WorldWideScience

Sample records for pulsed gas tungsten

  1. Modelling the transient behaviour of pulsed current tungsten-inert-gas weldpools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. S.; Zheng, W.; Wu, L.

    1999-01-01

    A three-dimensional model is established to simulate the pulsed current tungsten-inert-gas (TIG) welding process. The goal is to analyse the cyclic variation of fluid flow and heat transfer in weldpools under periodic arc heat input. To this end, an algorithm, which is capable of handling the transience, nonlinearity, multiphase and strong coupling encountered in this work, is developed. The numerical simulations demonstrate the transient behaviour of weldpools under pulsed current. Experimental data are compared with numerical results to show the effectiveness of the developed model.

  2. Effect of pulsed gas tungsten arc welding on corrosion behavior of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Maamallan Institute of Technology, Anna University, Sriperumpudur 602 105 (India)], E-mail: manianmb@rediffmail.com; Jayabalan, V. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Anna University, Guindy, Chennai 600 025 (India)], E-mail: jbalan@annauniv.edu; Balasubramanian, V. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608 002 (India)], E-mail: visvabalu@yahoo.com

    2008-07-01

    Due to the excellent combination of properties such as elevated strength-to-weight ratio, high toughness and excellent resistance to corrosion, make titanium alloys attractive for many industrial applications. Advantages of pulsed current welding frequently reported in literature include refinement of fusion zone grain size, etc. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the effect of pulsed current Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welding parameters on corrosion behavior of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy. Pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding was used to fabricate the joints. To optimize the number of experiments to be performed, central composite design was used. The investigation revealed increase in corrosion resistance with increase in peak current and pulse frequency up to an optimum value of the same and decrease in corrosion resistance beyond that optimum point. An increase in corrosion resistance with grain refinement was also detected.

  3. Effect of pulsed gas tungsten arc welding on corrosion behavior of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, M.; Jayabalan, V.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2008-01-01

    Due to the excellent combination of properties such as elevated strength-to-weight ratio, high toughness and excellent resistance to corrosion, make titanium alloys attractive for many industrial applications. Advantages of pulsed current welding frequently reported in literature include refinement of fusion zone grain size, etc. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the effect of pulsed current Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welding parameters on corrosion behavior of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy. Pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding was used to fabricate the joints. To optimize the number of experiments to be performed, central composite design was used. The investigation revealed increase in corrosion resistance with increase in peak current and pulse frequency up to an optimum value of the same and decrease in corrosion resistance beyond that optimum point. An increase in corrosion resistance with grain refinement was also detected

  4. Metallurgical characterization of pulsed current gas tungsten arc, friction stir and laser beam welded AZ31B magnesium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmanaban, G.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the influences of welding processes such as friction stir welding (FSW), laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (PCGTAW) on mechanical and metallurgical properties of AZ31B magnesium alloy. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-Ray diffraction technique were used to evaluate the metallurgical characteristics of welded joints. LBW joints exhibited superior tensile properties compared to FSW and PCGTAW joints due to the formation of finer grains in weld region, higher fusion zone hardness, the absence of heat affected zone, presence of uniformly distributed finer precipitates in weld region.

  5. Influences of pulsed current tungsten inert gas welding parameters on the tensile properties of AA 6061 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthil Kumar, T.; Balasubramanian, V.; Sanavullah, M.Y.

    2007-01-01

    Medium strength aluminium alloy (Al-Mg-Si alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. In any structural application of this alloy consideration its weldability is of utmost importance as welding is largely used for joining of structural components. The preferred welding process of aluminium alloy is frequently tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding due to its comparatively easier applicability and better economy. In the case of single pass TIG welding of thinner section of this alloy, the pulsed current has been found beneficial due to its advantages over the conventional continuous current process. The use of pulsed current parameters has been found to improve the mechanical properties of the welds compared to those of continuous current welds of this alloy due to grain refinement occurring in the fusion zone. Many considerations come into the picture and one need to carefully balance various pulse current parameters to arrive at an optimum combination. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of pulsed current TIG welding parameters on tensile properties of AA 6061 aluminium alloy weldments

  6. Developing mathematical models to predict tensile properties of pulsed current gas tungsten arc welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, M.; Jayabalan, V.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2008-01-01

    Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding process of titanium alloy is frequently gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding due to its comparatively easier applicability and better economy. In the case of single pass GTA welding of thinner section of this alloy, the pulsed current has been found beneficial due to its advantages over the conventional continuous current process. Many considerations come into the picture and one need to carefully balance various pulse current parameters to arrive at an optimum combination. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to develop mathematical models to predict tensile properties of pulsed current GTA welded titanium alloy weldments. Four factors, five level, central composite, rotatable design matrix is used to optimise the required number of experiments. The mathematical models have been developed by response surface method (RSM). The adequacy of the models has been checked by ANOVA technique. By using the developed mathematical models, the tensile properties of the joints can be predicted with 99% confidence level

  7. Developing mathematical models to predict tensile properties of pulsed current gas tungsten arc welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, M. [Department of Production Engineering, Sathyabama University, Old Mamallapuram Road, Chennai 600 119 (India)], E-mail: manianmb@rediffmail.com; Jayabalan, V. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Anna University, Guindy, Chennai 600 025 (India)], E-mail: jbalan@annauniv.edu; Balasubramanian, V. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608 002 (India)], E-mail: visvabalu@yahoo.com

    2008-07-01

    Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding process of titanium alloy is frequently gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding due to its comparatively easier applicability and better economy. In the case of single pass GTA welding of thinner section of this alloy, the pulsed current has been found beneficial due to its advantages over the conventional continuous current process. Many considerations come into the picture and one need to carefully balance various pulse current parameters to arrive at an optimum combination. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to develop mathematical models to predict tensile properties of pulsed current GTA welded titanium alloy weldments. Four factors, five level, central composite, rotatable design matrix is used to optimise the required number of experiments. The mathematical models have been developed by response surface method (RSM). The adequacy of the models has been checked by ANOVA technique. By using the developed mathematical models, the tensile properties of the joints can be predicted with 99% confidence level.

  8. Gas tungsten arc welder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable grinder, co-axial with the electrode, is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds. The specification also discloses means for loading of the cladding with fuel pellets and for placement of reflectors, gas capsules and end caps. Gravity feed conveyor and inerting means are also described. (author)

  9. The Effect of Constant and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Joint Properties of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel to 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neissi, R.; Shamanian, M.; Hajihashemi, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, dissimilar 316L austenitic stainless steel/2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) joints were fabricated by constant and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding process using ER2209 DSS as a filler metal. Microstructures and joint properties were characterized using optical and electron scanning microscopy, tensile, Charpy V-notch impact and micro-hardness tests, and cyclic polarization measurements. Microstructural observations confirmed the presence of chromium nitride and delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of DSS and 316L, respectively. In addition, there was some deviation in the austenite/ferrite ratio of the surface welding pass in comparison to the root welding pass. Besides having lower pitting potential, welded joints produced by constant current gas tungsten arc welding process, consisted of some brittle sigma phase precipitates, which resulted in some impact energy reduction. The tensile tests showed high tensile strength for the weld joints in which all the specimens were broken in 316L base metal.

  10. TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    After having recalled the Tungsten Inert Gas process principle and the different alternative TIG processes, the author explains the advantages and limits of this process. The applications and recent developments are given. (O.M.)

  11. The effect of gas tungsten arc welding and pulsed-gas tungsten arc welding processes’ parameters on the heat affected zone-softening behavior of strain-hardened Al–6.7Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadadzadeh, Amir; Ghaznavi, Majid Mahmoudi; Kokabi, Amir Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The strain-hardened Al–6.7Mg alloy was welded using GTAW and PGTAW processes. • The HAZ softening behavior of the welding joint was characterized. • Employing pulsed current in GTAW process eliminated the HAZ softening. • Duration ratio did not affect the weld strength while the frequency influenced it. - Abstract: The heat affected zone (HAZ) softening behavior of strain-hardened Al–6.7Mg alloy welded by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process was investigated. Increasing the heat input during welding led to formation of a wider HAZ. Moreover, the size of the precipitates was increased at higher heat inputs. Consequently, by increasing the heat input, lower strength was obtained for the welding joints. At the second stage of the study, pulsed-GTAW (PGTAW) process was employed to improve the strength of the joints. It was observed that the overall strength of the welding joints was improved and the fracture during tensile test was moved from the HAZ to the fusion zone. Moreover, the effect of duration ratio and pulse frequency was studied. For the current study, the duration ratio did not have a significant effect on the strength and microstructure of the weld, but increasing the frequency led to higher strength of the weld and finer microstructure

  12. Optimization of the pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (PCGTAW) parameters for corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steel (UNS S32760) welds using the Taguchi method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousefieh, M.; Shamanian, M.; Saatchi, A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Among the four factors and three levels tested, it was concluded that the pulse current had the most significant effect on the pitting potential and the background current had the next most significant effect. The effects of pulse frequency and % on time are less important when compared to the other factors. → The percentage contributions of the pulse current, the background current, % on time, and pulse frequency to the corrosion resistance are 66.28%, 25.97%, 2.71% and 5.04%, respectively. → The optimum conditions within the selected parameter values were found as the second level of pulse current (120 A), second level of background current (60 A), third level of % on time (80%) and third level of pulse frequency (5 Hz). → The confirmation test was carried out at optimum working conditions. Pitting potential was increased to 1.06 V SCE by setting the control factors. Predicted (1.04 V SCE ) and observed (1.06 V SCE ) pitting potential values are close to each other, which are the highest values obtained in the present study. - Abstract: In the present work, a design of experiment (DOE) technique, the Taguchi method, has been used to optimize the pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (PCGTAW) parameters for the corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steel (UNS S32760) welds. A L 9 (3 4 ) orthogonal array (OA) of Taguchi design which involves nine experiments for four parameters (pulse current, background current, % on time, pulse frequency) with three levels was used. Corrosion resistance in 3.5%NaCl solution was evaluated by anodic polarization tests at room temperature. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) is performed on the measured data and S/N (signal to noise) ratios. The higher the better response category was selected to obtain optimum conditions. The optimum conditions providing the highest pitting potential were estimated. The optimum conditions were found as the second level of pulse current (120 A), second level of

  13. Weldability Characteristics of Sintered Hot-Forged AISI 4135 Steel Produced through P/M Route by Using Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Joby; Muthukumaran, S.; Pandey, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Present investigation is an attempt to study the weldability characteristics of sintered hot-forged plates of AISI 4135 steel produced through powder metallurgy (P/M) route using matching filler materials of ER80S B2. Compacts of homogeneously blended elemental powders corresponding to the above steel were prepared on a universal testing machine (UTM) by taking pre-weighed powder blend with a suitable die, punch and bottom insert assembly. Indigenously developed ceramic coating was applied on the entire surface of the compacts in order to protect them from oxidation during sintering. Sintered preforms were hot forged to flat, approximately rectangular plates, welded by pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (PCGTAW) processes with aforementioned filler materials. Microstructural, tensile and hardness evaluations revealed that PCGTAW process with low heat input could produce weldments of good quality with almost nil defects. It was established that PCGTAW joints possess improved tensile properties compared to the base metal and it was mainly attributed to lower heat input, resulting in finer fusion zone grains and higher fusion zone hardness. Thus, the present investigation opens a new and demanding field in research.

  14. Gas phase pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonah, C.D.; Andong Liu; Mulac, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    Gas phase pulse radiolysis, a technique which can be used to study many different phenomena in chemistry and physics, is discussed. As a source of small radicals, pulse radiolysis is important to the field of chemistry, particularly to combustion and atmospheric kinetics. The reactions of 1,3-butadiene, allene, ethylene and acetylene with OH are presented. 52 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  15. Characteristics of tungsten oxide thin films prepared on the flexible substrates using pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, Yoshiaki; Kawasaki, Hiroharu; Ohshima, Tamiko; Yagyuu, Yoshihito

    2008-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO 3 ) thin films have been prepared on the flexible indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) using WO 3 targets in oxygen gas. Color of the WO 3 film on the flexible ITO substrates depends on the oxygen gas mixture. The plasma plume produced by PLD using a Nd:YAG laser and WO 3 target is investigated by temporal and spatial-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. WO 3 films prepared on the flexible ITO substrates show electrochromic properties, even when the substrates are bent. The film color changes from blue to transparent within 10-20 s after the applied DC voltage is turned off

  16. TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding; Le soudage TIG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-09-15

    After having recalled the Tungsten Inert Gas process principle and the different alternative TIG processes, the author explains the advantages and limits of this process. The applications and recent developments are given. (O.M.)

  17. Gas-driven permeation of deuterium through tungsten and tungsten alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchenauer, Dean A., E-mail: dabuche@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Karnesky, Richard A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Fang, Zhigang Zak; Ren, Chai [University of Utah, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Oya, Yasuhisa [Shizuoka University, Graduate School of Science, Shizuoka (Japan); Otsuka, Teppei [Kyushu University, Department of Advanced Energy Engineering Science, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamauchi, Yuji [Hokkaido University, Third Division of Quantum Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Sapporo (Japan); Whaley, Josh A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We have designed and performed initial studies on a high temperature gas-driven permeation cell capable of operating at temperatures up to 1150 °C and at pressures between 0.1–1 atm. • Permeation measurements on ITER grade tungsten compare well with past studies by Frauenfelder and Zahkarov in the temperature range from 500 to 1000 °C. • First permeation measurements on Ti dispersoid-strengthened ultra-fine grained tungsten show higher permeation at 500 °C, but very similar permeation with ITER tungsten at 1000 °C. Diffusion along grain boundaries may be playing a role for this type of material. - Abstract: To address the transport and trapping of hydrogen isotopes, several permeation experiments are being pursued at both Sandia National Laboratories (deuterium gas-driven permeation) and Idaho National Laboratories (tritium gas- and plasma-driven tritium permeation). These experiments are in part a collaboration between the US and Japan to study the performance of tungsten at divertor relevant temperatures (PHENIX). Here we report on the development of a high temperature (≤1150 °C) gas-driven permeation cell and initial measurements of deuterium permeation in several types of tungsten: high purity tungsten foil, ITER-grade tungsten (grains oriented through the membrane), and dispersoid-strengthened ultra-fine grain (UFG) tungsten being developed in the US. Experiments were performed at 500–1000 °C and 0.1–1.0 atm D{sub 2} pressure. Permeation through ITER-grade tungsten was similar to earlier W experiments by Frauenfelder (1968–69) and Zaharakov (1973). Data from the UFG alloy indicates marginally higher permeability (< 10×) at lower temperatures, but the permeability converges to that of the ITER tungsten at 1000 °C. The permeation cell uses only ceramic and graphite materials in the hot zone to reduce the possibility for oxidation of the sample membrane. Sealing pressure is applied externally, thereby allowing for elevation

  18. Temperature and distortion transients in gas tungsten-arc weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.; Friedman, E.

    1979-10-01

    An analysis and test program to develop a fundamental understanding of the gas tungsten-arc welding process has been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to develop techniques to determine and control the various welding parameters and weldment conditions so as to result in optimum weld response characteristics. These response characteristics include depth of penetration, weld bead configuration, weld bead sink and roll, distortion, and cracking sensitivity. The results are documented of that part of the program devoted to analytical and experimental investigations of temperatures, weld bead dimensions, and distortions for moving gas tungsten-arc welds applied to Alloy 600 plates

  19. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Tungsten Thin Films on Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, W.; Tabbal, M.; Roumie, M.

    2011-01-01

    Thin coatings of Tungsten were deposited on substrates fabricated by pre-depositing graphite thin layers on Si(100) wafers. We ablate pure W target using a 20 ns KrF excimer laser (248 nm) in an Ar ambient. The effect of background gas pressure, substrate temperature, and laser fluence, on the properties of the deposited W layers is studied using several techniques including X-Ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy, surface profilometry, and Rutherford Back-Scattering spectrometry. Our results indicate that the deposited layers consist of the well-crystallized body-centered-cubic α-W phase with bulk-like properties, particularly for films deposited at a substrate temperature of 450 0 C, laser fluence greater than 400mJ, and pressure of about 10mTorr. (author)

  20. Pulse current electrodeposition of tungsten coatings on V–4Cr–4Ti alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Fan; Zhang, Yingchun; Li, Xuliang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Tungsten coatings were successfully electroplated on vanadium alloy substrate. • Tungsten coatings consisted of two sub-layers. • Tungsten coatings plated at lower duty cycle has a better surface quality. • High heat flux property of tungsten coatings was investigated. • Helium ion irradiation property of tungsten coatings was investigated. - Abstract: Tungsten coatings with high (2 2 0)-orientation were formed on V alloy substrate by pulse current electrodeposition in air atmosphere. The coatings’ microstructure, crystal structure and adhesive strength between coatings and substrates were investigated. It could be observed the tungsten coatings consisted of two sub-layers with the inner tooth-like layer, and the outer columnar layer. The tungsten coatings deposited at lower duty cycle have a better surface quality with a little change in the adhesive strength. The tungsten coating was exposed to electron beam with power density of 200 MW/m 2 in the thermal shock test, the tungsten crystal grain surface melt, the microcracks are found among the crystal grains. Exfoliation, flaking and dense needle-like holes were observed on the tungsten coating after irradiation with helium ions at an energy of 65 keV and an implanted dose of 22.67 × 10 18 cm −2

  1. Response of fuzzy tungsten surfaces to pulsed plasma bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, D.; Doerner, R.P.; Iwamoto, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Miyamoto, M.; Nagata, M.; Sakuma, I.; Shoda, K.; Ueda, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Damage of fuzzy tungsten surfaces due to a transient plasma load is characterized in terms of mass loss, surface morphology, and optical properties. A single D pulsed (∼0.1–0.2 ms) plasma shot with surface absorbed energy density of ∼1.1 MJ m −2 leads to a mass loss of ∼80 μg, which cannot be explained by physical sputtering. Thus, macroscopic erosion processes such as droplets and dust release as well as arcing are thought to be responsible for the mass loss. In fact, scanning electron microscopy observations reveal the melting of the tips of fuzz and arc tracks. The optical reflectivity of the damaged (melted) surface is measured to be higher than that of an undamaged fuzzy surface (below ∼0.01%). Spectroscopic ellipsometry shows that the refractive index, n, and extinction coefficient, k, increase from n ≈ 1 and k ≈ 0 for an undamaged fuzzy surface with an increase in the degree of damage of fuzz

  2. Investigation of arcing on fiber-formed nanostructured tungsten by pulsed plasma during steady state plasma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yajima, M., E-mail: yajima.miyuki@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, 509-5292 Japan (Japan); Ohno, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kajita, S. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); De Temmerman, G. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, CS 90 046-13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Bystrov, K.; Bardin, S.; Morgan, T.W. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Masuzaki, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, 509-5292 Japan (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Arcing on fiber-formed nanostructured tungsten samples during ELM-like pulses was investigated using the superimposition of high power pulsed plasma on a steady state plasma with hydrogen gas in the linear plasma device Pilot-PSI. The ignition of arcing was observed when the floating potential of the samples was less than −75 V with sufficient heat flux. The surface observation showed that the arc spots were not in the center, but in the peripheral area of the plasma column. Considering the plasma potential profile in the Pilot-PSI, the arcing occurred at the position where the heat flux and the sheath potential drop are sufficiently large.

  3. Effect on structure and mechanical property of tungsten irradiated by high intensity pulsed ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xianxiu; Zhang, Xiaonan; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Younian

    2017-09-01

    The anti-thermal radiation performance of tungsten was investigated by high intensity pulsed ion beam technology. The ion beam was mainly composed of Cn+ (70%) and H+ (30%) at an acceleration voltage of 250 kV under different energy densities for different number of pulses. GIXRD analysis showed that no obvious phase structural changes occurred on the tungsten, and microstress generated. SEM analysis exhibited that there was no apparent irradiation damage on the surface of tungsten at the low irradiation frequency (3 times and 10 times) and at the low energy density (0.25 J/cm2 and 0.7 J/cm2). Cracks appeared on the surface of tungsten after 100-time and 300-time irradiation. Shedding phenomenon even appeared on the surface of tungsten at the energy densities of 1.4 J/cm2 and 2.0 J/cm2. The surface nano-hardness of tungsten decreased with the increase of the pulse times and the energy density. The tungsten has good anti-thermal radiation properties under certain heat load environment.

  4. Microstructural characterisation of Inconel 718 gas tungsten arc welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram, G.D.J.; Reddy, A.V.; Rao, K.P.

    2005-01-01

    The presence of Nb-rich, brittle, intermetallic Laves phase in Inconel 718 weld fusion zones is detrimental to weld mechanical properties. In the current work, autogenous bead-on-plate gas tungsten-arc welds were deposited in 2 mm thick IN 718 sheets. The welds were subjected to the following heat treatments: i) direct aging, ii) solution treatment at 980 C followed by aging, and iii) solution treatment at 1080 C followed by aging. Detailed microstructural characterisation was carried out using optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes and electron probe microanalysis. The microstructural features in as-welded and post-weld heat treated conditions are discussed. The results show that post-weld heat treatments alone cannot provide satisfactory solution to the Laves problem in Inconel 718 gas tungsten-arc welds

  5. Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschnauer, H.

    1978-01-01

    There is no substitute for tungsten in its main field of application so that the demand will not decrease, but there is a need for further important applications. If small variations are left out of account, a small but steady increase in the annual tungsten consumption can be expected. The amount of tungsten available will increase due to the exploritation of new deposits and the extension of existing mines. This tendency will probably be increased by the world-wide prospection. It is hard to make an assessment of the amount of tungsten are obtained in the People's Republic of china, the purchases of Eastern countries in the West, and the sales policy of the USA; pice forecasts are therefore hard to make. A rather interesting subject with regard to the tungsten cycle as a whole is the reprocessing of tungsten-containing wastes. (orig.) [de

  6. Tungsten Oxide Photonic Crystals as Optical Transducer for Gas Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrehn, Sabrina; Wu, Xia; Wagner, Thorsten

    2018-01-26

    Some metal oxide semiconductors, such as tungsten trioxide or tin dioxide, are well-known as resistive transducers for gas sensing and offer high sensitivities down to the part per billion level. Electrical signal read-out, however, limits the information obtained on the electronic properties of metal oxides to a certain frequency range and its application because of the required electrical contacts. Therefore, a novel approach for building an optical transducer for gas reactions utilizing metal oxide photonic crystals is presented here. By the rational design of the structure and composition it is possible to synthesize a functional material which allows one to obtain insight into its electronic properties in the optical frequency range with simple experimental measures. The concept is demonstrated by tungsten trioxide inverse opal structure as optical transducer material for hydrogen sensing. The sensing behavior is analyzed in a temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C and in a wide hydrogen concentration range (3000 ppm to 10%). The sensing mechanism is mainly the refractive index change resulting from hydrogen intercalation in tungsten trioxide, but the back reaction has also impact on the optical properties of this system. Detailed chemical reaction studies provide suggestions for specific sensing conditions.

  7. Closed-cage tungsten oxide clusters in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D M David Jeba; Pradeep, T; Thirumoorthy, Krishnan; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2010-05-06

    During the course of a study on the clustering of W-Se and W-S mixtures in the gas phase using laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry, we observed several anionic W-O clusters. Three distinct species, W(6)O(19)(-), W(13)O(29)(-), and W(14)O(32)(-), stand out as intense peaks in the regular mass spectral pattern of tungsten oxide clusters suggesting unusual stabilities for them. Moreover, these clusters do not fragment in the postsource decay analysis. While trying to understand the precursor material, which produced these clusters, we found the presence of nanoscale forms of tungsten oxide. The structure and thermodynamic parameters of tungsten clusters have been explored using relativistic quantum chemical methods. Our computed results of atomization energy are consistent with the observed LDI mass spectra. The computational results suggest that the clusters observed have closed-cage structure. These distinct W(13) and W(14) clusters were observed for the first time in the gas phase.

  8. Adsorption and gas-chromatographic properties of tungsten selenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilova, T.B.; Kiselev, A.V.; Roshchina, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    Method of gas chromatography was used to investigate the surface properties of a series of tungsten selenide WSe 2 samples as well as to determine the role of geometrical and electronic structure of adsorbate molecules and their orientation with respect to the surface during adsorption on WSe 2 . Thermodynamic characteristics of hydrocarbon C 6 -C 10 adsorption at surface occupation close to the zero one were determined. Correlation of the values of thermodynamic characteristics of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbon adsorption enabled to refer WSe 2 to nonspecific adsorbents. It is noted that the main role during hydrocarbon adsorption on WSe 2 is played by nonpolar basic facets, occupied by selenium atoms

  9. Recent progress on gas tungsten arc welding of vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; King, J.F.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Emphasis has been placed on welding 6.4 mm plate, primarily by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding. The weld properties were tested using blunt notch Charpy testing to determine the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Erratic results were attributed to hydrogen and oxygen contamination of the welds. An improved gas clean-up system was installed on the welding glove box and the resulting high purity welds had Charpy impact properties similar to those of electron beam welds with similar grain size. A post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) of 950{degrees}C for two hours did not improve the properties of the weld in cases where low concentrations of impurities were attained. Further improvements in the gas clean-up system are needed to control hydrogen contamination.

  10. Advances of orbital gas tungsten arc welding for Brazilian space applications – experimental setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Orlowski de Garcia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes details of the several steps of the technology involved for the orbital Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW process of pure commercially titanium tubes. These pieces will be used to connect the several components of the propulsion system of the China-Brazilian Satellite CBERS, and is part of the Brazilian aerospace industry development. The implantation involved the steps of environment control; cut and facing of the base metal; cleaning procedures; piece alignment; choice of the type, geometry and installation of the tungsten electrode; system for the pressure of the purge gas; manual tack welding; choice of the welding parameters; and, finally, the qualification of welding procedures. Three distinct welding programs were studied, using pulsed current with increasing speed, continuous current and pulsed current with decreasing amperage levels. The results showed that the high quality criteria required to the aerospace segment is such that usual welding operations must be carefully designed and executed. The three welding developed programs generated welds free of defects and with adequate morphology, allowing to select the condition that better fits the Brazilian aerospace segment, and to be implanted in the welding of the CBERS Satellite Propulsion System.

  11. Study of mechanoactivation of tungsten-molybdenum containing raw material in gas-jet mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnokov, T.Sh.; Gorobets, L.Zh.; Martynenko, V.P.; Fedorov, Yu.P.; Krakhmaleva, M.T.; Sokolova, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    Investigation is aimed at intensifying autoclave-soda leaching of tungsten-molybdenum-containing raw material. Connection of reactivity and physicochemical properties of crushed tungsten-molybdenum-containing products under different gas-jet crushing parameters is investigated. Optimal technological indices of hydrometallurgical reprocessing of tungsten-molybdenum-containing raw materials and products processed by gas-jet technique are given. The results obtained point out to perspectiveness of applying gas-jet technique of thermomechanical processing for intensifying and increasing the quality of tungsten- and molybdenum-containing raw materials and products of hydrometallurgical production

  12. Active gas adsorption-promoted evaporation of tungsten and niobium in strong electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ksenofontov, V.A.; Kul'ko, V.B.; Mikhajlovskij, I.M.

    1980-01-01

    Field-ion methods and pulsed mass-spectrometeric analysis are used to study field evaporation of tungsten and niobium affected by nitrogen and hydrogen. Active gas-promoted evaporation is found to take place at field intensities high enough for the field ionization of active gases. The evaporating field intensity is established to increase from 1.45x10 8 to 5.5x10 8 V/cm while passing from continuous to pulsed conditions of evaporation, this testifies to the change of the mechanism of the promoted evaporation. Under the effect of active gases, the evaporation rate essentially depends on the surface state. It is shown that in the microcrystals irradiated with 1-3 kV helium ions, the dependence of the evaporation rate of Nb in hydrogen on the field intensity gets monotonous. The obtained results are in fair agreement with the recombination model of a promoted evaporation [ru

  13. Instrumentation Around the ESS 5 MW Spallation Tungsten Target Submitted to 2 GeV Proton Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shea, Thomas; Plewinski, Francois; Nordt, Annika; Sadeghzadeh, Atefeh; Linander, Rikard; Kharoua, Cyril

    2013-06-01

    The 5 MW European Spallation Source, currently in its design phase, includes a linear proton accelerator sending a 2.86 ms long pulse of 2 GeV protons at 14 Hz to a tungsten target. This spallation source distributes thermal and cold neutron beams to a large variety of state-of-the-art neutron instruments, supported by a suite of laboratories and a supercomputing data management and software development center. The target is a rotating wheel 2.5 m in diameter composed of helium cooled tungsten plates and produces high intensity gamma and fast neutron pulses (higher than 2E15 n/cm 2 /s). This paper focuses on the design of 2 types of instrumentation: to monitor target operation and to control the proton beam parameters. Instrumentation mounted on the rotating target (designed for a minimum lifetime of 5 years) to monitor the helium coolant flow and the evolution of irradiated tungsten plates and the target vessel, the target balance, vibrations and displacement is presented as well as a dedicated instrumentation plug installed at opposite the impinging proton beam, which will monitor the target wheel with an LDV and an infra-red camera and perform gamma scanning during and after irradiation. Upstream of the target, a suite of instrumentation will monitor the properties of the 2 GeV proton beam. This suite will consist of imaging devices and multi-wire grids to monitor the beam density distribution at the proton beam window and at the target. An additional imaging system will observe luminescence from the Helium gas between the proton beam window and the target. Beam halo will be monitored by thermocouples located near the edge of the aperture. Further upstream, electromagnetic pickups will measure the beam centroid position, the beam current, and the beam pulse's time of arrival. This time-of-arrival signal will allow precise synchronization of the target's rotation and the beam pulse structure. (authors)

  14. Advanced Gas Tungsten Arc Weld Surfacing Current Status and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Egerland

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gas Shielded Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW – a process well-known providing highest quality weld results joined though by lower performance. Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW is frequently chosen to increase productivity along with broadly accepted quality. Those industry segments, especially required to produce high quality corrosion resistant weld surfacing e.g. applying nickel base filler materials, are regularly in consistent demand to comply with "zero defect" criteria. In this conjunction weld performance limitations are overcome employing advanced 'hot-wire' GTAW systems. This paper, from a Welding Automation perspective, describes the technology of such devices and deals with the current status is this field – namely the application of dual-cathode hot-wire electrode GTAW cladding; considerably broadening achievable limits.

  15. Q-switched all-fiber laser with short pulse duration based on tungsten diselenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyi; OuYang, Yuyi; Ma, Guoli; Liu, Mengli; Liu, Wenjun

    2018-05-01

    Fiber lasers are widely used in industrial processing, sensing, medical and communications applications due to their simple structure, good stability and low cost. With the rapid development of fiber lasers and the sustained improvement of industrial laser quality requirements, researchers in ultrafast optics focus on how to get laser pulses with high output power and narrow pulse duration. Q-switched technology is one of the most effective techniques to generate ultrashort pulses. In this paper, a tungsten diselenide saturable absorber with 16.82% modulation depth is prepared by chemical vapor deposition. Experimental results show that when the pump power changes from 115.7 mW to 630 mW, the all-fiber laser can achieve a stable Q-switched pulse output. The repetition rate of the output pulse varies from 80.32 kHz to 204.2 kHz, the pulse duration is 581 ns, the maximum output power is 17.1 mW and the maximum pulse energy is 83.7 nJ. Results in this paper show that tungsten diselenide can be applied to ultrafast optics, which is a kind of saturable absorption material with excellent properties.

  16. Binary-collision-approximation-based simulation of noble gas irradiation to tungsten materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Seiki; Takayama, Arimichi; Ito, Atsushi M.; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    To reveal the possibility of fuzz formation of tungsten material under noble gas irradiation, helium, neon, and argon atom injections into tungsten materials are performed by binary-collision-approximation-based simulation. The penetration depth is strongly depends on the structure of the target material. Therefore, the penetration depth for amorphous and bcc crystalline structure is carefully investigated in this paper

  17. Surface damage characteristics of CFC and tungsten with repetitive ELM-like pulsed plasma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Y., E-mail: ykikuchi@eng.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, 671-2280 Hyogo (Japan); Nishijima, D. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 (United States); Nakatsuka, M.; Ando, K.; Higashi, T.; Ueno, Y.; Ishihara, M.; Shoda, K.; Nagata, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, 671-2280 Hyogo (Japan); Kawai, T.; Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Fukumoto, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, 671-2280 Hyogo (Japan); Doerner, R.P. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Surface damage of carbon fiber composite (CFC) and tungsten (W) due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed plasma irradiation has been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. CX2002U CFC and stress-relieved W samples were exposed to repetitive pulsed deuterium plasmas with duration of {approx}0.5 ms, incident ion energy of {approx}30 eV, and surface absorbed energy density of {approx}0.3-0.7 MJ/m{sup 2}. Bright spots on a CFC surface during pulsed plasma exposures were clearly observed with a high-speed camera, indicating a local surface heating. No melting of a W surface was observed under a single plasma pulse exposure at energy density of {approx}0.7 MJ/m{sup 2}, although cracks were formed. Cracking of the W surface grew with repetitive pulsed plasma exposures. Subsequently, the surface melted due to localized heat absorption.

  18. The chemistry and structure of nickel–tungsten coatings obtained by pulse galvanostatic electrodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argañaraz, M.P. Quiroga; Ribotta, S.B.; Folquer, M.E.; Zelaya, E.; Llorente, C.; Ramallo-López, J.M.; Benítez, G.; Rubert, A.; Gassa, L.M.; Vela, M.E.; Salvarezza, R.C.

    2012-01-01

    A detailed characterization of electrodeposited Ni-W coatings prepared by pulse electrodeposition on steel and copper substrates is presented. The coatings were obtained at high current pulse frequency and show high microhardness and absence of brittleness. The surface of the coating consists of nanometer sized crystals forming a cauliflower-like structure protected by a mixture of nickel and tungsten oxides. The cauliflower structure is preserved into the bulk coating that exhibits an average composition ≈70 at% Ni-30 at% W. Different phases are observed in the bulk structure: a W-rich amorphous phase (≈40%) and Ni-rich crystalline phases (≈60%). The crystalline phases consist of crystalline domains ≈7 nm in size of Ni(W) (fcc) solid solution (12 at% W content) and a minor Ni 4 W component (less than 10%). The amorphous phase exhibits a less compact Ni-W structure where some amount of C could also be present. Oxidized W species cannot be detected in the bulk coating, thus discarding the presence of significant amounts of tungsten carbide, tungstates or citrate–tungsten complexes. Our results shed light on controversial points related to the chemical composition and demonstrate the complex structure of this system.

  19. Development of high frequency tungsten inert gas welding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morisada, Yoshiaki; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Inagaki, Fuminori; Kamai, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new ultrasonic wave TIG welding method was developed. ► The area of the blowholes decreased to less than about 1/8 in the normal TIG weld. ► The number of blowholes decreased with the decreasing frequency. ► The number of blowholes increased when the frequency was less than 15 kHz. ► The microstructure of the weld was refined by ultrasonic wave. -- Abstract: A new welding method, called high frequency tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, was developed to decrease blowholes in a weld. A1050 aluminum alloy plates (100 mm l × 50 mm w × 5 mm t ) were welded at a frequency from 10 to 40 kHz. An Ar-1% hydrogen mixture was used as the shielding gas to generate blowholes in the experiments. The welding was performed in the horizontal position so that the blowholes can easily be a problem. For comparison, a normal TIG welding was also performed at 60 Hz. After welding, the distribution of the blowholes in the welds was observed in order to evaluate the effect of the sonic wave. The number of blowholes changed with the frequency. A frequency near 15 kHz is the most suitable to decrease the blowholes. Using this new method, the area of blowholes is decreased to less than about 1/8 of the normal TIG weld. This method is much more effective for decreasing the number of blowholes, compared with an ultrasonic wave vibrator which is directly fixed to the sample.

  20. Calculation of cracking under pulsed heat loads in tungsten manufactured according to ITER specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakcheev, A.S.; Skovorodin, D.I.; Burdakov, A.V.; Shoshin, A.A.; Polosatkin, S.V.; Vasilyev, A.A.; Postupaev, V.V.; Vyacheslavov, L.N.; Kasatov, A.A.; Huber, A.; Mertens, Ph; Wirtz, M.; Linsmeier, Ch; Kreter, A.; Löwenhoff, Th; Begrambekov, L.; Grunin, A.; Sadovskiy, Ya

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical model of surface cracking under pulsed heat load was developed. The model correctly describes a smooth brittle–ductile transition. The elastic deformation is described in a thin-heated-layer approximation. The plastic deformation is described with the Hollomon equation. The time dependence of the deformation and stresses is described for one heating–cooling cycle for a material without initial plastic deformation. The model can be applied to tungsten manufactured according to ITER specifications. The model shows that the stability of stress-relieved tungsten deteriorates when the base temperature increases. This proved to be a result of the close ultimate tensile and yield strengths. For a heat load of arbitrary magnitude a stability criterion was obtained in the form of condition on the relation of the ultimate tensile and yield strengths.

  1. Increase in the energy absorption of pulsed plasma by the formation of tungsten nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, D.; Ohno, N.; Domon, F.; Kajita, S.; Kikuchi, Y.; Sakuma, I.

    2017-06-01

    The synergistic effects of steady-state and pulsed plasma irradiation to material have been investigated in the device NAGDIS-PG (NAGoya DIvertor Simulator with Plasma Gun). The duration of the pulsed plasma was ~0.25 ms. To investigate the pulsed plasma heat load on the materials, we developed a temperature measurement system using radiation from the sample in a high time resolution. The heat deposited in response to the transient plasma on a tungsten surface was revealed by using this system. When the nanostructures were formed by helium plasma irradiation, the temperature increase on the bulk sample was enhanced. The result suggested that the amount of absorbed energy on the surface was increased by the formation of nanostructures. The possible mechanisms causing the phenomena are discussed with the calculation of a sample temperature in response to the transient heat load.

  2. Pulse formation of gas-filled counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwatani, Kazuo; Teshima, Kazunori; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hasai, Hiromi

    1991-01-01

    The pulse formation of gas-filled counter has been calculated by simple models for the proportional and self-quenching streamer (SQS) modes. Calculated pulse shapes of counter output have accurately reproduced the observed ones for both modes. As a result, it is shown that the special density distribution of ion pairs in a streamer can be estimated with the rising part of observed pulse shape, using the model. (author)

  3. Fiber-integrated tungsten disulfide saturable absorber (mirror) for pulsed fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Li, Irene Ling; Ruan, Shuangchen; Guo, Tuan; Yan, Peiguang

    2016-08-01

    We propose two schemes for achieving tungsten disulfide (WS2)-based saturable absorber (SA) and saturable absorber mirror (SAM). By utilizing the pulsed laser deposition method, we grow the WS2 film on microfiber to form an evanescent field interaction SA device. Incorporating this SA device into a common ring-cavity erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser, stably passive mode-locking can be achieved with pulse duration of 395 fs and signal-to-noise ratio of 64 dB. We also produce a fiber tip integrated WS2-SAM by utilizing the magnetron sputtering technique (MST). This new type of SAM combines the WS2 layer as SA and gold mirror as high reflective mirror. By employing the WS2-SAM, we construct the linear-cavity EDF lasers, and achieve passive mode-locking operation with pulse duration of ˜1 ns and SNR of ˜61 dB. We further achieve stably passive Q-switching operation with pulse duration of ˜160 ns and pulse energy of 54.4 nJ. These fiber-integrated SAs and SAMs have merits of compactness and reliability, paving the way for the development of new photonic devices such as SAs for pulsed laser technology.

  4. Pulsed gas feed to the ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shigeru; Shibata, Takemasa

    1976-11-01

    Hydrogen gas feed to the ion source of a neutral beam injector for the JFT-2 tokamak has been pulsed by a set of gas reservoir, solenoid valve and variable leak. During the pulse width the flow rate is constant except for its initial overshoot. After detailed study of the temporal behaviour, the solenoid valve and variable leak were replaced with a piezo-electric valve, resulting in improvement of the rise and decay. (auth.)

  5. Construction of Tungsten Halogen, Pulsed LED, and Combined Tungsten Halogen-LED Solar Simulators for Solar Cell I-V Characterization and Electrical Parameters Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anon Namin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available I-V characterization of solar cells is generally done under natural sunlight or solar simulators operating in either a continuous mode or a pulse mode. Simulators are classified on three features of irradiance, namely, spectral match with respect to air mass 1.5, spatial uniformity, and temporal stability. Commercial solar simulators use Xenon lamps and halogen lamps, whereas LED-based solar simulators are being developed. In this work, we build and test seven simulators for solar cell characterization, namely, one tungsten halogen simulator, four monochromatic (red, green, blue, and white LED simulators, one multicolor LED simulator, and one tungsten halogen-blue LED simulator. The seven simulators provide testing at nonstandard test condition. High irradiance from simulators is obtained by employing elevated supply voltage to tungsten halogen lamps and high pulsing voltages to LEDs. This new approach leads to higher irradiance not previously obtained from tungsten halogen lamps and LEDs. From I-V curves, electrical parameters of solar cell are made and corrected based on methods recommended in the IEC 60891 Standards. Corrected values obtained from non-STC measurements are in good agreement with those obtained from Class AAA solar simulator.

  6. Manual gas tungsten arc (dc) and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of 6XXX aluminum. Welding procedure specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-1009 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for manual gas tungsten arc (DC) and semiautomatic gas metal arc (DC) welding of aluminum alloys 6061 and 6063 (P-23), in thickness range 0.187 to 2 in.; filler metal is ER4043 (F-23); shielding gases are helium (GTAW) and argon (GMAW)

  7. FABRICATION OF GAS-FILLED TUNGSTEN-COATED GLASS SHELLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NIKROO, A; BAUGH, W; STEINMAN, D.A.

    2003-09-01

    OAK-B135 Deuterium (D 2 ) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of ∼ 0.15 (micro)m/hr coatings with ∼ 2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 (micro)m/hr, was considerably worse (∼ 100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 C

  8. Reactive pulsed laser deposition with gas jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakowski, R.; Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M.

    2001-01-01

    Different metal (Sn, Al, steel, Cu, W) thin films were synthesized by reactive pulsed laser deposition on steel, copper and glass wafers. In our work pulsed Nd:glass (10 J, 800μs) laser system was used. Jet of gas was created by electromagnetic valve perpendicularly to the laser beam. Nitrogen, oxygen and argon were used. We used several to tens laser shots to obtain visible with the naked eye layers. Thin layers were observed under an optical microscope. (author)

  9. First principles study of inert-gas (helium, neon, and argon) interactions with hydrogen in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Xiang-Shan [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Hou, Jie [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Li, Xiang-Yan [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Xuebang, E-mail: xbwu@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, C.S., E-mail: csliu@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2017-04-15

    We have systematically evaluated binding energies of hydrogen with inert-gas (helium, neon, and argon) defects, including interstitial clusters and vacancy-inert-gas complexes, and their stable configurations using first-principles calculations. Our calculations show that these inert-gas defects have large positive binding energies with hydrogen, 0.4–1.1 eV, 0.7–1.0 eV, and 0.6–0.8 eV for helium, neon, and argon, respectively. This indicates that these inert-gas defects can act as traps for hydrogen in tungsten, and impede or interrupt the diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten, which supports the discussion on the influence of inert-gas on hydrogen retention in recent experimental literature. The interaction between these inert-gas defects and hydrogen can be understood by the attractive interaction due to the distortion of the lattice structure induced by inert-gas defects, the intrinsic repulsive interaction between inert-gas atoms and hydrogen, and the hydrogen-hydrogen repelling in tungsten lattice.

  10. Effect of Annealing on Tungsten Oxide Thin Films for Acetone Gas ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    11

    Abstract: The gas sensing properties and topology of tungsten oxide thin films ..... Figure 3: Atomic force microscopy images of sensing film for (a) as-deposited (a) .... the surface, it forms compounds with the oxygen ions species present on the ...

