WorldWideScience

Sample records for pulsed heating effects

  1. Numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction with convection boundary conditions and pulse heating effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.; Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes the numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction with convection boundary conditions. The effects of a step heat loading, a sudden pulse heat loading, and an internal heat source are considered in conjunction with convection boundary conditions. Two methods of solution are presened for predicting the transient behavior of the propagating thermal disturbances. In the first method, MacCormack's predictor-corrector method is employed for integrating the hyperbolic system of equations. Next, the transfinite element method, which employs specially tailored elements, is used for accurately representing the transient response of the propagating thermal wave fronts. The agreement between the results of various numerical test cases validate the representative behavior of the thermal wave fronts. Both methods represent hyperbolic heat conduction behavior by effectively modeling the sharp discontinuities of the propagating thermal disturbances.

  2. Numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction with convection boundary conditions and pulse heating effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.; Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes the numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction with convection boundary conditions. The effects of a step heat loading, a sudden pulse heat loading, and an internal heat source are considered in conjunction with convection boundary conditions. Two methods of solution are presened for predicting the transient behavior of the propagating thermal disturbances. In the first method, MacCormack's predictor-corrector method is employed for integrating the hyperbolic system of equations. Next, the transfinite element method, which employs specially tailored elements, is used for accurately representing the transient response of the propagating thermal wave fronts. The agreement between the results of various numerical test cases validate the representative behavior of the thermal wave fronts. Both methods represent hyperbolic heat conduction behavior by effectively modeling the sharp discontinuities of the propagating thermal disturbances.

  3. Heat effects of metals ablated with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Yoichi; Obara, Minoru

    2002-09-01

    Heat effects of metallic bulk crystals of Au, Ag, Cu, and Fe ablated with femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses is experimentally studied. As a result of X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, the XRD peak signal of the area ablated with Ti:sapphire laser is much smaller than that of the crystalline metal sample. While the crystal form of the metal sample is crystalline before laser ablation, the crystal form in the ablated area is partially changed into the amorphous form. The residual pulse energy that did not contribute to the ablation process remains, which leads to the formation of thin layer of melted phase. The melted layer is abruptly cooled down not to be re-crystallized, but to transform into amorphous form. It is evident that the area ablated with femtosecond laser is changed into amorphous metals. This mechanism would be the same as the melt-quenching generally used as the fabrication method of amorphous metals. This experimental result is consistent with the theoretical result.

  4. Influence of the Thomson effect on the pulse heating of high-current electrical contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkushev, A. G.; Pavleino, M. A.; Pavleino, O. M.; Pavlov, V. A.

    2014-09-01

    Pulse heating of high-current contacts is notable for the presence of considerable temperature gradients in the contact area, which cause the Thomson effect—the appearance of thermoelectric currents. The amount of this effect against conventional Joule heat release is quantitatively estimated. Pulse heating of electrical contacts is numerically simulated with the use of the Comsol program package. It is demonstrated that thermoelectric currents make a negligible contribution to heating in the case of copper contacts.

  5. Heat driven pulse pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Steve M (Inventor); Martins, Mario S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A heat driven pulse pump includes a chamber having an inlet port, an outlet port, two check valves, a wick, and a heater. The chamber may include a plurality of grooves inside wall of the chamber. When heated within the chamber, a liquid to be pumped vaporizes and creates pressure head that expels the liquid through the outlet port. As liquid separating means, the wick, disposed within the chamber, is to allow, when saturated with the liquid, the passage of only liquid being forced by the pressure head in the chamber, preventing the vapor from exiting from the chamber through the outlet port. A plurality of grooves along the inside surface wall of the chamber can sustain the liquid, which is amount enough to produce vapor for the pressure head in the chamber. With only two simple moving parts, two check valves, the heat driven pulse pump can effectively function over the long lifetimes without maintenance or replacement. For continuous flow of the liquid to be pumped a plurality of pumps may be connected in parallel.

  6. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  7. Synergistic effects of hydrogen plasma exposure, pulsed laser heating and temperature on rhodium surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marot, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Doerner, R. P.; Umstadter, K.; Wagner, R. S.; Mathys, D.; Duggelin, M.; Meyer, E.

    2013-01-01

    The combined effect of hydrogen plasma exposure and surface heating, either continuous or by short laser pulses (5 ns), on the surface morphology of rhodium layers has been studied. Investigations were performed by reflectivity measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray

  8. Effect of Catalytic Pyrolysis Conditions Using Pulse Current Heating Method on Pyrolysis Products of Wood Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sensho Honma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of catalysts on the compositions of char and pyrolysis oil obtained by pyrolysis of wood biomass with pulse current heating was studied. The effects of catalysts on product compositions were analyzed using GC-MS and TEM. The compositions of some aromatic compounds changed noticeably when using a metal oxide species as the catalyst. The coexistence or dissolution of amorphous carbon and iron oxide was observed in char pyrolyzed at 800°C with Fe3O4. Pyrolysis oil compositions changed remarkably when formed in the presence of a catalyst compared to that obtained from the uncatalyzed pyrolysis of wood meal. We observed a tendency toward an increase in the ratio of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the pyrolysis oil composition after catalytic pyrolysis at 800°C. Pyrolysis of biomass using pulse current heating and an adequate amount of catalyst is expected to yield a higher content of specific polyaromatic compounds.

  9. Effect of Catalytic Pyrolysis Conditions Using Pulse Current Heating Method on Pyrolysis Products of Wood Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Sensho; Hata, Toshimitsu; Watanabe, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The influence of catalysts on the compositions of char and pyrolysis oil obtained by pyrolysis of wood biomass with pulse current heating was studied. The effects of catalysts on product compositions were analyzed using GC-MS and TEM. The compositions of some aromatic compounds changed noticeably when using a metal oxide species as the catalyst. The coexistence or dissolution of amorphous carbon and iron oxide was observed in char pyrolyzed at 800°C with Fe3O4. Pyrolysis oil compositions changed remarkably when formed in the presence of a catalyst compared to that obtained from the uncatalyzed pyrolysis of wood meal. We observed a tendency toward an increase in the ratio of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the pyrolysis oil composition after catalytic pyrolysis at 800°C. Pyrolysis of biomass using pulse current heating and an adequate amount of catalyst is expected to yield a higher content of specific polyaromatic compounds. PMID:25614894

  10. AC measurement of heat capacity and magnetocaloric effect for pulsed magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohama, Yoshimitsu; Marcenat, Christophe; Klein, Thierry; Jaime, Marcelo

    2010-10-01

    A new calorimeter for measurements of the heat capacity and magnetocaloric effect of small samples in pulsed magnetic fields is discussed for the exploration of thermal and thermodynamic properties at temperatures down to 2 K. We tested the method up to μ(0)H=50 T, but it could be extended to higher fields. For these measurements we used carefully calibrated bare-chip Cernox(®) and RuO(2) thermometers, and we present a comparison of their performances. The monotonic temperature and magnetic field dependences of the magnetoresistance of RuO(2) allow thermometry with a precision as good as ±4 mK at T=2 K. To test the performance of our calorimeter, heat capacity and magnetocaloric effect for the spin-dimer compound Sr(3)Cr(2)O(8) and the triangular lattice antiferromagnet RbFe(MoO(4))(2) are presented.

  11. AC measurement of heat capacity and magnetocaloric effect for pulsed magnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    International audience; A new calorimeter for measurements of the heat capacity and magnetocaloric effect of small samples in pulsed magnetic fields is discussed for the exploration of thermal and thermodynamic properties at temperatures down to 2 K. We tested the method up to 0H=50 T, but it could be extended to higher fields. For these measurements we used carefully calibrated bare-chip Cernox® and RuO2 thermometers, and we present a comparison of their performances. The monotonic temperatu...

  12. Effect of electron emission on solids heating by femtosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirina, V. V.; Sergaeva, O. N.; Yakovlev, E. B.

    2011-02-01

    Ultrashort laser pulse interaction with material involves a number of specialities as compared to longer irradiations. We study laser heating of metal by femtosecond pulse with taking into account electron photo- and thermionic emission leading to accumulation of a high positive charge on the target surface and, thus, to the generation of the electric field which causes Coulomb explosion (an electronic mechanism of ablation). Also emission slightly influences the thermal and optical properties of solids.

  13. Application of Streaming Effect and Joule Heating Effect of Pulse Current in Crack Healing of Metal Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Remanufacture engineering is an emerging industry that saves resources as well as protects the environment. However, cracks on remanufactured components can result in serious trouble. Therefore, in order to avoid unnecessary waste of resources and energy, these cracks should be repaired radically in order to ensure the smooth progressing of the remanufacturing process. Consequently, the crack healing technique of metal materials is very important in the field of remanufacturing. In this study, the U-shape vane stainless steel of a centrifugal compressor which had cracks was processed by pulse current using a high pulse current discharge device, and the influence of the streaming effect and Joule heating effect of pulse current on the crack healing of metal materials was studied, aiming to provide references for the better application of this technology in the remanufacturing field in the future.

  14. Quantitative effects of rapid heating on soot-particle sizing through analysis of two-pulse LII

    KAUST Repository

    Cenker, Emre

    2017-02-27

    During the rapid laser pulse heating and consecutive cooling in laser-induced incandescence (LII), soot particles may undergo thermal annealing and sublimation processes which lead to a permanent change in its optical properties and its primary particle size, respectively. Overall, effects of these two processes on soot and LII model-based particle sizing are investigated by measuring the two-color time-resolved (2C-TiRe) LII signal decay from in-flame soot after two consecutive laser pulses at 1064-nm wavelength. Experiments are carried out on a non-premixed laminar ethylene/air flame from a Santoro burner with both low and moderate laser fluences suitable for particle sizing. The probe volume is set to a radial position close to the flame axis where the soot particles are known to be immature or less graphitic. With the first pulse, soot is pre-heated, and the LII signal after the consecutive second pulse is used for analysis. The two-color incandescence emission technique is used for the pyrometric determination of the LII-heated peak soot temperature at the second pulse. A new LII simulation tool is developed which accounts for particle heating via absorption and annealing, and cooling via sublimation, conduction, and radiation with various existing sub-models from the literature. The same approach of using two laser pulses is implemented in the simulations. Measurements indicate that thermal annealing and associated absorption enhancement becomes important at laser fluences above 0.17 J/cm2 for the immature in-flame soot. After a heating pulse at 0.33 J/cm2, the increase of the soot absorption function is calculated as 35% using the temperature measured at the second pulse and an absorption model based on the Rayleigh approximation. Present annealing model, on the other hand, predicts graphitization of soot even in the absence of laser heating at typical flame temperatures. Recorded experimental LII signal decays and LII-heated peak soot temperature

  15. Quantitative effects of rapid heating on soot-particle sizing through analysis of two-pulse LII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenker, E.; Roberts, W. L.

    2017-03-01

    During the rapid laser pulse heating and consecutive cooling in laser-induced incandescence (LII), soot particles may undergo thermal annealing and sublimation processes which lead to a permanent change in its optical properties and its primary particle size, respectively. Overall, effects of these two processes on soot and LII model-based particle sizing are investigated by measuring the two-color time-resolved (2C-TiRe) LII signal decay from in-flame soot after two consecutive laser pulses at 1064-nm wavelength. Experiments are carried out on a non-premixed laminar ethylene/air flame from a Santoro burner with both low and moderate laser fluences suitable for particle sizing. The probe volume is set to a radial position close to the flame axis where the soot particles are known to be immature or less graphitic. With the first pulse, soot is pre-heated, and the LII signal after the consecutive second pulse is used for analysis. The two-color incandescence emission technique is used for the pyrometric determination of the LII-heated peak soot temperature at the second pulse. A new LII simulation tool is developed which accounts for particle heating via absorption and annealing, and cooling via sublimation, conduction, and radiation with various existing sub-models from the literature. The same approach of using two laser pulses is implemented in the simulations. Measurements indicate that thermal annealing and associated absorption enhancement becomes important at laser fluences above 0.17 J/cm2 for the immature in-flame soot. After a heating pulse at 0.33 J/cm2, the increase of the soot absorption function is calculated as 35% using the temperature measured at the second pulse and an absorption model based on the Rayleigh approximation. Present annealing model, on the other hand, predicts graphitization of soot even in the absence of laser heating at typical flame temperatures. Recorded experimental LII signal decays and LII-heated peak soot temperature

  16. Effect of heat-induced pain stimuli on pulse transit time and pulse wave amplitude in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, Marit H N; Loeve, Arjo J; Kortekaas, Minke C; Niehof, Sjoerd P; Mik, Egbert G; Stolker, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Pain is commonly assessed subjectively by interpretations of patient behaviour and/or reports from patients. When this is impossible the availability of a quantitative objective pain assessment tool based on objective physiological parameters would greatly benefit clinical practice and research beside the standard self-report tests. Vasoconstriction is one of the physiological responses to pain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether pulse transit time (PTT) and pulse wave amplitude (PWA) decrease in response to this vasoconstriction when caused by heat-induced pain. The PTT and PWA were measured in healthy volunteers, on both index fingers using photoplethysmography and electrocardiography. Each subject received 3 heat-induced pain stimuli using a Temperature-Sensory Analyzer thermode block to apply a controlled, increasing temperature from 32.0 °C to 50.0 °C to the skin. After reaching 50.0 °C, the thermode was immediately cooled down to 32.0 °C. The study population was divided into 2 groups with a time-interval between the stimuli 20s or 60s. The results showed a significant (p  <  0.05) decrease of both PTT and PWA on the stimulated and contralateral side. Moreover, there was no significant difference between the stimulated and contralateral side. The time-interval of 20s was too short to allow PTT and PWA to return to baseline values and should exceed 40s in future studies. Heat-induced pain causes a decrease of PTT and PWA. Consequently, it is expected that, in the future, PTT and PWA may be applied as objective indicators of pain, either beside the standard self-report test, or when self-report testing is impossible.

  17. Effect of Heat Input on the Tensile Damage Evolution in Pulsed Laser Welded Ti6Al4V Titanium Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Gao, Xiaolong; Zhang, Jianxun

    2016-11-01

    The present paper is focused on studying the effect of heat input on the tensile damage evolution of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of Ti6Al4V alloy under monotonic loading. To analyze the reasons that the tensile fracture site of the pulsed-laser-welded Ti6Al4V sheet joints changes with the heat input under monotonic loading, the microstructure of the sample with different nominal strain values was investigated by in situ observation. Experiment results show that the tensile ductility and fatigue life of welded joints with low heat input are higher than that of welded joints with high heat input. Under tensile loads, the critical engineering strain for crack initiation is much lower in the welded joint with high heat input than in the welded joints with low and medium heat input. And the microstructural damage accumulation is much faster in the fusion zone than in the base metal for the welded joints with high input, whereas the microstructural damage accumulation is much faster in the base metal than in the fusion zone for the welded joints with low input. Consequently, the welded joints fractured in the fusion zone for the welds with high heat input, whereas the welded joints ruptured in the base metal for the welds with low heat input. It is proved that the fine grain microstructure produced by low heat input can improve the critical nominal strain for crack initiation and the resistance ability of microstructural damage.

  18. Effects of Laser Pulse Heating of Copper Photocathodes on High-brightness Electron Beam Production at Blowout Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Lianmin; Tang, Chuanxiang; Gai, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Producing high-brightness and high-charge (>100 pC) electron bunches at blowout regime requires ultrashort laser pulse with high fluence. The effects of laser pulse heating of the copper photocathode are analyzed in this paper. The electron and lattice temperature is calculated using an improved two-temperature model, and an extended Dowell-Schmerge model is employed to calculate the thermal emittance and quantum efficiency. A time-dependent growth of the thermal emittance and the quantum efficiency is observed. For a fixed amount of charge, the projected thermal emittance increases with the decreasing laser radius, and this effect should be taken into account in the laser optimization at blowout regime. Moreover, laser damage threshold fluence is simulated, showing that the maximum local fluence should be less than 40 mJ/cm^2 to prevent damage to the cathode. The cryogenic effect on the laser pulse heating is studied, showing that the hazards caused by the laser pulse heating will be significantly mitigated ...

  19. Heating dominated inception of pulsed discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Ashutosh; Hundsdorfer, Willem; Ebert, Ute

    2016-09-01

    We simulate the inception of pulsed discharges with heating as the driving agent that leads to spark formation. To understand the phenomenon, we developed a 2D-cylindrically symmetric model that couples the electric discharge dynamics with the background gas dynamics. To capture the ion dynamics well, we reduced the classical drift-diffusion-reaction model of electric discharges to the timescale of ion motion. Additionally, we include secondary emission of electrons from the cathode. We employed the model to study electrical breakdown in air at STP conditions between planar electrodes under the application of pulsed voltages. Our model captures space-charge effects, thermal shocks and induced pressure waves. We observe a cycle of discharge pulses heating the gas and the thermal expansion helping the discharge. This cycle might either lead to spark formation or to discharge decay.

  20. Fast Heat Pulse Propagation by Turbulence Spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Mantica, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of a cold pulse initiated by edge cooling in JET is compared to propagation of the heat wave originating from a modulation of the heating source roughly at mid radius. It is found that the propagation of the cold pulse is by far faster than what could be predicted on the basis of ...

  1. Fast Heat Pulse Propagation by Turbulence Spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Mantica, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of a cold pulse initiated by edge cooling in JET is compared to propagation of the heat wave originating from a modulation of the heating source roughly at mid radius. It is found that the propagation of the cold pulse is by far faster than what could be predicted on the basis of ...

  2. Transport coefficient and heat pulse propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Kubota, Tetsuyuki; Toda, Shinichiro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Hanada, Kazuaki [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    The problem of deducing {Chi}{sub e} from heat pulse propagation measurements is addressed. It is indicated that diffusive models can not explain the experimental observations on WT-3 tokamak. The equation taking account of the convective term gives a good fit to experimental results. It may indicate that for the sawtooth free plasma, there exists a convection of heat pulse. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Feasibility study on strengthening heating effect of high power short pulse laser on biological tissue by micro/nano metal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yonggang; Huai, Xiulan

    2008-10-01

    A new method for enhancing the heating effect of high power short pulse laser on biological tissue by micro/nano metal particles was proposed. Theoretical analysis of the influences of the micro/nano particle kind, the concentration and the microcosmic distribution of micro/nano particles on the temperature response was carried out with a multi-layer hyperbolic heat conduction model with volumetric heat generation. The results indicate that embedding micro/nano particles could improve the surface temperature increase of biological tissue with short duration and reduce the deeper material temperature under the same heating condition, which would help strengthen the heating effects of high power short pulse laser on biological tissue. This study may open a new technical approach for improving laser applications.

  4. Composite superconducting bulks for efficient heat dissipation during pulse magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskys, A.; Patel, A.; Hopkins, S.; Kenfaui, D.; Chaud, X.; Zhang, M.; Glowacki, B. A.

    2014-05-01

    Pulsed field magnetization is the most practical method of magnetizing a (RE)BCO bulk, however large heat generation limits the trapped field to significantly less than possible using field cooling. Modelling has been used to show that effective heat removal from the bulk interior, using embedded metallic structures, can enhance trapped field by increasing thermal stability. The reported results are for experimental pulsed magnetization of a thin walled YBCO sample with 55 vertical holes embedded with high thermal conductivity wires. A specially designed copper coldhead was used to increase the trapped field and flux of the perforated YBCO by about 12% at 35 K using a multi-pulse magnetization. Moreover, by filling the perforations with copper, the central trapped field was enhanced by 15% after a single-pulse at 35 K. 3D FEM computer model of a perforated YBCO bulk was also developed showing localised heating effects around the perforations during pulse magnetisation.

  5. Transient behavior of heat pipe with thermal energy storage under pulse heat loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming-, Jr.

    1991-02-01

    Future space missions will require thermal transport devices with the ability to handle transient pulse heat loads. A novel design of a high-temperature axially grooved heat pipe (HP) which incorporates thermal energy storage (TES) to migrate pulse heat loads was presented. A phase-change material (PCM) which is encapsulated in cylindrical containers was used for the thermal energy storage. The transient response of the HP/TES system under two different types of pulse heat loads was studied analytically. The first type is pulse heat loads applied at the heat pipe evaporator, the second type is reversed-pulse heat loads applied at the condenser. In this research, a new three-dimensional alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) method was developed to model the heat conduction through the heat pipe wall and wicks, including the liquid flow in grooves. A very important characteristic of this new ADI method is that it is consistent with physical considerations. Compared with the well-known Brian's and Douglas's ADI methods, this new ADI method had higher accuracy and requires less computer storage. In the numerical solution of heat transfer problems with phase change (Stefan-type problem), a modified Pham's method which includes features from enthalpy and heat capacity methods was used to simulate the melting and solidification processes of the PCG. The vapor flow was assumed quasi-steady and one-dimensional, and was coupled with the evaporation and condensation on the heat pipe inside wall surface and the surfaces of the PCM containers. The transient responses of three different HP/TES configurations were compared: (1) a heat pipe with a large empty cylinder installed in the vapor core, (2) a heat pipe with a large PCM cylinder, and (3) a heat pipe with six small PCM cylinders. From the numerical results, it was found that the PCM is very effective in mitigrating the adverse effect of pulse heat loads. The six small PCM cylinders are more efficient than the large PCM

  6. Pulse mitigation and heat transfer enhancement techniques. Volume 4: Transient behavior of heat pipe with thermal energy storage under pulse heat loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, L. C.; Chang, M. J.

    1992-08-01

    A novel design of a high-temperature axially grooved heat pipe (HP), which utilizes thermal energy storage (TES) to mitigate pulse heat loads, was presented. Phase-change material (PCM) encapsulated in cylindrical containers was used for thermal energy storage. The transient responses of the HP/TES system under two types of pulse heat loads were studied numerically. The first type is pulse heat loads applied at the heat pipe evaporator; the second type is reversed-pulse heat loads applied at the condenser. The transient response of three different HP/TES configurations were compared: (1) a heat pipe with a large empty cylinder installed in the vapor core, (2) a heat pipe with a large PCM cylinder, and (3) a heat pipe with six small PCM cylinders. It was found that the PCM is very effective in mitigating the adverse effect of pulse heat loads. The six small PCM cylinders are more efficient than the large PCM cylinder in relaxing the heat pipe temperature increase under pulse heat loads.

  7. Effects of shape and size of agar gels on heating uniformity during pulsed microwave treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Reyes, Nohemí; Temis-Pérez, Ana L; López-Malo, Aurelio; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; Sosa-Morales, María Elena

    2015-05-01

    Model gel systems with different shape (sphere, cylinder, and slab) and size (180 and 290 g) were prepared with agar (5%) and sucrose (5%). Dielectric constant (ε'), loss factor (ε"), thermophysical properties, and temperature distribution of the model system were measured. Each agar model system was immersed and suspended in water, and then, heated in a microwave oven with intermittent heating until the core temperature reached 50 °C. The ε' and ε" of agar gels decreased when frequency increased. The density and thermal conductivity values of the agar gels were 1033 kg/m(3) and 0.55 W/m °C, respectively. The temperature distribution of sphere, cylinder, and slab was different when similar power doses were applied. The slab reached 50 °C in less time (10 min) and showed a more uniform heating than spheres and cylinders in both sizes. Agar model systems of 180 g heated faster than those of 290 g. The coldest point was the center of the model systems in all studied cases. Shape and size are critical food factors that affect the heating uniformity during microwave heating processes.

  8. Effect of Heat Treatment on Liquation Cracking in Continuous Fiber and Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Welding of HASTELLOY X Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakniat, M.; Ghaini, F. Malek; Torkamany, M. J.

    2017-09-01

    Laser welding of HASTELLOY X is highly feasible; however, hot cracking can be a matter of concern. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of solution heat treatment on susceptibility to liquation cracking in welding of a 2-mm-thick HASTELLOY X plate. In addition, Nd-YAG pulsed laser (400 W) and continuous wave (CW) fiber laser (600 W) were compared with each other in this respect. Results revealed that performing the prewelding solution heat treatment reduces the tendency for occurrence of liquation cracking. Furthermore, it was established that by increasing pulse frequency, there was a significant reduction in the tendency for liquation cracking. With CW laser welding of HASTELLOY X in the solution-heat-treated condition, the tendency for heat-affected zone (HAZ) cracking was found to be minimized.

  9. Satellite and Opacity Effects on Resonance Line Shapes Produced from Short-Pulse Laser Heated Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, R; Audebert, P; Chen, H-K; Fournier, K B; Peyreusse, O; Moon, S; Lee, R W; Price, D; Klein, L; Gauthier, J C; Springer, P

    2002-12-03

    We measure the He-like, time-resolved emission from thin foils consisting of 250 {angstrom} of carbon-250 {angstrom} of aluminum and 500 {angstrom} aluminum illuminated with a 150 fs laser pulse at an intensity of 1 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Dielectronic satellite contributions to the 1s{sup 2}-1s2p({sup 1}P), 1s{sup 2}-1s3p({sup 1}P), and 1s{sup 2}1s4p({sup 1}P) line intensities are modeled using the configuration averaged code AVERROES and is found to be significant for all three resonance lines. The contribution of opacity broadening is inferred from the data and found to be significant only in the 1s{sup 2}-1s2p({sup 1}P).

  10. SUBSTATIONS OF DISTRICT HEATING SYSTEMS WITH PULSE COOLANT CIRCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey N. Makeev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Objectives The aim of the study is to generalise the results of the application of technologies and means for organising pulse coolant flow within a district heating system in order to increase its energy efficiency based on the organisation of local hydraulic shocks and the subsequent use of their energy to ensure the purification of heat energy equipment, intensify the heat transfer process and realise the possibility of transforming the available head from one hydraulic circuit to another. Methods Substations connecting the thermal power installations of consumers with heat networks via dependent and independent schemes are analytically generalised. The use of pulse coolant circulation is proposed as a means of overcoming identified shortcomings. Results Principal schemes of substations with pulse coolant circulation for dependent and independent connection of thermal power installations are detailed. A detailed description of their operation is given. The advantages of using pulse coolant circulation in substations are shown. The materials reflecting the results of the technical implementation and practical introduction of this technology are presented. Conclusion Theoretical analysis of the operation of the basic schemes of substations with pulse coolant circulation and the results of their practical application, as well as the materials of scientific works devoted to the use of the energy of a hydraulic impact and the study of the effect of pulse coolant flow on thermal and hydrodynamic processes, have yielded a combination of factors reflecting technical and economic rationality of application of pulse coolant circulation. 

  11. Effect of transient solar wind pulses on atmospheric heating at Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, J N; Guio, P

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we have presented the first study to investigate the response of the Jovian thermosphere to transient variations in solar wind dynamic pressure, using a coupled, azimuthally symmetric global circulation model coupled with a simple magnetosphere model. This work (Yates et al., 2013, submitted) described the response of thermospheric flows, momentum sources, and the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents to transient compressions and expansions in the magnetosphere. The present study describes the response of thermospheric heating, cooling and the auroral emissions to the aforementioned transient events. We find that transient compressions and expansions, on time scales = 25 K and a ~2000 TW increase in the total power dissipated in the thermosphere. In terms of auroral processes, transient compressions increase main oval UV emission by a factor of ~4.5 whilst transient expansions increase this main emission by a more modest 37%. Both types of transient event cause shifts in the position of the ...

  12. Three-dimensional noninvasive ultrasound Joule heat tomography based on the acousto-electric effect using unipolar pulses: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Renhuan; Li, Xu; Song, Aiguo; He, Bin; Yan, Ruqiang

    2012-11-21

    Electrical properties of biological tissues are highly sensitive to their physiological and pathological status. Thus it is of importance to image electrical properties of biological tissues. However, spatial resolution of conventional electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is generally poor. Recently, hybrid imaging modalities combining electric conductivity contrast and ultrasonic resolution based on the acousto-electric effect has attracted considerable attention. In this study, we propose a novel three-dimensional (3D) noninvasive ultrasound Joule heat tomography (UJHT) approach based on the acousto-electric effect using unipolar ultrasound pulses. As the Joule heat density distribution is highly dependent on the conductivity distribution, an accurate and high-resolution mapping of the Joule heat density distribution is expected to give important information that is closely related to the conductivity contrast. The advantages of the proposed ultrasound Joule heat tomography using unipolar pulses include its simple inverse solution, better performance than UJHT using common bipolar pulses and its independence of a priori knowledge of the conductivity distribution of the imaging object. Computer simulation results show that using the proposed method, it is feasible to perform a high spatial resolution Joule heat imaging in an inhomogeneous conductive media. Application of this technique on tumor scanning is also investigated by a series of computer simulations.

  13. Effect of gas heating on the generation of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam in the pulse-periodic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Sorokin, D. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-07-01

    The generation of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam (UAEB) in nitrogen in the pulse-periodic regime is investigated. The gas temperature in the discharge gap of the atmospheric-pressure nitrogen is measured from the intensity distribution of unresolved rotational transitions ( C 3Π u , v' = 0) → ( B 3Π g , v″ = 0) in the nitrogen molecule for an excitation pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz. It is shown that an increase in the UAEB current amplitude in the pulse-periodic regime is due to gas heating by a series of previous pulses, which leads to an increase in the reduced electric field strength as a result of a decrease in the gas density in the zone of the discharge formation. It is found that in the pulse-periodic regime and the formation of the diffuse discharge, the number of electrons in the beam increases by several times for a nitrogen pressure of 9 × 103 Pa. The dependences of the number of electrons in the UAEB on the time of operation of the generator are considered.

  14. Laser Pulse Heating of Spherical Metal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribelsky, Michael I.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Luk'Yanchuk, Boris S.; Khokhlov, Alexei R.

    2011-10-01

    We consider the general problem of laser pulse heating of spherical metal particles with the sizes ranging from nanometers to millimeters. We employ the exact Mie solution of the diffraction problem and solve the heat-transfer equation to determine the maximum temperature rise at the particle surface as a function of optical and thermometric parameters of the problem. Primary attention is paid to the case when the thermal diffusivity of the particle is much larger than that of the environment, as it is in the case of metal particles in fluids. We show that, in this case, for any given duration of the laser pulse, the maximum temperature rise as a function of the particle size reaches a maximum at a certain finite size of the particle. We suggest simple approximate analytical expressions for this dependence, which cover the entire parameter range of the problem and agree well with direct numerical simulations.

  15. Pressure waves in liquid mercury target from pulsed heat loads and the possible way controlling their effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, L.; Skala, K. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villingen (Switzerland)

    1996-06-01

    In ESS project liquid metals are selected as the main target for the pulsed spallation neutron source. Since the very high instantaneous energy is deposited on the heavy molten target in a very short period time, pressure waves are generated. They travel through the liquid and cause high stress in the container. Also, additional stress should be considered in the wall which is the result of direct heating of the target window. These dynamic processes were simulated with computational codes with the static response being analized first. The total resulting dynamic wall stress has been found to have exceeded the design stress for the selected container material. Adding a small amount of gas bubbles in the liquid could be a possible way to reduce the pressure waves.

  16. Heat Load Estimator for Smoothing Pulsed Heat Loads on Supercritical Helium Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoa, C.; Lagier, B.; Rousset, B.; Bonnay, P.; Michel, F.

    Superconducting magnets for fusion are subjected to large variations of heat loads due to cycling operation of tokamaks. The cryogenic system shall operate smoothly to extract the pulsed heat loads by circulating supercritical helium into the coils and structures. However the value of the total heat loads and its temporal variation are not known before the plasma scenario starts. A real-time heat load estimator is of interest for the process control of the cryogenic system in order to anticipate the arrival of pulsed heat loads to the refrigerator and finally to optimize the operation of the cryogenic system. The large variation of the thermal loads affects the physical parameters of the supercritical helium loop (pressure, temperature, mass flow) so those signals can be used for calculating instantaneously the loads deposited into the loop. The methodology and algorithm are addressed in the article for estimating the heat load deposition before it reaches the refrigerator. The CEA patented process control has been implemented in a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) and has been successfully validated on the HELIOS test facility at CEA Grenoble. This heat load estimator is complementary to pulsed load smoothing strategies providing an estimation of the optimized refrigeration power. It can also effectively improve the process control during the transient between different operating modes by adjusting the refrigeration power to the need. This way, the heat load estimator participates to the safe operation of the cryogenic system.

  17. Dynamic response of the target container under pulsed heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liping Ni [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    The structural mechanics of a liquid target container for pulsed spallation sources have been simulated using both a commercial code and a PSI-developed program. Results from the transient thermal-structural analysis showed that, due to inertia effects, the dynamic stress in the target container is contributed mainly from direct heating in the initial time stage, and later from the pressure wave in the target liquid once it reaches the wall. (author) figs., tab., refs.

  18. Experimental study of rf pulsed heating

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, L; Nantista, C; Dolgashev, V; Higashi, Y; Aicheler, M; Tantawi, S; Wuensch, W

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop (R), copper silver, and silver plated co...

  19. Experimental Investigation on Heating Kerosene Using Thrust Tube Waste Heat of Pulse Detonation Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiqiao; Yan, Yu; Mu, Yang; Zheng, Longxi; Chen, Le

    2013-12-01

    Performance of liquid hydrocarbon fueled pulse detonation engines are hindered by the time required to evaporate liquid fuel droplets within the mixture. Efforts such as heating the liquid fuel before introduced into the engine were made to overcome this problem. The engine wall suffered high temperature of gaseous detonative products, which is harmful to the engine. Therefore the waste heat of PDE engine wall was used here to heat the liquid kerosene of the engine by using two concentric heat-exchangers with helical slot inside mounted at the tail of the pulse detonation engine. The pulse detonation engine (PDE) used here are 110 mm in inner diameter and 1700 mm in length and liquid kerosene and gaseous air were used as fuel and oxidizer respectively. Heating liquid kerosene was found effective in enhancing the engine performance, which was helpful for deflagration to detonation transition process. It was found that the waste heat could elevate the kerosene temperature effectively and the wall temperature could also be decreased obviously.

  20. Multipulse mode of heating nanoparticles by nanosecond, picosecond and femtosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letfullin, Renat R.; Iversen, Christian B.; George, Thomas F.

    2010-02-01

    Nanoparticles are being researched as a noninvasive method for selectively killing cancer cells. With particular antibody coatings on nanoparticles, they attach to the abnormal cells of interest (cancer or otherwise). Once attached, nanoparticles can be heated with UV/visible/IR or RF pulses, heating the surrounding area of the cell to the point of death. Researchers often use single-pulse or multipulse lasers when conducting nanoparticle ablation research. In the present paper, we are conducting an analysis to determine if the multipulse mode has any advantage in heating of spherical metal nanoparticles (such as accumulative heating effect). The laser heating of nanoparticles is very sensitive to the time structure of the incident pulsed laser radiation, the time interval between the pulses, and the number of pulses used in the experiments. We perform time-dependent simulations and detailed analyses of the different nonstationary pulsed laser-nanoparticle interaction modes, and show the advantages and disadvantages of multipulse (set of short pulses) and single-pulse laser heating of nanoparticles. A comparative analysis for both radiation modes (single-pulse and multipulse) are discussed for laser heating of metal nanotargets on nanosecond, picosecond and femtosecond time scales to make recommendations for efficient laser heating of nanomaterials in the experiments.

  1. Influence of stem temperature changes on heat pulse sap flux density measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Burgess, Stephen S O; Downey, Alec; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    While natural spatial temperature gradients between measurement needles have been thoroughly investigated for continuous heat-based sap flow methods, little attention has been given to how natural changes in stem temperature impact heat pulse-based methods through temporal rather than spatial effects. By modelling the theoretical equation for both an ideal instantaneous pulse and a step pulse and applying a finite element model which included actual needle dimensions and wound effects, the influence of a varying stem temperature on heat pulse-based methods was investigated. It was shown that the heat ratio (HR) method was influenced, while for the compensation heat pulse and Tmax methods changes in stem temperatures of up to 0.002 °C s(-1) did not lead to significantly different results. For the HR method, rising stem temperatures during measurements led to lower heat pulse velocity values, while decreasing stem temperatures led to both higher and lower heat pulse velocities, and to imaginary results for high flows. These errors of up to 40% can easily be prevented by including a temperature correction in the data analysis procedure, calculating the slope of the natural temperature change based on the measured temperatures before application of the heat pulse. Results of a greenhouse and outdoor experiment on Pinus pinea L. show the influence of this correction on low and average sap flux densities.

  2. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with nanosecond laser pulses: Nanoparticle heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedyalkov, N.N., E-mail: nnn_1900@yahoo.com [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shousse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Imamova, S.E.; Atanasov, P.A. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shousse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Toshkova, R.A.; Gardeva, E.G.; Yossifova, L.S.; Alexandrov, M.T. [Institute of Experimental Pathology and Parasitology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, G. Bonchev Street, bl. 25, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Obara, M. [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental results on the heating process of gold nanoparticles irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses are presented. The efficiency of particle heating is demonstrated by in-vitro photothermal therapy of human tumor cells. Gold nanoparticles with diameters of 40 and 100 nm are added as colloid in the cell culture and the samples are irradiated by nanosecond pulses at wavelength of 532 nm delivered by Nd:YAG laser system. The results indicate clear cytotoxic effect of application of nanoparticle as more efficient is the case of using particles with diameter of 100 nm. The theoretical analysis of the heating process of nanoparticle interacting with laser radiation is based on the Mie scattering theory, which is used for calculation of the particle absorption coefficient, and two-dimensional heat diffusion model, which describes the particle and the surrounding medium temperature evolution. Using this model the dependence of the achieved maximal temperature in the particles on the applied laser fluence and time evolution of the particle temperature is obtained.

  3. Non-local model analysis of heat pulse propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, Takuya [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I.; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1998-10-01

    A new theoretical model equation which includes the non-local effect in the heat flux is proposed to study the transient transport phenomena. A non-local heat flux, which is expressed in terms of the integral equation, is superimposed on the conventional form of the heat flux. This model is applied to describe the experimental results from the power switching [Stroth U, et al 1996 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 38 1087] and the power modulation experiments [Giannone L, et al 1992 Nucl. Fusion 32 1985] in the W7-AS stellarator. A small fraction of non-local component in the heat flux is found to be very effective in modifying the response against an external modulation. The transient feature of the transport property, which are observed in the response of heat pulse propagation, are qualitatively reproduced by the transport simulations based on this model. A possibility is discussed to determine the correlation length of the non-local effect experimentally by use of the results of transport simulations. (author)

  4. Effect of heating samples during pulsed electron beam annealing on the open-circuit voltage of silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laugier, A.; Barbier, D.; Doghmane, M.S.; Chemisky, G. (Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, 69 - Villeurbanne (France))

    1983-01-01

    Defects associated with pulsed electron beam annealing of P implanted Si solar cells lead to poor Vsub(oc) (< 500mV). Their nature is discussed on the basic of S.E.M. observations, deep level transient spectroscopy study and degradation of electrical characteristics of Schottky barriers. An improved pulsed electron beam annealing process is determined, characterized by a low mean energy electron beam (10 keV) associated to a starting temperature of 450/sup 0/C and low fluences (<= 1J/cm/sup 2/). Values of Vsub(oc) similar to conventional thermal annealing are obtained.

  5. Electron heating enhancement by frequency-chirped laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, E.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.; Afarideh, H.; Riazi, Z.; Hora, H.

    2014-09-01

    Propagation of a chirped laser pulse with a circular polarization through an uprising plasma density profile is studied by using 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulation. The laser penetration depth is increased in an overdense plasma compared to an unchirped pulse. The induced transparency due to the laser frequency chirp results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum longitudinal electrostatic field at the back side of the solid target, which is very essential in target normal sheath acceleration regime of proton acceleration. For an applied chirp parameter between 0.008 and 0.01, the maximum amount of the electrostatic field is improved by a factor of 2. Furthermore, it is noticed that for a chirped laser pulse with a0 = 5, because of increasing the plasma transparency length, the laser pulse can penetrate up to about ne ≈ 6nc, where nc is plasma critical density. It shows 63% increase in the effective critical density compared to the relativistic induced transparency regime for an unchirped condition.

  6. Electron heating enhancement by frequency-chirped laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, E.; Afarideh, H., E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadighi-Bonabi, R., E-mail: Sadighi@sharif.ir [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9567, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Riazi, Z. [Physics and Accelerator School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hora, H. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2014-09-14

    Propagation of a chirped laser pulse with a circular polarization through an uprising plasma density profile is studied by using 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulation. The laser penetration depth is increased in an overdense plasma compared to an unchirped pulse. The induced transparency due to the laser frequency chirp results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum longitudinal electrostatic field at the back side of the solid target, which is very essential in target normal sheath acceleration regime of proton acceleration. For an applied chirp parameter between 0.008 and 0.01, the maximum amount of the electrostatic field is improved by a factor of 2. Furthermore, it is noticed that for a chirped laser pulse with a₀=5, because of increasing the plasma transparency length, the laser pulse can penetrate up to about n{sub e}≈6n{sub c}, where n{sub c} is plasma critical density. It shows 63% increase in the effective critical density compared to the relativistic induced transparency regime for an unchirped condition.

  7. Analysis on anomalous conductivity and heat pulse propagation in tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Itoh, Sanae [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    Heat pulse propagation is analyzed for different models of electron heat conduction coefficient {chi}{sub e}. Cases in which initial temperature perturbation is induced by (1) electron cyclotron heating (ECH) or (2) sawtooth are studied. Five models are adopted which have various dependences on temperature or temperature gradient. A model in which {chi}{sub e} has a temperature-gradient dependence explains the discrepancy that the values derived from heat pulse propagation deviate from those obtained from the stationary power balance in experiments. In this case the deviation is found to have appreciable radial dependence. (author).

  8. Laser pulse heating of surfaces and thermal stress analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yilbas, Bekir S; Al-Aqeeli, Nasser; Al-Qahtani, Hussain M

    2013-01-01

    This book introduces laser pulse heating and thermal stress analysis in materials surface. Analytical temperature treatments and stress developed in the surface region are also explored. The book will help the reader analyze the laser induced stress in the irradiated region and presents solutions for the stress field. Detailed thermal stress analysis in different laser pulse heating situations and different boundary conditions are also presented. Written for surface engineers.

  9. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Heating of Nanoparticles: Comparison of Theoretical Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renat R. Letfullin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between nanoparticles and ultrashort laser pulses holds great interest in laser nanomedicine, introducing such possibilities as selective cell targeting to create highly localized cell damage. Two models are studied to describe the laser pulse interaction with nanoparticles in the femtosecond, picosecond, and nanosecond regimes. The first is a two-temperature model using two coupled diffusion equations: one describing the heat conduction of electrons, and the other that of the lattice. The second model is a one-temperature model utilizing a heat diffusion equation for the phonon subsystem and applying a uniform heating approximation throughout the particle volume. A comparison of the two modeling strategies shows that the two-temperature model gives a good approximation for the femtosecond mode, but fails to accurately describe the laser heating for longer pulses. On the contrary, the simpler one-temperature model provides an adequate description of the laser heating of nanoparticles in the femtosecond, picosecond, and nanosecond modes.

  10. Impact of Dissociation and Sensible Heat Release on Pulse Detonation and Gas Turbine Engine Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2001-01-01

    A thermodynamic cycle analysis of the effect of sensible heat release on the relative performance of pulse detonation and gas turbine engines is presented. Dissociation losses in the PDE (Pulse Detonation Engine) are found to cause a substantial decrease in engine performance parameters.

  11. Customer Overview of Pulsed Laser Heating for Evaluation of Gun Bore Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Technical Report ARWSB-TR-15003 Customer Overview of Pulsed Laser Heating for Evaluation of Gun Bore Materials Mark E. Todaro...SUBTITLE Customer Overview of Pulsed Laser Heating for Evaluation of Gun Bore Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...thermomechanical effects that occur at the bore of large and medium caliber guns during firing. Hence, PLH has been used not only to gain insight into the erosion

  12. Integration of Heat-Pulse and Sensible Heat Balance Methods to Estimate Evaporation From Bare Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautz, A.; Smits, K. M.; Schulte, P.; Cihan, A.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2012-12-01

    A critical component of the water cycle at local, regional and global scales is evaporation from soil. Because it is very difficult to measure soil evaporation and soil moisture in the field, with the exception of using a lysimeter for local measurements, numerous model based estimation methods have been proposed. Numerical approaches that attempt to estimate evaporation rates within the top several centimeters of soil often rely of empirical and semi-empirical methods. Another less well known method to determine evaporation relies on heat pulse sensors to measure soil temperature and thermal properties. This approach does not rely on knowledge of soil hydraulic properties, effectively removing the need of several common empirical methods to define the soil surface boundary condition. The objective of this study was to integrate both the heat-pulse and sensible heat balance methods into a non-isothermal multiphase flow model in order to define the boundary conditions at the land/atmosphere interface. This model was tested using precision experimental data collected under laboratory conditions and compared to more traditional numerical modeling approaches. Experimental data was generated in a two-dimensional soil tank containing an array of sensors that allowed soil temperature, soil moisture content, and relative humidity to be collected continuously and autonomously. The soil tank was placed within a wind tunnel test facility to insure that atmospheric conditions were carefully controlled and monitored throughout the duration of the experiment. Numerical results of the model using the heat pulse and sensible heat balance methods were compared to those generated using different, more traditional modeling approaches. Results demonstrate the applicability of incorporating the heat-pulse and sensible heat balance methods in numerical approaches. Further validation was provided through a comparison of the numerical results and independently determined experimental

  13. Nanoscale heat transfer in direct nanopatterning into gold films by a nanosecond laser pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuanhai; Zhai, Tianrui; Zhang, Xinping

    2014-04-01

    We investigate nanoscale heat transfer and heat-flux overlapping effects in nanopatterning through interactions between interferogram produced by 5-ns laser pulses at 355 nm and gold films. These mechanisms played different roles in direct writing of gold nanolines with different periods. Continuous gold nanolines were produced for large periods, where heat-flux overlapping is too small to effect the laser-metal interactions. Thus, the heat-transfer distance and direct laser-ablation determined the width of resultant gold nanolines. However, gold nanolines consisting of isolated gold nanoparticles were produced for small periods, where the overlapped heat-flux exceeds the threshold for removing or melting gold films.

  14. Heat pulse propagation in chaotic 3-dimensional magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    del-Castillo-Negrete, D

    2014-01-01

    Heat pulse propagation in $3$-D chaotic magnetic fields is studied by solving the parallel heat transport equation using a Lagrangian-Green's function (LG) method. The LG method provides an efficient and accurate technique that circumvents limitations of finite elements and finite difference methods. The main two problems addressed are: (i) The dependence of the radial transport on the magnetic field stochasticity (controlled by the amplitude of the perturbation, $\\epsilon$); and (ii) The role of reversed shear configurations on pulse propagation. In all the cases considered there are no magnetic flux surfaces. However, radial transport is observed to depend strongly on $\\epsilon$ due to the presence of high-order magnetic islands and Cantori that act as quasi-transport barriers that preclude the radial penetration of heat pulses within physically relevant time scale. The dependence of the magnetic field connection length, $\\ell_B$, on $\\epsilon$ is studied in detail. The decay rate of the temperature maximum...

  15. Transient heat transfer properties in a pulse detonation combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Fontenot, Dion G.

    2011-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The heat transfer along the axis of a pulse detonation combustor has been characterized for various frequencies and fill fractions at 2.5 atmospheres of pressure for chamber refresh conditions. In a pulse detonation combustor, a supersonic detonation wave is the method for transforming chemical energy into mechanical energy and the wave propagates much faster than the subsonic flames in devices such as rockets and ramjets. The flow...

  16. Heat transport in metals irradiated by ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanavin, Andrei P.; Afanasiev, Yuri V.; Chichkov, Boris N.; Isakov, Vladimir A.; Smetanin, Igor V.

    2000-02-01

    Different regimes of heat propagation in metals irradiated by subpicosecond laser pulses are studied on the basis of two-temperature diffusion model. New analytical solutions for the heat conduction equation, corresponding to the different temperature dependences of the electron thermal conductivity (formula available n paper), are found. It is shown that in case of a strong electron-lattice nonequilibrium, the heat penetration depth grows linearly with time, lT varies direct as t, in opposite to the ordinary diffusionlike behavior, lT varies direct as t1/2. Moreover, the heat propagation velocity decreases with increasing laser fluence.

  17. Influence of the Water-Cooled Heat Exchanger on the Performance of a Pulse Tube Refrigerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The water-cooled heat exchanger is one of the key components in a pulse tube refrigerator. Its heat exchange effectiveness directly influences the cooling performance of the refrigerator. However, effective heat exchange does not always result in a good performance, because excessively reinforced heat exchange can lead to additional flow loss. In this paper, seven different water-cooled heat exchangers were designed to explore the best configuration for a large-capacity pulse tube refrigerator. Results indicated that the heat exchanger invented by Hu always offered a better performance than that of finned and traditional shell-tube types. For a refrigerator with a working frequency of 50 Hz, the best hydraulic diameter is less than 1 mm.

  18. Self-heating in pulsed mode for signal quality improvement: application to carbon nanostructures-based sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Monereo, O.; Casals Guillén, Olga; Prades García, Juan Daniel; Cirera Hernández, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Sensor signal instability and drift are still unresolved challenges in conductometric gas sensors. Here, the use of self-heating effect to operate a gas sensor in a pulsed temperature modulation mode (pulsed self-heating operation) is presented as an effective method to enhance signal stability and reduce consumption figures down to a few W. The sensor operation temperature was pulsed periodically between two levels, obtaining two different sensing states from one single device driven with se...

  19. 3D noninvasive ultrasound Joule heat tomography based on acousto-electric effect using unipolar pulses: a simulation study

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Renhuan; Li, Xu; Song, Aiguo; He, Bin; Yan, Ruqiang

    2012-01-01

    Electrical properties of biological tissues are highly sensitive to their physiological and pathological status. Thus it is of importance to image electrical properties of biological tissues. However, spatial resolution of conventional electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is generally poor. Recently, hybrid imaging modalities combining electric conductivity contrast and ultrasonic resolution based on acouto-electric effect has attracted considerable attention. In this study, we propose a nov...

  20. Laser short pulse heating of metal nano-wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Al-Dweik, A. Y.

    2012-11-01

    Non-equilibrium energy transfer takes place in a solid substrate during a short-pulse laser irradiation and temperature field can be obtained analytically in the irradiated region. In the present study, laser short-pulse heating of metal nano-wire is considered and the analytical solution for two-dimensional axisymmetric nano-wire is presented. Since the absorption of the incident beam takes place in the skin of the irradiated surface, a volumetric heat source resembling the absorption process is incorporated in the analysis. Three different nano-wire materials are introduced in the analysis for the comparison reason. These include silver, chromium, and copper. It is found that temperature decay is gradual on the surface vicinity and temporal variation of the surface temperature follows almost the laser pulse intensity profile at the irradiated center.

  1. Measurement of thermophysical properties by a pulse-heating technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Xiao; Jingmin Dai; Qingwei Wang

    2007-01-01

    A technique is described for the dynamic measurement of selected thermophysical properties of electrically conducting solids in the temperature range from 1100 K to the melting point. Based on rapid resistive self-heating of the specimen from room temperature to any desired high temperature in several seconds by the passage of an electical current pulse through it, this technique measures the pertinent quantities such as current, voltage, randiance temperature, with sub-millisecond time resolution. The pulse-heating technique is applied to strip specimens. The radiance temperature is measured by high-speed pyrometry,normal spectral emissivity of the strips is measured by integrating sphere reflectometry. The normal spectral emissivity results are used to compute the true temperature of the specimens. The heat capacity,electrical resistivity, total hemispherical emissivity are evaluated in the temperature range from 1100 K to the melting point.

  2. Heating model for metals irradiated by a subpicosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimier, B.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Hallo, L.

    2007-05-01

    We propose a model describing the heating and ablation of a metallic target irradiated by a subpicosecond laser pulse. It takes into account the temperature equilibration between the electrons and ions and the density variation of the target material during the heating process. A simple analytical equation of state is developed, which allows one to calculate the total pressure in the heated layer for different electron and ion temperatures. The thermodynamic behavior of a nonequilibrium system is discussed, and nonequilibrium spinodals and cohesion limits are introduced. The model is applied for a description of the thermal ablation process driven by a sub-ps laser pulse. Aluminum and copper targets are considered, and it is shown that the dominant ablation process is due to breaking the nonequilibrium cohesion limit. The numerical results are in good agreement with recent experimental data.

  3. Theories and heat pulse experiments of non-Fourier heat conduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ván Péter

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The experimental basis and theoretical background of non-Fourier heat conduction is shortly reviewed from the point of view of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The performance of different theories is compared in case of heat pulse experiments.

  4. Evaluation of externally heated pulsed MPD thruster cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Roger M.; Domonkos, Matthew; Gallimore, Alec D.

    1993-01-01

    Recent interest in solar electric orbit transfer vehicles (SEOTV's) has prompted a reevaluation of pulsed magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster systems due to their ease of power scaling and reduced test facility requirements. In this work the use of externally heated cathodes was examined in order to extend the lifetime of these thrusters to the 1000 to 3000 hours required for SEOTV missions. A pulsed MPD thruster test facility was assembled, including a pulse-forming network (PFN), ignitor supply and propellant feed system. Results of cold cathode tests used to validate the facility, PFN, and propellant feed system design are presented, as well as a preliminary evaluation of externally heated impregnated tungsten cathodes. The cold cathode thruster was operated on both argon and nitrogen propellants at peak discharge power levels up to 300 kW. The results confirmed proper operation of the pulsed thruster test facility, and indicated that large amounts of gas were evolved from the BaO-CaO-Al2O3 cathodes during activation. Comparison of the expected space charge limited current with the measured vacuum current when using the heated cathode indicate that either that a large temperature difference existed between the heater and the cathode or that the surface work function was higher than expected.

  5. Role of ambient gas in heating of metal samples by femtosecond pulses of laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, V. P.; Bulgakova, N. M.

    2009-06-01

    In this work we consider an experimentally observed effect of significant increasing of the residual heat in metal targets at their irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses in an ambient gas in respect to the vacuum conditions. Numerical modelling of heating of a platinum target by femtosecond laser pulses in argon under normal conditions has been performed taking into account gas breakdown in the focussing region of the laser beam in front of the target. The applied model is based on a combination of a thermal model describing heating and phase transitions in irradiated samples and a hydrodynamic model to describe motion of the ambient gas perturbed by laser irradiation as a result of multiphoton ionization. The hot ambient gas is shown to heat efficiently the irradiated sample. The hydrodynamic processes in the ambient gas play an important role in heating.

  6. Some non-Fourier heat conduction characters under pulsed inlet conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Qingmei; LU Wenqiang

    2004-01-01

    Through simulating one- and two-dimensional non-Fourier heat conduction problems under different pulsed inlet conditions, this paper numerically predicts some different non-Fourier heat conduction characters arose from different pulse types and different pulse frequencies. Meanwhile, the differences among thermal wave, non-Fourier and Fourier heat conduction are also showed.

  7. Vacuum heating of solid target irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG; Quanli(董全力); ZHANG; Jie(张杰)

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with solid targets was studied through experiments and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. It is proved that the vacuum heating and the inverse bremsstralung process are the main mechanisms of the laser pulse absorption under such conditions. The distribution of hot electrons and that of X-ray are found to have double-temperature structure, which is confirmed by PIC simulations. While the lower temperature is attributed to the resonant absorption, the higher one, however, is caused by the laser-induced electric field in the target normal direction. The time-integrated spectra ofthe reflected laser pulse shows that the mechanism of electron acceleration is determined by the plasma density profile.

  8. Plasma heating and current drive using intense, pulsed microwaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Nevins, W.M.; Rognlien, T.D.; Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.

    1988-01-01

    The use of powerful new microwave sources, e.g., free-electron lasers and relativistic gyrotrons, provide unique opportunities for novel heating and current-drive schemes in the electron-cyclotron and lower-hybrid ranges of frequencies. These high-power, pulsed sources have a number of technical advantages over conventional, low-intensity sources; and their use can lead to improved current-drive efficiencies and better penetration into a reactor-grade plasma in specific cases. The Microwave Tokamak Experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will provide a test for some of these new heating and current-drive schemes. This paper reports theoretical progress both in modeling absorption and current drive for intense pulses and in analyzing some of the possible complications that may arise, e.g., parametric instabilities and nonlinear self-focusing. 22 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Short-pulse laser heating of metals: a new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettner, Bernd

    1997-04-01

    Recently, several groups have demonstrated that the spatial and temporal temperature distribution inside metals resulting from femtosecond laser pulses cannot be fully explained by the two-temperature model for the electrons and phonons. Since these short pulse lengths may be comparable to the electron temperature relaxation time, we introduce a heat flow which is nonlocal in time. By this way we are taking into account in first order a non-equilibrium distribution of the electrons. As a consequence, three additional terms appear in the differential equation for the electron temperature. Furthermore, we offer an explanation for the different response of metals to the laser radiation on the basis of the electron-phonon coupling constant and the average phonon frequencies squared, well-known quantities in McMillan's theory on superconductivity. Using a double temperature model with nonlocal heat flow and a laser pulse length of 1 ps, the calculated surface temperatures of the electron and phonon subsystems are presented for Cu, Nb, and Pb. This is compared with the results of a local heat flow approach and with the conventional theory as well. Additionally we present calculations of the electron surface temperature of a thin Au film. We find that our model is capable of describing the new measurements on Au films more consistently than the standard double temperature model.

  10. Causality effects on accelerating light pulses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaminer, Ido; Lumer, Yaakov; Segev, Mordechai; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2011-01-01

    .... We explore the effects of causality, and find that, whereas decelerating pulses can asymptotically reach zero group velocity, pulses that accelerate towards infinite group velocity inevitably break...

