showed a significant effecton lipid peroxidation IC50 208.62 ± 1.68 μg/ml, as well as high reducing power. Among the solvents extracts tested, ethyl acetate extract of fruit peel showed broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Ethyl acetate extract supplemented C.elegans worms showed inhibition of lipid accumulation similar to acarbose indicating good hypoglycemic activity. The normal worms compared to test (ethyl acetate extract supplemented) showed the highest hypoglycaemic activity by increasing the lifespan of the worms. GC-MS analysis of PGPEa showed maximum amount of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and 4-fluorobenzyl alcohol (48.59 %). In the present investigation we observed various biological properties of pomegranate fruit peel. The results clearly indicated that pomegranate peel extract could be used in preventing

  13. Lipid Lowering Effect of Punica granatum L. Peel in High Lipid Diet Fed Male Rats

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    Alireza Sadeghipour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many herbal medicines have been recommended for the treatment of dyslipidemia. The antilipidemic effect of hydroethanolic extract of pomegranate peel (Punica granatum L. was investigated in high lipid diet fed male rats. Intraperitoneally administration of pomegranate peel extract (50, 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg body weight for 23 days on the levels of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL, HDL, alkaline phosphatase (AP, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT in high lipid diet fed male rats was evaluated. Treatment of pomegranate extract decreased body weight in treated rats, significantly. Administration of the plant extract significantly decreased serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-C, alkaline phosphatise, AST, and ALT levels, whereas it increased serum HDL-C in high lipid diet fed rats in comparison to saline control group. Also, histopathological study showed that treatment of pomegranate peel extract attenuates liver damage in high lipid diet fed rats in comparison to saline group. It is concluded that the plant should be considered as an excellent candidate for future studies on dyslipidemia.

  14. Lipid Lowering Effect of Punica granatum L. Peel in High Lipid Diet Fed Male Rats

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    Sadeghipour, Alireza; Ilchizadeh Kavgani, Ali; Ghahramani, Reza; Shahabzadeh, Saleh; Anissian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Many herbal medicines have been recommended for the treatment of dyslipidemia. The antilipidemic effect of hydroethanolic extract of pomegranate peel (Punica granatum L.) was investigated in high lipid diet fed male rats. Intraperitoneally administration of pomegranate peel extract (50, 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg body weight) for 23 days on the levels of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL, HDL, alkaline phosphatase (AP), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in high lipid diet fed male rats was evaluated. Treatment of pomegranate extract decreased body weight in treated rats, significantly. Administration of the plant extract significantly decreased serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-C, alkaline phosphatise, AST, and ALT levels, whereas it increased serum HDL-C in high lipid diet fed rats in comparison to saline control group. Also, histopathological study showed that treatment of pomegranate peel extract attenuates liver damage in high lipid diet fed rats in comparison to saline group. It is concluded that the plant should be considered as an excellent candidate for future studies on dyslipidemia. PMID:25295067

  15. Punica granatum peel extract protects against ionizing radiation-induced enteritis and leukocyte apoptosis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toklu, H.Z.; Sehirli, O.; Ozyurt, H.

    2009-01-01

    Radiation-induced enteritis is a well-recognized sequel of therapeutic irradiation. Therefore we examined the radioprotective properties of Punica granatum peel extract (PPE) on the oxidative damage in the ileum. Rats were exposed to a single whole-body X-ray irradiation of 800 cGy. Irradiated rats were pretreated orally with saline or PPE (50 mg/kg/day) for 10 days before irradiation and the following 10 days, while control rats received saline or PPE but no irradiation. Then plasma and ileum samples were obtained. Irradiation caused a decrease in glutathione and total antioxidant capacity, which was accompanied by increases in malondialdehyde levels, myeloperoxidase activity, collagen content of the tissue with a concomitant increase 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (an index of oxidative DNA damage). Similarly, pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) and lactate dehydrogenase were elevated in irradiated groups as compared to control. PPE treatment reversed all these biochemical indices, as well as histopathological alterations induced by irradiation. Furthermore, flow cytometric measurements revealed that leukocyte apoptosis and cell death were increased in irradiated animals, while PPE reversed these effects. PPE supplementation reduced oxidative damage in the ileal tissues, probably by a mechanism that is associated with the decreased production of reactive oxygen metabolites and enhancement of antioxidant mechanisms. Adjuvant therapy of PPE may have a potential to support a successful radiotherapy by protecting against radiation-induced enteritis. (author)

  16. In vitro assessment of the antimicrobial effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum L. peel decoction on saliva samples

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    Solon José de Oliveira Leite

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several products have been developed to eliminate or reduce potential pathogenic microorganisms of the oral microbiome. The continuous use of these synthetic products can result in side effects such as vomiting, diarrhea, darkening of the teeth and the induction of microbial resistance. Pomegranate (Punica granatum peel decoction was tested to assess its antimicrobial activity. In vitro analysis showed the decoction had antimicrobial activity against strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans, but none was detected against Enterococcus faecalis. When tested on saliva samples from children, the decoction showed great potential in reducing the load of microorganisms, the inhibition haloes produced with saliva samples being similar to those of the antimicrobial control (0.12% chlorhexidine. The pomegranate peel decoction in water could thus provide a promising source for developing solutions for use against oral diseases.

  17. Effect of Punica granatum fruit peel on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase in amphistome Gastrothylax indicus.

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    Aggarwal, Rama; Bagai, Upma

    2017-03-01

    Increasing anthelmintic resistance and the impact of conventional anthelmintics on the environment, it is important to look for alternative strategies against helminth parasite in sheep. Important lipogenic enzymes like glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) show subcellular distribution pattern. Activity of G-6-PDH was largely restricted to cytosolic fraction while MDH was found in both cytosolic and mitochondrial fraction in Gastrothylax indicus. Following in vitro treatment with ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Punica granatum fruit peel and commercial anthelmintic, albendazole G-6-PDH activity was decreased by 19-32 %, whereas MDH was suppressed by 24-41 %, compared to the respective control. Albendazole was quite effective when compared with negative control and both the extracts. The results indicate that phytochemicals of plant may act as potential vermifuge or vermicide.

  18. [Optimization of SFE-CO2 Extraction for Ursolic Acid from Punica granatum Peel by Plackett-Burman and Central Composite Design].

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    Wang, Zhan-yi; Jin, Mei-hua; Wang, Yu-hai; Zhang, Li-hua; Bi, Hai-dan; Li, Zhuo-wa

    2015-03-01

    The optimum extraction of ursolic acid from Punica granatum peel by SFE-CO2 was investigated. Based on the design of Plackett-Burman(PB), significant factors influencing the yield of ursolic acid in the operation process were filtered, with the extraction rate of ursolic acid as the index. The results obtained by steepest ascent method approximated the maximum area of ursolic acid yield. Then the Central Composite Design(CCD) design was used to carry on the response surface optimization of significant factors, getting a two order mathematical model affecting the ursolic acid yield, as well as the optimum process conditions. The best technological conditions of the extraction of ursolic acid from Punica granatum peel by SFE-CO2 were that the extraction temperature was 46. 29 °C, extraction time was 91. 6 min and the extraction pressure was 34. 49 MPa. Under the optimal conditions, verification test of ursolic acid yield was 12. 508 mg/g, approximating to the predicted value of 12. 645 mg/g. The PB test and CCD test design are combined to optimize the extraction process of ursolic acid from Punica granatum peel by SFE-CO2. The screening results are statistically significant and the process operation is feasible.

  19. Efficacy of the Punica granatum peels aqueous extract for symptom management in ulcerative colitis patients. A randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial.

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    Kamali, Mohammadali; Tavakoli, Hamid; Khodadoost, Mahmoud; Daghaghzadeh, Hamed; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Gachkar, Latif; Mansourian, Marjan; Adibi, Payman

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effects of the Punica granatum peel extract on symptoms of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). Patients with UC were randomized to receive an aqueous extract of the P. granatum peel (6 g of dry peel/day) or placebo for four weeks complementary to standard medications. Symptoms were assessed using the Lichtiger Colitis Activity Index (LCAI) at baseline, week 4, and week 10 (follow-up). Clinical response was defined by ≥ 3 point decrease in LCAI. The LCAI score was similarly reduced in both the P. granatum (-1.68 ± 3.85, P = 0.019) and placebo groups (-1.39 ± 2.41, P = 0.002). Clinical response was higher with P. granatum compared with placebo at week 4 (41.4% vs. 18.2%, P = 0.055), but not at week 10 (48.3% vs. 36.4%, P = 0.441). The P. granatum peel extract seems effective in complementary management of UC. Further studies in a larger sample of patients are warranted. IRCT2014040617156N1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. HPLC Evaluation of Phenolic Profile, Nutritive Content, and Antioxidant Capacity of Extracts Obtained from Punica granatum Fruit Peel

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    Middha, Sushil Kumar; Usha, Talambedu; Pande, Veena

    2013-01-01

    This study revealed polyphenolic content, nutritive content, antioxidant activity, and phenolic profile of methanol and aqueous extracts of Punica granatum peel extract. For this, extracts were screened for possible antioxidant activities by free radical scavenging activity (DPPH), hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. The total phenolics and flavonoid recovered by methanolic (MPE) and the water extract (AQPE) were ranged from 185 ± 12.45 to 298.00 ± 24.86 mg GAE (gallic acid equivalents)/gm and 23.05 ± 1.54 to 49.8 ± 2.14 quercetin (QE) mg/g, respectively. The EC50 of herbal extracts ranged from 100 µg/ml (0.38 quercetin equivalents), for AQPE, 168 µg/ml (0.80 quercetin equivalents), for MPE. The phenolic profile in the methanolic extracts was investigated by chromatographic (HPLC) method. About 5 different flavonoids, phenolic acids, and their derivatives including quercetin (1), rutin (2), gallic acid (3), ellagic acid (4), and punicalagin as a major ellagitannin (5) have been identified. Among both extracts, methanolic extract was the most effective. This report may be the first to show nutritive content and correlation analysis to suggest that phenols and flavonoids might contribute the high antioxidant activity of this fruit peel and establish it as a valuable natural antioxidant source applicable in the health food industry. PMID:23983682

  1. Isolation, characterization, antioxidant activity, and protein-precipitating capacity of the hydrolyzable tannin punicalagin from pomegranate yellow peel (Punica granatum)

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    Oudane, Boualem; Boudemagh, Djalila; Bounekhel, Mahmoud; Sobhi, Widad; Vidal, Michel; Broussy, Sylvain

    2018-03-01

    This work describes the isolation and characterization of the hydrolysable tannin punicalagin, obtained from the yellow peel of pomegranate (Punica granatum, belonging to the family Lythraceae). The natural product was present as a mixture of α and β anomers, rapidly interconverting under acidic pH conditions. A fast and efficient purification method was established using semi-preparative high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The chemical structure of the molecule was confirmed as punicalagin based on IR spectroscopy, 1H and 13C NMR, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry studies. The lowest energy conformations of the α and β anomers were calculated by quantum chemical methods, and their ratio compared to the experimental value (experimental: α/β = 2.2 to 2.5; calculated α/β = 2.4, in aqueous solution at acidic pH). The antioxidant activity of pure punicalagin was determined with a DPPH radical scavenging assay (IC50 = 1.9 ± 0.2 μg/mL) and was comparable to that of tannic acid (IC50 = 1.3 ± 0.2 μg/mL). Finally, we demonstrated that punicalagin, when used above a threshold concentration, was able to precipitate bovine serum albumin (BSA), although less efficiently than tannic acid.

  2. Protective effects of Punica granatum (pomegranate) peel extract on concanavalin A-induced autoimmune hepatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Men, Ruoting; Hu, Mingxing; Fan, Xiaoli; Yang, Xiaoxue; Huang, Xiaojun; Ye, Tinghong; Yang, Li

    2018-04-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic inflammatory liver disease of an unknown etiology, glucocorticoid therapy is currently recognized as an effective treatment for AIH, but conventional application and patient compliance are both hindered by its side effects. The exploration of the AIH pathogenesis and the searching for the new candidate drugs that exert potential activity and low toxicity are urgently needed. Pomegranate peel extract (PoPx) is a natural extract of Punica granatum and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. The present study aimed to clarify the effect of PoPx on the concanavalin A (ConA)-induced autoimmune hepatitis in a mouse model that is well established at 12h after tail vein injection with a dose of 20 mg/kg of ConA. C57BL/6 female mice were pretreated with PoPx (250 mg/kg, once daily for 3 days) followed by a ConA challenge. Pretreatment with PoPx significantly alleviated ConA-induced liver injury by down-regulating the levels of plasma alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and cytokine, including TNF-α, interferon (IFN) -γ and interleukin (IL)-6. Moreover, liver hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining displayed a lighter inflammatory infiltration around the portal area in the PoPx-pretreated mice. In addition, the flow cytometry (FCM) data showed that the immune response in the liver was died down in the PoPx-pretreated condition. Specially, pretreatment with PoPx reduced the infiltration of activated CD4 + and CD8 + T cells in the liver. Taken together, these findings contributed to a better understanding of the actions of PoPx against acute AIH and indicated that PoPx might be a potential compound in treating T cell-mediated autoimmune liver injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of antidiabetic, hypolipedimic and antioxidant activity of hydroalcoholic extract of leaves and fruit peel of Punica granatum in male Wistar albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salwe, Kartik J; Sachdev, Devender O; Bahurupi, Yogesh; Kumarappan, Manimekalai

    2015-01-01

    We investigated anti-diabetic, hypolipedimic and antioxidant activity of hydroalcoholic extract from leaves and fruit peel of Punica granatum. Streptozotocin induced diabetic Wister rats were used in this study consisting of seven groups of six animals each. Groups (1) normal control, (2) diabetic control, (3) leaves extract 100 mg/kg b.w. of P. granatum, (4) leaves extract 200 mg/kg b.w. of P. granatum, (5) fruit peel extract 100 mg/kg b.w. of P. granatum, (6) peel extract 200 mg/kg b.w. of P. granatum and (7) glibenclamide respectively. Fasting blood sugar was recorded on 1(st), 7(th), 14(th), 21(st) and 28(th) day. At the end of the experiment Lipid profile and levels of antioxidants were determined. Safety profile of both extracts was evaluated using acute and chronic toxicity studies. Higher dose of fruit peel extract of P. granatum (PEPG) and glibenclamide significantly lowered blood glucose level from 7(th) day onwards however glibenclamide was found to be more effective. Leaves extract at higher dose and fruit extract at lower dose also significantly lowered blood glucose level from 14(th) day onwards. Leaves extract at lower dose also significantly lowered blood glucose level from 21(st) day onwards. Glibenclamide and higher dose of fruit PEPG extract significantly reduced the total cholesterol, triglyceride levels and significantly increased the high density lipoprotein cholesterol level. Glibenclamide followed by higher dose was found more effective in reducing plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and increasing levels of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and catalase). No toxicity was observed even when both extracts were administered at 10 times of higher dose used in this study and no significant changes were seen when it were used chronically. Leaves and fruit PEPG possesses significant anti-diabetic, hypolipedimic and antioxidant properties. This study supports the traditional use of P. granatum in diabetes. Fruit peel which is

  4. Biogenic robust synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Punica granatum peel and its application as a green catalyst for the reduction of an anthropogenic pollutant 4-nitrophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, T. Jebakumar Immanuel; Sethuraman, M. G.

    2013-03-01

    A robust synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using the peel extract of Punica granatum is reported in this article. The formation of AgNPs was confirmed by the appearance of brownish yellow color and the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) peak at 432 nm. The biogenic AgNPs were found to have the size approximately 30 nm with distorted spherical shape. The high negative zeta potential values of AgNPs revealed their high stability which could be attributed to the capping of AgNPs by the phytoconstituents of the Punica granatum peel. The biogenic AgNPs were also found to function as an effective green catalyst in the reduction of anthropogenic pollutant viz., 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) by solid sodium borohydride, which was evident from the instantaneous color change of bright yellow (400 nm) to colorless (294 nm) solution, after the addition of AgNPs. The catalytic action of biogenic AgNPs in the reduction of 4-NP could be explained on the basis of Langmuir-Hinshelwood model.

  5. Punica granatum peel extracts: HPLC fractionation and LC MS analysis to quest compounds having activity against multidrug resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ilyas; Rahman, Hazir; Abd El-Salam, Nasser M; Tawab, Abdul; Hussain, Anwar; Khan, Taj Ali; Khan, Usman Ali; Qasim, Muhammad; Adnan, Muhammad; Azizullah, Azizullah; Murad, Waheed; Jalal, Abdullah; Muhammad, Noor; Ullah, Riaz

    2017-05-03

    Medicinal plants are rich source of traditional herbal medicine around the globe. Most of the plant's therapeutic properties are due to the presence of secondary bioactive compounds. The present study analyzed the High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) fractions of Puncia granatum (peel) extracts (aqueous, chloroform, ethanol and hexane) against multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens (Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus). All the fractions having antibacterial activity was processed for bioactive compounds identification using LC MS/MS analysis. Among total HPLC fractions (n = 30), 4 HPLC fractions of P. granatum (peel) showed potential activity against MDR pathogens. Fraction 1 (F1) and fraction 4 (F4) collected from aqueous extract showed maximum activity against P. aeruginosa. Fraction 2 (F2) of hexane showed antibacterial activity against three pathogens, while ethanol F4 exhibited antibacterial activity against A. baumannii. The active fractions were processed for LC MS/MS analysis to identify bioactive compounds. Valoneic acid dilactone (aqueous F1 and F4), Hexoside (ethanol F4) and Coumaric acid (hexane F2) were identified as bioactive compounds in HPLC fractions. Puncia granatum peel extracts HPLC fractions exhibited potential inhibitory activity against MDR bacterial human pathogens. Several bioactive compounds were identified from the HPLC fractions. Further characterization of these compounds may be helpful to conclude it as therapeutic lead molecules against MDR pathogens.

  6. The extract from Punica granatum (pomegranate) peel induces apoptosis and impairs metastasis in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuanle; Li, Yali; Yang, Fangfang; Zeng, Anqi; Yang, Shuping; Luo, Yi; Zhang, Yiwen; Xie, Yongmei; Ye, Tinghong; Xia, Yong; Yin, Wenya

    2017-09-01

    Prostate cancer is a big threat to male for its poor prognosis and high mortality rate. Natural compounds are important resources of many anticancer drugs. Pomegranate is a kind of antioxidant-rich fruit and its peel and seed has potential anticancer activities. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of pomegranate peel extract (PoPx) on the apoptosis and metastasis of prostate cancer cells and the related mechanism. We found that PoPx showed growth inhibition on prostate cancer cells. Nuclei morphological and flow cytometer (FCM) analysis indicated that PoPx could induce prostate cancer apoptosis. Further investigation indicated that mitochondrial mediated intrinsic pathway is involved in the apoptosis. Exposure to PoPx led to loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δym), accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Western blot analysis showed that PoPx could increase the expression ratio of Bax/Bcl2 and activation of apoptosis executor caspase 3. Wound healing assay and transwell migration and invasion assay implied that PoPx has the potential to inhibit migration and invasion, two critical steps in prostate cancer metastasis. Downregulation of MMP2/MMP9 and upregulation of TIMP2 showed accordance with the inhibition of migration and invasion. In summary, the present data showed that PoPx could be a promising drug candidate to treat prostate cancer, showing us a better way to develop novel drugs from natural compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Protective effects of Punica granatum seeds extract against aging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Punica granatum extract also significantly lowered lipid peroxidation level and increased antioxidant glutathione level in brain tissues. Punica granatum preparations could be protective in the treatment of cognitive disorders such as dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Key words: Punica granatum, Cognitive deficits, Vitamin ...

  8. Effect of Punica granatum peel extracts on antimicrobial properties in Walnut shell cellulose reinforced Bio-thermoplastic starch films from cashew nut shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harini, K; Chandra Mohan, C; Ramya, K; Karthikeyan, S; Sukumar, M

    2018-03-15

    The main aim of the present study is to extract and characterize cashew nut shell (CNS) starch and walnut shell cellulose (WNC) for development of cellulose reinforced starch films. Moreover, the extraction and characterization of pomegranate peel extract, for incorporation with CNS-WNC films, was investigated. CNS starch was examined to be a moderate amylose starch with 26.32 ± 0.43% amylose content. Thermal degradation temperature of CNS starch was found to be 310 °C. Walnut shell cellulose was found to have high crystallinity index of 72%, with two thermal degradation temperatures of 319 °C and 461 °C. 2% WN cellulose reinforced CNS starch films were examined to have good oxygen transfer rate, mechanical and physical properties. Thermal degradation temperature of CNS-WNC starch films were found to be at the range of 298-302 °C. Surface roughness of CNS-WNC starch films were found to be increasing with increase in concentration of cellulose in films. Hydroxymethylfurfurole, Benzene, 2-methoxy-1,3,4-trimethyl and 1,2,3-Propanetriol, 1-acetate were found to be major active compounds present in hydrophilic extracts of Punica granatum peels. 2% WN cellulose reinforced starch films infused with hydrophilic active compounds of pomegranate peel was examined to be having good active package properties. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dwindling of cardio damaging effect of isoproterenol by Punica granatum L. peel extract involve activation of nitric oxide-mediated Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway and apoptosis inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mahesh; Sharma, Pallavi; Mazumder, Arindam Ghosh; Patial, Vikram; Singh, Damanpreet

    2015-09-09

    Punica granatum L. (Punicaceae) peel is often considered as a food waste in-spite of its high bioactive metabolite composition. Primarily it is rich in therapeutically active phenolics that act on multiple cellular sites, through diverse mechanisms. Hence, the present study was envisaged to investigate the effect of standardised peel extract of P. granatum against isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial infarction (MI). ISO administration at a dose of 150 mg/kg; s.c., twice at 24 h interval resulted in electrocardiographic abnormalities with increased heart weight and myocardial tissue damage signifying MI. Pretreatment with the extract at 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg; p.o., for 21 days prior to ISO intoxication (30 min prior to intoxication on day 22 and 23) attenuated the observed changes, along with increased myocardial tissue superoxide dismutase activity, reduced glutathione and nitrite levels, and decreased lipid peroxidation. The extract treated groups also showed reduced serum marker enzymes of MI, showing maximum effect at highest tested dose. Immunohistochemical studies revealed increased myocardial expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Bcl-2 proteins in the extract treated groups with decreased Bax expression. From the results it can be concluded that the extract pretreatment prevents ISO-induced MI through increased myocardial expression of eNOS, leading to nitric oxide-mediated Nrf2 activation, thus upregulating antioxidant mechanisms, along with inhibition of apoptosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fatty acid synthase inhibitors isolated from Punica granatum L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, He-Zhong [School of Life Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, (China); Ma, Qing-Yun; Liang, Wen-Juan; Huang, Sheng-Zhuo; Dai, Hao-Fu; Wang, Peng-Cheng; Zhao, You-Xing, E-mail: zhaoyx1011@163.com [Institute of Tropical Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences, Haikou (China); Fan, Hui-Jin; Ma, Xiao-Feng, E-mail: maxiaofeng@gucas.ac.cn [College of Life Sciences, Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2012-05-15

    The aim of this work is the isolation of fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitors from the ethyl acetate extracts of fruit peels of Punica granatum L. Bioassay-guided chemical investigation of the fruit peels resulted in the isolation of seventeen compounds mainly including triterpenoids and phenolic compounds, from which one new oleanane-type triterpene (punicaone) along with fourteen known compounds were isolated for the first time from this plant. Seven isolates were evaluated for inhibitory activities of FAS and two compounds showed to be active. Particularly, flavogallonic acid exhibited strong FAS inhibitory activity with IC{sub 50} value of 10.3 {mu}mol L{sup -1}. (author)

  11. Fatty acid synthase inhibitors isolated from Punica granatum L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, He-Zhong; Ma, Qing-Yun; Liang, Wen-Juan; Huang, Sheng-Zhuo; Dai, Hao-Fu; Wang, Peng-Cheng; Zhao, You-Xing; Fan, Hui-Jin; Ma, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is the isolation of fatty acid synthase (FAS) inhibitors from the ethyl acetate extracts of fruit peels of Punica granatum L. Bioassay-guided chemical investigation of the fruit peels resulted in the isolation of seventeen compounds mainly including triterpenoids and phenolic compounds, from which one new oleanane-type triterpene (punicaone) along with fourteen known compounds were isolated for the first time from this plant. Seven isolates were evaluated for inhibitory activities of FAS and two compounds showed to be active. Particularly, flavogallonic acid exhibited strong FAS inhibitory activity with IC 50 value of 10.3 μmol L -1 . (author)

  12. Ameliorative properties of Iranian Trigonella foenum-graecum L. seeds and Punica granatum L. peel extracts in streptozotocin-induced experimental diabetic guinea pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Abdel Salam Ahmed Hasona

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: The Iranian T. foenum-graecum seeds and P. granatum peel extracts are significantly potent in ameliorating diabetic condition induced by streptozotocin and improving various biochemical parameters in serum and liver of guinea pigs.

  13. Micropropagation of pomegranate ( Punica granatum L.) 'Bhagava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reliable and reproducible protocols to get healthy and well formed plants from nodal explants of the pomegranate (Punica granatum L) cv 'Bhagava' has been developed. Nodal segments were cultured on two different media at full strength Murashige and Skoog (MS) and Woody Plant Medium (WPM). The media was ...

  14. Application of response surface methodology for the optimization of supercritical fluid extraction of essential oil from pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, Katayoun Mahdavi; Raofie, Farhad

    2016-07-01

    Essential oils and volatile components of pomegranate ( Punica granatum L.) peel of the Malas variety from Meybod, Iran, were extracted using supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and hydro-distillation methods. The experimental parameters of SFE that is pressure, temperature, extraction time, and modifier (methanol) volume were optimized using a central composite design after a (2 4-1 ) fractional factorial design. Detailed chemical composition of the essential oils and volatile components obtained by hydro-distillation and optimum condition of the supercritical CO 2 extraction were analyzed by GC-MS, and seventy-three and forty-six compounds were identified according to their retention indices and mass spectra, respectively. The optimum SFE conditions were 350 atm pressure, 55 °C temperature, 30 min extraction time, and 150 µL methanol. Results showed that oleic acid, palmitic acid and (-)-Borneol were major compounds in both extracts. The optimum extraction yield was 1.18 % (w/w) for SFE and 0.21 % (v/w) for hydro-distillation.

  15. Antimicrobial effect of the Tunisian Nana variety Punica granatum L. extracts against Salmonella enterica (serovars Kentucky and Enteritidis) isolated from chicken meat and phenolic composition of its peel extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wafa, Ben Ajmia; Makni, Mohamed; Ammar, Sonda; Khannous, Lamia; Hassana, Amal Ben; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Es-Safi, Nour Eddine; Gdoura, Radhouane

    2017-01-16

    Punica granatum L. is widely recognized for its potency against a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens. The purpose of this study was to explore the inhibitory and the bactericidal activities of Punica granatum against Salmonella strains. The effect of extracts obtained from different parts (peels, seeds, juice and flowers) of pomegranate and using different solvents against Salmonella enterica serovars Kentucky and Enteritidis isolated from chicken meat was thus investigated. Salmonella strains were identified with the standard API-20E system and confirmed by real time PCR. The obtained results showed that the highest antibacterial activity against Salmonella strains was observed with the peels ethanolic extract giving MIC values ranging from 10.75 to 12.5mg/mL. The ethanolic extract of P. granatum Nana peels at 0.8 and 1.6mg/g significantly inhibited the growth of Salmonella Kentucky in chicken meat stored at 4°C. The phenolic composition of the ethanolic peel extract was explored by HPLC coupled to both DAD and ESI/TOF-MS detections. The obtained results allowed the detection of 21 phytochemical compounds among which various phenolic compounds have been identified on the basis of their UV and MS spectra as well as with literature data. Among the detected compounds, anthocyanins, ellagitannins, ellagic acid derivatives and flavanols were further characterized through MS-MS analysis. Our results showed thus that the Tunisian variety Nana pomegranate constitutes a good source of bioactive compounds with potent antimicrobial activity on the growth of Salmonella strains suggesting that the studied pomegranate cultivar could be a natural remedy to minimize the emergence of Salmonella enterica strains which is often involved in food borne illness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Antimicrobial Ellagitannin of Punica granatum Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Thelma de B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The ethyl acetate extract of Punica granatum fruits was fractionated by chromatographic techniques to afford the ellagitannin punicalagin. The substance was found to be active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains and was identified by HPLC/UV and ¹HNMR. The antibacterial assays which guided the isolation of the tannin were conducted using the disc diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined by the dilution method according to NCCLS (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards procedure.

  17. Medicinal values of fruit peels from Citrus sinensis, Punica granatum, and Musa paradisiaca with respect to alterations in tissue lipid peroxidation and serum concentration of glucose, insulin, and thyroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Hamendra Singh; Kar, Anand

    2008-06-01

    Peel extracts from Citrus sinensis, Punica granatum, and Musa paradisiaca were investigated for their effects on tissue lipid peroxidation (LPO) and on the concentration of thyroid hormones, insulin, and glucose in male rats. In vitro inhibition of H(2)O(2)-induced LPO in red blood cells of rats by 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, and 2.0 microg/mL C. sinensis, P. granatum, and M. paradisiaca peel extracts was observed in a dose-specific manner. Maximum inhibition was observed at 0.50 microg/mL C. sinensis, 2.0 microg/mL P. granatum, and 1.0 microg/mL M. paradisiaca. In the in vivo investigation, out of four different concentrations of each peel extract, 25, 200, and 100 mg/kg C. sinensis, P. granatum, and M. paradisiaca, respectively, were found to maximally inhibit hepatic LPO. The most effective doses were further evaluated for effects on serum triiodothyronine (T(3)), thyroxine (T(4)), insulin, and glucose concentrations. C. sinensis exhibited antithyroidal, hypoglycemic, and insulin stimulatory activities, in addition to inhibition of LPO, as it significantly decreased the serum T(4) (P paradisiaca strongly inhibited the serum level of thyroid hormones (P < .01 for both T(3) and T(4)) but increased the level of glucose (P < .05). These findings reveal the hitherto unknown potential of the tested peel extracts in the regulation of thyroid function and glucose metabolism. Besides antiperoxidative activity, C. sinensis extract has antithyroidal, hypoglycemic, and insulin stimulatory properties, which suggest its potential to ameliorate both hyperthyroidism and diabetes mellitus.

  18. Study of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) peel extract containing anthocyanins on fatty streak formation in the renal arteries in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifiyan, Fatemeh; Movahedian-Attar, Ahmad; Nili, Nafiseh; Asgary, Sedigheh

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the supplementation of pomegranate peel extract containing anthocyanins on atherosclerotic plaque formation induced by hypercholesterolemia was investigated in renal arteries in rabbits. After the determination of polyphenol and anthocyanin's content of P. granatum peel hydroalcoholic extract, 30 male rabbits were randomly divided into three groups. They were fed basic diet, hypercholesterolemic diet and hypercholesterolemic diet along with P. granatum peel extract (polyphenolic content for each rabbit 1 g/kg diet) for 2 month. Blood samples were collected at the begging, middle and end of the study in order to measure lipid concentration and oxidative and antioxidative status variables, and renal arteries were taken for the assessment of atherosclerotic plaques at the end of the study. The results reveal that P. granatum peel extract significantly increases serum antioxidant capacity in the extract recipient group in comparison with hypercholesterolemic control (P 0.05). The results of this study indicate that consumption of pomegranate peel extract containing anthocyanins (polyphenol content 1 g/kg diet) despite of a significant increase in serum antioxidant capacity cannot protect the kidneys from hypercholesterolemia-induced damages during the treatment period.

  19. Ultrasound assisted extraction of polyphenols from Punica granatum (Grenada) fruit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Chanfrau, Jorge Enrique; Lopez Armas, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    Extraction of bioactive compounds from vegetable materials is a classical operation applied in many industrial processes. Few studies have made reference to processes to obtain extracts from Punica granatum. This fruit is generally consumed as such or as fermented juices. In Cuba, it is known as grenade and numerous studies have shown antiviral, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. Maceration process is the main used technology in the preparation of extracts from Punica granatum fruit, being this a long and expensive process. Ultrasound-assisted extractions have been proven to significantly decreased extraction time and increased extraction yields in many vegetable materials. However, few papers report the use of this methodology in the extraction processes of Punica granatum. To evaluate an ultrasound-assisted extraction process to extract polyphenols from Punica granatum fruit

  20. Green approach to corrosion inhibition of mild steel in two acidic solutions by the extract of Punica granatum peel and main constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behpour, M., E-mail: m.behpour@kashanu.ac.ir [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, I.R. 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghoreishi, S.M.; Khayatkashani, M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, I.R. 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soltani, N. [Department of Chemistry, Payame Noor University (PNU), 19395-4697 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-01-05

    Graphical abstract: Ellagic acid (EA) and tannic acid (TA) were studied as corrosion inhibitors. The electron density HOMO and LUMO of EA and TA were used to explain difference in behavior of them. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The extract of Punica granatum (PG) and their main constituent (ellagic acid (EA)) are found to be good inhibitors for the corrosion of mild steel in 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 2 M HCl. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrochemical inhibitive mechanism is explained by potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorption of ALLOX on mild steel surface was found to accord with the Temkin adsorption isotherm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of temperature on the corrosion behavior of mild steel in 2 M HCl and 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} without and with the PG extract was studied. - Abstract: The effect of the extract of Punica granatum (PG) and their main constituents involve ellagic acid (EA) and tannic acid (TA), as mild steel corrosion inhibitor in 2 M HCl and 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions was investigated by weight loss measurements. The results obtained from the weight loss measurements show that the inhibition efficiency of TA even in high concentration is very low. Thus, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) investigations were used for different concentrations of PG and EA and best concentration of TA. Potentiodynamic polarization curves indicated that PG and EA behave as mixed-type inhibitors. EIS measurements show an increase of the transfer resistance with increasing inhibitor concentration. The temperature effect on the corrosion behavior of steel without and with the PG extract was studied. The inhibition action of the extract was discussed in view of Langmuir adsorption isotherm.

  1. Green approach to corrosion inhibition of mild steel in two acidic solutions by the extract of Punica granatum peel and main constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behpour, M.; Ghoreishi, S.M.; Khayatkashani, M.; Soltani, N.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Ellagic acid (EA) and tannic acid (TA) were studied as corrosion inhibitors. The electron density HOMO and LUMO of EA and TA were used to explain difference in behavior of them. Highlights: ► The extract of Punica granatum (PG) and their main constituent (ellagic acid (EA)) are found to be good inhibitors for the corrosion of mild steel in 1 M H 2 SO 4 and 2 M HCl. ► The electrochemical inhibitive mechanism is explained by potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results. ► The adsorption of ALLOX on mild steel surface was found to accord with the Temkin adsorption isotherm. ► The effect of temperature on the corrosion behavior of mild steel in 2 M HCl and 1 M H 2 SO 4 without and with the PG extract was studied. - Abstract: The effect of the extract of Punica granatum (PG) and their main constituents involve ellagic acid (EA) and tannic acid (TA), as mild steel corrosion inhibitor in 2 M HCl and 1 M H 2 SO 4 solutions was investigated by weight loss measurements. The results obtained from the weight loss measurements show that the inhibition efficiency of TA even in high concentration is very low. Thus, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) investigations were used for different concentrations of PG and EA and best concentration of TA. Potentiodynamic polarization curves indicated that PG and EA behave as mixed-type inhibitors. EIS measurements show an increase of the transfer resistance with increasing inhibitor concentration. The temperature effect on the corrosion behavior of steel without and with the PG extract was studied. The inhibition action of the extract was discussed in view of Langmuir adsorption isotherm.

  2. Effect of Punica granatum on the virulence factors of cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulube, Zandiswa; Patel, Mrudula

    2016-09-01

    Dental caries is caused by acids produced by biofilm-forming Streptococcus mutans from fermentable carbohydrates and bacterial byproducts. Control of these bacteria is important in the prevention of dental caries. This study investigated the effect of the fruit peel of Punica granatum on biofilm formation, acid and extracellular polysaccharides production (EPS) by S. mutans. Pomegranate fruit peels crude extracts were prepared. The Minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were determined against S. mutans. At 3 sub-bactericidal concentrations, the effect on the acid production, biofilm formation and EPS production was determined. The results were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon Rank Sum Tests. The lowest MBC was 6.25 mg/mL. Punica granatum significantly inhibited acid production (p mutans. The crude extract of P. granatum killed cariogenic S. mutans at high concentrations. At sub-bactericidal concentrations, it reduced biofilm formation, acid and EPS production. This suggests that P. granatum extract has the potential to prevent dental caries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. In vivo antimicrobial inhibition of Punica granatum extracts as mouthwash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhifaf M. Al-Obaidi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background — Complex polysaccharides have been detected and characterized in Punica granatum or pomegranate constituents who may act as fungal and bacterial inhibitor as well as an anti-inflammatory effect. However, limited studies were reported on using pomegranate extracts as an anti-bacterial mouthwash. Objectives — To determine the effect of Punica granatum (pomegranate extract on microbial activity of some bacterial genus isolated from the mouth. Material and Methods — This study included preparation of three different concentrations of Punica granatum methanolic extract of 25%, 50%, and 75%. The inhibition activity of these extracts was tested on different strains such as Sm, Sa, Ec, Kp, Sg and Sf. Results — Results exhibited an effective inhibition of pomegranate extracts against most of the tested strains which were isolated from patients' mouths. The 50% and 75% concentrations of methanolic extract exhibited significant inhibition against four tested strains compared to mouthwash (P≤0.05, while the 25% concentration was less effective than the other concentrations and its antibacterial effect was non-significant in comparison with the mouthwash. Conclusions — This study indicates the inhibitory effectiveness of Punica granatum extracts of high percentage on microbial activity of some bacterial genus isolated from patients’ mouths and suggests the possibility prepare a mouthwash from pomegranate extract.

  4. Punica granatum L. Hydrogel for Wound Care Treatment: From Case Study to Phytomedicine Standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Aline; Cabral, Patrik F G; Vieira, Felipe F M; Pinheiro, Deo A; Pereira, Carlos R; Santos, Wilson C; Machado, Thelma B

    2016-08-22

    The pharmacological activities of many Punica granatum L. components suggest a wide range of clinical applications for the prevention and treatment of diseases where chronic inflammation is believed to play an essential etiologic role. The current work reports a case study analyzing the effect produced by a magistral formulation of ethanolic extracts of Punica granatum peels on a non-healing chronic ulcer. The complete closure of the chronic ulcer that was initially not responsive to standard medical care was observed. A 2% (w/w) P. granatum peels ethanolic extract hydrogel-based formulation (PGHF) was standardized and subjected to physicochemical studies to establish the quality control parameters using, among others, assessment criteria such as optimum appearance, pH range, viscosity and hydrogel disintegration. The stability and quantitative chromatographic data was assessed in storage for six months under two temperature regimes. An efficient HPLC-DAD method was established distinguishing the biomarkers punicalin and punicalagin simultaneously in a single 8 min run. PGHF presented suitable sensorial and physicochemical performance, showing that punicalagin was not significantly affected by storage (p > 0.05). Formulations containing extracts with not less than 0.49% (w/w) total punicalagin might find good use in wound healing therapy.

  5. Punica granatum: A New Host of Bipolaris spicifera in Morocco

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    Oumama Kadri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During March 2009 in the public gardens and the University of Sciences of Kenitra city (Morocco, 60% of leaves of 100 plants of pomegranate (Punica granatum L. ’Nana’ presented foliar lesions that affecting the aesthetic appearance of this ornamental plant. Bipolaris spicifera was isolated from ten necrotic lesions of 25 leaves. The artificial inoculation of the healthy leaves of three plants of Punica granatum L. ’Nana’ by conidial suspension of the pathogen induced the same lesions to that observed in nature. The diseased foliar surface and the total number of diseased leaves 30 days after inoculation with B. spicifera conidial suspension were 37.5% and 78. Conidia production of B. spicifera on inoculated leaves was 0.81 x 105 spore cm-2 and the fungus was re-isolated from lesions on inoculated plants. This is the first report of B. spicifera on pomegranate in Morocco.

  6. Bioactivity of Nonedible Parts of Punica granatum L.: A Potential Source of Functional Ingredients

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    Nawraj Rummun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Punica granatum L. has a long standing culinary and medicinal traditional use in Mauritius. This prompted a comparative study to determine the bioefficacy of the flower, peel, leaf, stem, and seed extracts of the Mauritian P. granatum. The flower and peel extracts resulting from organic solvent extraction exhibited strong antioxidant activities which correlated with the high levels of total phenolics, flavonoids, and proanthocyanidins. The peel extract had the most potent scavenging capacity reflected by high Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity value ( μmol/g air dry weight, very low IC50 values for hypochlorous acid ( mg air dry weight/mL, and hydroxyl radicals scavenging ( mg air dry weight/mL. Peel extracts also significantly inhibited S. mutans (, S. mitis (, and L. acidophilus ( growth compared to ciprofloxacin. The flower extract exhibited high ferric reducing, nitric oxide scavenging, and iron (II ions chelation and significantly inhibited microsomal lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, it showed a dose-dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase with an IC50 value of  mg air dry weight/mL. This study showed that nonedible parts of cultivated pomegranates, that are generally discarded, are bioactive in multiassay systems thereby suggesting their potential use as natural prophylactics and in food applications.

  7. Bioactivity of Nonedible Parts of Punica granatum L.: A Potential Source of Functional Ingredients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somanah, Jhoti; Ramsaha, Srishti; Bahorun, Theeshan; Neergheen-Bhujun, Vidushi S.

    2013-01-01

    Punica granatum L. has a long standing culinary and medicinal traditional use in Mauritius. This prompted a comparative study to determine the bioefficacy of the flower, peel, leaf, stem, and seed extracts of the Mauritian P. granatum. The flower and peel extracts resulting from organic solvent extraction exhibited strong antioxidant activities which correlated with the high levels of total phenolics, flavonoids, and proanthocyanidins. The peel extract had the most potent scavenging capacity reflected by high Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity value (5206.01 ± 578.48 μmol/g air dry weight), very low IC50 values for hypochlorous acid (0.004 ± 0.001 mg air dry weight/mL), and hydroxyl radicals scavenging (0.111 ± 0.001 mg air dry weight/mL). Peel extracts also significantly inhibited S. mutans (P < 0.001), S. mitis (P < 0.001), and L. acidophilus (P < 0.05) growth compared to ciprofloxacin. The flower extract exhibited high ferric reducing, nitric oxide scavenging, and iron (II) ions chelation and significantly inhibited microsomal lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, it showed a dose-dependent inhibition of xanthine oxidase with an IC50 value of 0.058 ± 0.011 mg air dry weight/mL. This study showed that nonedible parts of cultivated pomegranates, that are generally discarded, are bioactive in multiassay systems thereby suggesting their potential use as natural prophylactics and in food applications. PMID:26904607

  8. Spasmogenic and spasmolytic activity of rind of Punica granatum Linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Niaz; Jamil, Ayesha; Shah, Syed Wadood Ali; Shah, Ismail; Ahmed, Ghayour

    2017-02-07

    Rind of Punica granatum is traditionally used in treatment of abdominal cramps and various GIT disorders. So far spasmolytic activity of rind of Punica granatum has been reported using in vitro model. However, its mode of action is not explored yet. Therefore, the current work describes the possible mode of action for spasmolytic activity of methanolic extract of rind of Punica granatum (Pg. Cr). Acute toxicity study is also performed to determine its safe dose range. Rind of Punica granatum was subjected to shade drying. Shade dried materials were pulverized using conventional grinder. Grinded materials were macerated in commercial grade methanol. The extract of rind of P. granatum was concentrated using a rotary evaporator. Rabbits' jejunal preparations were mounted in organ bath containing 10 ml Tyrode's solution, constantly aerated with carbogen gas. Pg. Cr was tested on spontaneous rabbits' jejunal preparations in concentrations 0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mg/ml. Pg. Cr was also tested on KCl (80 mM)-induced contractions in rabbits' jejunal preparations. Since we observed spasmogenic activity for the first time, hence we also determined the effects of Pg. Cr in presence of atropine (0.03 μM). Pg. Cr was also tested in presence of 0.03 μM of loratadine HCl. Pg. Cr was also tested on barium chloride induced contractions. Calcium Concentration Response Curves (CCRCs) were constructed in the absence and presence of test samples of Pg. Cr in decalcified tissues to explore its possible mode of action. Acute toxicity screening was also performed to determine its safe dose range. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of saponins, tannins, carbohydrates, proteins, flavonoids, saponins and steroids. However, Pg. Cr tested negative for alkaloids and triterpenoids. Pg. Cr was safe up to 100 mg/kg with its LD 50 = 1305 mg/kg. Its respective EC 50, in the absence and presence of atropine, were 9.7 ± 0.3 and 3.12 ± 0.45 mg/ml. In

  9. Study of pomegranate (Punica granatum L. peel extract containing anthocyanins on fatty streak formation in the renal arteries in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

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    Fatemeh Sharifiyan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that consumption of pomegranate peel extract containing anthocyanins (polyphenol content 1 g/kg diet despite of a significant increase in serum antioxidant capacity cannot protect the kidneys from hypercholesterolemia-induced damages during the treatment period.

  10. Antifungal efficacy of Punica granatum, Acacia nilotica, Cuminum cyminum and Foeniculum vulgare on Candida albicans: An in vitro study

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    Pai Mithun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The establishment and maintenance of oral microbiota is related not only to interbacterial coaggregations but also to interactions of these bacteria with yeasts. Hence, it is important for agents used in the treatment of oral diseases to have antifungal properties for effective therapy. Objective: The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro antifungal efficacy of Punica granatum, Acacia nilotica, Cuminum cyminum and Foeniculum vulgare on Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: The pomegranate peel is separated, dried and powdered. Fennel, cumin and acacia bark obtained from the tree are powdered. Candida is inoculated at 37˚C and seeded on Sabourauds agar medium. Sterilized filter papers saturated with 30 μl of the extracts are placed on the seeded plates and inoculated at 24 and 48 h. Zones of inhibition on all four sides are measured around the filter paper with a vernier caliper. The experiments were repeated on four plates, with four samples of each extract on one plate for all of the extracts. Results: All the above-mentioned ingredients showed antifungal property, with Punica granatum showing the highest inhibition of Candida albicans with a mean zone of inhibition of 22 mm. P-values <0.05 were obtained for Punica granatum when compared with the other extracts. Conclusion: The results showed the potential use of these products as cheap and convenient adjuvants to pharmaceutical antifungal products.

  11. Anthelmintic potential of Calotropis procera, Azadirachta indica and Punica granatum against Gastrothylax indicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Rama; Kaur, Kiranjeet; Suri, Mansi; Bagai, Upma

    2016-12-01

    Anthelmintic activity of both ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Calotropis procera flowers, Azadirachta indica leaves and Punica granatum fruit peel in comparison with albendazole was evaluated through in vitro studies by the worm motility inhibition assay. Significant anthelmintic effects (p granatum ethanolic and aqueous extracts respectively, whereas it was 29.23 μg/ml ± 4.51 for albendazole. The mean mortality index (MI) was 1.0 and 0.90 for C. procera , 0.90 for A. indica and 0.73 and 0.80 for P. granatum ethanolic and aqueous extracts respectively whereas for albendazole it was 1.0. Percent mean worm motility inhibition (%WMI) was observed to be between 70 and 100 % for different extracts.Various concentrations (5-5000 μg/ml) of all the plant extracts and albendazole were used to detect their cytotoxic effects against HeLa cell line to determine CC-50 by MTT assay. CC-50 values, of all the plant extracts were determined to be >1000 μg/ml and for albendazole it was found to be >10 μM. All the three plants can be potential sources for novel anthelmintics.

  12. Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) response to different deficit irrigation conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Galindo Egea, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    [ESP] El trabajo se centró en el estudio de algunos aspectos agronómicos y fisiológicos de la respuesta del granado (Punica granatum) a diferentes condiciones de riego. A este fin se abordaron i) los mecanismos desarrollados a nivel de fruto y hoja para afrontar situaciones de déficit hídrico, ii) la comparación de distintos indicadores del déficit hídrico y iii) el estudio del efecto de las condiciones de riego deficitario y la maduración sobre las características físicas y químicas de la gr...

  13. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers in pomegranate (Punica granatum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirseyedi, Seyed Mostafa; Valizadehghan, Sahar; Mardi, Mohsen; Ghaffari, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoodi, Parvaneh; Zahravi, Mehdi; Zeinalabedini, Mehrshad; Nekoui, Seyed Mojtaba Khayam

    2010-05-03

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) has been cultivated from ancient times for its economic, ornamental and medicinal properties globally. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of 12 polymorphic microsatellite markers from a repeat-enriched genomic library of Punica granatum L. The genetic diversity of these loci was assessed in 60 genotypes of Punica granatum L. All loci were variable: the number of polymorphic alleles per locus ranged from two to five (average 2.9). The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.15 to 0.87 and 0.29 to 0.65, respectively. The polymorphic information content ranged from 0.26 to 0.61 (average: 0.43). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that polymorphic microsatellite markers have been reported for P. granatum L. These new markers should allow studies of the population structure and genetic diversity of pomegranate to be performed in the future.

  14. Isolation of Antidiabetic Principle from Fruit Rinds of Punica granatum

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    Vishal Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Present study was aimed to isolate and evaluate the antidiabetic activity of phytoconstituents from fruit rinds of Punica granatum. With the above objectives Valoneic acid dilactone (VAD was isolated from methanolic fruit rind extracts of Punica granatum (MEPG and confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and mass spectral data. Antidiabetic activity was evaluated by Aldose reductase, α-amylase and PTP1B inhibition assays in in vitro and Alloxan-induced diabetes in rats was used as an in vivo model. In bioactivity studies, MEPG and VAD have showed potent antidiabetic activity in α-amylase, aldose reductase, and PTP1B inhibition assays with IC50 values of 1.02, 2.050, 26.25 μg/mL and 0.284, 0.788, 12.41 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, in alloxan-induced diabetes model MEPG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o. and VAD (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, p.o. have showed significant and dose dependent antidiabetic activity by maintaining the blood glucose levels within the normal limits. Inline with the biochemical findings histopathology of MEPG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o., VAD (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, p.o., and glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, p.o. treated animals showed significant protection against alloxan-induced pancreatic tissue damage. These findings suggest that MEPG and VAD possess significant antidiabetic activity in both in vitro and in vivo models.

  15. Isolation of Antidiabetic Principle from Fruit Rinds of Punica granatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vishal; Viswanatha, G. L.; Manohar, D.; Shivaprasad, H. N.

    2012-01-01

    Present study was aimed to isolate and evaluate the antidiabetic activity of phytoconstituents from fruit rinds of Punica granatum. With the above objectives Valoneic acid dilactone (VAD) was isolated from methanolic fruit rind extracts of Punica granatum (MEPG) and confirmed by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and mass spectral data. Antidiabetic activity was evaluated by Aldose reductase, α-amylase and PTP1B inhibition assays in in vitro and Alloxan-induced diabetes in rats was used as an in vivo model. In bioactivity studies, MEPG and VAD have showed potent antidiabetic activity in α-amylase, aldose reductase, and PTP1B inhibition assays with IC50 values of 1.02, 2.050, 26.25 μg/mL and 0.284, 0.788, 12.41 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, in alloxan-induced diabetes model MEPG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) and VAD (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, p.o.) have showed significant and dose dependent antidiabetic activity by maintaining the blood glucose levels within the normal limits. Inline with the biochemical findings histopathology of MEPG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.), VAD (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, p.o.), and glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, p.o.) treated animals showed significant protection against alloxan-induced pancreatic tissue damage. These findings suggest that MEPG and VAD possess significant antidiabetic activity in both in vitro and in vivo models. PMID:22919408

  16. A comparative evaluation of efficacy of Punica granatum and chlorhexidine on plaque and gingivitis

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    Sakshi Ahuja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal diseases are chronic bacterial infections that lead to gingival inflammation, periodontal tissue destruction, and alveolar bone loss. Acting as powerful allies in the fight against periodontal disease, natural compounds can help safeguard against lethal age-related diseases that emanate from our mouths. Punica granatum (pomegranate shrub belongs to the Punicaceae family which has been used as an astringent, hemostatic, antidiabetic, antihelmintic, and also for diarrhea and dysentery. The aim of the present work was to investigate the possible efficacy of hydroalcoholic extract from Punica granatum fruit as an antiplaque and antigingivitis agent when compared with chlorhexidine. Materials and Methods: Twenty subjects diagnosed with chronic generalized gingivitis were selected and randomly divided into two groups: Group 1 - Pomegranate mouthwash and Group 2 - Chlorhexidine mouthwash. Punica granatum mouthwash was prepared using raw Punica granatum fruit. Patients were instructed to use the prescribed mouthwash for 15 days. Clinical evaluation was undertaken using the gingival index, the plaque index, and bleeding on probing at baseline, 7 days, and 15 days. Results: The clinical study observed significant improvement in gingival status in both the sites (P<0.05. Subjects using Punica granatum mouthwash showed significant improvement in bleeding and gingivitis score as compared with chlorhexidine. In contrast, Punica granatum was shown not to be so effective in reducing plaque scores. Chlorhexidine still remains as a standard in the reduction of plaque in subjects with gingivitis. Conclusion: Punica granatum mouthwash is beneficial in improving gingival status due to its profound styptic action, with sufficient reduction in plaque scores.

  17. The Role of Syndrome Differentiation in the Clinical Efficacy of Punica Granatum on Patients with Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Mohammadali; Khodadoost, Mahmoud; Tavakoli, Hamid; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Gachkar, Latif; Adibi, Payman; Heydari, Mojtaba

    2016-05-01

    The present study investigated the difference between therapeutic responses of hot and cold temperament patients (based on traditional Persian medicine) with ulcerative colitis to pomegranate peel extract. Seventy-eight patients with moderate ulcerative colitis based on Lichtiger Colitis Activity Index (LCAI) criteria were randomized to receive an aqueous extract of the Punica granatum peel (6 gram per day) or placebo for four weeks. They were assessed before and after the intervention in terms of symptoms by LCAI scoring system. The results were compared in two therapeutic groups based on the patient s' temperament (cold and hot) which were diagnosed based on a previously validated questionnaire. Therapeutic response was significantly higher in patients with hot temperament compared to patients with cold temperament in the P. granatum group (1.91±0.492 vs. -0.500±0.500, P=0.029). This study showed the importance of considering syndrome differentiation and temperament in interpreting the effect of P. granatum peel extract on ulcerative colitis.

  18. Punica granatum L. Çekirdek ve Kabuk Ekstrelerinin Antioksidan Aktiviteleri

    OpenAIRE

    DEMİR, Hülya

    2008-01-01

    Bu çalışmada, Punica granatum L.(Punicaceae) "Nar", meyve çekirdeği ile kabuk ekstraklarının antioksidan aktiviteleri araştırıldı. Punica granatum L. çekirdek ve kabuğunun metanol ve hekzan ekstrelerinde serbest radikal giderme aktivite, indirgenme gücü analizleri yapıldı. Elde edilen sonuçlar standart antioksidan olarak bilinen askorbik asit ile karşılaştırıldı. Bu çalışmada elde edilen sonuçlara göre antioksidan aktivite Askorbik asit> Punica granatum L. kabuğu> Puni...

  19. Prophylactic and therapeutic effect of Punica granatum in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid induced inflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Azra; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Afroz, Syeda; Mallick, Neelam

    2017-01-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L., Punicaceae) contains varieties of antioxidants and phytochemicals; there are evidences that phytochemicals and antioxidants play a vital role in reducing inflammation. Hence this investigation was planned to assess the outcome of Punica granatum on trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid provoked colitis in rats at 2, 5 and 8ml/kg of the body weight. The effect of P. granatum was assessed in two group i.e. prophylaxis as pre-colitis and therapeutic as post-colitis. After completion of dosing in both the groups, macroscopic and histological examination of colon was carried out along with estimation of serum myeloperoxidase, glutathione, alkaline phosphate, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein. In prophylactic procedure P. granatum revealed significant (Pgranatum have a role in prevention as well as treatment of inflammation.

  20. The pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) genome provides insights into fruit quality and ovule developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhaohe; Fang, Yanming; Zhang, Taikui; Fei, Zhangjun; Han, Fengming; Liu, Cuiyu; Liu, Min; Xiao, Wei; Zhang, Wenjing; Wu, Shan; Zhang, Mengwei; Ju, Youhui; Xu, Huili; Dai, He; Liu, Yujun; Chen, Yanhui; Wang, Lili; Zhou, Jianqing; Guan, Dian; Yan, Ming; Xia, Yanhua; Huang, Xianbin; Liu, Dongyuan; Wei, Hongmin; Zheng, Hongkun

    2017-12-22

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) has an ancient cultivation history and has become an emerging profitable fruit crop due to its attractive features such as the bright red appearance and the high abundance of medicinally valuable ellagitannin-based compounds in its peel and aril. However, the limited genomic resources have restricted further elucidation of genetics and evolution of these interesting traits. Here, we report a 274-Mb high-quality draft pomegranate genome sequence, which covers approximately 81.5% of the estimated 336-Mb genome, consists of 2177 scaffolds with an N50 size of 1.7 Mb and contains 30 903 genes. Phylogenomic analysis supported that pomegranate belongs to the Lythraceae family rather than the monogeneric Punicaceae family, and comparative analyses showed that pomegranate and Eucalyptus grandis share the paleotetraploidy event. Integrated genomic and transcriptomic analyses provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the biosynthesis of ellagitannin-based compounds, the colour formation in both peels and arils during pomegranate fruit development, and the unique ovule development processes that are characteristic of pomegranate. This genome sequence provides an important resource to expand our understanding of some unique biological processes and to facilitate both comparative biology studies and crop breeding. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Topical microemulsion containing Punica granatum extract: its control over skin erythema and melanin in healthy Asian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Rashida; Akhtar, Naveed; Mahmood, Tariq

    2014-12-01

    Punica granatum is apotent source of polyphenolic compounds with strong free radicals scavenging activity. The skin lightening effects of Punica granatum are assumed due to ellagic acid which acts by chelating copper at the active site of tyrosinase. To explore a topical microemulsion (O/W) of pomegranate (Punica granatum) extract for its control on skin erythema and melanin. Microemulsions were formulated using a polysorbate surfactant (Tween 80(®)) along with cosurfactant (propylene glycol) and were characterized regarding their stability. The placebo microemulsion (without extract) and the active microemulsion (containing Punica extract) were applied in a split face fashion by the volunteers (n = 11) for a period of 12 weeks. Skin erythema and melanin were measured at baseline and after every 15 days to determine any effect produced by these formulations. Active formulation showed a significant impact on skin erythema and melanin (p Punica granatum extract for conditions where elevated skin melanin and erythema have significantly prone skin physiology.

  2. Punica granatum (Pomegranate activity in health promotion and cancer prevention

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    Shahindokht Bassiri-Jahromi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer has become one of the most fatal diseases in most countries. In spite of the medical care developing, cancer still remains a significant problem. The majority of the cancers are resistant to treatment. Thus, the research for novel, more efficient and less side effect treatment methods continues. Pomegranate contains strong antioxidant activity, with potential health interests. Research concern in pomegranate is increasing because of their anticancer potential due to possess rich in polyphenols. We highlight the pomegranate potential health benefits and mechanism of cancer progression inhibition. Pomegranate has indicated antiproliferative, anti-metastatic and anti-invasive effects on different cancer cell line in vitro, in vivo and clinical trial. The aim of this review is to evaluate functional properties and the medical benifits of pomegranate against various cancer diseases. In addition, pomegranate properties in in vitro and in vivo experimental human and animal clinical trials and its future use are explored. The available data suggest that Punica granatum (pomegranate might be used in the control and potential therapeutic for some disease conditions and benefits human health status. This review summarizes in vitro, in vivo and clinical trial studies highlighting the pomegranate role in prevent and treatment of breast, prostate, lung, colon, skin and hepatocellular cell cancers.

  3. EKSTRAK BUAH DELIMA (Punica granatum L SEBAGAI FORMULASI LIPSTIK

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    Yuska Noviyanty

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pomegranate (Punica granatum l belongs to the family Punicaceae which has anthocyanin. The colour of pomegranate is caused by flavanoid which is anthocyanin. Anthocyanin is a pigments that can be used as natural dyes and replace synthetic dyes. This study was done to make the preparation of lipstick from pomegranate extract and determine the effect of different concentrations of pomegranate extract. The extract was made by maceration method using 96% ethanol as a solvent, then the solvent concentrated by rotary evaporator to get the pomegranate extract. The Components of lipstick were cera alba, alba vaseline, cetyl alcohol, carnauba wax, lanolin, propylene glycol, nipagin, ricini oleum, oleum rosae, as used the pomegranate extract with a concentration of 15%, 18% and 21%. The tests of lipstick’s quality that’s organoleptic test, homogeneity test, pH test, melting point test, stability test, and irritation test. The Preparations of lipstick so easily to apply and homogeneous, not irritating, stable, typical smell, a cylindrical shape, and the pink color. The average pH measurement from lipstick which containing pomegranate extract with a concentration of 15%: 4, 06%: 3.68 and 21%: 3.53. Melting point at a concentration of 15%: 59.2 ° C, 18%: 58.5 ° C and 21%: 57.6 ° C

  4. Punica granatum (Pomegranate) activity in health promotion and cancer prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Cancer has become one of the most fatal diseases in most countries. In spite of the medical care developing, cancer still remains a significant problem. The majority of the cancers are resistant to treatment. Thus, the research for novel, more efficient and less side effect treatment methods continues. Pomegranate contains strong antioxidant activity, with potential health interests. Research concern in pomegranate is increasing because of their anticancer potential due to possess rich in polyphenols. We highlight the pomegranate potential health benefits and mechanism of cancer progression inhibition. Pomegranate has indicated antiproliferative, anti-metastatic and anti-invasive effects on different cancer cell line in vitro, in vivo and clinical trial. The aim of this review is to evaluate functional properties and the medical benifits of pomegranate against various cancer diseases. In addition, pomegranate properties in in vitro and in vivo experimental human and animal clinical trials and its future use are explored. The available data suggest that Punica granatum (pomegranate) might be used in the control and potential therapeutic for some disease conditions and benefits human health status. This review summarizes in vitro, in vivo and clinical trial studies highlighting the pomegranate role in prevent and treatment of breast, prostate, lung, colon, skin and hepatocellular cell cancers. PMID:29441150

  5. Multiple Activities of Punica granatum Linne against Acne Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Jung; Chen, Lih-Geeng; Liang, Wen-Li; Wang, Ching-Chiung

    2017-01-12

    Acne is a common skin condition with sebum overproduction, hyperkeratosis, Propionibacterium acnes ( P . acnes ) and Staphylococcus aureus , and inflammation. Punica granatum (pomegranate) is well-known for its anti-inflammatory effects; however, few studies have discussed the anti-acne effects of pomegranate. In this study, we found that pomegranate extract (PG-E) significantly reduced P . acnes -induced edema in Wistar rat ears. Therefore, an evaluation platform using multiple pathogenic mechanisms of acne was established to explore the anti-acne effects of pomegranate. Results showed that PG-E inhibited bacterial growth and lipase activity. Through a bioguided-fractionation-isolation system, four hydrolysable tannins, punicalagin ( 1 ), punicalin ( 2 ), strictinin A ( 3 ), and granatin B ( 4 ), were isolated. Compounds 1 and 2 had greater anti-bacterial activities and anti-testosterone-induced HaCaT proliferative effects than the others. Compounds 1 , 3 , and 4 displayed lipase inhibitory effects. Compound 4 decreased cyclooxygenase-2 expression and downregulated prostaglandin E₂ production in heat-killed P . acnes -treated RAW 246.7 cells. In conclusion, PG-E is abundant in hydrolysable tannins that display multiple anti-acne capacities, including anti-bacterial, anti-lipase, anti-keratinocyte proliferation, and anti-inflammatory actions. Hence, PG-E has great potential in the application of anti-acne and skin-care products, and punicalagin ( 1 ), the most effective component in PG-E, can be employed as a quality control marker.