  11. Effect of noble gas ion pre-irradiation on deuterium retention in tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.; Zhao, Z. H.; De Temmerman, G.; Yuan, Y.; Morgan, T. W.; Guo, L. P.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, B. Y.; Zhang, P.; Cao, X. Z.; Lu, G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Impurity seeding of noble gases is an effective way of decreasing the heat loads onto the divertor targets in fusion devices. To investigate the effect of noble gases on deuterium retention, tungsten targets have been implanted by different noble gas ions and subsequently exposed to deuterium

  12. Evaluation of surface, microstructure and phase modifications on various tungsten grades induced by pulsed plasma loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vilémová, Monika; Pala, Zdeněk; Jäger, Aleš; Matějíček, Jiří; Chernyshova, M.; Kowalska-Strzęciwilk, E.; Tonarová, Dana; Gribkov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 3 (2016), č. článku 034003. ISSN 0031-8949. [PLASMA 2015 : International Conference on Research and Applications of Plasmas. Warsaw, 07.09.2015-11.09.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12837S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : tungsten * titanium carbide * yttrium oxide * plasma focus * damage Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: 1.3 Physical sciences; 1.3 Physical sciences (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.280, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0031-8949/91/3/034003/meta

  13. Fuel hydrogen retention of tungsten and the reduction by inert gas glow discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, T., E-mail: tomhino@qe.eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Plasma Physics and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Yamauchi, Y.; Kimura, Y. [Laboratory of Plasma Physics and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Nishimura, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu-ken 509-5292 (Japan); Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita-shi 565-0872 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The performances of inert gas glow discharges for reduction of fuel hydrogen retention in tungsten were systematically investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the tungsten with rough surface structure, the reduction of fuel hydrogen retention by inert gas discharges is quite small. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The deuterium glow discharge is quite useful to reduce the tritium retention in plasma facing walls in fusion reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The wall baking with temperature higher than 700-800 K is also useful to reduce the tritium retention in plasma facing walls. - Abstract: Polycrystalline tungsten was exposed to deuterium glow discharge followed by He, Ne or Ar glow discharge. The amount of retained deuterium in the tungsten was measured using residual gas analysis. The amount of desorbed deuterium during the inert gas glow discharge was also measured. The amount of retained deuterium was 2-3 times larger compared with a case of stainless steel. The ratios of desorbed amount of deuterium by He, Ne and Ar glow discharges were 4.6, 3.1 and 2.9%, respectively. These values were one order of magnitude smaller compared with the case of stainless steel. The inert gas glow discharge is not suitable to reduce the fuel hydrogen retention for tungsten walls. However, the wall baking with a temperature higher than 700 K is suitable to reduce the fuel hydrogen retention. It is also shown that the use of deuterium glow discharge is effective to reduce the in-vessel tritium inventory in fusion reactors through the hydrogen isotope exchange.

  14. Selective ablation of a titanium nitride film on tungsten carbide substrate using ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Eduardo Spinelli

    2017-01-01

    Surface coatings are applied to many cutting tools in the metallurgical industry in order to improve cutting efficiency and extend its useful life. In this work, tests were performed to remove the coating of titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) pellets, using an ultrashort laser pulses beam. After determination of the damage thresholds of the film and the substrate, were ablated on the surface of the coating lines using two ablation conditions, it was initially operated on the low fluence regime for the film, and later on the low fluence regime of the substrate, far below the threshold of the film, applying high overlapping pulses. A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was set up to monitor the materials present in the plasma generated by the laser, but the system did not present sufficient sensitivity to read the low intensity of the plasma generated in the process and was not used. After the analysis of the traces by electron microscopy, optical profilometer and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, it was not possible to determine a safe process to carry out the selective removal of the film in question, however, due to the data obtained and observations of the results in some traces, new possibilities were raised, opening the discussion for future work. (author)

  15. The erosion and erosion products of tungsten and carbon based materials bombarded by high energy pulse electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiang; Zhang Fu; Xu Zengyu; Liu Yong; Yoshida, N.; Noda, N.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the erosion behaviors and erosion products of tungsten and some carbon based materials, such as graphite, C/C composite and B 4 C/Cu functionally graded material, were investigated by using a pulse electron beam to simulate the vertical displacement events (VDE) process. The authors will focus on the forms and differences of erosion products among these testing materials, and make clear to their erosion mechanisms

  16. Fabrication of Miniature Titanium Capsule for Brachytherapy Sources Using Tungsten Inert Gas Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naghdi, R.; Sheibani, Sh.; Tamizifar, M.

    2013-01-01

    The capsules containing radioactive materials as brachytherapy sources are used for implanting into some target organs for malignant disorders treatments, such as prostate, eyes, and brain cancers. The conventional method for sealing the tubes is to weld them using a laser beam which is now a part of tube melting methods (self welding). The purpose of this study was to seal miniature titanium tubes containing radioactive materials in the form of capsules. This study introduced a new method based on melting process. A piece of commercially pure titanium grade 2 in the form of disk was used for the experiment. The sample was melted at the top of the tube by a Tungsten Inert Gas welding device for a short time duration. After completion of the melting, the disk in the form of a drop was mixed with a small part of it and both were solidified and hence closed the tube. We evaluated the tubes for the metallurgical properties and seal process which took place by Tungsten Inert Gas in different zones, including the heat affected zone, fusion zone, and interface of the joint of the drop to the tube. Finally, the produced samples were tested according to the ISO2919 and ISO9978 and the results confirmed the Disk and Tungsten Inert Gas procedure.

  17. Pulsed Laser-Induced Effects in the Material Properties of Tungsten Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, R [Centro de Investigacion CientIfica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, BC, 22860 (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, S [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, BC, 22860 (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, M A [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Colon y Tollocan, Toluca Edo. de Mexico, 50110 (Mexico); Sanchez-Perez, C [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 70-186, Mexico DF 04510 (Mexico); Esparza-GarcIa, A [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 70-186, Mexico DF 04510 (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    In this work we present evidence of photo-induced effects on crystalline Tungsten (W) films. A frequency doubled Nd:YAG (5ns) laser was used in our experiments. The W thin films were deposited on silicon substrates by the DC-sputtering technique using W (Lesker, 99.95% purity) targets in an argon atmosphere. The crystalline phase of the deposited W films was determined by X-ray diffraction. Our experimental results show clear evidence that several events take place as a consequence of exposure of the W films to the laser nanosecond pulses. One of those events has a chemical effect that results in a significant degree of oxidation of the film; a second event affects the structural nature of the initial W material, resulting into a material phase change; and a third event changes the initially homogeneous morphology of the film into an unexpected porous material film. As it has been confirmed by the experiments, all of these effects are laser fluence dependent. A full post exposure analysis of the W thin films included Energy Dispersive Spectrometry to determine the degree of oxidation of the W film; a micro-Raman system was used to explore and to study the transition of the crystalline W to the amorphous-crystalline WO{sub 3} phase; further analysis with Scanning Electron Microscopy showed a definite laser-induced porosity which changes the initial homogeneous film into a highly porous film with small features in the range from 100 to 300 nm.

  18. Nanosecond laser pulses for mimicking thermal effects on nanostructured tungsten-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besozzi, E.; Maffini, A.; Dellasega, D.; Russo, V.; Facibeni, A.; Pazzaglia, A.; Beghi, M. G.; Passoni, M.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we exploit nanosecond laser irradiation as a compact solution for investigating the thermomechanical behavior of tungsten materials under extreme thermal loads at the laboratory scale. Heat flux factor thresholds for various thermal effects, such as melting, cracking and recrystallization, are determined under both single and multishot experiments. The use of nanosecond lasers for mimicking thermal effects induced on W by fusion-relevant thermal loads is thus validated by direct comparison of the thresholds obtained in this work and the ones reported in the literature for electron beams and millisecond laser irradiation. Numerical simulations of temperature and thermal stress performed on a 2D thermomechanical code are used to predict the heat flux factor thresholds of the different thermal effects. We also investigate the thermal effect thresholds of various nanostructured W coatings. These coatings are produced by pulsed laser deposition, mimicking W coatings in tokamaks and W redeposited layers. All the coatings show lower damage thresholds with respect to bulk W. In general, thresholds decrease as the porosity degree of the materials increases. We thus propose a model to predict these thresholds for coatings with various morphologies, simply based on their porosity degree, which can be directly estimated by measuring the variation of the coating mass density with respect to that of the bulk.

  19. High pulse number thermal shock tests on tungsten with steady state particle background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, M.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Loewenhoff, Th; Pintsuk, G.; Sergienko, G.; Steudel, I.; Unterberg, B.; Wessel, E.

    2017-12-01

    Thermal fatigue of metallic materials, which will be exposed to severe environmental conditions e.g. plasma facing materials in future fusion reactors, is an important issue in order to predict the life time of complete wall components. Therefore experiments in the linear plasma device PSI-2 were performed to investigate the synergistic effects of high pulse number thermal shock events (L = 0.38 GW m-2, Δt = 0.5 ms) and stationary D/He (6%) plasma particle background on the thermal fatigue behavior of tungsten. Similar to experiments with pure thermal loads, the induced microstructural and surface modifications such as recrystallization and roughening as well as crack formation become more pronounced with increasing number of thermal shock events. However, the amount of damage significantly increases for synergistic loads showing severe surface roughening, plastic deformation and erosion resulting from the degradation of the mechanical properties caused by bombardment and diffusion of D/He to the surface and the bulk of the material. Additionally, D/He induced blistering and bubble formation were observed for all tested samples, which could change the thermal and mechanical properties of near surface regions.

  20. Pulsed Laser-Induced Effects in the Material Properties of Tungsten Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R; Camacho-Lopez, S; Camacho-Lopez, M A; Sanchez-Perez, C; Esparza-GarcIa, A

    2007-01-01

    In this work we present evidence of photo-induced effects on crystalline Tungsten (W) films. A frequency doubled Nd:YAG (5ns) laser was used in our experiments. The W thin films were deposited on silicon substrates by the DC-sputtering technique using W (Lesker, 99.95% purity) targets in an argon atmosphere. The crystalline phase of the deposited W films was determined by X-ray diffraction. Our experimental results show clear evidence that several events take place as a consequence of exposure of the W films to the laser nanosecond pulses. One of those events has a chemical effect that results in a significant degree of oxidation of the film; a second event affects the structural nature of the initial W material, resulting into a material phase change; and a third event changes the initially homogeneous morphology of the film into an unexpected porous material film. As it has been confirmed by the experiments, all of these effects are laser fluence dependent. A full post exposure analysis of the W thin films included Energy Dispersive Spectrometry to determine the degree of oxidation of the W film; a micro-Raman system was used to explore and to study the transition of the crystalline W to the amorphous-crystalline WO 3 phase; further analysis with Scanning Electron Microscopy showed a definite laser-induced porosity which changes the initial homogeneous film into a highly porous film with small features in the range from 100 to 300 nm

  1. PC-based arc ignition and arc length control system for gas tungsten arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Cook, G.E.; Barnett, R.J.; Springfield, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, a PC-based digital control system for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is presented. This system controls the arc ignition process, the arc length, and the process of welding termination. A DT2818 made by Data Translation is used for interface and A/D and D/A conversions. The digital I/O ports of the DT2818 are used for control of wirefeed, shield gas, cooling water, welding power supply, etc. The DT2818 is housed in a PC. The welding signals and status are displayed on the screen for in-process monitoring. A user can control the welding process by the keyboard

  2. Efficiency Enhancement in DC Pulsed Gas Discharge Memory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yukio

    1983-01-01

    Much improvement in the luminous efficiency of a dc pulsed gas discharge memory panel for color TV display was achieved by shortening the sustaining pulse duration. High energy electrons can thus be produced in the pulsed discharge with fast rise times. Calculated optimum value of E/P in a Xe gas discharge is 7-8 V/cm\\cdotTorr.

  3. Deuterium gas-driven permeation and subsequent retention in rolled tungsten foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Feng; Zhou, Haishan; Li, Xiao-Chun; Xu, Yuping; An, Zhongqing; Mao, Hongmin; Xing, Wenjing; Hou, Qing; Luo, Guang-Nan

    2014-01-01

    Experiments concerning deuterium gas-driven permeation through rolled tungsten foils in the temperature range of 850–950 K and subsequent deuterium retention have been performed. The steady state permeation flux of deuterium is proportional to the square root of the driving pressure. The permeability of deuterium is in an order of 10 −14 mol m −1 s −1 Pa −1/2 in this temperature range and the activation energy for permeation is 1.21 eV. Measurements of diffusivity are significantly affected by the driving pressure, which can be well explained by a saturable-trap model. Thermal desorption spectra of samples feature a single deuterium release peak at about 873 K. TMAP 4 modeling of this peak gives a detrapping energy of 1.70 eV, which fits the dissociation enthalpy of deuterium desorbing from the inner wall of vacancy clusters or pores in tungsten

  4. Deuterium gas-driven permeation and subsequent retention in rolled tungsten foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Zhou, Haishan; Li, Xiao-Chun; Xu, Yuping; An, Zhongqing; Mao, Hongmin; Xing, Wenjing; Hou, Qing; Luo, Guang-Nan

    2014-12-01

    Experiments concerning deuterium gas-driven permeation through rolled tungsten foils in the temperature range of 850-950 K and subsequent deuterium retention have been performed. The steady state permeation flux of deuterium is proportional to the square root of the driving pressure. The permeability of deuterium is in an order of 10-14 mol m-1 s-1 Pa-1/2 in this temperature range and the activation energy for permeation is 1.21 eV. Measurements of diffusivity are significantly affected by the driving pressure, which can be well explained by a saturable-trap model. Thermal desorption spectra of samples feature a single deuterium release peak at about 873 K. TMAP 4 modeling of this peak gives a detrapping energy of 1.70 eV, which fits the dissociation enthalpy of deuterium desorbing from the inner wall of vacancy clusters or pores in tungsten.

  5. Recent progress on gas tungsten arc welding of vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This is a progress report on a continuing research project to acquire a fundamental understanding of the metallurgical processes in the welding of vanadium alloys. It also has the goal of developing techniques for welding structural vanadium alloys. The alloy V-4Cr-4Ti is used as a representative alloy of the group; it is also the prime candidate vanadium alloy for the U.S. Fusion Program at the present time. However, other alloys of this class were used in the research as necessary. The present work focuses on recent findings of hydrogen embrittlement found in vanadium alloy welds. It was concluded that the atmosphere in the inert gas glove box was insufficient for welding 6mm thick vanadium alloy plates.

  6. The catalytic role of tungsten electrode material in the plasmachemical activity of a pulsed corona discharge in water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukeš, Petr; Člupek, Martin; Babický, Václav; Sisrová, I.; Janda, V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2011), 034011-034011 ISSN 0963-0252 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00430802; GA ČR(CZ) GD104/09/H080 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : corona discharge * water * erosion * tungsten * hydrogen peroxide * dimethylsulfoxide Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.521, year: 2011 http://www.ipp.cas.cz/Ips/public/lukes_2011a.pdf

  7. Gas sensing of ruthenium implanted tungsten oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesfamichael, T., E-mail: t.tesfamichael@qut.edu.au [Institute for Future Environments, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Ahsan, M. [William A. Cook Australia, 95 Brandl Street Eight Mile Plains, Brisbane, QLD 4113 (Australia); Notarianni, M. [Institute for Future Environments, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Groß, A.; Hagen, G.; Moos, R. [University of Bayreuth, Faculty of Engineering Science, Department of Functional Materials, Universitätsstr. 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Ionescu, M. [ANSTO, Institute for Environmental Research, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Bell, J. [Institute for Future Environments, School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia)

    2014-05-02

    to NO{sub 2} gas. • Implanted films of sufficient porosity and thickness are beneficial in gas sensors.

  8. Microstructural Characterization of a Polycrystalline Nickel-Based Superalloy Processed via Tungsten-Intert-Gas-Shaped Metal Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel; Bache, Martin R.; Whittaker, Mark T.

    2010-12-01

    Recent trials have produced tungsten-inert-gas (TIG)-welded structures of a suitable scale to allow an evaluation of the technique as an economic and commercial process for the manufacture of complex aeroengine components. The employment of TIG welding is shown to have specific advantages over alternative techniques based on metal inert gas (MIG) systems. Investigations using the nickel-based superalloy 718 have shown that TIG induces a smaller weld pool with less compositional segregation. In addition, because the TIG process involves a pulsed power source, a faster cooling rate is achieved, although this rate, in turn, compromises the deposition rate. The microstructures produced by the two techniques differ significantly, with TIG showing an absence of the detrimental delta and Laves phases typically produced by extended periods at a high temperature using MIG. Instead, an anisotropic dendritic microstructure was evident with a preferred orientation relative to the axis of epitaxy. Niobium was segregated to the interdendritic regions. A fine-scale porosity was evident within the microstructure with a maximum diameter of approximately 5 μm. This porosity often was found in clusters and usually was associated with the interdendritic regions. Subsequent postdeposition heat treatment was shown to have no effect on preexisting porosity and to have a minimal effect on the microstructure.

  9. Progress report on a fully automatic Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) system development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daumeyer, G.J. III

    1994-12-01

    A plan to develop a fully automatic gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) system that will utilize a vision-sensing computer (which will provide in-process feedback control) is presently in work. Evaluations of different technological aspects and system design requirements continue. This report summaries major activities in the plan`s successful progress. The technological feasibility of producing the fully automated GTAW system has been proven. The goal of this process development project is to provide a production-ready system within the shortest reasonable time frame.

  10. High-speed cinematography of gas-tungsten arc welding: theory and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, L.D.; Key, J.F.

    1981-06-01

    High-speed photo-instrumentation theory and application are reviewed, with particular emphasis on high-speed cinematography, for the engineer who has not acquired an extensive background in scientific photography. Camera systems, optics, timing system, lighting, photometric equipment, filters, and camera mounts are covered. Manufacturers and other resource material are listed in the Appendices. The properties and processing of photosensitive materials suitable for high-speed photography are reviewed, and selected film data are presented. Methods are described for both qualitative and quantitative film analysis. This technology is applied to the problem of analyzing plasma dynamics in a gas-tungsten welding arc.

  11. Particle fuelling for long pulse with standard gas puff and supersonic pulsed gas injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucalossi, J.; Tsitrone, E.; Martin, G.

    2003-01-01

    In addition to the standard gas puff and to the technically complex pellet injection, a novel intermediate method, based on the injection of a supersonic high density cloud of neutrals, has been recently implemented on the Tore Supra tokamak. Fuelling efficiency, in the 30-50% range are found while it lies in the 10-20% range for the gas puff. It is not sensitive to the plasma density and to the additional heating. According to modelling, the increased efficiency is attributed to the very short injection duration compared to the particle confinement time and to the strong cooling of the plasma edge resulting from the massive injection of matter. A feedback loop on the frequency of the injector has been successfully implemented to control the plasma density. In long pulse experiments (>200s), wall saturation has not been reached. Gas puffing rate was typically around 1 Pa.m 3 s -1 while dynamic wall retention around 0.6 Pa.m 3 s -1 . Co-deposited carbon layer could trap such large amounts of gas. A discharge fuelled by supersonic pulsed gas injections exhibits lower wall retention than a gas puff fuelled discharge. (author)

  12. Electron temperature and density measurement of tungsten inert gas arcs with Ar-He shielding gas mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn-Kauffeldt, M.; Marques, J.-L.; Forster, G.; Schein, J.

    2013-10-01

    The diagnostics of atmospheric welding plasma is a well-established technology. In most cases the measurements are limited to processes using pure shielding gas. However in many applications shielding gas is a mixture of various components including metal vapor in gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Shielding gas mixtures are intentionally used for tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding in order to improve the welding performance. For example adding Helium to Argon shielding gas allows the weld geometry and porosity to be influenced. Yet thermal plasmas produced with gas mixtures or metal vapor still require further experimental investigation. In this work coherent Thomson scattering is used to measure electron temperature and density in these plasmas, since this technique allows independent measurements of electron and ion temperature. Here thermal plasmas generated by a TIG process with 50% Argon and 50% Helium shielding gas mixture have been investigated. Electron temperature and density measured by coherent Thomson scattering have been compared to the results of spectroscopic measurements of the plasma density using Stark broadening of the 696.5 nm Argon spectral line. Further investigations of MIG processes using Thomson scattering technique are planned.

  13. Electron temperature and density measurement of tungsten inert gas arcs with Ar-He shielding gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kühn-Kauffeldt, M; Marques, J-L; Forster, G; Schein, J

    2013-01-01

    The diagnostics of atmospheric welding plasma is a well-established technology. In most cases the measurements are limited to processes using pure shielding gas. However in many applications shielding gas is a mixture of various components including metal vapor in gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Shielding gas mixtures are intentionally used for tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding in order to improve the welding performance. For example adding Helium to Argon shielding gas allows the weld geometry and porosity to be influenced. Yet thermal plasmas produced with gas mixtures or metal vapor still require further experimental investigation. In this work coherent Thomson scattering is used to measure electron temperature and density in these plasmas, since this technique allows independent measurements of electron and ion temperature. Here thermal plasmas generated by a TIG process with 50% Argon and 50% Helium shielding gas mixture have been investigated. Electron temperature and density measured by coherent Thomson scattering have been compared to the results of spectroscopic measurements of the plasma density using Stark broadening of the 696.5 nm Argon spectral line. Further investigations of MIG processes using Thomson scattering technique are planned

  14. A description of bubble growth and gas release of helium implanted tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharafat, S.; Hu, Q.; Ghoniem, N.; Tkahashi, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Bubble growth and gas release during annealing of helium implanted tungsten is described using a Kinetic Monte Carlo approach. The implanted spatial profiles of stable bubble nuclei are first determined using the Kinetic Rate Theory based helium evolution code, HEROS. The effects of implantation energy, temperature, and bias forces, such as temperature- and stress gradients on bubble migration and coalescence are investigated to explain experimental gas release measurements. This comprehensive helium bubble evolution and release model, demonstrates the impact of near surface (< 1 um) versus deep helium implantation on bubble evolution. Near surface implanted helium bubbles readily attain large equilibrium sizes, while matrix bubbles remain small with high helium pressures. Using the computer simulation, the various stages of helium bubble nucleation, growth, coalescence, and migration are demonstrated and compared with available experimental results. (authors)

  15. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-3, Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Submerged Arc Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, John

    This third in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection presents the apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspection for the tungsten inert gas, metal inert gas, and submerged arc welding processes. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  16. Crystalline mesoporous tungsten oxide nanoplate monoliths synthesized by directed soft template method for highly sensitive NO2 gas sensor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoa, Nguyen Duc; Duy, Nguyen Van; Hieu, Nguyen Van

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Mesoporous WO 3 nanoplate monoliths were obtained by direct templating synthesis. ► Enable effective accession of the analytic molecules for the sensor applications. ► The WO 3 sensor exhibited a high performance to NO 2 gas at low temperature. -- Abstract: Controllable synthesis of nanostructured metal oxide semiconductors with nanocrystalline size, porous structure, and large specific surface area is one of the key issues for effective gas sensor applications. In this study, crystalline mesoporous tungsten oxide nanoplate-like monoliths with high specific surface areas were obtained through instant direct-templating synthesis for highly sensitive nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) sensor applications. The copolymer soft template was converted into a solid carbon framework by heat treatment in an inert gas prior to calcinations in air to sustain the mesoporous structure of tungsten oxide. The multidirectional mesoporous structures of tungsten oxide with small crystalline size, large specific surface area, and superior physical characteristics enabled the rapid and effective accession of analytic gas molecules. As a result, the sensor response was enhanced and the response and recovery times were reduced, in which the mesoporous tungsten oxide based gas sensor exhibited a superior response of 21,155% to 5 ppm NO 2 . In addition, the developed sensor exhibited selective detection of low NO 2 concentration in ammonia and ethanol at a low temperature of approximately 150 °C.

  17. Effect of pulse current parameters on microstructure of tungsten coating electroplated from Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}–WO{sub 3}–NaPO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Fan; Zhang, Yingchun, E-mail: zycustb@163.com; Sun, Ningbo; Len, Jiaxun

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Tungsten coatings were electroplated on cooper alloy by pulse plating. • Increasing current density resulted in an increase in grain size of tungsten coating. • With the increase in duty cycle, the grain size of tungsten coating increased. • The pulse period had an insignificant effect on the tungsten grain size. - Abstract: The tungsten coatings with low oxygen content were prepared on copper alloy substrate by pulse electroplating in Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}–WO{sub 3}–NaPO{sub 3} molten salt. A series of tungsten coatings with compact morphologies were successfully obtained under various conditions. The influences of current density, duty cycle and period on tungsten grain size and coatings thickness were investigated. The results demonstrated that current density was the most important factor influencing tungsten grain size, which had a positive correlation with current density. The thickness of coating decreased when the current density was up to 80 mA cm{sup −2}. However, the tungsten grain size, tungsten coating thickness and current efficiency changed a little with the increase in pulse periods.

  18. Deuterium gas-driven permeation and subsequent retention in rolled tungsten foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Feng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhou, Haishan [Department of Fusion Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Li, Xiao-Chun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Xu, Yuping; An, Zhongqing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Mao, Hongmin; Xing, Wenjing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Hou, Qing [Key Laboratory for Radiation Physics and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610061 (China); Luo, Guang-Nan, E-mail: gnluo@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Experiments concerning deuterium gas-driven permeation through rolled tungsten foils in the temperature range of 850–950 K and subsequent deuterium retention have been performed. The steady state permeation flux of deuterium is proportional to the square root of the driving pressure. The permeability of deuterium is in an order of 10{sup −14} mol m{sup −1} s{sup −1} Pa{sup −1/2} in this temperature range and the activation energy for permeation is 1.21 eV. Measurements of diffusivity are significantly affected by the driving pressure, which can be well explained by a saturable-trap model. Thermal desorption spectra of samples feature a single deuterium release peak at about 873 K. TMAP 4 modeling of this peak gives a detrapping energy of 1.70 eV, which fits the dissociation enthalpy of deuterium desorbing from the inner wall of vacancy clusters or pores in tungsten.

  19. Surface modifications on toughened, fine-grained, recrystallized tungsten with repetitive ELM-like pulsed plasma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Y., E-mail: ykikuchi@eng.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, 671-2280 Hyogo (Japan); Sakuma, I.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, 671-2280 Hyogo (Japan); Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kurishita, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Surface modifications of toughened, fine-grained, recrystallized tungsten (TFGR W) materials with 1.1 wt.% TiC and 3.3 wt.% TaC dispersoids due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed (∼0.15 ms) helium plasma irradiation have been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. No surface cracking at the center part of the TFGR W samples exposed to 20 plasma pulses of ∼0.3 MJ m{sup −2} was observed. The suppression of surface crack formation due to the increase of the grain boundary strength by addition of TiC and TaC dispersoids was confirmed in comparison with a pure W material. On the other hand, surface cracks and small pits appeared at the edge part of the TFGR W sample after the pulsed plasma irradiation. Erosion of the TiC and TaC dispersoids due to the pulsed plasma irradiation could cause the small pits on the surface, resulting in the surface crack formation.

  20. Surface modifications on toughened, fine-grained, recrystallized tungsten with repetitive ELM-like pulsed plasma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.; Ueda, Y.; Kurishita, H.

    2015-08-01

    Surface modifications of toughened, fine-grained, recrystallized tungsten (TFGR W) materials with 1.1 wt.% TiC and 3.3 wt.% TaC dispersoids due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed (∼0.15 ms) helium plasma irradiation have been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. No surface cracking at the center part of the TFGR W samples exposed to 20 plasma pulses of ∼0.3 MJ m-2 was observed. The suppression of surface crack formation due to the increase of the grain boundary strength by addition of TiC and TaC dispersoids was confirmed in comparison with a pure W material. On the other hand, surface cracks and small pits appeared at the edge part of the TFGR W sample after the pulsed plasma irradiation. Erosion of the TiC and TaC dispersoids due to the pulsed plasma irradiation could cause the small pits on the surface, resulting in the surface crack formation.

  1. Tungsten sulfide nanoflakes. Synthesis by electrospinning and their gas sensing properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ke; Qin, Xiang; Deng, Da-Shen; Feng, Xu; Zhang, Chao [Chongqing Univ. of Technology, Chongqing (China). Dept. of Physics and Energy; Feng, Wen-Lin [Chongqing Univ. of Technology, Chongqing (China). Dept. of Physics and Energy; Chongqing Key Laboratory of Modern Photoelectric Detection Technology and Instrument, Chongqing (China).

    2017-07-01

    Tungsten sulfide (WS{sub 2}) nanoflakes were successfully prepared via electrospinning with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as organic solvent. In addition, Ag-deposited WS{sub 2} (Ag-WS{sub 2}) was obtained by chemical blending/calcination method. The structure and morphology of as-prepared materials were characterised by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The XRD result shows that the prepared WS{sub 2} has a graphene-like structure with P{sub 63/mmc} space group symmetry. The SEM illuminates that the sensing samples have nanoflake appearance. Furthermore, heater-type gas sensors were fabricated based on WS{sub 2} and Ag-WS{sub 2} nanomaterials. The sensing responses of WS{sub 2} and Ag-WS{sub 2} on the ammonia (NH{sub 3}), ethanol (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH), and acetone (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O) were investigated at about 220 C. The results indicate that gas sensor based on WS{sub 2} and Ag-WS{sub 2} nanoflakes has 60 ppm sensing threshold value for ammonia. One possible gas sensing mechanism of WS{sub 2} and Ag-WS{sub 2} gas sensors is surface control via charge transfer.

  2. Active flux tungsten inert gas welding of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Klobčar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the effects of flux assisted tungsten inert gas (A-TIG welding of 4 (10 mm thick austenitic stainless steel EN X5CrNi1810 (AISI 304 in the butt joint. The sample dimensions were 300 ´ 50 mm, and commercially available active flux QuickTIG was used for testing. In the planned study the influence of welding position and weld groove shape was analysed based on the penetration depth. A comparison of microstructure formation, grain size and ferrit number between TIG welding and A-TIG welding was done. The A-TIG welds were subjected to bending test. A comparative study of TIG and A-TIG welding shows that A-TIG welding increases the weld penetration depth.

  3. Operator Bias in the Estimation of Arc Efficiency in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Sikström

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the operator bias in the measurement process of arc efficiency in stationary direct current electrode negative gas tungsten arc welding is discussed. An experimental study involving 15 operators (enough to reach statistical significance has been carried out with the purpose to estimate the arc efficiency from a specific procedure for calorimetric experiments. The measurement procedure consists of three manual operations which introduces operator bias in the measurement process. An additional relevant experiment highlights the consequences of estimating the arc voltage by measuring the potential between the terminals of the welding power source instead of measuring the potential between the electrode contact tube and the workpiece. The result of the study is a statistical evaluation of the operator bias influence on the estimate, showing that operator bias is negligible in the estimate considered here. On the contrary the consequences of neglecting welding leads voltage drop results in a significant under estimation of the arc efficiency.

  4. Mechanism and Microstructure of Oxide Fluxes for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L. M.; Zhang, Z. D.; Song, G.; Wang, L.

    2007-03-01

    Five single oxide fluxes—MgO, CaO, TiO2, MnO2, and Cr2O3—were used to investigate the effect of active flux on the depth/width ratio in AZ31B magnesium alloy. The microstructure and mechanical property of the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding seam were studied. The oxygen content in the weld seam and the arc images during the TIG welding process were analyzed. A series of emission spectroscopy of weld arc for TIG welding for magnesium with and without flux were developed. The results showed that for the five single oxide fluxes, all can increase the weld penetration effectively and grain size in the weld seam of alternating current tungsten inert gas (ACTIG) welding of the Mg alloy. The oxygen content of the welds made without flux is not very different from those produced with oxide fluxes not considering trapped oxide. However, welds that have the best penetration have a relatively higher oxygen content among those produced with flux. It was found that the arc images with the oxide fluxes were only the enlarged form of the arc images without flux; the arc constriction was not observed. The detection of arc spectroscopy showed that the metal elements in the oxides exist as the neutral atom or the first cation in the weld arc. This finding would influence the arc properties. When TIG simulation was carried out on a plate with flux applied only on one side, the arc image video showed an asymmetric arc, which deviated toward the flux free side. The thermal stability, the dissociation energy, and the electrical conductivity of oxide should be considered when studying the mechanism for increased TIG flux weld penetration.

  5. Conversion of continuous-direct-current TIG welder to pulse-arc operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, D. R.

    1969-01-01

    Electronics package converts a continuous-dc tungsten-inert gas welder for pulse-arc operation. Package allows presetting of the pulse rate, duty cycle, and current value, and enables welding of various alloys and thicknesses of materials.

  6. Effects of oxygen addition in reactive cluster beam deposition of tungsten by magnetron sputtering with gas aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polášek, J.; Mašek, K.; Marek, A.; Vyskočil, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the possibilities of tungsten and tungsten oxide nanoclusters generation by means of non-reactive and reactive magnetron sputtering with gas aggregation. It was found that in pure argon atmosphere, cluster aggregation proceeded in two regimes depending on argon pressure in the aggregation chamber. At the lower pressure, cluster generation was dominated by two-body collisions yielding larger clusters (about 5.5 nm in diameter) at lower rate. At higher pressures, cluster generation was dominated by three-body collisions yielding smaller clusters (3–4 nm in diameter) at higher rate. The small amount of oxygen admixture in the aggregation chamber had considerable influence on cluster aggregation process. At certain critical pressure, the presence of oxygen led to the raise of deposition rate and cluster size. Resulting clusters were composed mostly of tungsten trioxide. The oxygen pressure higher than critical led to the target poisoning and the decrease in the sputtering rate. Critical oxygen pressure decreased with increasing argon pressure, suggesting that cluster aggregation process was influenced by atomic oxygen species (namely, O"− ion) generated by oxygen–argon collisions in the magnetron plasma. - Highlights: • Formation of tungsten and tungsten oxide clusters was observed. • Two modes of cluster aggregation in pure argon atmosphere were found. • Dependence of cluster deposition speed and size on oxygen admixture was observed. • Changes of dependence on oxygen with changing argon pressure were described.

  7. Effects of oxygen addition in reactive cluster beam deposition of tungsten by magnetron sputtering with gas aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polášek, J., E-mail: xpolasekj@seznam.cz [Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physic, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, Prague 8, CZ-18000 (Czech Republic); Mašek, K. [Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physic, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, Prague 8, CZ-18000 (Czech Republic); Marek, A.; Vyskočil, J. [HVM Plasma Ltd., Na Hutmance 2, Prague 5, CZ-158 00 (Czech Republic)

    2015-09-30

    In this work, we investigated the possibilities of tungsten and tungsten oxide nanoclusters generation by means of non-reactive and reactive magnetron sputtering with gas aggregation. It was found that in pure argon atmosphere, cluster aggregation proceeded in two regimes depending on argon pressure in the aggregation chamber. At the lower pressure, cluster generation was dominated by two-body collisions yielding larger clusters (about 5.5 nm in diameter) at lower rate. At higher pressures, cluster generation was dominated by three-body collisions yielding smaller clusters (3–4 nm in diameter) at higher rate. The small amount of oxygen admixture in the aggregation chamber had considerable influence on cluster aggregation process. At certain critical pressure, the presence of oxygen led to the raise of deposition rate and cluster size. Resulting clusters were composed mostly of tungsten trioxide. The oxygen pressure higher than critical led to the target poisoning and the decrease in the sputtering rate. Critical oxygen pressure decreased with increasing argon pressure, suggesting that cluster aggregation process was influenced by atomic oxygen species (namely, O{sup −} ion) generated by oxygen–argon collisions in the magnetron plasma. - Highlights: • Formation of tungsten and tungsten oxide clusters was observed. • Two modes of cluster aggregation in pure argon atmosphere were found. • Dependence of cluster deposition speed and size on oxygen admixture was observed. • Changes of dependence on oxygen with changing argon pressure were described.

  8. Reticulated Vitreous Carbon Electrodes for Gas Phase Pulsed Corona Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Locke, B

    1998-01-01

    A new design for gas phase pulsed corona reactors incorporating reticulated vitreous carbon electrodes is demonstrated to be effective for the removal of nitrogen oxides from synthetic air mixtures...

  9. Reticulated Vitreous Carbon Electrodes for Gas Phase Pulsed Corona Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LOCKE, B

    1999-01-01

    A new design for gas phase pulsed corona reactors incorporating reticulated vitreous carbon electrodes is demonstrated to be effective for the removal of nitrogen oxides from synthetic air mixtures...

  10. Hydrogen Cracking in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of an AISI Type 321 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenak, P.; Unigovski, Ya.; Shneck, R.

    The effects of in situ cathodic charging on the tensile properties and susceptibility to cracking of an AISI type 321 stainless steel, welded by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process, was studied by various treatments. Appearance of delta-ferrite phase in the as-welded steels in our tested conditions was observed with discontinuous grain boundaries (M23C6) and a dense distribution of metal carbides MC ((Ti, Nb)C), which precipitated in the matrix. Shielding gas rates changes the mechanical properties of the welds. Ultimate tensile strength and ductility are increases with the resistance to the environments related the increase of the supplied shielding inert gas rates. Charged specimens, caused mainly in decreases in the ductility of welded specimens. However, more severe decrease in ductility was obtained after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). The fracture of sensitized specimens was predominantly intergranular, whereas the as-welded specimens exhibited massive transgranular regions. Both types of specimen demonstrated narrow brittle zones at the sides of the fracture surface and ductile micro-void coalescences in the middle. Ferrite δ was form after welding with high density of dislocation structures and stacking faults formation and the thin stacking fault plates with e-martensite phase were typically found in the austenitic matrix after the cathodical charging process.

  11. Behavior and microstructural changes in different tungsten-based materials under pulsed plasma loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vilémová, Monika; Pala, Zdeněk; Jäger, Aleš; Matějíček, Jiří; Chernyshova, M.; Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, E.; Gribkov, V. A.; Janata, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, December (2016), s. 123-127 ISSN 2352-1791. [International Conference of Fusion Reactor Material (ICFRM-17) /17./. Aachen, 11.10.2015-16.10.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12837S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : ODS tungsten * yttrium oxide * porosity * phase stability * monoclinic phase * plasma focus * damage * erosion Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials; JJ - Other Materials (FZU-D) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nme.2016.06.004

  12. Behavior and microstructural changes in different tungsten-based materials under pulsed plasma loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vilémová

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, morphological, microstructural and phase changes of four types of tungsten materials after exposure to dense deuterium plasma were examined. The microstructures of the prepared materials mutually differ by the porosity, grain size and phase content. It was found that inherent porosity of sintered materials leads to a specific mechanism of erosion and might be a significant source of dust in the case of materials with higher porosity. Further, a preferential erosion of the dispersed particles by melting and evaporation and subsequent formation of thin film on the surface of W-Y2O3 was described as well.

  13. Characterization of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding Fume Generated by Apprentice Welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graczyk, Halshka; Lewinski, Nastassja; Zhao, Jiayuan; Concha-Lozano, Nicolas; Riediker, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) represents one of the most widely used metal joining processes in industry. Its propensity to generate a greater portion of welding fume particles at the nanoscale poses a potential occupational health hazard for workers. However, current literature lacks comprehensive characterization of TIG welding fume particles. Even less is known about welding fumes generated by welding apprentices with little experience in welding. We characterized TIG welding fume generated by apprentice welders (N = 20) in a ventilated exposure cabin. Exposure assessment was conducted for each apprentice welder at the breathing zone (BZ) inside of the welding helmet and at a near-field (NF) location, 60cm away from the welding task. We characterized particulate matter (PM4), particle number concentration and particle size, particle morphology, chemical composition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production potential, and gaseous components. The mean particle number concentration at the BZ was 1.69E+06 particles cm(-3), with a mean geometric mean diameter of 45nm. On average across all subjects, 92% of the particle counts at the BZ were below 100nm. We observed elevated concentrations of tungsten, which was most likely due to electrode consumption. Mean ROS production potential of TIG welding fumes at the BZ exceeded average concentrations previously found in traffic-polluted air. Furthermore, ROS production potential was significantly higher for apprentices that burned their metal during their welding task. We recommend that future exposure assessments take into consideration welding performance as a potential exposure modifier for apprentice welders or welders with minimal training. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  14. Characterization of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding Fume Generated by Apprentice Welders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graczyk, Halshka; Lewinski, Nastassja; Zhao, Jiayuan; Concha-Lozano, Nicolas; Riediker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) represents one of the most widely used metal joining processes in industry. Its propensity to generate a greater portion of welding fume particles at the nanoscale poses a potential occupational health hazard for workers. However, current literature lacks comprehensive characterization of TIG welding fume particles. Even less is known about welding fumes generated by welding apprentices with little experience in welding. We characterized TIG welding fume generated by apprentice welders (N = 20) in a ventilated exposure cabin. Exposure assessment was conducted for each apprentice welder at the breathing zone (BZ) inside of the welding helmet and at a near-field (NF) location, 60cm away from the welding task. We characterized particulate matter (PM4), particle number concentration and particle size, particle morphology, chemical composition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production potential, and gaseous components. The mean particle number concentration at the BZ was 1.69E+06 particles cm−3, with a mean geometric mean diameter of 45nm. On average across all subjects, 92% of the particle counts at the BZ were below 100nm. We observed elevated concentrations of tungsten, which was most likely due to electrode consumption. Mean ROS production potential of TIG welding fumes at the BZ exceeded average concentrations previously found in traffic-polluted air. Furthermore, ROS production potential was significantly higher for apprentices that burned their metal during their welding task. We recommend that future exposure assessments take into consideration welding performance as a potential exposure modifier for apprentice welders or welders with minimal training. PMID:26464505

  15. Thermal-treatment effect on the photoluminescence and gas-sensing properties of tungsten oxide nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Shibin; Chang, Xueting; Li, Zhenjiang

    2010-01-01

    Single-crystalline non-stoichiometric tungsten oxide nanowires were initially prepared using a simple solvothermal method. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) investigations indicate that the tungsten oxide nanowires exhibit various crystal defects, including stacking faults, dislocations, and vacancies. A possible defect-induced mechanism was proposed to account for the temperature-dependent morphological evolution of the tungsten oxide nanowires under thermal processing. Due to the high specific surface areas and non-stoichiometric crystal structure, the original tungsten oxide nanowires were highly sensitive to ppm level ethanol at room temperature. Thermal treatment under dry air condition was found to deteriorate the selectivity of room-temperature tungsten oxide sensors, and 400 o C may be considered as the top temperature limit in sensor applications for the solvothermally-prepared nanowires. The photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of tungsten oxide nanowires were also strongly influenced by thermal treatment.

  16. Thermal-treatment effect on the photoluminescence and gas-sensing properties of tungsten oxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Shibin [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061, Shandong (China); Chang, Xueting [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, Shandong (China); Li, Zhenjiang, E-mail: zjli126@126.com [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061, Shandong (China)

    2010-09-15

    Single-crystalline non-stoichiometric tungsten oxide nanowires were initially prepared using a simple solvothermal method. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) investigations indicate that the tungsten oxide nanowires exhibit various crystal defects, including stacking faults, dislocations, and vacancies. A possible defect-induced mechanism was proposed to account for the temperature-dependent morphological evolution of the tungsten oxide nanowires under thermal processing. Due to the high specific surface areas and non-stoichiometric crystal structure, the original tungsten oxide nanowires were highly sensitive to ppm level ethanol at room temperature. Thermal treatment under dry air condition was found to deteriorate the selectivity of room-temperature tungsten oxide sensors, and 400 {sup o}C may be considered as the top temperature limit in sensor applications for the solvothermally-prepared nanowires. The photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of tungsten oxide nanowires were also strongly influenced by thermal treatment.

  17. Experimental investigations of tungsten inert gas assisted friction stir welding of pure copper plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, M. A.; Boșneag, A.; Nitu, E.; Iordache, M.

    2017-10-01

    Welding copper and its alloys is usually difficult to join by conventional fusion welding processes because of high thermal diffusivity of the copper, alloying elements, necessity of using a shielding gas and a clean surface. To overcome this inconvenience, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), a solid state joining process that relies on frictional heating and plastic deformation, is used as a feasible welding process. In order to achieve an increased welding speed and a reduction in tool wear, this process is assisted by another one (WIG) which generates and adds heat to the process. The aim of this paper is to identify the influence of the additional heat on the process parameters and on the welding joint properties (distribution of the temperature, hardness and roughness). The research includes two experiments for the FSW process and one experiment for tungsten inert gas assisted FSW process. The outcomes of the investigation are compared and analysed for both welding variants. Adding a supplementary heat source, the plates are preheated and are obtain some advantages such as reduced forces used in process and FSW tool wear, faster and better plasticization of the material, increased welding speed and a proper weld quality.