  11. Mathematical modeling of the optimum pulse structure for safe and effective photo epilation using broadband pulsed light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Caerwyn; Donne, Kelvin; Daniel, Gwenaelle; Town, Godfrey; Clement, Marc; Valentine, Ronan

    2012-09-06

    The objective of this work is the investigation of intense pulsed light (IPL) photoepilation using Monte Carlo simulation to model the effect of the output dosimetry with millisecond exposure used by typical commercial IPL systems. The temporal pulse shape is an important parameter, which may affect the biological tissue response in terms of efficacy and adverse reactions. This study investigates the effect that IPL pulse structures, namely free discharge, square pulse, close, and spaced pulse stacking, has on hair removal. The relationship between radiant exposure distribution during the IPL pulse and chromophore heating is explored and modeled for hair follicles and the epidermis using a custom Monte Carlo computer simulation. Consistent square pulse and close pulse stacking delivery of radiant exposure across the IPL pulse is shown to generate the most efficient specific heating of the target chromophore, whilst sparing the epidermis, compared to free discharge and pulse stacking pulse delivery. Free discharge systems produced the highest epidermal temperature in the model. This study presents modeled thermal data of a hair follicle in situ, indicating that square pulse IPL technology may be the most efficient and the safest method for photoepilation. The investigation also suggests that the square pulse system design is the most efficient, as energy is not wasted during pulse exposure or lost through interpulse delay times of stacked pulses.

  12. Treatment of established colon carcinoma-bearing mice by dendritic cells pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING MinGang; ZHEN QiuHong; LIU Sheng; GONG FuSheng; XIE YunQing

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of dendritic cells pulsed with lysates of heat-treated CT26 colon carcinoma cells. Bone marrow-derived DCs were pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells and were used to immunize BALB/c mice with established colon carcinoma. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response was detected. The therapeutic effect induced by DCs was observed by tumor weight and survival time. DCs pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells markedly induced specific cytotoxic activity of CTLs. Tumor growth in the immunized BALB/c mice was significantly inhibited and the survival time of the tumor-bearing mice was prolonged, DCs pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells have an observable therapeutic effect on established colon carcinoma-bearing mice.

  13. Treatment of established colon carcinoma-bearing mice by dendritic cells pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of dendritic cells pulsed with lysates of heat-treated CT26 colon carcinoma cells. Bone marrow-derived DCs were pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells and were used to immunize BALB/c mice with established colon carcinoma. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response was detected. The therapeutic effect induced by DCs was observed by tumor weight and survival time. DCs pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells markedly induced specific cytotoxic activity of CTLs. Tumor growth in the immunized BALB/c mice was significantly inhibited and the survival time of the tumor-bearing mice was prolonged. DCs pulsed with lysates of heat-treated tumor cells have an observable therapeutic effect on established colon carcinoma-bearing mice.

  14. Substrate heating measurements in pulsed ion beam film deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tallant, D.R. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Dept.; Thompson, M.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) films have been deposited at Los Alamos National Laboratory by pulsed ion beam ablation of graphite targets. The targets were illuminated by an intense beam of hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen ions at a fluence of 15-45 J/cm{sup 2}. Ion energies were on the order of 350 keV, with beam current rising to 35 kA over a 400 ns ion current pulse. Raman spectra of the deposited films indicate an increasing ratio of sp{sup 3} to sp{sup 2} bonding as the substrate is moved further away from the target and further off the target normal. Using a thin film platinum resistor at varying positions, we have measured the heating of the substrate surface due to the kinetic energy and heat of condensation of the ablated material. This information is used to determine if substrate heating is responsible for the lack of DLC in positions close to the target and near the target normal. Latest data and analysis will be presented.

  15. The effect of pulsed electric fields on carotenoids bioaccessibility: The role of tomato matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Francesca; Verkerk, Ruud; Mastwijk, Hennie; Anese, Monica; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Capuano, Edoardo

    2018-02-01

    Tomato fractions were subjected to pulsed electric fields treatment combined or not with heating. Results showed that pulsed electric fields and heating applied in combination or individually induced permeabilization of cell membranes in the tomato fractions. However, no changes in β-carotene and lycopene bioaccessibility were found upon combined and individual pulsed electric fields and heating, except in the following cases: (i) in tissue, a significant decrease in lycopene bioaccessibility upon combined pulsed electric fields and heating and heating only was observed; (ii) in chromoplasts, both β-carotene and lycopene bioaccessibility significantly decreased upon combined pulsed electric fields and heating and pulsed electric fields only. The reduction in carotenoids bioaccessibility was attributed to modification in chromoplasts membrane and carotenoids-protein complexes. Differences in the effects of pulsed electric fields on bioaccessibility among different tomato fractions were related to tomato structure complexity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Pulse Parameters on Weld Quality in Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Kamal; Pal, Surjya K.

    2011-08-01

    The weld quality comprises bead geometry and its microstructure, which influence the mechanical properties of the weld. The coarse-grained weld microstructure, higher heat-affected zone, and lower penetration together with higher reinforcement reduce the weld service life in continuous mode gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Pulsed GMAW (P-GMAW) is an alternative method providing a better way for overcoming these afore mentioned problems. It uses a higher peak current to allow one molten droplet per pulse, and a lower background current to maintain the arc stability. Current pulsing refines the grains in weld fusion zone with increasing depth of penetration due to arc oscillations. Optimum weld joint characteristics can be achieved by controlling the pulse parameters. The process is versatile and easily automated. This brief review illustrates the effect of pulse parameters on weld quality.

  17. Dependence of core heating properties on heating pulse duration and intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Sunahara, Atsushi; Cai, Hongbo; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Mima, Kunioki

    2009-11-01

    In the cone-guiding fast ignition, an imploded core is heated by the energy transport of fast electrons generated by the ultra-intense short-pulse laser at the cone inner surface. The fast core heating (˜800eV) has been demonstrated at integrated experiments with GEKKO-XII+ PW laser systems. As the next step, experiments using more powerful heating laser, FIREX, have been started at ILE, Osaka university. In FIREX-I (phase-I of FIREX), our goal is the demonstration of efficient core heating (Ti ˜ 5keV) using a newly developed 10kJ LFEX laser. In the first integrated experiments, the LFEX laser is operated with low energy mode (˜0.5kJ/4ps) to validate the previous GEKKO+PW experiments. Between the two experiments, though the laser energy is similar (˜0.5kJ), the duration is different; ˜0.5ps in the PW laser and ˜ 4ps in the LFEX laser. In this paper, we evaluate the dependence of core heating properties on the heating pulse duration on the basis of integrated simulations with FI^3 (Fast Ignition Integrated Interconnecting) code system.

  18. Oxygen determination in oxides by the method of pulse heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasserman, A.M.; Bulanova, E.A.; Kunin, L.L. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Geokhimii i Analiticheskoj Khimii)

    1982-10-01

    An equipment and technique for determination of oxygen in oxides (a variant of reduction melting method), based on multiple pulse heating of samples of 2-5 mg mass in double graphite capsules in the flow of a gas-carrier (argon) is developed. The technique consists of three stages: oxygen evolution from samples in the form of carbon oxide, the oxide oxidation to dioxide and measuring the carbon dioxide quantity using a gas analyzer. The minimum temperature during the first pulse heating is determined by the oxide strength but it necessarily should be above 1200 deg C, so that oxygen could evolve in the form of CO. The maximum temperature depends on the form and material of a graphite resistor and usually exceeds 3000 deg C. The correctness of the technique is tested using the analysis of pure oxides Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Y/sub 3/Fe/sub 5/O/sub 12/ with the composition similar to a stoichiometric one. A relative standard deviation makes up 0.002-0.003. The duration of analysis per sample is 20-30 minutes.

  19. Pulse Mask Controlled HFAC Resonant Converter for high efficiency Industrial Induction Heating with less harmonic distortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Booma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses about the fixed frequency pulse mask control based high frequency AC conversion circuit for industrial induction heating applications. Conventionally, for induction heating load, the output power control is achieved using the pulse with modulation based converters. The conventional converters do not guarantee the zero voltage switching condition required for the minimization of the switching losses. In this paper, pulse mask control scheme for the power control of induction heating load is proposed. This power control strategy allows the inverter to operate closer to the resonant frequency, to obtain zero voltage switching condition. The proposed high frequency AC power conversion circuit has lesser total harmonic distortion in the supply side. Modeling of the IH load, design of conversion circuit and principle of the control scheme and its implementation using low cost PIC controller are briefly discussed. Simulation results obtained using the Matlab environment are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the pulse mask scheme. The obtained results indicate the reduction in losses, improvement in the output power and lesser harmonic distortion in the supply side by the proposed converter. The hardware results are in good agreement with the simulation results.

  20. Heat accumulation in ultra-short pulsed scanning laser ablation of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Franziska; Michalowski, Andreas; Kiedrowski, Thomas; Nolte, Stefan

    2015-01-26

    High average laser powers can have a serious adverse impact on the ablation quality in ultra-short pulsed laser material processing of metals. With respect to the scanning speed, a sharp transition between a smooth, reflective and an uneven, dark ablated surface is observed. Investigating the influence of the sample temperature, it is experimentally shown that this effect stems from heat accumulation. In a numerical heat flow simulation, the critical scanning speed indicating the change in ablation quality is determined in good agreement with the experimental data.

  1. Pulse accumulation, radial heat conduction, and anisotropic thermal conductivity in pump-probe transient thermoreflectance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Aaron J; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Gang

    2008-11-01

    The relationship between pulse accumulation and radial heat conduction in pump-probe transient thermoreflectance (TTR) is explored. The results illustrate how pulse accumulation allows TTR to probe two thermal length scales simultaneously. In addition, the conditions under which radial transport effects are important are described. An analytical solution for anisotropic heat flow in layered structures is given, and a method for measuring both cross-plane and in-plane thermal conductivities of thermally anisotropic thin films is described. As verification, the technique is used to extract the cross-plane and in-plane thermal conductivities of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. Results are found to be in good agreement with literature values.

  2. Optical Constants of Ultra-Short-Pulse Laser Heated Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Hitoki; Morikami, Hidetoshi; Ueda, Ken-Ichi; More, Richard M.

    The complex refractive index (n + ik) of ultra-short-pulse laser heated gold metal was measured with a new ellipsometric pump-probe technique. Two ratios of four different probe-beam polarizations were used to determine s- and p-reflectivity and their phase difference. In the early stage of heating, only the imaginary part of the dielectric constant ɛ(Im[ɛ] = 2nk) increased while real part of e (Re[ɛ] = n²-k²) was almost constant. This agrees with the Drude model. We observe a pause in the rise of Im[ɛ] at the boiling temperature. Beyond this point, Re[ɛ] started to change and the observed parameters disagree with the Drude theory. It was found that the parameters of the expanding plasma follow a unique trajectory in n, k space, even though time variation of Re[ɛ] and Im[ɛ] are different for various pump intensities. This means the gold remains in a unique state such as the neutral groundstate in this intensity range.

  3. Heat-affected zone of metals ablated with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Yoichi; Obara, Minoru

    2003-07-01

    The melted area is found on the surface ablated by nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses. However, the heat effect is little on the ablated surface in the case of femtosecond laser due to non-thermal ablation process. Heat-affected zone of metallic bulk crystal ablated with femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses is experimentally studied. As a result of XRD (X-ray diffraction) measurements, the XRD peak signal of the area ablated with Ti:sapphire laser becomes smaller than that of the crystalline metal sample. While the crystallinity of the metal sample is crystalline before the laser ablation, the crystallinity in the ablated area is partially changed into the amorphous form. Because the residual pulse energy that is not used for the ablation process remains, leading to the formation of thin layer of melt phase. The melt layer is abruptly cooled down not to be re-crystallized, but to transform into the amorphous form. It is evident that the area ablated with femtosecond laser is changed into the amorphous metal. Additionally XRD measurements and AR+ etching are performed alternately to measure the thickness of the amorphous layer. In the case of iron, the thickness is measured to be 1 μm approximately, therefore heat-affected zone is quite small.

  4. Efficient localized heating of silver nanoparticles by low-fluence femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H.; Sivayoganathan, M. [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Mechanical & Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Duley, W.W. [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Zhou, Y., E-mail: nzhou@uwaterloo.ca [Centre for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Mechanical & Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Obtained efficient localized heating (melting) of silver nanoparticles plasmonic structure, which is induced by the excitation of surface plasmon under femtosecond laser irradiation. • Resonance condition is not required here for surface plasmon induced efficient heating; this is different from previous studies where surface plasmon resonance is usually used to obtain enough heating generation. Compared to the previous studies of off-resonance laser heating, the laser fluence used in this study to obtain melting of silver nanoparticles is much lower, only 7.2 mJ/cm{sup 2}. • Beside surface plasmon itself induced heating, surface plasmon induced polymer shell deformation which resulted in electron and ion emission was identified to have certain contribution to the heating of silver nanoparticles plasmonic structure. - Abstract: Highly localized heating can be obtained in plasmonic nanomaterials using laser excitation but the high fluences required often produce unacceptable damage in and near irradiated components and structures. In this work we show that plasmonic nanostructures involving aggregated Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) can be heated effectively without attendant damage to the surrounding material when these structures are irradiated with many overlapping femtosecond (fs) laser pulses at very low fluence. Under these conditions, the effectiveness of heating is such that the temperature of 50 nm Ag NPs can be raised to their melting point from room temperature. Aggregates of these NPs are then observed to grow into larger spherical particles as laser heating continues. Imaging of these materials shows that the initiation of melting in individual Ag NPs depends on the local geometry surrounding each NP and on the polarization of the incident laser radiation. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations indicate that melting is triggered by localized surface plasmon (LSP)-induced electric field enhancement at “hotspots”.

  5. Recrystallization and grain growth behavior of rolled tungsten under VDE-like short pulse high heat flux loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Krieger, K.; Luo, G.-N.; Xu, H. Y.; Fu, B. Q.; Li, M.; Liu, W.

    2013-02-01

    Short pulse heat loads expected for vertical displacement events (VDEs) in ITER were applied in the high heat flux (HHF) test facility GLADIS at IPP-Garching onto samples of rolled W. Pulsed neutral beams with the central heat flux of 23 MW/m2 were applied for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 s, respectively. Rapid recrystallization of the adiabatically loaded 3 mm thick samples was observed when the pulse duration was up to 1.0 s. Grains grew markedly following recrystallization with increasing pulse length. The recrystallization temperature and temperature dependence of the recrystallized grain size were also investigated. The results showed that the recrystallization temperature of the W grade was around 2480 °C under the applied heat loading condition, which was nearly 1150 °C higher than the conventional recrystallization temperature, and the grains were much finer. A linear relationship between the logarithm of average grain size (ln d) and the inverse of maximum surface temperature (1/Tmax) was found and accordingly the activation energy for grain growth in temperature evolution up to Tmax in 1.5 s of the short pulse HHF load was deduced to be 4.1 eV. This provided an effective clue to predict the structure evolution under short pulse HHF loads.

  6. Conditions for effects of radiation pulsing

    CERN Document Server

    Trinkaus, H

    2002-01-01

    The possibility of pulsing effects on radiation damage is due to differences in the delay times of relevant defect reactions and/or to the non-linear dependence of such reactions on defect production rates. Thus, significant pulsing effects require (1) proper relationships of the internal time scales of defect production and reaction to the time scales of pulsing and (2) sufficiently large pulsing induced fluctuations in relevant microstructural variables. We show that the first condition, which we quantify by a 'relative dynamic bias', is indeed fulfilled in wide ranges of the main irradiation parameters. The second condition, quantified by an 'absolute dynamic bias', is, however, found to restrict the parameter ranges of possible pulsing effects substantially. For planned spallation neutron sources and similar accelerator driven systems facilities we find, for instance, that, in the temperature range of interest, the defect yield of one pulse (controlling the absolute dynamic bias) is much too small to allo...

  7. Eddy current pulsed phase thermography considering volumetric induction heating for delamination evaluation in carbon fiber reinforced polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruizhen; He, Yunze

    2015-06-01

    Anisotropy and inhomogeneity of carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) result in that many traditional non-destructive inspection techniques are inapplicable on the delamination evaluation. This letter introduces eddy current pulsed phase thermography (ECPPT) for CFRPs evaluation considering volumetric induction heating due to small electrical conductivity, abnormal thermal wave propagation, and Fourier analysis. The proposed methods were verified through experimental studies under transmission and reflection modes. Using ECPPT, the influence of the non-uniform heating effect and carbon fiber structures can be suppressed, and then delamination detectability can be improved dramatically over eddy current pulsed thermography.

  8. Finite heat-capacity effects in regenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waele, A. T. A. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the influence the finite heat capacity of the matrix of regenerators on the performance of cryocoolers. The dynamics of the various parameters is treated in the harmonic approximation focussing on the finite heat-capacity effects, real-gas effects, and heat conduction. It is assumed that the flow resistance is zero, that the heat contact between the gas and the matrix is perfect, and that there is no mass storage in the matrix. Based on an energy-flow analysis, the limiting temperature, temperature profiles in the regenerator, and cooling powers are calculated. The discussion refers to pulse-tube refrigerators, but it is equally relevant for Stirling coolers and GM-coolers.

  9. Effects of Combined Pulsed Electric Field and Heat Treatment on Texture Characteristics of Whey Protein Gels%脉冲电场协同加热对乳清蛋白凝胶质构特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金声琅; 殷涌光; 王莹

    2013-01-01

    By using whey protein isolate as the target, some treating conditions affecting the hardness, elasticity and water holding capacity of the whey protein gels were investigated by the single-factor experiments, among which the electric field strength, pulse numbers and heating temperature varied from 15 to 55 kV/cm, 2 to 8 and 50 to 90℃ , respectively. The research found that properties of the formed gel have shown significant change after being treated by the high intensity pulsed electric field. Compared with whey protein without effect from the high intensity pulsed electric field, the hardness, elasticity and water holding capacity of gel decreased when the electric field strength varied from 15 to 25 kV/cm, increased significantly when the electric field strength was 35 kV/cm, but decreased again when the electric field strength was 45 kV/cm. When the electric field strength was 35 kV/cm, the hardness, elasticity and water holding capacity of gel strengthened with the increase of pulse number, but the later amplification was not remarkable. When heating temperature was 80℃ , the hardness and elasticity of gel reached their best. The water holding capacity showed optimal performance when heating temperature was 70℃.%以乳清蛋白为研究对象,在电场强度15 ~ 55 kV/cm、脉冲数2~8个、水浴温度50~90℃范围内,通过单因素试验考察各因素对乳清蛋白硬度、弹性和保水性的影响.研究结果表明:乳清蛋白经高压脉冲电场作用后,所形成凝胶的性质有显著变化.与未受高压脉冲电场处理的对照样相比,凝胶硬度、弹性和保水性在电场强度15~25 kV/cm时降低,在电场强度35 kV/cm时显著提高,45 kV/cm时又降低.在电场强度35 kV/cm条件下,凝胶硬度、弹性和保水性随着脉冲数的增加而增强,但后期增幅变化不显著.凝胶硬度和弹性在水浴温度为80℃时最佳,保水性在水浴温度为70℃时最佳.

  10. Recrystallization and grain growth behavior of rolled tungsten under VDE-like short pulse high heat flux loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Y. [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Krieger, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Xu, H.Y.; Fu, B.Q.; Li, M. [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, W., E-mail: liuw@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Recrystallization temperature of a rolled W was ∼2480 °C under applied HHF loads. ► Fine grains were obtained under HHF loads with appropriate short pulse length. ► With increasing pulse length, the recrystallized grains significantly grew larger. ► A linear relationship between ln d and 1/T{sub max} was found. ► Activation energy for grain growth in T evolution up to T{sub max} in 1.5 s was obtained. -- Abstract: Short pulse heat loads expected for vertical displacement events (VDEs) in ITER were applied in the high heat flux (HHF) test facility GLADIS at IPP-Garching onto samples of rolled W. Pulsed neutral beams with the central heat flux of 23 MW/m{sup 2} were applied for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 s, respectively. Rapid recrystallization of the adiabatically loaded 3 mm thick samples was observed when the pulse duration was up to 1.0 s. Grains grew markedly following recrystallization with increasing pulse length. The recrystallization temperature and temperature dependence of the recrystallized grain size were also investigated. The results showed that the recrystallization temperature of the W grade was around 2480 °C under the applied heat loading condition, which was nearly 1150 °C higher than the conventional recrystallization temperature, and the grains were much finer. A linear relationship between the logarithm of average grain size (ln d) and the inverse of maximum surface temperature (1/T{sub max}) was found and accordingly the activation energy for grain growth in temperature evolution up to T{sub max} in 1.5 s of the short pulse HHF load was deduced to be 4.1 eV. This provided an effective clue to predict the structure evolution under short pulse HHF loads.

  11. Modulated heat pulse propagation and partial transport barriers in chaotic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    del-Castillo-Negrete, D

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of the time dependent parallel heat transport equation modeling heat pulses driven by power modulation in 3-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields are presented. The numerical method is based on the Fourier formulation of a Lagrangian-Green's function method that provides an accurate and efficient technique for the solution of the parallel heat transport equation in the presence of harmonic power modulation. The numerical results presented provide conclusive evidence that even in the absence of magnetic flux surfaces, chaotic magnetic field configurations with intermediate levels of stochasticity exhibit transport barriers to modulated heat pulse propagation. In particular, high-order islands and remnants of destroyed flux surfaces (Cantori) act as partial barriers that slow down or even stop the propagation of heat waves at places where the magnetic field connection length exhibits a strong gradient. Results on modulated heat pulse propagation in fully stochastic fields and across m...

  12. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuntao [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Dibble, Collin J. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Petrik, Nikolay G. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Smith, R. Scott [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Joly, Alan G. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Tonkyn, Russell G. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Kay, Bruce D. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Kimmel, Greg A. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352, USA

    2016-04-26

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond timescale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ~1010 K/s for temperature increases of ~100 – 200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (~5 × 109 K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-mortem analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ~ ± 3% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ~ ± 5 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces.

  13. Switching field dependence on heating pulse duration in thermally assisted magnetic random access memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papusoi, C. [Spintec, URA 2512 CEA/CNRS, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: cristian_papusoi@yahoo.com; Conraux, Y.; Prejbeanu, I.L. [Crocus Technology, 5 Robert Schumann, BP 1510, 38025 Grenoble (France); Sousa, R.; Dieny, B. [Spintec, URA 2512 CEA/CNRS, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2009-08-15

    The minimum applied field H{sub SW} required to reverse the magnetic moment of the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic storage layer of a thermally assisted magnetic random access memory (TA-MRAM) device during the application of a heating electric pulse is investigated as a function of pulse power P{sub HP} and duration {delta}. For the same power of the heating pulse P{sub HP} (or, equivalently, for the same temperature of the storage layer), H{sub SW} increases with decreasing heating time {delta}. This behavior is consistently interpreted by a thermally activated propagating domain-wall switching model, corroborated by a real-time study of switching. The increase of H{sub SW} with decreasing pulse width introduces a constraint for the minimum power consumption of a TA-MRAM where writing combines heating and magnetic field application.

  14. Pulsed Acoustic Sparker Bio-Fouling Control in Heat Transfer Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-21

    10/21/2002 1 Final Report SERDP/SEED Pulsed Acoustic Sparker Bio -Fouling Control in Heat Transfer...COVERED 00-00-2002 to 00-00-2002 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pulsed Acoustic Sparker Bio -Fouling Control in Heat Transfer Equipment 5a. CONTRACT...requirements. Furthermore, a sparker bio -controller would eliminate the requirements for hazardous materials storage. Sparkers also are economically

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of hydroxyapatite thin films on Ti-6Al-4V: effect of heat treatment on structure and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinda, G P; Shin, J; Mazumder, J

    2009-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is an attractive biomaterial that has been widely used as a coating for dental and orthopedic metal implants. In this work, HA coatings were deposited on Ti-6Al-4V substrates by laser ablation of HA targets with a KrF excimer laser. Deposition was performed at ambient temperature under different working pressures that varied from 10(-4) to 10(-1) torr of oxygen. The as-deposited films were amorphous. They were annealed at 290-310 degrees C in ambient air in order to restore the crystalline structure of HA. The coatings morphology, composition and structure were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Mechanical and adhesive properties were examined using nanoindentation and scratch tests, respectively. The stability of the HA coatings was tested under simulated physiological conditions. This study reveals that the combination of pulsed laser deposition and post-deposition annealing at 300 degrees C have the potential to produce pure, adherent, crystalline HA coatings, which show no dissolution in a simulated body fluid.

  16. Numerical Analysis of a Pulse Detonation Cross Flow Heat Load Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Naples, Andrew .; Hoke, John L.; Schauer, Fred

    2011-01-01

    A comparison between experimentally measured and numerically simulated, time-averaged, point heat transfer rates in a pulse detonation (PDE) engine is presented. The comparison includes measurements and calculations for heat transfer to a cylinder in crossflow and to the tube wall itself using a novel spool design. Measurements are obtained at several locations and under several operating conditions. The measured and computed results are shown to be in substantial agreement, thereby validating the modeling approach. The model, which is based in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is then used to interpret the results. A preheating of the incoming fuel charge is predicted, which results in increased volumetric flow and subsequent overfilling. The effect is validated with additional measurements.

  17. Single Electrode Heat Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Broers, G. H. J.

    1977-01-01

    SP, of theelectrode reaction. eta is the overvoltage at the electrode. This equation is appliedto a high temperature carbonate fuel cell. It is shown that the Peltier entropyterm by far exceeds the heat production due to the irreversible losses, and thatthe main part of heat evolved at the cathode is reabsorbed......The heat evolution at a single irreversibly working electrode is treated onthe basis of the Brønsted heat principle. The resulting equation is analogous to the expression for the total heat evolution in a galvanic cellwith the exception that –DeltaS is substituted by the Peltier entropy, Delta...

  18. Thermalization time of thin metal film heated by short pulse laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Hong-Yu; Zhang Yuan-Chong; Song Ya-Qin; Chen Dian-Yun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the hyperbolic two-step heat conduction model, using the Laplace transform and numerical inverse transform method (Riemann-sum approximation method), the thermal behaviour of thin metal films has been studied during femtosecond pulse laser heating. Also the thermalization time, which is the time for the electron gas and solid lattice to reach thermal balance, has been studied in detail. The values of thermalization time for silver (Ag), gold (Au),copper (Cu) and lead (Pb) are obtained. The effects of material parameters of the thin metal film on the thermalization time are considered for the four kinds of metals by changing one of the parameters and regarding the other parameters as constant. For a typical metal material, the order of the thermalization time is of the order of hundreds of picoseconds.The thermalization time decays exponentially with the increase of phonon-electron coupling factor or electron gas thermal conductivity, and it increases linearly with the increase of the ratio of lattice heat capacity to electron gas heat capacity. However, the relaxation time of the electron gas has very little effect on the thermalization time.

  19. Thermalization time of thin metal film heated by short pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong-Yu; Zhang, Yuan-Chong; Song, Ya-Qin; Chen, Dian-Yun

    2004-10-01

    Based on the hyperbolic two-step heat conduction model, using the Laplace transform and numerical inverse transform method (Riemann-sum approximation method), the thermal behaviour of thin metal films has been studied during femtosecond pulse laser heating. Also the thermalization time, which is the time for the electron gas and solid lattice to reach thermal balance, has been studied in detail. The values of thermalization time for silver (Ag), gold (Au), copper (Cu) and lead (Pb) are obtained. The effects of material parameters of the thin metal film on the thermalization time are considered for the four kinds of metals by changing one of the parameters and regarding the other parameters as constant. For a typical metal material, the order of the thermalization time is of the order of hundreds of picoseconds. The thermalization time decays exponentially with the increase of phonon-electron coupling factor or electron gas thermal conductivity and it increases linearly with the increase of the ratio of lattice heat capacity to electron gas heat capacity. However, the relaxation time of the electron gas has very little effect on the thermalization time.

  20. Heating of a metal nanofilm during femtosecond laser pulse absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezhanov, S. G.; Kanavin, A. P.; Uryupin, S. A.

    2014-09-01

    We have studied the temperature evolution of electrons and the lattice of a metal nanofilm interacting with a femtosecond s- or p-polarised pulse. It is shown that even if the film thickness is greater than the skin-layer depth, the temperature distribution during the pulse action may be close to the uniform one because of the high electron thermal conductivity, which leads to a rapid redistribution of energy over the film thickness.

  1. Time-resolved, local temperature measurements during pulsed laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappes, Ralf S; Li Chen; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Gutmann, Jochen S, E-mail: kappes@mpip-mainz.mpg.d [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    To analyse processes during laser heating, one needs to be able to measure temperatures of about 1000 K within one microsecond and with micrometre resolution. To achieve this accuracy, we set up a high-performance optical detection system with a microsecond gated camera in combination with selected interference filters to detect the thermal emission spectrum in the visible range. By fitting the emission spectrum to Planck's law, we are able to collect an area temperature profile for time intervals as short as one microsecond. Thus we can show that a polymer film, which is doped with an organic dye for energy conversion, can reach temperatures of at least 900 K, which is high above its 'normal' decomposition temperature. It is, furthermore, possible to relate the temperature to the effect of the laser beam on the polymer film.

  2. Heat Transfer Experiments on a Pulse Detonation Driven Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    in this experiment was to determine the design for the heat exchanger. Utilizing heat transfer principals ( Incropera , et al. 2007) a spreadsheet...flow is attained from a source ( Incropera , et al. 2007). From these numbers, q is calculated:  , ,hg,in hg,outq T Thg in hg outp pm C C  Eq...convection and radiation calculations for PDC tube and heat exchanger The following formulas and methods ( Incropera , et al. 2007) were used in

  3. Influence of heat processing on the bioaccessibility of zinc and iron from cereals and pulses consumed in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemalatha, Sreeramaiah; Platel, Kalpana; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2007-01-01

    Influence of heat processing on the bioaccessibility of zinc and iron from food grains consumed in India was evaluated. Cereals - rice (Oryza sativa), finger millet (Eleusine coracana), sorghum (Sorghum vulgare), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and maize (Zea mays), and pulses - chickpea (Cicer arietinum) - whole and decorticated, green gram (Phaseolus aureus) - whole and decorticated, decorticated black gram (Phaseolus mungo), decorticated red gram (Cajanus cajan), cowpea (Vigna catjang), and French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) were examined for zinc and iron bioaccessibility by employing an in vitro dialysability procedure. Both pressure-cooking and microwave heating were tested for their influence on mineral bioaccessibility. Zinc bioaccessibility from food grains was considerably reduced upon pressure-cooking, especially in pulses. Among cereals, pressure-cooking decreased zinc bioaccessibility by 63% and 57% in finger millet and rice, respectively. All the pressure-cooked cereals showed similar percent zinc bioaccessibility with the exception of finger millet. Bioaccessibility of zinc from pulses was generally lower as a result of pressure-cooking or microwave heating. The decrease in bioaccessibility of zinc caused by microwave heating ranged from 11.4% in chickpea (whole) to 63% in cowpea. Decrease in zinc bioaccessibility was 48% in pressure-cooked whole chickpea, 45% and 55% in pressure-cooked or microwave-heated whole green gram, 32% and 22% in pressure-cooked or microwave-heated decorticated green gram, and 45% in microwave-heated black gram. Iron bioaccessibility, on the other hand, was significantly enhanced generally from all the food grains studied upon heat treatment. Thus, heat treatment of grains produced contrasting effect on zinc and iron bioaccessibility.

  4. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuntao; Dibble, Collin J; Petrik, Nikolay G; Smith, R Scott; Joly, Alan G; Tonkyn, Russell G; Kay, Bruce D; Kimmel, Greg A

    2016-04-28

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond time scale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation, and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ∼10(10) K/s for temperature increases of ∼100-200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (∼5 × 10(9) K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-heating analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ∼±2.7% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ∼±4.4 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces.

  5. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuntao; Dibble, Collin J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Joly, Alan G.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kay, Bruce D.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2016-04-01

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond time scale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation, and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ˜1010 K/s for temperature increases of ˜100-200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (˜5 × 109 K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-heating analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ˜±2.7% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ˜±4.4 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces.

  6. Pulse-Width Dependence of the Cooling Effect on Sub-Micrometer ZnO Spherical Particle Formation by Pulsed-Laser Melting in a Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaki, Shota; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Yoshie; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2017-05-05

    Sub-micrometer spherical particles can be synthesized by irradiating particles in a liquid with a pulsed laser (pulse width: 10 ns). In this method, all of the laser energy is supposed to be spent on particle heating because nanosecond heating is far faster than particle cooling. To study the cooling effect, sub-micrometer spherical particles are fabricated by using a pulsed laser with longer pulse widths (50 and 70 ns). From the increase in the laser-fluence threshold for sub-micrometer spherical particle formation with increasing pulse width, it is concluded that the particles dissipate heat to the surrounding liquid, even during several tens of nanoseconds of heating. A particle heating-cooling model considering the cooling effect is developed to estimate the particle temperature during laser irradiation. This model suggests that the liquid surrounding the particles evaporates, and the generated vapor films suppress heat dissipation from the particles, resulting in efficient heating and melting of the particles in the liquid. In the case of small particle sizes and large pulse widths, the particles dissipate heat to the liquid without forming such vapor films. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. The Effect of Chirped Intense Femtosecond Laser Pulses on the Argon Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ghaforyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with atomic Argon clusters has been investigated by using nanoplasma model. Based on the dynamic simulations, ionization process, heating, and expansion of a cluster after irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses at intensities up to 2 × 1017 Wcm−2 are studied. The analytical calculation provides ionization rate for different mechanisms and time evolution of the density of electrons for different pulse shapes. In this approach, the strong dependence of laser intensity, pulse duration, and laser shape on the electron energy, the electron density, and the cluster size is presented using the intense chirped laser pulses. Based on the presented theoretical modifications, the effect of chirped laser pulse on the complex dynamical process of the interaction is studied. It is found that the energy of electrons and the radius of cluster for the negatively chirped pulses are improved up to 20% in comparison to the unchirped and positively chirped pulses.

  8. The effect of pulsed electric fields on carotenoids bioaccessibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, Francesca; Verkerk, Ruud; Mastwijk, Hennie; Anese, Monica; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Capuano, Edoardo

    2018-01-01

    Tomato fractions were subjected to pulsed electric fields treatment combined or not with heating. Results showed that pulsed electric fields and heating applied in combination or individually induced permeabilization of cell membranes in the tomato fractions. However, no changes in β-carotene and

  9. High-temperature potentiometry: modulated response of ion-selective electrodes during heat pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumbimuni-Torres, Karin Y; Thammakhet, Chongdee; Galik, Michal; Calvo-Marzal, Percy; Wu, Jie; Bakker, Eric; Flechsig, Gerd-Uwe; Wang, Joseph

    2009-12-15

    The concept of locally heated polymeric membrane potentiometric sensors is introduced here for the first time. This is accomplished in an all solid state sensor configuration, utilizing poly(3-octylthiophene) as the intermediate layer between the ion-selective membrane and underlying substrate that integrates the heating circuitry. Temperature pulse potentiometry (TPP) gives convenient peak-shaped analytical signals and affords an additional dimension with these sensors. Numerous advances are envisioned that will benefit the field. The heating step is shown to give an increase in the slope of the copper-selective electrode from 31 to 43 mV per 10-fold activity change, with a reproducibility of the heated potential pulses of 1% at 10 microM copper levels and a potential drift of 0.2 mV/h. Importantly, the magnitude of the potential pulse upon heating the electrode changes as a function of the copper activity, suggesting an attractive way for differential measurement of these devices. The heat pulse is also shown to decrease the detection limit by half an order of magnitude.

  10. Analysis of the cryogenic system behavior for pulsed heat load in EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L. B.; Zhuang, M.; Zhou, Z. W.; Xia, G. H.

    2014-01-01

    EAST is the first full superconducting fusion device. The plasma is confined by the magnetic fields generated from a large set of superconducting magnets which are made of cable in-conduit conductor (CICC). In operation, these magnets suffer heat loads from thermal and nuclear radiation from the surrounding components and plasma as well as the eddy currents and the AC losses generated within the magnets, together with the heat conduction through supports and the resistive heat generated at the current lead transiting to room temperature. The cryogenic system of our EAST consists of a 2kW/4K helium refrigerator and a distribution system for the cooling of poloidal field (PF) and toroidal field (TF) coils, structures, thermal shields, buslines and current leads. Pulsed heat load is the main difference between the cryogenic system of a full superconducting Tokamak system and other large scale cryogenic systems. The cryogenic system operates in a pulsed heat loads mode requiring the helium refrigerator to remove periodically large heat loads in time. At the same time, the cryogenic system parameters such as helium cooling superconducting magnets, helium refrigerator and helium distribution system are changing. In this paper, the variation range of the parameters of superconducting magnets and refrigerator has been analyzed in the typical plasma discharge mode. The control scheme for the pulsed loads characteristics of the cryogenic system has been proposed, the implementation of which helps to smooth the pulse loads and to improve the stability of the operation of the cryogenic system.

  11. Determination of the stochastic layer width induced by magnetic perturbations via heat pulse experiments in ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brida, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany); Lunt, T.; Wischmeier, M.; Birkenmeier, G.; Faitsch, M.; Fischer, R.; Kurzan, B.; Schubert, M.; Sieglin, B.; Suttrop, W.; Wolfrum, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Cahyna, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics CAS, v.v.i. Prague (Czech Republic); Feng, Y. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Collaboration: the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic Perturbations (MP) are studied on a number of tokamaks, due to their mitigating effect on Edge Localized Modes (ELMs), which pose a serious risk for the plasma facing components. MPs can lead to the creation of a stochastic layer in the plasma edge. Theory predicts, however, that the plasma screens the MP field, but the measurement of this screening effect remains elusive. In this contribution we present an experimental approach to measure the stochastic layer width, by the localized deposition of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating pulses in the edge region. Simulations with the 3D transport code EMC3-Eirene for ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) indicate that the propagation time to the target decreases with decreasing screening. A corresponding heat pulse L-mode experiment on AUG was carried out where no decrease of the propagation time between the case with and without MPs could be measured within the error bars, indicating strong screening.

  12. Study on mitigation of pulsed heat load for ITER cryogenic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, N.; Xiong, L. Y.; Jiang, Y. C.; Tang, J. C.; Liu, L. Q.

    2015-03-01

    One of the key requirements for ITER cryogenic system is the mitigation of the pulsed heat load deposited in the magnet system due to magnetic field variation and pulsed DT neutron production. As one of the control strategies, bypass valves of Toroidal Field (TF) case helium loop would be adjusted to mitigate the pulsed heat load to the LHe plant. A quasi-3D time-dependent thermal-hydraulic analysis of the TF winding packs and TF case has been performed to study the behaviors of TF magnets during the reference plasma scenario with the pulses of 400 s burn and repetition time of 1800 s. The model is based on a 1D helium flow and quasi-3D solid heat conduction model. The whole TF magnet is simulated taking into account thermal conduction between winding pack and case which are cooled separately. The heat loads are given as input information, which include AC losses in the conductor, eddy current losses in the structure, thermal radiation, thermal conduction and nuclear heating. The simulation results indicate that the temperature variation of TF magnet stays within the allowable range when the smooth control strategy is active.

  13. Plasma Sloshing in Pulse-heated Solar and Stellar Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, F.

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence that coronal heating is highly intermittent, and flares are the high energy extreme. The properties of the heat pulses are difficult to constrain. Here, hydrodynamic loop modeling shows that several large amplitude oscillations (˜20% in density) are triggered in flare light curves if the duration of the heat pulse is shorter than the sound crossing time of the flaring loop. The reason for this is that the plasma does not have enough time to reach pressure equilibrium during heating, and traveling pressure fronts develop. The period is a few minutes for typical solar coronal loops, dictated by the sound crossing time in the decay phase. The long period and large amplitude make these oscillations different from typical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. This diagnostic can be applied both to observations of solar and stellar flares and to future observations of non-flaring loops at high resolution.

  14. Plasma sloshing in pulse-heated solar and stellar coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Reale, F

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that coronal heating is highly intermittent, and flares are the high energy extreme. The properties of the heat pulses are difficult to constrain. Here hydrodynamic loop modeling shows that several large amplitude oscillations (~ 20% in density) are triggered in flare light curves if the duration of the heat pulse is shorter that the sound crossing time of the flaring loop. The reason is that the plasma has not enough time to reach pressure equilibrium during the heating and traveling pressure fronts develop. The period is a few minutes for typical solar coronal loops, dictated by the sound crossing time in the decay phase. The long period and large amplitude make these oscillations different from typical MHD waves. This diagnostic can be applied both to observations of solar and stellar flares and to future observations of non-flaring loops at high resolution.

  15. Laser pulse heating of nuclear fuels for simulation of reactor power transients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C S Viswanadham; K C Sahoo; T R G Kutty; K B Khan; V P Jathar; S Anantharaman; Arun Kumar; G K Dey

    2010-12-01

    It is important to study the behaviour of nuclear fuels under transient heating conditions from the point of view of nuclear safety. To simulate the transient heating conditions occurring in the known reactor accidents like loss of coolant accident (LOCA) and reactivity initiated accident (RIA), a laser pulse heating system is under development at BARC, Mumbai. As a prelude to work on irradiated nuclear fuel specimens, pilot studies on unirradiated UO2 fuel specimens were carried out. A laser pulse was used to heat specimens of UO2 held inside a chamber with an optically transparent glass window. Later, these specimens were analysed by metallography and X-ray diffraction. This paper describes the results of these studies.

  16. Membrane Heating in Living Tissues Exposed to Nonthermal Pulsed EM Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Pierro, V; Croce, R P; Pinto, I M

    2014-01-01

    A bio tissue model consisting of multilayer spherical cells including four nested radial domains (nucleus, nuclear membrane, cytoplasm and plasma membrane) is worked out to derive the cell heating dynamics in presence of membrane capacitance dispersion under pulsed electromagnetic exposure. Two possible cases of frequency-dependent membrana models are discussed: plasma and nuclear membranes are dispersive, only the nuclear memebrane is dispersive . In both models an high localized heating of the membranes occurs, without significant temperature rise in the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm.

  17. Importance of a finite speed of heat propagation in metals irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klossika, J. J.; Gratzke, U.; Vicanek, M.; Simon, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study theoretically the propagation of heat in a metal, due to irradiation with an ultrashort laser pulse. The target is treated in an extended two-fluid model for electrons and phonons, which accounts for a finite speed of heat propagation in the electron gas. As a result, the absorbed laser energy is more localized in the electronic system yielding an enhanced peak electron temperature.

  18. Intraband effects on ultrafast pulse propagation in semiconductor optical amplifier

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Hussain; S K Varshney; P K Datta

    2010-11-01

    High bit-rate (>10 Gb/s) signals are composed of very short pulses and propagation of such pulses through a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) requires consideration of intraband phenomena. Due to the intraband effects, the propagating pulse sees a fast recovering nonlinear gain which introduces less distortion in the pulse shape and spectrum of the output pulse but introduces a positive chirping at the trailing edge of the pulse.

  19. Heat-induced structure formation in metal films generated by single ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jürgen; Unger, Claudia; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2012-03-01

    Ultrashort pulsed lasers are increasingly used in micromachining applications. Their short pulse lengths lead to well defined thresholds for the onset of material ablation and to the formation of only very small heat affected zones, which can be practically neglected in the majority of cases. Structure sizes down to the sub-micron range are possible in almost all materials - including heat sensitive materials. Ultrashort pulse laser ablation - even though called "cold ablation" - in fact is a heat driven process. Ablation takes place after a strong and fast temperature increase carrying away most of the heat with the ablated particles. This type of heat convection is not possible when reducing the laser fluence slightly below the ablation threshold. In this case temperature decreases slower giving rise to heat-induced material deformations and melt dynamics. After cooling down protruding structures can remain - ablation-free laser surface structuring is possible. Structure formation is boosted on thin metal films and offers best reproducibility and broadest processing windows for metals with high ductility and weak electron phonon coupling strength. All approaches to understand the process formation are currently based only on images of the final structures. The pump-probe imaging investigations presented here lead to a better process understanding.

  20. The effect of chirped intense femtosecond laser pulses on the Argon cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaforyan, H; Irani, E

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with atomic Argon clusters has been investigated by using nano-plasma model. Based on the dynamic simulations, ionization process, heating and expansion of a cluster after irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses at intensities up to 2*1017 Wcm-2 are studied. The analytical calculation provides ionization ratefor different mechanisms and time evolution of the density of electrons for different pulse shapes. In this approach the strong dependence of laser intensity, pulse duration and laser shape on the electron energy, the electron density and the cluster size are presented using the intense chirped laser pulses. Based on the presented theoretical modifications, the effect of chirped laser pulse on the complex dynamical process of the interaction is studied. It is found that the energy of electrons and the radius of cluster for the negatively chirped pulsesare improved up to 20% in comparison to the unchirped and positively chirped pulses.

  1. Heating Effect On Serpentine Jades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T.-H.; Menu, M.

    2010-08-01

    Besides nephrite, serpentine is also frequently employed as a jade material in China since the Neolithic period. Translucent or opaque, serpentine presents diverse colors, including yellow-green, green, dark green, and tan, which are related to its chemical composition and occasionally to its associated sub-major minerals. Serpentine could be subjected to color change due to secondary alterations or weathering. In this study, we mainly focus on the heating effect on serpentine, as some ancient serpentine jades may have been exposed to heat for some different reasons, such as carving, funeral ceremony or imitating. A series of non-heated and heat-treated raw serpentine jades are examined using Raman spectroscopy and other complementary methods. The subtle change of molecular structure and color of serpentine due to the heat treatment is reported in detail.

  2. Passivation of organic light emitting diode anode grid lines by pulsed Joule heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janka, M.; Gierth, R.; Rubingh, J.E.; Abendroth, M.; Eggert, M.; Moet, D.J.D.; Lupo, D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the self-aligned passivation of a current distribution grid for an organic light emitting diode (OLED) anode using a pulsed Joule heating method to align the passivation layer accurately on the metal grid. This method involves passing an electric current through the grid to cure a polymer

  3. Production and characterization of transient heat and particle pulses in Pilot-PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielinski, J. J.; Al, R.; van der Meiden, H.; Melissen, W.; Rapp, J.; De Temmerman, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report on the generation of high transient heat and particle fluxes in Pilot-PSI. A capacitor bank (8400 mu F, 37.8 kJ) is coupled to the plasma source to superimpose the pulsed plasma on the top of steady-state plasma beam. Discharge currents up to 11.6 kA were reached correspondin

  4. Passivation of organic light emitting diode anode grid lines by pulsed Joule heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janka, M.; Gierth, R.; Rubingh, J.E.; Abendroth, M.; Eggert, M.; Moet, D.J.D.; Lupo, D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the self-aligned passivation of a current distribution grid for an organic light emitting diode (OLED) anode using a pulsed Joule heating method to align the passivation layer accurately on the metal grid. This method involves passing an electric current through the grid to cure a polymer

  5. Catalytic graphitization of wood-based carbons with alumina by pulse current heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hata, T; Ishimaru, K; Fujisawa, M; Bronsveld, P; Vystavel, T; De Hosson, J; Kikuchi, H; Nishizawa, T; Imamura, Y

    2005-01-01

    Japanese cedar was preheated at 500 degrees C and subsequently mixed with 40 mu m Al2O3 particles. A pulse current heating method was used for a 5-min carbonization step under a pressure of 50MPa in order to promote the graphitization at temperatures between 2000 and 2200 degrees C. The samples were

  6. Electron-phonon nonequilibrium during ultrashort pulsed laser heating of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew Neil

    2001-10-01

    Ultrashort pulsed lasers have repeatedly been demonstrated as an effective tool for the observation of transport properties on atomistic time and length scales. Accordingly, the number of applications of these types of lasers as diagnostic tools is rapidly increasing. To effectively use these tools, precise knowledge of the energy deposition mechanism is absolutely necessary. The accepted model for ultrashort pulsed laser heating is the ``Two Temperature Model'' which assumes equilibrium electron and phonon distributions that are not in equilibrium with each other. Recently the applicability of the ``Two Temperature Model'' has received some scrutiny for very low and very high intensity application. This model gave rise to the electron-phonon coupling factor, which, when combined with the temperature difference between the two systems, represents the rate of energy transfer for small perturbations in temperature. However, numerous applications use moderate to high intensity ultrashort pulses, which create far more than small perturbations in temperature. In this investigation the temperature dependence of the electron-phonon coupling factor, electron heat capacity, and thermal conductivity are examined for significant changes in the electron temperature. Experimental results are presented for transient thermoreflectance data taken at moderate fluences. A significant discrepancy is apparent between the two temperature model and the experimental data taken on Au. This problem was originally thought to arise from increased electron- phonon coupling for moderate changes in the electron temperature. Investigation into the temperature dependence of the electron-phonon coupling factor did not support this hypothesis. It was discovered that the discrepancy was due to a nonlinear relationship between changes in the electron temperature and changes in reflectance. The incident probe energy used when taking the experimental data was 1.5 eV, which is significantly less than

  7. Characterization of Preferential Flow Path in Fractured Rock Using Heat-pulse Flowmeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tsai-Ping; Lin, Ming-Hsuan; Chuang, Po-Yu; Chia, Yeeping

    2015-04-01

    Rigorous thinking on how to dispose radioactive wastes safely is essential to mankind and living environment. The concepts of multiple barriers and deep geologic disposal remain the preferred option to retard the radionuclide migration in most countries. However, the investigation of preferential groundwater flow path in a fractured rock is a challenge to the characterization of potential disposal site. Heat-pulse flowmeter is a developing logging tool for measuring the vertical flow velocity in a borehole under a constant pumping or injection rate and provides a promising direct measurement method for determining the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity of formation. As heat-pulse flowmeter is a potential technique to measure low-velocity borehole flow, we adopted it to test the feasibility of detecting permeable fractures. Besides, a new magnetic tracer made by nano-iron particles is developed to identify the possible flow path precisely and to verify the permeable section detected by the heat-pulse flowmeter. The magnetic tracer was received by a magnet array and can also be detected by a sensor of electric conductivity. The test site is located in the Heshe of Taiwan. Eight wells were established in a fractured sandy siltstone for characterizing the fracture network. The test wells are 25 to 45 m depth and opened ranging from 15 to 45 m. Prior to the heat-pulse flowmeter measurement, we also performed surface geological investigation, pumping test, geophysical logging, and salt tracer test. Field measurements using heat-pulse flowmeter were then conducted at a constant pumping rate. The measurement interval is 50 to 100 cm in depth but improved to 25 cm near the relatively permeable zone. Based on the results of heat-pulse flowmeter, several permeable sections were identified. The magnetic tracer tests were then conducted to verify the potential preferential flow pathway between adjacent wells. Test results indicated that water flow in borehole is

  8. Heat transfer mechanisms during short-pulse laser heating of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, T.Q.; Tien, C.L. (Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States))

    1993-11-01

    This work studies heat transfer mechanisms during ultrafast laser heating of metals from a microscopic point of view. The heating process is composed of three processes: the deposition of radiation energy on electrons, the transport of energy by electrons, and the heating of the material lattice through electron-lattice interactions. The Boltzmann transport equation is used to model the transport of electrons and electron lattice interactions. The scattering term of the Boltzmann equation is evaluated from quantum mechanical considerations, which shows the different contributions of the elastic and inelastic electron-lattice scattering processes on energy transport. By solving the Boltzmann equation, a hyperbolic two-step radiation heating model is rigorously established. It reveals the hyperbolic nature of energy flux carried by electrons and the nonequilibrium between electrons and the lattice during fast heating processes. Predictions from the current model agree with available experimental data during subpicosecond laser heating. 20 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Passivation of organic light emitting diode anode grid lines by pulsed Joule heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janka, M.; Gierth, R.; Rubingh, J.-E.; Abendroth, M.; Eggert, M.; Moet, D. J. D.; Lupo, D.

    2015-09-01

    We report the self-aligned passivation of a current distribution grid for an organic light emitting diode (OLED) anode using a pulsed Joule heating method to align the passivation layer accurately on the metal grid. This method involves passing an electric current through the grid to cure a polymer dielectric. Uncured polymer is then rinsed away, leaving a patterned dielectric layer that conforms to the shape of the grid lines. To enhance the accuracy of the alignment, heat conduction into the substrate and the transparent electrode is limited by using short current pulses instead of a constant current. Excellent alignment accuracy of the dielectric layer on printed metal grid lines has been achieved, with a typical 4-μm dielectric overhang. In addition to good accuracy, pulsed Joule heating significantly cuts down process time and energy consumption compared to heating with a constant current. The feasibility of using a printed current distribution grid and Joule heating was demonstrated in an OLED device.

  10. Computer program for pulsed thermocouples with corrections for radiation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    A pulsed thermocouple was used for measuring gas temperatures above the melting point of common thermocouples. This was done by allowing the thermocouple to heat until it approaches its melting point and then turning on the protective cooling gas. This method required a computer to extrapolate the thermocouple data to the higher gas temperatures. A method that includes the effect of radiation in the extrapolation is described. Computations of gas temperature are provided, along with the estimate of the final thermocouple wire temperature. Results from tests on high temperature combustor research rigs are presented.

  11. Effects of Beam Size and Pulse Duration on the Laser Drilling Process

    CERN Document Server

    Afrin, Nazia; Chen, J K; Zhang, Yuwen

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional axisymmetric transient laser drilling model is used to analyze the effects of laser beam diameter and laser pulse duration on the laser drilling process. The model includes conduction and convection heat transfer, melting, solidification and vaporization, as well as material removal resulting from the vaporization and melt ejection. The validated model is applied to study the effects of laser beam size and pulse duration on the geometry of the drilled hole. It is found that the ablation effect decrease with the increasing beam diameter due to the effect of increased vaporization rate, and deeper hole is observed for the larger pulse width due to the higher thermal ablation efficiency.

  12. Time-resolved soft X-ray core-level photoemission spectroscopy at 880 °C using the pulsed laser and synchrotron radiation and the pulse heating current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abukawa, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yukawa, R.; Kanzaki, S.; Mukojima, K.; Matsuda, I.

    2017-02-01

    We developed a time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy system for tracking the temporal variation in an electronic state of a heated sample. Our pump-probe method used laser and synchrotron radiation pulses on a silicon surface that was heated by a synchronized pulse current that did not interfere with the measurements. The transient surface photovoltage effect on the Si 2p core spectra was measured from room temperature to 880 °C and was found to be consistent with the thermal carrier distributions in silicon crystals at the corresponding temperatures. This versatile technique may have applications studying molecular dynamics on high temperature surfaces such as in catalytic reactions.

  13. Plasma heating effects during laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, G. K.; Dixon, R. D.

    Laser welding is a relatively low heat input process used in joining precisely machined components with minimum distortion and heat affects to surrounding material. The CO2 (10.6 (MU)m) and Nd-YAG (1.06 (MU)m) lasers are the primary lasers used for welding in industry today. Average powers range up to 20 kW for CO2 and 400 W for Nd-YAG with pulse lengths of milliseconds to continuous wave. Control of the process depends on an understanding of the laser-plasma-material interaction and characterization of the laser beam being used. Inherent plasma formation above the material surface and subsequent modulation of the incident laser radiation directly affect the energy transfer to the target material. The temporal and spatial characteristics of the laser beam affect the available power density incident on the target, which is important in achieving repeatability in the process. Other factors such as surface texture, surface contaminants, surface chemistry, and welding environment affect plasma formation which determines the weld penetration. This work involves studies of the laser-plasma-material interaction process and particularly the effect of the plasma on the coupling of laser energy to a material during welding. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser was used with maximum average power of 400 W.

  14. Influence of pulsed laser heating on morphological relaxation of surface ripples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khenner, M

    2005-07-01

    A continuum (Mullins-type) model is proposed for the nonisothermal, isotropic evolution of a crystal surface on which mass transport occurs by surface diffusion. The departure from constant temperature is assumed induced by incident pulsed radiation. It has been shown experimentally and theoretically [see, e.g., Yakunkin, High Temp. 26, 585 (1988); Yilbas and Kalyon, J. Phys. D. 34, 222 (2001)] that such a heating mode gives rise to the quasistationary regime, in which the surface temperature of a thick solid film oscillates about the mean value with the pulse repetition frequency. The implications of oscillatory driving with high frequency values on relaxation of surface ripples are examined; in particular, the traveling wave solutions with decreasing amplitude are detected numerically. Pulsed heating also results in faster smoothing of the ripple, compared to the case when the surface is at constant temperature which is same as the mean temperature in the pulsed heating mode. Impact on ripple shape is minor for ripple amplitudes considered.

  15. Working group summary report on effects of pulsed operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, T.A. [Oak Ridge Natinonal Lab., TN (United States); Ni, L. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villingen (Switzerland)

    1996-06-01

    In a short pulsed spallation neutron source, extremely high energy ({approx_gt}1 GeV) proton beam pulses are injected into a liquid metal target in a very short period of time ({approximately}1 {mu}sec) at a high repetition rate ({approximately}50 Hertz). The beam energy will be deposited in the target materials (such as mercury or lead) and converted into heat. It causes a sudden temperature rise and resulting pressure wave. This pressure wave travels through the liquid, reaches the steel container wall and may possibly lead to material damage due to induced stress. Almost all participants agreed that the shock problem due to the short pulse operation in the liquid metal target could be serious and could present a challenging problem. It was determined that the following points need to be addressed: (1) equation of state for mercury (2) code validation and benchmark experiments (3) shock effects on the entire target system (4) two phase flow by gas injection. All these investigations should be carried out in the framework of international cooperation. Two small scaled Hg pressure pulse tests are planned at ORNL to provide insight into the pressure wave propagation and thermal shock effects. One experiment will use exploding wires to generate the pulse pressure, the other the electron beam at ORELA. Also PSI, LANL, CERN (ISOLDE facility), INR and IPPE could contribute to the experimental methods for producing shock. The necessary R&D for bubble injection might be performed at PSI, RIGA, ORNL or Ben-Gurion University. All of the above experiments can possibly yield benchmarking data which is absolutely necessary for code validation.