  6. Punica granatum (Pomegranate) activity in health promotion and cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiri-Jahromi, Shahindokht

    2018-01-30

    Cancer has become one of the most fatal diseases in most countries. In spite of the medical care developing, cancer still remains a significant problem. The majority of the cancers are resistant to treatment. Thus, the research for novel, more efficient and less side effect treatment methods continues. Pomegranate contains strong antioxidant activity, with potential health interests. Research concern in pomegranate is increasing because of their anticancer potential due to possess rich in polyphenols. We highlight the pomegranate potential health benefits and mechanism of cancer progression inhibition. Pomegranate has indicated antiproliferative, anti-metastatic and anti-invasive effects on different cancer cell line in vitro , in vivo and clinical trial. The aim of this review is to evaluate functional properties and the medical benifits of pomegranate against various cancer diseases. In addition, pomegranate properties in in vitro and in vivo experimental human and animal clinical trials and its future use are explored. The available data suggest that Punica granatum (pomegranate) might be used in the control and potential therapeutic for some disease conditions and benefits human health status. This review summarizes in vitro , in vivo and clinical trial studies highlighting the pomegranate role in prevent and treatment of breast, prostate, lung, colon, skin and hepatocellular cell cancers.

  7. First report of Pilidiella granati causing dieback and fruit rot of pomegranate (Punica granatum) in Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirabolfathy, M.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Iran is the largest producer of pomegranate (Punica granatum) in the world, with more than 60,000 ha currently in production. In the spring of 2011, a decline and dieback of young pomegranate trees (7 to 10 years old) were observed in the Kheir area of Fars Province. Dieback and twig blight

  8. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity and Total Phenol Compounds of Punica granatum Hydro-Alcoholic Extract

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    Elahe Ahmadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Punica granatum is a non-productive form of a plant and is used for the treatment of diseases in traditional medicine. In this study, we evaluate the antibacterial activity and the total phenol compounds of Punica granatum. Materials & Methods: Disk and well diffusion methods and MIC were used to evaluate the antibacterial activity of hydro-alcoholic extract on S. aureus and E. coli compared to standard commercial antibiotic disks. Measurement of phenol compounds were performed by Seevers and Daly colorimetric methods (Folin-ciocalteu indicator. Results: 35 and 29 mm inhibition zones in S. aureus and 22 and 17 mm inhibition zones in E. coli were shown by disk and well diffusion method, respectively. Also, 7.8 mg/ml concentration of extract showed the MIC points for two bacteria. Phenol compound of extract was 233.15±5.1 mg/g of extraction. Conclusion: Antibacterial effect of Punica granatum compared to antibiotics indicates the strong activity against examined bacteria. Extensive antibacterial study of Punica granatum is suggested.

  9. Protective effects of Punica granatum seeds extract against aging and scopolamine induced cognitive impairments in mice.

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    Kumar, Sokindra; Maheshwari, Kamal Kishore; Singh, Vijender

    2008-10-25

    Dementia is one of the age related mental problems and characteristic symptom of various neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease. This impairment probably is due to the vulnerability of the brain cells to increased oxidative stress during aging process. Many studies have shown that certain phenolic antioxidants attenuate neuronal cell death induced by oxidative stress. The present work was undertaken to assess the effect of ethanolic extract of Punica granatum seeds on cognitive performance of aged and scopolamine treated young mice using one trial step-down type passive avoidance and elevated plus maze task. Aged or scopolamine treated mice showed poor retention of memory in step-down type passive avoidance and in elevated plus maze task. Chronic administration (21 days) of Punica granatum extract and vitamin C significantly (p Punica granatum extract also significantly lowered lipid peroxidation level and increased antioxidant glutathione level in brain tissues. Punica granatum preparations could be protective in the treatment of cognitive disorders such as dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Molecular genetic diversity of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) as revealed by microsatellite DNA markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is one of the oldest known edible fruits and more and more it arouse interest of scientific community given its numerous biological activities. However, information about its genetic resources and characterization using reliable molecular markers are still scarce. In...

  11. Evaluation of roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) leaf and pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit rind for activity against Meloidogyne incognita

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    Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit and roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) leaves have been used in traditional medicine, including as anthelmintics. Methanolic extracts from these plants were investigated for activity against the southern root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne incognita. Dried, ground p...

  12. Cardioprotective potential of Punica granatum extract in isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction in Wistar rats.

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    Mohan, Mahalaxmi; Patankar, Pankaj; Ghadi, Prakash; Kasture, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    To determine the protective role of Punica granatum L. (Punicaceae) seed juice extract and its butanolic fraction on heart rate, electrocardiographic patterns, vascular reactivity to catecholamines, cardiac marker enzymes, antioxidant enzymes together with morphologic and histopathological changes in isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction in male Wistar rats. The effects of Punica granatum seed juice extract (100 mg/kg, p.o. and 300 mg/kg, p.o.) and butanolic fraction of Punica granatum seed juice extract (100 mg/kg., p.o.) on cardiac parameters were studied. Isoproterenol hydrochloride was used to induce myocardial infarction in Wistar rats. At the end of the experiment, heart rate, ECG, pressure rate index and cardiac marker enzyme levels were assessed. Rats treated with isoproterenol (85 mg/kg, administered subcutaneously twice at an interval of 24 h) showed a significant increase in heart rate, ST elevation in ECG, pressure rate index and a significant increase in the levels of cardiac marker enzymes- lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase in serum. Isoproterenol significantly reduced superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and increased vascular reactivity to various catecholamines. Pretreatment with PJ (100 mg/kg, p.o. and 300 mg/kg, p.o.) and B-PJ (100 mg/kg., p.o.) for a period of 21 days significantly inhibited the effects of ISO on heart rate, PRI, ECG patterns, levels of LDH, CK, SOD, CAT, and vascular reactivity changes. Treatment with PJ (100 mg/kg and 300 mg/kg) and B-PJ (100 mg/kg., p.o.) alone did not alter any of the parameters as compared to vehicle-treated Wistar rats. Punica granatum-treated animals showed a lesser degree of cellular infiltration in histopathological studies. Punica granatum ameliorates cardiotoxic effects of isoproterenol and may be of value in the treatment of MI.

  13. Lipid composition of seed oils of different pomegranate (Punica granatum L. cultivars from Spain

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    Luana Fernandes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. is an ancient fruit tree traditionally cultivated in the Near and Middle East. Presently, its most important growing regions include Afghanistan, Iran, Israel, USA, Italy and Spain, the latter country the largest European exporter. The pomegranate fruit can be divided into several anatomical compartments: outside peel, inside peel, and arils (pulp and seeds, the last part being usually used for consumption as is or for juice, jams and jellies production. Even though pomegranate seeds are an industrial by-product, recent reports have highlighted their potential use as a source of oil with beneficial chemical attributes. Therefore, the main objective of the present work was to characterize the seed oil of nine European pomegranate varieties, collected in Spain, for their fatty acid and vitamin E compositions. All seed lipid fractions consisted mainly of punicic acid (c9,t11,c13 C-18:3, ranging between 77.3% and 83.6% of total fatty acids, followed by small amounts of linoleic acid (C18:2n6, oleic acid (C18:1n9 and palmitic acid (C16:0. Regarding vitamin E composition, α-, γ-, δ-tocopherols were found in all pomegranate seed oils, but mainly γ-tocopherol, with total tocopherols ranging from 174.5 to 627.3 mg/100g oil.The richness of these pomegranate varieties seed oils in punicic acid, a conjugated linolenic acid with interesting anti-carcinogenic activity, and the elevated amount of tocopherols on the extracted lipids, of technological and nutritional relevance, make this by-product interesting for further exploitation.

  14. The effect of extract of Punica granatum var. pleniflora for treatment of minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis.

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    Gavanji, Shahin; Larki, Behrouz; Bakhtari, Azizollah

    2014-06-01

    Herbal drugs are considered alternative agents and have been used for several years around the world. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common problems recognized by dentists and skin specialists. This problem is characterized by recurring, painful, small oral mucosal ulcers with a round or oval aspect that mostly appear in keratinized mucosa, cheeks, and on the surface of the mouth under the tongue. In our experiment, the alcoholic and water extracts of Punica granatum var. pleniflora, P. granatum var. Sweet Alak, and P. granatum var. Saveh Black were tested on minor RAS. The study was carried out using the double-blind method. The study population consisted of 210 participants, of whom 69 were females (32%) and 141 were males (68%). In addition to checking several factors, the pain and the degree of the participant's satisfaction had been determined based on visual analog scale. Data analysis was done in the form of a nonparametric method using Kruskal-Wallis test and SPSS version 20 software. The results show that the alcoholic and water extracts of P. granatum var. pleniflora have a meaningful therapeutic effect on minor RAS. Results from the antioxidant activity and its relation to total phenolics show that P. granatum var. pleniflora and P. granatum var. Sweet Alak are rich in phenols. The water and alcoholic extracts of P. granatum varpleniflora decreased the entire time of complete treatment, and the treatment was meaningfully satisfactory for patients who participated in this experiment.

  15. Punica granatum: A review on its potential role in treating periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Divyashree; Kunnaiah, Ravi

    2014-07-01

    A wide variety of plants possess enormous treasure of medicinal value. Majority of these medicinal plants have been used to treat various systemic conditions successfully. Over the recent years, use of these medicinal plants has resurfaced to treat oral conditions. Among the oral conditions, periodontal disease remains one of the most common. Alternative and preventive options has become the need of the hour in order to overcome the adverse effects of the antimicrobial agents used in large as an adjunct to mainstream periodontal treatment. Punica granatum (Pomegranate) is one of the oldest edible fruit which has a long history as a medicinal fruit. This review is an attempt to highlight the potential of Punica granatum as a preventive and therapeutic aid to periodontal disease.

  16. Punigratane, a novel pyrrolidine alkaloid from Punica granatum rind with putative efflux inhibition activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Zumaana; Narasimhan, Sreevidya; Vennila, Rosy; Vaidyanathan, Rama

    2016-02-25

    A new pyrrolidine alkaloid named Punigratane was isolated from the rind of Punica granatum. This is the first report of a pyrrolidine-like structure from the rind. The activity of this compound was tested in a representative MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae strain which exhibited high efflux pump activity. At a concentration of 6 mg, this compound Punigratane was found to have efflux inhibition activity.

  17. Punica granatum juice effects on oxidative stress in severe physical activity.

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    Naghizadeh-Baghi, Abbas; Mazani, Mohammad; Shadman-Fard, Ali; Nemati, Ali

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate Punica granatum juice effects on oxidative stress in young healthy males during severe physical activity. Our subjects were selected from healthy males at 18 - 24 years. They were enrolled and randomly distributed into control and supplemented groups. 240 ml of Punica granatum juice and tap water were given to supplement and control groups daily for two weeks, respectively. Fasting blood samples were taken at the starting and the end of two weeks of intervention. Subjects were given once severe physical activity and then fasting blood samples were taken. Fasting blood samples were used for testing of oxidative and antioxidative factors. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistical tests, paired samples t-test, and independent samples t-test. The levels of arylesterase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and total antioxidant capacity after severe physical activity in supplement group were significantly increased (pPunica granatum juice significantly modulates oxidative stress and thus protects against severe physical activity oxidative injury in young healthy males.

  18. The Effects of Punica granatum Flower Extract on Skin Injuries Induced by Burn in Rats

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    Ebrahim Nasiri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We compared the efficacy of P. granatum (P flower extract with that of silver sulfadiazine (SSD for treating thermal burn injuries in rats. Methods. Ten Wistar rats in each group were topically given base cream, normal saline, cream containing 1% SSD, or creams containing 5% or 10% Punica granatum flower extract. The treatments were administered once daily until complete wound healing was observed. The wound area and healing time were assessed. In addition, percentage wound contraction and histopathological characteristics such as neovascularization and collagen formation were determined. The tannin content in P. granatum extract was determined. Results. The decrease in the average size of wounds on day 15 of the treatment was higher in rats treated with creams containing P. granatum extract than in rats treated with cream containing SSD (2.8±0.9 cm2 versus 8.4±3.2 cm2. The wounds completely healed on day 25 of the treatment in rats treated with creams containing P. granatum flower extract compared with those in rats treated with the other agents. Conclusion. These results indicated that P. granatum flower extract promoted wound healing in rats and could be used for managing burn injuries.

  19. The Effects of Punica granatum Flower Extract on Skin Injuries Induced by Burn in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Ebrahim; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Akbari, Jafar; Azadbakht, Mohammad; Azizi, Soheil

    2017-01-01

    Background . We compared the efficacy of P. granatum (P) flower extract with that of silver sulfadiazine (SSD) for treating thermal burn injuries in rats. Methods . Ten Wistar rats in each group were topically given base cream, normal saline, cream containing 1% SSD, or creams containing 5% or 10% Punica granatum flower extract. The treatments were administered once daily until complete wound healing was observed. The wound area and healing time were assessed. In addition, percentage wound contraction and histopathological characteristics such as neovascularization and collagen formation were determined. The tannin content in P. granatum extract was determined. Results . The decrease in the average size of wounds on day 15 of the treatment was higher in rats treated with creams containing P. granatum extract than in rats treated with cream containing SSD (2.8 ± 0.9 cm 2 versus 8.4 ± 3.2 cm 2 ). The wounds completely healed on day 25 of the treatment in rats treated with creams containing P. granatum flower extract compared with those in rats treated with the other agents. Conclusion . These results indicated that P. granatum flower extract promoted wound healing in rats and could be used for managing burn injuries.

  20. Pharmacological investigations of Punica granatum in glycerol-induced acute renal failure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amrit Pal; Singh, Amteshwar Jaggi; Singh, Nirmal

    2011-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative potential and possible mechanism of hydroalcoholic extract of flowers of P. granatum in glycerol-induced acute renal failure (ARF) in rats. The rats were subjected to rhabdomyolytic ARF by single intramuscular injection of hypertonic glycerol (50% v/v; 8 ml/kg) and the animals were sacrificed after 24 hours of glycerol injection. The plasma creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine clearance, and histopathological studies were performed to assess the degree of renal injury. Pretreatment with hydroalcoholic extract of flowers of P. granatum (125 and 250 mg/kg p.o. twice daily for 3 days) significantly attenuated hypertonic glycerol-induced renal dysfunction in a dose-dependent manner. BADGE (Bisphenol-A-diglycidyl ether) (30 mg/kg), a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ antagonist, and N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME) (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg), nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, were employed to explore the mechanism of renoprotective effects of Punica granatum. Administration of BADGE (30 mg/kg) and L-NAME (40 mg/kg) abolished the beneficial effects of P. granatum in glycerol-induced renal dysfunction. Hydroalcoholic extract of flowers of P. granatum has ameliorative potential in attenuating myoglobinuric renal failure and its renoprotective effects involve activation of PPAR-γ and nitric oxide-dependent signaling pathway.

  1. Antibacterial Effect of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Punica granatum Linn. Petal on Common Oral Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajifattahi, Farnaz; Moravej-Salehi, Elham; Taheri, Maryam; Mahboubi, Arash; Kamalinejad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to assess the effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Punica granatum Linn. (P. granatum) petal on Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sobrinus, and Enterococcus faecalis. Materials and Methods. In this in vitro study, P. granatum extract was prepared using powdered petals and water-ethanol solvent. Antibacterial effect of the extract, chlorhexidine (CHX), and ampicillin was evaluated on brain heart infusion agar (BHIA) using the cup-plate method. By assessing the diameter of the growth inhibition zone, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the extract were determined for the above-mentioned bacteria. Results. Hydroalcoholic extract of P. granatum petal had inhibitory effects on the proliferation of all five bacterial strains with maximum effect on S. mutans with MIC and MBC of 3.9 mg/mL. The largest growth inhibition zone diameter belonged to S. sanguinis and the smallest to E. faecalis. Ampicillin and CHX had the greatest inhibitory effect on S. sanguinis. Conclusions. Hydroalcoholic extract of P. granatum had a significant antibacterial effect on common oral bacterial pathogens with maximum effect on S. mutans, which is the main microorganism responsible for dental plaque and caries.

  2. Affinity Crystallography Reveals the Bioactive Compounds of Industrial Juicing Byproducts of Punica granatum for Glycogen Phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stravodimos, George A; Kantsadi, Anastassia L; Apostolou, Anna; Kyriakis, Efthimios; Kafaski-Kanelli, Vassiliki-Nafsika; Solovou, Theodora; Gatzona, Pagona; Liggri, Panagiota G V; Theofanous, Stavroula; Gorgogietas, Vyron A; Kissa, Apostolia; Psachoula, Chariklia; Lemonakis, Angelos; Chatzileontiadou, Demetra S M; Psarra, Anna-Maria G; Skamnaki, Vassiliki T; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2018-01-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is a pharmaceutical target for the discovery of new antihyperglycaemic agents. Punica granatum is a well-known plant for its potent antioxidant and antimicrobial activities but so far has not been examined for antihyperglycaemic activity. The aim was to examine the inhibitory potency of eighteen polyphenolic extracts obtained from Punica granatum fruits and industrial juicing byproducts against GP and discover their most bioactive ingredients. Kinetic experiments were conducted to measure the IC50 values of the extracts while affinity crystallography was used to identify the most bioactive ingredient. The inhibitory effect of one of the polyphenolic extracts was also verified ex vivo, in HepG2 cells. All extracts exhibited significant in vitro inhibitory potency (IC50 values in the range of low μg/mL). Affinity crystallography revealed that the most bioactive ingredients of the extracts were chlorogenic and ellagic acids, found bound in the active and the inhibitor site of GP, respectively.While ellagic acid is an established GP inhibitor, the inhibition of chlorogenic acid is reported for the first time. Kinetic analysis indicated that chlorogenic acid is an inhibitor with Ki=2.5 x 10-3Mthat acts synergistically with ellagic acid. Our study provides the first evidence for a potential antidiabetic usage of Punica granatum extracts as antidiabetic food supplements. Although, more in vivo studies have to be performed before these extracts reach the stage of antidiabetic food supplements, our study provides a first positive step towards this process. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Punica granatum and its therapeutic implications on breast carcinogenesis: A review.

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    Vini, Ravindran; Sreeja, Sreeharshan

    2015-01-01

    Punica granatum has a recorded history of pharmacological properties which can be attributed to its rich reservoir of phytochemicals. Investigations in recent years have established its tremendous potential as an antitumorogenic agent against various cancers including breast cancer, which is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women. The plausible role of Punica as a therapeutic agent, as an adjuvant in chemotherapy, and its dietary implications as chemopreventive agent in breast cancer have been explored. Mechanistic studies have revealed that Punica extracts and its components, individually or in combination, can modulate and target key proteins and genes involved in breast cancer. Our earlier finding also demonstrated the role of methanolic extract of pomegranate pericarp in reducing proliferation in breast cancer by binding to estrogen receptor at the same time not affecting uterine weight unlike estradiol or tamoxifen. This review analyses other plausible mechanisms of Punica in preventing the progression of breast cancer and how it can possibly be a therapeutic agent by acting at various steps of carcinogenesis including proliferation, invasion, migration, metastasis, angiogenesis, and inflammation via various molecular mechanisms. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. Punica granatum fabricated platinum nanoparticles: A therapeutic pill for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Babita; Rao, Mugdha; Chattopadhyay, A.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Prasad, K.; Jha, Anal K.

    2018-05-01

    The current research highlights the fabrication of biocompatible platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) in first hand from arils of Punica granatum by using green chemistry approach. Formation of Pt NPs was determined by UV-visible, X-ray diffraction, and FTIR techniques. The anti-cancer potential of fabricated Pt NPs was evaluated by MTT assay on MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. This work is foreshadowing the prospect of Pt NPs application as a therapeutic drug for cancer treatment.

  5. Apoptotic effects of non-edible parts of Punica granatum on human multiple myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraz, Yağmur; Neergheen-Bhujun, Vidushi S; Rummun, Nawraj; Baran, Yusuf

    2016-02-01

    Multiple myeloma is of great concern since existing therapies are unable to cure this clinical condition. Alternative therapeutic approaches are mandatory, and the use of plant extracts is considered interesting. Punica granatum and its derived products were suggested as potential anticancer agents due to the presence of bioactive compounds. Thus, polypenolic-rich extracts of the non-edible parts of P. granatum were investigated for their antiproliferative and apoptotic effects on U266 multiple myeloma cells. We demonstrated that there were dose-dependent decreases in the proliferation of U266 cells in response to P. granatum extracts. Also, exposure to the extracts triggered apoptosis with significant increases in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in U266 cells exposed to the leaves and stem extracts, while the flower extract resulted in slight increases in loss of MMP. These results were confirmed by Annexin-V analysis. These results documented the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of P. granatum extracts on human U266 multiple myeloma cells via disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and increasing cell cycle arrest. The data suggest that the extracts can be envisaged in cancer chemoprevention and call for further exploration into the potential application of these plant parts.

  6. Anticoagulant, antiplatelet and antianemic effects of Punica granatum (pomegranate) juice in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Azra; Khan, Rafeeq A

    2016-04-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L., Punicaceae) is a good source of minerals and phytochemicals with diverse pharmacological activities such as anxiolytic, antidepressant, hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Effects of P. granatum on blood parameters and coagulation have, however, been little studied. The aim of the study was to assess the outcome of P. granatum on coagulation and anticoagulation factors at different doses on blood samples of healthy white rabbits. Blood samples of the animals were collected twice during the study and biochemical assays were performed to assess the effect on hematological, coagulation, anticoagulation, and platelet aggregation. Significant changes were observed in erythrocytes, hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, while bleeding and thrombin time were also prolonged significantly. There was significant increase in protein C, thrombin antithrombin complex levels, and decrease in platelet aggregation and fibrinogen concentration, in a dose-dependent manner. The results of hematological and coagulation assays lead to the speculation about a possible antianemic and cardioprotective effect of P. granatum.

  7. Study on antiviral activities, drug-likeness and molecular docking of bioactive compounds of Punica granatum L. to Herpes simplex virus - 2 (HSV-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunkumar, Jagadeesan; Rajarajan, Swaminathan

    2018-03-28

    Herpes simplex virus - 2 (HSV-2) causes lifelong persisting infection in the immunocompromised host and intermittent in healthy individuals with high morbidity in neonatals and also increase the transmission of HIV. Acyclovir is widely used drug to treat HSV-2 infection but it unable to control viral latency and recurrent infection and prolonged usage lead to drug resistance. Plant-based bioactive compounds are the lead structural bio-molecules play an inevitable role as a potential antiviral agent with reduced toxicity. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop anti-HSV-2 bioactive molecules to prevent viral resistance and control of latent infection. Punica granatum fruit is rich in major bioactive compounds with potential antimicrobial properties. Hence, we evaluated the anti-HSV-2 efficacy of lyophilized extracts and bioactive compounds isolated from fruit peel of P. granatum. As a result, ethanolic peel extract showed significant inhibition at 62.5 μg/ml. Hence, the fruit peel ethanolic extract was subjected for the isolation of bioactive compounds isolation by bioactivity-guided fractionation. Among isolated bioactive compounds, punicalagin showed 100% anti-HSV-2 activity at 31.25 μg/ml with supportive evidence of desirable in silico ADMET properties and strong interactions to selected protein targets of HSV-2 by docking analysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Exploiting DNA-based molecular tools to assess genetic diversity in pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) selections and cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowadays the demand for pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) as fresh fruit and derived products (arils, juice, jam, etc.) has been considerably rising due to increased awareness about its nutritive value and nutraceutical properties. Consequently, genetic improvement efforts are focused on the identifi...

  9. Rapid dereplication of estrogenic compounds in pomegranate (Punica granatum) using on-line biochemical detection coupled to mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elswijk, D.A.; Schobel, U.; Lansky, EP; Irth, H.; de Greef, J

    2004-01-01

    During recent years, phytoestrogens have been receiving an increasing amount of interest, as several lines of evidence suggest a possible role in preventing a range of diseases, including the hormonally dependent cancers. In this context, various parts of the pomegranate fruit (Punica granatum;

  10. Behavioral effects of Citrus limon and Punica granatum combinations in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Azra; Khan, Rafeeq Alam

    2017-02-01

    Dietary supplements are becoming more influential as viable treatment for common chronic diseases and to promote normal development and functions of all system including brain. Disorders like anxiety and depression may be managed through healthier variations is dietary pattern, since there are indications that diet rich in antioxidants and vitamins diminish anxiety and depression. Hence this investigation was planned to assess the behavioral effects of Citrus limon and Punica granatum in two combination doses i.e. 0.4 + 5 ml/kg and 0.2 + 8 ml/kg C. limon and P. granatum respectively in rats. Antidepressant and anxiolytic effects were explicitly judged twice during 15 days using forced swimming and open field tests and elevated plus maze. In open field test C. limon and P. granatum showed increase in distance travelled, number of central entries and number of rearing's at 0.4 + 5 ml/kg combination, in the elevated plus maze, number of open arm entries were found to be augmented and in forced swimming test, there was decline in duration of immobility and rise in duration of climbing at both combinations i.e. 0.4 + 5 ml/kg and 0.2 + 8 ml/kg C. limon and P. granatum. These results suggest that C. limon and P. granatum at 0.4 + 5 ml/kg combination have anxiolytic and antidepressant effect.

  11. Antibiotic activity of the extract of Punica granatum Linn. over bovine strains of Staphylococcus aureus

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    Maria A. R. Silva

    Full Text Available Human and veterinary medicines have not been so well succeeded in order to achieving their goals concerning the treatment of infections for long term caused by Staphylococcus aureus linked to resistance development against antibiotic agents. The antibiotic activity of the Punica granatum Linn. fresh fruit pericarp extract was evaluated by the agar diffusion method on 38 S. aureus strains, isolated from apparently healthy lactating cows in farms situated in counties of the semi-arid region of the State of Paraíba, Brazil to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. Twenty-two of the thirty-eight strains are penicillin-resistant (PRSA. The extract of P. granatum presented potential antibiotic action over all the assayed strains, forming 10 to 36 mm diameter inhibition zones. This paper's results claim the effectiveness of the extract of P. granatum as a potential antibacterial agent on S. aureus, and display the significance of evaluating new substances with antimicrobial potential, which can contribute to alternative therapeutics for veterinary and medicine.

  12. Antibacterial activity of crude extract of Punica granatum pericarp on pathogenic Gram-negative bacilli.

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    Voravuthikunchai, S.

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of crude extracts of Punica granatum Linn. pericarp with 3 different solvents against pathogenic Gram-negative bacilli. Ethanolic extracts showed the antibacterial activity against all strains tested including enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli 4 strains (E. coli O157: H7, E. coli O26: H11, E. coli O111: NM, E. coli O22, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella boydii and Salmonella london. Inhibition zones ranged from 10.02 to 19.15 mm. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC ranged from 0.09 to 3.13 mg/ml and 3.13 to 25 mg/ml, respectively. Aqueous extract had low antibacterial activity while crude chloroform extracts had no effect on the growth of these strains. Ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions of P. granatum pericarp demonstrated high activity with the best MIC and MBC values of 0.02 to 0.78 mg/ml and 0.19 to 6.25 mg/ml, respectively. As ethanolic extract of P. granatum was very effective against these pathogenic bacteria, further investigation on this plant species may provide alternative, but bioactive, medicines for the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infection.

  13. Growth-Inhibitory and Apoptosis-Inducing Effects of Punica granatum L. var. spinosa (Apple Punice) on Fibrosarcoma Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sineh Sepehr, Koushan; Baradaran, Behzad; Mazandarani, Masoumeh; Yousefi, Bahman; Abdollahpour Alitappeh, Meghdad; Khori, Vahid

    2014-12-01

    Punica granatum L. var. granatum (Pomegranate), an herbaceous plant found in Iran, The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic effects, induction of apoptosis, and the mechanism of cell death of ethanol extract from Punica granatum L. var. spinosa on the mouse fibrosarcoma cell line, WEHI-164. Various parts of the herbs were extracted from fruit using ethanol as the solvent, and the cytotoxicity and cell viability of the ethanolic extract were determined by the MTT assay. To determine whether necrosis or apoptosis is the predominant cause of cell death, cell death detection was performed using the ELISA method. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase- (TdT-) mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Moreover, a sensitive immunoblotting technique was used to examine the production of Caspase-3 and Bcl2 proteins. Our findings suggested that the ethalonic extract of Punica granatum L. var. spinosa altered cell morphology, decreased cell viability, suppressed cell proliferation and induced cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner in WEHI-164 cells (IC50 = 229.024μg/ml), when compared to a chemotherapeutic anticancer drug, Toxol (Vesper Pharmaceuticals), with increased nucleosome production from apoptotic cells. Induction of apoptosis by the plant extract was proved by the decrease of pro-Caspase-3 and Bcl2 proteins and quantitatively confirmed by Immunoblotting analysis. The results obtained from the present study have demonstrated the growth-inhibitory effect of Ethanol Extracts from Punica granatum L. var. spinosa, and clearly showed that apoptosis was the major mechanism of in-vitro cell death induced by the extract.

  14. Preparation and characterisation of Punica granatum pericarp aqueous extract loaded chitosan-collagen-starch membrane: role in wound healing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amal, B; Veena, B; Jayachandran, V P; Shilpa, Joy

    2015-05-01

    Engineered scaffolds made from natural biomaterials are crucial elements in tissue engineering strategies. In this study, biological scaffold like chitosan-collagen-starch membrane (CCSM) loaded with the antibacterial agent, Punica granatum pericarp aqueous extract was explored for enhanced regeneration of epithelial tissue during wound healing. Collagen was extracted from Rachycentron canadum fish skin. Membranous scaffold was prepared by mixing collagen, starch and chitosan in a fixed proportion, loaded with aqueous extract of P. granatum and its anti-pseudomonal activity was studied. Morphological characterization by SEM and mechanical property like tensile strength of the membrane were studied. Excision wound of 2 cm(2) size was induced in Guinea pig and the effect of P. granatum extract loaded CCSM in wound healing was studied. The SEM image showed deep pores in the membrane and also possessed good tensile strength. Wound surface area was reduced prominently in the experimental group with P. granatum extract loaded CCSM when compared to the group with unloaded membrane and the one with no membrane. Punica granatum extract loaded CCSM has antipseudomonal property and supported enhanced epithelial cell proliferation without leaving a scar after wound healing. This has significant therapeutic application in membranous scaffold mediated skin repair and regeneration.

  15. Studies on the Cytotoxic Activities of Punica granatum L. var. spinosa (Apple Punice) Extract on Prostate Cell Line by Induction of Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sineh Sepehr, Koushan; Baradaran, Behzad; Mazandarani, Masoumeh; Khori, Vahid; Shahneh, Fatemeh Zare

    2012-01-01

    The Punica granatum L. var. granatum (pomegranate) has been demonstrated to exert antitumor effects on various types of cancer cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the medicinal herbs Punica granatum L. var. spinosa (apple punice) that are native to Iran. This study was determined to test the possible cytotoxic activity and induction of apoptosis on human prostate cell lines. The effect of ethanol extracts of the herbs on the inhibition of cell proliferation was assessed by MTT colorimetric assay. PC3 cell lines treated with the extracts were analyzed for the induction of apoptosis by cell death detection (ELISA) and TUNEL assay. Dye exclusion analysis was performed for viability rate. Our results demonstrated that the Punica granatum L. var. spinosa extract dose dependently suppressed the proliferation of PC3 cells (IC(50)= 250.21 μg/mL) when compared with a chemotherapeutic anticancer drug (Toxol) (Vesper Pharmaceuticals) with increased nucleosome production from apoptotic cells. The Punica granatum L. var. spinosa extract attenuated the human prostate cell proliferation in vitro possibly by inducing apoptosis. The Punica granatum L. var. spinosa is likely to be valuable for the treatment of some forms of human prostate cell line.

  16. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of a pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) extract rich in ellagitannins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Trujano, María Eva; Pellicer, Francisco; Mena, Pedro; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) has been used for centuries for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, there is a lack of comprehensive information focused on the properties of a certain pomegranate (poly)phenolic profile to cure pain and gastric injury induced by anti-inflammatory drugs. This study investigated the systemic effects of different doses of a HPLC-characterized pomegranate extract on the formalin-induced nociceptive behavior in mice. The effect of the extract against gastric injury caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and ethanol was also assessed. Pomegranate reduced nociception in both phases of the formalin test, suggesting central and peripheral activities to inhibit nociception. Indomethacin-induced gastric injury was not produced in the presence of pomegranate, which also protected against ethanol-induced gastric lesions. The present results reinforce the benefits of pomegranate (poly)phenolics in the treatment of pain as well as their anti-inflammatory properties.

  17. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles using renewable Punica granatum juice and study of its catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Shib Shankar; Bag, Braja Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Punica granatum juice, a delicious multivitamin drink of great medicinal significance, is rich in different types of phytochemicals, such as terpenoids, alkaloids, sterols, polyphenols, sugars, fatty acids, aromatic compounds, amino acids, tocopherols, etc. We have demonstrated the use of the juice for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at room temperature under very mild conditions. The synthesis of the AuNPs was complete in few minutes and no extra stabilizing or capping agents were necessary. The size of the nanoparticles could be controlled by varying the concentration of the fruit extract. The AuNPs were characterized by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. Catalytic activity of the synthesized colloidal AuNPs has also been demonstrated.

  18. Antibacterial Inhibitory Effects of Punica Granatum Gel on Cariogenic Bacteria: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millo, Grazielle; Juntavee, Apa; Ratanathongkam, Ariya; Nualkaew, Natsajee; Peerapattana, Jomjai; Chatchiwiwattana, Supaporn

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vitro antibacterial effects of the formulated Punica granatum (PG) gel against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Lactobacillus casei. The PG extract was dissolved in water at 500 mg/mL. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used for identification and quantification of chemical marker punicalagin. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and time-kill assay (TKA) were investigated. Antibacterial activities of the formulated PG gel, 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) gel and blank gel were tested by measuring the zones of inhibition through agar well diffusion method. The HPLC results showed presence of punicalagin at 2023.58 ± 25.29 pg/mL in the aqueous PG extract and at 0.234% (w/w) in the formulated PG gel. The MBC for S. mutans, S. Sanguinis, and L. casei were 250, 125, and 500 mg/mL respectively. The TKA of 500 mg/mL aqueous PG extract showed total inhibition of S. mutans, S. Sanguinis, and L. casei at 6, 1, and 24 hours contact time respectively. Agar well diffusion revealed that for S. mutans, CHX gel > PG gel > blank gel; for S. sanguinis, CHX gel = PG gel > blank gel; for L. casei, CHX gel > PG gel = blank gel. Comparison of the PG gel potency showed that S. sanguinis = S. mutans > L. casei. The PG gel equivalent to 0.234% punicalagin (w/w) inhibited S. mutans and S. sanguinis but not L. casei within 24 hours incubation period and has the potential to be used for caries prevention. Millo G, Juntavee A, Ratanathongkam A, Nualkaew N, Peerapattana J, Chatchiwiwattana S. Antibacterial Inhibitory Effects of Punica Granatum Gel on Cariogenic Bacteria: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(2):152-157.

  19. Physiological and metabolomic analysis of Punica granatum (L.) under drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catola, Stefano; Marino, Giovanni; Emiliani, Giovanni; Huseynova, Taravat; Musayev, Mirza; Akparov, Zeynal; Maserti, Bianca Elena

    2016-02-01

    Punica granatum has a noticeable adaptation to drought stress. The levels of the green leaf volatile trans-2-hexenal increased in response to drought stress suggesting a possible role of this compound in drought stress response in pomegranate. Punica granatum (L.) is a highly valued fruit crop for its health-promoting effects and it is mainly cultivated in semi-arid areas. Thus, understanding the response mechanisms to drought stress is of great importance. In the present research, a metabolomics analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of drought stress on volatile organic compounds extracted from the leaves of pomegranate plants grown under water shortage conditions. The time course experiment (7 days of water deprivation and 24-h recovery) consisted of three treatments (control, drought stress, and rehydration of drought-stressed plants). Plant weights were recorded and control plants were irrigated daily at pot capacity to provide the lost water. Fraction of transpirable soil water has been evaluated as indicator of soil water availability in stressed plants. The levels of proline, hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxidation as well as of the photosynthetic parameters such as photosynthesis rate (A), stomatal conductance (g s), photosynthetic efficiency of photosystem II, and photochemical quenching were monitored after the imposition of drought stress and recovery as markers of plant stress. Constitutive carbon volatile components were analyzed in the leaf of control and drought-stressed leaves using Head Space Solid Phase Micro Extraction sampling coupled with Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry. A total of 12 volatile compounds were found in pomegranate leaf profiles, mainly aldehydes, alcohols, and organic acids. Among them, the trans-2-hexenal showed a significant increase in water-stressed and recovered leaves respect to the well-watered ones. These data evidence a possible role of the oxylipin pathway in the response to water stress in pomegranate

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Six Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. Varieties and Their Relation to Some of Their Pomological and Phytonutrient Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Erbil

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Arils from six pomegranate (Punica granatum L. varieties grown in the Mediterranean region of Turkey were tested for their antimicrobial properties by the agar diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC methods against seven bacteria: (Bacillus megaterium DSM 32, Pseudomonas aeruginosa DSM 9027, Staphylococcus aureus Cowan 1, Corynebacterium xerosis UC 9165, Escherichia coli DM, Enterococcus faecalis A10, Micrococcus luteus LA 2971, and threefungi (Kluvyeromyces marxianus A230, Rhodotorula rubra MC12, Candida albicans ATCC 1023. It has been observed that the pomegranate aril extracts had antimicrobial effect on all microorganisms, giving inhibition zones ranging in size from 13 to 26 mm. The MIC values for active pomegranate extracts ranged between 30 and >90 µg/mL. The results obtained appeared to confirm the antimicrobial potential of the Punica granatum varieties.

  1. EFFECT OF AQUEOUS EXTRACT OF PUNICA GRANATUM FLOWER ON BIOMARKERS AND ECG CHANGES IN ISOPROTERENOL INDUCED MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION IN RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Khatib N.A; Patel Jignesh; Medi Swathi

    2011-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of aqueous extract of Punica granatum flower (PG) against isoproterenol (ISO) induced myocardial infarction (MI) in rats by studying cardiac markers and electrocardiographic changes. MI was induced in rats by subcutaneous injection of ISO (150mg/kg b.w) at an interval of 24 hours for 2 days. ISO treated rats showed significant increase in cardiac markers such as Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Creatine kinase (CK-MB), Alanine aminotransfer...

  2. Atividade citotóxica e antiangiogênica de Punica granatum L., Punicaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligianne P. Oliveira

    Full Text Available Punica granatum L., Punicaceae, amplamente usada no Brasil, foi avaliada quanto ao seu potencial antitumoral in vitroe in vivo. Investigou-se in vitro a citotoxicidade do extrato etanólico do fruto e folha da P. granatumutilizando células K-562 e células do Tumor Ascítico de Ehrlich (TAE, pelos métodos de redução do MTT e exclusão do azul de tripano. Nos estudos in vivoavaliou-se o aumento da sobrevida de animais portadores do TAE e tratados, por via oral, com diferentes doses dos extratos etanólicos da P. granatum(12,5; 25; 50 e 100 mg/kg por dez dias consecutivos. Além disso, nestes animais analisou-se o potencial de inibição tumoral e a atividade antiangiogênica da P. granatum. Os resultados dos estudos in vitrodemonstraram uma redução na viabilidade das células K-562 e do TAE, concentração-dependente, nos métodos investigados. Os resultados in vivo demonstraram aumento da sobrevida dos animais portadores do TAE tratados, de forma dose-dependente. Em paralelo, observou-se diminuição do número de células tumorais na cavidade peritoneal dos animais portadores e tratados. Além disto, os tratamentos empregados reduziram o padrão de vascularização da parede abdominal. Dessa forma, os dados apresentados revelaram que o extrato de P. granatumpossui atividade antitumoral in vitroe in vivo em paralelo a redução da angiogênese peritoneal.

  3. Pomegranate (Punica granatum Juice Shows Antioxidant Activity against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis-Induced Oxidative Stress in Female BALB/c Mice

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    Badriah Alkathiri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania species are parasites that multiply within phagocytes and cause several clinical diseases characterized by single or multiple ulcerations. One of the complications that can induce tissue damage and the resulting scars is caused by secondary bacterial infections. Studies to find new, effective, and safe oral drugs for treating leishmaniasis are being conducted since several decades, owing to the problems associated with the use of antimonials available. Previously, the antiparasitic and antioxidant properties of Punica granatum (pomegranate, P. granatum have been reported. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed to investigate the antileishmanial activity of pomegranate aqueous juice in vitro and in female BALB/c mice. A 3-(4.5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay in Leishmania major promastigotes and alterations in the antioxidant status, liver function, and skin histological changes in L. major-infected mice orally treated with pomegranate juice alone and in combination with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin, were used to investigate the in vitro and in vivo antileishmanial activity of pomegranate juice, respectively. Oral P. granatum juice treatment significantly reduced the average size of cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions compared with that of the untreated mice. This antileishmanial activity of P. granatum was associated with enhanced antioxidant enzyme activities. Histopathological evaluation proved the antileishmanial activity of P. granatum, but did not reveal changes in the treated animals, compared to the positive control. In conclusion, P. granatum shows high and fast antileishmanial activity probably by boosting the endogenous antioxidant activity.

  4. Pomegranate (Punica granatum) Juice Shows Antioxidant Activity against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis-Induced Oxidative Stress in Female BALB/c Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkathiri, Badriah; El-Khadragy, Manal F; Metwally, Dina M; Al-Olayan, Ebtesam M; Bakhrebah, Muhammed A; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2017-12-18

    Leishmania species are parasites that multiply within phagocytes and cause several clinical diseases characterized by single or multiple ulcerations. One of the complications that can induce tissue damage and the resulting scars is caused by secondary bacterial infections. Studies to find new, effective, and safe oral drugs for treating leishmaniasis are being conducted since several decades, owing to the problems associated with the use of antimonials available. Previously, the antiparasitic and antioxidant properties of Punica granatum (pomegranate, P. granatum ) have been reported. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed to investigate the antileishmanial activity of pomegranate aqueous juice in vitro and in female BALB/c mice. A 3-(4.5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in Leishmania major promastigotes and alterations in the antioxidant status, liver function, and skin histological changes in L. major -infected mice orally treated with pomegranate juice alone and in combination with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin, were used to investigate the in vitro and in vivo antileishmanial activity of pomegranate juice, respectively. Oral P. granatum juice treatment significantly reduced the average size of cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions compared with that of the untreated mice. This antileishmanial activity of P. granatum was associated with enhanced antioxidant enzyme activities. Histopathological evaluation proved the antileishmanial activity of P. granatum , but did not reveal changes in the treated animals, compared to the positive control. In conclusion, P. granatum shows high and fast antileishmanial activity probably by boosting the endogenous antioxidant activity.

  5. Antifungal activity of the ethanolic extracts of Punica granatum L. and evaluation of the morphological and structural modifications of its compounds upon the cells of Candida spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anibal, Paula Cristina; Peixoto, Iza Teixeira Alves; Foglio, Mary Ann; Höfling, José Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Ethanolic crude extracts prepared from the arils and seeds, pericarp, peels and from the whole fruit of Punica granatum, known as pomegranate, had their antifungal activity tested against Candida spp. The ethanolic crude extracts were analyzed by Mass Spectrometry and yielded many compounds such as punicalagin and galladydilacton. The extracts from the pericarp and peel showed activity against Candida spp., with MICs of 125 μg/mL. The effect of pericarp and peel extracts upon the morphological and structure of C. albicans and C. krusei were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, with the visualization of an irregular membrane and hyphae, formation of vacuoles and thickening of the cell wall. The data obtained revealed potential antimicrobial activity against yeasts cells of the Candida genus, and the bioactive compounds could be responsible for changes in cell morphology and structure. The data obtained open new perspectives for future research in continuation to this study, where information such as determination of the site of action of the compounds could contribute to an alternative therapy against these organisms.

  6. Inhibitory Effect of the Punica granatum Fruit Extract on Angiotensin-II Type I Receptor and Thromboxane B2 in Endothelial Cells Induced by Plasma from Preeclamptic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumawati, Widya; Keman, Kusnarman; Soeharto, Setyawati

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate whether the Punica granatum fruit extract modulates the Angiotensin-II Type I receptor (AT1-R) and thromboxane B2 level in endothelial cells induced by plasma from preeclamptic patients. Endothelial cells were obtained from human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. At confluence, endothelial cells were divided into five groups, which included endothelial cells exposed to 2% plasma from normal pregnancy (NP), endothelial cells exposed to 2% plasma from preeclamptic patients (PP), and endothelial cells exposed to PP in the presence of ethanolic extract of Punica granatum (PP + PG) at the following three doses: 14; 28; and 56 ppm. The expression of AT1-R was observed by immunohistochemistry technique, and thromboxane B2 level was done by immunoassay technique. Plasma from PP significantly increased AT1-R expression and thromboxane B2 levels compared to cells treated by normal pregnancy plasma. The increasing of AT1-R expression significantly (P Punica granatum extract. Moreover, the increasing of thromboxane B2 levels significantly (P Punica granatum extract. We further concluded that Punica granatum fruit protects and inhibits the sensitivity of endothelial cells to plasma from preeclamptic patients due to inhibition of AT1-R expression (56 ppm) and reduced thromboxane B2 levels (14 ppm).

  7. Evaluation of Wound Healing Effect of Punica granatum L Peel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pomegranate husk) extract. (PHE) on ... water, flame and boiling oil. ... PH. 201309017) was deposited in the College of. Pharmacy, Guangxi University of Chinese. Medicine, China for future reference. The powdered sample (20 g) was placed a round.

  8. Attenuation of diabetic nephropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by Punica granatum Linn. leaves extract

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    Snehal Nitin Mestry

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available With an objective to develop Complementary and Alternative Medicine for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy, the present study investigated the protective effects of methanolic extract of Punica granatum leaves (MPGL in streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy has become a leading cause of end stage renal failure worldwide. P. granatum, due to its anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities may retard the progression of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, diabetes was induced by a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 45 mg/kg, i.p. in rats. STZ-diabetic rats were treated with oral doses of MPGL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg for 8 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, body and kidney weight and blood glucose levels were determined. Serum and urine parameters were investigated. Antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxide levels were determined in the kidney along with histopathological examination of the same. MPGL significantly increased body weight, lowered blood glucose levels and ameliorated kidney hypertrophy index in the STZ-diabetic rats. The extract also decreased the levels of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, total cholesterol, triglycerides, advanced glycation end products and albumin in serum and urine, respectively. MPGL significantly increased the antioxidant parameters in the kidney. Histological evaluation revealed that MPGL treated STZ-diabetic rats demonstrated reduced vacuolar degeneration of tubules; periodic acid Schiff base (PAS positivity staining intensity in glomeruli and basement membrane thickening. Present findings provide experimental evidence that MPGL has potential antioxidant, antihyperglycemic and anti-glycation activities which might be helpful in slowing the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  9. Anticonvulsant activity of the ethanolic extract of Punica granatum L. seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrzadi, Saeed; Sadr, Samir; Hosseinzadeh, Azam; Gholamine, Babak; Shahbazi, Ali; FallahHuseini, Hasan; Ghaznavi, Habib

    2015-06-01

    Various morphological parts of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) have extensively been used in the folk medicine to treat an array of human ailments. The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the anticonvulsant potential of the ethanolic extract of P. granatum L. seed in chemoconvulsant-induced seizures in mice. The anticonvulsant activity of the ethanolic extract was investigated in strychnine (STR)-induced and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure models in mice. Diazepam was used as reference anticonvulsant drug. Ethanolic extract (150, 300, and 600 mg/kg per os, p.o.), diazepam (1 mg/kg intraperitoneally, i.p.), and distilled water (10 ml/kg, i.p.) were administered before induction of seizures by PTZ (60 mg/kg, i.p.) or STR (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). The latent time before the onset of convulsions, the duration of convulsions, the percentage of seizure protection, and mortality rate were recorded. The seed ethanolic extract did not show any toxicity and did not protect the animals against seizures but demonstrated a significant increase in seizure latency at 300 and 600 mg/kg in both STR and PTZ seizure models (P < 0.001). It also showed a significant reduction in seizure duration at 300 mg/kg (P < 0.05) and 600 mg/kg (P < 0.001) in the STR seizure model and 600 mg/kg (P < 0.01) in the PTZ seizure model compared with the control group. Ethanol extract has dose-dependent anticonvulsant activity against STR- and PTZ-induced seizures. This activity might be due to its saponins, flavonoids, triterpenes, and alkaloids ingredients.

  10. Attenuation of diabetic nephropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by Punica granatum Linn. leaves extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestry, Snehal Nitin; Dhodi, Jayesh Bachu; Kumbhar, Sangita Balbhim; Juvekar, Archana Ramesh

    2017-07-01

    With an objective to develop Complementary and Alternative Medicine for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy, the present study investigated the protective effects of methanolic extract of Punica granatum leaves (MPGL) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy has become a leading cause of end stage renal failure worldwide. P. granatum , due to its anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities may retard the progression of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, diabetes was induced by a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 45 mg/kg, i.p.) in rats. STZ-diabetic rats were treated with oral doses of MPGL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) for 8 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, body and kidney weight and blood glucose levels were determined. Serum and urine parameters were investigated. Antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxide levels were determined in the kidney along with histopathological examination of the same. MPGL significantly increased body weight, lowered blood glucose levels and ameliorated kidney hypertrophy index in the STZ-diabetic rats. The extract also decreased the levels of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, total cholesterol, triglycerides, advanced glycation end products and albumin in serum and urine, respectively. MPGL significantly increased the antioxidant parameters in the kidney. Histological evaluation revealed that MPGL treated STZ-diabetic rats demonstrated reduced vacuolar degeneration of tubules; periodic acid Schiff base (PAS) positivity staining intensity in glomeruli and basement membrane thickening. Present findings provide experimental evidence that MPGL has potential antioxidant, antihyperglycemic and anti-glycation activities which might be helpful in slowing the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  11. Genetic, Biochemical, Nutritional and Antimicrobial Characteristics of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. Grown in Istria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Miklavčič Višnjevec

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study characterises the genetic variability of local pomegranate (Punica granatum L. germplasm from the Slovenian and Croatian areas of Istria. The bioactive components and antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of ethanol and water extracts of different parts of pomegranate fruit were also determined, along with their preliminary nutritional characterisation. Twenty-six different genotypes identified with microsatellite analysis indicate the great diversity of pomegranate in Istria. The pomegranate fruit ethanol extracts represent rich sources of phenolic compounds (mean value of the mass fraction in exocarp and mesocarp expressed as gallic acid is 23 and 16 mg/g, respectively. The ethanol extracts of pomegranate exocarp and mesocarp showed the greatest antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Exophiala dermatitidis and Staphylococcus aureus, and the same water extracts against S. aureus and Escherichia coli. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first report of the characterisation of pomegranate genetic resources from Istria at different levels, including the molecular, chemical, antimicrobial and nutritional properties.

  12. Diverse Phytochemicals and Bioactivities in the Ancient Fruit and Modern Functional Food Pomegranate (Punica granatum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng; Tian, Li

    2017-09-25

    Having served as a symbolic fruit since ancient times, pomegranate ( Punica granatum ) has also gained considerable recognition as a functional food in the modern era. A large body of literature has linked pomegranate polyphenols, particularly anthocyanins (ATs) and hydrolyzable tannins (HTs), to the health-promoting activities of pomegranate juice and fruit extracts. However, it remains unclear as to how, and to what extent, the numerous phytochemicals in pomegranate may interact and exert cooperative activities in humans. In this review, we examine the structural and analytical information of the diverse phytochemicals that have been identified in different pomegranate tissues, to establish a knowledge base for characterization of metabolite profiles, discovery of novel phytochemicals, and investigation of phytochemical interactions in pomegranate. We also assess recent findings on the function and molecular mechanism of ATs as well as urolithins, the intestinal microbial derivatives of pomegranate HTs, on human nutrition and health. A better understanding of the structural diversity of pomegranate phytochemicals as well as their bioconversions and bioactivities in humans will facilitate the interrogation of their synergistic/antagonistic interactions and accelerate their applications in dietary-based cancer chemoprevention and treatment in the future.

  13. Punica granatum L. protects mice against hexavalent chromium-induced genotoxicity

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    Renato Ivan de Ávila

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the chemoprotective effects of Punica granatum L. (Punicaceae fruits alcoholic extract (PGE on mice exposed to hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI]. Animals were pretreated with PGE (25, 50 or 75 mg/kg/day for 10 days and subsequently exposed to a sub-lethal dose of Cr(VI (30 mg/kg. The frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow was investigated and the Cr(VI levels were measured in the kidneys, liver and plasm. For the survival analysis, mice were previously treated with PGE for 10 days and exposed to a single lethal dose of Cr(VI (50 mg/kg. Exposure to a sub-lethal dose of Cr(VI induced a significant increase in the frequency of micronucleated cells. However, the prophylactic treatment with PGE led to a reduction of 44.5% (25 mg/kg, 86.3% (50 mg/kg and 64.2% (75 mg/kg in the incidence of micronuclei. In addition, the 50 mg/kg dose of PGE produced a higher chemoprotective effect, since the survival rate was 90%, when compared to that of the non-treated group. In these animals, reduced amounts of chromium were detected in the biological materials, in comparison with the other groups. Taken together, the results demonstrated that PGE exerts a protective effect against Cr(VI-induced genotoxicity.

  14. Punica granatum L. Leaf Extract Attenuates Lung Inflammation in Mice with Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Aruanã Joaquim Matheus Costa Rodrigues; Gonçalves, Jaciara Sá; Dourado, Ádylla Wilenna Alves; de Sousa, Eduardo Martins; Brito, Natilene Mesquita; Silva, Lanna Karinny; Batista, Marisa Cristina Aranha; de Sá, Joicy Cortez; Monteiro, Cinara Regina Aragão Vieira; Fernandes, Elizabeth Soares; Campbell, Lee Ann; Zago, Patrícia Maria Wiziack

    2018-01-01

    The hydroalcoholic extract of Punica granatum (pomegranate) leaves was previously demonstrated to be anti-inflammatory in a rat model of lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute peritonitis. Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of the ethyl acetate fraction obtained from the pomegranate leaf hydroalcoholic extract (EAFPg) on the LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. Male Swiss mice received either EAFPg at different doses or dexamethasone (per os) prior to LPS intranasal instillation. Vehicle-treated mice were used as controls. Animals were culled at 4 h after LPS challenge, and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung samples were collected for analysis. EAFPg and kaempferol effects on NO and cytokine production by LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages were also investigated. Pretreatment with EAFPg (100–300 mg/kg) markedly reduced cell accumulation (specially neutrophils) and collagen deposition in the lungs of ALI mice. The same animals presented with reduced lung and BALF TNF-α and IL-1β expression in comparison with vehicle controls (p < 0.05). Additionally, incubation with either EAFPg or kaempferol (100 μg/ml) reduced NO production and cytokine gene expression in cultured LPS-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Overall, these results demonstrate that the prophylactic treatment with EAFPg attenuates acute lung inflammation. We suggest this fraction may be useful in treating ALI. PMID:29675437

  15. Evaluation of pomegranate (Punica granatum pericarp aqueous extract on Eimeria spp. from Japanese quails (Coturnix japonica

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    Bruno P. Berto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antiparasitic properties have been associated with the extract of pomegranate (Punica granatum in several animals and conditions. The Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica, originated from North Africa, Europe and Asia, is used worldwide as an experimental animal and model for aviculture. The current study investigated the effects of the pomegranate pericarp aqueous extract on the shedding, viability and morphometry of three Eimeria spp. from Japanese quails, besides the weight gain and genotoxic activity. Although the pomegranate is recognized by multiple properties, including anti-coccidial, in the current study the results are contrary. The treated group shed greater amount of oocysts; the sporulation times and viability were similar in both groups; despite some morphometric differences, these were not expressive; weight gains were similar; and the pomegranate had insignificant effect genotoxic. Finally, these results suggest that the pomegranate pericarp extract did not influence on Eimeira spp. from Japanese quails; therefore, the pomegranate pericarp extract is not suggested in the prevention/treatment of coccidiosis in Japanese quails, or at least not using methods of preparation and administration applied in this study.

  16. Protective Effect of Pomegranate (Punica Granatum), Juice in Rats Consuming Aspartame Peroxidation and Antioxidant Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darwish, M.M.; Osman, N.N.; Farag, M.F.S.

    2009-01-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum) has been traditionally used as medicine in many countries due to its high antioxidant activity, which has been related to beneficial health properties. Aspartame (ASP) is a widely used artificial sweetener that may be harmful at abuse levels. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential efficacy of pomegranate juice (PJ) in protecting tissues from the possible damage induced by aspartame. ASP treated rats were given ASP, by gavages, at a dose of 250 mg/kg /day for 28 days. PJ-ASP treated rats were given PI at a dose of 1ml /kg body weight/day along with ASP. The data obtained indicate that ASP administration results in no significant change in the concentration of serum triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (Tc), low-density lipoprotein (LDL-c), high density lipoprotein (HDL-c) and glucose while significant decreases have been recorded for insulin. The results demonstrated also that aspartame promotes lipid peroxidation and decreases the level of antioxidants superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (Cat) activities and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents in serum and liver tissues. Significant elevations in the activities of serum aspartate transaminase (AST), serum alanine transaminase (AL T) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were also observed. Administration of PI in parallel with aspartame protected rats from aspartame-induced oxidative injury and ameliorated liver function

  17. EXTRACT OF Punica granatum L.: AN ALTERNATIVE TO BHT AS AN ANTIOXIDANT IN SEMISSOLID EMULSIFIED SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Tiago Tozetto

    Full Text Available Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. is a fruit which has important pharmacological activities and has been attracting attention due to its important antioxidant activity, a significant feature in relation to cosmetics. Formulations containing different concentrations of an ethanolic extract of pomegranate (0.1, 1.0 and 5.0% (w/w as an antioxidant agent showed that this is an interesting alternative for the use of natural products with biological activity. The stability and rheology of semissolid systems containing an extract of this plant were evaluated. Preliminary stability studies showed greater physico-chemical stability of the formulation, and thus it was used in an accelerated stability study, as well the quantification of total phenolic compounds and the determination of antioxidant activity. It was observed that different concentrations of the extract did not significantly influence the stability. Moreover, the formulation was found to have better stability when stored at room temperature than under heated or cooled conditions. Formulations containing 0.1 and 5.0% of extract showed more stable rheological behavior, due to the absence of a solid/liquid transition in the rheogram. Tests confirmed the high phenolic content and antioxidant activity, demonstrating the potential of this plant for use in cosmetology as an antioxidant.

  18. The pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) genome and the genomics of punicalagin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Gaihua; Xu, Chunyan; Ming, Ray; Tang, Haibao; Guyot, Romain; Kramer, Elena M; Hu, Yudong; Yi, Xingkai; Qi, Yongjie; Xu, Xiangyang; Gao, Zhenghui; Pan, Haifa; Jian, Jianbo; Tian, Yinping; Yue, Zhen; Xu, Yiliu

    2017-09-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is a perennial fruit crop grown since ancient times that has been planted worldwide and is known for its functional metabolites, particularly punicalagins. We have sequenced and assembled the pomegranate genome with 328 Mb anchored into nine pseudo-chromosomes and annotated 29 229 gene models. A Myrtales lineage-specific whole-genome duplication event was detected that occurred in the common ancestor before the divergence of pomegranate and Eucalyptus. Repetitive sequences accounted for 46.1% of the assembled genome. We found that the integument development gene INNER NO OUTER (INO) was under positive selection and potentially contributed to the development of the fleshy outer layer of the seed coat, an edible part of pomegranate fruit. The genes encoding the enzymes for synthesis and degradation of lignin, hemicelluloses and cellulose were also differentially expressed between soft- and hard-seeded varieties, reflecting differences in their accumulation in cultivars differing in seed hardness. Candidate genes for punicalagin biosynthesis were identified and their expression patterns indicated that gallic acid synthesis in tissues could follow different biochemical pathways. The genome sequence of pomegranate provides a valuable resource for the dissection of many biological and biochemical traits and also provides important insights for the acceleration of breeding. Elucidation of the biochemical pathway(s) involved in punicalagin biosynthesis could assist breeding efforts to increase production of this bioactive compound. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The inhibitory effect of anti- tumor polysaccharide from Punica granatum on metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Sheeja; Joseph, Manu M; S R, Aravind; B S, Unnikrishnan; Sreelekha, T T

    2017-10-01

    Galactomannan (PSP001) isolated from the fruit rind of Punica granatum was demonstrated as an excellent antioxidant, immunomodulatory and anticancer agent both in vitro and in vivo models. Since the most lethal and debilitating attribute of cancer cells is their ability to evolve to a state of malignancy, with key features like increased angiogenesis, invasion, migration, colony formation, and metastasis, the present study focused on evaluating the effects of the galactomannan on tumor and malignancy. PSP001 effectively reduced the neovascularization in chick embryos highlighting its potential as an angiogenic inhibitor. Furthermore, the invasion, migration and clonogenic capacity of human and murine cancer cells were dramatically inhibited by PSP001. Evaluation of the molecular mechanism of its unique potential revealed the down regulation of key players including VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9 with marked elevation of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2. The anti-metastatic potential of PSP001 tested in pulmonary metastasis C57BL/6 mice model deciphered the combinatorial administration with vincristine deliberated better survival rates and decreased metastatic index. The angiogenic inhibition potential of PSP001 was further proved with peritoneal angiogenesis assay in BALB/c mice ascitic tumor model. The outcomes of the current investigation highlight the mode of action of antitumor galactomannan in the reduction of tumor malignancy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Genetic, Biochemical, Nutritional and Antimicrobial Characteristics of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.)
Grown in Istria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Višnjevec, Ana Miklavčič; Ota, Ajda; Skrt, Mihaela; Butinar, Bojan; Možina, Sonja Smole; Cimerman, Nina Gunde; Nečemer, Marijan; Arbeiter, Alenka Baruca; Hladnik, Matjaž; Krapac, Marin; Ban, Dean; Bučar-Miklavčič, Milena; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar; Bandelj, Dunja

    2017-06-01

    This study characterises the genetic variability of local pomegranate ( Punica granatum L.) germplasm from the Slovenian and Croatian areas of Istria. The bioactive components and antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of ethanol and water extracts of different parts of pomegranate fruit were also determined, along with their preliminary nutritional characterisation. Twenty-six different genotypes identified with microsatellite analysis indicate the great diversity of pomegranate in Istria. The pomegranate fruit ethanol extracts represent rich sources of phenolic compounds (mean value of the mass fraction in exocarp and mesocarp expressed as gallic acid is 23 and 16 mg/g, respectively). The ethanol extracts of pomegranate exocarp and mesocarp showed the greatest antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans , Candida parapsilosis , Rhodotorula mucilaginosa , Exophiala dermatitidis and Staphylococcus aureus , and the same water extracts against S. aureus and Escherichia coli. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first report of the characterisation of pomegranate genetic resources from Istria at different levels, including the molecular, chemical, antimicrobial and nutritional properties.

