WorldWideScience

Sample records for pulverized fuel combustion

  1. Oxy-fuel combustion of pulverized fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Yan, Jinyue

    2016-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion of pulverized fuels (PF), as a promising technology for CO2 capture from power plants, has gained a lot of concerns and also advanced considerable research, development and demonstration in the last past years worldwide. The use of CO2 or the mixture of CO2 and H2O vapor as th...

  2. On gas and particle radiation in pulverized fuel combustion furnaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2015-01-01

    Radiation is the principal mode of heat transfer in a combustor. This paper presents a refined weighted sum of gray gases model for computational fluid dynamics modelling of conventional air-fuel combustion, which has greater accuracy and completeness than the existing gaseous radiative property...... models. This paper also presents new conversion-dependent models for particle emissivity and scattering factor, instead of various constant values in literature. The impacts of the refined or new models are demonstrated via computational fluid dynamics simulation of a pulverized coal-fired utility boiler...

  3. Advanced technique for computing fuel combustion properties in pulverized-fuel fired boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R. (Vsesoyuznyi Teplotekhnicheskii Institut (Russian Federation))

    1992-03-01

    Reviews foreign technical reports on advanced techniques for computing fuel combustion properties in pulverized-fuel fired boilers and analyzes a technique developed by Combustion Engineering, Inc. (USA). Characteristics of 25 fuel types, including 19 grades of coal, are listed along with a diagram of an installation with a drop tube furnace. Characteristics include burn-out intensity curves obtained using thermogravimetric analysis for high-volatile bituminous, semi-bituminous and coking coal. The patented LFP-SKM mathematical model is used to model combustion of a particular fuel under given conditions. The model allows for fuel particle size, air surplus, load, flame height, and portion of air supplied as tertiary blast. Good agreement between computational and experimental data was observed. The method is employed in designing new boilers as well as converting operating boilers to alternative types of fuel. 3 refs.

  4. A Model for Nitrogen Chemistry in Oxy-Fuel Combustion of Pulverized Coal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Hansen, Stine; Toftegaard, Maja Bøg

    2011-01-01

    , heating and devolatilization of particles, and gas–solid reactions. The model is validated by comparison with entrained flow reactor results from the present work and from the literature on pulverized coal combustion in O2/CO2 and air, covering the effects of fuel, mixing conditions, temperature......In this work, a model for the nitrogen chemistry in the oxy-fuel combustion of pulverized coal has been developed. The model is a chemical reaction engineering type of model with a detailed reaction mechanism for the gas-phase chemistry, together with a simplified description of the mixing of flows......, stoichiometry, and inlet NO level. In general, the model provides a satisfactory description of NO formation in air and oxy-fuel combustion of coal, but under some conditions, it underestimates the impact on NO of replacing N2 with CO2. According to the model, differences in the NO yield between the oxy...

  5. Effects of moisture release and radiation properties in pulverized fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2016-01-01

    and impacts via a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of a 609 MWe pulverized coal-fired utility boiler. Overall speaking, it is suggested to add the free moisture in the fuel to the primary air stream while lump the bound moisture with volatiles in PF combustion modelling, although different methods.......g., oxy-fuel or air–fuel), account for the variations in CO2 and H2O concentrations in a flame, and include the impacts of other participating gases (e.g., CO and hydrocarbons) needs to be derived for combustion CFD community....

  6. Effect of secondary fuels and combustor temperature on mercury speciation in pulverized fuel co-combustion: part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishir P. Sable; Wiebren de Jong; Ruud Meij; Hartmut Spliethoff [Delft University Technology, Delft (Netherlands). Section Energy Technology, Department of Process and Energy

    2007-08-15

    The present work mainly involves bench scale studies to investigate partitioning of mercury in pulverized fuel co-combustion at 1000 and 1300{sup o}C. High volatile bituminous coal is used as a reference case and chicken manure, olive residue, and B quality (demolition) wood are used as secondary fuels with 10 and 20% thermal shares. The combustion experiments are carried out in an entrained flow reactor with a fuel input of 7-8 kWth. Elemental and total gaseous mercury concentrations in the flue gas of the reactor are measured on-line, and ash is analyzed for particulate mercury along with other elemental and surface properties. Animal waste like chicken manure behaves very differently from plant waste. The higher chlorine contents of chicken manure cause higher ionic mercury concentrations whereas even with high unburnt carbon, particulate mercury reduces with increase in the chicken manure share. This might be a problem due to coarse fuel particles, low surface area, and iron contents. B-wood and olive residue cofiring reduces the emission of total gaseous mercury and increases particulate mercury capture due to unburnt carbon formed, fine particles, and iron contents of the ash. Calcium in chicken manure does not show any effect on particulate or gaseous mercury. It is probably due to a higher calcium sulfation rate in the presence of high sulfur and chlorine contents. However, in plant waste cofiring, calcium may have reacted with chlorine to reduce ionic mercury to its elemental form. According to thermodynamic predictions, almost 50% of the total ash is melted to form slag at 1300{sup o}C in cofiring because of high calcium, iron, and potassium and hence mercury and other remaining metals are concentrated in small amounts of ash and show an increase at higher temperatures. No slag formation was predicted at 1000{sup o}C. 24 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Numerical study on NO formation in a pulverized coal-fired furnace using oxy-fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Aiyue; Chen, Yuan; Sheng, Changdong [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). School of Energy and Environment

    2013-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach was employed to numerically investigate NO formation in a 600 MW wall-fired pulverized coal-fired furnace retrofitted for oxy-coal combustion, aimed at the impacts of flue gas recycle ratio, O{sub 2} staging and recycled NO with the recycled flue gas (RFG) on NO formation and emission. An in-house CFD research code for conventional air combustion was developed and extended to simulate O{sub 2}/RFG combustion with specific considerations of the change of gas properties and its impact on coal particle combustion processes. The extended De Soete mechanisms including NO reburning mechanism were applied to describe transformations of fuel nitrogen. It was shown that CFD simulation represented the significant reduction of NO formation during O{sub 2}/RFG combustion compared to that during air combustion. The in-burner and particularly the in-furnace O{sub 2} staging were confirmed still to play very important roles in NO formation control. Changing the recycle ratio had significant impact on the combustion performance and consequently on NO formation and emission. With the combustion performance ensured, decreasing the flue gas recycle ratio or increasing the inlet O{sub 2} concentration of combustion gas led to reduction of NO formation and emission. Although NO formation and emission was found to increase with increasing the inlet NO concentration of combustion gas, CFD simulation indicated that {proportional_to}74% of the inlet NO was reduced in the furnace, consistent with the experimental data reported in the literature. This demonstrated the significant contribution of reburning mechanism to the reduction of the recycled NO in the furnace.

  8. FUNDAMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF FUEL TRANSFORMATIONS IN PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION AND GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Hurt; Joseph Calo; Thomas H. Fletcher; Alan Sayre

    2005-04-29

    The goal of this project was to carry out the necessary experiments and analyses to extend current capabilities for modeling fuel transformations to the new conditions anticipated in next-generation coal-based, fuel-flexible combustion and gasification processes. This multi-organization, multi-investigator project has produced data, correlations, and submodels that extend present capabilities in pressure, temperature, and fuel type. The combined experimental and theoretical/computational results are documented in detail in Chapters 1-8 of this report, with Chapter 9 serving as a brief summary of the main conclusions. Chapters 1-3 deal with the effect of elevated pressure on devolatilization, char formation, and char properties. Chapters 4 and 5 deal with advanced combustion kinetic models needed to cover the extended ranges of pressure and temperature expected in next-generation furnaces. Chapter 6 deals with the extension of kinetic data to a variety of alternative solid fuels. Chapter 7 focuses on the kinetics of gasification (rather than combustion) at elevated pressure. Finally, Chapter 8 describes the integration, testing, and use of new fuel transformation submodels into a comprehensive CFD framework. Overall, the effects of elevated pressure, temperature, heating rate, and alternative fuel use are all complex and much more work could be further undertaken in this area. Nevertheless, the current project with its new data, correlations, and computer models provides a much improved basis for model-based design of next generation systems operating under these new conditions.

  9. Combustion of pulverized fuel under oxycoal conditions at low oxygen concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toporov D.; Foerster M.; Kneer R. [RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany). Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer

    2007-07-01

    Oxycoal combustion followed by post-combustion CO{sub 2} sequestration has gained justified interest as an option for significant and relatively quick reduction of emissions from fossil fuel power generation, while taking advantage of the existing power plant infrastructure. Burning pulverised coal in a mixture of CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} instead of air, however, will lead to modified distributions of temperature, species, and radiation fluxes inside the combustion chamber causing a retroaction on the homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. Utilizing a burner design, which was optimised for coal combustion in air, for oxycoal combustion will lead to flame instability and poor burnout. Stabilisation of the combustion process can be obtained by: i) an increased oxygen concentration (more than 21% vol.) in the oxidiser mixture, thus achieving similar reaction rates and temperature levels to a pulverised fuel-air flame without significant changes to the flame aerodynamics. ii) modifications to the burner aerodynamics, as presented here. The results in this study are obtained in the frame of OXYCOAL-AC, the research project, having the aim to burn a pulverised coal in a CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2}-atmosphere with oxygen, produced from high-temperature ceramic membrane thus leading to higher efficiency of the whole oxycoal process. Numerical and experimental investigations of a stable oxycoal flame, obtained with {le} 21% oxygen concentration in the burning mixture at the RWTH test facility are reported. Two different burner designs are considered, conclusions concerning the achievement of a stable oxycoal flame at O{sub 2} volume concentrations equal and less to the one of oxygen in air are derived. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Co-combustion of pulverized coal and solid recovered fuel in an entrained flow reactor- General combustion and ash behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Glarborg, Peter; Frandsen, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    .9 wt.%, 14.8 wt.% and 25 wt.%, respectively. The effect of additives was evaluated by maintaining the share of secondary fuel (mixture of SRF and additive) at 14.8 wt.%. The experimental results showed that the fuel burnout, NO and SO2 emission in co-combustion of coal and SRF were decreased...... with increasing share of SRF. The majority of the additives inhibited the burnout, except for NaCl which seemed to have a promoting effect. The impact of additives on NO emission was mostly insignificant, except for ammonium sulphate which greatly reduced the NO emission. For SO2 emission, it was found that all...

  11. Ignition et oxydation des particules de combustible solide pulvérisé Ignition and Oxidation of Pulverized Solid Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Soete G. G.

    2006-11-01

    élais d'ignition ont été déterminés pour un grand nombre de combustibles solides de rang inférieur et supérieur (charbons, cokes, asphaltènes, suies, bois, graphite. L'étude de la vitesse expérimentale de la combustion hétérogène, notamment l'étude de la température apparente d'activation, et sa dépendance par rapport à la taille des particules et à la concentration d'oxygène, montre que, dans les conditions des essais, cette combustion est contrôlée par la désorption du CO et se déroule principalement en régime cinético-diffusionnel mixte. L'étude de la dépendance des délais d'ignition par rapport à la température, la taille des particules et la pression partielle d'oxygène, suggère que, pendant ces délais, les réactions se déroulent en régime cinétique pur et que le produit des réactions de désorption est principalement le CO. The heated-grid method is used to investigate the competition between (1 the devolatilization and subsequent oxidation of pyrolysis products and (2 the ignition of the solid matrix and its rapid combustion. A comparison between the instant of ignition and the start of pyrolysis is used to determine the range in which ignition of a pyrolyzable solid fuel of the whole coal ignitiontype (i. e. when ignition occurs before pyrolysis becomes measurable occurs as a function of temperature, particle size and oxygen concentration. The results suggest that this type of ignition might occur, as a general rule, under conditions involving pulverized solid fuels in industrial flames. In the case of whole coalignition, the rate of combustion of the solid matrix is inhibited during the period following ignition. This inhibition is due partly to the difficulty oxygen has of spreading through the pores during the discharge of pyrolysis products and partly to preferential oxygen consumption during the oxidation of pyrolysis products, mainly when this oxidation develops in the form of flames. t is only when pyrolysis ends that

  12. Enhanced Combustion Low NOx Pulverized Coal Burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Towle; Richard Donais; Todd Hellewell; Robert Lewis; Robert Schrecengost

    2007-06-30

    For more than two decades, Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom) has developed a range of low cost, infurnace technologies for NOx emissions control for the domestic U.S. pulverized coal fired boiler market. This includes Alstom's internally developed TFS 2000{trademark} firing system, and various enhancements to it developed in concert with the U.S. Department of Energy. As of the date of this report, more than 270 units representing approximately 80,000 MWe of domestic coal fired capacity have been retrofit with Alstom low NOx technology. Best of class emissions range from 0.18 lb/MMBtu for bituminous coal to 0.10 lb/MMBtu for subbituminous coal, with typical levels at 0.24 lb/MMBtu and 0.13 lb/MMBtu, respectively. Despite these gains, NOx emissions limits in the U.S. continue to ratchet down for new and existing boiler equipment. On March 10, 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). CAIR requires 25 Eastern states to reduce NOx emissions from the power generation sector by 1.7 million tons in 2009 and 2.0 million tons by 2015. Low cost solutions to meet such regulations, and in particular those that can avoid the need for a costly selective catalytic reduction system (SCR), provide a strong incentive to continue to improve low NOx firing system technology to meet current and anticipated NOx control regulations. The overall objective of the work is to develop an enhanced combustion, low NOx pulverized coal burner, which, when integrated with Alstom's state-of-the-art, globally air staged low NOx firing systems will provide a means to achieve: Less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a high volatile Eastern or Western bituminous coal, Less than 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx emissions when firing a subbituminous coal, NOx reduction costs at least 25% lower than the costs of an SCR, Validation of the NOx control technology developed through large (15 MWt) pilot scale demonstration, and Documentation required for

  13. Impacts and implementation of fuel moisture release and radiation properties in modelling of pulverized fuel combustion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2015-01-01

    . Therefore, cares must be taken in particle radiation, especially particle radiative properties. The refined weighted-sum-of-gray-gases model (WSGGM) and conversion-dependent particle radiative property models presented in the paper are recommended for use in generic CFD modelling of PF combustion....

  14. Utilization of pulverized fuel ash in Malta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilleri, Josette; Sammut, Michael; Montesin, Franco E.

    2006-01-01

    In Malta all of the waste produced is mixed and deposited at various sites around the island. None of these sites were purpose built, and all of the waste is above groundwater level. The landfills are not engineered and do not contain any measures to collect leachate and gases emanating from the disposal sites. Another waste, which is disposed of in landfills, is pulverized fuel ash (PFA), which is a by-product of coal combustion by the power station. This has been disposed of in landfill, because its use has been precluded due to the radioactivity of the ashes. The aim of this study was to analyze the chemical composition of the pulverized fuel ash and to attempt to utilize it as a cement replacement in normal concrete mixes in the construction industry. The levels of radiation emitted from the ashes were measured by gamma spectrometry. The results of this study revealed that although at early ages cement replacement by PFA resulted in a reduction in compressive strength (P = 0), when compared to the reference concrete at later ages the strengths measured on concrete cores were comparable to the reference concrete (P > 0.05). The utilization of PFA up to 20% cement replacement in concrete did not raise the radioactivity of the concrete. In conclusion, utilization of PFA in the construction industry would be a better way of disposing of the ashes rather than controlling the leachate and any radioactivity emitted by the landfilled ashes

  15. Large-eddy simulation of swirling pulverized-coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, L.Y.; Luo, Y.H. [Shanghai Jiaotong Univ. (China). School of Mechanical Engineering; Zhou, L.X.; Xu, C.S. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Engineering Mechanics

    2013-07-01

    A Eulerian-Lagrangian large-eddy simulation (LES) with a Smagorinsky-Lilly sub-grid scale stress model, presumed-PDF fast chemistry and EBU gas combustion models, particle devolatilization and particle combustion models are used to study the turbulence and flame structures of swirling pulverized-coal combustion. The LES statistical results are validated by the measurement results. The instantaneous LES results show that the coherent structures for pulverized coal combustion is stronger than that for swirling gas combustion. The particles are concentrated in the periphery of the coherent structures. The flame is located at the high vorticity and high particle concentration zone.

  16. Numerical simulation of pulverized coal combustion to reduce pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad Bagher Ayani; Behnam Rahmanian

    2010-01-01

    Full text: In this research, the numerical simulation of pollutant reduction and in a pulverized coal combustion at 2D combustion chamber have been studied. Finite volume method using structured grid arrangement was utilized for modeling the pulverized coal combustion. The pressure base algorithm and implicit solver has been employed to simulate non-premix combustion model. The air was diluted by some participative gaseous such as whose percentages varied from 0 % to 20 %. Participative gases and air were preheated by a high-temperature gas generator, and the preheated oxidizer temperature could achieve. The combustion simulation with the generalized finite rate chemistry model, referred to as the Magnussen model and the reacting flow with the mixture fraction PDF/ equilibrium chemistry model, referred to as the PDF model are studied. Quick scheme was adopted for the discretization of all convective terms of the advective transport equations. So, as a result of addition participative gases into oxidizer the rate of formation of pollutants as well as NO x suppressed. The addition only a few percent of halogen components can make some systems nonflammable. The effects of addition halogen components and non-reaction gaseous such as Helium and Argon are fuel dilution and its acts as catalysts in reducing the H atom concentration necessary for the chain branching reaction sequence. Moreover, they act like surface and they make the increment of surface ratio versus volume. Because of this, the number of radical conflicts and hence destruction them will be increase. Furthermore, the rate of formation of pollutants will be decreased if the halogen components and non-reaction gaseous injection will be increased. However, as a result of this research, in the case of injection in pulverized coal combustion the flame temperature is lower than Steam, Argon and Helium. So, the emission levels of carbon dioxide is significantly lower than other participative gases, but in this

  17. NO emission characteristics of superfine pulverized coal combustion in the O2/CO2 atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jiaxun; Gao, Shan; Jiang, Xiumin; Shen, Jun; Zhang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Superfine pulverized coal combustion in O 2 /CO 2 atmosphere is a new promising technology. • NO emissions of superfine pulverized coal combustion in O 2 /CO 2 mixture were focused. • Coal particle sizes have significant effects on NO emissions in O 2 /CO 2 combustion. - Abstract: The combination of O 2 /CO 2 combustion and superfine pulverized coal combustion technology can make full use of their respective merits, and solve certain inherent disadvantages of each technology. The technology of superfine pulverized coal combustion in the O 2 /CO 2 atmosphere is easy and feasible to be retrofitted with few reconstructions on the existing devices. It will become a useful and promising method in the future. In this paper, a one-dimensional drop-tube furnace system was adopted to study the NO emission characteristics of superfine pulverized coal combustion in the O 2 /CO 2 atmosphere. The effects of coal particle size, coal quality, furnace temperature, stoichiometric ratio, etc. were analyzed. It is important to note that coal particle sizes have significant influence on NO emissions in the O 2 /CO 2 combustion. For the homogeneous NO reduction, smaller coal particles can inhibit the homogeneous NO formations under fuel-rich combustion conditions, while it becomes disadvantageous for fuel-lean combustion. However, under any conditions, heterogeneous reduction is always more significant for smaller coal particle sizes, which have smoother pore surfaces and simpler pore structures. The results from this fundamental research will provide technical support for better understanding and developing this new combustion process

  18. Pulverized straw combustion in a low-NOx multifuel burner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandø, Matthias; Rosendahl, Lasse; Yin, Chungen

    2010-01-01

    A CFD simulation of pulverized coal and straw combustion using a commercial multifuel burner have been undertaken to examine the difference in combustion characteristics. Focus has also been directed to development of the modeling technique to deal with larger non-spherical straw particles...... and to determine the relative importance of different modeling choices for straw combustion. Investigated modeling choices encompass the particle size and shape distribution, the modification of particle motion and heating due to the departure from the spherical ideal, the devolatilization rate of straw......, the influence of inlet boundary conditions and the effect of particles on the carrier phase turbulence. It is concluded that straw combustion is associated with a significantly longer flame and smaller recirculation zones compared to coal combustion for the present air flow specifications. The particle size...

  19. Fluidized bed and pulverized coal combustion residues for secondary pavements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafoori, N.; Diawara, H.; Wang, L.

    2009-01-01

    The United States produced nearly 125 million tons of coal combustion products in 2006. These by-products include fly ash, flue gas desulphurization materials, bottom ash, boiler slag, and other power plant by-products. The expense associated with waste disposal, lack of disposal sites, and significant environmental damage linked with the disposal of coal combustion residues have encouraged innovative utilization strategies such as the fluidized bed combustion (FBC) unit. This paper presented the results of a laboratory investigation that examined the properties of composites developed with different proportions of pre-conditioned FBC spent bed, pulverized coal combustion fly ash, natural fine aggregate, and Portland cement. The purpose of the study was to examine the extent to which the by-product composites could replace currently used materials in secondary roads. The paper presented the research objectives and experimental programs, including matrix constituent and proportions; mixture proportions; and mixing, curing, sampling, and testing. The discussion of results centered around compressive strength and expansion by internal sulfate attack. It was concluded that with proper proportioning, by-products of pulverized and fluidized bed combustion promote binding of sand particles and provide adequate strength under various curing and moisture conditions 4 refs., 6 tabs.

  20. Kinetics of devolatilization and oxidation of a pulverized biomass in an entrained flow reactor under realistic combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Santiago [LITEC-CSIC (Spanish Council for Scientific Research), Maria de Luna 10, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Remacha, Pilar; Ballester, Javier [LITEC-CSIC (Spanish Council for Scientific Research), Maria de Luna 10, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Fluid Mechanics Group, University of Zaragoza, Maria de Luna 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Ballesteros, Juan C.; Gimenez, Antonio [ENDESA GENERACION, S.A., Ribera del Loira 60, 28042 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-03-15

    In this paper the results of a complete set of devolatilization and combustion experiments performed with pulverized ({proportional_to}500 {mu}m) biomass in an entrained flow reactor under realistic combustion conditions are presented. The data obtained are used to derive the kinetic parameters that best fit the observed behaviors, according to a simple model of particle combustion (one-step devolatilization, apparent oxidation kinetics, thermally thin particles). The model is found to adequately reproduce the experimental trends regarding both volatile release and char oxidation rates for the range of particle sizes and combustion conditions explored. The experimental and numerical procedures, similar to those recently proposed for the combustion of pulverized coal [J. Ballester, S. Jimenez, Combust. Flame 142 (2005) 210-222], have been designed to derive the parameters required for the analysis of biomass combustion in practical pulverized fuel configurations and allow a reliable characterization of any finely pulverized biomass. Additionally, the results of a limited study on the release rate of nitrogen from the biomass particle along combustion are shown. (author)

  1. Modeling and optimization of processes for clean and efficient pulverized coal combustion in utility boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belošević Srđan V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulverized coal-fired power plants should provide higher efficiency of energy conversion, flexibility in terms of boiler loads and fuel characteristics and emission reduction of pollutants like nitrogen oxides. Modification of combustion process is a cost-effective technology for NOx control. For optimization of complex processes, such as turbulent reactive flow in coal-fired furnaces, mathematical modeling is regularly used. The NOx emission reduction by combustion modifications in the 350 MWe Kostolac B boiler furnace, tangentially fired by pulverized Serbian lignite, is investigated in the paper. Numerical experiments were done by an in-house developed three-dimensional differential comprehensive combustion code, with fuel- and thermal-NO formation/destruction reactions model. The code was developed to be easily used by engineering staff for process analysis in boiler units. A broad range of operating conditions was examined, such as fuel and preheated air distribution over the burners and tiers, operation mode of the burners, grinding fineness and quality of coal, boiler loads, cold air ingress, recirculation of flue gases, water-walls ash deposition and combined effect of different parameters. The predictions show that the NOx emission reduction of up to 30% can be achieved by a proper combustion organization in the case-study furnace, with the flame position control. Impact of combustion modifications on the boiler operation was evaluated by the boiler thermal calculations suggesting that the facility was to be controlled within narrow limits of operation parameters. Such a complex approach to pollutants control enables evaluating alternative solutions to achieve efficient and low emission operation of utility boiler units. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-33018: Increase in energy and ecology efficiency of processes in pulverized coal-fired furnace and optimization of utility steam boiler air preheater by using in

  2. Numerical simulation of altitude impact on pulverized coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Xiaohui; He, Boshu; Ling, Ling; Wang, Lei [Beijing Jiaotong Univ., Beijing (China). Inst. of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering

    2013-07-01

    A drop-tube Furnace simulation model has been developed to investigate the pulverized coal combustion characteristics under different altitudes using the commercially available software Fluent. The altitude conditions of 0, 500, 1,000, 1,500 m have been discussed. The results included the fields of temperature, pressure, velocity, the coal burnout, CO burnout and NO emission in the tube furnace. The variation of these parameters with altitude has been analyzed. The coal combustion characteristics were affected by the altitude. The time and space for coal burnout should be increased with the rise of altitude. The valuable results could be referenced in the design of coal- fired furnaces for the high altitude areas.

  3. Combustion behaviors and kinetics of sewage sludge blended with pulverized coal: With and without catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Hong, Chen; Xing, Yi; Li, Yifei; Feng, Lihui; Jia, Mengmeng

    2018-04-01

    The combustion behaviors of sewage sludge (SS), pulverized coal (PC), and their blends were studied using a thermogravimetric analyzer. The effect of the mass ratio of SS to PC on the co-combustion characteristics was analyzed. The experiments showed that the ignition performance of the blends improved significantly as the mass percentage of SS increased, but its combustion intensity decreased. The burnout temperature (T b ) and comprehensive combustibility index (S) of the blends were almost unchanged when the mass percentage of SS was less than 10%. However, a high mass percentage of SS (>10%) resulted in a great increase in T b and a notable decrease in S. Subsequently, the effects of different catalysts (CaO, CeO 2 , MnO 2 , and Fe 2 O 3 ) on the combustion characteristics and activation energy of the SS/PC blend were investigated. The four catalysts promoted the release and combustion of volatile matters in the blended fuels and shifted their combustion profiles to a low temperature. In addition, their peak separating tendencies were obvious at 350-550 C, resulting in high peak widths. All the catalysts improved combustion activity of the blended fuel and accelerated fixed carbon combustion, which decreased the ignition temperature and burnout temperature of the fuels. CeO 2 had the best catalytic effects in terms of the comprehensive combustion performance and activation energy, followed closely by Fe 2 O 3 . However, the rare-earth compounds are expensive to be applied in the catalytic combustion process of SS/PC blend at present. Based on both catalytic effects and economy, Fe 2 O 3 was potentially an optimal option for catalytic combustion among the tested catalysts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. LES and RANS modeling of pulverized coal combustion in swirl burner for air and oxy-combustion technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warzecha, Piotr; Boguslawski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Combustion of pulverized coal in oxy-combustion technology is one of the effective ways to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. The process of transition from conventional combustion in air to the oxy-combustion technology, however, requires a thorough investigations of the phenomena occurring during the combustion process, that can be greatly supported by numerical modeling. The paper presents the results of numerical simulations of pulverized coal combustion process in swirl burner using RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations) and LES (large Eddy simulation) methods for turbulent flow. Numerical simulations have been performed for the oxyfuel test facility located at the Institute of Heat and Mass Transfer at RWTH Aachen University. Detailed analysis of the flow field inside the combustion chamber for cold flow and for the flow with combustion using different numerical methods for turbulent flows have been done. Comparison of the air and oxy-coal combustion process for pulverized coal shows significant differences in temperature, especially close to the burner exit. Additionally the influence of the combustion model on the results has been shown for oxy-combustion test case. - Highlights: • Oxy-coal combustion has been modeled for test facility operating at low oxygen ratio. • Coal combustion process has been modeled with simplified combustion models. • Comparison of oxy and air combustion process of pulverized coal has been done. • RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations) and LES (large Eddy simulation) results for pulverized coal combustion process have been compared

  5. Co-combustion of Fossil Fuels and Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao

    The Ph.D. thesis deals with the alternative and high efficiency methods of using waste-derived fuels in heat and power production. The focus is on the following subjects: 1) co-combustion of coal and solid recovered fuel (SRF) under pulverized fuel combustion conditions; 2) dust-firing of straw...

  6. Formation of fine particles in co-combustion of coal and solid recovered fuel in a pulverized coal-fired power station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Glarborg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    showed an ultrafine mode centered at approximately 0.1 μm. Compared with coal combustion, co-combustion of coal and SRF increased the formation of submicron particles, especially ultrafine particles below 0.2 μm. The morphology of the particles indicated that supermicron particles were primarily formed...... by the melting of minerals. The ultrafine particles were generated through nucleation and coagulation of vaporized inorganic species, while for the particles in between supermicron and ultrafine particles, condensation of vaporized species or aggregation of nucleates on the existing spherical submicron particles...... appear to be an important formation mechanism. The elemental composition of the particles from coal combustion showed that S and Ca were significantly enriched in ultrafine particles and P was also enriched considerably. However, compared with supermicron particles, the contents of Al, Si and K were...

  7. Flat-flame burner studies of pulverized-coal combustion. Experimental results on char reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peck, R.E.; Shi, L.

    1996-12-01

    Structure of laminar, premixed pulverized-coal flames in a 1-D reactor has been studied with emphasis on char reactivity. A 1.1-meter-long tube furnace accommodated high-temperature environments and long residence times for the laminar flames produced by a flat-flame, coal-dust burner. Experiments were conducted at different operating conditions (fuel type/size, fuel-air ratio). Measurements included solid sample composition, major gas species and hydrocarbon species concentrations, and gas- and particle-phase line-of-sight temperatures at different axial locations in flames. Degree of char burnout increased with coal volatiles content and decreased with coal particle size. Combustion in furnace was in oxidizer-deficient environment and higher burnout was achieved as the fuel-air ratio neared stoichiometric. For 0-45 {mu}m particles most of the fixed carbon mass loss occurred within 5 cm of the furnace inlet, and char reaction was slow downstream due to low oxidizer concentrations. Fixed carbon consumption of the 45-90 {mu}m particles generally was slower than for the small particles. About 40%-80% of the fixed carbon was oxidized in the furnace. Primary volatiles mass loss occurred within the first 4.5 cm, and more than 90% of the volatiles were consumed in the flames. The flames stabilized in the furnace produced less CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2} in the burnt gas than similar unconfined flames. NO concentrations were found to decrease along the furnace and to increase with decreasing fuel/air ratio. Temperature measurement results showed that gas-phase temperatures were higher than solid-phase temperatures. Temperatures generally decreased with decreasing volatiles content and increased as the equivalence ratio approached one. The results can be used to interpret thermochemical processes occurring in pulverized-coal combustion. (au) 15 refs.

  8. Gasification in pulverized coal flames. Final report (Part I). Pulverized coal combustion and gasification in a cyclone reactor: experiment and model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnhart, J. S.; Laurendeau, N. M.

    1979-05-01

    A unified experimental and analytical study of pulverized coal combustion and low-BTU gasification in an atmospheric cyclone reactor was performed. Experimental results include several series of coal combustion tests and a coal gasification test carried out via fuel-rich combustion without steam addition. Reactor stability was excellent over a range of equivalence ratios from .67 to 2.4 and air flowrates from 60 to 220 lb/hr. Typical carbon efficiencies were 95% for air-rich and stoichiometric tests and 80% for gasification tests. The best gasification results were achieved at an equivalence ratio of 2.0, where the carbon, cold gas and hot gas efficiencies were 83, 45 and 75%, respectively. The corresponding product gas heating value was 70 BTU/scf. A macroscopic model of coal combustion in the cyclone has been developed. Fuel-rich gasification can also be modeled through a gas-phase equilibrium treatment. Fluid mechanics are modeled by a particle force balance and a series combination of a perfectly stirred reactor and a plug flow reactor. Kinetic treatments of coal pyrolysis, char oxidation and carbon monoxide oxidation are included. Gas composition and temperature are checked against equilibrium values. The model predicts carbon efficiency, gas composition and temperature and reactor heat loss; gasification parameters, such as cold and hot gas efficiency and make gas heating value, are calculated for fuel-rich conditions. Good agreement exists between experiment and theory for conditions of this investigation.

  9. Combustion characteristics and kinetic analysis of pulverized coal under different pressure grades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiwei ZUO

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available By using thermo gravimetric balance, experimental research on combustion characteristics and dynamics parameters of the typical coal injection from some domestic steelworks are conducted with non-isothermal method. The combustion characteristic parameters of the sample pulverized coal such as ignition temperature, peak temperature at maximum weight loss rate, burnout temperature, general burn exponent(S, and maximum combustion rate are studied under pressure grades of 0.1, 1.1, 2.1, 3.1 and 4.1 MPa, the activation energy (E and pre-exponential factor in the combustion process are calculated. The results show that when the pressure increases from 0.1 to 4.1 MPa, ignition temperature decreases by 85.7 K at most, peak temperature at maximum weight loss rate decreases by 249.3 K at most, burnout temperature decreases by 375 K at most, maximum weight loss rate increases by 10 times, and S increases by 33.6 times at most. It is also shown that there exists a kinetic complementation between E and ln A from the view point of dynamics, and the critical pressure of pulverized coal reaction control requirement and combustion mode transform is 3.1 MPa for the pulverized coal.

  10. Combustion of pulverized coal in counter-current flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timnat, Y M; Goldman, Y [Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa (Israel). Faculty of Aerospace Engineering

    1991-01-01

    In this report we describe the results obtained with two prototypes of pulverized coal combustors operating in counter-current flow, one at atmospheric pressure, the other at higher pressure and compare them to the predictions of a theoretical-numerical model, we have developed. The first prototype treats a vertical configuration, eight times larger than the one treated before (Hazanov et al. 1985), while in the second a horizontal arrangement with a smaller volume is studied. Attention was focused on particle trajectories, burnout, angle of injection, ash separation by rotational motion, effects of initial particle size and temperature, impingement velocity and the effect of gravity. Main development activity was directed to achieving stable and reliable coal burning in the combustors.

  11. A comprehensive study of combustion products generated from pulverized peat combustion in the furnace of BKZ-210-140F steam boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, V. A.; Zagrai, I. A.

    2017-11-01

    The experimental and theoretical study of combustion products has been carried out for the conditions of pulverized peat combustion in BKZ-210-140F steam boiler. Sampling has been performed in different parts of the boiler system in order to determine the chemical composition, radiative properties and dispersity of slag and ash particles. The chemical composition of particles was determined using the method of x-ray fluorescence analysis. Shapes and sizes of the particles were determined by means of electron scanning microscopy. The histograms and the particle size distribution functions were computed. The calculation of components of the gaseous phase was based on the combustion characteristics of the original fuel. The software package of calculation of thermal radiation of combustion products from peat combustion was used to simulate emission characteristics (flux densities and emissivity factors). The dependence of emission characteristics on the temperature level and on the wavelength has been defined. On the basis of the analysis of emission characteristics the authors give some recommendations how to determine the temperature of peat combustion products in the furnace of BKZ-210-140F steam boiler. The findings can be used to measure the combustion products temperature, support temperature control in peat combustion and solve the problem of boiler furnace slagging.

  12. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-08-17

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  13. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  14. A Pulverized Coal-Fired Boiler Optimized for Oxyfuel Combustion Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Dlouhý

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study on modifying a pulverized coal-fired steam boiler in a 250 MWe power plant for oxygen combustion conditions. The entry point of the study is a boiler that was designed for standard air combustion. It has been proven that simply substituting air by oxygen as an oxidizer is not sufficient for maintaining a satisfactory operating mode, not even with flue gas recycling. Boiler design optimization aggregating modifications to the boiler’s dimensions, heating surfaces and recycled flue gas flow rate, and specification of a flue gas recycling extraction point is therefore necessary in order to achieve suitable conditions for oxygen combustion. Attention is given to reducing boiler leakage, to which external pre-combustion coal drying makes a major contribution. The optimization is carried out with regard to an overall power plant conception for which a decrease in efficiency due to CO2 separation is formulated.

  15. Analysis of Chemical Reaction Kinetics Behavior of Nitrogen Oxide During Air-staged Combustion in Pulverized Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Xia Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Because the air-staged combustion technology is one of the key technologies with low investment running costs and high emission reduction efficiency for the pulverized boiler, it is important to reveal the chemical reaction kinetics mechanism for developing various technologies of nitrogen oxide reduction emissions. At the present work, a three-dimensional mesh model of the large-scale four corner tangentially fired boiler furnace is established with the GAMBIT pre-processing of the FLUENT software. The partial turbulent premixed and diffusion flame was simulated for the air-staged combustion processing. Parameters distributions for the air-staged and no the air-staged were obtained, including in-furnace flow field, temperature field and nitrogen oxide concentration field. The results show that the air-staged has more regular velocity field, higher velocity of flue gas, higher turbulence intensity and more uniform temperature of flue gas. In addition, a lower negative pressure zone and lower O2 concentration zone is formed in the main combustion zone, which is conducive to the NO of fuel type reduced to N2, enhanced the effect of NOx reduction. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 5th November 2015; Revised: 14th January 2016; Accepted: 16th January 2016  How to Cite: Zhang, J.X., Zhang, J.F. (2016. Analysis of Chemical Reaction Kinetics Behavior of Nitrogen Oxide During Air-staged Combustion in Pulverized Boiler. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (1: 100-108. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.1.431.100-108 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.1.431.100-108

  16. Fuel Combustion Laboratory | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel Combustion Laboratory Fuel Combustion Laboratory NREL's Fuel Combustion Laboratory focuses on designs, using both today's technology and future advanced combustion concepts. This lab supports the combustion chamber platform for fuel ignition kinetics research, was acquired to expand the lab's

  17. Coal char combustion under a CO{sub 2}-rich atmosphere: Implications for pulverized coal injection in a blast furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrego, A.G.; Casal, M.D. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC. P.O. Box 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain); Osorio, E.; Vilela, A.C.F. [Laboratorio de Siderurgia, DEMET/PPGEM - Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. P.O. Box 15021, 91501-970 Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2008-11-15

    Pulverized coal injection (PCI) is employed in blast furnace tuyeres attempting to maximize the injection rate without increasing the amount of unburned char inside the stack of the blast furnace. When coal is injected with air through the injection lance, the resolidified char will burn in an atmosphere with a progressively lower oxygen content and higher CO{sub 2} concentration. In this study an experimental approach was followed to separate the combustion process into two distinct devolatilization and combustion steps. Initially coal was injected into a drop tube furnace (DTF) operating at 1300 C in an atmosphere with a low oxygen concentration to ensure the combustion of volatiles and prevent the formation of soot. Then the char was refired into the DTF at the same temperature under two different atmospheres O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} (typical combustion) and O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} (oxy-combustion) with the same oxygen concentration. Coal injection was also performed under a higher oxygen concentration in atmospheres typical for both combustion and oxy-combustion. The fuels tested comprised a petroleum coke and coals currently used for PCI injection ranging from high volatile to low volatile bituminous rank. Thermogravimetric analyses and microscopy techniques were used to establish the reactivity and appearance of the chars. Overall similar burnouts were achieved with N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} for similar oxygen concentrations and therefore no loss in burnout should be expected as a result of enrichment in CO{sub 2} in the blast furnace gas. The advantage of increasing the amount of oxygen in a reacting atmosphere during burnout was found to be greater, the higher the rank of the coal. (author)

  18. Anatomy of an upgraded pulverized coal facility: Combustion modification through flue gas scrubbing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, J.U. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center; Savichky, W.J.; O`Dea, D.T. [New York State Electric and Gas Corp., Binghamton, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Regeneration is a biological term for formation or creating anew. In the case of Milliken station, a species of steam generation (Tangentus coali) regeneration refers to refitting critical systems with the latest technological advances to reduce emissions while maintaining or improving performance. The plant has undergone a series of operations which provided anatomical changes as well as a face lift. Each of the two units were place in suspended animation (outage) to allow these changes to be made. The paper describes the project which includes retrofitting combustion systems, pulverizers, boiler liners, scrubbers, and control room. This retrofit is meant to increase thermal efficiency while reducing the formation of nitrogen oxides.

  19. A simple numerical model to estimate the effect of coal selection on pulverized fuel burnout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, J.K.; Hurt, R.H.; Niksa, S.; Muzio, L.; Mehta, A.; Stallings, J. [Brown University, Providence, RI (USA). Division Engineering

    2003-06-01

    The amount of unburned carbon in ash is an important performance characteristic in commercial boilers fired with pulverized coal. Unburned carbon levels are known to be sensitive to fuel selection, and there is great interest in methods of estimating the burnout propensity of coals based on proximate and ultimate analysis - the only fuel properties readily available to utility practitioners. A simple numerical model is described that is specifically designed to estimate the effects of coal selection on burnout in a way that is useful for commercial coal screening. The model is based on a highly idealized description of the combustion chamber but employs detailed descriptions of the fundamental fuel transformations. The model is validated against data from laboratory and pilot-scale combustors burning a range of international coals, and then against data obtained from full-scale units during periods of coal switching. The validated model form is then used in a series of sensitivity studies to explore the role of various individual fuel properties that influence burnout.

  20. CFD analysis of the pulverized coal combustion processes in a 160 MWe tangentially-fired-boiler of a thermal power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Cristiano V. da; Beskow, Arthur B. [Universidade Regional Integrada do Alto Uruguai e das Misses (LABSIM/GEAPI/URI), Erechim, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia e Ciencia da Computacao. Grupo de Engenharia Aplicada a Processos Industriais], Emails: cristiano@uricer.edu.br, Arthur@uricer.edu.br; Indrusiak, Maria Luiza S. [Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos (UNISINOS), Sao Leopoldo, RS (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Mecanica], E-mail: sperbindrusiak@via-rs.net

    2010-10-15

    The strategic role of energy and the current concern with greenhouse effects, energetic and exegetic efficiency of fossil fuel combustion greatly enhance the importance of the studies of complex physical and chemical processes occurring inside boilers of thermal power plants. The state of the art in computational fluid dynamics and the availability of commercial codes encourage numeric studies of the combustion processes. In the present work the commercial software CFX Ansys Europe Ltd. was used to study the combustion of coal in a 160 MWe commercial thermal power plant with the objective of simulating the operational conditions and identifying factors of inefficiency. The behavior of the flow of air and pulverized coal through the burners was analyzed, and the three-dimensional flue gas flow through the combustion chamber and heat exchangers was reproduced in the numeric simulation. (author)

  1. Numerical analysis of loads effect on combustion performance and NO{sub x} emissions of a 220 MW pulverized coal boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jun; Yang, Weihong; Blasiak, Wlodzimierz [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Energy and Furnace Technology; Jankowski, Radoslaw; Kotecki, Michal; Szewczyk, Dariusz [Industrial Combustion Systems (ICS) Company, Poznan (Poland); Brzdekiewicz, Artur [Remak-Rozruch SA, Opole (Poland)

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents numerical study on the combustion performance and NO{sub x} emissions of a 220 MW pulverized coal boiler. Three different loads have been simulated with combusting coal, 200, 170 and 140 MW, respectively. In order to get as precise as possible numerical analysis results, two-step simulation method has been adopted in this work, namely, air supply system simulation and furnace simulation. After air supply system simulation, the results have been taken as the initial and boundary conditions for furnace simulation. The comparison between the measured values and predicted results from 200 MW case shows much better agreement. According to the simulation results, the adopted two-step simulation method is reasonable and suitable for predicting the characters of the flow and combustion process. It is concluded that the distributions of temperature, O{sub 2} and CO concentration inside furnace with different loads shows good similarly. The total NOx emissions decreased with the boiler load reducing, and fuel NO{sub x} has the same trend as total NO{sub x}, and fuel NO{sub x} account for about 66% in total NO{sub x} in all the three cases. More important, thermal NO{sub x} slowly decreased with the rise of boiler load. More detailed results presented in this paper enhance the understanding of combustion processes and complex flow patterns of front-wall pulverized coal boilers.

  2. Reducing NOx Emissions for a 600 MWe Down-Fired Pulverized-Coal Utility Boiler by Applying a Novel Combustion System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lun; Fang, Qingyan; Lv, Dangzhen; Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Yiping; Chen, Gang; Duan, Xuenong; Wang, Xihuan

    2015-11-03

    A novel combustion system was applied to a 600 MWe Foster Wheeler (FW) down-fired pulverized-coal utility boiler to solve high NOx emissions, without causing an obvious increase in the carbon content of fly ash. The unit included moving fuel-lean nozzles from the arches to the front/rear walls and rearranging staged air as well as introducing separated overfire air (SOFA). Numerical simulations were carried out under the original and novel combustion systems to evaluate the performance of combustion and NOx emissions in the furnace. The simulated results were found to be in good agreement with the in situ measurements. The novel combustion system enlarged the recirculation zones below the arches, thereby strengthening the combustion stability considerably. The coal/air downward penetration depth was markedly extended, and the pulverized-coal travel path in the lower furnace significantly increased, which contributed to the burnout degree. The introduction of SOFA resulted in a low-oxygen and strong-reducing atmosphere in the lower furnace region to reduce NOx emissions evidently. The industrial measurements showed that NOx emissions at full load decreased significantly by 50%, from 1501 mg/m3 (O2 at 6%) to 751 mg/m3 (O2 at 6%). The carbon content in the fly ash increased only slightly, from 4.13 to 4.30%.

  3. Review of coal-water fuel pulverization technology and atomization quality registration methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenkov Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Possibilities of coal-water fuel application in industrial power engineering are considered and described. Two main problems and disadvantages of this fuel type are suggested. The paper presents information about liquid fuel atomization technologies and provides data on nozzle type for coal-water fuel pulverization. This article also mentions some of the existing technologies for coal-water slurry spraying quality determination.

  4. An investigation into fuel pulverization with specific reference to high burn-up LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagnik, Suresh; Turnbull, James; Noirot, Jean; Walker, Clive; Hallstadius, Lars; Waeckel, N.; Blanpain, P.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the phenomenon of high burn-up fuel pellet material potentially disintegrating into powder under a rapid temperature transient, such as in a LOCA-type accident scenario, two independent scoping studies were commissioned. The first was to investigate the effect of hydrostatic restraint pressure on Fission Gas Release (FGR) from small samples of highly irradiated fuel (71 MWd/kgU) during a series of rapid temperature ramps. Experimentally, when the FGR increased rapidly during the temperature transients, the fuel was assumed to be 'pulverized', i.e., fragmented into powder. In the second series of experiments, laser heating of small samples was used to investigate the temperature at which fuel pulverization was initiated. Subsequent to fuel disintegration, there was always a spectrum of particle sizes present. The significance of this observation was recognized in the context of extended burn-up operation in commercial reactors. Based on the observation from these investigations, a fuel fragmentation threshold has been discussed and developed. We conclude that fuel disintegration could be of potential importance in limiting the performance and productive lifetime of nuclear fuel. However, since only fuel closely adjacent to ballooned or ruptured cladding would be released in a LOCA-type transient, expulsion of pulverized fuel from the ruptured fuel rod is not considered a safety issue; cooling of the defected assembly remains possible and there is no issue with respect to local criticality. (author)

  5. SCR at bio fuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Christer; Odenbrand, I.; Andersson, L.H.

    1998-10-01

    In this project the cause for and the extent of catalyst deactivation has been investigated when using 100 % wood as fuel. The trend of deactivation has been studied as a function of the flue gas temperature, the type of catalyst and the type of combustion technique used. The field tests have been performed in the CFB boiler in Norrkoeping, firing forest residues, and in the boiler in Jordbro, firing pulverized wood (PC). Samples of four different commercial catalyst types have been exposed to flue gas in a test rig connected to the convection section of the boiler. The samples have been analysed at even time intervals. The results after 2 100 hours show a large difference in deactivation trend between the two plants; when using a conventional honeycomb catalyst 80 % of the original activity remains in the CFB boiler but only 20 % remains in the PC boiler. The deactivation in the CFB boiler is about 3 - 4 times faster than what is expected for a conservative design for a coal fired boiler. The results show that the general deactivation trend is similar for the plate and the honeycomb catalyst types. With a catalyst optimised for bio fuels the deactivation rate was about 2/3 compared with a conventional catalyst. At an operating temperature of 315 deg C the deactivation was not as rapid as at 370 deg C. The amount of easily dissolved potassium increases on the surface of the catalyst, especially in the PC boiler, and this is probably the reason for the deactivation. The total amount of potassium in the flue gas is about 5 times higher in the CFB boiler compared with the PC boiler. This indicates that only a certain form of potassium attacks the catalyst and that the total alkali content of the fuel is not a good indicator of the deactivation tendency. The potassium on the catalyst dissolves easily in both water and sulphuric acid. A wash of deactivated catalyst samples with water resulted in higher activity than for the fresh samples if the washing was supplemented

  6. Alternate fuels; Combustibles alternos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero Paredes R, Hernando; Ambriz G, Juan Jose [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana. Iztapalapa (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In the definition and description of alternate fuels we must center ourselves in those technological alternatives that allow to obtain compounds that differ from the traditional ones, in their forms to be obtained. In this article it is tried to give an overview of alternate fuels to the conventional derivatives of petroleum and that allow to have a clear idea on the tendencies of modern investigation and the technological developments that can be implemented in the short term. It is not pretended to include all the tendencies and developments of the present world, but those that can hit in a relatively short term, in accordance with agreed with the average life of conventional fuels. Nevertheless, most of the conversion principles are applicable to the spectrum of carbonaceous or cellulosic materials which are in nature, are cultivated or wastes of organic origin. Thus one will approach them in a successive way, the physical, chemical and biological conversions that can take place in a production process of an alternate fuel or the same direct use of the fuel such as burning the sweepings derived from the forests. [Spanish] En la definicion y descripcion de combustibles alternos nos debemos centrar en aquellas alternativas tecnologicas que permitan obtener compuestos que difieren de los tradicionales, al menos en sus formas de ser obtenidos. En este articulo se pretende dar un panorama de los combustibles alternos a los convencionales derivados del petroleo y que permita tener una idea clara sobre las tendencias de la investigacion moderna y los desarrollos tecnologicos que puedan ser implementados en el corto plazo. No se pretende abarcar todas las tendencias y desarrollos del mundo actual, sino aquellas que pueden impactar en un plazo relativamente corto, acordes con la vida media de los combustibles convencionales. Sin embargo, la mayor parte de los principios de conversion son aplicables al espectro de materiales carbonaceos o celulosicos los cuales se

  7. Effect of the Reburning Zone Stoichiometry on the Nox Concentration at the Three-Stage Combustion of Pulverized Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernetskaya Nelya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical study of heat and mass transfer taking into account the combustion of coal particles in the furnace at the three-stage combustion of pulverized coal was performed. Analysis of the reburning zone stoichiometry on the concentration of nitrogen oxides at the furnace outlet was made. The values of excess air in the primary and reburning combustion zones, providing for the concentration of nitrogen oxides at the furnace outlet is not more than 350 mg/m3 and unburned carbon not more than 1 % when burning coal with a high content of nitrogen were established.

  8. Burning characteristics and gaseous/solid emissions of blends of pulverized coal with waste tire-derived fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levendis, Y.A.; Atal, A.; Courtemanche, B.; Carlson, J.B. [Northeastern University, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

    1998-10-01

    The combustion behaviour and the emissions from blends of a pulverized bituminous coal and ground waste automobile tires were investigated. Combustion took place under steady flow conditions, in an electrically-heated drop-tube furnace in air at a gas temperature of 1150{degree}C and a particle heating rate of approximate to 10{sup 5}{degree}C/s. Combustion observations were conducted with simultaneous pyrometry and cinematography. Interparticle flame interactions were visually observed in the near-stoichiometric and fuel-rich regions. Volatile flame interactions were apparent at a lower phi for tire crumb particles than for coal particles and became progressively more intense with increasing phi until at sufficiently high phi`s large group flames formed for tire particles. As particle flame interactions increased, average maximum temperatures in the flame decreased. Coal particles resisted the formation of group flames, even at high phi`s. Such observations correlated with the trends observed for the PAH emissions of the two fuels, those of tire crumb being much higher than those of coal Some stratification in the combustion of blends of particles of the two fuels was observed. This kept the PAH emissions lower levels than expected. NO{sub x} emissions from tires were much lower than those of coal, while those of the blends were close to the weighted average emissions. SO{sub 2} emissions from the blends were close to the weighted average emissions of the two fuels. Blending coal with tire reduced the CO{sub 2} emissions of coal but increased the CO emissions. Particulate emissions (soot and ash), measured in the range of 0.4 to 8{mu}m, increased with phi. Generally, tire produced more mass of submicron particulates than coal. Particulate emissions of blends of the two fuels were close to those expected based on weighted average of the two fuels.

  9. Fuels Combustion Research: Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glassman, Irvin

    2001-01-01

    .... The focus during the subject period was directed to understanding the pyrolysis and combustion of endothermic fuels under subcritical conditions and the pyrolysis of these fuels under supercritical conditions...

  10. Fuels Combustion Research: Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glassman, Irvin

    2000-01-01

    .... The focus during the subject period was directed to understanding the pyrolysis and combustion of endothermic fuels under subcritical conditions and the pyrolysis of these fuels under supercritical conditions...

  11. Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Maja Bøg; Brix, Jacob; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion is suggested as one of the possible, promising technologies for capturing CO2 from power plants. The concept of oxy-fuel combustion is removal of nitrogen from the oxidizer to carry out the combustion process in oxygen and, in most concepts, recycled flue gas to lower the flame...... provide additional options for improvement of process economics are however likewise investigated. Of particular interest is the change of the combustion process induced by the exchange of carbon dioxide and water vapor for nitrogen as diluent. This paper reviews the published knowledge on the oxy......-fuel process and focuses particularly on the combustion fundamentals, i.e. flame temperatures and heat transfer, ignition and burnout, emissions, and fly ash characteristics. Knowledge is currently available regarding both an entire oxy-fuel power plant and the combustion fundamentals. However, several...

  12. Characteristics of carbonized sludge for co-combustion in pulverized coal power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Woo; Jang, Cheol-Hyeon

    2011-03-01

    Co-combustion of sewage sludge can destabilize its combustion profile due to high volatility, which results in unstable flame. We carried out fuel reforming for sewage sludge by way of carbonization at pyrolysis temperature of 300-500°C. Fuel characteristics of carbonized sludge at each temperature were analyzed. As carbonization temperature increased, fuel ratio increased, volatile content reduced, and atomic ratio relation of H/C and O/C was similar to that of lignite. The analysis result of FT-IR showed the decrease of aliphatic C-H bond and O-C bond in carbonization. In the analysis result of TG-DTG, the thermogravimetry reduction temperature of carbonized sludge (CS400) was proven to be higher than that of dried sludge, but lower than that of sub-bituminous coal. Hardgrove grindability index increased in proportion to fuel ratio increase, where the carbonized sludge value of 43-110 was similar or higher than the coal value of 49-63. As for ash deposits, slagging and fouling index were higher than that of coal. When carbonized sludge (CS400) and coal were co-combusted in 1-10% according to calorific value, slagging tendency was low in all conditions, and fouling tendency was medium or high according to the compositions of coal. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characteristics of carbonized sludge for co-combustion in pulverized coal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang-Woo; Jang, Cheol-Hyeon

    2011-01-01

    Co-combustion of sewage sludge can destabilize its combustion profile due to high volatility, which results in unstable flame. We carried out fuel reforming for sewage sludge by way of carbonization at pyrolysis temperature of 300-500 deg. C. Fuel characteristics of carbonized sludge at each temperature were analyzed. As carbonization temperature increased, fuel ratio increased, volatile content reduced, and atomic ratio relation of H/C and O/C was similar to that of lignite. The analysis result of FT-IR showed the decrease of aliphatic C-H bond and O-C bond in carbonization. In the analysis result of TG-DTG, the thermogravimetry reduction temperature of carbonized sludge (CS400) was proven to be higher than that of dried sludge, but lower than that of sub-bituminous coal. Hardgrove grindability index increased in proportion to fuel ratio increase, where the carbonized sludge value of 43-110 was similar or higher than the coal value of 49-63. As for ash deposits, slagging and fouling index were higher than that of coal. When carbonized sludge (CS400) and coal were co-combusted in 1-10% according to calorific value, slagging tendency was low in all conditions, and fouling tendency was medium or high according to the compositions of coal.

  14. Effect of multiphase radiation on coal combustion in a pulverized coal jet flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Bifen; Roy, Somesh P.; Zhao, Xinyu; Modest, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    The accurate modeling of coal combustion requires detailed radiative heat transfer models for both gaseous combustion products and solid coal particles. A multiphase Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) radiation solver is developed in this work to simulate a laboratory-scale pulverized coal flame. The MCRT solver considers radiative interactions between coal particles and three major combustion products (CO 2 , H 2 O, and CO). A line-by-line spectral database for the gas phase and a size-dependent nongray correlation for the solid phase are employed to account for the nongray effects. The flame structure is significantly altered by considering nongray radiation and the lift-off height of the flame increases by approximately 35%, compared to the simulation without radiation. Radiation is also found to affect the evolution of coal particles considerably as it takes over as the dominant mode of heat transfer for medium-to-large coal particles downstream of the flame. To investigate the respective effects of spectral models for the gas and solid phases, a Planck-mean-based gray gas model and a size-independent gray particle model are applied in a frozen-field analysis of a steady-state snapshot of the flame. The gray gas approximation considerably underestimates the radiative source terms for both the gas phase and the solid phase. The gray coal approximation also leads to under-prediction of the particle emission and absorption. However, the level of under-prediction is not as significant as that resulting from the employment of the gray gas model. Finally, the effect of the spectral property of ash on radiation is also investigated and found to be insignificant for the present target flame. - Highlights: • A Monte Carlo–based nongray radiation solver is developed to study effects of radiation. • Radiation alters the lift-off height, and the distribution of temperature andspecies for the target flame. • Radiation alters the heat transfer mechanism of medium

  15. Application of Fly Ash from Solid Fuel Combustion in Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Hougaard

    2008-01-01

    with implementation of low-NOx combustion technologies. The present thesis concerns three areas of importance within this field: 1) testing of fly ash adsorption behavior; 2) the influence of fuel type and combustion conditions on the ash adsorption behaviour including full-scale experiments at the power plant...... has a low sensitivity toward small variations in AEA adsorption between different fly ashes and it requires further work before a finished procedure is accomplished. Finally, it was shown that changes in temperature affect both test methods. Pulverized fuel has been combusted in an entrained flow...... formation. It was found that the AEA adsorption of the fly ash was reduced up to five times compared to reference operation, when the plant was operated with minimum furnace air staging, three levels of burners instead of four and without recycled flue gas. The lower AEA requirements of the fly ash...

  16. Demonstration project: Oxy-fuel combustion at Callide-A plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, Keiji; Misawa, Nobuhiro; Kiga, Takashi; Spero, Chris

    2007-07-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion is expected to be one of the promising systems on CO2 recovery from pulverized-coal power plant, and enable the CO2 to be captured in a more cost-effective manner compared to other CO2 recover process. An Australia-Japan consortium was established in 2004 specifically for the purpose of conducting a feasibility study on the application of oxy-fuel combustion to an existing pulverized-coal power plant that is Callide-A power plant No.4 unit at 30MWe owned by CS Energy in Australia. One of the important components in this study has been the recent comparative testing of three Australian coals under both oxy-fuel and air combustion conditions using the IHI combustion test facilities. The tests have yielded a number of important outcomes including a good comparison of normal air with oxy-fuel combustion, significant reduction in NOx mass emission rates under oxy-fuel combustion. On the basis of the feasibility study, the project under Australia-Japan consortium is now under way for applying oxy-fuel combustion to an existing plant by way of demonstration. In this project, a demonstration plant of oxy-fuel combustion will be completed by the end of 2008. This project aims at recovering CO2 from an actual power plant for storage. (auth)

  17. Fuels and Combustion | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuels and Combustion Fuels and Combustion This is the March 2015 issue of the Transportation and , combustion strategy, and engine design hold the potential to maximize vehicle energy efficiency and performance of low-carbon fuels in internal combustion engines with a whole-systems approach to fuel chemistry

  18. Pulverized coal burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivy, J.L.; Rodgers, L.W.; Koslosy, J.V.; LaRue, A.D.; Kaufman, K.C.; Sarv, H.

    1998-11-03

    A burner is described having lower emissions and lower unburned fuel losses by implementing a transition zone in a low NO{sub x} burner. The improved burner includes a pulverized fuel transport nozzle surrounded by the transition zone which shields the central oxygen-lean fuel devolatilization zone from the swirling secondary combustion air. The transition zone acts as a buffer between the primary and the secondary air streams to improve the control of near-burner mixing and flame stability by providing limited recirculation regions between primary and secondary air streams. These limited recirculation regions transport evolved NO{sub x} back towards the oxygen-lean fuel pyrolysis zone for reduction to molecular nitrogen. Alternate embodiments include natural gas and fuel oil firing. 8 figs.