  16. Terahertz generation in GaN diodes operating in pulsed regime limited by self-heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, E. A.; Sokolov, V. N.; Kim, K. W.; Trew, R. J.

    2009-06-01

    The conditions for pulsed regime operation of terahertz power generation in vertical nanoscale GaN-based diodes are investigated via self-consistent simulation of the high-field electron transport in the active channel and thermal transport in the entire device structure. The combined electrothermal model allows for a detailed analysis of the dynamical local distributions of the electric field, drift-velocity, and lattice temperature. We show that stable generation is achievable with a self-heating limited output power of 2.25 W at an operation frequency of 0.71 THz for a pulse width of 3 ns with a few tens of nanosecond duty cycle.

  17. Transient temperature of liquid on micro metal layer heated by pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Zhang, Zhengfang; Liu, Dengying

    1999-06-01

    In this paper the transient temperature of liquid on micro metal layer heated by pulsed high energy laser is simulated by numerical method, especially around the theoretical homogeneous boiling point(THBP). The relationship between temperature rising rate and laser fluence is obtained; and under different temperature rising rate the distributions of temperature in liquid and metal around the THBP are obtained. With numerical simulation the relation between the temperature rising rate and laser parameters (fluence and pulse width) is known and so in the future the rapid transient boiling phenomenon could be studied and analyzed.

  18. Transient Temperature of Liquid on Micro Metal Layer Heated by Pulsed Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiJi; ZhangZhengfangtffu

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the transient temperature of liquid on micro metal layer heated by pulsed high energy laser is simulated by numerical method ,especially around the theoretical homogeneous boiling point (THBP),The relationship between temperature rising rate and laser fluence is obtained;and under different temperature rising rate the distributions of temperature in liquid and metal around the THBP are obtained.With numerical simulation the relation between the temperature rising rate and laser parameters(fluence and pulse width)is known and so in the future the rapid transient boiling phenomenon could be studed and analyzed.

  19. Contact printing for direct metallic pattern transfer based on pulsed infrared laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Hung; Lee, Yung-Chun

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports a novel contact printing method which can transfer patterned metallic films directly from a mold to a substrate, based on applied contact pressure and infrared pulse laser heating. Experiments have been carried out using a 1064 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method. Chromium (Cr) films of 70 nm thickness with both array-dot patterns and linear grating patterns of typically 500 nm feature sizes are successfully transferred. The transferred Cr patterns can serve as an etching mask for the subsequent etching on the substrate. The potential for applying this method to nano-patterning and nano-fabrication is addressed.

  20. A single-probe heat pulse method for estimating sap velocity in trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bernal, Álvaro; Testi, Luca; Villalobos, Francisco J

    2017-10-01

    Available sap flow methods are still far from being simple, cheap and reliable enough to be used beyond very specific research purposes. This study presents and tests a new single-probe heat pulse (SPHP) method for monitoring sap velocity in trees using a single-probe sensor, rather than the multi-probe arrangements used up to now. Based on the fundamental conduction-convection principles of heat transport in sapwood, convective velocity (Vh ) is estimated from the temperature increase in the heater after the application of a heat pulse (ΔT). The method was validated against measurements performed with the compensation heat pulse (CHP) technique in field trees of six different species. To do so, a dedicated three-probe sensor capable of simultaneously applying both methods was produced and used. Experimental measurements in the six species showed an excellent agreement between SPHP and CHP outputs for moderate to high flow rates, confirming the applicability of the method. In relation to other sap flow methods, SPHP presents several significant advantages: it requires low power inputs, it uses technically simpler and potentially cheaper instrumentation, the physical damage to the tree is minimal and artefacts caused by incorrect probe spacing and alignment are removed. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Bifurcation physics of magnetic islands and stochasticity explored by heat pulse propagation studies in toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Yoshinuma, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Narushima, Y.; Evans, T. E.; Ohdachi, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, K.

    2016-09-01

    Bifurcation physics of a magnetic island was investigated using the heat pulse propagation technique produced by the modulation of electron cyclotron heating. There are two types of bifurcation phenomena observed in a large helical device (LHD) and DIII-D. One is a bifurcation of the magnetic topology between nested and stochastic fields. The nested state is characterized by the bi-directional (inward and outward) propagation of the heat pulse with slow propagation speed. The stochastic state is characterized by the fast propagation of the heat pulse with electron temperature flattening. The other bifurcation is between the magnetic island with larger thermal diffusivity and that with smaller thermal diffusivity. The damping of toroidal flow is observed at the O-point of the magnetic island both in helical plasmas and in tokamak plasmas during a mode locking phase with strong flow shears at the boundary of the magnetic island. Associated with the stochastization of the magnetic field, the abrupt damping of toroidal flow is observed in LHD. The toroidal flow shear shows a linear decay, while the ion temperature gradient shows an exponential decay. This observation suggests that this flow damping is due to the change in the non-diffusive term of momentum transport.

  2. Effect of orientation on heat transfer in pulsating heat pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naumova A. M.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental research of orientation effect on heat transfer characteristics of a pulsating heat pipe (PHP. It is shown that transport of either mass or heat depends on PHP orientation against it`s axis. As a consequence of comparing experimental data with other authors’ results it was concluded that PHP thermal resistance depends not only on orientation but on some other determinal factors such as device construction and thermophysical properties of heat carrier.

  3. Effects of pulse-to-pulse residual species on discharges in repetitively pulsed discharges through packed bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszelnicki, Juliusz; Engeling, Kenneth W.; Foster, John E.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in packed bed reactors (PBRs) are being investigated for conversion of toxic and waste gases, and CO2 removal. These discharges are repetitively pulsed having varying flow rates and internal geometries, which results in species from the prior pulse still being in the discharge zone at the time the following discharge pulse occurs. A non-negligible residual plasma density remains, which effectively acts as preionization. This residual charge changes the discharge properties of subsequent pulses, and may impact important PBR properties such as chemical selectivity. Similarly, the residual neutral reactive species produced during earlier pulses will impact the reaction rates on subsequent pulses. We report on results of a computational investigation of a 2D PBR using the plasma hydrodynamics simulator nonPDPSIM. Results will be discussed for air flowing though an array of dielectric rods at atmospheric pressure. The effects of inter-pulse residual species on PBR discharges will be quantified. Means of controlling the presence of residual species in the reactor through gas flow rate, pulse repetition, pulse width and geometry will be described. Comparisons will be made to experiments. Work supported by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  4. Ultrafast laser pulse heating of metallic photocathodes and its contribution to intrinsic emittance

    CERN Document Server

    Maxson, J; Cultrera, L; Karkare, S; Padmore, H

    2016-01-01

    The heating of the electronic distribution of a copper photocathode is calculated under the two-temperature model for ultrafast laser illumination with fluences typical for use in RF photoinjectors. Using the finite temperature-extended relations for the photocathode intrinsic emittance and quantum efficiency, the time-dependent emittance growth due to this laser heating is calculated. This laser heating is seen to limit the intrinsic emittance achievable for photoinjectors using short laser pulses and low quantum efficiency metal photocathodes. A pump-probe photocathode experiment in a standard 1.6 cell S-band gun is proposed, in which simulations show the time dependent thermal emittance modulation from the laser heating can persist for meters downstream and, in principle, be measured using a slice emittance diagnostic.

  5. An Optimal Control Approach for an Overall Cryogenic Plant Under Pulsed Heat Loads

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez Palacin, Luis; Blanco Viñuela, Enrique; Maekawa, Ryuji; Chalifour, Michel

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the optimal management of a cryogenic plant composed by parallel refrigeration plants, which provide supercritical helium to pulsed heat loads. First, a data reconciliation approach is proposed to estimate precisely the refrigerator variables necessary to deduce the efficiency of each refrigerator. Second, taking into account these efficiencies, an optimal operation of the system is proposed and studied. Finally, while minimizing the power consumption of the refrigerators, the control system maintains stable operation of the cryoplant under pulsed heat loads. The management of the refrigerators is carried out by an upper control layer, which balances the relative production of cooling power in each refrigerator. In addition, this upper control layer deals with the mitigation of malfunctions and faults in the system. The proposed approach has been validated using a dynamic model of the cryoplant developed with EcosimPro software, based on first principles (mass and energy balances) and the...

  6. Study of rapid transient explosive boiling under short-pulsed laser heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Renxi; HUAI Xiulan; LIU Dengying

    2004-01-01

    Using acetone, ethanol, water and acetone-water mixture as test liquids, the rapid transient explosive boiling (RTEB) taking place under short-pulsed laser heating is observed in experiment. The behaviors of temperature variation are investigated via transient temperature measurement. The vapor bubble behaviors of RTEB are captured by high-speed photography, and the difference between RTEB and normal boiling is analyzed. The boiling heat transfer of RTEB is also discussed. It shows that the character of RTEB is far different from normal boiling.

  7. Synthesis of cubic Y zeolite using a pulsed microwave heating system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araújo L.R.G. de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Cubic Y zeolite were successfully synthesized using microwave heating for 18 - 25 min, whereas 10 - 50 h are required by hydrothermal heating technique depending upon the lattice Si/Al ratio. To this end, we used a commercial microwave oven modified in order to provide pulsed microwave pumping on the synthesis mixtures. The obtained samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, BET surface area and infrared spectroscopy measurements. As a result, we verify that Y zeolite samples obtained from hydrogels containing low aluminum contents, present a good degree of crystallinity and then can be suitable for using in adsorption and catalysis experiments.

  8. Birefringence effects of short probe pulses of electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshkov, Oleg M.; Kochetkova, Anastasia E.; Budyak, Victoria V.

    2016-04-01

    The numerical simulation results of radiations evolution in the presence of electromagnetically induced transparency for J=0-->J=1-->J=2 scheme of degenerate quantum transitions are presented. The pulse regime of wave interaction with Doppler broadening spectral lines was investigated. It was indicated that when the control field is linear polarized, the input circular polarized probe pulse breaks up in the medium into pulses with mutually perpendicular linear polarizations. Polarization direction of one of these pulses coincides with the polarization direction of control fields. The distance, which probe pulse passes in the medium to its full separation, decreases, when input probe pulse duration or control field intensity decreases. The input probe pulse intensity variation almost does not influence separation distance and speed of the linear polarized probe pulses in the medium. The effects, described above, may be interpreted as the birefringence effects of electromagnetically induced transparency in the case of short probe pulse.

  9. SYNTHESIS OF ZnO NANOPARTICLES WITH NARROW SIZE DISTRIBUTION UNDER PULSED MICROWAVE HEATING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongjun He

    2004-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticles with very narrow size distribution were synthesized by coupling homogeneous precipitation with microemulsion under pulsed microwave heating. The conditions of preparing ZnO nanoparticles were investigated. The products were characterized with DTA, TGA, XRD, TEM and UV-Vis. The synthesized ZnO nanopartices had much stronger ultraviolet absorptivity than normal ZnO powders; the average size of products was sensitive to the variation of the power or duration of microwave irradiation.

  10. Nonequilibrium heating and cooling of metals under action of supershort laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libenson, Mikhail N.

    2001-06-01

    It is considered photo-excitation, non-equilibrium heating and thermal after-action induced by super-short laser pluses interacting with metals. It is shown that classical model of thermal laser-induced destruction of metals should be corrected in the case when pulse duration is much less than characteristic time of energy transfer from electrons to the lattice. In particular, possible important role of laser- induced electric-physical processes should be taken into account.

  11. Measurement and simulation of Joule heating during treatment of B-16 melanoma tumors in mice with nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliquett, Uwe; Nuccitelli, Richard

    2014-12-01

    Experimental evidence shows that nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) trigger apoptosis in skin tumors. We have postulated that the energy delivered by nsPEF is insufficient to impart significant heating to the treated tissue. Here we use both direct measurements and theoretical modeling of the Joule heating in order to validate this assumption. For the temperature measurement, thermo-sensitive liquid crystals (TLC) were used to determine the surface temperature while a micro-thermocouple (made from 30 μm wires) was used for measuring the temperature inside the tissue. The calculation of the temperature distribution used an asymptotic approach with the repeated calculation of the electric field, Joule heating and heat transfer, and the subsequent readjustment of the electrical tissue conductivity. This yields a temperature distribution both in space and time. It can be shown that for the measured increase in temperature an unexpectedly high electrical conductivity of the tissue would be required, which was indeed found by using voltage and current monitoring during the experiment. Using impedance measurements within t(after)=50 μs after the pulse revealed a fast decline of the high conductivity state when the electric field ceases. The experimentally measured high conductance of a skin fold (mouse) between plate electrodes was about 5 times higher than those of the maximally expected conductance due to fully electroporated membrane structures (G(max)/G(electroporated))≈5. Fully electroporated membrane structure assumes that 100% of the membranes are conductive which is estimated from an impedance measurement at 10 MHz where membranes are capacitively shorted. Since the temperature rise in B-16 mouse melanoma tumors due to equally spaced (Δt=2 s) 300 ns-pulses with E=40 kV/cm usually does not exceed ΔΤ=3 K at all parts of the skin fold between the electrodes, a hyperthermic effect on the tissue can be excluded.

  12. Multiple pulse-heating experiments with different current to determine total emissivity, heat capacity, and electrical resistivity of electrically conductive materials at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiromichi; Yamashita, Yuichiro

    2012-01-01

    A modified pulse-heating method is proposed to improve the accuracy of measurement of the hemispherical total emissivity, specific heat capacity, and electrical resistivity of electrically conductive materials at high temperatures. The proposed method is based on the analysis of a series of rapid resistive self-heating experiments on a sample heated at different temperature rates. The method is used to measure the three properties of the IG-110 grade of isotropic graphite at temperatures from 850 to 1800 K. The problem of the extrinsic heating-rate effect, which reduces the accuracy of the measurements, is successfully mitigated by compensating for the generally neglected experimental error associated with the electrical measurands (current and voltage). The results obtained by the proposed method can be validated by the linearity of measured quantities used in the property determinations. The results are in reasonably good agreement with previously published data, which demonstrate the suitability of the proposed method, in particular, to the resistivity and total emissivity measurements. An interesting result is the existence of a minimum in the emissivity of the isotropic graphite at around 1120 K, consistent with the electrical resistivity results.

  13. Effect of Metal Proximity on a Pulsed Copper Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, H. K.; Schaffner, D. A.; Brown, M. R.; Kaur, M.; Fiedler-Kawaguchi, C.

    2016-10-01

    Generating and accelerating plasma in a stainless steel chamber affects the magnetic fields inside. These effects will decrease the field due to a pulsed coil (which will later be used to accelerate plasma) inside the chamber. This work is being done in conjunction with the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment. Both facilities are collaborating in an attempt to accelerate and compress plasma as part of ARPA-E's Accelerating Low-Cost Plasma Heating and Assembly (ALPHA) program. Measurements of the impact of the chamber on the coil's magnetic fields were made using a B-dot probe inside the coil, which was placed at incremental distances from a metal plate. As the coil is moved from the plate, the plate's interference with the field was seen to exponentially decay. This process was repeated for stainless steel, aluminum, and copper, and a range of voltages (500-800V). At least seventy percent of the original signal was recovered within two inches. Pulsing the coil inside the stainless steel chamber resulted in signals about one third the strength of those measured outside of the chamber. The results of this experiment will be used to guide development of the stainless steel pulse-coil system for the Swarthmore ALPHA project. Work supported by ARPA-E ALPHA program.

  14. Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the person's heart is pumping. Pulse ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  15. A fast and powerful release mechanism based on pulse heating of shape memory wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malka, Yoav; Shilo, Doron

    2017-09-01

    This article presents a novel actuator and a new concept for a release mechanism that are especially useful in applications that require fast motion of large masses over long distances. The actuator is based on ultra-fast pulse heating of NiTi wires, which provide a unique combination of large work per volume, short response time and enhanced energy efficiency. The release mechanism utilizes the fast and powerful actuator to form conditions in which the latch (safety pin) moves faster than the deployed device. As a result, the contact between these two masses is disconnected and the resulting friction forces are decreased to approximately zero. The actuator and release mechanism address the two major drawbacks of conventional shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators: slow actuation time and low energy efficiency. Using a dedicated setup, the experimental results validate the disconnection between the masses and map the effects of several variables on the performance of the actuator and release mechanism. In particular, we map the energetic efficiency and find the optimal operating conditions for a successful release using a minimal amount of input energy. At the optimal conditions, the actuator response time and the consumed input energy are smaller by an order of magnitude with respect to performances of previous SMA-based release mechanisms with comparable requirements.

  16. Induction time effects in pulse combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, J B; Marcus, D L; Pember, R B

    1999-04-09

    Combustion systems that take advantage of a periodic combustion process have many advantages over conventional systems. Their rate of heat transfer is greatly enhanced and their pollutant emissions are lower. They draw in their own supply of fuel and air and they are self-venting. They have few moving parts. The most common type of pulse combustor is based on a Helmholtz resonator - a burning cycle drives a resonant pressure wave, which in turn enhances the rate of combustion, resulting in a self-sustaining, large-scale oscillation. Although the basic physical mechanisms controlling such a process were explained by Rayleigh over a century ago, a full understanding of the operation of a pulse combustor still does not exist. The dominant processes in such a system--combustion, turbulent fluid dynamics, acoustics--are highly coupled and interact nonlinearly, which has reduced the design process to a costly and inefficient trial-and-error procedure. Several recent numerical and experimental studies, however, have been focused towards a better understanding of the basic underlying physics. Barr et al. [l] have elucidated the relative roles of the time scales governing the energy release, the turbulent mixing, and the acoustics. Keller et al. [5] have demonstrated the importance of the phase relation between the resonant pressure field in the tailpipe and the periodic energy release. Marcus et al. [6] have developed the capability for a fully three-dimensional simulation of the reacting flow in a pulse combustor. This paper is an application of that methodology to a detailed investigation of the frequency response of the model to changes in the chemical kinetics. The methodology consists of a fully conservative second-order Godunov algorithm for the inviscid, reacting gas dynamics equations coupled to an adaptive mesh refinement procedure[2]. The axisymmetric and three-dimensional simulations allow us to explore in detail the interaction between the transient fluid

  17. Application of low frequency pulsed ohmic heating for inactivation of foodborne pathogens and MS-2 phage in buffered peptone water and tomato juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Soon; Choi, Won; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to inactivate foodborne pathogens effectively by ohmic heating in buffered peptone water and tomato juice without causing electrode corrosion and quality degradation. Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes were used as representative foodborne pathogens and MS-2 phage was used as a norovirus surrogate. Buffered peptone water and tomato juice inoculated with pathogens were treated with pulsed ohmic heating at different frequencies (0.06-1 kHz). Propidium iodide uptake values of bacterial pathogens were significantly (p heating is applicable to inactivate foodborne pathogens effectively without causing electrode corrosion and quality degradation in tomato juice.

  18. Method for Estimating Harmonic Frequency Dependence of Diffusion Coefficient and Convective Velocity in Heat Pulse Propagation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Itoh, Kimitaka; Ida, Katsumi; Inagaki, Sigeru; Itoh, Sanae-I.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we propose a new set of formulae for estimating the harmonic frequency dependence of the diffusion coefficient and the convective velocity in the heat pulse propagation experiment in order to investigate the transport hysteresis. The assumptions that are used to derive the formulae can result in dummy frequency dependences of the transport coefficients. It is shown that these dummy frequency dependences of the transport coefficients can be distinguished from the true frequency dependence due to the transport hysteresis by using a bidirectional heat pulse propagation manner, in which both the outward propagating heat pulse and the inward propagating heat pulse are analyzed. The validity of the new formulae are examined in a simple numerical calculation.

  19. Observations of infrared radiation during disruptions in TEXTOR: heat pulses and runaway electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaspers, R. [FOM Instituut voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Grewe, T. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Finken, K.H. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kraemer-Flecken, A. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Lopes Cardozo, N.J. [FOM Instituut voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Mank, G. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Waidmann, G. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    1995-04-01

    Disruptions are studied in TEXTOR using two infrared cameras. In the thermal quench phase, fast changing heat fluxes are observed, each delivering energies larger than 1 kJ/m{sup 2} to the limiter. These bursts are correlated with an electron temperature pulse near the limiter and an increased release of impurities. Further bursts are observed in the current decay phase. For the first time a disruption generated beam of runaway electrons, accelerated in about 10 ms to about 20 MeV, is observed inside the plasma by the infrared synchrotron radiation. This beam carries a current of about 20 kA and is lost within approximately 100 {mu}s. The heat deposition on the limiter due to the runaways is comparable to the power flux by the heat bursts. ((orig.)).

  20. QUALITY TESTING OF HEAT TREATMENT OF MEDIUM-CARBON STEEL CONSTRUCTION ITEMS BASED ON THE BIPOLAR PULSED REMAGNETIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Matyuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The features of bipolar pulsed remagnetization of construction medium-carbon steel items for testing the heat treatment temperature and structure of these items are discussed, the methods of bipolar pulse remagnetization providing testing of items of considered steels are suggested.

  1. Limits of applicability of a two-temperature model under nonuniform heating of metal by an ultrashort laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, D. S.; Yakovlev, E. B.

    2015-10-01

    The heating of metals (silver and aluminium) by ultrashort laser pulses is analysed proceeding from a spatially nonuniform kinetic equation for the electron distribution function. The electron subsystem thermalisation is estimated in a wide range of absorbed pulse energy density. The limits of applicability are determined for the two-temperature model.

  2. Pulse Mitigation and Heat Transfer Enhancement Techniques. Volume 5. Transient Liquid Movement in Heat Pipe Wicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    pipe wall. This is not likely to be the case in the thin wicks used in most heat pipes unless severe dryout occurs. Eninger [7] studied the capillary...balance on a randomly oriented fibecr. The theoretical model required an empirical constant obtained from the experimental results. Eninger also 6...structure was utilized for this experimpnt. The two-component wick structure was utilized previously by Eninger [7], who was able to measure slight

  3. Application of Quasi-Heat-Pulse Solutions for Luikov’s Equations of Heat and Moisture Transfer for Calibrating and Utilizing Thermal Properties Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Dietenberger; Charles R. Boardman

    2014-01-01

    Several years ago the Laplace transform solutions of Luikov’s differential equations were presented for one-dimensional heat and moisture transfer in porous hydroscopic orthotropic materials for the boundary condition of a gradual heat pulse applied to both surfaces of a flat slab. This paper presents calibration methods and data for the K-tester 637 (Lasercomp),...

  4. Effects of chirp of pump pulses on broadband terahertz pulse spectra generated by optical rectification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamazaki, Junichi; Furusawa, Kentaro; Sekine, Norihiko; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Hosako, Iwao

    2016-11-01

    The effects of the chirp of the pump pulse in broadband terahertz (THz) pulse generation by optical rectification (OR) in GaP were systematically investigated. It was found that the pre-compensation for the dispersion of GaP is important for obtaining smooth and single-peaked THz spectra as well as high power-conversion efficiency. It was also found that an excessive amount of chirp leads to distortions in THz spectra, which can be quantitatively analyzed by using a simple model. Our results highlight the importance of accurate control over the chirp of the pump pulse for generating broadband THz pulses by OR.

  5. Heat-affected zone in microdrilling of metals by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audouard, E.; LeHarzic, R.; Huot, Nicolas; Laporte, Pierre; Valette, S.; Fourtunier, R.

    2002-09-01

    Several works on laser-matter interaction has shown the differences in sizes for the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) obtained with nanosecond and femtosecond regimes in laser cutting or drilling. To understand more clearly the basic phenomena that occur in femtosecond regime during the absorption of light by matter, and specially in the case of metals, we have developed both an experimental and a theoretical approach. We use a new method aimed at quantifying the dimensions of the HAZ, using thin-down samples which are micro-drilled and then observed by a transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) technique. The grain size in the samples is analysed near the micro-holes. According to theoretical studies, the thermal diffusion is due to the smaller value of the electron specific heat compared to the lattice one. The thermal diffusion length is found to be a few hundred of nanometers in the case of metals. We use a thermal model to describe the heat diffusion in the sample in order to obtain a theoretical estimation of the HAZ. Holes are drilled in Aluminum using nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses and characterized by Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM). The method for quantifying the dimensions of the heat affected zone (HAZ) surrounding micro-holes is based on the analyze of the grain size evolution. The experiments are using the same Ti-Sapphire laser source (1 kHz, 800 nm). The regeneratively amplified ultra-short pulses (150 fs) are utilized at a low fluence regime (typically 0.01-0.5 mJ/pulse), while the longer pulses (ns) are obtained from the regenerative amplifier without oscillator seeding (0.5 mJ,τ approximately 7-8 ns). The main conclusion is that a 40 micrometers wide HAZ is induced by nanosecond pulses, whereas the femtosecond regime does not produce any TEM observable HAZ. It has to be noticed that the width of the femtosecond HAZ is roughly less than 2 micrometers , which is our observation limit. These results are in agreement with theoretical

  6. Preparation of Gd2O3 Ultrafine Nanoparticles by Pulse Electrodeposition Followed by Heat-treatment Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Aghazadeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gd2O3 nanoparticles were prepared by a two–step process; cathodic electrodeposition followed by heat-treatment method. First, Gd(OH3 nanoparticles was galvanostatically deposited from nitrate bath on the steel substrate by pulse current (PC mode. The deposition experiments was conducted at a typical on-time and off-time (ton=1ms and toff=1ms for 60 min. The electrodeposited precursor was then heat-treated at 600 oC for 3h to obtain oxide product (i.e. Gd2O3. The morphological and structural analyses confirmed that the gadolinium hydroxynitrate nanoparticles with composition of [Gd(OH2.5(NO30.5 yH2O] and uniform size about 10 nm have been prepared during pulse cathodic electrodeposition process. Furthermore, mechanism of the gadolinium hydroxynitrate nanoparticles was explained based on the base (OH– electrogeneration process on the cathode surface. The morphological observations by SEM and TEM, and structural analyses via XRD and FT-IR revealed that the oxide product is composed of well-dispersed Gd2O3 nanoparticles with pure cubic crystalline structure. It was observed that the calcination process has no effect on the morphology of the Gd2O3 nanoparticles. Mechanism of oxide formation during heat-treatment step was investigated by DSC-TG analysis and discussed in detail. The results of this work showed that pulse current deposition followed by heat–treatment can be recognized as an easy and facile method for preparation of the Gd2O3 fine nanoparticles.

  7. Pulsed-Current Electrochemical Codeposition and Heat Treatment of Ti-Dispersed Ni-Matrix Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janetaisong, Pathompong; Boonyongmaneerat, Yuttanant; Techapiesancharoenkij, Ratchatee

    2016-08-01

    An electrochemical deposition is a fast and cost-efficient process to produce film or coating. In this research, Ni-Ti electrodeposition is developed by codepositing a Ti-dispersed Ni-matrix layer from a Ni-plating solution suspended with Ti particles. To enhance the coating uniformity and control the atomic composition, the pulsed current was applied to codeposit Ni-Ti layers with varying pulse duty cycles (10 to 100 pct) and frequencies (10 to 100 Hz). The microstructures and compositions of the codeposited layers were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray fluorescent techniques. The pulsed current significantly improved the quality of the Ni-Ti layer as compared to a direct current. The Ni-Ti layers could be electroplated with a controlled composition within 48 to 51 at. pct of Ti. The optimal pulse duty cycle and frequency are 50 pct and 10 Hz, respectively. The standalone Ni-49Ti layers were removed from copper substrates by selective etching method and subsequently heat-treated under Ar-fed atmosphere at 1423 K (1150 °C) for 5 hours. The phase and microstructures of the post-annealed samples exhibit different Ni-Ti intermetallic compounds, including NiTi, Ni3Ti, and NiTi2. Yet, the contamination of TiN and TiO2 was also present in the post-annealed samples.

  8. Synthesis of substituted lithium ferrites under the pulsed and continuous electron beam heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenko, Elena N.; Surzhikov, Anatoliy P.; Vlasov, Vitaliy A.; Nikolaev, Evgeniy V.; Malyshev, Andrey V.; Bryazgin, Alexandr A.; Korobeynikov, Mikhail V.; Mikhailenko, Mikhail A.

    2017-02-01

    Synthesis of substituted lithium ferrites with chemical formulas Li0.6Fe2.2Ti0.2O4 and Li0.649Fe1.598Ti0.5Zn0.2Mn0.051O4 under the pulsed and continuous electron beam heating was investigated by X-ray diffraction and thermomagnetometric analysis. The electron beams heating of Li2CO3-Fe2O3-TiO2 or Li2CO3-ZnO-Fe2O3-TiO2-MnO mixtures was carried out at a temperature of 750 °C during 60 min using two types of electron accelerators: ELV accelerator generating continuous electron beam or ILU-6 accelerator generating pulse electron beam. It was established that a high energy electron beam heating of initial reagents mixtures allows obtaining the substituted lithium ferrites with final composition at significantly lower temperatures (at least 200 °C lower than in the case of using traditional thermal synthesis) and times of synthesis. That statement is in agreement with results obtained by XRD analysis, showing single phase formation; by magnetic measurements, showing high values of specific magnetization; by DTG measurements showing the certain Curie temperatures of the synthesized samples.

  9. Transient thermal and nonthermal electron and phonon relaxation after short-pulsed laser heating of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E., E-mail: phopkins@virginia.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2015-12-07

    Several dynamic thermal and nonthermal scattering processes affect ultrafast heat transfer in metals after short-pulsed laser heating. Even with decades of measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, the role of thermal vs. nonthermal electron and phonon scattering on overall electron energy transfer to the phonons remains unclear. In this work, we derive an analytical expression for the electron-phonon coupling factor in a metal that includes contributions from equilibrium and nonequilibrium distributions of electrons. While the contribution from the nonthermal electrons to electron-phonon coupling is non-negligible, the increase in the electron relaxation rates with increasing laser fluence measured by thermoreflectance techniques cannot be accounted for by only considering electron-phonon relaxations. We conclude that electron-electron scattering along with electron-phonon scattering have to be considered simultaneously to correctly predict the transient nature of electron relaxation during and after short-pulsed heating of metals at elevated electron temperatures. Furthermore, for high electron temperature perturbations achieved at high absorbed laser fluences, we show good agreement between our model, which accounts for d-band excitations, and previous experimental data. Our model can be extended to other free electron metals with the knowledge of the density of states of electrons in the metals and considering electronic excitations from non-Fermi surface states.

  10. Transient thermal and nonthermal electron and phonon relaxation after short-pulsed laser heating of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-12-01

    Several dynamic thermal and nonthermal scattering processes affect ultrafast heat transfer in metals after short-pulsed laser heating. Even with decades of measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, the role of thermal vs. nonthermal electron and phonon scattering on overall electron energy transfer to the phonons remains unclear. In this work, we derive an analytical expression for the electron-phonon coupling factor in a metal that includes contributions from equilibrium and nonequilibrium distributions of electrons. While the contribution from the nonthermal electrons to electron-phonon coupling is non-negligible, the increase in the electron relaxation rates with increasing laser fluence measured by thermoreflectance techniques cannot be accounted for by only considering electron-phonon relaxations. We conclude that electron-electron scattering along with electron-phonon scattering have to be considered simultaneously to correctly predict the transient nature of electron relaxation during and after short-pulsed heating of metals at elevated electron temperatures. Furthermore, for high electron temperature perturbations achieved at high absorbed laser fluences, we show good agreement between our model, which accounts for d-band excitations, and previous experimental data. Our model can be extended to other free electron metals with the knowledge of the density of states of electrons in the metals and considering electronic excitations from non-Fermi surface states.

  11. Enhancement of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Heating by Short-Pulse Generated Cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Yoshizawa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A target tissue can be thermally coagulated in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU treatment noninvasively. HIFU thermal treatments have been clinically applied to various solid tumors. One of the problems in HIFU treatments is a long treatment time. Acoustically driven microbubbles can accelerate the ultrasonic heating, resulting in the significant reduction of the treatment time. In this paper, a method named “trigger HIFU exposure” which employs cavitation microbubbles is introduced and its results are reviewed. A trigger HIFU sequence consists of high-intensity short pulses followed by moderate-intensity long bursts. Cavitation bubbles induced in a multiple focal regions by rapidly scanning the focus of high-intensity pulses enhanced the temperature increase significantly and produced a large coagulation region with high efficiency.

  12. Electron-lattice kinetics of metals heated by ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkovsky, L. A.; Mishchenko, E. G.

    1999-01-01

    We propose a kinetic model of transient nonequilibrium phenomena in metals exposed to ultrashort laser pulses when heated electrons affect the lattice through direct electron-phonon interaction. This model describes the destruction of a metal under intense laser pumping. We derive the system of equations for the metal, which consists of hot electrons and a cold lattice. Hot electrons are described with the help of the Boltzmann equation and equation of thermoconductivity. We use the equations of motion for lattice displacements with the electron force included. The lattice deformation is estimated immediately after the laser pulse up to the time of electron temperature relaxation. An estimate shows that the ablation regime can be achieved.

  13. [Arc spectrum diagnostic and heat coupling mechanism analysis of double wire pulsed MIG welding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-qiang; Li, Huan; Yang, Li-jun; Zheng, Kai; Gao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A double wire pulsed MIG welding test system was built in the present paper, in order to analyze the heat-coupling mechanism of double wire pulsed MIG welding, and study are temperature field. Spectroscopic technique was used in diagnostic analysis of the are, plasma radiation was collected by using hollow probe method to obtain the arc plasma optical signal The electron temperature of double wire pulsed MIG welding arc plasma was calculated by using Boltzmann diagram method, the electron temperature distribution was obtained, a comprehensive analysis of the arc was conducted combined with the high speed camera technology and acquisition means of electricity signal. The innovation of this paper is the combination of high-speed camera image information of are and optical signal of arc plasma to analyze the coupling mechanism for dual arc, and a more intuitive analysis for are temperature field was conducted. The test results showed that a push-pull output was achieved and droplet transfer mode was a drop in a pulse in the welding process; Two arcs attracted each other under the action of a magnetic field, and shifted to the center of the arc in welding process, so a new heat center was formed at the geometric center of the double arc, and flowing up phenomenon occurred on the arc; Dual arc electronic temperature showed an inverted V-shaped distribution overall, and at the geometric center of the double arc, the arc electron temperature at 3 mm off the workpiece surface was the highest, which was 16,887.66 K, about 4,900 K higher than the lowest temperature 11,963.63 K.

  14. Effect of temperature field on solidification structure of pure Al under pulse magneto-oscillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the effect of temperature field on the Pulse Magneto-Oscillation (PMO induced solidification refinement of pure aluminium to provide more information for the industrial application of the PMO solidification technology. The temperature field is altered mainly by applied variable cooling conditions and pulse parameters. Experimental results show that the refinement effect in the case of full sand mould applied is weakened with the decreasing of cooling rate, however, in the alternative case, the sand mould whose sand bottom was replaced by a graphite block is favorable to the survival of equiaxed nucleus. The refinement mechanism is discussed in terms of the relationship between temperature field and the formation process of solidified structure. The formation or survival of nucleus depends on both temperature field and Joule heat produced by PMO, both low pulse frequency and high pulse current were experimentally confirmed to be effective; and PMO was demonstrated high potential in industrial application.

  15. Structural and phase transformations in zinc and brass wires under heating with high-density current pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervikov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The work is focused on revealing the mechanism of structure and phase transformations in the metal wires under heating with a high-density current pulse (the electric explosion of wires, EEWs). It has been demonstrated on the example of brass and zinc wires that the transition of a current pulse with the density of j ≈ 3.3 × 107 A/cm2 results in homogeneous heating of the crystalline structure of the metal/alloy. It has been determined that under heating with a pulse of high-density current pulse, the electric resistance of the liquid phases of zinc and brass decreases as the temperature increases. The results obtained allow for a conclusion that the presence of the particles of the condensed phase in the expanding products of EEW is the result of overheating instabilities in the liquid metal.

  16. Simulating Transient Effects of Pulsed Beams on Beam Intercepting Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Herta; Noah Messomo, Etam

    2011-01-01

    The development in the physics community towards higher beam power through the possibilities of particle accelerators lead to challenges for the developers of elements which are exposed to effect of particle beams (beam intercepting devices = BIDs). For the design of BIDs, the increasing heat load onto these devices due to energetic and focused beams and - in most cases - their highly pulsed nature has to be taken into account. The physics requirements are sometimes opposed to the current state of the art. As one possibility of many in combining the different aspects for these ambitious demands, two highly developed computer programs, namely FLUKA and ANSYS AUTODYN, were joined for this dissertation. The former is a widely enhanced Monte-Carlo-code which specializes on the interaction of particles with static matter, while the latter is a versatile explicit code for the simulation of highly dynamic processes. Both computer programs were developed intensively over years and are still continuously enhanced in o...

  17. Heating and ionization of metal clusters in the field of an intense femtosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostenko, O. F.; Andreev, N. E.

    2007-06-01

    Inverse bremsstrahlung heating and thermal electron-impact ionization of a metal cluster are analyzed with account for the spatial structure of the electromagnetic field. It is shown that, for a femtosecond IR radiation pulse with an intensity of ˜1018 W/cm2 and for an iron cluster with an optimum radius of ˜25 nm, the electron temperature is higher than 1 keV. In this case, the L shell of the ions is highly stripped. The X-ray bremsstrahlung yield from clusters with a radius greater than the skin depth is estimated.

  18. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental restorative materials with an ultra short pulse laser (USPL) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andreas; Wehry, Richard; Brede, Olivier; Frentzen, Matthias; Schelle, Florian

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental restoration materials following laser ablation using an Ultra Short Pulse Laser (USPL) system. Specimens of phosphate cement (PC), ceramic (CE) and composite (C) were used. Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm and a pulse length of 8 ps. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the thickness of the restoration material. A time delay for temperature increase was observed in the PC and C group. Employing the USPL system for removal of restorative materials, heat generation has to be considered.

  19. SU-E-T-558: An Exploratory RF Pulse Sequence Technique Used to Induce Differential Heating in Tissues Containing Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for a Possible Hyperthermic Adjuvant Effect to Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, S; Ionascu, D; Wilson, G [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Thapa, R [Oakland University, Rochester, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In pre-clinical trials of cancer thermotherapy, hyperthermia can be induced by exposing localized super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) to external alternating magnetic fields generated by a solenoid electrical circuit (Zhao et al., Theranostics 2012). Alternatively, an RF pulse technique implemented in a regular MRI system is explored as a possible hyperthermia induction technique . Methods: A new thermal RF pulse sequence was developed using the Philips pulse programming tool for the 3T Ingenia MRI system to provide a sinusoidal magnetic field alternating at the frequency of 1.43 kHz (multiples of sine waves of 0.7 ms period) before each excitation RF pulse for imaging. The duration of each thermal RF pulse routine was approximately 3 min, and the thermal pulse was applied multiple times to a phantom that contains different concentrations (high, medium and low) of SPION samples. After applying the thermal pulse each time, the temperature change was estimated by measuring the phase changes in the T1-weighted inversion-prepared multi-shot turbo field echo (TFE) sequence (TR=5.5 ms, TE=2.7 ms, inversion time=200 ms). Results: The phase values and relative differences among them changed as the number of applied thermal RF pulses increased. After the 5th application of the thermal RF pulse, the relative phase differences increased significantly, suggesting the thermal activation of the SPION. The increase of the phase difference was approximately linear with the SPION concentration. Conclusion: A sinusoidal RF pulse from the MRI system may be utilized to selectively thermally activate tissues containing super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

  20. Grain refinement, hardening and metastable phase formation by high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatment under heating and melting modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosdidier, T., E-mail: Thierry.grosdidier@univ-metz.f [Laboratoire d' Etude des Textures et Applications aux Materiaux (LETAM, CNRS 3143), Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France); Lab of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zou, J.X. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Textures et Applications aux Materiaux (LETAM, CNRS 3143), Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France); Bolle, B. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Textures et Applications aux Materiaux (LETAM, CNRS 3143), ENIM, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz (France); Hao, S.Z.; Dong, C. [Lab of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2010-08-15

    High current pulsed electron beam is a recently developed technique for surface modification. The pulsed electron irradiation introduces concentrated energy depositions in the thin surface layer of the treated materials, giving rise to an extremely fast heating and subsequent rapid cooling of the surface together with the formation of dynamic stress waves. Improved surface properties (hardness, corrosion resistance) can be obtained under the 'melting' mode when the top surface is melted and rapidly solidified (10{sup 7} K/s). In steels, this is essentially the result of nanostructures formed from the highly undercooled melt, melt surface purification, strain hardening induced by the thermal stress waves as well as metastable phase selections in the rapidly solidified melted layers. The use of the 'heating' mode is less conventional, combining effects of the heavy deformation and recrystallization/recovery mechanisms. A detailed analysis of a FeAl alloy demonstrates grain size refinement, hardening, solid-state enhanced diffusion and texture modification without modification of the surface geometry.

  1. Ion Acceleration via "Nonlinear Vacuum Heating" by the Laser Pulse Obliquely Incident on a Thin Foil Target

    CERN Document Server

    Yogo, A; Mori, M; Ogura, K; Esirkepov, T Zh; Pirozhkov, A S; Kanasaki, M; Sakaki, H; Fukuda, Y; Bolton, P R; Nishimura, H; Kondo, K

    2015-01-01

    Dependence of the energy of ions accelerated during interaction of the laser pulse obliquelly incident on the thin foil target on the laser polarization is studied experimentally and theoretically. We found that the ion energy being maximal for the p-polarization gradually decreases when the pulse becomes s-polarized. The experimentally found dependences of the ion energy are explained by invoking the anomalous electron heating which results in high electrostatic potential formation at the target surface. Anomalous heating of electrons beyond the energy of quiver motion in the laser field is described within the framework of theoretical model of driven oscillator with a step-like nonlinearity. We have demonstrated that the electron anomalous heating can be realized in two regimes: nonlinear resonance and stochastic heating, depending on the extent of stochasticity. We have found the accelerated ion energy scaling determined by the laser intensity, pulse duration, polarization angle and incident angle.

  2. Use of the correct heat conduction-convection equation as basis for heat-pulse sap flow methods in anisotropic wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Steppe, Kathy

    2012-05-01

    Heat-pulse methods to determine sap flux density in trees are founded on the theory of heat conduction and heat convection in an isotropic medium. However, sapwood is clearly anisotropic, implying a difference in thermal conductivity along and across the grain, and hence necessitates the theory for an anisotropic medium. This difference in thermal conductivities, which can be up to 50%, is, however, not taken into account in the key equation leading to the currently available heat-pulse methods. Despite this major flaw, the methods remain theoretically correct as they are based on derivations of the key equation, ruling out any anisotropic aspects. The importance of specifying the thermal characteristics of the sapwood according to axial, tangential or radial direction is revealed as well as referring to and using the proper anisotropic theory in order to avoid confusion and misinterpretation of thermal properties when dealing with sap flux density measurements or erroneous results when modelling heat transport in sapwood.

  3. Crystallization and thermal fatigue of ZrTiCuNiBe bulk amorphous alloys heated by laser pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The crystallization and thermal fatigue behavior of Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 bulk amorphous alloys heated by laser pulses was investigated. The results showed that crystallization occurred even below the crystallization temperature Tx in a low cycle time. Cracks appearred before or after crystallization of the heated area in the sample. The crystallization degree increased with the heating temperature and cycles. An increase in the fatigue cracks number was also observed. The plastic deformation in the heated area of the sample surface occurred, and became more pronounced with cycles and heating temperature.

  4. Tissue effects of Ho:YAG laser with varying fluences and pulse widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Sandor G.; van der Veen, Maurits J.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Shi, Wei-Qiang; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-02-01

    We investigated the effect of varying fluence and pulse width on the ablation rate and consequent thermal damage of the Ho:YAG (2.130 micrometers ) laser. The rate of ablation on fresh bovine knee joint tissues, fibrous cartilage, hyaline cartilage, and bone in saline was determined after varying the fluence (160 - 640 J/cm2) and pulse width (150, 250, 450 microsecond(s) ec, FWHM) at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. A 400/440 micrometers fiber was used. The ablation rate increased linearly with the fluence. In fibrocartilage, different pulse durations generated significant changes in the ablation rates, but showed minor effects on hyaline cartilage and bone. The heat of ablation for all three tissue types decreased after lengthening the pulse.

  5. Modelling the effects of surface water flood pulses on groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schot, P.P.; Wassen, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Flood pulses in wetlands steer ecosystem development directly through surface water processes and indirectly through the effects of the flood pulse on groundwater. Direct effects on ecosystems are exerted by e.g. inundation and deposition of sediments containing nutrients. Indirect effects include t

  6. Heat flow model for pulsed laser melting and rapid solidification of ion implanted GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeseok; Pillai, Manoj R.; Aziz, Michael J.; Scarpulla, Michael A.; Dubon, Oscar D.; Yu, Kin M.; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Ridgway, Mark C.

    2010-07-01

    In order to further understand the pulsed-laser melting (PLM) of Mn and N implanted GaAs, which we have used to synthesize thin films of the ferromagnetic semiconductor Ga1-xMnxAs and the highly mismatched alloy GaNxAs1-x, we have simulated PLM of amorphous (a-) and crystalline (c-) GaAs. We present a numerical solution to the one-dimensional heat equation, accounting for phase-dependent reflectivity, optical skin depth, and latent heat, and a temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and specific heat. By comparing the simulations with experimental time-resolved reflectivity and melt depth versus laser fluence, we identify a set of thermophysical and optical properties for the crystalline, amorphous, and liquid phases of GaAs that give reasonable agreement between experiment and simulation. This work resulted in the estimation of thermal conductivity, melting temperature and latent heat of fusion of a-GaAs of 0.008 W/cm K at 300 K, 1350 K, and 2650 J/cm3, respectively. These materials properties also allow the prediction of the solidification velocity of crystalline and ion-amorphized GaAs.

  7. Finite element modeling of heating phenomena of cracks excited by high-intensity ultrasonic pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhao-Jiang; Zheng Jiang; Zhang Shu-Yi; Mi Xiao-Bing; Zheng Kai

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional thermo-mechanical coupled finite element model is built up to simulate the phenomena of dynamical contact and frictional heating of crack faces when the plate containing the crack is excited by high-intensity ultrasonic pulses. In the finite element model, the high-power ultrasonic transducer is modeled by using a piezoelectric thermal-analogy method, and the dynamical interaction between both crack faces is modeled using a contact-impact theory. In the simulations, the frictional heating taking place at the crack faces is quantitatively calculated by using finite element thermal-structural coupling analysis, especially, the influences of acoustic chaos to plate vibration and crack heating are calculated and analysed in detail Meanwhile, the related ultrasonic infrared images are also obtained experimentally, and the theoretical simulation results are in agreement with that of the experiments. The results show that, by using the theoretical method, a good simulation of dynamic interaction and friction heating process of the crack faces under non-chaotic or chaotic sound excitation can be obtained.

  8. Urban Heat Island Effect Actions - Neighborhood Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisville Metro Government — The urban heat island effect — defined as the difference in temperature between the core of Louisville and its suburbs — contributes to heat-related illnesses and...

  9. Experimental study of the influence of cold heat exchanger geometry on the performance of a co-axial pulse tube cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaomin; Dai, Wei; Wang, Xiaotao; Vanapalli, S.; Luo, Ercang

    2016-09-01

    Improving the performance of the pulse tube cooler is one of the important objectives of the current studies. Besides the phase shifters and regenerators, heat exchangers also play an important role in determining the system efficiency and cooling capacity. A series of experiments on a 10 W @ 77 K class co-axial type pulse tube cooler with different cold heat exchanger geometries are presented in this paper. The cold heat exchangers are made from a copper block with radial slots, cut through using electrical discharge machining. Different slot widths varying from 0.12 mm to 0.4 mm and different slot numbers varying from around 20-60 are investigated, while the length of cold heat exchangers are kept the same. The cold heat exchanger geometry is classified into three groups, namely, constant heat transfer area, constant porosity and constant slot width. The study reveals that a large channel width of 0.4 mm (about ten times the thermal penetration depth of helium gas at 77 K, 100 Hz and 3.5 MPa) shows poor performance, the other results show complicated interaction effects between slot width and slot number. These systematic comparison experiments provide a useful reference for selecting a cold heat exchanger geometry in a practical cooler.

  10. Pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy: fast gas heating and active particle production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    The results of a numerical study on kinetic processes initiated by a pulsed nanosecond discharge in air at high specific deposited energy, when the dissociation degree of oxygen molecules is high, are presented. The calculations of the temporal dynamics of the electron concentration, density of atomic oxygen, vibrational distribution function of nitrogen molecules, and gas temperature agree with the experimental data. It is shown that quenching of electronically excited states of nitrogen N2(B3Πg), N2(C3Πu), N2(a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) by oxygen molecules leads to the dissociation of O2. This conclusion is based on the comparison of calculated dynamics of atomic oxygen in air, excited by a pulsed nanosecond discharge, with experimental data. In air plasma at a high dissociation degree of oxygen molecules ([O]/[O2] > 10%), relaxation of the electronic energy of atoms and molecules in reactions with O atoms becomes extremely important. Active production of NO molecules and fast gas heating in the discharge plasma due to the quenching of electronically excited N2(B3Πg, C3Πu, a‧1 Σ \\text{u}- ) molecules by oxygen atoms is notable. Owing to the high O atom density, electrons are effectively detached from negative ions in the discharge afterglow. As a result, the decay of plasma in the afterglow is determined by electron-ion recombination, and the electron density remains relatively high between the pulses. An increase in the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules at the periphery of the plasma channel at time delay t = 1-30 μs after the discharge is obtained. This is due to intense gas heating and, as a result, gas-dynamic expansion of a hot gas channel. Vibrationally excited N2(v) molecules produced near the discharge axis move from the axial region to the periphery. Consequently, at the periphery the vibrational temperature of nitrogen molecules is increased.

  11. Simulation study on thermal effect of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yao; Jin, Guangyong; Yuan, Boshi

    2016-10-01

    Laser machining is one of most widely used technologies nowadays and becoming a hot industry as well. At the same time, many kinds of carbon fiber material have been used in different area, such as sports products, transportation, microelectronic industry and so on. Moreover, there is lack of the combination research on the laser interaction with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) material with simulation method. In this paper, the temperature status of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP will be simulated and discussed. Firstly, a laser thermal damage model has been built considering the heat conduction theory and thermal-elasto-plastic theory. Then using COMSOL Multiphysics software to build the geometric model and to simulate the mathematic results. Secondly, the functions of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP has been introduced. Material surface temperature increased by time during the laser irradiating time and the increasing speed is faster when the laser fluence is higher. Furthermore, the peak temperature of the center of material surface is increasing by enhanced the laser fluence when the pulse length is a constant value. In this condition, both the ablation depth and the Heat Affected Zone(HAZ) is larger when increased laser fluence. When keep the laser fluence as a constant value, the laser with shorter pulse length is more easier to make the CFRP to the vaporization material. Meanwhile, the HAZ is becoming larger when the pulse length is longer, and the thermal effect depth is as the same trend as the HAZ. As a result, when long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material, the thermal effect is the significant value to analysis the process, which is mostly effect by laser fluence and pulse length. For laser machining in different industries, the laser parameter choose should be different. The shorter pulse length laser is suitable for the laser machining which requires high accuracy, and the longer one is better for the deeper or larger

  12. Self-pulsing effect in chaotic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, C [Centro de Ciencias FIsicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); MejIa-Monasterio, C [Centro de Ciencias FIsicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Merlo, O [Institut fuer Physik der Universitaet Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Seligman, T H [Centro de Ciencias FIsicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2004-05-01

    We study the quantum and classical scattering of Hamiltonian systems whose chaotic saddle is described by binary or ternary horseshoes. We are interested in situations for which a stable island, associated with the inner fundamental periodic orbit of the system exists and is large, but chaos around this island is well developed. Such situations are quite common as they correspond typically to the near-integrable domain in the transition from integrable to chaotic scattering. Both classical and quantum dynamics are analysed and in both cases, the most surprising effect is a periodic response to an incoming wave packet. The period of this self-pulsing effect or scattering echoes coincides with the mean period, by which the scattering trajectories rotate around the stable orbit. This period of rotation is directly related to the development stage of the underlying horseshoe. Therefore the predicted echoes will provide experimental access to topological information. We numerically test these results in kicked one-dimensional models and in open billiards.

  13. [Application of three heat pulse technique-based methods to determine the stem sap flow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Fan, Jun

    2015-08-01

    It is of critical importance to acquire tree transpiration characters through sap flow methodology to understand tree water physiology, forest ecology and ecosystem water exchange. Tri-probe heat pulse sensors, which are widely utilized in soil thermal parameters and soil evaporation measurement, were applied to implement Salix matsudana sap flow density (Vs) measurements via heat-ratio method (HRM), T-Max method (T-Max) and single-probe heat pulse probe (SHPP) method, and comparative analysis was conducted with additional Grainer's thermal diffusion probes (TDP) measured results. The results showed that, it took about five weeks to reach a stable measurement stage after TPHP installation, Vs measured with three methods in the early stage after installation was 135%-220% higher than Vs in the stable measurement stage, and Vs estimated via HRM, T-Max and SHPP methods were significantly linearly correlated with Vs estimated via TDP method, with R2 of 0.93, 0.73 and 0.91, respectively, and R2 for Vs measured by SHPP and HRM reached 0.94. HRM had relatively higher precision in measuring low rates and reverse sap flow. SHPP method seemed to be very promising to measure sap flow for configuration simplicity and high measuring accuracy, whereas it couldn' t distinguish directions of flow. T-Max method had relatively higher error in sap flow measurement, and it couldn' t measure sap flow below 5 cm3 · cm(-2) · h(-1), thus this method could not be used alone, however it could measure thermal diffusivity for calculating sap flow when other methods were imposed. It was recommended to choose a proper method or a combination of several methods to measure stem sap flow, based on specific research purpose.

  14. The effect of laser pulse tailored welding of Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccay, T. Dwayne; Mccay, Mary Helen; Sharp, C. Michael; Womack, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    Pulse tailored laser welding has been applied to wrought, wrought grain grown, and cast Inconel 718 using a CO2 laser. Prior to welding, the material was characterized metallographically and the solid state transformation regions were identified using Differential Scanning Calorimetry and high temperature x-ray diffraction. Bead on plate welds (restrained and unrestrained) were then produced using a matrix of pulse duty cycles and pulsed average power. Subsequent characterization included heat affected zone width, penetration and underbead width, the presence of cracks, microfissures and porosity, fusion zone curvature, and precipitation and liquated region width. Pedigree welding on three selected processing conditions was shown by microstructural and dye penetrant analysis to produce no microfissures, a result which strongly indicates the viability of pulse tailored welding for microfissure free IN 718.

  15. Delay time dependence of thermal effect of combined pulse laser machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Boshi; Jin, Guangyong; Ma, Yao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    The research focused on the effect of delay time in combined pulse laser machining on the material temperature field. Aiming at the parameter optimization of pulse laser machining aluminum alloy, the combined pulse laser model based on heat conduction equation was introduced. And the finite element analysis software, COMSOL Multiphysics, was also utilized in the research. Without considering the phase transition process of aluminum alloy, the results of the numerical simulation was shown in this paper. By the simulation study of aluminum alloy's irradiation with combined pulse, the effect of the change in delay time of combined pulse on the temperature field of the aluminum alloy and simultaneously the quantized results under the specific laser spot conditions were obtained. Based on the results, several conclusions could be reached, the delay time could affect the rule of temperature changing with time. The reasonable delay time controlling would help improving the efficiency. In addition, when the condition of the laser pulse energy density is constant, the optimal delay time depends on pulse sequence.

  16. Hybrid Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation of heat transfer and ionization balance in overdense plasmas irradiated by subpicosecond pulse lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhidkov, A.; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    A 1D hybrid electromagnetic particle-in-cell code with new methods to include particle collisions and atomic kinetics is developed and applied to ultra-short-pulse laser plasma interaction. Using the Langevin equation to calculate the Coulomb collision term, the present code is shown to be fast and stable in calculating the particle motion in the PIC simulation. Furthermore, by noting that the scale length of the change of atomic kinetics is much longer than the Debye radius, we calculate ionization and X-ray emission on kinetics cells, which are determined by averaging plasma parameters such as the electron density and energy over number of PIC cells. The absorption of short-pulse laser by overdense plasmas is calculated in self-consistent manner, including the effect of rapid change of density and temperature caused by instantaneous heating and successive fast ionization of the target material. The calculated results agree well with those obtained from the Fokker-Planck simulation as well as experiments, for non-local heat transport in plasmas with steep temperature gradient, and for the absorption of a short laser pulse by solid density targets. These results demonstrate usefulness of the code and the computational method therein for understanding of physics of short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments, and for application to the gain calculation of short-pulse laser excited X-ray laser as well. (author)

  17. Radiative heat transfer in plasma of pulsed high pressure caesium discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshin, V. F.