  1. A Comprehensive Review of Punica granatum (Pomegranate) Properties in Toxicological, Pharmacological, Cellular and Molecular Biology Researches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Arastoo, Mohammad; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2012-01-01

    Punica granatum (Pg), commonly known as pomegranate (Pg), is a member of the monogeneric family, Punicaceae, and is mainly found in Iran which is considered to be its primary centre of origin. Pg and its chemical components possess various pharmacological and toxicological properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory (by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokines), anti-cancer and anti-angiogenesis activities. They also show inhibitory effects on invasion/motility, cell cycle, apoptosis, and vital enzymes such as cyclooxygenase (COX), lipooxygenase (LOX), cytochrome P450 (CYP450), phospholipase A2 (PLA2), ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), carbonic anhydrase (CA), 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSDs) and serine protease (SP). Furthermore, they can stimulate cell differentiation and possess anti-mutagenic effects. Pg can also interfere with several signaling pathways including PI3K/AKT, mTOR, PI3K, Bcl-X, Bax, Bad, MAPK, ERK1/2, P38, JNK, and caspase. However, the exact mechanisms for its pharmacological and toxicological properties remain to be unclear and need further evaluation. These properties strongly suggest a wide range use of Pg for clinical applications. This review will discuss the areas for which Pg has shown therapeutic properties in different mechanisms. PMID:24250463

  2. Punica granatum L. Leaf Extract Attenuates Lung Inflammation in Mice with Acute Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Aruanã Joaquim Matheus Costa Rodrigues; Gonçalves, Jaciara Sá; Dourado, Ádylla Wilenna Alves; de Sousa, Eduardo Martins; Brito, Natilene Mesquita; Silva, Lanna Karinny; Batista, Marisa Cristina Aranha; de Sá, Joicy Cortez; Monteiro, Cinara Regina Aragão Vieira; Fernandes, Elizabeth Soares; Monteiro-Neto, Valério; Campbell, Lee Ann; Zago, Patrícia Maria Wiziack; Lima-Neto, Lidio Gonçalves

    2018-01-01

    The hydroalcoholic extract of Punica granatum (pomegranate) leaves was previously demonstrated to be anti-inflammatory in a rat model of lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute peritonitis. Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of the ethyl acetate fraction obtained from the pomegranate leaf hydroalcoholic extract (EAFPg) on the LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. Male Swiss mice received either EAFPg at different doses or dexamethasone (per os) prior to LPS intranasal instillation. Vehicle-treated mice were used as controls. Animals were culled at 4 h after LPS challenge, and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung samples were collected for analysis. EAFPg and kaempferol effects on NO and cytokine production by LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages were also investigated. Pretreatment with EAFPg (100-300 mg/kg) markedly reduced cell accumulation (specially neutrophils) and collagen deposition in the lungs of ALI mice. The same animals presented with reduced lung and BALF TNF- α and IL-1 β expression in comparison with vehicle controls ( p < 0.05). Additionally, incubation with either EAFPg or kaempferol (100  μ g/ml) reduced NO production and cytokine gene expression in cultured LPS-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Overall, these results demonstrate that the prophylactic treatment with EAFPg attenuates acute lung inflammation. We suggest this fraction may be useful in treating ALI.

  3. A galactomannan polysaccharide from Punica granatum imparts in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Manu M; Aravind, S R; George, Suraj K; Varghese, Sheeja; Sreelekha, T T

    2013-11-06

    Galactomannan polysaccharide (PSP001) was isolated from the fruit rind of Punica granatum and was previously reported to have excellent antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties. The cytotoxicity of PSP001 was evaluated in the human cancer cell lines A375, HCT116, and HepG2 as well as the murine cancer cell lines DLA and EAC over a wide range of concentrations. PSP001 exhibited significant cytotoxicity against cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis with no in vivo toxicity up to a concentration of 2000 mg/kg body weight when assessed in BALB/c mice. The antitumor efficacy of PSP001 was tested in DLA and EAC murine ascites and EAC solid tumor mouse models. PSP001 alone and in combination with doxorubicin produced a significant reduction in the tumor burden and increased life span in both models compared to the controls. The results suggest that PSP001 has the potential to be developed as an anticancer agent either alone or as an adjuvant to chemotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Triterpenes as uncompetitive inhibitors of α-glucosidase from flowers of Punica granatum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah El Dine, Riham; Ma, Qiong; Kandil, Zeinab A; El-Halawany, Ali M

    2014-01-01

    The α-glucosidase and maltase inhibitory effects of Punica granatum L. flowers (PGF) were investigated. The methanol extract (PGFMe), n-hexane extract (PGFH), chloroform extract (PGFC) and the remaining water fraction (PGFW) were assayed for their α-glucosidase and maltase inhibitory effects. PGFW showed potent α-glucosidase inhibition with IC₅₀ of 0.8 μg/mL followed by PGFMe (IC₅₀ of 4.0 μg/mL) then PGFC (IC₅₀ of 5.21 μg/mL) in comparison to acarbose (0.9 μM). Due to its selectivity towards α-glucosidase, PGFC was subjected to bioactivity-guided isolation of its main active constituents. Five known compounds (1-5) were identified as β-sitosterol (1), oleanolic acid (2), ursolic acid (3), p-coumaric acid (4) and apigenin (5). Ursolic and oleanolic acids showed potent α-glucosidase inhibition (IC₅₀ of 39.0 and 35.0 μM, respectively), while they did not show significant maltase inhibition. Kinetic study using the double Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed that ursolic acid uncompetitively inhibited α-glucosidase in comparison with acarbose as a competitive inhibitor.

  5. Comparison of antihyperlipidaemic activity of eugenia jambolana fruit with punica granatum fruit in diet induced hyperlipidaemic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilal, R.; Rashid, M.; Latif, W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the antihyperlipidemic effects of Eugenia Jambolana fruit pulp with Punica Granatum fruit in diet induced hyperlipidaemic rats at the same dose level. Methods: An experimental randomized control study was conducted on seventy five male albino rats over a period of 14 weeks in University of Health Sciences Lahore. They were divided into five groups labelled A, B, C, D and E with fifteen rats in each group. Group A was kept as normal control, groups B, C, D and E were given hyperlipidaemic diet for six weeks. In group B no further intervention was done, group C and D were given ethanolic extract of Eugenia Jambolana and Punica Granatum respectively for eight weeks. Group E was given combination of both for same duration. Serum total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), lowdensity lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) and triglycerides (TG) were measured at zero, six and fourteen weeks. Results: At fourteenth week significant reductions in TC, LDL-c and TG and a rise in HDL-c was observed in interventional groups C, D and E as compared to experimental hyperlipidaemic control group B (p 0.57, p > 0.22, p > 0.56, p > 0.76, respectively. On sixth week, there was no significant difference between groups B, C, D and E (p > 0.05). However, 15 rats of group A had significant lower levels of cholesterol, high density lipoproteins, low density lipoproteins and triglycerides when compared to 60 rats of groups B, C, D and E (p<0.05). Conclusion: In male albino rats combination of ethanolic extracts of Eugenia Jambolana and Punica Granatum fruit pulps was most effective in lowering serum total cholesterol and triglycerides while decrease in low density lipoprotein cholesterol and rise in high density lipoprotein cholesterol was same as the extracts given alone. (author)

  6. Amelioration of radiation induced decrease in activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in mouse liver by Punica granatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Jaimala; Mathur, Aarti

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in irradiated tissue. Cells of liver have their own defence system, the antioxidant system to deactivate ROS. Antioxidant system includes enzymatic and non-enzymatic components. Liver is rich in endogenous antioxidants and related enzymes. Catalase and Superoxide dismutase (SOD) are powerful antioxidant enzymes. In the present study Punica granatum fruit rind Ethanol extract (PGFRE) was tested against 60 Co gamma radiation induced alteration in Swiss albino mouse. Healthy adult (25±2) Swiss albino mouse were selected and divided into four groups. The first group was sham irradiated. The second group was irradiated with 8 Gy 60 Co gamma radiation only and served as control. The third group was administered with Ethanol extract of Punica granatum fruit rind one hour before irradiation at the dose rate of 10 mg/kg body weight orally. Animals were exposed to 8 Gy 60 Co gamma radiation. Fourth group was administered with Ethanol extract of Punica granatum fruit rind at the dose rate of 10 mg/kg body weight. Mice were sacrificed at various post irradiation intervals and liver was removed, weighed and analysed biochemically for Catalase and SOD activity. Catalase and SOD activity decreased up till 7th post irradiation day in 8 Gy irradiated group than normal. In PGFRE pretreated irradiated group catalase and SOD activity were higher than the corresponding control group at all the intervals. These results indicate that PGFRE extract protects damage to the catalase and SOD activity in liver of Swiss albino mouse against lethal dose of gamma radiation. (author)

  7. Inhibitory Effects of Two Varieties of Tunisian Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Extracts on Gastrointestinal Transit in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souli, Abdelaziz; Sebai, Hichem; Rtibi, Kais; Chehimi, Latifa; Sakly, Mohsen; Amri, Mohamed; El-Benna, Jamel; Marzouki, Lamjed

    2015-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether total and methanol juice extracts of two Tunisian Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) varieties (Garsi and Gabsi) protect against diarrhea as well as their effects on gastrointestinal transit (GIT) in healthy rats. In this respect, male Wistar rats were used and divided into control- and pomegranate-treated groups. The antidiarrheal activity was evaluated using the castor oil-induced diarrhea method and the GIT was assessed using charcoal meal. Our results showed that total and methanol P. granatum juice extracts produced a significant dose-dependent protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea. Pomegranate extracts and juice also decreased the GIT significantly and dose dependently. Importantly, the Garsi variety appeared to be more effective than the Gabsi variety on these two parameters. These findings suggest that pomegranate extracts have a potent antidiarrheal property in rats confirming their efficiency in the Tunisian traditional medicine.

  8. Evaluation of the effect of Punica granatum juice and punicalagin on NFκB modulation in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Tanmay A; Parikh, Mihir; Patel, Kirti V; Patel, Kalpana G; Joshi, Chaitanya G; Gandhi, Tejal R

    2016-08-01

    Punica granatum L. (Lythraceae) inhibits cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis through the modulation of cellular transcription factors and signaling proteins. No pharmacological work is reported on the effects of P. granatum juice on the cellular signaling pathways involved in initiation and progression of inflammation. The present investigation evaluates the effect of P. granatum juice (PJ) and purified punicalagin (PW) on nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) and the signaling pathways leading to its expression in colon inflammation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups: positive and negative control, vehicle (50 % ethanol), standard (5-ASA 100 mg/kg, p.o.), PJ (400 mg/kg, p.o.), PW (4 mg/kg, p.o.). Colitis was induced with 2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and animals were euthanized on 18th day. Colon samples collected were subjected to various histological assessment (CMDI, DAI), and biochemical parameters (MPO, MDA, SOD, NO). Gene expression study was carried out using RT-PCR for cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-18 and NF-κβ). Pretreatment with PJ and PW significantly (p granatum juice is more biologically active over punicalagin alone and can be potentially used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

  9. The Promising Pharmacological Effects and Therapeutic/Medicinal applications of Punica Granatum L. (Pomegranate) as a Functional Food in Humans and Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Muhammad; Naveed, Muhammad; BiBi, Jannat; Kamboh, Asghar Ali; Arain, Muhammad Asif; Shah, Qurban Ali; Alagawany, Mahmoud; Abd El-Hack, Mohamed Ezzat; Abdel-Latif, Mervat A.; Yatoo, Mohd. Iqbal; Tiwari, Ruchi; Chakraborty, Sandip; Dhama, Kuldeep

    2018-02-21

    Punica granatum L (pomegranate), is a shrub mostly available in the Mediterranean Sea region. The fruits have gained the substantial attention among researchers due to its promising biological activities including anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antidiarrheal, immune modulatory, antitumor, wound healing and antifungal that have been attributed to various constituents of seeds, bark, juice, pericarp and leaf of this tree across the globe. The phenolic compounds of pomegranate have been documented to possess numbers of prophylactic and therapeutic utilities against various pathological infections as well as non-infectious disorders. The current review expedites the pharmacological role of Punica granatum L. in curing elements related to infectious and non-infectious disorders. Commencing a thorough review of the published literature and patents available on Punica granatum and its therapeutic role in countering infectious disorders present review is prepared by using various published resources available on PubMed, Med line, PubMed Central, Science Direct and other scientific databases. The information retrieved has been compiled and analyzed pertaining to the theme of the study. Multi-dimensional beneficial application of pomegranate plant is recorded. The pomegranate seed oil has phytoestrogenic compounds and the fruit is rich in phenolic compounds with strong antioxidant activity. The fruit and bark of pomegranate are used against intestinal parasites, dysentery, and diarrhea in different animals and human models. Since, ancient time the juice and seeds had considered the best therapy for throat and heart disorders. Ellagic acid is one of the main components of pomegranate with potent antioxidant activity. Results from different studies reported that Punica granatum L or its byproducts can be used as natural food additives in human and animal nutrition in order to boost immunity, microbial safety and provide the housing environment without affecting body weight

  10. Metabolite fingerprinting of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) polyphenols by means of high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighenti, Virginia; Groothuis, Sebastiaan Frearick; Prencipe, Francesco Pio; Amir, Rachel; Benvenuti, Stefania; Pellati, Federica

    2017-01-13

    The present study was aimed at the development of a new analytical method for the comprehensive multi-component analysis of polyphenols in Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) juice and peel. While pomegranate juice was directly analysed after simple centrifugation, different extraction techniques, including maceration, heat reflux extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction and microwave-assisted extraction, were compared in order to obtain a high yield of the target analytes from pomegranate peel. Dynamic maceration with a mixture of water and ethanol 80:20 (v/v) with 0.1% of hydrochloric acid as the extraction solvent provided the best result in terms of recovery of pomegranate secondary metabolites. The quali- and quantitative analysis of pomegranate polyphenols was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry detection. The application of fused-core column technology allowed us to obtain an improvement of the chromatographic performance in comparison with that of conventional particulate stationary phases, thus enabling a good separation of all constituents in a shorter time and with low solvent usage. The analytical method was completely validated to show compliance with the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for the Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use guidelines and successfully applied to the characterisation of commercial and experimental pomegranate samples, thus demonstrating its efficiency as a tool for the fingerprinting of this plant material. The quantitative data collected were submitted to principal component analysis, in order to highlight the possible presence of pomegranate samples with high content of secondary metabolites. From the statistical analysis, four experimental samples showed a notable content of bioactive compounds in the peels, while commercial ones still represent the best source of healthy juice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  11. Effects of salt stress on growth and physiological characteristics of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) cuttings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.; Yan, M.; Huang, X.; Yuan, Z.

    2018-01-01

    With 2-years-old pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) cv. 'Tunisia' cuttings as materials, the growth properties, salt injury indexes, leaf membrane permeability, Chlorophyll (Chl) content, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, proline and soluble protein content, and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) were investigated under different NaCl concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6%, w/w) treatments after 7, 21 and 35 days. The results showed that: the height and ground diameter of pomegranate were increased at low salinity (0.1%), and they were significantly inhibited at high salinity (= 0.5%). With increased NaCl concentrations, Chl a, Chl b, and Chl (a + b) contents were decreased and chlorophyll a/b were increased. Leaf membrane permeability was seriously enhanced and the amount of MDA was markedly increased at high salinity (= 0.5%). The proline and soluble protein were significantly accumulated and quickly responded to NaCl stress. The activities of SOD, CAT, and POD showed a trend of first rising and then decreasing, with the maximum appearing at 0.4% salinity. In addition, the adverse effects on these physiological indexes aggravated gradually over time. Our study suggested that pomegranate 'Tunisi' was a moderately salt tolerant cultivar (0.4% NaCl) with a promoting effect on the growth below 0.1% salinity. This cultivar presents a mechanism of alleviating the detrimental effects of salt stress through improving the proline content, soluble protein content and the activities of antioxidant enzymes. But the protections of antioxidant enzymes are in a limited range of salinity. (author)

  12. Protective effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum) juice on testes against carbon tetrachloride intoxication in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Olayan, Ebtesam M; El-Khadragy, Manal F; Metwally, Dina M; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2014-05-22

    Pomegranate fruit has been extensively used as a natural medicine in many cultures. The present study was aimed at evaluating the protective effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum) juice against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced oxidative stress and testes injury in adult Wistar rats. Twenty eight Wistar albino male rats were divided equally into 4 groups for the assessment of protective potential of pomegranate juice. Rats of group I (control) received only vehicles and had free access to food and water. Rats of groups II and IV were treated with CCl4 (2 ml/kg bwt) via the intraperitoneal route once a week for ten weeks. The pomegranate juice was supplemented via drinking water 2 weeks before and concurrent with CCl4 treatment to group IV. Group III was supplemented with pomegranate juice for twelve weeks. The protective effects of pomegranate on serum sex hormones, oxidative markers, activities of antioxidant enzymes and histopathology of testes were determined in CCl4-induced reproductive toxicity in rats. Pomegranate juice showed significant elevation in testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) those depleted by the injection of CCl4. Activity levels of endogenous testesticular antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione (GSH) contents were increased while lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitric oxide (NO) were decreased with pomegranate juice. Moreover, degeneration of germ and Leydig cells along with deformities in spermatogenesis induced after CCl4 injections were restored with the treatment of pomegranate juice. The results clearly demonstrated that pomegranate juice augments the antioxidant defense mechanism against carbon tetrachloride-induced reproductive toxicity and provides evidence that it may have a therapeutic role in free radical mediated diseases.

  13. The efficacy of Punica granatum extract in the management of recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalayani, Parichehr; Zolfaghary, Behzad; Farhad, Ali Reza; Tavangar, Atefeh; Soleymani, Bahram

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common, painful ulcerative disorder of the oral cavity with unknown etiology. No documented cure exists and topical application of medications aims to reduce pain associated with this condition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Punica granatum (PG) extract on the clinical management of RAS. Methods: A total of 40 patients with RAS participated in this randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study. During three episodes of RAS, the efficacy of topical PG gel (10%) was evaluated. Patients were randomly assigned to use placebo gel or PG gel daily. The time of pain elimination and the time of complete healing were recorded and the pain degree was assessed and recorded by each patients in different time intervals including: Before using the oral gel (day 0), and on days 1, 3, 5, 7 after using the product. Data were analyzed using the repeated measures ANOVA, paired and independent t-test. Findings: Mean time of pain elimination showed a significant difference (P < 0.001) between PG group (3.4 ± 1.09) and placebo group (5.9 ± 0.6). The mean duration of complete healing also showed a significant difference (P < 0.001) between PG group (5.3 ± 0.81) and placebo group (8.6 ± 0.99). The visual analog scale score in PG group was significantly less than the placebo group in all time intervals (day 1 to day 7) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The findings of this study revealed that PG extract in the form of oral gel (10%) may be beneficial in reducing RAS pain and has a positive effect in reducing the overall time period of complete healing. It was concluded that PG is an effective herbal medicine for the management of RAS. PMID:24991610

  14. COMPORTAMENTO DE SEMENTES DE ROMÃ (Punica granatum L. SUBMETIDAS À FERMENTAÇÃO E SECAGEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LOPES KILSON PINHEIRO

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Sementes de romã (Punica granatum L. foram submetidas a diferentes períodos de fermentação (0; 24; 48; 72 e 96 horas, com e sem secagem. Avaliaram-se suas qualidades física e fisiológica, através das determinações do grau de umidade, peso de 100 sementes, porcentagem de emergência e velocidade de emergência de plântulas (IVE. O delineamento experimental adotado foi inteiramente casualizado, em esquema fatorial, onde os cinco períodos de fermentação frente às duas condições (com e sem secagem constituíram os tratamentos. Sementes submetidas ao maior período de fermentação apresentaram sarcotestas mais degradadas, favorecendo, conseqüentemente, uma melhor absorção de água, resultando numa porcentagem de emergência de 55% e IVE de 0,38, em 72 horas de fermentação. A secagem das sementes após fermentação promoveu uma menor porcentagem de emergência e IVE, apesar de se verificar um aumento de ambos, quando as sementes permaneceram em fermentação por um maior período. O comportamento verificado nas sementes de romã frente aos tratamentos empregados parece estar associado a fenômenos de dormência ou sensibilidade à secagem, característica esta, de sementes recalcitrantes.

  15. Protective effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum) juice on testes against carbon tetrachloride intoxication in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Pomegranate fruit has been extensively used as a natural medicine in many cultures. The present study was aimed at evaluating the protective effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum) juice against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced oxidative stress and testes injury in adult Wistar rats. Methods Twenty eight Wistar albino male rats were divided equally into 4 groups for the assessment of protective potential of pomegranate juice. Rats of group I (control) received only vehicles and had free access to food and water. Rats of groups II and IV were treated with CCl4 (2 ml/kg bwt) via the intraperitoneal route once a week for ten weeks. The pomegranate juice was supplemented via drinking water 2 weeks before and concurrent with CCl4 treatment to group IV. Group III was supplemented with pomegranate juice for twelve weeks. The protective effects of pomegranate on serum sex hormones, oxidative markers, activities of antioxidant enzymes and histopathology of testes were determined in CCl4-induced reproductive toxicity in rats. Results Pomegranate juice showed significant elevation in testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) those depleted by the injection of CCl4. Activity levels of endogenous testesticular antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione (GSH) contents were increased while lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitric oxide (NO) were decreased with pomegranate juice. Moreover, degeneration of germ and Leydig cells along with deformities in spermatogenesis induced after CCl4 injections were restored with the treatment of pomegranate juice. Conclusion The results clearly demonstrated that pomegranate juice augments the antioxidant defense mechanism against carbon tetrachloride-induced reproductive toxicity and provides evidence that it may have a therapeutic role in free radical mediated

  16. ANTIPLAQUE AND ANTIGINGIVITIS EFFECTS OF A GEL CONTAINING PUNICA GRANATUM LINN EXTRACT. A DOUBLE-BLIND CLINICAL STUDY IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Alexandre Daher Yunes; Maia, Juliana Lemos; Pereira, Sérgio Luís da Silva; de Lemos, Telma Leda Gomes; Mota, Olívia Morais de Lima

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The antiplaque and antigingivitis effects of a gel containing 10% Punica granatum Linn extract were evaluated using a 21-day partial-mouth experimental model of gingivitis. Methods: 23 volunteers participated in this cross-over, doubleblind study, carried out in 2 phases of 21 days each. For each period of the experiment, an acrylic toothshield was made for each volunteer to carry the test or placebo gel as well as to avoid brushing of the 4 experimental teeth (posterior teeth in the lower left quadrant). The subjects were randomly assigned to use either the placebo gel (control group) or the test gel (experimental group) and were instructed to brush the remaining teeth normally 3 times a day. On days 0 and 21, the visible plaque index (VPI) and gingival bleeding index (GBI) were recorded. Results: The results did not show statistically significant difference between control and experimental groups for either of the indices (VPI and GBI). Conclusion: The gel containing 10% Punica granatum Linn extract was not efficient in preventing supragingival dental plaque formation and gingivitis. PMID:19089066

  17. Protection against oxidative damage in human erythrocytes and preliminary photosafety assessment of Punica granatum seed oil nanoemulsions entrapping polyphenol-rich ethyl acetate fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccarin, Thaisa; Mitjans, Montserrat; Lemos-Senna, Elenara; Vinardell, Maria Pilar

    2015-12-25

    The main purpose of the present study is to evaluate the ability of nanoemulsion entrapping pomegranate peel polyphenol-rich ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) prepared from pomegranate seed oil and medium chain triglyceride to protect human erythrocyte membrane from oxidative damage and to assess preliminary in vitro photosafety. In order to evaluate the phototoxic effect of nanoemulsions, human red blood cells (RBCs) are used as a biological model and the rate of haemolysis and photohaemolysis (5 J cm(-2) UVA) is assessed in vitro. The level of protection against oxidative damage caused by the peroxyl radical generator AAPH in human RBCs as well as its effects on bilayer membrane characteristics such as fluidity, protein profile and RBCs morphology are determined. EAF-loaded nanoemulsions do not promote haemolysis or photohaemolysis. Anisotropy measurements show that nanoemulsions significantly retrain the increase in membrane fluidity caused by AAPH. SDS-PAGE analysis reveals that AAPH induced degradation of membrane proteins, but that nanoemulsions reduce the extension of degradation. Scanning electron microscopy examinations corroborate the interaction between AAPH, nanoemulsions and the RBC membrane bilayer. Our work demonstrates that Punica granatum nanoemulsions are photosafe and protect RBCs against oxidative damage and possible disturbance of the lipid bilayer of biomembranes. Moreover it suggests that these nanoemulsions could be promising new topical products to reduce the effects of sunlight on skin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Punica granatum L. Flower Water Extract on Five Common Oral Bacteria and Bacterial Biofilm Formation on Orthodontic Wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahid Dastjerdi, Elahe; Abdolazimi, Zahra; Ghazanfarian, Marzieh; Amdjadi, Parisa; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Mahboubi, Arash

    2014-12-01

    Use of herbal extracts and essences as natural antibacterial compounds has become increasingly popular for the control of oral infectious diseases. Therefore, finding natural antimicrobial products with the lowest side effects seems necessary. The present study sought to assess the effect of Punica granatum L. water extract on five oral bacteria and bacterial biofilm formation on orthodontic wire. Antibacterial property of P. granatum L. water extract was primarily evaluated in brain heart infusion agar medium using well-plate method. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration were determined by macro-dilution method. The inhibitory effect on orthodontic wire bacterial biofilm formation was evaluated using viable cell count in biofilm medium. At the final phase, samples were fixed and analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy. The growth inhibition zone diameter was proportional to the extract concentration. The water extract demonstrated the maximum antibacterial effect on Streptococcus sanguinis ATCC 10556 with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 6.25 mg/ml and maximum bactericidal effect on S. sanguinis ATCC 10556 and S. sobrinus ATCC 27607 with minimum bactericidal concentration of 25 mg/ml. The water extract decreased bacterial biofilm formation by S. sanguinis, S. sobrinus, S. salivarius, S. mutans ATCC 35608 and E. faecalis CIP 55142 by 93.7-100%, 40.6-99.9%, 85.2-86.5%, 66.4-84.4% and 35.5-56.3% respectively. Punica granatum L. water extract had significant antibacterial properties against 5 oral bacteria and prevented orthodontic wire bacterial biofilm formation. However, further investigations are required to generalize these results to the clinical setting.

  19. Effect of Punica granatum L. Flower Water Extract on Five Common Oral Bacteria and Bacterial Biofilm Formation on Orthodontic Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAHID DASTJERDI, Elahe; ABDOLAZIMI, Zahra; GHAZANFARIAN, Marzieh; AMDJADI, Parisa; KAMALINEJAD, Mohammad; MAHBOUBI, Arash

    2014-01-01

    Background: Use of herbal extracts and essences as natural antibacterial compounds has become increasingly popular for the control of oral infectious diseases. Therefore, finding natural antimicrobial products with the lowest side effects seems necessary. The present study sought to assess the effect of Punica granatum L. water extract on five oral bacteria and bacterial biofilm formation on orthodontic wire. Methods: Antibacterial property of P. granatum L. water extract was primarily evaluated in brain heart infusion agar medium using well-plate method. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration were determined by macro-dilution method. The inhibitory effect on orthodontic wire bacterial biofilm formation was evaluated using viable cell count in biofilm medium. At the final phase, samples were fixed and analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Results: The growth inhibition zone diameter was proportional to the extract concentration. The water extract demonstrated the maximum antibacterial effect on Streptococcus sanguinis ATCC 10556 with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 6.25 mg/ml and maximum bactericidal effect on S. sanguinis ATCC 10556 and S. sobrinus ATCC 27607 with minimum bactericidal concentration of 25 mg/ml. The water extract decreased bacterial biofilm formation by S. sanguinis, S. sobrinus, S. salivarius, S. mutans ATCC 35608 and E. faecalis CIP 55142 by 93.7–100%, 40.6–99.9%, 85.2–86.5%, 66.4–84.4% and 35.5–56.3% respectively. Conclusion: Punica granatum L. water extract had significant antibacterial properties against 5 oral bacteria and prevented orthodontic wire bacterial biofilm formation. However, further investigations are required to generalize these results to the clinical setting. PMID:26171362

  20. Anti-inflammatory potential of ellagic acid, gallic acid and punicalagin A&B isolated from Punica granatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenSaad, Lamees A; Kim, Kah Hwi; Quah, Chin Chew; Kim, Wee Ric; Shahimi, Mustafa

    2017-01-14

    Punica granatum (pomegranate), an edible fruit originating in the Middle East, has been used as a traditional medicine for treatment of pain and inflammatory conditions such as peptic ulcer. The numerous risks associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for treatment of pain and inflammation give rise to using medicinal herbs as alternative therapies. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of isolated compounds from the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction of P. granatum by determination of their inhibitory effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS), stimulated nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and cyclooxxgenase-2 (COX-2) release from RAW264.7 cells. The compounds ellagic acid, gallic acid and punicalagin A&B were isolated from EtOAc by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and further identified by mass spectrometry (MS). The inhibitory effect of ellagic acid, gallic acid and punicalagin A&B were evaluated on the production of LPS-induced NO by Griess reagent, PGE-2 and IL-6 by immunoassay kit and prostaglandin E2 competitive ELISA kit, and COX-2 by Western blotting. Ellagic acid, gallic acid and punicalagin A&B potentially inhibited LPS-induced NO, PGE-2 and IL-6 production. The results indicate that ellagic acid, gallic acid and punicalagin may be the compounds responsible for the anti-inflammatory potential of P. granatum.

  1. Antifungal activity of acetone extracts from Punica granatum L., Quercus suber L. and Vicia faba L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akroum, S

    2017-03-01

    Human and animal mycoses become more frequent and more resistant to traditional treatments. In this work, we tested the in vitro antifungal activity of acetonic extracts of Punica granatum L., Quercus suber L. and Vicia faba L. against seven pathogen fungi and the in vivo antifungal activity against Candida albicans and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. The phytochemical screening was also carried out and showed that the extracts contained mainly proanthocyanidins. Other polyphenols were also present but in low quantity. The acetone extract of V. faba L. gave a good in vitro inhibition of yeasts and was the most active for treating candidiasis in mice. It decreased the percentage of mortality with only 20μg. But the in vivo antifungal activity of this extract on T. mentagrophytes was low. It only showed a small diminution of crusting and erythema after the administration of 100μg. On the contrary, the acetone extracts of P. granatum L. had a poor activity against yeasts and a better one against moulds. It gave the best in vivo antifungal activity against T. mentagrophytes by healing animals with 40μg. The extract of P. granatum L. gave also an interesting in vivo antifungal activity against T. mentagrophytes with an active dose of 80μg. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Pomegranate (Punica granatum) Seed Oil for Treating Menopausal Symptoms: An Individually Controlled Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Roman; Gminski, Richard; Tang, Tao; Weinert, Tomas; Schulz, Sabine; Linke-Cordes, Margareta; Martin, Ines; Fischer, Heide

    2017-03-01

    Context • In the folk medicine of Mediterranean countries and in ancient Ayurveda, Punica granatum seeds (ie, pomegranate seeds) have been used for treatment of various disorders, including those that nowadays are classified as menopausal symptoms (MSs). Pomegranate seed oil (PSO) from those seeds mainly contains unsaturated fatty acids such as γ-linoleic acid and linolenic acid, but it also includes phytoestrogens. It is, therefore, regarded as a promising option for treating MSs today. Objectives • The study intended to investigate the safety and effectiveness of PSO as a defined P granatum seed oil for patients with MSs. Design • The research team designed an individually controlled, investigator-initiated cohort study. Setting • The treatments were performed at 2 institutions: (1) the Center for Complementary Medicine at the University Medical Center Freiburg (Freiburg, Germany); and (2) in the medical practice of H. Fischer (Freiburg, Germany). Participants • Seventy-eight patients, who had a mean duration of MSs of 46 mo, participated in the study. Intervention • After 4 wk without treatment, which functioned as a period providing an individual control, each participant took 1000 mg of PSO daily in 2 capsules for 8 wk. Outcome Measures • The symptom severity was scored on the German version of the menopausal rating scale (MRS) at baseline, after 4 wk without treatment, after 4 wk of treatment, and postintervention, with 0 = absence of symptoms and 4 = very strong symptoms. The efficacy and tolerability were estimated on scales from 0-4. Each participant's 17ß estradiol was determined at baseline and after postintervention using the patient's sera. The content of the β-sitosterol was determined in the PSO preparations by gas chromatography. Results • The content of β-sitosterol in the PSO used in the study was 6.3 mg/1000 mg. In the intention to treat analysis, most MRS symptoms were significantly and relevantly reduced (eg, hot flushes

  3. The effect of Punica granatum L. along with aerobic training on resistin, serum adiponectin and insulin resistance in women with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Abdi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Factors secreted from adipocytes, such as resistin and adiponectin can affect peripheral insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Physical activity and pomegranate, which has both anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties can affect resistin and adiponectin. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of Punica granatum L. along with aerobic training on serum resistin, adiponectin and insulin resistance in women with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: In this study, 33 diabetic women with type 2 diabetes were selected from Babol city and were randomly divided into four groups (control, P. granatum L., training and P. granatum L.+ training. The training groups participated in an aerobic training for six weeks, three sessions a week (60% to 75% of the reserved heart rate and for 25 to 45 min. The control groups of P. granatum L. and P. granatum L. + training were fed 150 mL of P. granatum L. for six weeks (at about 18 p.m. Two days before and after the protocol, blood samples were taken. Results: The results showed that there was no significant difference in the serum resistin levels among the three experimental groups. Also, the results showed a significant difference between adiponectin levels and insulin resistance in four groups. Conclusions: It seems that aerobic training and P. granatum L. and combination of both can have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects on reduction of adiponectin and insulin resistance in women with type 2 diabetes.

  4. A nematicidal tannin from Punica granatum L. rind and its physiological effect on pine wood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qunqun; Du, Guicai; Qi, Hongtao; Zhang, Yanan; Yue, Tongqing; Wang, Jingchao; Li, Ronggui

    2017-01-01

    The ethanol extract of Punica granatum L. rind was tested to show significant nematicidal activity against pine wood nematode. Three nematicidal compounds were obtained from the ethanol extract by bioassay-guided fractionation and identified as punicalagin 1, punicalin 2, and corilagin 3 by mass and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral data analysis. Punicalagin 1 was most active against PWN among the purified compounds with the LC 50 value of 307.08μM in 72h. According to the enzyme assays in vitro, punicalagin 1 could inhibit the activity of acetylcholinesterase, amylase and cellulase from PWN with IC 50 value of 0.60mM, 0.96mM and 1.24mM, respectively. The morphological structures of PWNs treated by punicalagin 1 were greatly changed. These physiological effects of punicalagin 1 on PWN may helpful to elucidate its nematicidal mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Investigation for Antifungal Effect of Medicinal Plants, Combination Infusion of Piper Bettle Leaves, Punica Granatum Fructus Cortec, Curcuma Domestica Rhizome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Elya

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The tested demartophyta used Candida albicans. This research using dilution method to determine of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and difusion method to determine zone inhibition around of disc. The results of determination of MIC showed that combination infusion Piper bettle leaves with Punica granatum Fructus Cortex against C. albicans respectively, 31,2 mg/ml : 7,8 mg/ml; 15,6 mg/ml : 15,6 mg/ml and 7,8 mg/ml : 31,2 mg/ml. The determination for zone inhibition from 3 concentration of infusion of Piper bettle leaves with 3 concentration of Punica granatum Fructus Cortex with 9 combination against C. albicans showed that combination of two infusion is the larger than the single infusion.

  6. Effect of Sodium Chloride Concentrations and Its Foliar Application Time on Quantitative and Qualitative Characteristics of Pomegranate Fruit (Punica granatum L.) CV. “Malas Saveh”

    OpenAIRE

    V. Rouhi; A. Nikbakht; S. Houshmand

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) belong to Punicaceae family is native to Iran and grown extensively in arid and semi-arid regions worldwide. Pomegranate is also important in human medicine and its components have a wide range of clinical applications. Cracking causes a major fruit loss, which is a serious commercial loss to farmers. Fruit cracking, seems to be a problem that lessens the marketability to a great extent. Fruit cracking is one of the physiological disorders wherev...

  7. Parasiticidal and brine shrimp cytotoxicity potential of crude methanolic extract of rind of Punica granatum Linn against round worms and tape worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Niaz; Jamil, Ayesha; Shah, Syed Wadood Ali; Shah, Ismail; Ahmed, Ghayour; Junaid, Muhammad; Ahmed, Zahoor

    2015-05-01

    Rind of Punica granatum is traditionally used for anthelmintic purposes. The current work describes the possible anthelmintic activity of crude methanolic extract of Punica granatum (Pg. Cr) against round worms (Ascaridia galli) and the tape worms (Raillietina spiralis). Brine shrimp cytotoxicity is also performed. Brine shrimp cytotoxic activity was tested using different concentrations (1000 μg/mL, 100 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL) of Pg.Cr. In vitro anthelmintic activity of Pg. Cr was determined against the parasites using albendazole and piperazine citrate as standard anthelmintic drugs in concentration 10 mg/ml. LC50 value for Brine shrimp cytotoxicity was 189.44 ±28 μg/mL. In test concentration of 40mg/ml of the Pg. Cr, Raillietina spiralis was paralyzed in 23 minutes. However, for parasiticidal activity (death of the parasite), it took less time (40 minutes) as compared to standard Albendazole. Time taken for death of the parasite Raillietina spiralis, in concentration 40 mg /ml, is 40 min. While standard drugs took more time to kill the Raillietina spiralis. Pg. Cr took 19 minutes to paralyze the Ascaridia galli at concentration 40 mg/ml whereas; it took 48 minutes for to kill the parasite Ascaridia galli. The current work confirms the traditional use of rind of Punica granatum as anthelmintic against Raillietina spiralis and Ascaridia galli. Results of brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay warrant for the isolation of cytotoxic compounds. List of abbreviation- Pg. Cr = Crude methanolic extract of Punica granatum.

  8. Down-Regulation of Glycosyl Transferase Genes in Streptococcus Mutans by Punica Granatum L. Flower and Rhus Coriaria L. Fruit Water Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahid-Dastjerdi, Elahe; Monadi, Elham; Khalighi, Hamid Reza; Torshabi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    In our previous studies, we showed the inhibitory effects of Punica granatum L. flower and Rhus coriaria L. fruit water extracts on dental plaque accumulation by several bacteria, especially Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), on orthodontic wire by in-vitro assays. In this study, the anti-cariogenic properties of the extracts were evaluated by assessing their effects on expression of glycosyltransferase (gtf) genes, which are responsible for initial biofilm formation by S. mutans. In this study, the effect of herbal extracts on expression of gtfB, C (encoding enzymes that produce water-insoluble glucans) and D (encoding enzymes that produce water-soluble glucans) genes in S. mutans growing in planktonic state was evaluated quantitatively by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) of understudied herbal water extracts significantly suppressed gtfB, C and D gene expression by 85.3 ± 7.5%, 33.3 ± 6.4% and 25 ± 14%, respectively for Punica granatum L. extract and 73.4 ± 7.3%, 93.8 ± 2.7% and 59.3 ± 9.8%, respectively for Rhus coriaria L. extract compared to the non-treated control group (P Punica granatum L. extract. These findings suggest that Punica granatum L. and especially Rhus coriaria L. maybe used as novel, natural antiplaque agents since they inhibit specific genes associated with bacterial biofilm formation without necessarily affecting the growth of oral bacteria.

  9. The comparative study of antifungal activity of Syzygium aromaticum, Punica granatum and nystatin on Candida albicans; an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansourian, A; Boojarpour, N; Ashnagar, S; Momen Beitollahi, J; Shamshiri, A R

    2014-12-01

    Candida species are opportunistic fungi, among which, Candida albicans is the most important species responsible for infections in immunocompromised patients with invasive fungal disease. Resistance of Candida species to antifungal drugs has led scientists to pay more attention to traditional medicine herbs. Due to the limitations in the treatment of fungal diseases such as shortages, high prices, antifungal side effects and drug resistance or reduced susceptibility to fungal drugs we decided to study the antifungal effects of herbal extracts of Syzygium aromaticum and Punica granatum. Twenty-one isolates of oral C. albicans in patients with denture stomatitis referred to prosthesis department, Dental faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were prepared and cultured. Plant extracts were prepared from the herbs market. Tests on patient samples and standard strains 5027ATCC (PTCC10231) yeast C. albicans were performed via well diffusion method. In addition, nystatin and methanol were used as positive and negative control, respectively. Finally, the antifungal effect of extracts using Statistical Repeated measurement ANOVA test was investigated. Both S. aromaticum and P. granatum showed noticeable antifungal activity in well method. Syzygium aromaticum showed better anti candida activity than nystatin (Pgranatum showed good antifungal effects (P-value<0.001). S. aromaticum (inhibition zone diameter: 29.62) showed better antifungal effects than nystatin (inhibition zone diameter: 28.48). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of anti-epileptic activity of leaf extracts of Punica granatum on experimental models of epilepsy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanatha, Gollapalle L; Venkataranganna, Marikunte V; Prasad, Nunna Bheema Lingeswara; Ashok, Godavarthi

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the anti-epileptic activity of leaf extracts of Punica granatum in experimental models of epilepsy in Swiss albino mice. Petroleum ether leaf extract of P. granatum (PLPG), methanolic LPG (MLPG), and aqueous LPG (ALPG) extracts of P. granatum leaves was initially evaluated against 6-Hz-induced seizure model; the potent extract was further evaluated against maximal electroshock (MES) and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsions. Further, the potent extract was evaluated for its influence on Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) levels in brain, to explore the possible mechanism of action. In addition, the potent extract was subjected to actophotometer test to assess its possible locomotor activity deficit inducing action. In 6-Hz seizure test, the MLPG has alleviated 6-Hz-induced seizures significantly and dose dependently at doses 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg. In contrast, PLPG and ALPG did not show any protection, only high dose of ALPG (400 and 800 mg/kg, p.o.) showed very slight inhibition. Based on these observations, only MLPG was tested in MES and PTZ models. Interestingly, the MLPG (50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) has offered significant and dose-dependent protection against MES ( P < 0.01) and PTZ-induced ( P < 0.01) seizures in mice. Further, MLPG showed a significant increase in brain GABA levels ( P < 0.01) compared to control and showed insignificant change in locomotor activity in all tested doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg). Interestingly, higher dose of MLPG (400 mg/kg, p.o.) and Diazepam (5 mg/mg, p.o.) have completely abolished the convulsions in all the anticonvulsant tests. These findings suggest that MLPG possesses significant anticonvulsant property, and one of the possible mechanisms behind the anticonvulsant activity of MLPG may be through enhanced GABA levels in the brain.

  11. Protective Effects of Combined Selenium and Punica granatum Treatment on Some Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Markers in Arsenic-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, Noha M; El Batsh, Maha M

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the major mechanisms implicated in inorganic arsenic poisoning. Punica granatum is known by its free radical scavenging properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective role of combined selenium and P. granatum against arsenic-induced liver injury. Seventy-five female albino rats were divided into five groups (of 15 rats each). Toxicity was induced by oral sodium arsenite (5.5 mg/kg body weight (bw) daily) (group ІІ). Treatment of arsenic-intoxicated rats was induced by daily oral administration of sodium selenite (3 mg/kg bw) (group ІІІ), 100 mg of P. granatum ethanol extract per kilogram body weight dissolved in 300 mL distilled water in three divided doses (100 mL of this suspension every 8 h) (group IV), and combined daily oral treatment with both selenite and P. granatum ethanol extract (group V). After 3 weeks, serum and liver tissues were obtained from the decapitated rats for different estimations. Hepatotoxicity was demonstrated by significant elevation in liver weights and activities of liver enzymes, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and decrease in serum total proteins and albumin (p granatum and selenium. It was concluded that combined P. granatum and selenium treatment had a synergistic hepatoprotective effect against arsenic toxicity through activation of Nrf2 anti-oxidant pathway.

  12. Punica granatum improves renal function in gentamicin-induced nephropathy in rats via attenuation of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestry, Snehal N; Gawali, Nitin B; Pai, Sarayu A; Gursahani, Malvika S; Dhodi, Jayesh B; Munshi, Renuka; Juvekar, Archana R

    2018-03-16

    Gentamicin is widely used as an antibiotic for the treatment of gram negative infections. Evidences indicates that oxidative stress is involved in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. In Ayurvedic medicine, Punica granatum Linn. is considered as 'a pharmacy unto itself". It has been claimed in traditional literature, to treat various kidney ailments due to its antioxidant potential. To explore the possible mechanism of action of methanolic extract of P.granatum leaves (MPGL) in exerting a protective effect on gentamicin-induced nephropathy. Animals were administered with gentamicin (80 mg/kg/day i.m.) and simultaneously with MPGL (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o.) or metformin (100 mg/kg p.o.) for 8 days. A satellite group was employed in order to check for reversibility of nephrotoxic effects post discontinuation of gentamicin administration. At the end of the study, all the rats were sacrificed and serum-urine parameters were investigated. Antioxidant enzymes and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels were determined in the kidney tissues along with histopathological examination of kidneys. Increase in serum creatinine, urea, TNF-α, lipid peroxidation along with fall in the antioxidant enzymes activity and degeneration of tubules, arterioles as revealed by histopathological examination confirmed the manifestation of nephrotoxicity caused due to gentamicin. Simultaneous administration of MPGL and gentamicin protected kidneys against nephrotoxic effects of gentamicin as evidenced from normalization of renal function parameters and amelioration of histopathological changes. Data suggests that MPGL attenuated oxidative stress associated renal injury by preserving antioxidant enzymes, reducing lipid peroxidation and inhibiting inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α. Copyright © 2017 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro propagation of two Iranian commercial pomegranates (Punica granatum L.) cvs. 'Malas Saveh' and 'Yusef Khani'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadehkaji, Babak; Ershadi, Ahmad; Tohidfar, Masoud

    2013-10-01

    An efficient in vitro propagation is described for Punica granatum L. using shoot tip and nodal explants. The influence of two basal medium, WPM and MS, and different plant growth regulators was investigated on micropropagation of the Iranian pomegranate cultivars, 'Malas Saveh' and 'Yousef Khani'. For proliferation stage, media supplemented with different concentrations (2.3, 4.7, 9.2 and 18.4 μM) of kinetin along with 0.54 μM NAA was used. WPM proved to be more efficient medium compared to MS. The best concentrations of kinetin were 4.7 μM for 'Malas Saveh' and 9.2 μM for 'Yousef Khani', resulting in the highest number of shoots per explants, shoot length and leaf number. For both cultivars, half-strength WPM medium supplemented with 5.4 μM NAA was most effective for rooting of shoots. Rooted plantlets were successfully acclimatized and transferred into soil. The micropropagated plants were morphologically uniform and exhibited similar growth characteristics and vegetative morphology to the mother plants.

  14. Rapid and Comprehensive Evaluation of (Polyphenolic Compounds in Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. Juice by UHPLC-MSn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Del Rio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The comprehensive identification of phenolic compounds in food and beverages is a crucial starting point for assessing their biological, nutritional, and technological properties. Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. has been described as a rich source of (polyphenolic components, with a broad array of different structures (phenolic acids, flavonoids, and hydrolyzable tannins and a quick, high throughput, and accurate screening of its complete profile is still lacking. In the present work, a method for UHPLC separation and linear ion trap mass spectrometric (MSn characterization of pomegranate juice phenolic fraction was optimized by comparing several different analytical conditions. The best solutions for phenolic acids, anthocyanins, flavonoids, and ellagitannins have been delineated and more than 70 compounds have been identified and fully characterized in less than one hour total analysis time. Twenty-one compounds were tentatively detected for the first time in pomegranate juice. The proposed fingerprinting approach could be easily translated to other plant derived food extracts and beverages containing a wide array of phytochemical compounds.

  15. Specific phenolic compounds and sensory properties of a new dealcoholized red wine with pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárrega, Maria Amparo; Varela, Paula; Fromentin, Emilie; Feuillère, Nicolas; Issaly, Nicolas; Roller, Marc; Sanz-Buenhombre, Marisa; Villanueva, Sonia; Moro, Carlos; Guadarrama, Alberto; Fiszman, Susana

    2014-09-01

    The pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruit has a long history of human consumption and possesses notable antioxidant and cardiovascular properties. This work evaluated the feasibility to provide a new functional beverage based on a dealcoholized red wine matrix supplemented by a pomegranate extract. The potential bioactive compounds in the pomegranate extract, punicalagin A and B and ellagic acid, were analyzed during the downstream process in order to evaluate the functional dose in the final beverage. The addition of pomegranate extract to the dealcoholized red wine resulted in a product with more intense yeast odor, acidity, yeast flavor, and astringency and with a less intense berry flavor. Consumer acceptance of the product was also investigated and the results revealed the existence of a niche of consumers willing to consume dealcoholized wine enriched with pomegranate extract. After tasting, 50% and 40% of those consumers initially interested by this product concept declared to be interested to purchase the control sample and the functional beverage, respectively. The daily consumption of two servings of 250 mL of this new pomegranate-enriched dealcoholized wine provides 82 mg of total ellagitannins, corresponding to the sum of punicalagin A and B and ellagic acid. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  16. Differentiation-promoting activity of pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit extracts in HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

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    Kawaii, Satoru; Lansky, Ephraim P

    2004-01-01

    Differentiation refers to the ability of cancer cells to revert to their normal counterparts, and its induction represents an important noncytotoxic therapy for leukemia, and also breast, prostate, and other solid malignancies. Flavonoids are a group of differentiation-inducing chemicals with a potentially lower toxicology profile than retinoids. Flavonoid-rich polyphenol fractions from the pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit exert anti-proliferative, anti-invasive, anti-eicosanoid, and pro-apoptotic actions in breast and prostate cancer cells and anti-angiogenic activities in vitro and in vivo. Here we tested flavonoid-rich fractions from fresh (J) and fermented (W) pomegranate juice and from an aqueous extraction of pomegranate pericarps (P) as potential differentiation-promoting agents of human HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells. Four assays were used to assess differentiation: nitro blue tetrazolium reducing activity, nonspecific esterase activity, specific esterase activity, and phagocytic activity. In addition, the effect of these extracts on HL-60 proliferation was evaluated. Extracts W and P were strong promoters of differentiation in all settings, with extract J showing only a relatively mild differentiation-promoting effect. The extracts had proportional inhibitory effects on HL-60 cell proliferation. The results highlight an important, previously unknown, mechanism of the cancer preventive and suppressive potential of pomegranate fermented juice and pericarp extracts.

  17. Two UGT84 Family Glycosyltransferases Catalyze a Critical Reaction of Hydrolyzable Tannin Biosynthesis in Pomegranate (Punica granatum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Nadia N; Qin, Xiaoqiong; Wilson, Alexander E; Li, Gang; Tian, Li

    2016-01-01

    Hydrolyzable tannins (HTs) play important roles in plant herbivore deterrence and promotion of human health. A critical step in HT production is the formation of 1-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (β-glucogallin, ester-linked gallic acid and glucose) by a UDP-glucosyltransferase (UGT) activity. We cloned and biochemically characterized four candidate UGTs from pomegranate (Punica granatum), of which only UGT84A23 and UGT84A24 exhibited β-glucogallin forming activities in enzyme assays. Although overexpression and single RNAi knockdown pomegranate hairy root lines of UGT84A23 or UGT84A24 did not lead to obvious alterations in punicalagin (the prevalent HT in pomegranate) accumulation, double knockdown lines of the two UGTs resulted in largely reduced levels of punicalagins and bis-hexahydroxydiphenyl glucose isomers. An unexpected accumulation of galloyl glucosides (ether-linked gallic acid and glucose) was also detected in the double knockdown lines, suggesting that gallic acid was utilized by an unidentified UGT activity for glucoside formation. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and immunogold labeling in roots of pomegranate seedlings collectively indicated cytosolic localization of UGT84A23 and UGT84A24. Overall, functional characterization and localization of UGT84A23 and UGT84A24 open up opportunities for further understanding the regulatory control of HT metabolism in plants and its coordination with other biochemical pathways in the metabolic network.

  18. Prophylactic effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum) juice on sodium fluoride induced oxidative damage in liver and erythrocytes of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouasla, Asma; Bouasla, Ihcène; Boumendjel, Amel; Abdennour, Cherif; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Messarah, Mahfoud

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the protective effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum) juice (PGJ) on oxidative damages in liver tissue and erythrocytes of rats intoxicated by sodium fluoride (NaF). Rats were randomly divided into two groups: group I received standard diet and group II received orally 1 mL of PGJ. After 5 weeks of pretreatment, each group was divided again into two subgroups and treated for another 3 weeks as follows: group I was subdivided into a control group and a group that was treated with 100 ppm of NaF (in drinking water); group II was subdivided into one group that was treated daily with both 100 ppm NaF and PGJ (1 mL orally) and one that received daily 1 mL of pomegranate juice. Exposure to NaF decreased hematological parameters, changed the total protein, albumin, bilirubin levels, and increased the activities of hepatic marker enzymes. We also noted an increase in lipid peroxidation contents, accompanied by a decrease of reduced glutathione levels. Antioxidant enzyme activities in both tissues were modified in the NaF group compared with the control group. However, the administration of PGJ juice caused an amelioration of the previous parameters. Our results indicated the potential effects of NaF to induce oxidative damage in tissues and the ability of PGJ to attenuate NaF-induced oxidative injury.

  19. Amelioration of Diabetes and Painful Diabetic Neuropathy by Punica granatum L. Extract and Its Spray Dried Biopolymeric Dispersions

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    K. Raafat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To evaluate the effect of Punica granatum (Pg rind extract and its spray dried biopolymeric dispersions with casein (F1 or chitosan (F2 against Diabetes mellitus (DM and diabetic neuropathy (DN. Methods. We measured the acute (6 h and subacute (8 days effect of various doses of Pg, F1, and F2 and the active compounds on alloxan-induced DM mouse model. We evaluated DN utilizing latency tests for longer period of time (8 weeks. In addition, the in vivo antioxidant activity was assessed utilizing serum catalase level. Results. The results proved that the highest dose levels of Pg extract, F1, F2 exerted remarkable hypoglycemic activity with 48, 52, and 40% drop in the mice glucose levels after 6 hours, respectively. The tested compounds also improved peripheral nerve function as observed from the latency tests. Bioguided fractionation suggested that gallic acid (GA was Pg main active ingredient responsible for its actions. Conclusion. Pg extract, F1, F2, and GA could be considered as a new therapeutic potential for the amelioration of diabetic neuropathic pain and the observed in vivo antioxidant potential may be involved in its antinociceptive effect. It is highly significant to pay attention to Pg and GA for amelioration and control of DM and its complications.

  20. Amelioration of Diabetes and Painful Diabetic Neuropathy by Punica granatum L. Extract and Its Spray Dried Biopolymeric Dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raafat, K.; Samy, W.

    2014-01-01

    Aims. To evaluate the effect of Punica granatum (Pg) rind extract and its spray dried biopolymeric dispersions with casein (F1) or chitosan (F2) against Diabetes mellitus (DM) and diabetic neuropathy (DN). Methods. We measured the acute (6 h) and subacute (8 days) effect of various doses of Pg, F1, and F2 and the active compounds on alloxan-induced DM mouse model. We evaluated DN utilizing latency tests for longer period of time (8 weeks). In addition, the in vivo antioxidant activity was assessed utilizing serum catalase level. Results. The results proved that the highest dose levels of Pg extract, F1, F2 exerted remarkable hypoglycemic activity with 48, 52, and 40% drop in the mice glucose levels after 6 hours, respectively. The tested compounds also improved peripheral nerve function as observed from the latency tests. Bioguided fractionation suggested that gallic acid (GA) was Pg main active ingredient responsible for its actions. Conclusion. Pg extract, F1, F2, and GA could be considered as a new therapeutic potential for the amelioration of diabetic neuropathic pain and the observed in vivo antioxidant potential may be involved in its antinociceptive effect. It is highly significant to pay attention to Pg and GA for amelioration and control of DM and its complications. PMID:24982685

  1. Punica granatum L. (Pomegranate) Extract: In Vivo Study of Antimicrobial Activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis in Galleria mellonella Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparecida Procópio Gomes, Livia; Alves Figueiredo, Lívia Mara; Corrêa Geraldo, Barbara Maria; Isler Castro, Kelly Cristine; Ruano de Oliveira Fugisaki, Luciana; Olavo Cardoso Jorge, Antônio; Dias de Oliveira, Luciane; Campos Junqueira, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increase of bacterial resistance, medicinal alternatives are being explored. Punica granatum L. is an effective herbal extract with broad spectrum of action and bactericidal, antifungal, anthelmintic potential and being able to modulate the immune response. The aim was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of pomegranate glycolic extract (PGE) against the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis by using Galleria mellonella as in vivo model. Fifteen larvae were used per group. Injection of high concentration (200, 100, and 25 mg/mL) of PGE showed a toxic effect, leading them to death. A suspension of P. gingivalis (106 cells/mL) was inoculated in the left last proleg and PGE (12.5, 6.25, 3.1, and 2.5 mg/mL) were injected into the right proleg. The larvae were then kept at 37°C under the dark. Injection of PGE at any dose statistically improved larvae survival rates. The data were analysed (log-rank test, Mantel-Cox, P < 0.05) and showed that all concentrations of PGE (12.5, 6.25, 3.1, and 2.5 mg/mL) presented higher larval survival rates, with significant statistical difference in relation to control group (P. gingivalis). In conclusion, the PGE had antimicrobial action against P. gingivalis in vivo model using G. mellonella. PMID:27668280

  2. Ellagitannins of the fruit rind of pomegranate (Punica granatum) antagonize in vitro the host inflammatory response mechanisms involved in the onset of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'agli, Mario; Galli, Germana V; Bulgari, Michela; Basilico, Nicoletta; Romeo, Sergio; Bhattacharya, Deepak; Taramelli, Donatella; Bosisio, Enrica

    2010-07-19

    The sun-dried rind of the immature fruit of pomegranate (Punica granatum) is presently used as a herbal formulation (OMARIA, Orissa Malaria Research Indigenous Attempt) in Orissa, India, for the therapy and prophylaxis of malaria. The pathogenesis of cerebral malaria, a complication of the infection by Plasmodium falciparum, is an inflammatory cytokine-driven disease associated to an up-regulation and activity of metalloproteinase-9 and to the increase of TNF production. The in vitro anti-plasmodial activity of Punica granatum (Pg) was recently described. The aim of the present study was to explore whether the anti-malarial effect of OMARIA could also be sustained via other mechanisms among those associated to the host immune response. From the methanolic extract of the fruit rind, a fraction enriched in tannins (Pg-FET) was prepared. MMP-9 secretion and expression were evaluated in THP-1 cells stimulated with haemozoin or TNF. The assays were conducted in the presence of the Pg-FET and its chemical constituents ellagic acid and punicalagin. The effect of urolithins, the ellagitannin metabolites formed by human intestinal microflora, was also investigated. Pg-FET and its constituents inhibited the secretion of MMP-9 induced by haemozoin or TNF. The effect occurred at transcriptional level since MMP-9 mRNA levels were lower in the presence of the tested compounds. Urolithins as well inhibited MMP-9 secretion and expression. Pg-FET and pure compounds also inhibited MMP-9 promoter activity and NF-kB-driven transcription. The beneficial effect of the fruit rind of Punica granatum for the treatment of malarial disease may be attributed to the anti-parasitic activity and the inhibition of the pro-inflammatory mechanisms involved in the onset of cerebral malaria.

  3. Ellagitannins of the fruit rind of pomegranate (Punica granatum antagonize in vitro the host inflammatory response mechanisms involved in the onset of malaria

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    Bhattacharya Deepak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sun-dried rind of the immature fruit of pomegranate (Punica granatum is presently used as a herbal formulation (OMARIA, Orissa Malaria Research Indigenous Attempt in Orissa, India, for the therapy and prophylaxis of malaria. The pathogenesis of cerebral malaria, a complication of the infection by Plasmodium falciparum, is an inflammatory cytokine-driven disease associated to an up-regulation and activity of metalloproteinase-9 and to the increase of TNF production. The in vitro anti-plasmodial activity of Punica granatum (Pg was recently described. The aim of the present study was to explore whether the anti-malarial effect of OMARIA could also be sustained via other mechanisms among those associated to the host immune response. Methods From the methanolic extract of the fruit rind, a fraction enriched in tannins (Pg-FET was prepared. MMP-9 secretion and expression were evaluated in THP-1 cells stimulated with haemozoin or TNF. The assays were conducted in the presence of the Pg-FET and its chemical constituents ellagic acid and punicalagin. The effect of urolithins, the ellagitannin metabolites formed by human intestinal microflora, was also investigated. Results Pg-FET and its constituents inhibited the secretion of MMP-9 induced by haemozoin or TNF. The effect occurred at transcriptional level since MMP-9 mRNA levels were lower in the presence of the tested compounds. Urolithins as well inhibited MMP-9 secretion and expression. Pg-FET and pure compounds also inhibited MMP-9 promoter activity and NF-kB-driven transcription. Conclusions The beneficial effect of the fruit rind of Punica granatum for the treatment of malarial disease may be attributed to the anti-parasitic activity and the inhibition of the pro-inflammatory mechanisms involved in the onset of cerebral malaria.

  4. The study of the inhibitory effect of calcium oxalate monohydrate's crystallization by two medicinal and aromatic plants: Ammi visnaga and Punica granatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachkoul, R; Sqalli Houssaini, T; Miyah, Y; Mohim, M; El Habbani, R; Lahrichi, A

    2018-03-01

    Urinary lithiasis is a recurrent disease defined by the presence of calculi in the urinary tract. Most urinary calculi have as a major component calcium oxalate which occurs mainly in two crystalline forms: Calcium oxalate monohydrate (whewellite) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (weddellite). The target behind, this work is to study the inhibiting effect of the calcium oxalate's crystallization by the extract of the Ammi visnaga and the Punica granatum. The inhibition of crystallization has been studied in vitro with both the absence and the presence of the different concentrations of the extracts of the two plants. This study consists in measurement, with the UV-Visible spectrophotometer, the temporal evolution of the optical density at λ equal to 620nm corresponding to the formation of the crystals due to the mixing of metastable solutions of calcium and oxalate. The characterization of the crystals is carried out in parallel by both the Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) and the observation of the crystals with the help of an optical microscope. In this respect, the inhibition percentages were calculated from the turbidity slopes in the presence and absence of the extract. The results obtained were more effective, especially for Punica granatum with percentages of 97.8±0.12 and 83.46±1.34% against nucleation and aggregation, respectively, the order of Ammi visnaga was as follow: 73.25±0.81 and 59.44±3.3%. Thus, all correlation coefficients are greater than 0.95 and all coefficients of variation are less than 10%. The prevention and treatment of urinary lithiasis and especially in the case of recurrence by plants remains an alternative choice for medical methods. This study justified the efficacy of the plants Ammi visnaga and in particular Punica granatum against the crystallization of calcium oxalate. 3. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Avaliação da atividade antioxidante em diferentes extratos da polpa e sementes da romã (Punica granatum, L. Antioxidant activity evaluation of different polarities extracts by pulp and seeds of pomegranate (Punica granatum, L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Archilla Jardini

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a atividade antioxidante dos extratos etéreo, alcoólico e aquoso obtidos da polpa e das sementes da romã (Punica granatum, L., utilizando-se dois sistemas: 1 co-oxidação do beta-caroteno/ácido linoléico e 2 Rancimat®. Inicialmente foram determinados os compostos redutores presentes na polpa (1.214 mg/100 g e nas sementes (1.732 mg/100 g e, em seqüência, avaliou-se nos extratos, através de cromatografia em camada delgada (CCD, a presença de compostos fenólicos com atividade antioxidante. Os extratos aquosos tanto da polpa quanto das sementes apresentaram as maiores porcentagens de inibição da oxidação: 87,31% e 93,08%, respectivamente. Através da avaliação cinética pelo teste de co-oxidação com beta-caroteno e ácido linoléico, pôde-se verificar que a alta porcentagem da atividade antioxidante dos extratos aquosos é devida à capacidade de inibir a oxidação nas fases inicial e mais avançada do processo oxidativo, agindo por mecanismos primário e secundário. Todos os extratos (etéreo, alcoólico e aquoso apresentaram elevada capacidade em prolongar o período de indução da oxidação, medida pelo aparelho Rancimat®, sendo, ainda, significativamente (pIn etheric, alcoholic and aqueous extracts obtained from pomegranate (Punica granatum, L. pulp and seeds their antioxidant activity was evaluated by using two systems: co-oxidation of beta-carotene/linoleic acid and 2 Rancimat®. First of all, the presence of reducing compounds was detected in the pulp (1,214 mg/100 g and in the seeds (1,732 mg/100 g. The phenolic compounds with antioxidant activity were then evaluated in the extracts using thin-layer chromatography (TLC. The aqueous extracts from the pulp and the seeds showed the highest antioxidant activity of 87.31% and of 93.08%, respectively. The kinetic curves obtained by cooxidation of beta-carotene and linoleic acid substrates also showed the highest values in the aqueous. These results were

  6. Protective effects of Punica Granatum (L) and synthetic ellagic acid on radiation induced biochemical alterations in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharmila, K.P.; Satheesh Kumar Bhandary, B.; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Vadisha Bhat, S.; Sherly, Sharmila; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Ionizing radiations produce deleterious effects in the living organisms and the rapid technological advancement has increased human exposure to ionizing radiations enormously. Radiotherapy, which is a chief modality to treat cancer, faces a major drawback because it produces severe side effects developed due to damage to normal tissue by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recent studies have indicated that some commonly used medicinal plants may be good sources of potent but non-toxic radioprotectors. The pomegranate, Punica granatum L., an ancient, mystical, and highly distinctive fruit, is the predominant member of the Punicaceae family. It is used in several systems of medicine for a variety of ailments. The objective of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of ethanolic extracts of pomegranate whole fruit (EPWF) and seeds (EPS) and Synthetic Ellagic acid (EA) against Electron beam radiation(EBR) induced biochemical alterations in Swiss albino mice. The extracts and synthetic compound were assessed for its radical scavenging property by DPPH radical scavenging and Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assays. The animals were exposed to sub-lethal dose (6 Gy) of Electron Beam Radiation and then treated with 200 mg/kg body wt. of pomegranate extracts and synthetic ellagic acid for 15 consecutive days. The biochemical estimations were carried out in the liver homogenate of the sacrificed animals. Radiation induced depletion in the level of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were prevented significantly by EPWF, EPS and EA administration. Also there was significant reduction in the levels of membrane lipid peroxidation in the treated groups compared to irradiated control. The findings of our study indicate the protective efficacy of pomegranate extracts and synthetic ellagic acid on radiation induced biochemical changes in mice may be due to its free radical scavenging and increased antioxidant levels. (author)

  7. Anti-diabetic action of Punica granatum flower extract: Activation of PPAR-γ and identification of an active component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Tom H.W.; Peng Gang; Kota, Bhavani P.; Li, George Q.; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D.; Li Yuhao

    2005-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ activators are widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes because they improve the sensitivity of insulin receptors. Punica granatum flower (PGF) has been used as an anti-diabetic medicine in Unani medicinal literature. The mechanism of actions is, however, unknown. In the current study, we demonstrated that 6-week oral administration of methanol extract from PGF (500 mg/kg, daily) inhibited glucose loading-induced increase of plasma glucose levels in Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF), a genetic animal model for type 2 diabetes, whereas it did not inhibit the increase in Zucker lean rats (ZL). The treatment did not lower the plasma glucose levels in fasted ZDF and ZL rats. Furthermore, RT-PCR results demonstrated that the PGF extract treatment in ZDF rats enhanced cardiac PPAR-γ mRNA expression and restored the down-regulated cardiac glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 (the insulin-dependent isoform of GLUTs) mRNA. These results suggest that the anti-diabetic activity of PGF extract may result from improved sensitivity of the insulin receptor. From the in vitro studies, we demonstrated that the PGF extract enhanced PPAR-γ mRNA and protein expression and increased PPAR-γ-dependent mRNA expression and activity of lipoprotein lipase in human THP-1-differentiated macrophage cells. Phytochemical investigation demonstrated that gallic acid in PGF extract is mostly responsible for this activity. Thus, our findings indicate that PPAR-γ is a molecular target for PGF extract and its prominent component gallic acid, and provide a better understanding of the potential mechanism of the anti-diabetic action of PGF

  8. Design, Formulation and Evaluation of an Oral Gel from Punica Granatum Flower Extract for the Treatment of Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis

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    Abolfazl Aslani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a disease with unknown etiology that’s mostly treated symptomatically and has no definite cure. Pomegranate (Punica granatum flowers have been used as medicinal herb that due to its antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and healing effects, has been useful in treatment of oral aphthous. Therefore, we decided to formulate a mucoadhesive gel with pomegranate flower extract to reduce the need for corticosteroid therapy in patients. Methods: Pomegranate flowers are extracted by percolation method. Several formulations with different amounts of carbomer 934, sodium carboxymethylcellulose (SCMC and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose K4M were prepared and the condensed extract was dispersed in polyethyleneglycol (PEG 400 and added to gel bases. Then the formulations underwent macroscopic and microscopic studies. The formulations that passed these tests successfully were studied through assay tests using spectrophotometry in 765 nm, drug release from mucoadhesive gel using cell diffusion method, viscosity test, mucoadhesion test and accelerated stability test. Results: The phenolic content of pomegranate flower dried extract was found to be 212.3±1.4 mg/g in dried extract. The F4–F6 formulations contains carbomer 934, SCMC, pomegranate flower extract, PEG 400, potassium sorbate and purified water passed all above tests. Conclusion: The F4 formulation had higher viscosity and mucoadhesion values due to its higher carbomer 934 and SCMC content. Since F4, F5 and F6 had no significant variation in drug release, the F4 formulation was chosen as the superior formulation because of proper appearance and uniformity, acceptable viscosity, mucoadhesion and stability in different temperatures.