  19. NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM FOSSIL FUEL COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of coal combustion as a significant global source of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions was reexamined through on-line emission measurements from six pulverized-coal-fired utility boilers and from laboratory and pilot-scale combustors. The full-scale utility boilers yielded d...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL RADIATIVELY/CONDUCTIVELY STABILIZED BURNER FOR SIGNIFICANT REDUCTION OF NOx EMISSIONS AND FOR ADVANCING THE MODELING AND UNDERSTANDING OF PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION AND EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noam Lior; Stuart W. Churchill

    2003-10-01

    The primary objective of the proposed study was the study and analysis of, and design recommendations for, a novel radiatively-conductively stabilized combustion (RCSC) process for pulverized coal, which, based on our prior studies with both fluid fuels and pulverized coal, holds a high promise to reduce NO{sub x} production significantly. We have primarily engaged in continuing and improving our process modeling and analysis, obtained a large amount of quantitative information about the effects of the major parameters on NO{sub x} production, conducted an extensive exergy analysis of the process, evaluated the practicalities of employing the Radiatively-Conductively Stabilized Combustor (RCSC) to large power and heat plants, and improved the experimental facility. Prior experimental work has proven the feasibility of the combustor, but slagging during coal combustion was observed and should be dealt with. The primary outcomes and conclusions from the study are: (1) we developed a model and computer program that represents the pulverized coal combustion in the RCSC, (2) the model predicts that NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced by a number of methods, detailed in the report. (3) the exergy analysis points out at least a couple of possible ways to improve the exergetic efficiency in this combustor: increasing the effectiveness of thermal feedback, and adjusting the combustor mixture exit location, (4) because of the low coal flow rates necessitated in this study to obtain complete combustion in the burner, the size of a burner operating under the considered conditions would have to be up to an order of magnitude, larger than comparable commercial burners, but different flow configurations of the RCSC can yield higher feed rates and smaller dimensions, and should be investigated. Related to this contract, eleven papers were published in journals and conference proceedings, and ten invited presentations were given at university and research institutions, as well as at

  1. Impact of Coal Fly Ash Addition on Combustion Aerosols (PM2.5) from Full-Scale Suspension-Firing of Pulverized Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damø, Anne Juul; Wu, Hao; Frandsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    The formation of combustion aerosols was studied in an 800 MWth suspension-fired power plant boiler, during combustion of pulverized wood pellets with and without addition of coal fly ash as alkali capture additive. The aerosol particles were sampled and characterized by a low-pressure cascade im...

  2. Staged combustion - main method for suppressing nitrogen oxides in pulverized-coal fired boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R. (Vsesoyuznyi Teplotekhnicheskii Institut (USSR))

    1989-08-01

    Describes principles behind staged combustion, which is based on organizing furnace operations so that only part of the air from the fuel is taken into the furnace. The remaining air, which is needed for combustion, is fed as a tertiary blast jet into the intermediate flame zone. Following inflammation and combustion of the volatile matter, the oxygen concentration in the flame drops sharply causing a retardation of the oxidation reactions forming NO and an intensification of the reactions causing the nitrogen-containing radicals NH{sub i} and CN to be converted into N{sub 2}. When the reducing agents CO, H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} are present in certain flame zones, even the nitrogen oxide is reduced to N{sub 2}. The NO concentrations in the flame are reduced until the jet of tertiary air is introduced. Discusses with reference to practice in the USA and Western Europe how to achieve maximum effect of this method for different types of boiler and presents the results of observations of the introduction of staged combustion to the BKZ-210-140 boiler burning Kuznetsk gassy coal. 5 refs.

  3. Revised users manual, Pulverized Coal Gasification or Combustion: 2-dimensional (87-PCGC-2): Final report, Volume 2. [87-PCGC-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P.J.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S.

    1987-12-01

    A two-dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and non-reactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. Recent code revisions and additions are described. The model, referred to as 87-PCGC-2, is applicable to cylindrical axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using either a flux method or discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a Lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. Several multi-step coal devolatilization schemes are included along with a heterogeneous reaction scheme that allows for both diffusion and chemical reaction. Major gas-phase reactions are modeled assuming local instantaneous equilibrium, and thus the reaction rates are limited by the turbulent rate mixing. A NO/sub x/ finite rate chemistry submodel is included which integrates chemical kinetics and the statistics of the turbulence. The gas phase is described by elliptic partial differential equations that are solved by an iterative line-by-line technique. Under-relaxation is used to achieve numerical stability. The generalized nature of the model allows for calculation of isothermal fluid mechanicsgaseous combustion, droplet combustion, particulate combustion and various mixtures of the above, including combustion of coal-water and coal-oil slurries. Both combustion and gasification environments are permissible. User information and theory are presented, along with sample problems. 106 refs.

  4. Mercury speciation in pulverized fuel co-combustion and gasification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sable, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    Coal based power generation is a significant source of mercury emissions to the atmosphere and this has attracted huge attention in the past decade. Recently, the concerns regarding global warming and need for new energy resources introduced the concept of cofiring of biomass and waste as secondary

  5. Improvement of fuel combustion technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumanovskii, A.G.; Babii, V.I.; Enyakin, Y.P.; Kotler, V.R.; Ryabov, G.V.; Verbovetskii, E.K.; Nadyrov, I.I. [All-Russian Thermal Engineering Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-07-01

    The main problems encountered in the further development of fuel combustion technologies at thermal power stations in Russia are considered. Experience is generalized and results are presented on the efficiency with which nitrogen oxide emissions are reduced by means of technological methods when burning natural gas, fuel oil, and coal. The problems that arise in the introduction of new combustion technologies and in using more promising grades of coal are considered. The results studies are presented that show that low grade Russian coals can be burnt in circulating fluidized bed boilers. 14 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Novel approaches in advanced combustion characterization of fuels for advanced pressurized combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, M.; Haemaelaeinen, J. [VTT Energy (Finland); Joutsenoja, T. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    This project is a part of the EU Joule 2 (extension) programme. The objective of the research of Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) is to produce experimental results of the effects of pressure and other important parameters on the combustion of pulverized coals and their char derivates. The results can be utilized in modelling of pressurized combustion and in planning pilot-scale reactors. The coals to be studied are Polish hvb coal, French lignite (Gardanne), German anthracite (Niederberg) and German (Goettelbom) hvb coal. The samples are combusted in an electrically heated, pressurized entrained flow reactor (PEFR), where the experimental conditions are controlled with a high precision. The particle size of the fuel can vary between 100 and 300 {mu}m. The studied things are combustion rates, temperatures and sizes of burning single coal and char particles. The latter measurements are performed with a method developed by Tampere University of Technology, Finland. In some of the experiments, mass loss and elemental composition of the char residue are studied in more details as the function of time to find out the combustion mechanism. Combustion rate of pulverized (140-180 {mu}m) Gardanne lignite and Niederberg anthracite were measured and compared with the data obtained earlier with Polish hvb coal at various pressures, gas temperatures, oxygen partial pressures and partial pressures of carbon dioxide in the second working period. In addition, particle temperatures were measured with anthracite. The experimental results were treated with multivariable partial least squares (PLS) method to find regression equation between the measured things and the experimental variables. (author)

  7. Fuel and combustion stratification study of Partially Premixed Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Dam, N.; Somers, B.; Johansson, B.

    2016-01-01

    Relatively high levels of stratification is one of the main advantages of Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) over the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) concept. Fuel stratification smoothens heat release and improves controllability of this kind of combustion. However, the lack of a clear definition of “fuel and combustion stratifications” is obvious in literature. Hence, it is difficult to compare stratification levels of different PPC strategies or other combustion concepts. T...

  8. Combustion means for solid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, D.

    1987-09-23

    A combustion device for solid fuel, suitable for coal, coke, charcoal, coal-dust briquettes etc., comprising:- a base stand with an opening therein, an imperforate heat resistant holding board locatable to close said opening; a combustion chamber standing on the base stand with the holding board forming the base of the combustion chamber; a wiper arm pivoted for horizontal wiping movement over the upper surface of the holding board; an inlet means at a lower edge of said chamber above the base stand, and/or in a surrounding wall of said chamber, whereby combustion air may enter as exhaust gases leave the combustion chamber; an exhaust pipe for the exhaust gases; generally tubular gas-flow heat-exchange ducting putting the combustion chamber and exhaust pipe into communication; and means capable of moving the holding board into and out of the opening for removal of ash or other residue. The invention can be used for a heating system in a house or in a greenhouse or for a boiler.

  9. Combustion of wet pulverized coal in reactor flow; Combustao de particulas de carvao pulverizado contendo umidade em seu interior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Valdeci Jose [Universidade do Planalto Catarinense (UNIPLAC), Lages, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas]. E-mail: vcosta@iscc.com.br; Krioukov, Viktor [Universidade Regional do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul (UNIJUI), Ijui, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Matematica]. E-mail: krioukov@main.unijui.tche.br; Maliska, Clovis Raimundo [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: maliska@sinmec.ufsc.br

    2000-07-01

    In this work I propose a numeric study destined to the combustion of wet pulverized coal in reacting flow. The mathematical model is composed by equations for the concentration of the substances in the reacting flow, written based in the chemical kinetics and exponential form, conservation equations and devolatilization equations, combustion of the carbon and residues. The study detects fluctuation among the temperatures of the gas and of the particles. The inclusion of the humidity as constituent part of the volatile matter doesn't affect the performance of the model, however, its presence alters the temperature profiles and the gaseous composition. With the increase of the humidity in the coal have a slight reduction in the time of combustion of the particle, what agrees with experimental data. The model foresees an increment in the difference Tp-Tg and a smaller production of CO with the increase of the wetness rate. The volatile ones, in spite of they have its fraction relatively reduced with the wetness presence they are liberated more slowly with its increment, provoking change in the position of front flame. (author)

  10. Combustor nozzle for a fuel-flexible combustion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Joel Meier [Niskayuna, NY; Mosbacher, David Matthew [Cohoes, NY; Janssen, Jonathan Sebastian [Troy, NY; Iyer, Venkatraman Ananthakrishnan [Mason, OH

    2011-03-22

    A combustor nozzle is provided. The combustor nozzle includes a first fuel system configured to introduce a syngas fuel into a combustion chamber to enable lean premixed combustion within the combustion chamber and a second fuel system configured to introduce the syngas fuel, or a hydrocarbon fuel, or diluents, or combinations thereof into the combustion chamber to enable diffusion combustion within the combustion chamber.

  11. Properties of palm oil fuel ash cement sand brick containing pulverized cockle shell as partial sand replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat Aris, S.; Muthusamy, K.; Uzer, A.; Ahmad, S. Wan

    2018-04-01

    Environmental pollution caused by the disposal of solid wastes generated from both palm oil industry and cockle shell trade has motivated researches to explore the potential of these wastes. Integrating these wastes in production of construction material is one of the ways to reduce amount of waste thrown at dumping area. Thus, the present investigation investigates the performance of palm oil fuel ash (POFA) cement sand brick containing pulverized cockle shell as partial fine aggregate replacement. All mixes used contain 20% of POFA as partial cement replacement. Total of six mixes were prepared by adding a range of pulverized cockle shell that is 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% as partial sand replacement. The mixes were prepared in form of brick. All the water cured samples were tested for compressive strength and flexural strength until 28 days. Findings show that brick produced using 20% pulverized cockle shell exhibit the highest compressive strength and flexural strength also the lowest water absorption value.

  12. Aspects chimiques de la combustion du charbon pulvérisé. Première partie Chemical Aspects of the Combustion of Pulverized Coal. Part One

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Soete G. G.

    2006-11-01

    deux mécanismes totalement différents, par exemple entre le mécanisme d'ignition homogène et le mécanisme d'ignition hétérogène du charbon, avec des conséquences pratiques pour la stabilisation de la flamme industrielle ; autre exemple : la compétition entre les divers mécanismes homogènes de formation d'oxydes d'azote et les mécanismes hétérogènes de leur réduction sur des particules solides de coke, de suie et de cendre. Avec ces idées présentes comme un leitmotiv implicite, on passe en revue les grandes étapes de la flamme industrielle de charbon pulvérisé : la dévolatilisation rapide avec la formation progressive de volatils gazeux, de goudrons et de coke ; la transformation partielle des produits gazeux et liquides de pyrolyse en suies ainsi que leur oxydation en phase gazeuse ; la combustion hétérogène du coke ; l'ignition du charbon et sa dépendance par rapport à des processus critiques homogènes et (ou hétérogènes. Comme exemple typique d'un épiphénomènechimique, on suit la transformation des espèces azotées en NO et en N2, qui se greffe en contrepoint et à chaque pas sur tes différents thèmes successifs de cette symphonie de l'oxydation du charbon. En de nombreux points de cette évolution du charbon à travers la flamme, les connaissances de la chimie de com-bustion en phase gazeuse constituent un instrument utile d'interprétation (par exemple : pour l'oxydation des volatils, pour la discussion des modalités d'ignition. II n'en reste pas moins vrai que la plupart des problèmes chimiques hétérogènes sont bien spécifiques de la flamme de charbon ; leur traitement est rendu ardu à cause de la complexité, évolutive au cours de la combustion, du combustible solide lui-même. It is not easy to obtain a full picture of the multiple chemical phenomena which occur inside a pulverized coal flame. This bibliographie review attempts to give more than just a juxtaposition of data from the recent literature and risks making

  13. Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance Photo of a gasoline emissions in advanced engine technologies. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL NREL's combustion research and combustion and engine research activities include: Developing experimental and simulation research platforms

  14. Study of sodium combustion and fire extinction by pulverized substances. Role of additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuillon, Marcelline.

    1976-01-01

    A study is presented on inflammation and combustion of liquid sodium, extinction of the metal fires by comburant concentration reducing and cooling, liquid covering, powder smothering. The role of the additives is discussed. The setting up and the experimental process are given. The sodium combustion residues are analyzed. Various powder mixtures based on alkaline carbonates, NaCl-Na 2 CO 3 , NaCl-Na 2 CO 3 ,H 2 O etc... are studied. An attempt of interpretation on sodium fire extinction is presented [fr

  15. Combustion of fuels with low sintering temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalin, D

    1950-08-16

    A furnace for the combustion of low sintering temperature fuel consists of a vertical fuel shaft arranged to be charged from above and supplied with combustion air from below and containing a system of tube coils extending through the fuel bed and serving the circulation of a heat-absorbing fluid, such as water or steam. The tube-coil system has portions of different heat-absorbing capacity which are so related to the intensity of combustion in the zones of the fuel shaft in which they are located as to keep all parts of the fuel charge below sintering temperature.

  16. Fuel and combustion stratification study of Partially Premixed Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Dam, N.; Somers, B.; Johansson, B.

    2016-01-01

    Relatively high levels of stratification is one of the main advantages of Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) over the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) concept. Fuel stratification smoothens heat release and improves controllability of this kind of combustion. However, the lack of a

  17. Fuel combustion in thermal power plants in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.

    1983-11-01

    The position of black coal in the energy balance of Japan is discussed. About 75% of electric energy is produced by thermal power plants. Eighty-five per cent of electricity is produced by power plants fired with liquid fuels and 3% by coal fired plants. Coal production in Japan, the forecast coal import to the country by 1990 (132 Mt/year), proportion of coal imported from various countries, chemical and physical properties of coal from Australia, China and Japan are discussed. Coal classification used in Japan is evaluated. The following topics associated with coal combustion in fossil-fuel power plants in Japan are discussed: coal grindability, types of pulverizing systems, slagging properties of boiler fuel in Japan, systems for slag removal, main types of steam boilers and coal fired furnaces, burner arrangement and design, air pollution control from fly ash, sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides, utilization of fly ash for cement production, methods for removal of nitrogen oxides from flue gas using ammonia and catalysts or ammonia without catalysts, efficiency of nitrogen oxide control, abatement of nitrogen oxide emission from boilers by flue gas recirculation and reducing combustion temperatures. The results of research into air pollution control carried out by the Nagasaki Technical Institute are reviewed.

  18. Pyrite thermochemistry, ash agglomeration, and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akan-Etuk, A.; Diaz, R.; Niksa, S.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of the present work is to introduce an experimental program that will eventually lead to time-resolved iron ash composition over the technological operating domain. The preceding literature survey suggests two important stipulations on any such experimental program. The first stipulation is that good control must be established over the operating conditions, to accurately quantify their effects. The other is that data must be obtained rapidly, to thoroughly cover the important operating domain. This work presents a series of studies that has characterized the desulfurization of pyrite during the early stages of combustion. An experimental system was established and used to monitor the effects of oxygen, temperature, and residence time on the evolution of condensed phase products of the combustion of pure pyrite. (VC)

  19. Pyrite thermochemistry, ash agglomeration, and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akan-Etuk, A.; Diaz, R.; Niksa, S.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of the present work is to introduce an experimental program that will eventually lead to time-resolved iron ash composition over the technological operating domain. The preceding literature survey suggests two important stipulations on any such experimental program. The first stipulation is that good control must be established over the operating conditions, to accurately quantify their effects. The other is that data must be obtained rapidly, to thoroughly cover the important operating domain. This work presents a series of studies that has characterized the desulfurization of pyrite during the early stages of combustion. An experimental system was established and used to monitor the effects of oxygen, temperature, and residence time on the evolution of condensed phase products of the combustion of pure pyrite. (VC)

  20. Chlorine in solid fuels fired in pulverized fuel boilers sources, forms, reactions, and consequences: a literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Tillman; Dao Duong; Bruce Miller [Foster Wheeler North America Corp. (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Chlorine is a significant source of corrosion and deposition, both from coal and from biomass, and in PF boilers. This investigation was designed to highlight the potential for corrosion risks associated with once-through units and advanced cycles. The research took the form of a detailed literature investigation to evaluate chlorine in solid fuels: coals of various ranks and origins, biomass fuels of a variety of types, petroleum cokes, and blends of the above. The investigation focused upon an extensive literature review of documents dating back to 1991. The focus is strictly corrosion and deposition. To address the deposition and corrosion issues, this review evaluates the following considerations: concentrations of chlorine in available solid fuels including various coals and biomass fuels, forms of chlorine in those fuels, and reactions - including reactivities - of chlorine in such fuels. The assessment includes consideration of alkali metals and alkali earth elements as they react with, and to, the chlorine and other elements (e.g., sulfur) in the fuel and in the gaseous products of combustion. The assessment also includes other factors of combustion: for example, combustion conditions including excess O{sub 2} and combustion temperatures. It also considers analyses conducted at all levels: theoretical calculations, bench scale laboratory data and experiments, pilot plant experiments, and full scale plant experience. Case studies and plant surveys form a significant consideration in this review. The result of this investigation focuses upon the concentrations of chlorine acceptable in coals burned exclusively, in coals burned with biomass, and in biomass cofired with coal. Values are posited based upon type of fuel and combustion technology. Values are also posited based upon both first principles and field experience. 86 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Quality and environmental aspects in relation to the application of pulverized fuel ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, J.W. van den

    1991-01-01

    In the Netherlands pulverised coal from different parts of the world is used in 5 coalfired power stations which each have 1 to 3 boilers, which in turn are equipped with various types of burners. This causes a large variation in the composition of the pulverized fuel ash (PFA). The PFA is marketed in several areas, each of which has its own specific quality requirements. These requirements are partially dictated in standard specifications. In order to obtain insight into the quality of the PFA, samples are taken and analysed daily. Rules for certification, concerning the quality and the quality control of PFA for use in concrete in The Netherlands have been agreed upon. The environmental aspects in relation to the application of PFA concern the working conditions and health aspects during processing and the environmental impact when PFA is used as a building material. The Dutch legislation concerning the environmental consequences of the application of PFA and other secondary materials is currently under review. 3 tabs

  2. Soil and fertilizer amendments and edge effects on the floral succession of pulverized fuel ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, P. [Roehampton University, London (United Kingdom). Whitelands College

    2009-01-15

    Plots of fresh pulverized fuel ash (PFA, an industrial waste) were inoculated with soils from existing PFA sites and fertilizers in a factorial design, then left unmanaged for 12 years during which time the floral development and soil chemistry were monitored annually. For the first 3 years, the site supported a sparse mix of chenopods (including the scarce Chenopodium glaucum) and halophytes. As salinity declined, ruderals, legumes, and grasses plus the fire-site moss Funaria hygrometrica colonized, followed by Festuca arundinacea grassland (NVC community MG12) and Hippophae rhamnoides scrub. Dactylorhiza incarnata (orchidacea) appeared after 7 years, but only in plots that had received soil from existing orchid colonies. Four years later, a larger second generation of Dactylorhiza appeared, but only in the central zone of the site where vegetation was thinnest. By year 12, the site was dominated by coarse grasses and scrub, with early successional species persisting only in the sparsely vegetated center, where nitrate levels were lowest. This edge effect is interpreted as centripetal encroachment, a process of potentially wider concern for the conservation of low-fertility habitat patches. Overall, seed bank inoculation seems to have introduced few but desirable species (D. incarnata, Pyrola rotundifolia, some halophytes, and annuals), whereas initial application of organic fertilizer had long-lasting ({ge} 10 years) effects on cover and soil composition.

  3. Waste plastics as supplemental fuel in the blast furnace process: improving combustion efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongsu; Shin, Sunghye; Sohn, Seungman; Choi, Jinshik; Ban, Bongchan

    2002-10-14

    The possibility of using waste plastics as a source of secondary fuel in a blast furnace has been of recent interest. The success of this process, however, will be critically dependent upon the optimization of operating systems. For instance, the supply of waste plastics must be reliable as well as economically attractive compared with conventional secondary fuels such as heavy oil, natural gas and pulverized coal. In this work, we put special importance on the improvement of the combustibility of waste plastics as a way to enhance energy efficiency in a blast furnace. As experimental variables to approach this target, the effects of plastic particle size, blast temperature, and the level of oxygen enrichment were investigated using a custom-made blast model designed to simulate a real furnace. Lastly, the combustion efficiency of the mixture of waste plastics and pulverized coal was tested. The observations made from these experiments led us to the conclusion that with the increase of both blast temperature and the level of oxygen enrichment, and with a decrease in particle size, the combustibility of waste polyethylene could be improved at a given distance from the tuyere. Also it was found that the efficiency of coal combustion decreased with the addition of plastics; however, the combustion efficiency of mixture could be comparable at a longer distance from the tuyere.

  4. The effect of char structure on burnout during pulverized coal combustion at pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, G.; Wu, H.; Benfell, K.E.; Lucas, J.A.; Wall, T.F.

    1999-07-01

    An Australian bituminous coal sample was burnt in a drop tube furnace (DTF) at 1 atm and a pressurized drop tube furnace (PDTF) at 15 atm. The char samples were collected at different burnout levels, and a scanning electron microscope was used to examine the structures of chars. A model was developed to predict the burnout of char particles with different structures. The model accounts for combustion of the thin-walled structure of cenospheric char and its fragmentation during burnout. The effect of pressure on reaction rate was also considered in the model. As a result, approximately 40% and 70% cenospheric char particles were observed in the char samples collected after coal pyrolysis in the DTF and PDTF respectively. A large number of fine particles (< 30 mm) were observed in the 1 atm char samples at burnout levels between 30% and 50%, which suggests that significant fragmentation occurred during early combustion. Ash particle size distributions show that a large number of small ash particles formed during burnout at high pressure. The time needed for 70% char burnout at 15 atm is approximately 1.6 times that at 1 atm under the same temperature and gas environment conditions, which is attributed to the different pressures as well as char structures. The overall reaction rate for cenospheric char was predicted to be approximately 2 times that of the dense chars, which is consistent with previous experimental results. The predicted char burnout including char structures agrees reasonably well with the experimental measurements that were obtained at 1 atm and 15 atm pressures.

  5. Use of combustible wastes as fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.; Salamov, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    Achievements of science and technology in creating and using units for combustion of wastes with recovery of heat of the escaping gases has been systematized and generalized. Scales and outlooks are examined for the use of general, industrial and agricultural waste as fuel, composition of the waste, questions of planning and operating units for combustion of solid refuse, settling of waste water and industrial and agricultural waste. Questions are covered for preparing them for combustion use in special units with recovery of heat and at ES, aspects of environmental protection during combustion of waste, cost indicators of the employed methods of recovering the combustible waste.

  6. Fundamental study of the pulverized coal char combustion in oxyfuel mode with drop tube furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Takamasa; Takafuji, Makoto; Suda, Toshiyuki; Fujimori, Toshiro [Heat and Fluid Dynamics Department, Yokohama (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    The combustion characteristics of coal char particles in either O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} or O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} conditions were experimentally investigated. Especially, the char burnout, the char particle temperature and the shrinkage of the char particles were discussed. A Drop Tube Furnace (DTF: whose wall temperature was set at 873, 923 and 973 K) was used as the experimental apparatus. The experimental results revealed that, in equivalent oxygen concentration, the char burnout and the char particle temperature were higher in O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} conditions than those in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} conditions. The shrinkage of the char particle did not show the large difference in either O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} or O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} conditions. Up to 15% of char burnout, the char particle diameters were reduced gradually. Up to 80% of char burnout, the char particle diameters were not changed. This is supposed that the chemical reaction is mainly occurred not on the external surface but on the internal surface of the char particle. Over 80% of char burnout, sudden shrinkage could be seen. Finally, an empirical equation for the prediction of the char particle shrinkage was introduced. Further investigation is required in high operating temperature, where CO{sub 2} gasification may have a large influence on the char burnout.

  7. Combustion of pulverized coal in vortex structures. Final report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gollahalli, S.R.; Butuk, N.

    1996-03-01

    The objectives of the project were: (i) to understand the effects of heating one of the streams on the characteristics of shear layers, (ii) to investigate the changes in the characteristics of large scale vortex structures in the shear layer caused by the introduction of inert solid particles in one of the feed streams; (iii) to understand the effects of pyrolyzing solids on the shear layer behavior; and (iv) to study the effects of combustion of particles and their pyrolysis products on the shear layer structure, heat release rate, and pollutant emission characteristics. An experimental facility for generating two-dimensional shear layers containing vortex structures has been designed and fabricated. The experimental facility is essentially a low speed wind tunnel designed to (i) provide two gas streams, initially with uniform velocity profiles and isotropic turbulence, mixing at the end of a splitter plate, (ii) introduce vorticity by passively perturbing one of the streams, (iii) allow heating of one of the streams to temperatures high enough to cause pyrolysis of coal particles, and (iv) provide a natural gas flame in one of the streams to result in ignition and burning of coal particles.

  8. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2013-12-31

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  9. Fuel and Additive Characterization for HCCI Combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Pitz, W J; Dibble, R

    2003-01-01

    This paper shows a numerical evaluation of fuels and additives for HCCl combustion. First, a long list of candidate HCCl fuels is selected. For all the fuels in the list, operating conditions (compression ratio, equivalence ratio and intake temperature) are determined that result in optimum performance under typical operation for a heavy-duty engine. Fuels are also characterized by presenting Log(p)-Log(T) maps for multiple fuels under HCCl conditions. Log(p)-Log(T) maps illustrate important processes during HCCl engine operation, including compression, low temperature heat release and ignition. Log(p)-Log(T) diagrams can be used for visualizing these processes and can be used as a tool for detailed analysis of HCCl combustion. The paper also includes a ranking of many potential additives. Experiments and analyses have indicated that small amounts (a few parts per million) of secondary fuels (additives) may considerably affect HCCl combustion and may play a significant role in controlling HCCl combustion. Additives are ranked according to their capability to advance HCCl ignition. The best additives are listed and an explanation of their effect on HCCl combustion is included

  10. Hexaaluminate Combustion Catalysts for Fuel Cell Fuel Reformers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas, Fred S; Campbell, Timothy J; Shaaban, Aly H; Binder, Michael J; Holcomb, Frank H; Knight, James

    2004-01-01

    .... When heat is produced by combustion of logistics fuel in an open-flame or radiant burner, the rate of hydrogen production in the steam reforming reactor is generally limited by the rate of heat transfer from the burner...

  11. Fuel injection apparatus for internal combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, H; Kobayashi, H; Nagata, S

    1975-01-07

    A fuel injection apparatus for a rapid cut of fuel supply to internal combustion engines during deceleration is described. The fuel cut is achieved by an electromagnetic switch. The number of engine revolutions are determined by the movement of cam shafts, and one of the cam shafts is made of electroconductive and nonconductive materials which generate an intermittent electrical signal to the magnetic switch. The device can cut the fuel in any deceleration condition, therefore it is more advantageous than fuel injection utilizing the intake load variation which can operate only under certain deceleration conditions.

  12. IEA combustion agreement : a collaborative task on alternative fuels in combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larmi, M.

    2009-01-01

    The focus of the alternative fuels in combustion task of the International Energy Agency is on high efficiency engine combustion, furnace combustion, and combustion chemistry. The objectives of the task are to develop optimum combustion for dedicated fuels by fully utilizing the physical and chemical properties of synthetic and renewable fuels; a significant reduction in carbon dioxide, NOx and particulate matter emissions; determine the minimum emission levels for dedicated fuels; and meet future emission standards of engines without or with minimum after-treatment. This presentation discussed the alternative fuels task and addressed issues such as synthetic fuel properties and benefits. The anticipated future roadmap was presented along with a list of the synthetic and renewable engine fuels to be studied, such as neat oxygenates like alcohols and ethers, biogas/methane and gas combustion, fuel blends, dual fuel combustion, high cetane number diesel fuels like synthetic Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel and hydrogenated vegetable oil, and low CN number fuels. Implementation examples were also discussed, such as fuel spray studies in optical spray bombs; combustion research in optical engines and combustion chambers; studies on reaction kinetics of combustion and emission formation; studies on fuel properties and ignition behaviour; combustion studies on research engines; combustion optimization; implementing the optimum combustion in research engines; and emission measurements. Overall milestone examples and the overall schedule of participating countries were also presented. figs.

  13. CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND CLB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thein; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan; Senthil Arumugam; Kevin Heflin

    2003-08-28

    Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain-diet diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. The manure could be used as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in an existing coal suspension fired combustion systems. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Reburn is a process where a small percentage of fuel called reburn fuel is injected above the NO{sub x} producing, conventional coal fired burners in order to reduce NO{sub x}. The manure could also be used as reburn fuel for reducing NO{sub x} in coal fired plants. An alternate approach of using animal waste is to adopt the gasification process using a fixed bed gasifier and then use the gases for firing in gas turbine combustors. In this report, the cattle manure is referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) and chicken manure as litter biomass (LB). The report generates data on FB and LB fuel characteristics. Co-firing, reburn, and gasification tests of coal, FB, LB, coal: FB blends, and coal: LB blends and modeling on cofiring, reburn systems and economics of use of FB and LB have also been conducted. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, lower in heat content, higher in moisture, and higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution) compared to coal. Small-scale cofiring experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} emissions will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. Further experiments showed that biomass is twice or more effective than coal when

  14. CO-FIRING COAL, FEEDLOT, AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND LFB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thien; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan

    2002-01-01

    Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. In this project a co-firing technology is proposed which would use manure that cannot be used for fertilizer, for power generation. Since the animal manure has economic uses as both a fertilizer and as a fuel, it is properly referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) for cow manure, or litter biomass (LB) for chicken manure. The biomass will be used a as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in existing coal fired combustion devices. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Therefore, it is the goal of the current research to develop an animal biomass cofiring technology. A cofiring technology is being developed by performing: (1) studies on fundamental fuel characteristics, (2) small scale boiler burner experiments, (3) gasifier experiments, (4) computer simulations, and (5) an economic analysis. The fundamental fuel studies reveal that biomass is not as high a quality fuel as coal. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, higher in moisture, higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution), and lower in heat content than coal. Additionally, experiments indicate that the biomass fuels have higher gas content, release gases more readily than coal, and less homogeneous. Small-scale boiler experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO(sub x) pollutant emissions produced will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. This is a surprising

  15. CO-FIRING COAL, FEEDLOT, AND LITTER BIOMASS (CFB AND LFB) FUELS IN PULVERIZED FUEL AND FIXED BED BURNERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyan Annamalai; John Sweeten; Saqib Mukhtar; Ben Thien; Gengsheng Wei; Soyuz Priyadarsan

    2002-01-15

    Intensive animal feeding operations create large amounts of animal waste that must be safely disposed of in order to avoid environmental degradation. Cattle feedlots and chicken houses are two examples. In feedlots, cattle are confined to small pens and fed a high calorie grain diet in preparation for slaughter. In chicken houses, thousands of chickens are kept in close proximity. In both of these operations, millions of tons of manure are produced every year. In this project a co-firing technology is proposed which would use manure that cannot be used for fertilizer, for power generation. Since the animal manure has economic uses as both a fertilizer and as a fuel, it is properly referred to as feedlot biomass (FB) for cow manure, or litter biomass (LB) for chicken manure. The biomass will be used a as a fuel by mixing it with coal in a 90:10 blend and firing it in existing coal fired combustion devices. This technique is known as co-firing, and the high temperatures produced by the coal will allow the biomass to be completely combusted. Therefore, it is the goal of the current research to develop an animal biomass cofiring technology. A cofiring technology is being developed by performing: (1) studies on fundamental fuel characteristics, (2) small scale boiler burner experiments, (3) gasifier experiments, (4) computer simulations, and (5) an economic analysis. The fundamental fuel studies reveal that biomass is not as high a quality fuel as coal. The biomass fuels are higher in ash, higher in moisture, higher in nitrogen and sulfur (which can cause air pollution), and lower in heat content than coal. Additionally, experiments indicate that the biomass fuels have higher gas content, release gases more readily than coal, and less homogeneous. Small-scale boiler experiments revealed that the biomass blends can be successfully fired, and NO{sub x} pollutant emissions produced will be similar to or lower than pollutant emissions when firing coal. This is a surprising

  16. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Effect of Coal Rank on Burn-off Time in Pulverized Coal Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Nozawa, Sohei; Wada, Nozomi; Matsushita, Yosuke; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Omori, Motohira; Harada, Tatsuro

    2012-01-01

    Thermogravimetry (TG) for two different coal ranks, Loy Yang coal and Newlands coal, was carried out in an atmospheric air environment. Detailed parameters of the heterogeneous oxidation reaction for each coal rank were estimated by analyzing the TG results. Heat and mass transfer of a single pulverized coal particle that was heated at a constant temperature were numerically simulated. In this calculation, the decrease in the mass ratio caused by the oxidation reaction was considered. The num...

  17. Plutonium, nuclear fuel; Le plutonium, combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grison, E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay aux Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Saclay

    1960-07-01

    A review of the physical properties of metallic plutonium, its preparation, and the alloys which it forms with the main nuclear metals. Appreciation of its future as a nuclear fuel. (author) [French] Apercu sur les proprietes physiques du plutonium metallique, sa preparation, ses alliages avec les principaux metaux nucleaires. Consideration sur son avenir en tant que combustible nucleaire. (auteur)

  18. 30 CFR 56.4103 - Fueling internal combustion engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fueling internal combustion engines. 56.4103... Prevention and Control Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 56.4103 Fueling internal combustion engines. Internal combustion engines shall be switched off before refueling if the fuel tanks are integral parts of...

  19. 30 CFR 57.4103 - Fueling internal combustion engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fueling internal combustion engines. 57.4103... Prevention and Control Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4103 Fueling internal combustion engines. Internal combustion engines shall be switched off before refueling if the fuel tanks are integral parts of...

  20. Pressing device for producing compacts from source material in powder form in particular pulverized nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, G.; Adelmann, M.; Konigs, W.; Wendorf, W.

    1984-01-01

    Pressing device for producing compacts from source material in powder form, in particular pulverized nuclear reactor fuel having a die-plate contained in platen and a bore associated with a ram, for receiving source material powder, a filling shoe, and a reservoir for powder connected by a hose to the filling shoe. The device is characterized by a passing wheel in the filling shoe as filling aid means; a tube containing a feedscrew disposed between the reservoir and hose as metering means; the reservoir having a bottom part with a can type place-on part with an opening eccentric to the axis; a coupling part and a cover part are placed on the open part of the can, these parts are also provided with a passageway to the feedscrew eccentric to the longitudinal axis

  1. Combustion aerosols from potassium-containing fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balzer Nielsen, Lars

    1998-01-01

    The scope of the work presented in this thesis is the formation and evolution of aerosol particles in the submicron range during combustion processes, in particular where biomass is used alone or co-fired with coal. An introduction to the formation processes of fly ash in general and submicron aerosol in particular during combustion is presented, along with some known problems related to combustion of biomass for power generation. The work falls in two parts. The first is the design of a laboratory setup for investigation of homogeneous nucleation and particle dynamics at high temperature. The central unit of the setup is a laminar flow aerosol condenser (LFAC), which essentially is a 173 cm long tubular furnace with an externally cooled wall. A mathematical model is presented which describes the formation and evolution of the aerosol in the LFAC, where the rate of formation of new nuclei is calculated using the so-called classical theory. The model includes mass and energy conservation equations and an expression for the description of particle growth by diffusion. The resulting set of nonlinear second-order partial differential equations are solved numerically using the method of orthogonal collocation. The model is implemented in the FORTRAN code MONAERO. The second part of this thesis describes a comprehensive investigation of submicron aerosol formation during co-firing of coal and straw carried out at a 380 MW Th pulverized coal unit at Studstrup Power Plant, Aarhus. Three types of coal are used, and total boiler load and straw input is varied systematically. Straw contains large amounts of potassium, which is released during combustion. Submicron aerosol is sampled between the two banks of the economizer at a flue gas temperature of 350 deg. C using a novel ejector probe. The aerosol is characterized using the SMPS system and a Berner-type low pressure impactor. The chemical composition of the particles collected in the impactor is determined using chemical

  2. Combustion aerosols from potassium-containing fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balzer Nielsen, Lars

    1999-12-31

    The scope of the work presented in this thesis is the formation and evolution of aerosol particles in the submicron range during combustion processes, in particular where biomass is used alone or co-fired with coal. An introduction to the formation processes of fly ash in general and submicron aerosol in particular during combustion is presented, along with some known problems related to combustion of biomass for power generation. The work falls in two parts. The first is the design of a laboratory setup for investigation of homogeneous nucleation and particle dynamics at high temperature. The central unit of the setup is a laminar flow aerosol condenser (LFAC), which essentially is a 173 cm long tubular furnace with an externally cooled wall. A mathematical model is presented which describes the formation and evolution of the aerosol in the LFAC, where the rate of formation of new nuclei is calculated using the so-called classical theory. The model includes mass and energy conservation equations and an expression for the description of particle growth by diffusion. The resulting set of nonlinear second-order partial differential equations are solved numerically using the method of orthogonal collocation. The model is implemented in the FORTRAN code MONAERO. The second part of this thesis describes a comprehensive investigation of submicron aerosol formation during co-firing of coal and straw carried out at a 380 MW{sub Th} pulverized coal unit at Studstrup Power Plant, Aarhus. Three types of coal are used, and total boiler load and straw input is varied systematically. Straw contains large amounts of potassium, which is released during combustion. Submicron aerosol is sampled between the two banks of the economizer at a flue gas temperature of 350 deg. C using a novel ejector probe. The aerosol is characterized using the SMPS system and a Berner-type low pressure impactor. The chemical composition of the particles collected in the impactor is determined using

  3. Combustion aerosols from potassium-containing fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balzer Nielsen, Lars

    1998-12-31

    The scope of the work presented in this thesis is the formation and evolution of aerosol particles in the submicron range during combustion processes, in particular where biomass is used alone or co-fired with coal. An introduction to the formation processes of fly ash in general and submicron aerosol in particular during combustion is presented, along with some known problems related to combustion of biomass for power generation. The work falls in two parts. The first is the design of a laboratory setup for investigation of homogeneous nucleation and particle dynamics at high temperature. The central unit of the setup is a laminar flow aerosol condenser (LFAC), which essentially is a 173 cm long tubular furnace with an externally cooled wall. A mathematical model is presented which describes the formation and evolution of the aerosol in the LFAC, where the rate of formation of new nuclei is calculated using the so-called classical theory. The model includes mass and energy conservation equations and an expression for the description of particle growth by diffusion. The resulting set of nonlinear second-order partial differential equations are solved numerically using the method of orthogonal collocation. The model is implemented in the FORTRAN code MONAERO. The second part of this thesis describes a comprehensive investigation of submicron aerosol formation during co-firing of coal and straw carried out at a 380 MW{sub Th} pulverized coal unit at Studstrup Power Plant, Aarhus. Three types of coal are used, and total boiler load and straw input is varied systematically. Straw contains large amounts of potassium, which is released during combustion. Submicron aerosol is sampled between the two banks of the economizer at a flue gas temperature of 350 deg. C using a novel ejector probe. The aerosol is characterized using the SMPS system and a Berner-type low pressure impactor. The chemical composition of the particles collected in the impactor is determined using

  4. New fossil fuel combustion technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minghetti, E.; Palazzi, G.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present article is to supply general information concerning fossil fuels that represent, today and for the near future, the main energy source of our Planet. New fossil fuel technologies are in continual development with two principal goals: to decrease environmental impact and increase transformation process efficiency. Examples of this efforts are: 1) gas-steam combined cycles integrated with coal gasification plants, or with pressurized-fluidized-bed combustors; 2) new cycles with humid air or coal direct fired turbine, now under development. In the first part of this article the international and national energy situations and trends are shown. After some brief notes on environmental problems and alternative fuels, such as bio masses and municipal wastes, technological aspects, mainly relevant to increase fossil-fueled power plant performances, are examined in greater depth. Finally the research and technological development activities of ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment) Engineering Branch, in order to improve fossil fuels energy and environmental use are presented

  5. Low emission turbulent technology for fuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finker, F. Z.; Kubyshkin, I. B.; Zakharov, B. Yu.; Akhmedov, D. B.; Sobchuk, Ch.

    1997-01-01

    The company 'POLITEKHENERGO' in co-operation and the Russian-Poland firm 'EnergoVIR' have performed investigations for modernization of the current existing boilers. A low emission turbulent technology has been used for the modernization of 10 industrial boilers. The reduction of NO x emissions is based on the following processes: 1) multistage combustion assured by two counter-deviated fluxes; 2) Some of the combustion facilities have an abrupt slope and a reduced air supply which leads to an intense separation of the fuel in the bottom part and a creation of a low-temperature combustion zone where the active restoration of the NO x takes part; 3) The influence of the top high-temperature zone on the NO x formation is small. Thus the 'sandwich' consisting of 'cold' and'hot' combustion layers provides a full rate combustion. This technique permits to: decrease of the NO x and CO x down to the European standard values;increase of the efficiency in 1-2%; obtain a stable coal combustion up to 97-98%; assure the large loading range (30 -100%); modernize and use the old boilers

  6. Control issues in oxy-fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snarheim, Dagfinn

    2009-08-15

    Combustion of fossil fuels is the major energy source in todays society. While the use of fossil fuels is a necessity for our society to function, there has been an increasing concern on the emissions of CO{sub 2} resulting from human activities. Emissions of CO{sub 2} are considered to be the main cause for the global warming and climate changes we have experienced in recent years. To fight the climate changes, the emissions of CO{sub 2} must be reduced in a timely fashion. Strategies to achieve this include switching to less carbon intensive fuels, renewable energy sources, nuclear energy and combustion with CO{sub 2} capture. The use of oxy-fuel combustion is among the alternative post- and pre combustion capture concepts, a strategy to achieve power production from fossil fuels with CO{sub 2} capture. In an oxy-fuel process, the fuel is burned in a mixture of oxygen and CO{sub 2} (or steam), leaving the exhaust consisting mainly of CO{sub 2} and steam. The steam can be removed by use of a condenser, leaving (almost) pure CO{sub 2} ready to be captured. The downside to CO{sub 2} capture is that it is expensive, both in capital cost of extra equipment, and in operation as it costs energy to capture the CO{sub 2}. Thus it is important to maximize the efficiency in such plants. One attractive concept to achieve CO{sub 2} capture by use of oxy-fuel, is a semi-closed oxy-fuel gas turbine cycle. The dynamics of such a plant are highly integrated, involving energy and mass recycle, and optimizing efficiency might lead to operational (control) challenges. In these thesis we investigate how such a power cycle should be controlled. By looking at control at such an early stage in the design phase, it is possible to find control solutions otherwise not feasible, that leads to better overall performance. Optimization is used on a nonlinear model based on first principles, to compare different control structures. Then, closed loop simulations using MPC, are used to validate

  7. Steam-moderated oxy-fuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seepana, Sivaji; Jayanti, Sreenivas

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to propose a new variant of the oxy-fuel combustion for carbondioxide (CO 2 ) sequestration in which steam is used to moderate the flame temperature. In this process, pure oxygen is mixed with steam and the resulting oxidant mixture is sent to the boiler for combustion with a fossil fuel. The advantage of this method is that flue gas recirculation is avoided and the volumetric flow rates through the boiler and auxiliary components is reduced by about 39% when compared to the conventional air-fired coal combustion power plant leading to a reduction in the size of the boiler. The flue gas, after condensation of steam, consists primarily of CO 2 and can be sent directly for compression and sequestration. Flame structure analysis has been carried out using a 325-step reaction mechanism of methane-oxidant combustion to determine the concentration of oxygen required to ensure a stable flame. Thermodynamic exergy analysis has also been carried out on SMOC-operated CO 2 sequestration power plant and air-fired power plant, which shows that though the gross efficiency increases the absolute power penalty of ∼8% for CO 2 sequestration when compared to air-fired power plant.

  8. Steam-moderated oxy-fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seepana, Sivaji; Jayanti, Sreenivas [Department of Chemical Engineering, IIT Madras, Adyar, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2010-10-15

    The objective of the present paper is to propose a new variant of the oxy-fuel combustion for carbondioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in which steam is used to moderate the flame temperature. In this process, pure oxygen is mixed with steam and the resulting oxidant mixture is sent to the boiler for combustion with a fossil fuel. The advantage of this method is that flue gas recirculation is avoided and the volumetric flow rates through the boiler and auxiliary components is reduced by about 39% when compared to the conventional air-fired coal combustion power plant leading to a reduction in the size of the boiler. The flue gas, after condensation of steam, consists primarily of CO{sub 2} and can be sent directly for compression and sequestration. Flame structure analysis has been carried out using a 325-step reaction mechanism of methane-oxidant combustion to determine the concentration of oxygen required to ensure a stable flame. Thermodynamic exergy analysis has also been carried out on SMOC-operated CO{sub 2} sequestration power plant and air-fired power plant, which shows that though the gross efficiency increases the absolute power penalty of {proportional_to}8% for CO{sub 2} sequestration when compared to air-fired power plant. (author)

  9. DRUCKFLAMM - Investigation on combustion and hot gas cleanup in pulverized coal combustion systems. Final report; DRUCKFLAMM - Untersuchungen zur Verbrennung und Heissgasreinigung bei der Druckkohlenstaubfeuerung. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, K.R.G.; Benoehr, A.; Schuermann, H.; Stroehle, J.; Klaiber, C.; Kuhn, R.; Maier, J.; Schnell, U.; Unterberger, S.

    2001-07-01

    The ambitions of making energy supply more efficient and less polluting brought forth the development of coal based combined cycle power plants allowing considerable increases in net efficiencies. One of the regarded firing concepts for a coal based combined cycle power plant is represented by the pressurised pulverised coal combustion process which has the highest efficiency potential compared with the other coal based concepts. The fundamental purpose of the project was to gain firm knowledge concerning firing behaviour of coal in a pressurised pulverised coal combustion system. Detailed investigations were carried out in a pressurised entrained flow reactor taking into account fuel conversion and particle behaviour, pollutant formation and material behaviour under conditions of a pressurised pulverised coal firing. During the project's investigations several different measurement techniques were tested and partially also acquired (e.g. a two-colour-pyrometry system to measure simultaneous particle surface temperature and particle diameter of burning fuel particles). Calculation models under pressurised conditions for pressure vessel simulation and better scale-up were developed synchronously with the experimental investigations. The results gained using the pressurised entrained flow reactor show that many combustion mechanisms are influenced by increased pressure, for instance the fuel conversion is intensified and at the same time pollutant emissions decreased. The material investigations show that the ceramic materials used due to the very high combustion temperatures are very sensitive versus slagging and fast temperature changes, therefore further development requirements are needed to fully realise the high durability of ceramics in the pressurised furnace. Concerning the improvement of existing models for furnace simulation under pressurised conditions, a good resemblance can be observed when considering the actual measurement results from the test

  10. Pulverizing Portraits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elias, Camelia

    Pulverizing Portraits provides the first book-length study of contemporary American poet Lynn Emanuel. Emanuel's poetry is significant because it situates itself in relation to current debates about the state of poetry, creative writing in the academia, and the importance of drawing on interdisci......Pulverizing Portraits provides the first book-length study of contemporary American poet Lynn Emanuel. Emanuel's poetry is significant because it situates itself in relation to current debates about the state of poetry, creative writing in the academia, and the importance of drawing...... been increasingly concerned with poetry as a tool for cultural criticism which constantly redefines our poetic discourse. Elias traces the power of Emanuel's writing and looks at her subtleties in combining intrinsic and formal constraints in poetry with extrinsic and socio-historical methodologies...

  11. 30 CFR 77.1105 - Internal combustion engines; fueling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Internal combustion engines; fueling. 77.1105 Section 77.1105 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... COAL MINES Fire Protection § 77.1105 Internal combustion engines; fueling. Internal combustion engines...

  12. Ash liberation from included minerals during combustion of pulverized coal: the relationship with char structure and burnout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, H.; Wall, T.; Liu, G.; Bryant, G. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia). CRC for Black Coal Utilization and Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-12-01

    In this study, the float fraction ({lt} specific gravity of 2.0) of a size cut (63-90 {mu}m) bituminous coal was combusted in a drop tube furnace (DTF) at a gas temperature of 1300{degree}C under an atmosphere of air, to investigate the ash liberation at five coal burnoff levels (35.5%, 54.3%, 70.1%, 87.1% and 95.6%). The data indicated that char structure determines the ash liberation at different burnoff levels. Fragmentation of porous char was found to be the determinative mechanism for formation of fine ash during the early and middle stages of char combustion, while coalescence of included mineral matter determines the coarse ash formed in the later stages of combustion. The investigation confirmed that the char morphology and structure play a key role in determining char fragmentation, char burnout history, and the ash liberation during combustion. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Advancing the Limits of Dual Fuel Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenigsson, Fredrik

    2012-07-01

    There is a growing interest in alternative transport fuels. There are two underlying reasons for this interest; the desire to decrease the environmental impact of transports and the need to compensate for the declining availability of petroleum. In the light of both these factors the Diesel Dual Fuel, DDF, engine is an attractive concept. The primary fuel of the DDF engine is methane, which can be derived both from renewables and from fossil sources. Methane from organic waste; commonly referred to as biomethane, can provide a reduction in greenhouse gases unmatched by any other fuel. The DDF engine is from a combustion point of view a hybrid between the diesel and the otto engine and it shares characteristics with both. This work identifies the main challenges of DDF operation and suggests methods to overcome them. Injector tip temperature and pre-ignitions have been found to limit performance in addition to the restrictions known from literature such as knock and emissions of NO{sub x} and HC. HC emissions are especially challenging at light load where throttling is required to promote flame propagation. For this reason it is desired to increase the lean limit in the light load range in order to reduce pumping losses and increase efficiency. It is shown that the best results in this area are achieved by using early diesel injection to achieve HCCI/RCCI combustion where combustion phasing is controlled by the ratio between diesel and methane. However, even without committing to HCCI/RCCI combustion and the difficult control issues associated with it, substantial gains are accomplished by splitting the diesel injection into two and allocating most of the diesel fuel to the early injection. HCCI/RCCI and PPCI combustion can be used with great effect to reduce the emissions of unburned hydrocarbons at light load. At high load, the challenges that need to be overcome are mostly related to heat. Injector tip temperatures need to be observed since the cooling effect of

  14. Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

    2013-12-17

    A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

  15. Experimental Study of Liquid Fuel Spray Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westlye, Fredrik Ree

    the specific physical quantities needed in CFD validation of these types of flames. This work is a testament to that fact. The first part of this thesis is an extensive study of optical combustion diagnostics applied to complex transient sprayflames in a high temperature and pressure environment...... by the Danish Council for Strategic Research. Other supporters of the project have been MAN Diesel & Turbo A/S, DTU Mechanical Engineering, DTU Chemical Engineering, Sandia National Laboratories USA, Norwegian University of Science & Technology (NTNU) and University of Nottingham, Malaysia Campus.......The physiochemical properties and electromagnetic interactions in flames, of which various optical combustion diagnostics are based, have been reviewed. Key diagnostics have been presented with practical examples of their application which, together with a comprehensive review of fuel spray flames, form...

  16. Effects of Fuel Quantity on Soot Formation Process for Biomass-Based Renewable Diesel Fuel Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei; Wu, Zengyang; Roberts, William L.; Fang, Tiegang

    2016-01-01

    Soot formation process was investigated for biomass-based renewable diesel fuel, such as biomass to liquid (BTL), and conventional diesel combustion under varied fuel quantities injected into a constant volume combustion chamber. Soot measurement

  17. Massive use of pulverized fuel ash in concrete for the construction of a U.K. power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, D.R.; Kitchener, J.N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the incorporation and benefits of pulverized fuel ash (PFA) in nearly 620,000 m 2 of concrete used in the construction of the UK's first commercial pressurized light water nuclear reactor power station, Sizewell B, Suffolk. Overall nearly 100,000 t of PFA, 1,300 t of sintered fly ash lightweight aggregate, and nearly 137,000 t of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) were used in the works. Generally in the construction of the main power station buildings, structural concrete with a characteristic strength of 45 N/mm 2 was placed and included fly ash as 40% of the cementitious component. Also, concrete with fly ash as 50% of the cementitious component was placed as mass fill. The program of research is reported, including sulfate resistance, heat of hydration,elastic properties, alkali-silica reaction, and long-term strength test results. Test and field results are presented and discussed. Strict quality assurance procedures were enforced and statistical summaries are offered to give an insight into the quality of control exercised. Test work and long-term results are also outlined

  18. Modeling of large-scale oxy-fuel combustion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2012-01-01

    Quite some studies have been conducted in order to implement oxy-fuel combustion with flue gas recycle in conventional utility boilers as an effective effort of carbon capture and storage. However, combustion under oxy-fuel conditions is significantly different from conventional air-fuel firing......, among which radiative heat transfer under oxy-fuel conditions is one of the fundamental issues. This paper demonstrates the nongray-gas effects in modeling of large-scale oxy-fuel combustion processes. Oxy-fuel combustion of natural gas in a 609MW utility boiler is numerically studied, in which...... calculation of the oxy-fuel WSGGM remarkably over-predicts the radiative heat transfer to the furnace walls and under-predicts the gas temperature at the furnace exit plane, which also result in a higher incomplete combustion in the gray calculation. Moreover, the gray and non-gray calculations of the same...

  19. Combustion Characterization of Individual Bio-oil Droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Brian Brun; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2015-01-01

    Single droplet combustion characteristics has been investigated for bio-oil slurries, containing biomass residue, and compared to conventional fuels for pulverized burners, such as fuel oil (start up) and wood chips (solid biomass fuel). The investigated fuels ignition delays and pyrolysis behavior...

  20. The rates of production of CO and CO2 from the combustion of pulverized coal particles in a shock tube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commissaris, F.A.C.M.; Banine, V.Y.; Roekaerts, D.J.E.M.; Veefkind, A.

    1998-01-01

    This work presents some results of experiments on coal combustion in a shock tube, as well as a time-dependent model of the boundary layer of a single, burning char particle under similar conditions. The partial pressure of O2 in a shock tube was varied between 0 and 10 bar, with gas temperatures

  1. Formation of fuel NOx during black-liquor combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, K.M.; Lien, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel NOx and thermal NOx were measured in combustion gases from black liquors in two laboratory furnaces. Combustion at 950 C in air (8% O 2 ) produced NOx concentrations of 40-80ppm. Combustion at 950 C in synthetic air containing no nitrogen (21% 0 2 in Ar) produced the same result, demonstrating that all of the NOx produced during combustion at 950 C was fuel NOx. Formation of fuel NOx increased moderately with increasing temperature in the range of 800-1,000 C, but temperature sensitivity of fuel NOx was much less than that of thermal NOx. The results imply that the major source of NOx in recovery furnace emissions is the fuel NOx in recovery furnace formed by conversion of liquor-bound nitrogen during combustion. This is consistent with thermal NOx theory, which postulates that black-liquor combustion temperatures are too low to generate significant amounts of thermal NOx

  2. Flow blurring atomization for combustion of viscous (bio)fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof; Bouma, Wilmer; Ratering, Martijn; Brem, Gerrit

    2017-01-01

    In order to achieve efficient combustion of liquid fuel a proper atomization of the fuel is needed. In case of many biomass fuels the atomization process is obstructed and hindered by high viscosity of the fuel. Preheating to reduce the viscosity in many cases is not possible because of fuel

  3. Combustion of Solid Fuel in a Vortex Furnace with Counter-swirling Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redko A.A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of computer simulation of the processes of incineration of low-grade solid fuel-pulverized peat with a moisture content of 40%, an ash content of 6% are given. It has been determined the fields of distribution of temperature, velocity of gases and particles in the volume and at the outlet from the furnace. The three-dimensional temperature distribution in the combustion chamber indicates high-temperature combustion of peat particles at temperatures above 1700°C with liquid ash removal in the lower part of the furnace. It has been determined that when the furnace is cooled, it is not ensured combustion of the fuel completely. The value of the swirling flow rate at the outlet from the furnace (up to 370 m/s ensures the efficiency of separation of fuel particles, reducing heat losses from mechanical underburning. It is determined that the concentration of oxygen is close to zero over the entire height of the furnace, at an outlet from the furnace the oxygen concentration is 5...6%, since oxygen is supplied with excess (αв=1,2. The results of a numerical study showed that the diameter of peat particles affects the process of their combustion: coke particles with an initial diameter of 25 mkm to 250 mkm burn out by 96%. With an increase in particle diameter up to 1000 mkm, the degree of burn-out of coke decreases, but at the same time their removal decreases. It is shown that the furnace ensures the completeness of combustion of peat particles of peat 99.8%, volatiles is 100%.

  4. Deposit Probe Measurements in Danish Grate and Pulverized Fuel Biomass Power Boilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Broholm; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    . Corresponding samples of fuels, ash deposits and fly ash have provided information on the transformation of inorganics in the boiler. Generally, grate fired boilers provide a fly ash containing high contents of K, Cl and S compared to the fuel ash, while suspension fired boilers fly ash has a composition nearly...... similar to the fuel ash. Inner most biomass deposits are always salt-rich, while thicker deposit layers also contain some Si and Ca. Deposit probe formation rate measurements have been performed in different ways on several boilers. Grate and suspension fired boilers seems to cause similar deposit...... formation rates. Suspension fired boilers generate more fly ash, while grate boilers form a fly ash with a higher fraction of melt formation (and thereby a higher sticking probability) at similar temperatures. For suspension fired units it is observed that wood with a lower ash content than straw gives rise...

  5. Radiation exposures due to fossil fuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Harold L.

    The current consensus regarding the potential radiation exposures resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels is examined. Sources, releases and potential doses to humans are discussed, both for power plants and waste materials. It is concluded that the radiation exposure to most individuals from any pathway is probably insignificant, i.e. only a tiny fraction of the dose received from natural sources in soil and building materials. Any small dose that may result from power-plant emissions will most likely be from inhalation of the small insoluble ash particles from the more poorly controlled plants burning higher than average activity fuel, rather than from direct or indirect ingestion of food grown on contaminated soil. One potentially significant pathway for exposure to humans that requires further evaluation is the effect on indoor external γ-radiation levels resulting from the use of flyash in building materials. The combustion of natural gas in private dwellings is also discussed, and the radiological consequences are concluded to be generally insignificant, except under certain extraordinary circumstances.

  6. Oxy-Fuel Combustion of Coal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Jacob

    This Ph.D. thesis describes an experimental and modeling investigation of the thermal conversion of coal and an experimental investigation of the emission of NO from char combustion in O2/N2 and O2/CO2 atmospheres. The motivation for the work has been the prospective use of the technology “Oxy......-Fuel Combustion” as a mean of CO2 abatement in large scale energy conversion. Entrained Flow Reactor (EFR) experiments have been conducted in O2/N2 and O2/CO2 mixtures in the temperature interval 1173 K – 1673 K using inlet O2 concentrations between 5 – 28 vol. %. Bituminous coal has been used as fuel in all....... % it was found that char conversion rate was lowered in O2/CO2 compared to O2/N2. This is caused by the lower diffusion coefficient of O2 in CO2 (~ 22 %) that limits the reaction rate in zone III compared to combustion in O2/N2. Using char sampled in the EFR experiments ThermoGravimetric Analyzer (TGA...

  7. National Jet Fuels Combustion Program – Area #3 : Advanced Combustion Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-31

    The goal of this study is to develop, conduct, and analyze advanced laser and optical measurements in the experimental combustors developed under ASCENT National Fuel Combustion Program to measure sensitivity to fuel properties. We conducted advanced...