    2016-01-01

    Two-temperature many component gas dynamic model is used for the analysis of features of radiative heat transfer in pulsed high pressure caesium discharge plasma. It is shown that at a sufficiently high pressure the radial optical thickness of arc column is close to unit (τR (λ) ∼ 1) in most part of spectrum. In this case radiative heat transfer has not local character. In these conditions the photons which are emitted in any point of plasma volume are absorbed in other point remote from an emission point on considerable distance. As a result, the most part of the electric energy put in the discharge mainly near its axis is almost instantly redistributed on all volume of discharge column. In such discharge radial profiles of temperature are smooth. In case of low pressure, when discharge plasma is optically transparent for own radiation in the most part of a spectrum (τR(λ) << 1), the emission of radiation without reabsorption takes place. Radiative heat transfer in plasma has local character and profiles of temperature have considerable gradient.

  18. Heating in short-pulse laser-driven cone-capped wire targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R. J.; Wei, M.; King, J.; Beg, F.; Stephens, R. B.

    2007-11-01

    The 2-D implicit hybrid simulation code e-PLAS has been used to study heating in cone-capped copper wire targets. The code e-PLAS tracks collisional particle-in-cell (PIC) electrons traversing background plasma of collisional Eulerian cold electron and ion fluids. It computes E- and B-fields by the Implicit Moment Method [1,2]. In recent experiments [3] at the Vulcan laser facility, sub- picosecond laser pulses at 1.06 μm, and 4.0 x 10^20 W/cm^2 intensity were focused into thin-walled (˜10 μm) cones attached to copper wires. The wire diameter was varied from 10-40 μm with a typical length of 1 mm. We characterize heating of the wires as a function of their diameters and length, and relate modifications of this heating to changes in the assumed laser-generated hot electron spectrum and directivity. As in recent nail experiments [4], the cones can serve as reservoirs for hot electrons, diverting them from passage down the wires. [1] R. J. Mason, and C. Cranfill, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-14, 45 (1986). [2] R. J. Mason, J. Comp. Phys. 71, 429 (1987). [3] J. King et al., to be submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett.. [4] R. J. Mason, M. Wei, F. Beg, R. Stephens, and C. Snell, in Proc. of ICOPS07, Albuquerque, NM, June 17-22, 2007, Talk 7D4.

  19. Experimental Study and Heat Transfer Analysis on the Boiling of Saturated Liquid Nitrogen under Transient Pulsed Laser Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoyi DONG; Xiulan HUAI

    2005-01-01

    The boiling behavior of the liquid nitrogen (LN2) under the transient high heat flux urgently needs to be researched systematically. In this paper, the high power short pulse duration laser was used to heat the saturated LN2 rapidly, and the high-speed photography aided by the spark light system was employed to take series of photos which displayed the process of LN2's boiling behavior under such conditions. Also, a special temperature measuring system was applied to record the temperature variation of the heating surface. The experiments indicated that an explosive boiling happened within LN2 by the laser heating, and a conventional boiling followed up after the newly-defined changeover time. By analyzing the temperature variation of the heating surface, it is found that the latent heat released by the crack of the bubbles in the bubble cluster induced by the explosive boiling is an important factor that greatly influences the boiling heat transfer mechanism.

  20. Modeling terahertz heating effects on water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torben T.L.; Withayachumnankul, Withawat; Jepsen, Peter Uhd;

    2010-01-01

    We apply Kirchhoff’s heat equation to model the influence of a CW terahertz beam on a sample of water, which is assumed to be static. We develop a generalized model, which easily can be applied to other liquids and solids by changing the material constants. If the terahertz light source is focused...... down to a spot with a diameter of 0.5 mm, we find that the steadystate temperature increase per milliwatt of transmitted power is 1.8◦C/mW. A quantum cascade laser can produce a CW beam in the order of several milliwatts and this motivates the need to estimate the effect of beam power on the sample...... temperature. For THz time domain systems, we indicate how to use our model as a worst-case approximation based on the beam average power. It turns out that THz pulses created from photoconductive antennas give a negligible increase in temperature. As biotissue contains a high water content, this leads...

  1. Influence of compression-expansion effect on oscillating-flow heat transfer in a finned heat exchanger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke TANG; Juan YU; Tao JIN; Zhi-hua GAN

    2013-01-01

    Compression and expansion of a working gas due to the pressure oscillation of an oscillating flow can lead to a temperature variation of the working gas,which will affect the heat transfer in the oscillating flow.This study focuses on the impact of the compression-expansion effect,indicated by the pressure ratio,on the heat transfer in a finned heat exchanger under practical operating conditions of the ambient-temperature heat exchangers in Stirling-type pulse tube refrigerators.The experimental results summarized as the Nusselt number are presented for analysis.An increase in the pressure ratio can result in a marked rise in the Nussclt number,which indicates that the compression-expansion effect should be considered in characterizing the heat transfer of the oscillating flow,especially in the cases with a higher Valensi number and a lower maximum Reynolds number.

  2. Analysis of Current Redistribution in a CICC under Transient Heat Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L; Marinucci, C

    2004-01-01

    We have performed experiments and simulations of the current distribution process in a CICC with the aim to understand better the coupled thermal, hydraulic and electric process that leads to a stable or unstable transient cable behaviour. The cable, wound from 128 Nb3Sn and pure copper strands, has been tested in the SULTAN facility. A resistive heater, glued on the jacket of the conductor, has been used to start the transient, and the response has been monitored with arrays of Hall plates. In this paper we report the results of simulations, especially the computed Hall signals, and compare them to the experimental data. Based on the experimental results and their interpretation we postulate that large temperature gradients must develop in the helium stream in the cable cross sections during the transient heat pulse.

  3. MW-scale ICRF plasma heating using IGBT switches in a multi-pulse scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be'ery, I.; Kogan, K.; Seemann, O.

    2015-06-01

    Solid-state silicon switches are cheap and reliable option for 1-10 MHz RF power sources, required for plasma ion cyclotron RF heating (ICRF). The large `on' resistance of MOSFET and similar devices limits their power delivery to a few tens of kW per switch. Low resistivity devices, such as IGBT, suffer from large `off' switching time, which limits their useful frequency range and increases the power dissipated in the switch. Here we demonstrate more than 0.8 MW circulated RF power at 2 MHz using only three high voltage IGBT switches. The circuit uses the fast `on' switching capability of the IGBTs to generate high-Q pulse train. This operation mode also simplifies the measurement of RF coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

  4. A Gyrokinetic 1D Scrape-Off Layer Model of an ELM Heat Pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, E L; Hammett, G W

    2014-01-01

    We have applied an electrostatic gyrokinetic-based model to simulate parallel plasma transport in the scrape-off layer to a divertor plate. We focus on a test problem that has been studied previously, using parameters chosen to model a heat pulse driven by an edge localized mode (ELM) in JET. Previous work has used direct particle-in-cell equations with full dynamics, or Vlasov or fluid equations with only parallel dynamics. With the use of the gyrokinetic quasineutrality equation and logical sheath boundary conditions, spatial and temporal resolution requirements are no longer set by the electron Debye length and plasma frequency, respectively. This test problem also helps illustrate some of the physics contained in the Hamiltonian form of the gyrokinetic equations and some of the numerical challenges in developing an edge gyrokinetic code.

  5. Development of high effectiveness droplet heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, W. J., III; Sekins, K. M.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1985-04-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation has been carried out to assess the feasibility of developing high effectiveness, high temperature droplet heat exchangers and to identify practical applications for this type of direct contact heat exchanger. The droplet heat exchanger (DHX) concept studies uses a counterflowing gas and droplet configuration, uniformly sized droplets or particles, and a uniform dispersion of droplets in gas to achieve high heat exchanger effectiveness. Direct contact between the heat transfer media eliminates the solid heat transfer surfaces that are used in conventional heat exchangers and is expected to make very high temperature heat transfer practical. Low temperature simulation tests and analysis have been used to demonstrate that uniformly sized droplets can be generated over a wide range of fluid properties and operating conditions appropriate for high temperature droplet heat exchanger applications. One- and two-dimensional, two-phase flow and heat transfer computer models have been developed and used to characterize both individual component configurations and overall DHX heat transfer rates and effectiveness. The computer model and test data began to diverge as the operating pressure was increased, indicating a need for more general transport rate correlations and a better understanding of the two-phase flows that govern DHX operation.

  6. Simulation of various ionization effects in overdense plasmas irradiated by a subpicosecond pulse laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhidkov, A.; Sasaki, Akira; Tajima, Toshiki [Advanced Photon Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    The effects of the elastic collisions and ionization under non-LET on the absorption efficiency, heat transfer, and particle acceleration in short pulse laser irradiated overdense plasmas are studied. We present a newly developed hybrid electromagnetic particle-in-cell method (in 1D) employing the nonlinear Langevin equation to account for Coulomb collisions and the average ion model to calculate the plasma transient ionization. The collisional and field ionization are included. Interaction between solid targets and thin foils with an arbitrary polarized, intense (I=10{sup 16}-10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulse are investigated. (author)

  7. Improvement of xenon purification system using a combination of a pulse tube refrigerator and a coaxial heat exchanger

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wan-Ting; Cussonneau, J -P; Donnard, J; Duval, S; Lemaire, O; Calloch, M Le; Ray, P Le; Mohamad-Hadi, A -F; Morteau, E; Oger, T; Scotto-Lavina, L; Stutzmann, J -S; Thers, D; Briend, P; Haruyama, T; Mihara, S; Tauchi, T

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a compact cryogenic system with a pulse tube refrigerator and a coaxial heat exchanger. This liquefaction-purification system not only saves the cooling power used to reach high gaseous recirculation rate, but also reduces the impurity level with high speed. The heat exchanger operates with an efficiency of 99%, which indicates the possibility for fast xenon gas recirculation in a highpressurized large-scale xenon storage with much less thermal losses.

  8. CO2 Laser Microchanneling Process: Effects of Compound Parameters and Pulse Overlapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Shashi; Kumar, Subrata

    2016-09-01

    PMMA (Polymethyl methacrylate) is commonly used in many microfluidic devices like Lab-on-a-chip devices, bioanalytical devices etc. CO2 lasers provide easy and cost effective solution for micromachining needs on PMMA. Microchannels are an integral part of most of these microfluidic devices. CO2 laser beams have been successfully applied by many authors to fabricate microchannels on PMMA substrates. Laser beam power and scanning speed are the most important laser input parameters affecting the output parameters like microchannel depth, width and heat affected zone (HAZ). The effect of these individual parameters on output parameters are well known and already elaborated by many authors. However, these output parameters can more significantly be described by some compound parameters (combination of direct input laser parameters) like laser fluence, specific point energy, interaction time and P/U (power/scanning speed) ratio. The explanation of effect of these compound parameters was not found in earlier researches. In this work, several experiments were carried out to determine the effects of these compound parameters on output parameters i.e. microchannel width, depth and heat affected zone. The effect of pulse overlapping was also determined by performing experiments at different pulse overlaps and with two different energy deposition settings. The concept of actual pulse overlapping has been introduced by considering actual beam spot diameter instead of using theoretical beam diameter. Minimum pulse overlapping was determined experimentally in order to ensure smooth microchannel edges.

  9. Development of long pulse RF heating and current drive for H-mode scenarios with metallic walls in WEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekedahl, Annika, E-mail: annika.ekedahl@cea.fr; Bourdelle, Clarisse; Artaud, Jean-François; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Bufferand, Hugo; Colas, Laurent; Decker, Joan; Delpech, Léna; Dumont, Rémi; Goniche, Marc; Helou, Walid; Hillairet, Julien; Lombard, Gilles; Magne, Roland; Mollard, Patrick; Nardon, Eric; Peysson, Yves; Tsitrone, Emmanuelle [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-12-10

    The longstanding expertise of the Tore Supra team in long pulse heating and current drive with radiofrequency (RF) systems will now be exploited in the WEST device (tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) [1]. WEST will allow an integrated long pulse tokamak programme for testing W-divertor components at ITER-relevant heat flux (10-20 MW/m{sup 2}), while treating crucial aspects for ITER-operation, such as avoidance of W-accumulation in long discharges, monitoring and control of heat fluxes on the metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) and coupling of RF waves in H-mode plasmas. Scenario modelling using the METIS-code shows that ITER-relevant heat fluxes are compatible with the sustainment of long pulse H-mode discharges, at high power (up to 15 MW / 30 s at I{sub P} = 0.8 MA) or high fluence (up to 10 MW / 1000 s at I{sub P} = 0.6 MA) [2], all based on RF heating and current drive using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). This paper gives a description of the ICRH and LHCD systems in WEST, together with the modelling of the power deposition of the RF waves in the WEST-scenarios.

  10. Surface thermocouples for measurement of pulsed heat flux in the divertor of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, D; LaBombard, B

    2012-03-01

    A novel set of thermocouple sensors has been developed to measure heat fluxes arriving at divertor surfaces in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, a magnetic confinement fusion experiment. These sensors operate in direct contact with the divertor plasma, which deposits heat fluxes in excess of ~10 MW/m(2) over an ~1 s pulse. Thermoelectric EMF signals are produced across a non-standard bimetallic junction: a 50 μm thick 74% tungsten-26% rhenium ribbon embedded in a 6.35 mm diameter molybdenum cylinder. The unique coaxial geometry of the sensor combined with its single-point electrical ground contact minimizes interference from the plasma/magnetic environment. Incident heat fluxes are inferred from surface temperature evolution via a 1D thermal heat transport model. For an incident heat flux of 10 MW/m(2), surface temperatures rise ~1000 °C/s, corresponding to a heat flux flowing along the local magnetic field of ~200 MW/m(2). Separate calorimeter sensors are used to independently confirm the derived heat fluxes by comparing total energies deposited during a plasma pulse. Langmuir probes in close proximity to the surface thermocouples are used to test plasma-sheath heat transmission theory and to identify potential sources of discrepancies among physical models.

  11. Heat losses and 3D diffusion phenomena for defect sizing procedures in video pulse thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, N.; Teruzzi, P.

    2002-06-01

    Dynamical thermographic techniques like video pulse thermography are very useful for the non-destructive testing of structural components. In literature different models were proposed, which allow to describe the time evolution of the thermal contrast for materials with sub-superficial defects. In the case of circular defect the time evolution of the full width half maximum (FWHM) of the thermal contrast was studied both theoretically and experimentally. Nevertheless a mismatch in defect sizing between experimental results and theoretical simulations was found. Possible explanations of this disagreement was analysed. A factor widely neglected is the heat loss (radiation and convection). In this paper a theoretical analysis of the influence of these contributions is reported. Furthermore in order to explain the experimental evidence of FWHM time evolution we introduced a correction due to lateral heat diffusion around the defect. In this way a possible explanation for the experimental results was obtained. Brick samples with a circular flat bottom hole as defect was tested both for the interest in defect sizing in building material through NDT and for the low thermal diffusivity of this material which allows the study of the phenomenon in a slow motion.

  12. Investigations of pulsed heat loads on a forced flow supercritical helium loop. Part B: Simulation of the cryogenic circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallcorba, R.; Hitz, D.; Rousset, B.; Lagier, B.; Hoa, C.

    2012-07-01

    The VINCENTA software is applied to model the transient thermal-hydraulic flow of the HELIOS supercritical helium circuit. This cryogenic circuit is equipped with dedicated heating to simulate pulsed heat loads - See Part A for the description of the experimental set up. Currently, one of the main important problems to be solved is the control and smoothing of heat pulses in the cryogenic circuit to keep the refrigerator in stable operation. In this context, the aim of the present development is to get a predictive model for the experimental management of overall heat loads absorbed by the refrigerator as well as to better understand the associated physical phenomena. This preliminary model is validated with early experiments performed with the HELIOS test facility which is dedicated to simulate representative pulsed loads related to the Japanese tokamak JT60-SA. This article presents the first comparison between model and experiments for two JT60-SA relevant scaled down pulses: (20 s/600 s-1000 W) and (60 s/1800 s-750 W).

  13. Detection of volatile impurities in turbine oils by the heat-pulse testing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripov, P. V.; Demin, V. A.; Shangin, V. V.; Starostin, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The research is aimed at development and implementation of methods and devices to control critical sections of the oil system of the power equipment that operates in the real time mode. The task was to develop a method for rapid detection of volatile impurities in turbine oils. The approach to the study is based on quantitative assessment of the short-term thermal stability of the substance that is formally associated with the content of the volatile impurity. The approach was selected on the basis of the results of search experiments taking into consideration the formulation of requirements for the method and the device, viz., (1) the method should reliably determine the moisture content in the range of 10-150 g of the impurity per ton of oil and (2) the device is to be applicable "in situ." For this purpose, a variant of the method of the controlled pulse heating of a wire probe, a resistance thermometer, has been developed. The advantages of the method are its speed, sensitivity to small contents of volatile impurities regardless of the nature of the impurity, and smallness of methodologically contributed perturbation. The heating conditions of the probe most sensitive to the appearance of moisture— including its trace amounts—in the system, has been defined. The duration of the measurement is on the order of milliseconds; the heat flux density through the surface of the probe reaches 1 MW/m2. The essence of the method consists in measuring, in the characteristic time interval, the temperature of the thermal instability onset associated with the content of the volatile impurity. The approach proposed by the authors is aimed at increasing the lifetime of the oil and preventing unpredictable failures of the operating equipment.

  14. Note: A method for correction of finite pulse time effects in flash diffusivity measurements of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Yang, Liping; Zhong, Qiu; Xu, Zijun; Luo, Caiyun

    2016-08-01

    A data correction method that can reduce finite pulse time effects in the flash method is presented in this article. Based on the physical model of the classical flash method, the present method uses the cutoff time moment of laser heating as zero point. This article investigated the case of constant heat flux heating by using the theoretical method and obtained a new calculation formula. The formula was tested in the case where half temperature rise time is less than the pulse time (i.e., τ0/t0.5 > 1), and the result was satisfactory. Theoretically, this method can correct the effect of any finite pulse time and significantly expand the scope of application of the flash method.

  15. Intra-Channel Nonlinear Effect on Optical PPM Pulse Transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun; Linghao; Jarmo; Takala

    2003-01-01

    PPM encoded Gaussian pulse sequence shows more immunity than non-PPM schemes on optical fiber intra-channel nonlinearity and demonstrated by a numerical study of IXPM and IFWM effects deploying on 100Gb/s single channelsystem.

  16. Effect of Initial Chirping and Pulse Shape on 10 Gb/s Optical Pulse Transmission in Birefringent Nonlinear Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Numerical method to solve the problem related with theinteractive effect of dispersion (both chromatic dispersion and polarization mode dispersion) and nonlinearity on optical pulse transmission is present. Evolutions of pulses with various initial chirping and shape at bit-rate of 10 Gb/s are simulated and compared. Gaussian pulse with appropriate prechirping is propitious for high bit-rate transmission.

  17. Combinations of pulsed white light and UV-C or mild heat treatment to inactivate conidia of Botrytis cinerea and Monilia fructigena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquenie, D; Geeraerd, A H; Lammertyn, J; Soontjens, C; Van Impe, J F; Michiels, C W; Nicolaï, B M

    2003-08-15

    The use of pulses of intense white light to inactivate conidia of the fungi Botrytis cinerea and Monilia fructigena, responsible for important economical losses during postharvest storage and transport of strawberries and sweet cherries, was investigated in this study. In the first stage, a light treatment applying pulses of 30 micros at a frequency of 15 Hz was investigated, resulting in a treatment duration varying from 1 to 250 s. The conidia of both fungi showed similar behaviour to pulsed light, with a maximal inactivation of 3 and 4 log units for B. cinerea and M. fructigena, respectively. The inactivation of the conidia increased with increasing treatment intensity, but no complete inactivation was achieved. The sigmoidal inactivation pattern obtained by the pulsed light treatment was described using a modification of the model of Geeraerd et al. [Int. J. Food Microbiol. 59 (2000) 185]. Hereto, the shoulder length was incorporated explicitly and relative values for the microbial populations were used. In the second stage, combinations of light pulses and ultraviolet-C or heat were applied. The UV light used in the experiments is the short-wave band or UV-C, running from 180 to 280 nm with a peak at 254 nm (UV-B runs from 280 to 320 nm and UV-A from 320 to 380 nm). The UV-C doses were 0.025, 0.05 and 0.10 J/cm(2), and the temperatures for the thermal treatment ranged from 35 to 45 degrees C during 3-15 min. When combining UV-C and light pulses, there was an increase in inactivation for both B. cinerea and M. fructigena, and synergism was observed. There was no effect of the order of the treatments. For the heat-light pulses combination, there was a difference between both fungi. The order of the treatments was highly significant for B. cinerea, but not for M. fructigena. Combining heat and light treatments improved the inactivation, and synergism between both methods was again observed. Complete inactivation of M. fructigena conidia was obtained after, e

  18. 脉冲发动机级间隔层传热仿真分析%Analysis of Heat Transfer on Insulator of Pulse Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐瑞强; 刘玉磊

    2013-01-01

    隔层的正常工作是脉冲发动机功能实现的关键因素,而能否达到绝热要求则是隔层正常工作的重要指标,对隔层的传热过程进行分析是隔层设计的重要环节。本文通过对脉冲发动机一脉冲工作时隔层传热进行数值仿真计算与分析,探讨了隔层厚度、工作时间、隔层导热系数等对隔层传热的影响,为脉冲发动机的方案设计、隔层结构设计和材料选择提供参考。%Regular work of insulator is a key factor for operation of pulse motor , while thermal insu-lation meeting requirement or not is an important index for insulator work well , and so the analysis for heat transfer process of insulator is important for insulator design .Through numerical simulation of heat transfer on pulse motor insulator working in first stage , this paper analyses the effects of parameters on heat trans-fer, including insulator thickness , work time and thermal conductivity .The result offers reference for pulse motor project design , choice of insulator material and structural design .

  19. Sapflow+: a four-needle heat-pulse sap flow sensor enabling nonempirical sap flux density and water content measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Steppe, Kathy

    2012-10-01

    • To our knowledge, to date, no nonempirical method exists to measure reverse, low or high sap flux density. Moreover, existing sap flow methods require destructive wood core measurements to determine sapwood water content, necessary to convert heat velocity to sap flux density, not only damaging the tree, but also neglecting seasonal variability in sapwood water content. • Here, we present a nonempirical heat-pulse-based method and coupled sensor which measure temperature changes around a linear heater in both axial and tangential directions after application of a heat pulse. By fitting the correct heat conduction-convection equation to the measured temperature profiles, the heat velocity and water content of the sapwood can be determined. • An identifiability analysis and validation tests on artificial and real stem segments of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) confirm the applicability of the method, leading to accurate determinations of heat velocity, water content and hence sap flux density. • The proposed method enables sap flux density measurements to be made across the entire natural occurring sap flux density range of woody plants. Moreover, the water content during low flows can be determined accurately, enabling a correct conversion from heat velocity to sap flux density without destructive core measurements. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. A computational model for heterogeneous heating during pulsed laser irradiation of polymers doped with light-absorbing microparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marla, Deepak; Zhang, Yang; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud

    2016-01-01

    Doping of polymers with light-absorbing microparticles to increase their optical properties is a commonly used pre-treatment technique in laser processing of polymers. The presence of these particles plays an important role during laser heating of the polymer that influences its surface...... characteristics. This work presents a study based on a computational model of laser heating of polymer doped with light-absorbing microparticles accounting for the heterogeneous nature of heating. The work aims at gaining a fundamental insight into the nature of the heating process and to understand the role...... of microparticles. The results suggest that apart from the laser intensity and pulse duration, the properties of the microparticles including their size and distribution also play an important role during the laser heating of polymers....

  1. Magnetic field turbulence, electron heating, magnetic holes, proton cyclotron waves, and the onsets of bipolar pulse (electron hole events: a possible unifying scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Tsurutani

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Two electron heating events have been identified on 20 May 1996 when Polar was in the polar cap/polar cusp boundary layer. The electron heating events were located within magnetic holes/cavities/bubbles and were accompanied by nonlinear ± 14 nT peak-to-peak (f ~ 0.6 to 0.7 fcp obliquely propagating proton cyclotron waves. The electrons appear to be heated isotropically. Electric bipolar pulse (electron hole onset events were also detected within the heating events. We propose a scenario which can link the above phenomena. Nonlinear Alfvén waves, generated through cusp magnetic reconnection, propagate down magnetic field lines and locally heat electrons through the ponderomotive force. The magnetic cavity is created through the diamagnetic effect of the heated electrons. Ion heating also occurs through ponderomotive acceleration (but much less than the electrons and the protons generate the electromagnetic proton cyclotron waves through the loss cone instability. The obliquely propagating electromagnetic proton cyclotron waves accelerate bi-streaming electrons, which are the source of free energy for the electron holes.

  2. Effect of pulsed light on structure and immunoreactivity of gluten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panozzo, Agnese; Manzocco, Lara; Lippe, Giovanna; Nicoli, Maria Cristina

    2016-03-01

    The effect of pulsed light (from 1.75 to 26.25Jcm(-2)) on selected properties of wheat gluten powder and aqueous suspension (absorbance, particle size and microstructure, free sulfhydryl content, protein fractions, protein electrophoretic mobility and immunoreactivity) was investigated. Gluten photoreactivity was strongly affected by hydration. While minor photo-induced structure modifications were observed in gluten powder, pulsed light induced the development of browning and promoted partial depolymerisation of hydrated gluten proteins by disulphide exchange. These changes were associated with a significant decrease in immunoreactivity, suggesting that pulsed light could be exploited to efficiently modify structure and thus functionality of gluten.

  3. Electrostrictive limit and focusing effects in pulsed photoacoustic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritier, J.-M.

    1983-01-01

    We give an analytical solution in the time and frequency domain for the cylindrical pressure wave generated by a laser pulse traveling in a liquid, which is valid over a wide range of laser beam dimensions and pulse durations. This leads to a simple prediction of the ultimate limitation set by the electrostrictive coupling and an easy analysis of the focusing effects on the photoacoustic signal. Two separate detection schemes were considered and show different behavior.

  4. Non-Fourier heat transport in metal-dielectric core-shell nanoparticles under ultrafast laser pulse excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi-Huyeh, M.; Volz, S.; Palpant, B.

    2008-09-01

    Relaxation dynamics of embedded metal nanoparticles after ultrafast laser pulse excitation is driven by thermal phenomena of different origins, the accurate description of which is crucial for interpreting experimental results: hot electron-gas generation, electron-phonon coupling, heat transfer to the particle environment, and heat propagation in the latter. Regarding this last mechanism, it is well known that heat transport in nanoscale structures and/or at ultrashort timescales may deviate from the predictions of the Fourier law. In these cases heat transport may rather be described by the Boltzmann transport equation. We present a numerical model allowing to determine the electron and lattice temperature dynamics in a spherical gold nanoparticle core under subpicosecond pulsed excitation as well as that in the surrounding shell dielectric medium. For this, we have used the electron-phonon coupling equation in the particle with a source term linked with the laser pulse absorption and the ballistic-diffusive equations for heat conduction in the host medium. Either thermalizing or adiabatic boundary conditions have been considered at the shell external surface. Our results show that the heat transfer rate from the particle to the matrix can be significantly smaller than the prediction of Fourier’s law. Consequently, the particle-temperature rise is larger and its cooling dynamics might be slower than that obtained by using Fourier’s law. This difference is attributed to the nonlocal and nonequilibrium heat conductions in the vicinity of the core nanoparticle. These results are expected to be of great importance for analyzing pump-probe experiments performed on single nanoparticles or nanocomposite media.

  5. Comparison of heat-pulse flow measurements and vertical gradients in a fractured limestone aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dearborn, L.L.; Calkin, S.F.; Andolsek, R.H. [ABB Environmental Services, Inc., Portland, ME (United States); Allison, W.S. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oliver Springs, TN (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Establishing a site-specific relationship between heat-pulse flowmeter (HPFM) data and corresponding vertical gradient data may allow prediction of potential vertical gradients through BPFM logging alone. Vertical gradient and corresponding BPFM rates were determined for 117 test intervals in a fractured limestone bedrock aquifer. From these data, it appears that HPFM data can be used in place of more labor intensive borehole packer testing to provide estimates of vertical gradients in this type of hydrogeologic system. Groundwater conditions in the fractured bedrock were investigated through testing of 66 open boreholes, as part of the hazardous waste remedial investigation at the former Loring Air Force Base (LAFB) in northern Maine, USA. Borehole geophysical logging tools, including BPFM and acoustic televiewer (ATV), in conjunction with air hammer drilling logs, were used to target specific fracture(s) to test using conventional straddle packers. HPFM and head data from 41 boreholes met general requirements for comparison purposes, and a linear correlation trend was identified.

  6. Preliminary study on heat load using calorimetric measurement during long-pulse high-performance discharges on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. K.; Hamada, N.; Hanada, K.; Gao, X.; Liu, H. Q.; Yu, Y. W.; Qian, J. P.; Yang, L.; Xu, T. J.; Jie, Y. X.; Yao, Y.; Wang, S. S.; Xu, J. C.; Yang, Z. D.; Li, G. S.; EAST Team

    2017-04-01

    Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) aims to demonstrate steady-state advanced high-performance H-mode plasmas with an ITER-like configuration, plasma control and heating schemes. The plasma-facing components in EAST are actively cooled, providing good conditions for researching long-pulse and high-energy discharges. A long-pulse high-performance plasma discharge (#59892 discharge) of up to 103 s with a core electron temperature of up to 4.5 keV was sustained with an injected energy exceeding 0.22 GJ in the 2015–2016 experimental campaign. A calorimetric measurement utilizing the temperature increment of cooling water is carried out to calculate the heat load on the strike point region of the lower divertor during long-pulse discharges in EAST. For the long-pulse and high-energy discharges, the comparison of the measurement results for the heat load measured by divertor Langmuir probes and the calorimetry diagnostic indicates that most of the heat load is delivered to the divertor panels as plasma, not radiation, and charge exchange neutrals. The ratio of the heat load on the strike point region of the lower divertor to the total injected energy is on average 42.5% per discharge with the lower single null divertor configuration. If the radiated energy loss measured by the fast bolometer diagnostic is taken into consideration, the ratio is found to be 61.6%. The experimental results and the analysis of the physics involved in these discharges are reported and discussed.

  7. Heating of multi-layered samples by a Nd: YAG pulsed laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diniz Neto, O. O.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available In the work we examine the heating of multi-layered samples by a powerful Nd - YAG pulsed láser. The samples are made of two and three layers, conductor-isolator (Al-Al2O3, conductor-conductor (Al-Ag; Al-Au and conductor-conductor-conductor (Al-Au-Ag; Ag-Au-Al. The transient behaviour of the temperature distribution throughout the sample is computed. We carry out three dimensional model calculations for the heating process in which we consider not only the temperature dependence of the sample thermal and optical parameters but also the space and time characteristics of the laser beam as the heating source. We showed the influence of the substrate in the thermal profile, in space and time, and máximum temperature on the multi-layered samples.

    Em nosso trabalho examinamos o aquecimento de amostras compostas de duas e três camadas, condutor- isolante e condutor-condutor, com um pulso potente de láser. O comportamento transiente da distribuição de temperatura através da amostra foi calculado. Em nosso modelo de calculo para o processo de aquecimento levamos em conta a dependência com a temperatura dos parâmetros térmicos (difusividade, capacidade e condutividade térmica, óticos (refletividade e coeficiente de absorção, bem como a dependência das condições de contorno com o tempo e consequentemente com a temperatura. Aplicamos nossa metodología para calcular o aquecimento amostras compostas: Al-Au, Al-Ag, Al-Al2O3, Al-Au-Ag e Ag-Au-Al. Concluimos que o substrato influencia as temperaturas máximas nas superfície exposta ao láser e a forma com que a frente de calor se propaga nas amostras termicamente finas.

  8. Analyzing screen heat insulation and its effect on energy consumption while heating building envelopes in conditions of intermittent heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vytchikov Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to screen heat insulation and its effect on energy consumption while heating building envelopes in conditions of intermittent heating. It also describes the non-stationary process of heat transfer through heat insulated outer walls. The authors introduce calculation results of specific energy consumption for heating insulated and non-insulted outer walls. The paper proves that energy consumption for heating insulated outer walls depends on the thickness of non-aerated air-space insulation The research shows positive effects of using thermal protection systems with screen thermal insulation in outer building envelopes in conditions of intermitten heating.

  9. Relativistic Doppler effect: universal spectra and zeptosecond pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordienko, S; Pukhov, A; Shorokhov, O; Baeva, T

    2004-09-10

    We report on a numerical observation of the train of zeptosecond pulses produced by the reflection of a relativistically intense femtosecond laser pulse from the oscillating boundary of an overdense plasma because of the Doppler effect. These pulses promise to become unique experimental and technological tools since their length is of the order of the Bohr radius and the intensity is extremely high proportional, variant 10(19) W/cm(2). We present the physical mechanism, analytical theory, and direct particle-in-cell simulations. We show that the harmonic spectrum is universal: the intensity of nth harmonic scales as 1/n(p) for n<4gamma(2), where gamma is the largest gamma factor of the electron fluid boundary, and p=3 and p=5/2 for the broadband and quasimonochromatic laser pulses, respectively.

  10. Multi-Pulse Effects in the Damage to the LCLS Reflective Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D

    2004-07-29

    A number of experiments to be performed on the planned Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) will have to use various types of reflective optics (see, e.g., [1]). On the other hand, LCLS will operate at a rate of 120 x-ray pulses per second. Therefore, when considering effects leading to the damage to its optics, one has to be concerned not only with a possible damage within one pulse, but also with effects accumulating during many pulses. We identify and analyze two of such effects: a thermal fatigue, and the intensity-dependent radiation damage. The first effect is associated with thermal stresses and deformations that occur in every pulse. The heating of the surface layers of the optics leads to a peculiar distribution of stresses, with a strong concentration near the surface. The quasistatic analysis of this problem was presented in [2]. In the present study, we show that transients in both transverse and longitudinal acoustic perturbations play a significant role and generally worsen the situation. If the maximum stresses approach the yield strength, the thermal fatigue causes degradation of the surface within a few thousands pulses. The second effect is related to formation of clusters of ionized atoms which lead to gross deformation of the lattice and formation of numerous vacancies and interstitials. At maximum LCLS fluxes, the number of displacements per atom may reach values exceeding unity during a few hours of operation of LCLS, meaning degradation of reflective properties of the surface of the optics. We derive constraints on the admissible fluence per pulse and suggest ways for decreasing the impact of the multipulse effects.

  11. Analytical solution of thermoelastic interaction in a half-space by pulsed laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ibrahim A.; Marin, Marin

    2017-03-01

    In this article, we consider the problem of a two-dimensional thermoelastic half-space in the context of generalized thermoelastic theory with one relaxation time. The surface of the half-space is taken to be traction free and thermally insulated. The solution of the considered physical quantity can be broken down in terms of normal modes. The nonhomogeneous basic equations have been written in the form of a vector-matrix differential equation, which is then solved by an eigenvalue approach. The exact analytical solution is adopted for the temperature, the components of displacement and stresses. The results obtained are presented graphically for the effect of laser pulse to display the phenomena physical meaning. The graphical results indicate that the thermal relaxation time has a great effect on the temperature, the components of displacement and the components of stress.

  12. Pulsed-laser heating: a tool for studying degradation of materials subjected to repeated high-temperature excursions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, A.; Cornell, R.H.

    1980-08-21

    The use of pulsed-laser heating was evaluated as a means to obtain high cyclic peak temperatures with short rise times. A two-stage neodymium glass laser was used which produces a 600-..mu..s pulse with energy outputs of up to 100 J. Small disk-shaped samples of AISI 4340 steel served as targets. Some of these were coated with a tungsten deposit. The rear face of some of the targets was instrumented for evaluation of temperature, strain, and stress response. Post-shot metallographic evaluations were made on a number of targets. We saw evidence of surface melting, cracking, and phase transformation. Surface damage was related to differences in the number of pulse cycles and input energy level, variables in the target materials, and the extent of strain-induced stresses. These experiments were performed in air at 1 atm and ambient laboratory temperature. 36 figures.

  13. An experimental study of temperature and moisture content of wet porous materials under short-pulsed laser heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renxi Jin; Xiulan Huai

    2005-01-01

    The measurements of temperature and moisture content of a wet porous material were accomplished on the micro-seconds scale. The temperature wave was observed when the wet porous material was heated by short-pulsed laser with high power. It firstly revealed that the moisture content of wet porous material rapidly rises twice in one laser irradiation. The influences of laser parameters, the thickness and initial moisture content of the wet porous material on its temperature and moisture content were investigated.

  14. Transient heating of metals by Microsecond-duration CO/sub 2/ laser pulses with air plasma ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKay, J.A.; Schriempf, J.T.

    1979-04-15

    We present a theoretical model for the heating of metal targets by CO/sub 2/ laser pulses, with air plasma ignition. Such modeling is necessary for deduction of the details of the thermal transient at the target surface, direct measurement of the transient being difficult or impossible, and the thermal flux being determined by the plasma coupling efficiency rather than the laser flux. Our model permits calculation of the thermal transient from simple time-integrated thermal fluence and energy deposition data.

  15. Spatial profile of thermoelectric effects during Peltier pulsing in Bi and Bi/MnBi eutectic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, R. P.; Larson, D. J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The spatial profile of the thermal transients that occur during and following the current pulsing associated with Peltier Interface Demarcation during directional solidification is studied. Results for pure Bi are presented in detail and compared with corresponding results for the Bi/MnBi eutectic. Significant thermal transients occur throughout the sample that can be accounted for by the Peltier effect, the Thomson effect, and Joule heating. These effects are separated and their behavior is studied as a function of time, current density, and position with respect to the solid/liquid interface.

  16. Enhanced detection of nitrogen dioxide via combined heating and pulsed UV operation of indium oxide nano-octahedra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Oriol; Roso, Sergio; Vilanova, Xavier; Llobet, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    We report on the use of combined heating and pulsed UV light activation of indium oxide gas sensors for enhancing their performance in the detection of nitrogen dioxide in air. Indium oxide nano-octahedra were synthesized at high temperature (900 °C) via vapour-phase transport and screen-printed onto alumina transducers that comprised interdigitated electrodes and a heating resistor. Compared to the standard, constant temperature operation of the sensor, mild heating (e.g., 100 °C) together with pulsed UV light irradiation employing a commercially available, 325 nm UV diode (square, 1 min period, 15 mA drive current signal), results in an up to 80-fold enhancement in sensitivity to nitrogen dioxide. Furthermore, this combined operation method allows for making savings in power consumption that range from 35% to over 80%. These results are achieved by exploiting the dynamics of sensor response under pulsed UV light, which convey important information for the quantitative analysis of nitrogen dioxide.

  17. Enhanced detection of nitrogen dioxide via combined heating and pulsed UV operation of indium oxide nano-octahedra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Gonzalez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We report on the use of combined heating and pulsed UV light activation of indium oxide gas sensors for enhancing their performance in the detection of nitrogen dioxide in air. Indium oxide nano-octahedra were synthesized at high temperature (900 °C via vapour-phase transport and screen-printed onto alumina transducers that comprised interdigitated electrodes and a heating resistor. Compared to the standard, constant temperature operation of the sensor, mild heating (e.g., 100 °C together with pulsed UV light irradiation employing a commercially available, 325 nm UV diode (square, 1 min period, 15 mA drive current signal, results in an up to 80-fold enhancement in sensitivity to nitrogen dioxide. Furthermore, this combined operation method allows for making savings in power consumption that range from 35% to over 80%. These results are achieved by exploiting the dynamics of sensor response under pulsed UV light, which convey important information for the quantitative analysis of nitrogen dioxide.

  18. Experimental investigation of heat transfer and effectiveness in corrugated plate heat exchangers having different chevron angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Bayram; İpek, Osman

    2017-02-01

    In this study, heat transfer rate and effectiveness of corrugated plate heat exchangers having different chevron angles were investigated experimentally. Chevron angles of plate heat exchangers are β = 30° and β = 60°. For this purpose, experimentally heating system used plate heat exchanger was designed and constructed. Thermodynamic analysis of corrugated plate heat exchangers having different chevron angles were carried out. The heat transfer rate and effectiveness values are calculated. The experimental results are shown that heat transfer rate and effectiveness values for β = 60° is higher than that of the other. Obtained experimental results were graphically presented.

  19. Quantum Zeno effects with "pulsed" and "continuous" measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Facchi, P.; Pascazio, S.

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of a quantum system undergoing measurements is investigated. Depending on the features of the interaction Hamiltonian, the decay can be slowed (quantum Zeno effect) or accelerated (inverse quantum Zeno effect), by changing the time interval between successive (pulsed) measurements or, alternatively, by varying the "strength" of the (continuous) measurement.

  20. Evaluation of pulsed RFI effects on digital satellite repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T. C.; Braun, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical approach for assessing the effect of pulsed RFI on the error probability of a coherent phase-shift keyed signal through a nonlinear satellite repeater. The RFI is assumed to affect the uplink channel and to consist of CW pulses with random power levels and arriving randomly in time with a Poisson distribution. A model to approximate the effect of intermodulation products is introduced and the error probability conditioned on the output of the satellite repeater is computed. The classical moment technique is then used as an efficient method of averaging the conditional error probability over the numerous random parameters associated with the uplink signal.

  1. The effectiveness of a heated air curtain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Daria

    2014-11-01

    Air curtains are high-velocity plane turbulent jets which are installed in the doorway in order to reduce the heat and the mass exchange between two environments. The air curtain effectiveness E is defined as the fraction of the exchange flow prevented by the air curtain compared to the open-door situation. In the present study, we investigate the effects of an opposing buoyancy force on the air curtain effectiveness. Such an opposing buoyancy force arises for example if a downwards blowing air curtain is heated. We conducted small-scale experiments using water as the working fluid with density differences created by salt and sugar. The effectiveness of a downwards blowing air curtain was measured for situations in which the initial density of the air curtain was less than both the indoor and the outdoor fluid density, which corresponds to the case of a heated air curtain. We compare the effectiveness of the heated air curtain to the case of the neutrally buoyant air curtain. It is found that the effectiveness starts to decrease if the air curtain is heated beyond a critical temperature. Furthermore, we propose a theoretical model to describe the dynamics of the buoyant air curtain. Numerical results obtained from solving this model corroborate our experimental findings.

  2. The effects of surface roughness on lunar Askaryan pulses

    CERN Document Server

    James, C W

    2016-01-01

    The effects of lunar surface roughness, on both small and large scales, on Askaryan radio pulses generated by particle cascades beneath the lunar surface has never been fully estimated. Surface roughness affects the chances of a pulse escaping the lunar surface, its coherency, and the characteristic detection geometry. It will affect the expected signal shape, the relative utility of different frequency bands, the telescope pointing positions on the lunar disk, and most fundamentally, the chances of detecting the known UHE cosmic ray and any prospective UHE neutrino flux. Near-future radio-telescopes such as FAST and the SKA promise to be able to detect the flux of cosmic rays, and it is critical that surface roughness be treated appropriately in simulations. of the lunar Askaryan technique. In this contribution, a facet model for lunar surface roughness is combined with a method to propagate coherent radio pulses through boundaries to estimate the full effects of lunar surface roughness on neutrino-detection...

  3. Effective field theory for coherent optical pulse propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Q H; Park, Q Han

    1996-01-01

    Hidden nonabelian symmetries in nonlinear interactions of radiation with matter are clarified. In terms of a nonabelian potential variable, we construct an effective field theory of self-induced transparency, a phenomenon of lossless coherent pulse propagation, in association with Hermitian symmetric spaces G/H. Various new properties of self-induced transparency, e.g. soliton numbers, effective potential energy, gauge symmetry and discrete symmetries, modified pulse area, conserved U(1)-charge etc. are addressed and elaborated in the nondegenerate two-level case where G/H = SU(2)/U(1). Using the U(1)-charge conservation, a new type of analysis on pulse stability is given which agrees with earlier numerical results.

  4. Effects of heat acclimation on time perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Maria; Jakobson, Ainika; Havik, Merle; Timpmann, Saima; Burk, Andres; Ööpik, Vahur; Allik, Jüri; Kreegipuu, Kairi

    2015-03-01

    Cognitive performance is impaired during prolonged exercise in hot environment compared to temperate conditions. These effects are related to both peripheral markers of heats stress and alterations in CNS functioning. Repeated-exposure to heat stress results in physiological adaptations, and therefore improvement in exercise capacity and cognitive functioning are observed. The objective of the current study was to clarify the factors contributing to time perception under heat stress and examine the effect of heat acclimation. 20 young healthy male subjects completed three exercise tests on a treadmill: H1 (at 60% VO(2)peak until exhaustion at 42°C), N (at 22°C; duration equal to H1) and H2 (walk until exhaustion at 42°C) following a 10-day heat acclimation program. Core temperature (T(C)) and heart rate (HR), ratings of perceived fatigue and exertion were obtained continuously during the exercise, and blood samples of hormones were taken before, during and after the exercise test for estimating the prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol response to acute exercise-heat stress. Interval production task was performed before, during and after the exercise test. Lower rate of rise in core temperature, heart rate, hormone response and subjective ratings indicated that the subjects had successfully acclimated. Before heat acclimation, significant distortions in produced intervals occurred after 60 minutes of exercise relative to pre-trial coefficients, indicating speeded temporal processing. However, this effect was absent after in acclimated subjects. Blood prolactin concentration predicted temporal performance in both conditions. Heat acclimation slows down the increase in physiological measures, and improvement in temporal processing is also evident. The results are explained within the internal clock model in terms of the pacemaker-accumulator functioning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Active chimney effect using heated porous layers: optimum heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehiris, Abdelhak; Ameziani, Djamel-Edine; Rahli, Omar; Bouhadef, Khadija; Bennacer, Rachid

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the present work is to treat numerically the problem of the steady mixed convection that occurs in a vertical cylinder, opened at both ends and filled with a succession of three fluid saturated porous elements, namely a partially porous duct. The flow conditions fit with the classical Darcy-Brinkman model allowing analysing the flow structure on the overall domain. The induced heat transfer, in terms of local and average Nusselt numbers, is discussed for various controlling parameters as the porous medium permeability, Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers. The efficiency of the considered system is improved by the injection/suction on the porous matrices frontier. The undertaken numerical exploration particularly highlighted two possible types of flows, with and without fluid recirculation, which principally depend on the mixed convection regime. Thus, it is especially shown that recirculation zones appear in some domain areas under specific conditions, obvious by a negative central velocity and a prevalence of the natural convection effects, i.e., turnoff flow swirls. These latter are more accentuated in the areas close to the porous obstacles and for weak permeability. Furthermore, when fluid injection or suction is considered, the heat transfer increases under suction and reduces under injection. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage II (ICOME 2016)", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  6. Ultrashort-pulse laser irradiation of metal films: the effect of a double-peak laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosandi, Yudi [Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Fachbereich Physik und Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Kaiserslautern (Germany); Universitas Padjadjaran, Department of Physics, Sumedang (Indonesia); Urbassek, Herbert M. [Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Fachbereich Physik und Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Using molecular-dynamics simulation coupled to a homogeneous model for the electron gas, we study the response of an Al thin film on short-pulse laser irradiation. Laser pulses are considered to have a double-peak structure consisting of two Gaussian pulses; the time delay between the two pulses is varied. The temporal dependence of the energy transfer from the electronic system to the lattice is considered in detail. The effect on the temperature and pressure inside the material, as well as on melting, void nucleation and spallation (ablation) are studied. (orig.)

  7. Effects of pulsed electric field on ULQ and RFP plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, M. [Iwate Univ., Morioka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Saito, K.; Suzuki, T. [and others

    1997-12-31

    Dynamo activity and self-organization processes are investigated using the application of pulsed poloidal and toroidal electric fields on ULQ and RFP plasmas. Synchronized to the application of the pulsed electric fields, the remarkable responses of the several plasma parameters are observed. The plasma has a preferential magnetic field structure, and the external perturbation activates fluctuation to maintain the structure through dynamo effect. This process changes the total dissipation with the variation of magnetic helicity in the system, showing that self organization accompanies an enhanced dissipation. (author)

  8. Wave packet dynamics under effect of a pulsed electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, A. R. C. B.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.; Dias, W. S.

    2016-06-01

    We studied the dynamics of an electron in a crystalline one-dimensional model under effect of a time-dependent Gaussian field. The time evolution of an initially Gaussian wave packet it was obtained through the numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Our analysis consists of computing the electronic centroid as well as the mean square displacement. We observe that the electrical pulse is able to promote a special kind of displacement along the chain. We demonstrated a direct relation between the group velocity of the wave packet and the applied electrical pulses. We compare those numerical calculations with a semi-classical approach.

  9. Pulse simulations and heat flow measurements for the ATLAS Forward Calorimeter under high-luminosity conditions

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)758133; Zuber, Kai

    The high luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is an important step for further and more detailed studies of the Standard Model of particle physics as well as searches for new physics. The necessary upgrade of the ATLAS detector is a challenging task as the increased luminosity entails many problems for the different detector parts. The liquid-argon Forward Calorimeter suffers signal-degradation effects and a high voltage drop of the supply potential under high-luminosity conditions. It is possible that the argon starts to boil due to the large energy depositions. The effect of the high-luminosity environment on the liquid-argon Forward Calorimeter has been simulated in order to investigate the level of signal degradation. The results show a curvature of the triangular pulse shape that appears prolonged when increasing the energy deposit. This effect is caused by the drop in the electric potential that produces a decrease in the electric field across the liquid-argon gap in the Forward Calorim...

  10. Evaluation of the Athermal Effect of Electric Pulsing on the Recovery Behavior of Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Jong; Kim, Sung-Dae; Yoo, Donghoon; Lee, Jinwoo; Rhyim, Youngmok; Kim, Daeyong

    2016-12-01

    It is still unclear whether the effects of the electric current on the mechanical behavior can be attributed exclusively to Joule heating. To evaluate athermal effect of electropulsing on recovery, we compared mechanical behavior, dislocation density, and hardness of a pre-tensioned magnesium alloy after treatment of electric pulses (EP) and annealing in an oil bath. The analysis reveals that the athermal effect of EP on the recovery is not clearly identified under a given set of conditions in this study, although EP treatment appears more efficient than conventional heat treatment. This is further supported by the in situ transmission electron microscopy results that little dislocation rearrangement was observed even during the high current density of 4000 A/mm2 as long as temperature remains low.

  11. Immunological effects of methylprednisolone pulse treatment in progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratzer, R; Romme Christensen, J; Romme Nielsen, B

    2014-01-01

    phenotypes investigated, 25 changed at nominal significance from baseline to week 12 (pTh17 or TFH cells. CONCLUSION: Methylprednisolone pulse treatment has...... some effects on circulating immune cells but does not modulate markers of Th17 and TFH cell activity in progressive MS....

  12. Pulsed microwave heating method for preparation of dye-sensitized solar cells for greener, faster, cheaper production of photovoltaic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Clifford B.; Cotta, Robert; Blais, Timothy; Hall, Charles B.

    2015-05-01

    Microwave heating methods are very popular for developing chemical syntheses that are achieved much more rapidly or with less solvent than via conventional heating methods. Their application to solar cell development has been primarily in developing improvements in the synthesis of dyes and curing of polymer substrates, but not in assisting the photoanode construction of dye-sensitized solar cells. Microwave heating of conducting substrates can lead to arcing of electricity in the reactor, which in turn, can lead to extensive degradation or complete destruction of the photoanode. Here we present our work in applying a pulsed microwave heating method that affords quicker dye deposition times in comparison to conventional heating (μw 40 min, conventional 60 min) with similar dye concentrations as characterized by UV-Vis absorbance, contact angle measurements, and cyclic voltammetry. Our photoanodes are constructed with anatase TiO2 cured onto FTO glass, and deposition of the N719 ruthenium dye either directly to the TiO2 layer or through amide bond formation to a silane layer that has been deposited on the TiO2 layer. Modest improvements in the solar energy conversion efficiency are shown through the microwave method in comparison to conventional heating (μw 0.78% vs. conventional 0.25% reported by K. Szpakolski, et. Al. Polyhedron, 2013, 52, 719-732.)

  13. Thermophysical properties of 22 pure metals in the solid and liquid state – The pulse-heating data collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pottlacher G.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The workgroup of subsecond thermophysics in Graz has a long tradition in performing fast pulseheating experiments on metals and alloys. Thereby, wire-shaped specimens are rapidly heated (108 K/s by a large current-pulse (104 A. This method provides thermophysical properties like volume-expansion, enthalpy and electrical resistivity up to the end of the liquid phase. Today, no more experiments on pure metals are to be expected, because almost all elements, which are suitable for pulse-heating so far, have been investigated. The requirements for pulse-heating are: a melting point which is high enough to enable pyrometric temperature measurements and the availability of wire-shaped specimens. These elements are: Co, Cu, Au, Hf, In, Ir, Fe, Pb, Mo, Ni, Nb, Pd, Pt, Re, Rh, Ag, Ta, Ti, W, V, Zn, and Zr. Hence, it is the correct time to present the results in a collected form. We provide data for the above mentioned quantities together with basic information on each material. The uniqueness of this compilation is the high temperature range covered and the homogeneity of the measurement conditions (the same method, the same laboratory, etc.. The latter makes it a good starting point for comparative analyses (e.g. a comparison of all 22 enthalpy traces is in first approximation conform with the rule of Dulong-Petit which states heat capacity – the slope of enthalpy traces – as a function of the number of atoms. The data is useful for input parameters in numerical simulations and it is a major purpose of our ongoing research to provide data for simulations of casting processes for the metal working industry. This work demonstrates some examples of how a data compilation like this can be utilized. Additionally, the latest completive measurement results on Ag, Ni, Ti, and Zr are described.

  14. Effect of eccentricity on pattern-pulse multifocal VEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klistorner, Alexander I; Graham, Stuart L

    2005-01-01

    The sparse pattern-pulse stimulation has been suggested to produce better cortical evoked responses compared to pattern reversal stimulation. This study examines varying pattern-pulse states and the effect of eccentricity of the stimulated visual field on the response amplitude and latency. The multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) was recorded using Accumap. 58 close-packed checkerboard segments in a dartboard configuration were used. The best configuration for pattern-pulse stimulation was determined. This optimal stimulus condition was then compared to pattern-reversal stimulation at different eccentricities of visual field.in terms of latency and signal/noise ratio (SNR) of mfVEP amplitude. The maximal response was seen when each element "1" of the binary sequence was represented by two "pattern on" frames followed by two "pattern off" frames while each element "0" of the binary sequence is represented by four "pattern off" frames. There was a significant overall increase of SNR using this pattern-pulse stimulating mode (SNR=15.5+/-3.8) compared with pattern-reversal stimulation (SNR=12.4+/-2.6). However, this was strongly dependant on eccentricity. In rings 1, 2 and 3 SNR improved by 48%, 43% and 26% respectively with ring 4 the effect was marginal and ring 5 was not significantly different. There was also a significant delay (10.1+/-5.3 msec) of the mfVEP response in pattern-pulse stimulation compared to pattern-reversal. The pattern-pulse method offers some advantages for achieving larger mfVEP signals from the central visual field. However, the more peripheral field where it is the most difficult to obtain signals, does not show any benefit.

  15. Heat Effects on Living Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert C. Hare

    1961-01-01

    This review of knowledge concerning the effects of high temperatures on plants was undertaken in preparation for research aimed at determining how forest fires affect physiological processes in woody species. Major subjects discussed include morphological and physiological responses to high temperatures, external and internal factors governing these responses,...

  16. Effects of pulse current on properties of electrodeposited RE-Ni-W-P-SiC composite coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zhong-cheng; ZHU Xiao-yun; XU Rui-dong

    2004-01-01

    Effects of pulse current on properties of electrodeposited RE-Ni-W-P-SiC composite coating were studied. The results show that hardness of the pulse current electrodeposited composite coatings is higher than that of the direct current electrodeposited composite coatings while other parameters are the same. Otherwise, the deposited velocity is higher, and wear resistance and corrosion resistance of the pulse current electrodeposited composite coatings are also improved when the average current density is 10 A/dm2 , pulse frequency is 800 Hz and duty ratio is 1: 5. The hardness of the coating as-deposited is HV500 - 700, and it reaches HV1300 after heat treatment at 400 ℃ for 1 h.

  17. Study of Heat Transfer in a Kapok Material from the Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient and the Excitation Pulse of Solicitations External Climatic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dieng

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to characterize thermal insulating local material, kapok, from a study in 3 dimensions in Cartesian coordinate and in dynamic frequency regime. From a study a 3 dimensional the heat transfer through a material made of wool kapok (thermal conductivity: &lambda = 0,035 W/m/K; density: &rho = 12, 35 kg/m3; thermal diffusivity: &alpha = 17, 1.10-7 m2 /s is presented. The evolution curves of temperature versus convective heat transfer coefficient have helped highlight the importance of pulse excitation and the depth in the material. The thermal impedance is studied from representations of Nyquist and Bode diagrams allowing characterizing the thermal behavior from thermistors. The evolution of the thermal impedance with the thermal capacity of the material is presented.