  9. Effects of rhaponticum carthamoides versus glycyrrhiza glabra and punica granatum extracts on metabolic syndrome signs in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Rhaponticum cathamoides (RC) is an endemic wild Siberian herb with marked medicinal properties that are still poorly understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the therapeutic potential of RC extract (ERC) compared to the effects of Glycyrrhiza glabra (EGG) and Punica granatum extracts (EPG) in a rat model with high-fat diet-(HFD)-induced signs of metabolic syndrome; therefore, this study addresses a significant global public health problem. Methods Six-month-old male Wistar Albino Glaxo rats were subjected to eight weeks of a standard diet (SD), HFD, or HFD in which ERC, EGG, or EPG powders were incorporated at 300 mg/kg/day. The serum lipid profile, corticosterone and cytokine concentrations, glucose tolerance, systolic blood pressure, triacylglycerol accumulation, and PPARα DNA-binding activities in the liver samples were determined. Results In contrast to EGG and EPG, an ERC supplement significantly reduced the weight of epididymal tissue (19.0%, p < 0.01) and basal serum glucose level (19.4%, p < 0.05). ERC improved glucose intolerance as well as dyslipidemia more efficiently than EGG and EPG. EGG but not ERC or EPG supplementation decreased systolic blood pressure by 12.0% (p < 0.05). All of the tested extracts reduced serum IL6 and corticosterone levels induced by HFD. However, the lowering effects of ERC consumption on the serum TNF-α level and its restoring effect on the adrenal corticosterone level significantly exceeded the improvements induced by EGG and EPG. ERC intake also reduced triacylglycerol accumulation and increased the PPARα DNA-binding activity in the liver more significantly than EGG and EPG. Conclusions ERC powder supplementation improved glucose and lipid metabolism more significantly than EGG and EPG in rats fed on HFD, supporting the strategy of R. carthamoides use for safe relief of metabolic syndrome and its related disturbances such as inflammation, stress, and hepatic steatosis. PMID:24444255

  10. Characterization of two TERMINAL FLOWER1 homologs PgTFL1 and PgCENa from pomegranate (Punica granatum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Hemant B; Chaurasia, Akhilesh K; Azeez, Abdul; Krishna, Bal; Subramaniam, V R; Sane, Aniruddha P; Sane, Prafullachandra V

    2017-12-21

    FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and TERMINAL FLOWER1/CENTRORADIALIS (TFL1/CEN) are the key regulators of flowering time in plants with FT promoting flowering and TFL1 repressing flowering. TFL1 also controls floral meristem identity and its maintenance. In this study we have characterized two pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) TFL1/CEN-like genes designated as PgTFL1 and PgCENa. The expression of PgTFL1 and PgCENa fluctuated through alternate pruning and flowering cycles, being highly expressed during the vegetative phase (immediately after pruning) and decreasing gradually in the months thereafter such that their lowest levels, especially for PgCENa coincided with the flowering phase. Both the genes are able to functionally suppress the Arabidopsis tfl1-14 mutant flowering defect. Their expression in Arabidopsis resulted in delayed flowering time, increased plant height and leaf number, branches and shoot buds as compared with wild type, suggesting that PgTFL1 and PgCENa are bonafide homologs of TFL1. However, both the genes show distinct expression patterns, being expressed differentially in vegetative shoot apex and floral bud samples. While PgTFL1 expression was low in vegetative shoot apex and high in flower bud, PgCENa expression showed the opposite trend. These results suggest that the two TFL1s in pomegranate may be utilized to control distinct developmental processes, namely repression of flowering by PgCENa and development and growth of the reproductive tissues by PgTFL1 via distinct temporal and developmental regulation of their expression. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Preventive Effect of Three Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Seeds Fractions on Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Zolfaghari, Behzd; Taheri, Diana; Gomarian, Mahdi

    2014-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) refers to afflicted inflammation of pancreas with unfavorable adverse effects and developed multiple organ failures. Unfortunately, there is not a certain therapeutic method for this disease. Oxidative stress has a serious role in the pathogenesis of AP. Thus, decreasing of oxidative stress may prevent induction and progression of AP. Punica granatum L. has been extensively used in traditional medicine and possesses various active biological elements. Due to antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of pomegranate, it could be considered as a good candidate alternative medicine with beneficial effects on AP. In this study, we decided to study the protective effect of three fractions of pomegranate seeds on cerulein-induced AP. AP was induced in male Syrian mice by five intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cerulein (50 μg/kg) with 1 h intervals. Treatments with pomegranate freeze-dried powder (PFDP) and hydroalcoholic pomegranate seeds extract (PSE) at doses of 125, 250, 500 mg/kg (i.p.) were started 30 min before pancreatitis induction. Pomegranate seed oil fraction (PSOF) was orally administered (50, 100, 200 μL/kg) and continued for 10 days. Pancreatic tissue was evaluated for histopathological parameters and pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity as well as lipase and amylase levels were measured in plasma. The higher doses of three fractions (250 and 500 mg/kg for PFDP and PSE and doses of 100, 200 μL/kg for PSOF) significantly reduced amylase and lipase activity in serum (at least P < 0.01), pancreatic MPO activity (P < 0.001), edema, leukocyte infiltration and vacuolization in comparison to the control group (P < 0.05). These results propose that pomegranate seeds fractions can prevent and/or treat the AP.

  12. Antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effects of ethanolic extract of leaves of Punica granatum in alloxan-induced non–insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus albino rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Swarnamoni; Barman, Sarajita

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Punica granatum L., (Family: Punicaceae) is used in Indian Unani medicine for treatment of diabetes mellitus. Therefore, the present study was done to evaluate the antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effects of ethanolic extract of leaves of P. granatum in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Healthy Wistar albino rats (100-150 g) were divided into four groups of six animals each. Groups A and B received normal saline [(10 ml/kg/day/per oral (p.o.)]; group C received ethanolic extract of leaves of P. granatum (500 mg/kg/p.o.); and group D received glibenclamide (0.5 mg/kg/day/p.o.). The extracts were given for 1 week in all groups. To induce diabetes, alloxan 150 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.) single dose was administered to groups B, C, and D. Blood glucose and serum lipids [Total Cholesterol (TC), Triglycerides (TG), Low Density Lipoproteins (LDL), and High Density Lipoproteins (HDL)] and the atherogenic index were estimated after one week. For mechanism of antidiabetic action glycogen estimation on the liver, cardiac and skeletal muscle, and intestinal glucose absorption was done. Results: Group B showed a significant (Pgranatum leaves possess significant antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic activity. PMID:22529479

  13. Effects of anti-lipid peroxidation of Punica granatum fruit extract in endothelial cells induced by plasma of severe pre-eclamptic patients

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    Isri Nasifah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a pregnancy disorder characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. This disorder involves oxidative stress and changes in endothelial homeostasis. This study was aimed to seek whether an ethanolic extract of Punica granatum fruit inhibits 8-iso-PGFα formation and modulates nitric oxide (NO in endothelial cells induced by plasma from pre-eclamptic patients. Endothelial cells were cultured from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. At confluence, endothelial cells were divided into five groups, which included endothelial cells exposed to 2% plasma from normal pregnancy (NP, endothelial cells exposed to 2% plasma from pre-eclamptic patients (PP, endothelial cells exposed to PP in the presence of ethanolic extract of P. granatum (PP+PG at the following three doses: 14; 28; and 56 ppm. Analysis of 8-iso-PGFα was done by immunoassay technique. Analysis of NO level was done by colorimetric technique. Plasma from PP significantly increased 8-iso-PGFα level compared to cells treated by normal pregnancy plasma. This increase in 8-iso-PGFα was significantly (p0.05 between groups. P. granatum fruit extract protects endothelial cells from oxidative stress induced by plasma from pre-eclamptic patients.

  14. Effects of anti-lipid peroxidation of Punica granatum fruit extract in endothelial cells induced by plasma of severe pre-eclamptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasifah, Isri; Soeharto, Setyawati; Nooryanto, Mukhamad

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy disorder characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. This disorder involves oxidative stress and changes in endothelial homeostasis. This study was aimed to seek whether an ethanolic extract of Punica granatum fruit inhibits 8-iso-PGFα formation and modulates nitric oxide (NO) in endothelial cells induced by plasma from pre-eclamptic patients. Endothelial cells were cultured from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. At confluence, endothelial cells were divided into five groups, which included endothelial cells exposed to 2% plasma from normal pregnancy (NP), endothelial cells exposed to 2% plasma from pre-eclamptic patients (PP), endothelial cells exposed to PP in the presence of ethanolic extract of P. granatum (PP+PG) at the following three doses: 14; 28; and 56 ppm. Analysis of 8-iso-PGFα was done by immunoassay technique. Analysis of NO level was done by colorimetric technique. Plasma from PP significantly increased 8-iso-PGFα level compared to cells treated by normal pregnancy plasma. This increase in 8-iso-PGFα was significantly (pgranatum extract. The level of NO was insignificant (p>0.05) between groups. P. granatum fruit extract protects endothelial cells from oxidative stress induced by plasma from pre-eclamptic patients. Copyright © 2017 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Swarm motility inhibitory and antioxidant activities of pomegranate peel processed under three drying conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contaminated fruits and vegetables cause global health problems and reduced economic productivity resulting in significant loss to food industry. Pomegranate (Punica granatum) peels provides a rich source of bioactive phytochemicals namely, punicalins (PC: a and ß) punicalagins (PG: a and ß) and ell...

  16. Effect of pectin methyl esterase and Ca²⁺ ions treatment on antioxidant capacity, shelf-life and quality of minimally processed pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) arils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Kumar, Ramesh; Nambi, V E

    2016-03-01

    Pomegranate fruits are difficult to peel and once peeled, extracted arils have very short shelf-life. Therefore, present investigation was carried out to extend the shelf life of minimally processed pomegranate arils using pectin methyl esterase (PME) and CaCl2 treatment during refrigerated storage. The arils of freshly harvested pomegranate fruits (Punica granatum L.) were treated with different concentrations of food-grade PME (50-300 units) and calcium ions (0.5-2.0% CaCl₂) for a period of 5-30 min using response surface methodology. Treated and untreated arils were then packed in low density polyethylene bags (25 μ) and maintained under low temperature (5°C; 90% RH) for evaluating the physical, biochemical and microbial quality of pomegranate arils at four day interval. Physiological loss in weight increased during storage but no food-borne pathogens were found during 28 day of cold storage in treated arils. Color and firmness of both treated and untreated arils decreased during storage but it was better maintained in treated arils. The firmness was found to be 0.630 N in treated samples compared to untreated one (0.511 N) after 20 d of storage. Total antioxidant capacity, ferric reducing antioxidant power, polyphenol oxidase and lipoxygenase activities increased during storage. Treatment with 249.33 units of PME and 1.70% CaCl₂for an immersion time of 24.93 min was found to be most effective treatment for maintaining the quality of minimally processed arils for longer period. Sensory score was also higher in treated pomegranate arils that were quite acceptable even after 20 day of referigerated storage as against 12 day for untreated ones.

  17. A new flavone glucoside together with known ellagitannins and flavones with anti-diabetic and anti-obesity activities from the flowers of pomegranate (Punica granatum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng; Tian, Li

    2018-03-03

    A new flavone glucoside tricetin 4'-O-β-glucopyranoside (1) and four known ellagitannins and flavones tricetin (2), luteolin (3), ellagic acid (4), and granatin B (5) were isolated from the flowers of Punica granatum L. (Lythraceae). Their structures were established by 1D and 2D NMR as well as mass spectrometry analyses. Among all tested compounds, tricetin (2) exhibited the strongest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity that was comparable to the anti-diabetic drug acarbose. Comparative structure-function analysis of tri-, tetra-, and pentahydroxy flavones [apigenin, luteolin (3), and tricetin (2), respectively] suggested that a greater number of hydroxyl groups on the flavone molecule enhanced its suppression of α-glucosidase, α-amylase, and lipase activities.

  18. A Traditional Mouthwash (Punica granatum var pleniflora) for Controlling Gingivitis of Diabetic Patients: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedigh-Rahimabadi, Massih; Fani, Mohammadmehdi; Rostami-Chijan, Mahsa; Zarshenas, Mohammad M; Shams, Mesbah

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluates the safety and efficacy of Punica granatum var pleniflora mouthwash in treatment of diabetic gingivitis. In a double-blind randomized clinical trial 80 patients with diabetes mellitus and gingivitis were assigned to Golnaar and chlorhexidine 0.2% groups. After using mouthwashes for 2 weeks; participants underwent tooth scaling and the last visit was 2 weeks after scaling. The primary outcome measures were plaque, modified gingival and gingival bleeding indices, and pocket depth. Both interventions had significant improvement on all of the gingival and plaque indices (P < .001 for all indices). There were no significant differences between Golnaar and chlorhexidine in primary outcome measures except for modified gingival index for which Golnaar mouthwash had a superiority after 2 weeks when comparing with chlorhexidine (P = .039). Meanwhile, Golnaar mouthwash had no staining effect. Golnaar mouthwash is safe and effective in treatment of gingivitis in diabetic patients although further studies are recommended. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Estudos com o extrato da Punica granatum Linn. (romã: efeito antimicrobiano in vitro e avaliação clínica de um dentifrício sobre microrganismos do biofilme dental = Studies with the extract of the punica granatum linn. (pomegranate: effect antimicrobial “in vitro” and trial avaliation of a toothpaste upon microrganisms of the oral biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira, Jozinete Vieira

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A atividade antimicrobiana in vitro, CIM (Concentração Inibitória Mínima, CIMA (Concentração Inibitória Mínima de Aderência e a CBM (Concentração Mínima Bactericida do extrato da romã (Punica granatum Linn. foi avaliada em cinco linhagens bacterianas do biofilme dental: Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus sobrinus e Lactobacillus casei. Em estudo comparativo com o gluconato de clorexidina, os resultados demonstraram efetiva ação inibitória de ambas as substâncias. O extrato da romã foi efetivo na CIMA das cinco linhagens ensaiadas, representada pela ausência de aderência ao vidro na presença de sacarose. A atividade antimicrobiana in vivo do extrato da romã foi testada em 13 pacientes, através do uso de um dentrifício a base desse extrato e foi observadas redução do número de Streptococcus mutans (53,84% e Índice de Sangramento Gengival. Conclui-se, portanto, que o extrato da Punica granatum Linn. , apresentou potente atividade antimicrobiana in vivo e in vitro sobre as linhagens do biofilme dental. Os resultados sugerem a utilização do extrato da romã em indicações terapêuticas na prática odontológica

  20. Improvement of skin condition in striae distensae: development, characterization and clinical efficacy of a cosmetic product containing Punica granatum seed oil and Croton lechleri resin extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Cătălina; Iurian, Sonia; Tomuta, Ioan; Moldovan, Mirela

    2017-01-01

    Striae distensae are a frequent skin condition associated with pregnancy, weight change or lack of skin elasticity. The aim of this research was to obtain a topical product containing herbal active ingredients with documented antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity ( Punica granatum seed oil and Croton lechleri resin extract) and demonstrate its positive effect on prevention and treatment of striae distensae. First, the cream base formulation was optimized through experimental design. Secondly, the cream containing the two active ingredients was investigated in an interventional nonrandomized clinical trial. The clinical outcome was assessed through biophysical parameters and ultrasonographic evaluation. The state of the skin was evaluated by biophysical measurements and ultrasonography at the beginning of the study and after 3 and 6 weeks. The experimental design was successfully used to set the best ranges for the technological and formulation factors to obtain a cosmetic formulation with optimal characteristics. The study of clinical efficacy on the optimal formulation revealed an increase in the dermis thickness, hydration and elasticity values in both groups after 6 weeks of cream application. The new oil-in-water cream containing P. granatum seed oil and C. lechleri resin extract can be helpful in the prevention or improving of skin changes associated with striae.

  1. De novo transcriptome assembly and quantification reveal differentially expressed genes between soft-seed and hard-seed pomegranate (Punica granatum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xue

    Full Text Available Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. belongs to Punicaceae, and is valued for its social, ecological, economic, and aesthetic values, as well as more recently for its health benefits. The 'Tunisia' variety has softer seeds and big arils that are easily swallowed. It is a widely popular fruit; however, the molecular mechanisms of the formation of hard and soft seeds is not yet clear. We conducted a de novo assembly of the seed transcriptome in P. granatum L. and revealed differential gene expression between the soft-seed and hard-seed pomegranate varieties. A total of 35.1 Gb of data were acquired in this study, including 280,881,106 raw reads. Additionally, de novo transcriptome assembly generated 132,287 transcripts and 105,743 representative unigenes; approximately 13,805 unigenes (37.7% were longer than 1,000 bp. Using bioinformatics annotation libraries, a total of 76,806 unigenes were annotated and, among the high-quality reads, 72.63% had at least one significant match to an existing gene model. Gene expression and differentially expressed genes were analyzed. The seed formation of the two pomegranate cultivars involves lignin biosynthesis and metabolism, including some genes encoding laccase and peroxidase, WRKY, MYB, and NAC transcription factors. In the hard-seed pomegranate, lignin-related genes and cellulose synthesis-related genes were highly expressed; in soft-seed pomegranates, expression of genes related to flavonoids and programmed cell death was slightly higher. We validated selection of the identified genes using qRT-PCR. This is the first transcriptome analysis of P. granatum L. This transcription sequencing greatly enriched the pomegranate molecular database, and the high-quality SSRs generated in this study will aid the gene cloning from pomegranate in the future. It provides important insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of soft seeds in pomegranate.

  2. De novo transcriptome assembly and quantification reveal differentially expressed genes between soft-seed and hard-seed pomegranate (Punica granatum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hui; Cao, Shangyin; Li, Haoxian; Zhang, Jie; Niu, Juan; Chen, Lina; Zhang, Fuhong; Zhao, Diguang

    2017-01-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) belongs to Punicaceae, and is valued for its social, ecological, economic, and aesthetic values, as well as more recently for its health benefits. The 'Tunisia' variety has softer seeds and big arils that are easily swallowed. It is a widely popular fruit; however, the molecular mechanisms of the formation of hard and soft seeds is not yet clear. We conducted a de novo assembly of the seed transcriptome in P. granatum L. and revealed differential gene expression between the soft-seed and hard-seed pomegranate varieties. A total of 35.1 Gb of data were acquired in this study, including 280,881,106 raw reads. Additionally, de novo transcriptome assembly generated 132,287 transcripts and 105,743 representative unigenes; approximately 13,805 unigenes (37.7%) were longer than 1,000 bp. Using bioinformatics annotation libraries, a total of 76,806 unigenes were annotated and, among the high-quality reads, 72.63% had at least one significant match to an existing gene model. Gene expression and differentially expressed genes were analyzed. The seed formation of the two pomegranate cultivars involves lignin biosynthesis and metabolism, including some genes encoding laccase and peroxidase, WRKY, MYB, and NAC transcription factors. In the hard-seed pomegranate, lignin-related genes and cellulose synthesis-related genes were highly expressed; in soft-seed pomegranates, expression of genes related to flavonoids and programmed cell death was slightly higher. We validated selection of the identified genes using qRT-PCR. This is the first transcriptome analysis of P. granatum L. This transcription sequencing greatly enriched the pomegranate molecular database, and the high-quality SSRs generated in this study will aid the gene cloning from pomegranate in the future. It provides important insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of soft seeds in pomegranate.

  3. Thermal Effects on the Body mass, Transpiration rate, Feeding and Food Conversion of the Pillbug Armadillo officinalis (Isopoda, Oniscidea Fed on the Dry Leaf of Punica Granatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelgader K. Youssef

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Observations were made on the body mass; transpiration rate; assimilation efficiency; gross and net production efficiencies; feeding, assimilation, conversion and metabolic rates of the pillbug Armadillo officinalis Dumeril acclimatized at 14º  and 21 °C for 15 days and fed on the dry leaf of Punica granatum (Pomegranate.  A brief description is given on the chemical composition of P. granatum leaf.  The difference in body mass increments of A. officinalis between the acclimatized temperatures was not significant (t = 1.09; p>0.05.  However, significant differences were discernible on the transpiration rate (t = 9.53; p<0.01, moisture (t = 9.01; p<0.01, assimilation efficiency (t = 5.16; p<0.01, feeding (t = 3.76; p<0.05 and conversion (t = 2.58; p<0.05  rates between the woodlice acclimatized at 14º and 21 °C.  Better feeding of    P. granatum leaf by these animals was observed at 21° C, but better assimilation efficiency at 14 °C.  Only 3.21% assimilated food at 14° C and 6.30% at 21 °C were converted into the production of new tissues.  The food consumption of A. officinalis at 14º and 21° C was 2.05% and 3.79% body mass/day respectively.  The effect of temperature on the activity of A. officinalis in the field is discussed.

  4. Punica granatum L.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-02

    May 2, 2008 ... Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB ... 2007). Currently, it is an important fruit species for India,. Iran, USA ... Pomological characterization ... Group Method using Arithmetic Average) method was used to.

  5. Exploiting antidiabetic activity of silver nanoparticles synthesized using Punica granatum leaves and anticancer potential against human liver cancer cells (HepG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saratale, Rijuta G; Shin, Han Seung; Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Benelli, Giovanni; Kim, Dong-Su; Saratale, Ganesh D

    2018-02-01

    This study first time reports the novel synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using a Punica granatum leaf extract (PGE). The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by various analytical techniques including UV-Vis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectra (FESEM-EDS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). FTIR analysis revealed that the involvement of biological macromolecules of P. granatum leaf extract were distributed and involved in the synthesis and stabilization of AgNPs. A surface-sensitive technique of XPS was used to analyse the composition and oxidation state of synthesized AgNPs. The analytical results confirmed that the AgNPs were crystalline in nature with spherical shape. The zeta potential study revealed that the surface charge of synthesized AgNPs was highly negative (-26.6 mV) and particle size distribution was ranging from ∼35 to 60 nm and the average particle size was about 48 nm determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The PGE-AgNPs antidiabetic potential exhibited effective inhibition against α-amylase and α-glucosidase (IC 50 ; 65.2 and 53.8 μg/mL, respectively). The PGE-AgNPs showed a dose-dependent response against human liver cancer cells (HepG2) (IC 50 ; 70 μg/mL) indicating its greater efficacy in killing cancer cells. They also possessed in vitro free radical-scavenging activity in terms of ABTS (IC 50 ; 52.2 μg/mL) and DPPH (IC 50 ; 67.1 μg/mL) antioxidant activity. PGE-AgNPs displayed strong antibacterial activity and potent synergy with standard antibiotics against pathogenic bacteria. Thus, synthesized PGE-AgNPs show potential biomedical and industrial applications.

  6. Improvement of skin condition in striae distensae: development, characterization and clinical efficacy of a cosmetic product containing Punica granatum seed oil and Croton lechleri resin extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan C

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cătălina Bogdan,1 Sonia Iurian,2 Ioan Tomuta,2 Mirela Moldovan1 1Department of Dermatopharmacy and Cosmetics, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iuliu Hatieganu, Cluj-Napoca, Romania Abstract: Striae distensae are a frequent skin condition associated with pregnancy, weight change or lack of skin elasticity. The aim of this research was to obtain a topical product containing herbal active ingredients with documented antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity (Punica granatum seed oil and Croton lechleri resin extract and demonstrate its positive effect on prevention and treatment of striae distensae. First, the cream base formulation was optimized through experimental design. Secondly, the cream containing the two active ingredients was investigated in an interventional nonrandomized clinical trial. The clinical outcome was assessed through biophysical parameters and ultrasonographic evaluation. The state of the skin was evaluated by biophysical measurements and ultrasonography at the beginning of the study and after 3 and 6 weeks. The experimental design was successfully used to set the best ranges for the technological and formulation factors to obtain a cosmetic formulation with optimal characteristics. The study of clinical efficacy on the optimal formulation revealed an increase in the dermis thickness, hydration and elasticity values in both groups after 6 weeks of cream application. The new oil-in-water cream containing P. granatum seed oil and C. lechleri resin extract can be helpful in the prevention or improving of skin changes associated with striae. Keywords: stretch marks, ultrasonography, texture analysis, design of experiments, oil-in-water emulsion

  7. Effect of Achyranthes aspera, 0.2% Aqueous Chlorhexidine Gluconate and Punica granatum Oral Rinse on the Levels of Salivary Streptococcus mutans in 8 to 12 Years Old Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Aayushi; Marwah, Nikhil; Nigam, Anant Gopal; Goenka, Puneet; Goel, Deepak

    2015-11-01

    To study the effect Achyranthes aspera, 0.2% aqueous chlorhexidine gluconate and Punica granatum oral rinse on salivary Streptococcus mutans count in children. A total of 60 children of 8 to 12 years of age were randomly allocated into 3 groups. Group A was given 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthwash, group B was given 10% A. aspera mouthwash and group C was given 15% P. granatum mouthwash. The day 1 saliva samples were collected from the subjects and inoculated onto mitis salivarius bacitracin (MSB) agar. The colony counts were obtained by a clinical microbiologist who was blinded to the subject allocation. Plaque scores were then recorded by the investigator with the help of a volunteer. Following this, they received a thorough scaling and polishing. Subjects in each group were then provided with 140 ml of the respective mouthwash, as a daily supervised rinse after breakfast and before sleeping as per instructions. Following mouth rinsing, the children were instructed not to eat or drink for 15 minutes. At the 7th day, unstimulated saliva was again collected from the subjects of all 3 groups, inoculated onto MSB agar and colony count was obtained. Modified Quigley-Hein plaque index was also evaluated for the refreshed score at this stage. Colony counting was done using loop method and statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for the Social Science (SPSS) software version 21. All the three mouthwashes showed statistically significant reduction of S. mutans count and plaque index after 7 days, i.e. chlorhexidine (p granatum (p granatum was statistically significant with respect to reduction of S. mutans count with chlorhexidine being marginally better than the other two; All the three mouthwashes were found to be at par when plaque index values from baseline and after interception of 7 days was calculated; Punica granatum has better antimicrobial effect than A. aspera.

  8. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles from aqueous leaf extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) and their anticancer activity on human cervical cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sonia; Kotteeswaran, Venkatesan

    2018-06-01

    Plants contain different important phytochemicals that can be used as a potential treatment for various ailments including cancer. The green synthesis of silver nanoparticles from the extract of different plant parts has gained a wide range of engrossment among the researchers due to its unique optical and structural property. The aim of this study is green synthesis of silver nanoparticles from the aqueous leaf extract of pomegranate (Punica granatum) and to investigate its anticancer activity on human cervical cancer cells (HeLa). The synthesis of silver nanoparticle was depicted by the colour change from golden yellowish to dark brownish, UV-visible spectral analysis gave a characteristic surface plasmon absorption peak at . Further morphological characterization was done by Zeta potential where the size analysis was depicted to be 46.1 nm and zeta potential as . Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) inferred 3 intense sharp peaks at , , , confirmed the presence of flavonoids and polyphenols. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis with energy diffraction spectroscopy (EDS) confirmed the presence of silver nanoparticles with size ranged from to . X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the crystallographic nature of silver. The cell proliferation activity of nanoparticles was tested by 3, ‑4, 5 dimethylthiazol-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay where the inhibitory concentration () was found at inhibiting of HeLa cell line. The anticancer activity of nanoparticles was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay where showed of cytotoxicity. Furthermore, the anticancer property of nanoparticles was confirmed by the DNA fragmentation assay.

  9. Effect of Genotype on the Sprouting of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Seeds as a Source of Phenolic Compounds from Juice Industry by-Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcinelli, Beatrice; Marconi, Ombretta; Maranghi, Stefano; Lutts, Stanley; Rosati, Adolfo; Famiani, Franco; Benincasa, Paolo

    2017-12-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruits are used mainly by the juice industry, for which seeds are a by-product to be disposed of, though they could potentially be a source of bioactive compounds. In this work, germination (total germination percentage, G; mean germination time, MGT; time to reach 80% of germination, TG80; seedling shoot length, fresh weight and dry matter), and nutritional value (total phenolics, TP; total flavonoids, TF; total non-tannins, TNT; antioxidant activities) of pomegranate seeds and sprouts were determined on four commercial pomegranate cultivars (Akko, Dente di Cavallo, Mollar de Elche and Wonderful). Seeds were removed from ripe fruits and incubated in plastic trays containing sterile cotton wetted with distilled water. Sprout shoots were harvested when they reached the complete cotyledon expansion, i.e., the ready-to-eat stage. Akko showed the best germination performance (G = 98%; MGT = 14 days after sowing, DAS; TG80 = 16 DAS), followed by Mollar de Elche. Sprouting dramatically increased TP, TF, TNT and antioxidant activity in all genotypes, with the highest values recorded in Mollar de Elche and Dente di Cavallo. Overall, based on germination performance, Akko and Mollar de Elche would be the best cultivars for sprouting. Sprouting pomegranate seeds appears to be a suitable way of utilizing by-products of the juice industry to obtain bioactive compounds.

  10. Punica granatum (pomegranate) leaves extract induces apoptosis through mitochondrial intrinsic pathway and inhibits migration and invasion in non-small cell lung cancer in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yali; Yang, Fangfang; Zheng, Weidong; Hu, Mingxing; Wang, Juanxiu; Ma, Sisi; Deng, Yuanle; Luo, Yi; Ye, Tinghong; Yin, Wenya

    2016-05-01

    Most conventional treatments on non-small cell lung carcinoma always accompany with awful side effects, and the incidence and mortality rates of this cancer are increasing rapidly worldwide. The objective of this study was to examine the anticancer effects of extract of Punica granatum (pomegranate) leaves extract (PLE) on the non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line A549, H1299 and mouse Lewis lung carcinoma cell line LL/2 in vitro, and explore its mechanisms of action. Our results have shown that PLE inhibited cell proliferation in non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry (FCM) assay showed that PLE affected H1299 cell survival by arresting cell cycle progression in G2/M phase in a dose-dependent manner and inducing apoptosis. Moreover, PLE could also decrease the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔYm), indicating that PLE may induce apoptosis via mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, PLE blocked H1299 cell migration and invasion, and the reduction of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression were also observed in vitro. These results suggested that PLE could be an effective and safe chemotherapeutic agent in non-small cell lung carcinoma treatment by inhibiting proliferation, inducing apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and impairing cell migration and invasion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. High-intensity-exercise-induced intestinal damage is protected by fermented milk supplemented with whey protein, probiotic and pomegranate (Punica granatum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Fernanda M; Baptista, Igor L; Simabuco, Fernando M; Quaresma, Paula G F; Pena, Fabiola L; Bezerra, Rosangela M N; Pauli, Jose R; da Cunha, Diogo T; Campos-Ferraz, Patricia L; Antunes, Adriane E C

    2018-04-01

    Here we evaluated the effect of fermented milk supplemented with whey protein (approximately 80 % protein), probiotic (Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB12) and pomegranate juice (Punica granatum L.) on the physical performance, intestinal motility and villi structure, inflammatory markers and intestinal microbiota of rats under high-intensity acute exercise. In all, twenty-four Wistar rats were separated into groups: control (Ctrl), supplemented (Supp), exercised (Exe) and exercised and supplemented (Exe+Supp). Rats in the Supp groups received fermented milk during 6 weeks by oral administration. At the end of the supplementation period, the Exe groups were submitted to high-intensity acute exercise on a treadmill. We found that intense acute exercise caused changes in the intestinal villi interspace, changes in the proportion of Lactobacillus species and an increase in Clostridium species, as well as a decrease in intestinal motility. Supplementation increased intestinal motility, and maintained the intestinal villi interspace and the natural microbiota proportions of the exercised rats. Physical performance was not improved by fermented milk supplementation. We conclude that the fermented milk containing whey protein, B. animalis (BB12) and pomegranate juice can re-establish intestinal microbiota and protect the animals from the undesirable effects of intense acute exercise.

  12. Potential Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Hydrophilic Fraction of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. Seed Oil on Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Costantini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we characterized conjugated linolenic acids (e.g., punicic acid as the major components of the hydrophilic fraction (80% aqueous methanol extract from pomegranate (Punica granatum L. seed oil (PSO and evaluated their anti-inflammatory potential on some human colon (HT29 and HCT116, liver (HepG2 and Huh7, breast (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and prostate (DU145 cancer lines. Our results demonstrated that punicic acid and its congeners induce a significant decrease of cell viability for two breast cell lines with a related increase of the cell cycle G0/G1 phase respect to untreated cells. Moreover, the evaluation of a great panel of cytokines expressed by MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells showed that the levels of VEGF and nine pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IL-17, IP-10, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1 and TNF-α decreased in a dose dependent way with increasing amounts of the hydrophilic extracts of PSO, supporting the evidence of an anti-inflammatory effect. Taken together, the data herein suggest a potential synergistic cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant role of the polar compounds from PSO.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of denture adhesive associated with Equisetum giganteum- and Punica granatum-enriched fractions against Candida albicans biofilms on acrylic resin surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Nara Ligia Martins; Saldanha, Luiz Leonardo; da Silva, Rafaela Alves; Pinke, Karen Henriette; da Costa, Eliane Ferraz; Porto, Vinicius Carvalho; Dokkedal, Anne Lígia; Lara, Vanessa Soares

    2018-01-01

    Candida biofilms adhere to the internal surface of removable dentures, which is an etiological factor in the pathogenesis of denture stomatitis (DS). Adhesive materials are used at the base of maxillary complete dentures to improve their retention and chewing qualities. This article reports the antimicrobial activity of the enriched fractions of Equisetum giganteum and Punica granatum incorporated into a denture adhesive against C. albicans biofilm. The biofilms were induced on the surface of heat-cured acrylic resin specimens that were previously treated with a mixture of adhesive/herb extracts. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated by CFU counts, XTT reduction, and SEM and CLSM analysis. Both herb extracts amplified the anti-biofilm action of the adhesive on the acrylic resin by up to 12 h. Therefore, when these extracts were combined with COREGA®, they played a collaborative and innovative role in biofilm control and can be considered alternatives for temporary use in the treatment and/or prevention of DS.

  14. Desarrollo de un proceso tecnológico a escala de laboratorio para la extracción de polifenoles totales del fruto de la Punica granatum L

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    Jorge Enrique Rodríguez Chanfrau

    Full Text Available Introducción: Punica granatum L., (Punicaceae es una especie conocida en Cuba como granada. Algunos fitocomponentes presentes en la fruta muestran una fuerte actividad antioxidante. En la medicina tradicional esta planta es empleada en el tratamiento de infecciones parasitarias, diarreas y disentería, así como en el tratamiento de asma, catarro, fiebre, inflamaciones y otras. En años recientes, la actividad biológica de los polifenoles presentes en la fruta de esta especie, ha despertado el interés de los investigadores y la industria farmacéutica. Objetivo: establecer un proceso a escala de laboratorio que permita extraer los polifenoles totales de la fruta. Métodos: se aplicó un proceso de maceración para la extracción de los polifenoles de la fruta y se realizó la optimización de los parámetros mediante diseños experimentales. Se evaluaron las variables independientes: tiempo de extracción, relación droga-menstruo y concentración alcohólica. Resultados: las tres variables presentaron una influencia significativa sobre el proceso de extracción de polifenoles. Conclusiones: en las condiciones de trabajo establecidas, la extracción óptima es la siguiente: tiempo de extracción de 72 h, relación droga-menstruo de 1:20 y concentración alcohólica del 50 % (v/v.

  15. Amelioration of radiation induced DNA damage and biochemical alterations by Punica Granatum (L) extracts and synthetic ellagic acid in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satheesh Kumar Bhandary, B.; Sharmila, K.P.; Suchetha Kumari, N.; Vadisha Bhat, S.; Sherly, Sharmila; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been used in cancer treatment for many decades; Although effective in killing tumor cells, ROS produced in radiotherapy threaten the integrity and survival of surrounding normal cells. ROS are scavenged by radioprotectors before they can interact with biochemical molecules, thus reducing harmful effects of radiation. The pomegranate, Punica granatum L., an ancient, mystical, and highly distinctive fruit, is the predominant member of the Punicaceae family. It is used in several systems of medicine for a variety of ailments. The objective of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of ethanolic extracts of pomegranate whole fruit (EPWF) and seeds (EPS) and Synthetic Ellagic acid (EA) against Electron Beam Radiation (EBR) induced DNA damage and biochemical alterations in Swiss Albino mice. The extracts and synthetic compound were assessed for its radical scavenging property by DPPH radical scavenging and Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assays. The animals were treated with 200 mg/kg body wt. of pomegranate extracts and Ellagic acid for 15 days before exposure to 6 Gy of EBR. Radiation induced DNA damage was assessed by comet assay in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of mice. The biochemical estimations were carried out in the serum and RBC lysate of the animals. The plant extracts and synthetic compound exhibited good radical scavenging and reducing properties.The pretreated animals before irradiation caused a reduction in the comet length, olive tail moment, % DNA in tail when compared to irradiated group. The biochemical parameters such as lipid peroxidation was significantly depleted in the treated groups when compared to irradiated group followed by significant elevation in reduced glutathione. Our findings indicate the ameliorating effects of pomegranate extracts and synthetic ellagic acid on radiation induced DNA damage and biochemical changes in mice may be due to its free radical scavenging and increased antioxidant

  16. PgTeL, the lectin found in Punica granatum juice, is an antifungal agent against Candida albicans and Candida krusei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Pollyanna Michelle; de Moura, Maiara Celine; Gomes, Francis Soares; da Silva Trentin, Danielle; Silva de Oliveira, Ana Patrícia; de Mello, Gabriela Souto Vieira; da Rocha Pitta, Maira Galdino; de Melo Rego, Moacyr Jesus Barreto; Coelho, Luana Cassandra Breitenbach Barroso; Macedo, Alexandre José; de Figueiredo, Regina Celia Bressan Queiroz; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique

    2018-03-01

    The pomegranate (Punica granatum) sarcotesta contains a chitin-binding lectin (PgTeL) with antibacterial activity against human pathogenic species. In this work, the structural stability of PgTeL was evaluated by fluorimetric analysis and the lectin was evaluated for cytotoxicity to human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and antifungal activity against Candida albicans and Candida krusei. PgTeL folding was impaired when lectin was incubated at pH≥6.0. On the other hand, the lectin did not undergo unfolding even when heated at 100°C. PgTeL (1, 10, and 100μg/mL) was not cytotoxic to PBMCs. Antifungal activity was detected for C. albicans (MIC: 25μg/mL; MFC: 50μg/mL) and C. krusei (MIC and MFC of 12.5μg/mL). Treatment of yeast cells with PgTeL resulted in decrease of intracellular ATP content even at sub-inhibitory concentrations (½MIC and ¼MIC) and induced lipid peroxidation. In addition, PgTeL damaged the integrity of fungal cell wall of both species, with more pronounced effects in C. krusei. The lectin showed significant antibiofilm activity on C. albicans at sub-inhibitory concentrations (0.195 and 0.39μg/mL). In conclusion, PgTeL is an anti-Candida agent whose action mechanism involves oxidative stress, energetic collapse, damage to the cell wall and rupture of yeast cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Punica granatum L. Juice Attenuates Experimental Cerebral Vasospasm in the Rabbit Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Model: A Basilar Artery Morphometric Study and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvenc, Yahya; Demirci, Adnan; Billur, Deniz; Aydin, Sevim; Ozeren, Ersin; Bayram, Pinar; Dilli, Alper; Gokce, Emre Cemal; Yaman, Onur; Celik, Haydar; Karatay, Mete; Alagoz, Fatih; Kaptanoglu, Erkan

    2017-03-01

    Background This study investigated the effect of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) juice on the rabbit basilar artery in an experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model. Methods  Eighteen adult male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: a control group ( n  = 6), SAH group ( n  = 6), and SAH + treatment group ( n  = 6). Basilar artery diameter was measured with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in all groups at the beginning of the study. Experimental SAH was created by injecting autologous arterial blood into the cisterna magna. In the treatment group, the subjects were administered a daily dose of 30 ml/kg pomegranate juice via gastric gavage for 4 days after the SAH. The SAH group and SAH + treatment group underwent cerebral MRA after 72 hours. After a neurologic score assessment, all the animals were killed. The wall thickness and lumen area of the basilar artery were measured histometrically in all groups, and the apoptotic cell percentage in the artery was identified. The mean diameter of the basilar artery during MRA was measured. Results  Pomegranate improved neurologic functions compared with the SAH group ( p   0.05). The apoptotic cell rate in the SAH + treatment group was significantly lower than in the SAH group ( p   0.05). Discussion  Pomegranate was shown to have a vasospasm- attenuating effect on the basilar artery in the rabbit SAH model for the first time in our study. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Avaliação da atividade antioxidante do extrato hidroalcoólico da romã (Punica granatum, L. sobre células da linhagem Caco-2 Antioxidant activity evaluation of the pomegranate (Punica granatum, L. hidroalcoholic extract at Caco-2 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Archilla Jardini

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A absorção dos compostos antioxidantes presentes no extrato hidroalcoólico da polpa da romã (Punica granatum, L. foi avaliada utilizando-se o modelo de cultura de células, cuja linhagem escolhida foi a Caco-2, provenientes de um adenocarcinoma do cólon. O extrato hidroalcoólico da polpa apresentou um conteúdo de 832 µg equivalente de ácido gálico.mL-1 de extrato e sua atividade antioxidante mostrou valores de 5,9% (0,1 ppm a 93,09% (8 ppm de capacidade de redução do radical DPPH•. As células tratadas com o extrato apresentaram uma inibição de crescimento celular de 4,16% (200 ppm, e a absorção dos compostos antioxidantes foi de 63,25%. Para o ácido gálico, os resultados mostraram uma inibição de 2,98% (400 ppm e uma absorção de 72,54% dos compostos antioxidantes. Os resultados mostraram que o método de avaliação de absorção através de cultura de células foi eficaz, e que os compostos antioxidantes foram absorvidos pelas células, que se apresentaram viáveis, após um período de exposição prolongado aos compostos.The absorption of antioxidant compounds present in hydroalcoholic extract of pomegranate pulp (Punica granatum, L. was evaluated by a cell culture model, using the Caco-2 cells (from an adenocarcinom of the colon. The hydroalcoholic extract of the pulp showed a content of reducing compounds of approximately 832 µg equivalent to gallic acid.mL-1 of the extract and its antioxidant activity was from 5.9% (0.1 ppm to 93.09% (8 ppm, measured by the capacity of reducing the DPPH• radical. The cells that were treated with the extract showed a 4.16% of growing inibition (at a concentration of 200 ppm, and an absorption of the antioxidants compounds of approximately 63.25%. The gallic acid showed, at 400 ppm of concentration, a growing inhibition of 2.98% and anabsorption of 72.54% of the antioxidant compounds. These results pointed out that the method of evaluating the absorption by using cell culture was

  19. One pot environmental friendly synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Punica Granatum Juice: A novel antioxidant agent for future dermatological and cosmetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubitosa, Jennifer; Rizzi, Vito; Lopedota, Angela; Fini, Paola; Laurenzana, Anna; Fibbi, Gabriella; Fanelli, Fiorenza; Petrella, Andrea; Laquintana, Valentino; Denora, Nunzio; Comparelli, Roberto; Cosma, Pinalysa

    2018-07-01

    The interesting properties of Gold Nanoparticles (AuNPs) make them attractive for different application fields such as cosmetology, medicine and clinical nanotechnologies. In this work a fast, easy and eco-friendly method for the AuNPs synthesis is proposed by using the Punica Granatum Juice (PGJ) with potential dermatological and cosmetic applications. The AuNPs antioxidant activity, due to the presence of phenols from the juice, and their use as booster for improving the Sun Protection Factor (SPF) in commercial sunscreen formulations, are thus expounded. By using appropriate amounts of PGJ and HAuCl 4 , under mild work conditions, AuNPs with a mean size of 100 ± 40 nm are observed and carefully characterized. Solution pH, temperature, and volume were also changed for optimizing the AuNPs formation and features. The antioxidant activity was studied, by evaluating the AuNP ability of scavenging the radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazylhydrate (DPPH). This finding was confirmed performing special experiments focused on the reaction between AuNPs and H 2 O 2 , by using suitable probes, such as 4-thiothymidine (S 4 TdR) and Cytochrome-c (Cyt-c). The SPF value was also calculated. The synthetized AuNPs showed a surface plasmon in visible range at 577 nm and resulted stable for long time in aqueous medium, also changing the pH values in the range 2-12. The studied antioxidant activity, confirmed also by performing special experiments with suitable probes, demonstrated the high performance of AuNPs. The AuNP photostability under sun irradiation is also shown. The calculated SPF values were in the range 3-18, related to AuNPs concentration in the range 1.80 × 10 -12 -1.00 × 10 -11  M. The same AuNPs concentrations were used for cellular experiments. Indeed, since the AuNPs-PGJ mediated will be potentially introduced by dermal contact, dermal fibroblasts (Human Dermal Fibroblasts, HDF) and Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HMVEC) were used to

  20. Preparation and antibacterial activities of Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites made by pomegranate (Punica granatum) rind extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Ren, Yan-yu; Wang, Tao; Wang, Chuang

    Nano-silver and its composite materials are widely used in medicine, food and other industries due to their strong conductivity, size effect and other special performances. So far, more microbial researches have been applied, but a plant method is rarely reported. In order to open up a new way to prepare AgNP composites, pomegranate peel extract was used in this work to reduce Ag+ to prepare Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites. UV-Vis was employed to detect and track the reduction of Ag+ and the forming process of AgNPs. The composition, structure and size of the crystal were analyzed by XRD and TEM. Results showed that, under mild conditions, pomegranate peel extract reacted with dilute AgNO3 solution to produce Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites. At pH = 8 and 10 mmol/L of AgNO3 concentration, the size of the achieved composites ranged between 15 and 35 nm with spherical shapes and good crystallinity. The bactericidal experiment indicated that the prepared Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticles had strong antibacterial activity against gram positive bacteria and gram negative bacteria. FTIR analysis revealed that biological macromolecules with groups of sbnd NH2, sbnd OH, and others were distributed on the surface of the newly synthesized Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticles. This provided a useful clue to further study the AgNP biosynthesis mechanism.

  1. Preparation and antibacterial activities of Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites made by pomegranate (Punica granatum rind extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yang

    Full Text Available Nano-silver and its composite materials are widely used in medicine, food and other industries due to their strong conductivity, size effect and other special performances. So far, more microbial researches have been applied, but a plant method is rarely reported. In order to open up a new way to prepare AgNP composites, pomegranate peel extract was used in this work to reduce Ag+ to prepare Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites. UV–Vis was employed to detect and track the reduction of Ag+ and the forming process of AgNPs. The composition, structure and size of the crystal were analyzed by XRD and TEM. Results showed that, under mild conditions, pomegranate peel extract reacted with dilute AgNO3 solution to produce Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites. At pH = 8 and 10 mmol/L of AgNO3 concentration, the size of the achieved composites ranged between 15 and 35 nm with spherical shapes and good crystallinity. The bactericidal experiment indicated that the prepared Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticles had strong antibacterial activity against gram positive bacteria and gram negative bacteria. FTIR analysis revealed that biological macromolecules with groups of NH2, OH, and others were distributed on the surface of the newly synthesized Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticles. This provided a useful clue to further study the AgNP biosynthesis mechanism. Keywords: Pomegranate rind, Biosynthesis, Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites, Antibacterial activity

  2. Effect of Sodium Chloride Concentrations and Its Foliar Application Time on Quantitative and Qualitative Characteristics of Pomegranate Fruit (Punica granatum L. CV. “Malas Saveh”

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    V. Rouhi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. belong to Punicaceae family is native to Iran and grown extensively in arid and semi-arid regions worldwide. Pomegranate is also important in human medicine and its components have a wide range of clinical applications. Cracking causes a major fruit loss, which is a serious commercial loss to farmers. Fruit cracking, seems to be a problem that lessens the marketability to a great extent. Fruit cracking is one of the physiological disorders wherever pomegranate trees are grown. It may be due to moisture imbalances as this fruit is very sensitive to variation in soil moisture prolonged drought causes hardening of skin and if this is followed by heavy irrigation the pulp grows then skin grows and cracks. Many factors i.e., climate, soil and irrigation, varieties, pruning, insects and nutrition statues influence the growth and production of fruit trees. Deficiencies of various nutrients are related to soil types, plants and even to various cultivars. Most nutrients are readily fixed in soil having different PH. Plant roots are unable to absorb these nutrients adequately from the dry topsoil. Foliar fertilization is particularly useful under conditions where the absorption of nutrients through the soil and this difficult situation to be present in the nutrients such as calcium. Since the calcium element is needed, so spraying them at the right time is correct way to save the plant requirements. Therefore, a research conducted on effect of sodium chloride concentrations and its foliar application time on quantitative and qualitative characteristics of pomegranate fruit (Punica granatum L. CV. “Malas Saveh”. Materials and Methods: An experiment conducted at Jarghoyeh, Esfahan, Iran in 2012. The factors were Sodium chloride (0, 5 and 10 g/L and times of spray (15, 45 and 75 days before harvest. The study was factorial experiment in the base of randomized complete blocks design with three replications

  3. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Pomegranate (Punica granatum on Eimeria papillata-Induced Infection in Mice

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    Omar S. O. Amer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coccidiosis is the most prevalent disease causing widespread economic loss, especially in poultry farms. Here, we investigated the effects of pomegranate peel extract (PPE on the outcome of coccidiosis caused by Eimeria papillata in mice. The data showed that mice infected with E. papillata and treated with PPE revealed a significant decrease in the output of oocysts in their faeces by day 5 p.i. Infection also induced inflammation and injury of the jejunum. This was evidenced (i as increases in reactive oxygen species, (ii, as increased neutrophils and decreased lymphocytes in blood (ii as increased mRNA levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, Bcl-2 gene, and of the cytokines interferon gamma (IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β, and (iv as downregulation of mucin gene MUC2 mRNA. All these infection-induced parameters were significantly altered during PPE treatment. In particular, PPE counteracted the E. papillata-induced loss of the total antioxidant capacity. Our data indicated that PPE treatment significantly attenuated inflammation and injury of the jejunum induced by E. papillata infections.

  4. Nanoscaled Electrocatalytic Optically Modulated ZnO Nanoparticles through Green Process of Punica granatum L. and Their Antibacterial Activities

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    Xolile Fuku

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most recently, green synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles has become an interesting subject of the nanoscience and nanotechnology. The use of plant systems has been deemed a green route and a dependable method for nanoparticle biosynthesis, owing to its environmental friendly nature. The present work demonstrates the bioreductive green synthesis of nanosized zinc oxide (ZnO using peel extracts of pomegranate. Highly crystalline ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs which are 5 nm in particle size were characterised by HRTEM and XRD. FT-IR spectra confirmed the presence of the biomolecules and formation of plant protein-coated ZnO NPs and also the pure ZnO NPs. Electrochemical investigation revealed the redox properties and the conductivity of the as-prepared ZnO nanoparticles. The optical band gap of ZnO NPs was calculated to be 3.48 eV which indicates that ZnO NPs can be used in metal oxide semiconductor-based devices. Further, the nanomaterials were also found to be good inhibitors of bacterial strains at both low and high concentrations of 5–10 mg mL−1.

  5. Photoprotection by Punica granatum seed oil nanoemulsion entrapping polyphenol-rich ethyl acetate fraction against UVB-induced DNA damage in human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccarin, Thaisa; Mitjans, Montserrat; Ramos, David; Lemos-Senna, Elenara; Vinardell, Maria Pilar

    2015-12-01

    There has been an increase in the use of botanicals as skin photoprotective agents. Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is well known for its high concentration of polyphenolic compounds and for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to analyze the photoprotection provided by P. granatum seed oil nanoemulsion entrapping the polyphenol-rich ethyl acetate fraction against UVB-induced DNA damage in the keratinocyte HaCaT cell line. For this purpose, HaCaT cells were pretreated for 1h with nanoemulsions in a serum-free medium and then irradiated with UVB (90-200 mJ/cm(2)) rays. Fluorescence microscopy analysis provided information about the cellular internalization of the nanodroplets. We also determined the in vitro SPF of the nanoemulsions and evaluated their phototoxicity using the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake Phototoxicity Test. The nanoemulsions were able to protect the cells' DNA against UVB-induced damage in a concentration dependent manner. Nanodroplets were internalized by the cells but a higher proportion was detected along the cell membrane. The SPF obtained (~25) depended on the concentration of the ethyl acetate fraction and pomegranate seed oil in the nanoemulsion. The photoprotective formulations were classified as non-phototoxic. In conclusion, nanoemulsions entrapping the polyphenol-rich ethyl acetate fraction show potential for use as a sunscreen product. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes by pomegranate (Punica granatum) peel extract in meat paté at different temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayrapetyan, H.; Hazeleger, W.C.; Beumer, R.R.

    2012-01-01

    Natural antimicrobials are being more and more considered as alternative approach for controlling growth of microorganisms in food. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pomegranate extract’s (PE) potential to be used as a natural preservative in ready to eat meats. Listeria monocytogenes

  7. Punica granatum L. Fruit Aqueous Extract Suppresses Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated p53/p65/miR-145 Expressions followed by Elevated Levels of irs-1 in Alloxan-Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Ehsan; Montasser Kouhsari, Shideh; Izad, Maryam

    2018-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an apoptosis inducer in pancreatic β-cells that stimulates p53/p65 mediated microRNA (miR)-145 expression. Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) is an antioxidant fruit that attenuates ROS generation. This study examines the effects of pomegranate fruit aqueous extract (PGE) on the levels of ROS, p53, p65, miR-145, and its target insulin receptor substrate 1 (irs-1) mRNA in Alloxan-diabetic male Wistar rats. In this experimental study, diabetic rats received different doses of PGE. The effects of the PGE polyphenols were examined through a long-term PGE treatment period model, followed by an evaluation of the plasma and tissue contents of free fatty acids (FFAs), triglycerides (TG), and glycogen compared with diabetic controls (DC) and normal controls (NC). We used real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to investigate the modulation of p53, p65, miR-145, and irs-1 expression levels. There was a noticeable reduction in fasting blood glucose (FBG) and ROS generation compared to DC. We observed marked decreases in p53, p65, miR-145 expression levels followed by an elevated level of irs-1, which contributed to improvement in insulin sensitivity. PGE administration downregulated miR-145 levels in Alloxan-diabetic Wistar rats by suppression of ROS-mediated p53 and p65 overexpression. Copyright© by Royan Institute. All rights reserved.

  8. A pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) WD40-repeat gene is a functional homologue of Arabidopsis TTG1 and is involved in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis during pomegranate fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Simhon, Zohar; Judeinstein, Sylvie; Nadler-Hassar, Talia; Trainin, Taly; Bar-Ya'akov, Irit; Borochov-Neori, Hamutal; Holland, Doron

    2011-11-01

    Anthocyanins are the major pigments responsible for the pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruit skin color. The high variability in fruit external color in pomegranate cultivars reflects variations in anthocyanin composition. To identify genes involved in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway in the pomegranate fruit skin we have isolated, expressed and characterized the pomegranate homologue of the Arabidopsis thaliana TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1), encoding a WD40-repeat protein. The TTG1 protein is a regulator of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins (PAs) biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, and acts by the formation of a transcriptional regulatory complex with two other regulatory proteins: bHLH and MYB. Our results reveal that the pomegranate gene, designated PgWD40, recovered the anthocyanin, PAs, trichome and seed coat mucilage phenotype in Arabidopsis ttg1 mutant. PgWD40 expression and anthocyanin composition in the skin were analyzed during pomegranate fruit development, in two accessions that differ in skin color intensity and timing of appearance. The results indicate high positive correlation between the total cyanidin derivatives quantity (red pigments) and the expression level of PgWD40. Furthermore, strong correlation was found between the steady state levels of PgWD40 transcripts and the transcripts of pomegranate homologues of the structural genes PgDFR and PgLDOX. PgWD40, PgDFR and PgLDOX expression also correlated with the expression of pomegranate homologues of the regulatory genes PgAn1 (bHLH) and PgAn2 (MYB). On the basis of our results we propose that PgWD40 is involved in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis during pomegranate fruit development and that expression of PgWD40, PgAn1 and PgAn2 in the pomegranate fruit skin is required to regulate the expression of downstream structural genes involved in the anthocyanin biosynthesis.

  9. Antitrypanosomal Potentials of Ethanolic Leaf Extracts of Punica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three doses (20mg/kg, 40mg/kg,80mg/kg) of ethanolic extracts of the leaves of Punica granatum were screened for trypanocidal activity against Trypanosoma brucei bruce in Balb Strain Albino mice. Parasitaemia and disappearance of clinical signs were used as parameters to monitor the efficacy of the extracts using the ...

  10. In vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity of pumpkin seeds and pomegranate peels extracts against Ascaridia galli

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    Amer R. Abdel Aziz

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Pumpkin seeds (Cucurbita pepo and Pomegranate peel (Punica granatum have anthelmintic properties. The aim of this study was to compare the anthelmintic efficacy of pumpkin seeds ethanolic extract and pomegranate peel aqueous extract against Ascaridia galli in vitro and in vivo in Baladi chicks. On adult worms, the extracts of the two herbs were compared in vitro at concentrations of 25, 50, and 75 mg/ml with fenbendazole at a concentration of 5 mg/ml. Chicks were infected with Ascaridia galli eggs containing second stage larva and treated with 2000 mg/kg of each of the extracts compared with 100 mg/kg fenbendazole. In vitro, all concentrations of pumpkin seed extract and the concentration of 75 mg/ml pomegranate peel extract exhibited a nearly similar effect to fenbendazole. In vivo, the mortality rate of the worms extracted from the 2000 mg/kg pumpkin seeds extract-treated chicken was non-significantly different from that of fenbendazole for 48 h. While pomegranate peels extract exhibited a lower lethal effect than fenbendazole. The anthelmintic efficacy was dependent on time and concentration. The study presented the anthelmintic efficacy of the pumpkin seeds and pomegranate peel extracts on Ascaridia galli. Pumpkin seed extract was more effective than pomegranate peel extract. Future studies to determine the optimal dose to maximize their effectiveness especially for pumpkin seeds as anthelmintic therapeutic are required. Keywords: Pomegranate peel, Pumpkin seeds, Anthelmintic, Ascaridia galli, In vitro, In vivo

  11. Antioxidant activity directed isolations form punica granatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqi, R.; Saeed, M.G.; Sayeed, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    The extracts derived from pomegranate juice following antioxidant activity directed isolation were screened for their antioxidant activity through their ability to scavenge 2,2- diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals. Only fractions which exhibited >50 / 0 DPPH scavenging effect at each step of isolation were selected for further purification and their ability to reduce peroxide formation (peroxide value) in heated com oil. Phytochemical analysis of the pure compounds finally obtained, revealed the presence of pelargonidin-3- galactose (Pg-3-galactose), cyanidin-3-glucose (Cy-3-Glucose), gallic acid, quercetin and myricetin in the fractions exhibiting >50% DPPH scavenging potential. The order of antioxidant activity of these pure compounds by DPPH method was found to be gallic acid> quercetin> myricetin> Cy-3-galactose> Pg-3-Glucose while order with respect to reduction in peroxide value (PV) was the reverse of DPPH. (author)

  12. Micropropagation of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) 'Bhagava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... 'Bhagava' cultivar using two different media combination. MS and WPM. MS medium proved to produce best vegetative growth characteristics compared to WPM medium. However in contrast to our findings Samir et al. (2009) found that WPM is best for vegetative growth compared to MS and NN medium.