  8. Influence of Environmentally Friendly and High-Efficiency Composite Additives on Pulverized Coal Combustion in Cement Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available 4 kinds of chemical reagents and 3 kinds of industrial wastes were selected as burning additives for 2 kinds of coals in cement industry. The work focused on the replacement of partial chemical reagents by industrial wastes, which not only reduced the cost and took full advantage of industrial wastes, but also guaranteed the high combustion efficiency and removed the NOX and SO2 simultaneously. The experiments were carried out in DTF. The combustion residues were analyzed by SEM and XRD. The results showed that the burnout rate was increased after adding the additives; meanwhile, the NOX and SO2 release concentration were reduced, but the degree of action varied for different additives and coals. The substitute of chemical reagents by industrial wastes was very effective; overall, the cold-rolled iron oxide worked better than others; the particles surface was tougher and the peaks of crystalline phase were lower than raw coal, which indicated that the additives played good roles in combustion process.

  9. Differential pulmonary inflammation and in vitro cytotoxicity of size-fractionated fly ash particles from pulverized coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Ian Gilmour; Silvia O' Connor; Colin A.J. Dick; C. Andrew Miller; William P. Linak [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory

    2004-03-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) has been associated with adverse health effects in humans. Pulmonary inflammatory responses were examined in CD1 mice after intratracheal instillation of 25 or 100 {mu}g of ultrafine ({lt}0.2 {mu}m), fine ({lt}2.5 {mu}m), and coarse ({gt}2.5 {mu}m) coal fly ash from a combusted Montana subbituminous coal, and of fine and coarse fractions from a combusted western Kentucky bituminous coal. After 18 hr, the lungs were lavaged and the bronchoalveolar fluid was assessed for cellular influx, biochemical markers, and pro-inflammatory cytokines. The responses were compared with saline and endotoxin as negative and positive controls, respectively. On an equal mass basis, the ultrafine particles from combusted Montana coal induced a higher degree of neutrophil inflammation and cytokine levels than did the fine or coarse PM. The western Kentucky fine PM caused a moderate degree of inflammation and protein levels in bronchoalveolar fluid that were higher than the Montana fine PM. Coarse PM did not produce any significant effects. In vitro experiments with rat alveolar macrophages showed that of the particles tested, only the Montana ultrafine displayed significant cytotoxicity. It is concluded that fly ash toxicity is inversely related with particle size and is associated with increased sulfur and trace element content. 42 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1987-01-01

    Combustion, Second Edition focuses on the underlying principles of combustion and covers topics ranging from chemical thermodynamics and flame temperatures to chemical kinetics, detonation, ignition, and oxidation characteristics of fuels. Diffusion flames, flame phenomena in premixed combustible gases, and combustion of nonvolatile fuels are also discussed. This book consists of nine chapters and begins by introducing the reader to heats of reaction and formation, free energy and the equilibrium constants, and flame temperature calculations. The next chapter explores the rates of reactio

  11. Chemistry and radiation in oxy-fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of combustion chemistry and radiation heat transfer in oxy-fuel combustion modeling, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling study has been performed for two different oxy-fuel furnaces. One is a lab-scale 0.8MW oxy-natural gas flame furnace whose detailed in....... Among the key issues in combustion modeling, e.g., mixing, radiation and chemistry, this paper derives useful guidelines on radiation and chemistry implementation for reliable CFD analyses of oxy-fuel combustion, particularly for industrial applications....

  12. Mercury emissions from polish pulverized coalfired boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wichliński Michał

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper presents the research results carried out at one of Polish power plants at a pulverized hard coal-fired 225 MW unit. The research was carried out at full load of the boiler (100% MCR and focused on analysis of mercury content in the input fuel and limestone sorbent for wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD system, as well as investigation of mercury content in the combustion products, i.e. fly ash, slag, FGD product (gypsum and FGD effluents (waste. Within the framework of the present study the concentration of mercury vapor in the exhaust gas was also investigated. The analysis was performed using Lumex RA-915+ spectrometer with an attachment (RP-91C. The measurements were carried out at three locations, i.e. before the electrostatic precipitator (ESP, downstream the ESP, and downstream the wet FGD plant. Design of the measurement system allowed to determine both forms of mercury in the flue gas (Hg0 and Hg2+ at all measurement locations.Based on the measurement results the balance of mercury for a pulverized coal (PC boiler was calculated and the amount of mercury was assessed both in the input solids (fuel and sorbent, as well as the gaseous and solids products (flue gas, slag, ash, gypsum and FGD waste.

  13. Water permeabilities of pulverized fuel ash; Bifuntan sekitanbai no tosui tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, T [Center for Coal Utilization, Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Nagataki, S [Niigata University, Niigata (Japan); Hosoda, N [Kumagai Gumi Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Utsuki, T [The Coal Mining Research Center, Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Kubo, H [Obayashi Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-09-01

    It is intended to establish a technology to utilize coal ash in bulk to deal with its increasing production. In order to expand its use into earth engineering materials, two kinds of combustion ashes produced from dust coal burning power plants were used for studies using different kinds of tests. The tests were carried out on strength properties, water permeability, and characteristics of dissolving trace amounts of chemical constituents, with regard to addition effects of cement into compacted and slurry-state dust coal burned ashes. The derived findings may be summarized as follows: as the strength properties, the strength for both of the compacted and slurry-state ashes increases as the cement addition ratio is increased; growth of the strength due to the cement addition ratio and material age varies depending on the kinds of dust coal burned ash; comparison of strengths of the compacted and the slurry-state ashes indicates the strength of the latter ash is about one-third to quarter of that of the former ash; water permeability of the ashes decreases both in the compacted and slurry- state ashes as the cement addition ratio is increased; and the cement addition ratio gives greater impact to the water permeability than the density of the ashes. 28 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Characterisation of fuels for advanced pressurised combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zevenhoven, R; Hupa, M; Backman, P; Forssen, M; Karlsson, M; Kullberg, M; Sorvari, V; Uusikartano, T [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group; Nurk, M [Tallinskij Politekhnicheskij Inst., Tallinn (Estonia)

    1997-10-01

    The objective of the research was to determine a set of fuel characteristics which quantify the behaviour of a fuel in a typical pressurised combustor or gasifier environment, especially in hybrid processes such as second generation PFBC. One specific aspect was to cover a wide range of fuels, including several coal types and several grades of peat and biomasses: 7 types of coal, 2 types of peat, 2 types of wood, 2 types of black liquor, Estonian oil shale and Venezuelan Orimulsion were studied. The laboratory facilities used are a pressurised thermogravimetric reactor (PTGR), a pressurised grid heater (PGH) and an atmospheric entrained flow quartz tube reactor, with gas analysis, which can be operated as a fixed bed reactor. A major part of the work was related to fuel devolatilisation in the PGH and sequential devolatilisation and char gasification (with carbon dioxide or steam) in the PTGR. The final part of that work is reported here, with the combustion of Estonian oil shale at AFBC or PFBC conditions as additional subject. Devolatilisation of the fuels at atmospheric pressure in nitrogen while monitoring gaseous exhausts, followed by ultimate analysis of the chars has been reported earlier. Here, results on the analysis of the reduction of NO (with and without CO) on chars at atmospheric pressure in a fixed bed reactor are reported. Finally, a comparison is given between experimental results and direct numerical simulation with several computer codes, i.e. PyroSim, developed at TU Graz, Austria, and the codes Partikkeli, Pisara and Cogas, which were provided by VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae

  15. LIEKKI and JALO: Combustion and fuel conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Thomas M.; Renz, Ulrich; Sarofim, Adel F.

    LIEKKI and JALO are well conceived and structured programs designed to strengthen Finland's special needs in combustion and gasification to utilize a diversity of fuels, increase the ratio of electrical to heat output, and to support the export market. Started in 1988, these two programs provide models of how universities, Technical research center's laboratories (VTT's), and industry can collaborate successfully in order to achieve national goals. The research is focused on long term goals in certain targeted niche areas. This is an effective way to use limited resources. The niche areas were chosen in a rational manner and appear to be appropriate for Finland. The LIEKKl and JALO programs have helped pull together research efforts that were previously more fragmented. For example, the combustion modeling area still appears fragmented. Individual project objectives should be tied to program goals at a very early stage to provide sharper focusing to the research. Both the LIEKKl and JALO programs appear to be strongly endorsed by industry. Industrial members of the Executive Committees were very supportive of these programs. There are good mechanisms for technology transfer in place, and the programs provide opportunities to establish good interfaces between industrial people and the individual researchers. The interest of industry is shown by the large number of applied projects that are supported by industry. This demonstrates the relevancy of the programs. There is a strong interaction between the JALO program and industry in black liquor gasification.

  16. Investigation of pressurized combustion and characterization of solid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, M; Haemaelaeinen, J; Paakkinen, K [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Joutsenoja, T [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The objective of the research of Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) was to produce results of the effects of pressure and other important parameters on the combustion of pulverized coals using both experimental and theoretical methods. The results can be utilized to model pressurized combustion and to plan pilot-scale reactors. The studied coals were Polish hvb coal, French lignite (Gardanne), German anthracite (Niederberg) and German (Goettelborn) hvb coal. In was originally planned to study also a char of one of these coals. However, anthracite was selected instead of char, because the theoretical studies predicted maximum pressure effect to be found for antracite-type coals (with low reactivity and low content of volatiles). The pulverized coal samples were combusted in an electrically heated, pressurized entrained flow reactor (PEFR), where the experimental conditions were controlled with a high precision. The studied particle size fractions were 100-125 Em and 140-180 Am for anthracite and 140-180 {mu}m for the other coals. The studied things were combustion rates and temperatures of burning particles. Two types of sets of experiments were carried out. In the first case, experimental planning was done and the results were handled with multivariable partial least squares (PLS) method. Gas temperature varied from 1073K to 1473K and pressure from 0.2 MPa to 0.8 MPa. The other variables were PO2 and PCO{sub 2}. Some of the experiments were carried out at conditions prevailing during flue gas recirculation (CO{sub 2} concentration was > 20 vol%). In the second case, oxygen concentration was kept constant ( 10 vol%) and pressure was varied from 0.2 MPa to 0.8 MPa with an interval of 0.1 MPa

  17. Gas turbines with complete continuous combustion of the fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, C

    1976-10-21

    The invention concerns a gas turbine plant with complete continuous combustion of the fuel. The fuel is taken to a gas generator in which the preheated fuel is catalytically converted at high temperature in a fuel mixture using an oxygen carrier. Heating of the fuel takes place in a heat exchanger which is situated in the outlet pipe of the turbine. The efficiency is increased and the emission of noxious gas is kept as low as possible using the heat exchanger as a fuel evaporator and by using part of the waste formed in the combustion chamber to carry oxygen to the gas generator via an outlet pipe.

  18. Fuel properties to enable lifted-flame combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Eric [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The Fuel Properties to Enable Lifted-Flame Combustion project responded directly to solicitation DE-FOA-0000239 AOI 1A, Fuels and Lubricants for Advanced Combustion Regimes. This subtopic was intended to encompass clean and highly-efficient, liquid-fueled combustion engines to achieve extremely low engine-out nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) as a target and similar efficiency as state-of-the-art direct injection diesel engines. The intent of this project was to identify how fuel properties can be used to achieve controllable Leaner Lifted Flame Combustion (LLFC) with low NOx and PM emissions. Specifically, this project was expected to identify and test key fuel properties to enable LLFC and their compatibility with current fuel systems and to enhance combustion models to capture the effect of fuel properties on advanced combustion. Successful demonstration of LLFC may reduce the need for after treatment devices, thereby reducing costs and improving thermal efficiency. The project team consisted of key technical personnel from Ford Motor Company (FMC), the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL). Each partner had key roles in achieving project objectives. FMC investigated fuel properties relating to LLFC and sooting tendency. Together, FMC and UW developed and integrated 3D combustion models to capture fuel property combustion effects. FMC used these modeling results to develop a combustion system and define fuel properties to support a single-cylinder demonstration of fuel-enabled LLFC. UW investigated modeling the flame characteristics and emissions behavior of different fuels, including those with different cetane number and oxygen content. SNL led spray combustion experiments to quantify the effect of key fuel properties on combustion characteristics critical for LLFC, as well as single cylinder optical engine experiments to improve fundamental

  19. Combustion of solid alternative fuels in the cement kiln burner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Linda Kaare

    In the cement industry there is an increasing environmental and financial motivation for substituting conventional fossil fuels with alternative fuels, being biomass or waste derived fuels. However, the introduction of alternative fuels may influence emissions, cement product quality, process...... stability, and process efficiency. Alternative fuel substitution in the calciner unit has reached close to 100% at many cement plants and to further increase the use of alternative fuels rotary kiln substitution must be enhanced. At present, limited systematic knowledge of the alternative fuel combustion...... properties and the influence on the flame formation is available. In this project a scientific approach to increase the fundamental understanding of alternative fuel conversion in the rotary kiln burner is employed through literature studies, experimental combustion characterisation studies, combustion...

  20. Advanced Combustion and Fuels; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zigler, Brad

    2015-06-08

    Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Office 2015 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, held June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. It addresses technical barriers of inadequate data and predictive tools for fuel and lubricant effects on advanced combustion engines, with the strategy being through collaboration, develop techniques, tools, and data to quantify critical fuel physico-chemical effects to enable development of advanced combustion engines that use alternative fuels.

  1. MODELING OF FUEL SPRAY CHARACTERISTICS AND DIESEL COMBUSTION CHAMBER PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Kukharonak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The computer model for coordination of fuel spray characteristics with diesel combustion chamber parameters has been created in the paper.  The model allows to observe fuel sprays  develоpment in diesel cylinder at any moment of injection, to calculate characteristics of fuel sprays with due account of a shape and dimensions of a combustion chamber, timely to change fuel injection characteristics and supercharging parameters, shape and dimensions of a combustion chamber. Moreover the computer model permits to determine parameters of holes in an injector nozzle that provides the required fuel sprays characteristics at the stage of designing a diesel engine. Combustion chamber parameters for 4ЧН11/12.5 diesel engine have been determined in the paper.

  2. Ammonia chemistry in oxy-fuel combustion of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendiara, Teresa; Glarborg, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The oxidation of NH3 during oxy-fuel combustion of methane, i.e., at high [CO2], has been studied in a flow reactor. The experiments covered stoichiometries ranging from fuel rich to very fuel lean and temperatures from 973 to 1773 K. The results have been interpreted in terms of an updated detai...

  3. A method for determining the completeness of fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavger, M.D.; Chepkin, V.M.; Gruzdev, V.N.; Talantov, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    The current of conductivity (ionization) of gaseous combustion products, which forms with feeding of electric voltage to a special probe, is proposed for determining the completeness of fuel combustion. Here, the charged particles are formed from substances which form in the intermediate stages of the combustion reaction. The volume of charged particles is proportional to the volume of the intermediate substances, whose presence attests to the incompleteness of the combustion reaction. The fullness of fuel combustion is determined from a formula which includes the stoichiometric coefficient, a gas constant, the energy of activation, the characteristics of the chemical activity of the intermediate substances, the coefficient of air excess, the temperature of the combustion products and the conductivity current.

  4. Engine combustion control at low loads via fuel reactivity stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2014-10-07

    A compression ignition (diesel) engine uses two or more fuel charges during a combustion cycle, with the fuel charges having two or more reactivities (e.g., different cetane numbers), in order to control the timing and duration of combustion. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot). At low load and no load (idling) conditions, the aforementioned results are attained by restricting airflow to the combustion chamber during the intake stroke (as by throttling the incoming air at or prior to the combustion chamber's intake port) so that the cylinder air pressure is below ambient pressure at the start of the compression stroke.

  5. Engine combustion control at low loads via fuel reactivity stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M.; Splitter, Derek A.; Kokjohn, Sage

    2017-12-26

    A compression ignition (diesel) engine uses two or more fuel charges during a combustion cycle, with the fuel charges having two or more reactivities (e.g., different cetane numbers), in order to control the timing and duration of combustion. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot). At low load and no load (idling) conditions, the aforementioned results are attained by restricting airflow to the combustion chamber during the intake stroke (as by throttling the incoming air at or prior to the combustion chamber's intake port) so that the cylinder air pressure is below ambient pressure at the start of the compression stroke.

  6. Combustion of alternative fuels in vortex trapped combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghenai, Chaouki; Zbeeb, Khaled; Janajreh, Isam

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We model the combustion of alternative fuels in trapped vortex combustor (TVC). ► We test syngas and hydrogen/hydrocarbon mixture fuels. ► We examine the change in combustion performance and emissions of TVC combustor. ► Increasing the hydrogen content of the fuel will increase the temperature and NO x emissions. ► A high combustor efficiency is obtained for fuels with different compositions and LHV. - Abstract: Trapped vortex combustor represents an efficient and compact combustor for flame stability. Combustion stability is achieved through the use of cavities in which recirculation zones of hot products generated by the direct injection of fuel and air are created and acting as a continuous source of ignition for the incoming main fuel–air stream. Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis was performed in this study to test the combustion performance and emissions from the vortex trapped combustor when natural gas fuel (methane) is replaced with renewable and alternative fuels such as hydrogen and synthetic gas (syngas). The flame temperature, the flow field, and species concentrations inside the Vortex Trapped Combustor were obtained. The results show that hydrogen enriched hydrocarbon fuels combustion will result in more energy, higher temperature (14% increase when methane is replaced with hydrogen fuels) and NO x emissions, and lower CO 2 emissions (50% decrease when methane is replaced with methane/hydrogen mixture with 75% hydrogen fraction). The NO x emission increases when the fraction of hydrogen increases for methane/hydrogen fuel mixture. The results also show that the flame for methane combustion fuel is located in the primary vortex region but it is shifted to the secondary vortex region for hydrogen combustion.

  7. Spray combustion of Jet-A and diesel fuels in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei; Roberts, William L.; Fang, Tiegang

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the spray combustion of Jet-A fuel in an optical constant-volume combustion chamber under different ambient initial conditions. Ambient temperature was varied at 800 K, 1000 K, and 1200 K and five different ambient O2

  8. Environmental effects of fossil fuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    Fossil fuel which include natural gas, petroleum, shale oil and bitumen are the main source of heat and electrical energy. All these fuels contain beside major constituents (carbon, hydrogen, oxygen) other materials as metal, sulfur and nitrogen compounds. During the combustion process different pollutants as fly ash, sulfur oxides (SO 2 and SO 3 ), nitrogen oxides (NO x NO + NO 2 ) and volatile organic compounds are emitted. Fly ash contain different trace elements (heavy metals). Gross emission of pollutants is tremendous all over the world. These pollutants are present in the atmosphere in such conditions that they can affect man and his environment. Air pollution caused by the particulate matter and other pollutants not only acts directly on environment but by contamination of water and soil leads to their degradation. Wet and dry deposition of inorganic pollutants leads to acidification of environment. These phenomena affect health of the people, increase corrosion, destroy cultivated soil and forests. Most of the plants, especially coniferous trees are not resistant to sulfur and nitrogen oxides. Following longer exposure leaves wither and fall. Widespread forest damage has been reported in Europe and North America regions. Many cultivated plants are not resistant to these pollutants either especially in the early period vegetation. The mechanisms of pollutants transformation in atmosphere are described by environmental chemistry. An important role in these transformations plays photochemistry. SO 2 and NO x are oxidized and sulfuric and nitric acids are formed in presence of water vapours, fog and droplets. Other problem discussed connected with human activities is emission of volatile organic compounds to the atmosphere. These emissions cause stratospheric ozone depletion, ground level photochemical ozone formation, toxic or carcinogenic human health effects, enhancing the global greenhouse effect, accumulation and persistence in environment. Wet flue gas

  9. Environmental effects of fossil fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewski, A G

    1999-07-01

    Fossil fuel which include natural gas, petroleum, shale oil and bitumen are the main source of heat and electrical energy. All these fuels contain beside major constituents (carbon, hydrogen, oxygen) other materials as metal, sulfur and nitrogen compounds. During the combustion process different pollutants as fly ash, sulfur oxides (SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} NO + NO{sub 2}) and volatile organic compounds are emitted. Fly ash contain different trace elements (heavy metals). Gross emission of pollutants is tremendous all over the world. These pollutants are present in the atmosphere in such conditions that they can affect man and his environment. Air pollution caused by the particulate matter and other pollutants not only acts directly on environment but by contamination of water and soil leads to their degradation. Wet and dry deposition of inorganic pollutants leads to acidification of environment. These phenomena affect health of the people, increase corrosion, destroy cultivated soil and forests. Most of the plants, especially coniferous trees are not resistant to sulfur and nitrogen oxides. Following longer exposure leaves wither and fall. Widespread forest damage has been reported in Europe and North America regions. Many cultivated plants are not resistant to these pollutants either especially in the early period vegetation. The mechanisms of pollutants transformation in atmosphere are described by environmental chemistry. An important role in these transformations plays photochemistry. SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} are oxidized and sulfuric and nitric acids are formed in presence of water vapours, fog and droplets. Other problem discussed connected with human activities is emission of volatile organic compounds to the atmosphere. These emissions cause stratospheric ozone depletion, ground level photochemical ozone formation, toxic or carcinogenic human health effects, enhancing the global greenhouse effect, accumulation and persistence in

  10. Legislative and Regulatory Timeline for Fossil Fuel Combustion Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    This timeline walks through the history of fossil fuel combustion waste regulation since 1976 and includes information such as regulations, proposals, notices, amendments, reports and meetings and site visits conducted.

  11. Combustion Characterization of Bio-derived Fuels and Additives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid

    Climate change has become a serious concern nowadays. The main reason is believed to be the high emission of greenhouse gases, namely CO2 which is mainly produced from the combustion of fossil fuels. At the same time, energy demand has increased exponentially while the energy supply mainly depends...... on fossil fuels, especially for transportation. The practical strategy to address such problems in medium term is to increase the efficiency of combustion-propelled energy-production systems, as well as to reduce the net release of CO2 and other harmful pollutants, likely by using nonconventional fuels....... Modern internal combustion engines such as Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines are more efficient and fuel-flexible compared to the conventional engines, making opportunities to reduce the release of greenhouse and other polluting gases to the environment. Combustion temperature...

  12. Research in Supercritical Fuel Properties and Combustion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-18

    identified reactions needing further study and C-2 and C-3 species to add to the mechanism . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Supercritical fluids , Brillouin scattering...kinetics mechanism for combustion of hydrocarbon fuels containing up to 2 carbon atoms, including uncertainties. • We identified key reactions and...safety. The chemical mechanisms for combustion of all of these fuels share the same set of elementary reactions of smaller-fragment hydrocarbons , and

  13. Advanced modeling of oxy-fuel combustion of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chungen Yin

    2011-01-15

    The main goal of this small-scale project is to investigate oxy-combustion of natural gas (NG) through advanced modeling, in which radiation, chemistry and mixing will be reasonably resolved. 1) A state-of-the-art review was given regarding the latest R and D achievements and status of oxy-fuel technology. The modeling and simulation status and achievements in the field of oxy-fuel combustion were also summarized; 2) A computer code in standard c++, using the exponential wide band model (EWBM) to evaluate the emissivity and absorptivity of any gas mixture at any condition, was developed and validated in detail against data in literature. A new, complete, and accurate WSGGM, applicable to both air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion modeling and applicable to both gray and non-gray calculation, was successfully derived, by using the validated EWBM code as the reference mode. The new WSGGM was implemented in CFD modeling of two different oxy-fuel furnaces, through which its great, unique advantages over the currently most widely used WSGGM were demonstrated. 3) Chemical equilibrium calculations were performed for oxy-NG flame and air-NG flame, in which dissociation effects were considered to different degrees. Remarkable differences in oxy-fuel and air-fuel combustion were revealed, and main intermediate species that play key roles in oxy-fuel flames were identified. Different combustion mechanisms are compared, e.g., the most widely used 2-step global mechanism, refined 4-step global mechanism, a global mechanism developed for oxy-fuel using detailed chemical kinetic modeling (CHEMKIN) as reference. 4) Over 15 CFD simulations were done for oxy-NG combustion, in which radiation, chemistry, mixing, turbulence-chemistry interactions, and so on were thoroughly investigated. Among all the simulations, RANS combined with 2-step and refined 4-step mechanism, RANS combined with CHEMKIN-based new global mechanism for oxy-fuel modeling, and LES combined with different combustion

  14. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    2008-01-01

    Combustion Engineering, a topic generally taught at the upper undergraduate and graduate level in most mechanical engineering programs, and many chemical engineering programs, is the study of rapid energy and mass transfer usually through the common physical phenomena of flame oxidation. It covers the physics and chemistry of this process and the engineering applications-from the generation of power such as the internal combustion automobile engine to the gas turbine engine. Renewed concerns about energy efficiency and fuel costs, along with continued concerns over toxic and particulate emissions have kept the interest in this vital area of engineering high and brought about new developments in both fundamental knowledge of flame and combustion physics as well as new technologies for flame and fuel control. *New chapter on new combustion concepts and technologies, including discussion on nanotechnology as related to combustion, as well as microgravity combustion, microcombustion, and catalytic combustion-all ...

  15. Fuel injection system for internal combustion engines. Kraftstoffeinspritzsystem fuer Brennkraftmaschinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafner, U.

    1990-09-13

    A fuel injection system for an internal combustion engine is provided with a fuel supply line (13) and at least one electromagnetically actuated fuel injection valve (14) for apportioning a quantity of fuel for injection. A connection muzzle (24) coming from the valve body (23) juts into an opening (22) in the suction pipe (21) of the internal combustion engine. The end of the injection valve opposite the connecting muzzle (24) is connected with the fuel supply line via a fuel entry. The valve body (23) is enclosed by a casing (25) in order to provide the conditions required for a warm start. An annulus (31) extending over a large part of the axial length of the valve remains between the casing and the valve body (23). The annulus (31) communicates with the fuel flow through the fuel supply line (13) via an afflux and an efflux opening (32, 33) (Fig. 1).

  16. Study of ignition, combustion, and production of harmful substances upon burning solid organic fuel at a test bench with a vortex chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdukov, A. P.; Chernetskiy, M. Yu.; Dekterev, A. A.; Anufriev, I. S.; Strizhak, P. A.; Greben'kov, P. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Results of investigation of furnace processes upon burning of pulverized fuel at a test bench with a power of 5 MW are presented. The test bench consists of two stages with tangential air and pulverized coal feed, and it is equipped by a vibrocentrifugal mill and a disintegrator. Such milling devices have an intensive mechanical impact on solid organic fuel, which, in a number of cases, increases the reactivity of ground material. The processes of ignition and stable combustion of a mixture of gas coal and sludge (wastes of concentration plant), as well as Ekibastus coal, ground in the disintegrator, were studied at the test bench. The results of experimental burning demonstrated that preliminary fuel grinding in the disintegrator provides autothermal combustion mode even for hardly inflammable organic fuels. Experimental combustion of biomass, wheat straw with different lignin content (18, 30, 60%) after grinding in the disintegrator, was performed at the test bench in order to determine the possibility of supporting stable autothermal burning. Stable biofuel combustion mode without lighting by highly reactive fuel was achieved in the experiments. The influence of the additive GTS-Powder (L.O.M. Leaders Co., Ltd., Republic of Korea) in the solid and liquid state on reducing sulfur oxide production upon burning Mugun coal was studied. The results of experimental combustion testify that, for an additive concentration from 1 to 15% of the total mass of the burned mixture, the maximum SO2 concentration reduction in ejected gases was not more than 18% with respect to the amount for the case of burning pure coal.

  17. The importance of fuel properties in the formation of nitrogen oxides and in combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aho, M.; Haemaelaeinen, J.; Rantanen, J.; Saastamoinen, J.

    1996-01-01

    Reactions of fuel nitrogen during pyrolysis and combustion of pulverized hvb coal, two peats and fir bark, thermal DeNOx-process and formation of N 2 0 from char were studied experimentally in a pressurized entrained flow reactor. Mass loss of fuel, release of C,N,H and 0, and formation of NH 3 and HCN were measured during pyrolysis (in N 2 containing O 2 vol ). Mass loss, and formation of NO, N 2 O and NO 2 through HCN and NH 3 were measured during combustion at 5-4 vol% O 2 . Thermal DeNOx process was studied at 2 and 15 bar at T= 700-950 deg C. Formation of N 2 O from peat and its char was studied in a modified thermobalance. The rate of pyrolysis of high-volatile fuels (fir bark and peat) increased with pressure. A reverse trend was found with Polish hvb coal. The HCN/NH 3 ratio in the flame was dependent on the fuel-O/fuel-N ratio and independent of pressure. Pressure did, however, increase the N 2 O/NO ratio, because the concentrations of the key radicals in NO formation are decreased by pressure. With peats, the formation of N 2 O increased slightly with pressure. The emissions of N 2 O, however, doubled with wood bark when the pressure increased from 0.2 MPa to 0.8 MPa. Formation of NO 2 increased clearly with pressure, and was fuel-dependent. One peat sample produced three times as much NO 2 as the other under identical conditions. Pressure seemed to effect on Thermal DeNOx-process by lowering the effective temperature. Experiments with entrained flow of fuel and its char in project Liekki2-301, and experiments with single char and fuel particles in this project suggested that volatile nitrogen forms much more N 2 O than char-N. Bed effects can change this situation in a real fluidized bed combustion process. (author)

  18. Turbine Burners: Turbulent Combustion of Liquid Fuels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sirignano, William A; Liu, Feng; Dunn-Rankin, Derek

    2006-01-01

    The proposed theoretical/computational and experimental study addresses the vital two-way coupling between combustion processes and fluid dynamic phenomena associated with schemes for burning liquid...

  19. Trace elements in co-combustion of solid recovered fuel and coal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao; Glarborg, Peter; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Trace element partitioning in co-combustion of a bituminous coal and a solid recovered fuel (SRF) was studied in an entrained flow reactor. The experiments were carried out at conditions similar to pulverized coal combustion, with SRF shares of 7.9 wt.% (wet basis), 14.8 wt.% and 25.0 wt.......%. In addition, the effect of additives such as NaCl, PVC, ammonium sulphate, and kaolinite on trace element partitioning was investigated. The trace elements studied were As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Sb and Zn, since these elements were significantly enriched in SRF as compared to coal. During the experiments, bottom ash...... was collected in a chamber, large fly ash particles were collected by a cyclone with a cut-off diameter of ~2.5 μm, and the remaining fly ash particles were gathered in a filter. It was found that when coal was co-fired with SRF, the As, Cd, Pb, Sb and Zn content in filter ash/cyclone ash increased almost...

  20. Second law comparison of oxy-fuel combustion and post-combustion carbon dioxide separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Adam P.; Simon, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    To define 2nd law efficiency targets for novel separation technologies, a simplified model of a power plant with two forms of CO 2 capture was developed. In this investigation, oxy-fuel combustion and post-combustion CO 2 separation were compared on an exergetic basis. Using exergy balances and black-box models of power plant components, multiple scenarios were run to determine the impact of plant configuration and separation unit efficiency on overall plant performance. Second law efficiency values from the literature were used to set the baseline performance of various CO 2 separation configurations. Assumed advances in 2nd law efficiency were used to determine the potential for overall system performance improvement. It was found that the 2nd law efficiency of air separation must reach a critical value before the thermodynamics of oxy-fuel combustion become favorable. Changes in operating equivalence ratio significantly move the tipping-point between post-combustion and oxy-fuel strategies

  1. Modelling of fuel spray and combustion in diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huttunen, M T; Kaario, O T [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Fuel spray and air motion characteristics and combustion in direct injection (DI) diesel engines was studied using computational models of the commercial CFD-code FIRE. Physical subprocesses modelled included Lagrangian spray droplet movement and behaviour (atomisation, evaporation and interaction of spray droplets) and combustion of evaporated liquid spray in the gas phase. Fuel vapour combustion rate was described by the model of Magnussen and Hjertager. The standard k,{epsilon}-model was used for turbulence. In order to be able to predict combustion accurately, the fuel spray penetration should be predicted with reasonable accuracy. In this study, the standard drag coefficient had to be reduced in order to match the computed penetration to the measured one. In addition, the constants in the submodel describing droplet breakup also needed to be adjusted for closer agreement with the measurements. The characteristic time scale of fuel consumption rate k/C{sub R} {epsilon} strongly influenced the heat release and in-cylinder pressure. With a value around 2.0 to 5.0 for C{sub R}, the computed in-cylinder pressure during the compression stroke agreed quite well with the measurements. On the other hand, the in-cylinder pressure was underpredicted during the expansion stroke. This is partly due to the fact that hydrocarbon fuel combustion was modelled as a one-step reaction reading to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O and inadequate description of the mixing of reactants and combustion products. (author) 16 refs.

  2. Modelling of fuel spray and combustion in diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huttunen, M.T.; Kaario, O.T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Fuel spray and air motion characteristics and combustion in direct injection (DI) diesel engines was studied using computational models of the commercial CFD-code FIRE. Physical subprocesses modelled included Lagrangian spray droplet movement and behaviour (atomisation, evaporation and interaction of spray droplets) and combustion of evaporated liquid spray in the gas phase. Fuel vapour combustion rate was described by the model of Magnussen and Hjertager. The standard k,{epsilon}-model was used for turbulence. In order to be able to predict combustion accurately, the fuel spray penetration should be predicted with reasonable accuracy. In this study, the standard drag coefficient had to be reduced in order to match the computed penetration to the measured one. In addition, the constants in the submodel describing droplet breakup also needed to be adjusted for closer agreement with the measurements. The characteristic time scale of fuel consumption rate k/C{sub R} {epsilon} strongly influenced the heat release and in-cylinder pressure. With a value around 2.0 to 5.0 for C{sub R}, the computed in-cylinder pressure during the compression stroke agreed quite well with the measurements. On the other hand, the in-cylinder pressure was underpredicted during the expansion stroke. This is partly due to the fact that hydrocarbon fuel combustion was modelled as a one-step reaction reading to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O and inadequate description of the mixing of reactants and combustion products. (author) 16 refs.

  3. Investigation of combustion characteristics of methane-hydrogen fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetkin, A. V.; Suris, A. L.; Litvinova, O. A.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical investigations of combustion characteristics of methane-hydrogen fuel used at present in tube furnaces of some petroleum refineries are carried out and possible problems related to change-over of existing furnaces from natural gas to methane-hydrogen fuel are analyzed. The effect of the composition of the blended fuel, associated temperature and emissivity of combustion products, temperature of combustion chamber walls, mean beam length, and heat release on variation in the radiation heat flux is investigated. The methane concentration varied from 0 to 100%. The investigations were carried out both at arbitrary given gas temperatures and at effective temperatures determined based on solving a set of equations at various heat-release rates of the combustion chamber and depended on the adiabatic combustion temperature and the temperature at the chamber output. The approximation dependence for estimation of the radiation heat exchange rate in the radiant chamber of the furnace at change-over to fuel with a greater hydrogen content is obtained. Hottel data were applied in the present work in connection with the impossibility to use approximated formulas recommended by the normative method for heat calculation of boilers to determine the gas emissivity, which are limited by the relationship of partial pressures of water steam and carbon dioxide in combustion products . The effect of the methane-hydrogen fuel on the equilibrium concentration of nitrogen oxides is also investigated.

  4. Combustion of Sewage Sludge as Alternative Fuel for Cement Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fuzhou; ZHANG Wei

    2011-01-01

    The combustion of sewage sludge and coal was studied by thermogravimetric analysis.Both differential scanning calorimetric analysis and derivative thermogravimetric profiles showed differences between combustion of sewage sludge and coal, and non-isothermal kinetics analysis method was applied to evaluate the combustion process. Based on Coats-Redfem integral method, some reaction models were tested,the mechanism and kinetics of the combustion reaction were discussed. The results show that the combustion of sewage sludge is mainly in the Iow temperature stage, meanwhile the ignition temperature and Arrhenius activation energy are lower than that of coal. The combustion of sewage sludge has the advantage over coal in some aspects, thus sewage sludge can partly replace coal used as cement industry fuel.

  5. Boiler for combustion fuel in a fluidized bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laković Mirjana S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuel combustion in fluidized bed combustion is a process that is current and which every day gives more attention and there are many studies that have been closely associated with this technology. This combustion technology is widespread and constantly improving the range of benefits it provides primarily due to reduced emissions. This paper presents the boilers for combustion in a fluidized bed, whit characteristics and advantages. Also is shown the development of this type of boilers in Republic of Serbia. In this paper is explained the concept of fluidized bed combustion. Boilers for this type of combustion can be improved and thereby increase their efficiency level. More detailed characteristics are given for boilers with bubbling and circulating fluidized bed as well as their mutual comparison.

  6. Shock Tube Measurements for Liquid Fuels Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Ronald K

    2006-01-01

    ...) fundamental studies of fuel spray evaporation rates and ignition times of low-vapor pressure fuels such as JP-8, diesel fuel and normal alkane surrogates in a new aerosol shock tube using state...

  7. Final Report - Low Temperature Combustion Chemistry And Fuel Component Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, Margaret [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-02-24

    Recent research into combustion chemistry has shown that reactions at “low temperatures” (700 – 1100 K) have a dramatic influence on ignition and combustion of fuels in virtually every practical combustion system. A powerful class of laboratory-scale experimental facilities that can focus on fuel chemistry in this temperature range is the rapid compression facility (RCF), which has proven to be a versatile tool to examine the details of fuel chemistry in this important regime. An RCF was used in this project to advance our understanding of low temperature chemistry of important fuel compounds. We show how factors including fuel molecular structure, the presence of unsaturated C=C bonds, and the presence of alkyl ester groups influence fuel auto-ignition and produce variable amounts of negative temperature coefficient behavior of fuel ignition. We report new discoveries of synergistic ignition interactions between alkane and alcohol fuels, with both experimental and kinetic modeling studies of these complex interactions. The results of this project quantify the effects of molecular structure on combustion chemistry including carbon bond saturation, through low temperature experimental studies of esters, alkanes, alkenes, and alcohols.

  8. Fundamental characterization of alternate fuel effects in continuous combustion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazowski, W.S.; Edelman, R.B.; Harsha, P.T.

    1978-09-11

    The overall objective of this contract is to assist in the development of fuel-flexible combustion systems for gas turbines as well as Rankine and Stirling cycle engines. The primary emphasis of the program is on liquid hydrocarbons produced from non-petroleum resouces. Fuel-flexible combustion systems will provide for more rapid transition of these alternate fuels into important future energy utilization centers (especially utility power generation with the combined cycle gas turbine). The specific technical objectives of the program are to develop an improved understanding of relationships between alternate fuel properties and continuous combustion system effects, and to provide analytical modeling/correlation capabilities to be used as design aids for development of fuel-tolerant combustion systems. Efforts this past year have been to evaluate experimental procedures for studying alternate fuel combustion effects and to determine current analytical capabilities for prediction of these effects. Jet Stirred Combustor studies during this period have produced new insights into soot formation in strongly backmixed systems and have provided much information for comparison with analytical predictions. The analytical effort included new applications of quasi-global modeling techniques as well as comparison of prediction with the experimental results generated.

  9. Sulfur Release from Cement Raw Materials during Solid Fuel Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Rooma; Larsen, Morten B.; Glarborg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    During combustion of solid fuels in the material inlet end of cement rotary kilns, local reducing conditions can occur and cause decomposition of sulfates from cement raw materials. Decomposition of sulfates is problematic because it increases the gas-phase SO2 concentration, which may cause...... deposit formation in the kiln system. SO2 release from cement raw materials during combustion of solid fuels has been studied experimentally in a high temperature rotary drum. The fuels were tire rubber, pine wood, petcoke, sewage sludge, and polypropylene. The SO2 release from the raw materials...

  10. Superheated fuel injection for combustion of liquid-solid slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robben, F.A.

    1984-10-19

    A method and device are claimed for obtaining, upon injection, flash evaporation of a liquid in a slurry fuel to aid in ignition and combustion. The device is particularly beneficial for use of coal-water slurry fuels in internal combustion engines such as diesel engines and gas turbines, and in external combustion devices such as boilers and furnaces. The slurry fuel is heated under pressure to near critical temperature in an injector accumulator, where the pressure is sufficiently high to prevent boiling. After injection into a combustion chamber, the water temperature will be well above boiling point at a reduced pressure in the combustion chamber, and flash boiling will preferentially take place at solid-liquid surfaces, resulting in the shattering of water droplets and the subsequent separation of the water from coal particles. This prevents the agglomeration of the coal particles during the subsequent ignition and combustion process, and reduces the energy required to evaporate the water and to heat the coal particles to ignition temperature. The overall effect will be to accelerate the ignition and combustion rates, and to reduce the size of the ash particles formed from the coal. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Combustion of coal gas fuels in a staged combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosfjord, T. J.; Mcvey, J. B.; Sederquist, R. A.; Schultz, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Gaseous fuels produced from coal resources generally have heating values much lower than natural gas; the low heating value could result in unstable or inefficient combustion. Coal gas fuels may contain ammonia which if oxidized in an uncontrolled manner could result in unacceptable nitrogen oxide exhaust emission levels. Previous investigations indicate that staged, rich-lean combustion represents a desirable approach to achieve stable, efficient, low nitrogen oxide emission operation for coal-derived liquid fuels contaning up to 0.8-wt pct nitrogen. An experimental program was conducted to determine whether this fuel tolerance can be extended to include coal-derived gaseous fuels. The results of tests with three nitrogen-free fuels having heating values of 100, 250, and 350 Btu/scf and a 250 Btu/scf heating value doped to contain 0.7 pct ammonia are presented.

  12. Oxy-fuel combustion with integrated pollution control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Brian R [Chicago, IL; Ochs, Thomas Lilburn [Albany, OR; Summers, Cathy Ann [Albany, OR; Oryshchyn, Danylo B [Philomath, OR; Turner, Paul Chandler [Independence, OR

    2012-01-03

    An oxygen fueled integrated pollutant removal and combustion system includes a combustion system and an integrated pollutant removal system. The combustion system includes a furnace having at least one burner that is configured to substantially prevent the introduction of air. An oxygen supply supplies oxygen at a predetermine purity greater than 21 percent and a carbon based fuel supply supplies a carbon based fuel. Oxygen and fuel are fed into the furnace in controlled proportion to each other and combustion is controlled to produce a flame temperature in excess of 3000 degrees F. and a flue gas stream containing CO2 and other gases. The flue gas stream is substantially void of non-fuel borne nitrogen containing combustion produced gaseous compounds. The integrated pollutant removal system includes at least one direct contact heat exchanger for bringing the flue gas into intimated contact with a cooling liquid to produce a pollutant-laden liquid stream and a stripped flue gas stream and at least one compressor for receiving and compressing the stripped flue gas stream.

  13. Advanced Diagnostics in Oxy-Fuel Combustion Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Jacob; Toftegaard, Maja Bøg; Clausen, Sønnik

    This report sums up the findings in PSO-project 010069, “Advanced Diagnostics in Oxy- Fuel Combustion Processes”. Three areas of optic diagnostics are covered in this work: - FTIR measurements in a 30 kW swirl burner. - IR measurements in a 30 kW swirl burner. - IR measurements in a laboratory...... technique was an invaluable tool in the discussion of data obtained by gas analysis, and it allowed for estimation of combustion times in O2/CO2 where the high CO2 concentration prevents the use of the carbon mass balance for that purpose. During the project the data have been presented at a conference......, formed the basis of a publication and it is part of two PhD dissertations. The name of the conference the journal and the dissertations are listed below. - Joint Meeting of the Scandinavian-Nordic and French Sections of the Combustion Institute, Combustion of Char Particles under Oxy-Fuel Conditions...

  14. Sensitivity of dual fuel engine combustion and knocking limits to gaseous fuel composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selim, M.Y.E. [United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2004-02-01

    Combustion noise, knock and ignition limits data are measured and presented for a dual fuel engine running on dual fuels of Diesel and three gaseous fuels separately. The gaseous fuels used are liquefied petroleum gas, pure methane and compressed natural gas mixture. The maximum pressure rise rate during combustion is presented as a measure of combustion noise, and the knocking and ignition limits are presented as torque output at the onset of knocking and ignition failure. Experimental investigation on the dual fuel engine revealed the noise generated from combustion, knocking and ignition limits for all gases at different design and operating conditions. A Ricardo E6 Diesel version engine is converted to run on dual fuel of Diesel and the tested gaseous fuel and is used throughout the work. The engine is fully computerized, and the cylinder pressure data, crank angle data and engine operating variables are stored in a PC for off line analysis. The effects of engine speeds, loads, pilot injection angle, pilot fuel quantity and compression ratio on combustion noise, knocking torque, thermal efficiency and maximum pressure are examined for the dual engine running on the three gaseous fuels separately. The combustion noise, knocking and ignition limits are found to relate to the type of gaseous fuels and to the engine design and operating parameters. (author)

  15. Sensitivity of dual fuel engine combustion and knocking limits to gaseous fuel composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selim, Mohamed Y.E.

    2004-01-01

    Combustion noise, knock and ignition limits data are measured and presented for a dual fuel engine running on dual fuels of Diesel and three gaseous fuels separately. The gaseous fuels used are liquefied petroleum gas, pure methane and compressed natural gas mixture. The maximum pressure rise rate during combustion is presented as a measure of combustion noise, and the knocking and ignition limits are presented as torque output at the onset of knocking and ignition failure. Experimental investigation on the dual fuel engine revealed the noise generated from combustion, knocking and ignition limits for all gases at different design and operating conditions. A Ricardo E6 Diesel version engine is converted to run on dual fuel of Diesel and the tested gaseous fuel and is used throughout the work. The engine is fully computerized, and the cylinder pressure data, crank angle data and engine operating variables are stored in a PC for off line analysis. The effects of engine speeds, loads, pilot injection angle, pilot fuel quantity and compression ratio on combustion noise, knocking torque, thermal efficiency and maximum pressure are examined for the dual engine running on the three gaseous fuels separately. The combustion noise, knocking and ignition limits are found to relate to the type of gaseous fuels and to the engine design and operating parameters

  16. Alternate-Fueled Combustion-Sector Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Nikita T.; Thomas, Anna E.; Shouse, Dale T.; Neuroth, Craig; Hendricks, Robert C.; Lynch, Amy; Frayne, Charles W.; Stutrud, Jeffrey S.; Corporan, Edwin; Hankins, Terry

    2012-01-01

    In order to meet rapidly growing demand for fuel, as well as address environmental concerns, the aviation industry has been testing alternate fuels for performance and technical usability in commercial and military aircraft. Currently, alternate aviation fuels must satisfy MIL-DTL- 83133F(2008) (military) or ASTM D 7566- Annex(2011) (commercial) standards and are termed drop-in fuel replacements. Fuel blends of up to 50% alternative fuel blended with petroleum (JP-8), which have become a practical alternative, are individually certified on the market. In order to make alternate fuels (and blends) a viable option for aviation, the fuel must be able to perform at a similar or higher level than traditional petroleum fuel. They also attempt to curb harmful emissions, and therefore a truly effective alternate fuel would emit at or under the level of currently used fuel. This paper analyzes data from gaseous and particulate emissions of an aircraft combustor sector. The data were evaluated at various inlet conditions, including variation in pressure and temperature, fuel-to-air ratios, and percent composition of alternate fuel. Traditional JP-8+100 data were taken as a baseline, and blends of JP- 8+100 with synthetic-paraffinic-kerosene (SPK) fuel (Fischer-Tropsch (FT)) were used for comparison. Gaseous and particulate emissions, as well as flame luminosity, were assessed for differences between FT composition of 0%, 50%, and 100%. The data showed that SPK fuel (a FT-derived fuel) had slightly lower harmful gaseous emissions, and smoke number information corroborated the hypothesis that SPK-FT fuels are cleaner burning fuels.

  17. Spray combustion of biomass-based renewable diesel fuel using multiple injection strategy in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei; Wu, Zengyang; Roberts, William L.; Fang, Tiegang

    2016-01-01

    Effect of a two-injection strategy associated with a pilot injection on the spray combustion process was investigated under conventional diesel combustion conditions (1000 K and 21% O2 concentration) for a biomass-based renewable diesel fuel, i

  18. Fuel reactivity and release of pollutants and alkali vapours in pressurized combustion for combined cycle power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, M.; Haemaelaeinen, J.; Paakkinen, K.; Rantanen, J. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Hernberg, R.; Haeyrinen, V.; Joutsenoja, T. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Lab. of Plasma Technology

    1996-12-01

    This project forms a part of the overall Pressurized Power Coal Combustion Project Area (PPFC) which aims at an assessment of the viability and technical merits of pressurized pulverized coal combustion, in an atmosphere of recycled flue gas and oxygen in a coordinated and harmonized programme. The objective of the research at Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and Tampere University of Technology (TUT) is aimed at determining the consequences of solid fuel burning in a mixture of oxygen and recycled flue gases. Combustion conditions of a pressurized entrained flow of pulverized coal and char particles in PEFR are determined with high precision. The effects of experimental parameters on the formation of nitrogen oxides (N{sub 2}O, NO and NO{sub 2}) and gaseous alkali compounds (indicated as NaX(g) and KX(g)) are studied. An effective on-line analysis method for vaporised Na and K compounds was developed. The dependency between particle temperatures and the vaporisation of Na and K was measured with three coals. The results show that alkali removal before gas turbines is always necessary with these coals if combusted in combined cycles. Pressure decreases the formation of NO and has usually no clear effect on the formation of N{sub 2}O. The order of NO/N{sub 2}O ratios correspond to fuel-O/fuel-N ratios. Increase of PO{sub 2} (oxygen concentration) of combustion gas increases the formation of NO{sub 2}. Remarkable concentrations of NO{sub 2} were often measured at high PO{sub 2} at 800-850 deg C. Therefore, NO{sub 2} should be measured from pressurized fluidized bed reactors. Some trends of the formation of NO{sub 2} with coal differ clearly from those with its parent char: N{sub 2}O formation is not strongly temperature dependent with char, and the concentrations of N{sub 2}O formed from char are much lower than those of coal. PO{sub 2} does not effect on the formation of NO from char in the studied range

  19. Modeling of combustion products composition of hydrogen-containing fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assad, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the usage of entropy maximum principal the algorithm and the program of chemical equilibrium calculation concerning hydrogen--containing fuels are devised. The program enables to estimate the composition of combustion products generated in the conditions similar to combustion conditions in heat engines. The program also enables to reveal the way hydrogen fraction in the conditional composition of the hydrocarbon-hydrogen-air mixture influences the harmful components content. It is proven that molecular hydrogen in the mixture is conductive to the decrease of CO, CO 2 and CH x concentration. NO outlet increases due to higher combustion temperature and N, O, OH concentrations in burnt gases. (authors)

  20. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, O.K.; Levasseur, A.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the U.S. Department of Energy is sponsoring the development of advanced coal-cleaning technologies aimed at expanding the use of the nation`s vast coal reserves in an environmentally and economically acceptable manner. Because of the lack of practical experience with deeply beneficiated coal-based fuels, PETC has contracted Combustion Engineering, Inc. to perform a multi-year project on `Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.` The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels (BCs) influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs.

  1. Detailed model for practical pulverized coal furnaces and gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philips, S.D.; Smoot, L.D.

    1989-08-01

    The need to improve efficiency and reduce pollutant emissions commercial furnaces has prompted energy companies to search for optimized operating conditions and improved designs in their fossil-fuel burning facilities. Historically, companies have relied on the use of empirical correlations and pilot-plant data to make decisions about operating conditions and design changes. The high cost of collecting data makes obtaining large amounts of data infeasible. The main objective of the data book is to provide a single source of detailed three-dimensional combustion and combustion-related data suitable for comprehensive combustion model evaluation. Five tasks were identified as requirements to achieve the main objective. First, identify the types of data needed to evaluate comprehensive combustion models, and establish criteria for selecting the data. Second, identify and document available three-dimensional combustion data related to pulverized coal combustion. Third, collect and evaluate three-dimensional data cases, and select suitable cases based on selection criteria. Fourth, organize the data sets into an easy-to-use format. Fifth, evaluate and interpret the nature and quality of the data base. 39 refs., 15 figs., 14 tabs.

  2. Oxy-fuel combustion on circulating fluidized bed. Chapter 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, E.J. [Canmet, Natural Resources Canada (Canada); Hack, H. [Foster Wheeler North America Corporation (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This paper explores the developments and field tests carried out with oxy-fuel fluidized bed combustion. This method has the advantage over the other options of emitting a pure stream of CO2 which thus does not need to be concentrated to be liquefied, transported and stored. In addition, pilot scale tests have shown that oxy-fired circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) results in low emission and fuel flexibility. This paper highlighted that oxy-fired CFBC might be a good option for CCS but tests performed so far have been on a small scale. To confirm the promising results of pilot tests, demonstration projects are underway and are presented herein.

  3. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1997-01-01

    This Third Edition of Glassman's classic text clearly defines the role of chemistry, physics, and fluid mechanics as applied to the complex topic of combustion. Glassman's insightful introductory text emphasizes underlying physical and chemical principles, and encompasses engine technology, fire safety, materials synthesis, detonation phenomena, hydrocarbon fuel oxidation mechanisms, and environmental considerations. Combustion has been rewritten to integrate the text, figures, and appendixes, detailing available combustion codes, making it not only an excellent introductory text but also an important reference source for professionals in the field. Key Features * Explains complex combustion phenomena with physical insight rather than extensive mathematics * Clarifies postulates in the text using extensive computational results in figures * Lists modern combustion programs indicating usage and availability * Relates combustion concepts to practical applications.

  4. Advanced Fuels and Combustion Processes for Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    production from biomass steam reforming – Conduct a feasibility analysis of the proposed integrated process Energia Technologies - D. Nguyen & K. Parimi...strength foam material development by Ultramet – Combustion experiments performed U. Of Alabama – End-user input provided by Solar Turbines Major

  5. Co-combustion: A summary of technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leckner Bo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-combustion of biomass or waste together with a base fuel in a boiler is a simple and economically suitable way to replace fossil fuels by biomass and to utilize waste. Co-combustion in a high-efficiency power station means utilization of biomass and waste with a higher thermal efficiency than what otherwise had been possible. Due to transport limitations, the additional fuel will only supply a minor part (less than a few hundreds MW fuel of the energy in a plant. There are several options: co-combustion with coal in pulverized or fluidized bed boilers, combustion on added grates inserted in pulverized coal boilers, combustors for added fuel coupled in parallel to the steam circuit of a power plant, external gas producers delivering its gas to replace an oil, gas or pulverized fuel burner. Furthermore biomass can be used for reburning in order to reduce NO emissions or for afterburning to reduce N2O emissions in fluidized bed boilers. Combination of fuels can give rise to positive or negative synergy effects, of which the best known are the interactions between S, Cl, K, Al, and Si that may give rise to or prevent deposits on tubes or on catalyst surfaces, or that may have an influence on the formation of dioxins. With better knowledge of these effects the positive ones can be utilized and the negative ones can be avoided.

  6. Influence of staged-air on airflow, combustion characteristics and NO(x) emissions of a down-fired pulverized-coal 300 MW(e) utility boiler with direct flow split burners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengqi; Kuang, Min; Zhang, Jia; Han, Yunfeng; Zhu, Qunyi; Yang, Lianjie; Kong, Weiguang

    2010-02-01

    Cold airflow experiments were conducted to investigate the aerodynamic field in a small-scale furnace of a down-fired pulverized-coal 300 MW(e) utility boiler arranged with direct flow split burners enriched by cyclones. By increasing the staged-air ratio, a deflected flow field appeared in the lower furnace; larger staged-air ratios produced larger deflections. Industrial-sized experiments on a full-scale boiler were also performed at different staged-air damper openings with measurements taken of gas temperatures in the burner region and near the right-side wall, wall heat fluxes, and gas components (O(2), CO, and NO(x)) in the near-wall region. Combustion was unstable at staged-air damper openings below 30%. For openings of 30% and 40%, late ignition of the pulverized coal developed and large differences arose in gas temperatures and heat fluxes between the regions near the front and rear walls. In conjunction, carbon content in the fly ash was high and boiler efficiency was low with high NO(x) emission above 1200 mg/m(3) (at 6% O(2) dry). For fully open dampers, differences in gas temperatures and heat fluxes, carbon in fly ash and NO(x) emission decreased yielding an increase in boiler efficiency. The optimal setting is fully open staged-air dampers.

  7. Environmental aspects of the combustion of sulfur-bearing fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manowitz, B.; Lipfert, F.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the origins of sulfur in fossil fuels and the consequences of its release into the environment after combustion, with emphasis on the United States. Typical sulfur contents of fuels are given, together with fuel uses and the resulting air concentrations of sulfur air pollutants. Atmospheric transformation and pollutant removal processes are described, as they affect the pathways of sulfur through the environment. The environmental effects discussed include impacts on human health, degradation of materials, acidification of ecosystems, and effects on vegetation and atmospheric visibility. The paper concludes with a recommendation for the use of risk assessment to assess the need for regulations which may require the removal of sulfur from fuels or their combustion products

  8. Universal autoignition models for designer fuels in HCCI combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandersickel, A.; Boulouchos, K.; Wright, Y.M. [LAV - Aerothermochemistry and Combustion Systems Laboratory - Institute of Energy Technology, ETH Zurich (Switzerland)], email: vandersickel@lav.mavt.ethz.ch

    2010-07-01

    In the energy sector, stringent regulations have been implemented on combustion emissions in order to address health and environmental concerns and help improve air quality. A novel combustion mode, homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), can improve the emissions performance of an engine in terms of NOx and soot release over that of diesel while maintaining the same efficiencies. However, problems of ignition timing control arise with HCCI. The aim of this paper is to determine how fuel properties impact the HCCI ignition process and operating range. This study was carried out as part of a collaboration among several universities and automotive companies and 10 fuels were investigated experimentally and numerically using Arrhenius' model and a lumped reaction model. The two ignition models were successfully adapted to describe the behavior of the studied fuels; atomizer engine experiments validated their results. Further work will be conducted to optimize the reaction mechanism for the remaining process fuels.

  9. Development of rapid mixing fuel nozzle for premixed combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuki, Masashi; Chung, Jin Do; Kim, Jang Woo; Hwang, Seung Min; Kim, Seung Mo; Ahn, Chul Ju

    2009-01-01

    Combustion in high-preheat and low oxygen concentration atmosphere is one of the attractive measures to reduce nitric oxide emission as well as greenhouse gases from combustion devices, and it is expected to be a key technology for the industrial applications in heating devices and furnaces. Before proceeding to the practical applications, we need to elucidate combustion characteristics of non-premixed and premixed flames in high-preheat and low oxygen concentration conditions from scientific point of view. For the purpose, we have developed a special mixing nozzle to create a homogeneous mixture of fuel and air by rapid mixing, and applied this rapidmixing nozzle to a Bunsen-type burner to observe combustion characteristics of the rapid-mixture. As a result, the combustion of rapid-mixture exhibited the same flame structure and combustion characteristics as the perfectly prepared premixed flame, even though the mixing time of the rapid-mixing nozzle was extremely short as a few milliseconds. Therefore, the rapid-mixing nozzle in this paper can be used to create preheated premixed flames as far as the mixing time is shorter than the ignition delay time of the fuel

  10. Multiple fuel supply system for an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers, William T.

    1977-01-01

    A multiple fuel supply or an internal combustion engine wherein phase separation of components is deliberately induced. The resulting separation permits the use of a single fuel tank to supply components of either or both phases to the engine. Specifically, phase separation of a gasoline/methanol blend is induced by the addition of a minor amount of water sufficient to guarantee separation into an upper gasoline phase and a lower methanol/water phase. A single fuel tank holds the two-phase liquid with separate fuel pickups and separate level indicators for each phase. Either gasoline or methanol, or both, can be supplied to the engine as required by predetermined parameters. A fuel supply system for a phase-separated multiple fuel supply contained in a single fuel tank is described.

  11. Compositional Effects of Gasoline Fuels on Combustion, Performance and Emissions in Engine

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ahfaz; Waqas, Muhammad; Naser, Nimal; Singh, Eshan; Roberts, William L.; Chung, Suk-Ho; Sarathy, Mani

    2016-01-01

    to interpret differences in combustion behavior of gasoline fuels that show similar knock characteristics in a cooperative fuel research (CFR) engine, but may behave differently in direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engines or any other engine combustion

  12. Development and numerical/experimental characterization of a lab-scale flat flame reactor allowing the analysis of pulverized solid fuel devolatilization and oxidation at high heating rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, R; Menanteau, S

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the thorough characterization of a new experimental test bench designed to study the devolatilization and oxidation of pulverized fuel particles in a wide range of operating conditions. This lab-scale facility is composed of a fuel feeding system, the functioning of which has been optimized by computational fluid dynamics. It allows delivering a constant and time-independent mass flow rate of fuel particles which are pneumatically transported to the central injector of a hybrid McKenna burner using a carrier gas stream that can be inert or oxidant depending on the targeted application. A premixed propane/air laminar flat flame stabilized on the porous part of the burner is used to generate the hot gases insuring the heating of the central coal/carrier-gas jet with a thermal gradient similar to those found in industrial combustors (>10(5) K/s). In the present work, results issued from numerical simulations performed a priori to characterize the velocity and temperature fields in the reaction chamber have been analyzed and confronted with experimental measurements carried out by coupling particle image velocimetry, thermocouple and two-color pyrometry measurements so as to validate the order of magnitude of the heating rate delivered by such a new test bench. Finally, the main features of the flat flame reactor we developed have been discussed with respect to those of another laboratory-scale system designed to study coal devolatilization at a high heating rate.