  18. Is pulsed electric field still effective for RNA separation in capillary electrophoresis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenqing; Dou, Xiaoming; Ni, Yi; Chen, Qinmiao; Cheng, Shuyi; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori

    2012-03-16

    Pulsed field capillary electrophoresis (PFCE) is a predominant technique to cope with difficulties in resolving large DNA strands, yet it is still unclear whether pulsed electric field is effective for the separation of higher mass RNA. In this paper we focused on the role of pulsed electric field in large RNA fragments analysis by comparing RNA separation performance in PFCE with that in constant field CE. Separation performance in terms of migration mobility, plate numbers, resolution, and selectivity has been tested for the analysis of RNA from 0.1 to 10.0 kilo nucleotide (knt) under different electrophoretic conditions. Denaturation, important to obtain uniform and identifiable peaks, was accomplished by heating the sample in 4.0M urea prior to analysis and the presence of 4.0M urea in the electrophoresis buffer. Results demonstrate that unlike DNA in PFCE, the pulsed electric field mainly affects the separation performance of RNA between 0.4 and 2.0 knt. The migration mobility of long RNA fragments is not a strong function of modulation depth and pulsed frequency. Moreover, the logarithm of RNA mobility is almost inversely proportional to the logarithm of molecule size up to 6.0 knt with correlation coefficient higher than 0.99 in all the polymer concentrations measured here. Resonance frequency of RNA in PFCE was also observed. While these initial experiments show no distinct advantages of using PFCE for RNA separation, they do take further step toward characterizing the migration behavior of RNA under pulsed field conditions.

  19. Formation of the domain structure in CLN under the pyroelectric field induced by pulse infrared laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Kosobokov, M. S.; Mingaliev, E. A.; Karpov, V. R. [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620000 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    The evolution of the self-assembled quasi-regular micro- and nanodomain structures after pulse infrared laser irradiation in congruent lithium niobate crystal was studied by in situ optical observation. Several scenarios of domain kinetics represented covering of the irradiated zone by nets of the separated domain chains and rays have been revealed. The time dependence of the total domain length was analyzed in terms of modified Kolmogorov-Avrami theory. The domain structure evolution was attributed to the action of pyroelectric field appeared during cooling. The time dependence of the spatial distribution of the pyroelectric field during pulse laser heating and subsequent cooling was calculated by finite element method. The results of computer simulation allowed us to explain the experimental results and can be used for creation of tailored domain structures thus opening the new abilities of the submicron-scale domain engineering in ferroelectrics.

  20. Formation of the domain structure in CLN under the pyroelectric field induced by pulse infrared laser heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ya. Shur

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the self-assembled quasi-regular micro- and nanodomain structures after pulse infrared laser irradiation in congruent lithium niobate crystal was studied by in situ optical observation. Several scenarios of domain kinetics represented covering of the irradiated zone by nets of the separated domain chains and rays have been revealed. The time dependence of the total domain length was analyzed in terms of modified Kolmogorov-Avrami theory. The domain structure evolution was attributed to the action of pyroelectric field appeared during cooling. The time dependence of the spatial distribution of the pyroelectric field during pulse laser heating and subsequent cooling was calculated by finite element method. The results of computer simulation allowed us to explain the experimental results and can be used for creation of tailored domain structures thus opening the new abilities of the submicron-scale domain engineering in ferroelectrics.

  1. Filamentation of arbitrary polarized femtosecond laser pulses in case of high-order Kerr effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, Nikolay A; Makarov, Vladimir A; Fedorov, Vladimir Y; Kosareva, Olga G

    2013-02-15

    We developed a model of femtosecond filamentation which includes high-order Kerr effect and an arbitrary polarization of a laser pulse. We show that a circularly polarized pulse has maximum filament intensity. Also, we show that, independently of the initial pulse polarization, the value of a maximum filament intensity tends to the maximum intensity of either linearly or circularly polarized pulse.

  2. Laboratory modeling of pulsed regimes of cyclotron instability in an ECR heated mirror-confined plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfeld, Dmitry; Viktorov, Mikhail; Golubev, Sergey; Vodopyanov, Alexander

    Despite more than half a century history, the studies of the interaction between electromagnetic waves and particles in magnetoactive plasma under electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) conditions still remain topical. One of the most interesting ECR manifestations is the generation of bursts of electromagnetic radiation that are related to the explosive growth of cyclotron instabilities of the magnetoactive plasma confined in magnetic traps of various kinds and that are accompanied by particle precipitations from the trap. Such phenomena are observed in a wide range of plasma parameters under various conditions: in the magnetospheres of the Earth and planets, in solar coronal loops, and in laboratory magnetic traps. We demonstrate the use of a laboratory setup based on a magnetic mirror trap with plasma sustained by a gyrotron radiation under ECR conditions for investigation of the cyclotron instabilities similar to the ones which take place in space plasmas. Three stages of pulsed ECR discharge offer the opportunity to study wave-particles interactions for essentially different plasma parameters: the initial stage, when the density of hot (relativistic) electrons (Nh) exceeds the density of cold electrons (Nc), the developed discharge (NhZ- or X- mode), propagating across the external magnetic field. The detailed investigation of spectral and temporal characteristics of non-stationary bursts of electromagnetic emission is presented. The interrelationship between the observed time-frequency spectrograms of electromagnetic emission with similar effects occurring in the inner magnetosphere is discussed in report.

  3. Effective heat strain index using pocket computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamon, E; Ryan, C

    1981-08-01

    An effective heat strain index (EHSI) using a hand calculator with memory is suggested for on-site evaluation of prevailing hot ambient conditions. The inputs to the programmed calculator include dry-bulb, wet-bulb and globe temperatures, and estimates of metabolism and air movements. The index is based on a program for calculation of the total heat balance and on the efficiency of sweating. The display of information on the ambient conditions EHSI display is one of following: no strain; low strain; high strain; or time limits of exposure.

  4. Modelling heating effects in cryocooled protein crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, J; Fayz, K; Fell, B; Garman, E

    2001-01-01

    With the application of intense X-ray beams from third generation synchrotron sources, damage to cryocooled macromolecular crystals is being observed more commonly . In order to fully utilize synchrotron facilities now available for studying biological crystals, it is essential to understand the processes involved in radiation damage and beam heating so that, if possible, action can be taken to slow the rate of damage. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been applied to model the heating effects of X-rays on cryocooled protein crystals, and to compare the relative cooling efficiencies of nitrogen and helium.

  5. Multi-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer of a Micro-Pump Thermally Driven by a Multi-Output Pulse Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUAI Xiu-Lan; TANG Zhi-Wei; WANG Guo-Xiang; WANG Wei-Wei

    2005-01-01

    @@ We present an experimental study of multi-phase flow and heat transfer in a micro-tube induced by a multi-output pulse laser. Extensive flow and heat transfer measurements and visualization experiments have been carried out to characterize the micro-pump behaviour under various conditions. The experiments reveal extremely unsteady and complex flow patterns in the micro tube with the flow closely related with generation and collapse of bubbles.It is found that the flow rates are controlled by the heating and condensation conditions within the tube. The laser pulse duration, pulse interval and output-power as well as the tube diameter all show a strong influence on the flow rate of the micro-pump. This study provides a basis for the design of thermally-driven micro-pump induced by a pulsed laser beam.

  6. Development of a new diagnosis method for caries in human teeth based on thermal images under pulse heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Kubo, Shiro; Naganuma, Takeshi; Inoue, Tomoyasu; Matsuyama, Kazumasa; Kaneko, Kenji

    2001-03-01

    A new diagnosis method based on the pulse heating thermographic NDT was proposed for the incipient caries of human teeth. Experimental study was made on the applicability of the proposed method to the quantitative evaluation of location and shape of the incipient caries as well as the quantitative diagnosis of the degree of incipient caries. The incipient caries were artificially introduced to the extracted human teeth in various severities. Impulse heat flux by the xenon flash lamp was applied to the surface of the tooth and sequential thermal images were taken by the high-speed infrared thermography. It was found that the caries were clearly identified as the localized high temperature region in the sequential thermal images. Coefficients of the temperature descent were obtained from sequential thermal images. It was found that the degree of the demineralization, i.e. the degree of incipient caries was evaluated from temperature descent coefficients.

  7. Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Effects from Short-Pulse Lasers and Fusion Neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eder, D C; Throop, A; Brown, Jr., C G; Kimbrough, J; Stowell, M L; White, D A; Song, P; Back, N; MacPhee, A; Chen, H; DeHope, W; Ping, Y; Maddox, B; Lister, J; Pratt, G; Ma, T; Tsui, Y; Perkins, M; O' Brien, D; Patel, P

    2009-03-06

    Our research focused on obtaining a fundamental understanding of the source and properties of EMP at the Titan PW(petawatt)-class laser facility. The project was motivated by data loss and damage to components due to EMP, which can limit diagnostic techniques that can be used reliably at short-pulse PW-class laser facilities. Our measurements of the electromagnetic fields, using a variety of probes, provide information on the strength, time duration, and frequency dependence of the EMP. We measure electric field strengths in the 100's of kV/m range, durations up to 100 ns, and very broad frequency response extending out to 5 GHz and possibly beyond. This information is being used to design shielding to mitigate the effects of EMP on components at various laser facilities. We showed the need for well-shielded cables and oscilloscopes to obtain high quality data. Significant work was invested in data analysis techniques to process this data. This work is now being transferred to data analysis procedures for the EMP diagnostics being fielded on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In addition to electromagnetic field measurements, we measured the spatial and energy distribution of electrons escaping from targets. This information is used as input into the 3D electromagnetic code, EMSolve, which calculates time dependent electromagnetic fields. The simulation results compare reasonably well with data for both the strength and broad frequency bandwidth of the EMP. This modeling work required significant improvements in EMSolve to model the fields in the Titan chamber generated by electrons escaping the target. During dedicated Titan shots, we studied the effects of varying laser energy, target size, and pulse duration on EMP properties. We also studied the effect of surrounding the target with a thick conducting sphere and cube as a potential mitigation approach. System generated EMP (SGEMP) in coaxial cables does not appear to be a significant at Titan. Our

  8. Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields on Osteoporosis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaowei, Yang; Liming, Wang; Guan, Z. C.; Yaou, Zhang; Xiangpeng, Wang

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the preventive effects and long term effects of extremely low frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs), generated by circular coils and pulsed electromagnetic fields stimulators, on osteoporosis in bilaterally ovariectomized rats. In preventive experiment, thirty three-month old female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three different groups: sham (SHAM), ovariectomy (OVX), PEMFs stimulation (PEMFs). All rats were subjected to bilaterally ovariectomy except those in SHAM group. The PEMFs group was exposed to pulsed electromagnetic fields with frequency 15 Hz, peak magnetic induction density 2.2mT and exposure time 2 hours per day. The bone mineral density (BMD) of vertebra and left femur were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry at eighth week, twelfth week and sixteenth week after surgery. In long term effects experiment, forty four rats were randomly divided into sham (14 rats, SHAM), ovariectomy group (10 rats, OVX), 15Hz PEMFs group(10 rats, 15Hz) and 30Hz PEMFs group(10 rats, 30Hz) at twenty-sixth week after surgery. Rats in PEMFs groups were stimulated sixteen weeks. In preventive experiment, the Corrected BMD of vertebra and femur was significantly higher than that of OVX group after 16 weeks (Ptreatment of osteoporosis.

  9. Sound scattering and localized heat deposition of pulse-driven microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Lohse, Detlef; Zomack, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The sound scattering of free microbubbles released from strongly driven ultrasound contrast agents with brittle shell (e.g., Sonovist®) is studied numerically. At high peak pressure of the driving pulses, the bubbles respond nonlinearly with cross sections pronouncedly larger than in the linear case

  10. Metal release in a stainless steel Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) system Part I. Effect of different pulse shapes; theory and experimental method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roodenburg, B.; Morren, J.; Berg, H.E.; Haan, S.W.H.de

    2005-01-01

    Liquid pumpable food is mostly pasteurised by heat treatment. In the last decennia there is an increasing interest in so-called Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) treatment. During this treatment food is pumped between two metal electrodes and exposed to short high electric field pulses, typical 2-4 kV mm-

  11. Effect of pulsed electromagnetic fields on orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, T M; Sinclair, P M

    1987-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the application of a simple surgically noninvasive, pulsed electromagnetic field could increase both the rate and amount of orthodontic tooth movement observed in guinea pigs. In addition, the objective was to evaluate the electromagnetic field's effects on bony physiology and metabolism and to search for possible systemic side effects. Laterally directed orthodontic force was applied to the maxillary central incisors of a sample of 40 young male, Hartley guinea pigs (20 experimental, 20 control) by means of a standardized intraoral coil spring inserted under constricting pressure into holes drilled in the guinea pigs' two maxillary central incisors. During the experimental period, the guinea pigs were placed in specially constructed, plastic animal holders with their heads positioned in an area of uniform electromagnetic field. Control animals were placed in similar plastic holders that did not carry the electrical apparatus. The application of a pulsed electromagnetic field to the experimental animals significantly increased both the rate and final amount of orthodontic tooth movement observed over the 10-day experimental period. The experimental animals also demonstrated histologic evidence of significantly greater amounts of bone and matrix deposited in the area of tension between the orthodontically moved maxillary incisors. This increase in cellular activity was also reflected by the presence of significantly greater numbers of osteoclasts in the alveolar bone surrounding the maxillary incisors of the experimental animals. After a 10-day exposure to pulsed electromagnetic field, minor changes in serologic parameters relating to protein metabolism and muscle activity were noted. The results of this study suggest that it is possible to increase the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and bone deposition through the application of a noninvasive, pulsed electromagnetic field.

  12. Enhanced soliton-effect pulse compression by cross-phase modulation in optical fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹文华; 刘颂豪

    2000-01-01

    A new method is proposed to enhance the soliton-effect compression of optical pulses. It consists of copropagating two optical pulses with close wavelengths in the anomalous group-velocity dispersion regime of single-mode fibers. Numerical simulations show that, as compared with the traditional single pulse compression method, cross-phase modulation can not only dramatically increase the compression ratio but also decrease the optimum fiber length. The effects of initial pulse-width mismatch, Raman self-scattering, and pulse walk-off on the pulse compression are also discussed.

  13. Effect of Pulsed Plasma Jets on the Recovering Boundary Layer Downstream of a Reflected Shock Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Benton; Clemens, Noel; Magari, Patrick; Micka, Daniel; Ueckermann, Mattheus

    2015-11-01

    Shock-induced turbulent boundary layer separation can have many detrimental effects in supersonic inlets including flow distortion and instability, structural fatigue, poor pressure recovery, and unstart. The current study investigates the effect of pulsed plasma jets on the recovering boundary layer downstream of a reflected shock wave-boundary layer interaction. The effects of pitch and skew angle of the jet as well as the heating parameter and discharge time scale are tested using several pulsing frequencies. In addition, the effect of the plasma jets on the undisturbed boundary layer at 6 mm and 11 mm downstream of the jets is measured. A pitot-static pressure probe is used to measure the velocity profile of the boundary layer 35 mm downstream of the plasma jets, and the degree of boundary layer distortion is compared between the different models and run conditions. Additionally, the effect of each actuator configuration on the shape of the mean separated region is investigated using surface oil flow visualization. Previous studies with lower energy showed a weak effect on the downstream boundary layer. The current investigation will attempt to increase this effect using a higher-energy discharge. Funded by AFRL through and SBIR in collaboration with Creare, LLC.

  14. Irreversible Heating Measurement with Microsecond Pulse Magnet: Example of the α-θ Phase Transition of Solid Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Toshihiro; Matsuda, Yasuhiro H.; Takeyama, Shojiro; Kobayashi, Tatsuo C.

    2016-09-01

    Dissipation inevitably occurs in first-order phase transitions, leading to irreversible heating. Conversely, the irreversible heating effect may indicate the occurrence of the first-order phase transition. We measured the temperature change at the magnetic-field-induced α-θ phase transition of solid oxygen. A significant temperature increase from 13 to 37 K, amounting to 700 J/mol, due to irreversible heating was observed at the first-order phase transition. We argue that the hysteresis loss of the magnetization curve and the dissipative structural transformation account for the irreversible heating. The measurement of irreversible heating can be utilized to detect the first-order phase transition in combination with an ultrahigh magnetic fields generated in a time of µs order.

  15. Dual Heat Pulse, Dual Layer Thermal Protection System Sizing Analysis and Trade Studies for Human Mars Entry Descent and Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Mary Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    NASA has been recently updating design reference missions for the human exploration of Mars and evaluating the technology investments required to do so. The first of these started in January 2007 and developed the Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0 (DRA5). As part of DRA5, Thermal Protection System (TPS) sizing analysis was performed on a mid L/D rigid aeroshell undergoing a dual heat pulse (aerocapture and atmospheric entry) trajectory. The DRA5 TPS subteam determined that using traditional monolithic ablator systems would be mass expensive. They proposed a new dual-layer TPS concept utilizing an ablator atop a low thermal conductivity insulative substrate to address the issue. Using existing thermal response models for an ablator and insulative tile, preliminary hand analysis of the dual layer concept at a few key heating points indicated that the concept showed potential to reduce TPS masses and warranted further study. In FY09, the followon Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) project continued by focusing on Exploration-class cargo or crewed missions requiring 10 to 50 metric tons of landed payload. The TPS subteam advanced the preliminary dual-layer TPS analysis by developing a new process and updated TPS sizing code to rapidly evaluate mass-optimized, full body sizing for a dual layer TPS that is capable of dual heat pulse performance. This paper describes the process and presents the results of the EDL-SA FY09 dual-layer TPS analyses on the rigid mid L/D aeroshell. Additionally, several trade studies were conducted with the sizing code to evaluate the impact of various design factors, assumptions and margins.

  16. Neurophysiological effects of exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelands, B; De Pauw, K; Meeusen, R

    2015-06-01

    Fatigue during prolonged exercise is a multifactorial phenomenon. The complex interplay between factors originating from both the periphery and the brain will determine the onset of fatigue. In recent years, electrophysiological and imaging tools have been fine-tuned, allowing for an improved understanding of what happens in the brain. In the first part of the review, we present literature that studied the changes in electrocortical activity during and after exercise in normal and high ambient temperature. In general, exercise in a thermo-neutral environment or at light to moderate intensity increases the activity in the β frequency range, while exercising at high intensity or in the heat reduces β activity. In the second part, we review literature that manipulated brain neurotransmission, through either pharmacological or nutritional means, during exercise in the heat. The dominant outcomes were that manipulations changing brain dopamine concentration have the potential to delay fatigue, while the manipulation of serotonin had no effect and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition was detrimental for performance in the heat. Research on the effects of neurotransmitter manipulations on brain activity during or after exercise is scarce. The combination of brain imaging techniques with electrophysiological measures presents one of the major future challenges in exercise physiology/neurophysiology.

  17. Osmotic and Heat Stress Effects on Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Julian

    2016-01-01

    During vertebrate embryonic development, early skin, muscle, and bone progenitor populations organize into segments known as somites. Defects in this conserved process of segmentation lead to skeletal and muscular deformities, such as congenital scoliosis, a curvature of the spine caused by vertebral defects. Environmental stresses such as hypoxia or heat shock produce segmentation defects, and significantly increase the penetrance and severity of vertebral defects in genetically susceptible individuals. Here we show that a brief exposure to a high osmolarity solution causes reproducible segmentation defects in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. Both osmotic shock and heat shock produce border defects in a dose-dependent manner, with an increase in both frequency and severity of defects. We also show that osmotic treatment has a delayed effect on somite development, similar to that observed in heat shocked embryos. Our results establish osmotic shock as an alternate experimental model for stress, affecting segmentation in a manner comparable to other known environmental stressors. The similar effects of these two distinct environmental stressors support a model in which a variety of cellular stresses act through a related response pathway that leads to disturbances in the segmentation process. PMID:28006008

  18. Hyperplasticity effect under magnetic pulse straightening of dual phase steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falaleev, AP; Meshkov, VV; Shymchenko, A.

    2016-10-01

    An investigation of the behaviour of dual phase steel parts during straightening operations, by means of magnetic pulse treatment, is presented. The mechanical analysis of magnetic-pulse treatment for the straightening of thin-walled sheet metal parts produced from dual phase steel was performed, taking into account the effect of hyperplasticity under the influence of the magnetic field. Taking account of the causes of the hyperplasticity and thus the increase of material plasticity, it has been shown that the magnetic impulse gravity can be adjusted by controlling the operation modes. The dependence of the generated magnetic impulse gravity force on the electrical current strength inducted in this part was explored and used for analysis of the magnetic pulse straightening of dual phase steel part. Experimental results were obtained for thin-walled sheet metal part produced from dual phase steel DP 780. The results are used to demonstrate the material deformation under the influence of magnetic impulse gravity force considering the increase of material plasticity. The dependence of relative material deformation on the generated magnetic impulse gravity as well as on the current strength induced in this material was obtained and analyzed

  19. Thermal conductivity and electron-phonon relaxation in a metal heated by a subpicosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Anisimov, S. I.

    2006-06-01

    This paper discusses the initial stages of the interaction of subpicosecond laser pulses with metallic targets: the absorption of light, energy transport by electronic thermal conductivity, and electron-phonon relaxation. It is shown that, with moderate surface energy density, hydrodynamic motion begins after the electronic and lattice temperatures equalize. A connection is established between the energy exchange rate between the electrons and the lattice and the electronic thermal conductivity (an analog of the Wiedemann-Franz law).

  20. Study of Dynamic Buckling of FG Plate Due to Heat Flux Pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czechowski L.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a FEM analysis of dynamic buckling of functionally graded clamped plates under heat flux loading with huge power. The materials of structures as well as their properties are varying in each layer across the plate thickness formulated by the power law distribution. The heat flux was applied evenly to the whole ceramic surface. The analysis was developed in the ANSYS 14.5 software. The duration of the heat flux loading equal to a period of natural fundamental flexural vibrations of given structures was taken into consideration. To implement large deflections of structures, the Green-Lagrange nonlinear-displacement equations and the incremental Newton-Raphson algorithm were applied. An evaluation of the dynamic response of structures was carried out on basis of the Budiansky-Hutchinson criterion. The studies were conducted for different volume fraction distributions and different shapes of the heat flux loading. The computation results of the heat flux versus maximal plate deflection are shown and discussed.

  1. Numerical analysis of heat transfer in unsteady nanofluids in a small pipe with pulse pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol; Yu, KiTae; Song, HeeGeun; Kim, Sedong; Jeong, Hyomin

    2017-08-01

    In the present paper, developing turbulence forced convection flows were numerically investigated by using water-Al2O3 nano-fluid through a circular compact pipe which has 4.5mm diameter. Each model has a steady state and uniform heat flux(UHF) at the wall. The whole numerical experiments were processed under the RPM 100 to 500 and the nano-fluid models were made by the Alumina volume fraction. A single-phase fluid models were defined through nano-fluid physical and thermal properties calculations, Two-phase models(mixture granular model) were processed in 100nm diameter. The results show that comparison of nusselt number and heat transfer rate are improved as the Al2O3 volume fraction increased. All of the numerical flow simulations are processed by the FLUENT. The results show an increase from volume fraction concentration and an increase in heat transfer coefficient with increasing RPM.

  2. Effect of heat leaks in platinum resistance thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldratt, E; Yeshurun, Y; Greenfield, A J

    1980-03-01

    The effect of heat leaks in platinum resistance thermometry is analyzed. An experimental method is proposed for estimating the magnitude of this effect. Results are reported for the measurement of the temperature of a hot, solid body under different heat-leak configurations. Design criteria for thermometers are presented which minimize the effect of such heat leaks.

  3. Oil Circulation Effects on Evaporation Heat Transfer in Brazed Plate Heat Exchanger using R134A

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Jaekyoo; Chang, Youngsoo; Kang, Byungha

    2012-01-01

    Experimental study was performed for oil circulation effects on evaporation heat transfer in the brazed type plate heat exchangers using R134A. In this study, distribution device was installed to ensure uniform flow distribution in the refrigerant flow passage, which enhances heat transfer performance of plate type heat exchanger. Tests were conducted for three evaporation temperature; 33℃, 37℃, and 41℃ and several oil circulation conditions. The nominal conditions of refrigerant are as follo...

  4. Temperature increase due to Joule heating in a nanostructured MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction over a wide current-pulse range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Boram; Lim, Sang Ho

    2011-07-01

    The temperature increase due to Joule heating in a nanopillar of a magnetic tunnel junction sandwiched by top and bottom electrodes was calculated by the finite element method. The results for the critical condition for the current-induced magnetization switching measured over a wide current-pulse range were taken from the literature. At long pulse widths, the temperature increase was solely dependent on the magnitude of the critical current density. However, no saturation in the temperature increase occurred for short pulse widths. In this case, the temperature increase additionally depended on the pulse width, so that a broad maximum occurred in the pulse width (or the critical current density) dependence of the temperature increase. The original results for the critical condition were corrected by accounting for the temperature increase and these corrected results, together with the Slonczewski equation, were used to extract an accurate value for the thermal stability factor.

  5. Flow impinging effect of critical heat flux and nucleation boiling heat transfer on a downward facing heating surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Huai-En; Chen, Mei-Shiue; Chen, Jyun-Wei; Lin, Wei-Keng; Pei, Bau-Shei [National Tsing Hua Univ., Taiwan (China). Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Science

    2015-05-15

    Boiling heat transfer has a high heat removal capability in convective cooling. However, the heat removal capability of downward-facing boiling is significantly worse than that of upward-facing cases because of the confined buoyancy effect. This study was inspired by the conception of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) condition relevant to the in-vessel retention (IVR) design of Westinghouse AP1000 plant. In the present study, a small-scale test facility had been established to investigate the local phenomena of boiling heat transfer under a downward-facing horizontal heated surface with impinging coolant flow. In this study, the surface temperature, heat flux information and several specific scenes of bubbles are taken down throughout the boiling processes for detailed investigation. It is observed that bubbles are confined under the downward-facing heated surface, which causes a worse heat transfer rate and a lower critical heat flux (CHF) limit than upward-facing boiling. Nevertheless, the impinging coolant flow is found to disturb the thermal boundary layer formed by the heated surface, so the CHF increases with an increase of coolant flow rate. In addition, during nucleate boiling, it is discovered that the growth, combination and dissipation of bubbles induce turbulent wakes and therefore enhance the heat transfer capability.

  6. Investigation of Input Signal Curve Effect on Formed Pulse of Hydraulic-Powered Pulse Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoseltseva, M. V.; Masson, I. A.; Pashkov, E. N.

    2016-04-01

    Well drilling machines should have as high efficiency factor as it is possible. This work proposes factors that are affected by change of input signal pulse curve. A series of runs are conducted on mathematical model of hydraulic-powered pulse machine. From this experiment, interrelations between input pulse curve and construction parameters are found. Results of conducted experiment are obtained with the help of the mathematical model, which is created in Simulink Matlab. Keywords - mathematical modelling; impact machine; output signal amplitude; input signal curve.

  7. Pulsed pump: Thermal effects in solid state lasers under super-Gaussian pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Nadgaran; M Sabaian

    2006-12-01

    Solid state laser (SSL) powers can be realistically scaled when pumped by a real, efficient and multimode pulse. In this work, a fourth-order super-Gaussian pulse was assumed as a pump for SSL's and a complete analytical expression for the thermal phase shift is given. Moreover, the focal length of thermal lens in paraxial ray approximation regime was studied. The results when applied to a Ti : sapphire crystal show an appreciable correction for abberation compared to a top-hat pulse.

  8. Observation on rapid transient explosive boiling under pulsed-laser heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Using various kinds of liquids (pure acetone, binary mixtures in various volume fractions of ethanol and acetone) as working liquids, the experiments of rapid transient explosive boiling induced by pulsed-laser irradiation are carried out. The temperature field on a microsecond scale is measured, and the behavior of bubbles is observed and captured by a microscopic camera system. The extreme characteristics that differ from those in normal boiling are clearly revealed. The influence of working liquid species, volume fraction of the mixture, nanoparticles added in the working liquid, and the laser irradiation parameters on the boiling behavior are also studied.

  9. Electron and phonon dynamics in laser short pulses-heated metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietanza, L. D.; Colonna, G.; Capitelli, M.

    2005-07-01

    The simultaneous electron and phonon relaxation dynamic in a metal film subjected to a laser pulse has been theoretically investigated. A system of two coupled time- and energy-dependent Boltzmann equations describing the electron and phonon dynamics has been numerically solved. The collision processes considered are electron-electron (e-e) and electron-phonon (e-p) collisions. Our results show the non-equilibrium electron distribution and the electron and phonon relaxation dynamics both after a femtosecond and a picosecond laser perturbations.

  10. Effect of Joule heating on electrokinetic transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Barbaros; Li, Dongqing

    2008-03-01

    The Joule heating (JH) is a ubiquitous phenomenon in electrokinetic flow due to the presence of electrical potential gradient and electrical current. JH may become pronounced for applications with high electrical potential gradients or with high ionic concentration buffer solutions. In this review, an in-depth look at the effect of JH on electrokinetic processes is provided. Theoretical modeling of EOF and electrophoresis (EP) with the presence of JH is presented and the important findings from the previous studies are examined. A numerical study of a fused-silica capillary PCR reactor powered by JH is also presented to extend the discussion of favorable usage of JH.

  11. Infrared emissivity studies of melting thresholds and structural changes of aluminium and copper samples heated by femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallo, L; Riou, O; Stenz, C; Tikhonchuk, V T [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, UMR 5107 CNRS-Universite Bordeaux 1-CEA, Universite Bordeaux 1, 351 Cours de la Liberation, 33405 Talence Cedex (France)

    2006-12-21

    We propose a new method for studies of laser-induced heating and melting of metallic foils. The method is based on time-integrated measurements of the surface infrared thermal emission. The experimental data are compared with a model where two equations describe the evolution of electron and lattice temperatures and the emissivity is found from the Drude model with the temperature-dependent electron collision frequency. A good agreement between the experimental data and the model is found for the aluminium samples. It is less satisfactory for the copper, but a signature of phase melting can also be pointed out. A multi-pulse laser irradiation study indicates significant changes in the surface emittance, related to preheating, oxidation and/or chemical modification of the copper sample. The proposed method is relatively simple and complementary to the pump-probe technique.

  12. Measuring normal spectral emissivities of niobium by a pulse-heating technique: 1000 K to the melting point

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingwei Wang; Peng Xiao; Jintao Yu; Jingmin Dai

    2006-01-01

    The normal spectral emissivity of niobium strip specimen is measured using a new pulse-heating reflectometric technique. The hemispherical spectral reflectivity of the surface of a strip tangent to an integrating sphere is determined by a high-speed lock-in technique. At the same time, the radiance temperature of the strip is measured by the multi-wavelength high-speed pyrometer from approximately 1000K to the melting point. Details of the measurement method and of the related calibration techniques are reported. Results of the normal spectral emissivity of niobium at 633, 753, 827, and 905 nm from room temperature to its melting point are presented. The accuracy of spectral emissivities is estimated better than 5%.

  13. Effect of Beam-Plasma Interaction on Characteristics of Drilling : Study on Material Processing by High Peak, Short Pulse CO_2 laser

    OpenAIRE

    Shozui, TAKENO; Masaharu, MORIYASU; Seigo, HIRAMOTO; Mitsubishi Electric Corporation

    1993-01-01

    The fundamentals of laser beam drilling were studied using a high peak, short pulse CO_2 laser. Specifically, those areas examined were the effects of the beam-plasma interaction and heat accumulation near the irradiation point during multi-pulse irradiation on the characteristics of drilling Si_3N_4 ceramics and acrylic resin (PMMA). In the case of beam-plasma interaction, the drilling efficiency and hole shape were compared in a vacuum and in air. For heat accumulation, holes formed with a ...

  14. Effect of inter-pulse delay time on production and size properties of colloidal nanoparticles prepared by collinear double-pulse laser ablation in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, Behzad; Mahdieh, Mohammah Hossein

    2016-08-01

    The influence of inter-pulse delay times (0-20 ns) between two collinear sequential nanosecond pulses on the production and size properties (mean size and size distribution) of colloidal nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser ablation of a silver target in a distilled water medium has been studied. Various laser fluences at different inter-pulse delay times between two collinear pulses were used. Furthermore, for a better understanding of the effect of the double-pulse and single-pulse mode, experiments were performed. The characterization of the synthesized colloidal nanoparticles was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Our results showed that 5 ns time-delayed double-pulse laser ablation results in the production of nanoparticles with the highest concentration among the other time-delayed ablation experiments and even more than single-pulse-mode experiments. It also found that using a double-pulse approach with inter-pulse delay times in the range of 0-20 ns leads to the production of nanoparticles with smaller mean sizes and narrower size distributions in comparison to single-pulse-mode laser ablation. The effect of time overlapping between two pulses in the case of double-pulse ablation was analyzed.

  15. Focal spacing and near-field heating during pulsed high temperature ultrasound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damianou, C; Hynynen, K

    1993-01-01

    It has been proposed that high temperature short duration hyperthermia treatment would be perfusion insensitive and thus, significantly improved thermal exposure uniformity could be achieved. This study investigates the execution of such a treatment, which utilizes single spherically curved transducer and multiple sonications to cover the complete target volume. The spacing of neighboring pulses as a function of the transducer characteristics was studied utilizing computer simulations. In addition, the temperature elevation in front of the focal zone during multiple sonications was evaluated. It was found that significant delays (20 s or longer) between the sonications must be introduced in order to avoid unwanted tissue damage in front of the focal zone. In addition, decreasing the pulse duration and F-number reduced the temperature build-up in front of the focus. The results were verified in vivo in dog's thigh muscle. This study is important not only for hyperthermia but also for ultrasound surgery, and indicates that each sonication system must be carefully evaluated for potential thermal damage outside of the target volume prior to implementation in therapy.

  16. In Situ Mitigation of Subsurface and Peripheral Focused Ion Beam Damage via Simultaneous Pulsed Laser Heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Michael G; Lewis, Brett B; Iberi, Vighter; Fowlkes, Jason D; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Rick; Rack, Philip D

    2016-04-01

    Focused helium and neon ion (He(+)/Ne(+)) beam processing has recently been used to push resolution limits of direct-write nanoscale synthesis. The ubiquitous insertion of focused He(+)/Ne(+) beams as the next-generation nanofabrication tool-of-choice is currently limited by deleterious subsurface and peripheral damage induced by the energetic ions in the underlying substrate. The in situ mitigation of subsurface damage induced by He(+)/Ne(+) ion exposures in silicon via a synchronized infrared pulsed laser-assisted process is demonstrated. The pulsed laser assist provides highly localized in situ photothermal energy which reduces the implantation and defect concentration by greater than 90%. The laser-assisted exposure process is also shown to reduce peripheral defects in He(+) patterned graphene, which makes this process an attractive candidate for direct-write patterning of 2D materials. These results offer a necessary solution for the applicability of high-resolution direct-write nanoscale material processing via focused ion beams.

  17. Effects of pulse strength and pulse duration on in vitro DNA electromobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharoff, David A; Yuan, Fan

    2004-04-01

    Interstitial transport of DNA is a rate-limiting step in electric field-mediated gene delivery in vivo. Interstitial transport of macromolecules, such as plasmid DNA, over a distance of several cell layers, is inefficient due to small diffusion coefficient and inadequate convection. Therefore, we explored electric field as a novel driving force for interstitial transport of plasmid DNA. In this study, agarose gels were used to mimic the interstitium in tissues as they had been well characterized and could be prepared reproducibly. We measured the electrophoretic movements of fluorescently labeled plasmid DNA in agarose gels with three different concentrations (1.0%, 2.0% and 3.0%) subjected to electric pulses at three different field strengths (100, 200 and 400 V/cm) and four different pulse durations (10, 50, 75, 99 ms). We observed that: (1) shorter pulses (10 ms) were not as efficient as longer pulses in facilitating plasmid transport through agarose gels; (2) plasmid electromobility reached a plateau at longer pulse durations; and (3) plasmid electromobility increased with applied electric energy, up to a threshold, in all three gels. These data suggested that both pulse strength and duration needed to be adequately high for efficient plasmid transport through extracellular matrix. We also found that electric field was better than concentration gradient of DNA as a driving force for interstitial transport of plasmid DNA.

  18. Effects of heat current on magnetization dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetro, Francesco Antonio; Brechet, Sylvain; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    The work is aimed at investigating the interplay between spin dynamics and heat currents in single-crystal Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG). The irreversible thermodynamics for a continuous medium predicts that a thermal gradient, in the presence of magnetization waves, produces a magnetic induction field, thus a magnetic analog of the well-known Seebeck effect. Time-resolved transmission measurements revealed a change in the attenuation of magnetization waves propagating along the thermal gradient when the gradient is reversed. This magnetic damping change can be accounted for by the Magnetic Seebeck effect. In order to characterize this effect further, we have conducted studies on magnetization dynamic in YIG single crystal samples placed in various geometrical configurations, e.g. with YIG disks in which magnetic vortices might be present. Various magnetic resonance schemes were used, e.g. local probes and cavities.

  19. Investigation of Gas Heating by Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Glow Discharges Used for Actuation of a Laminar Methane-Air Flame

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna A.

    2017-05-24

    This paper reports on the quantification of the heating induced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) glow discharges on a lean premixed methane-air flame. The flame, obtained at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, has an M-shape morphology. The equivalence ratio is 0.95 and the thermal power released by the flame is 113 W. The NRP glow discharges are produced by high voltage pulses of 10 ns duration, 7 kV amplitude, applied at a repetition frequency of 10 kHz. The average power of the plasma, determined from current and voltage measurements, is 1 W, i.e. about 0.9 % of the thermal power of the flame. Broadband vibrational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy of nitrogen is used to determine the temperature of the flame with and without plasma enhancement. The temperature evolution in the flame area shows that the thermal impact of NRP glow discharges is in the uncertainty range of the technique, i.e., +/- 40 K.

  20. Effects of high power microwave pulses on synaptic transmission and long term potentiation in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomov, Andrei G; Doyle, Joanne; Stuck, Bruce E; Murphy, Michael R

    2003-04-01

    Effects of short, extremely high power microwave pulses (EHPP) on neuronal network function were explored by electrophysiological techniques in the isolated rat hippocampal slice model. Population spikes (PS) in the CA1 area were evoked by repeated stimulation (1 per 30 s) of the Schaffer collateral pathway. A brief tetanus (2 s at 50 Hz) was used to induce long term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission. In three different series of experiments with a total of 160 brain slices, the EHPP irradiation was performed before, during, or after the tetanus. The EHPP carrier frequency was 9.3 GHz, the pulse width and repetition rate were from 0.5 to 2 micros and from 0.5 to 10 Hz, respectively, and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) in brain slices reached up to 500 MW/kg. Microwave heating of the preparation ranged from 0.5 degrees C (at 0.3 kW/kg time average SAR) to 6 degrees C (at 3.6 kW/kg). The experiments established that the only effect caused by EHPP exposure within the studied range of parameters was a transient and fully reversible decrease in the PS amplitude. Recovery took no more than a few minutes after the cessation of exposure and return to the initial temperature. This effect's features were characteristic of an ordinary thermal response: it was proportional to the temperature rise but not to any specific parameter of EHPP, and it could also be induced by a continuous wave (CW) irradiation or conventional heating. Irradiation did not affect the ability of neurons to develop LTP in response to tetanus or to retain the potentiated state that was induced before irradiation. No lasting or delayed effects of EHPP were observed. The results are consistent with the thermal mechanism of EHPP action and thus far provided no indication of EHPP-specific effects on neuronal function.

  1. Effects of pulsed electric fields on inactivation kinetics of Listeria innocua

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, P.C.; Dutreux, N.; Smelt, J.P.P.M.; Lelieveld, H.L.M.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment and processing factors on the inactivation kinetics of Listeria innocua NCTC 11289 were investigated by using a pilot plant PEF unit with a flow rate of 200 liters/h. The electric field strength, pulse length, number of pulses, and inlet temperatu

  2. The effect of electric pulse stimulation to juvenile cod and cod of commercial landing size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de D.; Fosseidengen, J.E.; Fjelldal, P.G.; Burggraaf, D.

    2011-01-01

    The first pilot study on the effects of electric pulse stimulation on larger cod carried out in 2008 was based on a single nominal setting of the Verburg-Holland UK153 pulse system with the intention to determine the range of pulse characteristics with which injuries to the fish occurred. This study

  3. Effect of frequency variation on electromagnetic pulse interaction with charges and plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; Goor, van F.A.; Verschuur, J.W.J.; Boller, K.-J.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of frequency variation (chirp) in an electromagnetic (EM) pulse on the pulse interaction with a charged particle and plasma is studied. Various types of chirp and pulse envelopes are considered. In vacuum, a charged particle receives a kick in the polarization direction after interaction

  4. Effects of a physiological GH pulse on interstitial glycerol in abdominal and femoral adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravhølt, C H; Schmitz, Ole; Simonsen, L

    1999-01-01

    Physiologically, growth hormone (GH) is secreted in pulses with episodic bursts shortly after the onset of sleep and postprandially. Such pulses increase circulating levels of free fatty acid and glycerol. We tested whether small GH pulses have detectable effects on intercellular glycerol...

  5. Physiological effects after exposure to heat : A brief literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, C.P.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Many employees are exposed to heat stress during their work. Although the direct effects of heat are well reported, the long term physiological effects occurring after heat exposure are hardly described. The present manuscript addresses these issues in the form of a brief literature review. Repeated

  6. An Inquiry into the Effect of Heating on Ascorbic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Din Yan

    2009-01-01

    Investigations that study the effect of heating on ascorbic acid are commonly performed in schools, but the conclusions obtained are quite variable and controversial. Some results indicate that heating may destroy vitamin C, but others suggest that heating may have no effect. This article reports an attempt to resolve this confusion through a…

  7. Physiological effects after exposure to heat : A brief literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, C.P.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Many employees are exposed to heat stress during their work. Although the direct effects of heat are well reported, the long term physiological effects occurring after heat exposure are hardly described. The present manuscript addresses these issues in the form of a brief literature review. Repeated

  8. Length Effect on the Thermal Performance of a Heat Pipe for NPP Decay Heat Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Joseph; Lee, Jae Young [Handong Global University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    After Fukushima accident, importance and necessity of passive safety for nuclear power plant have been emphasized. Due to its passive characteristic, heat pipe is seriously considered as an alternative device of the active safety system for removing decay heat from the reactor core. Among many possible applications of heat pipe in NPP, we considered the application to the control rod. In the situation of SBO(Station Black Out) due to BDBA(Beyond Design Basis Accident) in a PWR, control rods are dropped in to nuclear reactor core automatically. Thus, it is expected that applying heat pipe function to control rod can enhance reactor safety by removing decay heat of fuel assembly. Considering the height of the control rod, L/D of the heat pipe would be larger than 400 if the given diameter is assumed to be similar to the diameter of the control rod. Thus, it may not be the matter for small heat pipes, it is necessary to consider the effects of L/D for the large L/D heat pipes. There for, length effect on the thermal performance of heat pipe for decay heat removal was experimentally investigated in this study. Through this study, the L/D effect on the thermal performance of the large L/D heat pipe for nuclear reactor has been studied.

  9. Modeling of Thermodiffusion Inertia in Metal Films Heated with Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janavičius, A. J.; Turskienė, S.

    2006-10-01

    Previously, we considered the analytical solution of nonlinear diffusion equation in two-dimensional surface. This allows us to consider the same nonlinear heat conduction equation for metals heated by a picosecond laser. After fast thermalization (within a few femtoseconds) of the laser energy and electron excitation in the conductivity band, electrons ballistically diffuse and transfer their energies to the target atoms and equilibrium electrons from the conductivity band. In this case, we have thermal diffusion of nonequilibrium excited electrons and thermal inertia for thermodiffusion. The relaxation time of excited conductivity electrons is directly connected with thermal inertia and depends on electron-electron collision frequencies. The theoretical temperature surface plots for the thermodiffusion of excited electrons were obtained from analytical solutions of nonlinear thermodiffusion equations.

  10. Effect of low and high heating rates on reaction path of Ni(V)/Al multilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maj, Łukasz, E-mail: l.maj@imim.pl [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Morgiel, Jerzy; Szlezynger, Maciej [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, 25 Reymonta St., 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Bała, Piotr; Cios, Grzegorz [AGH University of Science and Technology, Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology, 30 Kawiory St., 30-055 Kraków (Poland)

    2017-06-01

    The effect of heating rates of Ni(V)/Al NanoFoils{sup ®} was investigated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Ni(V)/Al were subjected to heating by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in-situ TEM or electric pulse. Local chemical analysis was carried out using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Phase analysis was done with X-ray diffractions (XRD) and selected area electron diffractions (SAED). The experiments showed that slow heating in DSC results in development of separate exothermic effects at ∼230 °C, ∼280 °C and ∼390 °C, corresponding to precipitation of Al{sub 3}Ni, Al{sub 3}Ni{sub 2} and NiAl phases, respectively, i.e. like in vanadium free Ni/Al multilayers. Further heating to 700 °C allowed to obtain a single phase NiAl foil. The average grain size (g.s.) of NiAl phase produced in the DSC heat treated foil was comparable with the Ni(V)/Al multilayer period (∼50 nm), whereas in the case of reaction initiated with electric pulse the g.s. was in the micrometer range. Upon slow heating vanadium tends to segregate to zones parallel to the original multilayer internal interfaces, while in SHS process vanadium-rich phases precipitates at grain boundaries of the NiAl phase. - Highlights: • Peaks in DSC heating of Ni(V)/Al were explained by in-situ TEM observations. • Nucleation of Al{sub 3}Ni, Al{sub 3}Ni{sub 2} and NiAl at slow heating of Ni(V)/Al was documented. • Near surface NiAl obtained from NanoFoil show Ag precipitates at grain boundaries.

  11. Combined Effects of Wakes and Jet Pulsing on Film Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    water as a refer- ence. Constant current cold- wire and constant temperature hot - wire anemometry were used to measure flow temperature and velocity...Temperature measurements were made using an infrared camera, thermocouples, and constant current (cold wire ) anemometry . The local film cooling effectiveness...and heat transfer coefficient were de- termined from the measured temperatures. Phase locked flow temperature fields were determined from cold- wire

  12. Fast and effective: intense pulse light photodynamic inactivation of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisch, Tim; Spannberger, Franz; Regensburger, Johannes; Felgenträger, Ariane; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2012-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the photodynamic toxicity of TMPyP (5, 10, 15, 20-Tetrakis (1-methylpyridinium-4-yl)-porphyrin tetra p-toluenesulfonate) in combination with short pulses (ms) of an intense pulse light source within 10 s against Bacillus atrophaeus, Staphylococcus aureus, Methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Escherichia coli, major pathogens in food industry and in health care, respectively. Bacteria were incubated with a photoactive dye (TMPyP) that is subsequently irradiated with visible light flashes of 100 ms to induce oxidative damage immediately by generation of reactive oxygen species like singlet oxygen. A photodynamic killing efficacy of up to 6 log(10) (>99.9999%) was achieved within a total treatment time of 10 s using a concentration range of 1-100 μmol TMPyP and multiple light flashes of 100 ms (from 20 J cm(-2) up to 80 J cm(-2)). Both incubation of bacteria with TMPyP alone or application of light flashes only did not have any negative effect on bacteria survival. Here we could demonstrate for the first time that the combination of TMPyP as the respective photosensitizer and a light flash of 100 ms of an intense pulsed light source is enough to generate sufficient amounts of reactive oxygen species to kill these pathogens within a few seconds. Increasing antibiotic resistance requires fast and efficient new approaches to kill bacteria, therefore the photodynamic process seems to be a promising tool for disinfection of horizontal surfaces in industry and clinical purposes where savings in time is a critical point to achieve efficient inactivation of microorganisms.

  13. Modulational instability of short pulses in long optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P. K.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    The effect of time-derivative nonlinearity is incorporated into the study of the modulational instability of heat pulses propagating through long optical fibers. Conditions for soliton formation are discussed......The effect of time-derivative nonlinearity is incorporated into the study of the modulational instability of heat pulses propagating through long optical fibers. Conditions for soliton formation are discussed...

  14. Fuel Composition Analysis of Endothermically Heated JP-8 Fuel for Use in a Pulse Detonation Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    0.15 0.14 0.03 0.11 0.07 0.12 0.13 0.14 0.14 Methyl -cyclohexane * 3.38 0.13 0.25 0.30 0.37 0.38 0.18 0.31 0.26 0.31 0.28 0.32 0.33 Ethyl -cyclopentane...FUEL FOR USE IN A PULSE DETONATION ENGINE I. Introduction Motivation JP-8 is the predominant kerosene fuel currently used in the United States Air...Thermal Decomposition The fuel of choice for this research is JP-8 for many practical reasons. JP-8 is the predominant kerosene fuel currently used

  15. Development of a New Diagnosis Method for Incipient Caries in Human Teeth Based on Thermal Images under Pulse Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Kubo, Shiro; Naganuma, Takeshi; Inoue, Tomoyasu; Matsuyama, Kazumasa; Nakashima, Shoji; Kaneko, Kenji

    A new noninvasive diagnosis method based on the pulse heating thermographic NDT was proposed for incipient caries of human teeth. Experiments were conducted to study the applicability of the proposed method to the quantitative evaluation of location and shape of the incipient caries as well as the quantitative diagnosis of the degree of incipient caries. The incipient caries were artificially introduced to the extracted human teeth with various severities. Impulse heat flux by the xenon flash lamp was applied to the surface of the tooth and sequential thermal images were taken by the high-speed infrared thermography. It was found that the caries were clearly identified as the localized high temperature region in the sequential thermal images. A coefficient of the temperature descent was obtained from sequential thermal images. It was found that the degree of the demineralization, i. e. the degree of incipient caries was evaluated from the temperature descent coefficient. Further the proposed technique was applied to the detection of natural incipient caries in an extracted human molar tooth. It was found that natural incipient caries was also clearly identified in the thermal images.

  16. Experimental and numerical study of short pulse effects in FELs

    CERN Document Server

    Khodyachykh, S; Genz, H; Hessler, C; Richter, A; Asgekar, V

    2004-01-01

    We report the experimental and numerical investigations of the influence of short pulse effects occurring in FELs in different operational regimes for electron bunch lengths which are of the order of the slippage distance. Several observables such as the small signal gain, the macropulse power and the spectral distribution of the FEL radiation were determined experimentally within the constraints of the stable focus regime at the infrared FEL at the S- DALINAC and for the limit cycle regime at the Dutch near infrared FEL FELIX. The experimental findings were compared to predictions of numerical simulations based on the 1D time dependent code FEL1D-OSC. The agreement between experiment and simulation is good. Furthermore, the simulations reveal a chaotic behavior of the macropulses for specific values of the slippage as well as period-doubling, two effects that are predicted to show up in the spectral distribution.

  17. Experimental and numerical study of short pulse effects in FELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodyachykh, S.; Brunken, M.; Genz, H.; Hessler, C.; Richter, A.; Asgekar, V.

    2004-09-01

    We report the experimental and numerical investigations of the influence of short pulse effects occurring in FELs in different operational regimes for electron bunch lengths which are of the order of the slippage distance. Several observables such as the small signal gain, the macropulse power and the spectral distribution of the FEL radiation were determined experimentally within the constraints of the stable focus regime at the infrared FEL at the S-DALINAC and for the limit cycle regime at the Dutch near infrared FEL FELIX. The experimental findings were compared to predictions of numerical simulations based on the 1D time dependent code FEL1D-OSC. The agreement between experiment and simulation is good. Furthermore, the simulations reveal a chaotic behavior of the macropulses for specific values of the slippage as well as period-doubling, two effects that are predicted to show up in the spectral distribution.

  18. Influência da energia de soldagem em uniões de lâminas finas através de laser pulsado de Nd:YAG Effect of the heat input on pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of thin foil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente A. Ventrella

    2010-12-01

    as an important manufacturing process. It can be performed using either pulsed or continuous lasers. A pulsed laser can be used to create weld seams in thin foils by means of overlapping pulses. Typical problems in lap joint welding of thin foils for sealing components in corrosive environment applications include excessive distortion, absence of intimate contact between couple, melt drop through and high level of residual stress. Pulsed laser processing is expected to be the method of choice because it allows more precise heat control compared with continuous laser processing. Experimental investigations were carried out using a pulsed neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet laser welding to examine the influence of the pulse energy in the characteristics of the weld fillet. The pulse energy was varied from 1.0 to 2.25 J at an increment of 0.25 J and 4 ms pulse duration. The base material used for this study was the AISI 316L stainless steel foil with 100µm thickness. The welds were analyzed by optical microscopy, tensile shear tests and micro hardness. The results indicated that pulse energy control is of considerable importance for thin foil weld quality since it can generate good mechanical properties and discontinuities free weld joints. The ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints increased at first and then decreased with the pulse energy increasing. The process showed very sensitive to the gap between couple.

  19. Thermophysical processes initiated by inert-matrix-hosted nanoparticles heated by laser pulses of different durations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenskii, A. V.; Zvekov, A. A.; Nikitin, A. P.; Aduev, B. P.

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, a model for the heating of inert-matrix-hosted metal nanoparticles with laser radiation taking into account the melting processes is examined. The calculations were performed using the characteristics of gold and pentaerythritol tetranitrate materials. The kinetic dependences of the temperature and molten-layer thickness on nanoparticle surface were calculated. The main non-dimensional governing parameters of the model were identified. An expression for the maximum thickness of molten layer was obtained. The results can be used in predicting the stability of nonlinear-optics devices with hosted gold nanoparticles, in raising the efficiency of hyperthermia cancer therapy, and in optimizing the optical detonators.

  20. Effects of electromagnetic pulse on serum element levels in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kangchu; Ma, Shirong; Ren, Dongqing; Li, Yurong; Ding, Guirong; Liu, Junye; Guo, Yao; Guo, Guozhen

    2014-04-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) was a potentially harmful factor to the human body, and a biological dosimetry to evaluate effects of EMP is necessary. Little is known about effects of EMP on concentration of macro and trace elements in serum so far. In this study, Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 50-kV/m EMP-exposed group (n = 10), 100-kV/m EMP-exposed group (n = 10), 200-kV/m EMP-exposed group (n = 40), and the sham-exposed group (n = 20). The macro and trace element concentrations in serum were examined at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after EMP exposure at different electric field intensities. Compared with the sham-exposed groups, the concentration of sodium (Na), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), selenium (Se), and manganese (Mn) in rat serum was not changed significantly within 48 h after 200 pulses of EMP exposure at electric field intensity of 50, 100, and 200 kV/m although the K level was decreased and the Ca level was increased with the electric field intensity of EMP increasing. In addition, there was a tendency that the Zn level was decreased with the time going on within 48 h after EMP exposure. Under our experimental conditions, EMP exposure cannot affect the concentration of macro and trace elements in rat serum. There was no time-effect or dose-effect relationship between EMP exposure and serum element levels. The macro and trace elements in serum are not suitable endpoints of biological dosimetry of EMP.

  1. Experimental study of the influence of cold heat exchanger geometry on the performance of a co-axial pulse tube cooler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pang, Xiaomin; Dai, Wei; Wang, Xiaotao; Vanapalli, S.; Luo, Ercang

    2016-01-01

    Improving the performance of the pulse tube cooler is one of the important objectives of the current studies. Besides the phase shifters and regenerators, heat exchangers also play an important role in determining the system efficiency and cooling capacity. A series of experiments on a 10 W @ 77 K c

  2. Effect of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and intense pulsed light on the expression of heat shock protein 70 in rat skin%Q开关Nd:YAG激光与强脉冲光对鼠皮肤热休克蛋白70表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟华; 马伟元; 蔡大幸; 孙青

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of Q - switched Nd: YAG laser and intense pulsed light (IPL) on the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in rat skin. Methods: The dorsal skin of twenty Wister rats were divided into three areas before treatments: the cephalic region as normal control group, the middle region as the IPL treatment group and the caudal region as the YAG group. The skin samples were taken at day 1, day 7 and on week 4 after irradiation. The expression of HSF70 protein was detected with immunohistochemistry. Results: The expression of HSP70 of two treatment groups were reached the most significant at 1 week. At week 4 after irradiation, the expression of HSP70 decreased and there was no difference between the IPL group and the control group ( P > 0.05) , but YAG group was still stronger than the control group ( P < 0.05) , The expression of HSP70 of two light irradiated groups were different significantly at 1 day, 1 week and 4 weeks ( P < 0.05). Conclusion: The intensity of HSP70 expression in rat skin is related to the degree and depth of thermal damage after the light irradiation. The effect of Q- switched 1064 ran Nd: YAG laser on rat skin rejuvenation is stronger and more durable than IPL.%目的:确定Q开关1064 nm Nd:YAG激光与强脉冲光(IPL)对Wistar大鼠皮肤热休克蛋白70(HSP70)表达的影响.方法:Wistar大鼠20只,背部皮肤脱毛,平均分成3部分:近头侧区为正常对照组,中间区为IPL组,近尾侧区为YAG组.于照射后1天、1周、4周取大鼠皮肤标本,免疫组化技术检测HSP70的表达.结果:免疫组化显示:Q开关1064 nm Nd:YAG激光和IPL照射后1周,HSP70表达最为显著;照射后4周,HSP70表达下调,IPL组表达与正常对照组无差别,YAG组仍较正常对照组表达增强(P<0.05);两光照组间于照射后1天、1周和4周HSP70表达差别有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:HSP70的表达强度与光照后组织热损伤的程度和深度有关,Q开关1064 nm Nd:YAG激

  3. Ultrafast molecular photoionization by two-color orthogonally polarized ultraviolet laser pulses: Effects of relative pulse phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D.

    2017-09-01

    We present molecular photoionization by two-color 2ω1 =ω2 orthogonally polarized ultraviolet laser pulses. Simulations are performed on aligned H+ by numerically solving time-dependent Schrödinger equations. Two ionization processes with one ω2 photon interfering with two ω1 photon absorption are studied at different molecular alignments. Molecular frame photoelectron momentum and angular distributions exhibit asymmetries which are functions of the relative pulse phase. For resonant excitation processes by the ω1 pulse, symmetric distributions are obtained. An attosecond ionization model is adopted to describe the ultrafast ionization dynamics. The dependence of the ionization asymmetry on the molecular alignment allows to further monitor interference effects on orbital symmetry.