  13. Antiplaque and antigingivitis effects of a gel containing Punica granatum Linn extract: a double-blind clinical study in humans Efeito antiplaca e antiinflamatório de um gel contendo extrato de romã: estudo clínico duplo-cego em humanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Daher Yunes Salgado

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The antiplaque and antigingivitis effects of a gel containing 10% Punica granatum Linn extract were evaluated using a 21-day partial-mouth experimental model of gingivitis. METHODS: 23 volunteers participated in this cross-over, double-blind study, carried out in 2 phases of 21 days each. For each period of the experiment, an acrylic toothshield was made for each volunteer to carry the test or placebo gel as well as to avoid brushing of the 4 experimental teeth (posterior teeth in the lower left quadrant. The subjects were randomly assigned to use either the placebo gel (control group or the test gel (experimental group and were instructed to brush the remaining teeth normally 3 times a day. On days 0 and 21, the visible plaque index (VPI and gingival bleeding index (GBI were recorded. RESULTS: The results did not show statistically significant difference between control and experimental groups for either of the indices (VPI and GBI. CONCLUSION: The gel containing 10% Punica granatum Linn extract was not efficient in preventing supragingival dental plaque formation and gingivitis.OBJETIVOS: O efeito antiplaca e antigengivite de um gel contendo extrato de romã a 10% foi avaliado utilizando um modelo de gengivite experimental parcial em humanos. MÉTODOS: 23 indivíduos participaram voluntariamente deste estudo cruzado, duplo-cego, compreendendo dois períodos de 21 dias cada um. Uma moldeira de acrílico foi confeccionada para cada participante, a qual foi utilizada como carreadora dos géis sobre a área a ser avaliada (hemiarco inferior esquerdo. Os sujeitos foram aleatoriamente designados para usar o gel placebo (grupo controle ou o gel teste (grupo experimental, sendo instruídos a colocar o gel na moldeira e esta sobre os dentes teste, escovando os outros normalmente três vezes ao dia. No dia 0 e dia 21 os índices de placa visível (IPV e índice de sangramento gengival (ISG foram registrados. RESULTADOS: Os resultados n

  14. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Pomegranate Juice and Peel Extracts on Cariogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianmaria Fabrizio Ferrazzano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of hydroalcoholic extracts of pomegranate (Punica granatum L. peel and juice, against the microorganisms considered the main etiologic agents of dental caries. Methods. The values of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC were determined against Streptococcus mutans Clarke ATCC® 25175™ strain and Rothia dentocariosa clinical isolate. Results. Peel extracts inhibit effectively the growth and survival of S. mutans ATCC 25175 strain and R. dentocariosa clinical isolate with MIC and MBC values of 10 μg/μl and 15 μg/μl, respectively. Furthermore, the pomegranate juice extract showed high inhibitory activity against S. mutans ATCC 25175 strain with a MIC value of 25 μg/μl and a MBC value of 40 μg/μl, whereas, against R. dentocariosa, it has displayed a moderate inhibitory activity, with MIC and MBC values of 20 μg/μl and 140 μg/μl, respectively. Conclusions. In vitro microbiological tests demonstrate that the hydroalcoholic extracts of pomegranate juice and peel are able to contrast the main cariogenic bacteria involved in tooth decay. Although being preliminary data, our results suggest that pomegranate polyphenolic compounds could represent a good adjuvant for the prevention and treatment of dental caries.

  15. Analysis of phenolic compounds in different parts of pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit by HPLC-PDA-ESI/MS and evaluation of their antioxidant activity: application to different Italian varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Marina; Fanali, Chiara; Tripodo, Giusy; Dugo, Paola; Muleo, Rosario; Dugo, Laura; De Gara, Laura; Mondello, Luigi

    2018-06-01

    The analysis of pomegranate phenolic compounds belonging to different classes in different fruit parts was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array and mass spectrometry detection. Two different separation methods were optimized for the analysis of anthocyanins and hydrolyzable tannins along with phenolic acids and flavonoids. Two C 18 columns, core-shell and fully porous particle stationary phases, were used. The parameters for separation of phenolic compounds were optimized considering chromatographic resolution and analysis time. Thirty-five phenolic compounds were found, and 28 of them were tentatively identified as belonging to four different phenolic compound classes; namely, anthocyanins, phenolic acids, hydrolyzable tannins, and flavonoids. Quantitative analysis was performed with a mixture of nine phenolic compounds belonging to phenolic compound classes representative of pomegranate. The method was then fully validated in terms of retention time precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation, limit of detection, limit of quantification, and linearity range. Phenolic compounds were analyzed directly in pomegranate juice, and after solvent extraction with a mixture of water and methanol with a small percentage of acid in peel and pulp samples. The accuracy of the extraction method was also assessed, and satisfactory values were obtained. Finally, the method was used to study identified analytes in pomegranate juice, peel, and pulp of six different Italian varieties and one international variety. Differences in phenolic compound profiles among the different pomegranate parts were observed. Pomegranate peel samples showed a high concentration of phenolic compounds, ellagitannins being the most abundant ones, with respect to pulp and juice samples for each variety. With the same samples, total phenols and antioxidant activity were evaluated through colorimetric assays, and the results were correlated among them.

  16. Keeping quality of beef sausage using ethanolic extract of gamma-irradiated pomegranate peel powder

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    Mohammed Ibrahim Ali Soliman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to evaluate the antioxidant and antibacterial activity of ethanol extracts from gamma-irradiated pomegranate (Punica granatum peel powder (PE at the dose levels of 0, 3, 6, and 9 kGy. The аntioxidant activity of the extracts was estimated using the radical scavenging activity against 2,2′-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH•, β-carotene/linoleic acid bleaching system, and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP. Antibacterial activity of the extracts was assessed against Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsilla penumoneae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella typhumurium. The results showed that PE treated with 6 kGy had a higher content of total phenolic compounds (TPC, total flavonoid compounds (TFC, and antioxidant activity. Hence, the PE of 6 kGy-irradiated peels were selected to be added to beef sausage. Different concentrations of 6 KGy-irradiated PE were applied to improve beef sausage hygienic quality and extend the shelf life during cold storage (4°C. The results indicated that when 12 mL of the extract were added to one kg of beef sausage, the shelf-life of the sausage was extended from 15 days to 50 days (at 4°C, compared with the control, without changes of the microbiological, chemical, and sensory attributes.

  17. The Extraction and Determination of Ellagic Acid Content in the Peels of Six Iranian Pomegranates Cultivars Using a New Miniaturized Matrix Solid-Phase Dispersion Method

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    Fariba Nazari Serenjeh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim:The peels of six Iranian pomegranates (Punica granatum L. cultivars, as a traditional medicine, were treated with a new miniaturized matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD method for the HPLC determination of ellagic acid (EA. Materials and Methods:In the proposed method, only 10mg of the sample powder was ground and blended with an equal amount of C18 sorbent in an agate mortar. The use of the agate mortar with smooth surface facilitated the sample transfer into a cartridge and reduced the required amount of sample and sorbent. Micro volumes of dichloromethane, n-hexane and methanol were used as modifier, washing and elution solvents, respectively. The eluate was injected into an HPLC-UV system for the analysis. Results:Several factors such as the type and amount of dispersing sorbent, modifier, washing solvent and eluent were carefully studied and optimized. Six replicated analyses at the optimized conditions resulted in a recovery of 96.7% and a relative standard deviation of 5.87%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the extraction and determination of EA in the peels samples. Conclusion:According to the ultimate results, the MSPD method is an efficient technique for the quantitative extraction of EA from the peels of pomegranate. Malas cultivar has the highest amount (18.1 g kg-1 of ellagic acid content compared to the other studied pomegranate cultivars.

  18. Is pomegranate peels infusion effective for disinfection of toothbrushes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Lima de Luna FREIRE

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Methods of decontamination or sanitization of toothbrushes have been questioned. Objective This study assessed the effectiveness of pomegranate peels infusion as a disinfectant of toothbrushes against Streptococcus mutans. Material and method A sample of 16 schoolchildren aged between 7 and 9 years performed brushing 5 days/week, with a careful brushing once a day. After each day of brushing, the toothbrushes were washed and sprayed with one disinfectant solution. This procedure was repeated for 4 weeks using one of the different solutions per week: distilled water (G1; negative control, pomegranate (Punica granatum Linn peels infusion (G2, 1% sodium hypochlorite (G3 and 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate (G4. After the fifth day, toothbrushes were collected for laboratory analysis. Toothbrushes heads were subjected to agitation in saline dilution of 10–1, 10–2,10–3, and 25 μL of each dilution were seeded in mitis salivarius agar culture medium for S. mutans colony-forming unit (CFU counting. One calibrated examiner (Kappa = 0.91 performed the CFU (mL–1 × 104 counts. Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn Multiple Comparison tests were used at a significance level of 5%. Result G1 presented the highest number of CFU (3.9 ± 8.4, followed by G2 (3.2 ± 4.0. No S. mutans growth was observed in G3 and G4. There was no statistically significant difference between G1 and G2 and between G3 and G4 (p>0.05. Conclusion Pomegranate infusion was completely ineffective for the disinfection of toothbrushes against S. mutans when compared with 1% sodium hypochlorite and 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate solutions.

  19. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Chemical peels Overview Chemical peels: Overview Also called chemexfoliation , derma peeling Do ... Overview Chemical peels: FAQs Chemical peels: Preparation FAQs Chemical peels: FAQs To help you decide whether this ...

  20. Potential Application of Nanoemulsions for Skin Delivery of Pomegranate Peel Polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccarin, Thaisa; Lemos-Senna, Elenara

    2017-11-01

    Pomegranate peel and seeds have demonstrated to possess antioxidant compounds with potential application to protect the skin against the ultraviolet radiation damage. However, the photoprotection activity is dependent on the amount of these compounds that reach the viable skin layers. In this paper, we describe the in vitro skin permeation and retention of the major pomegranate peel polyphenols using Franz diffusion cells, after entrapping a ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) from Punica granatum peel extract into nanoemulsions (NEs) prepared with pomegranate seed oil (PSO) or medium chain triglyceride oil (MCT). The in vitro skin permeation of gallic acid (GA), ellagic acid (EA), and punicalagin (PC) was evaluated using a HPLC-DAD validated method. After 8 h of skin permeation, all polyphenol compounds were mostly retained in the skin and did not reach the receptor compartment. However, a 2.2-fold enhancement of the retained amount of gallic acid in the stratum corneum was verified after EAF-loaded NEs are applied, when compared with the free EAF. GA and EA were delivered to the viable epidermis and dermis only when nanoemulsions were applied onto the skin. The mean retained amounts of GA and EA in the EP and DE after applying the EAF-loaded PSO-NE were 1.78 and 1.36 μg cm -2 and 1.10 and 0.97 μg cm -2 , respectively. Similar values were obtained after applying the EAF-loaded MCT-NE. The skin permeation results were supported by the confocal microscopy images. These results evidenced the promising application of nanoemulsions to deliver the pomegranate polyphenols into the deeper skin layers.

  1. Root activity distribution pattern of Ganesh pomegranate (Punica granatum) seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotur, S.C.; Murthy, S.V.K.

    2001-01-01

    In one-year old Ganesh pomegranate seedlings raised on a loamy sand (Typic Haplustalf) under rain fed conditions, during winter (January-March) one-half of the active roots (44-51%) resided at 50 cm radial distance. Depth wise, bulk (44-78%) of the roots were found at 15 cm depth. The results indicate that the zone of high root activity is located around 50 cm distance from trunk and applications of fertilizers in this zone may lead to enhanced use efficiency of fertilizers. (author)

  2. Studies on Coloration and UV Protective Action of Anar Peel (Pomegranate Rind) as an Effective Natural Colorant for Cotton Khadi Fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnur, H. D.; Samanta, Ashis Kumar; Verma, D. K.; Kaware, Runali

    2017-10-01

    Besides optimization of conditions of colour extraction from dried anar peel, effect of different single and double mordants, dyeing process variables and UV protective action of anar peels (pomegranate rind i.e. Punica granatum L.) as a natural colourant is studied in this work. Mordants used are potash alum, aluminium sulphate and stannous chloride (as metallic salt mordant) and harda (i.e., myrobolan as natural mordant) from natural source. Relevant results indicate that 50:50 ratio of harda plus potash aluminium sulphate at overall 15% application level offers maximum K/S value and overall good colour fastness than any other combination. After finalizing the mordants, dyeing process variables were studied for standardization of conditions for dyeing cotton khadi fabric with aqueous extract of pomegranate rind. The results indicate that standardized conditions for dyeing are (a) dyeing time : 60 min, (b) dyeing temperature: 80 °C, (c) dye bath MLR : 1:30, (d) dye bath pH : 9.0, (e) max dye concentration : 20% and (f) common salt : 3%. Studies of FTIR, UV scan, Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS) and UV Protection Factor (UPF) characters show a medium to good level of ultraviolet protection. Corresponding reaction mechanism amongst mordant/fibre and dye forming giant complex is also reported.

  3. Studies on Coloration and UV Protective Action of Anar Peel (Pomegranate Rind) as an Effective Natural Colorant for Cotton Khadi Fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnur, H. D.; Samanta, Ashis Kumar; Verma, D. K.; Kaware, Runali

    2018-06-01

    Besides optimization of conditions of colour extraction from dried anar peel, effect of different single and double mordants, dyeing process variables and UV protective action of anar peels (pomegranate rind i.e. Punica granatum L.) as a natural colourant is studied in this work. Mordants used are potash alum, aluminium sulphate and stannous chloride (as metallic salt mordant) and harda (i.e., myrobolan as natural mordant) from natural source. Relevant results indicate that 50:50 ratio of harda plus potash aluminium sulphate at overall 15% application level offers maximum K/S value and overall good colour fastness than any other combination. After finalizing the mordants, dyeing process variables were studied for standardization of conditions for dyeing cotton khadi fabric with aqueous extract of pomegranate rind. The results indicate that standardized conditions for dyeing are (a) dyeing time : 60 min, (b) dyeing temperature: 80 °C, (c) dye bath MLR : 1:30, (d) dye bath pH : 9.0, (e) max dye concentration : 20% and (f) common salt : 3%. Studies of FTIR, UV scan, Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS) and UV Protection Factor (UPF) characters show a medium to good level of ultraviolet protection. Corresponding reaction mechanism amongst mordant/fibre and dye forming giant complex is also reported.

  4. Neuroprotective Effects of Pomegranate Peel Extract after Chronic Infusion with Amyloid-β Peptide in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morzelle, Maressa Caldeira; Salgado, Jocelem Mastrodi; Telles, Milena; Mourelle, Danilo; Bachiega, Patricia; Buck, Hudson Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a chronic and degenerative condition that had no treatment until recently. The current therapeutic strategies reduce progression of the disease but are expensive and commonly cause side effects that are uncomfortable for treated patients. Functional foods to prevent and/or treat many conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases, represent a promising field of study currently gaining attention. To this end, here we demonstrate the effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum) peel extract (PPE) regarding spatial memory, biomarkers of neuroplasticity, oxidative stress and inflammation in a mouse model of neurodegeneration. Male C57Bl/6 mice were chronically infused for 35 days with amyloid-β peptide 1–42 (Aβ) or vehicle (control) using mini-osmotic pumps. Another group, also infused with Aβ, was treated with PPE (p.o.– βA+PPE, 800 mg/kg/day). Spatial memory was evaluated in the Barnes maze. Animals treated with PPE and in the control group exhibited a reduction in failure to find the escape box, a finding that was not observed in the Aβ group. The consumption of PPE reduced amyloid plaque density, increased the expression of neurotrophin BDNF and reduced the activity of acetylcholinesterase enzyme. A reduction in lipid peroxidation and in the concentration of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α was also observed in the PPE group. No hepatic lesions were observed in animals treated with PPE. In conclusion, administration of pomegranate peel extract has neuroprotective effects involving multiple mechanisms to prevent establishment and progression of the neurodegenerative process induced by infusion with amyloid-β peptide in mice. PMID:27829013

  5. Antimicrobial and free radical scavenging activities of five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extracts from five indigenous Palestinian medicinal plants including Rosmarinus officinalis, Pisidium guajava, Punica granatum peel, grape seeds and Teucrium polium were investigated for antimicrobial and free radical scavenging activities against eight microorganisms, using well diffusion method. The microorganisms ...

  6. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Chemical Peels Uses for Chemical Peels Learn more ...

  7. Effects of Pomegranate peel hydroAlcoholic extract and vitamin E supplementation on Paraoxonase, myeloperoxidase Activities and nitric oxide levels following an exhaustive exercise in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Veiskarami

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: free radicals produced as a result of heavy training exercise especially oxygen species (ROS damage to body tissues Which can be prevent from this by consuming antioxidant substances timely. The aim of this study was to evaluate effect of Pomegranate (Punica Granatum peel hydro alcoholic on reduced of oxidative stress induced by an exhaustive exercise. Materials and Methods: Thirty two weight-matched male Wistar rats were evenly divided into: 1 control: received saline (0.2 ml saline/ rat by oral administration via epigastric tube. 2 Received oral administration of 200 mg/kg pomegranate peel hydro alcoholic extract (PPHE200. 3 Received oral administration of 250 mg/kg Pomegranate peel hydro alcoholic extract (PPHE250. 4 Received oral administration of vitamin E (vit E 5 mg/kg. Animals were submitted to swimming exhaustive exercise stress for an 8-week. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were collected for serum. Serum samples were analyzed for paraoxonase-1(PON-1 and myeloperoxidase (MPO activities and nitric oxide levels. Results: Paraoxonase-1 (PON-1 activities serum were significantly increases in PPHE200 (23.03±1.47, PPHE250 (23.59±1.98 and vit E (25.38±2.65 than in the control (18.57±1.380 (p<0.05.In PPHE200 (32.76±9.97 ،PPHE250 (31.45±6.05 and vit E (24.94±4.65 treated animals was determined in serum where myeloperoxidase activities reduced significantly compared with control (40.70±6.14 (p<0.05. Levels of Nitric oxide levels were significantly lower in PPHE 200 (46.59±2.48, PPHE250 (40.27±2.62 and vit E (36.25±3.82 treated than in control (47.18±5.36 (p<0.05. Conclusion: Results indicated that Pomegranate peel hydro alcoholic extract supplementations can strength antioxidant defense system and anti-inflammatory induced by exhaustive exercise.

  8. Chemical Peel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your expectations. Talk with your doctor about your motivations and expectations, as well as the potential risks. ... the sun permanently to prevent changes in skin color. Keep in mind that chemical peel results might ...

  9. Chemical Peels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back Injectable Deoxycholic Acid Injectable Hyaluronic Acid Injectable Poly-l-lactic Acid Injectable Polymethylmethacrylate + Bovine Collagen Filler ... but do not cause a great deal of pain. The gentlest peels use alpha-hydroxy, glycolic, lactic ...

  10. Antioxidant activity and protein-polyphenol interactions in a pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigueros, Lorena; Wojdyło, Aneta; Sendra, Esther

    2014-07-09

    Pomegranate juice (PGJ) is rich in phenolics which are potent antioxidants but also prone to interact with proteins. A yogurt rich in PGJ (40%) made from arils was elaborated (PGY) to determine the antioxidant activity and to estimate the phenolics-proteins interaction during 28 days of cold storage. Juice, yogurts, and protein-free permeates were analyzed for phenolic composition. Yogurt fermentation modified the anthocyanin profile of the initial PGJ, especially the content in cyanidin-3-O-glucoside. During storage, individual anthocyanin content in PGY decreased but it did not modify yogurt color. The analysis of permeates revealed that the degree of phenol-protein interaction depends on the type of phenolic, ellagic acid and dephinidin-3,5-O-diglucoside being the least bound phenolic compounds. The presence of PGJ in yogurt enhanced radical scavenging performance, whereas all the observed ferric reducing power ability of PGY was strictly due to the PGJ present. The 84.73% of total anthocyanins remained bound to proteins at the first day of storage and 90.06% after 28 days of cold storage, revealing the high affinity of anthocyanins for milk proteins.

  11. Use of infrared thermometer technique in irrigation scheduling of pomegranate (Punica granatum L. plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begüm TEKELİOĞLU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this study are to assess crop water stress index (CWSI and to determine irrigation schedule of pomegranate using infrared thermometer technique. Treatments with three replications were irrigated every three and six days intervals, as much as 0.50 (S1, 0.75 (S2, 1.00 (S3, and 1.25 (S4 of Class A pan evaporation. Additionally, an unirrigated plot was also formed. The equations obtained for non-water stress baseline is Tc-Ta=0.645VPD-4.338. The equation of full water stressed upper baseline obtained from data taken from branches of pomegranate plant cut in different days is given by Tc-Ta= 0.0489VPD+2.8734. According to the results obtained, it is concluded that infrared thermometer can be used for irrigation scheduling of the pomegranate plants in Antalya conditions. When using this technique in Antalya conditions, it is suggested to keep the seasonal mean CWSI value approximately 0.12 and the index value of 0.40 can be used to start the irrigation. Additionally, it is suggested that the amount of irrigation can be determined as much as the amount of evaporation measured until the index value reaches 0.40.

  12. Physicochemical composition and antioxidant activity of several pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) cultivars grown in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Luana; Pereira, J.A.; Lopéz-Cortés, Isabel; Salazar, Domingo M.; González-Álvarez, Julia; Ramalhosa, Elsa

    2017-01-01

    Nine pomegranate cultivars grown in Spain were selected, and their physicochemical (total soluble solids, pH, titratable acidity, maturity index, monomeric anthocyanin pigment, flavonoids, hydrolyzable tannins, and vitamin C) and antioxidant properties and polyphenolic composition of the juices were compared. A total of 53 polyphenols were identified, showing cultivars different profiles. Of all nine cultivars, Katirbasi had the highest contents of flavonoids, hydrolyzable tannins and vitamin...

  13. Optimization of ultrasonic-assisted extraction of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) seed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuting; Xu, Zhenbo; Zheng, Baodong; Martin Lo, Y

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) of pomegranate seed oil (PSO) was evaluated using a variety of solvents. Petroleum ether was the most effective for oil extraction, followed by n-hexane, ethyl acetate, diethyl ether, acetone, and isopropanol. Several variables, such as ultrasonic power, extraction temperature, extraction time, and the ratio of solvent volume and seed weight (S/S ratio) were studied for optimization using response surface methodology (RSM). The highest oil yield, 25.11% (w/w), was obtained using petroleum ether under optimal conditions for ultrasonic power, extraction temperature, extraction time, and S/S ratio at 140 W, 40 °C, 36 min, and 10 ml/g, respectively. The PSO yield extracted by UAE was significantly higher than by using Soxhlet extraction (SE; 20.50%) and supercriti cal fluid extraction (SFE; 15.72%). The fatty acid compositions were significantly different among the PSO extracted by Soxhlet extraction, SFE, and UAE, with punicic acid (>65%) being the most dominant using UAE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pomegranate juice (Punica granatum as an ideal mouthrinse for fixed orthodontic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haryono Utomo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevention of caries as well as periodontal disease is mandatory during orthodontic treatment. Nevertheless, the use of antiseptic mouthrinse is contraindicated for prolonged use. Pomegranate juice is a polyphenol-rich juice with high antioxidant capacity as well as antimicrobial properties. It has been shown to exert beneficial characteristics for orthodontic patients such as antioxidant and anti inflammatory effects. Moreover, it contained fluoride and phosphorous which are cariostatic. Previous study in fixed orthodontic patients revealed that rinsing with this juice showed reduced dental plaque and superior compared with chlorhexidine. If it has unwanted effect by reducing pro-inflammatory reaction that also needed in orthodontic movement is not clearly understood. Purpose: The aim of the present review was to discuss the beneficial and unwanted effect of pomegranate juice mouthrinse towards orthodontic treatment. Reviews: Pomegranate has antimicrobial activity, its methanolic skin extract is the most potent followed by seed juice. Nevertheless, seed juice is not only tastier, easier to make but also has mild antimicrobial potency which is beneficial for long-term use. Healthy periodontal tissue is preferable for orthodontic movement since it resulted in less unwanted bone resorption. Conclusion: Regarding its beneficial effect and safety of pomegranate juice if use daily mouthrinse in fixed orthodontic patients, it could be proposed as an ideal long term use mouthrinse for fixed orthodontic patients. However, further researches should be done to verify this concept.Latar belakang: Pencegahan karies dan penyakit periodontal sangat penting dalam perawatan ortodontik. Walaupun demikian, penggunaan obat kumur antiseptik jangka panjang merupakan kontraindikasi. Jus buah delima sangat kaya akan polifenol dengan kemampuan antioksidan yang tinggi disertai kemampuan antimikroba. Beberapa penelitian telah menunjukkan dampak menguntungkan pada pasien ortodonti, yaitu sebagai antioksidan dan anti radang. Selain itu juga mengandung fluor dan fosfor yang bersifat kariostatik. Penelitian terdahulu pada pasien ortodonti cekat menunjukkan penurunan plak gigi yang lebih banyak dibanding dengan klorheksidin. Akan tetapi, apakah juga menyebabkan dampak merugikan yaitu mengurangi reaksi keradangan yang juga penting bagi pergerakan ortodonti masih belum jelas. Tujuan: Membahas dampak menguntungkan maupun merugikan jus buah delima pada perawatan ortodonti. Tinjauan pustaka: Buah delima merupakan antimikroba, ekstrak dari kulit yang mengandung metanol adalah paling kuat diikuti jus biji delima. Akan tetapi, jus biji lebih enak rasanya, mudah dibuat dan merupakan antimikroba ringan sehingga menguntungkan untuk pemakaian jangka panjang. Jaringan periodontal yang sehat diperlukan untuk pergerakan ortodonti karena dapat mengurangi resorpsi tulang. Kesimpulan: Berdasarkan dampak menguntungkan dan keamanan jus buah delima bila digunakan tiap hari, bahan ini dapat diusulkan sebagai obat kumur jangka panjang yang ideal untuk pasien ortodonti cekat. Walaupun begitu, penelitian lebih lanjut harus dilakukan untuk verifikasi konsep ini.

  15. Rooting and vegetative growth of hardwood cuttings of 12 pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commercial pomegranate acreage has increased substantially in the western hemisphere due to increased consumer interest in the fruit. Low nursery inventory has caused many growers to propagate their own trees and the availability of only a few cultivars is believed to have played a role in a lack of...

  16. Pomegranate juice (punica granatum: a new storage medium for avulsed teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Tavassoli-Hojjati

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence indicating that pomegranate juice contains many of the essential properties necessary to retain cell viability and cell proliferation. These properties indicate that pomegranate juice is a suitable storage medium for avulsed teeth. However, this idea has not yet been tested. In this study, the capacity of pomegranate juice (PJ as a storage medium for retaining avulsed teeth was evaluated.PDL fibroblasts were obtained from healthy human premolars and cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM. Cultured cells were subjected to different concentrations of pomegranate juice (PJ, 1% Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS and tap water for 1, 3, 6 and 24 hours. PDL cell viability was assessed by the neutral red uptake assay.The results indicated that 7.5% PJ was the most effective solution for maintaining PDL cell viability amongst all the experimental solution's and time intervals (P<0.05. The results also showed that 1% PJ was as effective as HBSS for maintaining PDL cell viability. The amount of cell viability increased with increasing concentration of PJ at all time intervals (P<0.001. This effect is suggestive of the proliferative potential of PJ solution.In conclusion, PJ can be recommended as a suitable transport medium for avulsed teeth.

  17. Punica granatum (Pomegranate juice provides an HIV-1 entry inhibitor and candidate topical microbicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yun-Yao

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For ≈ 24 years the AIDS pandemic has claimed ≈ 30 million lives, causing ≈ 14,000 new HIV-1 infections daily worldwide in 2003. About 80% of infections occur by heterosexual transmission. In the absence of vaccines, topical microbicides, expected to block virus transmission, offer hope for controlling the pandemic. Antiretroviral chemotherapeutics have decreased AIDS mortality in industrialized countries, but only minimally in developing countries. To prevent an analogous dichotomy, microbicides should be: acceptable; accessible; affordable; and accelerative in transition from development to marketing. Already marketed pharmaceutical excipients or foods, with established safety records and adequate anti-HIV-1 activity, may provide this option. Methods Fruit juices were screened for inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IIIB using CD4 and CXCR4 as cell receptors. The best juice was tested for inhibition of: (1 infection by HIV-1 BaL, utilizing CCR5 as the cellular coreceptor; and (2 binding of gp120 IIIB and gp120 BaL, respectively, to CXCR4 and CCR5. To remove most colored juice components, the adsorption of the effective ingredient(s to dispersible excipients and other foods was investigated. A selected complex was assayed for inhibition of infection by primary HIV-1 isolates. Results HIV-1 entry inhibitors from pomegranate juice adsorb onto corn starch. The resulting complex blocks virus binding to CD4 and CXCR4/CCR5 and inhibits infection by primary virus clades A to G and group O. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of producing an anti-HIV-1 microbicide from inexpensive, widely available sources, whose safety has been established throughout centuries, provided that its quality is adequately standardized and monitored.

  18. Characterization of constituents, quality and stability of pomegranate seed oil (Punica granatum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Illana Louise Pereira de MELO

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to characterize pomegranate seed oil and evaluate its quality and stability parameters against those of linseed oil. The profile of fatty acids and phytosterols and the content of tocopherols were analyzed by gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. The quality of both oils was assessed as recommended by the American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS and stability was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, β-carotene bleaching (coupled oxidation of β-carotene/linoleic acid and Rancimat® assays. While α-linolenic acid (52% was the most abundant fatty acid in linseed oil (LO, punicic acid (55% was highest in pomegranate seed oil (PSO. Tocopherols and phytosterols (175 and 539 mg/100 g, respectively were greater in PSO than in LO (51 and 328 mg/100 g, respectively. Both oils met quality standards. The β-carotene bleaching and the DPPH assays showed greater oxidative stability for PSO than for LO. The Rancimat® method, on the other hand, indicated low stability for both oils.

  19. Radioprotective effect of Punica granatum extract in head and neck cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amulya, T.M.; Bhandary, Satheesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    To study protective role of pomegranate extract on radiation induced dermatitis and mucositis in head and neck cancer patients, a prospective, clinical, double blind case control study was carried out. 60 patients (30 active and controls) undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer were studied for 12 months. Patients in study group were given whole fruit pomegranate extract. Each capsule contained 300 mg of whole fruit extract, each capsule contains 40% polyphenols and 27% punicalagin. Each patient was given 2 capsules every day for a period of 6 to 7 weeks. The skin and mucosal changes was graded according to the Acute Radiation Morbidity Scoring criteria (RTOG) for skin and mucous membrane. Among the 30 patients who received the pomegranate extract, 27 had grade 1, 2 had grade 2 and 1 had grade 3 dermatitis. Whereas those who did not receive the extract, 20 had grade 2 dermatitis, 7 had grade 3 dermatitis and 3 had grade 4 dermatitis. Among the 30 patients who received the pomegranate extract, 10 had grade 0, 17 had grade 1 and 3 had grade 2 mucositis. Whereas of those who did not receive the extract, 21 had grade 2 mucositis, 9 had grade 3 mucositis. The results were statistically significant. Our study is one of the first study in humans to demonstrate the effectiveness of pomegranate extract in preventing radiation dermatitis and mucositis. (author)

  20. Spatial distribution of root activity of Ganesh pomegranate (Punica granatum) plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotur, S.C.; Keshava Murthy, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    Information on the root activity pattern is invaluable while adopting appropriate time and method of fertilizer application, irrigation, planting distance and other cultural practices. The pattern of root activity distribution determined using the technique of soil injection of 32 P compares well with actual pattern ascertained by root excavation method. The isotopic technique is also non-destructive, quick and inexpensive. Root activity distribution pattern has been determined using this technique in citrus, grape, mango, guava and papaya. To generate the information on inbred Ganesh pomegranate seedlings, studies were undertaken and the results are reported in this paper. (author)

  1. Cardioprotective Effects of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) Juice in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razani, Zahra; Dastani, Mostafa; Kazerani, Hamid Reza

    2017-11-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of pomegranate juice in patients with ischemic heart disease. One hundred patients, diagnosed with unstable angina or myocardial infarction, were randomly assigned to the test and the control groups (n = 50, each). During 5 days of hospitalization, in addition to the conventional medical therapies, the test groups received 220 mL pomegranate juice, daily. During the hospitalization period, the blood pressure, heart rate, as well as the intensity, occurrence, and duration of the angina were evaluated on a regular basis. At the end of the hospitalization period, the serum levels of malondialdehyde, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha were measured in all patients. The levels of serum troponin and high-sensitive C-reactive protein levels were also assayed in patients diagnosed with myocardial infarction. Pomegranate juice caused significant reductions in the intensity, occurrence, and duration of angina pectoris in patients with unstable angina. Consistently, the test patients had significantly lower levels of serum troponin and malondialdehyde. Other studied parameters did not change significantly. The results of this study suggest protective effects of pomegranate juice against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Bioactive properties of commercialised pomegranate (Punica granatum) juice: antioxidant, antiproliferative and enzyme inhibiting activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Les, Francisco; Prieto, Jose M; Arbonés-Mainar, Jose Miguel; Valero, Marta Sofía; López, Víctor

    2015-06-01

    Pomegranate juice and related products have long been used either in traditional medicine or as nutritional supplements claiming beneficial effects. Although there are several studies on this food plant, only a few studies have been performed with pomegranate juice or marketed products. The aim of this work is to evaluate the antioxidant effects of pomegranate juice on cellular models using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidizing agent or DPPH and superoxide radicals in cell free systems. The antiproliferative effects of the juice were measured on HeLa and PC-3 cells by the MTT assay and pharmacologically relevant enzymes (cyclooxygenases, xanthine oxidase, acetylcholinesterase and monoamine oxidase A) were selected for enzymatic inhibition assays. Pomegranate juice showed significant protective effects against hydrogen peroxide induced toxicity in the Artemia salina and HepG2 models; these effects may be attributed to radical scavenging properties of pomegranate as the juice was able to reduce DPPH and superoxide radicals. Moderate antiproliferative activities in HeLa and PC-3 cancer cells were observed. However, pomegranate juice was also able to inhibit COX-2 and MAO-A enzymes. This study reveals some mechanisms by which pomegranate juice may have interesting and beneficial effects in human health.

  3. Molecular Polymorphisms in Tunisian Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. as Revealed by RAPD Fingerprints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jemni Chibani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity among Tunisian pomegranate cultivars has been investigated. Using universal primers, the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD method was used to generate banding profiles from a set of twelve cultivars. Data was then computed with appropriate programs to construct a dendrogram illustrating the relationships between the studied cultivars. Our data proved the efficiency of the designed method to examine the DNA polymorphism in this crop since the tested primers are characterized by a collective resolving power of 12.83. In addition, the cluster analysis has exhibited a parsimonious tree branching independent from the geographic origin of the cultivars. In spite of the relatively low number of primers and cultivars, RAPD constitutes an appropriate procedure to assess the genetic diversity and to survey the phylogenetic relationships in this crop.

  4. Antiproliferative and Antiangiogenic Effects of Punica granatum Juice (PGJ) in Multiple Myeloma (MM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibullo, Daniele; Caporarello, Nunzia; Giallongo, Cesarina; Anfuso, Carmelina Daniela; Genovese, Claudia; Arlotta, Carmen; Puglisi, Fabrizio; Parrinello, Nunziatina L; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Romano, Alessandra; Lupo, Gabriella; Toscano, Valeria; Avola, Roberto; Brundo, Maria Violetta; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Raccuia, Salvatore Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal B-cell malignancy characterized by an accumulation of clonal plasma cells (PC) in the bone marrow (BM) leading to bone destruction and BM failure. Despite recent advances in pharmacological therapy, MM remains a largely incurable pathology. Therefore, novel effective and less toxic agents are urgently necessary. In the last few years, pomegranate has been studied for its potential therapeutic properties including treatment and prevention of cancer. Pomegranate juice (PGJ) contains a number of potential active compounds including organic acids, vitamins, sugars, and phenolic components that are all responsible of the pro-apoptotic effects observed in tumor cell line. The aim of present investigation is to assess the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic potential of the PGJ in human multiple myeloma cell lines. Our data demonstrate the anti-proliferative potential of PGJ in MM cells; its ability to induce G0/G1 cell cycle block and its anti-angiogenic effects. Interestingly, sequential combination of bortezomib/PGJ improved the cytotoxic effect of the proteosome inhibitor. We investigated the effect of PGJ on angiogenesis and cell migration/invasion. Interestingly, we observed an inhibitory effect on the tube formation, microvessel outgrowth aorting ring and decreased cell migration and invasion as showed by wound-healing and transwell assays, respectively. Analysis of angiogenic genes expression in endothelial cells confirmed the anti-angiogenic properties of pomegranate. Therefore, PGJ administration could represent a good tool in order to identify novel therapeutic strategies for MM treatment, exploiting its anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effects. Finally, the present research supports the evidence that PGJ could play a key role of a future therapeutic approach for treatment of MM in order to optimize the pharmacological effect of bortezomib, especially as adjuvant after treatment.

  5. Antiproliferative and Antiangiogenic Effects of Punica granatum Juice (PGJ in Multiple Myeloma (MM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Tibullo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a clonal B-cell malignancy characterized by an accumulation of clonal plasma cells (PC in the bone marrow (BM leading to bone destruction and BM failure. Despite recent advances in pharmacological therapy, MM remains a largely incurable pathology. Therefore, novel effective and less toxic agents are urgently necessary. In the last few years, pomegranate has been studied for its potential therapeutic properties including treatment and prevention of cancer. Pomegranate juice (PGJ contains a number of potential active compounds including organic acids, vitamins, sugars, and phenolic components that are all responsible of the pro-apoptotic effects observed in tumor cell line. The aim of present investigation is to assess the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic potential of the PGJ in human multiple myeloma cell lines. Our data demonstrate the anti-proliferative potential of PGJ in MM cells; its ability to induce G0/G1 cell cycle block and its anti-angiogenic effects. Interestingly, sequential combination of bortezomib/PGJ improved the cytotoxic effect of the proteosome inhibitor. We investigated the effect of PGJ on angiogenesis and cell migration/invasion. Interestingly, we observed an inhibitory effect on the tube formation, microvessel outgrowth aorting ring and decreased cell migration and invasion as showed by wound-healing and transwell assays, respectively. Analysis of angiogenic genes expression in endothelial cells confirmed the anti-angiogenic properties of pomegranate. Therefore, PGJ administration could represent a good tool in order to identify novel therapeutic strategies for MM treatment, exploiting its anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effects. Finally, the present research supports the evidence that PGJ could play a key role of a future therapeutic approach for treatment of MM in order to optimize the pharmacological effect of bortezomib, especially as adjuvant after treatment.

  6. Skin Peeling Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rajeev

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Peeling of the skin is an uncommonly encountered disorder. Occurrence of vesicles and bullae in peeling skin syndrome is very rare. We report a case of idiopathic peeling skin syndrome with vesicular lesions.

  7. The Roman Hannibal: Remembering the Enemy in Silius Italicus' Punica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stocks, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a new reading of Hannibal in Silius Italicus' Punica and provides fresh insight into how the Romans remembered their past. Silius Italicus' Punica, the longest surviving epic in Latin literature, has seen a resurgence of interest among scholars in recent years. A celebration of

  8. Antimicrobial Analysis of an Antiseptic Made from Ethanol Crude Extracts of P. granatum and E. uniflora in Wistar Rats against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Honório Lins Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Surgical site infection remains a challenge for hospital infection control, especially when it relates to skin antisepsis in the surgical site. Objective. To analyze the antimicrobial activity in vivo of an antiseptic from ethanol crude extracts of P. granatum and E. uniflora against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methods. Agar drilling and minimal inhibitory tests were conducted for in vitro evaluation. In the in vivo bioassay were used Wistar rats and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 14990. Statistical analysis was performed through variance analysis and Scott-Knott cluster test at 5% probability and significance level. Results. In the in vitro, ethanolic extracts of Punica granatum and Eugenia uniflora and their combination showed the best antimicrobial potential against S. epidermidis and S. aureus. In the in vivo bioassay against S. epidermidis, there was no statistically significant difference between the tested product and the patterns used after five minutes of applying the product. Conclusion. The results indicate that the originated product is an antiseptic alternative source against S. epidermidis compared to chlorhexidine gluconate. It is suggested that further researches are to be conducted in different concentrations of the test product, evaluating its effectiveness and operational costs.

  9. Antimicrobial Analysis of an Antiseptic Made from Ethanol Crude Extracts of P. granatum and E. uniflora in Wistar Rats against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Thaís Honório Lins; Sales Santos Veríssimo, Regina Célia; Alvino, Valter; Silva Araujo, Maria Gabriella; Evangelista Pires dos Santos, Raíssa Fernanda; Maurício Viana, Max Denisson; de Assis Bastos, Maria Lysete; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana; de Araújo-Júnior, João Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infection remains a challenge for hospital infection control, especially when it relates to skin antisepsis in the surgical site. To analyze the antimicrobial activity in vivo of an antiseptic from ethanol crude extracts of P. granatum and E. uniflora against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Agar drilling and minimal inhibitory tests were conducted for in vitro evaluation. In the in vivo bioassay were used Wistar rats and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 14990). Statistical analysis was performed through variance analysis and Scott-Knott cluster test at 5% probability and significance level. In the in vitro, ethanolic extracts of Punica granatum and Eugenia uniflora and their combination showed the best antimicrobial potential against S. epidermidis and S. aureus. In the in vivo bioassay against S. epidermidis, there was no statistically significant difference between the tested product and the patterns used after five minutes of applying the product. The results indicate that the originated product is an antiseptic alternative source against S. epidermidis compared to chlorhexidine gluconate. It is suggested that further researches are to be conducted in different concentrations of the test product, evaluating its effectiveness and operational costs.

  10. Supercapacitors from Activated Carbon Derived from Granatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiannan; Yang, Lin; Wang, Zhao; Chen, Kexun; Zhang, Lipeng

    2015-12-01

    Granatum carbon (GC) as electrode materials for supercapacitors is prepared via the chemical activation with different activating agent such as ZnC2 and KOH with an intention to improve the surface area and their electrochemical performance. The structure and electrochemical properties of GC materials are characterized with N2 adsorption/desorption measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The obtained results show that the specific surface area of the granatum-based activated carbons increased obviously from 573 m2 x g(-1) to 1341 m2 x g(-1) by ZnC2 activation and to 930 m2 x g(-1) by KOH treatment. Furthermore, GCZ also delivers specific capacitance of 195.1 Fx g(-1) at the current density of 0.1 A x g(-1) in 30 wt.% KOH aqueous electrolyte and low capacitance loss of 28.5% when the current density increased by 10 times.

  11. A case of peeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Peeling of paint and plaster from building facades is a well-known phenomenon. This contribution analyses a case of peeling on a villa and its gardens walls, Figure 1. The walls were levelled with cement plaster, before painted with a formally very dense acrylic paint. - The analysis shows...... that the present layer of acryl paint is not very dense because it is applied on a rough plaster surface. - However, the main reason of the peeling seems to be the difference in thermal expansion between the masonry and the cement plaster. It is shown that the peeling takes place both winter and summer....

  12. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cadewumi

    24. Yu, S., Zhang, Xen., Chen, G, and W. Liu. (2012). Compromised cellular responses to DNA damage accelerate chronological aging by incurring cell wall fragility in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mol Biol Rep. 39: 3573–3583. 25. Zoreky, N.S.A. (2009). Antimicrobial activity of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruit peels.

  13. The Effect of Two Methods of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L) Juice Extraction on Quality During Storage at $4^\\circ$ C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Graça; Dandlen, Susana; Antunes, Dulce; Neves, Alcinda; Martins, Denise

    2004-01-01

    The effect of two extraction methods of pomegranate juice on its quality and stability was evaluated. The first method consisted of separation of the seeds from fruits and centrifugation. The second method consisted of squeezing fruit halves with an electric lemon squeezer. During a period of 72 hours of cold storage at $4^\\circ$ C, the juices were evaluated for the presence of sugars, organic acids, and anthocyanins. Delphinidin 3-glucoside was identified to be the major anthocyanin present at the level of 45-69 mg/L. Among the organic acids, oxalic and tartaric acids dominated. The major sugars detected in pomegranate juice were glucose and sucrose. No significant differences in the content of sugars, organic acids, or anthocyanins in juices obtained through application of the two different extraction methods were detected, with the exception of the drastic decrease of cyanidin $3,5$ -diglucoside level in juice obtained by seed centrifugation. The pH did not show differences between treatments. Titrable acidity and the level of sugars expressed as ${}^{\\circ}$ Brix decreased after 32 and 15 hours after extraction, respectively, when juice was obtained by centrifuging the seeds.

  14. Inhibiting Listeria monocytogenes, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Morganella morganii with Aqueous Methanol Extracts of Punica granatum and Galla chinensis

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Morganella morganii are closely related to foodborne illnesses caused by the consumption of seafood and ready-to-eat (RTE) food. Traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) have been widely studied as complementary and alternative medicines, and many of them have been verified to have antimicrobial properties. The purpose of this research was to study antimicrobial effects of plant extracts as potential preservatives in seafood products and to ident...

  15. Diurnal patterns of photosynthesis and water relations for four orchard-grown pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-term drought, coupled with tighter regulations on limited water resources have caused growers to seek drought tolerant cultivars of common tree crops in California. Yet information on pomegranate physiology is lacking, even though it is grown throughout the world in various climates. The purpos...

  16. The Effect of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Byproducts and Ellagitannins on the Growth of Human Gut Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    The consumption of pomegranate products leads to a significant accumulation of ellagitannins in the large intestines, where they interact with complex gut microflora. This study investigated the effect of pomegranate tannin constituents on the growth of various species of human gut bacteria. Our r...

  17. Willingness to pay more for value-added pomegranate juice (Punica granatum L.): An open-ended contingent valuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Karen Rodrigues; Dias Bartolomeu Abadio Finco, Fernanda; Rosenthal, Amauri; Vinicius Alves Finco, Marcus; Deliza, Rosires

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed at estimating the consumer's willingness to pay (WTP) more for value-added pomegranate juice using the contingent valuation method (CVM). The WTP was estimated applying the open-ended elicitation technique with 454 consumers in two supermarkets located in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The average consumer's WTP more for pomegranate juice was estimated in R$2.04 (Brazilian currency) and the income elasticity coefficient at the midpoint was 0.19, i.e., a 10% increase in consumer income will increase, on average, 1.9% the WTP of pomegranate juice (ceteris paribus). Therefore, the income elasticity coefficient was considered inelastic, once an increase in income would have low effect on the WTP for these consumers. The results indicated that the consumers were interested in acquiring a non-traditional juice processed using a technology that preserves vitamins and antioxidants, maintains the flavor of "fresh juice" without colorants and preservatives, despite the pomegranate is not part of the Brazilian diet. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of putrescine and carnauba wax on functional and sensory quality of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruits during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Kalyan; Asrey, Ram; Pal, R K; Kaur, Charanjit; Jha, S K

    2014-01-01

    Functional properties (anthocyanins, antioxidant, ascorbic acid and tannin) and sensory score were determined in pomegranate fruits at two storage temperatures (3 and 5 °C) after treatment with 2 mM putrescine and 1 : 10 carnauba wax (carnauba wax : water). The treatments (putrescine and carnauba wax) were given by immersion method followed by storage up to 60 days. Both treatments retained significantly higher anthocyanins, antioxidant, ascorbic acid, tannin and sensory qualities as compared with control fruits under both the storage conditions. Combined application of putrescine + carnauba wax showed better response in retaining functional properties than putrescine treated or nontreated fruits. The impacts of putrescine and carnauba wax treatments were found more pronounced after 30 days at 3-5 °C storage temperature in retaining functional and sensory qualities. After 60 days of storage, putrescine + carnauba wax retained about 25% higher antioxidant activity both at 3 and 5 °C storage temperatures.

  19. Effect of different coatings on post-harvest quality and bioactive compounds of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meighani, Hossein; Ghasemnezhad, Mahmood; Bakhshi, Davood

    2015-07-01

    The effect of three different coatings; resin wax (Britex Ti), carnauba wax (Xedasol M14), and chitosan (1 and 2 % w/v) on postharvest quality of pomegranate fruits were investigated. Fruits quality characteristics and bioactive compounds were evaluated during 40, 80 and 120 days storage at 4.5 °C and 3 additional days at 20 °C. The results showed that uncoated fruits showed higher respiration rate, weight loss, L* and b* values of arils, total soluble solids (TSS)/titratable acidity (TA), and pH than coated fruits during storage. Coating treatments could delay declining TSS and TA percent, a* value of arils, as well as bioactive compounds such as total phenolics, flavonoids and anthocyanins content and antioxidant activity. The coated fruits with commercial resin and carnauba waxes showed significantly lower respiration rate and weight loss than other treatments, however carnauba wax could maintain considerably higher fruits quality and bioactive compounds than other coating treatments. The results suggested that postharvest application of carnauba wax have a potential to extend storage life of pomegranate fruits by reducing respiration rate, water loss and maintaining fruit quality.

  20. Influence of putrescine and carnauba wax on functional and sensory quality of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruits during storage

    OpenAIRE

    Barman, Kalyan; Asrey, Ram; Pal, R. K.; Kaur, Charanjit; Jha, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    Functional properties (anthocyanins, antioxidant, ascorbic acid and tannin) and sensory score were determined in pomegranate fruits at two storage temperatures (3 and 5 °C) after treatment with 2 mM putrescine and 1 : 10 carnauba wax (carnauba wax : water). The treatments (putrescine and carnauba wax) were given by immersion method followed by storage up to 60 days. Both treatments retained significantly higher anthocyanins, antioxidant, ascorbic acid, tannin and sensory qualities as compared...

  1. Fermentative preparation of functional drink from Punica granatum using lactic acid bacteria and exploring its anti-tumor potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Shruthi N.; Patnaik, Amie; Srinivasan, Nandini; Selvarajan, E.; Nivetha, A.; Mohanasrinivasan, V.

    2017-11-01

    In the present research work probiotic pomegranate juice production by fermentation was carried out using two different strains such as Lactobacillus plantarum VITES07 and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCIM2903 (Lactic acid bacteria). Fermented pomegranate juice was carried out at room temperature for 72h. During the fermentation period at regular intervals viable cells was determined. Efficiency of the fermented juice was analysed for 4 weeks under refrigerated condition at 4˚C. Total phenolics, sugar concentration, antioxidant potential, and antibacterial activity were determined. Organic acid concentration was determined by HPLC with retention time of a compound at 9.1 can be suspected to be Kaempferol hexoside and functional group was determined by FTIR also LCMS analysis was carried out to enumerate the chemical composition of the fermented juice.

  2. Molecular detection and characterization of Hop stunt viroid sequence variants from naturally infected pomegranate (Punica granatum L. in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten GORSANE

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Tunisian pomegranate Hop stunt viroid (HSVd variants are described. Dot-blot hybridization, S-Page, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR of RNA extracts from infected tissues were carried out. Results obtained by these techniques were confirmed by cDNA sequencing. The genetic diversity among the Tunisian variants was investigated, which also involved analysis of sequences of previously described HSVd variants from Tunisian citrus var. clementine and fig, and from fruit trees from other Mediterranean countries. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Tunisian pomegranate HSVd variants were clustered into two groups: a cachexia strain within the citrus type group and a recombinant citrus-plum type group. Results also showed a high haplotype diversity which was not related either to the host or to the geographical origin. Selective neutrality and genetic network tests suggest that the HSVd isolates have spread rapidly.

  3. Irradiation Effect on the antioxidant properties, anti-microbial and cytoprotective of the bark of Punica granatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanaa, Chahnez

    2013-01-01

    The bark of pomegranate has been used for some years to treat various health problems . Several studies have focused on specifying these problems, including antibacterial , antioxidant and cytoprotective . The use of pomegranate rind powder is an effective treatment against gastric ulcer and intestines and to strengthen the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. In this work, we studied the effects of gamma irradiation on the type antibacterial, anti-ulcer and bark grenade. This study was conducted on powdered pomegranate bark irradiated by applying decreasing radiation doses from 25kGy to 1.25KGy. All of our results shows that irradiation with a low degree improves the effectiveness of pomegranate bark for the treatment of gastric ulcer , however high degree irradiation enhances the antibacterial activity of bark pomegranate against Staphylococcus aureus.

  4. Facile synthesis of size-tunable gold nanoparticles by pomegranate (Punica granatum) leaf extract: Applications in arsenate sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Ashit; Mahajan, Ketakee; Bankar, Ashok [Institute of Bioinformatics and Biotechnology, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Srikanth, Rapole [Proteomics Laboratory, National Centre for Cell Science, Pune 411007 (India); Kumar, Ameeta Ravi [Institute of Bioinformatics and Biotechnology, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Gosavi, Suresh, E-mail: swg@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Centre for Sensor Studies, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Zinjarde, Smita, E-mail: smita@unipune.ac.in [Institute of Bioinformatics and Biotechnology, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Centre for Sensor Studies, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Pomegranate leaf extracts mediated rapid gold nanoparticle (AuNP) synthesis. ► The phyto-inspired AuNPs were size-tuned and characterized. ► The reducing and capping agents in the extract were identified. ► The nanoparticles reacted specifically with arsenate (V) ions. - Abstract: When pomegranate leaf extracts were incubated with chloroauric acid (HAuCl{sub 4}), gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized. These were characterized by a variety of techniques. With an increasing content of the leaf extract, a gradual decrease in size and an increase in monodispersity were observed. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images showed that the phyto-fabricated AuNPs were surrounded by an amorphous layer. Gallic acid in the extract mediated the reduction and a natural decapeptide capped the nanostructures. Blocking of thiol groups in the decapeptide cysteine residues caused the nanoparticles to aggregate. On interaction with arsenate (V) ions, the UV–vis spectra of the nanoparticles showed a decrease in intensity and a red-shift. Energy dispersive spectra confirmed the presence of arsenate associated with the AuNPs. Thus, by using these AuNPs, a method for sensing the toxic arsenate ions could be developed.

  5. Facile synthesis of size-tunable gold nanoparticles by pomegranate (Punica granatum) leaf extract: Applications in arsenate sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Ashit; Mahajan, Ketakee; Bankar, Ashok; Srikanth, Rapole; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Gosavi, Suresh; Zinjarde, Smita

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pomegranate leaf extracts mediated rapid gold nanoparticle (AuNP) synthesis. ► The phyto-inspired AuNPs were size-tuned and characterized. ► The reducing and capping agents in the extract were identified. ► The nanoparticles reacted specifically with arsenate (V) ions. - Abstract: When pomegranate leaf extracts were incubated with chloroauric acid (HAuCl 4 ), gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized. These were characterized by a variety of techniques. With an increasing content of the leaf extract, a gradual decrease in size and an increase in monodispersity were observed. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images showed that the phyto-fabricated AuNPs were surrounded by an amorphous layer. Gallic acid in the extract mediated the reduction and a natural decapeptide capped the nanostructures. Blocking of thiol groups in the decapeptide cysteine residues caused the nanoparticles to aggregate. On interaction with arsenate (V) ions, the UV–vis spectra of the nanoparticles showed a decrease in intensity and a red-shift. Energy dispersive spectra confirmed the presence of arsenate associated with the AuNPs. Thus, by using these AuNPs, a method for sensing the toxic arsenate ions could be developed

  6. Physicochemical properties and aroma volatile profiles in a diverse collection of California-grown pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are thousands of pomegranate accessions and more than 500 known pomegranate cultivars with around 50 available commercially, exhibiting different growing characteristics and quality attributes; such as fruit size, color, shape, seed hardness, taste and flavor traits which are sometimes not wel...

  7. Pomegranate ( Punica granatum L.) expresses several nsLTP isoforms characterized by different immunoglobulin E-binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Michela; Zenoni, Sara; Scheurer, Stephan; Vieths, Stefan; San Miguel Moncin, Maria Del Mar; Olivieri, Mario; Antico, Andrea; Ferrer, Marta; Berroa, Felicia; Enrique, Ernesto; Avesani, Linda; Marsano, Francesco; Zoccatelli, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Pomegranate allergy is associated with sensitization to non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs). Our aim was to identify and characterize the non-specific nsLTPs expressed in pomegranate at the molecular level and to study their allergenic properties in terms of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-binding and cross-reactivity with peach nsLTP (Pru p 3). A non-equilibrium two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoretic approach based on acid-urea PAGE and sodium dodecyl sulfate PAGE was set up to separate pomegranate nsLTPs. Their immunoreactivity was tested by immunoblotting carried out with anti-Pru p 3 polyclonal antibodies and sera from pomegranate-allergic patients. For final identification, pomegranate nsLTPs were purified by chromatography and subjected to trypsin digestion and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. For this purpose, the sequences obtained by cDNA cloning of three pomegranate nsLTPs were integrated in the database that was subsequently searched for MS data interpretation. Four nsLTPs were identified by 2-D immunoblotting. The detected proteins showed different IgE-binding capacity and partial cross-reactivity with Pru p 3. cDNA cloning and MS analyses led to the identification of three nsLTP isoforms with 66-68% amino acid sequence identity named Pun g 1.0101, Pun g 1.0201 and Pun g 1.0301. By 2-D electrophoresis, we could separate different nsLTP isoforms possessing different IgE-binding properties, which might reflect peculiar allergenic potencies. The contribution of Pru p 3 to prime sensitization is not central as in other plant nsLTPs. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Evaluation of pomegranate rind (Punica granatum hydroethanolic extract on blood parameters in male mice treated by Irinotecan Hcl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Mirazi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Irinotecan Hcl is the first order drug for some neoplasm treatment in patients. Irinotecan Hcl has side effects on blood such as anemia and leukopeny. The aim of this study was to evaluate erythropoetic effects of the pomegranate hydroethanolic extract were examined on mice which treated by irinotecan Hcl. Methods: In this experimental study, 49 male mice (25-30 g were divided in 7 groups (control, sham, treated by irinotecan Hcl (100 mg/kg, treated by pomegranate extract (100 and 400 mg/kg, i.p, daily for one week and treated by irinotecan Hcl plus pomegranate extract (100 and 400 mg/kg, i.p, daily for one week randomly. Anemia induced by administration of irinotecan in the experimental animal. At the end of experiment the blood samples were collected by cardiac puncture method and analized for RBC, WBC, Hb, Hct parameters. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: The results of this study showed that irinotecan has affected on blood factors and cause to significance decrese compared with control group (p<0.001. Also groups which treated with pomegranate extract (100 and 400 mg/kg significantly reduce the side effects of irinotecan and cause to increasing in blood factors (p<0.001. The number of WBC counts in the group which received Irinotecan (100 kg significantly decreased as compared with the control group (p<0.001. Irinotecan affected on blood Hb level and cause to significant decrease compared with control group. Groups which received pomegranate extract (100 and 400 kg had positive effect and significantly increased the blood Hb levels as compared to controls (p<0.001. Conclusion: These results showed that consumption of pomegranate rind extract in a dose-dependent manner has protective effect on blood parameters in mice which treated with Irinotecan Hcl.

  9. Anti-inflammatory activity of Punica granatum L. (Pomegranate) rind extracts applied topically to ex vivo skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, David M J; Bugert, Joachim; Denyer, Stephen P; Heard, Charles M

    2017-03-01

    Coadministered pomegranate rind extract (PRE) and zinc (II) produces a potent virucidal activity against Herpes simplex virus (HSV); however, HSV infections are also associated with localised inflammation and pain. Here, the objective was to determine the anti-inflammatory activity and relative depth penetration of PRE, total pomegranate tannins (TPT) and zinc (II) in skin, ex vivo. PRE, TPT and ZnSO 4 were dosed onto freshly excised ex vivo porcine skin mounted in Franz diffusion cells and analysed for COX-2, as a marker for modulation of the arachidonic acid inflammation pathway, by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Tape stripping was carried out to construct relative depth profiles. Topical application of PRE to ex vivo skin downregulated expression of COX-2, which was significant after just 6h, and maintained for up to 24h. This was achieved with intact stratum corneum, proving that punicalagin penetrated skin, further supported by the depth profiling data. When PRE and ZnSO 4 were applied together, statistically equal downregulation of COX-2 was observed when compared to the application of PRE alone; no effect followed the application of ZnSO 4 alone. TPT downregulated COX-2 less than PRE, indicating that tannins alone may not be entirely responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of PRE. Punicalagin was found throughout the skin, in particular the lower regions, indicating appendageal delivery as a significant route to the viable epidermis. Topical application of TPT and PRE had significant anti-inflammatory effects in ex vivo skin, confirming that PRE penetrates the skin and modulates COX-2 regulation in the viable epidermis. Pomegranates have potential as a novel approach in ameliorating the inflammation and pain associated with a range of skin conditions, including cold sores and herpetic stromal keratitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Genome-wide identification of microRNAs in pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) by high-throughput sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding endogenous RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally, play multiple key roles in plant growth and development and in biotic and abiotic stress response. Knowledge and roles of miRNAs in pomegranate fruit development have not...

  11. Hydroalcohol Fruit Peel Extract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L) fruit peel using 80 % ethanol-induced gastric ulcer model in rats. Methods: Male ... Conclusion: The study shows indicates the antiulcer properties of the methanol extracts of north white ... experimentation, Cimetidine was obtained from.

  12. Screening Marker Components Of Tyrosinase Inhibitor From Xylocarpus Granatum Stem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifah K Darusman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our research was to screen the marker components of tyrosinase inhibitor from Xylocarpus granatum stem collected from Pulau Sebuku, South Kalimantan, Indonesia.  The screening method started from selection of part of X. granatum, stem or stem bark.  Stem and stem bark of X. granatum were dried and grounded before submitted to methanol.  The stem extracts is more potent as tyrosinase inhibitor (IC50 for monophenolase is 45.12 μg/ml and diphenolase is 31.59μg/ml compared to the bark extracts. The IC50 values of kojic acid as positive control are 17.43μg/ml for monophenolase and 20.69 μg/ml for diphenolase. The stem extract then separated with silica gel column chromatography and preparative thin layer chromatography.  The results showed that component with Rf 0,25 and 0.63 (TLC analysis with stationary phase silica gel GF254 and mobile phase ethyl acetic: methanol (8:2 are the marker components as tyrosinase inhibitor for X. granatum.

  13. Study of biosorptive potential in the peel of Citrus reticulata, Punica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of cell structure, cell wall, micropores and macropores describe the potential of adsorbent. Batch laboratory time dependency, pH profile and concentration parameter were performed to determine the binding ability of biosorbents for cations and anions. Time dependency indicated that the first three samples ...

  14. Complications of Macular Peeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  15. Skin peeling syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gharpuray Mohan

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a case of skin peeling syndrome, a rare disorder in which sudden generalized exfoliation of the stratum corneum occurs. Histopathologically, there was well formed subcorneal pustule filled with polymorphs and nuclear dust, considering this to be a varient of subcorneal pustular dermatosis, we have put the patient on Dapsone.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: acral peeling skin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Acral peeling skin syndrome Acral peeling skin syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Acral peeling skin syndrome is a skin disorder characterized by ...

  17. In vitro mass multiplication of pomegranate from cotyledonary nodal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maria

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... Key words: Establishment, multiplication, rooting, acclimatization, Punica granatum. INTRODUCTION. Pomegranate Punica granatum L. belongs to the family. Punicaceae which comprises only one genus (Punica) and only two species, P. granatum and P. proptopunica. This is popularly known as anar, ...

  18. Peeling mechanism of tomato under infrared heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critical behaviors of peeling tomatoes using infrared heat are thermally induced peel loosening and subsequent cracking. However, the mechanism of peel loosening and cracking due to infrared heating remains unclear. This study aimed at investigating the mechanism of peeling tomatoes under infrared h...

  19. VEGETABLE PEELS: A PROMISING FEED RESOURCE FOR LIVESTOCK

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Emran HOSSAIN; Syeda Ayesha SULTANA; Mohammad Hasanul KARIM; Md. Imran AHMED

    2016-01-01

    The study was undertaken to find out the chemical composition of different vegetable peels available in Rangunia, Chittagong, Bangladesh. Total 10 different vegetable peels i.e., Banana blossom (Musa sapientum), Bottle gourd peel (Lagenaria siceraria), Brinjal peel (Solanum melongena), Gram husk (Cicer arietinum), Green banana peel (Musa sapieutum), Green coconut peel (Cocos nucifera), Pea husk (Pisum sativum), Potato peel (Solanum tuberosum), Pumpkin peel (Cucurbita maxima), Ripe banana peel...