  13. Development and numerical/experimental characterization of a lab-scale flat flame reactor allowing the analysis of pulverized solid fuel devolatilization and oxidation at high heating rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, R., E-mail: romain.lemaire@mines-douai.fr; Menanteau, S. [Mines Douai, EI, F-59508 Douai (France)

    2016-01-15

    This paper deals with the thorough characterization of a new experimental test bench designed to study the devolatilization and oxidation of pulverized fuel particles in a wide range of operating conditions. This lab-scale facility is composed of a fuel feeding system, the functioning of which has been optimized by computational fluid dynamics. It allows delivering a constant and time-independent mass flow rate of fuel particles which are pneumatically transported to the central injector of a hybrid McKenna burner using a carrier gas stream that can be inert or oxidant depending on the targeted application. A premixed propane/air laminar flat flame stabilized on the porous part of the burner is used to generate the hot gases insuring the heating of the central coal/carrier-gas jet with a thermal gradient similar to those found in industrial combustors (>10{sup 5} K/s). In the present work, results issued from numerical simulations performed a priori to characterize the velocity and temperature fields in the reaction chamber have been analyzed and confronted with experimental measurements carried out by coupling particle image velocimetry, thermocouple and two-color pyrometry measurements so as to validate the order of magnitude of the heating rate delivered by such a new test bench. Finally, the main features of the flat flame reactor we developed have been discussed with respect to those of another laboratory-scale system designed to study coal devolatilization at a high heating rate.

  14. Versatile Affordable Advanced Fuels and Combustion Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Fuels, Vol. 22, No. 4, 2008 2415 165 elastomer is highly fluorinated and relatively inert, as evident by the very low percentage of volume swell. Previous...decomposition often include gums, varnishes , and coke, which are detrimental because they can foul and plug fuel system components, such as filters

  15. The fuel cell; La pile a combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boursin, P.

    2005-07-01

    This document is an exhaustive review of the history of fuel cells from 1802 to 2004. It focusses mainly on the automotive applications and supplies many technical details about each prototype of fuel cell and/or vehicle. (J.S.)

  16. Advanced Integrated Fuel/Combustion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    ineffective in the T63, even at concentrations up to 40 times the recommended value. Additive companies were informed about the performance of their...M. (1996): NASA RP- 1385. • Toepke, S. (1999): Boeing Company , Personal Correspondence. • Ulrich, G.D. (1971): Comb. Sci. Tech., Vol. 4, pp. 47-58...temperature (K) THC = total hydrocarbons UNICORN = UNsteady Ignition and COmbustion with ReactioNs V = reactor volume (mL) WSR = well-stirred reactor

  17. Fossil fuel power plant combustion control: Research in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasini, S.; Trebbi, G.

    1991-01-01

    Electric power demand forecasts for Italy to the year 2000 indicate an increase of about 50% which, due to the current moratorium on nuclear energy, should be met entirely by fossil fuel power plants. Now, there is growing public concern about possible negative health impacts due to the air pollution produced through the combustion of fossil fuels. In response to these concerns, ENEL (Italian National Electricity Board) is investing heavily in air pollution abatement technology R ampersand D. The first phase involves the investigation of pollution mechanisms in order to develop suitable mathematical models and diagnostic techniques. The validity of the models is being tested through through measurements made by sophisticated instrumentation placed directly inside the combustion chambers of steam generator systems. These are allowing engineers to develop improved combustion control methods designed to reduce air pollution at source

  18. Fuel accountability and control at Combustion Engineering, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersteen, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    Combustion Engineering, Inc. has recently developed and installed an automated data collection, data processing system for the accounting and control of special nuclear material. The system uses a variety of data collection techniques and some relatively new data processing ideas. The next few pages describe the Fuel Accountability and Control System

  19. Fuel composition impact on heavy duty diesel engine combustion & emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frijters, P.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Heavy Duty Diesel or compression ignition (CI) engine plays an important economical role in societies all over the world. Although it is a fuel efficient internal combustion engine design, CI engine emissions are an important contributor to global pollution. To further reduce engine emissions

  20. Quantification of fusion in ashes from solid fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug; Frandsen, Flemming; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1999-01-01

    The fusion of ashes produced during solid fuel combustion greatly affects the tendency of these ashes to cause operational problems in utility boilers. In this paper, a new and quantitative laboratory method for assessing the fusion of ashes based on simultaneous thermal analysis, STA, is described...

  1. Combustion of diesel fuel from a toxicological perspective. I. Origin of incomplete combustion products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, P T; Bos, R P

    1992-01-01

    Since the use of diesel engines is still increasing, the contribution of their incomplete combustion products to air pollution is becoming ever more important. The presence of irritating and genotoxic substances in both the gas phase and the particulate phase constituents is considered to have significant health implications. The quantity of soot particles and the particle-associated organics emitted from the tail pipe of a diesel-powered vehicle depend primarily on the engine type and combustion conditions but also on fuel properties. The quantity of soot particles in the emissions is determined by the balance between the rate of formation and subsequent oxidation. Organics are absorbed onto carbon cores in the cylinder, in the exhaust system, in the atmosphere and even on the filter during sample collection. Diesel fuel contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and some alkyl derivatives. Both groups of compounds may survive the combustion process. PAHs are formed by the combustion of crankcase oil or may be resuspended from engine and/or exhaust deposits. The conversion of parent PAHs to oxygenated and nitrated PAHs in the combustion chamber or in the exhaust system is related to the vast amount of excess combustion air that is supplied to the engine and the high combustion temperature. Whether the occurrence of these derivatives is characteristic for the composition of diesel engine exhaust remains to be ascertained. After the emission of the particles, their properties may change because of atmospheric processes such as aging and resuspension. The particle-associated organics may also be subject to (photo)chemical conversions or the components may change during sampling and analysis. Measurement of emissions of incomplete combustion products as determined on a chassis dynamometer provides knowledge of the chemical composition of the particle-associated organics. This knowledge is useful as a basis for a toxicological evaluation of the health hazards of

  2. Combustion modelling of a fuel oil flame; Modelisation de la combustion d`une flamme de fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flour, I.; Mechitouan, N.

    1996-10-01

    The combustion modelling of a fuel oil flame has been realised in the scope of the R and D `Combustion Turbines`. This report presents the results of the 2D simulation of a fuel oil flame (n-octane), at atmospherical pressure, without swirl, realised using the Eulerian two-phase flow software Melodif. This calculation has been defined in collaboration with IFP, using experimental data from the IFRP. The hollow cone spray of liquid fuel is injected in the middle of the combustion chamber, with a co-flowing annular air. The furnace diameter is 2 meter and its length is 6,25 meter. A large recirculation zone is induced by the air flow, and leads to take into account the whole furnace, in order to avoid some problems with the limit conditions at the outlet. This calculation deals with droplets evaporation, gaseous phase combustion and radiation heat transfer. Predictions concerning gaseous axial mean velocity and mean temperature gradient in the flame, are in good agreement with measurements. However the temperature is too low in the peripheral zone of the flow. This is probably due to the fact that heat exchanges at the wall furnace are not correctly represented, because of a lack of detailed limit conditions for the walls. The mean radial velocity is not so well predicted, but this measurement is also quite difficult in a strongly longitudinal flow. The results concerning the dispersed phase will not be compared, because no measurements on the liquid fuel were available. As it has been experimentally observed, the simulation shows that the fuel oil spray quickly evaporates as it enters the combustion chamber. This result allows to propose to use an homogeneous approach (hypothesis of no-slipping between the two phases) in an Eulerian one-phase flow code, in case of a 3D simulation of liquid fuel turbine. (authors)

  3. Combustion and Fuels in Gas Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    English and French) AGARD Advisory Report 150. Results of WG 09 (February 1980) Through Flow Calculations in Axial Turbomachines AGARD Advisory Report 175...Averaging Techniques in Non-Uniform Internal Flows AGARD Advisory Report 182 (in English and French). Results of WG 14 (June/August 1983) Producibility...A linear regression was used to develop an expression for the change in combustion efficiency relatice to Aoa. 1 an O4 a 0.t T, 0.0274 aTar f:a

  4. Apparatus and method for solid fuel chemical looping combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Weber, Justin M

    2015-04-14

    The disclosure provides an apparatus and method utilizing fuel reactor comprised of a fuel section, an oxygen carrier section, and a porous divider separating the fuel section and the oxygen carrier section. The porous divider allows fluid communication between the fuel section and the oxygen carrier section while preventing the migration of solids of a particular size. Maintaining particle segregation between the oxygen carrier section and the fuel section during solid fuel gasification and combustion processes allows gases generated in either section to participate in necessary reactions while greatly mitigating issues associated with mixture of the oxygen carrier with char or ash products. The apparatus and method may be utilized with an oxygen uncoupling oxygen carrier such as CuO, Mn.sub.3O.sub.4, or Co.sub.3O.sub.4, or utilized with a CO/H.sub.2 reducing oxygen carrier such as Fe.sub.2O.sub.3.

  5. Combustion of large solid fuels in cement rotary kilns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Rooma

    (MBM), waste wood, sewage sludge, paper and plastics. The alternative fuel share of the total energy varies significantly from region to region, but the general trend is towards increased alternative fuel utilization. Solid alternative fuels typically have physical and chemical properties that differ...... from traditional solid fossil fuels. This creates a need for new combustion equipment or modification of existing kiln systems, because alternative fuels may influence process stability and product quality. Process stability is mainly influenced by exposing the raw material bed in the rotary kiln...... oxidation is a slow process which may greatly reduce the amounts of solid fuels to be utilized in the material inlet end of rotary kilns due to the limited residence time. Several parameters control the rate of char oxidation: a) bulk oxygen concentration, b) mass transfer rate of oxygen to char particles...

  6. Numerical Studies on Controlling Gaseous Fuel Combustion by Managing the Combustion Process of Diesel Pilot Dose in a Dual-Fuel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulski Maciej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Protection of the environment and counteracting global warming require finding alternative sources of energy. One of the methods of generating energy from environmentally friendly sources is increasing the share of gaseous fuels in the total energy balance. The use of these fuels in compression-ignition (CI engines is difficult due to their relatively high autoignition temperature. One solution for using these fuels in CI engines is operating in a dualfuel mode, where the air and gas mixture is ignited with a liquid fuel dose. In this method, a series of relatively complex chemical processes occur in the engine's combustion chamber, related to the combustion of individual fuel fractions that interact with one another. Analysis of combustion of specific fuels in this type of fuel injection to the engine is difficult due to the fact that combustion of both fuel fractions takes place simultaneously. Simulation experiments can be used to analyse the impact of diesel fuel combustion on gaseous fuel combustion. In this paper, we discuss the results of simulation tests of combustion, based on the proprietary multiphase model of a dual-fuel engine. The results obtained from the simulation allow for analysis of the combustion process of individual fuels separately, which expands the knowledge obtained from experimental tests on the engine.

  7. Fuel Flexible Combustion Systems for High-Efficiency Utilization of Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatesan, Krishna

    2011-11-30

    The purpose of this program was to develop low-emissions, efficient fuel-flexible combustion technology which enables operation of a given gas turbine on a wider range of opportunity fuels that lie outside of current natural gas-centered fuel specifications. The program encompasses a selection of important, representative fuels of opportunity for gas turbines with widely varying fundamental properties of combustion. The research program covers conceptual and detailed combustor design, fabrication, and testing of retrofitable and/or novel fuel-flexible gas turbine combustor hardware, specifically advanced fuel nozzle technology, at full-scale gas turbine combustor conditions. This project was performed over the period of October 2008 through September 2011 under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-08NT05868 for the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE/NETL) entitled "Fuel Flexible Combustion Systems for High-Efficiency Utilization of Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines". The overall objective of this program was met with great success. GE was able to successfully demonstrate the operability of two fuel-flexible combustion nozzles over a wide range of opportunity fuels at heavy-duty gas turbine conditions while meeting emissions goals. The GE MS6000B ("6B") gas turbine engine was chosen as the target platform for new fuel-flexible premixer development. Comprehensive conceptual design and analysis of new fuel-flexible premixing nozzles were undertaken. Gas turbine cycle models and detailed flow network models of the combustor provide the premixer conditions (temperature, pressure, pressure drops, velocities, and air flow splits) and illustrate the impact of widely varying fuel flow rates on the combustor. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were employed to compare some fundamental combustion characteristics of the target fuels, including flame speeds and lean blow-out behavior. Perfectly premixed combustion experiments were conducted to

  8. Municipal solid waste combustion: Fuel testing and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushnell, D.J.; Canova, J.H.; Dadkhah-Nikoo, A.

    1990-10-01

    The objective of this study is to screen and characterize potential biomass fuels from waste streams. This will be accomplished by determining the types of pollutants produced while burning selected municipal waste, i.e., commercial mixed waste paper residential (curbside) mixed waste paper, and refuse derived fuel. These materials will be fired alone and in combination with wood, equal parts by weight. The data from these experiments could be utilized to size pollution control equipment required to meet emission standards. This document provides detailed descriptions of the testing methods and evaluation procedures used in the combustion testing and characterization project. The fuel samples will be examined thoroughly from the raw form to the exhaust emissions produced during the combustion test of a densified sample.

  9. Gasoline Ultra Efficient Fuel Vehicle with Advanced Low Temperature Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Confer, Keith [Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC, Troy, MI (United States)

    2014-12-18

    The objective of this program was to develop, implement and demonstrate fuel consumption reduction technologies which are focused on reduction of friction and parasitic losses and on the improvement of thermal efficiency from in-cylinder combustion. The program was executed in two phases. The conclusion of each phase was marked by an on-vehicle technology demonstration. Phase I concentrated on short term goals to achieve technologies to reduce friction and parasitic losses. The duration of Phase I was approximately two years and the target fuel economy improvement over the baseline was 20% for the Phase I demonstration. Phase II was focused on the development and demonstration of a breakthrough low temperature combustion process called Gasoline Direct- Injection Compression Ignition (GDCI). The duration of Phase II was approximately four years and the targeted fuel economy improvement was 35% over the baseline for the Phase II demonstration vehicle. The targeted tailpipe emissions for this demonstration were Tier 2 Bin 2 emissions standards.

  10. Disturbing effect of free hydrogen on fuel combustion in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedler, A

    1923-01-01

    Experiments with fuel mixtures of varying composition, have recently been conducted by the Motor Vehicle and Airplane Engine Testing Laboratories of the Royal Technical High School in Berlin and at Fort Hahneberg, as well as at numerous private engine works. The behavior of hydrogen during combustion in engines and its harmful effect under certain conditions, on the combustion in the engine cylinder are of general interest. Some of the results of these experiments are given here, in order to elucidate the main facts and explain much that is already a matter of experience with chauffeurs and pilots.

  11. Mathematical model for solid fuel combustion in fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostikj, Zvonimir; Noshpal, Aleksandar

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model for computation of the combustion process of solid fuel in fluidized bed is presented in this work. Only the combustor part of the plant (the fluidized bed and the free board) is treated with this model. In that manner, all principal, physical presumption and improvements (upon which this model is based) are given. Finally, the results of the numerical realisation of the mathematical model for combustion of minced straw as well as the results of the experimental investigation of a concrete physical model are presented. (author)

  12. Pollutants generated by the combustion of solid biomass fuels

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Jenny M; Ma, Lin; Williams, Alan; Pourkashanian, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    This book considers the pollutants formed by the combustion of solid biomass fuels. The availability and potential use of solid biofuels is first discussed because this is the key to the development of biomass as a source of energy.This is followed by details of the methods used for characterisation of biomass and their classification.The various steps in the combustion mechanisms are given together with a compilation of the kinetic data. The chemical mechanisms for the formation of the pollutants: NOx, smoke and unburned hydrocarbons, SOx, Cl compounds, and particulate metal aerosols

  13. Fuel injector nozzle for an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Mark S.; Urven, Jr., Roger L.; Lawrence, Keith E.

    2008-11-04

    A direct injection fuel injector includes a nozzle tip having a plurality of passages allowing fluid communication between an inner nozzle tip surface portion and an outer nozzle tip surface portion and directly into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine. A first group of the passages have inner surface apertures located substantially in a first common plane. A second group of the passages have inner surface apertures located substantially in at least a second common plane substantially parallel to the first common plane. The second group has more passages than the first group.

  14. Electrostatic fuel conditioning of internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, P. I.

    1982-01-01

    Diesel engines were tested to determine if they are influenced by the presence of electrostatic and magnetic fields. Field forces were applied in a variety of configurations including pretreatment of the fuel and air, however, no affect on engine performance was observed.

  15. Fuels for internal-combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1925-10-23

    To reduce knocking in internal-conbustion engines, the fuel is mixed with a small quantity, for instance 10 percent, of the hydrocarbon obtained by extracting with liquid sulfur dioxide hydrocarbon material, such as mineral oil fractions, coal tar and lignite tar distillates of higher boiling point, for example distillates boiling between 150 and 300/sup 0/C.

  16. Combustion characteristics and air pollutant formation during oxy-fuel co-combustion of microalgae and lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Tahmasebi, Arash; Dou, Jinxiao; Yu, Jianglong

    2016-05-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels is seen as one of the key technologies for carbon capture to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The combustion characteristics of lignite coal, Chlorella vulgaris microalgae, and their blends under O2/N2 and O2/CO2 conditions were studied using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer-Mass Spectroscopy (TG-MS). During co-combustion of blends, three distinct peaks were observed and were attributed to C. vulgaris volatiles combustion, combustion of lignite, and combustion of microalgae char. Activation energy during combustion was calculated using iso-conventional method. Increasing the microalgae content in the blend resulted in an increase in activation energy for the blends combustion. The emissions of S- and N-species during blend fuel combustion were also investigated. The addition of microalgae to lignite during air combustion resulted in lower CO2, CO, and NO2 yields but enhanced NO, COS, and SO2 formation. During oxy-fuel co-combustion, the addition of microalgae to lignite enhanced the formation of gaseous species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Combustion of Refuse Derived Fuels; Foerbraenning av utsorterade avfallsfraktioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Magnus; Wikman, Karin [AaF-Energi och Miljoe, Stockholm (Sweden); Andersson, Christer; Myringer, Aase; Helgesson, Anna [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden); Eskilsson, David; Ekvall, Annika [SP Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden); Oehman, Marcus; Geyter, Sigrid de [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this project was to increase the understanding of opportunities and problems connected with combustion of sorted waste fractions containing paper, wood and plastics (PWP-fuel) in fluidized bed boilers. An evaluation of the effect of sulphur containing additives in a PWP-fuel fired boiler was also performed within the project since this is not previously reported in open literature. The experience from two boilers at different plants, Johannes (BFB) and Hoegdalen P6 (CFB) during the firing season 2003/2004 was documented. In the Johannes boiler the main fuel is bark while Hoegdalen P6 combusts 100 % PWP-fuel. Analysis of the fuels shows that there are large differences between the two boilers. At Johannes the PWP-fuel contained low amounts of elements (chlorine, alkali and other metals) that are expected to result in increased operational problems or emissions. A large proportion of these unwanted elements came from the wood and paper fractions. The plastic fraction in Johannes had very low levels of unwanted elements. The fuel at Hoegdalen contained large amounts of elements such as chlorine, alkali and other metals that can cause operational problems. First of all the plastic fraction contained large amounts of chlorine, most likely from PVC, which results in a more corrosive atmosphere in the boiler. The fraction of fines in the Hoegdalen fuel contained larger concentrations of potassium and sodium compared with the other fuel fractions, substances that also are related to the formation of deposits. The fraction of fines in the fuel probably also results in combustion taking place high up in the boiler and to some extent continuing in the cyclones. The characterisation of the combustion behaviour performed in Johannes identified a maldistribution in O{sub 2}, CO and gas temperature over a cross-section of the furnace. This was not depending on the fuel mixture but is more likely depending on uneven fuel feeding or air distribution. A comparison between

  18. Combustion Of Poultry-Derived Fuel in a CFBC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lufei; Anthony, Edward J.

    Poultry farming generates large quantities of waste. Current disposal practice is to spread the poultry wastes onto farmland as fertilizer. However, as the factory farms for poultry grow both in numbers and size, the amount of poultry wastes generated has increased significandy in recent years. In consequence, excessive application of poultry wastes on farmland is resulting in more and more contaminants entering the surface water. One of the options being considered is the use of poultry waste as power plant fuel. Since poultry-derived fuel (PDF) is biomass, its co-firing will have the added advantage of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from power generation. To evaluate the combustion characteristics of co-firing PDF with coal, combustion tests of mixtures of coal and PDF were conducted in CanmetENERGY's pilot-scale CFBC. The goal of the tests was to verify that PDF can be co-fired with coal and, more importantly, that emissions from the combustion process are not adversely affected by the presence of PDF in the fuel feed. The test results were very promising and support the view that co-firing in an existing coal-fired CFBC is an effective method of utilizing this potential fuel, both resolving a potential waste disposal problem and reducing the amount of CO2 released by the boiler.

  19. Characterisation of fuels for advanced pressurized combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zevenhoven, R.; Hupa, M.; Backman, P.; Karlsson, M.; Kullberg, M.; Sorvari, V. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland); Nurk, M. [Tallinn Univ. (Estonia)

    1996-12-01

    After 2 of the 3 years for this EU Joule 2 extension project, a rough comparison on the devolatilisation behaviour and char reactivity of 11 fossil fuels and 4 biofuels has been obtained. The experimental plan for 1995 has been completed, the laboratory facilities appeared to be well suited for the broad range of analyses presented here. A vast amount of devolatilisation tests in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure with gas analysis and char analysis gave a lot of information on the release of carbon, sulphur, nitrogen and also sodium, chloride and some other elements. Also first-order rate parameters could be determined. Solid pyrolysis yield measurements with the pressurised grid heater show a very good reproducibility except for the fuels with high carbonate content and those with very small char yield. Problems have to be solved considering lower heating rates and the use of folded grids. Fuel pyrolysis followed by gasification (with carbon dioxide or water as oxidising agent) at various temperatures and pressures shows that in general char solid yields and gasification reactivities are higher at elevated pressure. The design and construction of a pressurized single particle reactor, to be operational early 1996 is currently being negotiated. Numerical modelling of coal devolatilisation shows that even for atmospheric pressures the results differ significantly from experimental findings. (author)

  20. Synthesis of Diopside by Solution Combustion Process Using Glycine Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherikar, Baburao N.; Umarji, A. M.

    Nano ceramic Diopside (CaMgSi2O6) powders are synthesized by Solution Combustion Process(SCS) using Calcium nitrate, Magnesium nitrate as oxidizer and glycine as fuel, fumed silica as silica source. Ammonium nitrate (AN) is used as extra oxidizer. Effect of AN on Diopside phase formation is investigated. The adiabatic flame temperatures are calculated theoretically for varying amount of AN according to thermodynamic concept and correlated with the observed flame temperatures. A “Multi channel thermocouple setup connected to computer interfaced Keithley multi voltmeter 2700” is used to monitor the thermal events during the process. An interpretation based on maximum combustion temperature and the amount of gases produced during reaction for various AN compositions has been proposed for the nature of combustion and its correlation with the characteristics of as synthesized powder. These powders are characterized by XRD, SEM showing that the powders are composed of polycrystalline oxides with crystallite size of 58nm to 74nm.

  1. Plasma-Enhanced Combustion of Hydrocarbon Fuels and Fuel Blends Using Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappelli, Mark; Mungal, M Godfrey

    2014-10-28

    This project had as its goals the study of fundamental physical and chemical processes relevant to the sustained premixed and non-premixed jet ignition/combustion of low grade fuels or fuels under adverse flow conditions using non-equilibrium pulsed nanosecond discharges.

  2. From fuel to wheel: how modern fuels behave in combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pischinger, S.; Muether, M.; Fricke, F. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Inst. for Combustion Engines; Kolbeck, A. [FEV Motorentechnik GmbH und Co KG, Aachen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Fuel consumption/CO{sub 2}-emission reduction for spark-ignited (SI) gasoline engines and pollutant emission reduction for compression-ignited (CI) Diesel engines remain the major challenges for future combustion engine research and development. Currently a variety of technological developments is followed. The fuel has significant influence on the fuel injection and mixing, the self-ignition behaviour and the subsequent combustion process, and hence has considerable impact on the engine conversion efficiency and the emission characteristics. Therefore, a very promising approach to improve the engine efficiency and to lower the pollutant emission is to optimize the fuel composition. Several diesel-like fuels with varying aromatic concentrations (mono-, di-, tri- and total aromatics) and oxygenating components have already shown potential for soot reduction in diesel engines, which is of interest when looking at future biofuel components, which will most likely have particular higher oxygen content. 2nd generation biofuels, e.g. ethanol for SI engines and Fischer-Tropsch diesel for CI engines, have already demonstrated their positive influence on the engine performance, when the combustion system is specifically adapted. The full potential for future high efficient and low emission combustion systems can only be exploited by a simultaneous optimisation of the fuel and the internal combustion engine. (orig.)

  3. Combustion instabilities in sudden expansion oxy-fuel flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ditaranto, Mario; Hals, Joergen [Department of Energy Processes, SINTEF Energy Research, 7465 Trondheim (Norway)

    2006-08-15

    An experimental study on combustion instability is presented with focus on oxy-fuel type combustion. Oxidants composed of CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} and methane are the reactants flowing through a premixer-combustor system. The reaction starts downstream a symmetric sudden expansion and is at the origin of different instability patterns depending on oxygen concentration and Reynolds number. The analysis has been conducted through measurement of pressure, CH* chemiluminescence, and velocity. As far as stability is concerned, oxy-fuel combustion with oxygen concentration similar to that found in air combustion cannot be sustained, but requires at least 30% oxygen to perform in a comparable manner. Under these conditions and for the sudden expansion configuration used in this study, the instability is at low frequency and low amplitude, controlled by the flame length inside the combustion chamber. Above a threshold concentration in oxygen dependent on equivalence ratio, the flame becomes organized and concentrated in the near field. Strong thermoacoustic instability is then triggered at characteristic acoustic modes of the system. Different modes can be triggered depending on the ratio of flame speed to inlet velocity, but for all types of instability encountered, the heat release and pressure fluctuations are linked by a variation in mass-flow rate. An acoustic model of the system coupled with a time-lag-based flame model made it possible to elucidate the acoustic mode selection in the system as a function of laminar flame speed and Reynolds number. The overall work brings elements of reflection concerning the potential risk of strong pressure oscillations in future gas turbine combustors for oxy-fuel gas cycles. (author)

  4. Effects of Fuel Quantity on Soot Formation Process for Biomass-Based Renewable Diesel Fuel Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Soot formation process was investigated for biomass-based renewable diesel fuel, such as biomass to liquid (BTL), and conventional diesel combustion under varied fuel quantities injected into a constant volume combustion chamber. Soot measurement was implemented by two-color pyrometry under quiescent type diesel engine conditions (1000 K and 21% O2 concentration). Different fuel quantities, which correspond to different injection widths from 0.5 ms to 2 ms under constant injection pressure (1000 bar), were used to simulate different loads in engines. For a given fuel, soot temperature and KL factor show a different trend at initial stage for different fuel quantities, where a higher soot temperature can be found in a small fuel quantity case but a higher KL factor is observed in a large fuel quantity case generally. Another difference occurs at the end of combustion due to the termination of fuel injection. Additionally, BTL flame has a lower soot temperature, especially under a larger fuel quantity (2 ms injection width). Meanwhile, average soot level is lower for BTL flame, especially under a lower fuel quantity (0.5 ms injection width). BTL shows an overall low sooting behavior with low soot temperature compared to diesel, however, trade-off between soot level and soot temperature needs to be carefully selected when different loads are used.

  5. OxyFuel combustion of Coal and Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Maja Bøg

    The power and heat producing sector is facing a continuously increasing demand to reduce its emissions of CO2. Oxyfuel combustion combined with CO2 storage is suggested as one of the possible, promising technologies which will enable the continuous use of the existing fleet of suspension-fired po......The power and heat producing sector is facing a continuously increasing demand to reduce its emissions of CO2. Oxyfuel combustion combined with CO2 storage is suggested as one of the possible, promising technologies which will enable the continuous use of the existing fleet of suspension......-fired power plants burning coal or other fuels during the period of transition to renewable energy sources. The oxyfuel combustion process introduces several changes to the power plant configuration. Most important, the main part of the flue gas is recirculated to the boiler and mixed with pure oxygen....... The oxidant thus contains little or no nitrogen and a near-pure CO2 stream can be produced by cooling the flue gas to remove water. The change to the oxidant composition compared to combustion in air will induce significant changes to the combustion process. This Ph.D. thesis presents experimental...

  6. Combustion studies of coal derived solid fuels by thermogravimetric analysis. III. Correlation between burnout temperature and carbon combustion efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostam-Abadi, M.; DeBarr, J.A.; Chen, W.T.

    1990-01-01

    Burning profiles of 35-53 ??m size fractions of an Illinois coal and three partially devolatilized coals prepared from the original coal were obtained using a thermogravimetric analyzer. The burning profile burnout temperatures were higher for lower volatile fuels and correlated well with carbon combustion efficiencies of the fuels when burned in a laboratory-scale laminar flow reactor. Fuels with higher burnout temperatures had lower carbon combustion efficiencies under various time-temperature conditions in the laboratory-scale reactor. ?? 1990.

  7. C60 fullerenes from combustion of common fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Andrea J., E-mail: ajtiwari@vt.edu [Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Virginia Tech, 200 Patton Hall, 750 Drillfield Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Ashraf-Khorassani, Mehdi, E-mail: mashraf@vt.edu [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Tech, 480 Davidson Hall, 900 West Campus Drive, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Marr, Linsey C., E-mail: lmarr@vt.edu [Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Virginia Tech, 200 Patton Hall, 750 Drillfield Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Releases of C{sub 60} fullerenes to the environment will increase with the growth of nanotechnology. Assessing the potential risks of manufactured C{sub 60} requires an understanding of how its prevalence in the environment compares to that of natural and incidental C{sub 60}. This work describes the characterization of incidental C{sub 60} present in aerosols generated by combustion of five common fuels: coal, firewood, diesel, gasoline, and propane. C{sub 60} was found in exhaust generated by all five fuels; the highest concentrations in terms of mass of C{sub 60} per mass of particulate matter were associated with diesel and coal. Individual aerosols from these combustion processes were examined by transmission electron microscopy. No relationship was found between C{sub 60} content and either the separation of graphitic layers (lamellae) within the particles, nor the curvature of those lamellae. Estimated global emissions of incidental C{sub 60} to the atmosphere from coal and diesel combustion range from 1.6 to 6.3 t yr{sup −1}, depending upon combustion conditions. These emissions may be similar in magnitude to the total amount of manufactured C{sub 60} produced on an annual basis. Consequent loading of incidental C{sub 60} to the environment may be several orders of magnitude higher than has previously been modeled for manufactured C{sub 60}. - Highlights: • Exhaust of common fuels (coal, diesel, etc.) analyzed via chromatography for C{sub 60.} • All five fuels tested produced C{sub 60} in aerosols in mass fractions up to several ppm. • Emissions of incidental C{sub 60} may be comparable to the total amount manufactured.

  8. COMBUSTION SIMULATION IN A SPARK IGNITION ENGINE CYLINDER: EFFECTS OF AIR-FUEL RATIO ON THE COMBUSTION DURATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nureddin Dinler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion is an important subject of internal combustion engine studies. To reduce the air pollution from internal combustion engines and to increase the engine performance, it is required to increase combustion efficiency. In this study, effects of air/fuel ratio were investigated numerically. An axisymmetrical internal combustion engine was modeled in order to simulate in-cylinder engine flow and combustion. Two dimensional transient continuity, momentum, turbulence, energy, and combustion equations were solved. The k-e turbulence model was employed. The fuel mass fraction transport equation was used for modeling of the combustion. For this purpose a computational fluid dynamics code was developed by using the finite volume method with FORTRAN programming code. The moving mesh was utilized to simulate the piston motion. The developed code simulates four strokes of engine continuously. In the case of laminar flow combustion, Arrhenius type combustion equations were employed. In the case of turbulent flow combustion, eddy break-up model was employed. Results were given for rich, stoichiometric, and lean mixtures in contour graphs. Contour graphs showed that lean mixture (l = 1.1 has longer combustion duration.

  9. Surrogate fuel formulation for light naphtha combustion in advanced combustion engines

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ahfaz

    2015-03-30

    Crude oil once recovered is further separated in to several distinct fractions to produce a range of energy and chemical products. One of the less processed fractions is light naphtha (LN), hence they are more economical to produce than their gasoline and diesel counterparts. Recent efforts have demonstrated usage of LN as transportation fuel for internal combustion engines with slight modifications. In this study, a multicomponent surrogate fuel has been developed for light naphtha fuel using a multi-variable nonlinear constrained optimization scheme. The surrogate, consisting of palette species n-pentane, 2-methylhexane, 2-methylbutane, n-heptane and toluene, was validated against the LN using ignition quality tester following ASTM D6890 methodology. Comparison of LN and the surrogate fuel demonstrated satisfactory agreement.

  10. Spray combustion of Jet-A and diesel fuels in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the spray combustion of Jet-A fuel in an optical constant-volume combustion chamber under different ambient initial conditions. Ambient temperature was varied at 800 K, 1000 K, and 1200 K and five different ambient O2 concentrations were used, spanning 10-21%. These ambient conditions can be used to mimic practical diesel engine working conditions under different fuel injection timings and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) levels. Both transient and quasi-steady state analyses were conducted. The transient analysis focused on the flame development from the beginning to the end of the combustion process, illustrating how the flame structure evolves with time. The quasi-steady state analysis concentrated on the stable flame structure and compared the flame emissions in terms of spatially integrated intensity, flame effective area, and intensity per pixel. The transient analysis was based on measurements using high-speed imaging of both OH∗ chemiluminescence and broadband natural luminosity (NL). For the quasi-steady state analysis, three flame narrow-band emissions (OH∗ at 310 nm, Band A at 430 nm and Band B at 470 nm) were captured using an ICCD camera. Based on the current Jet-A data and diesel data obtained from previous experiments, a comparison between Jet-A and diesel was made in terms of flame development during the transient state and spatially integrated intensity, flame effective area, and intensity per pixel during the quasi-steady state. For the transient results, Jet-A shares a similar flame development trend to diesel, but featuring a narrower region of NL and a wider region of OH∗ with the increase of ambient temperature and O2 concentration. The soot cloud is oxidized more quickly for Jet-A than diesel at the end of combustion, evident by comparing the area of NL, especially under high O2 concentration. The quasi-steady state results suggest that soot is oxidized effectively under high O2 concentration conditions by the

  11. Fuel spray and combustion characteristics of butanol blends in a constant volume combustion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yu; Li, Jun; Jin, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A sudden drop is observed in spray penetration for B10S10D80 fuel at 800 and 900 K. • With increasing of temperature, auto-ignition timings of fuels become unperceivable. • Low n-butanol addition has little effect on autoignition timings from 800 to 1200 K. • n-Butanol additive can reduce soot emissions at the near-wall regions. • Larger soot reduction is seen at higher ambient temperatures for n-butanol addition. - Abstract: The processes of spray penetrations, flame propagation and soot formation and oxidation fueling n-butanol/biodiesel/diesel blends were experimentally investigated in a constant volume combustion chamber with an optical access. B0S20D80 (0% n-butanol, 20% soybean biodiesel, and 80% diesel in volume) was prepared as the base fuel. n-Butanol was added into the base fuel by volumetric percent of 5% and 10%, denoted as B5S15D80 (5% n-butanol/15% soybean biodiesel/80% diesel) and B10S10D80 (10% n-butanol/10% soybean biodiesel/80% diesel). The ambient temperatures at the time of fuel injection were set to 800 K, 900 K, 1000 K, and 1200 K. Results indicate that the penetration length reduces with the increase of n-butanol volumes in blending fuels and ambient temperatures. The spray penetration presents a sudden drop as fueling B10S10D80 at 800 K and 900 K, which might be caused by micro-explosion. A larger premixed combustion process is observed at low ambient temperatures, while the heat release rate of high ambient temperatures presents mixing controlled diffusion combustion. With a lower ambient temperature, the auto-ignition delay becomes longer with increasing of n-butanol volume in blends. However, with increasing of ambient temperatures, the auto-ignition timing between three fuels becomes unperceivable. Generally, low n-butanol addition has a limited or no effect on the auto-ignition timing in the current conditions. Compared with the base fuel of B0S20D80, n-butanol additive with 5% or 10% in volume can reduce soot

  12. Low-Emission combustion of fuel in aeroderivative gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulysova, L. A.; Vasil'ev, V. D.; Berne, A. L.

    2017-12-01

    The paper is the first of a planned set of papers devoted to the world experience in development of Low Emission combustors (LEC) for industrial Gas Turbines (GT). The purpose of the article is to summarize and analyze the most successful experience of introducing the principles of low-emission combustion of the so-called "poor" (low fuel concentration in air when the excess air ratio is about 1.9-2.1) well mixed fuelair mixtures in the LEC for GTs and ways to reduce the instability of combustion. The consideration examples are the most successful and widely used aero-derivative GT. The GT development meets problems related to the difference in requirements and operation conditions between the aero, industrial, and power production GT. One of the main problems to be solved is the LEC development to mitigate emissions of the harmful products first of all the Nitrogen oxides NOx. The ways to modify or convert the initial combustors to the LEC are shown. This development may follow location of multiburner mixers within the initial axial envelope dimensions or conversion of circular combustor to the can type one. The most interesting are Natural Gas firing GT without water injection into the operating process or Dry Low emission (DLE) combustors. The current GT efficiency requirement may be satisfied at compressor exit pressure above 3 MPa and Turbine Entry temperature (TET) above 1500°C. The paper describes LEC examples based on the concept of preliminary prepared air-fuel mixtures' combustion. Each combustor employs its own fuel supply control concept based on the fuel flow-power output relation. In the case of multiburner combustors, the burners are started subsequently under a specific scheme. The can type combustors have combustion zones gradually ignited following the GT power change. The combustion noise problem experienced in lean mixtures' combustion is also considered, and the problem solutions are described. The GT test results show wide ranges of stable

  13. Emissions from small scale combustion of pelletized wood fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachs, A.

    1998-01-01

    Combustion of wood pellets in small scale heating systems with an effect below 20 kW has increased. During the winter season 1995/96 1500 small plants for heating houses are estimated to be in operation. Stack emissions from three pellet burners and two pellet stoves have been studied at laboratory. Different pellet qualities were tested. When the fraction of fines increased also the NO x emissions increased with about 10 %. As reference fuel 8 mm pellets was used. Tests with 6 mm pellets gave, in most cases, significant lower emissions of CO and THC. Eleven stoves, burners and boilers were studied in a field test. The results show that all the plants generally have higher emissions in the field than during conditions when the plants are adjusted with a stack gas monitoring instrument. A conclusion is that it is difficult for the operator to adjust the plant without a monitoring instrument. The emissions from the tested plants give an estimation of stack gas emissions from small scale pellet plants. The difference between the 'best' and 'worst' technologies is big. The span of emissions with the best technology to the worst is given below. The interval is concerning normal combustion . During abnormal conditions the emissions are on a significant higher level: * CO 80-1 000 mg/MJ; * Tar 0,3-19 mg/MJ; * THC (as methane equivalents) 2-100 mg/MJ; * NO x 50-70 mg/W;, and * Dust emissions 20-40 mg/MJ. Emissions from pellets heating are lower than from wood combustion and the best technology is close to the emission from oil burners. Wood and pellets have the same origin but the conditions to burn them in an environmental friendly way differ. Combustion of pellets could be improved through improved control of the air and fuel ratio that will create more stable conditions for the combustion

  14. A review of oxy-fuel combustion in fluidized bed reactors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathekga, HI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Presently, there is no detailed review that summarizes the current knowledge status on oxy-fuel combustion in fluidized bed combustors. This paper reviewed the existing literature in heat transfer, char combustion and pollutant emissions oxy...

  15. Chemical looping combustion. Fuel conversion with inherent CO2 capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandvoll, Oeyvind

    2005-07-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a new concept for fuel energy conversion with CO2 capture. In CLC, fuel combustion is split into separate reduction and oxidation processes, in which a solid carrier is reduced and oxidized, respectively. The carrier is continuously recirculated between the two vessels, and hence direct contact between air and fuel is avoided. As a result, a stoichiometric amount of oxygen is transferred to the fuel by a regenerable solid intermediate, and CLC is thus a variant of oxy-fuel combustion. In principle, pure CO2 can be obtained from the reduction exhaust by condensation of the produced water vapour. The thermodynamic potential and feasibility of CLC has been studied by means of process simulations and experimental studies of oxygen carriers. Process simulations have focused on parameter sensitivity studies of CLC implemented in 3 power cycles; CLC-Combined Cycle, CLC-Humid Air Turbine and CLC-Integrated Steam Generation. Simulations indicate that overall fuel conversion ratio, oxidation temperature and operating pressure are among the most important process parameters in CLC. A promising thermodynamic potential of CLC has been found, with efficiencies comparable to, - or better than existing technologies for CO2 capture. The proposed oxygen carrier nickel oxide on nickel spinel (NiONiAl) has been studied in reduction with hydrogen, methane and methane/steam as well as oxidation with dry air. It has been found that at atmospheric pressure and temperatures above 600 deg C, solid reduction with dry methane occurs with overall fuel conversion of 92%. Steam methane reforming is observed along with methane cracking as side reactions, yielding an overall selectivity of 90% with regard to solid reduction. If steam is added to the reactant fuel, coking can be avoided. A methodology for long-term investigation of solid chemical activity in a batch reactor is proposed. The method is based on time variables for oxidation. The results for Ni

  16. Annual Report: DOE Advanced Combustion Systems & Fuels R&D; Light-Duty Diesel Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Despite compliance issues in previous years, automakers have demonstrated that the newest generation of diesel power trains are capable of meeting all federal and state regulations (EPA, 2016). Diesels continue to be a cost-effective, efficient, powerful propulsion source for many light- and medium-duty vehicle applications (Martec, 2016). Even modest reductions in the fuel consumption of light- and medium duty diesel vehicles in the U.S. will eliminate millions of tons of CO2 emissions per year. Continued improvement of diesel combustion systems will play an important role in reducing fleet fuel consumption, but these improvements will require an unprecedented scientific understanding of how changes in engine design and calibration affect the mixture preparation, combustion, and pollutant formation processes that take place inside the cylinder. The focus of this year’s research is to provide insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for improved thermal efficiency observed with a stepped-lip piston. Understanding how piston design can influence efficiency will help engineers develop and optimize new diesel combustion systems.

  17. Naphtha vs. dieseline – The effect of fuel properties on combustion homogeneity in transition from CI combustion towards HCCI

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.

    2018-03-20

    The scope of this research study pertains to compare the combustion and emission behavior between naphtha and dieseline at different combustion modes. In this study, US dieseline (50% US diesel + 50% RON 91 gasoline) and EU dieseline (45% EU diesel + 55% RON 97 gasoline) with derived cetane number (DCN) of 36 are selected for experimentation in an optical engine. Besides naphtha and dieseline, PRF60 is also tested as a surrogate fuel for naphtha. For the reported fuel with same RON = 60, the effect of physical properties on combustion homogeneity when moving from homogenized charge compression ignition (HCCI) to compression ignition (CI) combustion is studied.The combustion phasing of naphtha at an intake air temperature of 95 °C is taken as the baseline data. The engine experimental results show that higher and lower intake air temperature is required for dieseline mixtures to have same combustion phasing as that of naphtha at HCCI and CI conditions due to the difference in the physical properties. Especially at HCCI mode, due to wider distillation range of dieseline, the evaporation of the fuel is affected so that the gas phase mixture becomes too lean to auto-ignite. However, at partially premixed combustion (PPC) conditions, all test fuels required almost same intake air temperature to match up with the combustion phasing of baseline naphtha. From the rate of heat release and combustion images, it was found that naphtha and PRF60 showed improved premixed combustion when compared dieseline mixtures. The stratification analysis shows that combustion is more stratified for dieseline whereas it is premixed for naphtha and PRF60. The level of stratification linked with soot emission showed that soot concentration is higher at stratified CI combustion whereas near zero soot emissions were noted at PPC mode.

  18. Impact of Fuel Type on the Internal Combustion Engine Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdravko Schauperl

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the influence of liquefied petroleum gas as alternative fuel on the condition of the internal combustion engine. The traffic, energy, economic and ecological influence as well as the types of fuel are studied and analyzed in an unbiased manner, objectively, and in detail, and the obtained results are compared with the condition of the engine of a vehicle powered by the stipulated fuel, petrol Eurosuper 95. The study was carried out on two identical passenger cars with one being fitted with gas installation. The obtained results show that properly installed gas installations in vehicles and the usage of LPG have no significant influence on the driving performances, but they affect significantly the ecological and economic parameters of using passenger cars.

  19. FUEL FORMULATION EFFECTS ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION, COMBUSTION, EMISSIONS AND EMISSION CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehman, A; Alam, M; Song, J; Acharya, R; Szybist, J; Zello, V; Miller, K

    2003-08-24

    This paper describes work under a U.S. DOE sponsored Ultra Clean Fuels project entitled ''Ultra Clean Fuels from Natural Gas,'' Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41098. In this study we have examined the incremental benefits of moving from low sulfur diesel fuel and ultra low sulfur diesel fuel to an ultra clean fuel, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel produced from natural gas. Blending with biodiesel, B100, was also considered. The impact of fuel formulation on fuel injection timing, bulk modulus of compressibility, in-cylinder combustion processes, gaseous and particulate emissions, DPF regeneration temperature and urea-SCR NOx control has been examined. The primary test engine is a 5.9L Cummins ISB, which has been instrumented for in-cylinder combustion analysis and in-cylinder visualization with an engine videoscope. A single-cylinder engine has also been used to examine in detail the impacts of fuel formulation on injection timing in a pump-line-nozzle fueling system, to assist in the interpretation of results from the ISB engine.

  20. Total chain dynamical assessment with an integrated model of a Post Combustion Capture Plant at a Pulverized Coal Plant and CO2 downstream infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kler, R.C.F. de; Haar, A.M. van de

    2013-01-01

    The application of Post Combustion Capture has a significant advantage for mitigating the anthropogenic greenhouse gases in our atmosphere, in comparison to other capture technologies, since it is a so called “End of the Pipe” retrofit and therefore potentially applicable to existing power plants.

  1. Investigation of the flow, combustion, heat-transfer and emissions from a 609MW utility tangentially fired pulverized-coal boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Caillat, Sébastien; Harion, Jean-Luc.

    2002-01-01

    , some different strategies with the existing researches are used. Good agreement of simulation results with global design parameters and site operation records indicates this simulation is pretty reasonable and thus the conclusions of the gas flow deviation, emissions, combustion and heat transfer...

  2. Using Alcohols as an Alternative Fuel in Internal Combustion Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih ÖZER

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study summarizes the studies on alcohol use in internal combustion engines nature. Nowadays, alcohol is used in internal combustion engines sometimes in order to reduce emissions and sometimes as an alternative fuel. Even vehicle manufacturers are producing and launching vehicles that are running directly with alcohol. Many types of pure alcohol that can be used on vehicles are available on the world. Using all of these types of alcohol led to the formation of engine emissions and power curves. The studies reveal that these changes are because of the physical and chemical characteristics of alcohols. Thıs study tries to explain what kind of conclusions the physical and chemical properties cause

  3. Emission of nitrous oxide during combustion of organic fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.; Gol' dberg, A.S.

    1990-11-01

    Analyzes formation of nitrogen oxides during combustion of coal, natural gas and mazout: chemical reactions that lead to formation of nitrous oxide during coal combustion, reaction kinetics and reaction yields, factors that influence emission of nitrogen oxides from a furnace, factors that influence formation of nitrous oxide (temperature effects, air excess ratio, coal burnout degree, etc.), effects of fuel type and its chemical composition, effects of flue gas desulfurization and denitrification methods on nitrous oxide yield. Analyses show that yield of nitrous oxide is low and does not exceed 5 cm{sup 3}/m{sup 3} flue gas (0.0005%). However chemical reactions of nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere are said to form additional quantities of nitrous oxide which negatively influence the ozone layer. 4 refs.

  4. Magnox Fuel Cycles; Cycles des combustibles gaines de magnox; Toplivnye tsikly magnoks; Ciclos de combustible magnox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A. [United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Risley, Warrington, Lancs (United Kingdom)

    1963-10-15

    The interaction between reactivity flux and temperature distributions and irradiation patterns caused by different refuelling policies is considered and present calculation methods outlined. Various refuelling schemes for both batch and continuous discharge systems are compared. The problem of the efficient irradiation of the first charge is considered together with delayed onset refuelling and shuffling schemes. The economic advantages and problems of using non-natural uranium in flattened reactors are discussed. The practical consideration of on-load refuelling schemes on new reactors are considered and reference is made to the experience gained on Bradwell and Berkeley. The effect of the variation of fuel cost and endurance on fuel-cycle economics is outlined. (author) [French] L'auteur etudie en premier lieu l'interaction entre les distributions de la temperature du flux et de la reactivite, d'une part, et le regime de l'irradiation, d'autre part, dans le cas de differents programmes de rechargement du combustible et il decrit brievement les methodes de calcul actuelles. Il compare ensuite differents programmes de rechargement du combustible pour le dechargement par lots et le dechargement continu. Il etudie le probleme de l'irradiation effica ce de la premiere charge dans le cadre de programmes de remplacement et de deplacement des cartouches a action retardee. Il analyse les avantages economiques de l'utilisatio n d'uranium non naturel dans les reacteurs a flux aplati et les problemes qu'elle pose. Il examine les aspects pratiques des programmes de rechargement en marche pour les nouveaux reacteurs, en se referant a l'experience acquise au moyen des reacteurs de Bradwell et de Berkeley. Enfin, il decrit brievement les effets des variations du cout et de la resistance du combustible sur l'economie des cycles de combustible. (author) [Spanish] La memoria estudia la interaccion entre el flujo de reactividad y la distribucion de temperaturas, asi como los

  5. Oxy-combustion of high water content fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Fei

    As the issues of global warming and the energy crisis arouse extensive concern, more and more research is focused on maximizing energy efficiency and capturing CO2 in power generation. To achieve this, in this research, we propose an unconventional concept of combustion - direct combustion of high water content fuels. Due to the high water content in the fuels, they may not burn under air-fired conditions. Therefore, oxy-combustion is applied. Three applications of this concept in power generation are proposed - direct steam generation for the turbine cycle, staged oxy-combustion with zero flue gas recycle, and oxy-combustion in a low speed diesel-type engine. The proposed processes could provide alternative approaches to directly utilize fuels which intrinsically have high water content. A large amount of energy to remove the water, when the fuels are utilized in a conventional approach, is saved. The properties and difficulty in dewatering high water content fuels (e.g. bioethanol, microalgae and fine coal) are summarized. These fuels include both renewable and fossil fuels. In addition, the technique can also allow for low-cost carbon capture due to oxy-combustion. When renewable fuel is utilized, the whole process can be carbon negative. To validate and evaluate this concept, the research focused on the investigation of the flame stability and characteristics for high water content fuels. My study has demonstrated the feasibility of burning fuels that have been heavily diluted with water in a swirl-stabilized burner. Ethanol and 1-propanol were first tested as the fuels and the flame stability maps were obtained. Flame stability, as characterized by the blow-off limit -- the lowest O2 concentration when a flame could exist under a given oxidizer flow rate, was determined as a function of total oxidizer flow rate, fuel concentration and nozzle type. Furthermore, both the gas temperature contour and the overall ethanol concentration in the droplets along the

  6. Analysis of oxy-fuel combustion power cycle utilizing a pressurized coal combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Gazzino, Marco; Hong, Jongsup; Chaudhry, Gunaranjan; Brisson II, John G; Field, Randall; Ghoniem, Ahmed F

    2009-01-01

    Growing concerns over greenhouse gas emissions have driven extensive research into new power generation cycles that enable carbon dioxide capture and sequestration. In this regard, oxy-fuel combustion is a promising new technology in which fuels are burned in an environment of oxygen and recycled combustion gases. In this paper, an oxy-fuel combustion power cycle that utilizes a pressurized coal combustor is analyzed. We show that this approach recovers more thermal energy from the flue gases...

  7. Characterisation of ashes produced by co-combustion of recovered fuels and peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankenhaeuser, M.; Zevenhoven, R. [Borealis Polymers Oy, Porvoo (Finland); Skrifvars, B.J. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland); Orjala, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Peltola, K. [Foster Wheeler Energy (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    Source separation of combustible materials from household or municipal solid waste yields a raw material for the production of Packaging Derived Fuel (PDF). This fuel can substitute the traditional fuels in heat and power generation and is also called recycled fuel. Co-combustion of these types of fuels with coal has been studied in several LIEKKI-projects and the results have been both technically and environmentally favourable. (author)

  8. Experimental results with hydrogen fueled internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boer, P. C. T.; Mclean, W. J.; Homan, H. S.

    1975-01-01

    The paper focuses on the most important experimental findings for hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines, with particular reference to the application of these findings to the assessment of the potential of hydrogen engines. Emphasis is on the various tradeoffs that can be made, such as between maximum efficiency, maximum power, and minimum NO emissions. The various possibilities for induction and ignition are described. Some projections are made about areas in which hydrogen engines may find their initial application and about optimum ways to design such engines. It is shown that hydrogen-fueled reciprocal internal combustion engines offer important advantages with respect to thermal efficiency and exhaust emissions. Problems arising from preignition can suitably be avoided by restricting the fuel-air equivalence ratio to values below about 0.5. The direct cylinder injection appears to be a very attractive way to operate the engine, because it combines a wide range of possible power outputs with a high thermal efficiency and very low NO emissions at part loads.

  9. Dry pulverized solid material pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, John W.; Bonin, John H.; Daniel, Jr., Arnold D.

    1984-07-31

    Apparatus is shown for substantially increasing the feed rate of pulverized material into a pressurized container. The apparatus includes a rotor that is mounted internal to the pressurized container. The pulverized material is fed into an annular chamber defined by the center of the rotor. A plurality of impellers are mounted within the annular chamber for imparting torque to the pulverized material.

  10. Combustion Mode Design with High Efficiency and Low Emissions Controlled by Mixtures Stratification and Fuel Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu eWang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review on the combustion mode design with high efficiency and low emissions controlled by fuel reactivity and mixture stratification that have been conducted in the authors’ group, including the charge reactivity controlled homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI combustion, stratification controlled premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI combustion, and dual-fuel combustion concepts controlled by both fuel reactivity and mixture stratification. The review starts with the charge reactivity controlled HCCI combustion, and the works on HCCI fuelled with both high cetane number fuels, such as DME and n-heptane, and high octane number fuels, such as methanol, natural gas, gasoline and mixtures of gasoline/alcohols, are reviewed and discussed. Since single fuel cannot meet the reactivity requirements under different loads to control the combustion process, the studies related to concentration stratification and dual-fuel charge reactivity controlled HCCI combustion are then presented, which have been shown to have the potential to achieve effective combustion control. The efforts of using both mixture and thermal stratifications to achieve the auto-ignition and combustion control are also discussed. Thereafter, both charge reactivity and mixture stratification are then applied to control the combustion process. The potential and capability of thermal-atmosphere controlled compound combustion mode and dual-fuel reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI/highly premixed charge combustion (HPCC mode to achieve clean and high efficiency combustion are then presented and discussed. Based on these results and discussions, combustion mode design with high efficiency and low emissions controlled by fuel reactivity and mixtures stratification in the whole operating range is proposed.

  11. Solid Fuel - Oxygen Fired Combustion for Production of Nodular Reduced Iron to Reduce CO2 Emissions and Improve Energy Efficiencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald R. Fosnacht; Richard F. Kiesel; David W. Hendrickson; David J. Englund; Iwao Iwasaki; Rodney L. Bleifuss; Mathew A. Mlinar

    2011-12-22

    The current trend in the steel industry is an increase in iron and steel produced in electric arc furnaces (EAF) and a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the market demands of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling capabilities. This demand creates opportunity to convert iron ore or other iron bearing materials to Nodular Reduced Iron (NRI) in a recently designed Linear Hearth Furnace (LHF). NRI is a metallized iron product containing 98.5 to 96.0% iron and 2.5 to 4% C. It is essentially a scrap substitute with little impurity that can be utilized in a variety of steelmaking processes, especially the electric arc furnace. The objective of this project was to focus on reducing the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) through reducing the energy intensity using specialized combustion systems, increasing production and the use of biomass derived carbon sources in this process. This research examined the use of a solid fuel-oxygen fired combustion system and compared the results from this system with both oxygen-fuel and air-fuel combustion systems. The solid pulverized fuels tested included various coals and a bio-coal produced from woody biomass in a specially constructed pilot scale torrefaction reactor at the Coleraine Minerals Research Laboratory (CMRL). In addition to combustion, the application of bio-coal was also tested as a means to produce a reducing atmosphere during key points in the fusion process, and as a reducing agent for ore conversion to metallic iron to capture the advantage of its inherent reduced carbon footprint. The results from this study indicate that the approaches taken can reduce both greenhouse gas emissions and the associated energy intensity with the Linear Hearth Furnace process for converting

  12. Co-combustion for fossil fuel replacement and better environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M. Helena; Gulyurtlu, Ibrahim; Abelha, Pedro; Teixeira, P.; Crujeira, Teresa; Boavida, Dulce; Marques, F.; Cabrita, Isabel [INETI/DER, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2006-07-01

    The growing demand for energy and the requirements regarding CO{sub 2} emissions to comply with the Kyoto targets, together with crisis associated with the fuel supply, can be, to some degree, met by the use of renewable fuel sources, such as biomass. Although the use of biomass, originating from forests, could be beneficial, particularly in preventing fires, there are obstacles to achieve a sustainable supply of biomass in most European countries. In addition, there are also technical barriers as biomass combustion conditions may differ from those of coal, which could mean significant retrofitting of existing installations. The significance of this problem was recognized in the EU and a Project is being financed by the 6th Framework Programme, INETI from Portugal being the coordinator. Five EU countries plus Turkey participate in the project which aims at evaluating both the sustainable chain supply in the several countries, taking profit of the experience of northern European countries and the technical issues related with the co-combustion process, pollutant emission control and operational problems, such as fouling and slagging inside the boilers. At INETI, experimental work is being carried out, involving the characterization of several types of biomass and non-toxic residues. These materials are being burned on a pilot fluidized bed combustor, in order to evaluate combustion performance and improve conditions and synergies of fuel blends to control pollutant emissions and slagging tendency. Ashes produced are also being characterized, for composition and leachability, in order to evaluate possibilities of reutilization and compliance with landfilling regulations. In this paper a description of the project is presented, along with some of the results already obtained.