  18. High-repetition-rate short-pulse gas discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulip, J; Seguin, H; Mace, P N

    1979-09-01

    A high-average-power short-pulse gas discharge is described. This consists of a volume-preionized transverse discharge of the type used in gas lasers driven by a Blumlein energy storage circuit. The Blumlein circuit is fabricated from coaxial cable, is pulse-charged from a high-repetition-rate Marx-bank generator, and is switched by a high-repetition-rate segmented rail gap. The operation of this discharge under conditions typical of rare-gas halide lasers is described. A maximum of 900 pps was obtained, giving a power flow into the discharge of 30 kW.

  19. Tungsten wire and tubing joined by nickel brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Thin tungsten wire and tungsten tubing are brazed together using a contacting coil of nickel wire heated to its melting point in an inert-gas atmosphere. This method is also effective for brazing tungsten to tungsten-rhenium parts.

  20. Microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum 5083 weldments by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yao [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang Wenjing [School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Xie Jijia [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Sun Shouguang [School of Mechanical, Electronic and Control Engineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Wang Liang [College of Metallurgy and Material Engineering, Chongqing University of Science and Technology, Chongqing 401331 (China); Qian Ye; Meng Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wei Yujie, E-mail: yujie_wei@lnm.imech.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Welding zones by GTAW and GMAW are softer than the parent material Al5083. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GTAW for Al5083 are mechanically more reliable than that welded by GMAW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GTAW welds fail by shear, but GMAW welds show mixed shear and normal failure. - Abstract: The mechanical properties and microstructural features of aluminum 5083 (Al5083) weldments processed by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) are investigated. Weldments processed by both methods are mechanically softer than the parent material Al5083, and could be potential sites for plastic localization. It is revealed that Al5083 weldments processed by GTAW are mechanical more reliable than those by GMAW. The former bears higher strength, more ductility, and no apparent microstructure defects. Perceivable porosity in weldments by GMAW is found, which could account for the distinct mechanical properties between weldments processed by GTAW and GMAW. It is suggested that caution should be exercised when using GMAW for Al5083 in the high-speed-train industry where such light weight metal is broadly used.

  1. Microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum 5083 weldments by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yao; Wang Wenjing; Xie Jijia; Sun Shouguang; Wang Liang; Qian Ye; Meng Yuan; Wei Yujie

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Welding zones by GTAW and GMAW are softer than the parent material Al5083. ► GTAW for Al5083 are mechanically more reliable than that welded by GMAW. ► GTAW welds fail by shear, but GMAW welds show mixed shear and normal failure. - Abstract: The mechanical properties and microstructural features of aluminum 5083 (Al5083) weldments processed by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) are investigated. Weldments processed by both methods are mechanically softer than the parent material Al5083, and could be potential sites for plastic localization. It is revealed that Al5083 weldments processed by GTAW are mechanical more reliable than those by GMAW. The former bears higher strength, more ductility, and no apparent microstructure defects. Perceivable porosity in weldments by GMAW is found, which could account for the distinct mechanical properties between weldments processed by GTAW and GMAW. It is suggested that caution should be exercised when using GMAW for Al5083 in the high-speed-train industry where such light weight metal is broadly used.

  2. Trapping of He clusters by inert-gas impurities in tungsten: First-principles predictions and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen-Manh, Duc, E-mail: duc.nguyen@ccfe.ac.uk; Dudarev, S.L.

    2015-06-01

    Properties of point defects resulting from the incorporation of inert-gas atoms in bcc tungsten are investigated systematically using first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The most stable configuration for the interstitial neon, argon, krypton and xenon atoms is the tetrahedral site, similarly to what was found earlier for helium in W. The calculated formation energies for single inert-gas atoms at interstitial sites as well as at substitutional sites are much larger for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe than for He. While the variation of the energy of insertion of inert-gas defects into interstitial configurations can be explained by a strong effect of their large atomic size, the trend exhibited by their substitutional energies is more likely related to the covalent interaction between the noble gas impurity atoms and the tungsten atoms. There is a remarkable variation exhibited by the energy of interaction between inert-gas impurities and vacancies, where a pronounced size effect is observed when going from He to Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe. The origin of this trend is explained by electronic structure calculations showing that p-orbitals play an important part in the formation of chemical bonds between a vacancy and an atom of any of the four inert-gas elements in comparison with helium, where the latter contains only 1s{sup 2} electrons in the outer shell. The binding energies of a helium atom trapped by five different defects (He-v, Ne-v, Ar-v, Kr-v, Xe-v, where v denotes a vacancy in bcc-W) are all in excellent agreement with experimental data derived from thermal desorption spectroscopy. Attachment of He clusters to inert gas impurity atom traps in tungsten is analysed as a function of the number of successive trapping helium atoms. Variation of the Young modulus due to inert-gas impurities is analysed on the basis of data derived from DFT calculations.

  3. Analysis and fabrication of tungsten CERMET materials for ultra-high temperature reactor applications via pulsed electric current sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jonathan A.

    The optimized development path for the fabrication of ultra-high temperature W-UO2 CERMET fuel elements were explored within this dissertation. A robust literature search was conducted, which concluded that a W-UO 2 fuel element must contain a fine tungsten microstructure and spherical UO2 kernels throughout the entire consolidation process. Combined Monte Carlo and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis were used to determine the effects of rhenium and gadolinia additions on the performance of W-UO 2 fuel elements at refractory temperatures and in dry and water submerged environments. The computational analysis also led to the design of quasi-optimized fuel elements that can meet thermal-hydraulic and neutronic requirements A rigorous set of experiments were conducted to determine if Pulsed Electric Current Sintering (PECS) can fabricate tungsten and W-Ce02 specimens to the required geometries, densities and microstructures required for high temperature fuel elements as well as determine the mechanisms involved within the PECS consolidation process. The CeO2 acts as a surrogate for UO 2 fuel kernels in these experiments. The experiments seemed to confirm that PECS consolidation takes place via diffusional mass transfer methods; however, the densification process is rapidly accelerated due to the effects of current densities within the consolidating specimen. Fortunately the grain growth proceeds at a traditional rate and the PECS process can yield near fully dense W and W-Ce02 specimens with a finer microstructure than other sintering techniques. PECS consolidation techniques were also shown to be capable of producing W-UO2 segments at near-prototypic geometries; however, great care must be taken to coat the fuel particles with tungsten prior to sintering. Also, great care must be taken to ensure that the particles remain spherical in geometry under the influence of a uniaxial stress as applied during PECS, which involves mixing different fuel kernel sizes in

  4. Processing and structure of in situ Fe-Al alloys produced by gas tungsten arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Energy Research Center

    1997-02-14

    Iron aluminide weld overlays are being investigated for corrosion and erosion protection of boiler tubes in low NOx burners. The primary objective of the research is to identify overlay compositions which can be deposited in a crack-free condition and provide corrosion protection in moderately reducing environments. In the current phase of work, Fe-Al alloy weld overlays were produced by depositing commercially pure aluminum wire on to low carbon steel substrates using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. A systematic variation of the wire feed speed and current, two major factors affecting dilution, resulted in a variation in aluminum contents of the welds ranging from 3--42 wt% aluminum. The aluminum content was observed to increase with wire feed speed and a decrease in the current. The aluminum content was also found to affect the cracking susceptibility of the overlays. At 10wt% aluminum, few to no cracks were observed in the deposits. Above this value, cracking was prevalent throughout the weld. In addition, two types of microstructures were found correlating to different concentrations of aluminum. A homogeneous matrix with second phase particles consisting of coarse columnar grains was found for low aluminum concentrations. With higher aluminum contents, a two-phase constituent was observed to surround primary dendrites growing from the substrate. The transition of the microstructures occurred between 24 and 32 wt% Al.

  5. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, S D; Wong, F G; Gordon, S R; Wong, L L; Rebak, R B

    2006-01-01

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the waste package program has been the integrity of the container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIG method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion properties of specimens prepared using both types of welding techniques. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal (non-welded) to determine their relative corrosion behavior in simulated concentrated water (SCW) at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCl at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the same electrochemical behavior in the three tested electrolytes

  6. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten ARC Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Daniel Day; Frank M.G. Wong; Steven R. Gordon; Lana L. Wong; Raul B. Rebak

    2006-01-01

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the waste package program has been the integrity of the container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIC method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion properties of specimens prepared using both types of welding techniques. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal (non-welded) to determine their relative corrosion behavior in simulated concentrated water (SCW) at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCI at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the same electrochemical behavior in the three tested electrolytes

  7. Analysis of cracks in stainless steel TIG [tungsten inert gas] welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagaki, M.; Marschall, C.; Brust, F.

    1986-12-01

    This report contains the results of a combined experimental and analytical study of ductile crack growth in tungsten inert gas (TIG) weldments of austenitic stainless steel specimens. The substantially greater yield strength of the weld metal relative to the base metal causes more plastic deformation in the base metal adjacent to the weld than in the weld metal. Accordingly, the analytical studies focused on the stress-strain interaction between the crack tip and the weld/base-metal interface. Experimental work involved tests using compact (tension) specimens of three different sizes and pipe bend experiments. The compact specimens were machined from a TIG weldment in Type 304 stainless steel plate. The pipe specimens were also TIG welded using the same welding procedures. Elastic-plastic finite element methods were used to model the experiments. In addition to the J-integral, different crack-tip integral parameters such as ΔT/sub p/* and J were evaluated. Also, engineering J-estimation methods were employed to predict the load-carrying capacity of the welded pipe with a circumferential through-wall crack under bending

  8. Microstructure and erosion characteristic of nodular cast iron surface modified by tungsten inert gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abboud, Jaafar Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Local surface melting. ► Significant improvement in erosion resistance. ► The ductile behaviour was found. -- Abstract: The surface of nodular cast iron has been melted and rapidly solidified by Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) process to produce a chilled structure of high hardness and better erosion resistance. Welding currents of magnitude 100, 150, and 200 A at a constant voltage of 72 have been used to melt the surface of nodular cast iron. Microstructural characterization, hardness measurements, and erosion wear tests have been performed on these modified surfaces as well as on the untreated material. Microstructural characterization has shown that surface melting resulted in complete or partial dissolution of the graphite nodules and resolidification of primary austenite dendrites, which undergo further decomposition into ferrite and cementite, and interdendritic of acicular eutectic; their microhardness measured across the melted depth ranged between 600 and 800 Hv. The scale of the dendrites and the interdendritic eutectic became coarser when a higher current is used. The results also indicated that remelting process by TIG improved erosion resistance by three to four times. Eroded surface observations of the as-received and TIG melted samples showed a ductile behavior with a maximum erosion rate at 30°. The fine microstructures obtained by the rapid cooling and the formation of a large amount of eutectic cementite instead of the graphite have contributed greatly to the plastic flow and consequently to the better erosion resistance of the TIG surface melted samples.

  9. Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of Ni-rich NiTi plates: functional behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, J. P.; Barbosa, D.; Braz Fernandes, F. M.; Miranda, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    It is often reported that, to successfully join NiTi shape memory alloys, fusion-based processes with reduced thermal affected regions (as in laser welding) are required. This paper describes an experimental study performed on the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of 1.5 mm thick plates of Ni-rich NiTi. The functional behavior of the joints was assessed. The superelasticity was analyzed by cycling tests at maximum imposed strains of 4, 8 and 12% and for a total of 600 cycles, without rupture. The superelastic plateau was observed, in the stress-strain curves, 30 MPa below that of the base material. Shape-memory effect was evidenced by bending tests with full recovery of the initial shape of the welded joints. In parallel, uniaxial tensile tests of the joints showed a tensile strength of 700 MPa and an elongation to rupture of 20%. The elongation is the highest reported for fusion-welding of NiTi, including laser welding. These results can be of great interest for the wide-spread inclusion of NiTi in complex shaped components requiring welding, since TIG is not an expensive process and is simple to operate and implement in industrial environments.

  10. Study of the characteristics of duplex stainless steel activated tungsten inert gas welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chern, Tsann-Shyi; Tseng, Kuang-Hung; Tsai, Hsien-Lung

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the specific fluxes used in the tungsten inert gas (TIG) process on surface appearance, weld morphology, angular distortion, mechanical properties, and microstructures when welding 6 mm thick duplex stainless steel. This study applies a novel variant of the autogenous TIG welding, using oxide powders (TiO 2 , MnO 2 , SiO 2 , MoO 3 , and Cr 2 O 3 ), to grade 2205 stainless steel through a thin layer of the flux to produce a bead-on-plate joint. Experimental results indicate that using SiO 2 , MoO 3 , and Cr 2 O 3 fluxes leads to a significant increase in the penetration capability of TIG welds. The activated TIG process can increase the joint penetration and the weld depth-to-width ratio, and tends to reduce the angular distortion of grade 2205 stainless steel weldment. The welded joint also exhibited greater mechanical strength. These results suggest that the plasma column and the anode root are a mechanism for determining the morphology of activated TIG welds.

  11. Influence of titanium–boron additions on grain refinement of AA6082 gas tungsten arc welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore Babu, N.; Talari, Mahesh Kumar; Dayou, Pan; Zheng, Sun; Jun, Wei; SivaPrasad, K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ti in the weld metal resulted in grain refinement due to growth restriction effect. ► Weld metal strength improved due to grain refinement caused by Tibor™ addition. ► Weld metal responded to post-weld ageing treatment due to dilution from base metal. ► Weld metal with AA5356 filler are stronger then AA4043 for all Tibor™ additions. -- Abstract: Grain refinement of weld metal plays a vital role in improving mechanical properties (ductility and toughness) as well as weldability. The present study has investigated the influence of Tibor™ additions on the structure and mechanical properties of AA6082 gas tungsten arc (GTA) weldments. Controlled amounts of Tibor™ grain refiner (containing Ti and B in a ratio of 5:1) were introduced into the molten pool of AA6082 by pre-deposited cast inserts (AA4043 and AA5356) under different welding conditions by GTA welding. Full penetration GTA welds were prepared using alternating current (AC). It was observed that grain size was decreased with increasing amounts of Tibor™. The grain refinement is mainly caused grain nucleation associated with constitutional undercooling during solidification. It has been shown that welds prepared with 5356 cast insert exhibited high strength and ductility when compared with other welds. The observed grain refinement was shown to result in an appreciable increase in fusion zone hardness, strength and ductility.

  12. Field emission study of pulsed laser deposition of gold on clean and oxidized tungsten tip

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plšek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 292, FEB 2014 (2014), s. 717-725 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13022 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : nanoparticles * nucleation and growth * pulsed laser deposition Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.711, year: 2014

  13. Tungsten diselenide for mode-locked erbium-doped fiber lasers with short pulse duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjun; Liu, Mengli; OuYang, Yuyi; Hou, Huanran; Ma, Guoli; Lei, Ming; Wei, Zhiyi

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a WSe2 film prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is transferred onto a tapered fiber, and a WSe2 saturable absorber (SA) is fabricated. In order to measure the third-order optical nonlinearity of the WSe2, the Z-scan technique is applied. The modulation depth of the WSe2 SA is measured as being 21.89%. Taking advantage of the remarkable nonlinear absorption characteristic of the WSe2 SA, a mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser is demonstrated at 1557.4 nm with a bandwidth of 25.8 nm and signal to noise ratio of 96 dB. To the best of our knowledge, the pulse duration of 163.5 fs is confirmed to be the shortest compared with previous mode-locked fiber lasers based on transition-metal dichalcogenides SAs. These results indicate that WSe2 is a powerful competitor in the application of ultrashort pulse lasers.

  14. Tungsten oxide coatings deposited by plasma spray using powder and solution precursor for detection of nitrogen dioxide gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao, E-mail: zhangc@yzu.edu.cn [College of Mechanical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225127 (China); Wang, Jie [College of Mechanical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225127 (China); Geng, Xin [College of Mechanical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225127 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China)

    2016-05-25

    Increasing attention has been paid on preparation methods for resistive-type gas sensors based on semiconductor metal oxides. In this work, tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) coatings were prepared on alumina substrates and used as gas sensitive layers. The coatings were deposited by atmospheric plasma spray using powder, solution precursor, or a combination of both. Tungsten oxide powder through a powder port and ammonium tungstate aqueous solution through a liquid port were injected into plasma stream respectively or together to deposit WO{sub 3} coatings. Phase structures in the coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction analyzer. The field-emission scanning electron microscopy images confirmed that the coatings were in microstructure, nanostructure or micro-nanostructure. The sensing properties of the sensors based on the coatings exposed to 1 ppm nitrogen dioxide gas were characterized in a home-made instrument. Sensing properties of the coatings were compared and discussed. The influences of gas humidity and working temperature on the sensor responses were further studied. - Highlights: • Porous gas sensitive coatings were deposited by plasma spray using powder and solution precursor. • Crystallized WO{sub 3} were obtained through hybrid plasma spray plus a pre-conditioned step. • Plasma power had an important influence on coating microstructure. • The particle size of atmospheric plasma-sprayed microstructured coating was stable. • Solution precursor plasma-sprayed WO{sub 3} coatings had nanostructure and showed good responses to 1 ppm NO{sub 2}.

  15. Hydrogen gas driven permeation through tungsten deposition layer formed by hydrogen plasma sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Keiichiro; Katayama, Kazunari; Date, Hiroyuki; Fukada, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • H permeation tests for W layer formed by H plasma sputtering are performed. • H permeation flux through W layer is larger than that through W bulk. • H diffusivity in W layer is smaller than that in W bulk. • The equilibrium H concentration in W layer is larger than that in W bulk. - Abstract: It is important to evaluate the influence of deposition layers formed on plasma facing wall on tritium permeation and tritium retention in the vessel of a fusion reactor from a viewpoint of safety. In this work, tungsten deposition layers having different thickness and porosity were formed on circular nickel plates by hydrogen RF plasma sputtering. Hydrogen permeation experiment was carried out at the temperature range from 250 °C to 500 °C and at hydrogen pressure range from 1013 Pa to 101,300 Pa. The hydrogen permeation flux through the nickel plate with tungsten deposition layer was significantly smaller than that through a bare nickel plate. This indicates that a rate-controlling step in hydrogen permeation was not permeation through the nickel plate but permeation though the deposition layer. The pressure dependence on the permeation flux differed by temperature. Hydrogen permeation flux through tungsten deposition layer is larger than that through tungsten bulk. From analysis of the permeation curves, it was indicated that hydrogen diffusivity in tungsten deposition layer is smaller than that in tungsten bulk and the equilibrium hydrogen concentration in tungsten deposition layer is enormously larger than that in tungsten bulk at same hydrogen pressure.

  16. Predicting gas decomposition in an industrialized pulsed CO2 laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, A

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available to be stable at O2 levels in excess of 2%, whereas previously reported values suggest stable operation at values of less than 1%. This is thought to be related to the unusually high starting CO2 concentration of the gas mix, and the short time pulse...

  17. Fatigue behaviour of T welded joints rehabilitated by tungsten inert gas and plasma dressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramalho, Armando L.; Ferreira, Jose A.M.; Branco, Carlos A.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This study addresses the use of improvement techniques for repair T welded joints. → TIG and plasma arc re-melting are applied in joints with fatigue cracks at weld toes. → Plasma dressing provides reasonable repair in joints with cracks greater than 4 mm. → TIG dressing produces a deficient repair in joints with cracks greater than 4 mm. → TIG dressing provides good repair in joints with fatigue cracks lesser than 2.5 mm. -- Abstract: This paper concerns a fatigue study on the effect of tungsten inert gas (TIG) and plasma dressing in non-load-carrying fillet welds of structural steel with medium strength. The fatigue tests were performed in three point bending at the main plate under constant amplitude loading, with a stress ratio of R = 0.05 and a frequency of 7 Hz. Fatigue results are presented in the form of nominal stress range versus fatigue life (S-N) curves obtained from the as welded joints and the TIG dressing joints at the welded toe. These results were compared with the ones obtained in repaired joints, where TIG and plasma dressing were applied at the welded toes, containing fatigue cracks with a depth of 3-5 mm in the main plate and through the plate thickness. A deficient repair was obtained by TIG dressing, caused by the excessive depth of the crack. A reasonable fatigue life benefits were obtained with plasma dressing. Good results were obtained with the TIG dressing technique for specimens with shallower initial defects (depth lesser than 2.5 mm). The fatigue life benefits were presented in terms of a gain parameter assessed using both experimental data and life predictions based on the fatigue crack propagation law.

  18. UNS S31603 Stainless Steel Tungsten Inert Gas Welds Made with Microparticle and Nanoparticle Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Hung Tseng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between tungsten inert gas (TIG welding of austenitic stainless steel assisted by microparticle oxides and that assisted by nanoparticle oxides. SiO2 and Al2O3 were used to investigate the effects of the thermal stability and the particle size of the activated compounds on the surface appearance, geometric shape, angular distortion, delta ferrite content and Vickers hardness of the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG weld. The results show that the use of SiO2 leads to a satisfactory surface appearance compared to that of the TIG weld made with Al2O3. The surface appearance of the TIG weld made with nanoparticle oxide has less flux slag compared with the one made with microparticle oxide of the same type. Compared with microparticle SiO2, the TIG welding with nanoparticle SiO2 has the potential benefits of high joint penetration and less angular distortion in the resulting weldment. The TIG welding with nanoparticle Al2O3 does not result in a significant increase in the penetration or reduction of distortion. The TIG welding with microparticle or nanoparticle SiO2 uses a heat source with higher power density, resulting in a higher ferrite content and hardness of the stainless steel weld metal. In contrast, microparticle or nanoparticle Al2O3 results in no significant difference in metallurgical properties compared to that of the C-TIG weld metal. Compared with oxide particle size, the thermal stability of the oxide plays a significant role in enhancing the joint penetration capability of the weld, for the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG welds made with activated oxides.

  19. Comparison of creep rupture behavior of tungsten inert gas and electron beam welded grade 91 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, H.C.; Vanaja, J.; Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Albert, S.K.; Roy, G.G.

    2016-01-01

    Creep rupture behavior of Grade 91 steel weld joints fabricated by multi-pass tungsten inert gas (TIG) and electron beam welding (EBW) processes has been studied and compared with base metal. Cross-weld creep specimens were fabricated from the X-ray radiography qualified and post weld heat treated (760°C/4 h) weld joints. Creep testing of weld joints and base metal was carried out at 650°C over a stress range of 40°120 MPa. Creep life of EBW joint is comparable to base metal; whereas multi-pass TIG joint have shown significant drop in creep life tested for the same stress level. Both types of weld joints show Type IV cracking for all the stress levels. The steady state creep rate of multi-pass TIG is found to be fifteen times than that of EBW joint for stress level of 80 MPa, which may be attributed to over tempering, more re-austenization, and fine grain structure of inter-critical and fine grain heat affected zone regions of the TIG joint. In contrast, single-pass and rapid weld thermal cycles associated with EBW process causes minimum phase transformation in the corresponding regions of heat affected zone. Microstructure studies on creep tested specimens shows creep cavities formed at the primary austenite grain boundaries nucleated on coarse carbide precipitates. The hardness measured across the weld on creep tested specimens shows significant drop in hardness in the inter-critical and fine grain heat affected zone regions of multi-pass TIG (176 VHN) in comparison to 192 VHN in the corresponding locations in EBW joint. (author)

  20. A study of thorium exposure during tungsten inert gas welding in an airline engineering population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElearney, N; Irvine, D

    1993-07-01

    To investigate the theoretic possibility of excessive exposure to thorium during the process of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding using thoriated rods we carried out a cross-sectional study of TIG welders and an age- and skill-matched group. We measured the radiation doses from inhaled thorium that was retained in the body and investigated whether any differences in health or biologic indices could have been attributable to the welding and tip-grinding process. Sixty-four TIG welders, 11 non-TIG welders, and 61 control subjects from an airline engineering population participated. All of the subjects were interviewed for biographic, occupational history and morbidity details. All of the welders and eight control subjects carried out large-volume urine sampling to recover thorium 232 and thorium 228; this group also had chest radiographs. All of the subjects had a blood sample taken to estimate liver enzymes, and they provided small-volume urine samples for the estimation of retinol-binding protein and beta 2-microglobulin. We found no excess of morbidity among the TIG or non-TIG welding groups, and the levels of retinol-binding protein and beta 2-microglobulin were the same for both groups. There was a higher aspartate aminotransferase level in the control group. The internal radiation doses were estimated at less than an annual level of intake in all cases, and considerably less if the exposure (as was the case) was assumed to be chronic over many years. Some additional precautionary measures are suggested to reduce further any potential hazard from this process.

  1. Instrumentation of dynamic gas pulse loading system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohaupt, H.

    1992-04-14

    The overall goal of this work is to further develop and field test a system of stimulating oil and gas wells, which increases the effective radius of the well bore so that more oil can flow into it, by recording pressure during the gas generation phase in real time so that fractures can be induced more predictably in the producing formation. Task 1: Complete the laboratory studies currently underway with the prototype model of the instrumentation currently being studied. Task 2: Perform field tests of the model in the Taft/Bakersfield area, utilizing operations closest to the engineers working on the project, and optimize the unit for various conditions encountered there. Task 3: Perform field test of the model in DGPL jobs which are scheduled in the mid-continent area, and optimize the unit for downhole conditions encountered there. Task 4: Analyze and summarize the results achieved during the complete test series, documenting the steps for usage of downhole instrumentation in the field, and compile data specifying use of the technology by others. Task 5: Prepare final report for DOE, and include also a report on the field tests completed. Describe and estimate the probability of the technology being commercialized and in what time span. The project has made substantial technical progress, though we are running about a month behind schedule. Expenditures are in line with the schedule. Increased widespread interest in the use of DGPL stimulation has kept us very busy. The computer modeling and test instrumentation developed under this program is already being applied to commercial operations.

  2. Thin film deposition and characterization of pure and iron-doped electron-beam evaporated tungsten oxide for gas sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesfamichael, Tuquabo, E-mail: t.tesfamichael@qut.edu.a [Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering, School of Engineering Systems, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Arita, Masashi [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Kita-14, Nishi-9, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 060-0814 (Japan); Bostrom, Thor [Faculty of Science and Technology, School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Bell, John [Centre for Built Environment and Engineering Research, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia)

    2010-06-30

    Pure tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) and iron-doped (10 at.%) tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}:Fe) nanostructured thin films were prepared using a dual crucible Electron Beam Evaporation (EBE) technique. The films were deposited at room temperature under high vacuum onto glass as well as alumina substrates and post-heat treated at 300 {sup o}C for 1 h. Using Raman spectroscopy the as-deposited WO{sub 3} and WO{sub 3}:Fe films were found to be amorphous, however their crystallinity increased after annealing. The estimated surface roughness of the films was similar (of the order of 3 nm) to that determined using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). As observed by AFM, the WO{sub 3}:Fe film appeared to have a more compact surface as compared to the more porous WO{sub 3} film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that the elemental stoichiometry of the tungsten oxide films was consistent with WO{sub 3}. A slight difference in optical band gap energies was found between the as-deposited WO{sub 3} (3.22 eV) and WO{sub 3}:Fe (3.12 eV) films. The differences in the band gap energies of the annealed films were significantly higher, having values of 3.12 eV and 2.61 eV for the WO{sub 3} and WO{sub 3}:Fe films respectively. The heat treated films were investigated for gas sensing applications using noise spectroscopy. It was found that doping of Fe to WO{sub 3} produced gas selectivity but a reduced gas sensitivity as compared to the WO{sub 3} sensor.

  3. The effect of electrode vertex angle on automatic tungsten-inert-gas welds for stainless steel 304L plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maarek, V.; Sharir, Y.; Stern, A.

    1980-03-01

    The effect of electrode vertex angle on penetration depth and weld bead width, in automatic tungsten-inert-gas (TIG) dcsp bead-on-plate welding with different currents, has been studied for stainless steel 304L plates 1.5 mm and 8 mm thick. It has been found that for thin plates, wider and deeper welds are obtained when using sharper electrodes while, for thick plates, narrower and deeper welds are produced when blunt electrodes (vertex angle 180 deg) are used. An explanation of the results, based on a literature survey, is included

  4. Tungsten Filament Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  5. Microstructural, phase evolution and corrosion properties of silicon carbide reinforced pulse electrodeposited nickel-tungsten composite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Swarnima; Sribalaji, M.; Wasekar, Nitin P.; Joshi, Srikant; Sundararajan, G.; Singh, Raghuvir; Keshri, Anup Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) reinforced nickel-tungsten (Ni-W) coatings were successfully fabricated on steel substrate by pulse electrodeposition method (PED) and the amount of SiC was varied as 0 g/l, 2 g/l, and 5 g/l in Ni-W coating. Effect of subsequent addition of SiC on microstructures, phases and on corrosion property of the coating was investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) image of the surface morphology of the coating showed the transformation from the dome like structure to turtle shell like structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of Ni-W-5 g/l SiC showed the disappearance of (220) plane of Ni(W), peak splitting in major peak of Ni(W) and formation of distinct peak of W(Ni) solid solution. Absence of (220) plane, peak splitting and presence of W(Ni) solid solution was explained by the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images. Tafel polarization plot was used to study the corrosion property of the coatings in 0.5 M NaCl solution. Ni-W-5 g/l SiC coating was showed higher corrosion resistance (i.e. ∼21% increase in corrosion potential, Ecorr) compared to Ni-W coating. Two simultaneous phenomena have been identified for the enhanced corrosion resistance of Ni-W-5 g/l SiC coating. (a) Presence of crystallographic texture (b) formation of continuous double barrier layer of NiWO4 and SiO2.

  6. Models of WO x films growth during pulsed laser deposition at elevated pressures of reactive gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnedovets, A. G.; Fominski, V. Y.; Nevolin, V. N.; Romanov, R. I.; Fominski, D. V.; Soloviev, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The films of tungsten oxides were prepared by pulsed laser ablation of W target in a reactive gas atmosphere (air of laboratory humidity). Optical analysis and ion signal measurements for the laser plume allowed to recognise a threshold gas pressure that suppresses the deposition of non-scattered atomic flux from the plume. When the pressure exceeds about 40 Pa, the films grow due to the deposition of species that could be formed in collisions of W atoms with reactive molecules (e.g., O2). Kinetic Monte Carlo method was used for modelling film growth. Comparison of the model structures with the experimentally prepared films has shown that the growth mechanism of ballistic deposition at a pressure of 40 Pa could be changed on the diffusion limited aggregation at a pressure of ~100 Pa. Thus, a cauliflower structure of the film transformed to a web-like structure. For good correlation of experimental and model structures of WO x , a dimension of structural elements in the model should coincide with W-O cluster size.

  7. Microstructural, phase evolution and corrosion properties of silicon carbide reinforced pulse electrodeposited nickel–tungsten composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Swarnima; Sribalaji, M.; Wasekar, Nitin P.; Joshi, Srikant; Sundararajan, G.; Singh, Raghuvir; Keshri, Anup Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pulse electrodeposited Ni–W–SiC coating has been synthesized successfully. • Dome to turtle like structure has been observed on addition of SiC in Ni–W coating. • Formation of W(Ni) solid solution was observed on adding 5 g/l SiC in Ni–W coating. • Corrosion resistance improved for Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating. • Texture formation and continuous barrier layer enhanced the corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Silicon carbide (SiC) reinforced nickel–tungsten (Ni–W) coatings were successfully fabricated on steel substrate by pulse electrodeposition method (PED) and the amount of SiC was varied as 0 g/l, 2 g/l, and 5 g/l in Ni–W coating. Effect of subsequent addition of SiC on microstructures, phases and on corrosion property of the coating was investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) image of the surface morphology of the coating showed the transformation from the dome like structure to turtle shell like structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of Ni–W–5 g/l SiC showed the disappearance of (220) plane of Ni(W), peak splitting in major peak of Ni(W) and formation of distinct peak of W(Ni) solid solution. Absence of (220) plane, peak splitting and presence of W(Ni) solid solution was explained by the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images. Tafel polarization plot was used to study the corrosion property of the coatings in 0.5 M NaCl solution. Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating was showed higher corrosion resistance (i.e. ∼21% increase in corrosion potential, E_c_o_r_r) compared to Ni–W coating. Two simultaneous phenomena have been identified for the enhanced corrosion resistance of Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating. (a) Presence of crystallographic texture (b) formation of continuous double barrier layer of NiWO_4 and SiO_2.

  8. Microstructural, phase evolution and corrosion properties of silicon carbide reinforced pulse electrodeposited nickel–tungsten composite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Swarnima; Sribalaji, M. [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Navin Government Polytechnic Campus, Patliputra Colony, Patna, Bihar 800013 (India); Wasekar, Nitin P.; Joshi, Srikant; Sundararajan, G. [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy & New Materials (ARCI) Hyderabad, Balapur P.O., Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh 500005 (India); Singh, Raghuvir [CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur, Jharkhand 831007 (India); Keshri, Anup Kumar, E-mail: anup@iitp.ac.in [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Navin Government Polytechnic Campus, Patliputra Colony, Patna, Bihar 800013 (India)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pulse electrodeposited Ni–W–SiC coating has been synthesized successfully. • Dome to turtle like structure has been observed on addition of SiC in Ni–W coating. • Formation of W(Ni) solid solution was observed on adding 5 g/l SiC in Ni–W coating. • Corrosion resistance improved for Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating. • Texture formation and continuous barrier layer enhanced the corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Silicon carbide (SiC) reinforced nickel–tungsten (Ni–W) coatings were successfully fabricated on steel substrate by pulse electrodeposition method (PED) and the amount of SiC was varied as 0 g/l, 2 g/l, and 5 g/l in Ni–W coating. Effect of subsequent addition of SiC on microstructures, phases and on corrosion property of the coating was investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) image of the surface morphology of the coating showed the transformation from the dome like structure to turtle shell like structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of Ni–W–5 g/l SiC showed the disappearance of (220) plane of Ni(W), peak splitting in major peak of Ni(W) and formation of distinct peak of W(Ni) solid solution. Absence of (220) plane, peak splitting and presence of W(Ni) solid solution was explained by the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images. Tafel polarization plot was used to study the corrosion property of the coatings in 0.5 M NaCl solution. Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating was showed higher corrosion resistance (i.e. ∼21% increase in corrosion potential, E{sub corr}) compared to Ni–W coating. Two simultaneous phenomena have been identified for the enhanced corrosion resistance of Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating. (a) Presence of crystallographic texture (b) formation of continuous double barrier layer of NiWO{sub 4} and SiO{sub 2}.

  9. Attosecond pulse trains from long laser-gas interaction targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauri, C.P.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Varju, K.; Ruchon, T.; Gustafsson, E.; L'Huillier, A.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. Many experiments in attosecond physics require high XUV photon flux as well as a clean attosecond pulse train (APT) temporal structure. Temporal characterization of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in long interaction targets is thus of high interest. HHG being a very inefficient process, a large effort has been made to increase the amount of XUV photons emitted per infrared laser pulse. Besides quasi phase-matching in a modulated capillary, loose driving laser focusing conditions and subsequent self-channeling have shown to significantly increase the conversion efficiency. We characterized the temporal structure of APTs generated during the self-channeling of an intense IR driving laser pulse. Our first results indicate, however, that the temporal structure of the APT generated during the HHG process might be affected by quantum path interference and spectral phase distortion due to the self-channeling process itself. In particular, our measurements show that the relative spectral phase between consecutive harmonics can strongly vary depending on the target length and the position of the laser focus with respect to the target. In general for short gas targets, no clean APT structure can be expected since the individual attosecond pulses carry significant chirp. For longer targets, however, we observe a flattening of the harmonic spectral phase, resulting in near-transform-limited attosecond pulse trains. A complete analysis of the process is complex and involves detailed knowledge of the spatial and temporal evolution of the self-channeling driver laser pulse throughout the gas target.

  10. Assessment of Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Activated Tungsten Inert Gas-Welded Duplex Stainless Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwin, B.; Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.

    2017-12-01

    The stress corrosion cracking behavior of duplex stainless steel (DSS) weld joint largely depends on the ferrite-austenite phase microstructure balance. This phase balance is decided by the welding process used, heat input, welding conditions and the weld metal chemistry. In this investigation, the influence of activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of DSS joints was evaluated and compared. Boiling magnesium chloride (45 wt.%) environment maintained at 155 °C was used. The microstructure and ferrite content of different weld zones are correlated with the outcome of sustained load, SCC test. Irrespective of the welding processes used, SCC resistance of weld joints was inferior to that of the base metal. However, ATIG weld joint exhibited superior resistance to SCC than the TIG weld joint. The crack initiation and final failure were in the weld metal for the ATIG weld joint; they were in the heat-affected zone for the TIG weld joint.

  11. Dissimilar Joining of Stainless Steel and 5083 Aluminum Alloy Sheets by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding-Brazing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheepu, Muralimohan; Srinivas, B.; Abhishek, Nalluri; Ramachandraiah, T.; Karna, Sivaji; Venkateswarlu, D.; Alapati, Suresh; Che, Woo Seong

    2018-03-01

    The dissimilar joining using gas tungsten arc welding - brazing of 304 stainless steel to 5083 Al alloy had been conducted with the addition of Al-Cu eutectic filler metal. The interface microstructure formation between filler metal and substrates, and spreading of the filler metal were studied. The interface microstructure between filler metal and aluminum alloy characterized that the formation of pores and elongated grains with the initiation of micro cracks. The spreading of the liquid braze filler on stainless steel side packed the edges and appeared as convex shape, whereas a concave shape has been formed on aluminum side. The major compounds formed at the fusion zone interface were determined by using X-ray diffraction techniques and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. The micro hardness at the weld interfaces found to be higher than the substrates owing to the presence of Fe2Al5 and CuAl2 intermetallic compounds. The maximum tensile strength of the weld joints was about 95 MPa, and the tensile fracture occurred at heat affected zone on weak material of the aluminum side and/or at stainless steel/weld seam interface along intermetallic layer. The interface formation and its effect on mechanical properties of the welds during gas tungsten arc welding-brazing has been discussed.

  12. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming

    2012-01-01

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80–100 μm between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn 2 , Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg–Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: ► Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. ► Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. ► An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  13. The pulsed-gas tube, statement and perspectives; Le tube a gaz pulse, bilan et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domblides, J P; Neveau, P; Castaing-Lasvignottes, J [Laboratoire du froid du CNAM, 75 - Paris (France)

    1998-12-31

    The pulsed-gas tube has several advantages with respect to the other types of cryo-refrigerating machineries classically used to reach very low temperatures: no mobile parts moving at very low temperatures and no vibrations. However, this system discovered in 1963 is handicapped by its lack of power and by its low energy efficiency. Todays researches about pulsed-gas tubes concern: the technical adaptation of existing systems to applications where its simplicity makes it competitive, the improvement of its energetic performances (refrigerating power and range of temperatures of use), and the development of numerical models in order to better understand the functioning of the system and to optimize it. (J.S.) 19 refs.

  14. The pulsed-gas tube, statement and perspectives; Le tube a gaz pulse, bilan et perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domblides, J.P.; Neveau, P.; Castaing-Lasvignottes, J. [Laboratoire du froid du CNAM, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    The pulsed-gas tube has several advantages with respect to the other types of cryo-refrigerating machineries classically used to reach very low temperatures: no mobile parts moving at very low temperatures and no vibrations. However, this system discovered in 1963 is handicapped by its lack of power and by its low energy efficiency. Todays researches about pulsed-gas tubes concern: the technical adaptation of existing systems to applications where its simplicity makes it competitive, the improvement of its energetic performances (refrigerating power and range of temperatures of use), and the development of numerical models in order to better understand the functioning of the system and to optimize it. (J.S.) 19 refs.

  15. Pressing and tubes rolling out of tungsten of gas phase deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, Yu.M.; Kosachev, L.S.; Semiletov, S.S.; Solov'ev, V.F.; Sorkin, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of increasing ductility of tubes of tungsten fluoride using heat treatment and plastic deformation- pressing and thermal rolling are studied. When designing the processes of treatment it should be necessarily taken into account that structural state of initial blanks as well as the ratio of deformations in radial and tangential directions under pressing with a rigid needle strongly affects technological properties of pressed tubes. The columnar structure of blanks is undesirable for its embrittlement affects the pressed tubes

  16. Crystalline mesoporous tungsten oxide nanoplate monoliths synthesized by directed soft template method for highly sensitive NO{sub 2} gas sensor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoa, Nguyen Duc, E-mail: ndhoa@itims.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST) (Viet Nam); Duy, Nguyen Van [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST) (Viet Nam); Hieu, Nguyen Van, E-mail: hieu@itims.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST) (Viet Nam)

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Mesoporous WO{sub 3} nanoplate monoliths were obtained by direct templating synthesis. ► Enable effective accession of the analytic molecules for the sensor applications. ► The WO{sub 3} sensor exhibited a high performance to NO{sub 2} gas at low temperature. -- Abstract: Controllable synthesis of nanostructured metal oxide semiconductors with nanocrystalline size, porous structure, and large specific surface area is one of the key issues for effective gas sensor applications. In this study, crystalline mesoporous tungsten oxide nanoplate-like monoliths with high specific surface areas were obtained through instant direct-templating synthesis for highly sensitive nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sensor applications. The copolymer soft template was converted into a solid carbon framework by heat treatment in an inert gas prior to calcinations in air to sustain the mesoporous structure of tungsten oxide. The multidirectional mesoporous structures of tungsten oxide with small crystalline size, large specific surface area, and superior physical characteristics enabled the rapid and effective accession of analytic gas molecules. As a result, the sensor response was enhanced and the response and recovery times were reduced, in which the mesoporous tungsten oxide based gas sensor exhibited a superior response of 21,155% to 5 ppm NO{sub 2}. In addition, the developed sensor exhibited selective detection of low NO{sub 2} concentration in ammonia and ethanol at a low temperature of approximately 150 °C.

  17. Novel manufacturing process of nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals of tungsten inert gas welding by accumulative roll bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattahi, M., E-mail: fattahi.put@gmail.com [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Noei Aghaei, V. [Aerospace Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dabiri, A.R. [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirkhanlou, S. [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhavan, S.; Fattahi, Y. [Materials Engineering Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-11

    In the present work, accumulative roll bonding (ARB) was used as an effective method for manufacturing nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. After welding, the distribution of ceramic nanoparticles and mechanical properties of welds were investigated. By applying ARB, ceramic nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed in the composite filler metals. Consequently, the welds produced by these filler metals had a uniform dispersion of ceramic nanoparticles in their compositions. The test results showed that the yield strength of welds was greatly increased when using the nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals. The improvement in the yield strength was attributed to the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch and Orowan strengthening mechanisms. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals can serve as a novel filler metal for TIG welding of aluminum and its alloys.

  18. The effects of alloying elements on microstructures and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas welded AZ80 magnesium alloys joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Jiansheng; Ding, Rongrong

    2017-11-01

    The effects of alloying elements on the macrostructures, microstructures and tensile strength of AZ80 Mg alloy weldments were studied in the present study. The results indicate that with the decrease of Al element content of filler wire, the welding defects of seam are gradually eliminated and the β-Mg17Al12 phases at α-Mg boundaries are refined and become discontinuous, which are beneficial to the improvement of tensile strength. With AZ31 Mg alloy filler wire, the maximum tensile strength of AZ80 weldment is 220 MPa and fracture occurs at the welding seam of joint. It is experimentally proved that robust AZ80 Mg alloy joints can be obtained by tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process with AZ31 Mg alloy filler wire. However, further study is required to improve the microstructures and reduce welding defects of joint in order to further improve the joining strength of AZ80 Mg alloy joint.

  19. Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer and Arc-Melt Interaction in Tungsten Inert Gas Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linmin; Li, Baokuan; Liu, Lichao; Motoyama, Yuichi

    2017-04-01

    The present work develops a multi-region dynamic coupling model for fluid flow, heat transfer and arc-melt interaction in tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding using the dynamic mesh technique. The arc-weld pool unified model is developed on basis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations and the interface is tracked using the dynamic mesh method. The numerical model for arc is firstly validated by comparing the calculated temperature profiles and essential results with the former experimental data. For weld pool convection solution, the drag, Marangoni, buoyancy and electromagnetic forces are separately validated, and then taken into account. Moreover, the model considering interface deformation is adopted in a stationary TIG welding process with SUS304 stainless steel and the effect of interface deformation is investigated. The depression of weld pool center and the lifting of pool periphery are both predicted. The results show that the weld pool shape calculated with considering the interface deformation is more accurate.