  20. Chemical peeling in ethnic/dark skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Wendy E

    2004-01-01

    Chemical peeling for skin of color arose in ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, and other ancient cultures in and around Africa. Our current fund of medical knowledge regarding chemical peeling is a result of centuries of experience and research. The list of agents for chemical peeling is extensive. In ethnic skin, our efforts are focused on superficial and medium-depth peeling agents and techniques. Indications for chemical peeling in darker skin include acne vulgaris, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, melasma, scarring, photodamage, and pseudofolliculitis barbae. Careful selection of patients for chemical peeling should involve not only identification of Fitzpatrick skin type, but also determining ethnicity. Different ethnicities may respond unpredictably to chemical peeling regardless of skin phenotype. Familiarity with the properties each peeling agent used is critical. New techniques discussed for chemical peeling include spot peeling for postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and combination peels for acne and photodamage. Single- or combination-agent chemical peels are shown to be efficacious and safe. In conclusion, chemical peeling is a treatment of choice for numerous pigmentary and scarring disorders arising in dark skin tones. Familiarity with new peeling agents and techniques will lead to successful outcomes.

  1. A case of peeling skin syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Anil K Singhal; Devendra K Yadav; Bajrang Soni; Savita Arya

    2017-01-01

    Peeling skin syndrome is a very rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by widespread painless peeling of the skin in superficial sheets. Etiology is still unknown with an autosomal recessive inheritance. Less than 100 cases have been reported in the medical literature. We present a 32-year-old man having asymptomatic peeling of skin since birth. Sheets of skin were peeling from his neck, trunk, and extremities, following friction or rubbing especially if pre-soaked in water but sparin...

  2. Peeling mode relaxation ELM model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimblett, C. G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses an approach to modelling Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) in which toroidal peeling modes are envisaged to initiate a constrained relaxation of the tokamak outer region plasma. Relaxation produces both a flattened edge current profile (which tends to further destabilise a peeling mode), and a plasma-vacuum negative current sheet which has a counteracting stabilising influence; the balance that is struck between these two effects determines the radial extent (rE) of the ELM relaxed region. The model is sensitive to the precise position of the mode rational surfaces to the plasma surface and hence there is a 'deterministic scatter' in the results that has an accord with experimental data. The toroidal peeling stability criterion involves the edge pressure, and using this in conjunction with predictions of rE allows us to evaluate the ELM energy losses and compare with experiment. Predictions of trends with the edge safety factor and collisionality are also made

  3. The Effect of Two Methods of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L) Juice Extraction on Quality During Storage at 4°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Dulce

    2004-01-01

    The effect of two extraction methods of pomegranate juice on its quality and stability was evaluated. The first method consisted of separation of the seeds from fruits and centrifugation. The second method consisted of squeezing fruit halves with an electric lemon squeezer. During a period of 72 hours of cold storage at 4°C, the juices were evaluated for the presence of sugars, organic acids, and anthocyanins. Delphinidin 3-glucoside was identified to be the major anthocyanin present at the level of 45–69 mg/L. Among the organic acids, oxalic and tartaric acids dominated. The major sugars detected in pomegranate juice were glucose and sucrose. No significant differences in the content of sugars, organic acids, or anthocyanins in juices obtained through application of the two different extraction methods were detected, with the exception of the drastic decrease of cyanidin 3,5-diglucoside level in juice obtained by seed centrifugation. The pH did not show differences between treatments. Titrable acidity and the level of sugars expressed as °Brix decreased after 32 and 15 hours after extraction, respectively, when juice was obtained by centrifuging the seeds. PMID:15577198

  4. Effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging on Aril Physico-chemical and Microbial Properties of Two Pomegranate Cultivars (Punica granatum L. Grown in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighe Tavasoli Talarposhti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Edible parts of pomegranate fruits are a rich source of bioactive compounds. The present research examines the effect of modified atmosphere packaging on the fruit physico-chemical and microbial properties of two commercial pomegranate cultivars grown in Iran. Materials and Methods: The arils were packaged and stored under four different atmospheres. All of the packaged samples were stored at 4 °C for 15 days. Results: The results revealed an increase in total acidity of all treatments. The highest total soluble solid (TSS was observed in ‘Yousef-Khani’­ stored in 10% O2 + 15% CO2, while ‘Malas-e-Saveh’ treated with 20% O2 + 5% CO2 showed the highest degree of TSS. The mean value of a* in ‘Malas-e-Saveh’ arils packed with normal and (15% O2 + 10% CO2 + 75% N2 atmosphere increased significantly. The L* showed a decrease in ‘Yousef-Khani’­. Total phenolic compounds gradually increased during storage. After storage, decreases in total anthocyanin contents ranged from 12 to 30% for ‘Yousef-Khani’­. The overall antioxidant activity of arils in ‘Yousef-Khani’ showed a 6-15% increase during storage. However, a reverse effect was observed for ‘Malas-e-Saveh’. The lowest microbial counts were recorded under the atmosphere containing 10 and 15% CO2. Conclusions: Packaging of ‘Malas-e-Saveh’ arils in 15% O2 + 10% CO2 and ‘Yousef-Khani’ in 15% O2 + 10% CO2 or 10% O2 + 15% CO2 is recommended to extend the shelf-life of ready-to-eat arils. Keywords: Pomegranate, Modified atmosphere, Phenolic compounds, Anthocyanin, Antioxidant activity

  5. Comparison of anti-inflammatory mechanisms of mango (Mangifera Indica L.) and pomegranate (Punica Granatum L.) in a preclinical model of colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyemee; Banerjee, Nivedita; Ivanov, Ivan; Pfent, Catherine M; Prudhomme, Kalan R; Bisson, William H; Dashwood, Roderick H; Talcott, Stephen T; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2016-09-01

    Tannin-rich fruits have been evaluated as alternative prevention strategies for colorectal cancer based on their anti-inflammatory properties. This study compared tannin-rich preparations from mango (rich in gallotannins) and pomegranate (rich in ellagitannins) in the dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis model. In rats, mango and pomegranate beverages decreased intestinal inflammation and the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in mucosa and serum. The mango beverage suppressed the ratio of phosphorylated/total protein expression of the IGF-1R-AKT/mTOR axis and downregulated mRNA expression of Igf1, Insr, and pik3cv. Pomegranate decreased p70S6K and RPS6, as well as Rps6ka2, Map2k2, and Mapk1 mRNA. In silico modeling indicated a high binding of docked of gallic acid to the catalytic domain of IGF-1R, which may suppress the activity of the enzyme. Ellagic acid docked effectively into the catalytic domains of both IGF-1R and EGFR. In vitro assays with lipopolysaccharide-treated CCD-18Co cells using polyphenolic extracts from each beverage, as well as pure compounds, corroborated the predictions made in silico. Mango polyphenols inhibited the IGF-1R- AKT/mTOR axis, and pomegranate polyphenols downregulate the mTOR downstream pathway through reductions in ERK1/2. These results suggest that extracts rich in gallo- and ellagitannins act on different molecular targets in the protection against ulcerative colitis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Optimisation of Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. Seed Oil and Evaluation of Its Physicochemical and Bioactive Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasene Keskin Çavdar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pomegranate seed oil was extracted in a closed-vessel high-pressure microwave system. The characteristics of the obtained oil, such as fatty acid composition, free fatty acidity, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity and colour, were compared to those of the oil obtained by cold solvent extraction. Response surface methodology was applied to optimise extraction conditions: power (176–300 W, time (5–20 min, particle size (d=0.125–0.800 mm and solvent to sample ratio (2:1, 6:1 and 10:1, by mass. The predicted highest extraction yield (35.19 % was obtained using microwave power of 220 W, particle size in the range of d=0.125–0.450 mm and solvent-to-sample ratio of 10:1 (by mass in 5 min extraction time. Microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MASE resulted in higher extraction yield than that of Soxhlet (34.70 % in 8 h or cold (17.50 % in 8 h extraction. The dominant fatty acid of pomegranate seed oil was punicic acid (86 % irrespective of the extraction method. Oil obtained by MASE had bett er physicochemical properties, total phenolic content and antioxidant activity than the oil obtained by cold solvent extraction.

  7. Optimisation of Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Seed Oil and Evaluation 
of Its Physicochemical and Bioactive Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çavdar, Hasene Keskin; Yanık, Derya Koçak; Gök, Uğur; Göğüş, Fahrettin

    2017-03-01

    Pomegranate seed oil was extracted in a closed-vessel high-pressure microwave system. The characteristics of the obtained oil, such as fatty acid composition, free fatty acidity, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity and colour, were compared to those of the oil obtained by cold solvent extraction. Response surface methodology was applied to optimise extraction conditions: power (176-300 W), time (5-20 min), particle size ( d =0.125-0.800 mm) and solvent to sample ratio (2:1, 6:1 and 10:1, by mass). The predicted highest extraction yield (35.19%) was obtained using microwave power of 220 W, particle size in the range of d =0.125-0.450 mm and solvent-to-sample ratio of 10:1 (by mass) in 5 min extraction time. Microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) resulted in higher extraction yield than that of Soxhlet (34.70% in 8 h) or cold (17.50% in 8 h) extraction. The dominant fatty acid of pomegranate seed oil was punicic acid (86%) irrespective of the extraction method. Oil obtained by MASE had better physicochemical properties, total phenolic content and antioxidant activity than the oil obtained by cold solvent extraction.

  8. Improving the nutritional quality and shelf life of broiler meat by feeding diets supplemented with fermented pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S T; Ko, S-Y; Yang, C-J

    2017-12-01

    1. Four experimental diets containing 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0% fermented pomegranate by-products (FPB) were supplied to 320d-old broilers to evaluate the effects of FPB on growth performance, nutritional composition, fatty acid profile and oxidative stability of meat. 2. Dietary supplementation of FPB linearly increased the weight gain and feed intake of broilers with linear reduction in feed conversion ratio. 3. The crude protein, iron, magnesium, and sodium content were linearly higher, whereas cholesterol was linearly lower in the breast meat of FPB-supplemented broilers. In thigh meat, linearly lower ether extract and cholesterol with higher moisture was noted in response to increasing levels of FPB. 4. The proportion of saturated fatty acids was both linearly and quadratically lower in breast and thigh meat, whereas those of monounsaturated fatty acids of breast (linear and quadratic) and n-3 fatty acids of breast and thigh (linear) meat was higher in the FPB-supplemented broilers. The n-6/n-3 ratio of breast meat was linearly lower in response to FPB supplementation. The hypocholesterolaemic to hypercholesterolaemic ratio of thigh meat was higher in the FPB-supplemented groups. 5. The thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and pH value were lower in the breast and thigh meat of FPB-supplemented broilers. 6. Thus, additive supplementation of the diet with up to 2% FPB improved the nutritional quality, fatty acid profile and shelf life of broiler meat.

  9. A "White" Anthocyanin-less Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Caused by an Insertion in the Coding Region of the Leucoanthocyanidin Dioxygenase (LDOX; ANS) Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Simhon, Zohar; Judeinstein, Sylvie; Trainin, Taly; Harel-Beja, Rotem; Bar-Ya'akov, Irit; Borochov-Neori, Hamutal; Holland, Doron

    2015-01-01

    Color is an important determinant of pomegranate fruit quality and commercial value. To understand the genetic factors controlling color in pomegranate, chemical, molecular and genetic characterization of a "white" pomegranate was performed. This unique accession is lacking the typical pomegranate color rendered by anthocyanins in all tissues of the plant, including flowers, fruit (skin and arils) and leaves. Steady-state gene-expression analysis indicated that none of the analyzed "white" pomegranate tissues are able to synthesize mRNA corresponding to the PgLDOX gene (leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase, also called ANS, anthocyanidin synthase), which is one of the central structural genes in the anthocyanin-biosynthesis pathway. HPLC analysis revealed that none of the "white" pomegranate tissues accumulate anthocyanins, whereas other flavonoids, corresponding to biochemical reactions upstream of LDOX, were present. Molecular analysis of the "white" pomegranate revealed the presence of an insertion and an SNP within the coding region of PgLDOX. It was found that the SNP does not change amino acid sequence and is not fully linked with the "white" phenotype in all pomegranate accessions from the collection. On the other hand, genotyping of pomegranate accessions from the collection and segregating populations for the "white" phenotype demonstrated its complete linkage with the insertion, inherited as a recessive single-gene trait. Taken together, the results indicate that the insertion in PgLDOX is responsible for the "white" anthocyanin-less phenotype. These data provide the first direct molecular, genetic and chemical evidence for the effect of a natural modification in the LDOX gene on color accumulation in a fruit-bearing woody perennial deciduous tree. This modification can be further utilized to elucidate the physiological role of anthocyanins in protecting the tree organs from harmful environmental conditions, such as temperature and UV radiation.

  10. Polyphenol Extracts from Punica granatum and Terminalia chebula are anti-inflammatory and increase the survival rate of chickens challenged with Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) causes avian colibacillosis, inflammation in multi-organs of chickens, and results in serious economic loss to the chicken industry. Polyphenolic compounds possess a wide range of physiological activities that may contribute to their beneficial effects again...

  11. The Effect of Two Methods of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L Juice Extraction on Quality During Storage at 4∘C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graça Miguel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of two extraction methods of pomegranate juice on its quality and stability was evaluated. The first method consisted of separation of the seeds from fruits and centrifugation. The second method consisted of squeezing fruit halves with an electric lemon squeezer. During a period of 72 hours of cold storage at 4∘C, the juices were evaluated for the presence of sugars, organic acids, and anthocyanins. Delphinidin 3-glucoside was identified to be the major anthocyanin present at the level of 45–69 mg/L. Among the organic acids, oxalic and tartaric acids dominated. The major sugars detected in pomegranate juice were glucose and sucrose. No significant differences in the content of sugars, organic acids, or anthocyanins in juices obtained through application of the two different extraction methods were detected, with the exception of the drastic decrease of cyanidin 3,5-diglucoside level in juice obtained by seed centrifugation. The pH did not show differences between treatments. Titrable acidity and the level of sugars expressed as ∘Brix decreased after 32 and 15 hours after extraction, respectively, when juice was obtained by centrifuging the seeds.

  12. Antimicrobial Activity of Aloevera barbedensis, Daucus carota, Emblica officinalis, Honey and Punica granatum and Formulation of a Health Drink and Salad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeswin Philip

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Indian folk medicine has been in practice from time immemorial. Traditional medicine interconnects our body with nature for a healthy living. The naturally occurring antimicrobials in food vary in their efficacy and function, toxicology, safety and mechanism of action against microorganisms.Methodology and Results: The study revitalizes the traditional system of medicine in order to achieve self reliance in health care and health for all by analyzing the antimicrobial property of aqueous extracts of aloevera (Aloevera barbedensis, carrot (Daucus carota, Indian gooseberry (Emblica officinalis, honey and pomegranate (Punicagranatum, and to assess the reason for inhibition of growth of pathogenic organisms by DNA and protein analysis. Various aqueous extracts showed inhibition to microrganisms like Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Shigella flexineri and Staphylococcus aureus.Conclusion significance and impact of study: The study also formulated and standardized a nourishing health drink and salad using the tested foods and estimated their shelf life and nutritive value. The health drink and salad had a low protein, low fat and moderate carbohydrate content. Therapeutically this drink and salad can be used to treat obesity.

  13. Peeling Back the Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image of the rock target named 'Mazatzal' on sol 77 (March 22, 2004). It is a close-up look at the rock face and the targets that will be brushed and ground by the rock abrasion tool in upcoming sols. Mazatzal, like most rocks on Earth and Mars, has layers of material near its surface that provide clues about the history of the rock. Scientists believe that the top layer of Mazatzal is actually a coating of dust and possibly even salts. Under this light coating may be a more solid portion of the rock that has been chemically altered by weathering. Past this layer is the unaltered rock, which may give scientists the best information about how Mazatzal was formed. Because each layer reveals information about the formation and subsequent history of Mazatzal, it is important that scientists get a look at each of them. For this reason, they have developed a multi-part strategy to use the rock abrasion tool to systematically peel back Mazatzal's layers and analyze what's underneath with the rover's microscopic imager, and its Moessbauer and alpha particle X-ray spectrometers. The strategy began on sol 77 when scientists used the microscopic imager to get a closer look at targets on Mazatzal named 'New York,' 'Illinois' and 'Arizona.' These rock areas were targeted because they posed the best opportunity for successfully using the rock abrasion tool; Arizona also allowed for a close-up look at a range of tones. On sol 78, Spirit's rock abrasion tool will do a light brushing on the Illinois target to preserve some of the surface layers. Then, a brushing of the New York target should remove the top coating of any dust and salts and perhaps reveal the chemically altered rock underneath. Finally, on sol 79, the rock abrasion tool will be commanded to grind into the New York target, which will give scientists the best chance of observing Mazatzal's interior. The Mazatzal targets were named after the home states of

  14. Assessment of antidiarrhoeal activity of the methanol extract of Xylocarpus granatum bark in mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouf, Razina; Uddin, Shaikh Jamal; Shilpi, Jamil Ahmad; Alamgir, Mahiuddin

    2007-02-12

    The methanol extract of Xylocarpus granatum bark was studied for its antidiarrhoeal properties in experimental diarrhoea, induced by castor oil and magnesium sulphate in mice. At the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg per oral, the methanol extract showed significant and dose-dependent antidiarrhoeal activity in both models. The extracts also significantly reduced the intestinal transit in charcoal meal test when compared to atropine sulphate (5 mg/kg; i.m.). The results showed that the extracts of Xylocarpus granatum bark have a significant antidiarrhoeal activity and supports its traditional uses in herbal medicine.

  15. The role of pectin in Cd binding by orange peel biosorbents: A comparison of peels, depectinated peels and pectic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiewer, Silke, E-mail: sschiewer@alaska.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, PO Box 755900, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Iqbal, Muhammad, E-mail: iqbalmdr@brain.net.pk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, PO Box 755900, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Biosorption by cheaply and abundantly available materials such as citrus peels can be a cost efficient method for removing heavy metals from wastewater. To investigate the role pectin plays in metal binding by citrus peels, native orange peels, protonated peels, depectinated peels, and extracted pectic acid were compared. Kinetic experiments showed that equilibrium was achieved in 1 h. The 1st-order model was more effective in describing the kinetics than the 2nd-order model. Titrations showed two acidic sites with pK{sub a} values around 4 (carboxyl) and 10.5 (hydroxyl), respectively. The pH dependent surface charge was described well by a two-site model. Sorption isotherms were best modeled assuming a 1:2 binding stoichiometry, followed by the Langmuir and the Freundlich model. The binding capacity was highest for pectic acid (2.9 mequiv./g) followed by protonated peels and native peels, being lowest for depectinated peels (1.7 mequiv./g). This showed the importance of pectin in metal binding by citrus peels. However, even depectinated peels were still good sorbents which still provided carboxyl groups that were involved in metal binding. FTIR spectra confirmed the presence of carboxyl and hydroxyl groups in all materials and their involvement in metal binding.

  16. The role of pectin in Cd binding by orange peel biosorbents: A comparison of peels, depectinated peels and pectic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiewer, Silke; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Biosorption by cheaply and abundantly available materials such as citrus peels can be a cost efficient method for removing heavy metals from wastewater. To investigate the role pectin plays in metal binding by citrus peels, native orange peels, protonated peels, depectinated peels, and extracted pectic acid were compared. Kinetic experiments showed that equilibrium was achieved in 1 h. The 1st-order model was more effective in describing the kinetics than the 2nd-order model. Titrations showed two acidic sites with pK a values around 4 (carboxyl) and 10.5 (hydroxyl), respectively. The pH dependent surface charge was described well by a two-site model. Sorption isotherms were best modeled assuming a 1:2 binding stoichiometry, followed by the Langmuir and the Freundlich model. The binding capacity was highest for pectic acid (2.9 mequiv./g) followed by protonated peels and native peels, being lowest for depectinated peels (1.7 mequiv./g). This showed the importance of pectin in metal binding by citrus peels. However, even depectinated peels were still good sorbents which still provided carboxyl groups that were involved in metal binding. FTIR spectra confirmed the presence of carboxyl and hydroxyl groups in all materials and their involvement in metal binding.

  17. Peeling of tomatoes using novel infrared radiation heating technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effectiveness of using infrared (IR) dry-peeling as an alternative process for peeling tomatoes without lye and water was studied. Compared to conventional lye peeling, IR dry-peeling using 30 s to 75 s heating time resulted in lower peeling loss (8.3% - 13.2% vs. 12.9% - 15.8%), thinner thickne...

  18. Peeling-angle dependence of the stick-slip instability during adhesive tape peeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbe, Marie-Julie; Santucci, Stéphane; Vanel, Loïc; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe

    2014-12-28

    The influence of peeling angle on the dynamics observed during the stick-slip peeling of an adhesive tape has been investigated. This study relies on a new experimental setup for peeling at a constant driving velocity while keeping constant the peeling angle and peeled tape length. The thresholds of the instability are shown to be associated with a subcritical bifurcation and bistability of the system. The velocity onset of the instability is moreover revealed to strongly depend on the peeling angle. This could be the consequence of peeling angle dependance of either the fracture energy of the adhesive-substrate joint or the effective stiffness at play between the peeling front and the point at which the peeling is enforced. The shape of the peeling front velocity fluctuations is finally shown to progressively change from typical stick-slip relaxation oscillations to nearly sinusoidal oscillations as the peeling angle is increased. We suggest that this transition might be controlled by inertial effects possibly associated with the propagation of the peeling force fluctuations through elongation waves in the peeled tape.

  19. Granatum: a graphical single-cell RNA-Seq analysis pipeline for genomics scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xun; Wolfgruber, Thomas K; Tasato, Austin; Arisdakessian, Cédric; Garmire, David G; Garmire, Lana X

    2017-12-05

    Single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-Seq) is an increasingly popular platform to study heterogeneity at the single-cell level. Computational methods to process scRNA-Seq data are not very accessible to bench scientists as they require a significant amount of bioinformatic skills. We have developed Granatum, a web-based scRNA-Seq analysis pipeline to make analysis more broadly accessible to researchers. Without a single line of programming code, users can click through the pipeline, setting parameters and visualizing results via the interactive graphical interface. Granatum conveniently walks users through various steps of scRNA-Seq analysis. It has a comprehensive list of modules, including plate merging and batch-effect removal, outlier-sample removal, gene-expression normalization, imputation, gene filtering, cell clustering, differential gene expression analysis, pathway/ontology enrichment analysis, protein network interaction visualization, and pseudo-time cell series construction. Granatum enables broad adoption of scRNA-Seq technology by empowering bench scientists with an easy-to-use graphical interface for scRNA-Seq data analysis. The package is freely available for research use at http://garmiregroup.org/granatum/app.

  20. Mesotherapy, Microneedling, and Chemical Peels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Johnson C; Daniels, Mark A; Roth, Malcolm Z

    2016-07-01

    Mesotherapy, microneedling, and chemical peels are minimally invasive techniques used to combat facial aging. Chemical peeling is one of the oldest methods of facial rejuvenation. By using different chemicals in various combinations, strengths, and application techniques, plastic surgeons can tailor a patient's treatment for optimal, safe, and consistent results. Mesotherapy and microneedling have emerged in the plastic surgery literature with increasingly complex indications. Both techniques have increased in popularity although research into efficacy and long-term results is lagging. With a thorough understanding of patients and the modalities available, plastic surgeons can use the appropriate minimally invasive technique to provide patients with desired skin changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Line Creep in Paper Peeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosti J.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We have studied experimentally the dynamics of the separation of a sheet of paper into two halves in a peeling configuration. The experimental setup consists of a peeling device, where a fracture front is driven along the plane of the paper, with a constant force. The theoretical picture is how an elastic line interacts with a random landscape of fracture toughness. We compare the results with theoretical simulations in several aspects. One recent finding concerns the autocorrelation function of the average front position. The data from the experiments produces so-called cusps or singularities in the correlation function, as predicted by the functional renormalization group theory for elastic lines. Comparisons with simulations with either a short range or a long range elastic kernel demonstrate that the latter agrees with the experimental observations, as expected.

  2. A case of peeling skin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Singhal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peeling skin syndrome is a very rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by widespread painless peeling of the skin in superficial sheets. Etiology is still unknown with an autosomal recessive inheritance. Less than 100 cases have been reported in the medical literature. We present a 32-year-old man having asymptomatic peeling of skin since birth. Sheets of skin were peeling from his neck, trunk, and extremities, following friction or rubbing especially if pre-soaked in water but sparing palm and soles. Histologically, there was epidermal separation at the level of stratum corneum, just above the stratum granulosum. This case is being presented due to its rarity.

  3. A Case of Peeling Skin Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Anil K; Yadav, Devendra K; Soni, Bajrang; Arya, Savita

    2017-01-01

    Peeling skin syndrome is a very rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by widespread painless peeling of the skin in superficial sheets. Etiology is still unknown with an autosomal recessive inheritance. Less than 100 cases have been reported in the medical literature. We present a 32-year-old man having asymptomatic peeling of skin since birth. Sheets of skin were peeling from his neck, trunk, and extremities, following friction or rubbing especially if pre-soaked in water but sparing palm and soles. Histologically, there was epidermal separation at the level of stratum corneum, just above the stratum granulosum. This case is being presented due to its rarity.

  4. Woven fabric composites: Can we peel it?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sacchetti, Francisco; Grouve, Wouter Johannes Bernardus; Warnet, Laurent; Villegas, I. Fernandez

    2016-01-01

    The present work focuses on the applicability of the mandrel peel test to quantify the fracture toughness of woven fabric Carbon/PEEK composites. For this purpose, the mandrel peel test was compared to the standardized DCB test. Unstable crack propagation (stick-slip) was observed in both testing

  5. Single cell protein from mandarin orange peel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishio, M.; Magai, J.

    1981-01-01

    As the hydrolysis of mandarin orange peel with macerating enzyme (40 degrees C, 24 h) produced 0.59 g g-1 reducing sugar per dry peel compared to 0.36 by acid-hydrolysis (15 min at 120 degrees C with 0.8 N H2S04), the production of single cell protein (SCP) from orange peel was studied mostly using enzymatically hydrolyzed orange peel. When the enzymatically hydrolyzed peel media were used, the utilization efficiency of reducing sugars (%) and the growth yield from reducing sugars (g g-1) were: 63 and 0.51 for Saccharomyces cerevisiae; 56 and 0.48 for Candida utilis; 74 and 0.69 for Debaryomyces hansenii and 64 and 0.70 for Rhodotorula glutinis. SCP production from orange peel by D. hansenii and R. glutinis were further studied. Batch cultures for 24 h at 30 degrees C using 100g dried orange peel produced 45 g of dried cultivated peel (protein content, 33%) with D. hansenii and 34 g (protein content, 50%) with R. glutinis, and 38 g (protein content, 44%) with a mixture of both yeasts. (Refs. 12).

  6. Development of a kolanut peeling device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareem, I; Owolarafe, O K; Ajayi, O A

    2014-10-01

    A kolanut peeling machine was designed, constructed and evaluated for the postharvest processing of the seed. The peeling machine consists of a standing frame, peeling unit and hopper. The peeling unit consists of a special paddle, which mixes the kolanut, rubs them against one another and against the wall of the barrel and also conveys the kolanut to the outlet. The performance of the kolanut peeling machine was evaluated for its peeling efficiency at different moisture content (53.0, 57.6, 61.4 % w.b.) and speeds of operation of the machine. The result of the analysis of variance shows that the main factors and their interaction had significant effects (p peeling efficiency of the machine. The result also shows that the peeling efficiency of the machine increased as the moisture content increase and decreased with increase in machine speed. The highest efficiency of the machine was 60.3 % at a moisture content of 61.4 % w.b. and speed of 40 rpm.

  7. Food peeling: conventional and new approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeling is an important unit operation in food processing that prepares fruits and vegetables for subsequent processes through removal of inedible or undesirable rind or skin. This chapter covers an exhaustive discussion on advancement in peeling technologies of fruits and vegetables from different ...

  8. Ohmic Heating Assisted Lye Peeling of Pears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sarvesh; Sastry, Sudhir K

    2018-05-01

    Currently, high concentrations (15% to 18%) of lye (sodium hydroxide) are used in peeling pears, constituting a wastewater handling and disposal problem for fruit processors. In this study, the effect of ohmic heating on lye peeling of pears was investigated. Pears were peeled using 0.5%, 1%, 2%, and 3% NaOH under different electric field strengths at two run times and their peeled yields were compared to that obtained at 2% and 18% NaOH with conventional heating. Results revealed that ohmic heating results in greater than 95% peeled yields and the best peel quality at much lower concentrations of lye (2% NaOH at 532 V/m and 3% NaOH at 426 and 479 V/m) than those obtained under conventional heating conditions. Treatment times of 30 and 60 s showed no significant differences. Within the studied range, the effects of increasing field strength yielded no significant additional benefits. These results confirm that the concentration of lye can be significantly lowered in the presence of ohmic heating to achieve high peeled yields and quality. Our work shows that lye concentrations can be greatly reduced while peeling pears, resulting in significant savings in use of caustic chemicals, reduced costs for effluent treatment and waste disposal. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  9. Prediction of processing tomato peeling outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeling outcomes of processing tomatoes were predicted using multivariate analysis of Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. Tomatoes were obtained from a whole-peel production line. Each fruit was imaged using a 7 Tesla MR system, and a multivariate data set was created from 28 different images. After ...

  10. Chemical peeling in ethnic skin: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, A; Dadzie, O E; Galadari, H

    2013-10-01

    With the growth of cosmetic dermatology worldwide, treatments that are effective against skin diseases and augment beauty without prolonged recovery periods, or exposing patients to the risks of surgery, are increasing in popularity. Chemical peels are a commonly used, fast, safe and effective clinic room treatment that may be used for cosmetic purposes, such as for fine lines and photoageing, but also as primary or adjunct therapies for acne, pigmentary disorders and scarring. Clinicians are faced with specific challenges when using peels on ethnic skin (skin of colour). The higher risk of postinflammatory dyschromias and abnormal scarring makes peels potentially disfiguring. Clinicians should therefore have a sound knowledge of the various peels available and their safety in ethnic skin. This article aims to review the background, classification, various preparations, indications, patient assessment and complications of using chemical peels in ethnic skin. © 2013 The Authors BJD © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  11. Effects of Chemical Peeling and Cultivars on the Antinutritional and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2205, TMS30572) roots were peeled using three different methods: manual peeling, chemical peeling with either 10% NaOH followed by treatment with 3% citric acid, or 10% NaOH solution followed by treatment with 15% NaCl. Peeled roots ...

  12. Mud peeling and horizontal crack formation in drying clays

    KAUST Repository

    Style, Robert W.; Peppin, Stephen S. L.; Cocks, Alan C. F.

    2011-01-01

    equations for the depth of peeling and the time of peeling as functions of the evaporation rate. Our model predicts a simple relationship between the radius of curvature of a mud peel and the depth of peeling. The model predictions are in agreement

  13. Standard guidelines of care for chemical peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khunger Niti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical peeling is the application of a chemical agent to the skin, which causes controlled destruction of a part of or the entire epidermis, with or without the dermis, leading to exfoliation and removal of superficial lesions, followed by regeneration of new epidermal and dermal tissues. Indications for chemical peeling include pigmentary disorders, superficial acne scars, ageing skin changes, and benign epidermal growths. Contraindications include patients with active bacterial, viral or fungal infection, tendency to keloid formation, facial dermatitis, taking photosensitizing medications and unrealistic expectations. Physicians′ qualifications : The physician performing chemical peeling should have completed postgraduate training in dermatology. The training for chemical peeling may be acquired during post graduation or later at a center that provides education and training in cutaneous surgery or in focused workshops providing such training. The physician should have adequate knowledge of the different peeling agents used, the process of wound healing, the technique as well as the identification and management of complications. Facility : Chemical peeling can be performed safely in any clinic/outpatient day care dermatosurgical facility. Preoperative counseling and Informed consent : A detailed consent form listing details about the procedure and possible complications should be signed by the patient. The consent form should specifically state the limitations of the procedure and should clearly mention if more procedures are needed for proper results. The patient should be provided with adequate opportunity to seek information through brochures, presentations, and personal discussions. The need for postoperative medical therapy should be emphasized. Superficial peels are considered safe in Indian patients. Medium depth peels should be performed with great caution, especially in dark skinned patients. Deep peels are not recommended for

  14. [Drusen characteristics after internal limiting membrane peeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, F; Jenisch, T; Helbig, H; Gamulescu, M A

    2015-05-01

    There are some reports showing isolated cases of drusen regression after pars plana vitrectomy (ppV) with peeling of the internal limiting membrane (iLM). Drusen characteristics after iLM peeling was investigated in this study. The data of 527 patients who had received iLM peeling between 2004 and 2012 were retrospectively collected and those patients with retinal drusen were selected for the study. Fundus photographs before and after vitrectomy due to a macular hole or epiretinal gliosis were compared and drusen arrangement in the peeling site was analyzed. The aim of the study was to show whether there was drusen regression 2-5 months after surgery. Out of the 527 patients 11 showed central macular drusen, 4 with confluent large drusen (> 63 µm diameter) and 7 with small hard drusen (≤ 63 µm diameter). One patient showed drusen regression after iLM peeling without any changes in the other eye and all other patients showed no differences in the drusen findings (n = 6) or even some additional drusen (n = 4) without drusen alterations in the other eye. The results of this study could not confirm some reports showing drusen regression after iLM peeling in the peeling site in general and there was only one single case of central drusen regression.

  15. Glycolic acid peel therapy – a current review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad J

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jaishree Sharad Skinfiniti Aesthetic Skin and Laser Clinic, Mumbai, India Abstract: Chemical peels have been time-tested and are here to stay. Alpha-hydroxy peels are highly popular in the dermatologist's arsenal of procedures. Glycolic acid peel is the most common alpha-hydroxy acid peel, also known as fruit peel. It is simple, inexpensive, and has no downtime. This review talks about various studies of glycolic acid peels for various indications, such as acne, acne scars, melasma, postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, photoaging, and seborrhea. Combination therapies and treatment procedure are also discussed. Careful review of medical history, examination of the skin, and pre-peel priming of skin are important before every peel. Proper patient selection, peel timing, and neutralization on-time will ensure good results, with no side effects. Depth of the glycolic acid peel depends on the concentration of the acid used, the number of coats applied, and the time for which it is applied. Hence, it can be used as a very superficial peel, or even a medium depth peel. It has been found to be very safe with Fitzpatrick skin types I–IV. All in all, it is a peel that is here to stay. Keywords: acne scar, melasma, photoaging, chemical peel, alpha-hydroxy peel

  16. Fungal enrichment of cassava peels proteins

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2006-02-02

    Feb 2, 2006 ... animal diseases (Richard et al., 1985) and mycotoxin production (Mossel, 1982) ... Effects of replacing maize with maize bran and cassava peels on broiler ... Abiola SS (1997). Utilization of sun-dried poultry manure as protein.

  17. Suitability of banana peels for biogas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meseguer, C.M.; Silesky, F.; Chacon, G.

    1983-01-01

    Banana (Musa cavendishii) peel in the ripe state (yellow with sufficient spots) has the potential to produce by anaerobic fermentation 0.22 plus or minus 0.03 cubic m biogas/kg dry material. Inhibition of the process can be prevented if the peel is pretreated by oxidation or if the process is carried out at approximately 35 degrees. The inoculate used must be acclimated to the medium.

  18. Temperature field for radiative tomato peeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuccurullo, G; Giordano, L

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays peeling of tomatoes is performed by using steam or lye, which are expensive and polluting techniques, thus sustainable alternatives are searched for dry peeling and, among that, radiative heating seems to be a fairly promising method. This paper aims to speed up the prediction of surface temperatures useful for realizing dry-peeling, thus a 1D-analytical model for the unsteady temperature field in a rotating tomato exposed to a radiative heating source is presented. Since only short times are of interest for the problem at hand, the model involves a semi-infinite slab cooled by convective heat transfer while heated by a pulsating heat source. The model being linear, the solution is derived following the Laplace Transform method. A 3D finite element model of the rotating tomato is introduced as well in order to validate the analytical solution. A satisfactory agreement is attained. Therefore, two different ways to predict the onset of the peeling conditions are available which can be of help for proper design of peeling plants. Particular attention is paid to study surface temperature uniformity, that being a critical parameter for realizing an easy tomato peeling. (paper)

  19. Cipadesin A, a bioactive ingredient of Xylocarpus granatum, produces antidepressant-like effects in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiang; Gao, Yuan; Song, Han; Li, Jianli; Wu, Yibing; Shi, Xiaowei; Shi, Haishui; Ma, Yuxia

    2016-10-28

    Xylocarpus granatum Koenig, widely used in folk medicine in southeast countries, has been reported to exert neuropharmacological activities as well as mood regulation. The neuroprotective activities of limonoids, riches in X. granatum, are poorly understood. To investigate the potential antidepressant-like effects and the underlying mechanisms of cipadesin A, one limonoid component, extracted from X. granatum, in acute stress-induced depression mouse models. Antidepressant-like effects of cipadesin A were investigated through behavioral tests, and potential mechanism was assessed by neuroendocrine system. Antidepressant-like effects of cipadesin A (5, 15, 50mg/kg/day for 7days, intragastrically) were estimated through forced-swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST) and open field test (OFT). Effects of cipadesin A on hypothalamus-pituitary- adrenal (HPA) axis were evaluated by analysis of serum corticosterone (CORT) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cipadesin A administration significantly reduced the floating time in the FST and immobility time in the TST (15-50mg/kg). Cipadesin A dose-dependently increased the time in the central zone in the OFT (5-50mg/kg), without altering the locomotor activity. Moreover, repeated cipadesin A treatment significantly inhibited the increase levels of serum CORT (5-50mg/kg), ACTH (15-50mg/kg) following the forced swimming, but not in the absence of stress. Cipadesin A has antidepressant-like activities in acute stressed mice model of depression, which likely occurs by inhibiting the HPA axis activity response to stress. These data support further exploration for developing cipadesin A as a potential agent to treat depression and anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of fermented Banana peel on Broiler Carcass

    OpenAIRE

    Koni TNI

    2013-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to examine effect of inclusion of fermented banana peel by Rhyzopus oligosporus in diets on slaughter weight, carcass weight and carcass percentage, weight and percentage abdominal fat of broiler. The experiment was done based on Completely Randomized Design with four treatments and four replications and each replication consisted of six chickens. The treatment were R0 = without banana peel fermented, R1 = 5% banana peel fermented, R2 = 10% banana peel fermented...

  1. Hydrolysis of alkaline pretreated banana peel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatmawati, A.; Gunawan, K. Y.; Hadiwijaya, F. A.

    2017-11-01

    Banana peel is one of food wastes that are rich in carbohydrate. This shows its potential as fermentation substrate including bio-ethanol. This paper presented banana peel alkaline pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. The pretreatment was intended to prepare banana peel in order to increase hydrolysis performance. The alkaline pretreatment used 10, 20, and 30% w/v NaOH solution and was done at 60, 70 and 80°C for 1 hour. The hydrolysis reaction was conducted using two commercial cellulose enzymes. The reaction time was varied for 3, 5, and 7 days. The best condition for pretreatment process was one conducted using 30% NaOH solution and at 80°C. This condition resulted in cellulose content of 90.27% and acid insoluble lignin content of 2.88%. Seven-day hydrolysis time had exhibited the highest reducing sugar concentration, which was7.2869 g/L.

  2. Biomethanation of banana peel and pineapple waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardiya, N.; Somayaji, D.; Khanna, S. [Tata Energy Research Inst., New Delhi (India)

    1997-10-01

    Biomethanation of banana peel and pineapple wastes studied at various HRTs showed a higher rate of gas production at lower retention time. The lowest possible HRT for banana peel was 25 days, resulting in a maximum rate of gas production of 0.76 vol/vol/day with 36% substrate utilization, while pineapple-processing waste digesters could be operated at 10 days HRT, with a maximum rate of gas production of 0.93 vol/vol/day and 58% substrate utilization. For pineapple-processing waste lowering of retention time did not affect the methane content significantly; however, with banana peel an HRT below 25 days showed a drastic reduction in methane content. (author)

  3. Differential partitioning of triterpenes and triterpene esters in apple peel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apple peel functions as a protective barrier against biotic and abiotic stresses, and preserving the integrity and appearance of peel critical for market acceptance. Peel epidermal cells and epicuticular wax are a rich source of secondary metabolites, including triterpenes. Several studies have ou...

  4. Development of Infrared Radiation Heating Method for Sustainable Tomato Peeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although lye peeling is the widely industrialized method for producing high quality peeled fruit and vegetable products, the peeling method has resulted in negative impacts by significantly exerting both environmental and economic pressure on the tomato processing industry due to its associated sali...

  5. Development of infrared heating technology for tomato peeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    The commercial lye and steam peeling methods used in tomato processing industry are water- and energy-intensive and have a negative impact on the environment. To develop alternative peeling methods, we conducted comprehensive studies of using infrared (IR) heating for tomato peeling. The three major...

  6. Comparative study of 15% TCA peel versus 35% glycolic acid peel for the treatment of melasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Neerja

    2012-05-01

    Chemical peels are the mainstay of a cosmetic practitioner's armamentarium because they can be used to treat some skin disorders and can provide aesthetic benefit. To compare 15% TCA peel and 35% glycolic acid peel for the treatment of melasma. We selected 30 participants of melasma aged between 20 and 50 years from the dermatology outpatient department and treated equal numbers with 15% TCA and 35% glycolic acid. Subjective response as graded by the patient showed good or very good response in 70% participants in the glycolic acid group and 64% in the TCA group. There was statistically insignificant difference in the efficacy between the two groups for the treatment of melasma.

  7. Rejuvenescimento da pele por peeling químico: enfoque no peeling de fenol Facial skin rejuvenation by chemical peeling: focus on phenol peeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valéria Robles Velasco

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available O envelhecimento da pele é um processo que preocupa muitos indivíduos, que buscam a ajuda especializada do médico para minimizar seus sinais. Um dos recursos para melhorar a qualidade da pele são os peelings químicos, utilizando várias substâncias ativas, como ácido glicólico, retinóico, tricloroacético e o fenol, entre outros, que proporcionam a esfoliação cutânea e posterior renovação celular. Dependendo da concentração e do valor de pH em que são empregados nas formulações, desencadeiam o peeling superficial, médio e profundo. O fenol tem sido utilizado como peeling profundo tanto isoladamente como em associação com outros componentes da fórmula que atuam como promotores de penetração e permeação. A utilização desses produtos resulta no processo de renovação celular intenso, normalizando a pigmentação da pele, atenuando marcas e minimizando as rugas. Devido a sua toxicidade e contra-indicações, o fenol deve ser aplicado cuidadosamente segundo a técnica recomendada, e o paciente deve ser monitorado para se obter a máxima eficácia do peeling e também minimizar os efeitos sistêmicos.The natural aging of facial skin is a source of preoccupation for many, who seek out the aid of a specialized physician to minimize its signs. The skin's youthfulness can be obtained using chemical peeling made from various active substances such as glycolic, retinoic, and trichloroacetic acids and phenol. These substances proportion cutaneous exfoliation with subsequent cellular renovation. Depending on the formula concentration and pH value, peelings may be superficial, medium or deep. Phenol has been used in deep peeling. It is the main component of the Baker/Gordon formula, as well as other formula substances acting as penetration and permeation promoters. The use of these active substances results in an intensive process of cellular renovation. It decreases wrinkles, softens the presence of dark spots and gives the skin

  8. Vitrectomy with Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling versus No Peeling for Idiopathic Full-Thickness Macular Hole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiteri Cornish, Kurt; Lois, Noemi; Scott, Neil W

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling improves anatomic and functional outcomes of full-thickness macular hole (FTMH) surgery when compared with the no-peeling technique. DESIGN: Systematic review and individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis undertaken...... under the auspices of the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. PARTICIPANTS AND CONTROLS: Patients with idiopathic stage 2, 3, and 4 FTMH undergoing vitrectomy with or without ILM peeling. INTERVENTION: Macular hole surgery, including vitrectomy and gas...... endotamponade with or without ILM peeling. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was best-corrected distance visual acuity (BCdVA) at 6 months postoperatively. Secondary outcomes were BCdVA at 3 and 12 months; best-corrected near visual acuity (BCnVA) at 3, 6, and 12 months; primary (after a single surgery...

  9. Chemical peels for melasma in dark-skinned patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Sarkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Melasma is a common disorder of hyperpigmentation, which has a severe impact on the quality of life. Inspite of tremendous research, the treatment remains frustrating both to the patient and the treating physician. Dark skin types (Fitzpatrick types IV to VI are especially difficult to treat owing to the increased risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH. The treatment ranges from a variety of easily applied topical therapies to agents like lasers and chemical peels. Peels are a well-known modality of treatment for melasma, having shown promising results in many clinical trials. However, in darker races, the choice of the peeling agent becomes relatively limited; so, there is the need for priming agents and additional maintenance peels. Although a number of new agents have come up, there is little published evidence supporting their use in day-to -day practice. The traditional glycolic peels prove to be the best both in terms of safety as well as efficacy. Lactic acid peels being relatively inexpensive and having shown equally good results in a few studies, definitely need further experimentation. We also recommend the use of a new peeling agent, the easy phytic solution, which does not require neutralisation unlike the traditional alpha-hydroxy peels. The choice of peeling agent, the peel concentration as well as the frequency and duration of peels are all important to achieve optimum results.

  10. Palmoplantar peeling secondary to sirolimus therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L S; McNiff, J M; Colegio, O R

    2014-01-01

    Sirolimus (rapamycin) is an immunosuppressive agent commonly used in transplant recipients. Although sirolimus has less renal toxicity than calcineurin inhibitors, its use has been limited by its side effects. The most common cutaneous pathologies associated with sirolimus are inflammatory acneiform eruptions, lymphedema and aphthous ulcers. We present a novel cutaneous manifestation of sirolimus therapy that limited its use in at least one transplant recipient. Upon commencing sirolimus therapy, four solid organ transplant recipients developed tender, nonpruritic palmoplantar peeling within the first month of therapy. The peeling clinically resembled a mild form of hand-foot syndrome, yet none of the patients had been treated with chemotherapeutics. Desquamation presented on the palms and soles with dry vesicles and minor peeling extending to the dorsal aspects of the hands and feet. Histologically, the lesions were noninflammatory; the epidermis showed subtle separation between keratinocytes, suggesting either spongiosis or a defect in intercellular adhesion. One patient opted to discontinue treatment because of the tenderness associated with the palmoplantar peeling, which resulted in complete resolution within 2 weeks. © Copyright 2013 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  11. Enzyme-assisted peeling of cold water shrimps (Pandalus borealis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang, Tem Thi; Gringer, Nina; Jessen, Flemming

    2018-01-01

    An enzymatic method to facilitate the peeling of cold water shrimps (Pandalus borealis) was developed. The protease solutions were used to mature the shrimps to promote shell-loosening prior to peeling. The efficiency of peeling enzyme-treated shrimps was evaluated by a new quantitative measurement......L and 0.25% Exocut-A0 for 20 h resulted in the best peeling of shrimps (100% completely peeled shrimps, 3 mJ/g work and 89% meat yield). Reuse of the enzyme solution was possible due to a 95% retention rate of proteolytic activity after two 20-h cycles of maturation. The studied enzymatic maturation...... of shrimp. This approach would benefit the shrimp processing industry by 1) enhancing peeling efficiency that includes least efforts to remove the shell, high rate of completely peeled shrimps and high meat yield; 2) shortening the duration of maturation but still sufficiently loosening the shell...

  12. Effect of fermented Banana peel on Broiler Carcass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koni TNI

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to examine effect of inclusion of fermented banana peel by Rhyzopus oligosporus in diets on slaughter weight, carcass weight and carcass percentage, weight and percentage abdominal fat of broiler. The experiment was done based on Completely Randomized Design with four treatments and four replications and each replication consisted of six chickens. The treatment were R0 = without banana peel fermented, R1 = 5% banana peel fermented, R2 = 10% banana peel fermented, R3 = 15% banana peel fermented. Data of the experiment were analyzed, using ANOVA and then continued with Duncan's Multiple Range Test. Result showed that level of fermented banana peel affected slaughter weight and carcass weight. However carcass persentage, weight and percentage of abdominal fat was not affected by treatment. Banana peel fermented by Rhizopus oligosporus could can be used maximally 10% in broiler ration.

  13. Mud peeling and horizontal crack formation in drying clays

    KAUST Repository

    Style, Robert W.

    2011-03-01

    Mud peeling is a common phenomenon whereby horizontal cracks propagate parallel to the surface of a drying clay. Differential stresses then cause the layer of clay above the crack to curl up to form a mud peel. By treating the clay as a poroelastic solid, we analyze the peeling phenomenon and show that it is caused by the gradient in tensile stress at the surface of the clay, analogously to the spalling of thermoelastic materials. For a constant water evaporation rate at the clay surface we derive equations for the depth of peeling and the time of peeling as functions of the evaporation rate. Our model predicts a simple relationship between the radius of curvature of a mud peel and the depth of peeling. The model predictions are in agreement with the available experimental data. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Spatiotemporal patterns formed by deformed adhesive in peeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Toda, Akihiko

    2007-01-01

    Dynamical properties of peeling an adhesive tape are investigated experimentally as an analogy of sliding friction. An adhesive tape is peeled by pulling an elastic spring connected to the tape. Controlling its spring constant k and pulling speed V, peel force is measured and spatiotemporal patterns formed on the peeled tape by deformed adhesive are observed. It is found that there exist two kinds of adhesive state in peeling front. The emergence of multiple states is caused by the stability of a characteristic structure (tunnel structure) formed by deformed adhesive. Tunnel structures are distributed spatiotemporally on adhesive tape after peeling. Based on the spatiotemporal distribution, a morphology-dynamical phase diagram is constructed on k-V space and is divided into the four regions: (A) uniform pattern with tunnel structure, (B) uniform pattern without tunnel structure, (C) striped pattern with oscillatory peeling, and (D) spatiotemporally coexistent pattern

  15. Differential Partitioning of Triterpenes and Triterpene Esters in Apple Peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Brenton C; Buchanan, David A; Rudell, David R; Mattheis, James P

    2018-02-28

    Apple peel is a rich source of secondary metabolites, and several studies have outlined the dietary health benefits of ursane-type triterpenes in apple. Changes in triterpene metabolism have also been associated with the development of superficial scald, a postharvest apple peel browning disorder, and postharvest applications of diphenylamine and 1-methylcyclopropene. Previously, studies have generated metabolite profiles for whole apple peel or apple wax. In this study, we report separate metabolic analyses of isolated wax fractions and peel epidermis to investigate the spatial distribution of secondary metabolites in peel. In addition to examining previously reported triterpenes, we identified several unreported fatty acid esters of ursane-type triterpenes (C14-C22). All free pentacyclic triterpenes and triterpenic acids, with the exception of β-amyrin, were localized in the wax layer, along with esters of ursolic acid and uvaol. All sterols, sterol derivatives and α-amyrin esters were localized in the dewaxed peel epidermis.

  16. Apparatus Tests Peeling Of Bonded Rubbery Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Russell A.; Graham, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Instrumented hydraulic constrained blister-peel apparatus obtains data on degree of bonding between specimen of rubbery material and rigid plate. Growth of blister tracked by video camera, digital clock, pressure transducer, and piston-displacement sensor. Cylinder pressure controlled by hydraulic actuator system. Linear variable-differential transformer (LVDT) and float provide second, independent measure of change in blister volume used as more precise volume feedback in low-growth-rate test.

  17. AND Citrus senensis PEEL EXTRACTS ON Aeromonas hydrophila ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    peel contains calcium, phosphorus, potassium, ascorbic acid, and vitamin A, as well as volatile oil and ..... A. comosus peel and C. senensis peel at 1:1 ratio against the isolates. Test organism. MIC value (mg/ml). MBC value (mg/ml). S. paratyphi B1. 0.25. 1.00. S. paratyphi B2. 0.25. 0.50. S. paratyphi B3. 0.25. -. S. paratyphi ...

  18. Retrospective Study: Glycolic Acid Peel in Photoaging Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Rachmantyo, Brama; Indramaya, Diah Mira

    2016-01-01

    Background: Photoaging is premature skin aging that is caused by sun exposure in long periode. Glycolic acid peel is one of photoaging treatment that improve skin at epidermal layer. Improper patient selection and irregular follow-up may become factors of unsuccessful treatment. Purpose: To evaluate gycolic acid peel treatment for photoaging for improvement of medical service in the future. Methods: A retrospective study to photoaging patiens that were managed with glicolyc acid peel in Medic...

  19. Acral peeling skin syndrome: a case of two brothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakade, Oojwala; Adams, Beth; Shwayder, Tor

    2009-01-01

    We report two brothers of Middle Eastern descent with consanguineous parents who present with numerous fragile, flaccid blisters on the hands and feet. In addition to spontaneous peeling, they can manually peel skin from acral areas without pain. The symptoms worsen with warm temperatures, excessive water exposure, and perspiration. Two biopsies from flaccid blisters on the feet were taken from the older brother, which revealed cleavage at the level of the stratum corneum. A diagnosis of acral peeling skin syndrome was made.

  20. Katharsis of the skin: Peeling applications and agents of chemical peelings in Greek medical textbooks of Graeco-Roman antiquity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursin, F; Steger, F; Borelli, C

    2018-04-28

    Recipes for peelings date back to medical texts of old Egypt. The oldest medical papyri contain recipes for "improving beauty of the skin" and "removing wrinkles" by use of agents like salt and soda. The Egyptian Queen Cleopatra (69-30 BC) is said to have taken bathes in donkey's milk in order to improve the beauty of her skin. However, little is known about other agents and peeling applications in later Greek medical textbooks. We will discover new agents and describe ancient peeling applications. First, we will have to identify ancient Greek medical terms for the modern terms "peeling" and "chemical peeling". Second, based on the identified terms we will perform a systematic fulltext search for agents in original sources. Third, we will categorize the results into three peeling applications: (1) cleansing, (2) aesthetical improvement of the skin, and (3) therapy of dermatological diseases. We performed a full systematic keyword search with the identified Greek terms in databases of ancient Greek texts. Our keywords for peeling and chemical peeling are "smēxis" and "trīpsis". Our keywords for agents of peeling and chemical peeling are "smégmata", "rhýmmata", "kathartiká", and "trímmata". Diocles (4 th century BC) was the first one who mentioned "smēxis" and "trīpsis" as parts of daily cleansing routine. Criton (2 nd century AD) wrote about peeling applications, but any reference to the agents is lost. Antyllos (2 nd century AD) composed three lists of peeling applications including agents. Greek medical textbooks of Graeco-Roman antiquity report several peeling applications like cleansing, brightening, darkening, softening, and aesthetical improvement of the skin by use of peeling and chemical peeling, as well as therapy of dermatological diseases. There are 27 ancient agents for what is contemporarily called peeling and chemical peeling. We discovered more specific agents than hitherto known to research. This article is protected by copyright. All rights

  1. In vitro interactions with repeated grapefruit juice administration--to peel or not to peel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Shlomo; Zimmermann, Christian; Berger, Karin; Drewe, Juergen; Gutmann, Heike

    2009-03-01

    Interactions of acutely administered grapefruit juice (GFJ) with cytochrome P450 isoform 3A4 (CYP3A4) and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) function are well established. In this study, we investigated in vitro the effect of repeated administration of GFJ and its major constituents (the flavonoid naringin, its aglycone naringenin and the furanocoumarin bergamottin) on mRNA expression of MDR1 and CYP3A4 in LS180 cells. Since the bergamottin content is higher in the peel than in the fruit, we compared GFJ containing peel (GFJP+) with juice without any peel extract (GFJP-). GFJP- (1%) showed no significant effect on MDR1 and CYP3A4 mRNA expression, whereas 1% GFJP+ increased expression of MDR1 3.7-fold (Pextract may have a lower potential for interactions with CYP3A4 or P-glycoprotein.

  2. Influence of skin peeling procedure in allergic contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Park, Hyun Jeong; Cho, Baik Kee; Lee, Jun Young

    2008-03-01

    The prevalence of allergic contact dermatitis in patients who have previously undergone skin peeling has been rarely studied. We compared the frequency of positive patch test (PT) reactions in a patient group with a history of peeling, to that of a control group with no history of peeling. The Korean standard series and cosmetic series were performed on a total of 262 patients. 62 patients had previously undergone peeling and 200 patients did not. The frequency of positive PT reactions on Korean standard series was significantly higher in the peeling group compared with that of the control group (P peeling group was higher than that of the control group, but lacked statistical significance. The frequency (%) of positive PT reactions on cosmetic series in the high-frequency peel group was higher than that of the low-frequency group, but lacked statistical significance. It appears peeling may not generally affect the development of contact sensitization. Further work is required focusing on the large-scale prospective studies by performing a PT before and after peeling.

  3. Acral peeling skin syndrome: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Elena García; Carreño, Rosario Granados; Martínez González, Miguel A; Reyes, José Jiménez

    2005-01-01

    Peeling skin syndrome is a rare dermatosis characterized by spontaneous and painless peeling of the skin. The authors report two patients with history of spontaneous, asymptomatic, and noninflammatory peeling skin of the acral surfaces after soaking in water. On light microscopy, blisters were located in the mid layers of the stratum corneum, above the granular layer. Ultrastructural examination revealed increased intercellular lipids and abnormal, "moth-eaten," keratohyalin granules, but the authors were unable to determine whether the separation initiated within the horny cells or between adjacent cells. These patients represented a localized variant of peeling skin syndrome.

  4. Efficacy of Modified Jessner's Peel and 20% TCA Versus 20% TCA Peel Alone for the Treatment of Acne Scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Neerja

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of studies on the use of chemical peels for acne scars among the Asian population. A trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and Jessner's combination chemical peel, originally described by Monheit, is said to be better than a TCA peel alone. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of 20% TCA and Jessner's solution versus 20% TCA alone for the treatment of acne scars. : The patients were divided into two groups of 25 patients each. Chemical peeling was done in both the groups. In Group I, chemical peeling with Jessner's peel followed by 20% TCA was done and in Group II patients chemical peeling with 20% TCA peel alone was done. In Group I (Jessner's peel and 20% TCA), mild improvement of acne scars was seen in 8% cases, moderate improvement in 32% cases and marked improvement of acne scars was seen in 60% patients. In Group II (20% TCA), mild improvement of acne scars was seen in 32% cases, moderate improvement in 40% cases and marked improvement of acne scars was seen in 28% patients. But, the difference in improvement of acne scars was not statistically significant in both the groups (P value > 0.05).

  5. KANDUNGAN BUAH-BUAHAN DALAM ALQUR’AN: BUAH TIN (Ficus carica L, ZAITUN (Olea europea L, DELIMA (Punica granatum L, ANGGUR (Vitis vinivera L, DAN KURMA (Phoenix dactylifera L UNTUK KESEHATAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    nur khasanah

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aneka ragam buah-buahan segar diciptakan Sang Khalik untuk umat manusia. Di antara sekian banyak buah-buahan itu, salah satu yang disebutkan Allah SWT dalam Alquran. Adalah buah tin, zaitun, delima, anggur, dan kurma. Untuk itulah kita sebagai muslim perlu men- getahui zat-zat  yang terkandung dalam buah tersebut, se- hingga dapat memanfaatkan buah tersebut dengan sebaik- baiknya. Tidak ada sekecil apa pun Allah ciptaan jika tidak membawa kemanfaatan bagi manusia.

  6. Potential of pomegranate fruit extract (Punica granatum Linn.) to increase vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor expressions on the post-tooth extraction wound of Cavia cobaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirwana, Intan; Rachmadi, Priyawan; Rianti, Devi

    2017-08-01

    Pomegranates fruit extracts have several activities, among others, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antioxidants that have the main content punicalagin and ellagic acid. Pomegranate has the ability of various therapies through different mechanisms. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) function was to form new blood vessels produced by various cells one of them was macrophages. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) was a growth factor proven chemotactic, increased fibroblast proliferation and collagen matrix production. In addition, VEGF and PDGF synergize in their ability to vascularize tissues. The PDGF function was to stabilize and regulate maturation of new blood vessels. Activities of pomegranate fruit extract were observed by measuring the increased of VEGF and PDGF expression as a marker of wound healing process. To investigate the potential of pomegranate extracts on the tooth extraction wound to increase the expression of VEGF and PDGF on the 4 th day of wound healing process. This study used 12 Cavia cobaya , which were divided into two groups, namely, the provision of 3% sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and pomegranate extract. The 12 C. cobaya would be executed on the 4 th day, the lower jaw of experimental animals was taken, decalcified about 30 days. The expression of VEGF and PDGF was examined using immunohistochemical techniques. The differences of VEGF and PDGF expression were evaluated statistically using t-test. Statistically analysis showed that there were significant differences between control and treatment groups (p<0.05). Pomegranate fruit extract administration increased VEGF and PDGF expression on post-tooth extraction wound.

  7. Vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling versus no peeling for idiopathic full-thickness macular hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteri Cornish, Kurt; Lois, Noemi; Scott, Neil W; Burr, Jennifer; Cook, Jonathan; Boachie, Charles; Tadayoni, Ramin; la Cour, Morten; Christensen, Ulrik; Kwok, Alvin K H

    2014-03-01

    To determine whether internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling improves anatomic and functional outcomes of full-thickness macular hole (FTMH) surgery when compared with the no-peeling technique. Systematic review and individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis undertaken under the auspices of the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Patients with idiopathic stage 2, 3, and 4 FTMH undergoing vitrectomy with or without ILM peeling. Macular hole surgery, including vitrectomy and gas endotamponade with or without ILM peeling. Primary outcome was best-corrected distance visual acuity (BCdVA) at 6 months postoperatively. Secondary outcomes were BCdVA at 3 and 12 months; best-corrected near visual acuity (BCnVA) at 3, 6, and 12 months; primary (after a single surgery) and final (after >1 surgery) macular hole closure; need for additional surgical interventions; intraoperative and postoperative complications; patient-reported outcomes (PROs) (EuroQol-5D and Vision Function Questionnaire-25 scores at 6 months); and cost-effectiveness. Four RCTs were identified and included in the review. All RCTs were included in the meta-analysis; IPD were obtained from 3 of the 4 RCTs. No evidence of a difference in BCdVA at 6 months was detected (mean difference, -0.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.12 to 0.03; P=0.27); however, there was evidence of a difference in BCdVA at 3 months favoring ILM peeling (mean difference, -0.09; 95% CI, -0.17 to-0.02; P=0.02). There was evidence of an effect favoring ILM peeling with regard to primary (odds ratio [OR], 9.27; 95% CI, 4.98-17.24; Ppeeling was found to be highly cost-effective. Available evidence supports ILM peeling as the treatment of choice for patients with idiopathic stage 2, 3, and 4 FTMH. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantification of Transfer of Salmonella from Citrus Fruits to Peel, Edible Portion, and Gloved Hands during Hand Peeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jiin; Friedrich, Loretta M; Danyluk, Michelle D; Schaffner, Donald W

    2017-06-01

    Although studies have quantified bacterial transfer between hands and various materials, cross-contamination between the surface of fresh citrus fruit and the edible portions during hand peeling has not been reported. This study quantifies transfer of Salmonella to the edible portion of citrus fruit from a contaminated peel during hand peeling. Citrus fruits used for this study were Citrus sinensis (sweet orange) cultivars 'Valencia' and 'Navel', Citrus unshiu (Satsuma mandarins), Citrus reticulata × Citrus paradisi ('Minneola' tangelo or 'Honeybell'), and C. paradisi (grapefruit) cultivar 'Marsh'. An avirulent Salmonella Typhimurium LT2 (ATCC 700720) resistant to rifampin was used for all experiments. The inoculum containing approximately 9 log CFU/mL (50 μL) was spot inoculated onto the equator, stem, or styler of each fruit and allowed to dry for 24 h. Six volunteers put on single-use latex gloves and peeled inoculated fruit. Peel, edible fruit portion, and gloves were collected and enumerated separately. Three replicates of the study were performed in which each volunteer peeled two inoculated fruit of each variety (n = 36 fruit per variety). Cross-contamination from contaminated surface of citrus fruits to edible portion or gloved hands during peeling was affected by inoculation sites. Average Salmonella transfer to the edible portion ranged from 0.16% (Valencia inoculated at the equator) to 5.41% (navel inoculated at the stem). Average Salmonella transfer to gloved hands ranged from 0.41% (grapefruit inoculated at the stem) to 8.97% (navel inoculated at the stem). Most Salmonella remained on the peel of citrus fruits. The average level of Salmonella remaining on the peel ranged from 5.37% (Minneola inoculated at the equator) to 66.3% (Satsuma inoculated at the styler). When grapefruit was inoculated, the Salmonella that remained on the peel showed a bimodal pattern in which some individuals left almost all Salmonella on the peel, while others left

  9. Mangosteen peel can reduce methane production and rumen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mangosteen peel (MP), an agricultural by-product of tropical countries, has been reported to contain condensed tannins and saponins, which can affect rumen microbes to reduce enteric methane emission. In the present study, the effects of mangosteen peel on in vitro ruminal fermentation, gas production, methane ...