  4. Effect of the heating surface enhancement on the heat transfer coefficient for a vertical minichannel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piasecka Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to estimate effect of the heating surface enhancement on FC-72 flow boiling heat transfer for a vertical minichannel 1.7 mm deep, 24 mm wide and 360 mm long. Two types of enhanced heating surfaces were used: one with minicavities distributed unevenly, and the other with capillary metal fibrous structure. It was to measure temperature field on the plain side of the heating surface by means of the infrared thermography and to observe the two-phase flow patterns on the enhanced foil side. The paper analyses mainly the impact of the microstructured heating surface on the heat transfer coefficient. The results are presented as heat transfer coefficient dependences on the distance along the minichannel length. The data obtained using two types of enhanced heating surfaces in experiments was compared with the data when smooth foil as the heating surface was used. The highest local values of heat transfer coefficient were obtained using enhanced foil with minicavities - in comparison to other cases. Local values of heat transfer coefficient received for capillary fibrous structure were the lowest, even compared with data obtained for smooth foil. Probably this porous structure caused local flow disturbances.

  5. Study on the ionospheric effects with different heat-conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Fang; ZHAO Zhengyu; NI Binbin; ZHANG Yuannong

    2007-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed.Based on the numerical simulation results,the spatial effects of the ionosphere,mainly consisting of the change on electron density(ED)and electron temperature(ET),heated by the high frequency(HF)pump wave have been analyzed quantitatively.Results are presented as the space-time evolution regulation on the main parameters of the ionosphere resulted by the HF heating waves under the different heat-conditions,iust as different regions,such as high latitude and mid-low latitude;different heating power or frequency,such as underdense heating and over-dense heating and regions at different altitudes.The heating effects in different regions with different heating conditions have been presented in figures.Finally,some primary conclusions are given by comparing the simulation results with experimental observation.

  6. The influence of radiative heat exchange on the character of gasdynamic flows under conditions of pulsed discharge in high-pressure cesium vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksht, F. G.; Lapshin, V. F.

    2015-01-01

    The gasdynamics of pulse-periodic radiative discharge in high-pressure cesium vapor has been studied in the framework of a two-temperature multifluid model. It is established that, at a limited volume of the gas-discharge tube, the character of gasdynamic flows depends on the conditions of radiative heat exchange in discharge plasma. In cases in which the main contribution to radiative energy losses is related to a spectral region with optical thickness τ R (λ) ˜ 1, there is nonlocal radiative heat exchange in discharge plasma, which is uniformly heated over the entire tube volume and moves from the discharge axis to tube walls during the entire pulse of discharge current. Under the conditions of radiative losses determined by the spectral region where τ R (λ) ≪ 1, the reabsorption of radiation is absent and discharge plasma is nonuniformly heated by the current pulse. This leads to the appearance of reverse motions, so that the heated plasma is partly pushed toward the tube walls and partly returned to the discharge axis.

  7. Effect of DC voltage pulses on memristor behavior.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Brian R.

    2013-10-01

    Current knowledge of memristor behavior is limited to a few physical models of which little comprehensive data collection has taken place. The purpose of this research is to collect data in search of exploitable memristor behavior by designing and implementing tests on a HP Labs Rev2 Memristor Test Board. The results are then graphed in their optimal format for conceptualizing behavioral patterns. This series of experiments has concluded the existence of an additional memristor state affecting the behavior of memristors when pulsed with positively polarized DC voltages. This effect has been observed across multiple memristors and data sets. The following pages outline the process that led to the hypothetical existence and eventual proof of this additional state of memristor behavior.

  8. Effect of idler absorption in pulsed optical parametric oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, Gunnar; Arisholm, Gunnar; Farsund, Øystein

    2011-01-31

    Absorption at the idler wavelength in an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) is often considered detrimental. We show through simulations that pulsed OPOs with significant idler absorption can perform better than OPOs with low idler absorption both in terms of conversion efficiency and beam quality. The main reason for this is reduced back conversion. We also show how the beam quality depends on the beam width and pump pulse length, and present scaling relations to use the example simulations for other pulsed nanosecond OPOs.

  9. Effect of Orbital Angular Momentum on Nondiffracting Ultrashort Optical Pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornigotti, Marco; Conti, Claudio; Szameit, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    We introduce a new class of nondiffracting optical pulses possessing orbital angular momentum. By generalizing the X-wave solution of the Maxwell equation, we discover the coupling between angular momentum and the temporal degrees of freedom of ultrashort pulses. The spatial twist of propagation invariant light pulse turns out to be directly related to the number of optical cycles. Our results may trigger the development of novel multilevel classical and quantum transmission channels free of dispersion and diffraction. They may also find application in the manipulation of nanostructured objects by ultrashort pulses and for novel approaches to the spatiotemporal measurements in ultrafast photonics.

  10. Effects of Heat Shock on Glucocorticoid Receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋亮年

    1994-01-01

    The changes of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) during the heat shock response have been studied using a human osteosarcoma cell line (HOS-8603) as the model. The expression of the heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) mRNA in HOS-8603 cells has been enhanced markedly after a heat treatment at 43 ℃ for 30 min. A mild thermal pretreatment (42℃ for 1 h) protects the HOS-8603 cells against a subsequent heat challenge (46℃). This induced thermotolerance is reflected by the increase of cell viability of HOS-8603 cells. The GR binding activity in HOS-8603 cells decreased rapidly after the heat treatment at 43℃; only 42. 61% of controls were detected 60 min after the heat treatment. However, there was no significant change in the dissociation constant value (Kd). These results indicate that the heat shock induce not only the heat shock mRNA expression, but also the rapid reduction in GR binding activity, suggesting that there might be a functional relationship between GR action and the heat shock response.

  11. ITER-W monoblocks under high pulse number transient heat loads at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenhoff, Th., E-mail: T.Loewenhoff@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52428 Jülich (Germany); Linke, J., E-mail: J.Linke@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52428 Jülich (Germany); Pintsuk, G., E-mail: G.Pintsuk@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52428 Jülich (Germany); Pitts, R.A., E-mail: Richard.Pitts@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Riccardi, B., E-mail: Bruno.Riccardi@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy Joint Undertaking, Josep Pla No. 2 – T B3 7/01, Barcelona 08019 (Spain)

    2015-08-15

    In the context of using a full-tungsten (W) divertor for ITER, thermal shock resistance has become even more important as an issue that may potentially influence the long term performance. To address this issue a unique series of experiments has been performed on ITER-W monoblock mock ups in three EU high heat flux facilities: GLADIS (neutral beam), JUDITH 2 (electron beam) and Magnum-PSI (plasma beam). This paper discusses the JUDITH 2 experiments. Two different base temperatures, 1200 °C and 1500 °C, were chosen superimposed by ∼18,000/100,000 transient events (Δt = 0.48 ms) of 0.2 and 0.6 GW/m{sup 2}. Results showed a stronger surface deterioration at higher base temperature, quantified by an increase in roughening. This is intensified if the same test is done after preloading (exposure to high temperature without transients), especially at higher base temperature when the material recrystallizes.

  12. Heat and pulsed electric field resistance of pigmented and non-pigmented enterotoxigenic strains of Staphylococcus aureus in exponential and stationary phase of growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrián, G; Sagarzazu, N; Pagán, R; Condón, S; Mañas, P

    2007-09-30

    The survival of four enterotoxigenic strains of Staphylococcus aureus (with different pigment content) to heat and to pulsed electric fields (PEF) treatments, and the increase in resistance to both processing stresses associated with entrance into stationary phase was examined. Survival curves to heat (58 degrees C) and to PEF (26 kV/cm) of cells in the stationary and in the exponential phase of growth were obtained. Whereas a wide variation in resistance to heat treatments was detected amongst the four strains, with decimal reduction time values at 58 degrees C (D(58 degrees C)) ranging from 0.93 to 0.20 min, the resistance to PEF was very similar. The occurrence of a higher tolerance to heat in stationary phase was coincident with a higher content in carotenoid pigmentation in S. aureus colonies. However, cells of the most heat resistant (pigmented) and the most heat sensitive (non-pigmented) strains in the mid-exponential phase of growth showed similar resistance to heat and to PEF. Therefore the increase in thermotolerance upon entrance into stationary phase of growth was more marked for the pigmented strains. Recovery in anaerobic conditions particularly enhanced survival to heat treatments in a non-pigmented strain. Strain CECT 4630, which possess a deficient sigma B activity, showed low heat resistance, low pigmentation, and reduced increase in thermotolerance in stationary phase. These results indicate that the magnitude of the development of a higher heat resistance in S. aureus in stationary phase is positively related to the carotenoid content of the strain. The development of tolerance to pulsed electric field was less relevant and not linked to the carotenoid content.

  13. Effect of Corrugation Angle on Heat Transfer Studies of Viscous Fluids in Corrugated Plate Heat Exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sreedhara Rao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation heat transfer studies are conducted in corrugated plate heat exchangers (PHEs having three different corrugation angles of 300, 400 and 500. The plate heat exchangers have a length of 30 cm and a width of 10 cm with a spacing of 5 mm. Water and 20% glycerol solution are taken as test fluids and hot fluid is considered as heating medium. The wall temperatures are measured along the length of exchanger at seven different locations by means of thermocouples. The inlet and outlet temperatures of test fluid and hot fluid are measured by means of four more thermocouples. The experiments are conducted at a flowrate ranging from 0.5 lpm to 6 lpm with the test fluid. Film heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number are determined from the experimental data. These values are compared with different corrugation angles. The effects of corrugation angles on heat transfer rates are discussed.

  14. Effect of crash pulse shape on seat stroke requirements for limiting loads on occupants of aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carden, Huey D.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical study was made to provide comparative information on various crash pulse shapes that potentially could be used to test seats under conditions included in Federal Regulations Part 23 Paragraph 23.562(b)(1) for dynamic testing of general aviation seats, show the effects that crash pulse shape can have on the seat stroke requirements necessary to maintain a specified limit loading on the seat/occupant during crash pulse loadings, compare results from certain analytical model pulses with approximations of actual crash pulses, and compare analytical seat results with experimental airplace crash data. Structural and seat/occupant displacement equations in terms of the maximum deceleration, velocity change, limit seat pan load, and pulse time for five potentially useful pulse shapes were derived; from these, analytical seat stroke data were obtained for conditions as specified in Federal Regulations Part 23 Paragraph 23.562(b)(1) for dynamic testing of general aviation seats.

  15. Effect of pulse magnetic field on solidification structure and properties of pure copper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Xi-liang; GONG Yong-yong; LI Ren-xing; CHEN Wen-jie; ZHAI Qi-jie

    2007-01-01

    The application of pulse magnetic field to metal solidification is an advanced technique which can remarkably refine solidification structure. In this paper, the effect of pulse magnetic field on solidification structure,mechanical properties and conductivity of pure copper was experimentally investigated. The results showed that the solidification structure transformed from coarse columnar crystal to fine globular crystal with increasing pulse voltage.Increasing pulse voltage also improved the tensile strength. However, with the increase of pulse voltage, the elongation and electrical resistivity firstly decreased, then increased when the pulse voltage beyond a critical value. Moreover,in some conditions, pulse magnetic field can simultaneously improve the conductivity and mechanical property of pure copper.

  16. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields on benign prostate hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakopoulos, Xenophon K; Giotis, Christos; Karkabounas, Spyridon Ch; Verginadis, Ioannis I; Simos, Yannis V; Peschos, Dimitrios; Evangelou, Angelos M

    2011-12-01

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) has been treated with various types of electromagnetic radiation methods such as transurethral needle ablation (TUNA), interstitial laser therapy (ILC), holmium laser resection (HoLRP). In the present study, the effects of a noninvasive method based on the exposure of patients with BPH to a pulsative EM Field at radiofrequencies have been investigated. Twenty patients with BPH, aging 68-78 years old (y.o), were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: the treatment group (10 patients, 74.0 ± 5.7 y.o) treated with the α-blocker Alfusosin, 10 mg/24 h for at least 4 weeks, and the electromagnetic group (10 patients, 73.7 ± 6.3 y.o) exposed for 2 weeks in a very short wave duration, pulsed electromagnetic field at radiofrequencies generated by an ion magnetic inductor, for 30 min daily, 5 consecutive days per week. Patients of both groups were evaluated before and after drug and EMF treatment by values of total PSA and prostatic PSA fraction, acid phosphate, U/S estimation of prostate volume and urine residue, urodynamic estimation of urine flow rate, and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). There was a statistically significant decrease before and after treatment of IPSS (P < 0.02), U/S prostate volume (P < 0.05), and urine residue (P < 0.05), as well as of mean urine flow rate (P < 0.05) in patients of the electromagnetic group, in contrast to the treatment group who had only improved IPSS (P < 0.05). There was also a significant improvement in clinical symptoms in patients of the electromagnetic group. Follow-up of the patients of this group for one year revealed that results obtained by EMFs treatment are still remaining. Pulsed electromagnetic field at radiofrequencies may benefit patients with benign prostate hyperplasia treated by a non-invasive method.

  17. Investigation on reticle heating effect induced overlay error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mijung; Kim, Geunhak; Kim, SeoMin; Lee, Byounghoon; Kim, Seokkyun; Lim, Chang-moon; Kim, Myoungsoo; Park, Sungki

    2014-04-01

    As design rule of semiconductor decreases continuously, overlay error control gets more and more important and challenging. It is also true that On Product Overlay (OPO) of leading edge memory device shows unprecedented level of accuracy, owing to the development of precision optics, mechanic stage and alignment system with active compensation method. However, the heating of reticle and lens acts as a dominant detriment against further improvement of overlay. Reticle heating is more critical than lens heating in current advanced scanners because lens heating can be mostly compensated by feed-forward control algorithm. In recent years, the tools and technical ideas for reticle heating control are proposed and thought to reduce the reticle heating effect. Nevertheless, it is not still simple to predict the accurate heating amount and overlay. And it is required to investigate the parameters affecting reticle heating quantitatively. In this paper, the reticle pattern density and exposure dose are considered as the main contributors, and the effects are investigated through experiments. Mask set of various transmittance are prepared by changing pattern density. After exposure with various doses, overlay are measured and analyzed by comparing with reference marks exposed in heating free condition. As a result, it is discovered that even in the case of low dose and high transmittance, reticle heating is hardly avoidable. It is also shown that there is a simple relationship among reticle heating, transmittance and exposure dose. Based on this relationship, the reticle heating is thought to be predicted if the transmittance and dose are fixed.

  18. Variable viscosity effects on mixed convection heat and mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variable viscosity effects on mixed convection heat and mass transfer along a ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Keywords: Variable viscosity, Chemical Reaction, Viscous Dissipation, Finite difference method, Suction.

  19. Optimized Second Harmonic Generation of Femtosecond Pulse by Phase-Blanking Effect in Aperiodically Optical Superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Yan; CHEN Xian-Feng; XIA Yu-Xing

    2008-01-01

    @@ In order to minimize the effect of the unconsidered frequency components on the generated compression pulse,the phasing-blanking effect is taken into account of designing the one-dimensional aperiodic domain reversal structure. Hierarchic genetic algorithm for the design of a domain reversal grating to modulate the spectrum and phase of the generated SH pulse simultaneously are presented. Our simulation shows that the quality of an output pulse is fairly improved.

  20. Moment method, Higher order dispersion map and other effects in optical pulse propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Mondal, Basanti; Chowdhury, A. Roy.

    2005-01-01

    Analytical and numerical procedures are applied to show that both third and second order dispersion maps can be explicitly constructed and their mutual effects on the optical pulse propagation are analysed. In these connection it is also shown how the other important features such as amplification, intra-channel Raman Scattering(IRS), fibre loss, centre frequency of the pulse spectrum effect the propagation of pulse. Due to the presence of IRS, moment method is adopted which is easily reduced...

  1. The effect of magnetic field on nanofluids heat transfer through a uniformly heated horizontal tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatami, N.; Kazemnejad Banari, A.; Malekzadeh, A.; Pouranfard, A. R.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the effects of magnetic field on forced convection heat transfer of Fe3O4-water nanofluid with laminar flow regime in a horizontal pipe under constant heat flux conditions were studied, experimentally. The convective heat transfer of magnetic fluid flow inside the heated pipe with uniform magnetic field was measured. Fe3O4 nanoparticles with diameters less than 100 nm dispersed in water with various volume concentrations are used as the test fluid. The effect of the external magnetic field (Ha = 33.4 ×10-4 to 136.6 ×10-4) and nanoparticle concentrations (φ = 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1%) on heat transfer characteristics were investigated. Results showed that by the presence of a magnetic field, increase in nanoparticle concentration caused reduction of convection heat transfer coefficient. In this condition, heat transfer decreased up to 25%. Where, in the absence of an external magnetic field, adding magnetic nanoparticles increased convection heat transfer more than 60%. It was observed that the Nusselt number decreased by increasing the Hartmann number at a specified concentration of magnetic nanofluids, that reduction about 25% in heat transfer rate could be found.

  2. Effect of heat and heat acclimatization on cycling time trial performance and pacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Racinais, Sebastien; Périard, Julien D; Karlsen, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effects of heat-acclimatization on performance and pacing during outdoor cycling time-trials (TT, 43.4km) in the heat. METHODS: Nine cyclists performed 3 TTs in hot ambient conditions (TTH, ∼37ºC) on the first (TTH-1), sixth (TTH-2) and fourteenth (TTH-3) days of trainin...

  3. Effect of Process Parameters on the Total Heat Damaged Zone (HDZ) during Micro-EDM of Plastic Mold Steel 1.2738

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puthumana, Govindan

    2016-01-01

    In micro electrical discharge machining, three subsurface layersare formed on the workpiece, they are;recast zone, heat affected zone and converted zone, primarily due to heating-quenching cycles. The HDZ inmicro-EDM is characterized by cracks and weakness in the grain boundary and thermal residual.......8099. Therefore,the effect of process parameters governing the discharge energy are analyzed; they are: average current(Ia), peak current (Ip) and pulse ‘on-time’ (Ton). An overall increase in heat-damaged zone thickness by105% is observed with an increase in pulse on time....

  4. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT HEAT EXCHANGERS ON THE WASTE-HEAT DRIVEN THERMOACOUSTIC ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAVID W. Y. KHOO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the efficiency of the SCORE thermoacoustic engine, it is important to investigate the heat transfer between the bulge or theconvolution and the regenerator. Heat transfer due to convection has greatinfluence on performance of the thermoacoustic engine. The total heat transfer from the bulge or the convolution to the first few layers of the regenerator is mainly due to convection and radiation. In this paper, the two modes of heat transfers, convection and radiation are under investigation numerically. The main objective of the present study is to find an ideal shape of the bulge which transports heat from the cooking stove to regenerator. Four different designs of the bulge are proposed in this work. Numerical method FluentTM CFD modelling with surface to surface (S2S radiation method is chosen to study the radiation effect. The main challenge in the development of the models of such system is to simulate the coupled heat transfer effect and the temperature gradient across both the bulge and porous media surfaces. The results show a very limited amount of heat transfer by convection on all the bulge simulated cases, with a dominant radiative heat transfer over the convective heat transfer while convection was found to be dominant in the convolution simulated case. By looking at the heat fluxes solely, convolution design is recommended to improve the engine performance as it possesses higher total heat flux comparatively but most of it was found to be by convection rather than radiation. The results were validated analytically in a recent accepted paper and found to be in good agreement. To accurately predict the heat transfer in the model, conduction must also be included in future studies as well.

  5. Heat Waves in the United States: Mortality Risk during Heat Waves and Effect Modification by Heat Wave Characteristics in 43 U.S. Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G. Brooke; Bell, Michelle L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Devastating health effects from recent heat waves, and projected increases in frequency, duration, and severity of heat waves from climate change, highlight the importance of understanding health consequences of heat waves. Objectives We analyzed mortality risk for heat waves in 43 U.S. cities (1987–2005) and investigated how effects relate to heat waves’ intensity, duration, or timing in season. Methods Heat waves were defined as ≥ 2 days with temperature ≥ 95th percentile for the community for 1 May through 30 September. Heat waves were characterized by their intensity, duration, and timing in season. Within each community, we estimated mortality risk during each heat wave compared with non-heat wave days, controlling for potential confounders. We combined individual heat wave effect estimates using Bayesian hierarchical modeling to generate overall effects at the community, regional, and national levels. We estimated how heat wave mortality effects were modified by heat wave characteristics (intensity, duration, timing in season). Results Nationally, mortality increased 3.74% [95% posterior interval (PI), 2.29–5.22%] during heat waves compared with non-heat wave days. Heat wave mortality risk increased 2.49% for every 1°F increase in heat wave intensity and 0.38% for every 1-day increase in heat wave duration. Mortality increased 5.04% (95% PI, 3.06–7.06%) during the first heat wave of the summer versus 2.65% (95% PI, 1.14–4.18%) during later heat waves, compared with non-heat wave days. Heat wave mortality impacts and effect modification by heat wave characteristics were more pronounced in the Northeast and Midwest compared with the South. Conclusions We found higher mortality risk from heat waves that were more intense or longer, or those occurring earlier in summer. These findings have implications for decision makers and researchers estimating health effects from climate change. PMID:21084239

  6. Higher-order effects on self-similar parabolic pulse in the microstructured fibre amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Wei-Ci; Xu Wen-Cheng; Feng Jie; Chen Wei-Cheng; Li Shu-Xian; Lin Song-Hao

    2008-01-01

    By considering higher-order effects, the properties of self-similar parabolic pulses propagating in the microstructured fibre amplifier with a normal group-velocity dispersion have been investigated. The numerical results indicate that the higher-order effects can badly distort self-similar parabolic pulse shape and optical spectrum, and at the same time the peak shift and oscillation appear, while the pulse still reveals highly linear chirp but grows into asymmetry. The influence of different higher-order effects on self-similar parabolic pulse propagation has been analysed. It shows thatthe self-steepening plays a more important role. We can manipulate the geometrical parameters of the microstructured fibre amplifier to gain a suitable dispersion and nonlinearity coefficient which will keep high-quality self-similar parabolic pulse propagation. These results are significant for the further study of self-similar parabolic pulse propagation.

  7. Aerodynamic heating of ballistic missile including the effects of gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S N Maitra

    2000-10-01

    The aerodynamic heating of a ballistic missile due to only convection is analysed taking into consideration the effects of gravity. The amount of heat transferred to the wetted area and to the nose region has been separately determined, unlike A Miele's treatise without consideration of gravity. The peak heating ratesto the wetted area and to the nose of the missile are also investigated. Finally four numerical examples are cited to estimate the errors, in heat transfers and heating ratesto both wetted area and nose region of the missile, arising out of neglecting the gravitational forces.

  8. Investigation of effect of oblique ridges on heat transfer in plate heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosád, Jan; Dvořák, Václav

    2014-03-01

    This article deals with numerical investigation of flow in plate heat exchangers. These are counterflow heat exchangers formed by plates. These plates are shaped by the ridges to intensify heat transfer. The objective of the work is the investigation of effect of straight oblique triangular ridges for increasing of heat transfer and pressure losses. The ridges on adjacent plates intersect and thus form a channel of complex shape. The research includes various types of ridges with different fillets and ridges spacing.The work also investigates the number of ridges that is necessary for optimization calculations. Obtained data are analysed and the heat transfer coefficient and pressure loss are evaluated. Conclusion describes the effect of fillets, ridges pitch and number of ridges.

  9. On Effectiveness and Entropy Generatioin in Heat Exchanger

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiongDaxi; LiZhixin; 等

    1996-01-01

    Some conceptual problems were discussed in the present paper,Firstly,according to the physical meaning of effectiveness,a new expression of effectiveness was developed by using an ideal heat exchnager model and temperature histogram method,in which the non-uniform inlet temperature profile was considered.Secondly,the relation of entropy generation number to effectiveness was studied,it was pointed out that both of them could express the perfect degree of a heat exchanger to the second thermodynamic law.Finally,to describe both quantity and quality of heat transferred in a heat exchanger a criterion named as comperhensive thermal performance coefficient (CTPE) was presented.

  10. Effect of heating rate on the pyrolysis yields of rapeseed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Chemical Engineering Department, Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak, 34469 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-05-15

    The pyrolysis yields of rapeseed were investigated applying thermogravimetric analysis technique. The pyrolysis experiments were performed up to 1273K at heating rates of 5, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50K/min in a dynamic nitrogen flow of 40cc/min. Effects of heating rate on the mass losses from the rapeseed were examined using the derivative thermogravimetric analysis profiles. This study showed that important differences on the pyrolytic behavior of rapeseed are observed when heating rate is changed. At the lower heating rates, the maximum rates of mass losses were relatively low. When the heating rate was increased, maximum rates of mass losses also increased. These variations were interpreted by the heterogeneous structure of biomass. Heating rates also concluded to affect the shape of the peaks. Increase in the heating rate shifted the main peak on the DTG profile to the lower temperatures. At low heating rates, there is probably resistance to mass or heat transfer inside the biomass particles. However, increase in heating rate overcame these restrictions, and led to higher conversion rates. The final pyrolysis temperatures were also affected from the variation of the heating rate. Activation energy values were first increased and then decreased depending on the heating rates. (author)

  11. Subharmonic emissions from microbubbles: effect of the driving pulse shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Elena; Breschi, Luca; Vannacci, Enrico; Masotti, Leonardo

    2006-11-01

    The aims of this work are to investigate the response of the ultrasonic contrast agents (UCA) insonified by different arbitrary-shaped pulses at different acoustic pressures and concentration of the contrast agent focusing on subharmonic emission. A transmission setup was developed in order to insonify the contrast agent contained in a measurement chamber. The transmitted ultrasonic signals were generated by an arbitrary wave generator connected to a linear power amplifier able to drive a single-element transducer. The transmitted ultrasonic pulses that passed through the contrast agent-filled chamber were received by a second transducer or a hydrophone aligned with the first one. The radio frequency (RF) signals were acquired by fast echographic multiparameters multi-image novel apparatus (FEMMINA), which is an echographic platform able to acquire ultrasonic signals in a real-time modality. Three sets of ultrasonic signals were devised in order to evaluate subharmonic response of the contrast agent respect with sinusoidal burst signals used as reference pulses. A decreasing up to 30 dB in subharmonic response was detected for a Gaussian-shaped pulse; differences in subharmonic emission up to 21 dB were detected for a composite pulse (two-tone burst) for different acoustic pressures and concentrations. Results from this experimentation demonstrated that the transmitted pulse shape strongly affects subharmonic emission in spite of a second harmonic one. In particular, the smoothness of the initial portion of the shaped pulses can inhibit subharmonic generation from the contrast agents respect with a reference sinusoidal burst signal. It also was shown that subharmonic generation is influenced by the amplitude and the concentration of the contrast agent for each set of the shaped pulses. Subharmonic emissions that derive from a nonlinear mechanism involving nonlinear coupling among different oscillation modes are strongly affected by the shape of the ultrasonic

  12. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields on postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Siyi; He, Hongchen; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Haiming; Gao, Chengfei; Yu, Xijie; He, Chengqi

    2017-09-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMOP) is considered to be a well-defined subject that has caused high morbidity and mortality. In elderly women diagnosed with PMOP, low bone mass and fragile bone strength have been proven to significantly increase risk of fragility fractures. Currently, various anabolic and anti-resorptive therapies have been employed in an attempt to retain healthy bone mass and strength. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs), first applied in treating patients with delayed fracture healing and nonunions, may turn out to be another potential and effective therapy for PMOP. PEMFs can enhance osteoblastogenesis and inhibit osteoclastogenesis, thus contributing to an increase in bone mass and strength. However, accurate mechanisms of the positive effects of PEMFs on PMOP remain to be further elucidated. This review attempts to summarize recent advances of PEMFs in treating PMOP based on clinical trials, and animal and cellular studies. Possible mechanisms are also introduced, and the future possibility of application of PEMFs on PMOP are further explored and discussed. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:406-424, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Effects of temporal laser profile on the emission spectra for underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: Study by short-interval double pulses with different pulse durations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Ayaka, E-mail: tamura.ayaka.88m@st.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Matsumoto, Ayumu; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo, E-mail: sakka.tetsuo.2a@kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Nakajima, Takashi; Ogata, Yukio H. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Fukami, Kazuhiro [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2015-01-14

    We investigate the effects of temporal laser profile on the emission spectra of laser ablation plasma in water. We use short-interval (76 ns) double pulses with different pulse durations of the composing two pulses for the irradiation of underwater target. Narrow atomic spectral lines in emission spectra are obtained by the irradiation, where the two pulses are wide enough to be merged into a single-pulse-like temporal profile, while deformed spectra are obtained when the two pulses are fully separated. The behavior of the atomic spectral lines for the different pulse durations is consistent with that of the temporal profiles of the optical emission intensities of the plasma. All these results suggest that continuous excitation of the plasma during the laser irradiation for ∼100 ns is a key to obtain narrow emission spectral lines.

  14. Effect of surface-breakdown plasma on metal drilling by pulsed CO2-laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutiunian, P. V.; Baranov, V. Iu.; Bobkov, I. V.; Bol'Shakov, L. A.; Dolgov, V. A.

    1988-03-01

    The effect of low-threshold surface breakdown produced by short (5-microsec) CO2-laser pulses on the metal drilling process is investigated. Data on the interaction of metals with laser pulses having the same duration but different shape are shown to be different. The effect of the ambient atmospheric pressure on the laser drilling process is investigated.

  15. Investigation of plasma–surface interaction effects on pulsed electrostatic manipulation for reentry blackout alleviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, S.; Close, S.

    2017-03-01

    The reentry blackout phenomenon affects most spacecraft entering a dense planetary atmosphere from space, due to the presence of a plasma layer that surrounds the spacecraft. This plasma layer is created by ionization of ambient air due to shock and frictional heating, and in some cases is further enhanced due to contamination by ablation products. This layer causes a strong attenuation of incoming and outgoing electromagnetic waves including those used for command and control, communication and telemetry over a period referred to as the ‘blackout period’. The blackout period may last up to several minutes and is a major contributor to the landing error ellipse at best, and a serious safety hazard in the worst case, especially in the context of human spaceflight. In this work, we present a possible method for alleviation of reentry blackout using electronegative DC pulses applied from insulated electrodes on the reentry vehicle’s surface. We study the reentry plasma’s interaction with a DC pulse using a particle-in-cell (PIC) model. Detailed models of plasma–insulator interaction are included in our simulations. The absorption and scattering of ions and electrons at the plasma–dielectric interface are taken into account. Secondary emission from the insulating surface is also considered, and its implications on various design issues is studied. Furthermore, we explore the effect of changing the applied voltage and the impact of surface physics on the creation and stabilization of communication windows. The primary aim of this analysis is to examine the possibility of restoring L- and S-band communication from the spacecraft to a ground station. Our results provide insight into the effect of key design variables on the response of the plasma to the applied voltage pulse. Simulations show the creation of pockets where electron density in the plasma layer is reduced three orders of magnitude or more in the vicinity of the electrodes. These pockets extend to

  16. Effect of Rectangle Wave Pulse Current on Solidification Structure of ZA27 Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The effect of rectangle wave pulse current on solidification structure of ZA27 alloy was studied.The results show that the wave pattern relies on the frequency range of harmonic wave and the energy of pulse current within the frequency range of pulse current.Imposed pulse current could induce the solidification system to oscillate.The frequency range and the relevant energy distribution of pulse current exert an influence on the amount of atoms involved for forming critical nucleus, the surface states of clusters in melt, the oscillating state of melt on the surface of clusters, the active energy of atom diffusion , the frequnce response of the resonance of bulk melt and the absorbability of the solidification system to the external work.Rectangle wave pulse current involves rich harmonic waves; the amplitudes of high order of harmonic waves are higher and reduce slowly, so it has a better effect on inoculation and modification.

  17. Effect of pulsed light on activity and structural changes of horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei; Zhang, Yanyan; Venkitasamy, Chandrasekar; Wu, Bengang; Pan, Zhongli; Ma, Haile

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of pulsed light on the activity and structure of horseradish peroxidase in buffer solution. Enzyme residual activities were measured. Surface topography, secondary, and tertiary structures of horseradish peroxidase were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. Results showed that a complete inactivation of horseradish peroxidase was achieved by application of 10 pulses of pulsed light treatment at an intensity of 500J/pulse. The AFM analysis revealed that the aggregation of enzyme protein increased and surface roughness decreased with the increase in the treatment time. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy analysis exhibited that pulsed light destroyed the tertiary and secondary protein structures. The β-sheet composition was decreased while β-turn and random coils were increased. Pulsed light could effectively inactivate horseradish peroxidase by destroying the secondary and tertiary structures of protein in the active center of the enzyme. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Thermoelectric and morphological effects of Peltier pulsing on directional solidification of eutectic Bi-Mn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, R. P.; Larson, D. J., Jr.; Dressler, B.

    1984-01-01

    Extensive in situ thermal measurements using Peltier Interface Demarcation (PID) during directional solidification of eutectic Bi/MnBi were carried out. Observations indicate that significant thermal transients occur throughout the sample as a result of the Peltier pulsing. The contributions of the Peltier, Thomson, and Joule heats were separated and studied as a function of pulse intensity and polarity. The Joule and the combined Peltier and Thomson thermal contributions were determined as a function of time during and after the current pulses, close to the solid/liquid interface. Variations of the Bi/MnBi particle morphology clearly reveal the interface shape, changes in interface velocity, meltback, and temporary loss of cooperative growth, as a result of the pulsing.

  19. Thermoelectric and morphological effects of peltier pulsing on directional solidification of eutectic Bi-Mn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, R. P.; Larson, D. J.; Dressler, B.

    1984-12-01

    We have carried out extensive in situ thermal measurements during Peltier Interface Demarcation (PID) during directional solidification of eutectic Bi/MnBi. We have observed that significant thermal transients occur throughout the sample as a result of the Peltier pulsing. We have separated the contributions of the Peltier, Thomson, and Joule heats, and studied them as a function of pulse intensity and polarity. The Joule and the combined Peltier and Thomson thermal contributions were determined as a function of time during and after the current pulses, close to the solid/liquid interface. Variations of the Bi/MnBi particle morphology clearly reveal the interface shape, changes in interface velocity, meltback, and temporary loss of cooperative growth, as a result of the pulsing.

  20. Synchronizing the transcranial magnetic pulse with electroencephalographic recordings effectively reduces inter-trial variability of the pulse artefact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomasevic, Leo; Takemi, Mitsuaki; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electroencephalography (EEG) can capture the cortical response evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The TMS pulse provokes a large artefact, which obscures the cortical response in the first milliseconds after TMS. Removing this artefact remains a challenge. METHODS: We...... were tested at 10 and 20 kHz using the head phantom. We also tested the effect of a soft sheet placed between the stimulation coil and recording electrodes in both human and melon. RESULTS & CONCLUSION: Synchronizing TMS and data acquisition markedly reduced trial-to-trial variability of the pulse......-to-trial variability renders it possible to create an artefact template for off-line filtering. Template-based subtraction of the artefact from the EEG signals is a prerequisite to effectively recover the immediate physiological response in the stimulated cortex and inter-connected areas....

  1. Maldistribution in airewater heat pump evaporators. Part 1: Effects on evaporator, heat pump and system level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mader, Gunda; Palm, Björn; Elmegaard, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to quantify the effect of evaporator maldistribution onoperating costs of air-water heat pumps. In the proposed simulation model maldistributionis induced by two parameters describing refrigerant phase and air flow distribution.Annual operating costs are calculated...... based on heat pump performance at distinct operatingconditions. Results show that percentage increase of operating costs is similar for thethree considered climate zones, even though the effect of maldistribution on heat pumpperformance varies with operating conditions. Differences in terms of absolute...

  2. The measurement of surface heat flux using the Peltier effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shewen, E.C. (Pavement Management Systems Ltd., Cambridge, Ontario (Canada)); Hollands, K.G.T., Raithby, G.D. (Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-08-01

    Calorimetric methods for measuring surface heat flux use Joulean heating to keep the surface isothermal. This limits them to measuring the heat flux of surfaces that are hotter than their surroundings. Presented in this paper is a method whereby reversible Peltier effect heat transfer is used to maintain this isothermality, making it suitable for surfaces that are either hotter or colder than the surroundings. The paper outlines the theory for the method and describes physical models that have been constructed, calibrated, and tested. The tested physical models were found capable of measuring heat fluxes with an absolute accuracy of 1 percent over a wide range of temperature (5-50C) and heat flux (15-500 W/m{sup 2}), while maintaining isothermality to within 0.03 K. A drawback of the method is that it appears to be suited only for measuring the heat flux from thick metallic plates.

  3. Effects of spectral linewidth of ultrashort pulses on the spa-tiotemporal distribution of diffraction fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The spatiotemporal characteristics of electromagnetic pulses with ultrabroad spectral bandwidth in the far field are analyzed by using classical scalar diffraction theory. The effects of the ratio of the frequency width to the central frequency on the diffraction spatial distribution are discussed. It is concluded that the diffraction spatial dis-tribution of the pulsed radiation gets narrower than a mono-chromatic wave when the frequency width of the pulse is comparable to or larger than its central frequency.

  4. Pulsed high-magnetic-field experiments: New insights into the magnetocaloric effect in Ni-Mn-In Heusler alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar Mejía, C.; Ghorbani Zavareh, M.; Nayak, A. K.; Skourski, Y.; Wosnitza, J.; Felser, C.; Nicklas, M.

    2015-05-01

    The present pulsed high-magnetic-field study on Ni50Mn35In15 gives an extra insight into the thermodynamics of the martensitic transformation in Heusler shape-memory alloys. The transformation-entropy change, ΔS, was estimated from field-dependent magnetization experiments in pulsed high magnetic fields and by heat-capacity measurements in static fields. We found a decrease of ΔS with decreasing temperature. This behavior can be understood by considering the different signs of the lattice and magnetic contributions to the total entropy. Our results further imply that the magnetocaloric effect will decrease with decreasing temperature and, furthermore, the martensitic transition is not induced anymore by changing the temperature in high magnetic fields.

  5. Pulsed high-magnetic-field experiments: New insights into the magnetocaloric effect in Ni-Mn-In Heusler alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar Mejía, C., E-mail: Catalina.Salazar@cpfs.mpg.de; Nayak, A. K.; Felser, C.; Nicklas, M. [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Ghorbani Zavareh, M.; Wosnitza, J. [Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory (HLD-EMFL), Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Institut für Festkörperphysik, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Skourski, Y. [Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory (HLD-EMFL), Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-05-07

    The present pulsed high-magnetic-field study on Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} gives an extra insight into the thermodynamics of the martensitic transformation in Heusler shape-memory alloys. The transformation-entropy change, ΔS, was estimated from field-dependent magnetization experiments in pulsed high magnetic fields and by heat-capacity measurements in static fields. We found a decrease of ΔS with decreasing temperature. This behavior can be understood by considering the different signs of the lattice and magnetic contributions to the total entropy. Our results further imply that the magnetocaloric effect will decrease with decreasing temperature and, furthermore, the martensitic transition is not induced anymore by changing the temperature in high magnetic fields.

  6. Effect of aligning pulse train on the orientation and alignment of a molecule in presence of orienting pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Ashish; Maan, Anjali; Ahlawat, Dharamvir Singh; Prasad, Vinod

    2017-02-01

    Field-free molecular alignment is studied theoretically in presence of orienting laser pulse and a delayed Infrared laser (IRL) pulse train. The pulse shapes taken are sine square (sin2) and square. The degree of alignment can be significantly enhanced by the combination of orienting pulse and IRL pulse train compared with only IRL pulse train. Special emphasis is laid on time delay between orienting and aligning pulse, the width and shape of the pulse train. By adjusting the time delay, width and intensity of coupling laser one can suppress a population of particular state while simultaneously enhancing the population of desired states.

  7. Effect of Heating Rate on the Pressureless Sintering Densification of a Nickel-Based Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, David; Brochu, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    Pressureless sintering of Inconel 718 has important technological applications for the densification of metal injection molding or additive manufacturing of parts with powder/binder systems. The effect of heating rates ranging from 15 to 200 K/minute on the sintering behavior of fine (-325 mesh) Inconel 718 powders was studied using the master sintering curve (MSC) concept. A pressureless pulsed electric current sintering setup was used to heat samples. The temperature at the onset of sintering increased as the heating rate increased. The formation of a supersolidus liquid fraction was shifted toward higher temperatures for increased heating rates. The apparent activation energy of sintering was obtained by least squares fitting of the sintering data to the MSC and was in good agreement with the lattice diffusion activation energy of the alloying elements present in Inconel 718. The MSC followed different kinetics for low heating rates (≤50 K/minute) and high heating rates (≥75 K/minute), and these differences were related to liquation kinetics.

  8. An investigation of pulsed phase thermography for detection of disbonds in HIP-bonded beryllium tiles in ITER normal heat flux first wall (NHF FW) components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushell, J., E-mail: joe.bushell@amec.com [AMEC Foster Wheeler, Booths Hall, Chelford Road, Knutsford, Cheshire WA16 8QZ, England (United Kingdom); Sherlock, P. [AMEC Foster Wheeler, Booths Hall, Chelford Road, Knutsford, Cheshire WA16 8QZ, England (United Kingdom); Mummery, P. [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom); Bellin, B.; Zacchia, F. [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Pulsed phase thermography was trialled on Be-tiled plasma facing components. • Two components, one with known disbonds, one intact, were inspected and compared. • Finite element analysis was used to verify experimental observations. • PPT successfully detected disbonds in the failed component. • Good agreement found with ultrasonic test, though defect geometry was uncertain. - Abstract: Pulsed phase thermography (PPT) is a non destructive examination (NDE) technique, traditionally used in the Aerospace Industry for inspection of composite structures, which combines characteristics and benefits of flash thermography and lock-in thermography into a single, rapid inspection technique. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of PPT as a means of inspection for the bond between the beryllium (Be) tiles and the copper alloy (CuCrZr) heatsink of the ITER NHF FW components. This is a critical area dictating the functional integrity of these components, as single tile detachment in service could result in cascade failure. PPT has advantages over existing thermography techniques using heated water which stress the component, and the non-invasive, non-contact nature presents advantages over existing ultrasonic methods. The rapid and non-contact nature of PPT also gives potential for in-service inspections as well as a quality measure for as-manufactured components. The technique has been appraised via experimental trials using ITER first wall mockups with pre-existing disbonds confirmed via ultrasonic tests, partnered with finite element simulations to verify experimental observations. This paper will present the results of the investigation.

  9. Effect of pulse duty cycle on Inconel 718 laser welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCay, M. H.; McCay, T. D.; Dahotre, N. B.; Sharp, C. M.; Sedghinasab, A.; Gopinathan, S.

    1989-01-01

    Crack sensitive Inconel 718 was laser pulse welded using a 3.0 kW CO2 laser. Weld shape, structure, and porosity were recorded as a function of the pulse duty cycle. Within the matrix studied, the welds were found to be optimized at a high (17 ms on, 7 ms off) duty cycle. These welds were superior in appearance and lack of porosity to both low duty cycle and CW welds.

  10. Particle shape effect on heat transfer performance in an oscillating heat pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hsiu-hung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effect of alumina nanoparticles on the heat transfer performance of an oscillating heat pipe (OHP was investigated experimentally. A binary mixture of ethylene glycol (EG and deionized water (50/50 by volume was used as the base fluid for the OHP. Four types of nanoparticles with shapes of platelet, blade, cylinder, and brick were studied, respectively. Experimental results show that the alumina nanoparticles added in the OHP significantly affect the heat transfer performance and it depends on the particle shape and volume fraction. When the OHP was charged with EG and cylinder-like alumina nanoparticles, the OHP can achieve the best heat transfer performance among four types of particles investigated herein. In addition, even though previous research found that these alumina nanofluids were not beneficial in laminar or turbulent flow mode, they can enhance the heat transfer performance of an OHP.

  11. Effects of Pulse Ultrasound on Adsorption of Geniposide on Resin 1300 in a Fixed Bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆向红; 徐之超; 计建炳

    2011-01-01

    The effects of pulse ultrasound with different pulse parameters on the breakthrough curves of Geniposide on Resin 1300 were studied. The mass transfer model describing the adsorption process was constructed. Adsorption capability and the overall mass-transfer coefficient were obtained by fitting the constructed mass-transfer model and the experimental data. The effects of pulse ultrasound on adsorption of Geniposide on Resin1300 in a fixed bed were studied and compared. Amount of Geniposide adsorbed on Resin 1300 in the presence of ultrasound is lower than that in the absence of ultrasound, but the mass-transfer rate with ultrasonic irradiation is higher than that without ultrasound. Furthermore, mass transfer rate is enhanced by pulse modulation. In the conditions studied, the adsorption equilibrium constant decreases with increasing ultrasonic power, while the overall mass-transfer co-efficient increases. With increasing pulse duty ratio, adsorption equilibrium constant decreases initially, reaches a minimum when pulse duty ratio is 0.5, and then increases. On the contrary, the overall mass-transfer coefficient in-creases initially and reaches a maximum when pulse ratio is 0.5, and then decreases. Effects of pulse period on ad-sorption equilibrium and mass transfer rate reached the peak at pulse period of 28.6 ms.

  12. Microstructure changes during non-conventional heat treatment of thin Ni-Ti wires by pulsed electric current studied by transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delville, R., E-mail: remi.delville@ua.ac.be [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Malard, B.; Pilch, J.; Sittner, P. [Institute of Physics, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Praha (Czech Republic); Schryvers, D. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2010-08-15

    Transmission electron microscopy, electrical resistivity measurements and mechanical testing were employed to investigate the evolution of microstructure and functional superelastic properties of 0.1 mm diameter as-drawn Ni-Ti wires subjected to a non-conventional heat treatment by controlled electric pulse currents. This method enables a better control of the recovery and recrystallization processes taking place during the heat treatment and accordingly a better control on the final microstructure. Using a stepwise approach of millisecond pulse annealing, it is shown how the microstructure evolves from a severely deformed state with no functional properties to an optimal nanograined microstructure (20-50 nm) that is partially recovered through polygonization and partially recrystallized and that has the best functional properties. Such a microstructure is highly resistant against dislocation slip upon cycling, while microstructures annealed for longer times and showing mostly recrystallized grains were prone to dislocation slip, particularly as the grain size exceeds 200 nm.

  13. Effects of heat stress on baroreflex function in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Craig G.; Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Heat stress significantly reduces orthostatic tolerance in humans. The mechanism(s) causing this response remain unknown. The purpose of this review article is to present data pertaining to the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance in heat stressed individuals is a result of heat stress induced alterations in baroflex function. METHODS: In both normothermic and heat stressed conditions baroreflex responsiveness was assessed via pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods. In addition, the effects of heat stress on post-synaptic vasoconstrictor responsiveness were assessed. RESULTS: Generally, whole body heating did not alter baroreflex sensitivity defined as the gain of the linear portion of the baroreflex curve around the operating point. However, whole body heating shifted the baroreflex curve to the prevailing (i.e. elevated) heart rate and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Finally, the heat stress impaired vasoconstrictor responses to exogenous administration of adrenergic agonists. CONCLUSION: Current data do not support the hypothesis that reduced orthostatic tolerance associated with heat stress in humans is due to impaired baroreflex responsiveness. This phenomenon may be partially due to the effects of heat stress on reducing vasoconstrictor responsiveness.

  14. Effect of high-power nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses on silicon nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachurin, G. A., E-mail: kachurin@isp.nsc.ru; Cherkova, S. G.; Volodin, V. A.; Marin, D. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); Deutschmann, M. [Laser Zentrum Hannover (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    The effect of high-power nanosecond (20 ns) and femtosecond (120 fs) laser pulses on silicon nanostructures produced by ion-beam-assisted synthesis in SiO{sub 2} layers or by deposition onto glassy substrates is studied. Nanosecond annealing brings about a photoluminescence band at about 500 mn, with the intensity increasing with the energy and number of laser pulses. The source of the emission is thought to be the clusters of Si atoms segregated from the oxide. In addition, the nanosecond pulses allow crystallization of amorphous silicon nanoprecipitates in SiO{sub 2}. Heavy doping promotes crystallization. The duration of femtosecond pulses is too short for excess Si to be segregated from SiO{sub 2}. At the same time, such short pulses induce crystallization of Thin a-Si films on glassy substrates. The energy region in which crystallization is observed for both types of pulses allows short-term melting of the surface layer.

  15. Effectiveness of pulsed ultraviolet-light treatment for bacterial inactivation on agar surface and liquid medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Saïd, Noura Elmnasser; Federighi, Michel; Bakhrouf, Amina; Orange, Nicole

    2010-11-01

    In the present study, the efficiency of a broad-spectrum pulsed ultraviolet (UV)-light for the inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A, L. monocytogenes CNL 895807, and Pseudomonas fluorescens MF37 populations as agar seeded or suspended cells was investigated. The bacterial populations were treated by pulsed UV-light at different number of pulses (1 to 3), dose of energy (162, 243, or 324 J), and distance from the strobe (4, 9, or 12 cm). After pulsed UV-light treatment, the bacterial reduction was determined by standard plate count. The results showed that there was a significant reduction of population along with an increase of light energy and number of pulses. Decreasing the distance between the Petri dishes and the xenon lamp demonstrated an increase in bacterial reduction. Decontamination efficacy decreased significantly with the increase in level of contamination. This study demonstrates that pulsed UV-light can be used as an effective sterilizing method for the bacteria.

  16. Effects of cavity-dispersion noncoaxiality on the generation of ultrabroadband femtosecond pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO ZhongXing; LEI Liang; HUANG ZhiLing; WEN JinHui; LAI Tianshu; LIN WeiZhu

    2008-01-01

    The effects of cavity-dispersion noncoaxiality (CDN) on the generation of ultrabroadband femtosecond pulses in KLM Ti:sapphire laser were investigated theoretically and experimentally. It was predicted that when the laser sub-cavity works near the coaxial operation point, the limitation of CDN on the bandwidth broadening is minimum, which is favorable for ultrabroadband pulse generation. On the basis of this prediction, femtosecond pulses with bandwidth of 650 to 1000 nm were directly generated from a home built KLM Ti:sapphire laser. To our knowledge, they are the broadest bandwidth pulses produced from KLM Ti:sapphire laser with similar oscillator configuration and gain crystal length of 3 mm.

  17. Perceived heat stress and health effects on construction workers

    OpenAIRE

    Priya Dutta; Ajit Rajiva; Dileep Andhare; Gulrez Shah Azhar; Abhiyant Tiwari; Perry Sheffield; Ahmedabad Heat and Climate Study Group

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing heat waves-particularly in urban areas where construction is most prevalent, highlight a need for heat exposure assessment of construction workers. This study aims to characterize the effects of heat on construction workers from a site in Gandhinagar. Materials and Methods: This study involved a mixed methods approach consisting of a cross sectional survey with anthropometric measurements (n = 219) and four focus groups with construction workers, as well as environmen...

  18. Perceived heat stress and health effects on construction workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Dutta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Increasing heat waves-particularly in urban areas where construction is most prevalent, highlight a need for heat exposure assessment of construction workers. This study aims to characterize the effects of heat on construction workers from a site in Gandhinagar. Materials and Methods: This study involved a mixed methods approach consisting of a cross sectional survey with anthropometric measurements (n = 219 and four focus groups with construction workers, as well as environmental measurements of heat stress exposure at a construction site. Survey data was collected in two seasons i.e., summer and winter months, and heat illness and symptoms were compared between the two time periods. Thematic coding of focus group data was used to identify vulnerability factors and coping mechanisms of the workers. Heat stress, recorded using a wet bulb globe temperature monitor, was compared to international safety standards. Results: The survey findings suggest that heat-related symptoms increased in summer; 59% of all reports in summer were positive for symptoms (from Mild to Severe as compared to 41% in winter. Focus groups revealed four dominant themes: (1 Non-occupational stressors compound work stressors; (2 workers were particularly attuned to the impact of heat on their health; (3 workers were aware of heat-related preventive measures; and (4 few resources were currently available to protect workers from heat stress. Working conditions often exceed international heat stress safety thresholds. Female workers and new employees might be at increased risk of illness or injury. Conclusion: This study suggests significant health impacts on construction workers from heat stress exposure in the workplace, showed that heat stress levels were higher than those prescribed by international standards and highlights the need for revision of work practices, increased protective measures, and possible development of indigenous work safety standards for

  19. The effect of heating direction on flow boiling heat transfer of R134a in micro-channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingchen; Jia, Li; Dang, Chao; Peng, Qi

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents effects of heating directions on heat transfer performance of R134a flow boiling in micro- channel heat sink. The heat sink has 30 parallel rectangular channels with cross-sectional dimensions of 500μm width 500μm depth and 30mm length. The experimental operation condition ranges of the heat flux and the mass flux were 13.48 to 82.25 W/cm2 and 373.3 to 1244.4 kg/m2s respectively. The vapor quality ranged from 0.07 to 0.93. The heat transfer coefficients of top heating and bottom heating both were up to 25 kW/m2 K. Two dominate transfer mechanisms of nucleate boiling and convection boiling were observed according to boiling curves. The experimental results indicated that the heat transfer coefficient of bottom heating was 13.9% higher than top heating in low heat flux, while in high heat flux, the heat transfer coefficient of bottom heating was 9.9%.higher than the top heating, because bubbles were harder to divorce the heating wall. And a modified correlation was provided to predict heat transfer of top heating.

  20. Effect of heat input on dilution and heat affected zone in submerged arc welding process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hari Om; Sunil Pandey

    2013-12-01

    Submerged arc welding (SAW) is a fusion joining process, known for its high deposition capabilities. This process is useful in joining thick section components used in various industries. Besides joining, SAW can also be used for surfacing applications. Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) produced within the base metal as a result of tremendous heat of arc is of big concern as it affects the performance of welded/surfaced structure in service due to metallurgical changes in the affected region. This work was carried out to investigate the effect of polarity and other SAW parameters on HAZ size and dilution and to establish their correlations. Influence of heat input on dilution and heat affected zone was then carried out. Four levels of heat input were used to study their effect on % dilution and HAZ area at both the electrode positive and electrode negative polarities. Proper management of heat input in welding is important, because power sources can be used more efficiently if one knows how the same heat input can be applied to get the better results. Empirical models have been developed using statistical technique.

  1. Effects of ridged walls on the heat transfer in a heated square duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, M.S.; Rodriguez, W.V. [Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico DF (Mexico). Instituto de Ingenieria, UNAM, Coordinacion de Ingenieria de Procesos Industrails y Ambientales, Circuito Interior; Issa, R. [LEGI-MOST, INPG, Grenoble (France)

    2005-05-01

    Turbulent flows in rectangular cooling ducts of rocket engine thrust chambers are characterized by secondary motions of Prandtl's first and second kinds. These secondary currents play a prominent part in heat transfer between the thrust chamber and the cooling gas conveyed in the duct. Previous numerical and experimental works reveal that attaching ridges on the walls of the duct causes the formation of new secondary flows of Prandtl's second kind. These new structures are likely to increase the heat transfer. The present study has investigated numerically, through large eddy simulations, the effects of different forms of ridges on heat transfer in straight square duct flows. (author)

  2. Surface wettability effects on critical heat flux of boiling heat transfer using nanoparticle coatings

    KAUST Repository

    Hsu, Chin-Chi

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of surface wettability on pool boiling heat transfer. Nano-silica particle coatings were used to vary the wettability of the copper surface from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic by modifying surface topography and chemistry. Experimental results show that critical heat flux (CHF) values are higher in the hydrophilic region. Conversely, CHF values are lower in the hydrophobic region. The experimental CHF data of the modified surface do not fit the classical models. Therefore, this study proposes a simple model to build the nexus between the surface wettability and the growth of bubbles on the heating surface. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Heated Perimeter on Forced Convection Heat Transfer of he i at a Supercritical Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, D.; Shiotsu, M.; Shirai, Y.; Hama, K.

    2008-03-01

    The forced convection heat transfer coefficients were measured on two pairs of test plates all 6.0 mm in width and located face to face on inner walls of a rectangular duct. Each pair having length of 20 mm and 80 mm, respectively, was connected in series electrically. The rectangular duct was 420 mm in length and 5 mm×6 mm in inner cross section. The experiments were performed for inlet temperatures from 2.2 to 6.5 K, flow velocities from 0.1 to 5.6 m/s, and at a supercritical pressure of 2.8 atm. Comparison of the obtained Nusselt numbers with the former results with a single test plate showed the clear effect of a heated perimeter. Non-dimensional heat transfer equation including the effect of heated perimeter is presented.

  4. An evaluation of the effect of pulsed ultrasound on the cleaning efficacy of passive ultrasonic irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, L.M.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Zangrillo, C.; Cuckovic, D.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Multiple activations of the irrigant by using pulsed ultrasound may enhance the removal of dentin debris because of repeated acceleration of the irrigant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pulsed ultrasound on passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) in its ability to

  5. An Evaluation of the Effect of Pulsed Ultrasound on the Cleaning Efficacy of Passive Ultrasonic Irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Lei-Meng; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, Andreas Michel; Zangrillo, Chiara; Cuckovic, Doris; van der Sluis, Lucas W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Multiple activations of the irrigant by using pulsed ultrasound may enhance the removal of dentin debris because of repeated acceleration of the irrigant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pulsed ultrasound on passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) in its ability to

  6. An Evaluation of the Effect of Pulsed Ultrasound on the Cleaning Efficacy of Passive Ultrasonic Irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Lei-Meng; Verhaagen, Bram; Versluis, Michel; Zangrillo, Chiara; Cuckovic, Doris; van der Sluis, Lucas W. M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Multiple activations of the irrigant by using pulsed ultrasound may enhance the removal of dentin debris because of repeated acceleration of the irrigant. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pulsed ultrasound on passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) in its ability to

  7. Effects of Pulse Current on Solidification Structure of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Jin-hui; CHEN Yu; LI Ren-xing; ZHAI Qi-jie

    2004-01-01

    The 1Cr18Ni9Ti specimens were treated respectively with pulse current under 520 V and 2 600 V during solidification and the solidification structure was observed. The results showed that pulse current can refine solidification grains, cut primary dentrities remarkably and reduce second dentritic arm spacing. The mechanism and effect are changed with operation parameters.