  20. Corrosion characterisation of laser beam and tungsten inert gas weldment of nickel base alloys: Micro-cell technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, Geogy J.; Kain, V.; Dey, G.K.; Raja, V.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Grain matrix showed better corrosion resistance than grain boundary. • Microcell studies showed distinct corrosion behaviour of individual regions of weldment. • TIG welding resulted in increased stable anodic current density on weld fusion zone. • LB welding resulted in high stable anodic current density for heat affected zone. - Abstract: The electrochemical studies using micro-cell technique gave new understanding of electrochemical behaviour of nickel base alloys in solution annealed and welded conditions. The welding simulated regions depicted varied micro structural features. In case of tungsten inert gas (TIG) weldments, the weld fusion zone (WFZ) showed least corrosion resistance among all other regions. For laser beam (LB) weldments it was the heat-affected zone (HAZ) that showed comparatively high stable anodic current density. The high heat input of TIG welding resulted in slower heat dissipation hence increased carbide precipitation and segregation in WFZ resulting in high stable anodic current density

  1. TRANSIENT FINITE ELEMENT SIMULATION AND MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION OF AA2219 WELD JOINT USING GAS TUNGSTEN ARC WELDING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraman Arunkumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we focus on finite element simulation of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW of AA2219 aluminum alloy and the behavioral of the microstructure before and after weld. The simulations were performed using commercial COMSOL Multiphysics software. The thermal history of the weld region was studied by initially developed mathematical model. A sweep type meshing was used and transient analysis was performed for one welding cycle. The highest temperature noted was 3568 °C during welding. The welding operation was performed on 200×100×25 mm plates. Through metallurgical characterization, it was observed that a fair copper rich cellular (CRC network existed in the weld region. A small amount of intermetallic compounds like Al2Cu is observed through the XRD pattern.

  2. Effect of heat input on the microstructure and mechanical properties of gas tungsten arc welded AISI 304 stainless steel joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Subodh; Shahi, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Welding procedure is established for welding 6 mm thick AISI 304 using GTAW process. → Mechanical properties of the weld joints are influenced strongly by the heat input. → Highest tensile strength of 657.32 MPa is achieved by joints using low heat input. → Welding parameters affect heat input and hence microstructure of weld joints. → Extent of grain coarsening in the HAZ increases with increase in the heat input. -- Abstract: Influence of heat input on the microstructure and mechanical properties of gas tungsten arc welded 304 stainless steel (SS) joints was studied. Three heat input combinations designated as low heat (2.563 kJ/mm), medium heat (2.784 kJ/mm) and high heat (3.017 kJ/mm) were selected from the operating window of the gas tungsten arc welding process (GTAW) and weld joints made using these combinations were subjected to microstructural evaluations and tensile testing so as to analyze the effect of thermal arc energy on the microstructure and mechanical properties of these joints. The results of this investigation indicate that the joints made using low heat input exhibited higher ultimate tensile strength (UTS) than those welded with medium and high heat input. Significant grain coarsening was observed in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of all the joints and it was found that the extent of grain coarsening in the heat affected zone increased with increase in the heat input. For the joints investigated in this study it was also found that average dendrite length and inter-dendritic spacing in the weld zone increases with increase in the heat input which is the main reason for the observable changes in the tensile properties of the weld joints welded with different arc energy inputs.

  3. Study and development of solid fluxes for gas tungsten arc welding applied to titanium and its alloys and stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, N.

    2000-06-01

    Gas Tungsten Arc Welding uses an electric arc between the refractory tungsten electrode and the plates to be welded under an argon shielding gas. As a result, the joint quality is excellent, no pollution nor defects are to be feared, consequently this process is used in nuclear, aeronautic, chemical and food industries. Despite of this good qualities, GTAW is limited because of, on the one side, a poor penetrating weld pool and, on the other side, a week productivity rate. Indeed, up to 3 mm thick plates, machining and filler metal is needed. Multiple runs increase the defect's risks, the manufactory time and increase the deformations and the heat affected zone. The goal of this study is to break through this limits without any device investment. Active GTA welding (or ATIG) is a new technique with GTA device and an activating flux to be spread on the upper plate before welding. The arc, by plasma electrochemical equilibrium modifications, and the pool with the inner connective flows inversion, allow 7 mm thick joints in one run without edges machining or filler metal for both stainless steel and titanium alloys. This manuscript describes the development of these fluxes, highlights the several phenomena and presents the possibilities of this new process. This work, in collaboration with B.S.L. industries, leads to two flux formulations (stainless steel and titanium alloys) now in a commercial phase with CASTOLIN S.A. Moreover, B.S.L.industries produces a pressure device (nitrate column) with the ATIG process using more than 2800 ATIG welds. (author)

  4. Pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Sophia

    A phenomenological picture of pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water is produced by combining electrical, spectroscopic, and imaging methods. The discharge is generated by applying one microsecond long 5 to 20 kilovolt pulses between the needle and disk electrodes submerged in water. A gas bubble is generated at the tip of the needle electrode. The study includes detailed experimental investigation of the discharge in argon bubbles and a brief look at the discharge in oxygen bubbles. Imaging, electrical characteristics, and time-resolved optical emission data point to a fast streamer propagation mechanism and formation of a plasma channel in the bubble. Spectroscopic methods based on line intensity ratios and Boltzmann plots of line intensities of argon, atomic hydrogen, and argon ions and the examination of molecular emission bands from molecular nitrogen and hydroxyl radicals provide evidence of both fast beam-like electrons and slow thermalized ones with temperatures of 0.6 -- 0.8 electron-volts. The collisional nature of plasma at atmospheric pressure affects the decay rates of optical emission. Spectroscopic study of rotational-vibrational bands of hydroxyl radical and molecular nitrogen gives vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures of the discharge of about 0.9 and 0.1 electron-volt, respectively. Imaging and electrical evidence show that discharge charge is deposited on the bubble wall and water serves as a dielectric barrier for the field strength and time scales of this experiment. Comparing the electrical and imaging information for consecutive pulses applied at a frequency of 1 Hz indicates that each discharge proceeds as an entirely new process with no memory of the previous discharge aside from long-lived chemical species, such as ozone and oxygen. Intermediate values for the discharge gap and pulse duration, low repetition rate, and unidirectional character of the applied voltage pulses make the discharge process here unique

  5. Development of Long-Lifetime Pulsed Gas Valves for Pulsed Electric Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Wendel M.; Crapuchettes, John M.; Addona, Brad M.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2015-01-01

    It is advantageous for gas-fed pulsed electric thrusters to employ pulsed valves so propellant is only flowing to the device during operation. The propellant utilization of the thruster will be maximized when all the gas injected into the thruster is acted upon by the fields produced by the electrical pulse. Gas that is injected too early will diffuse away from the thruster before the electrical pulse can act to accelerate the propellant. Gas that is injected too late will miss being accelerated by the already-completed electrical pulse. As a consequence, the valve must open quickly and close equally quickly, only remaining open for a short duration. In addition, the valve must have only a small amount of volume between the sealing body and the thruster so the front and back ends of the pulse are as coincident as possible with the valve cycling, with very little latent propellant remaining in the feed lines after the valve is closed. For a real mission of interest, a pulsed thruster can be expected to pulse at least 10(exp 10) - 10(exp 11) times, setting the range for the number of times a valve must open and close. The valves described in this paper have been fabricated and tested for operation in an inductive pulsed plasma thruster (IPPT) for in-space propulsion. In general, an IPPT is an electrodeless space propulsion device where a capacitor is charged to an initial voltage and then discharged, producing a high-current pulse through a coil. The field produced by this pulse ionizes propellant, inductively driving current in a plasma located near the face of the coil. Once the plasma is formed, it can be accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity by the electromagnetic Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the induced plasma current and the magnetic field produced by the current in the coil. The valve characteristics needed for the IPPT application require a fast-acting valve capable of a minimum of 10(exp 10) valve actuation cycles. Since

  6. Effect of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Parameters on Hydrogen-Assisted Cracking of Type 321 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenak, Paul; Unigovski, Yaakov; Shneck, Roni

    2016-05-01

    The susceptibility of AISI type 321 stainless steel welded by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process to hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC) was studied in a tensile test combined with in situ cathodic charging. Specimen charging causes a decrease in ductility of both the as-received and welded specimens. The mechanical properties of welds depend on welding parameters. For example, the ultimate tensile strength and ductility increase with growing shielding gas (argon) rate. More severe decrease in the ductility was obtained after post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). In welded steels, in addition to discontinuous grain boundary carbides (M23C6) and dense distribution of metal carbides MC ((Ti, Nb)C) precipitated in the matrix, the appearance of delta-ferrite phase was observed. The fracture of sensitized specimens was predominantly intergranular, whereas the as-welded specimens exhibited mainly transgranular regions. High-dislocation density regions and stacking faults were found in delta-ferrite formed after welding. Besides, thin stacking fault plates and epsilon-martensite were found in the austenitic matrix after the cathodic charging.

  7. Analysis of effect of temperature gradients on surface-tension phenomena in gas-tungsten-arc welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.A.; Chien, P.S.J.

    1982-10-01

    Fluid motion directed by surface tension is considered as a contributor to heat penetration in a weld pool. The potential phenomena at the gas-liquid interface were analyzed, and the dependence of surface motion on temperature in the gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welding process was examined. An existing heat-transfer model was used and was able to predict weld size to +- 50% of the actual value. A momentum-transfer equation was derived by considering the contribution of Lorentz force. The momentum boundary condition was developed and was able to predict the Marangoni effect. The magnitude of surface-tension-driven force is comparable to the gravitational force on one gram. An empirical approach was proposed to couple heat-transfer and momentum-transfer phenomena. A dimensional analysis identified the pertinent dimensionless groups as Reynolds, Weber, Froude, Peclet, and Power numbers and a dimensionless velocity. A simplified form of the correction was developed by combining dimensionless groups to yield a correlation with the Bond, Prandtl, and modified power numbers. Future experimental work was proposed to test the functionality of the dimensionless groups

  8. In situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of chemical compositions in stainless steels during tungsten inert gas welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taparli, Ugur Alp; Jacobsen, Lars; Griesche, Axel; Michalik, Katarzyna; Mory, David; Kannengiesser, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was combined with a bead-on-plate Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding process for the in situ measurement of chemical compositions in austenitic stainless steels during welding. Monitoring the weld pool's chemical composition allows governing the weld pool solidification behavior, and thus enables the reduction of susceptibility to weld defects. Conventional inspection methods for weld seams (e.g. ultrasonic inspection) cannot be performed during the welding process. The analysis system also allows in situ study of the correlation between the occurrence of weld defects and changes in the chemical composition in the weld pool or in the two-phase region where solid and liquid phase coexist. First experiments showed that both the shielding Ar gas and the welding arc plasma have a significant effect on the selected Cr II, Ni II and Mn II characteristic emissions, namely an artificial increase of intensity values via unspecific emission in the spectra. In situ investigations showed that this artificial intensity increase reached a maximum in presence of weld plume. Moreover, an explicit decay has been observed with the termination of the welding plume due to infrared radiation during sample cooling. Furthermore, LIBS can be used after welding to map element distribution. For austenitic stainless steels, Mn accumulations on both sides of the weld could be detected between the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the base material.

  9. Room temperature NO2 gas sensing of Au-loaded tungsten oxide nanowires/porous silicon hybrid structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Deng-Feng; Liang Ji-Ran; Li Chang-Qing; Yan Wen-Jun; Hu Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report an enhanced nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) gas sensor based on tungsten oxide (WO 3 ) nanowires/porous silicon (PS) decorated with gold (Au) nanoparticles. Au-loaded WO 3 nanowires with diameters of 10 nm–25 nm and lengths of 300 nm–500 nm are fabricated by the sputtering method on a porous silicon substrate. The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) micrographs show that Au nanoparticles are uniformly distributed on the surfaces of WO 3 nanowires. The effect of the Au nanoparticles on the NO 2 -sensing performance of WO 3 nanowires/porous silicon is investigated over a low concentration range of 0.2 ppm–5 ppm of NO 2 at room temperature (25 °C). It is found that the 10-Å Au-loaded WO 3 nanowires/porous silicon-based sensor possesses the highest gas response characteristic. The underlying mechanism of the enhanced sensing properties of the Au-loaded WO 3 nanowires/porous silicon is also discussed. (paper)

  10. Study on characteristics of valves for pulsed gas feed into a cyclotron multicharged ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogomolov, S.L.; Efremov, A.A.; Koval'chuk, I.M.; Kutner, V.B.; Pasyuk, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    Different valves (with rotating drum, piezoelectric and electromagnetic) for pulsed gas feed into cyclotron multicharged ion arc source are described. It is shown that piezoelectric and electromagnetic valves provide a possibility of regulating in a wide range the gas flow pulse parameters

  11. Effect of different electrode tip angles with tilted torch in stationary gas tungsten arc welding: A 3D simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abid, M.; Parvez, S.; Nash, D.H.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effect of different tip angles (30°, 60°, 90° and 120°) on the arc and weld pool behavior is analyzed in 2 mm and 5 mm arc lengths with tilted (70°) torch. Arc temperature, velocity, current density, heat flux and gas shear are investigated in the arc region and pool convection and puddle shapes are studied in the weld pool region. The arc temperature at the tungsten electrode is found the maximum with sharp tip and decreases as the tip angle increases. The arc temperature on the anode (workpiece) surface becomes concentrated with increase in tip angle. The arc velocity and gas shear stress are observed large with sharp tip and decreasing as the tip angle increases. Current density on the anode surface does not change with tip angle and observed almost the same in all the tip angles in both 2 mm and 5 mm arc lengths. Heat flux due to conduction and convection is observed more sensitive to the tip angle and decreases as the tip angle increases. The electromagnetic force is slightly observed increasing and the buoyancy force is observed slightly decreasing with increase in tip angle. Analyzing each driving force in the weld pool individually shows that the gas drag and Marangoni forces are much stronger than the electromagnetic and buoyancy forces. The weld pool shape is observed wide and shallow in sharp and narrow and deep in large tip angle. Increasing the arc length does not change the weld pool width; however, the weld pool depth significantly changes with arc length and is observed deep in short arc length. The arc properties and weld pool shapes are observed wide ahead of the electrode tip in the weld direction due to 70° torch angle. Good agreement is observed between the numerical and experimental weld pool shapes

  12. Compact permanent magnet H⁺ ECR ion source with pulse gas valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashita, Y; Tongu, H; Fuwa, Y; Ichikawa, M

    2016-02-01

    Compact H(+) ECR ion source using permanent magnets is under development. Switching the hydrogen gas flow in pulse operations can reduce the gas loads to vacuum evacuation systems. A specially designed piezo gas valve chops the gas flow quickly. A 6 GHz ECR ion source equipped with the piezo gas valve is tested. The gas flow was measured by a fast ion gauge and a few ms response time is obtained.

  13. Microstructure and abrasive wear properties of M(Cr,Fe7C3 carbides reinforced high-chromium carbon coating produced by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner BUYTOZ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, high-chromium ferrochromium carbon hypereutectic alloy powder was coated on AISI 4340 steel by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process. The coating layers were analyzed by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Depending on the gas tungsten arc welding pa-rameters, either hypoeutectic or hypereutectic microstructures were produced. Wear tests of the coatings were carried out on a pin-on-disc apparatus as function of contact load. Wear rates of the all coating layers were decreased as a function of the loading. The improvement of abrasive wear resistance of the coating layer could be attributed to the high hardness of the hypereutectic M7C3 carbides in the microstruc-ture. As a result, the microstructure of surface layers, hardness and abrasive wear behaviours showed different characteristics due to the gas tungsten arc welding parameters.

  14. Demonstration of radiation pulse shaping with nested-tungsten-wire-array pinches for high-yield inertial confinement fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneo, M E; Vesey, R A; Sinars, D B; Chittenden, J P; Waisman, E M; Lemke, R W; Lebedev, S V; Bliss, D E; Stygar, W A; Porter, J L; Schroen, D G; Mazarakis, M G; Chandler, G A; Mehlhorn, T A

    2005-10-28

    Nested wire-array pinches are shown to generate soft x-ray radiation pulse shapes required for three-shock isentropic compression and hot-spot ignition of high-yield inertial confinement fusion capsules. We demonstrate a reproducible and tunable foot pulse (first shock) produced by interaction of the outer and inner arrays. A first-step pulse (second shock) is produced by inner array collision with a central CH2 foam target. Stagnation of the inner array at the axis produces the third shock. Capsules optimized for several of these shapes produce 290-900 MJ fusion yields in 1D simulations.

  15. Microstructure formation in partially melted zone during gas tungsten arc welding of AZ91 Mg cast alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Tianping; Chen, Zhan W.; Gao Wei

    2008-01-01

    During gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of AZ91 Mg cast alloy, constitutional liquid forms locally in the original interdendritic regions in the partially melted zone (PMZ). The PMZ re-solidification behaviour has not been well understood. In this study, the gradual change of the re-solidification microstructure within PMZ from base metal side to weld metal side was characterised. High cooling rate experiments using Gleeble thermal simulator were also conducted to understand the morphological change of the α-Mg/β-Mg 17 Al 12 phase interface formed during re-solidification after partial melting. It was found that the original partially divorced eutectic structure has become a more regular eutectic phase in most of the PMZ, although close to the fusion boundary the re-solidified eutectic is again a divorced one. Proceeding the eutectic re-solidification, if the degree of partial melting is sufficiently high, α-Mg re-solidified with a cellular growth, resulting in a serrated interface between α-Mg and α-Mg/β-Mg 17 Al 12 in the weld sample and between α-Mg and β-Mg 17 Al 12 (fully divorced eutectic) in Gleeble samples. The morphological changes affected by the peak temperature and cooling rate are also explained

  16. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and pitting corrosion behaviour of similar and dissimilar stainless steel gas tungsten arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Dilkush; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to weld dissimilar alloys of 5mm thick plates i.e., austenitic stainless steel (316L) and duplex stainless steel (2205) and compared with that of similar welds. Welds are made with conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process with two different filler wires namely i.e., 309L and 2209. Welds were characterized using optical microscopy to observe the microstructural changes and correlate with mechanical properties using hardness, tensile and impact testing. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out to observe the pitting corrosion behaviour in different regions of the welds. Results of the present study established that change in filler wire composition resulted in microstructural variation in all the welds with different morphology of ferrite and austenite. Welds made with 2209 filler showed plate like widmanstatten austenite (WA) nucleated at grain boundaries. Compared to similar stainless steel welds inferior mechanical properties was observed in dissimilar stainless steel welds. Pitting corrosion resistance is observed to be low for dissimilar stainless steel welds when compared to similar stainless steel welds. Overall study showed that similar duplex stainless steel welds having favorable microstructure and resulted in better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Relatively dissimilar stainless steel welds made with 309L filler obtained optimum combination of mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance when compared to 2209 filler and is recommended for industrial practice.

  17. Effect of PWHT on Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Behaviour of Gas Tungsten Arc Welds of IN718 Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilkush; Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work aims to improve corrosion resistance and mechanical behavior of the welds with suitable post weld heat treatment i.e. direct aging and solutionizing treatments (980STA, 1080STA). Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been performed on Inconel 718 (IN718) nickel based super alloy plates with 3mm thickness. The structural –property relationship of the post weld heat treated samples is judged by correlating the microstructural changes with observed mechanical behavior and pitting corrosion resistance of the welds As-recevied, direct aging (DA), 980STA,1080STA were studied. Welds were characterized for microstructure changes with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM).Vickers micro- hardness tester was used to measure the hardness of the weldments. Potential-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance in 3.5%NaCl (Sodium chloride) solution at 30°C.Results of the present study established that post weld heat treatments resulted in promoting the element segregation diffusion and resolve them from brittle laves particles in the matrix. Increased precipitation of strengthening phases lead to a significant increase in fusion zone hardness of 1080STA post weld heat treated condition compared to as welded, direct aged, 980STA conditions. Due to significant changes in the microstructural behavior of 1080STA condition resulted in superior pitting corrosion resistance than 980STA, direct aged and as- recevied conditions of IN718 GTA welds

  18. Biomarkers of exposure to stainless steel tungsten inert gas welding fumes and the effect of exposure on exhaled breath condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccelli, Maria Grazia; Goldoni, Matteo; Andreoli, Roberta; Mozzoni, Paola; Pinelli, Silvana; Alinovi, Rossella; Selis, Luisella; Mutti, Antonio; Corradi, Massimo

    2018-08-01

    The respiratory tract is the main target organ of the inhaled hexavalent chromium (Cr-VI) and nickel (Ni) contained in stainless steel (SS) welding fumes (WFs). The aim of this study was to investigate the Cr and Ni content of the exhaled breath condensate (EBC) of SS tungsten inert gas (TIG) welders, and relate their concentrations with oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers. EBC and urine from 100 SS TIG welders were collected pre-(T 0 ) and post-shift (T 1 ) on a Friday, and pre-shift (T 2 ) on the following Monday morning. Both EBC and urinary Cr concentrations were higher at T 1 (0.08 μg/L and 0.71 μg/g creatinine) and T 0 (0.06 μg/L and 0.74 μg/g creatinine) than at T 2 (below the limit of detection [LOD] and 0.59 μg/g creatinine), and EBC Ni concentrations generally remained welding also play a role in generating lung oxidative stress. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hybrid laser-TIG welding, laser beam welding and gas tungsten arc welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Liming; Wang Jifeng; Song Gang

    2004-01-01

    Welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy was carried out using hybrid laser-TIG (LATIG) welding, laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc (TIG) welding. The weldability and microstructure of magnesium AZ31B alloy welded using LATIG, LBW and TIG were investigated by OM and EMPA. The experimental results showed that the welding speed of LATIG was higher than that of TIG, which was caught up with LBW. Besides, the penetration of LATIG doubles that of TIG, and was four times that of LBW. In addition, arc stability was improved in hybrid of laser-TIG welding compared with using the TIG welding alone, especially at high welding speed and under low TIG current. It was found that the heat affect zone of joint was only observed in TIG welding, and the size of grains in it was evidently coarse. In fusion zone, the equiaxed grains exist, whose size was the smallest welded by LBW, and was the largest by TIG welding. It was also found that Mg concentration of the fusion zone was lower than that of the base one by EPMA in three welding processes

  20. Effect of location on microstructure and mechanical properties of additive layer manufactured Inconel 625 using gas tungsten arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.F. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Special Welding Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); Sun, Q.J., E-mail: qjsun@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Special Welding Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); Wang, H. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, J.P. [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Special Welding Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); China Nuclear Industry 23 Construction Co., Ltd., Beijing 101300 (China); Feng, J.C. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Special Welding Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China)

    2016-10-31

    Additive layer manufacturing (ALM), using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) as heat source, is a promising technology in producing Inconel 625 components due to significant cost savings, high deposition rate and convenience of processing. With the purpose of revealing how microstructure and mechanical properties are affected by the location within the manufactured wall component, the present study has been carried out. The manufactured Inconel 625 consists of cellular grains without secondary dendrites in the near-substrate region, columnar dendrites structure oriented upwards in the layer bands, followed by the transition from directional dendrites to equiaxed grain in the top region. With the increase in deposited height, segregation behavior of alloying elements Nb and Mo constantly strengthens with maximal evolution in the top region. The primary dendrite arm spacing has a well coherence with the content of Laves phase. The microhardness and tensile strength show obvious variation in different regions. The microhardness and tensile strength of near-substrate region are superior to that of layer bands and top region. The results are further explained in detail through the weld pool behavior and temperature field measurement.

  1. Effect of location on microstructure and mechanical properties of additive layer manufactured Inconel 625 using gas tungsten arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.F.; Sun, Q.J.; Wang, H.; Liu, J.P.; Feng, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Additive layer manufacturing (ALM), using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) as heat source, is a promising technology in producing Inconel 625 components due to significant cost savings, high deposition rate and convenience of processing. With the purpose of revealing how microstructure and mechanical properties are affected by the location within the manufactured wall component, the present study has been carried out. The manufactured Inconel 625 consists of cellular grains without secondary dendrites in the near-substrate region, columnar dendrites structure oriented upwards in the layer bands, followed by the transition from directional dendrites to equiaxed grain in the top region. With the increase in deposited height, segregation behavior of alloying elements Nb and Mo constantly strengthens with maximal evolution in the top region. The primary dendrite arm spacing has a well coherence with the content of Laves phase. The microhardness and tensile strength show obvious variation in different regions. The microhardness and tensile strength of near-substrate region are superior to that of layer bands and top region. The results are further explained in detail through the weld pool behavior and temperature field measurement.

  2. Effect of Microstructure on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel Gas Tungsten Arc Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    Present work is aimed to improve stress corrosion cracking resistance of high nitrogen steel and its welds. An attempt to weld high nitrogen steel of 5 mm thick plate using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with three high strength age hardenable fillers i.e., 11-10 PH filler, PH 13- 8Mo and maraging grade of MDN 250 filler is made. Welds were characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers hardness testing of the welds was carried out to study the mechanical behaviour of welds. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were done to determine pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl solution. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing was carried out using constant load type machine with applied stress of 50% yield strength and in 45% MgCl2 solution boiling at 155°C. The results of the present investigation established that improvement in resistance to stress corrosion cracking was observed for PH 13- 8Mo GTA welds when compared to 11-10 PH and MDN 250 GTA welds. However, All GTA welds failed in the weld interface region. This may be attributed to relatively lower pitting potential in weld interface which acts as active site and the initiation source of pitting.

  3. Recrystallization and grain growth behavior of rolled tungsten under VDE-like short pulse high heat flux loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Y.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Krieger, K.; Luo, G.-N.; Xu, H.Y.; Fu, B.Q.; Li, M.; Liu, W.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Recrystallization temperature of a rolled W was ∼2480 °C under applied HHF loads. ► Fine grains were obtained under HHF loads with appropriate short pulse length. ► With increasing pulse length, the recrystallized grains significantly grew larger. ► A linear relationship between ln d and 1/T max was found. ► Activation energy for grain growth in T evolution up to T max in 1.5 s was obtained. -- Abstract: Short pulse heat loads expected for vertical displacement events (VDEs) in ITER were applied in the high heat flux (HHF) test facility GLADIS at IPP-Garching onto samples of rolled W. Pulsed neutral beams with the central heat flux of 23 MW/m 2 were applied for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 s, respectively. Rapid recrystallization of the adiabatically loaded 3 mm thick samples was observed when the pulse duration was up to 1.0 s. Grains grew markedly following recrystallization with increasing pulse length. The recrystallization temperature and temperature dependence of the recrystallized grain size were also investigated. The results showed that the recrystallization temperature of the W grade was around 2480 °C under the applied heat loading condition, which was nearly 1150 °C higher than the conventional recrystallization temperature, and the grains were much finer. A linear relationship between the logarithm of average grain size (ln d) and the inverse of maximum surface temperature (1/T max ) was found and accordingly the activation energy for grain growth in temperature evolution up to T max in 1.5 s of the short pulse HHF load was deduced to be 4.1 eV. This provided an effective clue to predict the structure evolution under short pulse HHF loads

  4. Recrystallization and grain growth behavior of rolled tungsten under VDE-like short pulse high heat flux loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Krieger, K.; Luo, G.-N.; Xu, H. Y.; Fu, B. Q.; Li, M.; Liu, W.

    2013-02-01

    Short pulse heat loads expected for vertical displacement events (VDEs) in ITER were applied in the high heat flux (HHF) test facility GLADIS at IPP-Garching onto samples of rolled W. Pulsed neutral beams with the central heat flux of 23 MW/m2 were applied for 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 s, respectively. Rapid recrystallization of the adiabatically loaded 3 mm thick samples was observed when the pulse duration was up to 1.0 s. Grains grew markedly following recrystallization with increasing pulse length. The recrystallization temperature and temperature dependence of the recrystallized grain size were also investigated. The results showed that the recrystallization temperature of the W grade was around 2480 °C under the applied heat loading condition, which was nearly 1150 °C higher than the conventional recrystallization temperature, and the grains were much finer. A linear relationship between the logarithm of average grain size (ln d) and the inverse of maximum surface temperature (1/Tmax) was found and accordingly the activation energy for grain growth in temperature evolution up to Tmax in 1.5 s of the short pulse HHF load was deduced to be 4.1 eV. This provided an effective clue to predict the structure evolution under short pulse HHF loads.

  5. Structural and optical properties of nano-structured tungsten-doped ZnO thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngom, B.D. [African Laser Centre, CSIR campus, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria (South Africa); Groupes de Laboratoires de physique des Solides et Sciences des Materiaux, Faculte des sciences et Techniques Universite Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar (UCAD), B.P. 25114 Dakar-Fann Dakar (Senegal); NANO-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Group, iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation (South Africa)], E-mail: bdngom@tlabs.ac.za; Mpahane, T. [NANO-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Group, iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation (South Africa); Manyala, N. [Department of Physics and Electronics National University of Lesotho (Lesotho); Nemraoui, O. [NANO-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Group, iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation (South Africa); Buttner, U. [Engineering Department, University of Stellenbosch (South Africa); Kana, J.B. [Department of Physique University of Yaounde 1 (Cameroon); Fasasi, A.Y. [Centre for Energy Research and Development, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State (Nigeria); Maaza, M. [African Laser Centre, CSIR campus, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria (South Africa); NANO-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Group, iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation (South Africa); Beye, A.C. [African Laser Centre, CSIR campus, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria (South Africa); Groupes de Laboratoires de physique des Solides et Sciences des Materiaux, Faculte des sciences et Techniques Universite Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar (UCAD), B.P. 25114 Dakar-Fann Dakar (Senegal)

    2009-01-15

    Novel highly c-oriented tungsten-doped zinc oxide (WZO) thin films with 1 wt% were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique on corning 1737F glass substrate. The effects of laser energy on the structural, morphological as well as optical transmission properties of the films were studied. The films were highly transparent with average transmittance exceeding 87% in the wavelength region lying between 400 and 2500 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) results indicated that the WZO films had c-axis preferred orientation with wurtzite structure. Film thickness and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the (0 0 2) peaks of the films were found to be dependent on laser fluence. The composition determined through Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) appeared to be independent of the laser fluence. By assuming a direct band gap transition, the band gap values of 3.36, 3.34 and 3.31 eV were obtained for corresponding laser fluence of 1, 1.7 and 2.7 J cm{sup -2}, respectively. Compared with the reported undoped ZnO band gap value of 3.37 eV, it is conjectured that the observed low band gap values obtained in this study may be attributable to tungsten incorporation in the films as well as the increase in laser fluence. The high transparency makes the films useful as optical windows while the high band gap values support the idea that the films could be good candidates for optoelectronic applications.

  6. Laser, tungsten inert gas, and metal active gas welding of DP780 steel: Comparison of hardness, tensile properties and fatigue resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hun; Park, Sung Hyuk; Kwon, Hyuk Sun; Kim, Gyo Sung; Lee, Chong Soo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We report the mechanical properties of DP780 steel welded by three methods. • The size of the welded zone increases with heat input (MAG > TIG > laser). • The hardness of the welded zone increases with cooling rate (laser > TIG > MAG). • Tensile and fatigue properties are strongly dependent on welding method. • Crack initiation sites depend on the microstructural features of the welded zone. - Abstract: The microstructural characteristics, tensile properties and low-cycle fatigue properties of a dual-phase steel (DP780) were investigated following its joining by three methods: laser welding, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, and metal active gas (MAG) welding. Through this, it was found that the size of the welded zone increases with greater heat input (MAG > TIG > laser), whereas the hardness of the weld metal (WM) and heat-affected zone (HAZ) increases with cooling rate (laser > TIG > MAG). Consequently, laser- and TIG-welded steels exhibit higher yield strength than the base metal due to a substantially harder WM. In contrast, the strength of MAG-welded steel is reduced by a broad and soft WM and HAZ. The fatigue life of laser-and TIG-welded steel was similar, with both being greater than that of MAG-welded steel; however, the fatigue resistance of all welds was inferior to that of the non-welded base metal. Finally, crack initiation sites were found to differ depending on the microstructural characteristics of the welded zone, as well as the tensile and cyclic loading

  7. Gas Sensing Properties of Metal Doped WO3 Thin Film Sensors Prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition and DC Sputtering Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Md. Mosharraf Hossain; Ueda, Tsuyoshi; Ikegami, Tomoaki; Ebihara, Kenji

    2006-10-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) thin films gas sensors were prepared by the KrF excimer pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. The films were prepared on the quartz glass, silicon and also on the Al2O3 sensor substrates with platinum interdigitated electrodes. The effect of doping of the platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd) or gold (Au) on the WO3 thin film was also investigated. These metals were doped to the WO3 thin film by the DC sputtering process during the PLD. The substrate temperature and the oxygen pressure were 400 °C and 100 mTorr, respectively, during the deposition. The films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The sensitivity of the prepared sensors to 60 ppm NO gas was examined using the two terminal resistance method in a chamber at atmospheric pressure and operating temperatures of 25-350 °C. The sensitivity of the WO3 thin films doped with Pt, Pd, or Au was found to be higher than that of the undoped WO3 thin film.

  8. The Role of Spraying Parameters and Inert Gas Shrouding in Hybrid Water-Argon Plasma Spraying of Tungsten and Copper for Nuclear Fusion Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Kavka, Tetyana; Bertolissi, Gabriele; Ctibor, Pavel; Vilémová, Monika; Mušálek, Radek; Nevrlá, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 5 (2013), s. 744-755 ISSN 1059-9630 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI2/702; GA TA ČR TA01010300 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : plasma spraying * tungsten * copper * inert gas shrouding * water-argon plasma torch * gas shroud * hybrid plasma torch * influence of spray parameters * nuclear fusion * oxidation Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.491, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs11666-013-9895-x.pdf

  9. Development of a Gas-Fed Pulse Detonation Research Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Hutt, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In response to the growing need for empirical data on pulse detonation engine performance and operation, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and placed into operation a low-cost gas-fed pulse detonation research engine. The guiding design strategy was to achieve a simple and flexible research apparatus, which was inexpensive to build and operate. As such, the engine was designed to operate as a heat sink device, and testing was limited to burst-mode operation with run durations of a few seconds. Wherever possible, maximum use was made of standard off-the-shelf industrial or automotive components. The 5-cm diameter primary tube is about 90-cm long and has been outfitted with a multitude of sensor and optical ports. The primary tube is fed by a coaxial injector through an initiator tube, which is inserted directly into the injector head face. Four auxiliary coaxial injectors are also integrated into the injector head assembly. All propellant flow is controlled with industrial solenoid valves. An automotive electronic ignition system was adapted for use, and spark plugs are mounted in both tubes so that a variety of ignition schemes can be examined. A microprocessor-based fiber-optic engine control system was developed to provide precise control over valve and ignition timing. Initial shakedown testing with hydrogen/oxygen mixtures verified the need for Schelkin spirals in both the initiator and primary tubes to ensure rapid development of the detonation wave. Measured pressure wave time-of-flight indicated detonation velocities of 2.4 km/sec and 2.2 km/sec in the initiator and primary tubes, respectively. These values implied a fuel-lean mixture corresponding to an H2 volume fraction near 0.5. The axial distribution for the detonation velocity was found to be essentially constant along the primary tube. Time-resolved thrust profiles were also acquired for both underfilled and overfilled tube conditions. These profiles are consistent with previous time

  10. High-performance gas sensing achieved by mesoporous tungsten oxide mesocrystals with increased oxygen vacancies

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Dong

    2013-01-01

    The inner structure of W18O49 mesocrystals was observed by electron microscopy with the help of ultramicrotomy and focused ion beam techniques. The results showed that these mesocrystals contain irregular mesopores formed through partial fusion of self-assembled nanowires, and consequently have long-range structural ordering in one dimension and short-range ordering in the other two dimensions. The W18O 49 mesocrystals exhibit superior performance in gas sensing applications, which is considered to be associated with the presence of more oxygen vacancy sites in the unique mesoporous structure. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Effect of post-weld heat treatment and electrolytic plasma processing on tungsten inert gas welded AISI 4140 alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewan, Mohammad W.; Liang, Jiandong; Wahab, M.A.; Okeil, Ayman M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of PWHT and EPP were explored on TIG welded AISI4140 alloy steel. • All welded samples were checked with PAUT and ensured defect-free before testing. • Residual stresses, hardness, and tensile properties were measured experimentally. • PWHT resulted higher ductility but lower tensile strength for grain refinement. • EPP-treated samples showed higher tensile strength but lower ductility. - Abstract: Post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) is commonly adopted on welded joints and structures to relieve post-weld residual stresses; and restore the mechanical properties and structural integrity. An electrolytic plasma process (EPP) has been developed to improve corrosion behavior and wear resistance of structural materials; and can be employed in other applications and surface modifications aspects. In this study the effects of PWHT and EPP on the residual stresses, micro-hardness, microstructures, and uniaxial tensile properties are explored on tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded AISI-4140 alloys steel with SAE-4130 chromium–molybdenum alloy welding filler rod. For rational comparison all of the welded samples are checked with nondestructive Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing (PAUT) and to ensure defect-free samples before testing. Residual stresses are assessed with ultrasonic testing at different distances from weld center line. PWHT resulted in relief of tensile residual stress due to grain refinement. As a consequence higher ductility but lower strength existed in PWHT samples. In comparison, EPP-treated samples revealed lower residual stresses, but no significant variation on the grain refinement. Consequently, EPP-treated specimens exhibited higher tensile strength but lower ductility and toughness for the martensitic formation due to the rapid heating and quenching effects. EPP was also applied on PWHT samples, but which did not reveal any substantial effect on the tensile properties after PWHT at 650 °C. Finally the microstructures and

  12. Prepulse effect on intense femtosecond laser pulse propagation in gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giulietti, Antonio; Tomassini, Paolo; Galimberti, Marco; Giulietti, Danilo; Gizzi, Leonida A.; Koester, Petra; Labate, Luca; Ceccotti, Tiberio; D'Oliveira, Pascal; Auguste, Thierry; Monot, Pascal; Martin, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of an ultrashort laser pulse can be affected by the light reaching the medium before the pulse. This can cause a serious drawback to possible applications. The propagation in He of an intense 60-fs pulse delivered by a Ti:sapphire laser in the chirped pulse amplification (CPA) mode has been investigated in conditions of interest for laser-plasma acceleration of electrons. The effects of both nanosecond amplified spontaneous emission and picosecond pedestals have been clearly identified. There is evidence that such effects are basically of refractive nature and that they are not detrimental for the propagation of a CPA pulse focused to moderately relativistic intensity. The observations are fully consistent with numerical simulations and can contribute to the search of a stable regime for laser acceleration

  13. Initiation of ignition by the action of a high-current pulsed discharge on a gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starikovskii, AY

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of nonthermal initiation of chemical reactions by a uniform pulsed nanosecond discharge is demonstrated. Dependences of variation of the ignition delay on initial conditions are obtained. It is shown that the main role in combustion initiation under conditions of a pulsed gas

  14. Impact of Dissociation and Sensible Heat Release on Pulse Detonation and Gas Turbine Engine Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2001-01-01

    A thermodynamic cycle analysis of the effect of sensible heat release on the relative performance of pulse detonation and gas turbine engines is presented. Dissociation losses in the PDE (Pulse Detonation Engine) are found to cause a substantial decrease in engine performance parameters.

  15. Intense microwave pulse propagation through gas breakdown plasmas in a waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    High-power microwave pulse-compression techniques are used to generate 2.856 GHz pulses which are propagated in a TE 10 mode through a gas filled section of waveguide, where the pulses interact with self-generated gas-breakdown plasmas. Pulse envelopes transmitted through the plasmas, with duration varying from 2 ns to greater than 1 μs, and peak powers of a few kW to nearly 100 MW, are measured as a function of incident pulse and gas pressure for air, nitrogen, and helium. In addition, the spatial and temporal development of the optical radiation emitted by the breakdown plasmas are measured. For transmitted pulse durations ≥ 100 ns, good agreement is found with both theory and existing measurements. For transmitted pulse duration as short as 2 ns (less than 10 rf cycles), a two-dimensional model is used in which the electrons in the plasma are treated as a fluid whose interactions with the microwave pulse are governed by a self-consistent set of fluid equations and Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic field. The predictions of this model for air are compared with the experimental results over a pressure range of 0.8 torr to 300 torr. Good agreement is obtained above about 1 torr pressure, demonstrating that microwave pulse propagation above the breakdown threshold can be accurately modeled on this time scale. 63 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Studies on gas breakdown in pulsed radio frequency atmospheric pressure glow discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, W. G.; Jian, S. J.; Yao, J.; Ding, Z. F.

    2014-01-01

    In pulsed RF atmospheric pressure glow discharges, the gas breakdown judged by the rapid drop in the amplitude of the pulsed RF voltage is no longer universally true. The steep increment of the plasma-absorbed RF power is proposed to determine the gas breakdown. The averaged plasma-absorbed RF power over a pulse period is used to evaluate effects of the preceding pulsed RF discharge on the breakdown voltage of the following one, finding that the breakdown voltage decreases with the increment in the averaged plasma-absorbed RF power under constant pulse duty ratio. Effects of the pulse off-time on the breakdown voltage and the breakdown delay time are also studied. The obtained dependence of the breakdown voltage on the pulse off-time is indicative of the transitional plasma diffusion processes in the afterglow. The breakdown voltage varies rapidly as the plasma diffuses fast in the region of moderate pulse off-time. The contribution of nitrogen atom recombination at the alumina surface is demonstrated in the prolonged memory effect on the breakdown delay time vs. the pulse off-time and experimentally validated by introducing a trace amount of nitrogen into argon at short and long pulse off-times

  17. Ozone Synthesis Efficiency Upgrading in the Pulsed Point-to-Plane Gas Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golota, V.I.; Zavada, L.M.; Kotyukov, O.V.; Polyakov, A.V.; Pugach, S.G.

    2006-01-01

    Results are reported from the studies into electrodynamic characteristics of the barrierless point-to-plane gas discharge as a HV pulse of positive polarity is applied to the point electrode. The efficiency of ozone synthesis has been determined as a function of the length and repetition frequency of the HV pulse. It has been demonstrated that the electrodynamic characteristics of the discharge and the efficiency of ozone synthesis in oxygen-containing gas mixtures essentially depend on the parameters of HV power supply. The HV switch HTS-300 (BEHLKE Electronic GmbH) was used for HV pulse shaping

  18. Synthesis of the cactus-like silicon nanowires/tungsten oxide nanowires composite for room-temperature NO{sub 2} gas sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weiyi, E-mail: zhangweiyi@tju.edu.cn [School of Electronic Information Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072 (China); Hu, Ming [School of Electronic Information Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu, Xing; Wei, Yulong; Li, Na [School of Electronic Information Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072 (China); Qin, Yuxiang, E-mail: qinyuxiang@tju.edu.cn [School of Electronic Information Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Ceramics and Machining Technology, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2016-09-15

    In the present work, the tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) nanowires functionalized silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with cactus-like structure has been successfully synthesized for room-temperature NO{sub 2} detection. The novel nanocomposite was fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) and thermal annealing of tungsten film. The WO{sub 3} nanowires were evenly distributed from the upper to the lower part of the SiNWs, indicating excellent uniformity which is conducive to adsorption and desorption of gas molecules. The gas-sensing properties have been examined by measuring the resistance change towards 0.25–5 ppm NO{sub 2} gas. At room temperature, which is the optimum working temperature, the SiNWs/WO{sub 3} nanowires composite showed two-times higher NO{sub 2} response than that of the bare SiNWs at 2 ppm NO{sub 2}. On the contrary, the responses of composite sensors to high concentrations of other reducing gases were very low, indicating excellent selectivity. Simultaneously, the composite sensors exhibited good sensing repeatability and stability. The enhancement in gas sensing properties may be attributed to the change in width of the space charge region, which is similar to the behavior of p-n junctions under forward bias, in the high-density p-n heterojunction structure formed between SiNWs and WO{sub 3} nanowires. - Highlights: • SiNWs/WO{sub 3} nanowires composite with cactus-like structure is synthesized. • The morphology of WO{sub 3} nanowires depends on the thermal annealing temperature. • The nanocomposite sensor exhibit better gas response than that of bare SiNWs. • The gas sensing mechanism is discussed using p-n heterojunction theory.