  10. Temperature effects on peel spotting in "Sucrier banana" fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trakulnaleumsai, C.; Ketsa, S.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2006-01-01

    Banana fruit of the cultivar `Sucrier¿ (Musa acuminata, AA Group) develops peel spotting at a relatively early stage of development (when the peel is about as slightly more yellow than green). Holding ripening bananas at 15 and 18 °C instead of room temperature (26¿27 °C) only temporarily reduced

  11. Antifungal properties of Musa paradisiaca (Plantain) peel and stalk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of plantain (Musa paradisiaca (L) AAB genomic group) peel and stalk extracts were investigated using percentage inhibition test. Complete inhibition of growth (100%) was observed for Aspergillusniger, Aspergillus oryzae and Rhizopus stolonifer at 1.0 mg/ml concentration of stalk extract. Peel extract inhibited A.

  12. ( Myrciaria jaboticaba ) peel on blood glucose and cholesterol levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Berg) peel was lyophilized and the proximate composition, total anthocyanins and polyphenolic content were determined. The effect of the freeze-dried jaboticaba peels (FJP) in the plasmatic levels of glucose, lipid fractions, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in Wistar adult male rats was ...

  13. Banana peel: A novel substrate for cellulase production under solid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These results indicated that banana peel provided necessary nutrients for cell growth and cellulase synthesis. It can be used as a potential substrate for cellulase production by T. viride GIM 3.0010 under solid-state fermentation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on cellulase production using banana peel.

  14. Single cell protein production from mandarin orange peel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, N.; Nagai, S.

    1981-01-01

    As the hydrolysis of mandarin orange peel with macerating enzyme (40/sup 0/C,24 h)produced 0.59 g g/sup -1/ reducing sugar per dry peel compared to 0.36 by acid-hydrolysis (15 min at 120/sup 0/C with 0.8 N H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/), the production of single cell protein (SCP) from orange peel was studied mostly using enzymatically hydrolyzed orange peel. When the enzymatically hydrolyzed peel media were used, the utilization efficiency of reducing sugars (%) and the growth yield from reducing sugars (gg/sup -1/)were: 63 and 0.51 for Saccharomyces cerevisiae; 56 and 0.48 for Candida utilis; 74 and 0.69 for Debaryomyces hansenii and 64 and 0.70 for Rhodotorula glutinis. SCP production from orange peel by D. hansenii and R. glutinis were further studied. Batch cultures for 24 h at 30/sup 0/C using 100 g dried orange peel produced 45 g of dried cultivated peel (protein content, 33%) with D. hansenii and 34 g (protein content, 50%) with R. glutinis, and 38 g (protein content, 44%) with a mixture of both yeasts.

  15. Design and fabrication of a cassava peeling machine | Akintunde ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design and fabrication of a cassava peeling machine. ... Journal Home > Vol 23, No 1 (2005) > ... The varying shapes and sizes of cassava tubers have made cassava peeling to be one of the major problems in the mechanization of cassava ...

  16. Production of ethanol from mango ( Mangifera indica L.) peel by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mango fruit processing industries generate two types of waste, including solid waste (peel and stones) and liquid waste (juice and wash ... Direct fermentation of mango peel extract gave only 5.13% (w/v) of ethanol. ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  17. Thermal stability of liquid antioxidative extracts from pomegranate peel

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research was carried out to assess the potential of using the natural antioxidants in pomegranate peel extracts as replacement for synthetic antioxidants. As a result the thermal stability of pomegranate peel extract products during sterilization and storage, and its effect on industrial, color...

  18. Guidelines for chemical peeling in Japan (3rd edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Chemical peeling may be defined as the therapies, procedures and techniques used for the treatment of certain cutaneous diseases or conditions, and for aesthetic improvement. The procedures include the application of one or more chemical agents to the skin. Chemical peeling has been very popular in both medical and aesthetic fields. Because neither its scientific background is well understood nor a systematic approach established, medical and social problems have taken place. This prompted us to establish and distribute a standard guideline of care for chemical peeling. Previous guidelines such as the 2001 and 2004 versions included minimum standards of care such as indications, chemicals, applications, and any associated precautions, including post-peeling care. The principles in this updated version of chemical peeling are as follows: (i) chemical peeling should be performed under the strict technical control and responsibility of a physician; (ii) the physician should have sufficient knowledge of the structure and physiology of the skin and subcutaneous tissues, and understand the mechanisms of wound-healing induced by chemical peeling; (iii) the physician should be board-certified in an appropriate specialty such as dermatology; and (iv) the ultimate judgment regarding the appropriateness of any specific chemical peeling procedure must be made by the physician while considering all standard therapeutic protocols, which should be presented to each individual patient. Keeping these concepts in mind, this new version of the guidelines includes a more scientific and detailed approach from the viewpoint of evidence-based medicine. © 2011 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  19. Killing Unwanted West Indies Mahogany Trees by Peeling and Frilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. W. Nobles; C. B. Briscoe

    1966-01-01

    Peeling and frilling each killed approximately 70 percent of treated West Indies mahogany, but peeling killed a higher percentage of trees between 18 and 33 centimeters (7 and 13 inches) than did frilling. Essentially all mortality occurred within the first 15 months following treatment.

  20. Feasibility of Jujube peeling using novel infrared radiation heating technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infrared (IR) radiation heating has a promising potential to be used as a sustainable and effective method to eliminate the use of water and chemicals in the jujube-peeling process and enhance the quality of peeled products. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of use IR he...

  1. Self-peeling of impacting droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Jolet; Soto, Dan; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2018-01-01

    Whether an impacting droplet sticks or not to a solid surface has been conventionally controlled by functionalizing the target surface or by using additives in the drop. Here we report on an unexpected self-peeling phenomenon that can happen even on smooth untreated surfaces by taking advantage of the solidification of the impacting drop and the thermal properties of the substrate. We control this phenomenon by tuning the coupling of the short-timescale fluid dynamics--leading to interfacial defects upon local freezing--and the longer-timescale thermo-mechanical stresses--leading to global deformation. We establish a regime map that predicts whether a molten metal drop impacting onto a colder substrate will bounce, stick or self-peel. In many applications, avoiding adhesion of impacting droplets around designated target surfaces can be as crucial as bonding onto them to minimize waste or cleaning. These insights have broad applicability in processes ranging from thermal spraying and additive manufacturing to extreme ultraviolet lithography.

  2. Sorbents based on carbonized rice peel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansurova, R. M.; Taipova, R. A.; Zhylybaeva, N. K.; Mansurov, Z. A.; Bijsenbaev, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    The process receiving of sorbents based on carbonized rice peel (RP) was received and their sorption properties were investigated. Processing carbonization of samples leading on station, this was developed in laboratory of hybrid technology. Carbonization of samples was realized in nitric atmosphere on 400-8000 deg. C. On raising temperature of carbonization content of carbon in samples is rice, hydrogen and oxygen is reduce as a result isolation of volatility products is discover. The samples carbonized on 650 deg. C (910 m 2 /g) owners with maximum removed surface is discover. On carbonization temperature 600-800 deh. C the sorption of ions, which carbonized by sorbents based on rice peel is run to 95-100 %. Electron-microscopic investigation of samples leaded on EM-125 mechanism by accelerating pressure 100 kV. From electron-microscopic print of original samples of RP it is evident, that sample consists of carbonic fractions of different species: carbonic fiber of rounded fractions, fractions of ellipsoid form and of more thickly carbonic structure. Increasing sizes of pores and modification structure of synthesized sorbent is occur during carbonization process. The RP-samples, which carbonized by 650 deg. C has the higher specific surface. Samples consist of thin carbonic scum and reducing specific surface, by higher temperature

  3. Manufacturing of par-fried french-fries. Part 2: Modelling yield efficiency of peeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somsen, D.J.; Capelle, A.; Tramper, J.

    2004-01-01

    The paper outlines the yield efficiency of steam peeling. It was proven that peeling potatoes manually with sandpaper results in the lowest possible peel losses. These losses were desired or wanted losses. However, in practice steam peeling results not only in wanted losses but also in substantial

  4. Ripening influences banana and plantain peels composition and energy content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emaga, Thomas Happi; Bindelle, Jérôme; Agneesens, Richard; Buldgen, André; Wathelet, Bernard; Paquot, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Musa sp. peels are widely used by smallholders as complementary feeds for cattle in the tropics. A study of the influence of the variety and the maturation stage of the fruit on fermentability and metabolisable energy (ME) content of the peels was performed using banana (Yangambi Km5) and plantain (Big Ebanga) peels at three stages of maturation in an in vitro model of the rumen. Peel samples were analysed for starch, free sugars and fibre composition. Samples were incubated in the presence of rumen fluid. Kinetics of gas production were modelled, ME content was calculated using prediction equation and short-chain fatty acids production and molar ratio were measured after 72 h of fermentation. Final gas production was higher in plantain (269-339 ml g(-1)) compared to banana (237-328 ml g(-1)) and plantain exhibited higher ME contents (8.9-9.7 MJ/kg of dry matter, DM) compared to banana (7.7-8.8 MJ/kg of DM). Butyrate molar ratio decreased with maturity of the peels. The main influence of the variety and the stage of maturation on all fermentation parameters as well as ME contents of the peels was correlated to changes in the carbohydrate fraction of the peels, including starch and fibre.

  5. Development of environmental friendly lost circulation material from banana peel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauki, Arina; Hasan, Nur â.€˜Izzati; Naimi, Fardelen Binti Md; Othman, Nur Hidayati

    2017-12-01

    Loss of expensive mud could lead to major financial problem in executing a drilling project and is one of the biggest problems that need to be tackled during drilling. Synthetic Based Mud (SBM) is the most stable state of the art drilling mud used in current drilling technologies. However, the problem with lost circulation is still inevitable. The focus of this project is to develop a new potential waste material from banana peel in order to combat lost circulation in SBM. Standard industrial Lost Circulation Material (LCM) is used to compare the performance of banana peel as LCM in SBM. The effects of different sizing of banana peels (600 micron, 300 micron and 100 micron) were studied on the rheological and filtration properties of SBM and the bridging performance of banana peel as LCM additive. The tests were conducted using viscometer, HTHP filter press and sand bed tester. Thermal analysis of banana peel was also studied using TGA. According to the results obtained, 300 and 100 micron size of banana peel LCM exhibited an improved bridging performance by 65% as compared to industrial LCM. However, banana peel LCM with the size of 600 micron failed to act as LCM due to the total invasion of mud into the sand bed.

  6. ILM peeling in nontractional diabetic macular edema: review and metanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, M; dell'Omo, R; Morescalchi, F; Semeraro, F; Gambicorti, E; Cacciatore, F; Chiosi, F; Costagliola, C

    2017-10-31

    To evaluate the effect of internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling during vitrectomy for nontractional diabetic macular edema. PUBMED, MEDLINE and CENTRAL were reviewed using the following terms (or combination of terms): diabetic macular edema, nontractional diabetic macular edema, internal limiting membrane peeling, vitrectomy, Müller cells. Randomized and nonrandomized studies were included. The eligible studies compared anatomical and functional outcomes of vitrectomy with or without ILM peeling for tractional and nontractional diabetic macular edema. Postoperative best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness were considered, respectively, the primary and secondary outcomes. Meta-analysis on mean differences between vitrectomy with and without ILM peeling was performed using inverse variance method in random effects. Four studies with 672 patients were eligible for analysis. No significant difference was found between postoperative best-corrected visual acuity or best-corrected visual acuity change of ILM peeling group compared with nonpeeling group. There was no significant difference in postoperative central macular thickness and central macular thickness reduction between the two groups. The visual acuity outcomes in patients affected by nontractional diabetic macular edema using pars plana vitrectomy with ILM peeling versus no ILM peeling were not significantly different. A larger prospective and randomized study would be necessary.

  7. The effects of banana peel preparations on the properties of banana peel dietary fibre concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phatcharaporn Wachirasiri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Four different preparation methods of banana peel, dry milling, wet milling, wet milling and tap water washing, and wet milling and hot water washing were investigated on their effects on the chemical composition and properties of the banana peel dietary fibre concentrate (BDFC. The dry milling process gave the BDFC a significant higher fat, protein, and starch content than the wet milling process, resulting in a lower water holding capacity (WHC and oil holding capacity(OHC. Washing after wet milling could enhance the concentration of total dietary fibre by improving the removal of protein and fat. Washing with hot water after wet milling process caused a higher loss of soluble fibre fraction, resulting in a lower WHC and OHC of the obtained BDFC when compared to washing with tap water. Wet milling and tap water washing gave the BDFC the highest concentration of total and soluble dietary fibre, WHC and OHC.

  8. Acral peeling skin syndrome in two East-African siblings: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kiprono, Samson K; Chaula, Baraka M; Naafs, Bernard; Masenga, John E

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Acral peeling skin syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis due to a missense mutation in transglutaminase 5. The skin peeling occurs at the separation of the stratum corneum from the stratum granulosum. Case presentation We present a case of two siblings who developed continuous peeling of the palms and soles from the first year of life. This peeling was more severe on the soles than palms and on younger sibling than elder sibling. Peeling is worsened by occl...

  9. Bringing diagnostics to developing countries: an interview with Rosanna Peeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeling, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    Interview with Professor Rosanna Peeling, PhD by Claire Raison (Commissioning Editor) Professor Rosanna Peeling is Chair of Diagnostic Research at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (London, UK) and founded the International Diagnostics Centre at the institution. Professor Peeling previously worked for the WHO in Geneva, Switzerland, and continues to work on innovations for molecular diagnostics for point-of-care use in developing countries, addressing challenges posed by lack of funding and resources, regulatory issues and under-developed healthcare systems in these locations. Here, she discusses her career, recent progress in the field and how connectivity will affect global healthcare.

  10. Complications of medium depth and deep chemical peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanma Nikalji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Superficial and medium depth peels are dynamic tools when used as part of office procedures for treatment of acne, pigmentation disorders, and photo-aging. Results and complications are generally related to the depth of wounding, with deeper peels providing more marked results and higher incidence of complications. Complications are also more likely with darker skin types, certain peeling agents, and sun exposure. They can range from minor irritations, uneven pigmentation to permanent scarring. In very rare cases, complications can be life-threatening.

  11. Banana peel: an effective biosorbent for aflatoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shar, Zahid Hussain; Fletcher, Mary T; Sumbal, Gul Amer; Sherazi, Syed Tufail Hussain; Giles, Cindy; Bhanger, Muhammad Iqbal; Nizamani, Shafi Muhammad

    2016-05-01

    This work reports the application of banana peel as a novel bioadsorbent for in vitro removal of five mycotoxins (aflatoxins (AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, AFG2) and ochratoxin A). The effect of operational parameters including initial pH, adsorbent dose, contact time and temperature were studied in batch adsorption experiments. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and point of zero charge (pHpzc) analysis were used to characterise the adsorbent material. Aflatoxins' adsorption equilibrium was achieved in 15 min, with highest adsorption at alkaline pH (6-8), while ochratoxin has not shown any significant adsorption due to surface charge repulsion. The experimental equilibrium data were tested by Langmuir, Freundlich and Hill isotherms. The Langmuir isotherm was found to be the best fitted model for aflatoxins, and the maximum monolayer coverage (Q0) was determined to be 8.4, 9.5, 0.4 and 1.1 ng mg(-1) for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2 respectively. Thermodynamic parameters including changes in free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (ΔS) were determined for the four aflatoxins. Free energy change and enthalpy change demonstrated that the adsorption process was exothermic and spontaneous. Adsorption and desorption study at different pH further demonstrated that the sorption of toxins was strong enough to sustain pH changes that would be experienced in the gastrointestinal tract. This study suggests that biosorption of aflatoxins by dried banana peel may be an effective low-cost decontamination method for incorporation in animal feed diets.

  12. Photoprotective effects of apple peel nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennet D

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Devasier Bennet,1 Se Chan Kang,2 Jongback Gang,3 Sanghyo Kim1,4 1Department of Bionanotechnology, 2Department of Life Science, 3Department of Nano Chemistry, Gachon University, Bokjeong-Dong, Sujeong-Gu, Seongnam-Si, Gyeonggi-Do, Republic of Korea; 4Graduate Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Medical Center, Inchon, Republic of Korea Abstract: Plants contain enriched bioactive molecules that can protect against skin diseases. Bioactive molecules become unstable and ineffective due to unfavorable conditions. In the present study, to improve the therapeutic efficacy of phytodrugs and enhance photoprotective capability, we used poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide as a carrier of apple peel ethanolic extract (APETE on permeation-enhanced nanoparticles (nano-APETE. The in vitro toxicity of nano-APETE-treated dermal fibroblast cells were studied in a bioimpedance system, and the results coincided with the viability assay. In addition, the continuous real-time evaluations of photodamage and photoprotective effect of nano-APETE on cells were studied. Among three different preparations of nano-APETE, the lowest concentration provided small, spherical, monodispersed, uniform particles which show high encapsulation, enhanced uptake, effective scavenging, and sustained intracellular delivery. Also, the nano-APETE is more flexible, allowing it to permeate through skin lipid membrane and release the drug in a sustained manner, thus confirming its ability as a sustained transdermal delivery. In summary, 50 µM nano-APETE shows strong synergistic photoprotective effects, thus demonstrating its higher activity on target sites for the treatment of skin damage, and would be of broad interest in the field of skin therapeutics. Keywords: apple peel ethanolic extract, antioxidant, cellular uptake, electric cell-substrate impedance sensing, phyto-drugs, light-induced damage

  13. Ultrastructural observations of chemical peeling for skin rejuvenation (ultrastructural changes of the skin due to chemical peeling).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omi, Tokuya; Sato, Shigeru; Numano, Kayoko; Kawana, Seiji

    2010-02-01

    Chemical peeling of the skin is commonly used as a means to treat photoaging, but the mechanism underlying its efficacy has not yet been fully clarified. We recently conducted chemical peeling of the skin with glycolic acid and lactic acid and observed it at the ultrastructural level. No changes in the horny layer or the upper epidermal layer were observed but there was dissociation and vacuolation between the basal cells and increases in vimentin filaments within fibroblasts and endothelial cells were seen. These findings suggest that chemical peeling of the skin with this type of agent directly induces collagen formation within the dermis and thus directly stimulates remodeling of the dermis.

  14. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of peel and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    studies were carried out using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging assay, ..... Table 4: Antibacterial activity of methanol and ethanol extracts of peels and pulp of red and white variety of SP .... naphthoquinones [24].

  15. Stick-slip substructure in rapid tape peeling

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2010-10-15

    The peeling of adhesive tape is known to proceed with a stick-slip mechanism and produces a characteristic ripping sound. The peeling also produces light and when peeled in a vacuum, even X-rays have been observed, whose emissions are correlated with the slip events. Here we present direct imaging of the detachment zone when Scotch tape is peeled off at high speed from a solid surface, revealing a highly regular substructure, during the slip phase. The typical 4-mm-long slip region has a regular substructure of transverse 220 μm wide slip bands, which fracture sideways at speeds over 300 m/s. The fracture tip emits waves into the detached section of the tape at ∼100 m/s, which promotes the sound, so characteristic of this phenomenon.

  16. Preliminary investigations on the effect of pawpaw peel meal on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grower female rabbits were fed either a complete concentrate diet or a ... and a higher population of monocytes (P<0.05) than the animals on the pawpaw ... Keywords: rabbits, pawpaw peels, growth, reproductive tract, endocrine, hematology

  17. Biodigestion of cassava peels blended with pig dung for methane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OKOROIGWE

    2013-10-02

    Oct 2, 2013 ... Biogas production from cassava (Manihot esculentus) peels and pig dung under a mesophilic ... is a gap to be filled up by further investigation. Ezekoye ..... Biofertilizer and Chemical Fertilizer Application on Maize Production.

  18. Emerging and potential technologies for facilitating shrimp peeling: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dang, Tem Thi; Gringer, Nina; Jessen, Flemming

    2018-01-01

    , ultrasound and microwave can potentially become the alternatives since they have strong peeling effects on lobsters, crabs, bivalve mollusks, eggshells, human skin, fruits and vegetables. Also these technologies offer benefits such as short process time, retained nutritional and sensorial characteristics...

  19. Bioethanol production from cassava peels using different microbial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioethanol production from cassava peels using different microbial inoculants. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Abstract. The potential of bioethanol production using different microbial inoculants for the simultaneous ...

  20. Surgical outcomes after epiretinal membrane peeling combined with cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Glenn; Marra, Kyle V; Wagley, Sushant; Krishnan, Sheela; Sandhu, Harpal; Kovacs, Kyle; Kuperwaser, Mark; Arroyo, Jorge G

    2013-09-01

    To compare functional and anatomical outcomes after idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) peeling combined with phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation versus ERM peeling alone. A retrospective, non-randomised comparative case series study was conducted of 81 eyes from 79 patients who underwent ERM peeling at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center between 2001 and 2010. Eyes that underwent combined surgery for ERM and cataracts (group 1) were compared with those that had ERM peeling alone (group 2) with respect to best-corrected visual acuity at 6 months and 1 year after surgery, postoperative central macular thickness (CMT) as measured on optical coherence tomography, and rates of complications, including elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), ERM recurrence and need for reoperation. Mean logMAR visual acuity improved significantly in both groups at 6 months (ppeeling alone with respect to visual and anatomical outcomes. Further studies are necessary to determine if there may be greater ERM recurrence or need for reoperation after combined surgery.

  1. Understanding Surface Adhesion in Nature: A Peeling Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhen; Li, Siheng; Zhang, Feilong; Wang, Shutao

    2016-07-01

    Nature often exhibits various interesting and unique adhesive surfaces. The attempt to understand the natural adhesion phenomena can continuously guide the design of artificial adhesive surfaces by proposing simplified models of surface adhesion. Among those models, a peeling model can often effectively reflect the adhesive property between two surfaces during their attachment and detachment processes. In the context, this review summarizes the recent advances about the peeling model in understanding unique adhesive properties on natural and artificial surfaces. It mainly includes four parts: a brief introduction to natural surface adhesion, the theoretical basis and progress of the peeling model, application of the peeling model, and finally, conclusions. It is believed that this review is helpful to various fields, such as surface engineering, biomedicine, microelectronics, and so on.

  2. Stick-slip substructure in rapid tape peeling

    KAUST Repository

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T; Nguyen, H. D.; Takehara, K.; Etoh, T. G.

    2010-01-01

    The peeling of adhesive tape is known to proceed with a stick-slip mechanism and produces a characteristic ripping sound. The peeling also produces light and when peeled in a vacuum, even X-rays have been observed, whose emissions are correlated with the slip events. Here we present direct imaging of the detachment zone when Scotch tape is peeled off at high speed from a solid surface, revealing a highly regular substructure, during the slip phase. The typical 4-mm-long slip region has a regular substructure of transverse 220 μm wide slip bands, which fracture sideways at speeds over 300 m/s. The fracture tip emits waves into the detached section of the tape at ∼100 m/s, which promotes the sound, so characteristic of this phenomenon.

  3. 24 hydrocarbon degradation in poultry droppings and cassava peels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWOLE AKINNAGBE

    2009-01-01

    Jan 1, 2009 ... This greenhouse study was aimed at determining the potentials of poultry droppings (PD) and cassava peels ... shift in the composition of bacterial community to ..... Oil and Gas Journal. pp. ... Prentice-Hall of India Private Ltd.

  4. Salicylic acid as a peeling agent: a comprehensive review

    OpenAIRE

    Arif, Tasleem

    2015-01-01

    Tasleem Arif Postgraduate Department of Dermatology, STD and Leprosy, Government Medical College, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India Abstract: Salicylic acid has been used to treat various skin disorders for more than 2,000 years. The ability of salicylic acid to exfoliate the stratum corneum makes it a good agent for peeling. In particular, the comedolytic property of salicylic acid makes it a useful peeling agent for patients with acne. Once considered as a keratolytic agent, the role of s...

  5. A Pontential Agriculture Waste Material as Coagulant Aid: Cassava Peel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, N.; Abd-Rahim, N.-S.; Tuan-Besar, S.-N.-F.; Mohd-Asharuddin, S.; Kumar, V.

    2018-02-01

    All A large amount of cassava peel waste is generated annually by small and medium scale industries. This has led to a new policy of complete utilization of raw materials so that there will be little or no residue left that could pose pollution problems. Conversion of these by-products into a material that poses an ability to remove toxic pollutant would increase the market value and ultimately benefits the producers. This study investigated the characteristics of cassava peel as a coagulant aid material and optimization process using the cassava peel was explored through coagulation and flocculation. This research had highlighted that the Cassava peels contain sugars in the form of polysaccharides such as starch and holocellulose. The FTIR results revealed that amino acids containing abundant of carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups which has significant capabilities in removing pollutants. Whereas analysis by XRF spectrometry indicated that the CP samples contain Fe2O3 and Al2O3 which might contribute to its coagulation ability. The optimum condition allowed Cassava peel and alum removed high turbidity up to 90. This natural coagulant from cassava peel is found to be an alternative coagulant aid to reduce the usage of chemical coagulants

  6. Duration of hydrothermal treatment and peeling of 'Murcott' tangor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Pinheiro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal treatment facilitates the peeling of 'Pera' sweet orange fruit and does not alter its quality. The aim of this work was to adapt the technology of peeling for the use of hydrothermal treatment in 'Murcott' tangor and to evaluate its influence in the CO2 production and the physicochemical, microbiologic and sensorial characteristics of fruits. The peeling time, the yield of marketable fruits and the internal temperature of fruits during the treatment were also evaluated. The hydrothermal treatment consisted of placing the fruits in a water-bath at 50 ºC for 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 min. Fruits were peeled by first opening a gap in the peduncle region with a knife and then manually removing the flavedo and albedo. Fruits were stored at 5 ºC for six days. Hydrothermal treatment caused changes in the fruits' CO2 production for only the first few hours after processing. Internal fruit temperature after 30 min of treatment reached 35 ºC. There were no changes in the physicochemical and microbiologic characteristics of the fruits. The treatment did not change the flavor, improved the fruits' appearance, decreased the peeling time of the treated fruits by 57 % and increased the yield of marketable fruits. In conclusion, the hydrothermal treatment accomplished from 5 to 30 min at 50 ºC can be used as part of the peeling process for 'Murcott' tangor.

  7. Characterization of peeling modes in a low aspect ratio tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongard, M. W.; Thome, K. E.; Barr, J. L.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Hinson, E. T.; Redd, A. J.; Schlossberg, D. J.

    2014-11-01

    Peeling modes are observed at the plasma edge in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment under conditions of high edge current density (Jedge ˜ 0.1 MA m-2) and low magnetic field (B ˜ 0.1 T) present at near-unity aspect ratio. Their macroscopic properties are measured using external Mirnov coil arrays, Langmuir probes and high-speed visible imaging. The modest edge parameters and short pulse lengths of Pegasus discharges permit direct measurement of the internal magnetic field structure with an insertable array of Hall-effect sensors, providing the current profile and its temporal evolution. Peeling modes generate coherent, edge-localized electromagnetic activity with low toroidal mode numbers n ⩽ 3 and high poloidal mode numbers, in agreement with theoretical expectations of a low-n external kink structure. Coherent MHD fluctuation amplitudes are found to be strongly dependent on the experimentally measured Jedge/B peeling instability drive, consistent with theory. Peeling modes nonlinearly generate ELM-like, field-aligned filamentary structures that detach from the edge and propagate radially outward. The KFIT equilibrium code is extended with an Akima spline profile parameterization and an improved model for induced toroidal wall current estimation to obtain a reconstruction during peeling activity with its current profile constrained by internal Hall measurements. It is used to test the analytic peeling stability criterion and numerically evaluate ideal MHD stability. Both approaches predict instability, in agreement with experiment, with the latter identifying an unstable external kink.

  8. Salicylic acid as a peeling agent: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Tasleem

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid has been used to treat various skin disorders for more than 2,000 years. The ability of salicylic acid to exfoliate the stratum corneum makes it a good agent for peeling. In particular, the comedolytic property of salicylic acid makes it a useful peeling agent for patients with acne. Once considered as a keratolytic agent, the role of salicylic acid as a desmolytic agent, because of its ability to disrupt cellular junctions rather than breaking or lysing intercellular keratin filaments, is now recognized and is discussed here. Salicylic acid as a peeling agent has a number of indications, including acne vulgaris, melasma, photodamage, freckles, and lentigines. The efficacy and safety of salicylic acid peeling in Fitzpatrick skin types I-III as well as in skin types V and VI have been well documented in the literature. This paper reviews the available data and literature on salicylic acid as a peeling agent and its possible indications. Its properties, efficacy and safety, the peeling procedure, and possible side effects are discussed in detail. An account of salicylism is also included.

  9. Salicylic acid as a peeling agent: a comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif T

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tasleem Arif Postgraduate Department of Dermatology, STD and Leprosy, Government Medical College, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India Abstract: Salicylic acid has been used to treat various skin disorders for more than 2,000 years. The ability of salicylic acid to exfoliate the stratum corneum makes it a good agent for peeling. In particular, the comedolytic property of salicylic acid makes it a useful peeling agent for patients with acne. Once considered as a keratolytic agent, the role of salicylic acid as a desmolytic agent, because of its ability to disrupt cellular junctions rather than breaking or lysing intercellular keratin filaments, is now recognized and is discussed here. Salicylic acid as a peeling agent has a number of indications, including acne vulgaris, melasma, photodamage, freckles, and lentigines. The efficacy and safety of salicylic acid peeling in Fitzpatrick skin types I–III as well as in skin types V and VI have been well documented in the literature. This paper reviews the available data and literature on salicylic acid as a peeling agent and its possible indications. Its properties, efficacy and safety, the peeling procedure, and possible side effects are discussed in detail. An account of salicylism is also included. Keywords: acne vulgaris, desmolytic agent, melasma, photodamage, salicylic acid 

  10. Lactic acid peeling in superficial acne scarring in Indian skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Silonie

    2010-09-01

    Chemical peeling with both alpha and beta hydroxy acids has been used to improve acne scarring with pigmentation. Lactic acid, a mild alpha hydroxy acid, has been used in the treatment of various dermatological indications but no study is reported in acne scarring with pigmentation. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of full strength pure lactic acid 92% (pH 2.0) chemical peel in superficial acne scarring in Indian skin. Seven patients, Fitzpatrick skin type IV-V, in age group 20-30 years with superficial acne scarring were enrolled in the study. Chemical peeling was done with lactic acid at an interval of 2 weeks to a maximum of four peels. Pre- and post-peel clinical photographs were taken at every session. Patients were followed every month for 3 months after the last peel to evaluate the effects. At the end of 3 months, there was definite improvement in the texture, pigmentation, and appearance of the treated skin, with lightening of scars. Significant improvement (greater than 75% clearance of lesions) occurred in one patient (14.28%), good improvement (51-75% clearance) in three patients (42.84%), moderate improvement (26-50% clearance) in two patients (28.57%), and mild improvement (1-25% clearance) in one patient (14.28%). © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Deformation of nanotubes in peeling contact with flat substrate: An in situ electron microscopy nanomechanical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zheng, Meng; Wei, Qing; Ke, Changhong, E-mail: cke@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York 13902-6000 (United States); Signetti, Stefano [Laboratory of Bio-Inspired and Graphene Nanomechanics, Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Pugno, Nicola M. [Laboratory of Bio-Inspired and Graphene Nanomechanics, Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Centre for Materials and Microsystems, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Povo (Trento) (Italy); School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-21

    Peeling of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures from flat substrates is an essential technique in studying their adhesion properties. The mechanical deformation of the nanostructure in the peeling experiment is critical to the understanding of the peeling process and the interpretation of the peeling measurements, but it is challenging to measure directly and quantitatively at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate the peeling deformation of a bundled carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber by using an in situ scanning electron microscopy nanomechanical peeling technique. A pre-calibrated atomic force microscopy cantilever is utilized as the peeling force sensor, and its back surface acts as the peeling contact substrate. The nanomechanical peeling scheme enables a quantitative characterization of the deformational behaviors of the CNT fiber in both positive and negative peeling configurations with sub-10 nm spatial and sub-nN force resolutions. Nonlinear continuum mechanics models and finite element simulations are employed to interpret the peeling measurements. The measurements and analysis reveal that the structural imperfections in the CNT fiber may have a substantial influence on its peeling deformations and the corresponding peeling forces. The research findings reported in this work are useful to the study of mechanical and adhesion properties of 1D nanostructures by using nanomechanical peeling techniques.

  12. Evidence and Considerations in the Application of Chemical Peels in Skin Disorders and Aesthetic Resurfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berson, Diane S.; Cohen, Joel L.; Roberts, Wendy E.; Starker, Isaac; Wang, Beatrice

    2010-01-01

    Chemical peeling is a popular, relatively inexpensive, and generally safe method for treatment of some skin disorders and to refresh and rejuvenate skin. This article focuses on chemical peels and their use in routine clinical practice. Chemical peels are classified by the depth of action into superficial, medium, and deep peels. The depth of the peel is correlated with clinical changes, with the greatest change achieved by deep peels. However, the depth is also associated with longer healing times and the potential for complications. A wide variety of peels are available, utilizing various topical agents and concentrations, including a recent salicylic acid derivative, β-lipohydroxy acid, which has properties that may expand the clinical use of peels. Superficial peels, penetrating only the epidermis, can be used to enhance treatment for a variety of conditions, including acne, melasma, dyschromias, photodamage, and actinic keratoses. Medium-depth peels, penetrating to the papillary dermis, may be used for dyschromia, multiple solar keratoses, superficial scars, and pigmentary disorders. Deep peels, affecting reticular dermis, may be used for severe photoaging, deep wrinkles, or scars. Peels can be combined with other in-office facial resurfacing techniques to optimize outcomes and enhance patient satisfaction and allow clinicians to tailor the treatment to individual patient needs. Successful outcomes are based on a careful patient selection as well as appropriate use of specific peeling agents. Used properly, the chemical peel has the potential to fill an important therapeutic need in the dermatologist's and plastic surgeon's armamentarium. PMID:20725555

  13. Vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling versus vitrectomy with no peeling for idiopathic full-thickness macular hole (FTMH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiteri Cornish, Kurt; Lois, Noemi; Scott, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Several observational studies have suggested the potential benefit of internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling to treat idiopathic full-thickness macular hole (FTMH). However, no strong evidence is available on the potential benefit(s) of this surgical manoeuvre and uncertainty remains among...... vitreoretinal surgeons about the indication for peeling the ILM, whether to use it in all cases or in long-standing and/or larger holes. ...

  14. Cross-validation and Peeling Strategies for Survival Bump Hunting using Recursive Peeling Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazard, Jean-Eudes; Choe, Michael; LeBlanc, Michael; Rao, J. Sunil

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a framework to build a survival/risk bump hunting model with a censored time-to-event response. Our Survival Bump Hunting (SBH) method is based on a recursive peeling procedure that uses a specific survival peeling criterion derived from non/semi-parametric statistics such as the hazards-ratio, the log-rank test or the Nelson--Aalen estimator. To optimize the tuning parameter of the model and validate it, we introduce an objective function based on survival or prediction-error statistics, such as the log-rank test and the concordance error rate. We also describe two alternative cross-validation techniques adapted to the joint task of decision-rule making by recursive peeling and survival estimation. Numerical analyses show the importance of replicated cross-validation and the differences between criteria and techniques in both low and high-dimensional settings. Although several non-parametric survival models exist, none addresses the problem of directly identifying local extrema. We show how SBH efficiently estimates extreme survival/risk subgroups unlike other models. This provides an insight into the behavior of commonly used models and suggests alternatives to be adopted in practice. Finally, our SBH framework was applied to a clinical dataset. In it, we identified subsets of patients characterized by clinical and demographic covariates with a distinct extreme survival outcome, for which tailored medical interventions could be made. An R package PRIMsrc (Patient Rule Induction Method in Survival, Regression and Classification settings) is available on CRAN (Comprehensive R Archive Network) and GitHub. PMID:27034730

  15. Acral peeling skin syndrome in two East-African siblings: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiprono Samson K

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acral peeling skin syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis due to a missense mutation in transglutaminase 5. The skin peeling occurs at the separation of the stratum corneum from the stratum granulosum. Case presentation We present a case of two siblings who developed continuous peeling of the palms and soles from the first year of life. This peeling was more severe on the soles than palms and on younger sibling than elder sibling. Peeling is worsened by occlusion and sweating. Conclusions Sporadic cases of Acral Peeling Skin Syndrome occur in African population. There is variability in time of presentation and clinical severity even within families.

  16. Acral peeling skin syndrome in two East-African siblings: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiprono, Samson K; Chaula, Baraka M; Naafs, Bernard; Masenga, John E

    2012-03-19

    Acral peeling skin syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis due to a missense mutation in transglutaminase 5. The skin peeling occurs at the separation of the stratum corneum from the stratum granulosum. We present a case of two siblings who developed continuous peeling of the palms and soles from the first year of life. This peeling was more severe on the soles than palms and on younger sibling than elder sibling. Peeling is worsened by occlusion and sweating. Sporadic cases of Acral Peeling Skin Syndrome occur in African population. There is variability in time of presentation and clinical severity even within families.

  17. Combination Superficial Peels With Salicylic Acid and Post-Peel Retinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kligman, Douglas E; Draelos, Zoe D

    2016-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and retinoids, tretinoin (all-trans retinoic acid [ATRA]), and retinol (all-trans retinol) are widely used as topical agents for the improvement of photodamage and acne vulgaris. They can be used in daily take-home products or as part of an in-office procedure, combining the benefits of a keratolytic (SA) and a retinoid. The objective of this research was to compare the efficacy for ameliorating photodamage of topical tretinoin (0.25%) and retinol (0.25%) to baseline and with each other when applied after a 30% salicylic acid peel on human facial skin. Twenty female subjects received a full face 30% SA peel followed by the overnight application of tretinoin to a 1 randomized half-face and retinol to the opposite side (split-face study). The identical procedure was repeated at week 2. Double-blinded subject and investigator assessments of the results were captured at weeks 2 and 4. By investigator evaluation, both peeling regimens were effective in improving photodamage parameters compared to baseline. (ATRA P-values at week 4 were: P=.00008 texture, P=.00013 roughness, P=.00221 pores, P=.00098 dryness, P=.02770 erythema, and P=.00008 overall appearance. Retinol P-values at week 4 were: P=.00019 texture, P=.00053 roughness, P=.00221 pores, P=.00147 dryness, P=.02770 erythema, and P=.0043 overall appearance.) By subject self-assessment compared with baseline, both tretinoin and retinol were effective in improving overall appearance (ATRA P=.0229 and retinol P=.0190). By investigator evaluation comparing tretinoin with retinol, tretinoin was slightly better than retinol at week 4 in improving texture P=.00506, roughness P=.01171, and overall appearance P=.00506. By subject self-assessment comparing tretinoin with retinol, there was no difference in overall appearance (ATRA P=.2367 and retinol P=.3613). Either topical tretinoin (0.25%) or retinol (0.25%) can be used safely and effectively when applied in office immediately after SA peeling to

  18. [The in vitro action of plants on Vibrio cholerae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, J M; Chumpitaz, J; Valencia, E

    1994-01-01

    Natural products of several plants, according to the geographic location, are used by Peruvian people in the popular treatment of diarrhea, with good success. When cholerae cases appeared in Peru, we were interested to know the "in vitro" effect against Vibrio cholerae 01, of these useful plants to treat diarrhea. The following plants were tested: Cichorium intybus, Althaea officinalis, Psorela glandulosa, Geranium maculatum, Punica granatum, Malus sativa, Cydonia oblonga, Chenopodium ambrosoides, Krameria triandria, Tea chinensis, Daucus carota, Persea gratissima, Psidium guayaba and Lippia dulcis. Decoction or infusion of the plants were used in the "in vitro" experiments. The following plants showed no "in vitro" effect against V. cholerae: Cichorium intybus, Althaea officinalis, Psorela glandulosa, Geranium maculatum, Chenopodium ambrosoides, Krameria triandria, Psidium guayaba, Lippia dulcis and Daucus carota. Decoction of Malus sativa and Cydenia oblonga showed bactericidal effect for their acidity and stone avocado (Persea gratissima) a late bactericidal effect. Tea infusión and the decoction of Punica granatum peel, showed the best bactericidal effect and we suggest to use them as to stop cholera spreading.

  19. Peel testing behavior of mushroom-top terminated structured adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossfeld, Craig Kenneth

    Synthetic structured surfaces have been created based on the extraordinary adhesive ability exhibited by insects, spiders, and geckos. The adhesion of synthetic and natural structured adhesives is attributed to the cumulative addition of van der Waals forces acting on the structures of the surface. It has been shown that for synthetic surfaces a "mushroom top" or "flanged" terminating structure exhibits the highest adhesion. Unfortunately, due to the variety of testing and fabrication techniques and the small scale of previous studies, the detachment behavior of these structures is not well understood. This research systematically investigated the effect of peel angle, pillar diameter, flange diameter, and pillar aspect ratio on the force required for peeling. Explicit emphasis was placed on relatively large pillar structures to allow for in situ optical visualization in order to gain insights into fundamental mechanisms which dictate peeling. Traditional molding techniques were used to fabricate optical-scale mushroom terminated structures with pillar diameters of 1mm and 400microm and aspect ratios of 1, 3, and 5. Results were quantitatively compared to peel testing theory for conventional adhesives. It was convincingly demonstrated that the adhesive energy of a patterned surface changes as function of angle, and cannot be treated as a constant. The variability in the energy was linked to mechanistic differences in detachment through in situ observations and finite element analysis. Experimental results show that smaller pillars do not necessarily lead to higher adhesion during peeling, aspect ratio plays little role in peeling adhesive behavior, and pillar flange size is critical to adhesion. The conclusions from this study outline design parameters for mushroom topped dry adhesives in peeling applications.

  20. Gamma Irradiation Induced Degradation of Orange Peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Saucedo Luna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, gamma irradiation induced degradation of orange peels (OP was investigated. The lignocellulosic biomass degradation was carried out at doses of 0 (control, 600, 1800 and 3500 kGy using a Co-60 gamma radiation source. The samples were tested for total and reducing sugars. The concentrations of total sugars ranged from 0.530 g∙g−1 in control sample to 0.382 g∙g−1 of dry weight in the sample which received the highest radiation dose. The reducing sugars content varying from 0.018 to 0.184 g∙g−1 of dry weight with the largest rise occurring in the sample irradiated at 3500 kGy. The concentrations of sucrose, glucose and fructose were determined. The changes generated in physico-chemical properties were determined by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and termogravimetric analysis (TG-DTG. The results show that OP was affected, but not significantly, which suggests that lignocellulose and sugars profiles were partially degraded after gamma irradiation.

  1. Patients' self-esteem before and after chemical peeling procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Anargyros; Platsidaki, Eftychia; Christodoulou, Christos; Efstathiou, Vasiliki; Markantoni, Vasiliki; Armyra, Kalliopi; Potouridou, Irene; Rigopoulos, Dimitrios; Kontochristopoulos, Georgios

    2017-12-29

    Chemical peeling is a safe method, widely used to treat a variety of skin conditions and reduce the aging effects. This study aims to evaluate self-esteem among adolescents who undergo chemical peelings. One hundred and twenty six patients constituted the study group. Sixty seven individuals had undergone chemical peeling for therapeutic reasons and 59 individuals for cosmetic reasons. To assess patients' self-esteem, the Rosenberg's Self-esteem Scale (RSES) was used before and after treatment. The control group included 71 healthy, age- and sex-matched volunteers from the general population. They were also asked to complete the RSES, after the same time interval as the patients. The healthy controls (23.01 ± 3.12) presented statistically significantly higher self-esteem than both the groups of individuals who would be submitted to chemical peeling. Furthermore, patients who would undergo peeling for therapeutic reasons (21.58 ± 3.20) had statistically significantly higher self-esteem than those who would undergo the procedure for cosmetic reasons (18.97 ± 3.36). After the chemical peeling sessions, the self-esteem of patients treated for therapeutic reasons (23.48 ± 2.43) and of patients treated for cosmetic reasons (22.83 ± 3.34) improved statistically significantly, while the self-esteem of the healthy controls remained stable, as expected. Patients who undergo chemical peelings tend to have low levels of self-esteem. Although facial lesions in skin diseases such as acne, acne scars, rosacea, and melasma seem to have negative effect on individuals' self-consciousness, patients who would be submitted to chemical peeling in order to treat wrinkles, loss of radiance, and skin tone clarity have even lower self-esteem. Chemical peelings were shown to favorably affect patient's self-esteem since all patients showed an increase in self-esteem after treatment, while the control group experienced no change.

  2. Antioxidant activities of Rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L peel in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mistriyani,

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rambutan, Nephelium lappaceum L, peel due to consumption of fresh rambutan fruit is taken into account as waste, therefore the exploration of rambutan peel as a natural antioxidant is highly needed. The aim of this study is to investigate the antioxidant activity of rambutan peel from two cultivars (Aceh and Binjai using ABTS radical assay of and ferric reducing activity power (FRAP and to correlate with total phenolics and flavonoids. The powdered rambutan peel is extracted using maceration technique using methanol as extracting solvent. The methanolic extract is added with warm water and fractionated using petroleum ether, chloroform, and ethyl acetate to get corresponding fractions. Rambutan cultivar Binjai revealed the higher ABTS antiradical activity than that of cultivar Aceh. Furthermore, among methanolic extract and its fraction, ethyl acetate fraction exhibited the highest antiradical activity using ABTS radical with IC50 values of 3.10 μg/mL and 0.77 μg/mL for Aceh and Binjai, respectively. The ethyl acetate fraction also revealed the highest FRAP values of 1424.897 ± 28.56 μg/mg fraction sample (Aceh and 968.57± 7.48 μg/mg fraction sample (Binjai. These activities were correlated with phenolics and flavonoid contents. Rambutan peel exhibited strong antioxidant activities, contained high amounts of phenolics and flavonoid and is potential to be developed as a functional food.

  3. Cadmium ion removal using biosorbents derived from fruit peel wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanna Saikaew

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of fruit peel wastes, corn, durian, pummelo, and banana, to remove cadmium ions from aqueous solution by biosorption were investigated. The experiments were carried out by batch method at 25oC. The influence of particle sizes, solution pH, and initial cadmium ion concentrations were evaluated on the biosorption studies. The result showed that banana peel had the highest cadmium ions removal followed by durian, pummelo, and corn peels at cadmium ions removal of 73.15, 72.17, 70.56, and 51.22%, respectively. There was a minimal effect when using different particle sizes of corn peel as biosorbent, while the particle size of the others had no influence on the removal of cadmium ions. The cadmium ions removal increased significantly as the pH of the solution increased rapidly from 1 to 5. At pH 5, the cadmium ions removal reached a maximum value. The equilibrium process was best described by the Langmuir isotherms, with maximum biosorption capacities of durian, pummelo, and banana peel of 18.55, 21.83, and 20.88 mg/g respectively. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy revealed that carboxyl, hydroxyl, and amide groups on the fruit peels’ surface and these groups were involved in the adsorption of the cadmium ions.

  4. Studies on the development of functional powder from citrus peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H J; Chawla, S P; Jo, C; Kwon, J H; Byun, M W

    2006-03-01

    The suitability of citrus peels, generated as a by-product of the juice industry, as a source of antioxidants was investigated. Citrus peel powder was prepared by lyophilizing 70% ethanol extract from citrus peels. Extraction was carried out at room temperature (20 degrees C) for 72 h. The extract was subjected to gamma-irradiation treatment (20 kGy). The aqueous solutions of citrus peel powder were examined for color characteristics and antioxidant potential in terms of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, beta-carotene bleaching and nitrite scavenging activities. There were significant changes in Hunter color values due to irradiation. The a*- and b*-values decreased due to radiation treatment. DPPH radical scavenging, beta-carotene bleaching and nitrite scavenging activities were not affected by irradiation treatment. Nitrite scavenging activity was the highest in the extract at pH 1.2 followed by pH 4.2 and 6.0. These functional properties of the aqueous solution were found to be stable in heat treatment. It could significantly improve oxidative stability of lipids in fish meat system. Based on these results there may be opportunities to use citrus peel powder as a functional component in the food processing industry with gamma irradiation treatment improving its color characteristics without adversely influencing the functional properties.

  5. Multiple extrafoveal macular holes following internal limiting membrane peeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain N

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Nazimul Hussain, Sandip Mitra Department of Ophthalmology, Al Zahra Hospital, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates Objective: Internal limiting membrane (ILM peeling has been the standard of treatment for macular holes. Besides, causing retinal nerve fiber layer surface abnormality, postoperative extrafoveal multiple retinal holes is a rare phenomenon following ILM peeling. We report an unusual complication of eight extrafoveal macular holes occurring following ILM peeling.Case presentation: A 60-year-old male presented with complaints of decreased and distorted vision in the right eye. He was diagnosed as having epiretinal membrane with lamellar macular hole. He underwent 23G pars plana vitrectomy, brilliant blue assisted ILM peeling and fluid gas exchange. Intraoperatively, ILM was found to be adherent to the underlying neurosensory retina. One month after cataract surgery, he underwent YAG capsulotomy in the right eye. He complained of visual distortion. His fundus evaluation in the right eye showed multiple (eight extrafoveal retinal holes temporal to the macula clustered together.Conclusion: This case demonstrated that peeling of ILM, especially when it is adherent to the underlying neurosensory retina, may cause unwanted mechanical trauma to the inner retina. Glial apoptosis and neuronal degeneration may presumably play a role in delayed appearance of multiple (eight extrafoveal macular holes, which has not been reported earlier. Keywords: internal limiting membrane, lamellar macular hole, full thickness macular holes, epiretinal membrane

  6. Multiple extrafoveal macular holes following internal limiting membrane peeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Nazimul; Mitra, Sandip

    2018-01-01

    Internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling has been the standard of treatment for macular holes. Besides, causing retinal nerve fiber layer surface abnormality, postoperative extrafoveal multiple retinal holes is a rare phenomenon following ILM peeling. We report an unusual complication of eight extrafoveal macular holes occurring following ILM peeling. A 60-year-old male presented with complaints of decreased and distorted vision in the right eye. He was diagnosed as having epiretinal membrane with lamellar macular hole. He underwent 23G pars plana vitrectomy, brilliant blue assisted ILM peeling and fluid gas exchange. Intraoperatively, ILM was found to be adherent to the underlying neurosensory retina. One month after cataract surgery, he underwent YAG capsulotomy in the right eye. He complained of visual distortion. His fundus evaluation in the right eye showed multiple (eight) extrafoveal retinal holes temporal to the macula clustered together. This case demonstrated that peeling of ILM, especially when it is adherent to the underlying neurosensory retina, may cause unwanted mechanical trauma to the inner retina. Glial apoptosis and neuronal degeneration may presumably play a role in delayed appearance of multiple (eight) extrafoveal macular holes, which has not been reported earlier.

  7. Adhesion strength study of IBAD-MOCVD-based 2G HTS wire using a peel test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y., E-mail: yzhang@superpower-inc.com [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Avenue, Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Hazelton, D.W.; Knoll, A.R.; Duval, J.M.; Brownsey, P.; Repnoy, S.; Soloveichik, S.; Sundaram, A.; McClure, R.B. [SuperPower Inc., 450 Duane Avenue, Schenectady, NY 12304 (United States); Majkic, G.; Selvamanickam, V. [University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Road, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    A peel test was used to study the adhesion strength of a commercial grade 2G HTS wire which features a characteristic multilayer structure with the rare earth-based MOCVD superconducting film deposited on an IBAD-MgO template. The peel test could be carried out at various peeling angles (from 90 Degree-Sign to 180 Degree-Sign) and the peel strength of a wire was defined as the steady-state peeling load determined from a load-displacement curve. The test results had good reproducibility and accuracy, making the test a reliable and useful method for studying the adhesion strength of the wire. By characterizing the peeled surfaces the weakest interface in a wire could be identified. The peel strength data of the wire was analyzed together with the performance of the experimental magnet coils fabricated using the wire. The effect of the silver contact layer annealing on the peel strength is discussed.

  8. “Self-Peel-Off” Transfer Produces Ultrathin Polyvinylidene-Fluoride-Based Flexible Nanodevices

    KAUST Repository

    Tai, Yanlong; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Here, a new strategy, self-peel-off transfer, for the preparation of ultrathin flexible nanodevices made from polyvinylidene-fluoride (PVDF) is reported. In this process, a functional pattern of nanoparticles is transferred via peeling from a

  9. Adhesion strength study of IBAD-MOCVD-based 2G HTS wire using a peel test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Hazelton, D.W.; Knoll, A.R.; Duval, J.M.; Brownsey, P.; Repnoy, S.; Soloveichik, S.; Sundaram, A.; McClure, R.B.; Majkic, G.; Selvamanickam, V.

    2012-01-01

    A peel test was used to study the adhesion strength of a commercial grade 2G HTS wire which features a characteristic multilayer structure with the rare earth-based MOCVD superconducting film deposited on an IBAD-MgO template. The peel test could be carried out at various peeling angles (from 90° to 180°) and the peel strength of a wire was defined as the steady-state peeling load determined from a load-displacement curve. The test results had good reproducibility and accuracy, making the test a reliable and useful method for studying the adhesion strength of the wire. By characterizing the peeled surfaces the weakest interface in a wire could be identified. The peel strength data of the wire was analyzed together with the performance of the experimental magnet coils fabricated using the wire. The effect of the silver contact layer annealing on the peel strength is discussed.

  10. The peeling behaviour of a graphene sheet on a nano-scale corrugated surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hao; Chen, Shaohua

    2013-01-01

    The peeling process and average peeling force of a graphene (GE) sheet on a corrugated surface are investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. It is found that the peeling behaviour varies with the substrate surface roughness and the peeling angle. Three kinds of typically peeling behaviours include (a) GE sheet directly passing the valley of the substrate roughness; (b) bouncing off from the substrate; and (c) continuously peeling off similarly to that on a flat substrate. As a result, the average peeling force is strongly dependent of the peeling behaviours. Furthermore, some interesting phenomena are caught, such as partial detaching and partial sliding of GE sheet in the valley of the substrate roughness, which are mainly due to the effects of pre-tension in GE sheet and the reduction of friction resistance. The results in this paper should be useful for the design of nano-film/substrate systems. (paper)

  11. Trace element concentrations in the fruit peels and trunks of Musa paradisiaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selema, M D; Farago, M E

    1996-08-01

    Chemical analyses for the elementary compositions of the ashes of the fruit peels and trunks of the tropical plantain Musa paradisiaca have been undertaken. The elements, categorized as trace elements, generally are found to have higher mean concentrations in the fruit peels than in the trunks (except in the case of Zn). Their peel-trunk uptake ratios have been calculated and range between 1 and 4, showing normal levels of accumulations in the fruit peels over the trunks.

  12. Observations of peeling of a polyisobutynele-based pressure-sensitive adhesive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren. F.; Everland, Hanne.; Hassager, Ole

    1998-01-01

    A pressure-sensitive adhesive(PSA) was prepared by mixing low- and high-molecular-weight polyisobutylenes(PIB). Peeling of the adhesive from polycarbonate was observed from the side and from below at three different peel rates.......A pressure-sensitive adhesive(PSA) was prepared by mixing low- and high-molecular-weight polyisobutylenes(PIB). Peeling of the adhesive from polycarbonate was observed from the side and from below at three different peel rates....

  13. Generation of ultra-sound during tape peeling

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy O.; Riker, Paul W.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the generation of the screeching sound commonly heard during tape peeling using synchronised high-speed video and audio acquisition. We determine the peak frequencies in the audio spectrum and, in addition to a peak frequency at the upper end of the audible range (around 20 kHz), we find an unexpected strong sound with a high-frequency far above the audible range, typically around 50 kHz. Using the corresponding video data, the origins of the key frequencies are confirmed as being due to the substructure "fracture" bands, which we herein observe in both high-speed continuous peeling motions and in the slip phases for stick-slip peeling motions.

  14. Generation of ultra-sound during tape peeling

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy O.

    2014-03-21

    We investigate the generation of the screeching sound commonly heard during tape peeling using synchronised high-speed video and audio acquisition. We determine the peak frequencies in the audio spectrum and, in addition to a peak frequency at the upper end of the audible range (around 20 kHz), we find an unexpected strong sound with a high-frequency far above the audible range, typically around 50 kHz. Using the corresponding video data, the origins of the key frequencies are confirmed as being due to the substructure "fracture" bands, which we herein observe in both high-speed continuous peeling motions and in the slip phases for stick-slip peeling motions.

  15. The electrostatics of charged insulating sheets peeled from grounded conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, M J; Horenstein, M N

    2008-01-01

    The physics of a charged, insulating sheet peeled from a ground-plane conductor is examined. Contact charging is ensured by charging a sheet to 10-12 kV with corona to establish intimate electrostatic contact with the underlying conductor. The surface potential is next forced to zero by sweeping the sheet with a stainless-steel brush, and the surface recharged to a new potential between 0 and 11 kV. The sheet is then peeled from the ground plane and its residual charge density is measured. Results show that the residual charge equals the breakdown-limiting value, but its polarity depends on the surface potential acquired just prior to peeling. The results have relevance to studies of industrial webs and insulating sheets.

  16. External kink (peeling) modes in x-point geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huysmans, G T A

    2005-01-01

    The influence of the separatrix on the stability of edge current driven external kink (peeling) modes has been studied. Two approaches have been compared: taking the limit towards the separatrix using linear ideal and resistive MHD stability codes and including the complete x-point geometry using a new resistive MHD code. A strong stabilizing effect has been observed for the ideal and the resistive peeling mode for instabilities driven by the edge current gradient. Both approaches are in good agreement. A new resistive instability remains unstable and is not significantly affected by the separatrix. This mode is a combination of a kink and a tearing type mode and could be called a peeling-tearing mode

  17. Peeled film GaAs solar cell development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilt, D.M.; Thomas, R.D.; Bailey, S.G.; Brinker, D.J.; DeAngelo, F.L.

    1990-01-01

    Thin film, single crystal gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells could exhibit a specific power approaching 700 W/Kg including coverglass. A simple process has been described whereby epitaxial GaAs layers are peeled from a reusable substrate. This process takes advantage of the extreme selectivity (>10 6 ) of the etching rate of aluminum arsenide (AlAs) over GaAs in dilute hydrofloric acid (HF). The intent of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of using the peeled film technique to fabricate high efficiency, low mass GaAs solar cells. We have successfully produced a peeled film GaAs solar cell. The device, although fractured and missing the aluminum gallium arsenide (Al x Ga 1 - x As) window and antireflective (AR) coating, had a Voc of 874 mV and a fill factor of 68% under AMO illumination

  18. comparative analysis of type 1 and type 2 cassava peeling machines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    to design a cassava peeling machine that is capable of efficiently peeling .... the peeling chamber to the chute. Both the ... A belt and pulley mechanism was used to transfer the motion ... conveyor shaft that will not allow cassava tubers to drop ...

  19. Demonstration tests of infrared peeling system with electrical emitters for tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infrared (IR) dry-peeling is an emerging technology that could avoid the drawbacks of steam and lye peeling of tomatoes. The objectives of this research was to evaluate the performance of an IR peeling system at two tomato processing plants located in California and to compare product quality, peela...

  20. Effect of chemical peeling on the skin in relation to UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funasaka, Yoko; Abdel-Daim, Mohamed; Kawana, Seiji; Nishigori, Chikako

    2012-07-01

    Chemical peeling is one of the dermatological treatments available for certain cutaneous diseases and conditions or improvement of cosmetic appearance of photoaged skin. However, it needs to be clarified whether the repetitive procedure of chemical peeling on photodamaged skin is safe and whether the different chemicals used for peeling results in similar outcomes or not. In this article, we reviewed the effect of peeling or peeling agents on the skin in relation to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The pretreatment of peeling agents usually enhance UV sensitivity by inducing increased sunburn cell formation, lowering minimum erythematous dose and increasing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. However, this sensitivity is reversible and recovers to normal after 1-week discontinuation. Using animals, the chronic effect of peeling and peeling agents was shown to prevent photocarcinogenesis. There is also an in vitro study using culture cells to know the detailed mechanisms of peeling agents, especially on cell proliferation and apoptotic changes via activating signalling cascades and oxidative stress. It is important to understand the effect of peeling agents on photoaged skin and to know how to deal with UV irradiation during the application of peeling agents and treatment of chemical peeling in daily life. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Predictive modeling of infrared radiative heating in tomato dry-peeling process: Part I. Model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infrared (IR) dry-peeling has emerged as an effective non-chemical alternative to conventional lye and steam methods of peeling tomatoes. Successful peel separation induced by IR radiation requires the delivery of a sufficient amount of thermal energy onto tomato surface in a very short duration. Th...

  2. Bio-Diesel Production from Oil of Orange ( Citrus Sinensis ) Peels as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although, in Nigeria orange peels are considered as a waste, this study is intended to convert the waste into wealth by establishing the production of biodiesel with oil obtained from orange peels; using transeterification process. Oil from sun-dried/ ground orange peels were extractedusing n-hexane. Transesterification ...

  3. Total phenolic, condensed tannin and antioxidant activity of four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-07

    Sep 7, 2011 ... the common fruits and vegetables across the US (Wu et al., 2004). ... or pellicle were separated from the shell by cracking with a small hammer ..... shell (Carya Illinoensis), pomegranate husk (Punica granatum) and creosote ...

  4. Pomegranate seed oil rich in conjugated linolenic acids reduces in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2016-10-01

    Oct 1, 2016 ... Keywords: Gas production, methane, Punica granatum L, ruminal fermentation, .... methane production was measured by injecting 1 mL headspace gas from each of the syringes into a gas-liquid chromatograph (Agilent 5890 ...

  5. Aroma compounds in fresh cut pomegranate arils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little published information exists regarding flavor and aroma compounds in pomegranate (Punica granatum). Although arils have fruity and sweet characteristics, we found no publications describing actual compounds responsible for their typical flavor. Since most commercial usage of pomegranates in...

  6. Ethnobotanical knowledge and practices of tradi- tional healers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pus integer N.E.Br (80%), Punica granatum L. (75%) and Cordia africana L. ... to their attributes having wide biological and medicinal activities, high safety margins ..... tory activity and cardiovascular protective effect (Santhosha et al., 2013).