  8. Theory of Pulse Train Amplification Without Patterning Effects in Quantum Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander V.; Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    A theory for pulse amplification and saturation in quantum dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is developed. In particular, the maximum bit rate at which a data stream of pulses can be amplified without significant patterning effects is investigated. Simple expressions are derived th...

  9. Constructs of highly effective heat transport paths by bionic optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG; Xinguang; (程新广); LI; Zhixin; (李志信); GUO; Zengyuan; (过增元)

    2003-01-01

    The optimization approach based on the biological evolution principle is used to construct the heat transport paths for volume-to-point problem. The transport paths are constructed by inserting high conductivity materials in the heat conduction domain where uniform or nonuniform heat sources exist. In the bionic optimization process, the optimal constructs of the high conductivity material are obtained by numerically simulating the evolution and degeneration process according to the uniformity principle of the temperature gradient. Finally, preserving the features of the optimal constructs, the constructs are regularized for the convenience of engineering manufacture. The results show that the construct obtained by bionic optimization is approximate to that obtained by the tree-network constructal theory when the heat conduction is enhanced for the domain with a uniform heat source and high conductivity ratio of the inserting material to the substrate, the high conductivity materials are mainly concentrated on the heat outlet for the case with a uniform heat source and low thermal conductivity ratio, and for the case with nonuniform heat sources, the high conductivity material is concentrated in the heat source regions and construacts several highly effective heat transport paths to connect the regions to the outlet.

  10. Effects of Pulse Width and Electrode Placement on the Efficacy and Cognitive Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackeim, Harold A.; Prudic, Joan; Nobler, Mitchell S.; Fitzsimons, Linda; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Payne, Nancy; Berman, Robert M.; Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Perera, Tarique; Devanand, D. P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND While electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depression is effective, cognitive effects limit its use. Reducing the width of the electrical pulse and using the right unilateral electrode placement may decrease adverse cognitive effects, while preserving efficacy. METHODS In a double-masked study, we randomly assigned 90 depressed patients to right unilateral ECT at 6 times seizure threshold or bilateral ECT at 2.5 times seizure threshold, using either a traditional brief pulse (1.5 ms) or an ultrabrief pulse (0.3 ms). Depressive symptoms and cognition were assessed before, during, and immediately, two, and six months after therapy. Patients who responded were followed for a one-year period. RESULTS The final remission rate for ultrabrief bilateral ECT was 35 percent, compared with 73 percent for ultrabrief unilateral ECT, 65 percent for standard pulse width bilateral ECT, and 59 percent for standard pulse width unilateral ECT (all P’s<0.05 after covariate adjustment). The ultrabrief right unilateral group had less severe cognitive side effects than the other 3 groups in virtually all primary outcome measures assessed in the acute postictal period, and during and immediately following therapy. Both the ultrabrief stimulus and right unilateral electrode placement produced less short- and long-term retrograde amnesia. Patients rated their memory deficits as less severe following ultrabrief right unilateral ECT compared to each of the other three conditions (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS The use of an ultrabrief stimulus markedly reduces adverse cognitive effects, and when coupled with markedly suprathreshold right unilateral ECT, also preserves efficacy. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00487500.) PMID:19756236

  11. Contact Angle Effects in Boiling Heat Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Urquiola, Erwin; Fujita, Yasunobu

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports boiling experiments with pure water and surfactant solutions of SDS on horizontal heating surface. The static contact angle, rather than the surface tension value, was found to be the leading factor for the results and probably its prev

  12. Electroweak Hall Effect of Neutrino and Coronal Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Kenzo

    2015-01-01

    The inversion of temperature at the solar corona is hard to understand from classical physics, and the coronal heating mechanism remains unclear. The heating in the quiet region seems contradicting with the thermodynamics and is a keen problem for physicists. A new mechanism for the coronal heating based on the neutrino radiative transition unique in the corona region is studied. The probability is enormously amplified by an electroweak Chern-Simons form and overlapping waves, and the sufficient energy is transfered. Thus the coronal heating is understood from the quantum effects of the solar neutrino.

  13. Permeabilization of plant tissues by monopolar pulsed electric fields: effect of frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asavasanti, Suvaluk; Ristenpart, William; Stroeve, Pieter; Barrett, Diane M

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) nonthermally induce cell membrane permeabilization and thereby improve dehydration and extraction efficiencies in food plant materials. Effects of electrical field strength and number of pulses on plant tissue integrity have been studied extensively. Two previous studies on the effect of pulse frequency, however, did not provide a clear view: one study suggested no effect of frequency, while the other found a greater impact on tissue integrity at lower frequency. This study establishes the effect of pulse frequency on integrity of onion tissues. Changes in electrical characteristics, ion leakage, texture parameters, and percent weight loss were quantified for a wide range of pulse frequencies under conditions of fixed field strength and pulse number. Optical microscopy and viable-cell staining provided direct visualization of effects on individual cells. The key finding is that lower frequencies (f plant tissue. We hypothesize that cytoplasmic streaming plays a significant role in moving conductive ionic species from permeabilized cells to the intercellular space between plant cells, making subsequent pulses more efficacious at sufficiently low frequencies. The results suggest that decreasing the pulse frequency in PEF may minimize the number of pulses needed to achieve a desired amount of permeabilization, thus lowering the total energy consumption. Practical Application: PEF cause pores to be formed in plant cell membranes, thereby improve moisture removal and potential extraction of desirable components. This study used in situ microscopic evaluation of onion cells, as they were pulsed with electric fields at different frequencies, to determine whether frequency was an important parameter. We illustrate that membranes were more effectively broken at lower frequencies as compared to higher frequencies. Application of this information will allow for improved design of PEF systems for more energy efficient dehydration or extraction of

  14. Thermoelectric Effects in Self-heating Silicon Microwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Gokhan

    Self-heating mechanisms of small-scale structures have been an important subject where electrical and thermal transports are coupled, such as many electronic and optoelectronic devices, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), thermoelectric energy conversion devices and phase-change memory devices. In this work, nanocrystalline silicon microwires (L: 1 — 30 gm, Width: 0.1 — 1 gm, Thickness: 50 — 130 nm) are self-heated either through a single, short duration ( 1300 K) give rise to significant electron-hole pair generation and strong thermal gradients (˜1 K/nm) lead to substantial gradients in the generation-recombination balance. The modeled results are good agreement with the both microsecond voltage pulse and long duration AC signal experiments.

  15. Effect of quantum correction on nonlinear thermal wave of electrons driven by laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafari, F.; Ghoranneviss, M.

    2016-08-01

    In thermal interaction of laser pulse with a deuterium-tritium (DT) plane, the thermal waves of electrons are generated instantly. Since the thermal conductivity of electron is a nonlinear function of temperature, a nonlinear heat conduction equation is used to investigate the propagation of waves in solid DT. This paper presents a self-similar analytic solution for the nonlinear heat conduction equation in a planar geometry. The thickness of the target material is finite in numerical computation, and it is assumed that the laser energy is deposited at a finite initial thickness at the initial time which results in a finite temperature for electrons at initial time. Since the required temperature range for solid DT ignition is higher than the critical temperature which equals 35.9 eV, the effects of quantum correction in thermal conductivity should be considered. This letter investigates the effects of quantum correction on characteristic features of nonlinear thermal wave, including temperature, penetration depth, velocity, heat flux, and heating and cooling domains. Although this effect increases electron temperature and thermal flux, penetration depth and propagation velocity are smaller. This effect is also applied to re-evaluate the side-on laser ignition of uncompressed DT.

  16. Effect of heat loss in a geothermal reservoir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganguly, Sayantan; Tan, Lippong; Date, Abhijit; Mohan Kumar, Mandalagiri Subbarayappa

    This paper reports a three-dimensional (3D) numerical study to determine the effect of heat loss on the transient heat transport and temperature distribution in a geothermal reservoir. The operation of a geothermal power plant, which is essentially an injection-production process, involves

  17. Pulse shaping effects on weld porosity in laser beam spot welds : contrast of long- & short- pulse welds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellison, Chad M. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Perricone, Matthew J. (R.J. Lee Group, Inc., Monroeville, PA); Faraone, Kevin M. (BWX Technologies, Inc., Lynchburg, VA); Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-10-01

    Weld porosity is being investigated for long-pulse spot welds produced by high power continuous output lasers. Short-pulse spot welds (made with a pulsed laser system) are also being studied but to a much small extent. Given that weld area of a spot weld is commensurate with weld strength, the loss of weld area due to an undefined or unexpected pore results in undefined or unexpected loss in strength. For this reason, a better understanding of spot weld porosity is sought. Long-pulse spot welds are defined and limited by the slow shutter speed of most high output power continuous lasers. Continuous lasers typically ramp up to a simmer power before reaching the high power needed to produce the desired weld. A post-pulse ramp down time is usually present as well. The result is a pulse length tenths of a second long as oppose to the typical millisecond regime of the short-pulse pulsed laser. This study will employ a Lumonics JK802 Nd:YAG laser with Super Modulation pulse shaping capability and a Lasag SLS C16 40 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Pulse shaping will include square wave modulation of various peak powers for long-pulse welds and square (or top hat) and constant ramp down pulses for short-pulse welds. Characterization of weld porosity will be performed for both pulse welding methods.

  18. Climate Change Effects on Heat Waves and Future Heat Wave-Associated IHD Mortality in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Zacharias

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of future climate change on the occurrence of heat waves and its implications for heat wave-related mortality due to ischemic heart diseases (IHD in Germany is studied. Simulations of 19 regional climate models with a spatial resolution of 0.25° × 0.25° forced by the moderate climate change scenario A1B are analyzed. Three model time periods of 30 years are evaluated, representing present climate (1971–2000, near future climate (2021–2050, and remote future climate (2069–2098. Heat waves are defined as periods of at least three consecutive days with daily mean air temperature above the 97.5th percentile of the all-season temperature distribution. Based on the model simulations, future heat waves in Germany will be significantly more frequent, longer lasting and more intense. By the end of the 21st century, the number of heat waves will be tripled compared to present climate. Additionally, the average duration of heat waves will increase by 25%, accompanied by an increase of the average temperature during heat waves by about 1 K. Regional analyses show that stronger than average climate change effects are observed particularly in the southern regions of Germany. Furthermore, we investigated climate change impacts on IHD mortality in Germany applying temperature projections from 19 regional climate models to heat wave mortality relationships identified in a previous study. Future IHD excess deaths were calculated both in the absence and presence of some acclimatization (i.e., that people are able to physiologically acclimatize to enhanced temperature levels in the future time periods by 0% and 50%, respectively. In addition to changes in heat wave frequency, we incorporated also changes in heat wave intensity and duration into the future mortality evaluations. The results indicate that by the end of the 21st century the annual number of IHD excess deaths in Germany attributable to heat waves is expected to rise by factor 2

  19. Hydration Effects on Human Physiology and Exercise-Heat Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    AD REPORT NO T7-90 HYDRATION EFFECTS :N HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY AND EXERCISE-HEA PERFORMANCE Co U S ARMY RESEARCH INSTITUTE N OF I ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE...effects on human physiology and exercise.-heat performance 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Michael N. Sawka, Andrew J. Young. William A. Latzka, P. Darrell...acknowledge Ms. Patricia DeMusis for preparing the manuscript. AD Report No. HYDRATION EFFECTS ON HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY AND EXERCISE-HEAT PERFORMANCE by Michael N

  20. The effect of EarthPulse on learning of declarative knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Heather E.

    The purpose of this double-blind, bio-medical research study was to investigate the effect of EarthPulse, a brainwave entrainment and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) device, on learning of declarative knowledge. Currently, PEMF research explores physiological and psychological effects but a gap exists in the potential effects of PEMF on learning. The study explored whether a relationship existed between receiving a thirty minute EarthPulse treatment on the "Entrain Up" setting and learning of declarative knowledge; whether the relationship remained over time; whether EarthPulse had an effect on sleep; and whether EarthPulse had an effect on attrition. Ninety-eight, randomly assigned, undergraduate students participated in this double-blind, experimental design study, of which 87 remained after attrition. After receiving a thirty minute EarthPulse or placebo treatment, experimental and control groups read identical passages and completed identical instruments to test learning and retention of declarative knowledge. Participants completed the same test in two intervals: an immediate (learning) and delayed (retention) posttest. Assumptions for normality and reliability were met. One-way ANOVA revealed no statistically significant effects on learning or retention at the 0.05 level. However, Chi square analysis revealed those who received the EarthPulse treatment were significantly less likely to fall asleep than those who received the control treatment (p=0.022) and very closely approached significance for attrition (p=0.051).

  1. Effect of PMD-induced Pulse Broadening on Sensitivity and Frequency Spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The PMD-induced pulse broadening may cause the degradation of receiver sensitivity and has negative effects on the power spectrum of received signals. The expressions of PMD-induced pulse broadening effects on receiver sensitivity are derived based on the concept of mean square pulse width. The effects of PMD on the spectrum of received power are analyzed in detail. Finally, the scheme is discussed with which the power of a certain frequency component is extracted as a feedback control signal in a PMD compensation system.

  2. Effects of particle size and laser wavelength on heating of silver nanoparticles under laser irradiation in liquid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HODA MAHDIYAN MOMEN

    2016-08-01

    Laser energy absorption results in significant heating of metallic nanoparticles and controlling the heating of nanoparticles is one of the essential stages of selective cell targeting. It is necessary to note that the laser action should be done by laser pulses with a wavelength that is strongly absorbed by the particles and it is important to select wavelengths that are not absorbed by the medium. Laser pulse duration must be chosen sufficiently short to minimize heat flow emitted from absorbing particles. Numerical calculations based on Mie theory were used to obtain the effect of laser wavelength and particle size on absorption factor for colloidal silver nanoparticles with radii between 5 and 50 nm. Calculations for acquiring temperatures under irradiations of pulsed KrF laser and pulsed Nd:YAG laser were performed. We showed that for low wavelengths of the laser, smaller nanoparticles have larger absorption efficiency compared to larger nanoparticles and in high wavelengths, temperature of all particles increased in the same way.

  3. Finite Span Effects on Flap Heating and Effectiveness in a Turbulent Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    Flap Span on Centerline Heating Distribution(15 Deflection) ........ ......................... 46 35 Span Edge Effect on Centerline Heat Transfer...Pressure Distributions at 87.5% Chord Station ....... ...................... 50 39 Span Edge Effect on Spanwise Pressure Distribution ........... 52 40...Distribution at 87.5% Chord Station ..... ............... 55 43 Span Edge Effect on Spanwise Heat Transfer Distribution ..... 56 44 Finite Span Effects

  4. Analysis of thermodynamic effect in Si irradiated by pulsed-laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming; Jin, Guangyong; Li, Mingxin; Ma, Yao; Yuan, Boshi; Yu, Huadong

    2014-12-01

    According to the heat conduction equation, thermoelastic equation and boundary conditions of finite, using the finite element method(FEM), established the three-dimensional finite element calculation model of thermal elastic ,numerical simulation the transient temperature field and stress field distribution of the single crystal silicon materials by the pulsing laser irradiation, and analytic solution the temperature distribution and stress distribution of laser irradiation on the silicon material , and analyzes the different parameters such as laser energy, pulse width, pulse number influence on temperature and stress, and the intrinsic damage mechanism of pulsed laser irradiation on silicon were studied. The results show that the silicon material is mainly in hot melt under the action of ablation damage.According to the irradiation of different energy and different pulse laser ,we can obtain the center temperature distribution, then get the law of the change of temperature with the variation of laser energy and pulse width in silicon material; according to the principal stress and shear stress distribution in 110 direction with different energy and different pulse, we can get the law of the change of stress distribution with the variation of laser energy and pulse width ;according to the principal stress distribution of single pulse and pulse train in 110 direction, we can get the law of the change of stress with pulse numbers in silicon.When power density of laser on optical material surface (or energy density) is the damage threshold, the optical material surface will form a spontaneous, periodic, and permanent surface ripple, it is called periodic surface structure laser induced (LIPSS).It is the condensed optical field of work to generate low dimensional quantum structures by laser irradiation on Si samples. The pioneering work of research and development and application of low dimensional quantum system has important academic value.The result of this paper

  5. Accumulated Effects of Work under Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    for acclimatized men. The American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air- Conditioning Engineers ( ASHRAE ), on the other hand recommended that the... refrigeration . The sera and urines were kept frozen until just prior to analysis. 2. Blood and urine chemical analysis: Within 5 min after the urine was pa...All the certificates of illness stored in the archives of the plants were collected for each employee from January 1st 1971 to December 31, 1976. The

  6. Synchronization of circadian Per2 rhythms and HSF1-BMAL1:CLOCK interaction in mouse fibroblasts after short-term heat shock pulse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruya Tamaru

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are the general physiological processes of adaptation to daily environmental changes, such as the temperature cycle. A change in temperature is a resetting cue for mammalian circadian oscillators, which are possibly regulated by the heat shock (HS pathway. The HS response (HSR is a universal process that provides protection against stressful conditions, which promote protein-denaturation. Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 is essential for HSR. In the study presented here, we investigated whether a short-term HS pulse can reset circadian rhythms. Circadian Per2 rhythm and HSF1-mediated gene expression were monitored by a real-time bioluminescence assay for mPer2 promoter-driven luciferase and HS element (HSE; HSF1-binding site-driven luciferase activity, respectively. By an optimal duration HS pulse (43°C for approximately 30 minutes, circadian Per2 rhythm was observed in the whole mouse fibroblast culture, probably indicating the synchronization of the phases of each cell. This rhythm was preceded by an acute elevation in mPer2 and HSF1-mediated gene expression. Mutations in the two predicted HSE sites adjacent (one of them proximally to the E-box in the mPer2 promoter dramatically abolished circadian mPer2 rhythm. Circadian Per2 gene/protein expression was not observed in HSF1-deficient cells. These findings demonstrate that HSF1 is essential to the synchronization of circadian rhythms by the HS pulse. Importantly, the interaction between HSF1 and BMAL1:CLOCK heterodimer, a central circadian transcription factor, was observed after the HS pulse. These findings reveal that even a short-term HS pulse can reset circadian rhythms and cause the HSF1-BMAL1:CLOCK interaction, suggesting the pivotal role of crosstalk between the mammalian circadian and HSR systems.

  7. Review of Literature on High Power Microwave Pulse Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    City-Base, Texas. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 BACKGROUND ... BACKGROUND Systems radiating pulsed energy at microwave frequencies (300 MHz to 300 GHz) are used for military communication, detection, and...15, 220-229. Ørstavik, K., Norheim, I., & Jørum, E. (2006). Pain and small-fiber neuropathy in patients with hypothyroidism . Neurology, 67, 786-791

  8. Effects of heat stress on day-old broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, R A; Weathers, W W; Smith, J

    1984-09-01

    Short-term heat stress can occur when chicks are transported from the hatchery to growing facilities. Two experiments were conducted to determine the possible effects of short-term heat stress on growth and feed conversion of broiler (Hubbard X Hubbard) chicks. The heat stress was accomplished by placing chicks in Jamesway 252 incubators at dry bulb temperatures ranging from 40 to 45 C for variable times. Growth, feed consumption, and mortality were measured for 16 days following the heat stress. Short sublethal heat stress significantly reduced growth rate to 16 days in these experiments without any effect on feed conversion ratio. The results indicate that the hatchery industry should avoid overheating chicks even for periods as short as 1 hr.

  9. Beneficial effects of microwave-assisted heating versus conventional heating in noble metal nanoparticle synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Naween; García, Stephany; Zhou, Jiping; Humphrey, Simon M

    2012-11-27

    An extensive comparative study of the effects of microwave versus conventional heating on the nucleation and growth of near-monodisperse Rh, Pd, and Pt nanoparticles has revealed distinct and preferential effects of the microwave heating method. A one-pot synthetic method has been investigated, which combines nucleation and growth in a single reaction via precise control over the precursor addition rate. Using this method, microwave-assisted heating enables the convenient preparation of polymer-capped nanoparticles with improved monodispersity, morphological control, and higher crystallinity, compared with samples heated conventionally under otherwise identical conditions. Extensive studies of Rh nanoparticle formation reveal fundamental differences during the nucleation phase that is directly dependent on the heating method; microwave irradiation was found to provide more uniform seeds for the subsequent growth of larger nanostructures of desired size and surface structure. Nanoparticle growth kinetics are also markedly different under microwave heating. While conventional heating generally yields particles with mixed morphologies, microwave synthesis consistently provides a majority of tetrahedral particles at intermediate sizes (5-7 nm) or larger cubes (8+ nm) upon further growth. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy indicates that Rh seeds and larger nanoparticles obtained from microwave-assisted synthesis are more highly crystalline and faceted versus their conventionally prepared counterparts. Microwave-prepared Rh nanoparticles also show approximately twice the catalytic activity of similar-sized conventionally prepared particles, as demonstrated in the vapor-phase hydrogenation of cyclohexene. Ligand exchange reactions to replace polymer capping agents with molecular stabilizing agents are also easily facilitated under microwave heating, due to the excitation of polar organic moieties; the ligand exchange proceeds with excellent retention of

  10. Effect of surface etching on condensing heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok, Sung Chul; Park, Jae Won; Jung, Jiyeon; Choi, Chonggun; Choi, Gyu Hong; Hwang, Seung Sik; Chung, Tae Yong; Shin, Donghoon [Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Jun [Hoseo University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    This study conducted experiments on humid air condensation during heat transfer in an air preheating exchanger attached to a home condensing boiler to improve thermal efficiency. An etchant composed of sulfuric acid and sodium nitrate was used to create roughness on the heat exchanger surface made from STS430J1L. A counter flow heat exchanger was fabricated to test the performance of heat transfer. Results showed that the overall heat transfer coefficients of all specimens treated with etchant improved with respect to the original specimens (not treated with etchant), and the overall heat transfer coefficient of the 60 s etching specimen increased by up to 15%. However, the increasing rate of the heat transfer coefficient was disproportional to the etching time. When the etching time specifically increased above 60 s, the heat transfer coefficient decreased. This effect was assumed to be caused by surface characteristics such as contact angle. Furthermore, a smaller contact angle or higher hydrophilicity leads to higher heat transfer coefficient.

  11. Pulse testing in the presence of wellbore storage and skin effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogbe, D.O.; Brigham, W.E.

    1984-08-01

    A pulse test is conducted by creating a series of short-time pressure transients in an active (pulsing) well and recording the observed pressure response at an observation (responding) well. Using the pressure response and flow rate data, the transmissivity and storativity of the tested formation can be determined. Like any other pressure transient data, the pulse-test response is significantly influenced by wellbore storage and skin effects. The purpose of this research is to examine the influence of wellbore storage and skin effects on interference testing in general and on pulse-testing in particular, and to present the type curves and procedures for designing and analyzing pulse-test data when wellbore storage and skin effects are active at either the responding well or the pulsing well. A mathematical model for interference testing was developed by solving the diffusivity equation for radial flow of a single-phase, slightly compressible fluid in an infinitely large, homogeneous reservoir. When wellbore storage and skin effects are present in a pulse test, the observed response amplitude is attenuated and the time lag is inflated. Consequently, neglecting wellbore storage and skin effects in a pulse test causes the calculated storativity to be over-estimated and the transmissivity to be under-estimated. The error can be as high as 30%. New correlations and procedures are developed for correcting the pulse response amplitude and time lag for wellbore storage effects. Using these correlations, it is possible to correct the wellbore storage-dominated response amplitude and time lag to within 3% of their expected values without wellbore storage, and in turn to calculate the corresponding transmissivity and storativity. Worked examples are presented to illustrate how to use the new correction techniques. 45 references.

  12. First pulse effect self-suppression picosecond regenerative amplifier (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Haitao; Chang, Liang; Zhang, Yi; Yao, Siyi; Lu, Wei; Yang, Xiaohong

    2017-03-01

    First pulse effect, commonly seen in nanosecond cavity-dumped lasers and picosecond regenerative amplifiers, not only leads to degradation of processing quality, but also acts as potential threat to optical switching elements. Several methods have been developed to suppress that effect, including electronic controls, polarization controls, and diffraction controls. We present a new way for first pulse self-suppression without any additional components. By carefully arranging the cavity mirror of a regenerative amplifier, we realized `parasitic lasing like' radiation. When the regenerative amplifier works in `operation ready' status, the parasitic lasing occurs and prevents the gain crystal from saturation. When the regenerative amplifier starts working and amplifying pulses, the first pulse in a pulse train will not get much more gain and energy than pulses following it. As parasitic lasing disappears at the same time, the average output power of the amplifier does not significantly reduce. This cost effective method does not require any additional component. In addition, as it is not polarization dependent, this method is widely suitable for different kinds of regenerative amplifiers. It's the easiest and cheapest way to suppress first pulse effect, to the best of our knowledge.

  13. Effects of beam velocity and density on an ion-beam pulse moving in magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xiao-ying; Zhao, Yong-tao; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The wakefield and stopping power of an ion-beam pulse moving in magnetized plasmas are investigated by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The effects of beam velocity and density on the wake and stopping power are discussed. In the presence of magnetic field, it is found that beside the longitudinal conversed V-shaped wakes, the strong whistler wave are observed when low-density and low-velocity pulses moving in plasmas. The corresponding stopping powers are enhanced due to the drag of these whistler waves. As beam velocities increase, the whistler waves disappear, and only are conversed V-shape wakes observed. The corresponding stopping powers are reduced compared with these in isotropic plasmas. When high-density pulses transport in the magnetized plasmas, the whistler waves are greatly inhibited for low-velocity pulses and disappear for high-velocity pulses. Additionally, the magnetic field reduces the stopping powers for all high-density cases.

  14. Evidence of surface charge effects in T-branch nanojunctions using microsecond-pulse testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iniguez-de-la-Torre, I; Mateos, J; Gonzalez, T [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Roelens, Y; Gardes, C; Bollaert, S [Institut d' Electronique de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, Universite de Lille 1, Avenue Poincare BP60069, 59652, Villeneuve d' Ascq CEDEX (France)

    2011-11-04

    The understanding of the influence of surface charge effects on the electrical properties of nanostructures is a key aspect for the forthcoming generations of electronic devices. In this paper, by using an ultrafast electrical pulse characterization technique, we report on the room-temperature time response of a T-branch nanojunction which allows us to identify the signature of surface states. Different pulse widths from 500 ns to 100 {mu}s were applied to the device. For a given pulse width, the stem voltage is measured and compared with the DC result. The output value in the stem is found to depend on the pulse width and to be related to the characteristic charging time of the interface states. As expected, the results show that the well-known nonlinear response of T-branch junctions is more pronounced for long pulses, beyond such a characteristic time.

  15. Effect of Pulse Shaping on Observing Coherent Energy Transfer in Single Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kai; Bai, Shuming; Shi, Qiang

    2016-11-17

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies have revealed that quantum coherence plays an important role in the excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting (LH) complexes. Inspired by the recent single-molecule two-color double-pump experiment, we theoretically investigate the effect of pulse shaping on observing coherent energy transfer in the single bacterial LH2 complex. It is found that quantum coherent energy transfer can be observed when the time delay and phase difference between the two laser pulses are controlled independently. However, when the two-color pulses are generated using the pulse-shaping method, how the laser pulses are prepared is crucial to the observation of quantum coherent energy transfer in single photosynthetic complexes.

  16. Pulsed radio frequency interference effects on data communications via satellite transponder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, A.; Hong, Y.

    1979-01-01

    Power-limited communication links may be susceptible to significant degradation if intentional or unintentional pulsed high level radio frequency interference (RFI) is present. Pulsed RFI is, in fact, of current interest to NASA in studies relating to its Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The present paper examines the impact of pulsed RFI on the error probability performance of a power-limited satellite communication link: the assumed modulation scheme is PN coded binary PSK. The composite effects of thermal noise, pulsed CW and pulsed Gaussian noise are analyzed, where RFI arrivals are assumed to follow Poisson statistics. Under the assumption that the satellite repeater is ideal and that integrate and dump filtering is employed at the ground receiver, an exact error probability expression and associated approximations are derived. Computed results are generated using an arbitrarily specified RFI model.

  17. Differential effects of magnetic pulses on the orientation of naturally migrating birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Richard A

    2010-11-01

    In migratory passerine birds, strong magnetic pulses are thought to be diagnostic of the remagnetization of iron minerals in a putative sensory system contained in the beak. Previous evidence suggests that while such a magnetic pulse affects the orientation of migratory birds in orientation cages, no effect was present when pulse-treated birds were tested in natural migration. Here we show that two migrating passerine birds treated with a strong magnetic pulse, designed to alter the magnetic sense, migrated in a direction that differed significantly from that of controls when tested in natural conditions. The orientation of treated birds was different depending on the alignment of the pulse with respect to the magnetic field. These results can aid in advancing understanding of how the putative iron-mineral-based receptors found in birds' beaks may be used to detect and signal the intensity and/or direction of the Earth's magnetic field.

  18. Numerical study of the conjugate heat transfer in a horizontal pipe heated by Joulean effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touahri Sofiane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The three dimensional mixed convection heat transfer in a electrically heated horizontal pipe conjugated to a thermal conduction through the entire solid thickness is investigated by taking into account the thermal dependence of the physical properties of the fluid and the outer heat losses. The model equations of continuity, momentum and energy are numerically solved by the finite volume method. The pipe thickness, the Prandtl and the Reynolds numbers are fixed while the Grashof number is varied from 104to107. The results obtained show that the dynamic and thermal fields for mixed convection are qualitatively and quantitatively different from those of forced convection, and the local Nusselt number at the interface solid-fluid is not uniform: it has considerable axial and azimuthally variations. The effect of physical variables of the fluid depending on temperature is significant, which justifies its inclusion. The heat transfer is quantified by the local and average Nusselt numbers. We found that the average Nusselt number of solid-fluid interface of the duct increases with the increase of Grashof number. We have equally found out that the heat transfer is improved thanks to the consideration of the thermo dependence of the physical properties. We have tried modelling the average Nusselt number as a function of Richardson number. With the parameters used, the heat transfer is quantified by the correlation: NuA=12.0753 Ri0.156

  19. Effects of gas bubble production on heat transfer from a volumetrically heated liquid pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Geoffrey R.

    Aqueous solutions of uranium salts may provide a new supply chain to fill potential shortfalls in the availability of the most common radiopharmaceuticals currently in use worldwide, including Tc99m which is a decay product of Mo99. The fissioning of the uranium in these solutions creates Mo99 but also generates large amounts of hydrogen and oxygen from the radiolysis of the water. When the dissolved gases reach a critical concentration, bubbles will form in the solution. Bubbles in the solution affect both the fission power and the heat transfer out of the solution. As a result, for safety and production calculations, the effects of the bubbles on heat transfer must be understood. A high aspect ratio tank was constructed to simulate a section of an annulus with heat exchangers on the inner and outer steel walls to provide cooling. Temperature measurements via thermocouples inside the tank and along the outside of the steel walls allowed the calculation of overall and local heat transfer coefficients. Different air injection manifolds allowed the exploration of various bubble characteristics and patterns on heat transfer from the pool. The manifold type did not appear to have significant impact on the bubble size distributions in water. However, air injected into solutions of magnesium sulfate resulted in smaller bubble sizes and larger void fractions than those in water at the same injection rates. One dimensional calculations provide heat transfer coefficient values as functions of the superficial gas velocity in the pool.

  20. Effective Heat Transfer Enhancement in Finned Tube Heat Exchanger with Different Fin Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A.Livingston1 , P. Selvakumar2

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available During cross flow in a heat exchanger, heat transfer in the front portion of the tube is more compared to back portion of the tube. This is due to less formation of vortices at the backside of the tube. For uniform heat transfer to take place throughout the tube, it is necessary to increase the vortex formation at the rear side of the tube. The aim of this study is to explore the possibilities of improving the flow structure and thereby increasing uniform heat transfer around the tubes by introducing special type of fin arrangement over the tubes. The effect of shape and orientation of the fin on vortex generation and respective heat transfers are studied numerically. It have been identified that by introducing special type of fin arrangement over the tube there is a possibility for increase the vortex formation at the rear portion of the tube, which significantly leads to creation of uniform heat transfer all around the tube.

  1. Heat shock and heat shock protein 70i enhance the oncolytic effect of replicative adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviv, Y S; Blackwell, J L; Li, H; Wang, M; Lei, X; Curiel, D T

    2001-12-01

    Replication-competent viruses are currently being evaluated for their cancer cell-killing properties. These vectors are designed to induce tumor regression after selective viral propagation within the tumor. However, replication-competent viruses have not resulted heretofore in complete tumor eradication in the clinical setting. Recently, heat shock has been reported to partially alleviate replication restriction on an avian adenovirus (Ad) in a human lung cancer cell line. Therefore, we hypothesized that heat shock and overexpression of heat shock protein (hsp) would support the oncolytic effect of a replication-competent human Ad. To this end, we tested the oncolytic and burst kinetics of a replication-competent Ad after exposure to heat shock or to inducible hsp 70 overexpression by a replication-deficient Ad (Adhsp 70i). Heat-shock resulted in augmentation of Ad burst and oncolysis while decreasing total intracellular Ad DNA. Overexpression of hsp 70i also enhanced Ad-mediated oncolysis but did not decrease intracellular Ad DNA levels. We conclude that heat shock and Adhsp 70i enhance the Ad cell-killing potential via distinct mechanisms. A potential therapeutic implication would be the use of local hyperthermia to augment oncolysis by increasing the burst of replication-competent Ad. The role of hsp in Ad-mediated oncolysis should be additionally explored.

  2. Substrate bias effect on crystallinity of polycrystalline silicon thin films prepared by pulsed ion-beam evaporation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Fazlat; Gunji, Michiharu; Yang, Sung-Chae; Suzuki, Tsuneo; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang, Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi [Nagaoka Univ. of Technology, Extreme Energy-Density Research Inst., Nagaoka, Niigata (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    The deposition of polycrystalline silicon thin films has been tried by a pulsed ion-beam evaporation method, where high crystallinity and deposition rate have been achieved without heating the substrate. The crystallinity and the deposition rate were improved by applying bias voltage to the substrate, where instantaneous substrate heating might have occurred by ion-bombardment. (author)

  3. An electrohydrodynamics model for non-equilibrium electron and phonon transport in metal films after ultra-short pulse laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Li, Nianbei; Yang, Ronggui

    2015-06-01

    The electrons and phonons in metal films after ultra-short pulse laser heating are in highly non-equilibrium states not only between the electrons and the phonons but also within the electrons. An electrohydrodynamics model consisting of the balance equations of electron density, energy density of electrons, and energy density of phonons is derived from the coupled non-equilibrium electron and phonon Boltzmann transport equations to study the nonlinear thermal transport by considering the electron density fluctuation and the transient electric current in metal films, after ultra-short pulse laser heating. The temperature evolution is calculated by the coupled electron and phonon Boltzmann transport equations, the electrohydrodynamics model derived in this work, and the two-temperature model. Different laser pulse durations, film thicknesses, and laser fluences are considered. We find that the two-temperature model overestimates the electron temperature at the front surface of the film and underestimates the damage threshold when the nonlinear thermal transport of electrons is important. The electrohydrodynamics model proposed in this work could be a more accurate prediction tool to study the non-equilibrium electron and phonon transport process than the two-temperature model and it is much easier to be solved than the Boltzmann transport equations.

  4. Heat-pulse flowmeter test to characterize the seawater intrusion in fractured rock, western coast of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, H.; Hwang, S.; Shin, J.; Park, K.

    2007-12-01

    Seawater intrusion occurs commonly along the western and southern coasts of Korea. Almost coastal area consists of a reclaimed land, and is affected by seawater intrusion through the fractured rocks connected the seaside within several kilometers of coasts. A combination of drilling, conventional geophysical well logging including caliper log, natural gamma log, fluid temperature/conductivity log etc., acoustic televiewer, flowmeter, hydrophysical logging, packer test, and freshwater injection test was performed to evaluate seawater intrusion through the fractured rock in Baeksu-eup, Youngkwang-gun, Korea. The geological structure of the survey area comprises mud, sand, and granite and andesite bedrock (below an approximate depth of 22 m). The test boreholes are located with the brackish area interpreted with surface geophysical survey and hydrogeochemcial survey. The depth of two test boreholes is 50m, and the diameter is 3 inch, the distance between boreholes is 10m. Although the core log showed the several fractures, we didn't identify the minor fractures using 3-arm caliper logs because of small aperture size of fractures. The electrical conductivity of the borehole fluid is seen to be more than 1000 μS/cm at depth of about 35 m, and the highest conductivity is about 5000 μS/cm. Several intervals shown the change of conductivity logs doesn't relate with fractures identified by 3-arm caliper logs. In order to verify the permeable fractures, heat-pulse flowmeter test was conducted within single hole and interpreted with Paillet inversion method. Five permeable fractures are detected and hydraulic properties are estimated. These results are compared with hydrophysical logging performed one borehole. After the replacement of borehole fluid with freshwater, the change of fluid conductivity shows at least seven fractures with different salinity. Main fractures with highest salinity detected acoustic televiewer show low dip angles. To define subsurface connection

  5. Effect of aligning pulse train on the orientation and alignment of a molecule in presence of orienting pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Ashish; Maan, Anjali; Ahlawat, Dharamvir Singh; Prasad, Vinod

    2017-02-15

    Field-free molecular alignment is studied theoretically in presence of orienting laser pulse and a delayed Infrared laser (IRL) pulse train. The pulse shapes taken are sine square (sin(2)) and square. The degree of alignment can be significantly enhanced by the combination of orienting pulse and IRL pulse train compared with only IRL pulse train. Special emphasis is laid on time delay between orienting and aligning pulse, the width and shape of the pulse train. By adjusting the time delay, width and intensity of coupling laser one can suppress a population of particular state while simultaneously enhancing the population of desired states. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of noise on Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fittinghoff, D.N.; DeLong, K.W.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    We study the effects of noise in Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses. We quantify the measurement accuracy in the presence of additive, muliplicative, and quantization noise, and discuss filtering and pre-processing of the data.

  7. Effects of initial frequency chirp on the linear propagation characteristics of the exponential optical pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Hong-Jun; Liu Shan-Liang

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the linear propagation characteristics of the exponential optical pulse with initial linear and nonlinear frequency chirp are numerically studied in a single mode fibre for β2< 0. It can be found that the temporal full width at half maximum and time-bandwidth product of exponential pulse monotonically increase with the increase of propagation distance and decrease with the increase of linear chirp C for C < 0.5, go through an initial decreasing stage near ζ = 1, then increase with the increase of propagation distance and linear chirp C for C ≥ 0.5. The broadening of pulses with negative chirp is faster than that with positive chirp. The exponential pulse with linear chirp gradually evolves into a near-Gaussian pulse. The effect of nonlinear chirp on waveform of the pulse is much greater than that of linear chirp. The temporal waveform breaking of exponential pulse with nonlinear chirp is first observed in linear propagation. Furthermore, the expressions of the spectral width and time-bandwidth product of the exponential optical pulse with the frequency chirp are given by use of the numerical analysis method.

  8. Effects of heat on cut mark characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltenberger, Lukas; Schutkowski, Holger

    2017-02-01

    Cut marks on bones provide crucial information about tools used and their mode of application, both in archaeological and forensic contexts. Despite a substantial amount of research on cut mark analysis and the influence of fire on bones (shrinkage, fracture pattern, recrystallisation), there is still a lack of knowledge in cut mark analysis on burnt remains. This study provides information about heat alteration of cut marks and whether consistent features can be observed that allow direct interpretation of the implemented tools used. In a controlled experiment, cut marks (n=25) were inflicted on pig ribs (n=7) with a kitchen knife and examined using micro-CT and digital microscopy. The methods were compared in terms of their efficacy in recording cut marks on native and heat-treated bones. Statistical analysis demonstrates that floor angles and the maximum slope height of cuts undergo significant alteration, whereas width, depth, floor radius, slope, and opening angle remain stable. Micro-CT and digital microscopy are both suitable methods for cut mark analysis. However, significant differences in measurements were detected between both methods, as micro-CT is less accurate due to the lower resolution. Moreover, stabbing led to micro-fissures surrounding the cuts, which might also influence the alteration of cut marks.

  9. Pulse shapes and surface effects in segmented germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, Daniel

    2010-03-24

    It is well established that at least two neutrinos are massive. The absolute neutrino mass scale and the neutrino hierarchy are still unknown. In addition, it is not known whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) will be used to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. The discovery of this decay could help to answer the open questions. In the GERDA experiment, germanium detectors enriched in the isotope {sup 76}Ge are used as source and detector at the same time. The experiment is planned in two phases. In the first, phase existing detectors are deployed. In the second phase, additional detectors will be added. These detectors can be segmented. A low background index around the Q value of the decay is important to maximize the sensitivity of the experiment. This can be achieved through anti-coincidences between segments and through pulse shape analysis. The background index due to radioactive decays in the detector strings and the detectors themselves was estimated, using Monte Carlo simulations for a nominal GERDA Phase II array with 18-fold segmented germanium detectors. A pulse shape simulation package was developed for segmented high-purity germanium detectors. The pulse shape simulation was validated with data taken with an 19-fold segmented high-purity germanium detector. The main part of the detector is 18-fold segmented, 6-fold in the azimuthal angle and 3-fold in the height. A 19th segment of 5mm thickness was created on the top surface of the detector. The detector was characterized and events with energy deposited in the top segment were studied in detail. It was found that the metalization close to the end of the detector is very important with respect to the length of the of the pulses observed. In addition indications for n-type and p-type surface channels were found. (orig.)

  10. Effect of temperature field on solidification structure of pure Al under pulse magneto-oscillation

    OpenAIRE

    Li Bo; Yin Zhenxing; Gong Yongyong

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of temperature field on the Pulse Magneto-Oscillation (PMO) induced solidification refinement of pure aluminium to provide more information for the industrial application of the PMO solidification technology. The temperature field is altered mainly by applied variable cooling conditions and pulse parameters. Experimental results show that the refinement effect in the case of full sand mould applied is weakened with the decreasing of cooling rate, however, in ...

  11. Effects of aqueous humor hydrodynamics on human eye heat transfer under external heat sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiang, Kor L; Ooi, Ean H

    2016-08-01

    The majority of the eye models developed in the late 90s and early 00s considers only heat conduction inside the eye. This assumption is not entirely correct, since the anterior and posterior chambers are filled aqueous humor (AH) that is constantly in motion due to thermally-induced buoyancy. In this paper, a three-dimensional model of the human eye is developed to investigate the effects AH hydrodynamics have on the human eye temperature under exposure to external heat sources. If the effects of AH flow are negligible, then future models can be developed without taking them into account, thus simplifying the modeling process. Two types of external thermal loads are considered; volumetric and surface irradiation. Results showed that heat convection due to AH flow contributes to nearly 95% of the total heat flow inside the anterior chamber. Moreover, the circulation inside the anterior chamber can cause an upward shift of the location of hotspot. This can have significant consequences to our understanding of heat-induced cataractogenesis. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Added effect of heat wave on mortality in Seoul, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Kyung; Lee, Hye Ah; Lim, Youn Hee; Park, Hyesook

    2016-05-01

    A heat wave could increase mortality owing to high temperature. However, little is known about the added (duration) effect of heat wave from the prolonged period of high temperature on mortality and different effect sizes depending on the definition of heat waves and models. A distributed lag non-linear model with a quasi-Poisson distribution was used to evaluate the added effect of heat wave on mortality after adjusting for long-term and intra-seasonal trends and apparent temperature. We evaluated the cumulative relative risk of the added wave effect on mortality on lag days 0-30. The models were constructed using nine definitions of heat wave and two relationships (cubic spline and linear threshold model) between temperature and mortality to leave out the high temperature effect. Further, we performed sensitivity analysis to evaluate the changes in the effect of heat wave on mortality according to the different degrees of freedom for time trend and cubic spline of temperature. We found that heat wave had the added effect from the prolonged period of high temperature on mortality and it was considerable in the aspect of cumulative risk because of the lagged influence. When heat wave was defined with a threshold of 98th percentile temperature and ≥2, 3, and 4 consecutive days, mortality increased by 14.8 % (7.5-22.6, 95 % confidence interval (CI)), 18.1 % (10.8-26.0, 95 % CI), 18.1 % (10.7-25.9, 95 % CI), respectively, in cubic spline model. When it came to the definitions of 90th and 95th percentile, the risk increase in mortality declined to 3.7-5.8 % and 8.6-11.3 %, respectively. This effect was robust to the flexibility of the model for temperature and time trend, while the definitions of a heat wave were critical in estimating its relationship with mortality. This finding could help deepen our understanding and quantifying of the relationship between heat wave and mortality and select an appropriate definition of heat wave and temperature model in the future

  13. Thermal effect on CFRP ablation with a 100-W class pulse fiber laser using a PCF amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuji; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Matsuoka, Fumihiro; Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Abe, Nobuyuki

    2017-09-01

    An experimental study on CFRP processing is presented using a high-power pulsed fiber laser operated at a 1064-nm fundamental wavelength, a 100-W average power, a 1-MHz repetition rate, and a 10-ns pulse width under ambient air, a dry air jet, or a nitrogen gas jet. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy are conducted to measure the heat-affected zone (HAZ) quantitatively. Here, the HAZ is defined as the sum of the matrix evaporation zone (MEZ) and the resin alteration zone (RAZ). The MEZ, RAZ, and HAZ in air exceed 600, 2550, and 3150 μm, respectively. In the case of N2 gas jet, the MEZ, RAZ, and HAZ are 30, 88, and 118 μm, respectively. The results show that a nitrogen gas jet most effectively suppresses the HAZ by suppressing oxidization of the carbon fiber and cooling of heat accumulation. Additionally, the cutting speed with a dry air jet or a nitrogen gas jet increases by about 10% compared to that in ambient air.

  14. Generation of time-dependent ultra-short optical pulse trains in the presence of self-steepening effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Xian-Qiong; Xiang An-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Starting from the extended nonlinear Schrodinger equation in which the self-steepening effect is included, the evolution and the splitting processes of continuous optical wave whose amplitude is perturbed into time related ultra-short optical pulse trains in an optical fibre are numerically simulated by adopting the split-step Fourier algorithm. The results show that the self-steepening effect can cause the characteristic of the pulse trains to vary with time, which is different from the self-steepening-free case where the generated pulse trains consist of single pulses which are identical in width, intensity, and interval, namely when pulses move a certain distance, they turn into the pulse trains within a certain time range. Moreover, each single pulse may split into several sub-pulses. And as timc gocs on, the number of the sub-pulses will decrease gradually and the pulse width and the pulse intcnsity will change too. With the increase of the self-steepening parameter, the distance needed to generate time-dependent pulse trains will shorten. In addition, for a large self-steepening parameter and at the distance where more sub-pulses appear, the corresponding frequency spectra of pulse trains are also wider.

  15. Diamond electrophoretic microchips-Joule heating effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karczemska, Anna T., E-mail: anna.karczemska@p.lodz.pl [Technical University of Lodz, Institute of Turbomachinery, 219/223 Wolczanska str., Lodz (Poland); Witkowski, Dariusz [Technical University of Lodz, Institute of Turbomachinery, 219/223 Wolczanska str., Lodz (Poland); Ralchenko, Victor, E-mail: ralchenko@nsc.gpi.ru [General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Science, 38 Vavilov str., Moscow (Russian Federation); Bolshakov, Andrey; Sovyk, Dmitry [General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Science, 38 Vavilov str., Moscow (Russian Federation); Lysko, Jan M., E-mail: jmlysko@ite.waw.pl [Institute of Electron Technology, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Fijalkowski, Mateusz, E-mail: petr.louda@vslib.cz [Technical University of Liberec, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering (Czech Republic); Bodzenta, Jerzy, E-mail: jerzy.bodzenta@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Institute of Physics, 2 Krzywoustego str., 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Hassard, John, E-mail: j.hassard@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    Microchip electrophoresis (MCE) has become a mature separation technique in the recent years. In the presented research, a polycrystalline diamond electrophoretic microchip was manufactured with a microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD) method. A replica technique (mould method) was used to manufacture microstructures in diamond. A numerical analysis with CoventorWare{sup TM} was used to compare thermal properties during chip electrophoresis of diamond and glass microchips of the same geometries. Temperature distributions in microchips were demonstrated. Thermal, electrical, optical, chemical and mechanical parameters of the polycrystalline diamond layers are advantageous over traditionally used materials for microfluidic devices. Especially, a very high thermal conductivity coefficient gives a possibility of very efficient dissipation of Joule heat from the diamond electrophoretic microchip. This enables manufacturing of a new generation of microdevices.

  16. Effect of pulse chirp parameter on the soliton high-speed transmission systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladanyi, L.; Scholtz, L.; Solanska, M.; Mullerova, J.

    2016-12-01

    The word soliton refers to a special kind of wave packets that can propagate undistorted over long distances. As a source for generating soliton pulses in 1990 erbium doped lasers were used. Soliton transmission systems have been the subject of interest for years. It is known that interaction and the balance between the dispersion and nonlinear effects in optical fibers can lead to a special pulse behavior. Soliton pulses can propagate without any changes of the amplitude and the shape via long transmission systems. Due to this advantage they are of interest in long haul communication systems. Here we describe how the random change of input pulse chirp in optical fibers can affect the soliton propagation and interaction between two or more solitons. We have focused on describing some numerical approaches to solve the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, which are useful by solving this kind of problem. Most of laser sources can be approximated by Gaussian distribution or in special cases the second hyperbolic pulses are generated to produce a soliton shaped pulse. The effect of pulse chirp can generate new frequencies due to the frequency chirp. In high bitratetransmission systems this chirp is very important to reduce, because of this new frequency can influence the neighbor channels and lead to BER increasing.

  17. Empirical compensation function for eddy current effects in pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X X; Macdonald, P M

    1995-05-01

    An empirical compensation function for the correction of eddy current effects in the Stejskal-Tanner pulsed-gradient spin-echo (PGSE) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments has been established. Eddy currents may arise as a result of the application of sharp and strong gradient pulses and may cause severe distortion of the NMR signals. In this method, the length of one gradient pulse is altered to compensate for the eddy current effects. The compensation is considered to be ideal when the position and the phase of the spin-echo maximum obtained from an aqueous solution of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is the same in the presence and absence of a gradient pulse in the PGSE pulse sequence. We first characterized the functional dependence of the length of the required compensation on the three principal variables in the PGSE experiment: the gradient strength, the duration of the gradient pulse, and the interval between the two gradient pulses. Subsequently, we derived a model which successfully describes the general relationship between these variables and the size of the induced eddy current. The parameters extracted from fitting the model to the experimental compensation data may be used to predict the correct compensation for any combination of the three principal variables.

  18. EFFECTIVE HEAT INSULATION OF COMPLICATED FORM FOR HEAT AGGREGATES OF METALLURGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Toropov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The matters of determination of rational parameters of isolation coverings for heat aggregates, functioning in metallurgical, machine-building and industrial complexes, are examined in the article. Recommendations on choice of geometrical parameters of isolation of complicated form, providing obtaining of energy saving effect at functioning of high-temperature aggregates, are offered.

  19. FLATTENING EFFECT ON HEAT TRANSFER CHARACTERISTICS OF A SINTERED-WICK HEAT PIPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weeranut Intagun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of pipe flattening on heat transfer characteristics and the internal phenomena of a sintered-wick heat pipe has been investigated by using three-dimensional Finite Element Method. The calculation domains were focused at three important regions, i.e., vapor core, wick and wall. The Cartesian coordinates and the three-dimensional tetrahedral elements were applied in this model. The selected total elements were 638,400 to ensure the accuracy. The original diameter and total length of heat pipe were 6 mm and 200 mm, respectively. The composite wick made from sintered copper powder and grooved copper pipe was applied with water as working fluid. The vapor flow was assumed to be laminar and incompressible. The predicted results from the program were validated with the experimental results conducted with all similar controlled parameters. It was found that the predicted wall temperature and thermal resistance agreed well with the experimental data with the standard deviations of ±5.95 and ±32.85%, respectively. Furthermore, the overall thermal resistances of the tubular heat pipes (original diameter of 6 mm, which were flattened into the final thickness of 4.0 and 3.0 mm, decreased from 0.91 to 0.83°C/W due to an increase of the contacted surface for heat transfer surface. However, the overall thermal resistance of a flattened heat pipe with the final thickness of 2.5 mm increased to 0.88°C/W, resulting from drastic increase of pressure drop in narrower vapor core. The pivotal final thickness of flattened heat pipe, which is the minimum thickness of pipe to be flattened, has been analysed to be 2.75 mm (about 45% from original diameter.

  20. The effects of water on heat-styling damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Paul; Winsey, Nigel; Whatmough, Marie; Cornwell, Paul A

    2011-01-01

    Heated styling appliances, such as straightening irons, have grown in popularity in recent years, as have hair products such as heat-protection sprays. In this study we investigate whether the water in a heat-protection spray can affect the level of damage caused by heat styling. Tryptophan damage from heat styling was measured using fluorescence spectroscopy, and structural damage was investigated using light microscopy and single-fiber tensile testing. Hair samples were heat treated with straightening irons, following treatment with either a water-based, "wet," heat-protection spray or an ethanol-based, "dry," spray. Results showed that, as expected, tryptophan damage was reduced by repeated applications of both the "wet" and "dry" heat-protection sprays. However, no differences were seen between the "wet" versus the "dry" product. Light microscopy studies showed greater structural damage to hair treated with water and the "wet" spray. Tensile tests confirmed that there was greater damage to hair treated with the "wet" spray. Decreases in Young's modulus were greater in the presence of the "wet" spray. The results of this study suggest that the type of damage caused by heat treatments is different in wet versus dry hair. In dry hair, thermal treatments cause chemical damage and some structural damage. However, in wet hair, thermal treatments cause the same chemical damage, but considerably more structural damage, which causes significant changes in the physical properties of the hair. It is likely that the rapid evaporation of water from the hair is the main causal factor. Our experiments suggest that the effectiveness of commercial heat-protection sprays can be improved by the removal of water and by the use of volatile ingredients, such as ethanol, as base solvents.

  1. Theory of Pulse Train Amplification Without Patterning Effects in Quantum Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander V.; Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    A theory for pulse amplification and saturation in quantum dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is developed. In particular, the maximum bit rate at which a data stream of pulses can be amplified without significant patterning effects is investigated. Simple expressions are derived...... that clearly show the dependence of the maximum bit rate on material and device parameters. A comparative analysis of QD, quantum well (QW), and bulk SOAs shows that QD SOAs may have superior properties; calculations predict patterning-free amplification up to bit rates of 150–200 Gb/s with pulse output...

  2. Effect of pulsed voltage on electrochemical migration of tin in electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    influences the dendritic growth, although a tendency for more hydroxide precipitation was observed for lower duty cycles. The precipitation of tin hydroxides was identified as influencing factor for the reduction of charge transfer under pulsed voltage with low duty cycles, therefore resulting...... in the suppression of dendrite growth....... respectively at 10 and 5 V, while the duty cycle and the pulse width were varied in the range of ms. The results showed that varying of pulse width at fixed duty cycle has a minor effect under investigated conditions, whereas increasing duty cycle significantly reduces the time to short due to dendrite...

  3. Effect of heat treatment on viability of Taenia hydatigena eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttar, Birpal S; Nelson, Mark L; Busboom, Jan R; Hancock, Dale D; Walsh, Douglas B; Jasmer, Douglas P

    2013-04-01

    Effects of heat treatments on activation and infectivity of Taenia hydatigena eggs were assessed. Eggs containing oncospheres were used for in vitro and in vivo studies to determine the response to 5min of heat treatment, ranging from room temperature (22°C) to 60°C. The study demonstrated 99.47% and 100% reduction in oncosphere activation or infectivity after 5min of heat treatment at 60°C and 57.38°C under in vitro and in vivo conditions, respectively. Similar results between the two approaches indicted the appropriateness of the in vitro methods to identify oncosphericidal treatments of practical significance. Similar heat treatments may also be effective against Taenia saginata and help to reduce occurrence of beef cysticercosis.

  4. Advanced high-power pulsed light device to decontaminate food from pathogens: effects on Salmonella typhimurium viability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksiene, Z; Gudelis, V; Buchovec, I; Raudeliuniene, J

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to construct an advanced high-power pulsed light device for decontamination of food matrix and to evaluate its antibacterial efficiency. Key parameters of constructed device-emitted light spectrum, pulse duration, pulse power density, frequency of pulses, dependence of emitted spectrum on input voltage, irradiation homogenicity, possible thermal effects as well as antimicrobial efficiency were evaluated. Antimicrobial efficiency of high-power pulsed light technique was demonstrated and evaluated by two independent methods - spread plate and Miles-Misra method. Viability of Salmonella typhimurium as function of a given light dose (number of pulses) and pulse frequency was examined. According to the data obtained, viability of Salmonella typhimurium reduced by 7 log order after 100 light pulses with power density 133 W cm(-2). In addition, data indicate, that the pulse frequency did not influence the outcome of pathogen inactivation in the region 1-5 Hz. Moreover, no hyperthermic effect was detected during irradiation even after 500 pulses on all shelves with different distance from light source and subsequently different pulse power density (0-252 W cm(-2)). Newly constructed high-power pulsed light technique is effective nonthermal tool for inactivation of Salmonella typhimurium even by 7 log order in vitro. Novel advanced high-power pulsed light device can be a useful tool for development of nonthermal food decontamination technologies.