  19. Treatment of Dye Wastewater by Using a Hybrid Gas/Liquid Pulsed Discharge Plasma Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Na; Li Jie; Wu Yan; Masayuki, Sato

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid gas/liquid pulsed discharge plasma reactor using a porous ceramic tube is proposed for dye wastewater treatment. High voltage pulsed discharge plasma was generated in the gas phase and simultaneously the plasma channel was permeated through the tiny holes of the ceramic tube into the water phase accompanied by gas bubbles. The porous ceramic tube not only separated the gas phase and liquid phase but also offered an effective plasma spreading channel. The effects of the peak pulse voltage, additive gas varieties, gas bubbling rate, solution conductivity and TiO 2 addition were investigated. The results showed that this reactor was effective for dye wastewater treatment. The decoloration efficiency of Acid Orange II was enhanced with an increase in the power supplied. Under the studied conditions, 97% of Acid Orange II in aqueous solution was effectively decolored with additive oxygen gas, which was 51% higher than that with argon gas, and the increasing O 2 bubbling rate also benefited the decoloration of dye wastewater. Water conductivity had a small effect on the level of decoloration. Catalysis of TiO 2 could be induced by the pulsed discharge plasma and addition of TiO 2 aided the decoloration of Acid Orange II.

  20. Pulse current gas metal arc welding characteristics, control and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Prakriti Kumar

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is a first-of-its-kind compilation on high deposition pulse current GMAW process. The nine chapters of this monograph may serve as a comprehensive knowledge tool to use advanced welding engineering in prospective applications. The contents of this book will prove useful to the shop floor welding engineer in handling this otherwise critical welding process with confidence. It will also serve to inspire researchers to think critically on more versatile applications of the unique nature of pulse current in GMAW process to develop cutting edge welding technology.

  1. Pulse Shape Analysis and Discrimination for Silicon-Photomultipliers in Helium-4 Gas Scintillation Neutron Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Cathleen; Zhu, Ting; Rolison, Lucas; Kiff, Scott; Jordan, Kelly; Enqvist, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Using natural helium (helium-4), the Arktis 180-bar pressurized gas scintillator is capable of detecting and distinguishing fast neutrons and gammas. The detector has a unique design of three optically separated segments in which 12 silicon-photomultiplier (SiPM) pairs are positioned equilaterally across the detector to allow for them to be fully immersed in the helium-4 gas volume; consequently, no additional optical interfaces are necessary. The SiPM signals were amplified, shaped, and readout by an analog board; a 250 MHz, 14-bit digitizer was used to examine the output pulses from each SiPMpair channel. The SiPM over-voltage had to be adjusted in order to reduce pulse clipping and negative overshoot, which was observed for events with high scintillation production. Pulse shaped discrimination (PSD) was conducted by evaluating three different parameters: time over threshold (TOT), pulse amplitude, and pulse integral. In order to differentiate high and low energy events, a 30ns gate window was implemented to group pulses from two SiPM channels or more for the calculation of TOT. It was demonstrated that pulses from a single SiPM channel within the 30ns window corresponded to low-energy gamma events while groups of pulses from two-channels or more were most likely neutron events. Due to gamma pulses having lower pulse amplitude, the percentage of measured gamma also depends on the threshold value in TOT calculations. Similarly, the threshold values were varied for the optimal PSD methods of using pulse amplitude and pulse area parameters. Helium-4 detectors equipped with SiPMs are excellent for in-the-field radiation measurement of nuclear spent fuel casks. With optimized PSD methods, the goal of developing a fuel cask content monitoring and inspection system based on these helium-4 detectors will be achieved.

  2. Cyclic Nanostructures of Tungsten Oxide (WO3)n  (n = 2–6) as NOx Gas Sensor: A Theoretical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadyar, Mohammad; Jamsaz, Azam

    2014-01-01

    Today's WO3-based gas sensors have received a lot of attention, because of important role as a sensitive layer for detection of the small quantities of  NOx. In this research, a theoretical study has been done on the sensing properties of different cyclic nanoclusters of (WO3)n  (n = 2–6) for NOx  (x = 1,2) gases. Based on the calculated adsorption energies by B3LYP and X3LYP functionals, from the different orientations of  NOx molecule on the tungsten oxide clusters, O–N⋯W was preferred. Different sizes of the mentioned clusters have been analyzed and W2O6 cluster was chosen as the best candidate for NOx detection from the energy viewpoint. Using the concepts of the chemical hardness and electronic charge transfer, some correlations between the energy of adsorption and interaction energy have been established. These analyses confirmed that the adsorption energy will be boosted with charge transfer enhancement. However, the chemical hardness relationship is reversed. Finally, obtained results from the natural bond orbital and electronic density of states analysis confirmed the electronic charge transfer from the adsorbates to WO3 clusters and Fermi level shifting after adsorption, respectively. The last parameter confirms that the cyclic clusters of tungsten oxide can be used as NOx gas sensors. PMID:25544841

  3. Cyclic Nanostructures of Tungsten Oxide WO3n  (n=2–6 as NOx Gas Sensor: A Theoretical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Izadyar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Today’s WO3-based gas sensors have received a lot of attention, because of important role as a sensitive layer for detection of the small quantities of  NOx. In this research, a theoretical study has been done on the sensing properties of different cyclic nanoclusters of WO3n  (n=2–6 for NOx  (x=1,2 gases. Based on the calculated adsorption energies by B3LYP and X3LYP functionals, from the different orientations of  NOx molecule on the tungsten oxide clusters, O–N⋯W was preferred. Different sizes of the mentioned clusters have been analyzed and W2O6 cluster was chosen as the best candidate for NOx detection from the energy viewpoint. Using the concepts of the chemical hardness and electronic charge transfer, some correlations between the energy of adsorption and interaction energy have been established. These analyses confirmed that the adsorption energy will be boosted with charge transfer enhancement. However, the chemical hardness relationship is reversed. Finally, obtained results from the natural bond orbital and electronic density of states analysis confirmed the electronic charge transfer from the adsorbates to WO3 clusters and Fermi level shifting after adsorption, respectively. The last parameter confirms that the cyclic clusters of tungsten oxide can be used as NOx gas sensors.

  4. Cyclic Nanostructures of Tungsten Oxide (WO3) n   (n = 2-6) as NO x Gas Sensor: A Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadyar, Mohammad; Jamsaz, Azam

    2014-01-01

    Today's WO3-based gas sensors have received a lot of attention, because of important role as a sensitive layer for detection of the small quantities of  NO x . In this research, a theoretical study has been done on the sensing properties of different cyclic nanoclusters of (WO3) n   (n = 2-6) for NO x   (x = 1,2) gases. Based on the calculated adsorption energies by B3LYP and X3LYP functionals, from the different orientations of  NO x molecule on the tungsten oxide clusters, O-N⋯W was preferred. Different sizes of the mentioned clusters have been analyzed and W2O6 cluster was chosen as the best candidate for NO x detection from the energy viewpoint. Using the concepts of the chemical hardness and electronic charge transfer, some correlations between the energy of adsorption and interaction energy have been established. These analyses confirmed that the adsorption energy will be boosted with charge transfer enhancement. However, the chemical hardness relationship is reversed. Finally, obtained results from the natural bond orbital and electronic density of states analysis confirmed the electronic charge transfer from the adsorbates to WO3 clusters and Fermi level shifting after adsorption, respectively. The last parameter confirms that the cyclic clusters of tungsten oxide can be used as NO x gas sensors.

  5. Synthesis and optical properties of Au decorated colloidal tungsten oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahmasebi, Nemat; Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Tungsten oxide nanoparticles were prepared by pulsed laser ablation (PLA). • A very fine metallic Au particles or coating are decorated on the surface of tungsten oxide nanoparticles. • UV–Vis spectroscopy shows an absorption peak at ∼530 nm which is due to SPR effect of gold. • After exposing to hydrogen gas, Au/WO_3 colloidal nanoparticles show excellent gasochromic coloring. - Abstract: In this study, colloidal tungsten oxide nanoparticles were fabricated by pulsed laser ablation of tungsten target using the first harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) in deionized water. After ablation, a 0.33 g/lit HAuCl_4 aqueous solution was added into as-prepared colloidal nanoparticles. In this process, Au"3"+ ions were reduced to decorate gold metallic state (Au"0) onto colloidal tungsten oxide nanoparticles surface. The morphology and chemical composition of the synthesized nanoparticles were studied by AFM, XRD, TEM and XPS techniques. UV–Vis analysis reveals a distinct absorption peak at ∼530 nm. This peak can be attributed to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Au and confirms formation of gold state. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that Au ions’ reduction happens after adding HAuCl_4 solution into as-prepared colloidal tungsten oxide nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscope shows that an Au shell has been decorated onto colloidal WO_3 nanoparticles. Noble metal decorated tungsten oxide nanostructure could be an excellent candidate for photocatalysis, gas sensing and gasochromic applications. Finally, the gasochromic behavior of the synthesized samples was investigated by H_2 and O_2 gases bubbling into the produced colloidal Au/WO_3 nanoparticles. Synthesized colloidal nanoparticles show excellent coloration contrast (∼80%) through NIR spectra.

  6. High-energy, high-rate consolidation of tungsten and tungsten-based composite powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunathan, S.K.; Persad, C.; Bourell, D.L.; Marcus, H.L. (Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1991-01-20

    Tungsten and tungsten-based heavy alloys are well known for their superior mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. However, unalloyed tungsten is difficult to consolidate owing to its very high melting temperature (3683 K). The additions of small amounts of low-melting elements such as iron, nickel, cobalt and copper, facilitate the powder processing of dense heavy alloys at moderate temperatures. Energetic high-current pulses have been used recently for powder consolidation. In this paper, the use of a homopolar generator as a power source to consolidate selected tungsten and tungsten-based alloys is examined. Various materials were consolidated including unalloyed tungsten, W-Nb, W-Ni, and tungsten heavy alloy with boron carbide. The effect of process parameters such as pressure and specific energy input on the consolidation of different alloy systems is described in terms of microstructure and property relationships. (orig.).

  7. Engine with pulse-suppressed dedicated exhaust gas recirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Edward J.; Baker, Rodney E.

    2016-06-07

    An engine assembly includes an intake assembly, a spark-ignited internal combustion engine, and an exhaust assembly. The intake assembly includes a charge air cooler disposed between an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) mixer and a backpressure valve. The charge air cooler has both an inlet and an outlet, and the back pressure valve is configured to maintain a minimum pressure difference between the inlet of the charge air cooler and an outlet of the backpressure valve. A dedicated exhaust gas recirculation system is provided in fluid communication with at least one cylinder and with the EGR mixer. The dedicated exhaust gas recirculation system is configured to route all of the exhaust gas from the at least one cylinder to the EGR mixer for recirculation back to the engine.

  8. Effects of oxygen gas pressure on properties of iron oxide films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Qixin; Shi, Wangzhou; Liu, Feng; Arita, Makoto; Ikoma, Yoshifumi; Saito, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Tooru; Nishio, Mitsuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pulsed laser deposition is a promising technique for growing iron oxide films. ► Crystal structure of the iron oxide films strongly depends on oxygen gas pressure. ► Optimum of the oxygen gas pressure leads single phase magnetite films with high crystal quality. -- Abstract: Iron oxide films were grown on sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition at oxygen gas pressures between 1 × 10 −5 and 1 × 10 −1 Pa with a substrate temperature of 600 °C. Atomic force microscope, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray absorption fine structure, and vibrational sample magnetometer analysis revealed that surface morphology and crystal structure of the iron oxide films strongly depend on the oxygen gas pressure during the growth and the optimum oxygen gas pressure range is very narrow around 1 × 10 −3 Pa for obtaining single phase magnetite films with high crystal quality

  9. Flame Motion In Gas Turbine Burner From Averages Of Single-Pulse Flame Fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tylli, N.; Hubschmid, W.; Inauen, A.; Bombach, R.; Schenker, S.; Guethe, F. [Alstom (Switzerland); Haffner, K. [Alstom (Switzerland)

    2005-03-01

    Thermo acoustic instabilities of a gas turbine burner were investigated by flame front localization from measured OH laser-induced fluorescence single pulse signals. The average position of the flame was obtained from the superposition of the single pulse flame fronts at constant phase of the dominant acoustic oscillation. One observes that the flame position varies periodically with the phase angle of the dominant acoustic oscillation. (author)

  10. Pressure pulses generated by gas released from a breached fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.S.

    1979-01-01

    In experimental measurements of liquid pressure pulses generated by rapid release of gas from breached fuel elements in a nuclear reactor, different peak pressures were observed at locations equidistant from the origin of the release. Using the model of a submerged spherical bubble with a nonstationary center, this analysis predicts not only that the peak pressure would be higher at a point in front of the advancing bubble than that at a point the same distance behind the bubble origin, but also that the pressure pulse in front of the bubble reaches its peak later than the pulse behind the origin

  11. Shield gas induced cracks during nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation of Zr-based metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hu; Noguchi, Jun; Yan, Jiwang [Keio University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    Laser processing techniques have been given increasing attentions in the field of metallic glasses (MGs). In this work, effects of two kinds of shield gases, nitrogen and argon, on nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation of Zr-based MG were comparatively investigated. Results showed that compared to argon gas, nitrogen gas remarkably promoted the formation of cracks during laser irradiation. Furthermore, crack formation in nitrogen gas was enhanced by increasing the peak laser power intensity or decreasing the laser scanning speed. X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopy indicated that the reason for enhanced cracks in nitrogen gas was the formation of ZrN. (orig.)

  12. Shield gas induced cracks during nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation of Zr-based metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hu; Noguchi, Jun; Yan, Jiwang

    2016-10-01

    Laser processing techniques have been given increasing attentions in the field of metallic glasses (MGs). In this work, effects of two kinds of shield gases, nitrogen and argon, on nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation of Zr-based MG were comparatively investigated. Results showed that compared to argon gas, nitrogen gas remarkably promoted the formation of cracks during laser irradiation. Furthermore, crack formation in nitrogen gas was enhanced by increasing the peak laser power intensity or decreasing the laser scanning speed. X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopy indicated that the reason for enhanced cracks in nitrogen gas was the formation of ZrN.

  13. Fast gas spectroscopy using pulsed quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, T.; Braun, M.; Lambrecht, A.

    2003-03-01

    Laser spectroscopy has found many industrial applications, e.g., control of automotive exhaust and process monitoring. The midinfrared region is of special interest because it has stronger absorption lines compared to the near infrared (NIR). However, in the NIR high quality reliable laser sources, detectors, and passive optical components are available. A quantum cascade laser could change this situation if fundamental advantages can be exploited with compact and reliable systems. It will be shown that, using pulsed lasers and available fast detectors, lower residual sensitivity levels than in corresponding NIR systems can be achieved. The stability is sufficient for industrial applications.

  14. 6.1-MV, 0.79-MA laser-triggered gas switch for multimodule, multiterawatt pulsed-power accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. LeChien

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A 6.1-MV, 0.79-MA laser-triggered gas switch (LTGS is used to synchronize the 36 modules of the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. Each module includes one switch, which serves as the last command-fired switch of the module, and hence is used to determine the time at which each module electrically closes relative to the other modules. The switch is ∼81-cm in length, ∼45-cm in diameter, and is immersed in mineral oil. The outer switch envelope consists of six corrugated monomer-cast acrylic insulators and five contoured stainless-steel rings. The trigger electrodes are fabricated from copper-infused tungsten. The switch is pressurized with several atmospheres of sulfur hexafluoride (SF_{6}, which is turbulently purged within 2 seconds after every shot. Each switch is powered from a 6-MV, 0.78-MJ Marx generator which pulse charges a 24-nF intermediate-store water capacitor in 1.4-μs. Closure of the switch allows power to flow into pulse-forming transmission lines. The power pulse is subsequently compressed by water switches, which results in a total accelerator output power in excess of 70-TW. A previous version of the LTGS performed exceptionally at a 5.4-MV, 0.7-MA level on an engineering test module used for switch development. It exhibited a 1-σ jitter of ∼5  ns, a prefire and flashover rate less than 0.1%, and a lifetime in excess of 150 shots. When installed on the Z accelerator, however, the switch exhibited a prefire probability of ∼3%, a flashover probability of ∼7%, and a 15-ns jitter. The difference in performance is attributed to several factors such as higher total charge transfer, exposure to more debris, and more stressful dynamic mechanical loading upon machine discharge. Under these conditions, the replacement lifetime was less than ten shots. Since refurbishment of Z in October 2007, there have been three LTGS design iterations to improve the performance at 6.1-MV. The most recent design exhibits a

  15. Modeling pulsed excitation for gas-phase laser diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Settersten, Thomas B.; Linne, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    Excitation dynamics for pulsed optical excitation are described with the density-matrix equations and the rate equations for a two-level system. A critical comparison of the two descriptions is made with complete and consistent formalisms that are amenable to the modeling of applied laser-diagnostic techniques. General solutions, resulting from numerical integration of the differential equations describing the excitation process, are compared for collisional conditions that range from the completely coherent limit to the steady-state limit, for which the two formalisms are identical. This analysis demonstrates the failure of the rate equations to correctly describe the transient details of the excitation process outside the steady-state limit. However, reasonable estimates of the resultant population are obtained for nonsaturating (linear) excitation. This comparison provides the laser diagnostician with the means to evaluate the appropriate model for excitation through a simple picture of the breakdown of the rate-equation validity

  16. Effect of weld metal properties on fatigue crack growth behaviour of gas tungsten arc welded AISI 409M grade ferritic stainless steel joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugam, K.; Lakshminarayanan, A.K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel and duplex stainless steel on fatigue crack growth behaviour of the gas tungsten arc welded ferritic stainless steel joints was investigated. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single 'V' butt welded joints. Centre cracked tensile (CCT) specimens were prepared to evaluate fatigue crack growth behaviour. Servo hydraulic controlled fatigue testing machine was used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behaviour of the welded joints. From this investigation, it was found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed superior fatigue crack growth resistance compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Higher yield strength, hardness and relatively higher toughness may be the reasons for superior fatigue performance of the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal.

  17. Effect of current and speed on porosity in autogenous Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding of aluminum alloys A1100 butt joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyardi, Indra; Sunar Baskoro, Ario

    2018-04-01

    Autogenous Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding has been conducted on aluminum alloy A1100. The purpose of this research is to determine the proper current and speed of autogenous TIG welding with butt joint pattern. Variations on welding current are 150 A, 155 A, and 160 A with the variations on welding speed are 1 mm/seconds, 1.1 mm/seconds, 1.2 mm/seconds. The welded results were tested using non-destructive test (NDT) method using X-Ray radiography. After the test, it is found that the appropriate current for the best result without porosity can be achieved using the welding parameter of welding current of 160 A and the welding speed of 1.1 mm seconds.

  18. Enhanced mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas welded AZ31 magnesium alloy joint using two-pass friction stir processing with rapid cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Nan, E-mail: xunan@hhu.edu.cn; Bao, Yefeng

    2016-02-08

    In this study, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded AZ31 magnesium alloy joint was subjected to two-pass rapid cooling friction stir processing (RC-FSP). The main results show that, two-pass RC-FSP causes the significant dissolution of the coarse eutectic β-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase into the magnesium matrix and the remarkable grain refinement in the stir zone. The low-hardness region which frequently located at heat-affected zone was eliminated. The stir zone showed ultrafine grains of 3.1 μm, and exhibited a good combination of ultrahigh tensile strength of 284 MPa and large elongation of 7.1%. This work provides an effective strategy to enhance the strength of TIG welded magnesium alloy joint without ductility loss.

  19. A new technique for the strengthening of aluminum tungsten inert gas weld metals: using carbon nanotube/aluminum composite as a filler metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Rashidkhani, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S; Arabian, N

    2013-01-01

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) on the mechanical properties of aluminum multipass weld metal prepared by the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process was investigated. High energy ball milling was used to disperse MWCNT in the aluminum powder. Carbon nanotube/aluminum composite filler metal was fabricated for the first time by hot extrusion of ball-milled powders. After welding, the tensile strength, microhardness and MWCNT distribution in the weld metal were investigated. The test results showed that the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was greatly increased when using the filler metal containing 1.5 wt.% MWCNT. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the filler metal containing MWCNT can serve as a super filler metal to improve the mechanical properties of TIG welds of Al and its alloys. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation between corrosion resistance properties and thermal cycles experienced by gas tungsten arc welding and laser beam welding Alloy 690 butt weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H T; Wu, J L

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the correlation between the thermal cycles experienced by Alloy 690 weldments fabricated using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and laser beam welding (LBW) processes, and their corresponding corrosion resistance properties. The corrosion resistance of the weldments is evaluated using a U-bend stress corrosion test in which the specimens are immersed in a boiling, acid solution for 240 h. The experimental results reveal that the LBW inputs significantly less heat to the weldment than the GTAW, and therefore yields a far faster cooling rate. Moreover, the corrosion tests show that in the GTAW specimen, intergranular corrosion (IGC) occurs in both the fusion zone (FZ) and the heat affected zone (HAZ). By contrast, the LBW specimen shows no obvious signs of IGC.

  1. Enhanced mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas welded AZ31 magnesium alloy joint using two-pass friction stir processing with rapid cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Nan; Bao, Yefeng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded AZ31 magnesium alloy joint was subjected to two-pass rapid cooling friction stir processing (RC-FSP). The main results show that, two-pass RC-FSP causes the significant dissolution of the coarse eutectic β-Mg_1_7Al_1_2 phase into the magnesium matrix and the remarkable grain refinement in the stir zone. The low-hardness region which frequently located at heat-affected zone was eliminated. The stir zone showed ultrafine grains of 3.1 μm, and exhibited a good combination of ultrahigh tensile strength of 284 MPa and large elongation of 7.1%. This work provides an effective strategy to enhance the strength of TIG welded magnesium alloy joint without ductility loss.

  2. Ecton processes in the generation of pulsed runaway electron beams in a gas discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesyats, G. A.

    2017-09-01

    As was shown earlier for pulsed discharges that occur in electric fields rising with extremely high rates (1018 V/(cm s)) during the pulse rise time, the electron current in a vacuum discharge is lower than the current of runaway electrons in an atmospheric air discharge in a 1-cm-long gap. In this paper, this is explained by that the field emission current from cathode microprotrusions in a gas discharge is enhanced due to gas ionization. This hastens the initiation of explosive electron emission, which occurs within 10-11 s at a current density of up to 1010 A/cm2. Thereafter, a first-type cathode spot starts forming. The temperature of the cathode spot decreases due to heat conduction, and the explosive emission current ceases. Thus, the runaway electron current pulse is similar in nature to the ecton phenomenon in a vacuum discharge.

  3. Time resolved Thomson scattering diagnostic of pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kühn-Kauffeldt, M; Schein, J; Marquès, J L

    2014-01-01

    In this work a Thomson scattering diagnostic technique was applied to obtain time resolved electron temperature and density values during a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process. The investigated GMAW process was run with aluminum wire (AlMg 4,5 Mn) with 1.2 mm diameter as a wire electrode, argon as a shielding gas and peak currents in the range of 400 A. Time resolved measurements could be achieved by triggering the laser pulse at shifted time positions with respect to the current pulse driving the process. Time evaluation of resulting electron temperatures and densities is used to investigate the state of the plasma in different phases of the current pulse and to determine the influence of the metal vapor and droplets on the plasma properties

  4. Direct injection of high pressure gas : scaling properties of pulsed turbulent jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baert, R.S.G.; Klaassen, A.; Doosje, E.

    2010-01-01

    Existing gasoline DI injection equipment has been modified to generate single hole pulsed gas jets. Injection experiments have been performed at combinations of 3 different pressure ratios (2 of which supercritical) respectively 3 different hole geometries (i.e. length to diameter ratios). Injection

  5. Tar removal from biomass derived fuel gas by pulsed corona discharges: chemical kinetic study II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nair, S.A.; Yan, K.; Pemen, A.J.M.; Heesch, van E.J.M.; Ptasinski, K.J.; Drinkenburg, A.A.H.

    2005-01-01

    Tar (heavy hydrocarbon or poly aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)) removal from biomass derived fuel gas is one of the biggest obstacles in its utilization for power generation. We have investigated pulsed corona as a method for tar removal. Our previous experimental results indicate the energy consumption

  6. Micro-engineered first wall tungsten armor for high average power laser fusion energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafat, Shahram; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Anderson, Michael; Williams, Brian; Blanchard, Jake; Snead, Lance; HAPL Team

    2005-12-01

    The high average power laser program is developing an inertial fusion energy demonstration power reactor with a solid first wall chamber. The first wall (FW) will be subject to high energy density radiation and high doses of high energy helium implantation. Tungsten has been identified as the candidate material for a FW armor. The fundamental concern is long term thermo-mechanical survivability of the armor against the effects of high temperature pulsed operation and exfoliation due to the retention of implanted helium. Even if a solid tungsten armor coating would survive the high temperature cyclic operation with minimal failure, the high helium implantation and retention would result in unacceptable material loss rates. Micro-engineered materials, such as castellated structures, plasma sprayed nano-porous coatings and refractory foams are suggested as a first wall armor material to address these fundamental concerns. A micro-engineered FW armor would have to be designed with specific geometric features that tolerate high cyclic heating loads and recycle most of the implanted helium without any significant failure. Micro-engineered materials are briefly reviewed. In particular, plasma-sprayed nano-porous tungsten and tungsten foams are assessed for their potential to accommodate inertial fusion specific loads. Tests show that nano-porous plasma spray coatings can be manufactured with high permeability to helium gas, while retaining relatively high thermal conductivities. Tungsten foams where shown to be able to overcome thermo-mechanical loads by cell rotation and deformation. Helium implantation tests have shown, that pulsed implantation and heating releases significant levels of implanted helium. Helium implantation and release from tungsten was modeled using an expanded kinetic rate theory, to include the effects of pulsed implantations and thermal cycles. Although, significant challenges remain micro-engineered materials are shown to constitute potential

  7. Micro-engineered first wall tungsten armor for high average power laser fusion energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharafat, Shahram; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Anderson, Michael; Williams, Brian; Blanchard, Jake; Snead, Lance

    2005-01-01

    The high average power laser program is developing an inertial fusion energy demonstration power reactor with a solid first wall chamber. The first wall (FW) will be subject to high energy density radiation and high doses of high energy helium implantation. Tungsten has been identified as the candidate material for a FW armor. The fundamental concern is long term thermo-mechanical survivability of the armor against the effects of high temperature pulsed operation and exfoliation due to the retention of implanted helium. Even if a solid tungsten armor coating would survive the high temperature cyclic operation with minimal failure, the high helium implantation and retention would result in unacceptable material loss rates. Micro-engineered materials, such as castellated structures, plasma sprayed nano-porous coatings and refractory foams are suggested as a first wall armor material to address these fundamental concerns. A micro-engineered FW armor would have to be designed with specific geometric features that tolerate high cyclic heating loads and recycle most of the implanted helium without any significant failure. Micro-engineered materials are briefly reviewed. In particular, plasma-sprayed nano-porous tungsten and tungsten foams are assessed for their potential to accommodate inertial fusion specific loads. Tests show that nano-porous plasma spray coatings can be manufactured with high permeability to helium gas, while retaining relatively high thermal conductivities. Tungsten foams where shown to be able to overcome thermo-mechanical loads by cell rotation and deformation. Helium implantation tests have shown, that pulsed implantation and heating releases significant levels of implanted helium. Helium implantation and release from tungsten was modeled using an expanded kinetic rate theory, to include the effects of pulsed implantations and thermal cycles. Although, significant challenges remain micro-engineered materials are shown to constitute potential

  8. Huge increase in gas phase nanoparticle generation by pulsed direct current sputtering in a reactive gas admixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonskyi, Oleksandr; Peter, Tilo; Mohammad Ahadi, Amir; Hinz, Alexander; Strunskus, Thomas; Zaporojtchenko, Vladimir; Biederman, Hynek; Faupel, Franz

    2013-07-01

    Using reactive DC sputtering in a gas aggregation cluster source, we show that pulsed discharge gives rise to a huge increase in deposition rate of nanoparticles by more than one order of magnitude compared to continuous operation. We suggest that this effect is caused by an equilibrium between slight target oxidation (during "time-off") and subsequent sputtering of Ti oxides (sub-oxides) at "time-on" with high power impulse.

  9. Pulse-driven micro gas sensor fitted with clustered Pd/SnO2 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Koichi; Shin, Yuka; Ma, Nan; Oyama, Tokiharu; Sasaki, Miyuki; Yuasa, Masayoshi; Kida, Tetsuya; Shimanoe, Kengo

    2015-08-18

    Real-time monitoring of specific gas concentrations with a compact and portable gas sensing device is required to sense potential health risk and danger from toxic gases. For such purposes, we developed an ultrasmall gas sensor device, where a micro sensing film was deposited on a micro heater integrated with electrodes fabricated by the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technology. The developed device was operated in a pulse-heating mode to significantly reduce the heater power consumption and make the device battery-driven and portable. Using clustered Pd/SnO2 nanoparticles, we succeeded in introducing mesopores ranging from 10 to 30 nm in the micro gas sensing film (area: ϕ 150 μm) to detect large volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The micro sensor showed quick, stable, and high sensor responses to toluene at ppm (parts per million) concentrations at 300 °C even by operating the micro heater in a pulse-heating mode where switch-on and -off cycles were repeated at one-second intervals. The high performance of the micro sensor should result from the creation of efficient diffusion paths decorated with Pd sensitizers by using the clustered Pd/SnO2 nanoparticles. Hence we demonstrate that our pulse-driven micro sensor using nanostructured oxide materials holds promise as a battery-operable, portable gas sensing device.

  10. Synthesis of Nanoparticles in a Pulsed-Periodic Gas Discharge and Their Potential Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Efimov, A. A.; Myl'nikov, D. A.; Lizunova, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    Conditions for the synthesis of three types nanoparticles (SnO2, Al2O3, and Ag) with typical sizes in the range of 4 to 10 nm and a performance of 0.4 g/h are employed in a pulsed-periodic gas discharge in an atmosphere of air. Spherical Ge nanoparticles with a characteristic size of 13 nm are synthesized by these means for the first time with a performance of around 10 mg/h. The specific energy consumption in the synthesis of nanoparticles is for these materials in the range of 2000 to 5000 kW h/kg. The prospects for using tinoxide nanoparticles in sensor components and jets of silver nanoparticles for aerosol printing are discussed. The merits and demerits of the pulsed gas-discharge method among other gas-phase approaches to the synthesis of nanoparticles are analyzed for the current level of development.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of tungsten carbide doped cobalt via gas-solid reaction in rotary bed reactor; Sintese e caracterizacao de carbeto de tungstenio dopado com cobalto via reacao gas-solido em reator de leito rotativo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tertuliano, R.S.C.; Araujo, C.P.B. de; Frota, A.V.V.M.; Moriyama, A.L.L.; Souza, C.P. de, E-mail: ruasavio@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Quimica

    2016-07-01

    The search for materials with high added value, high applicability and sustainability, motivates innovations in all areas of engineering. In this context, so-called doped carbides, ceramic and metal compounds are included. This work proposes the synthesis and characterization of tungsten carbide doped cobalt (WC-Co) through the gas-solid reaction in a rotating bed reactor. The production stages of the material are: precursor synthesis by wetting, drying at 80 deg C, characterization of the precursor by MEV, DRX and FRX, gas-solid reaction at 750 deg C in a reducing atmosphere of CH{sub 4} / H{sub 2} in a rotary reactor at 34 rpm and characterization of the reaction product by the techniques already mentioned. The results showed that tungsten carbide powders were produced with cobalt inserted into the structure, with high surface area, nanometric grains and with potential for applications in the areas of catalysis, reactors and fuel cells, showing the relevance of this type of research.

  12. Continuous processing of polymers in repetitively pulsed atmospheric pressure discharges with moving surfaces and gas flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhoj, Ananth N [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kushner, Mark J [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2007-11-21

    Atmospheric pressure corona discharges are industrially employed to treat large areas of commodity polymer sheets by creating new surface functional groups. The most common processes use oxygen containing discharges to affix oxygen to hydrocarbon polymers, thereby increasing their surface energy and wettability. The process is typically continuous and is carried out in a web configuration with film speeds of tens to hundreds of cm s{sup -1}. The densities and relative abundances of functional groups depend on the gas composition, gas flow rate and residence time of the polymer in the discharge zone which ultimately determine the magnitude and mole fractions of reactive fluxes to the surface. In this paper, results are discussed from a two-dimensional computational investigation of the atmospheric pressure plasma functionalization of a moving polypropylene sheet in repetitively pulsed He/O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O discharges. O and OH typically initiate surface processing by hydrogen abstraction. These species are regenerated during every plasma pulse but are also largely consumed during the inter-pulse period. Longer-lived species such as O{sub 3} accumulate over many pulses and convect downstream with the gas flow. Optimizing the interplay between local rapid reactions, such as H abstraction which occurs dominantly in the discharge zone, and non-local slower processes, such as surface-surface reactions, may enable the customization of the relative abundance of surface functional groups.

  13. Continuous processing of polymers in repetitively pulsed atmospheric pressure discharges with moving surfaces and gas flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhoj, Ananth N; Kushner, Mark J

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure corona discharges are industrially employed to treat large areas of commodity polymer sheets by creating new surface functional groups. The most common processes use oxygen containing discharges to affix oxygen to hydrocarbon polymers, thereby increasing their surface energy and wettability. The process is typically continuous and is carried out in a web configuration with film speeds of tens to hundreds of cm s -1 . The densities and relative abundances of functional groups depend on the gas composition, gas flow rate and residence time of the polymer in the discharge zone which ultimately determine the magnitude and mole fractions of reactive fluxes to the surface. In this paper, results are discussed from a two-dimensional computational investigation of the atmospheric pressure plasma functionalization of a moving polypropylene sheet in repetitively pulsed He/O 2 /H 2 O discharges. O and OH typically initiate surface processing by hydrogen abstraction. These species are regenerated during every plasma pulse but are also largely consumed during the inter-pulse period. Longer-lived species such as O 3 accumulate over many pulses and convect downstream with the gas flow. Optimizing the interplay between local rapid reactions, such as H abstraction which occurs dominantly in the discharge zone, and non-local slower processes, such as surface-surface reactions, may enable the customization of the relative abundance of surface functional groups

  14. Theoretical analysis of fluorescence signals in filamentation of femtosecond laser pulses in nitrogen molecular gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arevalo, E.; Becker, A.

    2005-01-01

    We study numerically and analytically the role of the combined effect of self-focusing, geometrical focusing, and the plasma defocusing in the formation of the fluorescence signal during the filamentation of a Ti:sapphire laser pulse in nitrogen molecular gas. Results of numerical simulations are used to estimate the number of excited ions in the focal volume, which is proportional to the fluorescence signal. We find good agreement between the theoretical results and the experimental data, showing that such data can be used to get further insight into the effective focal volume during filamentation of femtosecond laser pulses in transparent media

  15. Generation of Attosecond Light Pulses from Gas and Solid State Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanos Chatziathanasiou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Real-time observation of ultrafast dynamics in the microcosm is a fundamental approach for understanding the internal evolution of physical, chemical and biological systems. Tools for tracing such dynamics are flashes of light with duration comparable to or shorter than the characteristic evolution times of the system under investigation. While femtosecond (fs pulses are successfully used to investigate vibrational dynamics in molecular systems, real time observation of electron motion in all states of matter requires temporal resolution in the attosecond (1 attosecond (asec = 10−18 s time scale. During the last decades, continuous efforts in ultra-short pulse engineering led to the development of table-top sources which can produce asec pulses. These pulses have been synthesized by using broadband coherent radiation in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV spectral region generated by the interaction of matter with intense fs pulses. Here, we will review asec pulses generated by the interaction of gas phase media and solid surfaces with intense fs IR laser fields. After a brief overview of the fundamental process underlying the XUV emission form these media, we will review the current technology, specifications and the ongoing developments of such asec sources.

  16. Pulse length of ultracold electron bunches extracted from a laser cooled gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. H. Franssen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of the pulse length of ultracold electron bunches generated by near-threshold two-photon photoionization of a laser-cooled gas. The pulse length has been measured using a resonant 3 GHz deflecting cavity in TM110 mode. We have measured the pulse length in three ionization regimes. The first is direct two-photon photoionization using only a 480 nm femtosecond laser pulse, which results in short (∼15 ps but hot (∼104 K electron bunches. The second regime is just-above-threshold femtosecond photoionization employing the combination of a continuous-wave 780 nm excitation laser and a tunable 480 nm femtosecond ionization laser which results in both ultracold (∼10 K and ultrafast (∼25 ps electron bunches. These pulses typically contain ∼103 electrons and have a root-mean-square normalized transverse beam emittance of 1.5 ± 0.1 nm rad. The measured pulse lengths are limited by the energy spread associated with the longitudinal size of the ionization volume, as expected. The third regime is just-below-threshold ionization which produces Rydberg states which slowly ionize on microsecond time scales.

  17. Effect of current pulsing on tensile properties of titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Jayabalan, V.; Balasubramanian, M.

    2008-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys have been considered as one of the best engineering metals for industrial applications. This is due to the excellent combination of properties such as elevated strength to weight ratio, high toughness, excellent resistance to corrosion and good fatigue properties make them attractive for many industrial applications. Recently, considerable research has been performed on pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding process and reported advantages include improved bead contour, lower heat input requirements, reduced residual stresses and distortion. Metallurgical advantages of pulsed current welding frequently reported in literature include refinement of fusion zone grain size, reduced width of heat affected zone, etc. All these factors will help in improving the mechanical properties. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the effect of pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding parameters on Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy

  18. Effect of current pulsing on tensile properties of titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, V. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608 002 (India)], E-mail: visvabalu@yahoo.com; Jayabalan, V. [Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Anna University, Guindy, Chennai 600 025 (India)], E-mail: jbalan@annauniv.edu; Balasubramanian, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Maamallan Institute of Technology, Sriperumpudur 602 105 (India)], E-mail: manianmb@rediffmail.com

    2008-07-01

    Titanium and its alloys have been considered as one of the best engineering metals for industrial applications. This is due to the excellent combination of properties such as elevated strength to weight ratio, high toughness, excellent resistance to corrosion and good fatigue properties make them attractive for many industrial applications. Recently, considerable research has been performed on pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding process and reported advantages include improved bead contour, lower heat input requirements, reduced residual stresses and distortion. Metallurgical advantages of pulsed current welding frequently reported in literature include refinement of fusion zone grain size, reduced width of heat affected zone, etc. All these factors will help in improving the mechanical properties. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the effect of pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding parameters on Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy.

  19. Momentum distributions of selected rare-gas atoms probed by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-01-01

    We provide a direct comparison between numerical and experimental (Rudenko et al 2004 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 37 L407) photoelectron momentum distributions in strong-field ionization of selected rare-gas atoms (He, Ne and Ar), probed by femtosecond linearly polarized laser pulses. The cal......We provide a direct comparison between numerical and experimental (Rudenko et al 2004 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 37 L407) photoelectron momentum distributions in strong-field ionization of selected rare-gas atoms (He, Ne and Ar), probed by femtosecond linearly polarized laser pulses....... The calculations are performed by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation within the single-active-electron approximation, and focal-volume effects are taken into account by appropriately averaging the results. The resulting momentum distributions are in quantitative agreement with the experimental...

  20. Simultaneous, single-pulse, synchrotron x-ray imaging and diffraction under gas gun loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, D.; Luo, S. N., E-mail: sluo@pims.ac.cn [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Huang, J. W.; Zeng, X. L.; Li, Y.; E, J. C.; Huang, J. Y. [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Wang, Z. [Physics Division P-25, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We develop a mini gas gun system for simultaneous, single-pulse, x-ray diffraction and imaging under high strain-rate loading at the beamline 32-ID of the Advanced Photon Source. In order to increase the reciprocal space covered by a small-area detector, a conventional target chamber is split into two chambers: a narrowed measurement chamber and a relief chamber. The gas gun impact is synchronized with synchrotron x-ray pulses and high-speed cameras. Depending on a camera’s capability, multiframe imaging and diffraction can be achieved. The proof-of-principle experiments are performed on single-crystal sapphire. The diffraction spots and images during impact are analyzed to quantify lattice deformation and fracture; fracture is dominated by splitting cracks followed by wing cracks, and diffraction peaks are broadened likely due to mosaic spread. Our results demonstrate the potential of such multiscale measurements for studying high strain-rate phenomena at dynamic extremes.

  1. LPS levels in root canals after the use of ozone gas and high frequency electrical pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago André Fontoura de MELO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study aims to verify the effect of ozone gas (OZY® System and high frequency electric pulse (Endox® System systems on human root canals previously contaminated with Escherichia colilipopolysaccharide (LPS. Fifty single-rooted teeth had their dental crowns removed and root lengths standardized to 16 mm. The root canals were prepared up to #60 hand K-files and sterilized using gamma radiation with cobalt 60. The specimens were divided into the following five groups (n = 10 based on the disinfection protocol used: OZY® System, one 120-second-pulse (OZY 1p; OZY® System, four 24-second-pulses (OZY 4p; and Endox® System (ENDOX. Contaminated and non-contaminated canals were exposed only to apyrogenic water and used as positive (C+ and negative (C- controls, respectively. LPS (O55:B55 was administered in all root canals except those belonging to group C-. After performing disinfection, LPS samples were collected from the canals using apyrogenic paper tips. Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate (LAL was used to quantify the LPS levels, and the data obtained was analyzed using one-way ANOVA. The disinfection protocols used were unable to reduce the LPS levels significantly (p = 0.019. The use of ozone gas and high frequency electric pulses was not effective in eliminating LPS from the root canals.

  2. Wiebel instability of microwave gas discharge in strong linear and circular pulsed fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokri, B.; Ghorbanalilu, M.

    2004-01-01

    Being much weaker than the atomic fields, the gas breakdown produced by high-power pulsed microwave fields is investigated in the nonrelativistic case. The distribution function of the electrons produced by the interaction with intense linearly and circularly polarized microwave fields is obtained and it is shown that it is in a nonequilibrium state and anisotropic. The discharge mechanism for the gas atoms is governed by electron-impact avalanche ionization. By analyzing the instability of the system and by finding its growth rate, it is shown that the instability which is governed by the anisotropic property of the distribution function is Wiebel instability

  3. A critical comparison of constant and pulsed flow systems exploiting gas diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Claudineia Rodrigues; Henriquez, Camelia; Frizzarin, Rejane Mara; Zagatto, Elias Ayres Guidetti; Cerda, Victor

    2016-02-01

    Considering the beneficial aspects arising from the implementation of pulsed flows in flow analysis, and the relevance of in-line gas diffusion as an analyte separation/concentration step, influence of flow pattern in flow systems with in-line gas diffusion was critically investigated. To this end, constant or pulsed flows delivered by syringe or solenoid pumps were exploited. For each flow pattern, two variants involving different interaction times of the donor with the acceptor streams were studied. In the first one, both the acceptor and donor streams were continuously flowing, whereas in the second one, the acceptor was stopped during the gas diffusion step. Four different volatile species (ammonia, ethanol, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide) were selected as models. For the flow patterns and variants studied, the efficiencies of mass transport in the gas diffusion process were compared, and sensitivity, repeatability, sampling frequency and recorded peak shape were evaluated. Analysis of the results revealed that sensitivity is strongly dependent on the implemented variant, and that flow pattern is an important feature in flow systems with in-line gas diffusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nanoparticle Thin Films for Gas Sensors Prepared by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rella

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE technique has been used for the deposition of metal dioxide (TiO2, SnO2 nanoparticle thin films for gas sensor applications. For this purpose, colloidal metal dioxide nanoparticles were diluted in volatile solvents, the solution was frozen at the liquid nitrogen temperature and irradiated with a pulsed excimer laser. The dioxide nanoparticles were deposited on Si and Al2O3 substrates. A rather uniform distribution of TiO2 nanoparticles with an average size of about 10 nm and of SnO2 nanoparticles with an average size of about 3 nm was obtained, as demonstrated by high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM-FEG inspections. Gas-sensing devices based on the resistive transduction mechanism were fabricated by depositing the nanoparticle thin films onto suitable rough alumina substrates equipped with interdigitated electrical contacts and heating elements. Electrical characterization measurements were carried out in controlled environment. The results of the gas-sensing tests towards low concentrations of ethanol and acetone vapors are reported. Typical gas sensor parameters (gas responses, response/recovery time, sensitivity, and low detection limit towards ethanol and acetone are presented.