  13. Co-combustion for fossil fuel replacement and better environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Helena Lopes; I. Gulyurtlu; P. Abelha; P. Teixeira; T. Crujeira; D. Boavida; F. Marques; I. Cabrita [INETI, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2006-07-01

    The growing demand for energy and the requirement regarding CO{sub 2} emissions, to comply with the Kyoto targets, together with crisis associated with the fuel supply, can be, to some degree, met by the use of renewable fuel sources, such as biomass. Although the use of biomass, originating from forests, could be beneficial, there are obstacles to achieve a sustainable supply of biomass in most European countries. In addition, there are also technical barriers as biomass combustion conditions may differ from those of coal, which could mean significant retrofitting of existing installations. The significance of this problem was recognized in the EU and a Project is being financed by the 6th Framework Programme, INETI from Portugal being the coordinator. Five EU countries plus Turkey participate in the project which aims at evaluating both the sustainable chain supply in the several countries, taking profit of the experience of northern European countries and the technical issues related with the co-combustion process, pollutant emission control and operational problems, such as fouling and slagging inside the boilers. At INETI, experimental work is being carried out, involving the characterization of several types of biomass and non-toxic residues. These materials are being burned on a pilot fluidized bed combustor, in order to evaluate combustion performance and improve conditions and synergies of fuel blends to control pollutant emissions and slagging tendency. Ashes produced are also being characterized, for composition and leachability, in order to evaluate possibilities of reutilization and compliance with landfilling regulations. In this paper a description of the project is presented, along with some of the results already obtained. 19 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Premixer assembly for mixing air and fuel for combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, William David; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2016-12-13

    A premixer assembly for mixing air and fuel for combustion includes a plurality of tubes disposed at a head end of a combustor assembly. Also included is a tube of the plurality of tubes, the tube including an inlet end and an outlet end. Further included is at least one non-circular portion of the tube extending along a length of the tube, the at least one non-circular portion having a non-circular cross-section, and the tube having a substantially constant cross-sectional area along its length

  15. Observer-Based Fuel Control Using Oxygen Measurement. A study based on a first-principles model of a pulverized coal fired Benson Boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Palle; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Mortensen, Jan Henrik; Just Nielsen, Rene; Soendergaard Pedersen, Tom [Aalborg Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Control Engineering

    2005-01-01

    This report describes an attempt to improve the existing control of coal mills used at the Danish power plant Nordjyllandsvaerket Unit 3. The coal mills pulverize raw coal to a fine-grained powder, which is injected into the furnace of the power plant. In the furnace the coal is combusted, producing heat, which is used for steam production. With better control of the coal mills, the power plant can be controlled more efficiently during load changes, thus improving the overall availability and efficiency of the plant. One of the main difficulties from a control point of view is that the coal mills are not equipped with sensors that detect how much coal is injected into the furnace. During the project, a fairly detailed, non-linear differential equation model of the furnace and the steam circuit was constructed and validated against data obtained at the plant. It was observed that this model was able to capture most of the important dynamics found in the data. Based on this model, it is possible to extract linearized models in various operating points. The report discusses this approach and illustrates how the model can be linearized and reduced to a lower-order linear model that is valid in the vicinity of an operating point by removing states that have little influence on the overall response. A viable adaptive control strategy would then be to design controllers for each of these simplified linear models, i.e., the control loop that sets references to the coal mills and feedwater, and use the load as a separate input to the control. The control gains should then be scheduled according to the load. However, the variations and uncertainties in the coal mill are not addressed directly in this approach. Another control approach was taken in this project, where a Kalman filter based on measurements of air flow blown into the furnace and the oxygen concentration in the flue gas is designed to estimate the actual coal flow injected into the furnace. With this estimate

  16. High pressure combustion of liquid fuels. [alcohol and n-paraffin fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canada, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements were made of the burning rates and liquid surface temperatures for a number of alcohol and n-paraffin fuels under natural and forced convection conditions. Porous spheres ranging in size from 0.64-1.9 cm O.D. were emloyed to simulate the fuel droplets. The natural convection cold gas tests considered the combustion in air of methanol, ethanol, propanol-1, n-pentane, n-heptane, and n-decane droplets at pressures up to 78 atmospheres. The pressure levels of the natural convection tests were high enough so that near critical combustion was observed for methanol and ethanol vaporization rates and liquid surface temperature measurements were made of droplets burning in a simulated combustion chamber environment. Ambient oxygen molar concentrations included 13%, 9.5% and pure evaporation. Fuels used in the forced convection atmospheric tests included those listed above for the natural convection tests. The ambient gas temperature ranged from 600 to 1500 K and the Reynolds number varied from 30 to 300. The high pressure forced convection tests employed ethanol and n-heptane as fuels over a pressure range of one to 40 atmospheres. The ambient gas temperature was 1145 K for the two combustion cases and 1255 K for the evaporation case.

  17. Experimental study on fuel economies and emissions of direct-injection premixed combustion engine fueled with gasoline/diesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Jiakun; Sun, Wanchen; Guo, Liang; Xiao, Senlin; Tan, Manzhi; Li, Guoliang; Fan, Luyan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A compound combustion concept was proposed and investigated. • Premixed combustion near the top dead center was investigated using blended fuels. • Increasing gasoline blend ratio was found to enhance the mixture preparation. • Too much addition of gasoline decreases indicated thermal efficiency. • Gasoline/diesel blends may be a promising alternative for premixed combustion. - Abstract: The effects of gasoline/diesel blended fuel composed of diesel fuel with gasoline as additives in volume basis, on combustion, fuel economies and exhaust emissions were experimentally investigated. Tests were carried out based on a turbocharged Common-rail Direct Injection engine at a constant engine speed of 1800 r/min and different loads of 3.2 bar, 5.1 bar Indicated Mean Effective Pressure. Additionally, the effect of combustion phasing and Exhaust Gas Recirculation were evaluated experimentally for various fuels. The results indicated that with the fraction of gasoline increasing in blends, the ignition delay was prolonged and the combustion phasing was retarded with the common injection timing. This led to a significant increase of premixed burning phase, which was in favor of smoke reduction; although, too much gasoline might be adverse to fuel consumption. An optimum combustion phasing was identified, leading to a higher thermal efficiency and better premixed combustion with blended fuels. A combined application of Exhaust Gas Recirculation and blended fuel with a high gasoline fraction was confirmed effective in reducing the oxides of nitrogen and smoke emissions simultaneously at the optimum combustion phasing without giving significant penalty of fuel consumption. A compound combustion mode with its emission lower than the conventional Compression Ignition engines, and efficiency higher than the typical Spark Ignition engines, could be achieved with a cooperative control of Exhaust Gas Recirculation and combustion phasing of the gasoline

  18. PM From the Combustion of heavy fuel oils

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2018-03-30

    This work presents an experimental study investigating the formation and oxidation of particulate matter from the combustion of heavy fuel oil, HFO, droplets. The study includes results from both a falling droplet in a drop tube furnace and a suspended droplet in a heated convective flow. The falling droplets in a heated coflow air with variable temperature path and velocity were combusted and the resulting particles, cenospheres, were collected. To characterize the microstructure of these particles, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-Ray (EDX) analysis were used. The particles were found to have either a porous or a skeleton/membrane morphology. The percentage of particles of either type appears to be related to the thermal history, which was controlled by the heated co-flow velocity. In the suspended droplet experiments, by suspending the droplet on a thermocouple, the temperature inside the droplet was measured while simultaneously imaging the various burning phases. A number of specific phases were identified, from liquid to solid phase combustion are presented and discussed. The droplet ignition temperature was seen to be independent of the droplet size. However, the liquid phase ignition delay time and the droplet lifetime were directly proportional to the initial droplet diameter.

  19. Spray combustion of Jet-A and diesel fuels in a constant volume combustion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Wei; Roberts, William L.; Fang, Tiegang

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the spray combustion of Jet-A fuel in an optical constant-volume combustion chamber under different ambient initial conditions. Ambient temperature was varied at 800 K, 1000 K, and 1200 K and five different ambient O 2 concentrations were used, spanning 10–21%. These ambient conditions can be used to mimic practical diesel engine working conditions under different fuel injection timings and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) levels. Both transient and quasi-steady state analyses were conducted. The transient analysis focused on the flame development from the beginning to the end of the combustion process, illustrating how the flame structure evolves with time. The quasi-steady state analysis concentrated on the stable flame structure and compared the flame emissions in terms of spatially integrated intensity, flame effective area, and intensity per pixel. The transient analysis was based on measurements using high-speed imaging of both OH ∗ chemiluminescence and broadband natural luminosity (NL). For the quasi-steady state analysis, three flame narrow-band emissions (OH ∗ at 310 nm, Band A at 430 nm and Band B at 470 nm) were captured using an ICCD camera. Based on the current Jet-A data and diesel data obtained from previous experiments, a comparison between Jet-A and diesel was made in terms of flame development during the transient state and spatially integrated intensity, flame effective area, and intensity per pixel during the quasi-steady state. For the transient results, Jet-A shares a similar flame development trend to diesel, but featuring a narrower region of NL and a wider region of OH ∗ with the increase of ambient temperature and O 2 concentration. The soot cloud is oxidized more quickly for Jet-A than diesel at the end of combustion, evident by comparing the area of NL, especially under high O 2 concentration. The quasi-steady state results suggest that soot is oxidized effectively under high O 2 concentration conditions by

  20. Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Prototype for CO2 Capture from Existing Pulverized Coal-Fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrus, Jr., Herbert E. [Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Chiu, John H. [Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Edberg, Carl D. [Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Thibeault, Paul R. [Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Turek, David G. [Alstom Power Inc., Windsor, CT (United States)

    2012-09-30

    Alstom’s Limestone Chemical Looping (LCL™) process has the potential to capture CO2 from new and existing coal-fired power plants while maintaining high plant power generation efficiency. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion- gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology. This process could also be potentially configured as a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas or hydrogen for various applications while also producing a separate stream of CO2 for use or sequestration. The targets set for this technology is to capture over 90% of the total carbon in the coal at cost of electricity which is less than 20% greater than Conventional PC or CFB units. Previous work with bench scale test and a 65 kWt Process Development Unit Development (PDU) has validated the chemistry required for the chemical looping process and provided for the investigation of the solids transport mechanisms and design requirements. The objective of this project is to continue development of the combustion option of chemical looping (LCL-C™) by designing, building and testing a 3 MWt prototype facility. The prototype includes all of the equipment that is required to operate the chemical looping plant in a fully integrated manner with all major systems in service. Data from the design, construction, and testing will be used to characterize environmental performance, identify and address technical risks, reassess commercial plant economics, and develop design information for a demonstration plant planned to follow the proposed Prototype. A cold flow model of the prototype will be used to predict operating conditions for the prototype and help in operator training. Operation of the prototype will provide operator experience with this new technology and performance data of the LCL-C™ process, which will be applied to the commercial design and economics and plan for a future demonstration

  1. Coal-water slurry fuel internal combustion engine and method for operating same

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillian, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    An internal combustion engine fueled with a coal-water slurry is described. About 90 percent of the coal-water slurry charge utilized in the power cycle of the engine is directly injected into the main combustion chamber where it is ignited by a hot stream of combustion gases discharged from a pilot combustion chamber of a size less than about 10 percent of the total clearance volume of main combustion chamber with the piston at top dead center. The stream of hot combustion gases is provided by injecting less than about 10 percent of the total coal-water slurry charge into the pilot combustion chamber and using a portion of the air from the main combustion chamber that has been heated by the walls defining the pilot combustion chamber as the ignition source for the coal-water slurry injected into the pilot combustion chamber.

  2. Advisable alternative fuels for Mexico; Combustibles alternativos convenientes para Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar Gonzalez, Jorge Luis [ICA Fluor (Mexico)

    2007-07-15

    The alternative fuels are born with the goal of not damaging the environment; biodiesel, electricity, ethanol, hydrogen, methanol, natural gas, LP gas, are the main alternative fuels. However, the biodiesel and bioetanol are the only completely renewable ones, this makes them ideal to be developed in Mexico, since the agricultural sector could be fortified, the technological independence be favored, improve the conservation of the oil resources and by all means not to affect the environment. On the other hand, also efficient cultivation techniques should be developed to guarantee the economy of the process. [Spanish] Los combustibles alternativos nacen con la meta de no danar el medio ambiente; el biodiesel, electricidad, etanol, hidrogeno, metanol, gas natural, gas LP, son los principales combustibles alternativos. No obstante, el biodiesel y el bioetanol son los unicos completamente renovables, esto los hace ideales para desarrollarse en Mexico, ya que se podria fortalecer el sector agricola, favorecer la independencia tecnologica, mejorar la administracion de los recursos petroleros y por supuesto no afectar al medio ambiente. Por otro lado tambien se tendrian que desarrollar tecnicas de cultivo eficientes para garantizar la economia del proceso.

  3. Does fossil fuel combustion lead to global warming?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    Tropospheric sulfate aerosols produced by atmospheric oxidation of SO 2 emitted from fossil fuel combustion scatter solar radiation and enhance the reflectivity of clouds. Both effects decrease the absorption of solar radiation by the earth-atmosphere system. This cooling influence tends to offset the warming influence resulting from increased absorption of terrestrial infrared radiation by increased atmospheric concentrations of CO 2 . The sulfate forcing is estimated to be offsetting 70% of the forcing by CO 2 derived from fossil fuel combustion, although the uncertainty of this estimate is quite large--range 28-140%, the latter figure indicating that the present combined forcing is net cooling. Because of the vastly different atmospheric residence times of sulfate aerosol (about a week) and CO 2 (about 100 years), the cooling influence of sulfate aerosol is exerted immediately, whereas most of the warming influence of CO 2 is exerted over more than 100 years. Consequently the total forcing integrated over the entire time the materials reside in the atmosphere is net warming, with the total CO 2 forcing estimate to exceed the sulfate forcing by a factor of 4. The present situation in which the forcing by sulfate is comparable to that by CO 2 is shown to be a consequence of the steeply increasing rates of emission over the industrial era. (author)

  4. Applying Thermodynamics to Fossil Fuels: Heats of Combustion from Elemental Compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, William G.; Davenport, Derek A.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed are the calculations of heats of combustions of some selected fossil fuel compounds such as some foreign shale oils and United States coals. Heating values for coal- and petroleum-derived fuel oils are also presented. (HM)

  5. Fuel formulation and mixing strategy for rate of heat release control with PCCI combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, R.P.C.; Yu, M.; Luijten, C.C.M.; Dam, N.J.; Baert, R.S.G.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2009-01-01

    Premixed charge compression ignition (or PCCI) is a new combustion concept that promises very low emissions of nitrogen oxides and of particulate matter by internal combustion engines. In the PCCIcombustion mode fuel, products from previous combustion events and air are mixed and compresseduntil the

  6. Combustion characteristics of a turbocharged DI compression ignition engine fueled wth petroleum diesel fuels and biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canakci, M. [Kocaeli University, Izmit (Turkey). Department of Mechanical Education

    2007-04-15

    In this study, the combustion characteristics and emissions of two different petroleum diesel fuels (No. 1 and No. 2) and biodiesel from soybean oil were compared. The tests were performed at steady state conditions in a four-cylinder turbocharged DI diesel engine at full load at 1400-rpm engine speed. The experimental results compared with No. 2 diesel fuel showed that biodiesel provided significant reductions in PM, CO, and unburned HC, the NO{sub x} increased by 11.2%. Biodiesel had a 13.8% increase in brake-specific fuel consumption due to its lower heating value. However, using No. 1 diesel fuel gave better emission results, NO{sub x} and brake-specific fuel consumption reduced by 16.1% and 1.2%, respectively. The values of the principal combustion characteristics of the biodiesel were obtained between two petroleum diesel fuels. The results indicated that biodiesel may be blended with No. 1 diesel fuel to be used without any modification on the engine. (author)

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF CARBON BURNOUT ON SUBMICRON PARTICLE FORMATION FROM EMULSIFIED FUEL OIL COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of an examination of particle behavior and particle size distributions from the combustion of different fuel oils and emulsified fuels in three experimental combusators. Results indicate that improved carbon (C) burnout from fule oil combustion, either by...

  8. Experimental validation of combustion control with multi-pulse fuel injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, X.; Velayutham, S.; Willems, F.P.T.

    2017-01-01

    Closed-loop combustion control helps to achieve precise fuel injection and robust engine performance against disturbances. The controller design complexity increases greatly with larger number of fuel injection pulses due to the coupled influence of changing individual pulse on the combustion

  9. Emissions from laboratory combustion of wildland fuels: Emission factors and source profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    L.-W. Anthony Chen; Hans Moosmuller; W. Patrick Arnott; Judith C. Chow; John G. Watson; Ronald A. Susott; Ronald E. Babbitt; Cyle E. Wold; Emily N. Lincoln; Wei Min Hao

    2007-01-01

    Combustion of wildland fuels represents a major source of particulate matter (PM) and light-absorbing elemental carbon (EC) on a national and global scale, but the emission factors and source profiles have not been well characterized with respect to different fuels and combustion phases. These uncertainties limit the accuracy of current emission inventories, smoke...

  10. Ash related behaviour in staged and non-staged combustion of biomass fuels and fuel mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becidan, Michaël; Todorovic, Dusan; Skreiberg, Øyvind; Khalil, Roger A.; Backman, Rainer; Goile, Franziska; Skreiberg, Alexandra; Jovovic, Aleksandar; Sørum, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The fate of selected elements (with focus on the important players in corrosion i.e. Na, K, Pb, Zn, Cl and S) are investigated for three biomasses (wood, demolition wood and coffee waste) and six mixtures of these as pellets both with and without air staging in a laboratory reactor. In order to get a complete overview of the combustion products, both online and offline analytical methods are used. Information is collected about: flue gas composition, particle (fly ash) size distribution and composition, bottom ash composition and melting properties. The main findings are: (1) complex interactions are taking place between the mixed fuels during combustion; (2) the mode of occurrence of an element as well as the overall structure of the fuel are important for speciation; (3) the pelletisation process, by bringing chemical elements into intimate contact, may affect partitioning and speciation; (4) staging and mixing might simultaneously have positive and negative effects on operation; (5) staging affects the governing mechanisms of fly ash (aerosols) formation. -- Highlights: ► Complex interactions are taking place between the mixed fuels during combustion. ► The mode of occurrence of an element as well as the overall structure of the fuel are important for speciation. ► The pelletisation process, by bringing chemical elements into intimate contact, may affect partitioning and speciation. ► Staging and mixing might simultaneously have positive and negative effects on operation. ► Staging affects the governing mechanisms of fly ash (aerosols) formation.

  11. Decrease of noxious emissions in the residual fuel oil combustion; Disminucion de emisiones nocivas en la combustion de aceite combustible residual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandoki W, Jorge [Econergia S. de R. L. de C. V. Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1994-12-31

    The residual fuel oil combustion emits noxious substances such as carbonaceous particulate, nitrogen oxides, and sulfur trioxide at unacceptable levels. Water emulsified in the fuel substantially reduces such emissions, achieving besides, in most of the cases, a net saving in the fuel consumption. The beneficial effects are shown in burning the residual fuel oil as a water emulsion, as well as the method to produce an adequate emulsion. The emulsified fuel technology offers a low cost option to reduce air pollution. The fuel oil quality has been declining during the last decades due to: 1. Increase in the production of crude heavy oils, generally with higher content of asphaltens and sulfur. 2. Less availability of vacuum distillation residues due to its conversion into greater value products. 3. More intensive conversion processes such as catalytic cracking, visbreaking, etc. that increase the asphaltenes concentration in the bottoms, causing instability problems. 4. The increase in the vanadium and other metals content as the concentration of asphaltenes increases. The use of emulsified fuel oil provides an efficient and economical method to substantially reduce the noxious emissions to the atmosphere. The emulsion contains water particles in a diameter between 2 and 20 microns, uniformly distributed in the fuel oil, generally in a proportion generally of 5 to 10%; besides, it contains a tensioactive agent to assure a stable emulsion capable of withstanding the shearing forces of the pumping and distribution systems. When the atomized oil drops get into the combustion chamber, the emulsified water flashes into high pressure steam, originating a violent secondary atomization. The effect of this secondary atomization is the rupture of the oil drops of various hundred microns, producing drops of 5 to 15 microns in diameter. Since the necessary time for combustion is an exponential function of the drop diameter, a very substantial improvement in the combustion is

  12. Use of a perfume composition as a fuel for internal combustion engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to fuel compositions containing perfume fractions, that is to say compositions of fragrance materials, and to the use of such perfume fractions containing fuel compositions to provide a fuel for internal combustion engines and burners. According to the present fuel

  13. Public perception related to a hydrogen hybrid internal combustion engine transit bus demonstration and hydrogen fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickson, Allister; Phillips, Al; Morales, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen has been widely considered as a potentially viable alternative to fossil fuels for use in transportation. In addition to price competitiveness with fossil fuels, a key to its adoption will be public perceptions of hydrogen technologies and hydrogen fuel. This paper examines public perceptions of riders of a hydrogen hybrid internal combustion engine bus and hydrogen as a fuel source

  14. Comparison of char structural characteristics and reactivity during conventional air and oxy-fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaowei; Xu, Minghou; Yao, Hong; Gu, Ying; Si, Junping; Xiong, Chao [Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Lab. of Coal Combustion

    2013-07-01

    The capture and sequestration of CO{sub 2} generated from large- scale stationary power plants is considered to be one of the leading technologies that could potentially have a significant impact on reducing greenhouse emissions. Among these emerging technologies, the oxy-fuel combustion is a near-zero emission technology that can be adapted to both new and existing pulverized coal-fired power stations. The goal of this work is to make a comparative study on char structural characteristics (including char yield, swelling ratio, BET surface area, pore distribution, morphology) and reactivity during conventional air and oxy-fuel combustion. Specific experimental designs include two series. One is carried out in pure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} (pyrolysis experiments), and another is prepared in N{sub 2} + 5%O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} + 5%O{sub 2}. Coal samples included raw coal, low density fraction coal and medium density fraction coal in all experiments. The present study is a further effort to extend our knowledge about physical and chemical structural characteristics and reactivity of char in the presence of high concentration CO{sub 2}. Combustion and pyrolysis of a density fractionated China coal at drop tube furnace yielded the following conclusions. Compared to oxy-chars obtained under pure CO{sub 2} atmosphere, the swelling ratios of char obtained in pure N{sub 2} atmosphere are higher. When adding 5%O{sub 2}, experimental results are completely different with those of the pyrolysis experiment. In comparison with the oxy-chars obtained under CO{sub 2} + 5%O{sub 2} atmosphere, the swelling ratios of the char obtained in N{sub 2} + 5%O{sub 2} atmosphere are lower. In the pyrolysis experiment, the BET surfaces Area of the oxy-chars are about 10-20 times as much as chars. When adding 5%O{sub 2}, the BET surfaces Area of the oxy-chars are about two to four times as much as chars. During pyrolysis experiment, the total pore volumes of the oxy-chars obtained under pure CO

  15. Engineering and Economic Analysis of an Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant with and without Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Task 7. Design and Economic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booras, George [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Powers, J. [General Electric, Schenectady, NY (United States); Riley, C. [General Electric, Schenectady, NY (United States); Hendrix, H. [Hendrix Engineering Solutions, Inc., Calera, AL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report evaluates the economics and performance of two A-USC PC power plants; Case 1 is a conventionally configured A-USC PC power plant with superior emission controls, but without CO2 removal; and Case 2 adds a post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) system to the plant from Case 1, using the design and heat integration strategies from EPRI’s 2015 report, “Best Integrated Coal Plant.” The capture design basis for this case is “partial,” to meet EPA’s proposed New Source Performance Standard, which was initially proposed as 500 kg-CO2/MWh (gross) or 1100 lb-CO2/MWh (gross), but modified in August 2015 to 635 kg-CO2/MWh (gross) or 1400 lb-CO2/MWh (gross). This report draws upon the collective experience of consortium members, with EPRI and General Electric leading the study. General Electric provided the steam cycle analysis as well as v the steam turbine design and cost estimating. EPRI performed integrated plant performance analysis using EPRI’s PC Cost model.

  16. Nuclear reactor using fuel sphere for combustion and fuel spheres for breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns a pebble bed-type reactor which can efficiently convert parent nuclides to fission nuclides. Fuel spheres for combustion having fission nuclides as main fuels, and fuel spheres for breeding having parent nuclides as main fuels are used separately, in the pebble bed-type reactor. According to the present invention, fuel spheres for breeding can be stayed in a reactor core for a long period of time, so that parent nuclides can be sufficiently converted into fission nuclides. In addition, since fuel spheres for breeding are loaded repeatedly, the amount thereof to be used is reduced. Therefore, the amount of the fuel spheres for breeding is small even when they are re-processed. On the other hand, since the content of the fission nuclides in the fuel spheres for breeding is not great, they can be put to final storage. This is attributable that although the fuel spheres for breeding contain fission nuclides generated by conversion, the fission nuclides are annihilated by nuclear fission reactions at the same time with the generation thereof. (I.S.)

  17. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion 2011: Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Durban, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: - estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2009; - selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; - CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information. These estimates have been calculated using the IEA energy databases and the default methods and emission factors from the Revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

  18. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion - 2012 Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Doha, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2010; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; and CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information.

  19. Automatic welding of fuel elements; Soudure automatique des elements combustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briola, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The welding process depends on the type of fuel element, the can material and the number of cartridges to be welded: - inert-gas welding (used for G2 and the 1. set of EL3), - inert atmosphere arc welding (used for welding uranium and zirconium), - electronic welding (used for the 2. set of EL3 and the tank of Proserpine). (author) [French] Suivant le type d'element combustible, le materiau de gaine et l'importance de la serie a fabriquer, le soudeur dispose des differents procedes examines dans cette communication: - soudure classique a l'arc sous gaz inerte (utilisee pour G2 et le premier jeu EL3), - soudure en atmosphere complete d'argon (utilisee pour la soudure d'uranium et de zirconium), - soudure electronique (utilisee pourdeuxieme jeu EL3 et la cuve de Proserpine). (auteur)

  20. Sulfur Release during Alternative fuels Combustion in Cement Rotary Kilns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortada Mut, Maria del Mar

    fuel with the bed material, heating up of a particle, 5 iv devolatilization, char combustion, the reactions between CaSO 4 and the different reducing agents, and the oxidation of the volatiles gases in the free board. The main reducing agents are CO, CH 4 and H 2 , which are introduced under the bed...... are of high importance for SO 2 release because it is shown that introducing the same total amount of gas, the highest reducing agent concentration fo r a short period released a higher total SO 2 amount compared to the lowest concentration during a long period. A mathematical reaction based model...... but the effect of sulfur content in the bed cannot be predicted. Further development regarding particle motion according to the rotational speed may be needed. Furthermore, a model for predicting the tendency of build-ups for a kiln system is developed based on the prediction of SO 3 and Cl concentrations...

  1. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion 2011: Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Durban, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: - estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2009; - selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; - CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information. These estimates have been calculated using the IEA energy databases and the default methods and emission factors from the Revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

  2. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion - 2012 Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Doha, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2010; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; and CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information.

  3. Comprehensive study of biodiesel fuel for HSDI engines in conventional and low temperature combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tormos, Bernardo; Novella, Ricardo; Garcia, Antonio; Gargar, Kevin [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia, ES, Campus de Vera, s/n, Edificio 6D. Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    In this research, an experimental investigation has been performed to give insight into the potential of biodiesel as an alternative fuel for High Speed Direct Injection (HSDI) diesel engines. The scope of this work has been broadened by comparing the combustion characteristics of diesel and biodiesel fuels in a wide range of engine loads and EGR conditions, including the high EGR rates expected for future diesel engines operating in the low temperature combustion (LTC) regime. The experimental work has been carried out in a single-cylinder engine running alternatively with diesel and biodiesel fuels. Conventional diesel fuel and neat biodiesel have been compared in terms of their combustion performance through a new methodology designed for isolating the actual effects of each fuel on diesel combustion, aside from their intrinsic differences in chemical composition. The analysis of the results has been sequentially divided into two progressive and complementary steps. Initially, the overall combustion performance of each fuel has been critically evaluated based on a set of parameters used as tracers of the combustion quality, such as the combustion duration or the indicated efficiency. With the knowledge obtained from this previous overview, the analysis focuses on the detailed influence of biodiesel on the different diesel combustion stages known ignition delay, premixed combustion and mixing controlled combustion, considering also the impact on CO and UHC (unburn-hydrocarbons) pollutant emissions. The results of this research explain why the biodiesel fuel accelerates the diesel combustion process in all engine loads and EGR rates, even in those corresponding with LTC conditions, increasing its possibilities as alternative fuel for future DI diesel engines. (author)

  4. Prediction of air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion through a generic gas radiation property model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Chungen

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A gas radiation model for general combustion CFD presented, programmed & verified. • Its general applicability/practical accuracy demonstrated in air-fuel and oxy-fuel. • Useful guidelines for air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion CFD suggested. • Important to include the impact of CO in gas radiation for oxy-fuel combustion CFD. - Abstract: Thermal radiation plays an important role in heat transfer in combustion furnaces. The weighted-sum-of-gray-gases model (WSGGM), representing a good compromise between computational efficiency and accuracy, is commonly used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of combustion processes for evaluating gaseous radiative properties. However, the WSGGMs still have some limitations in practical use, e.g., unable to naturally accommodate different combustion environments, difficult to accurately address the variations in species concentrations in a flame, and inconvenient to account for the impacts of participating species other than H_2O and CO_2. As a result, WSGGMs with different coefficients have been published for specific applications. In this paper, a reliable generic model for gaseous radiation property calculation, which is a computationally efficient exponential wide band model (E-EWBM) applicable to combustion CFD and able to naturally solve all the practical limitations of the WSGGMs, is presented, programmed and verified. The model is then implemented to CFD simulation of a 300 kW air-fuel and a 0.8 MW oxy-fuel combustion furnace, respectively, to demonstrate its computational applicability to general combustion CFD and its capability in producing reliable CFD results for different combustion environments. It is found that the usefulness of the WSGGMs in oxy-fuel combustion CFD is compromised if the important impacts of high levels of CO under oxy-fuel combustion cannot be accounted for. The E-EWBM that appropriately takes the impacts of H_2O, CO_2, CO and CH_4 into account is a good replacement

  5. Effects of ashes in solid fuels on fuel particle charging during combustion in an air stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharov, A.G.; Fialkov, B.S.; Mel' nichuk, A.Yu.; Khvan, L.A.

    1982-09-01

    Black coal from the Karaganda basin is mixed with sodium chloride and graphite. Coal characteristics are given in a table (density, ashes, content of silica, aluminium oxides, iron oxides, calcium oxides, potassium oxides and magnesium oxides). Effects of ash fluctuations on electric potential of fuel particles during combustion are analyzed. Analyses show that with increasing ash content electric potential of fuel particles decreases and reaches the minimum when ash content ranges from 70 to 80 %. Particles with electric potential are generated during chemical processes between carbon and oxygen when coal is burned in an air stream. (5 refs.) (In Russian)

  6. Quantitative characterization of pulverized coal and biomass–coal blends in pneumatic conveying pipelines using electrostatic sensor arrays and data fusion techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Xiangchen; Wang, Chao; Yan, Yong; Shao, Jiaqing; Wang, Lijuan; Zhou, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative data about the dynamic behaviour of pulverized coal and biomass–coal blends in fuel injection pipelines allow power plant operators to detect variations in fuel supply and oscillations in the flow at an early stage, enable them to balance fuel distribution between fuel feeding pipes and ultimately to achieve higher combustion efficiency and lower greenhouse gas emissions. Electrostatic sensor arrays and data fusion algorithms are combined to provide a non-intrusive solution to the measurement of fuel particle velocity, relative solid concentration and flow stability under pneumatic conveying conditions. Electrostatic sensor arrays with circular and arc-shaped electrodes are integrated in the same sensing head to measure ‘averaged’ and ‘localized’ characteristics of pulverized fuel flow. Data fusion techniques are applied to optimize and integrate the results from the sensor arrays. Experimental tests were conducted on the horizontal section of a 150 mm bore pneumatic conveyor circulating pulverized coal and sawdust under various flow conditions. Test results suggest that pure coal particles travel faster and carry more electrostatic charge than biomass–coal blends. As more biomass particles are added to the flow, the overall velocity of the flow reduces, the electrostatic charge level on particles decreases and the flow becomes less stable compared to the pure coal flow. (paper)

  7. Quantitative characterization of pulverized coal and biomass-coal blends in pneumatic conveying pipelines using electrostatic sensor arrays and data fusion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiangchen; Yan, Yong; Shao, Jiaqing; Wang, Lijuan; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Chao

    2012-08-01

    Quantitative data about the dynamic behaviour of pulverized coal and biomass-coal blends in fuel injection pipelines allow power plant operators to detect variations in fuel supply and oscillations in the flow at an early stage, enable them to balance fuel distribution between fuel feeding pipes and ultimately to achieve higher combustion efficiency and lower greenhouse gas emissions. Electrostatic sensor arrays and data fusion algorithms are combined to provide a non-intrusive solution to the measurement of fuel particle velocity, relative solid concentration and flow stability under pneumatic conveying conditions. Electrostatic sensor arrays with circular and arc-shaped electrodes are integrated in the same sensing head to measure ‘averaged’ and ‘localized’ characteristics of pulverized fuel flow. Data fusion techniques are applied to optimize and integrate the results from the sensor arrays. Experimental tests were conducted on the horizontal section of a 150 mm bore pneumatic conveyor circulating pulverized coal and sawdust under various flow conditions. Test results suggest that pure coal particles travel faster and carry more electrostatic charge than biomass-coal blends. As more biomass particles are added to the flow, the overall velocity of the flow reduces, the electrostatic charge level on particles decreases and the flow becomes less stable compared to the pure coal flow.

  8. Computational modeling and experimental studies on NO{sub x} reduction under pulverized coal combustion conditions. Third quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpaty, S.K.; Subramanian, K.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental plan outlining the first year`s activity was sent to Dr. Lori Gould, Project Officer/Contracting Officer`s Technical Representative on April 24, 1995. An approval was received with some questions on June 15, 1995. However, with some foresight of the director of the in-house combustion group of the PETC, Dr. Ekmann, a tentative hold-off on the purchase of the equipment was requested by the project officer on June 29, 1995. Enclosed with that request were some of Dr. Ekmann`s concerns. The research team spent the month of July in study of pertinent literature as well as in the preparation of the responses to Dr. Gould`s comments and Dr. Ekmann`s concerns. These responses included the choice of the reactor, reactor design, rate of gas heating, detailed test matrix and answers to host of other comments. Upon review of the above information submitted on July 24, 1995 by the Rust research team, the project officer called for a conference call on September 6, 1995 which involved the PI (Dr. Kumpaty), the research consultant (Mr. Subramanian), Dr. Gould and Dr. Ekmann. Dr. Ekmann insisted that further calculations be made on the rate of gas heating without taking radiation into account. Accordingly, calculations pertaining to the rate of gas heating based on convection were performed and submitted to Dr. Ekmann on September 13, 1995. This report contains the information emerged through the dialogue between the Rust College research team and the PETC represented by Dr. Gould and Dr. Ekmann during this quarter.

  9. Factors affecting the amounts of emissions arising from fluidized bed combustion of solid fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horbaj, P.

    1996-01-01

    The factors affecting the amounts of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) and sulfur oxides (SO x , i.e. SO 2 + SO 3 ) formed during fluidized bed combustion of fossil fuels are analyzed using both theoretical concepts and experimental data. The factors treated include temperature, excess air, fuel parameters, pressure, degree of combustion gas recycling, combustion distribution along the combustion chamber height, and sulfur trapping processes for NO x , and the Ca/S ratio, fluidized layer height and fluidization rate, granulometry and absorbent type, fluidized layer temperature, and pressure during combustion for SO x . It is concluded that fluidized bed boilers are promising power generating facilities, mitigating the environmental burden arising from fossil fuel combustion. (P.A.). 12 figs., 9 refs

  10. A comparison of hydrogen-fueled fuel cells and combustion engines for electric utility applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenung, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen-fueled systems have been proposed for a number of stationary electric generation applications including remote power generation, load management, distribution system peak shaving, and reliability or power quality enhancement. Hydrogen fueling permits clean, low pollution operation. This is particularly true for systems that use hydrogen produced from electrolysis, rather than the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels. Both fuel cells and combustion engines are suitable technologies for using hydrogen in many electric utility applications. This paper presents results from several studies performed for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program. A comparison between the two technologies shows that, whereas fuel cells are somewhat more energy efficient, combustion engine technology is less expensive. In this paper, a comparison of the two technologies is presented, with an emphasis on distributed power and power quality applications. The special case of a combined distributed generation I hydrogen refueling station is also addressed. The comparison is made on the basis of system costs and benefits, but also includes a comparison of technology status: power ratings and response time. A discussion of pollutant emissions and pollutant control strategies is included. The results show those electric utility applications for which each technology is best suited. (author)

  11. Fuel flexible distributed combustion for efficient and clean gas turbine engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Ahmed E.E.; Gupta, Ashwani K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Examined distributed combustion for gas turbines applications using HiTAC. • Gaseous, liquid, conventional and bio-fuels are examined with ultra-low emissions. • Novel design of fuel flexibility without any atomizer for liquid fuel sprays. • Demonstrated fuel flexibility with emissions x and CO, low noise, enhanced stability, higher efficiency and alleviation of combustion instability. Distributed reaction conditions were achieved using swirl for desirable controlled mixing between the injected air, fuel and hot reactive gases from within the combustor prior to mixture ignition. In this paper, distributed combustion is further investigated using a variety of fuels. Gaseous (methane, diluted methane, hydrogen enriched methane and propane) and liquid fuels, including both traditional (kerosene) and alternate fuels (ethanol) that cover a wide range of calorific values are investigated with emphasis on pollutants emission and combustor performance with each fuel. For liquid fuels, no atomization or spray device was used. Performance evaluation with the different fuels was established to outline the flexibility of the combustor using a wide range of fuels of different composition, phase and calorific value with specific focus on ultra-low pollutants emission. Results obtained on pollutants emission and OH * chemiluminescence for the specific fuels at various equivalence ratios are presented. Near distributed combustion conditions with less than 8 PPM of NO emission were demonstrated under novel premixed conditions for the various fuels tested at heat (energy) release intensity (HRI) of 27 MW/m 3 -atm. and a rather high equivalence ratio of 0.6. Higher equivalence ratios lacked favorable distributed combustion conditions. For the same conditions, CO emission varied for each fuel; less than 10 ppm were demonstrated for methane based fuels, while heavier liquid fuels provided less than 40 ppm CO emissions. Lower emissions of NO ( x can be possible by

  12. Study on Combustion Oscillation of Premixed Flame with Pilot Fuel at Elevated Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Masaya; Yoshida, Shohei; Hirata, Yoshitaka; Kobayashi, Nariyoshi

    Acoustically-coupled combustion oscillation is studied for premixed flame with pilot fuel to be used in gas turbine combustors. Premixed gas is passed through swirl vanes and burnt with the centrally injected pilot fuel. The dependencies of pressure, fuel to air ratio, premixed fuel rate, inlet velocity and air temperature on the combustion oscillation are investigated. Two kinds of oscillation modes of ˜100Hz and ˜350Hz are activated according to inlet velocities. Fluctuating pressures are amplified when the premixed fuel rate is over ˜80% at elevated pressures. The fluctuating pressure peak moves to a higher premixed fuel ratio region with increased pressure or fuel to air ratio for the Helmholz type mode. Combustion oscillation occurs when the pilot fuel velocity is changed proportionally with the flame length.

  13. Working group report: methane emissions from fuel combustion and industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdowski, J.J.M.; Beck, L.; Piccot, S.; Olivier, J.G.J.; Veldt, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper lists the source categories which are currently recognised as minor sources of methane. These fall into five broad groups: stationary fuel combustion (residential combustion of fuels, solid waste incineration at home sites, on-site agricultural waste burning, industrial and utility combustion of coal, wood, oil and gas, commercial and industrial waste incineration); mobile fuel combustion; non-combustion industrial processes (primary metals production, chemical manufacturing processes, petroleum refining, commercial charcoal manufacturing waste treatments); minor energy production sources (storage and distribution of automotive fuels, geothermal energy production; peat mining operations, oil shale mining operations); and miscellaneous sources. The paper also presents a preliminary estimate of global methane emissions from these minor sources and the results of the working group's discussion on recommendations for the IPCC/OECD methodology and specific research needs. A list of control options for emissions from minor sources is provided. 2 tabs

  14. Construction of combustion models for rapeseed methyl ester bio-diesel fuel for internal combustion engine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovitchev, Valeri I; Yang, Junfeng

    2009-01-01

    Bio-diesel fuels are non-petroleum-based diesel fuels consisting of long chain alkyl esters produced by the transesterification of vegetable oils, that are intended for use (neat or blended with conventional fuels) in unmodified diesel engines. There have been few reports of studies proposing theoretical models for bio-diesel combustion simulations. In this study, we developed combustion models based on ones developed previously. We compiled the liquid fuel properties, and the existing detailed mechanism of methyl butanoate ester (MB, C(5)H(10)O(2)) oxidation was supplemented by sub-mechanisms for two proposed fuel constituent components, C(7)H(16) and C(7)H(8)O (and then, by mp2d, C(4)H(6)O(2) and propyne, C(3)H(4)) to represent the combustion model for rapeseed methyl ester described by the chemical formula, C(19)H(34)O(2) (or C(19)H(36)O(2)). The main fuel vapor thermal properties were taken as those of methyl palmitate C(19)H(36)O(2) in the NASA polynomial form of the Burcat database. The special global reaction was introduced to "crack" the main fuel into its constituent components. This general reaction included 309 species and 1472 reactions, including soot and NO(x) formation processes. The detailed combustion mechanism was validated using shock-tube ignition-delay data under diesel engine conditions. For constant volume and diesel engine (Volvo D12C) combustion modeling, this mechanism could be reduced to 88 species participating in 363 reactions.

  15. Investigation of Bio-Diesel Fueled Engines under Low-Temperature Combustion Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chia-fon F. Lee; Alan C. Hansen

    2010-09-30

    In accordance with meeting DOE technical targets this research was aimed at developing and optimizing new fuel injection technologies and strategies for the combustion of clean burning renewable fuels in diesel engines. In addition a simultaneous minimum 20% improvement in fuel economy was targeted with the aid of this novel advanced combustion system. Biodiesel and other renewable fuels have unique properties that can be leveraged to reduce emissions and increase engine efficiency. This research is an investigation into the combustion characteristics of biodiesel and its impacts on the performance of a Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) engine, which is a novel engine configuration that incorporates technologies and strategies for simultaneously reducing NOx and particulate emissions while increasing engine efficiency. Generating fundamental knowledge about the properties of biodiesel and blends with petroleum-derived diesel and their impact on in-cylinder fuel atomization and combustion processes was an important initial step to being able to optimize fuel injection strategies as well as introduce new technologies. With the benefit of this knowledge experiments were performed on both optical and metal LTC engines in which combustion and emissions could be observed and measured under realistic conditions. With the aid these experiments and detailed combustion models strategies were identified and applied in order to improve fuel economy and simultaneously reduce emissions.

  16. Experimental study on combustion of biomass micron fuel (BMF) in cyclone furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Siyi; Xiao Bo; Hu Zhiquan; Liu Shiming; He Maoyun

    2010-01-01

    Based on biomass micron fuel (BMF) with particle size less than 250 μm, a cyclone combustion concept was presented and a lab-scale cyclone furnace was designed to evaluate the feasibility. The influences of equivalence ration (ER) and particle size of BMF on combustion performance were studied, as well as temperature distribution in the combustion chamber. The results show that BMF combustion in the cyclone furnace is reliable, with rational temperature distribution inside furnace hearth, lower CO emission, soot concentration and C content in ashes. As ER being 1.2, the temperature in the chamber is maximized up to 1200 deg. C. Smaller particles results in better combustion performances.

  17. Study on Characteristics of Co-firing Ammonia/Methane Fuels under Oxygen Enriched Combustion Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hua; Wang, Zhaolin; Valera-Medina, Agustin; Bowen, Philip J.

    2018-06-01

    Having a background of utilising ammonia as an alternative fuel for power generation, exploring the feasibility of co-firing ammonia with methane is proposed to use ammonia to substitute conventional natural gas. However, improvement of the combustion of such fuels can be achieved using conditions that enable an increase of oxygenation, thus fomenting the combustion process of a slower reactive molecule as ammonia. Therefore, the present study looks at oxygen enriched combustion technologies, a proposed concept to improve the performance of ammonia/methane combustion. To investigate the characteristics of ammonia/methane combustion under oxygen enriched conditions, adiabatic burning velocity and burner stabilized laminar flame emissions were studied. Simulation results show that the oxygen enriched method can help to significantly enhance the propagation of ammonia/methane combustion without changing the emission level, which would be quite promising for the design of systems using this fuel for practical applications. Furthermore, to produce low computational-cost flame chemistry for detailed numerical analyses for future combustion studies, three reduced combustion mechanisms of the well-known Konnov's mechanism were compared in ammonia/methane flame simulations under practical gas turbine combustor conditions. Results show that the reduced reaction mechanisms can provide good results for further analyses of oxygen enriched combustion of ammonia/methane. The results obtained in this study also allow gas turbine designers and modellers to choose the most suitable mechanism for further combustion studies and development.

  18. Combustion-derived substances in deep basins of Puget Sound: Historical inputs from fossil fuel and biomass combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, Li-Jung; Louchouarn, Patrick; Herbert, Bruce E.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Wade, Terry L.; Crecelius, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Reconstructions of 250 years historical inputs of two distinct types of black carbon (soot/graphitic black carbon (GBC) and char-BC) were conducted on sediment cores from two basins of the Puget Sound, WA. Signatures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also used to support the historical reconstructions of BC to this system. Down-core maxima in GBC and combustion-derived PAHs occurred in the 1940s in the cores from the Puget Sound Main Basin, whereas in Hood Canal such peak was observed in the 1970s, showing basin-specific differences in inputs of combustion byproducts. This system showed relatively higher inputs from softwood combustion than the northeastern U.S. The historical variations in char-BC concentrations were consistent with shifts in climate indices, suggesting an influence of climate oscillations on wildfire events. Environmental loading of combustion byproducts thus appears as a complex function of urbanization, fuel usage, combustion technology, environmental policies, and climate conditions. - Research highlights: → We reconstructed the historical inputs of GBC and char-BC in Puget Sound, WA, USA. → Temporal trend of GBC was linked to human activities (urbanization, fuel usage). → Temporal trend of char-BC was more likely driven by regional climate oscillations. → Historical trends of combustion byproducts show the geographical heterogeneities. - Temporal trend of GBC was directly linked to human activities, while the input of char-BC in Puget Sound was more likely driven by regional climate oscillations.

  19. Optimization of combustion process for radiation-treated solid fuels in dust state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askarova, A.S.; Bajdullaeva, G.E.

    1997-01-01

    Computation experiment on combustion of solid radiation-treated fuel in burning chamber of boiler at Pavlodar thermal electric plant is carried out. Velocity, temperature distribution and concentration of combustion products by height of chamber are received. Analysis of received results shows that radiation treatment of fuels exerts substantial effect on egress parameters of thermal electric plant. It is shown, that radiation treatment allows to improve effectiveness of boiler device and reduce of harmful substances discharge in atmosphere. Results of conducted numerical experiments allow to create complete methods of solid fuel combustion with high moisture and ashiness

  20. Combustion and emission characteristics of diesel engine fueled with diesel-like fuel from waste lubrication oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiangli; Ni, Peiyong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • 100% diesel-like fuel from waste lubricating oil was conducted in a diesel engine. • Good combustion and fuel economy are achieved without engine modifications. • Combustion duration of DLF is shorter than diesel. • NOx and smoke emissions with the DLF are slightly higher than pure diesel. - Abstract: Waste lubricant oil (WLO) is one of the most important types of the energy sources. WLO cannot be burned directly in diesel engines, but can be processed to be used as diesel-like fuel (DLF) to minimize its harmful effect and maximize its useful values. Moreover, there are some differences in physicochemical properties between WLO and diesel fuel. In order to identify the differences in combustion and emission performance of diesel engine fueled with the two fuels, a bench test of a single-cylinder direct injection diesel engine without any engine modification was investigated at four engine speeds and five engine loads. The effects of the fuels on fuel economic performance, combustion characteristics, and emissions of hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and smoke were discussed. The DLF exhibits longer ignition delay period and shorter combustion duration than diesel fuel. The test results indicate that the higher distillation temperatures of the DLF attribute to the increase of combustion pressure, temperature and heat release rate. The brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) of the DLF compared to diesel is reduced by about 3% at 3000 rpm under light and medium loads. The DLF produces slightly higher NOx emissions at middle and heavy loads, somewhat more smoke emissions at middle loads, and notably higher HC and CO emissions at most measured points than diesel fuel. It is concluded that the DLF can be used as potential available fuel in high-speed diesel engines without any problems.

  1. Ozone applied to the homogeneous charge compression ignition engine to control alcohol fuels combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masurier, J.-B.; Foucher, F.; Dayma, G.; Dagaut, P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ozone was useful to control combustion phasing of alcohol fuels in HCCI engine. • Ozone helps to improve the combustion and advance its phasing. • Butanol is more impacted by ozone than methanol and ethanol. • HCCI combustion parameters may be controlled by managing ozone concentration. • Kinetics demonstrates that alcohol fuels are initially oxidized by O-atoms. - Abstract: The present investigation examines the impact of seeding the intake of an HCCI engine with ozone, one of the most oxidizing chemical species, on the combustion of three alcohol fuels: methanol, ethanol and n-butanol. The research was performed through engine experiments and constant volume computations. The results showed that increasing the ozone concentration led to an improvement in combustion coupled with a combustion advance. It was also observed, by comparing the results for each fuel selected, that n-butanol is the most impacted by ozone seeding and methanol the least. Further analyses of the experimental results showed that the alcohol fuel combustion can be controlled with ozone, which presents an interesting potential. Finally, computation results confirmed the experimental results observed. They also showed that in presence of ozone, alcohol fuels are not initially oxidized by molecular oxygen but by O-atoms coming from the ozone decomposition.

  2. Air fuel ratio detector corrector for combustion engines using adaptive neurofuzzy networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Arora

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A perfect mix of the air and fuel in internal combustion engines is desirable for proper combustion of fuel with air. The vehicles running on road emit harmful gases due to improper combustion. This problem is severe in heavy vehicles like locomotive engines. To overcome this problem, generally an operator opens or closes the valve of fuel injection pump of locomotive engines to control amount of air going inside the combustion chamber, which requires constant monitoring. A model is proposed in this paper to alleviate combustion process. The method involves recording the time-varying flow of fuel components in combustion chamber. A Fuzzy Neural Network is trained for around 40 fuels to ascertain the required amount of air to form a standard mix to produce non-harmful gases and about 12 fuels are used for testing the network’s performance. The network then adaptively determines the additional/subtractive amount of air required for proper combustion. Mean square error calculation ensures the effectiveness of the network’s performance.

  3. Investigation of the submodels for combustion; Polton osamallien kaeytettaevyys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjaeldman, L.; Huttunen, M.; Kyttaelae, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The capability for numerical analysis of flow, combustion and heat transfer in furnaces has been developed by improving the knowledge of the sensitivity of computed results on submodels recently implemented to the computational environment Ardemus owned by VTT Energy and Imatran Voima Oy. The submodels studied include models for combustion of gaseous (pyrolysed) fuel and for nitric oxide. The cases investigated included a gas flame and pulverized coal and peat combustion in single burner furnaces. The effect of grid refinement on the results was investigated for a corner fired power station furnace. (orig.)

  4. Experimental study on the potential of higher octane number fuels for low load partially premixed combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, S.; van der Waart, K.; Somers, B.; de Goey, P.

    2017-01-01

    The optimal fuel for partially premixed combustion (PPC) is considered to be a gasoline boiling range fuel with an octane number around 70. Higher octane number fuels are considered problematic with low load and idle conditions. In previous studies mostly the intake air temperature did not exceed 30

  5. A Numerical Comparison of Spray Combustion between Raw and Water-in-Oil Emulsified Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tarlet

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Heavy fuel-oils, used engine oils and animal fat can be used as dense, viscous combustibles within industrial boilers. Burning these combustibles in the form of an emulsion with water enables to decrease the flame length and the formation of carbonaceous residue, in comparison with raw combustibles. These effects are due to the secondary atomization among the spray, which is a consequence of the micro-explosion phenomenon. This phenomenon acts in a single emulsion droplet by the fast (< 0.1 ms vaporization of the inside water droplets, leading to complete disintegration of the whole emulsion droplet. First, the present work demonstrates a model of spray combustion of raw fuel. Secondly, the spray combustion of water-in-oil emulsified fuel is exposed to the same burning conditions, taking into account the micro-explosion phenomenon. Finally, the comparison between the results with and without second atomization shows some similar qualitative tendencies with experimental measurements from the literature.

  6. EMISSION AND COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF DIFFERENT FUELS IN A HCCI ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sendilvelan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Different intake valve timings and fuel injection amounts were tested in order to identify their effects on exhaust emissions and combustion characteristics using variable valve actuation (VVA in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI engine. The HCCI engine is a promising concept for future automobile engines and stationary power plants. The two-stage ignition process in a HCCI engine creates advanced ignition and stratified combustion, which makes the ignition timing and combustion rate controllable. Meanwhile, the periphery of the fuel-rich zone leads to fierce burning, which results in slightly high NOx emissions. The experiments were conducted in a modified single cylinder water-cooled diesel engine. In this experiment we use diesel, bio-diesel (Jatropha and gasoline as the fuel at different mixing ratios. HCCI has advantages in high thermal efficiency and low emissions and could possibly become a promising combustion method in internal combustion engines.

  7. The influence of particle shape on the combustion properties and emission of nitrogen oxides when using pulverized biofuels; Partikelformens betydelse foer foerbraenningsegenskaper och utslaepp av kvaeveoxider (NO{sub x}) vid anvaendning av biobraenslepulver 970701-991231

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastberg, Susanne; Nilsson, Calle [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Agricultural Research for Northern Sweden

    2000-08-01

    The objectives of the project are: 1. to make a detailed fuel characterisation of wood- and reed canary-grass powder with respect to particle size distribution and particle shape, 2. to compare the result from this characterisation with a more quick and simple field method, 3. to perform studies of how the powder characteristics influences combustion performance and emissions and to define critical parameters using a 150 kW powder burner, and 4. to make more detailed flame studies by simulations. This report gives the result from the project covering 970701-991231 and includes the installation and function verification of the 150 kW powder burner using wood and reed canary grass powder. It also includes a performance test using wood powder utilising experimental design and parameter study. In addition characterisation of powder fuel from various mills by sieving, laser diffraction and image analysis is reported. The results shows that after some minor modifications the burner performed well, the ignition of the powder was easy and a stable combustion was achieved. Optimisation with wood powder showed stable, low emission levels at an air excess of 4-5 % (mean values CO 30-40 ppm, HC 2-3 ppm, NO 40-50 mg/MJ). These emissions were obtained using a low level of secondary air and high primary and tertiary air levels. Three different industrial mills were tested for reed canary-grass. A preliminary combustion test was performed, however not showing the same stable emission levels as for wood powder. Mean CO and HC were low but peaks were noted for CO. The combustion chamber became covered with porous slag products due to the ash composition and high ash content of the fuel. For powder characterisation the techniques sieving, laser diffraction and image analysis were used on different powder qualities obtained using lab mills as well as industrial mills. Valving experiments were also performed. Principal component analysis was used for evaluation of the results from

  8. Preparation and combustion of Yugoslavian lignite-water fuel, Task 7.35. Topical report, July 1991--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.M.; DeWall, R.A.; Ljubicic, B.R.; Musich, M.A.; Richter, J.J.

    1994-03-01

    Yugoslavia`s interest in lignite-water fuel (LWF) stems from its involvement in an unusual power project at Kovin in northern Serbia. In the early 1980s, Electric Power of Serbia (EPS) proposed constructing a 600-MW power plant that would be fueled by lignite found in deposits along and under the Danube River. Trial underwater mining at Kovin proved that the dredging operation is feasible. The dredging method produces a coal slurry containing 85% to 90% water. Plans included draining the water from the coal, drying it, and then burning it in the pulverized coal plant. In looking for alternative ways to utilize the ``wet coal`` in a more efficient and economical way, a consortium of Yugoslavian companies agreed to assess the conversion of dredged lignite into a LWF using hot-water-drying (HWD) technology. HWD is a high-temperature, nonevaporative drying technique carried out under high pressure in water that permanently alters the structure of low-rank coals. Changes effected by the drying process include irreversible removal of moisture, micropore sealing by tar, and enhancement of heating value by removal of oxygen, thus, enhancement of the slurry ability of the coal with water. Physical cleaning results indicated a 51 wt % reduction in ash content with a 76 wt % yield for the lignite. In addition, physical cleaning produced a cleaned slurry that had a higher attainable solids loading than a raw uncleaned coal slurry. Combustion studies were then performed on the raw and physically cleaned samples with the resulting indicating that both samples were very reactive, making them excellent candidates for HWD. Bench-scale results showed that HWD increased energy densities of the two raw lignite samples by approximately 63% and 81%. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate was conducted to evaluate the HWD and pipeline transport of Kovin LWF to domestic and export European markets. Results are described.

  9. Internal combustion engine cylinder-to-cylinder balancing with balanced air-fuel ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ralph E.; Bourn, Gary D.; Smalley, Anthony J.

    2006-01-03

    A method of balancing combustion among cylinders of an internal combustion engine. For each cylinder, a normalized peak firing pressure is calculated as the ratio of its peak firing pressure to its combustion pressure. Each cylinder's normalized peak firing pressure is compared to a target value for normalized peak firing pressure. The fuel flow is adjusted to any cylinder whose normalized peak firing pressure is not substantially equal to the target value.

  10. Low-Temperature Combustion of High Octane Fuels in a Gasoline Compression Ignition Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanh Duc Cung

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gasoline compression ignition (GCI has been shown as one of the advanced combustion concepts that could potentially provide a pathway to achieve cleaner and more efficient combustion engines. Fuel and air in GCI are not fully premixed compared to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI, which is a completely kinetic-controlled combustion system. Therefore, the combustion phasing can be controlled by the time of injection, usually postinjection in a multiple-injection scheme, to mitigate combustion noise. Gasoline usually has longer ignition delay than diesel. The autoignition quality of gasoline can be indicated by research octane number (RON. Fuels with high octane tend to have more resistance to autoignition, hence more time for fuel-air mixing. In this study, three fuels, namely, aromatic, alkylate, and E30, with similar RON value of 98 but different hydrocarbon compositions were tested in a multicylinder engine under GCI combustion mode. Considerations of exhaust gas recirculating (EGR, start of injection, and boost were investigated to study the sensitivity of dilution, local stratification, and reactivity of the charge, respectively, for each fuel. Combustion phasing (location of 50% of fuel mass burned was kept constant during the experiments. This provides similar thermodynamic conditions to study the effect of fuels on emissions. Emission characteristics at different levels of EGR and lambda were revealed for all fuels with E30 having the lowest filter smoke number and was also most sensitive to the change in dilution. Reasonably low combustion noise (<90 dB and stable combustion (coefficient of variance of indicated mean effective pressure <3% were maintained during the experiments. The second part of this article contains visualization of the combustion process obtained from endoscope imaging for each fuel at selected conditions. Soot radiation signal from GCI combustion were strong during late injection and also more intense

  11. Effect of exhaust gas recirculation on some combustion characteristics of dual fuel engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selim, Mohamed Y.E. [United Arab Emirates Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2003-03-01

    Combustion pressure rise rate and thermal efficiency data are measured and presented for a dual fuel engine running on a dual fuel of Diesel and compressed natural gas and utilizing exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). The maximum pressure rise rate during combustion is presented as a measure of combustion noise. The experimental investigation on the dual fuel engine revealed the noise generated from combustion and the thermal efficiency at different EGR ratios. A Ricardo E6 Diesel version engine is converted to run on a dual fuel of Diesel and compressed natural gas and having an exhaust gas recycling system is used throughout the work. The engine is fully computerized, and the cylinder pressure data and crank angle data are stored in a PC for offline analysis. The effects of EGR ratio, engine speeds, loads, temperature of recycled exhaust gases, intake charge pressure and engine compression ratio on combustion noise and thermal efficiency are examined for the dual fuel engine. The combustion noise and thermal efficiency of the dual fuel engine are found to be affected when EGR is used in the dual fuel engine. (Author)

  12. Comparison of Fuel-Nox Formation Characteristics in Conventional Air and Oxy fuel Combustion Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Mino; Park, Kweon Ha; Choi, Byung Chul

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO x ) formation characteristics in non-premixed diffusion flames of methane fuels have been investigated experimentally and numerically by adding 10% ammonia to the fuel stream, according to the variation of the oxygen ratio in the oxidizer with oxygen/carbon dioxide and oxygen/nitrogen mixtures. In an experiment of co flow jet flames, in the case of an oxidizer with oxygen/carbon dioxide, the NO x emission increased slightly as the oxygen ratio increased. On the other hand, in case of an oxygen/nitrogen oxidizer, the NO x emission was the maximum at an oxygen ratio of 0.7, and it exhibited non-monotonic behavior according to the oxygen ratio. Consequently, the NO x emission in the condition of oxy fuel combustion was overestimated as compared to that in the condition of conventional air combustion. To elucidate the characteristics of NO x formation for various oxidizer compositions, 1a and 2a numerical simulations have been conducted by adopting one kinetic mechanism. The result of 2 simulation for an oxidizer with oxygen/nitrogen well predicted the trend of experimentally measured NO x emissions

  13. Change in the electric potential of solid fuels on their combustion and gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fialkov, B.S.; Zakharov, A.G.; Plitsyn, V.T.

    1979-01-01

    Solid fuels of various degrees of graphitization (graphite, coke, hard coal, lignite) were used to study the changes in electric potential of samples during gasification and combustion in air. The potential shows three peaks during combustion, the third corresponding to ignition. Two peaks occur during the gasification process.

  14. Fluidized combustion of beds of large, dense particles in reprocessing HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, D.T.