  5. A study of the heated length to diameter effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Ho; Baek, Won Pil; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    An analytical and experimental investigation has been performed on the heated length-to-diameter effect on critical heat flux exit conditions. A L/D correction factor is developed by applying artificial neural network and conventional regression techniques to the KAIST CHF data base. In addition, experiment is being performed to validate the developed L/D correction factor with independent data. Assessment shows that the developed correction factor is promising for practical applications. 6 refs., 8 figs. (Author)

  6. Sea Spray Effects on Surface Heat and Moisture Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Andreas, E. L., and E. C. Monahan, 1999: The role of whitecap bubbles in air- sea heat and moisture exchange. J. Phys. Oceanogr., in press. ...1 Sea Spray Effects on Surface Heat and Moisture Fluxes Edgar L Andreas U. S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory 72 Lyme Road...www.crrel.usace.army.mil LONG-TERM GOAL The goal is to investigate, theoretically and through analyzing existing data, the role that sea spray plays in

  7. The effect of pulsewidth of pumping pulse on the stability of distributed feedback dye laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasandideh, K.; Rahbari, M.; Sadighi Bonabi, R.

    2017-04-01

    The generation of a single and stable picosecond pulse by distributed feedback dye laser is investigated in this work. The numerical result for the rate equation system that includes the thermal effects in the lasing medium is provided. By applying this model to Rhodamine 6G, it is found that considerable improvement in the stability of the laser can be achieved by pumping the system with narrower laser pulses. The simulation shows that if the dye solution is pumped by sub-200 ps pulse, the laser can be operated in single-pulse output mode with acceptable stability in pulsewidth over a long range of pumping intensity. This result is confirmed by a more complicated model composed of non-averaged Maxwell and rate equations. Even though the thermal effects do not play a significant role in equivalent cavity lifetime, they result in considerable wavelength shift toward the shorter wavelengths.

  8. Pulse width effect on the dissociation probability of CH4+ in the intense femtosecond laser field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gao; SONG Di; LIU Yuyan; KONG Fan'ao

    2006-01-01

    The laser pulse width effect on the dissociation probability of CH4+ irradiated by an ultrafast laser has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The femtosecond laser at 800 nm with an intensity of 8.0 × 1013 W/cm2 was used. The observed relative yield of the primary fragment ion CH3+ increases with increasing pulse width and tends to saturate when the pulse width is longer than 120 fs. The field-assisted dissociation (FAD) model and quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculation were applied to predicting the dissociation probability of CH4+.The calculated probability is corrected with the molecular orientation effect and the spatial distribution of laser intensity. The modified results show that the dissociation requires at least 23 fs and saturates with long pulse widths (≥100 rs). The result is approximately consistent with the experimental observation.

  9. Heating Effects on Structural and Electrical Properties of Polyetherimide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissaf Mzabi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Polyetherimide (PEI has several uses such as electrical insulation. It can undergo different constraints like heat or high voltage which influence its performances as insulator. In this study, the effects of heating on structural and electrical properties of polyetherimide (Ultem 1000 are studied. Approach: PEI samples were heated at different temperatures below the glass transition temperature (175, 190 and 205°C. Different complementary techniques were used to investigate structural alterations and dielectric relaxations. These are infrared (IR spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, Thermally Stimulated Depolarisation Current (TSDC technique and Dielectric Spectroscopy (DS. Results: Physical ageing was revealed in heated samples by DSC analysis. DS and TSDC results have shown that dipolar relaxations are affected by heating. The amount of relaxing dipoles decreases when the material is heated at 190°C. Conclusion/Recommendations: The heating of polyetherimide at 190°C leads to a stabilisation of charges in deeper energetic levels which influences the insulating character of the material.

  10. Acute and chronic effects from pulse exposure of D. magna to silver and copper oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Sara Nørgaard; Holten Lützhøft, Hans-Christian; Rasmussen, Rose; Baun, Anders

    2016-11-01

    Aquatic toxicity testing of nanoparticles (NPs) is challenged by their dynamic behavior in test suspensions. The resulting difficulties in controlling and characterizing exposure concentrations are detrimental to the generation of concentration-response data needed for hazard identification of NPs. This study explores the applicability of short-term (1, 2 and 3h) pulse exposures as means to keep the exposure stable and at the same time disclose acute and chronic effects of AgNPs and CuONPs in D. magna. Dissolution, agglomeration and sedimentation were found to have less influence on exposure concentrations during 1-3h pulses than for 24-48h continuous exposures. For AgNPs, preparation of test suspensions in medium 24h before toxicity testing (aging) increased stability during the short-term pulses. In pulse tests, organisms were exposed to the test materials, AgNPs and CuONPs for 1, 2 and 3h, and afterwards transferred to clean medium and observed for 48h (post-exposure period) for acute effects and for 21 d for chronic effects. AgNO3 and CuCl2 were used as reference materials for dissolved silver and copper, respectively. For all test materials, a 3h pulse caused comparable immobility in D. magna (observed after 48h post-exposure) as 24h continuous exposure, as evidenced by overlapping 95% confidence intervals of EC50-values. In the 21 d post-exposure period, no trends in mortality or body length were identified. AgNP and AgNO3 pulses had no effect on the number of moltings, days to first live offspring or cumulated number of offspring, but the number of offspring increased for AgNPs (3h pulse only). In contrast, CuONP and CuCl2 pulses decreased the number of moltings and offspring, and for CuONPs the time to first live offspring was prolonged. After CuONP exposures, the offspring production decreased more with increasing concentrations than for CuCl2 exposures when taking the measured dissolved copper into account. This indicates a nanoparticle-specific effect

  11. Pulse-width modulation for small heat pump installations - Phase 4; Pulsbreitenmodulation fuer Kleinwaermepumpenanlagen. Phase 4: Erweiterung der PBM-Regler fuer Kombianlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, M.; Shafai, E. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Institut fuer Mess- und Regeltechnik, Zuerich (Switzerland); Gabathuler, H.R.; Mayer, H. [Gabathuler AG, Beratende Ingenieure, Diessenhofen (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of the fourth phase of a project that investigated three types of pulse-width modulation (PWM) controllers that were developed during its first two phases. A third phase monitored the controllers when used in a simulated environment and for a real-life heat pump. The report discusses the fourth phase of the project, in which the controller was further developed and tested using the building emulation developed in the third phase. The functioning of the self-regulating controller and its use of meteorological data is described and the savings to be made in heating costs are discussed.

  12. Current heating induced spin Seebeck effect

    OpenAIRE

    Schreier, Michael; Roschewsky, Niklas; Dobler, Erich; Meyer, Sibylle; Huebl, Hans; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2013-01-01

    A new measurement technique for the spin Seebeck effect is presented, wherein the normal metal layer used for its detection is exploited simultaneously as a resistive heater and thermometer. We show how the various contributions to the measured total signal can be disentangled, allowing to extract the voltage signal solely caused by the spin Seebeck effect. To this end we performed measurements as a function of the external magnetic field strength and its orientation. We find that the effect ...

  13. Effect of passive heat stress on arterial stiffness in smokers versus non-smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyen, N. E.; Ganio, M. S.; Burchfield, J. M.; Tucker, M. A.; Gonzalez, M. A.; Dougherty, E. K.; Robinson, F. B.; Ridings, C. B.; Veilleux, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    In non-smokers, passive heat stress increases shear stress and vasodilation, decreasing arterial stiffness. Smokers, who reportedly have arterial dysfunction, may have similar improvements in arterial stiffness with passive heat stress. Therefore, we examined the effects of an acute bout of whole-body passive heat stress on arterial stiffness in smokers vs. non-smokers. Thirteen smokers (8.8 ± 5.5 [median = 6] cigarettes per day for >4 years) and 13 non-smokers matched for age, mass, height, and exercise habits (27 ± 8 years; 78.8 ± 15.4 kg; 177.6 ± 6.7 cm) were passively heated to 1.5 °C core temperature ( T C) increase. At baseline and each 0.5 °C T C increase, peripheral (pPWV) and central pulse wave velocity (cPWV) were measured via Doppler ultrasound. No differences existed between smokers and non-smokers for any variables (all p > 0.05), except cPWV slightly increased from baseline (526.7 ± 81.7 cm · s-1) to 1.5 °C Δ T C (579.7 ± 69.8 cm · s-1; p 0.05). Changes in cPWV and pPWV during heating correlated ( p < 0.05) with baseline PWV in smokers (cPWV: r = -0.59; pPWV: r = -0.62) and non-smokers (cPWV: r = -0.45; pPWV: r = -0.77). Independent of smoking status, baseline stiffness appears to mediate the magnitude of heating-induced changes in arterial stiffness.

  14. Effects of Lewis number on coupled heat and mass transfer in a circular tube subjected to external convective heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Anjun; Zhang, Yuwen; Ma, Hongbin; Critser, John

    2009-03-01

    Heat and mass transfer in a circular tube subject to the boundary condition of the third kind is investigated. The closed form of temperature and concentration distributions, the local Nusselt number based on the total external heat transfer and convective heat transfer inside the tube, as well as the Sherwood number were obtained. The effects of Lewis number and Biot number on heat and mass transfer were investigated.

  15. Current heating induced spin Seebeck effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreier, Michael, E-mail: michael.schreier@wmi.badw.de; Roschewsky, Niklas; Dobler, Erich; Meyer, Sibylle; Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B. [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany)

    2013-12-09

    A measurement technique for the spin Seebeck effect is presented, wherein the normal metal layer used for its detection is exploited simultaneously as a resistive heater and thermometer. We show how the various contributions to the measured total signal can be disentangled, allowing to extract the voltage signal solely caused by the spin Seebeck effect. To this end, we performed measurements as a function of the external magnetic field strength and its orientation. We find that the effect scales linearly with the induced rise in temperature, as expected for the spin Seebeck effect.

  16. Heat Stress on Poultry: Metabolism, Effects and Efforts to Overcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hasil Tamzil

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Poultry industries in the tropics are challenged by high ambient temperatures and humidities which cause poultry suffer from heat stress. Heat stress contributes to the instability of certain compounds, such as enzymes. Consequently the enzymes function reduces. Affecting the physiological and hormonal conditions of the poultry. In such condition, the body will attempt to restore homeostasis to the state before it happened. When physiological failed to meet the condition, the body will use the genetic pathway by activating Heat Shock Protein (HSP genes to protect proteins which are sensitive to high temperatures. Heat stress in poultry triggers the emergence of various diseases and affects the growth of poultry and egg production. These negative effects on poultry can be minimized by selecting the type of chickens which are tolerant to high ambient temperature, modifying microclimates of cages and adding anti-stress compounds through feed and or drink.

  17. The effect of laser pulse width on laser-induced damage at K9 and UBK7 components surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinda; Ba, Rongsheng; Zheng, Yinbo; Yuan, Jing; Li, Wenhong; Chen, Bo

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of laser pulse width on laser-induced damage. We measured the damage threshold of K9 glass and UBK7 glass optical components at different pulse width, then analysis pulse-width dependence of damage threshold. It is shown that damage threshold at different pulse width conforms to thermal restriction mechanism, Because of cm size laser beam, defect on the optical component surface leads to laser-induced threshold decreased.

  18. Change in Color and Volatile Composition of Skim Milk Processed with Pulsed Electric Field and Microfiltration Treatments or Heat Pasteurization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Chugh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-thermal processing methods, such as pulsed electric field (PEF and tangential-flow microfiltration (TFMF, are emerging processing technologies that can minimize the deleterious effects of high temperature short time (HTST pasteurization on quality attributes of skim milk. The present study investigates the impact of PEF and TFMF, alone or in combination, on color and volatile compounds in skim milk. PEF was applied at 28 or 40 kV/cm for 1122 to 2805 µs, while microfiltration (MF was conducted using membranes with three pore sizes (lab-scale 0.65 and 1.2 µm TFMF, and pilot-scale 1.4 µm MF. HTST control treatments were applied at 75 or 95 °C for 20 and 45 s, respectively. Noticeable color changes were observed with the 0.65 µm TFMF treatment. No significant color changes were observed in PEF-treated, 1.2 µm TFMF-treated, HTST-treated, and 1.4 µm MF-treated skim milk (p ≥ 0.05 but the total color difference indicated better color retention with non-thermal preservation. The latter did not affect raw skim milk volatiles significantly after single or combined processing (p ≥ 0.05, but HTST caused considerable changes in their composition, including ketones, free fatty acids, hydrocarbons, and sulfur compounds (p < 0.05. The findings indicate that for the particular thermal and non-thermal treatments selected for this study, better retention of skim milk color and flavor components were obtained for the non-thermal treatments.

  19. RESEARCH OF THE ENTRANCE ANGLE EFFECT ON THE REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF THE STAINLESS STEEL SURFACE OXIDIZED BY PULSED LASER RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Veiko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.Oxide films on the metal surfaces can be obtained both by surface-uniform infrared heating and local laser treatment e.g. by sequence of nanosecond laser pulses. Due to interference in created films the coloration of treated area is observed. The present work shows the results of spectrophotometric measurements for various light entrance angles in the range of 10-60°. Method. AISI 304 stainless steel plates were oxidized by two methods: in muffle furnace FM - 10 (Т= 500-600° С, t = 5-7 min. and at line-by-line scanning by sequence of nanosecond laser pulses (λ = 1.06 μm, τ =100 ns, r = 25 μm,q=2.91∙107 W/cm2, Nx = 30, Ny = 1. Surface research in optical resolution was realized by Carl Zeiss Axio Imager A1M. Reflectance spectra were obtained with spectrophotometer Lambda Perkin 1050 with integrating sphere at different fixed light incidence angles. Topographic features were detected by scanning probe microscopy investigation with NanoEducator equipment. Main Results. The quantitative surface geometry characteristics of AISI 304 stainless steel patterns treated by different methods are obtained. It was found that the increase of light entrance angle has no influence on the form of reflection coefficient dependence from a wavelength, but a blue-shift occurs especially for the case of laser treatment. This difference can be caused by surface topology formed by laser heating and variety of oxide film thickness. This effect results in more significant change in observed sample color for laser treatment then for infrared heating. Practical Relevance. The results obtained in the present work can be used to implement a new element of product protection against forgery with the product marking.

  20. Effects of an external magnetic field in pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, T. [Universidad Autonoma de la Ciudad de Mexico (UACM), Prolongacion San Isidro 151, Col. San Lorenzo Tezonco, C.P. 09790, Mexico DF (Mexico)], E-mail: tupacgarcia@yahoo.com; Posada, E. de [CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad Merida, Applied Physics Department, A.P. 73, Cordemex, C.P. 97130 Merida, Yuc. (Mexico); Villagran, M. [CCADET, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), A.P. 70-186, C.P. 04510, Mexico DF (Mexico); Ll, J.L. Sanchez [Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Facultad de Fisica-IMRE, Universidad de La Habana, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Bartolo-Perez, P.; Pena, J.L. [CINVESTAV-IPN Unidad Merida, Applied Physics Department, A.P. 73, Cordemex, C.P. 97130 Merida, Yuc. (Mexico)

    2008-12-30

    Thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition, PLD, on Si (1 0 0) substrates by the ablation of a sintered ceramic SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} target with and without the presence of a nonhomogeneous magnetic field of {mu}{sub 0}H = 0.4 T perpendicular to substrate plane and parallel to the plasma expansion axis. The field was produced by a rectangular-shaped Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet and the substrate was just placed on the magnet surface (Aurora method). An appreciable increment of optical emission due to the presence of the magnetic field was observed, but no film composition change or thickness increment was obtained. It suggests that the increment of the optical emission is due mainly to the electron confinement rather than confinement of ionic species.

  1. Pulsed THz radiation due to phonon-polariton effect in [110] ZnTe crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Chien-Ming; Chu, Wei-Chen; Luo, Chih-Wei; Chen, Jeng-Chung; Chi, Cheng-Chung

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed terahertz (THz) radiation, generated through optical rectification (OR) by exciting [110] ZnTe crystal with ultrafast optical pulses, typically consists of only a few cycles of electromagnetic field oscillations with a duration about a couple of picoseconds. However, it is possible, under appropriate conditions, to generate a long damped oscillation tail (LDOT) following the main cycles. The LDOT can last tens of picoseconds and its Fourier transform shows a higher and narrower frequency peak than that of the main pulse. We have demonstrated that the generation of the LDOT depends on both the duration of the optical pulse and its central wavelength. Furthermore, we have also performed theoretical calculations based upon the OR effect coupled with the phonon-polariton mode of ZnTe and obtained theoretical THz waveforms in good agreement with our experimental observation.

  2. Kinematic study of the effect of dispersion in quantum vacuum emission from strong laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Finazzi, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    A strong light pulse propagating in a nonlinear medium causes an effective change in the local refractive index. With a suitable tuning of the pulse velocity, the leading and trailing edge of the pulse were predicted to behave as analogue black and white horizons in the limit of a dispersionless medium. In this paper, we study a more realistic situation where the frequency dispersion of the medium is fully taken into account. As soon as negative frequency modes are present in the comoving frame, spontaneous emission of quantum vacuum radiation is expected to arise independently of the presence of horizons. We finally investigate the kinematic constraints put on the emission and we show that the optimal directions to observe Hawking-like emission form a narrow angle with the direction of propagation of the pulse.

  3. Acute and chronic effects from pulse exposure of D. magna to silver and copper oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sara Nørgaard; Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten; Rasmussen, Rose

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic toxicity testing of nanoparticles (NPs) is challenged by their dynamic behavior in test suspensions. The resulting difficulties in controlling and characterizing exposure concentrations are detrimental to the generation of concentration-response data needed for hazard identification of NPs...... concentrations during 1–3 h pulses than for 24–48 h continuous exposures. For AgNPs, preparation of test suspensions in medium 24 h before toxicity testing (aging) increased stability during the short-term pulses. In pulse tests, organisms were exposed to the test materials, AgNPs and CuONPs for 1, 2 and 3 h...... (observed after 48 h post-exposure) as 24 h continuous exposure, as evidenced by overlapping 95% confidence intervals of EC50-values. In the 21 d post-exposure period, no trends in mortality or body length were identified. AgNP and AgNO3 pulses had no effect on the number of moltings, days to first live...

  4. The effect of pulse current on energy saving during Electrochemical Chloride Extraction (ECE) in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Tian R.; Geiker, Mette R.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Energy consumption is a factor influencing the cost of Electrochemical Chloride Extraction (ECE) in concrete. The aims of this work were to investigate the possibility for energy saving when using a pulsed electric field during ECE and the effect of the pulsed current on removal of chloride. Four...... experiments with artificially polluted concrete under same charge transfer were conducted. Results showed that the energy consumption was decreased 15% by pulse current in experiments with 0.2 mA/cm2 current density, which was higher than that of 0.1 mA/cm2 experiments with a decrease of 9.6%. When comparing...... the voltage drop at different parts of the experimental cells, it was found that the voltage drop of the area across the concrete was the major contributor to energy consumption, and results indicated that the pulse current could decrease the voltage drop of this part by re-distribution of ions in pore fluid...

  5. Effect of melt pulse electric current and thermal treatment on A356 alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何树先; 王俊; 江莞; 孙宝德; 周尧和

    2003-01-01

    Effects of the melt pulse electric current and thermal treatment on solidification structures of A356 alloywere investigated. In the experiments, the low temperature melt(953 K and 903 K) treated by pulse electric currentwas mixed with high temperature melt(1 223 K). By the control experiments, the results show that the solidificationstructure of A356 alloy is refined apparently by the pulse electric current togeth er with melt thermal treatmentprocess, and the mechanical properties, especially the elongation ratio of the specimen treated is improved greatly.The structure change of the melt by pulse electric current and melt thermal treatment is the main reason for the re-finement of the solidification structure of A356 alloy.

  6. The effects of high-voltage pulse electric discharges on ion adsorption on activated carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafurov, M. M.; Sveshnikova, D. A.; Larin, S. V.; Rabadanov, K. Sh.; Shabanova, Z. E.; Yusupova, A. A.; Ramazanov, A. Sh.

    2008-07-01

    The effects of high-voltage pulse electric discharges (HPED) on sorption of boron and sulfate ions on activated carbons of different kinds (KM-2, BAU, DAK) were investigated. The effect of HPED activation on the sorption characteristics of the systems was found to be similar to the temperature effect.

  7. Magnetite-based magnetoreception: the effect of repeated pulsing on the orientation of migratory birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklhofer, M.; Wiltschko, W.; Wiltschko, R.; Ford, H.; Munro, U.

    2007-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that a magnetic pulse affected the orientation of passerine migrants for a short period only: for about 3 days, the birds' headings were deflected eastward from their migratory direction, followed by a phase of disorientation, with the birds returning to their normal migratory direction after about 10 days. To analyze the processes involved in the fading of the pulse effect, migratory birds were subjected to a second, identical pulse 16 days after the first pulse, when the effect of that pulse had disappeared. This second pulse affected the birds' behavior in a different way: it caused an increase in the scatter of the birds' headings for 2 days, after which the birds showed normal migratory orientation again. These observations are at variance with the hypothesis that the magnetite-based receptor had been fully restored, but also with the hypothesis that the input of this receptor was ignored. They rather indicate dynamic processes, which include changes in the affected receptor, but at the same time cause the birds to weigh and rate the altered input differently. The bearing of these findings on the question of whether single domains or superparamagnetic particles are involved in the magnetite-based receptors is discussed.

  8. Magnetite-based magnetoreception: the effect of repeated pulsing on the orientation of migratory birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltschko, Wolfgang; Ford, Hugh; Munro, Ursula; Winklhofer, Michael; Wiltschko, Roswitha

    2007-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that a magnetic pulse affected the orientation of passerine migrants for a short period only: for about 3 days, the birds' headings were deflected eastward from their migratory direction, followed by a phase of disorientation, with the birds returning to their normal migratory direction after about 10 days. To analyze the processes involved in the fading of the pulse effect, migratory birds were subjected to a second, identical pulse 16 days after the first pulse, when the effect of that pulse had disappeared. This second pulse affected the birds' behavior in a different way: it caused an increase in the scatter of the birds' headings for 2 days, after which the birds showed normal migratory orientation again. These observations are at variance with the hypothesis that the magnetite-based receptor had been fully restored, but also with the hypothesis that the input of this receptor was ignored. They rather indicate dynamic processes, which include changes in the affected receptor, but at the same time cause the birds to weigh and rate the altered input differently. The bearing of these findings on the question of whether single domains or superparamagnetic particles are involved in the magnetite-based receptors is discussed.

  9. Investigation of a direct effect of nanosecond pulse electric fields on mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estlack, Larry E.; Roth, Caleb C.; Cerna, Cesario Z.; Wilmink, Gerald J.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2014-03-01

    The unique cellular response to nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) exposure, as compared to longer pulse exposure, has been theorized to be due to permeabilization of intracellular organelles including the mitochondria. In this investigation, we utilized a high-throughput oxygen and pH sensing system (Seahorse® XF24 extracellular flux analyzer) to assess the mitochondrial activity of Jurkat and U937 cells after nsPEF. The XF Analyzer uses a transient micro-chamber of only a few μL in specialized cell culture micro-plates to enable oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) to be monitored in real-time. We found that for nsPEF exposures of 10 pulses at 10-ns pulse width and at 50 kV/cm e-field, we were able to cause an increase in OCR in both U937 and Jurkat cells. We also found that high pulse numbers (>100) caused a significant decrease in OCR. Higher amplitude 150 kV/cm exposures had no effect on U937 cells and yet they had a deleterious effect on Jurkat cells, matching previously published 24 hour survival data. These results suggest that the exposures were modulating metabolic activity in cells possibly due to direct effects on the mitochondria themselves. To validate this hypothesis, we isolated mitochondria from U937 cells and exposed them similarly and found no significant change in metabolic activity for any pulse number. In a final experiment, we removed calcium from the buffer solution that the cells were exposed in and found that no significant enhancement in metabolic activity was observed. These results suggest that direct permeabilization of the mitochondria is unlikely a primary effect of nsPEF exposure and calcium-mediated intracellular pathway activation is likely responsible for observed pulse-induced mitochondrial effects.

  10. Analysis of PMD and PDL effect on Chirped Gaussian and SuperGaussain pulse shapes by controlling SOP in SMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VINAYAGAPRIYA.S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a numerical analysis of impairments due to PMD and PDL on system performance is investigated in High Speed Optical Communication System. Optical Polarization has pronounced effect on signal quality. Thus there is a need to control the State of Polarization (SOP. Pulse Broadening can be controlled by launching the light signal in particular State of Polarization such as Linear and Circular. Two types of Pulses such as Chirped Gaussian and Supergaussian pulses are launched at different SOP into the optical fiber and it is found that maximum pulse width reduction is achieved when the pulse is at Circular SOP than that of Linear SOP. Also results clearly show that with PMD and PDL, pulse width ratio of Chirped Gaussian pulse is much reduced than that of Chirped Supergaussian Pulse.

  11. Effects of acoustic noise on the auditory nerve compound action potentials evoked by electric pulse trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourski, Kirill V; Abbas, Paul J; Miller, Charles A; Robinson, Barbara K; Jeng, Fuh-Cherng

    2005-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of acoustic noise on the auditory nerve compound action potentials in response to electric pulse trains. Subjects were adult guinea pigs, implanted with a minimally invasive electrode to preserve acoustic sensitivity. Electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAP) were recorded from the auditory nerve trunk in response to electric pulse trains both during and after the presentation of acoustic white noise. Simultaneously presented acoustic noise produced a decrease in ECAP amplitude. The effect of the acoustic masker on the electric probe was greatest at the onset of the acoustic stimulus and it was followed by a partial recovery of the ECAP amplitude. Following cessation of the acoustic noise, ECAP amplitude recovered over a period of approximately 100-200 ms. The effects of the acoustic noise were more prominent at lower electric pulse rates (interpulse intervals of 3 ms and higher). At higher pulse rates, the ECAP adaptation to the electric pulse train alone was larger and the acoustic noise, when presented, produced little additional effect. The observed effects of noise on ECAP were the greatest at high electric stimulus levels and, for a particular electric stimulus level, at high acoustic noise levels.

  12. Effect of low pressure generator temperature on the performance of double effect vapour absorption heat transformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomri, Rabah [Faculty of Engineering, Department of Genie Climatique, University of Constantine (Algeria)], E-mail: rabahgomri@yahoo.fr

    2011-07-01

    Energy consumption in the industrial sector is high and a significant part of this energy is lost in the form of waste heat. Methods can be used to recover a part of this heat and to improve energetic efficiency, one of them being the absorption heat transformer. This technology uses waste heat, solar energy or geothermal energy to generate heat at a higher temperature than that of the fluid feeding it. The aim of this paper is to determine the exergy performance of a double-effect lithium bromide/water absorption heat transformer system. An exergy analysis was conducted on each of its components. Results showed that the exergy performance increases when the condenser temperature increases but that the absorber temperature interval for which the heat transformer can operate diminishes when the condenser temperature increases. This paper provided useful information on the exergy performance of a double-effect lithium bromide/water absorption heat transformer system.

  13. Effect of subcooling on critical heat flux during pool boiling on a horizontal heated wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T.; Kawae, N.; Monde, M.

    Critical heat flux(CHF) is measured during pool boiling of water and R113 on a heated horizontal wire submerged in a subcooled liquid. Experiments are conducted over a pressure range from 0.1 to 3.0MPa and subcooling up to 220K. CHF data reveal that the CHF increases in a linear fashion with an increase in subcooling, and that the increment of the CHF with increasing subcooling becomes larger with increasing pressure. The characteristics of the CHF obtained differ from those of existing correlations at high pressures, although it is a similar tendency to them in that the CHF is proportional to the subcooling. A new correlation is derived by taking into account the effect of both the density ratio, ρL/ρV, and the Peclet number, Pe, and it succeeds in predicting the CHF data up to higher pressure and higher subcooling ranges, more effectively than previous studies using existing applicable ranges.

  14. The effect of flexible tube vibration on pressure drop and heat transfer in heat exchangers considering viscous dissipation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokouhmand, H.; Sangtarash, F.

    2008-04-01

    The pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient in tube bundle of shell and tube heat exchangers are investigated considering viscous dissipation effects. The governing equations are solved numerically. Because of temperature-dependent viscosity the equations should be solved simultaneously. The flexible tubes vibration is modeled in a quasi-static method by taking the first tube of the row to be in 20 asymmetric positions with respect to the rest of the tubes which are assumed to be fixed and time averaging the steady state solutions corresponding to each one of these positions .The results show that the eccentricity of the first tube increases pressure drop and heat transfer coefficients significantly comparing to the case of rigid tube bundles, symmetrically placed. In addition, these vibrations not only compensate the effect of viscous dissipations on heat transfer coefficient but also increase heat transfer coefficient. The constant viscosity results obtained from our numerical method have a good agreement with the available experimental data of constant viscosity for flexible tube heat exchangers.

  15. Peculiarities of the inverse Faraday effect induced in iron garnet films by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhaev, M. A.; Chernov, A. I.; Savochkin, I. V.; Kuz'michev, A. N.; Zvezdin, A. K.; Belotelov, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    The inverse Faraday effect in iron garnet films subjected to femtosecond laser pulses is experimentally investigated. It is found that the magnitude of the observed effect depends nonlinearly on the energy of the optical pump pulses, which is in contradiction with the notion that the inverse Faraday effect is linear with respect to the pump energy. Thus, for pump pulses with a central wavelength of 650 nm and an energy density of 1 mJ/cm2, the deviation from a linear dependence is as large as 50%. Analysis of the experimental data demonstrates that the observed behavior is explained by the fact that the optically induced normal component of the magnetization is determined, apart from the field resulting from the inverse Faraday effect, by a decrease in the magnitude of the precessing magnetization under the influence of the femtosecond electromagnetic field.

  16. Effect of heat treatment on corrosion behavior of duplex coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Raghu Ram Mohan Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, duplex WC-Co/NiCrAlY coating is coated onto Ti6Al4V substrate and vacuum heat treatment is employed to investigate the corrosion behavior of heat treated samples as well as Ti6Al4V substrate for comparison. In this duplex coating system, High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF process is used to deposit NiCrAlY interlayer with a constant thickness of 200 μm and WC-Co ceramic top layer with varying thickness of 250 μm, 350 μm and 450 μm deposited by Detonation Spray (DS process. Different heat treatment temperatures (600–1150 °C were employed for the coated samples to study the microstructure and the effect on corrosion resistance of the duplex coatings. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried to investigate the corrosion performance of duplex coated heat treated samples and the substrate in Ringer’s solution at 37 °C and prepared the pH to 5.7. The microstructure upon corrosion after heat treatment was characterized by SEM analysis to understand the corrosion behavior. The results disclosed that at all heat treatment temperatures, all the coated samples exhibited better corrosion resistance than the base substrate. However, during 950 °C and 1150 °C heat treatment temperatures, it was observed highest corrosion potential than 600 °C and 800 °C. The 350 μm thickness, coated sample exhibited highest corrosion resistance compared to other two coated samples and the substrate at all heat treatment temperatures.

  17. Replication of the Apparent Excess Heat Effect in a Light Water-Potassium Carbonate-Nickel Electrolytic Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedra, Janis M.; Myers, Ira T.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Baldwin, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Replication of experiments claiming to demonstrate excess heat production in light water-Ni-K2CO3 electrolytic cells was found to produce an apparent excess heat of 11 W maximum, for 60 W electrical power into the cell. Power gains range from 1.06 to 1.68. The cell was operated at four different dc current levels plus one pulsed current run at 1 Hz, 10% duty cycle. The 28 liter cell used in these verification tests was on loan from a private corporation whose own tests with similar cells are documented to produce 50 W steady excess heat for a continuous period exceeding hundreds of days. The apparent excess heat can not be readily explained either in terms of nonlinearity of the cell's thermal conductance at a low temperature differential or by thermoelectric heat pumping. However, the present data do admit efficient recombination of dissolved hydrogen-oxygen as an ordinary explanation. Calorimetry methods and heat balance calculations for the verification tests are described. Considering the large magnitude of benefit if this effect is found to be a genuine new energy source, a more thorough investigation of evolved heat in the nickel-hydrogen system in both electrolytic and gaseous loading cells remains warranted.

  18. Investigation of the effect of finite pulse errors on the BABA pulse sequence using the Floquet-Magnus expansion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene S.; Reid, Alicia E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study of finite pulse widths for the BABA pulse sequence using the Floquet-Magnus expansion (FME) approach. In the FME scheme, the first order ? is identical to its counterparts in average Hamiltonian theory (AHT) and Floquet theory (FT). However, the timing part in the FME approach is introduced via the ? function not present in other schemes. This function provides an easy way for evaluating the spin evolution during the time in between' through the Magnus expansion of the operator connected to the timing part of the evolution. The evaluation of ? is particularly useful for the analysis of the non-stroboscopic evolution. Here, the importance of the boundary conditions, which provide a natural choice of ? , is ignored. This work uses the ? function to compare the efficiency of the BABA pulse sequence with ? and the BABA pulse sequence with finite pulses. Calculations of ? and ? are presented.

  19. Effects of Solar Photovoltaic Panels on Roof Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, A.; Klessl, J.; Samady, M.; Luvall, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Building Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) is a major contributor to urban energy use. In single story buildings with large surface area such as warehouses most of the heat enters through the roof. A rooftop modification that has not been examined experimentally is solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays. In California alone, several GW in residential and commercial rooftop PV are approved or in the planning stages. With the PV solar conversion efficiency ranging from 5-20% and a typical installed PV solar reflectance of 16-27%, 53-79% of the solar energy heats the panel. Most of this heat is then either transferred to the atmosphere or the building underneath. Consequently solar PV has indirect effects on roof heat transfer. The effect of rooftop PV systems on the building roof and indoor energy balance as well as their economic impacts on building HVAC costs have not been investigated. Roof calculator models currently do not account for rooftop modifications such as PV arrays. In this study, we report extensive measurements of a building containing a flush mount and a tilted solar PV array as well as exposed reference roof. Exterior air and surface temperature, wind speed, and solar radiation were measured and thermal infrared (TIR) images of the interior ceiling were taken. We found that in daytime the ceiling surface temperature under the PV arrays was significantly cooler than under the exposed roof. The maximum difference of 2.5 C was observed at around 1800h, close to typical time of peak energy demand. Conversely at night, the ceiling temperature under the PV arrays was warmer, especially for the array mounted flat onto the roof. A one dimensional conductive heat flux model was used to calculate the temperature profile through the roof. The heat flux into the bottom layer was used as an estimate of the heat flux into the building. The mean daytime heat flux (1200-2000 PST) under the exposed roof in the model was 14.0 Watts per square meter larger than

  20. Pulsed Discharge Effects on Bacteria Inactivation in Low-Pressure Radio-Frequency Oxygen Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicoveanu, Dragos; Ohtsu, Yasunori; Fujita, Hiroharu

    2008-02-01

    The sporicidal effects of low-pressure radio frequency (RF) discharges in oxygen, produced by the application of continuous and pulsed RF power, were evaluated. For all cases, the survival curves showed a biphasic evolution. The maximum efficiency for bacteria sterilization was obtained when the RF power was injected in the continuous wave mode, while in the pulsed mode the lowest treatment temperature was ensured. The inactivation rates were calculated from the microorganism survival curves and their dependencies on the pulse characteristics (i.e., pulse frequency and duty cycle) were compared with those of the plasma parameters. The results indicated that the inactivation rate corresponding to the first phase of the survival curves is related to the time-averaged intensity of the light emission by the excited neutral atoms in the pulsed plasma, whereas the inactivation rate calculated from the second slope of the survival curves and the time-averaged plasma density have similar behaviors, when the pulse parameters were modified.

  1. Transient plasma potential in pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasmas and effect of substrate biasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anurag; Yeom, Geun Young

    2016-09-01

    An electron emitting probe in saturated floating potential mode has been used to investigate the temporal evolution of plasma potential and the effect of substrate RF biasing on it for pulsed dual frequency (2 MHz/13.56 MHz) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The low frequency power (P2MHz) has been pulsed at 1 KHz and a duty ratio of 50%, while high frequency power (P13.56MHz) has been used in continuous mode. The substrate has been biased with a separate bias power at (P12.56MHz) Argon has been used as a discharge gas. During the ICP power pulsing, three distinct regions in a typical plasma potential profile, have been identified as `initial overshoot', pulse `on-phase' and pulse `off-phase'. It has been found out that the RF biasing of the substrate significantly modulates the temporal evolution of the plasma potential. During the initial overshoot, plasma potential decreases with increasing RF biasing of the substrate, however it increases with increasing substrate biasing for pulse `on-phase' and `off-phase'. An interesting structure in plasma potential profile has also been observed when the substrate bias is applied and its evolution depends upon the magnitude of bias power. The reason of the evolution of this structure may be the ambipolar diffusion of electron and its dependence on bias power.

  2. Effect of Electromagnetic Pulse Exposure on Brain Micro Vascular Permeability in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUI-RONG DING; KANG-CHU LI; XIAO-WU WANG; YONG-CHUN ZHOU; LIAN-BO QIU; JUAN TAN; SHENG-LONG XU; GUO-ZHEN GUO

    2009-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) exposure on cerebral micro vascular permeability in rats.Methods The whole-body of male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed or sham exposed to 200 pulses or 400 pulses (1 Hz) of EMP at 200 kV/m.At 0.5,1,3,6,and 12 h after EMP exposure,the permeability of cerebral micro vascular was detected by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry using lanthanum nitrate and endogenous albumin as vascular tracers,respectively. Results The lanthanum nitrate tracer was limited to the micro vascular lumen with no lanthanum nitrate or albumin tracer extravasation in control rat brain.After EMP exposure,the lanthanum nitrate ions reached the tight junction,basal lamina and pericapillary tissue.Similarly,the albumin immunopositive staining was identified in pericapillary tissue.The changes in brain micro vascular permeability were transient,the leakage of micro vascular vessels appeared at 1 h,and reached its peak at 3 h,and nearly recovered at 12 h,after EMP exposure.In addition,the leakage of micro vascular was more obvious after exposure of EMP at 400 pulses than after exposure of EMP at 200 pulses. Conclusion Exposure to 200 and 400 pulses (1 Hz) of EMP at 200 kV/m can increase cerebral micro vascular permeability in rats,which is recoverable.

  3. Dynamic effects of high-pressure pulsed water jet in low-permeability coal seams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-hong; ZHOU Dong-ping; LU Yi-yu; KANG Yong; ZHAO Yu; WANG Xiao-chuan

    2009-01-01

    Mine gas extraction in China is difficult due to the characteristics such as mi-cro-porosity, low-permeability and high adsorption of coal seams. The pulsed mechanism of a high-pressure pulsed water jet was studied through theoretical analysis, experiment and field measurement. The results show that high-pressure pulsed water jet has three dynamic properties. What's more, the three dynamic effects can be found in low-perme-ability coal seams. A new pulsed water jet with 200-1 000 Hz oscillation frequency and peak pressure 2.5 times than average pressure was introduced. During bubble collapsing, sound vibration and instantaneous high pressures over 100 MPa enhanced the cutting ability of the high-pressure jet. Through high-pressure pulsed water jet drilling and slotting, the exposure area of coal bodies was greatly enlarged and pressure of the coal seams rapidly decreased. Therefore, the permeability of coal seams was improved and gas ab-sorption rate also decreased. Application results show that gas adsorption rate decreased by 30%-40% and the penetrability coefficient increased 100 times. This proves that high-pressure pulsed water is more efficient than other conventional methods.

  4. THE EFFECTS OF SWIRL GENERATOR HAVING WINGS WITH HOLES ON HEAT TRANSFER AND PRESSURE DROP IN TUBE HEAT EXCHANGER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeki ARGUNHAN

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of turbulance creators on heat transfer and pressure drop used in concentric heat exchanger experimentaly. Heat exchanger has an inlet tube with 60 mm in diameter. The angle of swirl generators wings is 55º with each wing which has single, double, three and four holes. Swirl generators is designed to easily set to heat exchanger entrance. Air is passing through inner tube of heat exhanger as hot fluid and water is passing outer of inner tube as cool fluid.

  5. Effect of Combustion Air Pre-Heating In Carbon Monoxide Emission in Diesel Fired Heat Treatment Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E B Muhammed Shafi,

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the effect of combustion air pre- heating in Diesel fired heat Treatment Furnace. The main heat treatment processes are Normalizing, Tempering, Hardening, Annealing, Solution Annealing and Stress Relieving. The emission of carbon monoxide is measured with combustion air pre-heating and without preheating. The results are then compared and it is found that the emission of CO is reduced by 29.12%. With the Combustion air pre-heating a considerable reduction in Specific Furnace Fuel Consumption (SFFC is obtained. The test was caaried out at Peekay Steels Casting (P ltd, Nallalam, Calicut.

  6. Effects of heat acclimation on hand cooling efficacy following exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Elizabeth L; Vandermark, Lesley W; Pryor, J Luke; Pryor, Riana R; VanScoy, Rachel M; Denegar, Craig R; Huggins, Robert A; Casa, Douglas J

    2017-05-01

    This study examined the separate and combined effects of heat acclimation and hand cooling on post-exercise cooling rates following bouts of exercise in the heat. Seventeen non-heat acclimated (NHA) males (mean ± SE; age, 23 ± 1 y; mass, 75.30 ± 2.27 kg; maximal oxygen consumption [VO2 max], 54.1 ± 1.3 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) completed 2 heat stress tests (HST) when NHA, then 10 days of heat acclimation, then 2 HST once heat acclimated (HA) in an environmental chamber (40°C; 40%RH). HSTs were 2 60-min bouts of treadmill exercise (45% VO2 max; 2% grade) each followed by 10 min of hand cooling (C) or no cooling (NC). Heat acclimation sessions were 90-240 min of treadmill or stationary bike exercise (60-80% VO2 max). Repeated measures ANOVA with Fishers LSD post hoc (α < 0.05) identified differences. When NHA, C (0.020 ± 0.003°C·min(-1)) had a greater cooling rate than NC (0.013 ± 0.003°C·min(-1)) (mean difference [95%CI]; 0.007°C [0.001,0.013], P = 0.035). Once HA, C (0.021 ± 0.002°C·min(-1)) was similar to NC (0.025 ± 0.002°C·min(-1)) (0.004°C [-0.003,0.011], P = 0.216). Hand cooling when HA (0.021 ± 0.002°C·min(-1)) was similar to when NHA (0.020 ± 0.003°C·min(-1)) (P = 0.77). In conclusion, when NHA, C provided greater cooling rates than NC. Once HA, C and NC provided similar cooling rates.

  7. The effect of passive heating and face cooling on perceived exertion during exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armada-da-Silva, P A S; Woods, J; Jones, D A

    2004-05-01

    Increased body temperature is thought to be an important component of the higher perception of exertion that is a feature of fatigue during exercise in the heat but a causal relationship has yet to be demonstrated. We have investigated the effect of passive heating on the perception of exertion during a standard bout of exercise and also assessed the effect of cooling the head on compensating for the increased body temperature on the feelings of exertion. Ten male subjects performed a 14-min cycling exercise [average power approximately 63% of maximum power output ( W(max))] at an ambient temperature of 35 degrees C at resting rectal temperature [mean (SD): 37.49 (0.27) degrees C; control (CON) trial] on one occasion, and after sitting in a sauna to raise rectal temperature [mean (SD): 38.95(0.13) degrees C; sauna (SAU) trial]. During the exercise, subjects reported their ratings of overall perceived exertion (RPE), perceived exertion of the legs (RPE(legs)) and thermal comfort (TC). A blood sample was collected by the end of the exercise for determination of plasma glucose, lactate and prolactin and haematocrit. RPE values were significantly elevated after passive heating [mean (SE): 14.5 (0.7) units in CON and 17.2 (0.5) units in SAU, at the end of exercise; PFAN) and SAU(FAN)) that was achieved by combining face fanning and spraying the face with a mist of cooled water. Face cooling decreased RPE values after sauna to a point that no differences between the two conditions existed. RPE(legs) scores and heart rate, however, remained higher in SAU(FAN) compared with CON(FAN) ( P<0.05). We conclude that hyperthermia is a causative element of the increased perception of exertion during submaximal exercise in the heat and that the effect of increased core temperature on the feelings of exertion is modulated by face cooling.

  8. The Effect of Ionospheric Models on Electromagnetic Pulse Locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenimore, Edward E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Triplett, Laurie A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Locations of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) determined by time-of-arrival (TOA) often have outliers with significantly larger errors than expected. In the past, these errors were thought to arise from high order terms in the Appleton-Hartree equation. We simulated 1000 events randomly spread around the Earth into a constellation of 22 GPS satellites. We used four different ionospheres: “simple” where the time delay goes as the inverse of the frequency-squared, “full Appleton-Hartree”, the “BobRD integrals” and a full raytracing code. The simple and full Appleton-Hartree ionospheres do not show outliers whereas the BobRD and raytracing do. This strongly suggests that the cause of the outliers is not additional terms in the Appleton-Hartree equation, but rather is due to the additional path length due to refraction. A method to fix the outliers is suggested based on fitting a time to the delays calculated at the 5 GPS frequencies with BobRD and simple ionospheres. The difference in time is used as a correction to the TOAs.

  9. Pulsed Laser Interactions with Space Debris: Target Shape Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Liedahl, D A; Libby, S B; Nikolaev, S; Phipps, C R

    2013-01-01

    Among the approaches to the proposed mitigation and remediation of the space debris problem is the de-orbiting of objects in low Earth orbit through irradiation by ground-based high-intensity pulsed lasers. Laser ablation of a thin surface layer causes target recoil, resulting in the depletion of orbital angular momentum and accelerated atmospheric re-entry. However, both the magnitude and direction of the recoil are shape dependent, a feature of the laser-based remediation concept that has received little attention. Since the development of a predictive capability is desirable, we have investigated the dynamical response to ablation of objects comprising a variety of shapes. We derive and demonstrate a simple analytical technique for calculating the ablation-driven transfer of linear momentum, emphasizing cases for which the recoil is not exclusively parallel to the incident beam. For the purposes of comparison and contrast, we examine one case of momentum transfer in the low-intensity regime, where photon p...

  10. Effects of Freestream Turbulence on Turbine Blade Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Giel, Paul W.; Ames, Forrest E.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments have shown that moderate turbulence levels can nearly double turbine blade stagnation region heat transfer. Data have also shown that heat transfer is strongly affected by the scale of turbulence as well as its level. In addition to the stagnation region, turbulence is often seen to increase pressure surface heat transfer. This is especially evident at low to moderate Reynolds numbers. Vane and rotor stagnation region, and vane pressure surface heat transfer augmentation is often seen in a pre-transition environment. Accurate predictions of transition and relaminarization are critical to accurately predicting blade surface heat transfer. An approach is described which incorporates the effects of both turbulence level and scale into a CFD analysis. The model is derived from experimental data for cylindrical and elliptical leadng edges. Results using this model are compared to experimental data for both vane and rotor geometries. The comparisons are made to illustrate that using a model which includes the effects of turbulence length scale improves agreement with data, and to illustrate where improvements in the modeling are needed.

  11. Laser pulse amplification and dispersion compensation in an effectively extended optical cavity containing Bose-Einstein condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Tarhan, Devrim; Mustecaplioglu, Ozgur E; 10.1088/0953-4075/46/1/015501

    2013-01-01

    We review and critically evaluate our proposal of a pulse amplification scheme based on two Bose-Einstein condensates inside the resonator of a mode-locked laser. Two condensates are used for compensating the group velocity dispersion. Ultraslow light propagation through the condensate leads to a considerable increase in the cavity round-trip delay time, lowers the effective repetition rate of the laser, and hence scales up the output pulse energy. It has been recently argued that atom-atom interactions would make our proposal even more efficient. However, neither in our original proposal nor in the case of interactions, limitations due to heating of the condensates by optical energy absorption were taken into account. Our results show that there is a critical time of operation, $~0.3$ ms, for the optimal amplification factor, which is in the order of $\\sim 10^2$ at effective condensate lengths in the order of $\\sim 50$ $\\mu$m. The bandwidth limitation of the amplifier on the minimum temporal width of the pul...

  12. Effects of irradiation of energetic heavy ions on digital pulse shape analysis with silicon detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlini, S.; Carboni, S.; Bardelli, L.; Le Neindre, N.; Bini, M.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Casini, G.; Edelbruck, P.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Poggi, G.; Rivet, M. F.; Stefanini, A. A.; Baiocco, G.; Berjillos, R.; Bonnet, E.; Bruno, M.; Chbihi, A.; Cruceru, I.; Degerlier, M.; Dueñas, J. A.; Galichet, E.; Gramegna, F.; Kordyasz, A.; Kozik, T.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Lopez, O.; Marchi, T.; Martel, I.; Morelli, L.; Parlog, M.; Piantelli, S.; Petrascu, H.; Rosato, E.; Seredov, V.; Vient, E.; Vigilante, M.; Fazia Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    The next generation of 4π detector arrays for heavy ion studies will largely use Pulse Shape Analysis to push the performance of silicon detectors with respect to ion identification. Energy resolution and pulse shape identification capabilities of silicon detectors under prolonged irradiation by energetic heavy ions have thus become a major issue. In this framework, we have studied the effects of irradiation by energetic heavy ions on the response of neutron transmutation doped (nTD) silicon detectors. Sizeable effects on the amplitude and the risetime of the charge signal have been found for detectors irradiated with large fluences of stopped heavy ions, while much weaker effects were observed by punching-through ions. The robustness of ion identification based on digital pulse shape techniques has been evaluated.

  13. [Effect of pulsed electromagnetic field on orthodontic tooth movement through transmission electromicroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q

    1991-01-01

    This experiment is to observe the effect of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on orthodontic tooth movement of guinea pigs through transmission electron microscope (TEM). 14-days observations indicate that PEMF could accelerate the rate of orthodontic tooth movement as a result of the increase in quantity of active cell without changing the ultrastructures of cells and have no unfavorable effects on periodontal tissues.

  14. Modeling and analysis of the HPM pulse-width upset effect on CMOS inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinhai, Yu; Changchun, Chai; Liping, Qiao; Yintang, Yang; Yang, Liu; Xiaowen, Xi

    2015-05-01

    We derive analytical models of the excess carrier density distribution and the HPM (high-power microwave) upset susceptibility with dependence of pulse-width, which are validated by the simulated results and experimental data. Mechanism analysis and model derivation verify that the excess carriers dominate the current amplification process of the latch-up. Our results reveal that the excess carrier density distribution in P-substrate behaves as pulse-width dependence. The HPM upset voltage threshold Vp decreases with the incremental pulse-width, while there is an inflection point which is caused because the excess carrier accumulation in the P-substrate will be suppressed over time. For the first time, the physical essence of the HPM pulse-width upset effect is proposed to be the excess carrier accumulation effect. Validation concludes that the Vp model is capable of giving a reliable and accurate prediction to the HPM upset susceptibility of a CMOS inverter, which simultaneously considers technology information, ambient temperature, and layout parameters. From the model, the layout parameter LB has been demonstrated to have a significant impact on the pulse-width upset effect: a CMOS inverter with minor LB is more susceptible to HPM, which enables us to put forward hardening measures for inverters that are immune from the HPM upset. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 60776034) and the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2014CB339900).

  15. Effect of heat on laterised concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efe E. Ikponmwosa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of investigation of the effects of temperature variation on the compressive strength of laterised concrete. Cube specimens were cast, cured in water at ambient laboratory temperature and subjected to different temperature regimes before testing. A concrete mix ratio of 2:3:6 (cement: laterite/sand: granite with water/cement ratio of 0.65 was adopted for this investigation. The laterite content in the fine aggregate was varied from 0 to 100% at 25% interval. Specimens cured for 7 and 28 days were subjected to uniaxial compressive loading tests at room and elevated temperatures of 250, 500 and 750oC. The results show that normal concrete cannot withstand appreciable load above 250oC while laterised concrete with 25% laterite in the fine aggregate is able to resist higher load with increase in age and at temperature up to 500oC. It is also observed that there is no appreciable increase in strength at higher temperatures. The peak compressive strength value of 30.44 N/mm2 is recorded for the mix with 25% laterite-75% sand at 500oC. This is an indication that the strength of laterised concrete is generally sufficient for use at elevated temperature not exceeding 500oC.

  16. The effect of high voltage, high frequency pulsed electric field on slain ovine cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgarifar, Hajarossadat; Oloyede, Adekunle; Zare, Firuz

    2014-04-01

    High power, high frequency pulsed electric fields known as pulsed power (PP) has been applied recently in biology and medicine. However, little attention has been paid to investigate the application of pulse power in musculoskeletal system and its possible effect on functional behavior and biomechanical properties of bone tissue. This paper presents the first research investigating whether or not PP can be applied safely on bone tissue as a stimuli and what will be the possible effect of these signals on the characteristics of cortical bone by comparing the mechanical properties of this type of bone pre and post expose to PP and in comparison with the control samples. A positive buck-boost converter was applied to generate adjustable high voltage, high frequency pulses (up to 500 V and 10 kHz). The functional behavior of bone in response to pulse power excitation was elucidated by applying compressive loading until failure. The stiffness, failure stress (strength) and the total fracture energy (bone toughness) were determined as a measure of the main bone characteristics. Furthermore, an ultrasonic technique was applied to determine and comprise bone elasticity before and after pulse power stimulation. The elastic property of cortical bone samples appeared to remain unchanged following exposure to pulse power excitation for all three orthogonal directions obtained from ultrasonic technique and similarly from the compression test. Nevertheless, the compressive strength and toughness of bone samples were increased when they were exposed to 66 h of high power pulsed electromagnetic field compared to the control samples. As the toughness and the strength of the cortical bone tissue are directly associated with the quality and integrity of the collagen matrix whereas its stiffness is primarily related to bone mineral content these overall results may address that although, the pulse power stimulation can influence the arrangement or the quality of the collagen network

  17. Effective disinfection of rough rice using infrared radiation heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of infrared (IR) heating and tempering treatments on disinfection of Aspergillus flavus in freshly harvested rough rice and storage rice. Rice samples with initial moisture contents (IMCs) of 14.1 to 27.0% (wet basis) were infected with A. fl...

  18. Effects of acupoints TENS on heat pain threshold in normal subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宁华; 许云影

    2003-01-01

    Objective To delineate the influence of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on heat pain threshold and vibration threshold in human.Methods Twenty healthy, young subjects, aged from 20 to 39, participated in the study. They were randomly allocated into either TENS or placebo group. Thirty minutes of conventional TENS (200 μs pulses at 100 Hz and 2-3 times sensory threshold) or placebo stimulation was applied to the acupuncture points (LI4) on each subject's left hand. Heat pain and vibration thresholds were measured using Medoc TSA-2001 and VSA-3000 respectively on the thenar eminence of each subject's left hand. These assessments were done at 30, 20 and 10 minutes before and 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 minutes after 30 minutes of TENS or placebo treatment.Results This study showed a significant increase in heat pain threshold by 0.81℃ and 1.54℃ respectively at 0 (P=0.002) and 20 minutes (P=0.004) after 30 minutes of TENS application to the LI4 acupoint of young healthy subjects, compared with placebo stimulation. Interestingly, no significant difference in vibration threshold was found between the TENS and placebo groups.Conclusion The effect of TENS on the acupoint is to reduce pain but not tactile (specifically vibration) sensibility.

  19. Effects of acupoints TENS on heat pain threshold in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ninghua; Hui-Chan, Christina

    2003-12-01

    To delineate the influence of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on heat pain threshold and vibration threshold in human. Twenty healthy, young subjects, aged from 20 to 39, participated in the study. They were randomly allocated into either TENS or placebo group. Thirty minutes of conventional TENS (200 micro s pulses at 100 Hz and 2 - 3 times sensory threshold) or placebo stimulation was applied to the acupuncture points (LI4) on each subject's left hand. Heat pain and vibration thresholds were measured using Medoc TSA-2001 and VSA-3000 respectively on the thenar eminence of each subject's left hand. These assessments were done at 30, 20 and 10 minutes before and 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 minutes after 30 minutes of TENS or placebo treatment. This study showed a significant increase in heat pain threshold by 0.81 degrees C and 1.54 degrees C respectively at 0 (P = 0.002) and 20 minutes (P = 0.004) after 30 minutes of TENS application to the LI4 acupoint of young healthy subjects, compared with placebo stimulation. Interestingly, no significant difference in vibration threshold was found between the TENS and placebo groups. The effect of TENS on the acupoint is to reduce pain but not tactile (specifically vibration) sensibility.

  20. Effects of High-voltage Pulse Electric Field Treatment on the Structure Stability of Konjac Glucomannan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Min-Na; FAN Lin-Lin; LIU Ya-Nan; CHEN Qing-Ai; ZENG Yuan; JIAN Wen-Jie; PANG Jie

    2011-01-01

    Structures of KGM treated in two high-voltage pulse electric fields were characterized by infrared spectroscopy,Raman spectroscopy,X-ray diffraction and so on.The results showed that intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions of KGM were reduced after being treated with high-voltage pulse electric field,but there was no significant effect on its fiber chain form and thermal characteristics.Results of the study can provide a useful reference for further study on the structure and property of KGM,and especially can provide theoretical basis for the effect of physical field on the foodstuff deep processing related to KGM.