  5. Nanoparticle thin films for gas sensors prepared by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricato, Anna Paola; Luches, Armando; Rella, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique has been used for the deposition of metal dioxide (TiO(2), SnO(2)) nanoparticle thin films for gas sensor applications. For this purpose, colloidal metal dioxide nanoparticles were diluted in volatile solvents, the solution was frozen at the liquid nitrogen temperature and irradiated with a pulsed excimer laser. The dioxide nanoparticles were deposited on Si and Al(2)O(3) substrates. A rather uniform distribution of TiO(2) nanoparticles with an average size of about 10 nm and of SnO(2) nanoparticles with an average size of about 3 nm was obtained, as demonstrated by high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM-FEG) inspections. Gas-sensing devices based on the resistive transduction mechanism were fabricated by depositing the nanoparticle thin films onto suitable rough alumina substrates equipped with interdigitated electrical contacts and heating elements. Electrical characterization measurements were carried out in controlled environment. The results of the gas-sensing tests towards low concentrations of ethanol and acetone vapors are reported. Typical gas sensor parameters (gas responses, response/recovery time, sensitivity, and low detection limit) towards ethanol and acetone are presented.

  6. Thermal response of plasma sprayed tungsten coating to high heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X.; Yang, L.; Tamura, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Yoshida, N.; Noda, N.; Xu, Z.

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the thermal response of tungsten coating on carbon and copper substrates by vacuum plasma spray (VPS) or inert gas plasma spray (IPS), annealing and cyclic heat load experiments of these coatings were conducted. It is indicated that the multi-layered tungsten and rhenium interface of VPS-W/CFC failed to act as a diffusion barrier at elevated temperature and tungsten carbides were developed after 1 h incubation time when annealing temperature was higher than 1600 deg. C. IPS-W/Cu and W/C without an intermediate bonding layer were failed by the detachment of the tungsten coating at 900 and 1200 deg. C annealing for several hours, respectively. Cyclic heat load of electron beam with 35 MW/m 2 and 3-s pulse duration indicated that IPS-W/Cu samples failed with local detachment of the tungsten coating within 200 cycles and IPS-W/C showed local cracks by 300 cycles, but VPS-W/CFC withstood 1000 cycles without visible damages. However, crack creation and propagation in VPS-W/CFC were also observed under higher heat load

  7. Real Gas Effects on the Performance of Hydrocarbon-fueled Pulse Detonation Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis A.; Yungster, Shaye

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents results for a single-pulse detonation tube wherein the effects of high temperature dissociation and the subsequent recombination influence the sensible heat release available for providing propulsive thrust. The study involved the use of ethylene and air at equivalence ratios of 0.7 and 1.0. The real gas effects on the sensible heat release were found to be significantly large so as to have an impact on the thrust, impulse and fuel consumption of a PDE.

  8. Effect of Alternate Supply of Shielding Gases of Tungsten Inert Gas Welding on Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Neelam Vilas; Telsang, Martand Tamanacharya

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, an attempt is made to study the effect of alternate supply of the shielding gas in comparison with the conventional method of TIG welding with pure argon gas. The two sets of combination are used as 10-10 and 40-20 s for alternate supply of the Argon and Helium shielding gas respectively. The effect of alternate supply of shielding gas is studied on the mechanical properties like bend test, tensile test and impact test. The full factorial experimental design is applied for three set of combinations. The ANOVA is used to find significant parameters for the process and regression analysis used to develop the mathematical model. The result shows that the alternate supply of the shielding gas for 10-10 s provides better result for the bend, tensile and impact test as compared with the conventional argon gas and the alternate supply of 40-20 s argon and helium gas respectively. Welding speed can be increased for alternate supply of the shielding gas that can reduce the total welding cost.

  9. Final Report of Project Curriculum Development: Pulsed Tig Welding, 1978-1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlantic County Area Vocational-Technical School, NJ.

    Designed to help unemployed and disadvantaged workers find new career opportunities, this curriculum provides vocational students with a basic course of instruction in pulsed tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. The first of four sections provides a general background of welding, the welding industry, and welding processes. Section 2 focuses on…

  10. Pulse Combustor Driven Pressure Gain Combustion for High Efficiency Gas Turbine Engines

    KAUST Repository

    Lisanti, Joel

    2017-02-01

    The gas turbine engine is an essential component of the global energy infrastructure which accounts for a significant portion of the total fossil fuel consumption in transportation and electric power generation sectors. For this reason there is significant interest in further increasing the efficiency and reducing the pollutant emissions of these devices. Conventional approaches to this goal, which include increasing the compression ratio, turbine inlet temperature, and turbine/compressor efficiency, have brought modern gas turbine engines near the limits of what may be achieved with the conventionally applied Brayton cycle. If a significant future step increase in gas turbine efficiency is to be realized some deviation from this convention is necessary. The pressure gain gas turbine concept is a well established new combustion technology that promises to provide a dramatic increase in gas turbine efficiency by replacing the isobaric heat addition process found in conventional technology with an isochoric process. The thermodynamic benefit of even a small increase in stagnation pressure across a gas turbine combustor translates to a significant increase in cycle efficiency. To date there have been a variety of methods proposed for achieving stagnation pressure gains across a gas turbine combustor and these concepts have seen a broad spectrum of levels of success. The following chapter provides an introduction to one of the proposed pressure gain methods that may be most easily realized in a practical application. This approach, known as pulse combustor driven pressure gain combustion, utilizes an acoustically resonant pulse combustor to approximate isochoric heat release and thus produce a rise in stagnation pressure.

  11. Coherent Control of Multiphoton Transitions in the Gas and Condensed Phases with Shaped Ultrashort Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantus, Marcos

    2008-01-01

    Controlling laser-molecule interactions has become an integral part of developing devices and applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, optical switching, micromachining and photochemistry. Coherent control of multiphoton transitions could bring a significant improvement of these methods. In microscopy, multi-photon transitions are used to activate different contrast agents and suppress background fluorescence; coherent control could generate selective probe excitation. In photochemistry, different dissociative states are accessed through two, three, or more photon transitions; coherent control could be used to select the reaction pathway and therefore the yield-specific products. For micromachining and processing a wide variety of materials, femtosecond lasers are now used routinely. Understanding the interactions between the intense femtosecond pulse and the material could lead to technologically important advances. Pulse shaping could then be used to optimize the desired outcome. The scope of our research program is to develop robust and efficient strategies to control nonlinear laser-matter interactions using ultrashort shaped pulses in gas and condensed phases. Our systematic research has led to significant developments in a number of areas relevant to the AMO Physics group at DOE, among them: generation of ultrashort phase shaped pulses, coherent control and manipulation of quantum mechanical states in gas and condensed phases, behavior of isolated molecules under intense laser fields, behavior of condensed phase matter under intense laser field and implications on micromachining with ultrashort pulses, coherent control of nanoparticles their surface plasmon waves and their nonlinear optical behavior, and observation of coherent Coulomb explosion processes at 10 16 W/cm 2 . In all, the research has resulted in 36 publications (five journal covers) and nine invention disclosures, five of which have continued on to patenting

  12. Gas phase collision dynamics by means of pulse-radiolysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Yoshihiko

    1989-01-01

    After a brief survey of recent advances in gas-phase collision dynamics studies using pulse radiolysis methods, the following two topics in our research programs are presented with emphasis on the superior advantages of the pulse radiolysis methods over the various methods of gas-phase collision dynamics, such as beam methods, swarm methods and flow methods. One of the topics is electron attachment to van der Waals molecules. The attachment rates of thermal electrons to O 2 and other molecules in dense gases have been measured in wide ranges of both gas temperatures and pressures, from which experimental evidence has been obtained for electron attachment to van der Waals molecules. The results have been compared with theories and discussed in terms of the effect of van der Waals interaction on the electron attachment resonance. The obtained conclusions have been related with investigations of electron attachment, solvation and localization in the condensed phase. The other is Penning ionization and its related processes. The rate constants for the de-excitation of He(2 1 P), He(2 3 S), Ne( 3 P 0 ), Ne( 3 P 1 ), Ne( 3 P 2 ), Ar( 1 P 1 ), Ar( 3 P 1 ), by atoms and molecules have been measured in the temperature range from 100 to 300 K, thus obtaining the collisional energy dependence of the de-excitation cross sections. The results are compared in detail with theories classified according to the excited rare gas atoms in the metastable and resonance states. (author)

  13. On the propagation of the pressure pulse due to an unconfined gas cloud explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essers, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    A critical analysis of flow models used in computer codes for the simulation of the propagation in air of a pressure pulse due to a gas cloud explosion is presented. In particular, weaknesses of simple linear acoustic model are pointed out, and a more reliable non-linear isentropic model is proposed. A simple one-dimensional theory is used to evaluate as a function of the relative overpressure the speed of an incident normal shock-wave, as well as the strength and speed of the wave after reflection on a simplified rigid obstacle. Results obtained with the different models are compared to those obtained from the full Euler equations. A theoretical analysis of pulse deformation during its propagation is presented, and the ability of each model to correctly simulate that purely non-linear phenomenon is discussed. In particular, the formation of a sharp pressure pulse (shock-up phenomenon) is analyzed in detail. From the analysis, the accuracy of the linear acoustic model for the evaluation of strength and speed of incident and reflected waves is found to be quite poor except for very weak overpressures. Additionally, such a model is completely unable to simulate pulse deformations. As a result, it should be expected to lead to important errors in the simulation of pulse interaction with non-rigid obstacles, even at very weak overpressures. As opposed to that very simple model, the proposed non-linear isentropic model is found to lead to an excellent accuracy in the prediction of all wave characteristics mentioned above and in the simulation of pulse deformation if overpressure is not too large. (author)

  14. Effect of filler metals on the mechanical properties of Inconel 625 and AISI 904L dissimilar weldments using gas tungsten arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthur Prabu, S.; Devendranath Ramkumar, K.; Arivazhagan, N.

    2017-11-01

    In the present research work, dissimilar welding between Inconel 625 super alloy and AISI 904L super austenitic stainless steel using manual multi-pass continuous current gas tungsten arc (CCGTA) welding process employed with ERNiCrMo-4 and ERNiCrCoMo-1 fillers were performed to determine the mechanical properties and weldability. Tensile test results corroborated that the fracture had occurred at the parent metal of AISI 904L irrespective of filler used for all the trials. The presence of the macro and micro void coalescence in the fibrous matrix characterised for ductile mode of fracture. The hardness values at the weld interface of Inconel 625 side were observed to be higher for ERNiCrMo-4 filler due to the presence of strengthening elements such as W, Mo, Ni and Cr. The impact test accentuated that the weldments using ERNiCrMo-4 filler offered better impact toughness (41J) at room temperature. Bend test results showed that the weldments using these fillers exhibited good ductility without cracks.

  15. Tungsten Inert Gas and Friction Stir Welding Characteristics of 4-mm-Thick 2219-T87 Plates at Room Temperature and -196 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xuefeng; Deng, Ying; Yin, Zhimin; Xu, Guofu

    2014-06-01

    2219-T87 aluminum alloy is widely used for fabricating liquid rocket propellant storage tank, due to its admirable cryogenic property. Welding is the dominant joining method in the manufacturing process of aerospace components. In this study, the tungsten inert gas welding and friction stir welding (FSW) characteristics of 4-mm-thick 2219-T87 alloy plate at room temperature (25 °C) and deep cryogenic temperature (-196 °C) were investigated by property measurements and microscopy methods. The studied 2219 base alloy exhibits a low strength plane anisotropy and excellent room temperature and cryogenic mechanical properties. The ultimate tensile strength values of TIG and FSW welding joints can reach 265 and 353 MPa at room temperature, and 342 and 438 MPa at -196 °C, respectively. The base metal consists of elongated deformed grains and many nano-scaled θ (Al2Cu) aging precipitates. Fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the TIG joint are characterized by coarsening dendritic grains and equiaxed recrystallized grains, respectively. The FSW-welded joint consists of the weld nugget zone, thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), and HAZ. In the weld nugget zone, a micro-scaled sub-grain structure is the main microstructure characteristic. The TMAZ and HAZ are both characterized by coarsened aging precipitates and elongated deformed grains. The excellent FSW welding properties are attributed to the preservation of the working structures and homogenous chemical compositions.

  16. Corrosion evaluation of multi-pass welded nickel–aluminum bronze alloy in 3.5% sodium chloride solution: A restorative application of gas tungsten arc welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbaghzadeh, Behnam; Parvizi, Reza; Davoodi, Ali; Moayed, Mohammad Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Corrosion of GTA welded nickel–aluminum bronze (C95800) was studied. • Drastic microstructural changes occurred during the welding operations. • The β′ and α phases acts as anode and cathode, correspondingly, in weld region. • A few nanoamperes couple current was measured in ZRA test as galvanic corrosion. • Corrosion resistance of weld parts could not be weakened in marine environments. - Abstract: In this research, the corrosion behavior of a gas tungsten arc welded nickel–aluminum bronze (NAB) alloy is investigated by DC and AC electrochemical techniques in 3.5% sodium chloride solution. Regarding the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic results, uniform corrosion resistance of instantly immersed weld and base samples are almost analogous and increased (more in weld region) during the immersion times. Moreover, zero resistant ammeter results demonstrated that the few nanoampere galvanic currents are attributed to microstructural and morphological differences between these two regions. Therefore, the welding procedure could not deteriorate the general corrosion resistance of the restored damaged NAB parts operating in marine environments

  17. Effect of post-weld aging treatment on mechanical properties of Tungsten Inert Gas welded low thickness 7075 aluminium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temmar, M.; Hadji, M.; Sahraoui, T.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The effects of post-weld aging treatment on the properties of joints is studied. → The post-weld aging treatment increases the tensile strength of TIG welded joints. → The strengthening is due to a balance of dissolution, reversion and precipitation. → Simple post-weld aging at 140 o C enhances the properties of the welded joints. -- Abstract: This paper reports the influence of post-weld aging treatment on the microstructure, tensile strength, hardness and Charpy impact energy of weld joints low thickness 7075 T6 aluminium alloy welded by Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG). Hot cracking occurs in aluminium welds when high levels of thermal stress and solidification shrinkage are present while the weld is undergoing various degrees of solidification. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit microstructure modifications because of the thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results in low weld mechanical properties and low resistance to hot cracking. It has been observed that the mechanical properties are very sensitive to microstructure of weld metal. Simple post-weld aging treatment at 140 o C applied to the joints is found to be beneficial to enhance the mechanical properties of the welded joints. Correlations between microstructures and mechanical properties were discussed.

  18. Investigation on AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel to AISI 4140 low alloy steel dissimilar joints by gas tungsten arc, electron beam and friction welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, N.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Beneficial effects of FRW, GTAW and EBW joints of dissimilar AISI 304 and AISI 4140 materials. → Comparative study of FRW, GTAW and EBW joints on mechanical properties. → SEM/EDAX, XRD analysis on dissimilar AISI 304 and AISI 4140 materials. -- Abstract: This paper presents the investigations carried out to study the microstructure and mechanical properties of AISI 304 stainless steel and AISI 4140 low alloy steel joints by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW) and Friction Welding (FRW). For each of the weldments, detailed analysis was conducted on the phase composition, microstructure characteristics and mechanical properties. The results of the analysis shows that the joint made by EBW has the highest tensile strength (681 MPa) than the joint made by GTAW (635 Mpa) and FRW (494 Mpa). From the fractographs, it could be observed that the ductility of the EBW and GTA weldment were higher with an elongation of 32% and 25% respectively when compared with friction weldment (19%). Moreover, the impact strength of weldment made by GTAW is higher compared to EBW and FRW.

  19. Improved microstructure and mechanical properties in gas tungsten arc welded aluminum joints by using graphene nanosheets/aluminum composite filler wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, M; Gholami, A R; Eynalvandpour, A; Ahmadi, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, different amounts of graphene nanosheets (GNSs) were added to the 4043 aluminum alloy powders by using the mechanical alloying method to produce the composite filler wires. With each of the produced composite filler wires, one all-weld metal coupon was welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process. The microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture surface morphology of the weld metals have been evaluated and the results are compared. As the amount of GNSs in the composition of filler wire is increased, the microstructure of weld metal was changed from the dendritic structure to fine equiaxed grains. Furthermore, the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was improved, and is attributed to the augmented nucleation and retarded growth. From the results, it was seen that the GNSs/Al composite filler wire can be used to improve the microstructure and mechanical properties of GTA weld metals of aluminum and its alloys. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Gas tungsten arc welding assisted hybrid friction stir welding of dissimilar materials Al6061-T6 aluminum alloy and STS304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, HanSur; Bang, HeeSeon; Jeon, GeunHong; Oh, IkHyun; Ro, ChanSeung

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► GTAW assisted hybrid friction stir welding (HFSW) has been carried out for dissimilar butt joint. ► Mechanical strength of dissimilar butt joint by HFSW and FSW has been investigated and compared. ► Microstructure of dissimilar butt joint by HFSW and FSW has been investigated and compared. -- Abstract: The aim of this research is to evaluate the potential for using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) assisted hybrid friction stir welding (HFSW) process to join a stainless steel alloy (STS304) to an aluminum alloy (Al6061) in order to improve the weld strength. The difference in mechanical and microstructural characteristics of dissimilar joint by friction stir welding (FSW) and HFSW has been investigated and compared. Transverse tensile strength of approximately 93% of the aluminum alloy (Al6061) base metal tensile strength is obtained with HFSW, which is higher than the tensile strength of FSW welds. This may be due to the enhanced material plastic flow and partial annealing effect in dissimilar materials due to preheating of stainless steel surface by GTAW, resulting in significantly increased elongation of welds. The results indicate that HFSW that integrates GTAW preheating to FSW is advantageous in joining dissimilar combinations compared to conventional FSW.

  1. Joint properties of dissimilar Al6061-T6 aluminum alloy/Ti–6%Al–4%V titanium alloy by gas tungsten arc welding assisted hybrid friction stir welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, HanSur; Bang, HeeSeon; Song, HyunJong; Joo, SungMin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Hybrid friction stir welding for Al alloy and Ti alloy joint has been carried out. • Mechanical strength of dissimilar joint by HFSW and FSW has been compared. • Microstructure of dissimilar joint by HFSW and FSW has been compared. - Abstract: Hybrid friction stir butt welding of Al6061-T6 aluminum alloy plate to Ti–6%Al–4%V titanium alloy plate with satisfactory acceptable joint strength was successfully achieved using preceding gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) preheating heat source of the Ti alloy plate surface. Hybrid friction stir welding (HFSW) joints were welded completely without any unwelded zone resulting from smooth material flow by equally distributed temperature both in Al alloy side and Ti alloy side using GTAW assistance for preheating the Ti alloy plate unlike friction stir welding (FSW) joints. The ultimate tensile strength was approximately 91% in HFSW welds by that of the Al alloy base metal, which was 24% higher than that of FSW welds without GTAW under same welding condition. Notably, it was found that elongation in HFSW welds increased significantly compared with that of FSW welds, which resulted in improved joint strength. The ductile fracture was the main fracture mode in tensile test of HFSW welds

  2. Quantitative monitoring of gas flooding in oil-bearing reservoirs using a pulsed neutron tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhovets, N.; Wyatt, D.F. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on quantitative monitoring of gas flooding in oil bearing reservoirs which is unique in that saturations of three fluids (gas, oil and water) in the effective pore space have to be determined, while in most other applications saturation behind casing is determined only for two fluids: hydrocarbons and water. A new method has been developed to monitor gas flooding of oil reservoirs. The method is based on computing two porosities: true effective (base) porosity determined before gas flooding, and apparent effective (monitor) porosity determined after gas flooding. The base porosity is determined from open and/or cased hole porosity logs run before the flooding. When open hole logs are available, the cased hole porosity logs are calibrated against open hole log. The monitor porosity is determined from one of the cased hole porosity logs, such as a neutron log or count rate ratio curve from a pulsed neutron log run after the gas flooding. The base and monitor porosities provide determination of the hydrogen index of the reservoir fluid after the flooding. This hydrogen index is then used to determine saturation of the flood agent after flooding. Water saturation after flooding can be determined from the equation which relates neutron total cross section (Σm) to volumetric constituent cross sections, using Σm values from a monitor run (after flooding)

  3. A pulsed supersonic gas jet target for precision spectroscopy at the HITRAP facility at GSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedemann, D.; Stiebing, K. E.; Winters, D. F. A.; Quint, W.; Varentsov, V.; Warczak, A.; Malarz, A.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2014-11-01

    A pulsed supersonic gas jet target for experiments at the HITRAP facility at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt has been designed and built as a multi-purpose installation for key experiments on fundamental atomic physics in strong fields. This setup is currently installed at the Institut für Kernphysik of Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (IKF), in order to explore its operation prior to its installation at the HITRAP facility. Design and performance of the target are described. The measured target densities of 5.9×1012 atoms/cm3 for helium and 8.1×1012 atoms/cm³ for argon at the stagnation pressure of 30 bar match the required values. The target-beam diameter of 0.9 mm and the pulsed operation mode (jet built-up-time ≤15 ms) are well suited for the use at HITRAP.

  4. Effect of pulsed corona discharge voltage and feed gas flow rate on dissolved ozone concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasetyaningrum, A., E-mail: ajiprasetyaningrum@gmail.com; Ratnawati,; Jos, B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Diponegoro University Jl. Prof. H. Soedarto Tembalang, Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia, 50276 (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Ozonization is one of the methods extensively used for water purification and degradation of organic materials. Ozone (O{sub 3}) is recognized as a powerful oxidizing agent. Due to its strong oxidability and better environmental friendless, ozone increasing being used in domestic and industrial applications. Current technology in ozone production utilizes several techniques (corona discharge, ultra violet radiation and electrolysis). This experiment aimed to evaluating effect of voltage and gas flow rate on ozone production with corona discharge. The system consists of two net-type stainless steel electrode placed in a dielectric barrier. Three pulsed voltage (20, 30, 40 KV) and flow rate (5, 10, 15 L/min) were prepare for operation variable at high frequency (3.7 kHz) with AC pulsed power supply. The dissolved ozone concentration depends on the applied high-voltage level, gas flow rate and the discharge exposure duration. The ozone concentration increases with decreasing gas flow rate. Dissolved ozone concentrations greater than 200 ppm can be obtained with a minimum voltage 40 kV.

  5. Effect of pulsed corona discharge voltage and feed gas flow rate on dissolved ozone concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasetyaningrum, A.; Ratnawati,; Jos, B.

    2015-01-01

    Ozonization is one of the methods extensively used for water purification and degradation of organic materials. Ozone (O 3 ) is recognized as a powerful oxidizing agent. Due to its strong oxidability and better environmental friendless, ozone increasing being used in domestic and industrial applications. Current technology in ozone production utilizes several techniques (corona discharge, ultra violet radiation and electrolysis). This experiment aimed to evaluating effect of voltage and gas flow rate on ozone production with corona discharge. The system consists of two net-type stainless steel electrode placed in a dielectric barrier. Three pulsed voltage (20, 30, 40 KV) and flow rate (5, 10, 15 L/min) were prepare for operation variable at high frequency (3.7 kHz) with AC pulsed power supply. The dissolved ozone concentration depends on the applied high-voltage level, gas flow rate and the discharge exposure duration. The ozone concentration increases with decreasing gas flow rate. Dissolved ozone concentrations greater than 200 ppm can be obtained with a minimum voltage 40 kV

  6. Effect of pulsed corona discharge voltage and feed gas flow rate on dissolved ozone concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyaningrum, A.; Ratnawati, Jos, B.

    2015-12-01

    Ozonization is one of the methods extensively used for water purification and degradation of organic materials. Ozone (O3) is recognized as a powerful oxidizing agent. Due to its strong oxidability and better environmental friendless, ozone increasing being used in domestic and industrial applications. Current technology in ozone production utilizes several techniques (corona discharge, ultra violet radiation and electrolysis). This experiment aimed to evaluating effect of voltage and gas flow rate on ozone production with corona discharge. The system consists of two net-type stainless steel electrode placed in a dielectric barrier. Three pulsed voltage (20, 30, 40 KV) and flow rate (5, 10, 15 L/min) were prepare for operation variable at high frequency (3.7 kHz) with AC pulsed power supply. The dissolved ozone concentration depends on the applied high-voltage level, gas flow rate and the discharge exposure duration. The ozone concentration increases with decreasing gas flow rate. Dissolved ozone concentrations greater than 200 ppm can be obtained with a minimum voltage 40 kV.

  7. Tungsten and tungsten alloys by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belhadjhamida, A.; German, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Tungsten has a historical link with powder metallurgy and there is continued progress in expanding the available compositions and processing options. This paper starts with an introduction to the history of tungsten powder metallurgy and use this as a basis for analyzing some of the current trends. The literature base in tungsten processing is expanding and includes new alloys, microstructures, and processing routes. A few examples will be emphasize here to produce a frame work for this program, including description of sintering mechanisms for tungsten, liquid phase sintering advances, hot consolidation fundamentals, and options for complex shaping using powder injection modeling. For this base, subsequent presentations will expand on these fundamental advances

  8. Controlling fundamentals in high-energy high-rate pulsed power materials processing of powdered tungsten, titanium aluminides, and copper-graphite composites. Final technical report, 1 Jun 87-31 Aug 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persad, C.; Marcus, H.L.; Bourell, D.L.; Eliezer, Z.; Weldon, W.F.

    1990-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine the controlling fundamentals in the high-energy high-rate (1 MJ in 1s) processing of metal powders. This processing utilizes a large electrical current pulse to heat a pressurized powder mass. The current pulse was provided by a homopolar generator. Simple short cylindrical shapes were consolidated so as to minimize tooling costs. Powders were subjected to current densities of 5 kA/cm2 to 25 kA/cm2 under applied pressures ranging from 70 MPa to 500 MPa. Disks with diameters of 25 mm to 70 mm, and thicknesses of 1 mm to 10 mm were consolidated. Densities of 75% to 99% of theoretical values were obtained in powder consolidates of tungsten, titanium aluminides, copper-graphite, and other metal-ceramic composites. Extensive microstructural characterization was performed to follow the changes occuring in the shape and microstructure of the various powders. The processing science has at its foundation the control of the duration of elevated temperature exposure during powder consolidation.

  9. Tungsten oxide nanowires grown on amorphous-like tungsten films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellasega, D; Pezzoli, A; Russo, V; Passoni, M; Pietralunga, S M; Nasi, L; Conti, C; Vahid, M J; Tagliaferri, A

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten oxide nanowires have been synthesized by vacuum annealing in the range 500–710 °C from amorphous-like tungsten films, deposited on a Si(100) substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in the presence of a He background pressure. The oxygen required for the nanowires formation is already adsorbed in the W matrix before annealing, its amount depending on deposition parameters. Nanowire crystalline phase and stoichiometry depend on annealing temperature, ranging from W_1_8O_4_9-Magneli phase to monoclinic WO_3. Sufficiently long annealing induces the formation of micrometer-long nanowires, up to 3.6 μm with an aspect ratio up to 90. Oxide nanowire growth appears to be triggered by the crystallization of the underlying amorphous W film, promoting their synthesis at low temperatures. (paper)

  10. Oxidation of ammonium sulfite by a multi-needle-to-plate gas phase pulsed corona discharge reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hua; Lu, Na; Shang, Kefeng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-03-01

    The oxidation of ammonium sulfite in the ammonia-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process was investigated in a multi-needle-to-plate gas phase pulsed corona discharge reactor in this paper. The effect of several parameters, including capacitance and peak pulse voltage of discharge system, electrode gap and bubbling gas flow rate on the oxidation rate of ammonium sulfite was reviewed. The oxidation rate of ammonium sulfite could reach 47.2% at the capacitance, the peak pulse voltage, electrode gap and bubbling gas flow rate equal to 2 nF, -24.6 k V, 35 mm and 4 L min-1 within treatment time of 40 min The experimental results indicate that the gas phase pulsed discharge system with a multi-needle-to-plate electrode can oxide the ammonium sulfite. The oxidation rate increased with the applied capacitance and peak pulse voltage and decreased with the electrode gap. As the bubbling gas flow rate increased, the oxidation rate increased first and then tended to reach a stationary value. These results would be important for the process optimization of the (NH4)2SO3 to (NH4)2SO4 oxidation.

  11. Modified gas diffusion layer for fuel cells synthesized by pulsed laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrasu, Daniela; Stefanescu, Ioan; Dorcioman, Gabriela; Serban, Nicolae; Axente, Emil; Sima, Felix; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ioan N.; Enculescu, Ionut

    2010-01-01

    Full text; In this paper there are presented the first results regarding the development of a modified gas diffusion layer for fuel cells consisting of a simple or teflonized carbon cloth deposited by pulsed laser with metal oxide nanostructures. These are designed to operate both as co-catalyst, and oxidic support for other electrochemically active catalysts. We selected TiO 2 , ZnO and Al 2 O 3 doped (2 wt.%) ZnO which were uniformly distributed over the surface of gas diffusion layers in order to improve the catalytic activity, stability and lifetime, and reduce the production costs of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We evidenced by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy that our depositions consisted of TiO 2 nanoparticles while in the case of ZnO and Al 2 O 3 doped (2 wt.%) ZnO transparent quasicontinuous films were synthesized. (authors)

  12. Yield of H2O2 in Gas-Liquid Phase with Pulsed DBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Song; Wen, Yiyong; Liu, Kefu

    2014-01-01

    Electric discharge in water can generate a large number of oxidants such as ozone, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals. In this paper, a non-thermal plasma processing system was established by means of pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in gas-liquid phase. The electrodes of discharge reactor were staggered. The yield of H2O2 was enhanced after discharge. The effects of discharge time, discharge voltage, frequency, initial pH value, and feed gas were investigated. The concentration of hydrogen peroxide and ozone was measured after discharge. The experimental results were fully analyzed. The chemical reaction equations in water were given as much as possible. At last, the water containing Rhodamine B was tested in this system. The degradation rate came to 94.22% in 30 min.

  13. Effects of Sc and Zr on mechanical property and microstructure of tungsten inert gas and friction stir welded aerospace high strength Al–Zn–Mg alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ying, E-mail: csudengying@163.com [School of Metallurgy and Environment, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Power Metallurgy, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Peng, Bing [School of Metallurgy and Environment, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Xu, Guofu, E-mail: csuxgf66@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Power Metallurgy, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Pan, Qinglin; Yin, Zhimin; Ye, Rui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Wang, Yingjun; Lu, Liying [Northeast Light Alloy Co. Ltd., Hei Longjiang, Harbin 150060 (China)

    2015-07-15

    New aerospace high strength Al–Zn–Mg and Al–Zn–Mg–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) alloys were welded by tungsten inert gas (TIG) process using a new Al–6.0Mg–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) filler material, and friction stir welding (FSW) process, respectively. Mechanical property and microstructure of the welded joints were investigated comparatively by tensile tests and microscopy methods. The results show that Sc and Zr can improve the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of Al–Zn–Mg alloy by 59 MPa (23.3%) and 16 MPa (4.0%) in TIG welded joints, and by 77 MPa (23.8%) and 54 MPa (11.9%) in FSW welded joints, respectively. The ultimate tensile strength and elongation of new Al–Zn–Mg–Sc–Zr alloy FSW welded joint are 506±4 MPa and 6.34±0.2%, respectively, showing superior post welded performance. Mechanical property of welded joint is mainly controlled by its “weakest microstructural zone”. TIG welded Al–Zn–Mg and Al–Zn–Mg–Sc–Zr alloys reinforced with weld bead both failed at fusion boundaries. Secondary Al{sub 3}Sc{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x} particles originally present in parent alloy coarsen during TIG welding process, but they can restrain the grain growth and recrystallization here, thus improving welding performance. For two FSW welded joints, fracture occurred in weld nugget zone. Secondary Al{sub 3}Sc{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x} nano-particles almost can keep unchangeable size (20–40 nm) across the entire FSW welded joint, and thus provide effective Orowan strengthening, grain boundary strengthening and substructure strengthening to strengthen FSW joints. The positive effect from Sc and Zr additions into base metals can be better preserved by FSW process than by TIG welding process.

  14. Effects of Sc and Zr on mechanical property and microstructure of tungsten inert gas and friction stir welded aerospace high strength Al–Zn–Mg alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Ying; Peng, Bing; Xu, Guofu; Pan, Qinglin; Yin, Zhimin; Ye, Rui; Wang, Yingjun; Lu, Liying

    2015-01-01

    New aerospace high strength Al–Zn–Mg and Al–Zn–Mg–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) alloys were welded by tungsten inert gas (TIG) process using a new Al–6.0Mg–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) filler material, and friction stir welding (FSW) process, respectively. Mechanical property and microstructure of the welded joints were investigated comparatively by tensile tests and microscopy methods. The results show that Sc and Zr can improve the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of Al–Zn–Mg alloy by 59 MPa (23.3%) and 16 MPa (4.0%) in TIG welded joints, and by 77 MPa (23.8%) and 54 MPa (11.9%) in FSW welded joints, respectively. The ultimate tensile strength and elongation of new Al–Zn–Mg–Sc–Zr alloy FSW welded joint are 506±4 MPa and 6.34±0.2%, respectively, showing superior post welded performance. Mechanical property of welded joint is mainly controlled by its “weakest microstructural zone”. TIG welded Al–Zn–Mg and Al–Zn–Mg–Sc–Zr alloys reinforced with weld bead both failed at fusion boundaries. Secondary Al 3 Sc x Zr 1−x particles originally present in parent alloy coarsen during TIG welding process, but they can restrain the grain growth and recrystallization here, thus improving welding performance. For two FSW welded joints, fracture occurred in weld nugget zone. Secondary Al 3 Sc x Zr 1−x nano-particles almost can keep unchangeable size (20–40 nm) across the entire FSW welded joint, and thus provide effective Orowan strengthening, grain boundary strengthening and substructure strengthening to strengthen FSW joints. The positive effect from Sc and Zr additions into base metals can be better preserved by FSW process than by TIG welding process

  15. Fusion welding of Fe-added lap joints between AZ31B magnesium alloy and 6061 aluminum alloy by hybrid laser-tungsten inert gas welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Xiao-dong; Liu, Li-ming

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Hybrid Laser-TIG fusion welding technique was used for joining Mg to Al alloys. → Laser defocusing amount determined penetration depth inside Al alloy of joints. → The addition of Fe interlayer suppressed Mg-Al intermetallics greatly in joints. → A maximum joint strength with optimum thickness of Fe interlayer was obtained. → Excessive addition of Fe interlayer was adverse for the strength improvement. -- Abstract: AZ31B magnesium alloy and 6061-T6 aluminum alloy were lap joined together with the addition of Fe interlayer by fusion welding of hybrid laser-tungsten inert gas (TIG) technique. The influence of location of laser focal spot (LFS) on joint penetration depth and that of the depth on joint strength were investigated. The results showed that when the LFS was just on the surface of Al plate, the deepest penetration could be obtained, which contributed to the improvement of shear strength of Fe-added joints, but not to the elevation of the strength of Mg/Al direct joints. The addition of Fe interlayer suppressed massive production of Mg-Al intermetallics but produced Fe-Al intermetallics in the fusion zone of the joints, whose micro-hardness was extremely high and was also adverse for the enhancement of joint shear strength. The effect of Fe-interlayer thickness on the joint shear strength was also examined, and the maximum shear strength of Fe-added joint could achieve 100 MPa with 0.13 mm thick Fe interlayer. The fracture modes of 0.07 and 0.13 mm Fe-interlayer-added joints were both quasi-cleavage, while those of direct and 0.22 mm interlayer-added joints were completely cleavage. The theoretical shear strength of the Fe-added joints was also discussed.

  16. The effect of location on the microstructure and mechanical properties of titanium aluminides produced by additive layer manufacturing using in-situ alloying and gas tungsten arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yan; Cuiuri, Dominic; Hoye, Nicholas; Li, Huijun; Pan, Zengxi, E-mail: zengxi@uow.edu.au

    2015-04-17

    An innovative and low cost additive layer manufacturing (ALM) process is used to produce γ-TiAl based alloy wall components. Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) provides the heat source for this new approach, combined with in-situ alloying through separate feeding of commercially pure Ti and Al wires into the weld pool. This paper investigates the morphology, microstructure and mechanical properties of the additively manufactured TiAl material, and how these are affected by the location within the manufactured component. The typical additively layer manufactured morphology exhibits epitaxial growth of columnar grains and several layer bands. The fabricated γ-TiAl based alloy consists of comparatively large α{sub 2} grains in the near-substrate region, fully lamellar colonies with various sizes and interdendritic γ structure in the intermediate layer bands, followed by fine dendrites and interdendritic γ phases in the top region. Microhardness measurements and tensile testing results indicated relatively homogeneous mechanical characteristics throughout the deposited material. The exception to this homogeneity occurs in the near-substrate region immediately adjacent to the pure Ti substrate used in these experiments, where the alloying process is not as well controlled as in the higher regions. The tensile properties are also different for the vertical (build) direction and horizontal (travel) direction because of the differing microstructure in each direction. The microstructure variation and strengthening mechanisms resulting from the new manufacturing approach are analysed in detail. The results demonstrate the potential to produce full density titanium aluminide components directly using the new additive layer manufacturing method.

  17. The effect of location on the microstructure and mechanical properties of titanium aluminides produced by additive layer manufacturing using in-situ alloying and gas tungsten arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Yan; Cuiuri, Dominic; Hoye, Nicholas; Li, Huijun; Pan, Zengxi

    2015-01-01

    An innovative and low cost additive layer manufacturing (ALM) process is used to produce γ-TiAl based alloy wall components. Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) provides the heat source for this new approach, combined with in-situ alloying through separate feeding of commercially pure Ti and Al wires into the weld pool. This paper investigates the morphology, microstructure and mechanical properties of the additively manufactured TiAl material, and how these are affected by the location within the manufactured component. The typical additively layer manufactured morphology exhibits epitaxial growth of columnar grains and several layer bands. The fabricated γ-TiAl based alloy consists of comparatively large α 2 grains in the near-substrate region, fully lamellar colonies with various sizes and interdendritic γ structure in the intermediate layer bands, followed by fine dendrites and interdendritic γ phases in the top region. Microhardness measurements and tensile testing results indicated relatively homogeneous mechanical characteristics throughout the deposited material. The exception to this homogeneity occurs in the near-substrate region immediately adjacent to the pure Ti substrate used in these experiments, where the alloying process is not as well controlled as in the higher regions. The tensile properties are also different for the vertical (build) direction and horizontal (travel) direction because of the differing microstructure in each direction. The microstructure variation and strengthening mechanisms resulting from the new manufacturing approach are analysed in detail. The results demonstrate the potential to produce full density titanium aluminide components directly using the new additive layer manufacturing method

  18. Effects of TiO2 coating on the microstructures and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas welded AZ31 magnesium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Linzhi; Shen Jun; Xu Nan

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The weld penetration and the D/W ratio could be improved dramatically by increasing of the amount of the TiO 2 coating. → The average grain size of the α-Mg grains increased and the β-Mg 17 Al 12 IMC transformed from granular structure to continuous structure with an increase of the amount of the TiO 2 coating. → With an increase of the amount of the TiO 2 coating, the microhardness of the FZ of the AZ31 magnesium alloy welded joints decreased slightly at first and then decreased sharply. → The UTS value of the welded joints increased with an increase of the amount of the TiO 2 coating. → However, too much TiO 2 coating caused a significant decrease of the UTS value of the welded joints. - Abstract: The effects of TiO 2 coating on the macro-morphologies, microstructures and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded AZ31 magnesium alloy joints were investigated by microstructural observations, microhardness tests and tensile tests. The results showed that an increase in the amount of the TiO 2 coating resulted in an increase in the weld penetration and the depth/width (D/W) ratio of the TIG welded AZ31 magnesium alloy seams. Moreover, the average grain size of the α-Mg grains increased and the β-Mg 17 Al 12 intermetallic compound (IMC) was coarser in the case of higher amount of the TiO 2 coating. With an increase in the amount of the TiO 2 coating, the microhardness of the fusion zone (FZ) of the AZ31 magnesium alloy welded joints decreased slightly initially and then decreased sharply. In addition, with an increase in the amount of the TiO 2 coating, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) value and elongation of the welded joints increased at first and then decreased sharply.

  19. Pulsed-plasma gas-discharge inactivation of microbial pathogens in chilled poultry wash water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, N J; Espie, S; Harrower, J; Anderson, J G; Marsili, L; MacGregor, S J

    2007-12-01

    A pulsed-plasma gas-discharge (PPGD) system was developed for the novel decontamination of chilled poultry wash water. Treatment of poultry wash water in the plasma generation chamber for up to 24 s at 4 degrees C reduced Escherichia coli NCTC 9001, Campylobacter jejuni ATCC 33560, Campylobacter coli ATCC 33559, Listeria monocytogenes NCTC 9863, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ATCC 4931, and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 14028 populations to non-detectable levels ( or = 3 log CFU/ml) in recalcitrant B. cereus NCTC 11145 endospore numbers within 30 s, the level of endospore reduction was dependent on the nature of the sparged gas used in the plasma treatments. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that significant damage occurred at the cellular level in PPGD-treated test organisms. This electrotechnology delivers energy in intense ultrashort bursts, generating products such as ozone, UV light, acoustic and shock waves, and pulsed electric fields that have multiple bactericidal properties. This technology offers an exciting complementary or alternative approach for treating raw poultry wash water and for preventing cross-contamination in processing environments.

  20. The tungsten powder study of the dispenser cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Jixiu; Wan Baofei

    2006-01-01

    The intercorrelation of tungsten powder properties, such as grain size, distribution and morphology, and porous matrix parameters with electron emission capability and longevity of Ba dispenser cathodes has been investigated for the different grain morphologies. It is shown that a fully cleaning step of the tungsten powder is so necessary that the tungsten powder will be reduction of oxide in hydrogen atmosphere above 700 deg. C. The porosity of the tungsten matrix distributes more even and the closed pore is fewer, the average granule size of the tungsten powder distributes more convergent. The porosity of the tungsten matrix and the evaporation of the activator are bigger and the pulse of the cathode is smaller when the granularity is bigger by the analysis of the electronic microscope and diode experiment

  1. The tungsten powder study of the dispenser cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ji-xiu; Wan, Bao-fei

    2006-06-01

    The intercorrelation of tungsten powder properties, such as grain size, distribution and morphology, and porous matrix parameters with electron emission capability and longevity of Ba dispenser cathodes has been investigated for the different grain morphologies. It is shown that a fully cleaning step of the tungsten powder is so necessary that the tungsten powder will be reduction of oxide in hydrogen atmosphere above 700 °C. The porosity of the tungsten matrix distributes more even and the closed pore is fewer, the average granule size of the tungsten powder distributes more convergent. The porosity of the tungsten matrix and the evaporation of the activator are bigger and the pulse of the cathode is smaller when the granularity is bigger by the analysis of the electronic microscope and diode experiment.

  2. Tungsten Alloy Outgassing Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherfoord, John P; Shaver, L

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have not seen extensive use in liquid argon calorimeters so far. Because the manufacturing process for tungsten is different from the more common metals used in liquid argon there is concern that tungsten could poison the argon thereby creating difficulties for precision calorimetry. In this paper we report measurements of outgassing from the tungsten alloy slugs proposed for use in the ATLAS FCal module and estimate limits on potential poisoning with reasonable assumptions. This estimate gives an upper limit poisoning rate of tungsten slugs.