    1977-03-01

    Fluidized bed combustion of graphite fuel elements and carbon external to fuel particles is required in reprocessing high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) cores for recovery of uranium. This burning process requires combustion of beds containing both large particles and very dense particles as well as combustion of fine graphite particles which elutriate from the bed. Equipment must be designed for optimum simplicity and reliability as ultimate operation will occur in a limited access ''hot cell'' environment. Results reported in this paper indicate that successful long-term operation of fuel element burning with complete combustion of all graphite fines leading to a fuel particle product containing <1% external carbon can be performed on equipment developed in this program

  15. CMS: CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuels Combustion, ACES Inventory for Northeastern USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset provides estimates of annual and hourly carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels (FF) for 13 states across the Northeastern...

  16. CO2 Emissions From Fuel Combustion. Highlights. 2013 Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Warsaw, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process, the IEA is making available for free download the ''Highlights'' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion now for sale on IEA Bookshop. This annual publication contains, for more than 140 countries and regions: estimates of CO2 emissions from 1971 to 2011; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; a decomposition of CO2 emissions into driving factors; and CO2emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, key sources, and other relevant information. The nineteenth session of the Conference of the Parties to the Climate Change Convention (COP-19), in conjunction with the ninth meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP 9), met in Warsaw, Poland from 11 to 22 November 2013. This volume of ''Highlights'', drawn from the full-scale study, was specially designed for delegations and observers of the meeting in Warsaw.

  17. Low temperature combustion of organic coal-water fuel droplets containing petrochemicals while soaring in a combustion chamber model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiullin Timur R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the integral characteristics (minimum temperature, ignition delay times of stable combustion initiation of organic coal-water fuel droplets (initial radius is 0.3-1.5 mm in the oxidizer flow (the temperature and velocity varied in ranges 500-900 K, 0.5-3 m/s. The main components of organic coal-water fuel were: brown coal particles, filter-cakes obtained in coal processing, waste engine, and turbine oils. The different modes of soaring and ignition of organic coal-water fuel have been established. The conditions have been set under which it is possible to implement the sustainable soaring and ignition of organic coal-water fuel droplets. We have compared the ignition characteristics with those defined in the traditional approach (based on placing the droplets on a low-inertia thermocouple junction into the combustion chamber. The paper shows the scale of the influence of heat sink over the thermocouple junction on ignition inertia. An original technique for releasing organic coal-water fuel droplets to the combustion chamber was proposed and tested. The limitations of this technique and the prospects of experimental results for the optimization of energy equipment operation were also formulated.

  18. Unified approach to the study of solid fuel combustion characteristics at high airflow speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vnuchkov, D. A.; Lukashevich, S. V.; Nalivaychenko, D. G.; Zvegintsev, V. I.

    2017-10-01

    The main objective of the research is the development of guidelines for a unified approach to testing the combustion of different solid fuels in gaseous oxidant high-speed flow, so that research outcomes could be presented in a standardized and cohesive form. All the experiments were performed on a special experimental installation designed for quantification of the burning characteristics of different fuels in a wide range of the airflow parameters at the same geometry of the combustion chamber.

  19. 40 CFR 60.4360 - How do I determine the total sulfur content of the turbine's combustion fuel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... content of the turbine's combustion fuel? 60.4360 Section 60.4360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Standards of Performance for Stationary Combustion Turbines Monitoring § 60.4360 How do I determine the total sulfur content of the turbine's combustion fuel? You must monitor the total sulfur content of the...

  20. Internal combustion engines for alcohol motor fuels: a compilation of background technical information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaser, Richard

    1980-11-01

    This compilation, a draft training manual containing technical background information on internal combustion engines and alcohol motor fuel technologies, is presented in 3 parts. The first is a compilation of facts from the state of the art on internal combustion engine fuels and their characteristics and requisites and provides an overview of fuel sources, fuels technology and future projections for availability and alternatives. Part two compiles facts about alcohol chemistry, alcohol identification, production, and use, examines ethanol as spirit and as fuel, and provides an overview of modern evaluation of alcohols as motor fuels and of the characteristics of alcohol fuels. The final section compiles cross references on the handling and combustion of fuels for I.C. engines, presents basic evaluations of events leading to the use of alcohols as motor fuels, reviews current applications of alcohols as motor fuels, describes the formulation of alcohol fuels for engines and engine and fuel handling hardware modifications for using alcohol fuels, and introduces the multifuel engines concept. (LCL)

  1. Pulverized coal burnout in blast furnace simulated by a drop tube furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Shan-Wen [Steel and Aluminum Research and Development Department, China Steel Corporation, Kaohsiung 812 (China); Chen, Wei-Hsin [Department of Greenergy, National University of Tainan, Tainan 700 (China); Lucas, John A. [School of Engineering of the University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    Reactions of pulverized coal injection (PCI) in a blast furnace were simulated using a drop tube furnace (DTF) to investigate the burnout behavior of a number of coals and coal blends. For the coals with the fuel ratio ranging from 1.36 to 6.22, the experimental results indicated that the burnout increased with decreasing the fuel ratio, except for certain coals departing from the general trend. One of the coals with the fuel ratio of 6.22 has shown its merit in combustion, implying that the blending ratio of the coal in PCI operation can be raised for a higher coke replacement ratio. The experiments also suggested that increasing blast temperature was an efficient countermeasure for promoting the combustibility of the injected coals. Higher fuel burnout could be achieved when the particle size of coal was reduced from 60-100 to 100-200 mesh. However, once the size of the tested coals was in the range of 200 and 325 mesh, the burnout could not be improved further, resulting from the agglomeration of fine particles. Considering coal blend reactions, the blending ratio of coals in PCI may be adjusted by the individual coal burnout rather than by the fuel ratio. (author)

  2. The importance of fuel properties in the formation of nitrogen oxides and in combustion; Polttoaineen ominaisuuksien merkitys typenoksidien muodostuksessa ja palamisessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, M.; Haemaelaeinen, J.; Rantanen, J.; Saastamoinen, J. [VTT Energia, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    Reactions of fuel nitrogen during pyrolysis and combustion of pulverized hvb coal, two peats and fir bark, thermal DeNOx-process and formation of N{sub 2}0 from char were studied experimentally in a pressurized entrained flow reactor. Mass loss of fuel, release of C,N,H and 0, and formation of NH{sub 3} and HCN were measured during pyrolysis (in N{sub 2} containing O{sub 2} < 50 ppm{sub vol}). Mass loss, and formation of NO, N{sub 2}O and NO{sub 2} through HCN and NH{sub 3} were measured during combustion at 5-4 vol% O{sub 2}. Thermal DeNOx process was studied at 2 and 15 bar at T= 700-950 deg C. Formation of N{sub 2}O from peat and its char was studied in a modified thermobalance. The rate of pyrolysis of high-volatile fuels (fir bark and peat) increased with pressure. A reverse trend was found with Polish hvb coal. The HCN/NH{sub 3} ratio in the flame was dependent on the fuel-O/fuel-N ratio and independent of pressure. Pressure did, however, increase the N{sub 2}O/NO ratio, because the concentrations of the key radicals in NO formation are decreased by pressure. With peats, the formation of N{sub 2}O increased slightly with pressure. The emissions of N{sub 2}O, however, doubled with wood bark when the pressure increased from 0.2 MPa to 0.8 MPa. Formation of NO{sub 2} increased clearly with pressure, and was fuel-dependent. One peat sample produced three times as much NO{sub 2} as the other under identical conditions. Pressure seemed to effect on Thermal DeNOx-process by lowering the effective temperature. Experiments with entrained flow of fuel and its char in project Liekki2-301, and experiments with single char and fuel particles in this project suggested that volatile nitrogen forms much more N{sub 2}O than char-N. Bed effects can change this situation in a real fluidized bed combustion process. (author)

  3. Numerical modeling on homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion engine fueled by diesel-ethanol blends

    OpenAIRE

    Hanafi H.; Hasan M.M; Rahman M.M; Noor M.M; Kadirgama K.; Ramasamy D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance and emission characteristics of HCCI engines fueled with oxygenated fuels (ethanol blend). A modeling study was conducted to investigate the impact of ethanol addition on the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine fueled by diesel. One dimensional simulation was conducted using the renowned commercial software for diesel and its blend fuels with 5% (E5) and 10% ethanol (E10) (in vo...

  4. Modeling JP-8 Fuel Effects on Diesel Combustion Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schihl, Peter; Hoogterp, Laura; Pangilinan, Harold; Schwarz, Ernest; Bryzik, Walter

    2006-01-01

    .... Since engine manufacturers rely solely on DF-2 for commercial vehicle applications most domestic industry, university, and national laboratory lead diesel engine combustion system research activities...

  5. Structures of the particles of the condensed dispersed phase in solid fuel combustion products plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaryan, A.A.; Chernyshev, A.V.; Nefedov, A.P.; Petrov, O.F.; Fortov, V.E.; Mikhailov, Yu.M.; Mintsev, V.B.

    2000-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations of a type of dusty plasma which has been least studied--the plasma of solid fuel combustion products--were presented. Experiments to determine the parameters of the plasma of the combustion products of synthetic solid fuels with various compositions together with simultaneous diagnostics of the degree of ordering of the structures of the particles of the dispersed condensed phase were performed. The measurements showed that the charge composition of the plasma of the solid fuels combustion products depends strongly on the easily ionized alkali-metal impurities which are always present in synthetic fuel in one or another amount. An ordered arrangement of the particles of a condensed dispersed phase in structures that form in a boundary region between the high-temperature and condensation zones was observed for samples of aluminum-coated solid fuels with a low content of alkali-metal impurities

  6. An innovative system for supplying air and fuel mixture to a combustion chamber of an engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikumar, G. R. Bharath

    2018-04-01

    Conventional carburetors are being used since decades to ensure that the desired ratio of air and fuel enters the combustion chamber for combustion for the purpose of generating power in an Spark Ignition(SI) internal combustion engine. However to increase the efficiency, the carburetor system is gradually being replaced by fuel injection systems. Fuel injection systems use injectors to supply pressurized fuel into the combustion chamber. Owing to the high initial and maintenance cost, carburetors are still ruling in the low cost vehicle domain. An innovative concept is conceived, which is an alternative method to the carburetor system to supply the air and fuel mixture to a combustion chamber of an engine. This system comprises of an inner hollow cylinder with minute holes drilled along its length with an outer cylinder capable of sliding along its length or its longitudinal axis. This system is placed in the venturi instead of the conventional carburetor system. Fuel enters from the bottom inlet of the inner cylinder and flows out through the holes provided along its length. The fuel flow from the inner cylinder is dependent on the size and the number of holes exposed at that instance by the sliding outer cylinder which in turn is connected to the throttle or accelerator.

  7. Compositional Effects of Gasoline Fuels on Combustion, Performance and Emissions in Engine

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ahfaz

    2016-10-17

    Commercial gasoline fuels are complex mixtures of numerous hydrocarbons. Their composition differs significantly owing to several factors, source of crude oil being one of them. Because of such inconsistency in composition, there are multiple gasoline fuel compositions with similar octane ratings. It is of interest to comparatively study such fuels with similar octane ratings and different composition, and thus dissimilar physical and chemical properties. Such an investigation is required to interpret differences in combustion behavior of gasoline fuels that show similar knock characteristics in a cooperative fuel research (CFR) engine, but may behave differently in direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engines or any other engine combustion modes. Two FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasolines, FACE F and FACE G with similar Research and Motor Octane Numbers but dissimilar physical properties were studied in a DISI engine under two sets of experimental conditions; the first set involved early fuel injection to allow sufficient time for fuel-air mixing hence permitting operation similar to homogenous DISI engines, while the second set consists of advance of spark timings to attain MBT (maximum brake torque) settings. These experimental conditions are repeated across different load points to observe the effect of increasing temperature and pressure on combustion and emission parameters. The differences in various engine-out parameters are discussed and interpreted in terms of physical and thermodynamic properties of the fuels.

  8. Future combustion technology for synthetic and renewable fuels in compression ignition engines (REFUEL). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakko-Saksa, P.; Brink, A.; Happonen, M. [and others

    2012-07-01

    This domestic project, Future Combustion Technology for Synthetic and Renewable Fuels in Compression Ignition Engines (ReFuel), was part of a Collaborative Task 'Future Combustion Technology for Synthetic and Renewable Fuels in Transport' of International Energy Agency (IEA) Combustion Agreement. This international Collaborative Task is coordinated by Finland. The three-year (2009-2011) prooject was a joint research project with Aalto University (Aalto), Tampere University of Technology (TUT), Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and Aabo Akademi University (AAU). The project was funded by TEKES, Waertsilae Oyj, Agro Sisu Power, Aker Arctic Technology Oy and the research partners listed above. Modern renewable diesel fuels have excellent physical and chemical properties, in comparison to traditional crude oil based fuels. Purely paraffinic fuels do not contain aromatic compounds and they are totally sulphur free. Hydrotreated Vegetable Oil (HVO) was studied as an example of paraffinic high cetane number (CN) diesel fuels. HVO has no storage and low temperature problems like the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) have. The combustion properties are better than those of crude oil based fuels and FAME, because they have very high cetane numbers and contain no polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). With low HVO density, viscosity and distillation temperatures, these advantageous properties allow far more advanced combustion strategies, such as very high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rates or extreme Miller timings, than has been possible with current fossil fuels. The implementation of these advanced combustion technologies, together with the novel renewable diesel fuel, brought significant nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), particulate matter (PM) emission reductions with no efficiency losses. (orig.)

  9. Improved correlations of hydrogen content versus combustion performance related properties of aviation turbine fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal, J.M.; Sharma, R.L.; Sagu, M.L.; Tiwari, G.B. (Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehradun (India))

    1994-01-01

    In recent years the hydrogen content of Aviation Fuels has generated considerable interest. Various investigators have suggested correlation of hydrogen content with combustion related properties of aviation turbine fuel (ATF). A suitable threshold value of hydrogen content 13.8 wt% is being considered as a waiver of specifications such as specific energy, aniline gravity product, smoke point, aromatic content, naphthalenes and luminometer number. In the present paper relationship between the hydrogen content and combustion related properties has been examined and improved correlations of hydrogen content with several combustion related properties have been developed by incorporating a characterization factor in the equations. The supporting threshold value of a hydrogen content of 13.8wt% is verified with 25 data points for waiving of combustion properties such as specific energy, aniline gravity product, smoke point and aromatic content from aviation turbine fuel. 6 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Comparative study of combustion product emissions of Pakistani coal briquettes and traditional Pakistani domestic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, E.A.; Gammage, R.B.; Haas, J.W. III; Wilson, D.L.; DePriest, J.C.; Wade, J.; Ahmad, N.; Sibtain, F.; Zahid Raza, M.

    1992-10-01

    A comparative emissions study was conducted on combustion products of various solid domestic cooking fuels; the objective was to compare relative levels of organic and inorganic toxic emissions from traditional Pakistani fuels (wood, wood charcoal, and dried animal dung) with manufactured low-rank coal briquettes (Lakhra and Sor- Range coals) under conditions simulating domestic cooking. A small combustion shed 12 m 3 internal volume, air exchange rate 14 h -1 was used to simulate south Asian cooking rooms. 200-g charges of the various fuels were ignited in an Angethi stove located inside the shed, then combusted to completion; effluents from this combustion were monitored as a function of time. Measurements were made of respirable particulates, volatile and semi-volatile organics, CO, SO 2 , and NO x . Overall it appears that emissions from coal briquettes containing combustion amendments (slaked lime, clay, and potassium nitrate oxidizer) are no greater than emissions from traditional fuels, and in some cases are significantly lower; generally, emissions are highest for all fuels in the early stages of combustion

  11. Study of PAH emission from the solid fuels combustion in residential furnaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakareka, Sergey V.; Kukharchyk, Tamara I.; Khomich, Valery S.

    2005-01-01

    The procedure for and results of a test study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission from a few types of solid fuels combustion in residential furnaces of various designs typical for Belarus are discussed. Greatest levels of PAH emission were detected from domestic wastes and wood waste combustion. Lowest levels of PAH emission are from peat briquette combustion. It was found that PAH concentration in off-gases from firewood combustion also varies significantly depending on the type of wood: the highest values of PAH are typical for waste gases from birch firewood combustion in comparison with pine firewood combustion. Draft PAH emission factors are proposed with intended application for emission inventory of such installations

  12. Oxy-fuel combustion as an alternative for increasing lime production in rotary kilns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, D.A.; Chejne, F.; Mejía, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A one-dimensional model for oxy-fuel combustion in a rotary kiln was developed. • Flue gas recirculation becomes an important parameter for controlling the process. • Combustion process decreases the flame length making it more dense. • Increases of 12% in raw material with 40% of FGR and conversion of 98% was obtained. - Abstract: The effect of Flue Gas Recirculation (FGR) on the decarbonation process during oxy-fuel combustion in a lime (and cement) rotary kiln is analyzed using an unsteady one-dimensional Eulerian–Lagrangian mathematical model. The model considers gas and limestone as continuous phases and the coal particles as the discrete phase. The model predicts limestone decarbonation, temperature and species distribution of gas and solid phases along the kiln. Simulation results of an air-combustion case are successfully validated with reported experimental data. This model is used to study and to compare the conventional air combustion process with oxy-fuel combustion with FGR ratios between 30% and 80% as controller parameter in this process. Changes in decarbonation process due to energy fluxes by convection and radiation with different FGRs were simulated and analyzed. Simulation results indicate a temperature increase of 20% in the gas and solid phases and a higher decarbonation rate of 40% in relation to the air-combustion case, for a given constant fuel consumption rate. However, for a given temperature, the increase of the CO_2 partial pressure in the oxy-fuel case promotes a reduction of the decarbonation rate. Therefore, there is a compromise between FGR and decarbonation rate, which is analyzed in the present study. Simulation results of the decarbonation step in low FGR cases, compared to air-combustion case, shows that conversion takes place in shorter distances in the kiln, suggesting that the production rate can be increased for existing kilns in oxy-fuel kilns or, equivalently, shorter kilns can be designed for an

  13. Ethanol-fueled low temperature combustion: A pathway to clean and efficient diesel engine cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asad, Usman; Kumar, Raj; Zheng, Ming; Tjong, Jimi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Concept of ethanol–diesel fueled Premixed Pilot Assisted Combustion (PPAC). • Ultra-low NOx and soot with diesel-like thermal efficiency across the load range. • Close to TDC pilot injection timing for direct combustion phasing control. • Minimum pilot quantity (15% of total energy input) for clean, stable operation. • Defined heat release profile distribution (HRPD) to optimize pilot-ethanol ratio. - Abstract: Low temperature combustion (LTC) in diesel engines offers the benefits of ultra-low NOx and smoke emissions but suffers from lowered energy efficiency due to the high reactivity and low volatility of diesel fuel. Ethanol from renewable biomass provides a viable alternate to the petroleum based transportation fuels. The high resistance to auto-ignition (low reactivity) and its high volatility make ethanol a suitable fuel for low temperature combustion (LTC) in compression-ignition engines. In this work, a Premixed Pilot Assisted Combustion (PPAC) strategy comprising of the port fuel injection of ethanol, ignited with a single diesel pilot injection near the top dead centre has been investigated on a single-cylinder high compression ratio diesel engine. The impact of the diesel pilot injection timing, ethanol to diesel quantity ratio and exhaust gas recirculation on the emissions and efficiency are studied at 10 bar IMEP. With the lessons learnt, successful ethanol–diesel PPAC has been demonstrated up to a load of 18 bar IMEP with ultra-low NOx and soot emissions across the full load range. The main challenge of PPAC is the reduced combustion efficiency especially at low loads; therefore, the authors have presented a combustion control strategy to allow high efficiency, clean combustion across the load range. This work entails to provide a detailed framework for the ethanol-fueled PPAC to be successfully implemented.

  14. Combustion of drops of Mexican fuel oils with high asphaltenes content; Combustion de gotas de combustoleos mexicanos con alto contenido de asfaltenos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Rodriguez, Jose Francisco [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1998-09-01

    In this work the combustion of fuel drops with a content of 18% of asphaltenes has been studied . The results obtained for this fuel were compared with the ones obtained for another with a content of 12% asphaltenes. The drops were suspended in a platinum filament and burned in an spherical radiant furnace. The drop size varied between 600 and 800 microns. The fuel drops with 12% asphaltenes showed shorter combustion times, a smaller diameter increment of the smaller diameter during the combustion stages and also a shorter burning time of the carbonaceous residue than the fuel drops with a content of 18% asphaltenes. [Espanol] En el presente trabajo se ha estudiado la combustion de gotas de combustible con 18% de contenido de asfaltenos. Los resultados obtenidos para este combustible se compararon con los obtenidos para otro con 12% de contenido de asfaltenos. Las gotas fueron suspendidas en un filamento de platino y quemadas en un horno radiante esferico. El tamano de las gotas vario entre 600 y 800 micras. Las gotas de combustible con 12% de asfaltenos mostraron tiempos de combustion mas cortos, un incremento del diametro menor durante las etapas de combustion y un tiempo de quemado del residuo carbonoso tambien mas corto que las gotas del combustible con 18% de contenido de asfaltenos.

  15. Spray combustion of biomass-based renewable diesel fuel using multiple injection strategy in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei

    2016-05-26

    Effect of a two-injection strategy associated with a pilot injection on the spray combustion process was investigated under conventional diesel combustion conditions (1000 K and 21% O2 concentration) for a biomass-based renewable diesel fuel, i.e., biomass to liquid (BTL), and a regular No. 2 diesel in a constant volume combustion chamber using multiband flame measurement and two-color pyrometry. The spray combustion flame structure was visualized by using multiband flame measurement to show features of soot formation, high temperature and low temperature reactions, which can be characterized by the narrow-band emissions of radicals or intermediate species such as OH, HCHO, and CH. The objective of this study was to identify the details of multiple injection combustion, including a pilot and a main injection, and to provide further insights on how the two injections interact. For comparison, three injection strategies were considered for both fuels including a two-injection strategy (Case TI), single injection strategy A (Case SA), and single injection strategy B (Case SB). Multiband flame results show a strong interaction, indicated by OH emissions between the pilot injection and the main injection for Case TI while very weak connection is found for the narrow-band emissions acquired through filters with centerlines of 430 nm and 470 nm. A faster flame development is found for the main injection of Case TI compared to Cases SA and SB, which could be due to the high temperature environment and large air entrainment from the pilot injection. A lower soot level is observed for the BTL flame compared to the diesel flame for all three injection types. Case TI has a lower soot level compared to Cases SA and SB for the BTL fuel, while the diesel fuel maintains a similar soot level among all three injection strategies. Soot temperature of Case TI is lower for both fuels, especially for diesel. Based on these results, it is expected that the two-injection strategy could be

  16. Biomass utilization for green environment: Co-combustion of diesel fuel and producer gas in thermal application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Ani, F.N.; Mehamed, A.F.

    2007-01-01

    Study of co-combustion of diesel oil and producer gas from a gasifier, individually as well as combined, in an experimental combustion chamber revealed that the producer gas can be co-combusted with liquid fuel. The process produced more CO, NO/sub x/, SO/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ as compared to the combustion of diesel oil alone; the exhaust temperature for the process was higher than the diesel combustion alone. (author)

  17. Performance Evaluation of a High Bandwidth Liquid Fuel Modulation Valve for Active Combustion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saus, Joseph R.; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, a characterization rig was designed and constructed for the purpose of evaluating high bandwidth liquid fuel modulation devices to determine their suitability for active combustion control research. Incorporated into the rig s design are features that approximate conditions similar to those that would be encountered by a candidate device if it were installed on an actual combustion research rig. The characterized dynamic performance measures obtained through testing in the rig are planned to be accurate indicators of expected performance in an actual combustion testing environment. To evaluate how well the characterization rig predicts fuel modulator dynamic performance, characterization rig data was compared with performance data for a fuel modulator candidate when the candidate was in operation during combustion testing. Specifically, the nominal and off-nominal performance data for a magnetostrictive-actuated proportional fuel modulation valve is described. Valve performance data were collected with the characterization rig configured to emulate two different combustion rig fuel feed systems. Fuel mass flows and pressures, fuel feed line lengths, and fuel injector orifice size was approximated in the characterization rig. Valve performance data were also collected with the valve modulating the fuel into the two combustor rigs. Comparison of the predicted and actual valve performance data show that when the valve is operated near its design condition the characterization rig can appropriately predict the installed performance of the valve. Improvements to the characterization rig and accompanying modeling activities are underway to more accurately predict performance, especially for the devices under development to modulate fuel into the much smaller fuel injectors anticipated in future lean-burning low-emissions aircraft engine combustors.

  18. Overview of the EBFGT installation solutions applicable for flue gases from various fuels combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Tyminski, B.; Pawelec, A.; Zimek, Z.; Licki, J.

    2011-01-01

    The overview of the solutions used in EBFGT process and adaptation of process parameters for flue gas from combustion of various fuels was presented. The inlets parameters of flue gas from four fuels with high emission of pollutants, process parameters and process constrain were analysed. Also the main problems of this technology and their solutions were presented. (author)

  19. Development of Combustion Tube for Gaseous, Liquid, and Solid Fuels to Study Flame Acceleration and DDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Tyler J.

    An experimental combustion tube of 20 ft. in length and 10.25 in. in internal diameter was designed and fabricated in order to perform combustion tests to study deflagration rates, flame acceleration, and the possibility of DDT. The experiment was designed to allow gaseous, liquid, or solid fuels, or any combination of the three to produce a homogenous fuel/air mixture within the tube. Combustion tests were initiated with a hydrogen/oxygen torch igniter and the resulting flame behavior was measured with high frequency ion probes and pressure transducers. Tests were performed with a variety of gaseous and liquid fuels in an unobstructed tube with a closed ignition end and open muzzle. The flame performance with the gaseous fuels is loosely correlated with the expansion ratio, while there is a stronger correlation with the laminar flame speed. The strongest correlation to flame performance is the run-up distance scaling factor. This trend was not observed with the liquid fuels. The reason for this is likely due to incomplete evaporation of the liquid fuel droplets resulting in a partially unburned mixture, effectively altering the intended equivalence ratio. Results suggest that the simple theory for run-up distance and flame acceleration must be modified to more accurately predict the behavior of gaseous fuels. Also, it is likely that more complex spray combustion modeling is required to accurately predict the flame behavior for liquid fuels.

  20. Overview of the EBFGT installation solutions applicable for flue gases from various fuels combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewski, A. G.; Tyminski, B.; Pawelec, A.; Zimek, Z. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Licki, J. [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock-Świerk (Poland)

    2011-07-01

    The overview of the solutions used in EBFGT process and adaptation of process parameters for flue gas from combustion of various fuels was presented. The inlets parameters of flue gas from four fuels with high emission of pollutants, process parameters and process constrain were analysed. Also the main problems of this technology and their solutions were presented. (author)

  1. Fluidized bed combustion with the use of Greek solid fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakaras Emmanuel

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is an overview of the results obtained up to date from the combustion and co-combustion activities with Greek brown coal in different installations, both in semi-industrial and laboratory scale. Combustion tests with Greek lignite were realized in three different Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (CFBC facilities. Low rank lignite was burned in a pilot scale facility of approx. 100kW thermal capacity, located in Athens (NTUA and a semi-industrial scale of 1.2 MW thermal capacity, located at RWE's power station Niederaussem in Germany. Co-combustion tests with Greek xylitic lignite and waste wood were carried out in the 1 MWth CFBC installation of AE&E, in Austria. Lab-scale co-combustion tests of Greek pre-dried lignite with biomass were accomplished in a bubbling fluidized bed in order to investigate ash melting problems. The obtained results of all aforementioned activities showed that fluidized bed is the appropriate combustion technology to efficiently exploit the low quality Greek brown coal either alone or in conjunction with biomass species.

  2. Investigation of the effects of renewable diesel fuels on engine performance, combustion, and emissions

    KAUST Repository

    Ogunkoya, Dolanimi

    2015-01-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate renewable fuels in a compression-ignition internal combustion engine. The focus of this study was the effect of newly developed renewable fuels on engine performance, combustion, and emissions. Eight fuels were investigated, and they include diesel, jet fuel, a traditional biodiesel (fatty acid methyl ester: FAME), and five next generation biofuels. These five fuels were derived using a two-step process: hydrolysis of the oil into fatty acids (if necessary) and then a thermo-catalytic process to remove the oxygen via a decarboxylation reaction. The fuels included a fed batch deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids (DCFA), a fed batch deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids with varying amounts of H2 used during the deoxygenation process (DCFAH), a continuous deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids (CDCFA), fed batch deoxygenation of lauric acid (DLA), and a third reaction to isomerize the products of the deoxygenated canola derived fatty acid alkanes (IPCF). Diesel, jet fuel, and biodiesel (FAME) have been used as benchmarks for comparing with the newer renewable fuels. The results of the experiments show slightly lower mechanical efficiency but better brake specific fuel consumption for the new renewable fuels. Results from combustion show shorter ignition delays for most of the renewable (deoxygenated) fuels with the exception of fed batch deoxygenation of lauric acid. Combustion results also show lower peak in-cylinder pressures, reduced rate of increase in cylinder pressure, and lower heat release rates for the renewable fuels. Emission results show an increase in hydrocarbon emissions for renewable deoxygenated fuels, but a general decrease in all other emissions including NOx, greenhouse gases, and soot. Results also demonstrate that isomers of the alkanes resulting from the deoxygenation of the canola derived fatty acids could be a potential replacement to conventional fossil diesel and biodiesel based on the

  3. Combustion characteristics of the LO2/GCH4 fuel-rich preburners for staged combustion cycle rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Fumiei; Tamura, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Masaki

    1991-09-01

    The combustion characteristics of Liquid Oxygen (LO2)/Gaseous Methane (GCH4) fuel rich preburners were experimentally studied using subscale hardware. Three types of preburners with coaxial type propellant injection elements were designed and fabricated, and were used for hot fire testing. LO2 was used as oxidizer, and GCH4 at room temperature was used as fuel. The tests were conducted at chamber pressures ranging from 6.7 to 11.9 M Pa, and oxidizer to fuel ratios ranged from 0.16 to 0.42. The test results, which include combustion gas temperature T(sub c), characteristic velocity C(sup *) and soot adhesion data, are presented. The T(sub c) efficiency and the C(sup *) efficiency were found to be a function of oxidizer to fuel ratio and chamber pressure. These efficiencies are correlated by an empirical correlation parameter which accounts for the effects of oxidizer to fuel ratio and chamber pressure. The exhaust plumes were colorless and transparent under all tests conditions. There was some soot adhesion to the chamber wall, but no soot adhesion was observed on the main injector simulator orifices. Higher temperature igniter gas was required to ignite the main propellants of the preburner compared with that of the LO2/Gaseous Hydrogen (GH2) propellants combination.

  4. The pulverization and handling of soft plastics for energy recovery; Soenderdelning och hantering av mjuka plaster foer energiutvinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiklund, Sven-Erik

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of the project has primarily been to investigate suitable equipment (mills, crushers, shredders) for the pulverization of different types of soft plastics from the agricultural sector (large sacks and silage plastic) and the peat extraction industry (plastic covers) with the aim of being able to use the plastic material as fuel in conventional solid waste-fired plants. Many of the mills that are used for pulverizing different types of biofuel have proved not to be particularly suitable for soft plastics. The project has comprised the following: * Contact with a number of plant owners with different types of plants (grate, CFB and BFB boilers) for a review of existing fuel handling and fuel feed equipment as well as the demands they make on the fuel that is to be fired. * Contact with Trio Plast concerning previous tests carried out in connection with the collection, baling, handling, pulverization and combustion of plastics from the agricultural sector. * Contact with mill suppliers for participation in the tests and for feedback on experience gained in connection with the pulverization of soft plastics. * Choice of a suitable plant for practical trials based on contact with the above plant owners as a reference group. * Practical trials in 5 mills with the pulverization of soft plastics from agriculture (silage plastic and large sacks) as well as plastic from peat extraction (plastic covers) and * Evaluation of technical, economic, energy-related and environmental preconditions. Following contact with several owners of solid waste-fired combustion plants, and after hearing their opinions, it became clear that many of them were doubtful about the combustion of plastic. They are primarily afraid of tripping superheaters, etc. Consequently, two plants without superheaters, one in Oestersund and the other in Malmoe, were chosen for the tests. The mills that were tested were: * A SIM mill from WahIkvist, Oedeshoeg Plant - a mobile slow-action pulverizer for

  5. Investigations on oxy-fuel combustion in glass melting furnaces; Untersuchungen zur Oxy-Fuel-Feuerung in Glasschmelzwannen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leicher, Joerg; Giese, Anne [Gaswaerme-Institut e.V., Essen (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Glass melting requires process temperatures of more than 1600 C which are usually achieved using intensive air preheating and near-stoichiometric combustion. This often leads to high nitrous oxide emissions (NO{sub x}). Oxy-fuel technology offers an interesting alternative since high combustion temperatures can be achieved using pure oxygen as oxidizer while obtaining low NO{sub x} emissions. In the course of the AiF research project ''O2-Glaswanne'' (IGF-Nr.: 15987 N), Gaswaerme- Institut e.V. Essen investigates this combustion process by experimental and numerical means in order to determine potential optimization approaches for glass melting furnaces.

  6. Characterisation of ashes produced by co-combustion of recovered fuels and peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankenhaeuser, M. [Borealis Polymers Oy, Porvoo (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The current project focuses on eventual changes in ash characteristics during co-combustion of refuse derived fuel with coal, peat, wood or bark, which could lead to slagging, fouling and corrosion in the boiler. Ashes were produced at fluidised bed (FB) combustion conditions in the 15 kW reactor at VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae, the fly ash captured by the cyclone was further analysed by XRF at Outokumpu Geotechnical Laboratory, Outokumpu. The sintering behaviour of these ashes was investigated using a test procedure developed at the Combustion Chemistry Research Group at Aabo Akademi University. The current extended programme includes a Danish refuse-derived fuel (RDF), co-combusted with bark/coal (5 tests) and wood/coal (2 tests), a RF from Jyvaskyla (2 tests with peat/coal) and de-inking sludges co- combusted at full-scale with wood waste or paper mill sludge (4 ashes provided by IVO Power). Ash pellets were thermally treated in nitrogen in order to avoid residual carbon combustion. The results obtained show no sintering tendencies below 600 deg C, significant changes in sintering are seen with pellets treated at 1000 deg C. Ash from 100 % RDF combustion does not sinter, 25 % RDF co-combustion with wood and peat, respectively, gives an insignificant effect. The most severe sintering occurs during co-combustion of RDF with bark. Contrary to the earlier hypothesis a 25 % coal addition seems to have a negative effect on all fuel blends. Analysis of the sintering results versus ash chemical composition shows, that (again), in general, an increased level of alkali chlorides and sulphates gives increased sintering. Finally, some results on sintering tendency measurements on ashes from full-scale CFB co-combustion of deinking sludge with wood waste and paper mill sludge are given. This shows that these ashes show very little, if any, sintering tendency, which can be explained from ash chemistry

  7. GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM FOSSIL FUELS AND BIOMASS COMBUSTION IN SMALL HEATING APPLIANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Dell'Antonia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of emission control has increased sharply due to the increased need of energy from combustion. However, biomass utilization in energy production is not free from problems because of physical and chemical characteristics which are substantially different from conventional energy sources. In this situation, the quantity and quality of emissions as well as used renewable sources as wood or corn grain are often unknown. To assess this problem the paper addresses the objectives to quantify the amount of greenhouse gases during the combustion of corn as compared to the emissions in fossil combustion (natural gas, LPG and diesel boiler. The test was carried out in Friuli Venezia Giulia in 2006-2008 to determine the air pollution (CO, NO, NO2, NOx, SO2 and CO2 from fuel combustion in family boilers with a power between 20-30 kWt. The flue gas emission was measured with a professional semi-continuous multi-gas analyzer, (Vario plus industrial, MRU air Neckarsulm-Obereisesheim. Data showed a lower emission of fossil fuel compared to corn in family boilers in reference to pollutants in the flue gas (NOx, SO2 and CO. In a particular way the biomass combustion makes a higher concentration of carbon monoxide (for an incomplete combustion because there is not a good mixing between fuel and air and nitrogen oxides (in relation at a higher content of nitrogen in herbaceous biomass in comparison to another fuel.

  8. Dual-Fuel Combustion for Future Clean and Efficient Compression Ignition Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Benajes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Stringent emissions limits introduced for internal combustion engines impose a major challenge for the research community. The technological solution adopted by the manufactures of diesel engines to meet the NOx and particle matter values imposed in the EURO VI regulation relies on using selective catalytic reduction and particulate filter systems, which increases the complexity and cost of the engine. Alternatively, several new combustion modes aimed at avoiding the formation of these two pollutants by promoting low temperature combustion reactions, are the focus of study nowadays. Among these new concepts, the dual-fuel combustion mode known as reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI seems more promising because it allows better control of the combustion process by means of modulating the fuel reactivity depending on the engine operating conditions. The present experimental work explores the potential of different strategies for reducing the energy losses with RCCI in a single-cylinder research engine, with the final goal of providing the guidelines to define an efficient dual-fuel combustion system. The results demonstrate that the engine settings combination, piston geometry modification, and fuel properties variation are good methods to increase the RCCI efficiency while maintaining ultra-low NOx and soot emissions for a wide range of operating conditions.

  9. Advanced diagnostics in oxy-fuel combustion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brix, J.; Clausen, Soennik; Degn Jensen, A. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. CHEC Research Centre, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Boeg Toftegaard, M. (DONG Energy Power, Hvidovre (Denmark))

    2012-07-01

    This report sums up the findings in PSO-project 010069, ''Advanced Diagnostics in Oxy-Fuel Combustion Processes''. Three areas of optic diagnostics are covered in this work: - FTIR measurements in a 30 kW swirl burner. - IR measurements in a 30 kW swirl burner. - IR measurements in a laboratory scale fixed bed reactor. The results obtained in the swirl burner have proved the FTIR method as a valuable technique for gas phase temperature measurements. When its efficacy is evaluated against traditional thermocouple measurements, two cases, with and without probe beam stop, must however be treated separately. When the FTIR probe is operated with the purpose of gas phase concentration measurements the probe needs to operate with a beam stop mounted in front of it. With this beam stop in place it was shown that the measured gas phase temperature was affected by cooling, induced by the cooled beam stop. Hence, for a more accurate determination of gas phase temperatures the probe needed to operate without the beam stop. When this was the case, the FTIR probe showed superior to traditional temperature measurements using a thermocouple as it could measure the fast temperature fluctuations. With the beam stop in place the efficacy of the FTIR probe for gas temperature determination was comparable to the use of a traditional thermocouple. The evaluation of the FTIR technique regarding estimation of gas phase concentrations of H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and CO showed that the method is reliable though it cannot be stated as particularly accurate. The accuracy of the method is dependent on the similarity of the reference emission spectra of the gases with those obtained in the experiments, as the transmittance intensity is not a linear function of concentration. The length of the optical path also affects the steadiness of the measurements. The length of the optical path is difficult to adjust on the small scales that are the focus of this work. However

  10. Emissions of Jatropha oil-derived biodiesel blend fuels during combustion in a swirl burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwazan, A. R.; Mohd. Jaafar, M. N.; Sapee, S.; Farouk, Hazir

    2018-03-01

    Experimental works on combustion of jatropha oil biodiesel blends of fuel with high swirling flow in swirl burner have been studied in various blends percentage. Jatropha oil biodiesel was produced using a two-step of esterification-transesterification process. The paper focuses on the emissions of biodiesel blends fuel using jatropha oil in lean through to rich air/fuel mixture combustion in swirl burner. The emissions performances were evaluated by using axial swirler amongst jatropha oil blends fuel including diesel fuel as baseline. The results show that the B25 has good emissions even though it has a higher emission of NOx than diesel fuel, while it emits as low as 42% of CO, 33% of SO2 and 50% of UHC emissions with high swirl number. These are due to the higher oxygen content in jatropha oil biodiesel.

  11. Modeling and control of fuel distribution in a dual-fuel internal combustion engine leveraging late intake valve closings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassa, Mateos [Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL, USA; Hall, Carrie [Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL, USA; Ickes, Andrew [Fuels, Engine and Aftertreatment Research, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, USA; Wallner, Thomas [Fuels, Engine and Aftertreatment Research, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, USA

    2016-10-07

    Advanced internal combustion engines, although generally more efficient than conventional combustion engines, often encounter limitations in multi-cylinder applications due to variations in the combustion process encountered across cylinders and between cycles. This study leverages experimental data from an inline 6-cylinder heavy-duty dual fuel engine equipped with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), a variable geometry turbocharger, and a fully-flexible variable intake valve actuation system to study cylinder-to-cylinder variations in power production and the underlying uneven fuel distribution that causes these variations. The engine is operated with late intake valve closure timings in a dual-fuel combustion mode in which a high reactivity fuel is directly injected into the cylinders and a low reactivity fuel is port injected into the cylinders. Both dual fuel implementation and late intake valve closing (IVC) timings have been shown to improve thermal efficiency. However, experimental data from this study reveal that when late IVC timings are used on a multi-cylinder dual fuel engine a significant variation in IMEP across cylinders results and as such, leads to efficiency losses. The difference in IMEP between the different cylinders ranges from 9% at an IVC of 570°ATDC to 38% at an IVC of 610°ATDC and indicates an increasingly uneven fuel distribution. These experimental observations along with engine simulation models developed using GT-Power have been used to better understand the distribution of the port injected fuel across cylinders under various operating conditions on such dual fuel engines. This study revealed that the fuel distribution across cylinders in this dual fuel application is significantly affected by changes in the effective compression ratio as determined by the intake valve close timing as well as the design of the intake system (specifically the length of the intake runners). Late intake valve closures allow a portion of the trapped air

  12. Combustion and exhaust emission characteristics of a dual fuel compression ignition engine operated with pilot Diesel fuel and natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papagiannakis, R.G.; Hountalas, D.T.

    2004-01-01

    Towards the effort of reducing pollutant emissions, especially soot and nitrogen oxides, from direct injection Diesel engines, engineers have proposed various solutions, one of which is the use of a gaseous fuel as a partial supplement for liquid Diesel fuel. These engines are known as dual fuel combustion engines, i.e. they use conventional Diesel fuel and a gaseous fuel as well. This technology is currently reintroduced, associated with efforts to overcome various difficulties of HCCI engines, using various fuels. The use of natural gas as an alternative fuel is a promising solution. The potential benefits of using natural gas in Diesel engines are both economical and environmental. The high autoignition temperature of natural gas is a serious advantage since the compression ratio of conventional Diesel engines can be maintained. The present contribution describes an experimental investigation conducted on a single cylinder DI Diesel engine, which has been properly modified to operate under dual fuel conditions. The primary amount of fuel is the gaseous one, which is ignited by a pilot Diesel liquid injection. Comparative results are given for various engine speeds and loads for conventional Diesel and dual fuel operation, revealing the effect of dual fuel combustion on engine performance and exhaust emissions

  13. Multiple Threats to Child Health from Fossil Fuel Combustion: Impacts of Air Pollution and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Frederica P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Approaches to estimating and addressing the risk to children from fossil fuel combustion have been fragmented, tending to focus either on the toxic air emissions or on climate change. Yet developing children, and especially poor children, now bear a disproportionate burden of disease from both environmental pollution and climate change due to fossil fuel combustion. Objective: This commentary summarizes the robust scientific evidence regarding the multiple current and projected health impacts of fossil fuel combustion on the young to make the case for a holistic, child-centered energy and climate policy that addresses the full array of physical and psychosocial stressors resulting from fossil fuel pollution. Discussion: The data summarized here show that by sharply reducing our dependence on fossil fuels we would achieve highly significant health and economic benefits for our children and their future. These benefits would occur immediately and also play out over the life course and potentially across generations. Conclusion: Going beyond the powerful scientific and economic arguments for urgent action to reduce the burning of fossil fuels is the strong moral imperative to protect our most vulnerable populations. Citation: Perera FP. 2017. Multiple threats to child health from fossil fuel combustion: impacts of air pollution and climate change. Environ Health Perspect 125:141–148; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP299 PMID:27323709

  14. Multiple Threats to Child Health from Fossil Fuel Combustion: Impacts of Air Pollution and Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Frederica P

    2017-02-01

    Approaches to estimating and addressing the risk to children from fossil fuel combustion have been fragmented, tending to focus either on the toxic air emissions or on climate change. Yet developing children, and especially poor children, now bear a disproportionate burden of disease from both environmental pollution and climate change due to fossil fuel combustion. This commentary summarizes the robust scientific evidence regarding the multiple current and projected health impacts of fossil fuel combustion on the young to make the case for a holistic, child-centered energy and climate policy that addresses the full array of physical and psychosocial stressors resulting from fossil fuel pollution. The data summarized here show that by sharply reducing our dependence on fossil fuels we would achieve highly significant health and economic benefits for our children and their future. These benefits would occur immediately and also play out over the life course and potentially across generations. Going beyond the powerful scientific and economic arguments for urgent action to reduce the burning of fossil fuels is the strong moral imperative to protect our most vulnerable populations. Citation: Perera FP. 2017. Multiple threats to child health from fossil fuel combustion: impacts of air pollution and climate change. Environ Health Perspect 125:141-148; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP299.

  15. Combustion of High Molecular Weight Hydrocarbon Fuels and JP-8 at Moderate Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    1. Introduction Fundamental knowledge of mechanisms of autoignition of condensed hydrocarbon fuels at elevated pressures is essential for accurate...particular JP-8) and surrogates of jet-fuels in laminar non-uniform flows at elevated pressures upto 2.5 MPa. Experimental and kinetic modeling studies...AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Combustion, Jet Fuels, JP-8, Elevated

  16. Effects of Catalysts on Emissions of Pollutants from Combustion Processes of Liquid Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bok Agnieszka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic growth of the use of non-renewable fuels for energy purposes results in demand for catalysts to improve their combustion process. The paper describes catalysts used mainly in the processes of combustion of motor fuels and fuel oils. These catalysts make it possible to raise the efficiency of oxidation processes simultanously reducing the emission of pollutants. The key to success is the selection of catalyst compounds that will reduce harmful emissions of combustion products into the atmosphere. Catalysts are introduced into the combustion zone in form of solutions miscible with fuel or with air supplied to the combustion process. The following compounds soluble in fuel are inclused in the composition of the described catalysts: organometallic complexes, manganese compounds, salts originated from organic acids, ferrocen and its derivatives and sodium chloride and magnesium chloride responsible for burning the soot (chlorides. The priority is to minimize emissions of volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides, and carbon monoxide, as well as particulate matter.

  17. Recovered fuels - The connection between fuel preparation, combustion equipments and ash quality; Returbraenslen - kopplingen mellan braensleberedning, foerbraenningsutrustning och askkvalitet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyllenhammar, Marianne; Johansson, Inge [S.E.P. Scandinavian Energy Project AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2004-01-01

    The lack of bio fuel and new regulations of waste treatment have increased the interest of recovered fuels. Co-combustion is of great interest, but the consequences and permit handling involved in introducing a new fuel into a plant have to be investigated. The aim of this study is to see if it is possible to affect the ash quality by pre-treatment of the fuel, or by firing in different combustion equipments. Ashes can be used in several different types of applications. Few of these have uniform requirements of ash quality. The ongoing research will hopefully help generating unified regulations and recommendations for the uses of ashes. However, right now the knowledge is limited and very specific. Every type of ash has to be analysed for the appropriate use. It is especially the requirements of leaching that are difficult to make general. The work started with a survey of recovered fuels. It contains roughly which fuels exist and which of those are accessible for the energy market in Sweden. The survey showed that there are approximately 13 Mton/y wastes partly accessible to the energy market; 50 % are used for material recycling, 32 % for energy recovery, 1.5 % for composting and the rest are used as landfill. Three recovered fuels were chosen and studied more thoroughly. These were PTP (paper, wood and plastic), tires and impregnated wood. The project showed that the recovered fuels have different qualifications as fuels and have different possibilities at co-combustion which results in variable ash quality. A pre-treated fuel is more homogeneous which give better combustion and cleaner ashes. A fluidised bed demands a more pre-treated fuel than a grate and the fluidised bed generate more ashes because the ashes contain bed material. As a result of this the ashes from a fluidised bed is generally easier to utilize. In this project the composition of ashes from co-combustion of the three recovered fuels together with wood fuel has been estimated. The aim was to

  18. Proceedings of the 1999 international joint power generation conference (FACT-vol. 23). Volume 1: Fuels and combustion technologies; Gas turbines; and Nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfield, S.R. Jr.; Moussa, N.A.

    1999-01-01

    Papers are arranged under the following topical sections: Gas turbine combustion; Advanced energy conversion; Low NOx solutions; Burner developments; Alternative fuels combustion; Advanced energy conversion technologies; Numerical modeling of combustion; Fluidized bed combustion; Coal combustion; Combustion research; Gasification systems; Mercury emissions; Highly preheated air combustion; Selective catalytic reduction; Special topics in combustion research; Gas turbines and advanced energy; and How can the nuclear industry become more efficient? Papers within scope have been processed separately for inclusion on the database

  19. Semi-volatile and particulate emissions from the combustion of alternative diesel fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, S; Graham, J; Striebich, R

    2001-01-01

    Motor vehicle emissions are a major anthropogenic source of air pollution and contribute to the deterioration of urban air quality. In this paper, we report results of a laboratory investigation of particle formation from four different alternative diesel fuels, namely, compressed natural gas (CNG), dimethyl ether (DME), biodiesel, and diesel, under fuel-rich conditions in the temperature range of 800-1200 degrees C at pressures of approximately 24 atm. A single pulse shock tube was used to simulate compression ignition (CI) combustion conditions. Gaseous fuels (CNG and DME) were exposed premixed in air while liquid fuels (diesel and biodiesel) were injected using a high-pressure liquid injector. The results of surface analysis using a scanning electron microscope showed that the particles formed from combustion of all four of the above-mentioned fuels had a mean diameter less than 0.1 microm. From results of gravimetric analysis and fuel injection size it was found that under the test conditions described above the relative particulate yields from CNG, DME, biodiesel, and diesel were 0.30%. 0.026%, 0.52%, and 0.51%, respectively. Chemical analysis of particles showed that DME combustion particles had the highest soluble organic fraction (SOF) at 71%, followed by biodiesel (66%), CNG (38%) and diesel (20%). This illustrates that in case of both gaseous and liquid fuels, oxygenated fuels have a higher SOF than non-oxygenated fuels.

  20. Research into three-component biodiesel fuels combustion process using a single droplet technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Raslavičius

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the engine emission while at same time improving engine efficiency, it is very important to clarify the combustion mechanism. Even if, there are many researches into investigating the mechanism of engine combustion, so that to clarify the relationship between complicated phenomena, it is very difficult to investigate due to the complicated process of both physical and chemical reaction from the start of fuel injection to the end of combustion event. The numerical simulations are based on a detailed vaporization model and detailed chemical kinetics. The influence of different physical parameters like droplet temperature, gas phase temperature, ambient gas pressure and droplet burning velocity on the ignition delay process is investigated using fuel droplet combustion stand. Experimental results about their influence on ignition delay time were presented.

  1. Emission of pollutants from the combustion of composite fuels by metallurgical processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Łabaj

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the study on emission characteristics of pollutants resulting from combustion process of composite alternative fuels for use in the processes of pyrometallurgy of copper as an alternative fuel to currently used coke breeze. These fuels are mainly based on waste carrier of “C” element, and the composition of the fuel is modelled in order to obtain the appropriate energy and emission parameters as well as strength parameters. These studies confirmed the possibility of using composite fuels as an alternative reducing agent as well as an energy carrier in the processes of pyrometallurgy of copper.

  2. Optimization of combustion chamber geometry and operating conditions for compression ignition engine fueled with pre-blended gasoline-diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seokhwon; Jeon, Joonho; Park, Sungwook

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Pre-blended gasoline-diesel fuel was used with direct injection system. • KIVA-CHEMKIN code modeled dual-fuel fuel spray and combustion processes with discrete multi-component model. • The characteristics of Combustion and emission on pre-blended fuel was investigated with various fuel reactivities. • Optimization of combustion chamber shape improved combustion performance of the gasoline-diesel blended fuel engine. - Abstract: In this study, experiments and numerical simulations were used to improve the fuel efficiency of compression ignition engine using a gasoline-diesel blended fuel and an optimization technology. The blended fuel is directly injected into the cylinder with various blending ratios. Combustion and emission characteristics were investigated to explore the effects of gasoline ratio on fuel blend. The present study showed that the advantages of gasoline-diesel blended fuel, high thermal efficiency and low emission, were maximized using the numerical optimization method. The ignition delay and maximum pressure rise rate increased with the proportion of gasoline. As the gasoline fraction increased, the combustion duration and the indicated mean effective pressure decreased. The homogeneity of the fuel-air mixture was improved due to longer ignition delay. Soot emission was significantly reduced up to 90% compared to that of conventional diesel. The nitrogen oxides emissions of the blended fuel increased slightly when the start of injection was retarded toward top dead center. For the numerical study, KIVA-CHEMKIN multi-dimensional CFD code was used to model the combustion and emission characteristics of gasoline-diesel blended fuel. The micro genetic algorithm coupled with the KIVA-CHEMKIN code were used to optimize the combustion chamber shape and operating conditions to improve the combustion performance of the blended fuel engine. The optimized chamber geometry enhanced the fuel efficiency, for a level of nitrogen oxides

  3. EMISSION AND COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF DIFFERENT FUELS IN A HCCI ENGINE

    OpenAIRE

    S. Sendilvelan; S.Mohanamurugan

    2011-01-01

    Different intake valve timings and fuel injection amounts were tested in order to identify their effects on exhaust emissions and combustion characteristics using variable valve actuation (VVA) in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine. The HCCI engine is a promising concept for future automobile engines and stationary power plants. The two-stage ignition process in a HCCI engine creates advanced ignition and stratified combustion, which makes the ignition timing and combus...

  4. Formulation and analyses of vaporization and diffusion-controlled combustion of fuel sprays

    OpenAIRE

    Arrieta Sanagustín, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the modelling of vaporization and combustion of sprays. A general two-continua formulation is given for the numerical computation of spray flows, including the treatment of the droplets as homogenized sources. Group combustion is considered, with the reaction between the fuel coming from the vaporizing droplets and the oxygen of the air modeled in the Burke-Schumann limit of infinitely fast chemical reaction, with nonunity Lewis numbers allowed for the different r...

  5. Physical properties, evaporation and combustion characteristics of nanofluid-type fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Tanvir, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Nanofluids are liquids with stable suspension of nanoparticles. Limited studies in the past have shown that both energetic and catalytic nanoparticles once mixed with traditional liquid fuels can be advantageous in combustion applications, e.g., increased energy density and shortened ignition delay. Contradictions in existing literature, scarcity of experimental data and lack of understanding on how the added nanoparticles affect the physical properties as well as combustion characteristics o...

  6. The effect of low-NOx combustion on residual carbon in fly ash and its adsorption capacity for air entrainment admixtures in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Hougaard; Jensen, Anker Degn; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2010-01-01

    been combusted in an entrained flow reactor to test the impact of changes in operating conditions and fuel type on the AEA adsorption of ash and NOx formation. Increased oxidizing conditions, obtained by improved fuel-air mixing or higher excess air, decreased the AEA requirements of the produced ash......Fly ash from pulverized coal combustion contains residual carbon that can adsorb the air-entraining admixtures (AEAs) added to control the air entrainment in concrete. This is a problem that has increased by the implementation of low-NOx combustion technologies. In this work, pulverized fuel has...... by up to a factor of 25. This was due to a lower carbon content in the ash and a lower specific AEA adsorptivity of the carbon. The latter was suggested to be caused by changes in the adsorption properties of the unburned char and a decreased formation of soot, which was found to have a large AEA...

  7. Conversion of sewage sludge to clean solid fuel using hydrothermal carbonization: Hydrochar fuel characteristics and combustion behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Chao; Giannis, Apostolos; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The hydrothermal carbonization of sewage sludge process is developed. • Hydrochars are solid fuels with less nitrogen and sulfur contents. • The first order combustion reaction of hydrochars is derived. • Main combustion decomposition of hydrochars is easier and more stable. • Formation pathways of hydrochars during hydrothermal carbonization are proposed. - Abstract: Conventional thermochemical treatment of sewage sludge (SS) is energy-intensive due to its high moisture content. To overcome this drawback, the hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process was used to convert SS into clean solid fuel without prior drying. Different carbonization times were applied in order to produce hydrochars possessing better fuel properties. After the carbonization process, fuel characteristics and combustion behaviors of hydrochars were evaluated. Elemental analysis showed that 88% of carbon was recovered while 60% of nitrogen and sulfur was removed. Due to dehydration and decarboxylation reactions, hydrogen/carbon and oxygen/carbon atomic ratios reduced to 1.53 and 0.39, respectively. It was found that the fuel ratio increased to 0.18 by prolonging the carbonization process. Besides, longer carbonization time seemed to decrease oxygen containing functional groups while carbon aromaticity structure increased, thereby rendering hydrochars highly hydrophobic. The thermogravimetric analysis showed that the combustion decomposition was altered from a single stage for raw sludge to two stages for hydrochars. The combustion reaction was best fitted to the first order for both raw sludge and hydrochars. The combustion of hydrochars is expected to be easier and more stable than raw sludge because of lower activation energy and pre-exponential factor

  8. Availability analysis of a syngas fueled spark ignition engine using a multi-zone combustion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakopoulos, C.D.; Michos, C.N.; Giakoumis, E.G.

    2008-01-01

    A previously developed and validated zero-dimensional, multi-zone, thermodynamic combustion model for the prediction of spark ignition (SI) engine performance and nitric oxide (NO) emissions has been extended to include second-law analysis. The main characteristic of the model is the division of the burned gas into several distinct zones, in order to account for the temperature and chemical species stratification developed in the burned gas during combustion. Within the framework of the multi-zone model, the various availability components constituting the total availability of each of the multiple zones of the simulation are identified and calculated separately. The model is applied to a multi-cylinder, four-stroke, turbocharged and aftercooled, natural gas (NG) SI gas engine running on synthesis gas (syngas) fuel. The major part of the unburned mixture availability consists of the chemical contribution, ranging from 98% at the inlet valve closing (IVC) event to 83% at the ignition timing of the total availability for the 100% load case, which is due to the presence of the combustible fuel. On the contrary, the multiple burned zones possess mainly thermomechanical availability. Specifically, again for the 100% load case, the total availability of the first burned zone at the exhaust valve opening (EVO) event consists of thermomechanical availability approximately by 90%, with similar percentages for all other burned zones. Two definitions of the combustion exergetic efficiency are used to explore the degree of reversibility of the combustion process in each of the multiple burned zones. It is revealed that the crucial factor determining the thermodynamic perfection of combustion in each burned zone is the level of the temperatures at which combustion occurs in the zone, with minor influence of the whole temperature history of the zone during the complete combustion phase. The availability analysis is extended to various engine loads. The engine in question is

  9. Sulfur emission from Victorian brown coal under pyrolysis, oxy-fuel combustion and gasification conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luguang; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2013-02-05

    Sulfur emission from a Victorian brown coal was quantitatively determined through controlled experiments in a continuously fed drop-tube furnace under three different atmospheres: pyrolysis, oxy-fuel combustion, and carbon dioxide gasification conditions. The species measured were H(2)S, SO(2), COS, CS(2), and more importantly SO(3). The temperature (873-1273 K) and gas environment effects on the sulfur species emission were investigated. The effect of residence time on the emission of those species was also assessed under oxy-fuel condition. The emission of the sulfur species depended on the reaction environment. H(2)S, SO(2), and CS(2) are the major species during pyrolysis, oxy-fuel, and gasification. Up to 10% of coal sulfur was found to be converted to SO(3) under oxy-fuel combustion, whereas SO(3) was undetectable during pyrolysis and gasification. The trend of the experimental results was qualitatively matched by thermodynamic predictions. The residence time had little effect on the release of those species. The release of sulfur oxides, in particular both SO(2) and SO(3), is considerably high during oxy-fuel combustion even though the sulfur content in Morwell coal is only 0.80%. Therefore, for Morwell coal utilization during oxy-fuel combustion, additional sulfur removal, or polishing systems will be required in order to avoid corrosion in the boiler and in the CO(2) separation units of the CO(2) capture systems.

  10. Effect of W/O Emulsion Fuel Properties on Spray Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Tamio; Fuchihata, Manabu; Takeda, Shuuco

    This study proposes a realizable technology for an emulsion combustion method that can reduce environmental loading. This paper discusses the effect on spray combustion for W/O emulsion fuel properties with an added agent, and the ratio between water and emulsifier added to a liquid fuel. The addition of water or emulsifier to a liquid fuel affected the spray combustion by causing micro-explosions in the flame due to geometric changes in the sprayed flame and changes to the temperature distribution. Experimental results revealed that the flame length shortened by almost 40% upon the addition of the water. Furthermore, it was found that water was effective in enhancing combustion due to its promoting micro-explosions. Results also showed that when the emulsifier was added to the spray flame, the additive burned in the flame's wake, producing a bright red flame. The flame length was observed to be long as a result. The micro-explosion phenomenon, caused by emulsifier dosage differences, was observed using time-dependent images at a generated frequency and an explosion scale with a high-speed photography method. Results indicated that the micro-explosion phenomenon in the W/O emulsion combustion method effectively promoted the combustion reaction and suppressed soot formation.