  7. Modeling Transfer of Vibrio Parahaemolyticus During Peeling of Raw Shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xingning; Pang, Haiying; Wang, Wen; Fang, Weihuan; Fu, Yingchun; Li, Yanbin

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to qualify the transfer of Vibrio parahaemolyticus during the shrimp peeling process via gloves under 3 different scenarios. The 1st 2 scenarios provided quantitative information for the probability distribution of bacterial transfer rates from (i) contaminated shrimp (6 log CFU/g) to non-contaminated gloves (Scenario 1) and (ii) contaminated gloves (6 log CFU/per pair) to non-contaminated shrimp (Scenario 2). In Scenario 3, bacterial transfer from contaminated shrimp to non-contaminated shrimp in the shrimp peeling process via gloves was investigated to develop a predictive model for describing the successive bacterial transfer. The range of bacterial transfer rate (%) in Scenarios 1 and 2 was 7% to 91.95% and 0.04% to 12.87%, respectively, indicating that the bacteria can be transferred from shrimp to gloves much easier than that from gloves to shrimp. A Logistic (1.59, 0.14) and Triangle distribution (-1.61, 0.12, 1.32) could be used to describe the bacterial transfer rate in Scenarios 1 and 2, respectively. In Scenario 3, a continuously decay patterning with fluctuations as the peeling progressed has been observed at all inoculation levels of the 1st shrimp (5, 6, and 7 log CFU/g). The bacteria could be transferred easier at 1st few peels, and the decreasing bacterial transfer was found in later phase. Two models (exponential and Weibull) could describe the successive bacterial transfer satisfactorily (pseudo-R 2 > 0.84, RMSE peeling process. The bacterial transfer rate distribution and predictive model derived from this work could be used in risk assessment of V. parahaemolyticus to ensure peeled shrimp safety. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  8. Corrosion Inhibitor of Carbon Steel from Onion Peel Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Samsudin Asep

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon steels composed by two main elements, they are iron (Fe and carbon (C elements which widely used in industrial because of its resistance and more affordable than stainless steel, but their weakness is they have low corrosion resistance. One way to modify carbon steel is by coating them with antioxidant compounds that can delay, slow down, and prevent lipid oxidation process, which obtained from onion peel extract. Several studies on corrosion inhibitors have been performed. However, the efficiency was not reach the optimum. This study aims to examine the effect of onion peel extract concentration on the efficiency of corrosion inhibitor and characterization of the green corrosion inhibitor from onion peel extract. This research method begins by extracting onion peel to 200 ml solvent which we use aquadest and methanol and mixed with 5 grams of crushed onion peel, then let them be extracted for 60 minutes with room temperature. Once it was filtered and the solution obtained, followed by evaporating process with rotary evaporator to decrease the content of solvent. The product is ready to be used as a green corrosion inhibitor of carbon steel in 1 mol/L HCl. While the analysis used is HPLC qualitative analysis, and electroplatting process. The impedance is measured at a frequency of 100 kHz to 4 mHz with an AC current of 10mV. Inhibitor concentrations are vary between 2 ml and 4 ml of onion peel extract. Electroplatting is done within 30 minutes with 10 minutes each checking time. Furthermore, quantitative analysis was done for the analysis of corrosion rate and weight loss. Based on HPLC analysis, it is known that the extract of onion peel contains 1mg/L of quercetin, which is belong to flavonoid group as green inhibitor. While electroplatting process, aquadest solvent having average efficiency of 99,57% for 2 ml of extract, and 99,60% for 4 ml of extract. Methanol solvent having average efficiency of 99,52% for 2 ml of extract and 99

  9. The therapeutic value of glycolic acid peels in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grover C

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical peeling or chemexfoliation has become increasingly popular in recent years for treatment of a number of cosmetic skin problems. Topical glycolic acid in the concentration of 10-30% for 3-5 minutes at fortnightly intervals was investigated as a therapeutic peeling agent in 41 patients having acne (39%, melasma (36.5%, post inflammatory hyperpigmentation (12% and superficial scarring of varied etiology (12%. A final evaluation done at 16 weeks revealed that this modality is useful especially in superficial scarring and melasma, moderately successful in acne patients with no response in dermal pigmentation. No significant untoward effects were seen.

  10. HEMI-TEMPORAL INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE PEELING IS AS EFFECTIVE AND SAFE AS CONVENTIONAL FULL PEELING FOR MACULAR HOLE SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiono, Akira; Kogo, Jiro; Sasaki, Hiroki; Yomoda, Ryo; Jujo, Tatsuya; Tokuda, Naoto; Kitaoka, Yasushi; Takagi, Hitoshi

    2018-05-09

    To investigate the efficacy of hemi-temporal internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling for idiopathic macular hole. The medical records of patients with macular holes who had undergone vitrectomy with ILM peeling were studied. Forty-two eyes with macular hole were divided into 2 groups based on surgical procedure (hemi-temporal ILM peeling [hemi group]: 15 eyes; 360° ILM peeling [360° group]: 27 eyes). The closure rates and distances between the optic disc and the intersection of two retinal vessels most closely located nasally or temporally to the macular hole were compared. The primary closure rates were not significantly different between the two groups (hemi group: 93.3%; 360° group: 92.5%, P = 0.92). The temporal retinal vessels in the hemi group were displaced 120.5 ± 102.0 µm toward the optic disc at 1 week postoperatively, which did not differ significantly from the 360° group (136.1 ± 106.1 µm) (P = 0.107). However, the nasal retinal vessels in the hemi group were displaced by 42.4 ± 42.9 µm at 1 week postoperatively, which was significantly less than the 90.1 ± 77.3 µm displacement seen in the 360° group (P = 0.040). Hemi-temporal ILM peeling may be preferable to 360° ILM peeling because of less displacement of the retina and greater safety.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  11. Vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling versus vitrectomy with no peeling for idiopathic full-thickness macular hole (FTMH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteri Cornish, Kurt; Lois, Noemi; Scott, Neil; Burr, Jennifer; Cook, Jonathan; Boachie, Charles; Tadayoni, Ramin; la Cour, Morten; Christensen, Ulrik; Kwok, Alvin

    2013-06-05

    Several observational studies have suggested the potential benefit of internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling to treat idiopathic full-thickness macular hole (FTMH). However, no strong evidence is available on the potential benefit(s) of this surgical manoeuvre and uncertainty remains among vitreoretinal surgeons about the indication for peeling the ILM, whether to use it in all cases or in long-standing and/or larger holes.  To determine whether ILM peeling improves anatomical and functional outcomes of macular hole surgery compared with the no-peeling technique and to investigate the impact of different parameters such as presenting vision, stage/size of the hole and duration of symptoms in the success of the surgery. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 2), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, (January 1950 to February 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to February 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to February 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We searched the reference lists of included studies for any additional studies not identified by the electronic searches. We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 28 February 2013.We searched reference lists of the studies included in the review for information about other studies on ILM peeling in macular hole surgery. We searched Proceedings for the following conferences up to February 2013: American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), Annual Meeting of the American Society of Retina Specialists

  12. Peeling skin syndrome associated with novel variant in FLG2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfares, Ahmed; Al-Khenaizan, Sultan; Al Mutairi, Fuad

    2017-12-01

    Peeling skin syndrome is a rare genodermatosis characterized by variably pruritic superficial generalized peeling of the skin with several genes involved until now little is known about the association between FLG2 and peeling skin syndrome. We describe multiple family members from a consanguineous Saudi family with peeling skin syndrome. Next Generation Sequencing identifies a cosegregating novel variant in FLG2 c.632C>G (p.Ser211*) as a likely etiology in this family. Here, we reported on the clinical manifestation of homozygous loss of function variant in FLG2 as a disease-causing gene for peeling skin syndrome and expand the dermatology findings. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Efficacy of modified Jessner′s peel and 20% TCA versus 20% TCA peel alone for the treatment of acne scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Puri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a paucity of studies on the use of chemical peels for acne scars among the Asian population. A trichloroacetic acid (TCA and Jessner′s combination chemical peel, originally described by Monheit, is said to be better than a TCA peel alone. Aims: The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of 20% TCA and Jessner′s solution versus 20% TCA alone for the treatment of acne scars. Materials and Methods : The patients were divided into two groups of 25 patients each. Chemical peeling was done in both the groups. In Group I, chemical peeling with Jessner′s peel followed by 20% TCA was done and in Group II patients chemical peeling with 20% TCA peel alone was done. Results: In Group I (Jessner′s peel and 20% TCA, mild improvement of acne scars was seen in 8% cases, moderate improvement in 32% cases and marked improvement of acne scars was seen in 60% patients. In Group II (20% TCA, mild improvement of acne scars was seen in 32% cases, moderate improvement in 40% cases and marked improvement of acne scars was seen in 28% patients. But, the difference in improvement of acne scars was not statistically significant in both the groups (P value > 0.05.

  14. Dietary fibre components and pectin chemical features of peels during ripening in banana and plantain varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happi Emaga, Thomas; Robert, Christelle; Ronkart, Sébastien N; Wathelet, Bernard; Paquot, Michel

    2008-07-01

    The effects of the ripeness stage of banana (Musa AAA) and plantain (Musa AAB) peels on neutral detergent fibre, acid detergent fibre, cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin, pectin contents, and pectin chemical features were studied. Plantain peels contained a higher amount of lignin but had a lower hemicellulose content than banana peels. A sequential extraction of pectins showed that acid extraction was the most efficient to isolate banana peel pectins, whereas an ammonium oxalate extraction was more appropriate for plantain peels. In all the stages of maturation, the pectin content in banana peels was higher compared to plantain peels. Moreover, the galacturonic acid and methoxy group contents in banana peels were higher than in plantain peels. The average molecular weights of the extracted pectins were in the range of 132.6-573.8 kDa and were not dependant on peel variety, while the stage of maturation did not affect the dietary fibre yields and the composition in pectic polysaccharides in a consistent manner. This study has showed that banana peels are a potential source of dietary fibres and pectins.

  15. INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE PEELING IN MACULAR HOLE SURGERY; WHY, WHEN, AND HOW?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatziralli, Irini P; Theodossiadis, Panagiotis G; Steel, David H W

    2018-05-01

    To review the current rationale for internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling in macular hole (MH) surgery and to discuss the evidence base behind why, when, and how surgeons peel the ILM. Review of the current literature. Pars plana vitrectomy is an effective treatment for idiopathic MH, and peeling of the ILM has been shown to improve closure rates and to prevent postoperative reopening. However, some authors argue against ILM peeling because it results in a number of changes in retinal structure and function and may not be necessary in all cases. Furthermore, the extent of ILM peeling optimally performed and the most favorable techniques to remove the ILM are uncertain. Several technique variations including ILM flaps, ILM scraping, and foveal sparing ILM peeling have been described as alternatives to conventional peeling in specific clinical scenarios. Internal limiting membrane peeling improves MH closure rates but can have several consequences on retinal structure and function. Adjuvants to aid peeling, instrumentation, technique, and experience may all alter the outcome. Hole size and other variables are important in assessing the requirement for peeling and potentially its extent. A variety of evolving alternatives to conventional peeling may improve outcomes and need further study.

  16. Banana peel: A novel substrate for cellulase production under solid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-05

    Dec 5, 2011 ... The feasibility of using banana peel for the production of cellulase by Trichoderma viride GIM 3.0010 in solid-state fermentation was evaluated in this study. The effect of incubation time, incubation temperature, initial moisture content of the medium, inoculum size and supplementation of carbon sources ...

  17. The peeling process of infinite Boltzmann planar maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budd, Timothy George

    2016-01-01

    criterion has a very simple interpretation. The finite random planar maps under consideration were recently proved to possess a well-defined local limit known as the infinite Boltzmann planar map (IBPM). Inspired by recent work of Curien and Le Gall, we show that the peeling process on the IBPM can...

  18. Protein enrichment of cassava peel by submerged fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2010-01-11

    Jan 11, 2010 ... enzyme and non-enzyme pre-treated cassava peel. ... T. viride in the fermentor revealed that dry biomass increased in crude protein, true protein, crude fat, ... either directly for human food or indirectly by conversion to animal ...

  19. Apple-peel atresia presenting as foetal intestinal obstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apple-peel atresia or Type 3 jejuno-ileal atresia (JIA) is an uncommon cause of foetal intestinal obstruction. Bowel obstruction in the foetus is diagnosed on the prenatal ultrasonography only in 50% cases. We report a case in which foetal intestinal obstruction was diagnosed on prenatal ultrasonography. The child showed ...

  20. Insecticidal efficacy of Lambdacyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, orange peel oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mortality effects of lambdacyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, orange peel oil and Platostoma sp. leaves extracts on adult Anopheles mosquitoes were compared in the laboratory at room temperature of 30± 2oC. Thirty adult Anopheles mosquitoes of age 2-4 days were exposed to the four formulations at concentrations ranging from ...

  1. Chemical Constituents from the Fruit Peel of Goniothalamus scortechinii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aryanti Abdullah; Zuriati Zakaria; Fasihuddin Ahmad; Mat-Salleh, K.; Laily Din

    2009-01-01

    The phytochemicals investigation on the fruit peel of Goniothalamus scortechinii (Selayar Raja Ubat) obtained from Gunung Stong, Kelantan has resulted in the isolation of five compounds namely pinocembrine, altholactone, goniofufurone, goniotriol and goniopypyrone. Their structures were determined extensive ultra violet (UV), infrared (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrum (GCMS) analysis. (author)

  2. Life cycle assessment of orange peel waste management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Negro, Viviana; Ruggeri, Bernardo; Fino, Debora

    2017-01-01

    on-land digestate use. Orange peel waste use for animal feeding, while appearing interesting from an environmental perspective (for example to reduce meal imports), presents practical challenges as far as the nutritional aspects and costs are concerned, and these eventually hinder its market...

  3. Effect of supplementation of cassava peel meal based diet with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A four-week experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of Maxigrain® enzyme supplementation on performance, nutrient digestibility and economic indices of broiler finishers fed soaked and sun-dried cassava peel meal (CPM) based diet. CPM was included in the diets replacing maize at 0%, 25%, 50% and 75% ...

  4. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of peel and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The extract of peels of red specie (PERS) showed total phenolic contents (TPC) 8.9 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g dry extract and flavonoids 6.5 mg catechin equivalent (CE)/g dry extract. The extract of PERS also showed promising DPPH free radical scavenging activity, inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation ...

  5. Tetramethyl-O-scutellarin isolated from peels of immature Shiranuhi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of the ethanol extract of the immature fruit of a citrus, Shiranuhi, and to identify the active ingredient. Methods: The immature Shiranuhi peel was extracted with 80 % ethanol, and the extract was fractionated with solvents (n-hexane, ethyl acetate and n-butanol) to afford ...

  6. Optimization of biogas production from banana peels: Effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... The matooke processing industry being set up by the Presidential Initiative on Banana Industrial Development ... a solution to that waste, but information on the pre-treatment of the matooke peel waste is inadequate. ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  7. Investigation of waste banana peels and radish leaves for their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is mainly based on the production of biodiesel and bioethanol from waste banana peels and radish leaves. The oily content from both the samples were converted to biodiesel by acid catalyzed and base catalyzed transesterification using methanol and ethanol. The biodiesel so obtained was subjected to ...

  8. Antibacterial effects of Solanum tuberosum peel ethanol extract in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanpour Raana

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Today, medicinal plants are being widely used due to being natural, available, and cheaper than synthetic drugs and having minimum side effects. Since there were reports about the antibacterial properties of Solanum tuberosum (SE, the aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of SE ethanol extract in vitro condition on Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Methods: Ethanol extract of SE peel was prepared by maceration method. Initially, antibacterial activity of ethanol extract of SE was qualitatively determined by disk diffusion test; then, the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration were qualitatively determined by micro-dilution method. Results: SE peel extract had antibacterial properties and its effect was more pronounced on gram-positive bacteria, especially S. aureus (0.62±0.00 mg/ml. The extract had antibacterial activity on gram-negative bacteria, P. aeruginosa, too (8.33±2.88 mg/ml. Conclusion: SE peel extract has antibacterial activity and its effect on gram-positive bacteria was more pronounced than the investigated gram-negative bacteria. Therefore, it is suggested that SE peel constituent compounds be determined and to determine the exact mechanism of its antibacterial properties, and more comprehensive research be done to apply it, clinically.

  9. Extraction kinetics and properties of proanthocyanidins from pomegranate peel

    Science.gov (United States)

    With an objective of developing a safe and efficient method to extract proanthocyanidins products from pomegranate peel for use in nutraceuticals or as food additives, the effects of extraction parameters on the production efficiency, product properties, and extraction kinetics were systematically s...

  10. Hydrocarbon Degradation In Poultry Droppings And Cassava Peels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This greenhouse study was aimed at determining the potentials of poultry droppings (PD) and cassava peels (CP) for nutrient-enhanced biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon (THC) in a well drained Typic Paleustults using the THC levels and degradation duration as remediation indices. The performance of the organic ...

  11. Protein enrichment of cassava peel by submerged fermentation with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) peel is one of the solid wastes produced as a consequence of cassava processing. It is low in protein but contains a large amount of carbohydrate, causing an environmental problem with disposal. In order to add-value to this major cassava processing waste and also reduce its resultant ...

  12. Novel TGM5 mutations in acral peeling skin syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, Jaap J. A. J.; van Geel, Michel; Nellen, Ruud G. L.; Jonkman, Marcel F.; McGrath, John A.; Nanda, Arti; Sprecher, Eli; van Steensel, Maurice A. M.; McLean, W. H. Irwin; Cassidy, Andrew J.

    Acral peeling skin syndrome (APSS, MIM #609796) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by superficial exfoliation and blistering of the volar and dorsal aspects of hands and feet. The level of separation is at the junction of the stratum granulosum and stratum corneum. APSS is caused

  13. Dermal morphological changes following salicylic acid peeling and microdermabrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Motaleb, Amira A; Abu-Dief, Eman E; Hussein, Mahmoud Ra

    2017-12-01

    Microdermabrasion and chemical peeling are popular, inexpensive, and safe methods for treatment of some skin disorders and to rejuvenate skin. To study the alterations of the dermal connective tissue following salicylic acid peeling and microdermabrasion. Twenty patients were participated in our study. All participants underwent facial salicylic acid 30% peel or microdermabrasion (10 cases in each group) weekly for 6 weeks. Punch biopsies were obtained from the clinically normal skin of the right postauricular region 1 week before treatment (control group). Other punch skin biopsies were obtained 1 week after the end of the treatments from the left postauricular area. This region was treated in a similar way to the adjacent lesional skin (treated group). We used routine histological techniques (H&E stain), special stains (Masson trichrome and orcein stains), and image analyzer to study the alterations of the dermal connective tissues. Our study demonstrates variations in the morphological changes between the control and the treated groups, and between chemical peels and microdermabrasion. Both salicylic acid 30% and microdermabrasion were associated with thickened epidermal layer, shallow dermal papillae, dense collagen, and elastic fibers. There was a significant increase among those treated sites vs control regarding epidermal thickness and collagen thickness. Also, there was a highly statistically significant increase among those treated with salicylic acid vs microdermabrasion regarding the epidermal, collagen, and elastin thickness. Both methods stimulate the repair process. The mechanisms underlying these variations are open for further investigations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. (Pleurotus pulmonarius) grown on cotton waste and cassava peel

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work evaluated the yield of Pleurotus pulmonarius on different mixtures of cotton waste and cassava peel. P. pulmonarius demonstrated significantly higher colonization rate on cotton waste substrate (100 g cotton waste) 3 weeks after inoculation of spawn than any other substrate mixtures. Cotton waste had the ...

  15. Studies on bactericidal efficacy of pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Duchesne peel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Zawane Kamarudin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: T o explore the in vitro antibacterial potential of the peel of Cucurbita moschata D uchesne ( tropical pumpkin ( C. moschata against human pathogenic bacteria. Methods: I n the present study, dichloromethane ( DCM , methanol ( MEOH and aqueous extracts of C. moschata peel were examined for in vitro antibacterial potency against eight bacterial strains i.e. Bacillus cereus, Burkholderia cepacia, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphyloccocus aureus, Pseudomonas aerugenosa, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus using K irby- B auer disk diffusion susceptibility and broth micro-dilution methods. Results: DCM extract of pumpkin peel exhibited the maximum zone of inhibition against Staphyloccocus aureus ( 21 mm whereas aqueous extract of pumpkin peel revealed the least zone of inhibition against Escherichia coli ( 8 mm . MEOH extract gave maximum zone of inhibition against Pseudomonas aerugenosa ( 19 mm . B roth micro-dilution method showed minimum inhibitory concentration for the DCM extract against Burkholderia cepacia at 6 . 25 mg/m L . T he minimum bactericidal concentrations were also determined to know the nature of all extracts. DCM and MEOH extracts exhibited bactericidal nature to all bacterial strains except for the Vibrio alginolyticus. T he minimum bactericidal concentrations values exhibited bactericidal nature ranging from 3 . 12 mg/m L to 100 . 00 mg/m L . T he screening of antimicrobial properties of different extracts of C. moschata peel revealed that the DCM extract possessed good antimicrobial efficacy compared to MEOH and aqueous extracts. Conclusions: P eel of C. moschata possesses antibacterial compounds and could be potential source for a new class of antibiotics.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of internal limiting membrane peeling versus no peeling for patients with an idiopathic full-thickness macular hole: results from a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternent, Laura; Vale, Luke; Boachie, Charles; Burr, Jennifer M; Lois, Noemi

    2012-03-01

    To determine whether internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling is cost-effective compared with no peeling for patients with an idiopathic stage 2 or 3 full-thickness macular hole. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed alongside a randomised controlled trial. 141 participants were randomly allocated to receive macular-hole surgery, with either ILM peeling or no peeling. Health-service resource use, costs and quality of life were calculated for each participant. The incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained was calculated at 6 months. At 6 months, the total costs were on average higher (£424, 95% CI -182 to 1045) in the No Peel arm, primarily owing to the higher reoperation rate in the No Peel arm. The mean additional QALYs from ILM peel at 6 months were 0.002 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.013), adjusting for baseline EQ-5D and other minimisation factors. A mean incremental cost per QALY was not computed, as Peeling was on average less costly and slightly more effective. A stochastic analysis suggested that there was more than a 90% probability that Peeling would be cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay threshold of £20,000 per QALY. Although there is no evidence of a statistically significant difference in either costs or QALYs between macular hole surgery with or without ILM peeling, the balance of probabilities is that ILM Peeling is likely to be a cost-effective option for the treatment of macular holes. Further long-term follow-up data are needed to confirm these findings.

  17. Fovea sparing internal limiting membrane peeling using multiple parafoveal curvilinear peels for myopic foveoschisis: technique and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haiying; Zhang, Qi; Zhao, Peiquan

    2016-10-18

    To introduce a modified surgical technique, the "parafoveal multiple curvelinear internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling", to preserve epi-foveal ILM in myopic foveoschisis surgery. Consecutive patients with myopic foveoschisis were enrolled in the present prospective interventional case series. The surgeries were performed using transconjunctival 23-gauge system. The macular area was divided into quadrants. ILM was peeled off in a curvilinear manner centered around the site that was away from the central fovea in each quadrant. Shearing forces were used to control the direction to keep the peeling away from central fovea. ILM at central fovea of about 500 to 1000 μm was preserved by this technique. This technique was performed in 20 eyes of 20 consecutive patients. Epi-foveal ILM was successfully preserved in all cases using the technique. Patients were followed up for more than 12 months. The mean postoperative logMAR visual acuity improved from 1.67 ± 0.65 preoperatively to 1.15 ± 0.49 (P = 0.015; paired t-test). Postoperative OCT examinations showed that full-thickness macular holes (MHs) did not developed in any case. Central fovea thickness decreased from 910 ± 261 μm preoperatively to 125 ± 85 postoperatively (P = 0.001; paired t-test). Fovea sparing ILM peeling using multiple parafoveal curvilinear peels prevents the development of postoperative full-thickness MHs in eyes with myopic foveoschisis.

  18. Nutrient, phytochemical, and antinutrient composition of Citrus maxima fruit juice and peel extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ani, Peace Nwanneka; Abel, Happiness Chiamaka

    2018-05-01

    Nutrient, phytochemical, and antinutrient composition of Citrus maxima fruit juice and peel extract were determined. The fruit was procured from a garden in Trans-Ekulu, Enugu East Local Government Area, Enugu State, Nigeria. Mature undamaged Citrus maxima fruits were thoroughly washed with distilled water to remove contamination, dirt, and air-dried. The peel was separated from the pulp. The pulp (100 g) was blended and filtered through a muslin cloth to obtain a clear juice. The peel (50 g) was macerated with 200 ml of ethanol for 20 min. The peel extract was filtered through filter paper. The supernatant was concentrated by rotary evaporation. The peel extract was weighed and stored in a plastic container until needed. Proximate, mineral, vitamins, antinutrient, and phytochemical composition of the juice and peel extract were determined using standard procedures. Citrus maxima peel extract contains significantly ( p  maxima juice. Alkaloid, phenolics, and flavonoids were also significantly ( p   Na > Ph > Fe > Mg > K in the juice and Ca > Ph > Na > Fe > K > Mg in the peel extract. Vitamin C content of the juice and peel extract were 26.36 mg/100 g and 19.34 mg/100 g, respectively. Citrus maxima peel is highly nutritive and rich in phytochemicals, further research is recommended to investigate its therapeutic effect.

  19. Improvement of Biogas Production from Orange Peel Waste by Leaching of Limonene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachma Wikandari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Limonene is present in orange peel wastes and is known as an antimicrobial agent, which impedes biogas production when digesting the peels. In this work, pretreatment of the peels to remove limonene under mild condition was proposed by leaching of limonene using hexane as solvent. The pretreatments were carried out with homogenized or chopped orange peel at 20–40°C with orange peel waste and hexane ratio (w/v ranging from 1 : 2 to 1 : 12 for 10 to 300 min. The pretreated peels were then digested in batch reactors for 33 days. The highest biogas production was achieved by treating chopped orange peel waste and hexane ratio of 12 : 1 at 20°C for 10 min corresponding to more than threefold increase of biogas production from 0.061 to 0.217 m3 methane/kg VS. The solvent recovery was 90% using vacuum filtration and needs further separation using evaporation. The hexane residue in the peel had a negative impact on biogas production as shown by 28.6% reduction of methane and lower methane production of pretreated orange peel waste in semicontinuous digestion system compared to that of untreated peel.

  20. Improvement of biogas production from orange peel waste by leaching of limonene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikandari, Rachma; Nguyen, Huong; Millati, Ria; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2015-01-01

    Limonene is present in orange peel wastes and is known as an antimicrobial agent, which impedes biogas production when digesting the peels. In this work, pretreatment of the peels to remove limonene under mild condition was proposed by leaching of limonene using hexane as solvent. The pretreatments were carried out with homogenized or chopped orange peel at 20-40°C with orange peel waste and hexane ratio (w/v) ranging from 1 : 2 to 1 : 12 for 10 to 300 min. The pretreated peels were then digested in batch reactors for 33 days. The highest biogas production was achieved by treating chopped orange peel waste and hexane ratio of 12 : 1 at 20°C for 10 min corresponding to more than threefold increase of biogas production from 0.061 to 0.217 m(3) methane/kg VS. The solvent recovery was 90% using vacuum filtration and needs further separation using evaporation. The hexane residue in the peel had a negative impact on biogas production as shown by 28.6% reduction of methane and lower methane production of pretreated orange peel waste in semicontinuous digestion system compared to that of untreated peel.

  1. Alpha-hydroxyacid chemical peeling agents: case studies and rationale for safe and effective use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briden, M Elizabeth

    2004-02-01

    Chemical peeling is an in-office procedure that involves the application of a chemical agent to the skin to induce controlled destruction or exfoliation of old skin and stimulation of new epidermal growth with more evenly distributed melanin. When peel agents reach the dermal layer, important wound-healing activities occur that cause skin remodeling and skin smoothing, both antiaging benefits. There are a number of key factors in selecting a peeling agent and procedure, and each is discussed. Variables to consider are the peeling agent and its formulation, the concentration of the agent, the patient's skin type, the site to be peeled, the skin preparation procedure prior to and immediately preceding the application of the agent, the application method, the duration of contact, and the patient's medical history and lifestyle. Various types of peels are discussed. Of particular interest are superficial chemical peels, which offer great flexibility over a range of skin types and conditions with minimal to no "downtime." Alpha-hydroxyacid (AHA) peels are superficial and can be combined with other cosmetic procedures in the office to maximize benefits. In addition, AHA peels work well when combined with supportive homecare products including AHAs or polyhydroxy acids (PHAs), topical retinoids, and antiacne/antirosacea treatments. Case studies are presented of patients using AHA peels for the treatment of acne and hyperpigmentation in a variety of skin types, including Asian skin.

  2. Improvement of Biogas Production from Orange Peel Waste by Leaching of Limonene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikandari, Rachma; Nguyen, Huong; Millati, Ria; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.

    2015-01-01

    Limonene is present in orange peel wastes and is known as an antimicrobial agent, which impedes biogas production when digesting the peels. In this work, pretreatment of the peels to remove limonene under mild condition was proposed by leaching of limonene using hexane as solvent. The pretreatments were carried out with homogenized or chopped orange peel at 20–40°C with orange peel waste and hexane ratio (w/v) ranging from 1 : 2 to 1 : 12 for 10 to 300 min. The pretreated peels were then digested in batch reactors for 33 days. The highest biogas production was achieved by treating chopped orange peel waste and hexane ratio of 12 : 1 at 20°C for 10 min corresponding to more than threefold increase of biogas production from 0.061 to 0.217 m3 methane/kg VS. The solvent recovery was 90% using vacuum filtration and needs further separation using evaporation. The hexane residue in the peel had a negative impact on biogas production as shown by 28.6% reduction of methane and lower methane production of pretreated orange peel waste in semicontinuous digestion system compared to that of untreated peel. PMID:25866787

  3. Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling to Prevent Post-vitrectomy Epiretinal Membrane Development in Retinal Detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Kunihiko; Fujinami, Kaoru; Watanabe, Ken; Tsunoda, Kazushige; Noda, Toru

    2016-11-01

    To determine the efficacy of internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling during vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) regarding post-vitrectomy epiretinal membrane (ERM) development and visual outcomes. Retrospective, interventional, comparative case series. Setting: Institutional. One hundred and two consecutive eyes with RRD treated with vitrectomy and followed for at least 6 months. ILM was peeled without using dye such as indocyanine green (ICG). Observational Procedures: Patients were divided into 2 groups based on postoperative ERM development: Group 1, 81 eyes without ERM formation; Group 2, 21 eyes with ERM development. Patients also were divided into 2 subgroups: those with and without ILM peeling (58 and 44 eyes, respectively). Statistical analyses were performed between the 2 groups with/without ERM formation and between the 2 subgroups with/without ILM peeling for 5 preoperative factors including foveal involvement of the RRD, 4 intraoperative factors including ILM peeling, baseline best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and final BCVA. An association of ILM peeling with ERM prevention and the influence of ILM peeling on visual outcomes. ILM peeling was significantly (P peeling. ILM peeling without ICG staining during the initial vitrectomy for RRDs may prevent postoperative ERM formation with favorable visual outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficacy of combination of glycolic acid peeling with topical regimen in treatment of melasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Savita; Dayal, Surabhi

    2013-10-01

    Various treatment modalities are available for management of melasma, ranging from topical and oral to chemical peeling, but none is promising alone. Very few studies are available regarding efficacy of combination of topical treatment with chemical peeling. Combination of chemical peeling and topical regimen can be a good treatment modality in the management of this recalcitrant disorder. To assess the efficacy of combination of topical regimen (2% hydroquinone, 1% hydrocortisone and 0.05% tretinoin) with serial glycolic acid peeling in the treatment of melasma in Indian patients. Forty Indian patients of moderate to severe epidermal variety melasma were divided into two groups of 20 each. One Group i.e. peel group received topical regimen (2% hydroquinone, 1% hydrocortisone and 0.05% tretinoin) with serial glycolic acid peeling and other group i.e. control group received topical regimen (2% hydroquinone, 1% hydrocortisone, 0.05% tretinoin). There was an overall decrease in MASI from baseline in 24 weeks of therapy in both the groups (P value peel with topical regimen showed early and greater improvement than the group which was receiving topical regimen only. This study concluded that combining topical regimen (2% hydroquinone, 1% hydrocortisone and 0.05% tretinoin) with serial glycolic acid peeling significantly enhances the therapeutic efficacy of glycolic acid peeling. The combination of glycolic acid peeling with the topical regimen is a highly effective, safe and promising therapeutic option in treatment of melasma.

  5. Decreased retinal sensitivity after internal limiting membrane peeling for macular hole surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayoni, Ramin; Svorenova, Ivana; Erginay, Ali; Gaudric, Alain; Massin, Pascale

    2012-12-01

    To compare the retinal sensitivity and frequency of microscotomas found by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) combined with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) microperimetry after idiopathic macular hole closure, in eyes that underwent internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling and eyes that did not. This was a retrospective, non-randomised, comparative study. Combined SD-OCT and SLO microperimetry was performed in 16 consecutive eyes after closure of an idiopathic macular hole. A customised microperimetry pattern with 29 measurement points was used. The ILM was peeled in 8/16 eyes. The main outcome measure was mean retinal sensitivity. Mean retinal sensitivity (in dB) was lower after peeling: 9.80 ± 2.35 dB with peeling versus 13.19 ± 2.92 without (p=0.0209). Postoperative microscotomas were significantly more frequent after ILM peeling: 11.3 ± 6.6 points with retinal sensitivity below 10 dB in eyes that underwent peeling versus 2.9 ± 4.6 in those that did not (p=0.0093). These results suggest that ILM peeling may reduce retinal sensitivity, and significantly increase the incidence of microscotomas. Until a prospective trial confirming or not these results, it seems justified to avoid peeling the ILM when its potential benefit seems minor or unproved, and when peeling is carried out, to limit the surface peeled to the bare minimum.

  6. Intermittent stick-slip dynamics during the peeling of an adhesive tape from a roller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Dalbe, Marie-Julie; Guerra, Claudia; Cohen, Caroline; Ciccotti, Matteo; Santucci, Stéphane; Vanel, Loïc

    2013-02-01

    We study experimentally the fracture dynamics during the peeling at a constant velocity of a roller adhesive tape mounted on a freely rotating pulley. Thanks to a high speed camera, we measure, in an intermediate range of peeling velocities, high frequency oscillations between phases of slow and rapid propagation of the peeling fracture. This so-called stick-slip regime is well known as the consequence of a decreasing fracture energy of the adhesive in a certain range of peeling velocity coupled to the elasticity of the peeled tape. Simultaneously with stick slip, we observe low frequency oscillations of the adhesive roller angular velocity which are the consequence of a pendular instability of the roller submitted to the peeling force. The stick-slip dynamics is shown to become intermittent due to these slow pendular oscillations which produce a quasistatic oscillation of the peeling angle while keeping constant the peeling fracture velocity (averaged over each stick-slip cycle). The observed correlation between the mean peeling angle and the stick-slip amplitude questions the validity of the usually admitted independence with the peeling angle of the fracture energy of adhesives.

  7. In vivo analgesic activity and safety assessment of Vitis vinifera L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    grape) and Punica granatum (pomegranate) in Albino mal mice. Methods: The analgesic activity of fruit extracts of V. vinifera and P. granatum were examined in vivo using thermal stimulus assays (i.e., tail immersion and hot plate) and acetic ...

  8. A comparison of dynamic mechanical properties of processing-tomato peel as affected by hot lye and infrared radiation heating for peeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the viscoelastic characteristics of tomato skins subjected to conventional hot lye peeling and emerging infrared-dry peeling by using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Three DMA testing modes, including temperature ramp, frequency sweep, and creep behavior test, were conduct...

  9. Studies on cytotoxic and clot lysis activity of probiotically fermented cocktail juice prepared using Camellia sinensis and Punica grantum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Ananya; Deori, Meenakshi; Nivetha, A.; Mohansrinivasan, V.

    2017-11-01

    In the current research the effect of probiotic microorganisms viz; Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum on fermentation of Camellia sinensis and Punica grantum was studied. In vitro test were done to analyze the anticancer, antioxidant and atherosclerosis (clot lysis) properties of fermented juice. The juice was fermented for 48 and 96h, during which concentration of phenolic content, total acid content and free radical scavenging activity of the sample was analyzed by DPPH assay (α, α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl). Dropping of pH was observed after 48 h of fermentation. The clot lysis activity was found to be 80 % in 100μl concentration of fermented cocktail juice. The 96 h fermented sample has shown around 70% inhibition against colon cancer cell lines. Analytical study of HPLC proves the organic acid production such as ascorbic acid in superior amount for 96h of fermented sample, Based on the retention time, the corresponding peaks were detected at 4.919 and 4.831 min.

  10. Retinal thickness after vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling for macular hole and epiretinal membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Kazuyuki; Ogino, Nobuchika; Furukawa, Mariko; Hangai, Masanori; Kazama, Shigeyasu; Nishigaki, Shirou; Larson, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the retinal thickness (RT), after vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling, for an idiopathic macular hole (MH) or an epiretinal membrane (ERM). Also, to investigate the effect of a dissociated optic nerve fiber layer (DONFL) appearance on RT. Methods A non-randomized, retrospective chart review was performed for 159 patients who had successful closure of a MH, with (n = 148), or without (n = 11), ILM peeling. Also studied were 117 patients who had successful removal of an ERM, with (n = 104), or without (n = 13), ILM peeling. The RT of the nine Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study areas was measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). In the MH-with-ILM peeling and ERM-with-ILM peeling groups, the RT of the operated eyes was compared to the corresponding areas of normal fellow eyes. The inner temporal/inner nasal ratio (TNR) was used to assess the effect of ILM peeling on RT. The effects of DONFL appearance on RT were evaluated in only the MH-with-ILM peeling group. Results In the MH-with-ILM peeling group, the central, inner nasal, and outer nasal areas of the retina of operated eyes were significantly thicker than the corresponding areas of normal fellow eyes. In addition, the inner temporal, outer temporal, and inner superior retina was significantly thinner than in the corresponding areas of normal fellow eyes. Similar findings were observed regardless of the presence of a DONFL appearance. In the ERM-with-ILM peeling group, the retina of operated eyes was significantly thicker in all areas, except the inner and outer temporal areas. In the MH-with-ILM peeling group, the TNR was 0.86 in operated eyes, and 0.96 in fellow eyes (P peeling group, the TNR was 0.84 in operated eyes, and 0.95 in fellow eyes (P peeling group was 0.98, which was significantly greater than that of the MH-with-ILM peeling group (P peeling group was 0.98, which was significantly greater than that of ERM-with-ILM peeling

  11. Biosynthesis of CdS nanoparticles in banana peel extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guang Ju; Li, Shuo Hao; Zhang, Yu Cang; Fu, Yun Zhi

    2014-06-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by using banana peel extract as a convenient, non-toxic, eco-friendly 'green' capping agent. Cadmium nitrate and sodium sulfide are main reagents. A variety of CdS NPs are prepared through changing reaction conditions (banana extracts, the amount of banana peel extract, solution pH, concentration and reactive temperature). The prepared CdS colloid displays strong fluorescence spectrum. X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrates the successful formation of CdS NPs. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectrogram indicates the involvement of carboxyl, amine and hydroxyl groups in the formation of CdS NPs. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) result reveals that the average size of the NPs is around 1.48 nm.

  12. Adsorption study of copper (II) by chemically modified orange peel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Ningchuan; Guo Xueyi; Liang Sha

    2009-01-01

    An adsorbent, the chemically modified orange peel, was prepared from hydrolysis of the grafted copolymer, which was synthesized by interaction of methyl acrylate with cross-linking orange peel. The presence of poly (acrylic acid) on the biomass surface was verified by infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry (TG). Total negative charge in the biomass surface and the zeta potentials were determined. The modified biomass was found to present high adsorption capacity and fast adsorption rate for Cu (II). From Langmuir isotherm, the adsorption capacity for Cu (II) was 289.0 mg g -1 , which is about 6.5 times higher than that of the unmodified biomass. The kinetics for Cu (II) adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. The adsorbent was used to remove Cu (II) from electroplating wastewater and was suitable for repeated use for more than four cycles.

  13. Inflammatory peeling skin syndrome caused a novel mutation in CDSN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telem, Dana Fuchs; Israeli, Shirli; Sarig, Ofer; Sprecher, Eli

    2012-04-01

    Generalized peeling skin syndrome (PSS) is a rare autosomal recessive dermatosis manifesting with continuous exfoliation of the stratum corneum. The inflammatory (type B) subtype of PSS was recently found to be caused by deleterious mutations in the CDSN gene encoding corneodesmosin, a major component of desmosomal junctions in the uppermost layers of the epidermis. In the present study, we assessed a 10-month-old baby, who presented with generalized superficial peeling of the skin. Using PCR amplification and direct sequencing, we identified the third PSS-associated mutation in CDSN, a homozygous 4 bp duplication in the second exon of the gene (c.164_167dup GCCT; p.Thr57ProfsX6). These data further support the notion that corneodesmosin deficiency impairs cell-cell adhesion in the upper epidermis, paving the way for an abnormal inflammatory response due to epidermal barrier disruption.

  14. Ancient Seed for Modern Cure - Pomegranate Review of Therapeutic Applications in Periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangavelu, Arthiie; Elavarasu, Sugumari; Sundaram, Rajasekar; Kumar, Tamilselvan; Rajendran, Dhivya; Prem, Fairlin

    2017-11-01

    Punica granatum (pomegranate), the member of Punicaceae family, is used in the prevention and treatment of health disorders. P. granatum contains diverse range of phytochemicals including ellagic acid, punicalagin, pedunculagin, quercetin, rutin, tannic acid, polyphenol, anthocyanins, and catechins. This review aims at providing an overview of the chemical constituents, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties of P. granatum , and its role in the prevention and treatment of gingival and periodontal diseases.

  15. Macular morphology and visual acuity after macular hole surgery with or without internal limiting membrane peeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, U.C.; Kroyer, K.; Sander, B.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To examine postoperative macular morphology and visual outcome after 12 months in relation to internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling versus no peeling, indocyanine green (ICG) staining and re-operation in eyes that achieved macular hole closure after surgery. Methods: Seventy-four eyes...... with closed stage 2 or 3 macular holes were recruited from a randomised clinical trial comparing: (1) vitrectomy without ILM peeling; (2) vitrectomy with 0.05% isotonic ICG-assisted ILM peeling; and (3) vitrectomy with 0.15% trypan blue-assisted ILM peeling. Contrast-enhanced Stratus optical coherence...... between subgroups. Conclusions: Poor vision after 12 months despite macular hole closure was associated with attenuation and disruption of the foveolar photoreceptor matrix. The extent of attenuation and disruption was independent of peeling and staining....

  16. Orange peel flour effect on physicochemical, textural and sensory properties of cooked sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Hernandez Garcia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Orange peel flours as a source of fiber, protein, and flavonoids as antioxidants was added to meat batters in order to improve nutritional quality and physicochemical, textural and sensory properties. Orange peel flour in meat batters improved yield and reduced expressible moisture. Hardness in orange peel flour samples was higher, but less resilient and cohesive. Warner-Bratzler shear force was not different between control (no orange peel flour and samples with this functional ingredient. A no trained panel determinate that there was no difference between control and orange peel flour added sausages at a 5% (w/w level. In this view, orange peel flour can be employed to improve yield and texture of cooked meat products.

  17. ( Citrus maxima ) peel powder on lipid oxidation of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of phenolic compounds in Shaddock peel powder (SPP) and its effect on lipid oxidation in cooked and raw semimembranosus (SM) muscle in goats were examined. The SPP was applied to cooked and raw minced SM at the rate of 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% of the weight of the meat and compared with 0.01% ...

  18. High oxygen levels promote peel spotting in banana fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maneenuam, T.; Ketsa, S.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2007-01-01

    We studied the effect of high oxygen on early peel spotting in `Sucrier¿ bananas held at 25 °C and 90% RH. Fruit first ripened to colour index 3¿4 (about as yellow as green) and were then held in containers with a continuous gas flow of 18 ± 2 kPa (control) or 90 ± 2 kPa oxygen. High oxygen promoted

  19. Peeling Potatoes Near-optimally in Near-linear Time

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cabello, S.; Cibulka, J.; Kynčl, J.; Saumell, Maria; Valtr, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 5 (2017), s. 1574-1602 ISSN 0097-5397 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP202/12/G061 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1506; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0038 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : geometric optimization * potato peeling * visibility graph * geometric probability * approximation algorithm Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.433, year: 2016

  20. Peeling Decoding of LDPC Codes with Applications in Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijun Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new approach for the analysis of iterative peeling decoding recovery algorithms in the context of Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC codes and compressed sensing. The iterative recovery algorithm is particularly interesting for its low measurement cost and low computational complexity. The asymptotic analysis can track the evolution of the fraction of unrecovered signal elements in each iteration, which is similar to the well-known density evolution analysis in the context of LDPC decoding algorithm. Our analysis shows that there exists a threshold on the density factor; if under this threshold, the recovery algorithm is successful; otherwise it will fail. Simulation results are also provided for verifying the agreement between the proposed asymptotic analysis and recovery algorithm. Compared with existing works of peeling decoding algorithm, focusing on the failure probability of the recovery algorithm, our proposed approach gives accurate evolution of performance with different parameters of measurement matrices and is easy to implement. We also show that the peeling decoding algorithm performs better than other schemes based on LDPC codes.

  1. Superficial chemical peeling with salicylic acid in facial dermatoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, A.U.; Iqbal, Z.; Rahman, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of salicylic acid chemical peeling in common dermatological conditions affecting face in people with predominant Fitzpatrick skin type IV and V. A total of 167 patients of either gender, aged between 13 to 60 years, having some facial dermatoses (melasma, acne vulgaris, postinflammatory hyperpigmentations, freckles, fine lines and wrinkles, post-inflammatory scars, actinic keratoses, and plane facial warts) were included. A series of eight weekly hospital based peeling sessions was conducted in all patients under standardized conditions with 30% salicylic acid. Clinical improvement in different disorders was evaluated by change in MASI score, decrease in the size of affected area and % reduction in lesions count. McNemar test was applied for data analysis. Majority of the patients showed moderate to excellent response. There was 35% to 63% improvement (p< 0.05) in all dermatoses. Significant side effects, as feared in Asian skins were not observed. Chemical peeling with salicylic acid is an effective and safe treatment modality in many superficial facial dermatoses. (author)

  2. Extraction and characterisation of cellulose nanocrystals from pineapple peel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Raquel Madureira

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The potential of pineapple peel as a source of cellulose nanocrystals was evaluated. Peels skin from fresh-cut fruit was used as raw material. These residues were purified to remove pigments, lipids and hemicellulose, and a bleaching process for delignification was carried out for 4-6 h. All resulting products were characterised for their lignin, hemicellulose, cellulose and ash contents using standard techniques. Dry matter at the end was low (ca. 50% compared with the raw material (ca. 90%. The process applied resulted in ca. 20% (m/m of purified cellulose (ca. 80% purity, with ineligible levels of lignin and hemicellulose present, especially when using 6h of bleaching. The purified cellulose was subject to acid hydrolysis for nanocrystal extraction with two testing times, 30 and 60 minutes. These cellulose nanocrystals had small sizes (< 1000 nm, with high variability and negative zeta potential values. The time of extraction did not affect the nanocrystals’ chemical and physical properties. The use of 6 h of bleaching treatment during purification was shown to be more effective than 4 h. Pineapple peel was demonstrated to be a good source of cellulose for the production of cellulose nanocrystals.

  3. Interface characteristics of peeling-off damages of laser coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Yun, E-mail: coating@siom.ac.cn; Yi, Kui; Guohang, Hu; Shao, Jianda

    2014-01-30

    Coating stacks of HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} were separately prepared by electron beam evaporation and dual ion beam sputtering. Damage characteristics at the interlayer interfaces were analyzed after irradiation of the coatings by a 1064 nm laser. The cross-sectional morphologies of damage spots indicated that peeling-off damages always occurred at the interface where the low refractive index material (SiO{sub 2}) was deposited on the high refractive index material (HfO{sub 2} or Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}). The effects of interface microstructure and components on peeling-off damages were also discussed. The microstructure of the interface was not a major factor that influenced peeling-off damages. Incomplete oxides (SiO{sub x}) and Na, K, Li ions accumulated near the interface and caused the formation of micro-defects layers with nano-sized thicknesses. Micro-defects layers maybe reduced adhesion of different interfaces and formed plasmas by absorbing laser energy. Finally stripping damages happened from micro-defects layers during irradiation by a 1064 nm laser.

  4. Influence of chemical peeling on the skin stress response system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Ayako; Kanazawa, Nobuo; Li, Hong-Jin; Yonei, Nozomi; Yamamoto, Yuki; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2012-07-01

    Skin stress response system (SSRS) involves corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived peptides, such as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), a-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) and b-endorphin that are locally generated in response to locally provided stressors or proinflammatory cytokines. This system would restrict tissue damage and restore local homoeostasis. Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) is one of the most widely used peeling agents and applied for cosmetic treatment of photodamaged skin. However, the biological mechanism responsible for TCA peeling has yet to be fully determined. While our investigation focused on the inflammation and wound healing pathways, in the recent study, we have examined involvement of the SSRS as the third pathway. Mostly depending on our findings that TCA peeling activates the SSRS by inducing the POMC expression of keratinocytes in the CRH-independent manner, together with the results reported by other researchers, we can say that the biological effect of POMC seems to be responsible for the TCA-induced epidermal SSRS activation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Cupuacu peel utilization for energy production; Aproveitamento da casca do cupuacuzeiro para producao de energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Eyde Cristianne Saraiva dos; Souza, Rubem Cesar Rodrigues; Seye, Omar; Lau, Jim; Freitas, Katriana Tavares de [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Centro de Desenvolvimento Energetico Amazonico (CDEAM)], e-mail: cdeam_ufam@yahoo.com.br

    2004-07-01

    In the present study, are presented preliminaries results of the project 'Use of the fruit of the cupuacuzeiro for generation of energy.' The elementary and thermal analyses are carried out for the cupuacu peel and for the coal obtained starting from the carbonization of that peel. The initial results come quite favorable for the use of the peel and of the coal as energy input in thermo conversion process where the generation of electric energy is sought. (author)

  6. Damage and recovery of skin barrier function after glycolic acid chemical peeling and crystal microdermabrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji Youn; Kang, Hyun A; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Park, Young Min; Kim, Hyung Ok

    2004-03-01

    Superficial chemical peeling and microdermabrasion have become increasingly popular methods for producing facial rejuvenation. However, there are few studies reporting the skin barrier function changes after these procedures. To evaluate objectively the degree of damage visually and the time needed for the skin barrier function to recover after glycolic acid peeling and aluminum oxide crystal microdermabrasion using noninvasive bioengineering methods. Superficial chemical peeling using 30%, 50%, and 70% glycolic acid and aluminum oxide crystal microdermabrasion were used on the volar forearm of 13 healthy women. The skin response was measured by a visual observation and using an evaporimeter, corneometer, and colorimeter before and after peeling at set time intervals. Both glycolic acid peeling and aluminum oxide crystal microdermabrasion induced significant damage to the skin barrier function immediately after the procedure, and the degree of damage was less severe after the aluminum oxide crystal microdermabrasion compared with glycolic acid peeling. The damaged skin barrier function had recovered within 24 hours after both procedures. The degree of erythema induction was less severe after the aluminum oxide crystal microdermabrasion compared with the glycolic acid peeling procedure. The degree of erythema induced after the glycolic acid peeling procedure was not proportional to the peeling solution concentration used. The erythema subsided within 1 day after the aluminum oxide crystal microdermabrasion procedure and within 4 days after the glycolic acid peeling procedure. These results suggest that the skin barrier function is damaged after the glycolic acid peeling and aluminum oxide crystal microdermabrasion procedure but recovers within 1 to 4 days. Therefore, repeating the superficial peeling procedure at 2-week intervals will allow sufficient time for the damaged skin to recover its barrier function.

  7. Numerical models of delamination behavior in 2G HTS tapes under transverse tension and peel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yujie; Ta, Wurui; Gao, Yuanwen

    2018-02-01

    In extreme operating environments, delamination in 2G HTS tapes occurs within and/or near the superconductor layer from high transverse tensile stresses caused by fabrication, Lorentz forces and thermal mismatch, etc. Generally, transverse opening and peeling off are the main delamination modes, and are always studied in anvil and peel tests, respectively. Numerical models of these modes for 2G HTS tape are presented wherein the mixed-mode traction-separation law at the interface of the silver and superconductor layers is considered. Plastic deformations of copper, silver, and Hastelloy® in the HTS tape are taken into account. The results obtained from the transverse opening model show that the maximum average tensile stress is smaller than the delamination tensile strength because delamination is asynchronous in the tape. When a crack appears in the tape, only a small stress ( ≤ 1 MPa) is required to expand the crack to other stress free areas through peeling. Using the peeling model, the dependency of the peel strength on peeling angle is investigated under constant fracture toughness. Peel strength decreases with the peeling angle until the minimum value is reached at 150°, and thereafter increases slightly. Other results indicate that peel strength depends strongly on delamination strength, fracture toughness, and thickness of copper layer. The fracture toughness of the delamination interface, which is difficult to obtain by experiment, can be extracted using the present model.

  8. Inertial and stick-slip regimes of unstable adhesive tape peeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbe, Marie-Julie; Villey, Richard; Ciccotti, Matteo; Santucci, Stéphane; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Vanel, Loïc

    2016-05-18

    We present an experimental characterization of the detachment front unstable dynamics observed during the peeling of pressure sensitive adhesives. We use an experimental set-up specifically designed to control the peeling angle θ and the peeled tape length L, while peeling an adhesive tape from a flat substrate at a constant driving velocity V. High-speed imaging allows us to report the evolution of the period and amplitude of the front oscillations, as well as the relative durations of their fast and slow phases, as a function of the control parameters V, L and θ. Our study shows that, as the driving velocity or the peeling angle increases, the oscillations of the peeling front progressively evolve from genuine "stick-slip" oscillations, made of alternating long stick phases and very brief slip phases, to sinusoidal oscillations of amplitude twice the peeling velocity. We propose a model which, taking into account the peeling angle-dependent kinetic energy cost to accelerate and decelerate the peeled tape, explains the transition from the "stick-slip" to the "inertial" regime of the dynamical instability. Using independent direct measurements of the effective fracture energy of the adhesive-substrate joint, we show that our model quantitatively accounts for the two regimes of the unstable dynamics.

  9. Peel strength of LDPE/ethylene-1-butene copolymer film crosslinked by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nho, Young Chang; Kim, Jeong Il; Kang, Phil Hyun

    2003-01-01

    In this study, ethylene-1-butene copolymer(EBP) was blended with LDPE to improve the mechanical properties as the packaging materials. After they were irradiated by an electron beam, their physical properties such as tensile strength, elongation, modulus, peel strength, DSC, and DMA were examined. The results showed that the addition of EBP to LDPE exerted significant effects on the mechanical properties such as the tensile strength and peel strength. The addition of EBP led to a maximum increase in peel strength of ∼ 430%. The addition of 10-25w% EBP in LDPE was sufficient to enhance the peel strength significantly

  10. [Optical coherence tomography and microperimetry after internal limiting membrane peeling for epiretinal membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimbert, P; Lebreton, O; Weber, M

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the anatomical and functional consequences of internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling in epiretinal membrane (ERM) surgery. Retrospective single-center study including consecutive patients operated on for idiopathic ERM. The integrity of the ILM was assessed by ILM Blue® staining after removal of the ERM: either the peeling was spontaneous (group 1) or a complementary peeling was required (group 2). Pre- and post-operatively (1 and 6 months), all patients were analyzed using visual acuity, SD-OCT (Spectralis HRA OCT, Heidelberg, Germany) and microperimetry (OPKO/OTI, Miami, USA). Twenty-one eyes of 21 patients were included: 12 "active ILM peelings" and 9 "spontaneous peelings". In both groups, visual acuity increased significantly after surgery. Microperimetry revealed more microscotomata at 1 and 6 months for active peeling (Ppeeling is frequently performed to reduce ERM recurrence. Despite lack of effect on visual acuity, active ILM peeling increases the incidence of microscotomas related to the site where the ERM or ILM is grasped. Active ILM peeling may be responsible for postoperative visual discomfort related to microscopic trauma during peeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Citrus peel extract and powder attenuate hypercholesterolemia and hyperglycemia using rodent experimental modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humaira Ashraf

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Conclusively, inclusion of citrus peel bioflavonoids in dietary therapies is a promising strategy to modulate lipidemic and glycemic attributes without imparting any deleterious effect on hematological parameters.

  12. Changes in macular pigment optical density after membrane peeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Mario R; Cennamo, Gilda; Grassi, Piergiacomo; Sparnelli, Federica; Allegrini, Davide; Cennamo, Giovanni

    2018-01-01

    To highlight the differences in macular pigment optical density (MPOD) between eyes with vitreoretinal interface syndrome and healthy control eyes, to assess the changes in MPOD in eyes treated with macular peeling, to investigate the relationships between MPOD changes and measures of retinal sensitivity such as best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and microperimetry. In this cross-sectional comparative study, 30 eyes affected by idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM, 15eyes) or full-thickness macular hole (FTMH, 15eyes) were compared with 60 eyes from 30 healthy age-matched patients. MPOD values (mean MPOD, maximum MPOD, MPOD area, and MPOD volume) were measured in a range of 4°-7° of eccentricity around the fovea, using the one-wavelength reflectometry method (Visucam 200, Carl-Zeiss Meditec). Patients affected by iERM and FTMH were treated with vitrectomy and epiretinal membrane-inner limiting membrane (ERM-ILM) peeling, with follow-up examinations performed preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. The main outcome measures were the differences in MPOD between eyes with vitreoretinal interface syndrome and healthy eyes, changes in MPOD after ERM-ILM peeling, and relationships between MPOD and functional changes. Mean MPOD differed significantly between control eyes and those with iERM (P = .0001) or FTMH (P = .0006). The max MPOD and MPOD area increased, but not significantly. After peeling, the only significant change in MPOD was in MPOD volume (P = .01). In the ERM group, postoperative mean MPOD correlated significantly with best-corrected visual acuity (r = .739, P = .002). MPOD was reduced in patients with iERM or FTMH compared with healthy eyes. We found a significant correlation between the mean postoperative MPOD and postoperative BCVA, hypothesizing that the postoperative increase in mean MPOD could be due to a change in distribution for unfolding and expansion of the fovea after the peeling. MOPD may be considered as a prognostic factor associated

  13. Histological case-control study of peeling-induced skin changes by different peeling agents in surgically subcutaneous undermined skin flaps in facelift patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonser, P; Kaestner, S; Jaminet, P; Kaye, K

    2017-11-01

    A histological evaluation of peeling-induced skin changes in subcutaneous undermined preauricular facial skin flaps of nine patients was performed. There were three treatment groups: Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) 25%, TCA 40% and phenol/croton oil; one group served as control. Two independent evaluators determined the epidermal and dermal thickness and the depth of necrosis (micrometre). The percentual tissue damage due to the peeling was calculated, and a one-sample t-test for statistical significance was performed. On the basis of the histomorphological changes, peeling depth was classified as superficial, superficial-partial, deep-partial and full thickness chemical burn. The histological results revealed a progression of wound depth for different peeling agents without full thickness necrosis. TCA peels of up to 40% can be safely applied on subcutaneous undermined facial skin flaps without impairing the vascular patency, producing a predictable chemical burn, whereas deep peels such as phenol/croton oil peels should not be applied on subcutaneous undermined skin so as to not produce skin slough or necrosis by impairing vascular patency. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling vs no peeling for Macular Hole-induced Retinal Detachment (MHRD): a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing; Liu, Xinquan; Zheng, Lijun; Cui, Hongping

    2015-06-20

    we conducted our meta-analysis of published studies to assess existing evidence about the efficacy and safety of vitrectomy with ILM peeling vs. that of vitrectomy with no ILM peeling for Macular hole-induced retinal detachment. Databases, including Pubmed, Cochrane Library, Ovid, Web of Science, Wanfang and CNKI, were searched to identify studies comparing outcomes following vitrectomy with ILM peeling and that with no ILM peeling for macular hole-induced retinal detachment. The meta-analysis was performed by RevMan 5.1. Six comparative studies comprising 180 eyes were identified. It was indicated that the rate of retinal reattachment (Odds ratio (OR) = 3.03, 95 % Confidence interval (CI):1.35 to 6.78; P = 0.007) and macular hole closure (OR = 6.74, 95 % CI:3.26 to 13.93; P peeling than that in the group of vitrectomy with no ILM peeling. However, the improved BCVA (Weighted mean difference (WMD) = 0.14, 95 % CI: -0.20 to 0.47; P = 0.42) and the rate of postoperative complications were similar between the two groups. Vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling is an efficient and safe procedure for macular hole-induced retinal detachment.

  15. Lemon peel oil – A novel renewable alternative energy source for diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashok, B.; Thundil Karuppa Raj, R.; Nanthagopal, K.; Krishnan, Rahul; Subbarao, Rayapati

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel biofuel is extracted from lemon peels through steam distillation process. • Lemon peel oil is found to be a potential, renewable alternate eco-friendly fuel. • Significant vibration is observed with 100% lemon peel oil. • Reduction of CO, HC and smoke emission are observed with lemon peel oil blends. • Lemon peel oil blends are showed higher brake thermal efficiency than diesel fuel. - Abstract: The present research work has embarked on to exploit the novel renewable and biodegradable source of energy from lemon fruit rinds. A systematic approach has been made in this study to find the suitability of lemon peel oil for internal combustion engines and gensets applications. Extracted lemon peel oil is found to exhibit comparatively very low viscosity, flash point and boiling point than that of conventional diesel. Various blends of lemon peel oil have been prepared with conventional diesel with volumetric concentration of 20%, 40%, 50% and 100% and their physical and chemical properties are evaluated for its suitability in direct injection diesel engine. Lower cetane index of lemon peel oil significantly influences the ignition delay period and peak heat release rate that lead to the penalty in NOx emissions. Interestingly, the diesel engine performance characteristics have been improved to a remarkable level with higher proportions of lemon peel oil in the blends. In addition, the reduction of BSCO, BSHC and smoke emission is proportional to the lemon oil concentration in the blends. Overall diesel engine characteristics indicated that lemon peel oil can partially or completely replace the petroleum diesel usage to a great extent in developing countries like India.

  16. Value of internal limiting membrane peeling in surgery for idiopathic macular hole stage 2 and 3: a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, U C; Krøyer, K; Sander, B

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling on anatomical and functional success rates in stage 2 and 3 idiopathic macular hole surgery (MHS). METHODS: Randomised clinical trial of stage 2 and 3 idiopathic macular hole without visible epiretinal fibrosis and with less...... than 1 year's duration of symptoms. Eyes were randomised to (1) vitrectomy alone without retinal surface manipulation, (2) vitrectomy plus 0.05% isotonic Indocyanine Green (ICG)-assisted ILM peeling or (3) vitrectomy plus 0.15% Trypan Blue (TB)-assisted ILM peeling. Main outcomes were hole closure...... after 3 and 12 months and best-corrected visual acuity after 12 months. RESULTS: 78 eyes were enrolled. Primary closure rates were significantly higher with ILM peeling than without peeling for both stage 2 holes (ICG peeling 100%, non-peeling 55%, p = 0.014) and for stage 3 holes (ICG peeling 91%, TB...

  17. Physico-chemical and viscoelastic properties of high pressure homogenized lemon peel fiber fraction suspensions obtained after sequential pectin extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, K.L.D.D.; Panozzo, A.; Moelants, K.; Debon, S.J.J.; Desmet, C.; Cardinaels, R.M.; Moldenaers, P.; Wallecan, J.; Hendrickx, M.E.G.

    2017-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of high pressure homogenized lemon peel cell wall fiber suspensions, obtained after sequential selective pectin extraction, were investigated in the current study. For comparison, a general pectin extraction was additionally performed on lemon peel under acid thermal

  18. Loss of Corneodesmosin Leads to Severe Skin Barrier Defect, Pruritus, and Atopy: Unraveling the Peeling Skin Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Oji, Vinzenz; Eckl, Katja-Martina; Aufenvenne, Karin; Nätebus, Marc; Tarinski, Tatjana; Ackermann, Katharina; Seller, Natalia; Metze, Dieter; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Hausser, Ingrid; Traupe, Heiko; Hennies, Hans Christian

    2010-01-01

    Generalized peeling skin disease is an autosomal-recessive ichthyosiform erythroderma characterized by lifelong patchy peeling of the skin. After genome-wide linkage analysis, we have identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in CDSN in a large consanguineous family with generalized peeling skin, pruritus, and food allergies, which leads to a complete loss of corneodesmosin. In contrast to hypotrichosis simplex, which can be associated with specific dominant CDSN mutations, peeling skin disea...

  19. Exploring orange peel treatment with deep eutectic solvents and diluted organic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bruinhorst, A.; Kouris, P.; Timmer, J.M.K.; de Croon, M.H.J.M.; Kroon, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    The disintegration of orange peel waste in deep eutectic solvents and diluted organic acids is presented in this work. The albedo and flavedo layers of the peel were studied separately, showing faster disintegration of the latter. Addition of water to the deep eutectic solvents lowered the amount of

  20. Facilitating shrimp (Pandalus borealis) peeling by power ultrasound and proteolytic enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thi Dang, Tem; Gringer, Nina; Jessen, Flemming

    2018-01-01

    the ultrasonic process (27.6-μm amplitude, 120 min duration and 0.9-s pulse), while the peelability of shrimp monitored as peeling work, meat yield and proportion of completely peeled shrimp were less dependent on the temperature. Increasing amplitude (0–46 μm) and time (0–45 min) of ultrasound prior...