  3. Effect of surfactant concentration in the electrolyte on the tribological properties of nickel-tungsten carbide composite coatings produced by pulse electro co-deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartal, Muhammet, E-mail: kartal@sakarya.edu.tr [Sakarya University, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgical & Materials Engineering Department, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey); Uysal, Mehmet [Sakarya University, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgical & Materials Engineering Department, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey); Gul, Harun [Duzce University, Gumusova Vocational School, 81850 Duzce (Turkey); Alp, Ahmet; Akbulut, Hatem [Sakarya University, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgical & Materials Engineering Department, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Effect of surfactant concentration on the co-deposited WC was investigated. • In the Ni matrix significantly high hardness was achieved by WC co-deposition. • Optimum surfactant resulted in obtaining superior wear resistance in the Ni. • Friction coefficient was decreased by WC co-deposition in the Ni matrix. - Abstract: A nickel plating bath containing WC particles was used to obtain hard and wear-resistant particle reinforced Ni/WC MMCs on steel surfaces for anti-wear applications. Copper substrates were used for electro co-deposition of Ni matrix/WC with the particle size of <1 μm tungsten carbide reinforcements. The influence of surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) concentration on particle distribution, microhardness and wear resistance of composite coatings has been studied. The nickel films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of the surfactant on the zeta potential, co-deposition and distribution of WC particles in the nickel matrix, as well as the tribological properties of composite coatings were also investigated. The tribological behaviors of the electrodeposited WC composite coatings sliding against M50 steel ball (Ø 10 mm) were examined on a CSM Instrument. All friction and wear tests were performed without lubrication at room temperature and in the ambient air (relative humidity 55–65%).

  4. Effect of surfactant concentration in the electrolyte on the tribological properties of nickel-tungsten carbide composite coatings produced by pulse electro co-deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Muhammet; Uysal, Mehmet; Gul, Harun; Alp, Ahmet; Akbulut, Hatem

    2015-11-01

    A nickel plating bath containing WC particles was used to obtain hard and wear-resistant particle reinforced Ni/WC MMCs on steel surfaces for anti-wear applications. Copper substrates were used for electro co-deposition of Ni matrix/WC with the particle size of <1 μm tungsten carbide reinforcements. The influence of surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) concentration on particle distribution, microhardness and wear resistance of composite coatings has been studied. The nickel films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of the surfactant on the zeta potential, co-deposition and distribution of WC particles in the nickel matrix, as well as the tribological properties of composite coatings were also investigated. The tribological behaviors of the electrodeposited WC composite coatings sliding against M50 steel ball (Ø 10 mm) were examined on a CSM Instrument. All friction and wear tests were performed without lubrication at room temperature and in the ambient air (relative humidity 55-65%).

  5. Improvement of the yield of highly charged ions by a gas-pulsing technique and the current status of the NIRS Penning source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Tomohiro; Miyoshi, Tomohiro; Sakuma, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Mitsugu; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Sato, Yukio

    2004-01-01

    The yields of highly charged ions have been improved by using a gas-pulsing technique in the pulsed Penning-ionized-gauge ion source (PIGIS) in the heavy-ion medical accelerator in Chiba. So far, this pulsed PIGIS has been operated under a low-duty factor (10 -2 -10 -3 ), in which the gas flow is not being pulsed. A solenoid-type gas valve, having a simple structure compared to the piezo-electric type, was attached to the outside of the PIGIS chamber in order to control the gas flow into the PIGIS chimney. Beam tests for Ne with gas pulsing showed that the pressure response time should actually be a few tens ms, and the intensity of Ne 6+ was increased by ten times, from 20 to 200 eμA. The gas pulsing also improved the average vacuum in the low energy beam transport (LEBT) line by a factor of 4. When producing H 2 + , H 3 + , and He 1+ by PIGIS with gas pulsing, the beam loss of highly charged ions from electron cyclotron resonance ion sources in the LEBT was reduced to be negligible; meanwhile, it was around 30% without gas pulsing. This paper describes the gas-pulsing technique and the preliminary results, as well as some recent developments in the NIRS-PIGIS

  6. Tokamak experiments on JIPP T-II with pulsed gas injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, K.; Itoh, S.; Fujita, J.; Kadota, K.; Kawahata, K.

    1978-02-01

    The confinement of tokamak plasma has been investigated in the wide range of electron density average n sub(e) from 1 x 10 13 to 5 x 10 13 cm -3 by using the pulsed gas injection. The gross energy confinement time increases with increase of electron density and reaches 14 msec. The averaged effective ionic charge derived from plasma conductivity = is about 1 to 2 in the regime of small streaming parameter ( = 0.01 -- 0.08). The ratio of ion temperature to electron one is in the range greater than 0.5. This fact means that the ion energy confinement time is greater than the electron-ion energy relaxation time. Excessive injection of cold neutral gas excites m = 2 MHD oscillations. Much more gas injection leads to the remarkable cooling of plasma periphery and disruptive instabilities. These MHD oscillations and disruptive instabilities have been suppressed by the heating of plasma periphery with the second rapid rise of plasma current. (auth.)

  7. Universal stability curve for pattern formation in pulsed gas-solid fluidized beds of sandlike particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Martín, Lilian; Ottevanger, Coen; van Ommen, J. Ruud; Coppens, Marc-Olivier

    2018-03-01

    A granular layer can form regular patterns, such as squares, stripes, and hexagons, when it is fluidized with a pulsating gas flow. These structures are reminiscent of the well-known patterns found in granular layers excited through vibration, but, contrarily to them, they have been hardly explored since they were first discovered. In this work, we investigate experimentally the conditions leading to pattern formation in pulsed fluidized beds and the dimensionless numbers governing the phenomenon. We show that the onset to the instability is universal for Geldart B (sandlike) particles and governed by the hydrodynamical parameters Γ =ua/(utϕ ¯) and f /fn , where ua and f are the amplitude and frequency of the gas velocity, respectively, ut is the terminal velocity of the particles, ϕ ¯ is the average solids fraction, and fn is the natural frequency of the bed. These findings suggest that patterns emerge as a result of a parametric resonance between the kinematic waves originating from the oscillating gas flow and the bulk dynamics. Particle friction plays virtually no role in the onset to pattern formation, but it is fundamental for pattern selection and stabilization.

  8. Synergistic effects of liquid and gas phase discharges using pulsed high voltage for dyes degradation in the presence of oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Zhou, Minghua; Lei, Lecheng

    2005-07-01

    The technology of combined liquid and gas phase discharges (LGD) using pulsed high voltage for dyes degradation was developed in this study. Apparent synergistic effects for Acid orange II (AO) degradation in the presence of oxygen were observed. The enhancement of AO degradation rate was around 302%. Furthermore, higher energy efficiency was obtained comparing with individual liquid phase discharge (LD) or gas phase discharge process (GD). The AO degradation in the presence of oxygen by LGD proceeded through the direct ozone oxidation and the ozone decomposition induced by LD. Important operating parameters such as electrode distance, applied voltage, pulse repetition rate, and types of dyes were further investigated.

  9. Signal-Pressure Curves of Cascaded Four-Wave Mixing in Gas-Filled Capillary by fs Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Baozhen; Huang Zuqia

    2005-01-01

    The theoretical framework for the cascaded four waves mixing (CFWM) in gas-filled capillary by fs pulses is constructed. Based on the theoretical framework, the signal-pressure curves (SPC) of the CFWM in gas-filled capillary by fs pulses are calculated. With a comparison between the theoretical and experimental SPC we have discussed the influence of the walk-off and phase modulation on the SPC. At the same time, we have discussed the possible origin of the first three peaks of the SPC.

  10. Stabilization of the composition of the gas medium of a repetitively pulsed CO2 laser by means of hopcalite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, V. Iu.; Drokov, G. F.; Kuzmenko, V. A.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Pigulskaia, V. V.

    1986-05-01

    Results of experiments in which hopcalite was used to stabilize the composition of the gas medium of repetitively pulsed and monopulse CO2 lasers are reported. In particular, the mechanisms of the decrease in the catalyst activity with time under conditions for catalyst regeneration are determined. It is shown that the use of hopcalite has made it possible to achieve long-term operation of a high-power repetitively pulsed CO2 laser without changing the gas mixture in a closed circuit. Some details related to the use of hopcalite are discussed.

  11. Twin-Wire Pulsed Tandem Gas Metal Arc Welding of API X80 Steel Linepipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhao Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Twin-Wire Pulsed Tandem Gas Metal Arc Welding process with high welding production efficiency was used to join the girth weld seam of API X80 steel linepipe of 18.4 mm wall thickness and 1422 mm diameter. The macrostructure, microstructure, hardness, and electrochemical corrosion behavior of welded joints were studied. Effects of temperature and Cl− concentration on the corrosion behavior of base metal and weld metal were investigated. Results show that the welded joint has good morphology, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance. The corrosion resistance of both the base metal and the weld metal decreases with increasing temperature or Cl− concentration. In the solution with high Cl− concentration, the base metal and weld metal are more susceptible to pitting. The corrosion resistance of the weld metal is slightly lower than that of the base metal.

  12. Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam diode using gas puff plasma gun as ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, H.; Higashiyama, M.; Takata, S.; Kitamura, I.; Masugata, K.

    2006-01-01

    A magnetically insulated ion diode with an active ion source of a gas puff plasma gun has been developed in order to generate a high-intensity pulsed heavy ion beam for the implantation process of semiconductors and the surface modification of materials. The nitrogen plasma produced by the plasma gun is injected into the acceleration gap of the diode with the external magnetic field system. The ion diode is operated at diode voltage approx. =200 kV, diode current approx. =2 kA and pulse duration approx. =150 ns. A new acceleration gap configuration for focusing ion beam has been designed in order to enhance the ion current density. The experimental results show that the ion current density is enhanced by a factor of 2 and the ion beam has the ion current density of 27 A/cm 2 . In addition, the coaxial type Marx generator with voltage 200 kV and current 15 kA has been developed and installed in the focus type ion diode. The ion beam of ion current density approx. =54 A/cm 2 is obtained. To produce metallic ion beams, an ion source by aluminum wire discharge has been developed and the aluminum plasma of ion current density ∼70 A/cm 2 is measured. (author)

  13. Operability of an Ejector Enhanced Pulse Combustor in a Gas Turbine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Dougherty, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    A pressure-gain combustor comprised of a mechanically valved, liquid fueled pulsejet, an ejector, and an enclosing shroud, was coupled to a small automotive turbocharger to form a self-aspirating, thrust producing gas turbine engine. The system was constructed in order to investigate issues associated with the interaction of pulsed combustion devices and turbomachinery. Installed instrumentation allowed for sensing of distributed low frequency pressure and temperature, high frequency pressure in the shroud, fuel flow rate, rotational speed, thrust, and laboratory noise. The engine ran successfully and reliably, achieving a sustained thrust of 5 to 6 lbf, and maintaining a rotor speed of approximately 90,000 rpm, with a combustor pressure gain of approximately 4 percent. Numerical simulations of the system without pressure-gain combustion indicated that the turbocharger would not operate. Thus, the new combustor represented a substantial improvement in system performance. Acoustic measurements in the shroud and laboratory indicated turbine stage sound pressure level attenuation of 20 dB. This is consistent with published results from detonative combustion experiments. As expected, the mechanical reed valves suffered considerable damage under the higher pressure and thermal loading characteristics of this system. This result underscores the need for development of more robust valve systems for this application. The efficiency of the turbomachinery components did not appear to be significantly affected by unsteadiness associated with pulsed combustion, though the steady component efficiencies were already low, and thus not expected to be particularly sensitive.

  14. Behavior of tungsten carbide in water stabilized plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Matějíček, Jiří; Neufuss, Karel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2007), s. 213-220 ISSN 1335-8987 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/05/0540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : water stabilized plasma * tungsten carbide * tungsten hemicarbide * decarburization Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  15. Stress in tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon multilayer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon (WC-DLC) multilayer coatings have been prepared by sputter deposition from a tungsten-carbide target and periodic switching on and off of the reactive acetylene gas flow. The stress in the resulting WC-DLC multilayers has been studied by substrate curvature.

  16. Gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding of ultrafine grained AISI 304L stainless steel: Microstructural and mechanical behavior characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabooni, S., E-mail: s.sabooni@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimzadeh, F.; Enayati, M.H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ngan, A.H.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Jabbari, H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    In the present study, an ultrafine grained (UFG) AISI 304L stainless steel with the average grain size of 650 nm was successfully welded by both gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and friction stir welding (FSW). GTAW was applied without any filler metal. FSW was also performed at a constant rotational speed of 630 rpm and different welding speeds from 20 to 80 mm/min. Microstructural characterization was carried out by High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) with Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Nanoindentation, microhardness measurements and tensile tests were also performed to study the mechanical properties of the base metal and weldments. The results showed that the solidification mode in the GTAW welded sample is FA (ferrite–austenite) type with the microstructure consisting of an austenite matrix embedded with lath type and skeletal type ferrite. The nugget zone microstructure in the FSW welded samples consisted of equiaxed dynamically recrystallized austenite grains with some amount of elongated delta ferrite. Sigma phase precipitates were formed in the region ahead the rotating tool during the heating cycle of FSW, which were finally fragmented into nanometric particles and distributed in the weld nugget. Also there is a high possibility that the existing delta ferrite in the microstructure rapidly transforms into sigma phase particles during the short thermal cycle of FSW. These suggest that high strain and deformation during FSW can promote sigma phase formation. The final austenite grain size in the nugget zone was found to decrease with increasing Zener–Hollomon parameter, which was obtained quantitatively by measuring the peak temperature, calculating the strain rate during FSW and exact examination of hot deformation activation energy by considering the actual grain size before the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization. Mechanical properties observations showed that the welding

  17. Modeling and analyzing the effects of heat treatment on the characteristics of magnesium alloy joint welded by the tungsten-arc inert gas welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Te-Chang; Chou, Chih-Chung; Tsai, Deng-Maw; Chiang, Ko-Ta

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The mathematical model was provided to study the effect of heat treatment on the magnesium alloy welded joint. → The solution strengthening effect of β-phase Mg 17 Al 12 gain promotes the strengthening matrix and ductility of hcp-α-phase Mg. → The average size and proportion of α-phase Mg grain decreases with the increase of the tempering time and temperature. → An increase in the high value of tempering temperature and tempering time leads to increase the maximum tensile strength. → The values of the elongation increases with increasing in both the value of tempering temperature and tempering time. -- Abstract: The objective of this paper is to present the mathematical models for modeling and analysis of the effects of heat treatment on the characteristics of magnesium alloy joint welded by the tungsten-arc inert gas (TIG) welding. The process of heat treatment adopts the tempering process with varying processing parameters, including tempering temperature and tempering time. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joint are considered in the characteristic evaluation and explored by experiment. An experimental plan of the face-centered central composite design (CCD) based on the response surface methodology (RSM) has been employed to carry out the experimental study. The results of analysis of variance (ANOVA) and comparisons of experimental data show that the mathematical models of the value of the maximum tensile strength and elongation are fairly well fitted with the experimental values with a 95% confidence interval. In the tempering process, the microstructure of welded joint in the weld bead displays two main microstructures of hcp-α-phase Mg and bcc-β-phase Mg 17 Al 12 . Results show that the average size and proportion of α-phase Mg grains decreases with the increase of the tempering time and temperature. But, the increase of the tempering time and temperature promote increasing the average size and

  18. Effect of gas heating on the generation of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam in the pulse-periodic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Sorokin, D. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-07-01

    The generation of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam (UAEB) in nitrogen in the pulse-periodic regime is investigated. The gas temperature in the discharge gap of the atmospheric-pressure nitrogen is measured from the intensity distribution of unresolved rotational transitions ( C 3Π u , v' = 0) → ( B 3Π g , v″ = 0) in the nitrogen molecule for an excitation pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz. It is shown that an increase in the UAEB current amplitude in the pulse-periodic regime is due to gas heating by a series of previous pulses, which leads to an increase in the reduced electric field strength as a result of a decrease in the gas density in the zone of the discharge formation. It is found that in the pulse-periodic regime and the formation of the diffuse discharge, the number of electrons in the beam increases by several times for a nitrogen pressure of 9 × 103 Pa. The dependences of the number of electrons in the UAEB on the time of operation of the generator are considered.

  19. Single channel analog pulse processor Asic for gas proportional counters and SI detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandratre, V.B.; Sarkar, Soumen; Kataria, S.K.; Viyogi, Y.P.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the design and development of a single channel pulse processor in short Singleplex ASIC targeted for gas proportional counters/Si detectors. The design is optimized for the dynamic range of +500 fC to -500 fC with provision for externally adjusted pole-zero cancellation. A dedicated filter based on the de-convolution principle is used for the cancellation of the long hyperbolic signal tail produced by the slow drift of ions, typical in gas proportional with the filter time constants derived from the actual detector input signal shape. The pole-zero adjustment can be done by external dc voltage to achieve perfect base-line recovery to 1% after 5 μs. The simulated 0 pf noise is 500 e - rms for the peaking time of 1.2 μs with noise slope of 7e - -. The gain is 3.4 mv/fC over the entire linear dynamic range with power dissipation of 13 mW. This design is a modified version of Indiplex chip with features dynamic range equal gain on both polarities with nearly same noise and serves as diagnostic chip for Indiplex. The chip can be used for radiation monitoring instruments. (author)

  20. Mechanical properties of 5083 aluminium welds after manual and automatic pulsed gas metal arc welding using E5356 filler

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mutombo, K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Semi-automatic and automatic pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of aluminium alloy 5083 with ER5356 filler wire causes considerable softening in the weld. The tensile strength of dressed automatic welds approaches that of the base metal...

  1. Studies of some elementary processes involving electrons in the gas phase by pulse-radiolysis microwave-cavity technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunagawa, Takeyoshi; Makita, Takeshi; Musasa, Hirofumi; Tatsumi, Yoshitsugu; Shimamori, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    The pulse radiolysis-microwave cavity technique has been employed for detection of free electrons in the gas phase. Presented are results of the observation of electron disappearance by attachment to molecules, the electron thermalization (energy loss) processes in the presence of an electron-attaching compound, and the formation of electrons by Penning ionization. (author)

  2. Substitution of thoriated tungsten electrodes in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, H.; Piller, G.

    2006-01-01

    Thoriated tungsten electrodes are frequently used for inert gas welding (TIG/WIG). The use of these electrodes can lead to doses which are well above the limit for the general population (1mSv/year). This has been shown by different investigations, for example from the ''Berufsgenossenschaft''. With these findings in mind, the regulatory authorities (Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (SFOPH) and Swiss National Accident Insurance Association (Suva)) started in 1999 to examine the justification of thoriated tungsten electrodes and a possible substitution with products containing no radioactive material. Up to this time, the use of thoriated tungsten electrodes could be justified since no thorium-free products leading to comparable results were available on the market. This was also the reason why the SFOPH approved several types of these electrodes. Discussions with formation centers for welding and inquiries made at welding shops, trading companies and producers showed that in the mean-time thorium-free products with comparable welding specifications and results became available on the market. Since the 1 January 2004, thoriated tungsten electrodes can only be used if the user has obtained the corresponding license from the SFOPH. The use of thoriated tungsten electrodes is thus not completely forbidden, but very strict conditions have to be fulfilled. Up to now and due to the involvement of the relevant partners, the substitution process has not met any problem. Neither trading companies nor users made any opposition and no request for obtaining a license for thoriated tungsten electrodes was made. (orig.)

  3. The effects of focusing power on TEA CO2 laser-induced gas breakdown and the consequent pulse shaping effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshtipour, Saleheh; Safari, Ebrahim; Majdabadi, Abbas; Silakhori, Kaveh

    2018-02-01

    Transversely Excited Atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser pulses were used in order to generate an optical breakdown in a variety of mono- and polyatomic molecules using different focusing powers. The dependence of the spark kernel geometry and the transmitted pulse shapes on the focusing power as well as the pressure, molecular weight, and ionization energy of the gases was investigated in detail. Partial removal of the transmitted pulse tail in the 0.05-2.6 μs range together with shortened spikes in the 10-60 ns range has been observed by applying a 2.5 cm focal length lens for all the gases. At higher focal lengths, this effect is only incompletely observed for He gas. Spatial-temporal analyses of the laser beams and the relevant plasma plumes indicate that this behavior is due to the drop in the plasma density below the critical level, before the laser pulse tail is completed.

  4. RF induction plasma spheroidization of tungsten powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Zhogntao; Ye Gaoying; Liu Chuandong; Tong Honghui

    2009-01-01

    Irregularly-shaped tungsten powders (average granular sizes of 512 μm) have been spheroidized by radio frequency (RF)induction plasma. The effects of feed rate, mode of material dispersion, particle size on spheroidization efficiency are investigated. Experimental results show that the spheroidization efficiency decreases rapidly when the feed rate increases to more than 95 g/min. Only 30% spheroidization efficiency is gained at the feed rate of 135.75 g/min. The spheroidization efficiency is also affected by the flow rate of carrier gas. When the flow rate of carrier gas is 0.12 m 3 /h, the dispersion effect is the best, and the spheroidization efficiency is almost 100%. The apparent density of tungsten powders increases a bit with the increase of spheroidization efficiency. And the particle size uniformity of spheroidized tungsten powders is in accordance with that of original powders. (authors)

  5. Gas-phase mechanisms in the growth of ZrCyN1-y thin films by pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spillmann, H.; Clerc, C.; Doebeli, M.; Willmott, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    Superhard zirconium carbonitride films have been grown via pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation (PRCLA) using zirconium metal and a nitrogen- and carbon-containing gas pulse mixture. The control of stoichiometry was much simplified by using the thermally stable gas-phase species N 2 and CH 4 . The gas-phase processes are investigated using quadrupole mass spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy. The excitation of the ablation plume depends intimately on the collision partner of the gas pulse, in particular on its density of states and the probability of energy transfer to internal degrees of freedom

  6. Disinfection and toxicological assessments of pulsed UV and pulsed-plasma gas-discharge treated-water containing the waterborne protozoan enteroparasite Cryptosporidium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jennifer; Kirf, Dominik; Garvey, Mary; Rowan, Neil

    2013-09-01

    We report for the first time on the comparative use of pulsed-plasma gas-discharge (PPGD) and pulsed UV light (PUV) for the novel destruction of the waterborne enteroparasite Cryptosporidium parvum. It also describes the first cyto-, geno- and ecotoxicological assays undertaken to assess the safety of water decontaminated using PPGD and PUV. During PPGD treatments, the application of high voltage pulses (16 kV, 10 pps) to gas-injected water (N2 or O2, flow rate 2.5L/min) resulted in the formation of a plasma that generated free radicals, ultraviolet light, acoustic shock waves and electric fields that killed ca. 4 log C. parvum oocysts in 32 min exposure. Findings showed that PPGD-treated water produced significant cytotoxic properties (as determined by MTT and neutral red assays), genotoxic properties (as determined by comet and Ames assays), and ecotoxic properties (as determined by Microtox™, Thamnotox™ and Daphnotox™ assays) that are representative of different trophic levels in aquatic environment (pozone (0.8 mg/L) and/or dissociated nitric and nitrous acid that contributed to the observed disinfection and toxicity. Chemical analysis of PPGD-treated water revealed increasing levels of electrode metals that were present at ≤ 30 times the tolerated respective values for EU drinking water. PUV-treated water did not exhibit any toxicity and was shown to be far superior to that of PPGD for killing C. parvum oocysts taking only 90 s of pulsing [UV dose of 6.29 μJ/cm(2)] to produce a 4-log reduction compared to a similar reduction level achieved after 32min PPGD treatment as determined by combined in vitro CaCo-2 cell culture-qPCR. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Michael

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation. The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D2 molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  8. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, M.

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. . Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D 2 molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. . Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  9. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, M

    2004-07-01

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. . Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D{sub 2} molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. . Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  10. Textbook tests with tungsten

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2010-01-01

    CERN's linear collider detector group joins forces with CALICE in building the world's first tungsten hadronic calorimeter.   Hadronic calorimeter prototype made of tungsten for the linear collider detector being equipped with CALICE scintillators. In a hall for test beam experiments at CERN, next to the CLOUD climate experiment and an irradiation facility, sits a detector prototype that is in many ways a first. It's the first ever hadronic sandwich calorimeter (HCal) prototype made of tungsten. It's the first prototype for a detector for the Compact Linear Collider Study CLIC, developed by the linear collider detector R&D group (LCD group) at CERN. And it's the first piece of hardware that results directly from the cooperation between CLIC and ILC detector study groups. Now its makers are keen to see first particle showers in their detector. The tungsten calorimeter has just moved from a workshop at CERN, where it was assembled from finely polished tungsten squares and triangles, into the ...

  11. Efficient compression of the femtosecond pulses of an ytterbium laser in a gas-filled capillary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konyashchenko, Aleksandr V; Losev, Leonid L; Tenyakov, S Yu

    2011-01-01

    A 290-fs radiation pulse of an ytterbium laser system with a central wavelength of 1028 nm and an energy of 145 μJ was compressed to a 27-fs pulse with an energy of 75 μJ. The compression was realised on the basis of the effect of pulse spectrum broadening in a xenon-filled glass capillary for a pulse repetition rate of 3kHz. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  12. Organotin analysis by gas chromatography-pulsed flame-photometric detection (GC-PFPD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leermakers, M.; Nuyttens, J.; Baeyens, W. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Analytical and Environmental Chemistry (ANCH), Brussel (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Monobutyltin (MBuT), dibutyltin (DBuT), and tributyltin (TBuT) mixtures have been separated and quantified by gas chromatography with pulsed flame-photometric detection (GC-PFPD). The compounds were first derivatized with NaBEt{sub 4}, then extracted with hexane and injected into the GC in splitless mode. Optimum GC and detector conditions were established. For GC, various injector temperatures and oven temperature programs were tested. For the PFPD detector, gate settings (gate delay and gate width) and detector temperature were optimized. A very good linearity was obtained up to 100-150 ppb for all organotin compounds. The detection limits obtained were: MBuT (0.7 ppb), DBuT (0.8 ppb), and TBuT (0.6 ppb). RSD for repeatability and reproducibility were well below 20% when the instrument was in routine operation. A biological sample (CRM 477) was also analyzed for organotins. Extraction from the biological matrix was performed with TMAH. Besides the increased risk of contamination, the derivatization step seemed to be critical. pH and amount of derivatizing agent were tested. When using an internal standard (TPrT) between 90% and 110% of the certified amounts of organotin were recovered. (orig.)

  13. Multi-objective Optimization of Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Using Neuro NSGA-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Kamal; Pal, Surjya K.

    2018-05-01

    Weld quality is a critical issue in fabrication industries where products are custom-designed. Multi-objective optimization results number of solutions in the pareto-optimal front. Mathematical regression model based optimization methods are often found to be inadequate for highly non-linear arc welding processes. Thus, various global evolutionary approaches like artificial neural network, genetic algorithm (GA) have been developed. The present work attempts with elitist non-dominated sorting GA (NSGA-II) for optimization of pulsed gas metal arc welding process using back propagation neural network (BPNN) based weld quality feature models. The primary objective to maintain butt joint weld quality is the maximization of tensile strength with minimum plate distortion. BPNN has been used to compute the fitness of each solution after adequate training, whereas NSGA-II algorithm generates the optimum solutions for two conflicting objectives. Welding experiments have been conducted on low carbon steel using response surface methodology. The pareto-optimal front with three ranked solutions after 20th generations was considered as the best without further improvement. The joint strength as well as transverse shrinkage was found to be drastically improved over the design of experimental results as per validated pareto-optimal solutions obtained.

  14. Measurement of gas temperature and OH density in the afterglow of pulsed positive corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2008-01-01

    The gas temperature and OH density in the afterglow of pulsed positive corona discharge are measured using the laser-induced predissociation fluorescence (LIPF) of OH radicals. Discharge occurs in a 13 mm point-to-plane gap in an atmospheric-pressure H 2 O(2.8%)/O 2 (2.0%)/N 2 mixture. The temperature measurement shows that (i) the temperature increases after discharge and (ii) the temperature near the anode tip (within 1 mm from the anode tip) is much higher than that of the rest of the discharge volume. Near the anode tip, the temperature increases from 500 K (t = 0 μs) to 1100 K (t = 20 μs), where t is the postdischarge time, while it increases from 400 K (t = 0 μs) to 700 K (t = 100 μs) in the rest of the discharge volume away from the anode tip. This temperature difference between the two volumes (near and far from the anode tip) causes a difference in the decay rate of OH density: OH density near the anode tip decays approximately 10 times slower than that far from the tip. The spatial distribution of OH density shows good agreement with that of the secondary streamer luminous intensity. This shows that OH radicals are mainly produced in the secondary streamer, not in the primary one

  15. Optical Properties Dependence with Gas Pressure in AlN Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J A; Riascos, H; Caicedo, J C; Cabrera, G; Yate, L

    2011-01-01

    AlN films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique (PLD) using an Nd: YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm). The films were deposited in a nitrogen atmosphere as working gas; the target was an aluminum high purity (99.99%). The films were deposited with a laser fluence of 7 J/cm2 for 10 minutes on silicon (100) substrates. The substrate temperature was 300 deg. C and the working pressure was varied from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr. The thickness measured by profilometer was 150 nm for all films. The crystallinity was observed via XRD pattern, the morphology and composition of the films were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), respectively. The optical reflectance spectra and color coordinates of the films were obtained by optical spectral reflectometry technique in the range of 400 cm-1- 900 cm-1 by an Ocean Optics 2000 spectrophotometer. In this work, a clear dependence of the reflectance, dominant wavelength and color purity was found in terms of the applied pressure to the AlN films. A reduction in reflectance of about 55% when the pressure was increased from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr was observed. This paper deals with the formation of AlN thin films as promising materials for the integration of SAW devices on Si substrates due to their good piezoelectric properties and the possibility of deposition at low temperature compatible with the manufacturing of Si integrated circuits.

  16. The study on a gas-coupled two-stage stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X. L.; Chen, L. B.; Zhu, X. S.; Pan, C. Z.; Guo, J.; Wang, J. J.; Zhou, Y.

    2017-12-01

    A two-stage gas-coupled Stirling-type pulse tube cryocooler (SPTC) driven by a linear dual-opposed compressor has been designed, manufactured and tested. Both of the stages adopted coaxial structure for compactness. The effect of a cold double-inlet at the second stage on the cooling performance was investigated. The test results show that the cold double-inlet will help to achieve a lower cooling temperature, but it is not conducive to achieving a higher cooling capacity. At present, without the cold double-inlet, the second stage has achieved a no-load temperature of 11.28 K and a cooling capacity of 620 mW/20 K with an input electric power of 450 W. With the cold double-inlet, the no-load temperature is lowered to 9.4 K, but the cooling capacity is reduced to 400 mW/20 K. The structure of the developed cryocooler and the influences of charge pressure, operating frequency and hot end temperature will also be introduced in this paper.

  17. Optical Properties Dependence with Gas Pressure in AlN Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J A; Riascos, H [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira, Grupo plasma Laser y Aplicaciones A.A 097 (Colombia); Caicedo, J C [Grupo pelIculas delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Cabrera, G; Yate, L, E-mail: jcaicedoangulo@gmail.com [Department de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain)

    2011-01-01

    AlN films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique (PLD) using an Nd: YAG laser ({lambda} = 1064 nm). The films were deposited in a nitrogen atmosphere as working gas; the target was an aluminum high purity (99.99%). The films were deposited with a laser fluence of 7 J/cm2 for 10 minutes on silicon (100) substrates. The substrate temperature was 300 deg. C and the working pressure was varied from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr. The thickness measured by profilometer was 150 nm for all films. The crystallinity was observed via XRD pattern, the morphology and composition of the films were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), respectively. The optical reflectance spectra and color coordinates of the films were obtained by optical spectral reflectometry technique in the range of 400 cm-1- 900 cm-1 by an Ocean Optics 2000 spectrophotometer. In this work, a clear dependence of the reflectance, dominant wavelength and color purity was found in terms of the applied pressure to the AlN films. A reduction in reflectance of about 55% when the pressure was increased from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr was observed. This paper deals with the formation of AlN thin films as promising materials for the integration of SAW devices on Si substrates due to their good piezoelectric properties and the possibility of deposition at low temperature compatible with the manufacturing of Si integrated circuits.

  18. Magnetic discharge accelerating diode for the gas-filled pulsed neutron generators based on inertial confinement of ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlovskij, K I; Shikanov, A E; Vovchenko, E D; Shatokhin, V L; Isaev, A A; Martynenko, A S

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with magnetic discharge diode module with inertial electrostatic ions confinement for the gas-filled pulsed neutron generators. The basis of the design is geometry with the central hollow cathode surrounded by the outer cylindrical anode and electrodes made of permanent magnets. The induction magnitude about 0.1-0.4 T in the central region of the discharge volume ensures the confinement of electrons in the space of hollow (virtual) cathode and leads to space charge compensation of accelerated ions in the centre. The research results of different excitation modes in pulsed high-voltage discharge are presented. The stable form of the volume discharge preserveing the shape and amplitude of the pulse current in the pressure range of 10 -3 -10 -1 Torr and at the accelerating voltage up to 200 kV was observed. (paper)

  19. Investigation of the Impact of Transient Heat Loads Applied by Laser Irradiation on ITER-Grade Tungsten

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Alexander; Arakcheev, A.; Philipps, V.; Pintsuk, Gerald; Reinhart, Michael; Samm, Ulrich; Shoshin, A.; Schweer, Bernd; Unterberg, Bernhard; Zlobinski, M.; Sergienko, Gennady; Steudel, Isabel; Wirtz, Marius; Burdakov, A. V.; Coenen, Jan Willem

    2014-01-01

    Cracking thresholds and crack patterns in tungsten targets after repetitive ITER-like edge localized mode (ELM) pulses have been studied in recent simulation experiments by laser irradiation. The tungsten specimens were tested under selected conditions to quantify the thermal shock response. A Nd:YAG laser capable of delivering up to 32 J of energy per pulse with a duration of 1 ms at the fundamental wavelength λ = 1064 nm has been used to irradiate ITER-grade tungsten samples with repetitive...

  20. Plasma etching of patterned tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franssila, S.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma etching of tungsten is discussed from the viewpoint of thin film structure and integrated circuit process engineering. The emphasis is on patterned tungsten etching for silicon device and X-ray mask fabrication. After introducing tungsten etch chemistries and mechanisms, microstructural aspects of tungsten films (crystal structure, grain size, film density, defects, impurities) in relation to etching are discussed. Approaches to etch process optimization are presented, and the current state-of-the-art of patterned tungsten etching is reviewed. (orig.)

  1. Bremsstrahlung γ-ray generation by electrons from gas jets irradiated by laser pulses for radiographic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Yuji; Nayuki, Takuya; Zhidkov, Alexei; Fujii, Takashi; Nemoto, Koshichi

    2012-01-01

    Electron generation from a gas jet irradiated by low energy femtosecond laser pulses is studied experimentally as a promising source of radiation for radioisotope-free γ-ray imaging systems. The calculated yield of γ-rays in the 0.5-2 MeV range, produced by low-average-power lasers and gas targets, exceeds the yields from solid tape targets up to 60 times. In addition, an effect of quasi-mono energetic electrons on γ-ray imaging is also discussed.

  2. Generation of ozone by pulsed corona discharge over water surface in hybrid gas-liquid electrical discharge reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukes, Petr [Department of Pulse Plasma Systems, Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Za Slovankou 3, PO Box 17, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Clupek, Martin [Department of Pulse Plasma Systems, Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Za Slovankou 3, PO Box 17, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Babicky, Vaclav [Department of Pulse Plasma Systems, Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Za Slovankou 3, PO Box 17, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Janda, Vaclav [Department of Water Technology and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 160 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Sunka, Pavel [Department of Pulse Plasma Systems, Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Za Slovankou 3, PO Box 17, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2005-02-07

    Ozone formation by a pulse positive corona discharge generated in the gas phase between a planar high voltage electrode made from reticulated vitreous carbon and a water surface with an immersed ground stainless steel plate electrode was investigated under various operating conditions. The effects of gas flow rate (0.5-3 litre min{sup -1}), discharge gap spacing (2.5-10 mm), applied input power (2-45 W) and gas composition (oxygen containing argon or nitrogen) on ozone production were determined. Ozone concentration increased with increasing power input and with increasing discharge gap. The production of ozone was significantly affected by the presence of water vapour formed through vaporization of water at the gas-liquid interface by the action of the gas phase discharge. The highest energy efficiency for ozone production was obtained using high voltage pulses of approximately 150 ns duration in Ar/O{sub 2} mixtures with the maximum efficiency (energy yield) of 23 g kW h{sup -1} for 40% argon content.

  3. Generation of ozone by pulsed corona discharge over water surface in hybrid gas-liquid electrical discharge reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukes, Petr; Clupek, Martin; Babicky, Vaclav; Janda, Vaclav; Sunka, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    Ozone formation by a pulse positive corona discharge generated in the gas phase between a planar high voltage electrode made from reticulated vitreous carbon and a water surface with an immersed ground stainless steel plate electrode was investigated under various operating conditions. The effects of gas flow rate (0.5-3 litre min -1 ), discharge gap spacing (2.5-10 mm), applied input power (2-45 W) and gas composition (oxygen containing argon or nitrogen) on ozone production were determined. Ozone concentration increased with increasing power input and with increasing discharge gap. The production of ozone was significantly affected by the presence of water vapour formed through vaporization of water at the gas-liquid interface by the action of the gas phase discharge. The highest energy efficiency for ozone production was obtained using high voltage pulses of approximately 150 ns duration in Ar/O 2 mixtures with the maximum efficiency (energy yield) of 23 g kW h -1 for 40% argon content

  4. A comparative evaluation of microstructural and mechanical behavior of fiber laser beam and tungsten inert gas dissimilar ultra high strength steel welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiteerth R. Joshi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different welding processes on the mechanical properties and the corresponding variation in the microstructural features have been investigated for the dissimilar weldments of 18% Ni maraging steel 250 and AISI 4130 steel. The weld joints are realized through two different fusion welding processes, tungsten inert arc welding (TIG and laser beam welding (LBW, in this study. The dissimilar steel welds were characterized through optical microstructures, microhardness survey across the weldment and evaluation of tensile properties. The fiber laser beam welds have demonstrated superior mechanical properties and reduced heat affected zone as compared to the TIG weldments.

  5. Computational and experimental progress on laser-activated gas avalanche switches for broadband, high-power electromagnetic pulse generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayhall, D.J.; Yee, J.H.; Villa, F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the gas avalanche switch, a high-voltage, picosecond-speed switch, which has been proposed. The basic switch consists of pulse-charged electrodes, immersed in a high-pressure gas. An avalanche discharge is induced in the gas between the electrodes by ionization from a picosecond-scale laser pulse. The avalanching electrons move toward the anode, causing the applied voltage to collapse in picoseconds. This voltage collapse, if rapid enough, generates electromagnetic waves. A two-dimensional (2D), finite difference computer code solves Maxwell's equations for transverse magnetic modes for rectilinear electrodes between parallel plate conductors, along with electron conservation equations for continuity, momentum, and energy. Collision frequencies for ionization and momentum and energy transfer to neutral molecules are assumed to scale linearly with neutral pressure. Electrode charging and laser-driven electron deposition are assumed to be instantaneous. Code calculations are done for a pulse generator geometry, consisting of an 0.7 mm wide by 0.8 mm high, beveled, rectangular center electrode between grounded parallel plates at 2 mm spacing in air

  6. The impact of a pulsing groundwater table on greenhouse gas emissions in riparian grey alder stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Ülo; Maddison, Martin; Soosaar, Kaido; Teemusk, Alar; Kanal, Arno; Uri, Veiko; Truu, Jaak

    2015-02-01

    Floods control greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in floodplains; however, there is a lack of data on the impact of short-term events on emissions. We studied the short-term effect of changing groundwater (GW) depth on the emission of (GHG) carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in two riparian grey alder (Alnus incana) stands of different age in Kambja, southern Estonia, using the opaque static chamber (five replicates in each site) and gas chromatography methods. The average carbon and total nitrogen content in the soil of the old alder (OA) stand was significantly higher than in the young alder (YA) stand. In both stands, one part was chosen for water table manipulation (Manip) and another remained unchanged with a stable and deeper GW table. Groundwater table manipulation (flooding) significantly increases CH4 emission (average: YA-Dry 468, YA-Manip 8,374, OA-Dry 468, OA-Manip 4,187 μg C m(-2) h(-1)) and decreases both CO2 (average: OA-Dry 138, OA-Manip 80 mg C m(-2) h(-1)) and N2O emissions (average: OA-Dry 23.1, OA-Manip 11.8 μg N m(-2) h(-1)) in OA sites. There was no significant difference in CO2 and CH4 emissions between the OA and YA sites, whereas in OA sites with higher N concentration in the soil, the N2O emission was significantly higher than at the YA sites. The relative CO2 and CH4 emissions (the soil C stock-related share of gaseous losses) were higher in manipulated plots showing the highest values in the YA-Manip plot (0.03 and 0.0030 % C day(-1), respectively). The soil N stock-related N2O emission was very low achieving 0.000019 % N day(-1) in the OA-Dry plot. Methane emission shows a negative correlation with GW, whereas the 20 cm depth is a significant limit below which most of the produced CH4 is oxidized. In terms of CO2 and N2O, the deeper GW table significantly increases emission. In riparian zones of headwater streams, the short-term floods (e.g. those driven by extreme climate events) may significantly enhance

  7. Helium effects on tungsten surface morphology and deuterium retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Y.; Peng, H.Y.; Lee, H.T.; Ohno, N.; Kajita, S.; Yoshida, N.; Doerner, R.; De Temmerman, G.; Alimov, V.; Wright, G.

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental results on tungsten surface morphology, especially nano-structure (fuzz), induced by helium plasma exposure at temperatures between 1000 K and 2000 K are reviewed. This structure was firstly reported in 2006. In this review, most of experimental results reported so far including characteristics and formation conditions of the nano-structure in both linear plasma devices and magnetic confinement devices, erosion and arcing by steady-state plasma exposure and ELM-like pulsed heat or pulsed plasma exposure by a laser and a plasma gun are summarized. In addition, He effects on D retention under simultaneous D/He irradiation on tungsten are presented

  8. The Determination of Pesticidal and Non-Pesticidal Organotin Compounds by in situ Ethylation and Capillary Gas Chromatography with Pulsed Flame Photometric Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concurrent determination of pesticidal and non-pesticidal organotin compounds in several water matrices, using a simultaneous in situ ethylation and liquid-liquid extraction followed by splitless injection mode capillary gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detect...

  9. The Determination of Pesticidal and Non-Pesticidal Organotin Compounds in Water Matrices by in situ Ethylation and Gas Chromatography with Pulsed Flame Photometric Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concurrent determination of pesticidal and non-pesticidal organotin compounds in several water matrices, using a simultaneous in situ ethylation and liquid-liquid extraction followed by splitless injection mode capillary gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detect...