  11. Ignition of a Droplet of Composite Liquid Fuel in a Vortex Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiullin, T. R.; Vershinina, K. Yu; Glushkov, D. O.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2017-11-01

    Experimental study results of a droplet ignition and combustion were obtained for coal-water slurry containing petrochemicals (CWSP) prepared from coal processing waste, low-grade coal and waste petroleum products. A comparative analysis of process characteristics were carried out in different conditions of fuel droplet interaction with heated air flow: droplet soars in air flow in a vortex combustion chamber, droplet soars in ascending air flow in a cone-shaped combustion chamber, and droplet is placed in a thermocouple junction and motionless in air flow. The size (initial radii) of CWSP droplet was varied in the range of 0.5-1.5 mm. The ignition delay time of fuel was determined by the intensity of the visible glow in the vicinity of the droplet during CWSP combustion. It was established (under similar conditions) that ignition delay time of CWSP droplets in the combustion chamber is lower in 2-3.5 times than similar characteristic in conditions of motionless droplet placed in a thermocouple junction. The average value of ignition delay time of CWSP droplet is 3-12 s in conditions of oxidizer temperature is 600-850 K. Obtained experimental results were explained by the influence of heat and mass transfer processes in the droplet vicinity on ignition characteristics in different conditions of CWSP droplet interaction with heated air flow. Experimental results are of interest for the development of combustion technology of promising fuel for thermal power engineering.

  12. Realisations in the field of combustion for a new type of gaseous fuel based on hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paunescu, L.; Surugiu, G. [Metallurgical Research Inst., Bucharest (Romania); Dica, C. [Rokura Industrial Applications, Bucharest (Romania); Stanescu, P.D. [Univ. for Technical Installation, Bucharest (Romania); Iorga, G. [Uzinsider Engineering, Galati (Romania); Necula, H. [Politechnica Univ., Bucharest (Romania); Ivan, I. [Mittal Steel, Galati (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    The trend towards the use of non-polluting energy sources to reduce or eliminate environmentally damaging combustion products such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and nitrous oxides was discussed. Water electrolysis experiments were conducted to obtain an oxy-hydric gaseous fuel known as Klein gas. Klein gas contains hydrogen and oxygen in an almost stoichiometric proportion and has a unique molecular structure. From an energetic point of view, Klein gas behaves differently from other gases depending on the conditions where ignition and combustion occur. The temperature inside the flame varies from about 130 degrees C during free combustion under normal temperature and pressure conditions, up to the melting temperatures of some metals or refractory materials. If ignited Klein gas comes in contact with the surfaces of such a materials it can be used for cutting, brazing or welding. In order to use Klein gas in combustion installations such as industrial heating furnaces in iron and steel mills or in the ceramic and refractory industry, it should be used in combination with other gaseous fuels before ignition or by injection into an existing flame. This paper presented experimental results obtained by a Romanian team of researchers regarding the use of Klein gas in combustion installations with natural gas. The combustion rate was found to intensify as flame temperature increased, depending on the proportion of Klein gas used. The optimal proportion between the two fuels was found to be 1:5. 5 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  13. Mixture of fuels for solution combustion synthesis of porous Fe3O4 powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnianfar, H.; Masoudpanah, S. M.; Alamolhoda, S.; Fathi, H.

    2017-06-01

    The solution combustion synthesis of porous magnetite (Fe3O4) powders by a mixture of glycine and urea fuels was investigated concerning the thermodynamic aspects and powder characteristics. The adiabatic combustion temperature and combusted species were thermodynamically calculated as a function of the fuel to oxidant molar ratio (ϕ). The combustion behavior, phase evolution, porous structure and magnetic properties were characterized by thermal analysis, X-ray diffractometry, N2 adsorption-desorption, electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry techniques. Nearly single phase Fe3O4 powders were synthesized by the mixture of fuels at ϕ values of 0.75 and 1. The as-combusted Fe3O4 powders at ϕ = 1 exhibited porous structure with the specific surface area of 83.4 m2/g. The highest saturation magnetization of 75.5 emu/g and the lowest coercivity of 84 Oe were achieved at ϕ = 1, due to the high purity and large crystallite size, inducing from the highest adiabatic combustion temperature.

  14. Numerical Simulations of Hollow-Cone Injection and Gasoline Compression Ignition Combustion With Naphtha Fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad A.

    2016-01-29

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI), also known as partially premixed compression ignition (PPCI) and gasoline direct injection compression ignition (GDICI), engines have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition (SI) engines. Lean-burn combustion with the direct injection of fuel eliminates throttle losses for higher thermodynamic efficiencies, and the precise control of the mixture compositions allows better emission performance such as NOx and particulate matter (PM). Recently, low octane gasoline fuel has been identified as a viable option for the GCI engine applications due to its longer ignition delay characteristics compared to diesel and lighter evaporation compared to gasoline fuel (Chang et al., 2012, "Enabling High Efficiency Direct Injection Engine With Naphtha Fuel Through Partially Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Combustion," SAE Technical Paper No. 2012-01-0677). The feasibility of such a concept has been demonstrated by experimental investigations at Saudi Aramco (Chang et al., 2012, "Enabling High Efficiency Direct Injection Engine With Naphtha Fuel Through Partially Premixed Charge Compression Ignition Combustion," SAE Technical Paper No. 2012-01-0677; Chang et al., 2013, "Fuel Economy Potential of Partially Premixed Compression Ignition (PPCI) Combustion With Naphtha Fuel," SAE Technical Paper No. 2013-01-2701). The present study aims to develop predictive capabilities for low octane gasoline fuel compression ignition (CI) engines with accurate characterization of the spray dynamics and combustion processes. Full three-dimensional simulations were conducted using converge as a basic modeling framework, using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulent mixing models. An outwardly opening hollow-cone spray injector was characterized and validated against existing and new experimental data. An emphasis was made on the spray penetration characteristics. Various spray breakup and collision models have been

  15. Numerical exploration of mixing and combustion in ethylene fueled scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharavath, Malsur; Manna, P.; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations are performed for full scale scramjet combustor of a hypersonic airbreathing vehicle with ethylene fuel at ground test conditions corresponding to flight Mach number, altitude and stagnation enthalpy of 6.0, 30 km and 1.61 MJ/kg respectively. Three dimensional RANS equations are solved along with species transport equations and SST-kω turbulence model using Commercial CFD software CFX-11. Both nonreacting (with fuel injection) and reacting flow simulations [using a single step global reaction of ethylene-air with combined combustion model (CCM)] are carried out. The computational methodology is first validated against experimental results available in the literature and the performance parameters of full scale combustor in terms of thrust, combustion efficiency and total pressure loss are estimated from the simulation results. Parametric studies are conducted to study the effect of fuel equivalence ratio on the mixing and combustion behavior of the combustor.

  16. High-resolution observations of combustion in heterogeneous surface fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Louise Loudermilk; Gary L. Achtemeier; Joseph J. O' Brien; J. Kevin Hiers; Benjamin S. Hornsby

    2014-01-01

    In ecosystems with frequent surface fires, fire and fuel heterogeneity at relevant scales have been largely ignored. This could be because complete burns give an impression of homogeneity, or due to the difficulty in capturing fine-scale variation in fuel characteristics and fire behaviour. Fire movement between patches of fuel can have implications for modelling fire...

  17. Recent Trends in the Production, Combustion and Modeling of Furan-Based Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen A. Eldeeb

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the use of furans, a class of alternative fuels derived from biomass, as transportation fuels. This paper reviews recent progress in the characterization of its combustion properties. It reviews their production processes, theoretical kinetic explorations and fundamental combustion properties. The theoretical efforts are focused on the mechanistic pathways for furan decomposition and oxidation, as well as the development of detailed chemical kinetic models. The experiments reviewed are mostly concerned with the temporal evolutions of homogeneous reactors and the propagation of laminar flames. The main thrust in homogeneous reactors is to determine global chemical time scales such as ignition delay times. Some studies have adopted a comparative approach to bring out reactivity differences. Chemical kinetic models with varying degrees of predictive success have been established. Experiments have revealed the relative behavior of their combustion. The growing body of literature in this area of combustion chemistry of alternative fuels shows a great potential for these fuels in terms of sustainable production and engine performance. However, these studies raise further questions regarding the chemical interactions of furans with other hydrocarbons. There are also open questions about the toxicity of the byproducts of combustion.

  18. Feasibility Assessment of CO2 Capture Retrofitted to an Existing Cement Plant : Post-combustion vs. Oxy-fuel Combustion Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerbelová, Hana; Van Der Spek, Mijndert; Schakel, Wouter

    2017-01-01

    This research presents a preliminary techno-economic evaluation of CO2 capture integrated with a cement plant. Two capture technologies are evaluated, monoethanolamine (MEA) post-combustion CO2 capture and oxy-fuel combustion. Both are considered potential technologies that could contribute to

  19. Thermodynamic modeling of LPG combustion in dual-fuel engines; Modelisation thermodynamique de la combustion du GPL dans les moteurs dual-fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilcan, A.; Le Corre, O.; Tazerout, M. [Ecole des Mines de Nantes, 44 (France); Ramesh, A. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras (India)

    2002-07-01

    Dual-fuel engines are modified diesel engines burning simultaneously two fuels inside the cylinder: a gaseous one, called the primary fuel and a liquid one, called the pilot fuel. The thermal efficiency of the dual-fuel engine and of the diesel engine are comparable; the level of emissions is lower compared to the diesel one. This article presents a new procedure for the combustion modeling in a LPG-diesel dual-fuel engine. The procedures deals with the ignition delay period and with the rate of heat release inside the cylinder. This procedure is validated using experimental data issued front a collaboration with the Indian Institute of Technology from Madras, India. The used engine is a single-cylinder one, air-cooled. The pilot fuel is direct injected inside the cylinder The engine was run at constant load and with different diesel substitutions, i.e. for different air to fuel ratios of the primary fuel-air mixture. The general error of the procedure is below 10%. (authors)

  20. Experimental study on the impact of operating conditions and fuel composition on PCCI combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leermakers, C.A.J.

    2010-03-15

    Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) is a combustion concept that holds the promise of combining emission levels of a spark-ignition (SI) engine with the efficiency of a compressionignition (CI) engine. In a short term scenario, PCCI combustion will be used in the low load part of the engine operating range only. This would guarantee low engine-out emission levels at operating conditions where exhaust temperatures are too low for effective NOx reduction through catalytic after treatment. At higher loads, the engine would run in conventional CI combustion mode, with emission requirements met through catalytic NOx reduction. Implicit with this scenario is that engine hardware design would be very close to that of current modern diesel engines. Compression ratio could be made load dependent through implementation of variable valve actuation. The PCCI experiments presented here have been performed using a modified 6 cylinder 12.6 liter heavy duty DI DAF XE 355 C engine. Experiments are conducted in one dedicated cylinder, which is equipped with a stand-alone fuel injection system, EGR circuit, and air compressor. For the low to medium load operating range the compression ratio has been lowered to 12:1 by means of a thicker head gasket. As engine hardware should - in the short term - preferably remain close to current diesel engines, optimizing operating conditions should focus on parameters like EGR level, intake temperature, intake pressure and injection timing. While past work in the Combustion Technology group has focused on low load PCCI combustion, in this report the effects on engine performance and emission behavior are investigated for both low and medium load PCCI combustion, up to 40% of full load. In the interpretation of experimental results, emphasis lies on the effect on combustion phasing and maximum pressure rise rate, which are inherent challenges to enable viable PCCI combustion. As in the short term scenario fuels will be used that are not too

  1. Regenerable mixed copper-iron-inert support oxygen carriers for solid fuel chemical looping combustion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Tian, Hanjing

    2016-12-20

    The disclosure provides an oxygen carrier for a chemical looping cycle, such as the chemical looping combustion of solid carbonaceous fuels, such as coal, coke, coal and biomass char, and the like. The oxygen carrier is comprised of at least 24 weight % (wt %) CuO, at least 10 wt % Fe2O3, and an inert support, and is typically a calcine. The oxygen carrier exhibits a CuO crystalline structure and an absence of iron oxide crystalline structures under XRD crystallography, and provides an improved and sustained combustion reactivity in the temperature range of 600.degree. C.-1000.degree. C. particularly for solid fuels such as carbon and coal.

  2. Fuel rich and fuel lean catalytic combustion of the stabilized confined turbulent gaseous diffusion flames over noble metal disc burners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal S. Zakhary

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic combustion of stabilized confined turbulent gaseous diffusion flames using Pt/Al2O3 and Pd/Al2O3 disc burners situated in the combustion domain under both fuel-rich and fuel-lean conditions was experimentally studied. Commercial LPG fuel having an average composition of: 23% propane, 76% butane, and 1% pentane was used. The thermal structure of these catalytic flames developed over Pt/Al2O3 and Pd/Al2O3 burners were examined via measuring the mean temperature distribution in the radial direction at different axial locations along the flames. Under-fuel-rich condition the flames operated over Pt catalytic disc attained high temperature values in order to express the progress of combustion and were found to achieve higher activity as compared to the flames developed over Pd catalytic disc. These two types of catalytic flames demonstrated an increase in the reaction rate with the downstream axial distance and hence, an increase in the flame temperatures was associated with partial oxidation towards CO due to the lack of oxygen. However, under fuel-lean conditions the catalytic flame over Pd catalyst recorded comparatively higher temperatures within the flame core in the near region of the main reaction zone than over Pt disc burner. These two catalytic flames over Pt and Pd disc burners showed complete oxidation to CO2 since the catalytic surface is covered by more rich oxygen under the fuel-lean condition.

  3. A Review of Heavy-Fueled Rotary Engine Combustion Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Triangle Park, NC, 2009. 17. Shimizu, R.; Tadokoro, T.; Nakanishi, T.; Funamoto, J. Mazda 4-Rotor Rotary Engine for the Le Mans 24-Hour Endurance...2000. 102. Schock, H.; Hamady, F.; Somerton , C. Stratified Charge Rotary Engine Combustion Studies; NASA-CR-197985; National Aeronautics and

  4. Blending Octane Number of Toluene with Gasoline-like and PRF Fuels in HCCI Combustion Mode

    KAUST Repository

    Waqas, Muhammad Umer

    2018-04-03

    Future internal combustion engines demand higher efficiency but progression towards this is limited by the phenomenon called knock. A possible solution for reaching high efficiency is Octane-on-Demand (OoD), which allows to customize the antiknock quality of a fuel through blending of high-octane fuel with a low octane fuel. Previous studies on Octane-on-Demand highlighted efficiency benefits depending on the combination of low octane fuel with high octane booster. The author recently published works with ethanol and methanol as high-octane fuels. The results of this work showed that the composition and octane number of the low octane fuel is significant for the blending octane number of both ethanol and methanol. This work focuses on toluene as the high octane fuel (RON 120). Aromatics offers anti-knock quality and with high octane number than alcohols, this work will address if toluene can provide higher octane enhancement. Our aim is to investigate the impact of three gasoline-like fuels and two Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs). More specifically, fuels are FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) I, FACE J, FACE A, PRF 70 and PRF 84. A CFR engine was used to conduct the experiments in HCCI mode. For this combustion mode, the engine operated at four specific conditions based on RON and MON conditions. The octane numbers corresponding to four HCCI numbers were obtained for toluene concentration of 0, 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20%. Results show that the blending octane number of toluene varies non-linearly and linearly with the increase in toluene concentration depending on the base fuel, experimental conditions and the concentration of toluene. As a result, the blending octane number can range from close to 150 with a small fraction of toluene to a number closer to that of toluene, 120, with larger fractions.

  5. Furnace devices aerodynamics optimization for fuel combustion efficiency improvement and nitrogen oxide emission reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, E. P.; Prokhorov, V. B.; Arkhipov, A. M.; Chernov, S. L.; Kirichkov, V. S.; Kaverin, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    MPEI conducts researches on physical and mathematical models of furnace chambers for improvement of power-generation equipment fuel combustion efficiency and ecological safety. Results of these researches are general principles of furnace aerodynamics arrangement for straight-flow burners and various fuels. It has been shown, that staged combustion arrangement with early heating and igniting with torch distribution in all furnace volume allows to obtain low carbon in fly ash and nitrogen oxide emission and also to improve boiler operation reliability with expand load adjustment range. For solid fuel combustion efficiency improvement it is practical to use high-placed and strongly down-tilted straight-flow burners, which increases high-temperature zone residence time for fuel particles. In some cases, for this combustion scheme it is possible to avoid slag-tap removal (STR) combustion and to use Dry-bottom ash removal (DBAR) combustion with tolerable carbon in fly ash level. It is worth noting that boilers with STR have very high nitrogen oxide emission levels (1200-1800 mg/m3) and narrow load adjustment range, which is determined by liquid slag output stability, so most industrially-developed countries don’t use this technology. Final decision about overhaul of boiler unit is made with regard to physical and mathematical modeling results for furnace and zonal thermal calculations for furnace and boiler as a whole. Overhaul of boilers to provide staged combustion and straight-flow burners and nozzles allows ensuring regulatory nitrogen oxide emission levels and corresponding best available technology criteria, which is especially relevant due to changes in Russian environmental regulation.

  6. Numerical simulations of the industrial circulating fluidized bed boiler under air- and oxy-fuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamczyk, Wojciech P.; Kozołub, Paweł; Klimanek, Adam; Białecki, Ryszard A.; Andrzejczyk, Marek; Klajny, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Measured and numerical results of air-fuel combustion process within large scale industrial circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler is presented in this paper. For numerical simulations the industrial compact CFB boiler was selected. Numerical simulations were carried out using three-dimensional model where the dense particulate transport phenomenon was simultaneously modelled with combustion process. The fluidization process was modelled using the hybrid Euler-Lagrange approach. The impact of the geometrical model simplification on predicted mass distribution and temperature profiles over CFB boiler combustion chamber two kinds of geometrical models were used, namely the complete model which consist of combustion chamber, solid separators, external solid super-heaters and simplified boiler geometry which was reduced to the combustion chamber. The evaluated temperature and pressure profiles during numerical simulations were compared against measured data collected during boiler air-fuel operation. Collected data was also used for validating numerical model of the oxy-fuel combustion model. Stability of the model and its sensitivity on changes of several input parameters were studied. The comparison of the pressure and temperature profiles for all considered cases gave comparable trends in contrary to measured data. Moreover, some additional test was carried out the check the influence of radiative heat transfer on predicted temperature profile within the CFB boiler. - Highlights: • Hybrid Euler-Lagrange approach was used for modelling particle transport, air- and oxy-fuel combustion process. • Numerical results were validated against measured data. • The influence of different boiler operating conditions on calculated temperature profile was investigated. • New strategy for resolving particle transport in circulating fluidized bed was shown

  7. Global combustion: the connection between fossil fuel and biomass burning emissions (1997–2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, Jennifer K.; Nagy, R. Chelsea; Archibald, Sally; Moritz, Max A.; Williamson, Grant J.

    2016-01-01

    Humans use combustion for heating and cooking, managing lands, and, more recently, for fuelling the industrial economy. As a shift to fossil-fuel-based energy occurs, we expect that anthropogenic biomass burning in open landscapes will decline as it becomes less fundamental to energy acquisition and livelihoods. Using global data on both fossil fuel and biomass burning emissions, we tested this relationship over a 14 year period (1997–2010). The global average annual carbon emissions from biomass burning during this time were 2.2 Pg C per year (±0.3 s.d.), approximately one-third of fossil fuel emissions over the same period (7.3 Pg C, ±0.8 s.d.). There was a significant inverse relationship between average annual fossil fuel and biomass burning emissions. Fossil fuel emissions explained 8% of the variation in biomass burning emissions at a global scale, but this varied substantially by land cover. For example, fossil fuel burning explained 31% of the variation in biomass burning in woody savannas, but was a non-significant predictor for evergreen needleleaf forests. In the land covers most dominated by human use, croplands and urban areas, fossil fuel emissions were more than 30- and 500-fold greater than biomass burning emissions. This relationship suggests that combustion practices may be shifting from open landscape burning to contained combustion for industrial purposes, and highlights the need to take into account how humans appropriate combustion in global modelling of contemporary fire. Industrialized combustion is not only an important driver of atmospheric change, but also an important driver of landscape change through companion declines in human-started fires. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The interaction of fire and mankind’. PMID:27216509

  8. Global combustion: the connection between fossil fuel and biomass burning emissions (1997-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, Jennifer K; Nagy, R Chelsea; Archibald, Sally; Bowman, David M J S; Moritz, Max A; Roos, Christopher I; Scott, Andrew C; Williamson, Grant J

    2016-06-05

    Humans use combustion for heating and cooking, managing lands, and, more recently, for fuelling the industrial economy. As a shift to fossil-fuel-based energy occurs, we expect that anthropogenic biomass burning in open landscapes will decline as it becomes less fundamental to energy acquisition and livelihoods. Using global data on both fossil fuel and biomass burning emissions, we tested this relationship over a 14 year period (1997-2010). The global average annual carbon emissions from biomass burning during this time were 2.2 Pg C per year (±0.3 s.d.), approximately one-third of fossil fuel emissions over the same period (7.3 Pg C, ±0.8 s.d.). There was a significant inverse relationship between average annual fossil fuel and biomass burning emissions. Fossil fuel emissions explained 8% of the variation in biomass burning emissions at a global scale, but this varied substantially by land cover. For example, fossil fuel burning explained 31% of the variation in biomass burning in woody savannas, but was a non-significant predictor for evergreen needleleaf forests. In the land covers most dominated by human use, croplands and urban areas, fossil fuel emissions were more than 30- and 500-fold greater than biomass burning emissions. This relationship suggests that combustion practices may be shifting from open landscape burning to contained combustion for industrial purposes, and highlights the need to take into account how humans appropriate combustion in global modelling of contemporary fire. Industrialized combustion is not only an important driver of atmospheric change, but also an important driver of landscape change through companion declines in human-started fires.This article is part of the themed issue 'The interaction of fire and mankind'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Combustion performance of an aluminum melting furnace operating with liquid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieckele, Angela Ourivio; Naccache, Monica Feijo; Gomes, Marcos Sebastiao de P. [Pontificia Universidade Catolica (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica], E-mails: nieckele@puc-rio.br, naccache@puc-rio.br, mspgomes@puc-rio.br

    2010-10-15

    The characteristics associated with the delivery of the fuel to be used as the energy source in any industrial combustion equipment are of extreme importance, as for example, in improving the performance of the combustion process and in the preservation of the equipment. A clean and efficient combustion may be achieved by carefully selecting the fuel and oxidant, as well as the operational conditions of the delivery system for both. In the present work, numerical simulations were carried out using the commercial code FLUENT for analyzing some of the relevant operational conditions inside an aluminum reverb furnace employing liquid fuel and air as the oxidant. Different fuel droplets sizes as well as inlet droplet stream configurations were examined. These characteristics, associated with the burner geometry and the fuel dispersion and delivery system may affect the flame shape, and consequently the temperature and the heat flux distribution within the furnace. Among the results obtained in the simulations, it was shown the possible damages to the equipment, which may occur as a result of the combustion process, if the flame is too long or too intense and concentrated. (author)

  10. Hydrogen enriched compressed natural gas (HCNG: A futuristic fuel for internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanthagopal Kasianantham

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is fast becoming a serious global problem with increasing population and its subsequent demands. This has resulted in increased usage of hydrogen as fuel for internal combustion engines. Hydrogen resources are vast and it is considered as one of the most promising fuel for automotive sector. As the required hydrogen infrastructure and refueling stations are not meeting the demand, widespread introduction of hydrogen vehicles is not possible in the near future. One of the solutions for this hurdle is to blend hydrogen with methane. Such types of blends take benefit of the unique combustion properties of hydrogen and at the same time reduce the demand for pure hydrogen. Enriching natural gas with hydrogen could be a potential alternative to common hydrocarbon fuels for internal combustion engine applications. Many researchers are working on this for the last few years and work is now focused on how to use this kind of fuel to its maximum extent. This technical note is an assessment of HCNG usage in case of internal combustion engines. Several examples and their salient features have been discussed. Finally, overall effects of hydrogen addition on an engine fueled with HCNG under various conditions are illustrated. In addition, the scope and challenges being faced in this area of research are clearly described.

  11. Sensors Based Measurement Techniques of Fuel Injection and Ignition Characteristics of Diesel Sprays in DI Combustion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rehman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Innovative sensor based measurement techniques like needle lift sensor, photo (optical sensor and piezoresistive pressure transmitter are introduced and used to measure the injection and combustion characteristics in direct injection combustion system. Present experimental study is carried out in the constant volume combustion chamber to study the ignition, combustion and injection characteristics of the solid cone diesel fuel sprays impinging on the hot surface. Hot surface ignition approach has been used to create variety of advanced combustion systems. In the present study, the hot surface temperatures were varied from 623 K to 723 K. The cylinder air pressures were 20, 30 and 40 bar and fuel injection pressures were 100, 200 and 300 bar. It is found that ignition delay of fuel sprays get reduced with the rise in injection pressure. The ignition characteristics of sprays much less affected at high fuel injection pressures and high surface temperatures. The fuel injection duration reduces with the increase in fuel injection pressures. The rate of heat release becomes high at high injection pressures and it decreases with the increase in injection duration. It is found that duration of burn/combustion decrease with the increase in injection pressure. The use of various sensors is quite effective, reliable and accurate in measuring the various fuel injection and combustion characteristics. The study simulates the effect of fuel injection system parameters on combustion performance in large heavy duty engines.

  12. Research of power fuel low-temperature vortex combustion in industrial boiler based on numerical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlova K.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the presented research is to perform numerical modelling of fuel low-temperature vortex combustion in once-through industrial steam boiler. Full size and scaled-down furnace model created with FIRE 3D software and was used for the research. All geometrical features were observed. The baseline information for the low-temperature vortex furnace process are velocity and temperature of low, upper and burner blast, air-fuel ratio, fuel consumption, coal dust size range. The obtained results are: temperature and velocity three dimensional fields, furnace gases and solid fuel ash particles concentration.

  13. On Combustion in the CNG-Diesel Dual Fuel Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Königsson, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Currently there is a large interest in alternative transport fuels. There are two underlying reasons for this interest: the desire to decrease the environmental impact of transports and the need to compensate for the declining availability of petroleum. In the light of both these factors, the CNG-diesel dual fuelengine is an attractive concept. The primary fuel of the dual fuel engine is methane, which can be derived both from renewables and from fossil sources. Methane from organic waste, co...

  14. The nuclear fuel cycle; Le cycle du combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    After a short introduction about nuclear power in the world, fission physics and the French nuclear power plants, this brochure describes in a digest way the different steps of the nuclear fuel cycle: uranium prospecting, mining activity, processing of uranium ores and production of uranium concentrates (yellow cake), uranium chemistry (conversion of the yellow cake into uranium hexafluoride), fabrication of nuclear fuels, use of fuels, reprocessing of spent fuels (uranium, plutonium and fission products), recycling of energetic materials, and storage of radioactive wastes. (J.S.)

  15. A synthesis of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andres, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Bréon, F.-M.

    2012-01-01

    This synthesis discusses the emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel combustion and cement production. While much is known about these emissions, there is still much that is unknown about the details surrounding these emissions. This synthesis explores our knowledge of these emissions in terms......; and the uncertainties associated with these different aspects of the emissions. The magnitude of emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels has been almost continuously increasing with time since fossil fuels were first used by humans. Despite events in some nations specifically designed to reduce emissions......, or which have had emissions reduction as a byproduct of other events, global total emissions continue their general increase with time. Global total fossilfuel carbon dioxide emissions are known to within 10% uncertainty (95% confidence interval). Uncertainty on individual national total fossil-fuel carbon...

  16. Hydraulic modelling of the CARA Fuel element; Desarrollo hidraulico del combustible CARA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasnarof, Daniel O; Juanico, Luis [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Disenios Avanzados y Evaluacion Economica; Giorgi, M [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Dept. de Materiales; Ghiselli, Alberto M; Zampach, Ruben; Fiori, Jose M; Yedros, Pablo A [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Dept. de Ensayos no Destructivos

    2004-07-01

    The CARA fuel element is been developing by the National Atomic Energy Commission for both Argentinean PHWRs. In order to keep the hydraulic restriction in their fuel channels, one of CARA's goals is to keep its similarity with both present fuel elements. In this paper is presented pressure drop test performed at a low-pressure facility (Reynolds numbers between 5x10{sup 4} and 1,5x10{sup 5}) and rational base models for their spacer grid and rod assembly. Using these models, we could estimate the CARA hydraulic performance in reactor conditions that have shown to be satisfactory. (author) [Spanish] Con el objeto de validar la similitud hidraulica del elemento combustible CARA con los actuales combustibles de Atucha y Embalse, se realizaron ensayos de perdida de carga en el circuito CBP del CAC con un nuevo diseno de separador de mejor desempeno hidraulico. Se presenta aqui el analisis de los mismos, de los cuales se validaron modelos de base racional para estimar las restricciones hidraulicas de los distintos componentes estructurales (separadores, grillas y barras combustibles) en funcion del flujo refrigerante. Se estimo asi la caida de presion del CARA dentro del canal combustible Embalse en condiciones nominales de reactor, siendo la misma similar al del combustible actual de 37 barras. (autor)

  17. The atomization and the flame structure in the combustion of residual fuel oils; La atomizacion y estructura de flama en la combustion de combustibles residuales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolado Estandia, Ramon [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1986-12-31

    In this article a research on the combustion of heavy residual fuel oils is presented. The type of flames studied were obtained by means of the burning of sprays produced by an atomizer designed and calibrated specially for the research purpose. The flame characteristics that were analyzed are its length, its luminosity, the temperature, the distribution of the droplets size and mainly the burning regime of the droplets in the flame. The experimental techniques that were used for these studies were shadow micro-photography, suction pyrometry and of total radiation, laser diffraction, 35 mm photography, and impact push. The analysis of the experimental results, together with the results of the application of a mathematical model, permitted to establish two parameters, that quantitatively related determine the burning regime of the droplets in a flame of sprays of residual heavy fuel oil. [Espanol] En este articulo se presenta una investigacion sobre la combustion de combustibles residuales pesados. El tipo de flamas estudiadas se obtuvieron mediante el quemado de sprays producidos por un atomizador disenado y calibrado especialmente para el proposito de la investigacion. Las caracteristicas de flama que se analizaron son la longitud, la luminosidad, la temperatura, la distribucion de tamano de gotas y, principalmente, el regimen de quemado de gotas en la flama. Las tecnicas experimentales que se usaron para estos estudios fueron microfotografia de sombras, pirometria de succion y de radiacion total, difraccion laser, fotografia de 35 mm y empuje de impacto. El analisis de resultados experimentales, junto con los resultados de la aplicacion de un modelo matematico, permitio establecer dos parametros, que relacionados cuantitativamente, determinan el regimen de quemado de gotas en una flama de sprays de combustible residual pesado.

  18. The atomization and the flame structure in the combustion of residual fuel oils; La atomizacion y estructura de flama en la combustion de combustibles residuales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolado Estandia, Ramon [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1985-12-31

    In this article a research on the combustion of heavy residual fuel oils is presented. The type of flames studied were obtained by means of the burning of sprays produced by an atomizer designed and calibrated specially for the research purpose. The flame characteristics that were analyzed are its length, its luminosity, the temperature, the distribution of the droplets size and mainly the burning regime of the droplets in the flame. The experimental techniques that were used for these studies were shadow micro-photography, suction pyrometry and of total radiation, laser diffraction, 35 mm photography, and impact push. The analysis of the experimental results, together with the results of the application of a mathematical model, permitted to establish two parameters, that quantitatively related determine the burning regime of the droplets in a flame of sprays of residual heavy fuel oil. [Espanol] En este articulo se presenta una investigacion sobre la combustion de combustibles residuales pesados. El tipo de flamas estudiadas se obtuvieron mediante el quemado de sprays producidos por un atomizador disenado y calibrado especialmente para el proposito de la investigacion. Las caracteristicas de flama que se analizaron son la longitud, la luminosidad, la temperatura, la distribucion de tamano de gotas y, principalmente, el regimen de quemado de gotas en la flama. Las tecnicas experimentales que se usaron para estos estudios fueron microfotografia de sombras, pirometria de succion y de radiacion total, difraccion laser, fotografia de 35 mm y empuje de impacto. El analisis de resultados experimentales, junto con los resultados de la aplicacion de un modelo matematico, permitio establecer dos parametros, que relacionados cuantitativamente, determinan el regimen de quemado de gotas en una flama de sprays de combustible residual pesado.

  19. Management of spent fuel; Gestion del combustible irradiado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrampes Blanch, J.

    2015-07-01

    The management of irradiated fuel has become one of the materials that more time and resources deals within their responsibilities that also cover other areas such as the design of the new cycles, supply of fresh fuel, tracking operation cycles and strategies of power changes. (Author)

  20. Numerical Study on the Performance Characteristics of Hydrogen Fueled Port Injection Internal Combustion Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Rosli A. Bakar; Mohammed K. Mohammed; M. M. Rahman

    2009-01-01

    This study was focused on the engine performance of single cylinder hydrogen fueled port injection internal combustion engine. GT-Power was utilized to develop the model for port injection engine. One dimensional gas dynamics was represented the flow and heat transfer in the components of the engine model. The governing equations were introduced first, followed by the performance parameters and model description. Air-fuel ratio was varied from stoichiometric limit to a lean limit and the rota...

  1. Influence of fuel ratios on auto combustion synthesis of barium ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Single-domain barium ferrite nano particles have been synthesized with narrow particle-size distribution using an auto combustion technique. In this process, citric acid was used as a fuel. Ratios of cation to fuel were maintained variously at 1 : 1, 1 : 2 and 1 : 3. The pH was 7 in all cases. Of all three cases, a cation ...

  2. Reduced Gravity Studies of Soret Transport Effects in Liquid Fuel Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Benjamin D.

    2004-01-01

    Soret transport, which is mass transport driven by thermal gradients, can be important in practical flames as well as laboratory flames by influencing transport of low molecular weight species (e.g., monatomic and diatomic hydrogen). In addition, gas-phase Soret transport of high molecular weight fuel species that are present in practical liquid fuels (e.g., octane or methanol) can be significant in practical flames (Rosner et al., 2000; Dakhlia et al., 2002) and in high pressure droplet evaporation (Curtis and Farrell, 1992), and it has also been shown that Soret transport effects can be important in determining oxygen diffusion rates in certain classes of microgravity droplet combustion experiments (Aharon and Shaw, 1998). It is thus useful to obtain information on flames under conditions where Soret effects can be clearly observed. This research is concerned with investigating effects of Soret transport on combustion of liquid fuels, in particular liquid fuel droplets. Reduced-gravity is employed to provide an ideal (spherically-symmetrical) experimental model with which to investigate effects of Soret transport on combustion. The research will involve performing reduced-gravity experiments on combustion of liquid fuel droplets in environments where Soret effects significantly influence transport of fuel and oxygen to flame zones. Experiments will also be performed where Soret effects are not expected to be important. Droplets initially in the 0.5 to 1 mm size range will be burned. Data will be obtained on influences of Soret transport on combustion characteristics (e.g., droplet burning rates, droplet lifetimes, gas-phase extinction, and transient flame behaviors) under simplified geometrical conditions that are most amenable to theoretical modeling (i.e., spherical symmetry). The experiments will be compared with existing theoretical models as well as new models that will be developed. Normal gravity experiments will also be performed.

  3. The importance of fuel properties in the formation of nitrogen oxides and in combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huotari, J.; Aho, M.; Haemaelaeinen, J.; Huotari, J.; Saastamoinen, J.; Rantanen, J.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this work is to find new information about the effects of pressure, temperature and fuel properties (Fuel-O/Fuel-N) on the formation of nitrogen oxides through the most important intermediates (NH 3 and HCN). In addition, a single particle model for the simultaneous pyrolysis and char combustion will be improved to be used for calculating combustion under pressure. Experimental work is done with an electrically heated pressurized entrained flow reactor (PEFR) which is equipped with modern analytics (as FT-IR for the analysis of N 2 O, NO and NO 2 and FT-IR pyrometry for the measurement of particle temperatures). The experimental work is carried out in several stages: (a) Study of the formation of HCN and NH 3 during pressurized pyrolysis (b) Oxidation of HCN and NH 3 to nitrogen oxides in pressurized combustion (c) Reduction of NO by NH 3 under pressure (thermax denox) Task a is performed with fuels of various O/N ratio. Task b is performed with pure HCN and NH 3 and with more complicated gas mixtures including HCN and NH 3 . A large part of these results are utilized in kinetic modelling in Aabo Akademi University, Finland in project LIEKKI 2-201. Two kinds of modelling work is performed in VTT in this project (a) Simultaneous modelling of the composition of solid and gaseous phases in the pyrolysis and combustion of a small fuel particle (multiphase modelling) (b) Modelling of pyrolysis and combustion of a single fuel particle under pressurized conditions (single particle modelling). The results can be used in planning of pressurized combustors and in minimizing the emissions of nitrogen oxides. (author)

  4. Dynamic simulation in the process of pressurized denitration based on oxy-fuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiang; Zhou, Dong

    2018-02-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion is considered as one of the most promising technologies for capturing CO2 from coal-fired power plants. It will greatly reduce the cost of gas purification if we remove NOx in the process of compression, which is the characteristic of oxy-combustion. In this paper, simulation of denitration process of oxy-fuel combustion flue gas was realized by the Aspen Plus software, systematically analyzed the effect of temperature, pressure, initial concentration of O2 and NO in the denitration process. Results show that the increasing of pressure, initial concentration of O2, initial concentration of NO and the decrease of temperature are all beneficial to the denitration process.

  5. CO-COMBUSTION OF REFUSE DERIVED FUEL WITH COAL IN A FLUIDISED BED COMBUSTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. WAN AB KARIM GHANI

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Power generation from biomass is an attractive technology which utilizes municipal solid waste-based refused derived fuel. In order to explain the behavior of biomass-fired fluidized bed incinerator, biomass sources from refuse derived fuel was co-fired with coal in a 0.15 m diameter and 2.3 m high fluidized bed combustor. The combustion efficiency and carbon monoxide emissions were studied and compared with those from pure coal combustion. This study proved that the blending effect had increased the carbon combustion efficiency up to 12% as compared to single MSW-based RDF. Carbon monoxide levels fluctuated between 200-1600 ppm were observed when coal is added. It is evident from this research that efficient co-firing of biomass with coal can be achieved with minimum modification of existing coal-fired boilers.

  6. A synthesis of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Andres

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This synthesis discusses the emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel combustion and cement production. While much is known about these emissions, there is still much that is unknown about the details surrounding these emissions. This synthesis explores our knowledge of these emissions in terms of why there is concern about them; how they are calculated; the major global efforts on inventorying them; their global, regional, and national totals at different spatial and temporal scales; how they are distributed on global grids (i.e., maps; how they are transported in models; and the uncertainties associated with these different aspects of the emissions. The magnitude of emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels has been almost continuously increasing with time since fossil fuels were first used by humans. Despite events in some nations specifically designed to reduce emissions, or which have had emissions reduction as a byproduct of other events, global total emissions continue their general increase with time. Global total fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions are known to within 10 % uncertainty (95 % confidence interval. Uncertainty on individual national total fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions range from a few percent to more than 50 %. This manuscript concludes that carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion continue to increase with time and that while much is known about the overall characteristics of these emissions, much is still to be learned about the detailed characteristics of these emissions.

  7. Development of correlations for combustion modelling with supercritical surrogate jet fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Sekhar Dondapati

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical fluid technology finds its application in almost all engineering aspects in one or other way. Technology of clean jet fuel combustion is also seeing supercritical fluids as one of their contender in order to mitigate the challenges related to global warming and health issues occurred due to unwanted emissions which are found to be the by-products in conventional jet engine combustion. As jet fuel is a blend of hundred of hydrocarbons, thus estimation of chemical kinetics and emission characteristics while simulation become much complex. Advancement in supercritical jet fuel combustion technology demands reliable property statistics of jet fuel as a function temperature and pressure. Therefore, in the present work one jet fuel surrogate (n-dodecane which has been recognized as the constituent of real jet fuel is studied and thermophysical properties of each is evaluated in the supercritical regime. Correlation has been developed for two transport properties namely density and viscosity at the critical pressure and over a wide range of temperatures (TC + 100 K. Further, to endorse the reliability of the developed correlation, two arithmetical parameters have been evaluated which illustrates an outstanding agreement between the data obtained from online NIST Web-Book and the developed correlation.

  8. Heavy fuel oil pyrolysis and combustion: kinetics and evolved gases investigated by TGA-FTIR

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2017-08-24

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) obtained from crude oil distillation is a widely used fuel in marine engines and power generation technologies. In the present study, the pyrolysis and combustion of a Saudi Arabian HFO in nitrogen and in air, respectively, were investigated using non-isothermal thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with a Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. TG and DTG (differential thermo-gravimetry) were used for the kinetic analysis and to study the mass loss characteristics due to the thermal degradation of HFO at temperatures up to 1000°C and at various heating rates of 5, 10 and 20°C/min, in air and N2 atmospheres. FTIR analysis was then performed to study the composition of the evolved gases. The TG/DTG curves during HFO combustion show the presence of three distinct stages: the low temperature oxidation (LTO); fuel decomposition (FD); and high temperature oxidation (HTO) stages. The TG/DTG curves obtained during HFO pyrolysis show the presence of two devolatilization stages similar to that seen in the LTO stage of HFO combustion. Apart from this, the TG/DTG curves obtained during HFO combustion and pyrolysis differ significantly. Kinetic analysis was also performed using the distributed activation energy model, and the kinetic parameter (E) was determined for the different stages of HFO combustion and pyrolysis processes, yielding a good agreement with the measured TG profiles. FTIR analysis showed the signal of CO2 as approximately 50 times more compared to the other pollutant gases under combustion conditions. Under pyrolytic conditions, the signal intensity of alkane functional groups was the highest followed by alkenes. The TGA-FTIR results provide new insights into the overall HFO combustion processes, which can be used to improve combustor designs and control emissions.

  9. 40 CFR 60.107a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for fuel gas combustion devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or less. In the case of a liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) product specification in the pressurized liquid state, the gas phase sulfur content should be evaluated assuming complete vaporization of the LPG... for fuel gas combustion devices. 60.107a Section 60.107a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  10. HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF AN EMULSIFIED HEAVY FUEL OIL IN A FIRETUBE BOILER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of measuring emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from the combustion flue gases of a No. 6 fuel oil, both with and without an emulsifying agent, in a 2.5 million Btu/hr (732 kW) firetube boiler with the purpose of determining the impacts of the e...

  11. Influence of fuel ratios on auto combustion synthesis of barium ferrite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Influence of fuel ratios on auto combustion synthesis of barium ferrite nano particles. D BAHADUR*, S RAJAKUMAR and ANKIT KUMAR. Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology,. Mumbai 400 076 e-mail: dhirenb@iitb.ac.in. Abstract. Single-domain barium ferrite nano ...

  12. EPA/IFP EUROPEAN WORKSHOP ON THE EMISSION ON NITROUS OXIDE FROM FOSSIL FUEL COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes the proceedings of an EPA/Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP) cosponsored workshop addressing direct nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from fossil fuel combustion. The third in a series, it was held at the IFP in Rueil-Malmaison, France, on June 1-2, 1988. Increas...

  13. Cylinder Pressure-based Combustion Control with Multi-pulse Fuel Injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, X.; Wang, S.; Jager, B. de; Willems, F.P.T.

    2015-01-01

    With an increased number of fuel injection pulses, the control problem in diesel engines becomes complex. Consisting of multiple single-input single-output (SISO) controllers, the conventional control strategy shows unsatisfactory dynamic performance in tracking combustion load and phase reference

  14. Combustion Chamber Deposits and PAH Formation in SI Engines Fueled by Producer Gas from Biomass Gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Schramm, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    Investigations were made concerning the formation of combustion chamber deposits (CCD) in SI gas engines fueled by producer gas. The main objective was to determine and characterise CCD and PAH formation caused by the presence of the light tar compounds phenol and guaiacol in producer gas from an...

  15. Non-traditional Process of Hydrogen Containing Fuel Mixtures Production for Internal-combustion Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady G. Kuvshinov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article justifies the perspectives of development of the environmentally sound technology of hydrogen containing fuel mixtures for internal-combustion engines based on the catalytic process of low-temperature decomposition of hydrocarbons into hydrogen and nanofibrous carbon.

  16. Three Dimensional Transient Turbulent Simulations of Scramjet Fuel Injection and Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahbaz, Marwane

    2011-11-01

    Scramjet is a propulsion system that is more effective for hypersonic flights (M >5). The main objective of the simulation is to understand both the mixing and combustion process of air flow using hydrogen fuel in high speed environment s. The understanding of this phenomenon is used to determine the number of fuel injectors required to increase combustion efficiency and energy transfer. Due to the complexity of this simulation, multiple software tools are used to achieve this objective. First, Solid works is used to draw a scramjet combustor with accurate measurements. Second software tool used is Gambit; It is used to make several types of meshes for the scramjet combustor. Finally, Open Foam and CFD++ are software used to process and post process the scramjet combustor. At this stage, the simulation is divided into two categories. The cold flow category is a series of simulations that include subsonic and supersonic turbulent air flow across the combustor channel with fuel interaction from one or more injectors'. The second category is the combustion simulations which involve fluid flow and fuel mixing with ignition. The simulation and modeling of scramjet combustor will assist to investigate and understand the combustion process and energy transfer in hypersonic environment.

  17. Systematic design of an intra-cycle fueling control system for advanced diesel combustion concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kefalidis, L.

    2017-01-01

    This technical report presents a systematic approach for the design and development of an intra-cycle fueling control system for diesel combustion concepts. A high level system was developed and implemented on an experimental engine setup. Implementation and experimental validation are performed for

  18. Modeling CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion using the logistic equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Ming; Niu, Dongxiao

    2011-01-01

    CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion have been known to contribute to the greenhouse effect. Research on emission trends and further forecasting their further values is important for adjusting energy policies, particularly those relative to low carbon. Except for a few countries, the main figures of CO 2 emission from fossil fuel combustion in other countries are S-shaped curves. The logistic function is selected to simulate the S-shaped curve, and to improve the goodness of fit, three algorithms were provided to estimate its parameters. Considering the different emission characteristics of different industries, the three algorithms estimated the parameters of CO 2 emission in each industry separately. The most suitable parameters for each industry are selected based on the criterion of Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE). With the combined simulation values of the selected models, the estimate of total CO 2 emission from fossil fuel combustion is obtained. The empirical analysis of China shows that our method is better than the linear model in terms of goodness of fit and simulation risk. -- Highlights: → Figures of CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion in most countries are S-shape curves. → Using the logistic function to model the S-shape curve. → Three algorithms are offered to estimate the parameters of the logistic function. → The empirical analysis from China shows that the logistic equation has satisfactory simulation results.

  19. Characterisation of supplementary fuels for co-combustion with pulverised coal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heikkinen, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The current and future energy policy aims at increasing the share of renewable energy in worlds energy supply. One possibility to enhance energy production by renewable sources within a short term is co-combustion. This means co-firing biomass and waste with fossil fuels at existing power plants

  20. Combustion of Liquid Bio-Fuels in an Internal Circulating Fluidized Bed

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miccio, F.; Kalisz, S.; Baxter, D.; Svoboda, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 143, 1-3 (2008), s. 172-179 ISSN 1385-8947 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : internal circulating fluidized bed * liquid fuel * combustion Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.813, year: 2008

  1. Physical and chemical effects of low octane gasoline fuels on compression ignition combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2016-09-30

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines running on low octane gasoline fuels are considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition engines. In this study, three fuels with different chemical and physical characteristics have been investigated in single cylinder engine running in GCI combustion mode at part-load conditions both experimentally and numerically. The studied fuels are: Saudi Aramco light naphtha (SALN) (Research octane number (RON) = 62 and final boiling point (FBP) = 91 °C), Haltermann straight run naphtha (HSRN) (RON = 60 and FBP = 140 °C) and a primary reference fuel (PRF65) (RON = 65 and FBP = 99 °C). Injection sweeps, where the start of injection (SOI) is changed between −60 and −11 CAD aTDC, have been performed for the three fuels. Full cycle computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were executed using PRFs as chemical surrogates for the naphtha fuels. Physical surrogates based on the evaporation characteristics of the naphtha streams have been developed and their properties have been implemented in the engine simulations. It was found that the three fuels have similar combustion phasings and emissions at the conditions tested in this work with minor differences at SOI earlier than −30 CAD aTDC. These trends were successfully reproduced by the CFD calculations. The chemical and physical effects were further investigated numerically. It was found that the physical characteristics of the fuel significantly affect the combustion for injections earlier than −30 CAD aTDC because of the low evaporation rates of the fuel because of the higher boiling temperature of the fuel and the colder in-cylinder air during injection. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  2. Assessment of the Potential Impact of Combustion Research on Internal Combustion Engine Emission and Fuel Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    A review of the present level of understanding of the basic thermodynamic, fluid dynamic, and chemical kinetic processes which affect the fuel economy and levels of pollutant exhaust products of Diesel, Stratified Charge, and Spark Ignition engines i...

  3. The Decomposition of Surrogate Fuel Molecules During Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsang, Wing; Manion, Jeffrey A

    2006-01-01

    This project is aimed at developing a chemical kinetic database consisting of the rate constants of fundamental single step reactions that describe the pyrolytic decomposition of surrogate fuels molecules...

  4. Performance of Combustion Engineering fuel in operating PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, M.G.; Freeburn, H.R.; Wohlsen, W.D.

    1979-01-01

    Performance data on fuel assembly components from seven (7) operating reactors are presented, and discussed in detail where potential problems have occurred and been resolved. Fuel rod performance has continually improved over the last four (4) years with the gradual changeover to the current C-E fuel design. The reliability level is estimated at better than 99.99%, based on activity levels obtained through January 1979 at each plant. Control rod guide tubes have shown various degrees of wear caused by vibration of the control rods in their fully-withdrawn position. The retrofit of wear sleeves within the top portion of the affected guide tubes during routine refueling has permitted the use of these fuel assemblies with no significant loss in performance or safety margins

  5. Fuel oil combustion with low production of nitrogen oxides; Combustion de combustoleo con baja produccion de oxidos de nitrogeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escalera Campoverde, Rogelio [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1998-09-01

    This work presents the results of the theoretical-experimental study of the effects of the secondary air jet directed perpendicularly to the flame axis in the fuel oil combustion in a 500 Kw furnace. The main purpose of this study was to obtain low nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions without increasing the CO, which is observed in low NO{sub x} conventional burners. The experimental results showed a significative reduction of the NO{sub x} and of the CO, from 320 to 90 ppm and from 50 ppm to negligible values, respectively. A commercial computational code of fluid dynamics was employed for modeling the combustion in base line conditions, without secondary air and with the injection of secondary air. The experimental results were compared with calculated ones. [Espanol] En este trabajo se presentan los resultados del estudio teorico experimental de los efectos de los chorro de aire secundario dirigidos en forma perpendicular al eje de la flama en la combustion del combustoleo en un horno de 500 kW. El proposito principal del estudio fue obtener bajas emisiones de oxidos de nitrogeno (NO{sub x}) sin incrementar el CO, lo cual se observa en quemadores convencionales de bajo NO{sub x}. Los resultados experimentales demostraron una reduccion significativa del NO{sub x} y del CO: de 320 a 90 ppm y de 50 ppm a valores despreciables, respectivamente. Se empleo un codigo computacional comercial de dinamica de fluidos para modelar la combustion en condiciones de linea base, sin aire secundario, y con la inyeccion del aire secundario. Se comparan resultados experimentales con los calculados.

  6. Combustion of Microalgae Oil and Ethanol Blended with Diesel Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddam H. Al-lwayzy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Using renewable oxygenated fuels such as ethanol is a proposed method to reduce diesel engine emission. Ethanol has lower density, viscosity, cetane number and calorific value than petroleum diesel (PD. Microalgae oil is renewable, environmentally friendly and has the potential to replace PD. In this paper, microalgae oil (10% and ethanol (10% have been mixed and added to (80% diesel fuel as a renewable source of oxygenated fuel. The mixture of microalgae oil, ethanol and petroleum diesel (MOE20% has been found to be homogenous and stable without using surfactant. The presence of microalgae oil improved the ethanol fuel demerits such as low density and viscosity. The transesterification process was not required for oil viscosity reduction due to the presence of ethanol. The MOE20% fuel has been tested in a variable compression ratio diesel engine at different speed. The engine test results with MOE20% showed a very comparable engine performance of in-cylinder pressure, brake power, torque and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC to that of PD. The NOx emission and HC have been improved while CO and CO2 were found to be lower than those from PD at low engine speed.

  7. Review of fuel oil quality and combustion of fast pyrolysis bio-oils from lignocellulosic biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, Jani; Oasmaa, Anja; Solantausta, Yrjö; Kytö, Matti; Chiaramonti, David

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Review of state-of-the-art fast pyrolysis oil combustion in burner applications. • Fast pyrolysis oil has been found to be suitable for industrial scale utilization. • Curves for NO x -emissions for air-assisted atomization burners are presented. • Quality control, combined with standards and specifications is recommended. - Abstract: Fast pyrolysis bio-oils are completely different from petroleum fuels and other bio-fuels available in the market, as regards both to their physical properties and chemical composition. When the unusual properties of these bio-oils are carefully taken into account in system and burner design, their combustion without a pilot flame or support fuel is possible on an industrial scale. The aim of the paper is to review the work done on combustion of fast pyrolysis bio-oils and highlight the latest and most important findings of its combustion from laboratory fundamentals to industrial scale. The main focus of the paper is on the bio-oil burner applications. In recent industrial scale bio-oil combustion tests, bio-oil has been found to be technically suitable for replacing heavy fuel oil in district heating. In addition, it has also been found out that limited possibilities for further lowering particulate emissions exist, since the majority of the particulates are typically incombustible matter. Curves for NO x -emissions of fast pyrolysis bio-oil combustion for air-assisted atomization burners are presented in the paper. Current burner designs are quite sensitive to the changes in the quality of the bio-oil, which may cause problems in ignition, flame detection and flame stabilization. Therefore, in order to be able to create reliable bio-oil combustion systems that operate at high efficiency, bio-oil grades should be standardized for combustion applications. Careful quality control, combined with standards and specifications, all the way from feedstock harvesting through production to end-use is recommended in

  8. Flame blowout and pollutant emissions in vitiated combustion of conventional and bio-derived fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupinder

    The widening gap between the demand and supply of fossil fuels has catalyzed the exploration of alternative sources of energy. Interest in the power, water extraction and refrigeration (PoWER) cycle, proposed by the University of Florida, as well as the desirability of using biofuels in distributed generation systems, has motivated the exploration of biofuel vitiated combustion. The PoWER cycle is a novel engine cycle concept that utilizes vitiation of the air stream with externally-cooled recirculated exhaust gases at an intermediate pressure in a semi-closed cycle (SCC) loop, lowering the overall temperature of combustion. It has several advantages including fuel flexibility, reduced air flow, lower flame temperature, compactness, high efficiency at full and part load, and low emissions. Since the core engine air stream is vitiated with the externally cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) stream, there is an inherent reduction in the combustion stability for a PoWER engine. The effect of EGR flow and temperature on combustion blowout stability and emissions during vitiated biofuel combustion has been characterized. The vitiated combustion performance of biofuels methyl butanoate, dimethyl ether, and ethanol have been compared with n-heptane, and varying compositions of syngas with methane fuel. In addition, at high levels of EGR a sharp reduction in the flame luminosity has been observed in our experimental tests, indicating the onset of flameless combustion. This drop in luminosity may be a result of inhibition of processes leading to the formation of radiative soot particles. One of the objectives of this study is finding the effect of EGR on soot formation, with the ultimate objective of being able to predict the boundaries of flameless combustion. Detailed chemical kinetic simulations were performed using a constant-pressure continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) network model developed using the Cantera combustion code, implemented in C++. Results have

  9. Combustion and emission formation in a biomass fueled grate furnace - measurements and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsjoe, H.

    1997-06-01

    A study of turbulent combustion with special emphasis on the formation of nitrous oxide emissions in a biomass fueled grate furnace has been conducted with the aid of measurements, literature studies and CFD-computations. The literature study covers nitrous oxide formation and the pyrolysis, gasification and combustion of biomass fuel. The measurements were conducted inside the furnace and at the outlet, and temperature and some major species were measured. A tool for the treatment of the bed processes (pyrolysis, gasification and combustion) has been developed. The measurements show significantly higher concentrations of oxygen above the fuel bed than expected. The gas production in the bed was shown to be very unevenly distributed over the width of the furnace. The measured temperatures were relatively low and in the same order as reported from other, similar measurements. The computational results are in good quantitative agreement with the measurements, even for the nitrous oxide emissions. It was necessary to include tar as one of the combustible species to achieve reasonable results. The computations point out that the fuel-NO mechanism is the most important reaction path for the formation of nitrous oxide in biomass combustion in grate furnaces. The thermal NO mechanism is responsible for less than 10% of the total amount of NO-emissions. Although the results are quantitatively in good agreement with the measurements, a sensitivity study showed that the fuel-NO model did not respond to changes in the distribution of secondary air as the measurements indicate. The results from this work have lead to some guidelines on how the furnace should be operated to achieve minimum NO-emissions. Some proposals of smaller changes in the construction are also given. 33 refs, 37 figs, 7 tabs

  10. Mixing fuel particles for space combustion research using acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Robert J.; Johnson, Jerome A.; Klimek, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    Part of the microgravity science to be conducted aboard the Shuttle (STS) involves combustion using solids, particles, and liquid droplets. The central experimental facts needed for characterization of premixed quiescent particle cloud flames cannot be adequately established by normal gravity studies alone. The experimental results to date of acoustically mixing a prototypical particulate, lycopodium, in a 5 cm diameter by 75 cm long flame tube aboard a Learjet aircraft flying a 20-sec low-gravity trajectory are described. Photographic and light detector instrumentation combine to measure and characterize particle cloud uniformity.

  11. The fuel cell and the electrical vehicle; La pile a combustible et la voiture electrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, J C [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-01-01

    The fuel cell is an electrochemical generator able to transform directly the chemical energy of a gaseous fuel (hydrogen, natural gas, coke gas or methanol...) with a combustive (oxygen for example) in electricity, heat, water and carbon dioxide. This article briefly describes at first the history of the fuel cell and after its working principle with the main reasons of its present development. Indeed, the fuel cell could be an alternative to the batteries for the electrically powered vehicles but also for other applications demanding autonomous electrical supply. The different types of fuel cells are described with their own performances. The proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are more specially described. Examples of polymer membranes with their performances are given. The different programs in the EC and in the world are described as well as their applications in different domains such as the electrical powered car. (authors) 10 refs.

  12. Hydrogen combustion and exhaust emissions in a supercharged gas engine ignited with micro pilot diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, E.; Kawahara, N. [Okayama Univ., Okayama (Japan); Roy, M.M. [Rajshahi Univ. of Engineering and Technology, Rajshahi (Bangladesh)

    2009-07-01

    A hydrogen combustion and exhaust emissions in a supercharged gas engine ignited with micro pilot diesel fuel was discussed in this presentation. A schematic diagram of the experimental study was first presented. The single cylinder, water-cooled, supercharged test engine was illustrated. Results were presented for the following: fuel energy and energy share (hydrogen and diesel fuel); pressure history and rate of heat release; engine performance and exhaust emissions; effect of nitrogen dilution on heat value per cycle; effect of N{sub 2} dilution on pressure history and rate of heat release; and engine performance and exhaust emissions. This presentation demonstrated that smooth and knock-free engine operation results from the use of hydrogen in a supercharged dual-fuel engine for leaner fuel-air equivalence ratios maintaining high thermal efficiency. It was possible to attain mor3 than 90 per cent hydrogen-energy substitution to the diesel fuel with zero smoke emissions. figs.

  13. Hydrogen combustion and exhaust emissions in a supercharged gas engine ignited with micro pilot diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, E.; Kawahara, N.; Roy, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    A hydrogen combustion and exhaust emissions in a supercharged gas engine ignited with micro pilot diesel fuel was discussed in this presentation. A schematic diagram of the experimental study was first presented. The single cylinder, water-cooled, supercharged test engine was illustrated. Results were presented for the following: fuel energy and energy share (hydrogen and diesel fuel); pressure history and rate of heat release; engine performance and exhaust emissions; effect of nitrogen dilution on heat value per cycle; effect of N 2 dilution on pressure history and rate of heat release; and engine performance and exhaust emissions. This presentation demonstrated that smooth and knock-free engine operation results from the use of hydrogen in a supercharged dual-fuel engine for leaner fuel-air equivalence ratios maintaining high thermal efficiency. It was possible to attain mor3 than 90 per cent hydrogen-energy substitution to the diesel fuel with zero smoke emissions. figs.

  14. Numerical simulation of fuel sprays and combustion in a premixed lean diesel engine; Kihaku yokongo diesel kikan ni okeru nenryo funmu to nensho no suchi simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, T; Harada, A; Sasaki, S; Shimazaki, N; Hashizume, T; Akagawa, H; Tsujimura, K

    1997-10-01

    Fuel sprays and combustion in a direct injection Premixed lean Diesel Combustion (PREDIC) engine, which can make smokeless combustion with little NOx emission, is studied numerically. Numerical simulation was carried out by means of KIVA II based computer code with a combustion submodel. The combustion submodel describes the formation of combustible fuel vapor by turbulent mixing and four-step chemical reaction which includes low temperature oxidation. Comparison between computation and experiment shows qualitatively good agreement in terms of heat release rate and NO emission. Computational results indicate that the combustion is significantly influenced by fuel spray characteristics and injection timing to vary NO emission. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Experimental and theoretical analysis of the combustion process at low loads of a diesel natural gas dual-fuel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Weifeng; Liu, Zhongchang; Wang, Zhongshu

    2016-01-01

    To construct an effective method to analyze the combustion process of dual fuel engines at low loads, effects of combustion boundaries on the combustion process of an electronically controlled diesel natural gas dual-fuel engine at low loads were investigated. Three typical combustion modes, including h, m and n, appeared under different combustion boundaries. In addition, the time-sequenced characteristic and the heat release rate-imbalanced characteristic were found in the dual fuel engine combustion process. To quantify these characteristics, two quantitative indicators, including the TSC (time-sequenced coefficient) and the HBC (HRR-balanced coefficient) were defined. The results show that increasing TSC and HBC can decrease HC (hydrocarbon) emissions and improve the BTE (brake thermal efficiency) significantly. The engine with the n combustion mode can obtain the highest BTE and the lowest HC emissions, followed by m, and then h. However, the combustion process of the engine will deteriorate sharply if boundary conditions are not strictly controlled in the n combustion mode. Based on the n combustion mode, advancing the start of diesel injection significantly, using large EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) rate and appropriately intake throttling can effectively reduce HC emissions and improve the BTE of dual fuel engines at low loads with relatively high natural gas PES (percentage energy substitution). - Highlights: • We reported three typical combustion modes of a dual-fuel engine at low loads. • Time-sequenced characteristic was put forward and qualified. • HRR-imbalanced characteristic was put forward and qualified. • Three combustion modes appeared as equivalence ratio/diesel injection timing varied. • The engine performance varied significantly with different combustion mode.

  16. Numerical Simulations of Hollow Cone Injection and Gasoline Compression Ignition Combustion With Naphtha Fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad A.

    2016-01-11

    Gasoline compression ignition (GCI), also known as partially premixed compression ignition (PPCI) and gasoline direct injection compression ignition (GDICI), engines have been considered an attractive alternative to traditional spark ignition engines. Lean burn combustion with the direct injection of fuel eliminates throttle losses for higher thermodynamic efficiencies, and the precise control of the mixture compositions allows better emission performance such as NOx and particulate matter (PM). Recently, low octane gasoline fuel has been identified as a viable option for the GCI engine applications due to its longer ignition delay characteristics compared to diesel and lighter evaporation compared to gasoline fuel [1]. The feasibility of such a concept has been demonstrated by experimental investigations at Saudi Aramco [1, 2]. The present study aims to develop predictive capabilities for low octane gasoline fuel compression ignition engines with accurate characterization of the spray dynamics and combustion processes. Full three-dimensional simulations were conducted using CONVERGE as a basic modeling framework, using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulent mixing models. An outwardly opening hollow-cone spray injector was characterized and validated against existing and new experimental data. An emphasis was made on the spray penetration characteristics. Various spray breakup and collision models have been tested and compared with the experimental data. An optimum combination has been identified and applied in the combusting GCI simulations. Linear instability sheet atomization (LISA) breakup model and modified Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor (KH-RT) break models proved to work the best for the investigated injector. Comparisons between various existing spray models and a parametric study have been carried out to study the effects of various spray parameters. The fuel effects have been tested by using three different primary reference fuel (PRF

  17. Calculation for Primary Combustion Characteristics of Boron-Based Fuel-Rich Propellant Based on BP Neural Network

    OpenAIRE

    Wan'e, Wu; Zuoming, Zhu

    2012-01-01

    A practical scheme for selecting characterization parameters of boron-based fuel-rich propellant formulation was put forward; a calculation model for primary combustion characteristics of boron-based fuel-rich propellant based on backpropagation neural network was established, validated, and then was used to predict primary combustion characteristics of boron-based fuel-rich propellant. The results show that the calculation error of burning rate is less than ± 7 . 3 %; in the formulation rang...

  18. Conversion of a gasoline internal combustion engine to operate on hydrogen fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, M.; Dincer, I.

    2009-01-01

    This study deals with the conversion of a gasoline spark ignition internal combustion engine to operate on hydrogen fuel while producing similar power, economy and reliability as gasoline. The conversion engine will have the fuel system redesigned and ignition and fuel timing changed. Engine construction material is of great importance due to the low ignition energy of hydrogen, making aluminum a desirable material in the intake manifold and combustion chamber. The engine selected to convert is a 3400 SFI dual over head cam General Motors engine. Hydrogen reacts with metals causing hydrogen embrittlement which leads to failure due to cracking. There are standards published by American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) to avoid such a problem. Tuning of the hydrogen engine proved to be challenging due to the basic tuning tools of a gasoline engine such as a wide band oxygen sensor that could not measure the 34:1 fuel air mixture needed for the hydrogen engine. Once the conversion was complete the engine was tested on a chassis dynamometer to compare the hydrogen horsepower and torque produced to that of a gasoline engine. Results showed that the engine is not operating correctly. The engine is not getting the proper amount of fuel needed for complete combustion when operated in a loaded state over 3000 rpm. The problem was found to be the use of the stock injector driver that could not deliver enough power for the proper operation of the larger CM4980 injectors. (author)

  19. Experimental study of hydrogen as a fuel additive in internal combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saanum, Inge

    2008-07-01

    Combustion of hydrocarbons in internal combustion engines results in emissions that can be harmful both to human health and to the environment. Although the engine technology is improving, the emissions of NO{sub x}, PM and UHC are still challenging. Besides, the overall consumption of fossil fuel and hence the emissions of CO{sub 2} are increasing because of the increasing number of vehicles. This has lead to a focus on finding alternative fuels and alternative technologies that may result in lower emissions of harmful gases and lower CO{sub 2} emissions. This thesis treats various topics that are relevant when using blends of fuels in different internal combustion engine technologies, with a particular focus on using hydrogen as a fuel additive. The topics addressed are especially the ones that impact the environment, such as emissions of harmful gases and thermal efficiency (fuel consumption). The thesis is based on experimental work performed at four different test rigs: 1. A dynamic combustion rig with optical access to the combustion chamber where spark ignited premixed combustion could be studied by means of a Schlieren optical setup and a high speed video camera. 2. A spark ignition natural gas engine rig with an optional exhaust gas recycling system. 3. A 1-cylinder diesel engine prepared for homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion. 4. A 6-cylinder standard diesel engine The engine rigs were equipped with cylinder pressure sensors, engine dynamometers, exhaust gas analyzers etc. to enable analyses of the effects of different fuels. The effect of hydrogen blended with methane and natural gas in spark ignited premixed combustion was investigated in the dynamic combustion rig and in a natural gas engine. In the dynamic combustion rig, the effect of hydrogen added to methane on the flame speed and the flame structure was investigated at elevated pressure and temperature. A considerable increase in the flame speed was observed when adding 30 vol

  20. Analysis of pre-heated fuel combustion and heat-emission dynamics in a diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, S. A.; Kartashevich, A. N.; Buzikov, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    The article explores the feasibility of diesel fuel pre-heating. The research goal was to obtain and analyze the performance diagrams of a diesel engine fed with pre-heated fuel. The engine was tested in two modes: at rated RPMs and at maximum torque. To process the diagrams the authors used technique developed by the Central Diesel Research Institute (CDRI). The diesel engine’s heat emission curves were obtained. The authors concluded that fuel pre-heating shortened the initial phase of the combustion process and moderated the loads, thus making it possible to boost a diesel engine’s mean effective pressure.

  1. Chemical effects of a high CO2 concentration in oxy-fuel combustion of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Bentzen, L.L.B.

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of methane in an atmospheric-pres sure flow reactor has been studied experimentally under highly diluted conditions in N-2 and CO2, respectively. The stoichiometry was varied from fuel-lean to fuel-rich, and the temperatures covered the range 1200-1800 K. The results were interpreted...... CO2. The high local CO levels may have implications for near-burner corrosion and stagging, but increased problems with CO emission in oxy-fuel combustion are not anticipated....

  2. THE MARINE HEAVY FUEL IGNITION AND COMBUSTION BY PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOROIANU CORNELIU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The continuous damage of the used fuel quality, of its dispersion due to the increasing viscosity, make necessary the volume expansion and the rise of the e electric spark power used at ignition. A similar situation appears to the transition of the generator operation from the marine Diesel heavy fuel to the residues of water-fuel mixture. So, it feels like using an ignition system with high specific energy and power able to perform the starting and burning of the fuels mentioned above. Such a system is that which uses a low temperature plasma jet. Its use involves obtaining a high temperature area round about the jet, with a high discharge power, extending the possibility of obtaining a constant burning of different concentration (density mixtures. Besides the action of the temperature of the air-fuel mixture, the plasma jet raises the rate of oxidation reaction as a result of appearance of lot number of active centers such as loaded molecules, atoms, ions, free radicals.

  3. Numerical investigation of combustion phenomena in pulse detonation engine with different fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Noor; Sharma, K. K.; Pandey, K. M.

    2018-05-01

    The effects of different fuel-air mixture on the cyclic operation of pulse detonation engine (PDE) are numerically investigated. The present simulation is to be consider 1200 mm long straight tube combustor channel and 60 mm internal diameter, and filled with stoichiometric ethane-air and ethylene-air (C2H6-air & C2H4) fuel mixture at atmospheric pressure and temperature of 0.1 MPa and 300 K respectively. The obstacles of blockage ratio (BR) 0.5 and having 60 mm spacing among them are allocated inside the combustor tube. There are realizable k-ɛ turbulence model used to analyze characteristic of combustion flame. The objective of present simulation is to analyze the variation in combustion mechanism for two different fuels with one-step reduced chemical reaction model. The obstacles were creating perturbation inside the PDE tube. Therefore, flame surface area increases and reduces deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) run-up length.

  4. Combustion characteristics of compressed natural gas/diesel dual-fuel turbocharged compressed ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenghua, L.; Longbao, Z.; Ziyan, W.; Jiang, R. [Xi' an Jiaotong Univ. (China). Dept. of Automotive Engineering

    2003-09-01

    The combustion characteristics of a turbocharged natural gas and diesel dual-fuelled compression ignition (CI) engine are investigated. With the measured cylinder pressures of the engine operated on pure diesel and dual fuel, the ignition delay, effects of pilot diesel and engine load on combustion characteristics are analysed. Emissions of HC, CO, NO{sub x} and smoke are measured and studied too. The results show that the quantity of pilot diesel has important effects on the performance and emissions of a dual-fuel engine at low-load operating conditions. Ignition delay varies with the concentration of natural gas. Smoke is much lower for the developed dual-fuel engine under all the operating conditions. (Author)

  5. Emission performance and combustion efficiency of a conical fluidized-bed combustor firing various biomass fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permchart, W.; Kouprianov, V.I.

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study on combustion of three distinct biomass fuels (sawdust, rice husk and pre-dried sugar cane bagasse) in a single fluidized-bed combustor (FBC) with a conical bed using silica sand as the inert bed material. Temperature, CO, NO and O 2 concentrations along the combustor height as well as in flue (stack) gas were measured in the experimental tests. The effects of fuel properties and operating conditions (load and excess air) on these variables were investigated. Both CO and NO axial profiles were found to have a maximum whose location divides conventionally the combustor volume into formation (lower) and reduction (upper) regions for these pollutants. Based on CO emission and unburned carbon content in fly ash, the combustion efficiency of the conical FBC was quantified for the selected biomass fuels fired under different operating conditions. (Author)

  6. Fuel Vaporization and Its Effect on Combustion in a High-Speed Compression-Ignition Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1933-01-01

    The tests discussed in this report were conducted to determine whether or not there is appreciable vaporization of the fuel injected into a high-speed compression-ignition engine during the time available for injection and combustion. The effects of injection advance angle and fuel boiling temperature were investigated. The results show that an appreciable amount of the fuel is vaporized during injection even though the temperature and pressure conditions in the engine are not sufficient to cause ignition either during or after injection, and that when the conditions are such as to cause ignition the vaporization process affects the combustion. The results are compared with those of several other investigators in the same field.

  7. Auto-Ignition and Combustion of Diesel Fuel in a Constant-Volume Bomb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, Robert F

    1938-01-01

    Report presents the results of a study of variations in ignition lag and combustion associated with changes in air temperature and density for a diesel fuel in a constant-volume bomb. The test results have been discussed in terms of engine performance wherever comparisons could be drawn. The most important conclusions drawn from this investigation are: the ignition lag was essentially independent of the injected fuel quantity. Extrapolation of the curves for the fuel used shows that the lag could not be greatly decreased by exceeding the compression-ignition engines. In order to obtain the best combustion and thermal efficiency, it was desirable to use the longest ignition lag consistent with a permissible rate of pressure rise.

  8. Thermal analysis and kinetics of coal during oxy-fuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosowska-Golachowska, Monika

    2017-08-01

    The pyrolysis and oxy-fuel combustion characteristics of Polish bituminous coal were studied using non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. Pyrolysis tests showed that the mass loss profiles were almost similar up to 870°C in both N2 and CO2 atmospheres, while further mass loss occurred in CO2 atmosphere at higher temperatures due to char-CO2 gasification. Replacement of N2 in the combustion environment by CO2 delayed the combustion of bituminous coal. At elevated oxygen levels, TG/DTG profiles shifted through lower temperature zone, ignition and burnout temperatures decreased and mass loss rate significantly increased and complete combustion was achieved at lower temperatures and shorter times. Kinetic analysis for the tested coal was performed using Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) method. The activation energies of bituminous coal combustion at the similar oxygen content in oxy-fuel with that of air were higher than that in air atmosphere. The results indicated that, with O2 concentration increasing, the activation energies decreased.

  9. Effect of flue gas recirculation during oxy-fuel combustion in a rotary cement kiln

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, David A.; Chejne, Farid; Mejía, Juan M.; Gómez, Carlos A.; Berrío, Ariel; Jurado, William J.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Flue Gas Recirculation (FGR) during Oxy-Fuel Combustion in a Rotary Cement Kiln was analyzed by using a CFD model applied to coal combustion process. The CFD model is based on 3D-balance equations for mass, species, energy and momentum. Turbulence and radiation model coupled to a chemical kinetic mechanism for pyrolysis processes, gas–solid and gas–gas reactions was included to predicts species and flame temperature distribution, as well as convective and radiation energy fluxes. The model was used to study coal combustion with air and with oxygen for FGR between 30 and 85% as controller parameter for temperature in the process. Flame length effect and heat transfer by convection and radiation to the clinkering process for several recirculation ratios was studied. Theoretical studies predicted a located increase of energy flux and a reduction in flame length with respect to the traditional system which is based on air combustion. The impact of FGR on the oxy-fuel combustion process and different energy scenarios in cement kilns to increase energy efficiency and clinker production were studied and evaluated. Simulation results were in close agreement with experimental data, where the maximum deviation was 7%

  10. Oxy-fuel combustion characteristics and kinetics of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris by thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunxiang; Lu, Ziguang; Ma, Xiaoqian; Long, Jun; Peng, Yuning; Hu, Likun; Lu, Quan

    2013-09-01

    Oxy-fuel or O2/CO2 combustion technology was used to investigate the combustion of Chlorella vulgaris by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Oxy-fuel combustion occurs in an O2/CO2 atmosphere instead of an O2/N2 atmosphere and offers an alternative method of C. vulgaris preparation for biofuels processing. Our results show that three stages were observed during C. vulgaris combustion and the main combustion process occurred at the second stage. Compared with a 20%O2/80%N2 atmosphere, the mass loss rate at the DTG peaks (Rp) and the average reaction rate (Rv) in a 20%O2/80%CO2 atmosphere was lower, while the ignition temperature (TI) was higher. As oxygen concentration increases in an O2/CO2 atmosphere, Rp, Rv and the apparent activation energy (E) increases, while TI, the final temperature detected as mass stabilization (Tf) and the residue mass (Mr) decreases; As the heating rate (β) increases, TI, Tf and Rp increase, while Mr decreases. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Combustion and Heat Transfer Studies Utilizing Advanced Diagnostics: Fuels Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    competing reactions (Reactions (6) and (7)) and their respective rate equations (Eqs. 8 and 9). Reaction (6) has the advantage of no activation energy and...cartridges were J&W (diol, cyano and C-18) J.T. Baker (silica gel) and Alltech (IC/Ag). All were conditioned and used according to the vendors...hot fuel through the test section. At the same time the water supply to the fuel cooler is turned on. The main advantage of this procedure is that it

  12. Nitrogen Chemistry During Burnout in Fuel-Staged Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Per Gravers; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1996-01-01

    A parametric study involving flow reactor experiments and chemical kinetic modeling is presented for the burnout zone in fuel-staging (reburning). The results provide guidelines for optimizing the reburn process and provide a test basis for verifying kinetic models for nitrogen chemistry at tempe......A parametric study involving flow reactor experiments and chemical kinetic modeling is presented for the burnout zone in fuel-staging (reburning). The results provide guidelines for optimizing the reburn process and provide a test basis for verifying kinetic models for nitrogen chemistry...

  13. Experimental study on the combustion characteristics of liquid fuel in the straight tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fei; Li, JunWei; Zhou, ZhaoQiu; Zhang, Xin; Wang, NingFei [Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing (China). School of Aerospace Engineering

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates combustion characteristics of liquid hydrocarbon fuel (n-heptane, c7h16) under different operating conditions. In the paper we designed a burner consisting of a stainless steel capillary which is used to dump the fuel and a larger stainless steel tube (or quartz tube) used as a combustion chamber. The inner diameter (ID) of the capillary is 0.24 mm, the inner and external diameter of the larger tube is 4 and 6 mm, respectively. According to the experimental results, the combustion process reaches a stable status after about 100 s. Wall temperature distribution and combustion products are analyzed under conditions with different equivalence ratios, gas flow velocities and materials. As equivalence ratio (ER) whose range is in 0.56-1.08 increases, the wall temperature declines, and wall temperature gradient increases slightly. The range of gas flow velocity is in 0.6-1 m/s, the overall trend of wall temperature distribution is the second point from left boundary as a line, the wall temperature distribution of the four points in the right side increases with the flow velocity increasing, but the left point is rapidly declining. When the burner made of stainless steel, the wall temperature distribution varies slightly due to the larger thermal conductivity of stainless steel than that of quartz, which makes the heat transfer in stainless steel faster and the temperature distribution is more uniform. The thermodynamic calculation software is also used to study the compositions of combustion products. In a word, this structure of the burner shows poor combustion characteristics, we should change the structure and the experimental conditions to achieve better combustion characteristics in the future.

  14. Experiments and simulations of NOx formation in the combustion of hydroxylated fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Bohon, Myles

    2015-06-01

    This work investigates the influence of molecular structure in hydroxylated fuels (i.e. fuels with one or more hydroxyl groups), such as alcohols and polyols, on NOx formation. The fuels studied are three lower alcohols (methanol, ethanol, and n-propanol), two diols (1,2-ethanediol and 1,2-propanediol), and one triol (1,2,3-propanetriol); all of which are liquids at room temperature and span a wide range of thermophysical properties. Experimental stack emissions measurements of NO/NO2, CO, and CO2 and flame temperature profiles utilizing a rake of thermocouples were obtained in globally lean, swirling, liquid atomized spray flames inside a refractory-lined combustion chamber as a function of the atomizing air flow rate and swirl number. These experiments show significantly lower NOx formation with increasing fuel oxygen content despite similarities in the flame temperature profiles. By controlling the temperature profiles, the contribution to NOx formation through the thermal mechanism were matched, and variations in the contribution through non-thermal NOx formation pathways are observed. Simulations in a perfectly stirred reactor, at conditions representative of those measured within the combustion region, were conducted as a function of temperature and equivalence ratio. The simulations employed a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic model for NOx formation from hydroxylated fuels developed based on recent alcohol combustion models and extended to include polyol combustion chemistry. These simulations provide a qualitative comparison to the range of temperatures and equivalence ratios observed in complex swirling flows and provide insight into the influence of variations in the fuel decomposition pathways on NOx formation. It is observed that increasing the fuel bound oxygen concentration ultimately reduces the formation of NOx by increasing the proportion of fuel oxidized through formaldehyde, as opposed to acetylene or acetaldehyde. The subsequent

  15. The combustion of low calorific value fuels (oil shale) by using fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzam, S M

    1994-12-31

    The present work reports an experimental data for combustion of oil-shale in a fluidized bed combustor. The experimental set up was designed for the combustion of low calorific value fuel such as oil-shale to facilitate the variation of many parameters over a wide operating range. A cold run was firstly conducted to study the fluidization parameters. Fluidization experiment were made with different sized quartiz particles. Minimum fluidization velocities and other fluidization characteristics were determined at room temperature. Secondary a hot run was started, first studying the combustion of `LPG` in a fluidized bed as a starting process, then studying the combustion if oil-shale with different flow rates. The experimetal results are promising and give rise to hopes that this valuable deposit can be used as a fuel source and can be burned sucessfully in a fluidized bed combustor. This study had prooved that utilization of oil-shale a fuel source is no more a complicated technical problem, this opens the way for power generation using fluidized bed combustors. (author). 17 refs., 32 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. The combustion of low calorific value fuels (oil shale) by using fluidized bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzam, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The present work reports an experimental data for combustion of oil-shale in a fluidized bed combustor. The experimental set up was designed for the combustion of low calorific value fuel such as oil-shale to facilitate the variation of many parameters over a wide operating range. A cold run was firstly conducted to study the fluidization parameters. Fluidization experiment were made with different sized quartiz particles. Minimum fluidization velocities and other fluidization characteristics were determined at room temperature. Secondary a hot run was started, first studying the combustion of 'LPG' in a fluidized bed as a starting process, then studying the combustion if oil-shale with different flow rates. The experimetal results are promising and give rise to hopes that this valuable deposit can be used as a fuel source and can be burned sucessfully in a fluidized bed combustor. This study had prooved that utilization of oil-shale a fuel source is no more a complicated technical problem, this opens the way for power generation using fluidized bed combustors. (author). 17 refs., 32 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Analysis of oxy-fuel combustion power cycle utilizing a pressurized coal combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jongsup; Chaudhry, Gunaranjan; Brisson, J.G.; Field, Randall; Gazzino, Marco; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2009-01-01

    Growing concerns over greenhouse gas emissions have driven extensive research into new power generation cycles that enable carbon dioxide capture and sequestration. In this regard, oxy-fuel combustion is a promising new technology in which fuels are burned in an environment of oxygen and recycled combustion gases. In this paper, an oxy-fuel combustion power cycle that utilizes a pressurized coal combustor is analyzed. We show that this approach recovers more thermal energy from the flue gases because the elevated flue gas pressure raises the dew point and the available latent enthalpy in the flue gases. The high-pressure water-condensing flue gas thermal energy recovery system reduces steam bleeding which is typically used in conventional steam cycles and enables the cycle to achieve higher efficiency. The pressurized combustion process provides the purification and compression unit with a concentrated carbon dioxide stream. For the purpose of our analysis, a flue gas purification and compression process including de-SO x , de-NO x , and low temperature flash unit is examined. We compare a case in which the combustor operates at 1.1 bars with a base case in which the combustor operates at 10 bars. Results show nearly 3% point increase in the net efficiency for the latter case.

  18. Pyrolysis and oxy-fuel combustion characteristics and kinetics of petrochemical wastewater sludge using thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbiao; Mu, Lin; Cai, Jingcheng; Yao, Pikai; Song, Xigeng; Yin, Hongchao; Li, Aimin

    2015-12-01

    The pyrolysis and oxy-fuel combustion characteristics of petrochemical wastewater sludge (PS) were studied in air (O2/N2) and oxy-fuel (O2/CO2) atmospheres using non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Pyrolysis experiments showed that the weight loss profiles were almost similar up to 1050K in both N2 and CO2 atmospheres, while further weight loss took place in CO2 atmosphere at higher temperatures due to char-CO2 gasification. Compared with 20%O2/80%N2, the drying and devolatilization stage of PS were delayed in 20%O2/80%CO2 due to the differences in properties of the diluting gases. In oxy-fuel combustion experiments, with O2 concentration increasing, characteristic temperatures decreased, while characteristic combustion rates and combustion performance indexes increased. Kinetic analysis of PS decomposition under various atmospheres was performed using Coats-Redfern approach. The results indicated that, with O2 concentration increasing, the activation energies of Step 1 almost kept constant, while the values of subsequent three steps increased. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigations of combustion process in combined cooker-boiler fired on solid fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojiljković Dragoslava D.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to make some reconstructions on the existing stove used for cooking and baking and to obtain the combined cooker-boiler which will fulfill the demands of European standard EN 12815. Implementation of modern scientific achievements in the field of combustion on stoves and furnaces fired on solid fuels was used. During the investigations four various constructions were made with different fresh air inlet and secondary air supply with the intention to obtain more complete combustion with increased efficiency and reduced CO emission. Three different fuels were used: firewood, coal, and wood briquette. A numerous parameters were measured: fuel weight changes during the combustion process, temperature of inlet and outlet water, flue gas composition (O2, CO, SO2, CO2, NOx, flue gas temperature, ash quantity etc. The result of the investigations is the stove with the efficiency of more than 75% - boiler Class 1 (according EN 12815 and CO emission of about 1% v/v. The results obtained during the measurements were used as parameters for modeling of combustion process. .

  20. Prediction of Agglomeration, Fouling, and Corrosion Tendency of Fuels in CFB Co-Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barišć, Vesna; Zabetta, Edgardo Coda; Sarkki, Juha

    Prediction of agglomeration, fouling, and corrosion tendency of fuels is essential to the design of any CFB boiler. During the years, tools have been successfully developed at Foster Wheeler to help with such predictions for the most commercial fuels. However, changes in fuel market and the ever-growing demand for co-combustion capabilities pose a continuous need for development. This paper presents results from recently upgraded models used at Foster Wheeler to predict agglomeration, fouling, and corrosion tendency of a variety of fuels and mixtures. The models, subject of this paper, are semi-empirical computer tools that combine the theoretical basics of agglomeration/fouling/corrosion phenomena with empirical correlations. Correlations are derived from Foster Wheeler's experience in fluidized beds, including nearly 10,000 fuel samples and over 1,000 tests in about 150 CFB units. In these models, fuels are evaluated based on their classification, their chemical and physical properties by standard analyses (proximate, ultimate, fuel ash composition, etc.;.) alongside with Foster Wheeler own characterization methods. Mixtures are then evaluated taking into account the component fuels. This paper presents the predictive capabilities of the agglomeration/fouling/corrosion probability models for selected fuels and mixtures fired in full-scale. The selected fuels include coals and different types of biomass. The models are capable to predict the behavior of most fuels and mixtures, but also offer possibilities for further improvements.

  1. Application of the Advanced Distillation Curve Method to Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engine Gasolines

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Jessica L.

    2015-07-16

    © This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published 2015 by the American Chemical Society. Incremental but fundamental changes are currently being made to fuel composition and combustion strategies to diversify energy feedstocks, decrease pollution, and increase engine efficiency. The increase in parameter space (by having many variables in play simultaneously) makes it difficult at best to propose strategic changes to engine and fuel design by use of conventional build-and-test methodology. To make changes in the most time- and cost-effective manner, it is imperative that new computational tools and surrogate fuels are developed. Currently, sets of fuels are being characterized by industry groups, such as the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) and other entities, so that researchers in different laboratories have access to fuels with consistent properties. In this work, six gasolines (FACE A, C, F, G, I, and J) are characterized by the advanced distillation curve (ADC) method to determine the composition and enthalpy of combustion in various distillate volume fractions. Tracking the composition and enthalpy of distillate fractions provides valuable information for determining structure property relationships, and moreover, it provides the basis for the development of equations of state that can describe the thermodynamic properties of these complex mixtures and lead to development of surrogate fuels composed of major hydrocarbon classes found in target fuels.

  2. Experimental setup for combustion characteristics in a diesel engine using derivative fuel from biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andi Mulkan; Zainal, Z.A.

    2006-01-01

    Reciprocating engines are normally run on petroleum fuels or diesel fuels. Unfortunately, energy reserves such as gas and oil are decreasing. Today, with renewable energy technologies petroleum or diesel can be reduced and substituted fully or partly by alternative fuels in engine. The objective of this paper is to setup the experimental rig using producer gas from gasification system mix with diesel fuel and fed to a diesel engine. The Yanmar L60AE-DTM single cylinder diesel engine is used in the experiment. A 20 kW downdraft gasifier has been developed to produce gas using cut of furniture wood used as biomass source. Air inlet of the engine has been modified to include the producer gas. An AVL quartz Pressure Transducer P4420 was installed into the engine head to measure pressure inside the cylinder of the engine. Several test were carried out on the downdraft gasifier system and diesel engine. The heating value of the producer gas is about 4 MJ/m 3 and the specific biomass fuel consumption is about 1.5 kg/kWh. Waste cooking oil (WCO) and crude palm oil (CPO) were used as biomass fuel. The pressure versus crank angle diagram for using blend of diesel are presented and compared with using diesel alone. The result shows that the peak pressure is higher. The premixed combustion is lower but have higher mixing controlled combustion. The CO and NO x emission are higher for biomass fuel

  3. Effects of direct injection timing and blending ratio on RCCI combustion with different low reactivity fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benajes, Jesús; Molina, Santiago; García, Antonio; Monsalve-Serrano, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • E85 requires notable lower premixed energy ratios to achieve a stable combustion. • E10-95 leads to shorter and advanced combustion with higher maximum RoHR peaks. • E20-95, E10-98 and E10-95 reach EURO VI NOx and soot levels for all the engine loads. • E10-95 allows a significant reduction in HC and CO emissions. - Abstract: This work investigates the effects of the direct injection timing and blending ratio on RCCI performance and engine-out emissions at different engine loads using four low reactivity fuels: E10-95, E10-98, E20-95 and E85 (port fuel injected) and keeping constant the same high reactivity fuel: diesel B7 (direct injected). The experiments were conducted using a heavy-duty single-cylinder research diesel engine adapted for dual-fuel operation. All the tests were carried out at 1200 rpm. To assess the blending ratio effect, the total energy delivered to the cylinder coming from the low reactivity fuel was kept constant for the different fuel blends investigated by adjusting the low reactivity fuel mass as required in each case. In addition, a detailed analysis of the air/fuel mixing process has been developed by means of a 1-D in-house developed spray model. Results suggest that notable higher diesel amount is required to achieve a stable combustion using E85. This fact leads to higher NOx levels and unacceptable ringing intensity. By contrast, EURO VI NOx and soot levels are fulfilled with E20-95, E10-98 and E10-95. Finally, the higher reactivity of E10-95 results in a significant reduction in CO and HC emissions, mainly at low load

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from the combustion of alternative fuels in a gas turbine engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Simon; Raper, David; Lee, David S; Williams, Paul I; Rye, Lucas; Blakey, Simon; Wilson, Chris W; Lobo, Prem; Hagen, Donald; Whitefield, Philip D

    2012-06-05

    We report on the particulate-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the exhaust of a test-bed gas turbine engine when powered by Jet A-1 aviation fuel and a number of alternative fuels: Sasol fully synthetic jet fuel (FSJF), Shell gas-to-liquid (GTL) kerosene, and Jet A-1/GTL 50:50 blended kerosene. The concentration of PAH compounds in the exhaust emissions vary greatly between fuels. Combustion of FSJF produces the greatest total concentration of PAH compounds while combustion of GTL produces the least. However, when PAHs in the exhaust sample are measured in terms of the regulatory marker compound benzo[a]pyrene, then all of the alternative fuels emit a lower concentration of PAH in comparison to Jet A-1. Emissions from the combustion of Jet A-1/GTL blended kerosene were found to have a disproportionately low concentration of PAHs and appear to inherit a greater proportion of the GTL emission characteristics than would be expected from volume fraction alone. The data imply the presence of a nonlinear relation between fuel blend composition and the emission of PAH compounds. For each of the fuels, the speciation of PAH compounds present in the exhaust emissions were found to be remarkably similar (R(2) = 0.94-0.62), and the results do provide evidence to support the premise that PAH speciation is to some extent indicative of the emission source. In contrast, no correlation was found between the PAH species present in the fuel with those subsequently emitted in the exhaust. The results strongly suggests that local air quality measured in terms of the particulate-bound PAH burden could be significantly improved by the use of GTL kerosene either blended with or in place of Jet A-1 kerosene.

  5. Chemical Looping Combustion with Different Types of Liquid Fuels Combustion en boucle chimique avec différentes charges liquides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoteit A.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available CLC is a new promising combustion process for CO2 capture with less or even no energy penalty compared to other processes. Up to now, most of the work performed on CLC was conducted with gaseous or solid fuels, using methane and coal and/or pet coke. Liquid fuels such as heavy fuels resulting from oil distillation or conversion may also be interesting feedstocks to consider. However, liquid fuels are challenging feedstock to deal with in fluidized beds. The objective of the present work is therefore to investigate the feasibility of liquid feed injection and contact with oxygen carrier in CLC conditions in order to conduct partial or complete combustion of hydrocarbons. A batch experimental fluidized bed set-up was developed to contact alternatively oxygen carrier with liquid fuels or air. The 20 mm i.d. fluidized bed reactor was filled up with 45 g of NiAl0.44O1.67 and pulses of 1-2 g of liquid were injected in the bed at high temperatures up to 950˚C. Different feedstocks have been injected, from dodecane to heavy fuel oils No.2. Results show that, during the reduction period, it is possible to convert all the fuel injected and there is no coke remaining on particles at the end of the reduction step. Depending upon oxygen available in the bed, either full combustion or partial combustion can be achieved. Similar results were found with different liquid feeds, despite their different composition and properties. Le CLC est un nouveau concept prometteur appliqué à la combustion qui permet le captage de CO en minimisant la pénalité énergétique liée au captage. Jusqu’à présent, l’essentiel des travaux de recherche dans le domaine du CLC concerne les charges gazeuses (méthane et solides (charbon et coke. Les charges liquides, et particulièrement les résidus pétroliers, sont des charges également intéressantes à considérer a priori. La mise en oeuvre de ces charges en lit fluidisé est cependant délicate. L’objet de ce

  6. SO2 Release as a Consequence of Alternative Fuel Combustion in Cement Rotary Kiln Inlets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortada Mut, Maria del Mar; Nørskov, Linda Kaare; Glarborg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The combustion of alternative fuels in direct contact with the bed material of the rotary kiln may cause local reducing conditions and, subsequently, decomposition of sulfates from cement raw materials, increasing the SO2 concentration in the gas phase. The decomposition of sulfates increases...... the sulfur circulation and may be problematic because high sulfur circulation can cause sticky material buildup, affecting the process operation of the cement kiln system. The SO2 release from cement raw materials during combustion of pine wood and tire rubber has been studied experimentally in a high...

  7. Combustion Chamber Deposits and PAH Formation in SI Engines Fueled by Producer Gas from Biomass Gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Schramm, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    Investigations were made concerning the formation of combustion chamber deposits (CCD) in SI gas engines fueled by producer gas. The main objective was to determine and characterise CCD and PAH formation caused by the presence of the light tar compounds phenol and guaiacol in producer gas from...... on filters and a sorbent was used for collection of vapour phase aromatic compounds. The filters and sorbent were analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) formed during combustion. The measurements showed that there was no significant increase in particulate PAH emissions due to the tar compounds...

  8. Formation of Liquid Products at the Filtration Combustion of Solid Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Salgansky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Yields of liquid and gaseous products of the filtration combustion of cellulose, wood, peat, coal, and rubber have been investigated. Experiments have shown that the gasification of solid fuels in the regime with superadiabatic heating yields liquid hydrocarbons with quantity and quality, which are close to those produced using other methods, for example, by pyrolysis. But in this case no additional energy supply is needed to carry out the gasification process. The low calorific combustible gas, which forms in this process, contains a substantial quantity of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which are components of syngas.

  9. Technology channel fuel cells; Reseau technologique piles a combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This document presents the PACo channel, its research and development program and the calendar of the first year. The PACo channel aims at stimulate the technology innovation in the domain of the fuel cells and organize collaborations between enterprises and research laboratories. (A.L.B.)

  10. Knock characteristics of dual-fuel combustion in diesel engines ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    system of a natural gas engine is some what different from that of the liquid fuel ... encoder. Magnetic speed sensor. Transducer. Figure 1. Illustration of system. .... Natural gas is fumigated during the induction stroke and some quantity of pilot ...

  11. Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology Program. Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    4 4C Where: M is the molecular weight of th hxth specie Nt is the mole fraction of the x specie a is the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the fuel...RATIO F’gure 7-15 Idle Emisions Characteristics of Variable Geometry Cornbusuom geometry combustor configurations as well. The remaining performance

  12. Perspective usage estimation of Volga region combustible shale as a power generating fuel alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, E.; Barieva, E.; Eskin, A.

    2018-05-01

    A comprehensive study of combustible shale, common within Tatarstan and Ulyanovsk region, is carried out. The rocks physicochemical parameters are found to meet the power generating fuels requirements. The predictive estimate of ash products properties of combustible shale burning is held. Minding furnace process technology it is necessary to know mineral and organic components behavior when combustible shale is burnt. Since the first will determine slagging properties of energy raw materials, the second – its calorific value. In consideration of this the main research methods were X-ray, thermal and X-ray fluorescence analyses. Summing up the obtained results, we can draw to the following conclusions: 1. The combustible shale in Tatarstan and the Ulyanovsk region has predominantly low calorific value (Qb d = 5-9 MJ/kg). In order to enhance its efficiency and to reduce cost it is possible to conduct rocks burning together with some other organic or organic mineral power generating fuels. 2. High ash content (Ad = 60-80%) that causes a high external ballast content in shale implies the appropriateness of using this fuel resource next to its exploitation site. The acceptable distance to a consumer will reduce unproductive transportation charges for large ash and moisture masses. 3. The performed fuel ash components characteristics, as well as the yield and volatiles composition allow us to specify the basic parameters for boiler units, designed for the Volga combustible shale burning. 4. The noncombustible residual components composition shows that shale ash can be used in manufacture of materials of construction.

  13. Internal combustion engines fueled by natural gas-hydrogen mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akansu, S.O.; Kahraman, N. [Erciyes University, Kayseri (Turkey). Engineering Faculty; Dulger, Z. [Kocaeli University (Turkey). Engineering Faculty; Veziroglu, T.N. [University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States). College of Engineering

    2004-11-01

    In this study, a survey of research papers on utilization of natural gas-hydrogen mixtures in internal combustion engines is carried out. In general, HC, CO{sub 2}, and CO emissions decrease with increasing H{sub 2}, but NO{sub x} emissions generally increase. If a catalytic converter is used, NO{sub x} emission values can be decreased to extremely low levels. Consequently, equivalence zero emission vehicles (EZEV) standards may be reached. Efficiency values vary with H{sub 2} amount, spark timing, compression ratio, equivalence ratio, etc. Under certain conditions, efficiency values can be increased. In terms of BSFC, emissions and BTE, a mixture of low hydrogen percentage is suitable for using. (author)

  14. Oxygen Transport Membrane Reactors for Oxy-Fuel Combustion and Carbon Capture Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenstein-Smith, Ryan L.

    This thesis investigates oxygen transport membrane reactors (OTMs) for the application of oxy-fuel combustion. This is done by evaluating the material properties and oxygen permeability of different OTM compositions subjected to a variety of operating conditions. The scope of this work consists of three components: (1) evaluate the oxygen permeation capabilities of perovskite-type materials for the application of oxy-fuel combustion; (2) determine the effects of dual-phase membrane compositions on the oxygen permeation performance and membrane characteristics; and (3) develop a new method for estimating the oxygen permeation performance of OTMs utilized for the application of oxy-fuel combustion. SrSc0.1Co0.9O3-delta (SSC) is selected as the primary perovskite-type material used in this research due to its reported high ionic and electronic conductive properties and chemical stability. SSC's oxygen ion diffusivity is investigated using a conductivity relaxation technique and thermogravimetric analysis. Material properties such as chemical structure, morphology, and ionic and electronic conductivity are examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and conductivity testing using a four-probe method, respectively. Oxygen permeation tests study the oxygen permeability OTMs under modified membrane temperatures, sweeping gas flow rates, sweeping gas compositions, membrane configurations, and membrane compositions. When utilizing a pure CO2 sweeping gas, the membrane composition was modified with the addition of Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9-delta (SDC) at varying wt.% to improve the membranes mechanical stability. A newly developed method to evaluate the oxygen permeation performance of OTMs is also presented by fitting OTM's oxygen permeability to the methane fraction in the sweeping gas composition. The fitted data is used to estimate the overall performance and size of OTMs utilized for the application of oxy-fuel combustion. The findings from this

  15. The industrial production of fuel elements; La fabrication en france des elements combustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussard, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Nadal, J [Societe Industrielle de Combustible Nucleaire (SICN), 75 - Paris (France); Pellen, A [Compagnie pour l' Etude et la Realisation de Combustibles Atomiques (CERCA), 75 - Paris (France)

    1964-07-01

    -pool type reactors. The authors show how the problem of the industrial production of rolled fuel elements has been solved in France, and give the three steps involved: 1 - Assembly of the plates made in the U.S.A., 2 - Rolling of the cores made in the U.S.A. to obtain the plates, 3 - Fabrication of the U-Al alloy and production of the cores. They then recall briefly the characteristics of the different fuel elements now in production. A description is given of the various stages of the production including information about the equipment; stress is laid on the extent of the controls carried out at each stage. In conclusion the authors consider the future development of this type of production taking into account the improvements planned and those which are possible. (authors) [French] Les auteurs traitent successivement de la fabrication industrielle des elements combustibles pour reacteurs de puissance de la filiere U naturel graphite-gaz et plus particulierement pour les centrales energetiques d'E.D.F. et de celle des elements combustibles a base d'U enrichi destines aux reacteurs experimentaux du type 'piscine'. 1ere Partie - LES ELEMENTS COMBUSTIBLES AVANCES POUR LES REACTEURS E.D.F.: Apres un bref rappel des caracteristiques des elements combustibles actuellement fabriques industriellement pour les reacteurs de MARCOULE et de CHINON, les auteurs indiquent les differentes etapes suivies pour aboutir au stade de la fabrication industrielle d'un element combustible nouveau, tant en ce qui concerne la gaine et eventuellement la chemise de graphite que le combustible lui-meme. Pour ce qui est de l'elaboration du combustible, ils decrivent les differentes operations en insistant sur les points originaux de la fabrication et de l'appareillage tels que: - coulees en moules chauds, - traitement thermique des alliages U.Mo 1 p. 100, - soudure des pastilles de fermeture des tubes, - gainage - controle aux differents stades. En ce qui concerne la fabrication des gaines, ils

  16. EXPERIMENTAL COMBUSTION ANALYSIS OF A HSDI DIESEL ENGINE FUELLED WITH PALM OIL BIODIESEL-DIESEL FUEL BLENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOHN AGUDELO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Differences in the chemical nature between petroleum diesel fuels and vegetable oils-based fuels lead to differences in their physical properties affecting the combustion process inside the engine. In this work a detailed combustion diagnosis was applied to a turbocharged automotive diesel engine operating with neat palm oil biodiesel (POB, No. 2 diesel fuel and their blends at 20 and 50% POB by volume (B20 and B50 respectively. To isolate the fuel effect, tests were executed at constant power output without carrying out any modification of the engine or its fuel injection system. As the POB content in the blend increased, there was a slight reduction in the fuel/air equivalence ratio from 0.39 (B0 to 0.37 (B100, an advance of injection timing and of start of combustion. Additionally, brake thermal efficiency, combustion duration, maximum mean temperature, temperature at exhaust valve opening and exhaust gas efficiency decreased; while the peak pressure, exergy destruction rate and specific fuel consumption increased. With diesel fuel and the blends B20 and B50 the same combustion stages were noticed. However, as a consequence of the differences pointed out, the thermal history of the process was affected. The diffusion combustion stage became larger with POB content. For B100 no premixed stage was observed.

  17. Identification of accelerants, fuels and post-combustion residues using a colorimetric sensor array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Jang, Minseok; Askim, Jon R; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2015-09-07

    A linear (1 × 36) colorimetric sensor array has been integrated with a pre-oxidation technique for detection and identification of a variety of fuels and post-combustion residues. The pre-oxidation method permits the conversion of fuel vapor into more detectable species and therefore greatly enhances the sensitivity of the sensor array. The pre-oxidation technique used a packed tube of chromic acid on an oxide support and was optimized in terms of the support and concentration. Excellent batch to batch reproducibility was observed for preparation and use of the disposable pre-oxidation tubes. Twenty automotive fuels including gasolines and diesel from five gasoline retailers were individually identifiable with no confusions or misclassifications in quintuplicate trials. Limits of detection were at sub-ppm concentrations for gasoline and diesel fuels. In addition, burning tests were performed on commonly used fire accelerants, and clear differentiation was achieved among both the fuels themselves and their volatile residues after burning.

  18. Experimental investigation on combustion and heat transfer characteristics in a furnace fueled with unconventional biomass fuels (date stones and palm stalks)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Omari, S.-A.B.

    2006-01-01

    The combustion of date stones and palm stalks in a small scale furnace with a conical solid fuel bed is investigated experimentally. This investigation (to the best of the knowledge of the author) is the first addressing date stones as a new renewable energy source. Different experimental conditions are investigated where different fuel feed conditions and different combustion air flow rates are considered. The major results are given in terms of the fuel reduction rates and the heat transferred to the cooling water flowing in a water jacket around the furnace as functions of time. Combustion of the biomass fuels considered here in the investigated furnace is initiated by using LPG fuel as a starter. The hot products of LPG combustion, which is taking place in a burner built prior to the investigated solid fuel furnace, are allowed to penetrate the conical fuel bed for 2-3 min from its bottom base in the upward direction, causing effective heating and gasification and pyrolysis of the solid fuel in the bed to take place. The resulting combustible gases mix with the combustion air and subsequently are ignited by an external ignition source. The results of the present study highlight date stones as a renewable energy source with a good potential

  19. Chemical analysis of solid residue from liquid and solid fuel combustion: Method development and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trkmic, M. [University of Zagreb, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecturek Zagreb (Croatia); Curkovic, L. [University of Zagreb, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Zagreb (Croatia); Asperger, D. [HEP-Proizvodnja, Thermal Power Plant Department, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-06-15

    This paper deals with the development and validation of methods for identifying the composition of solid residue after liquid and solid fuel combustion in thermal power plant furnaces. The methods were developed for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer analysis. Due to the fuels used, the different composition and the location of creation of solid residue, it was necessary to develop two methods. The first method is used for identifying solid residue composition after fuel oil combustion (Method 1), while the second method is used for identifying solid residue composition after the combustion of solid fuels, i. e. coal (Method 2). Method calibration was performed on sets of 12 (Method 1) and 6 (Method 2) certified reference materials (CRM). CRMs and analysis test samples were prepared in pellet form using hydraulic press. For the purpose of method validation the linearity, accuracy, precision and specificity were determined, and the measurement uncertainty of methods for each analyte separately was assessed. The methods were applied in the analysis of real furnace residue samples. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Experimental Investigation Of Biogas-Biodiesel Dual Fuel Combustion In A Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesha D. K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt at achieving diesel fuel equivalent performance from diesel engines with maximum substitution of diesel with renewable fuels. In this context the study has been designed to analyze the influence of B20 algae biodiesel as a pilot fuel in a biodiesel biogas dual fuel engine, and results are compared to those of biodiesel and diesel operation at identical engine settings. Experiments were performed at various loads from 0 to 100 % of maximum load at a constant speed of 1500 rpm. In general, B20 algae biodiesel is compatible with diesel in terms of performance and combustion characteristics. Dual fuel mode operation displays lower thermal efficiency and higher fuel consumption than for other fuel modes of the test run across the range of engine loads. Dual fuel mode displayed lower emissions of NOx and Smoke opacity while HC and CO concentrations were considerably higher as compared to other fuels. In dual fuel mode peak pressure and heat release rate were slightly higher compared to diesel and biodiesel mode of operation for all engine loads.

  1. Sanitary effects of fossil fuels; Effets sanitaires des combustibles fossiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nifenecker, H. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (IN2P3/CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2006-07-01

    In this compilation are studied the sanitary effects of fossil fuels, behavioral and environmental sanitary risks. The risks in connection with the production, the transport and the distribution(casting) are also approached for the oil(petroleum), the gas and the coal. Accidents in the home are evoked. The risks due to the atmospheric pollution are seen through the components of the atmospheric pollution as well as the sanitary effects of this pollution. (N.C.)

  2. Ash chemistry and behavior in advanced co-combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M; Skrifvars, B J [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this LIEKKI 2 project is to report results achieved within the EU/JOULE/OPTEB project to the Finnish combustion research community through the LIEKKI program. The purpose of the EU/JOULE/OPTEB project is to find prediction methods for evaluating ash behavior, such as slagging, fouling and corrosion propensity, in full scale combustion systems through chemical or mineralogical analyses, intelligent laboratory tests and chemistry calculations. The project focuses on coals, coal mixtures and coal biomass mixtures fired in advanced combustion systems, such as fluidized bed boilers, pulverized fuel boilers with critical steam values etc. The project will make use of (1) advanced multi-component combustion equilibrium calculations, (2) ash sintering tendency laboratory tests and (3) chemical evaluations of slagging, fouling and corrosion measurements in full scale units. (orig.)

  3. Effects of MTBE blended diesel fuel on diesel combustion and emissions; MTBE kongo keiyu ga diesel nensho haiki ni oyobosu eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shundo, S; Yokota, H; Kakegawa, T [Hino Motors, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The effects of MTBE (Methyl-t-butyl ether) blended diesel fuel on diesel combustion and emissions were studied. In conventional diesel combustion, the testing mode was carried out in conformity with the Japanese 13 mode. Furthermore, this fuel was applied to a new combustion system (Homogeneous Charge Intelligent Multiple Injection). MTBE blended diesel fuel is more effective in the case of new combustion system and very low NOx, PM capability is suggested. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. THE INFLUENCE OF SELECTED GASEOUS FUELS ON THE COMBUSTION PROCESS IN THE SI ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek FLEKIEWICZ

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of SI engine tests, carried out for different gaseous fuels. The analysis carried out made it possible to define the correlation between fuel composition and engine operating parameters. The tests covered various gaseous mixtures: methane with hydrogen from 5% to 50% by volume and LPG with DME from 5% to 26% by mass. The first group, considered as low-carbon-content fuels can be characterized by low CO2 emissions. Flammability of hydrogen added in those mixtures realizes the function of the combustion process activator. Thus, hydrogen addition improves energy conversion by about 3%. The second group of fuels is constituted by LPG and DME mixtures. DME mixes perfectly with LPG, and differently than other hydrocarbon fuels, consisting of oxygen as well, which makes the stoichiometric mixture less oxygen demanding. In the case of this fuel an improvement in engine volumetric and overall engine efficiency has been noticed compared with LPG. For the 11% DME share in the mixture an improvement of 2% in the efficiency has been noticed. During the tests, standard CNG–LPG feeding systems have been used, which underlines the utility value of the research. The stand-test results have been followed by combustion process simulation including exhaust forming and charge exchange.

  5. Solution combustion synthesis of strontium aluminate, SrAl2O4, powders: single-fuel versus fuel-mixture approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianoş, Robert; Istratie, Roxana; Păcurariu, Cornelia; Lazău, Radu

    2016-01-14

    The solution combustion synthesis of strontium aluminate, SrAl2O4, via the classic single-fuel approach and the modern fuel-mixture approach was investigated in relation to the synthesis conditions, powder properties and thermodynamic aspects. The single-fuel approach (urea or glycine) did not yield SrAl2O4 directly from the combustion reaction. The absence of SrAl2O4 was explained by the low amount of energy released during the combustion process, in spite of the highly negative values of the standard enthalpy of reaction and standard Gibbs free energy. In the case of single-fuel recipes, the maximum combustion temperatures measured by thermal imaging (482 °C - urea, 941 °C - glycine) were much lower than the calculated adiabatic temperatures (1864 °C - urea, 2147 °C - glycine). The fuel-mixture approach (urea and glycine) clearly represented a better option, since (α,β)-SrAl2O4 resulted directly from the combustion reaction. The maximum combustion temperature measured in the case of a urea and glycine fuel mixture was the highest one (1559 °C), which was relatively close to the calculated adiabatic temperature (1930 °C). The addition of a small amount of flux, such as H3BO3, enabled the formation of pure α-SrAl2O4 directly from the combustion reaction.

  6. Emulsified fuels. Its use in stationary sources; Combustibles emulsionados. Su utilizacion en fuentes estacionarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos Morales, Gilberto; Magdaleno Molina, Moises; Vargas Y, Victor M; Gavira D, A [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1993-12-31

    Basic aspects are set forth of the heavy hydrocarbon fuels, the principles, preparation and particularities of the combustion with emulsions, that currently represent one option, either by themselves or in combination with other technologies to utilize heavy hydrocarbons, obtaining advantages in the reduction of polluting emissions, particulate matter and NOx, which allow continuing operating the operation within the limits established by the technical ecological standards. [Espanol] Se exponen aspectos basicos de los combustibles de hidrocarburos pesados (HC), los principios, preparacion y particularidades de la combustion con emulsiones, que actualmente representan una alternativa por si solos o en combinacion con otras tecnologias para utilizar hidrocarburos pesados, obteniendose ventajas en la reduccion de emisiones de contaminantes de particulas y NOx, lo cual permite continuar operando dentro de los limites que establecen las normas tecnicas ecologicas.

  7. Emulsified fuels. Its use in stationary sources; Combustibles emulsionados. Su utilizacion en fuentes estacionarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos Morales, Gilberto; Magdaleno Molina, Moises; Vargas Y, Victor M.; Gavira D, A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1992-12-31

    Basic aspects are set forth of the heavy hydrocarbon fuels, the principles, preparation and particularities of the combustion with emulsions, that currently represent one option, either by themselves or in combination with other technologies to utilize heavy hydrocarbons, obtaining advantages in the reduction of polluting emissions, particulate matter and NOx, which allow continuing operating the operation within the limits established by the technical ecological standards. [Espanol] Se exponen aspectos basicos de los combustibles de hidrocarburos pesados (HC), los principios, preparacion y particularidades de la combustion con emulsiones, que actualmente representan una alternativa por si solos o en combinacion con otras tecnologias para utilizar hidrocarburos pesados, obteniendose ventajas en la reduccion de emisiones de contaminantes de particulas y NOx, lo cual permite continuar operando dentro de los limites que establecen las normas tecnicas ecologicas.

  8. Effects of ignition parameters on combustion process of a rotary engine fueled with natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Baowei; Pan, Jianfeng; Liu, Yangxian; Zhu, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A 3-D simulation model based on the chemical reaction kinetics is established. • The tumble near the trailing spark plug is beneficial for the combustion rate. • The best position of the trailing spark plug is at the rear of the tumble zone. • An increase of the tumble effect time can improve the combustion rate. • Considering the rate of pressure rise, the best ignition timing is 50 °CA (BTDC). - Abstract: The side-ported rotary engine fueled with natural gas is a new, clean, efficient energy system. This work aims to numerically study the performance, combustion and emission characteristics of a side-ported rotary engine fueled with natural gas under different ignition positions and ignition timings. Simulations were performed using multi-dimensional software ANASYS Fluent. On the basis of the software, a three-dimensional dynamic simulation model was established by writing dynamic mesh programs and choosing a detailed reaction mechanism. The three-dimensional dynamic simulation model, based on the chemical reaction kinetics, was also validated by the experimental data. Meanwhile, further simulations were then conducted to investigate how to impact the combustion process by the coupling function between ignition operating parameter and the flow field inside the cylinder. Simulation results showed that in order to improve the combustion efficiency, the trailing spark plug should be located at the rear of the tumble zone and the ignition timing should be advanced properly. This was mainly caused by the trailing spark plug being located at the rear of the tumble zone, as it not only allowed the fuel in the rear of combustion chamber to be burnt without delay, but also permitted the acceleration of the flame propagation by the tumble. Meanwhile, with advanced ignition timing, the time between ignition timing and the timing of the tumble disappearance increased, which led to an increase of the tumble effect time used to improve the combustion

  9. Fuel oil-water emulsions combustion and application perspectives in Mexico; Combustion de emulsiones de agua en combustoleo y perspectivas de aplicacion en Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo Barrera, Rene [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1998-09-01

    Fuel drops with a content of 16% by weight were burned in three emulsions prepared with 5%, 15% and 25% water. The combustion of the drops was carried out in an spherical furnace utilizing the technique of a drop suspended in a filament. The combustion process was registered by a high velocity video system. It was found that the surface of the particles produced by the combustion of the emulsions, had larger holes than the ones of the fuel, therefore it is expected that emulsifying the fuel can help in reducing the unburned particles emission. [Espanol] Se quemaron gotas de un combustoleo, con un contenido de asfaltenos del 16% en peso, y de tres emulsiones preparadas con 5%, 15% y 25% de agua. La combustion de las gotas se llevo a cabo en un horno esferico empleando la tecnica de gota suspendida en un filamento. El proceso de combustion se registro mediante un sistema de video de alta velocidad. Se encontro que la superficie de las particulas de coque, producidas por la combustion de emulsiones, tuvo hoyos mas grandes que la del combustoleo, por lo que es de esperarse que emulsionar el combustoleo puede ayudar a reducir las emisiones de particulas inquemadas.

  10. Graphite fuels combustion off-gas treatment options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkham, R.J.; Lords, R.E.

    1993-03-01

    Scenarios for burning bulk graphite and for burning crushed fuel particles from graphite spent nuclear fuels have been considered. Particulates can be removed with sintered metal filters. Subsequent cooling would then condense semi-volatile fission products into or onto a particulate. These particulates would be trapped by a second sintered metal filter or downstream packed bed. A packed bed scrub column can be used to eliminate most of the iodine-129 and tritium. A molecular sieve bed is proposed to collect the residual 129 I and other tramp radionuclides downstream (Ruthenium, etc.). Krypton-85 can be recovered, if need be, either by cryogenics or by the KALC process (Krypton Adsorption in Liquid Carbon dioxide). Likewise carbon-14 in the form of carbon dioxide could be collected with a caustic or lime scrub solution and incorporated into a grout. Sulfur dioxide present will be well below regulatory concern level of 4.0 tons per year and most of it would be removed by the scrubber. Carbon monoxide emissions will depend on the choice of burner and start-up conditions. Should the system exceed the regulatory concern level, a catalytic converter in the final packed bed will be provided. Radon and its daughters have sufficiently short half-lives (less than two minutes). If necessary, an additional holdup bed can be added before the final HEPA filters or additional volume can be added to the molecular sieve bed to limit radon emissions. The calculated total effective dose equivalent at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory boundary from a single release of all the 3 , 14 C, 85 Kr, and 129 I in the total fuel mass if 0.43 mrem/year

  11. Status of Westinghouse coal-fueled combustion turbine programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalzo, A.J.; Amos, D.J.; Bannister, R.L.; Garland, R.V.

    1992-01-01

    Developing clean, efficient, cost effective coal utilization technologies for future power generation is an essential part of our National Energy Strategy. Westinghouse is actively developing power plants utilizing advanced gasification, atmospheric fluidized beds (AFB), pressurized fluidized beds (PFB), and direct firing technology through programs sponsored by the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE). The DOE Office of Fossil Energy is sponsoring the Direct Coal-Fired Turbine program. This paper presents the status of current and potential Westinghouse Power Generation Business Unit advanced coal-fueled power generation programs as well as commercial plans

  12. Combined catalysts for the combustion of fuel in gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoshkina, Elvira V.; Laster, Walter R.

    2012-11-13

    A catalytic oxidation module for a catalytic combustor of a gas turbine engine is provided. The catalytic oxidation module comprises a plurality of spaced apart catalytic elements for receiving a