  10. High Heat Load Properties of Ultra Fine Grain Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z.; Du, J.; Ge, C.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Song, S.X.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tungsten is increasingly considered as a promising candidate armour materials facing the plasma in tokamaks for medium to high heat flux components (EAST, ASDEX, ITER). Fabrication tungsten with ultra fine grain size is considered as an effective way to ameliorate some disadvantages of tungsten, such as its brittleness at room temperature. But the research data on the performance of ultra fine grain tungsten is still very limit. In this work, high heat load properties of pure ultra-fine grain tungsten have been studied. The ultra fine grain tungsten samples with average grain size of 0.2 μm, 1 μm and 3 μm were fabricated by resistance sintering under ultra high pressure. The annealing experiments for the investigation of the material resistance against grain growth have been done by annealing samples in a vacuum furnace at different temperature holding for 2 hours respectively. It is found that recrystallization and grain growth occur at heating temperature of 1250 deg. c. The finer the initial grain sizes of tungsten, the smaller its grain growth grain. The effects of transient high thermal loads (off normal events like disruptions) on tungsten surface morphology have been performed in electron beam test facility JUDITH. The thermal loads tests have been carried out with 4 ms pulses at different power density of 0.22, 0.33, 0.44, 0.55 and 0.88 GW/m 2 respectively. Horizontal cracks formed for all tungsten samples at 0.44 GW/m 2 . Particle erosions occurred for tungsten with 3 μm size at 0.33 GW/m 2 and for tungsten with 0.2 and 1 μm size at 0.55 GW/m 2 . The weight loss of tungsten with 0.2, 1 and 3 μm size are 2,0.1,0.6 mg respectively at 0.88 GW/m 2 . The effects of a large number of very short transient repetitive thermal loads (ELM-like) on tungsten surface morphology also have been performed by using a fundamental wave of a YAG laser. It is found that tungsten with 0.2 μm size has the best performance. (authors)

  11. High Heat Load Properties of Ultra Fine Grain Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z.; Du, J.; Ge, C. [Lab. of Special Ceramic and P/M, University of Science and Technology, 100083 Beijing (China); Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G. [FZJ-Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association Euratom-FZJ, Institut fur Plasmaphysik, Postfach 1913, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Song, S.X. [Research Center on Fusion Materials (RCFM), University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), 100083 Beijing (China)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tungsten is increasingly considered as a promising candidate armour materials facing the plasma in tokamaks for medium to high heat flux components (EAST, ASDEX, ITER). Fabrication tungsten with ultra fine grain size is considered as an effective way to ameliorate some disadvantages of tungsten, such as its brittleness at room temperature. But the research data on the performance of ultra fine grain tungsten is still very limit. In this work, high heat load properties of pure ultra-fine grain tungsten have been studied. The ultra fine grain tungsten samples with average grain size of 0.2 {mu}m, 1 {mu}m and 3 {mu}m were fabricated by resistance sintering under ultra high pressure. The annealing experiments for the investigation of the material resistance against grain growth have been done by annealing samples in a vacuum furnace at different temperature holding for 2 hours respectively. It is found that recrystallization and grain growth occur at heating temperature of 1250 deg. c. The finer the initial grain sizes of tungsten, the smaller its grain growth grain. The effects of transient high thermal loads (off normal events like disruptions) on tungsten surface morphology have been performed in electron beam test facility JUDITH. The thermal loads tests have been carried out with 4 ms pulses at different power density of 0.22, 0.33, 0.44, 0.55 and 0.88 GW/m{sup 2} respectively. Horizontal cracks formed for all tungsten samples at 0.44 GW/m{sup 2}. Particle erosions occurred for tungsten with 3 {mu}m size at 0.33 GW/m{sup 2} and for tungsten with 0.2 and 1 {mu}m size at 0.55 GW/m{sup 2}. The weight loss of tungsten with 0.2, 1 and 3 {mu}m size are 2,0.1,0.6 mg respectively at 0.88 GW/m{sup 2}. The effects of a large number of very short transient repetitive thermal loads (ELM-like) on tungsten surface morphology also have been performed by using a fundamental wave of a YAG laser. It is found that tungsten with 0.2 {mu}m size has

  12. Tungsten Deposition on Graphite using Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Uttam; Chauhan, Sachin S; Sharma, Jayshree; Sanyasi, A K; Ghosh, J; Choudhary, K K; Ghosh, S K

    2016-01-01

    The tokamak concept is the frontrunner for achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction on earth, an environment friendly way to solve future energy crisis. Although much progress has been made in controlling the heated fusion plasmas (temperature ∼ 150 million degrees) in tokamaks, technological issues related to plasma wall interaction topic still need focused attention. In future, reactor grade tokamak operational scenarios, the reactor wall and target plates are expected to experience a heat load of 10 MW/m 2 and even more during the unfortunate events of ELM's and disruptions. Tungsten remains a suitable choice for the wall and target plates. It can withstand high temperatures, its ductile to brittle temperature is fairly low and it has low sputtering yield and low fuel retention capabilities. However, it is difficult to machine tungsten and hence usages of tungsten coated surfaces are mostly desirable. To produce tungsten coated graphite tiles for the above-mentioned purpose, a coating reactor has been designed, developed and made operational at the SVITS, Indore. Tungsten coating on graphite has been attempted and successfully carried out by using radio frequency induced plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (rf -PECVD) for the first time in India. Tungsten hexa-fluoride has been used as a pre-cursor gas. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) clearly showed the presence of tungsten coating on the graphite samples. This paper presents the details of successful operation and achievement of tungsten coating in the reactor at SVITS. (paper)

  13. Electrospark doping of steel with tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisova, Yulia, E-mail: yukolubaeva@mail.ru; Shugurov, Vladimir, E-mail: shugurov@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); Petrikova, Elizaveta, E-mail: elizmarkova@yahoo.com [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Seksenalina, Malika, E-mail: sportmiss@bk.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Ivanova, Olga, E-mail: ivaov@mail.ru; Ikonnikova, Irina, E-mail: irinaikonnikova@yandex.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Kunitsyna, Tatyana, E-mail: kma11061990@mail.ru; Vlasov, Victor, E-mail: rector@tsuab.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Klopotov, Anatoliy, E-mail: klopotovaa@tsuab.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Yuriy, E-mail: yufi55@mail.ru [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of thermal processes and the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of carbon steel subjected to electrospark doping with tungsten. The problem of finding the temperature field in the system film (tungsten) / substrate (iron) is reduced to the solution of the heat conductivity equation. A one-dimensional case of heating and cooling of a plate with the thickness d has been considered. Calculations of temperature fields formed in the system film / substrate synthesized using methods of electrospark doping have been carried out as a part of one-dimensional approximation. Calculations have been performed to select the mode of the subsequent treatment of the system film / substrate with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. Authors revealed the conditions of irradiation allowing implementing processes of steel doping with tungsten. A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of iron with tungsten in equilibrium conditions has been performed. The studies have been carried out on the surface layer of the substrate modified using the method of electrospark doping. The results showed the formation in the surface layer of a structure with a highly developed relief and increased strength properties.

  14. Electrospark doping of steel with tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisova, Yulia; Shugurov, Vladimir; Petrikova, Elizaveta; Seksenalina, Malika; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina; Kunitsyna, Tatyana; Vlasov, Victor; Klopotov, Anatoliy; Ivanov, Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of thermal processes and the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of carbon steel subjected to electrospark doping with tungsten. The problem of finding the temperature field in the system film (tungsten) / substrate (iron) is reduced to the solution of the heat conductivity equation. A one-dimensional case of heating and cooling of a plate with the thickness d has been considered. Calculations of temperature fields formed in the system film / substrate synthesized using methods of electrospark doping have been carried out as a part of one-dimensional approximation. Calculations have been performed to select the mode of the subsequent treatment of the system film / substrate with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. Authors revealed the conditions of irradiation allowing implementing processes of steel doping with tungsten. A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of iron with tungsten in equilibrium conditions has been performed. The studies have been carried out on the surface layer of the substrate modified using the method of electrospark doping. The results showed the formation in the surface layer of a structure with a highly developed relief and increased strength properties

  15. Three-dimensional modelling of arc behaviour and gas shield quality in tandem gas-metal arc welding using anti-phase pulse synchronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnick, M; Lohse, M; Fuessel, U; Wilhelm, G; Murphy, A B

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a transient three-dimensional model of an anti-phase-synchronized pulsed tandem gas-metal arc welding process, which is used to analyse arc interactions and their influence on the gas shield flow. The shielding gases considered are pure argon and a mixture of argon with 18% CO 2 . Comparison of the temperature fields predicted by the model with high-speed images indicates that the essential features of the interactions between the arcs are captured. The paper demonstrates strong arc deflection and kinking, especially during the low-current phase of the pulse, in agreement with experimental observations. These effects are more distinct for the argon mixture with 18% CO 2 . The second part of the paper demonstrates the effects of arc deflection and instabilities on the shielding gas flow and the occurrence of air contamination in the process region. The results allow an improved understanding of the causes of periodic instabilities and weld seam imperfections such as porosity, spatter, heat-tint oxidation and fume deposits.

  16. Tungsten deposition by hydrogen-atom reaction with tungsten hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.

    1991-01-01

    Using gaseous hydrogen atoms with WF 6 , tungsten atoms can be produced in a gas-phase reaction. The atoms then deposit in a near-room temperature process, which results in the formation of tungsten films. The W atoms (10 10 -10 11 /cm 3 ) were measured in situ by atomic absorption spectroscopy during the CVD process. Deposited W films were characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, and X-ray diffraction. The surface morphology of the deposited films and filled holes was studied using scanning electron microscopy. The deposited films were highly adherent to different substrates, such as Si, SiO 2 , Ti/Si, TiN/Si and Teflon. The reaction mechanism and kinetics were studied. The experimental results indicated that this method has three advantages compared to conventional CVD or PECVD: (1) film growth occurs at low temperatures; (2) deposition takes place in a plasma-free environment; and (3) a low level of impurities results in high-quality adherent films

  17. The simplest equivalent circuit of a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge and the determination of the gas gap charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipa, A. V.; Koskulics, J.; Brandenburg, R.; Hoder, T.

    2012-11-01

    The concept of the simplest equivalent circuit for a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is critically reviewed. It is shown that the approach is consistent with experimental data measured either in large-scale sinusoidal-voltage driven or miniature pulse-voltage driven DBDs. An expression for the charge transferred through the gas gap q(t) is obtained with an accurate account for the displacement current and the values of DBD reactor capacitance. This enables (i) the significant reduction of experimental error in the determination of q(t) in pulsed DBDs, (ii) the verification of the classical electrical theory of ozonizers about maximal transferred charge qmax, and (iii) the development of a graphical method for the determination of qmax from charge-voltage characteristics (Q-V plots, often referred as Lissajous figures) measured under pulsed excitation. The method of graphical presentation of qmax is demonstrated with an example of a Q-V plot measured under pulsed excitation. The relations between the discharge current jR(t), the transferred charge q(t), and the measurable parameters are presented in new forms, which enable the qualitative interpretation of the measured current and voltage waveforms without the knowledge about the value of the dielectric barrier capacitance Cd. Whereas for quantitative evaluation of electrical measurements, the accurate estimation of the Cd is important.

  18. The simplest equivalent circuit of a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge and the determination of the gas gap charge transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipa, A. V.; Brandenburg, R.; Hoder, T.; Koskulics, J.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the simplest equivalent circuit for a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is critically reviewed. It is shown that the approach is consistent with experimental data measured either in large-scale sinusoidal-voltage driven or miniature pulse-voltage driven DBDs. An expression for the charge transferred through the gas gap q(t) is obtained with an accurate account for the displacement current and the values of DBD reactor capacitance. This enables (i) the significant reduction of experimental error in the determination of q(t) in pulsed DBDs, (ii) the verification of the classical electrical theory of ozonizers about maximal transferred charge q max , and (iii) the development of a graphical method for the determination of q max from charge-voltage characteristics (Q-V plots, often referred as Lissajous figures) measured under pulsed excitation. The method of graphical presentation of q max is demonstrated with an example of a Q-V plot measured under pulsed excitation. The relations between the discharge current j R (t), the transferred charge q(t), and the measurable parameters are presented in new forms, which enable the qualitative interpretation of the measured current and voltage waveforms without the knowledge about the value of the dielectric barrier capacitance C d . Whereas for quantitative evaluation of electrical measurements, the accurate estimation of the C d is important.

  19. Influence of shielding gas composition on weld profile in pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of low carbon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jokar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Weld area and weld depth/width ratio can be considered to be of the most important geometrical factors in pulsed laser welding. The effects of carbon dioxide and oxygen additions to the argon shielding gas on the weld properties in pulsed laser welding of low carbon steel is investigated. Presence of carbon dioxide and oxygen up to 10 and 15 percent respectively decreases the weld geometrical factors. But, at higher levels of additions, the weld geometrical factors will increase. It is observed that the plasma plume temperature decreases from 6000K to 5500K with the addition of 15% carbon dioxide but increases to 7700K with 25% carbon dioxide addition. Increase in laser absorption coefficient, laser energy absorption, formation of oxide layer on the work-piece surface, exothermic reactions and their competitive effects can be considered as the competing phenomena involved in such a behavior in the weld profile

  20. Steady Secondary Flows Generated by Periodic Compression and Expansion of an Ideal Gas in a Pulse Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeffrey M.

    1999-01-01

    This study establishes a consistent set of differential equations for use in describing the steady secondary flows generated by periodic compression and expansion of an ideal gas in pulse tubes. Also considered is heat transfer between the gas and the tube wall of finite thickness. A small-amplitude series expansion solution in the inverse Strouhal number is proposed for the two-dimensional axisymmetric mass, momentum and energy equations. The anelastic approach applies when shock and acoustic energies are small compared with the energy needed to compress and expand the gas. An analytic solution to the ordered series is obtained in the strong temperature limit where the zeroth-order temperature is constant. The solution shows steady velocities increase linearly for small Valensi number and can be of order I for large Valensi number. A conversion of steady work flow to heat flow occurs whenever temperature, velocity or phase angle gradients are present. Steady enthalpy flow is reduced by heat transfer and is scaled by the Prandtl times Valensi numbers. Particle velocities from a smoke-wire experiment were compared with predictions for the basic and orifice pulse tube configurations. The theory accurately predicted the observed steady streaming.

  1. Quantitative study of the ionization-induced refraction of picosecond laser pulses in gas-jet targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackinnon, A.J.; Borghesi, M.; Iwase, A.; Jones, M.W.; Pert, G.J.; Rae, S.; Burnett, K.; Willi, O.

    1996-01-01

    A quantitative study of refractive whole beam defocusing and small scale breakup induced by optical ionization of subpicosecond and picosecond, 0.25 and 1 μm, laser pulses in gas-jet targets at densities above 1x10 19 cm -3 has been carried out. A significant reduction of the incident laser intensity was observed due to refraction from ionization-induced density gradients. The level of refraction measured with optical probing correlated well with the fraction of energy transmitted through the plasma. The numerical and analytical models were found to agree well with experimental observations. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  2. Pulse gas chromatographic study of adsorption of substituted aromatics and heterocyclic molecules on MIL-47 at zero coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerinck, Tim; Couck, Sarah; Vermoortele, Frederik; De Vos, Dirk E; Baron, Gino V; Denayer, Joeri F M

    2012-10-02

    The low coverage adsorptive properties of the MIL-47 metal organic framework toward aromatic and heterocyclic molecules are reported in this paper. The effect of molecular functionality and size on Henry adsorption constants and adsorption enthalpies of alkyl and heteroatom functionalized benzene derivates and heterocyclic molecules was studied using pulse gas chromatography. By means of statistical analysis, experimental data was analyzed and modeled using principal component analysis and partial least-squares regression. Structure-property relationships were established, revealing and confirming several trends. Among the molecular properties governing the adsorption process, vapor pressure, mean polarizability, and dipole moment play a determining role.

  3. Tungsten behaviour under anodic polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vas'ko, A.T.; Patsyuk, F.N.

    1980-01-01

    Electrochemical investigations have been carried out to identify the state of elements of the tungsten galvanic coating. Active zones on anode polarization curves in the hydrogen region of galvanic tungsten are established. The difference in the behaviour of monocrystal and galvanic tungsten electrodes is shown to be connected with the oxidation of hydrogen in the galvanic sediment

  4. Tungsten transport in the plasma edge at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzer, Michael Arthur

    2015-04-30

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFC) will play a crucial role in future deuterium-tritium magnetically confined fusion power plants, since they will be subject to high energy and particle loads, but at the same time have to ensure long lifetimes and a low tritium retention. These requirements will most probably necessitate the use of high-Z materials such as tungsten for the wall materials, since their erosion properties are very benign and, unlike carbon, capture only little tritium. The drawback with high-Z materials is, that they emit strong line radiation in the core plasma, which acts as a powerful energy loss mechanism. Thus, the concentration of these high-Z materials has to be controlled and kept at low levels in order to achieve a burning plasma. Understanding the transport processes in the plasma edge is essential for applying the proper impurity control mechanisms. This control can be exerted either by enhancing the outflux, e.g. by Edge Localized Modes (ELM), since they are known to expel impurities from the main plasma, or by reducing the influx, e.g. minimizing the tungsten erosion or increasing the shielding effect of the Scrape Off Layer (SOL). ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been successfully operating with a full tungsten wall for several years now and offers the possibility to investigate these edge transport processes for tungsten. This study focused on the disentanglement of the frequency of type-I ELMs and the main chamber gas injection rate, two parameters which are usually linked in H-mode discharges. Such a separation allowed for the first time the direct assessment of the impact of each parameter on the tungsten concentration. The control of the ELM frequency was performed by adjusting the shape of the plasma, i.e. the upper triangularity. The radial tungsten transport was investigated by implementing a modulated tungsten source. To create this modulated source, the linear dependence of the tungsten erosion rate at the Ion Cyclotron Resonance

  5. Direct fabrication of gas diffusion cathode by pulse electrodeposition for proton exchange membrane water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyanjoo; Choe, Seunghoe; Kim, Hoyoung; Kim, Dong-Kwon; Cho, GeonHee; Park, YoonSu; Jang, Jong Hyun; Ha, Don-Hyung; Ahn, Sang Hyun; Kim, Soo-Kil

    2018-06-01

    Pt catalysts for water electrolysis were prepared on carbon paper by using both direct current and pulse electrodeposition. Controlling the mass transfer of Pt precursor in the electrolyte by varying the deposition potential enables the formation of various Pt particle shapes such as flower-like and polyhedral particles. Further control of the deposition parameters for pulse electrodeposition resulted in changes to the particle size and density. In particular, the upper potential of pulse was found to be the critical parameter controlling the morphology of the particles and their catalytic activity. In addition to the typical electrochemical measurements, Pt samples deposited on carbon paper were used as cathodes for a proton exchange membrane water electrolyser. This single cell test revealed that our Pt particle samples have exceptional mass activity while being cost effective.

  6. Coherent soft X-ray high-order harmonics using tight-focusing laser pulses in the gas mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Faming; Xia, Yuanqin; Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Deying; Zhao, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally study the harmonics from a Xe-He gas mixture using tight-focusing femtosecond laser pulses. The spectrum in the mixed gases exhibits an extended cutoff region from the harmonic H21 to H27. The potential explanation is that the harmonics photons from Xe contribute the electrons of He atoms to transmit into the excited-state. Therefore, the harmonics are emitted from He atoms easily. Furthermore, we show that there are the suppressed harmonics H15 and H17 in the mixed gases. The underlying mechanism is the destructive interference between harmonics generated from different atoms. Our results indicate that HHG from Xe-He gas mixture is an efficient method of obtaining the coherent soft X-ray source.

  7. Optimization of pulsed TIG welding process parameters on mechanical properties of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Warangal 506 004 (India)], E-mail: adepu_kumar7@yahoo.co.in; Sundarrajan, S. [Scientist ' G' , Defence Research and Development Laboratory, Hyderabad 500 028 (India)

    2009-04-15

    The present work pertains to the improvement of mechanical properties of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy welds through pulsed tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process. Taguchi method was employed to optimize the pulsed TIG welding process parameters of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy welds for increasing the mechanical properties. Regression models were developed. Analysis of variance was employed to check the adequacy of the developed models. The effect of planishing on mechanical properties was also studied and observed that there was improvement in mechanical properties. Microstructures of all the welds were studied and correlated with the mechanical properties.

  8. Optimization of pulsed TIG welding process parameters on mechanical properties of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.; Sundarrajan, S.

    2009-01-01

    The present work pertains to the improvement of mechanical properties of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy welds through pulsed tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process. Taguchi method was employed to optimize the pulsed TIG welding process parameters of AA 5456 Aluminum alloy welds for increasing the mechanical properties. Regression models were developed. Analysis of variance was employed to check the adequacy of the developed models. The effect of planishing on mechanical properties was also studied and observed that there was improvement in mechanical properties. Microstructures of all the welds were studied and correlated with the mechanical properties

  9. Preparation of tungsten coatings on graphite by electro-deposition via Na2WO4–WO3 molten salt system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Ning-bo; Zhang, Ying-chun; Jiang, Fan; Lang, Shao-ting; Xia, Min

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Tungsten coatings on graphite were firstly obtained by electro-deposition method via Na 2 WO 4 –WO 3 molten salt system. • Uniform and dense tungsten coatings could be easily prepared in each face of the sample, especially the complex components. • The obtained tungsten coatings are with high purity, ultra-low oxygen content (about 0.022 wt%). • Modulate pulse parameters can get tungsten coatings with different thickness and hardness. - Abstract: Tungsten coating on graphite substrate is one of the most promising candidate materials as the ITER plasma facing components. In this paper, tungsten coatings on graphite substrates were fabricated by electro-deposition from Na 2 WO 4 –WO 3 molten salt system at 1173 K in atmosphere. Tungsten coatings with no impurities were successfully deposited on graphite substrates under various pulsed current densities in an hour. By increasing the current density from 60 mA cm −2 to 120 mA cm −2 an increase of the average size of tungsten grains, the thickness and the hardness of tungsten coatings occurs. The average size of tungsten grains can reach 7.13 μm, the thickness of tungsten coating was in the range of 28.8–51 μm, and the hardness of coating was higher than 400 HV. No cracks or voids were observed between tungsten coating and graphite substrate. The oxygen content of tungsten coating is about 0.022 wt%

  10. Laser irradiation of carbon–tungsten materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, A; Lungu, C P; Ursescu, D; Porosnicu, C; Grigoriu, C; Avotina, L; Kizane, G; Marin, A; Osiceanu, P; Grigorescu, C E A; Demitri, N

    2014-01-01

    Carbon–tungsten layers deposited on graphite by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) were directly irradiated with a femtosecond terawatt laser. The morphological and structural changes produced in the irradiated area by different numbers of pulses were systematically explored, both along the spots and in their depths. Although micro-Raman and Synchrotron-x-ray diffraction investigations have shown no carbide formation, they have shown the unexpected presence of embedded nano-diamonds in the areas irradiated with high fluencies. Scanning electron microscopy images show a cumulative effect of the laser pulses on the morphology through the ablation process. The micro-Raman spatial mapping signalled an increased percentage of sp 3 carbon bonding in the areas irradiated with laser fluencies around the ablation threshold. In-depth x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations suggested a weak cumulative effect on the percentage increase of the sp 2 -sp 3 transitions with the number of laser pulses just for nanometric layer thicknesses. (paper)

  11. Room temperature H2S gas sensing property of indium oxide thin films obtained by pulsed D.C. magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisha, R.; Madhusoodanan, K.N.; Karthikeyan, Sreejith; Hill, Arthur E.; Pilkington, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Indium oxide thin films were prepared by pulsed dc magnetron sputtering technique with no substrate heating. X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the structural properties and AFM was used to study the surface morphology gas sensing performance were conducted using a static gas sensing system. Room temperature gas sensing performance was conducted in range of 17 to 286 ppm. The sensitivity, response and recovery time of the sensor was also determined. (author)

  12. Electrodeposition of metallic tungsten coating from binary oxide molten salt on low activation steel substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.H.; Zhang, Y.C.; Jiang, F.; Fu, B.J.; Sun, N.B.

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten is considered a promising plasma facing armor material for future fusion devices. An electrodeposited metallic tungsten coating from Na 2 WO 4 –WO 3 binary oxide molten salt on low activation steel (LAS) substrate was investigated in this paper. Tungsten coatings were deposited under various pulsed currents conditions at 1173 K in atmosphere. Cathodic current density and pulsed duty cycle were investigated for pulsed current electrolysis. The crystal structure and microstructure of tungsten coatings were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy X-ray dispersive analysis techniques. The results indicated that pulsed current density and duty cycle significantly influence tungsten nucleation and electro-crystallization phenomena. The average grain size of the coating becomes much larger with increasing cathodic current density, which demonstrates that appropriate high cathodic current density can accelerate the growth of grains on the surface of the substrate. The micro-hardness of tungsten coatings increases with the increasing thickness of coatings; the maximum micro-hardness is 482 HV. The prepared tungsten coatings have a smooth surface, a porosity of less than 1%, and an oxygen content of 0.024 wt%

  13. Electrodeposition of metallic tungsten coating from binary oxide molten salt on low activation steel substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y. H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology BeiJing, Beijing (China); State Nuclear Power Research Institute, Xicheng District, Beijing (China); Zhang, Y.C., E-mail: zycustb@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology BeiJing, Beijing (China); Jiang, F.; Fu, B. J.; Sun, N. B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology BeiJing, Beijing (China)

    2013-11-15

    Tungsten is considered a promising plasma facing armor material for future fusion devices. An electrodeposited metallic tungsten coating from Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}–WO{sub 3} binary oxide molten salt on low activation steel (LAS) substrate was investigated in this paper. Tungsten coatings were deposited under various pulsed currents conditions at 1173 K in atmosphere. Cathodic current density and pulsed duty cycle were investigated for pulsed current electrolysis. The crystal structure and microstructure of tungsten coatings were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy X-ray dispersive analysis techniques. The results indicated that pulsed current density and duty cycle significantly influence tungsten nucleation and electro-crystallization phenomena. The average grain size of the coating becomes much larger with increasing cathodic current density, which demonstrates that appropriate high cathodic current density can accelerate the growth of grains on the surface of the substrate. The micro-hardness of tungsten coatings increases with the increasing thickness of coatings; the maximum micro-hardness is 482 HV. The prepared tungsten coatings have a smooth surface, a porosity of less than 1%, and an oxygen content of 0.024 wt%.

  14. Pulse radiolysis of alkanes in the gas-phase, ion-molecule reactions and neutralization mechanisms of hydrocarbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ausloos, P.

    1975-01-01

    A discussion is presented of the fate of unreactive hydrocarbon ions in various selected gaseous systems. It is shown that experiments performed with the high radiation dose rates obtained in pulse radiolysis experiments have several advantages over conventional low dose rate experiments for the elucidation of the mechanism of homogeneous neutralization of unreactive hydrocarbon ions. This is so because the charged species has a much shorter lifetime with respect to neutralization under high dose rate (pulse radiolysis) conditions, so that the reaction of the ions with minor impurities or accumulated products is much less probable than in low dose rate experiments. It is further shown through a few examples, that quantitative information about the rate contants of neutralization events and ion-molecule reactions can be obtained when the dose rate is high enough for neutralization and chemical reaction to be in competition. Once reliable rate constants for neutralization and ion-molecule reactions are derived, one can obtain a quantitative evaluation of the products which will by formed in the pulse radiolysis of a hydrocarbon gas mixture from a computer calculation. (author)

  15. Investigation of the Pulsed Annular Gas Jet for Chemical Reactor Cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvegintsev Valery Ivanovich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most economical technology for production of titanium dioxide pigment is plasma-chemical syntheses with the heating of the oxygen. The highlight of the given reaction is formation of a solid phase as a result of interactions between two gases, thus brings the formation of particle deposits on the reactor walls, and to disturbing the normal operation of the technological process. For the solving of the task of reactor internal walls cleaning the pulsed gaseous system was suggested and investigated, which throws circular oxygen jet along surfaces through regular intervals. Study of aerodynamic efficiency of the impulse system was carried by numerical modeling and experimentally with the help of a specially created experimental facility. The distribution of the pulsed flow velocity at the exit of cylindrical reactor was measured. The experimental results have shown that used impulse device creates a pulsed jet with high value of the specified flow rate. It allows to get high velocities that are sufficient for the particle deposits destruction and their removal away. Designed pulsed peelings system has shown high efficiency and reliability in functioning that allows us to recommend it for wide spreading in chemical industry.

  16. Transient effects caused by pulsed gas and liquid injections into low pressure plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, D; Goeckner, M; Overzet, L; Chung, C W

    2010-01-01

    The fast injection of liquid droplets into a glow discharge causes significant time variations in the pressure, the chemical composition of the gas and the phases present (liquid and/or solid along with gas). While the variations can be large and important, very few studies, especially kinetic studies, have been published. In this paper we examine the changes brought about in argon plasma by injecting Ar (gas), N 2 (gas) hexane (gas) and hexane (liquid droplets). The changes in the RF capacitively coupled power (forward and reflected), electron and ion density (n e , n i ), electron temperature (T e ) and optical emissions were monitored during the injections. It was found that the Ar injection (pressure change only) caused expected variations. The electron temperature reduced, the plasma density increased and the optical emission intensity remained nearly constant. The N 2 and hexane gas injections (chemical composition and pressure changes) also followed expected trends. The plasma densities increased and electron temperature decreased while the optical emissions changed from argon to the injected gas. These all serve to highlight the fact that the injection of evaporating hexane droplets in the plasma caused very little change. This is because the number of injected droplets is too small to noticeably affect the plasma, even though the shift in the chemical composition of the gas caused by evaporation from those same droplets can be very significant. The net conclusion is that using liquid droplets to inject precursors for low pressure plasmas is both feasible and controllable.

  17. Spectroscopic diagnosis of plasma in atmospheric pressure negative pulsed gas-liquid discharge with nozzle-cylinder electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, SUN; Zhan, TAO; Zhipeng, ZHU; Dong, WANG; Wenjun, PAN

    2018-05-01

    The plasma characteristics of a gas-liquid phase discharge reactor were investigated by optical and electrical methods. The nozzle-cylinder electrode in the discharge reactor was supplied with a negative nanosecond pulsed generator. The optical emission spectrum diagnosis revealed that OH (A2∑+ → X2Π, 306–309 nm), N2 (C3Π→B3Πg, 337 nm), O (3p5p→3s5s0, 777.2 nm) and O (3p3p→3s3s0, 844.6 nm) were produced in the discharge plasma channels. The electron temperature (T e) was calculated from the emission relative intensity ratio between the atomic O 777.2 nm and 844.6 nm, and it increased with the applied voltage and the pulsed frequency and fell within the range of 0.5–0.8 eV. The gas temperature (T g) that was measured by Lifbase was in a range from 400 K to 600 K.

  18. Chlorinated organic compound removal by gas phase pulsed streamer corona electrical discharge with reticulated vitreous carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, M.J.; Finney, W.C.; Locke, B. R.

    2002-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) and vinyl chloride removal by pulsed corona discharge was investigated with attention to energy efficiency and byproduct identification. Approximately, 50 to 95 percent removal of TCE and vinyl chloride was observed depending on the energy density applied to the gas. Water vapor had no significant effect on TCE removal. Evidence was found for post-corona reactions leading to removal of vinyl chloride downstream of the plasma discharge. Energy efficiencies of 100-900 g/kw-hr in the case of 1000 ppm feed of TCE and efficiencies of 2-24 g/kw-hr for a 100 ppm feed of vinyl chloride were found. In TCE experiments, the formation of dichloroacetyl chloride was observed, while chloro-ethane formation was found for vinyl chloride. In both cases, Cl- was measured downstream of the pulsed corona reactor in a water trap using an ion-selective electrode, although measured amounts varied widely due to condensation in the gas lines between the reactor and the water trap. The addition of a platinum-rhodium coated electrode was found only to reduce the downstream removal of vinyl chloride at low energy density. (author)

  19. The flip-over effect in pulsed laser deposition: Is it relevant at high background gas pressures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda-G-P, Alejandro; Schneider, Christof W.; Döbeli, Max; Lippert, Thomas; Wokaun, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    In pulsed laser deposition the use of a rectangular or elliptical beam spot with a non 1:1 aspect ratio leads to the so called flip-over effect. Here, the longest dimension of the laser spot results in the shortest direction of plasma plume expansion. This effect has been mainly reported for vacuum depositions of single element targets and is particularly noticeable when the aspect ratio of the beam spot is large. We investigate the flip-over effect in vacuum and at three relevant background-gas pressures for pulsed laser deposition using a La0.4Ca0.6MnO3 target by measuring the thickness dependence of the deposited material as a function of angle. The film thicknesses and compositions are determined by Rutherford backscattering and argon is used to reduce the influence of additional chemical reactions in the plasma. The results show the prevalence of the flip-over effect for all pressures except for the highest, i.e. 1 × 10-1 mbar, where the film thickness is constant for all angles. The composition profiles show noticeable compositional variations of up to 30% with respect to the target material depending on the background gas pressure, the angular location, and the laser spot dimensions.

  20. Atmospheric pulsed laser deposition of plasmonic nanoparticle films of silver with flowing gas and flowing atmospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, T. M.; Pokle, A.; Lunney, J. G.

    2018-04-01

    Two methods of atmospheric pulsed laser deposition of plasmonic nanoparticle films of silver are described. In both methods the ablation plume, produced by a 248 nm, 20 ns excimer laser in gas, is strongly confined near the target and forms a nanoparticle aerosol. For both the flowing gas, and the atmospheric plasma from a dielectric barrier discharge plasma source, the aerosol is entrained in the flow and carried to a substrate for deposition. The nanoparticle films produced by both methods were examined by electron microscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy. With plasma assistance, the deposition rate was significantly enhanced and the film morphology altered. With argon gas, isolated nanoparticles of 20 nm size were obtained, whereas in argon plasma, the nanoparticles are aggregated in clusters of 90 nm size. Helium gas also leads to the deposition of isolated nanoparticles, but with helium plasma, two populations of nanoparticles are observed: one of rounded particles with a mean size of 26 nm and the other of faceted particles with a mean size 165 nm.

  1. Electrocatalysis on tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.

    1975-01-01

    General concepts of electrocatalysis, the importance of the equilibrium rest potential and its standardization on polished WC-electrodes, the influence of oxygen in the catalysts upon the oxidation of hydrogen, and the attained results of the hydrogen oxidation on tungsten carbide are treated. (HK) [de

  2. OPAL Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  3. Tungsten coatings electro-deposited on CFC substrates from oxide molten salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Ningbo; Zhang, Yingchun, E-mail: zycustb@163.com; Lang, Shaoting; Jiang, Fan; Wang, Lili

    2014-12-15

    Tungsten is considered as plasma facing material in fusion devices because of its high melting point, its good thermal conductivity, its low erosion rate and its benign neutron activation properties. On the other hand, carbon based materials like C/C fiber composites (CFC) have been used for plasma facing materials (PFMs) due to their high thermal shock resistance, light weight and high strength. Tungsten coatings on CFC substrates are used in the JET divertor in the frame of the JET ITER-like wall project, and have been prepared by plasma spray (PS) and other techniques. In this study, tungsten coatings were electro-deposited on CFC from Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}–WO{sub 3} molten salt under various deposition parameters at 900 °C in air. In order to obtain tungsten coatings with excellent performance, the effects of pulse duration ratio and pulse current density on microstructures and crystal structures of tungsten coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Rigaku Industrial Co., Ltd., D/MAX-RB) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM, JSM 6480LV). It is found that the pulsed duration ratio and pulse current density had a significant influence on tungsten nucleation and electro-crystallization phenomena. SEM observation revealed that intact, uniform and dense tungsten coatings formed on the CFC substrates. Both the average grain size and thickness of the coating increased with the pulsed current density. The XRD results showed that the coatings consisted of a single phase of tungsten with the body centered cubic (BCC) structure. The oxygen content of electro-deposited tungsten coatings was lower than 0.05%, and the micro-hardness was about 400 HV.

  4. Synthesis of Tungsten Diselenide Nanoparticles by Chemical Vapor Condensation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg V. Tolochko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline tungsten diselenide (WSe2 nanoparticles have been synthesized by a gas phase reaction using tungsten hexacarbonyl and elemental selenium as precursors. The WSe2 nanoparticle morphology varies from the spherical shape to flake-like layered structures. Mean size in smaller dimension are less than 5 nm and the number of layers decreased linearly with decreasing of reaction time and concentration of carbonyl in the gas phase. The mean value of interlayer distance in <0001> direction is comparable with the microscopic values. The selenium-to-tungsten atomic ratios of 2.07, 2.19 and 2.19 were determined respectively, approach to the stoichiometric ratio of 2:1. Main impurities are oxygen and carbon and strongly interrelated with carbonyl concentration in the gas phase.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7356

  5. Trends in tungsten coil atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, George L.

    Renewed interest in electrothermal atomic spectrometric methods based on tungsten coil atomizers is a consequence of a world wide increasing demand for fast, inexpensive, sensitive, and portable analytical methods for trace analysis. In this work, tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometry (WCAAS) and tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES) are used to determine several different metals and even a non-metal at low levels in different samples. Improvements in instrumentation and new strategies to reduce matrix effects and background signals are presented. Investigation of the main factors affecting both WCAAS and WCAES analytical signals points to the importance of a reducing, high temperature gas phase in the processes leading to atomic cloud generation. Some more refractory elements such as V and Ti were determined for the first time by double tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (DWCAES). The higher temperatures provided by two atomizers in DWCAES also allowed the detection of Ag, Cu and Sn emission signals for the first time. Simultaneous determination of several elements by WCAES in relatively complex sample matrices was possible after a simple acid extraction. The results show the potential of this method as an alternative to more traditional, expensive methods for fast, more effective analyses and applications in the field. The development of a new metallic atomization cell is also presented. Lower limits of detection in both WCAAS and WCAES determinations were obtained due to factors such as better control of background signal, smaller, more isothermal system, with atomic cloud concentration at the optical path for a longer period of time. Tungsten coil-based methods are especially well suited to applications requiring low sample volume, low cost, sensitivity and portability. Both WCAAS and WCAES have great commercial potential in fields as diverse as archeology and industrial quality control. They are simple, inexpensive, effective

  6. The Behaviour of Gas Bubble during Rest Period of Pulse-Activated Electrolysis Hydrogen Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilasmongkolchai Thanet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pulse-activated electrolyzer has been developed and used for several years. With the capability of enhancing the efficiency of an electrolytic process and easy operation, this technique becomes an interesting process for hydrogen production. Unfortunately during electrolytic reaction, the creation of bubbles becomes a reaction inhibitor and consumes energy. This paper aims to study the proper rest period that gives the bubble free rise-off the solution without additional bubble created. The mathematical method and acoustic emission method were used for investigation of bubble’s rising velocity. The result shows that the variation of rest period on pulse-activated makes production efficiency enhanced. For the practicality of use and set control parameters, duty cycle and frequency were demonstrated instead of rest period.

  7. Pulse Combustor Driven Pressure Gain Combustion for High Efficiency Gas Turbine Engines

    KAUST Repository

    Lisanti, Joel; Roberts, William L.

    2017-01-01

    The gas turbine engine is an essential component of the global energy infrastructure which accounts for a significant portion of the total fossil fuel consumption in transportation and electric power generation sectors. For this reason

  8. The response of the Tore Supra edge plasma to supersonic pulsed gas injection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pánek, Radomír; Gunn, J. P.; Bucalossi, J.; Ďuran, Ivan; Geraud, A.; Hron, Martin; Loarer, T.; Pégourié, B.; Stöckel, Jan; Tsitrone, E.

    337-339, č. 16 (2005), s. 530-534 ISSN 0022-3115. [Plasma Surface Interactions /16./. Portland, 24.5.2005-28.5.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP202/03/P062 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Edge plasma * Gas injection and fuelling * probes * Plasma flow * Tore Supra Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.414, year: 2005

  9. Microstructural characterization and formation of α′ martensite phase in Ti–6Al–4V alloy butt joints produced by friction stir and gas tungsten arc welding processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmaily, M.; Nooshin Mortazavi, S.; Todehfalah, P.; Rashidi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A fusion (GTAW) and a solid state method (FSW) are used to weld Ti–6Al–4V alloy. ► Optimal parameters yielding defects-free weldments are identified. ► A very careful microstructural quantification of the FSW and GTAW weldments are performed. ► α′ Martensite formed only in FSWed samples and avoided in GTAWed samples. ► FSW process produced joints with considerably smaller HAZ and higher hardness values. - Abstract: The obtained microstructures of a Ti–6Al–4V alloy welded by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and Friction Stir Welding (FSW) were investigated and evaluated quantitatively. In the GTAW method, the effect of current was examined so that the samples were subjected to various currents between 90 and 120 A. In the FSW process, samples were welded by different rotational speeds (450–850 rpm). Non-destructive tests including Visual and Radiography Tests (VT and RT) were used to identify defect-free samples. The microstructural studies by electron microscopes revealed formation of different phases in the weld area of the samples welded via mentioned methods. The recorded peak temperatures in the weld regions compared favorably with the expectations about the evolved microstructures. A bi-modal microstructure was just obtained in the FSWed sample with a peak temperature below β transus temperature (T < 995 °C). α′ martensite phase, which is an acicular and strengthening phase in this alloy, was only observed in FSWed specimens

  10. Surface modification of the titanium implant using TEA CO2 laser pulses in controllable gas atmospheres - Comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciganovic, J.; Stasic, J.; Gakovic, B.; Momcilovic, M.; Milovanovic, D.; Bokorov, M.; Trtica, M.

    2012-01-01

    Interaction of a TEA CO 2 laser, operating at 10.6 μm wavelength and pulse duration of 100 ns (FWHM), with a titanium implant in various gas atmospheres was studied. The Ti implant surface modification was typically studied at the moderate laser beam energy density/fluence of 28 J/cm 2 in the surrounding of air, N 2 , O 2 or He. The energy absorbed from the TEA CO 2 laser beam is partially converted to thermal energy, which generates a series of effects, such as melting, vaporization of the molten material, shock waves, etc. The following titanium implant surface changes and phenomena were observed, depending on the gas used: (i) creation of cone-like surface structures in the atmospheres of air, N 2 and O 2 , and dominant micro-holes/pores in He ambient; (ii) hydrodynamic features, most prominent in air; (iii) formation of titanium nitride and titanium oxide layers, and (iv) occurrence of plasma in front of the implant. It can be concluded from this study that the reported laser fluence and gas ambiences can effectively be applied for enhancing the titanium implant roughness and creation of titanium oxides and nitrides on the strictly localized surface area. The appearance of plasma in front of the implants indicates relatively high temperatures created above the surface. This offers a sterilizing effect, facilitating contaminant-free conditions.

  11. Surface modification of the titanium implant using TEA CO{sub 2} laser pulses in controllable gas atmospheres - Comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciganovic, J.; Stasic, J.; Gakovic, B.; Momcilovic, M.; Milovanovic, D. [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. BOX 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Bokorov, M. [Faculty of Sciences, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Trtica, M., E-mail: etrtica@vinca.rs [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. BOX 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2012-01-15

    Interaction of a TEA CO{sub 2} laser, operating at 10.6 {mu}m wavelength and pulse duration of 100 ns (FWHM), with a titanium implant in various gas atmospheres was studied. The Ti implant surface modification was typically studied at the moderate laser beam energy density/fluence of 28 J/cm{sup 2} in the surrounding of air, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} or He. The energy absorbed from the TEA CO{sub 2} laser beam is partially converted to thermal energy, which generates a series of effects, such as melting, vaporization of the molten material, shock waves, etc. The following titanium implant surface changes and phenomena were observed, depending on the gas used: (i) creation of cone-like surface structures in the atmospheres of air, N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, and dominant micro-holes/pores in He ambient; (ii) hydrodynamic features, most prominent in air; (iii) formation of titanium nitride and titanium oxide layers, and (iv) occurrence of plasma in front of the implant. It can be concluded from this study that the reported laser fluence and gas ambiences can effectively be applied for enhancing the titanium implant roughness and creation of titanium oxides and nitrides on the strictly localized surface area. The appearance of plasma in front of the implants indicates relatively high temperatures created above the surface. This offers a sterilizing effect, facilitating contaminant-free conditions.

  12. Characterization of molecular and elemental impurities in tungsten hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streusand, B.J.; Yost, V.E.; Govorchin, S.W.; Fry, R.C.; Padula, F.J.; Hughes, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of WF 6 is a very difficult process because of the reactivity of the compound, the low detection limits required by its use in semiconductor processing, and by the presence of large amounts of tungsten in the analyte. It is not possible to perform elemental analysis with low detection limits directly on WF 6 or on hydrolyzed WF 6 . However, it is possible to remove the interfering tungsten by physical and chemical separation techniques. This paper discusses how the analysis of molecular impurities in WF 6 may be accomplished directly in the gas phase by infrared spectroscopy and by gas chromatography

  13. Variable-geometry turbocharger with asymmetric divided volute for engine exhaust gas pulse optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serres, Nicolas

    2010-11-09

    A turbine assembly for a variable-geometry turbocharger includes a turbine housing defining a divided volute having first and second scrolls, wherein the first scroll has a substantially smaller volume than the second scroll. The first scroll feeds exhaust gas to a first portion of a turbine wheel upstream of the throat of the wheel, while the second scroll feeds gas to a second portion of the wheel at least part of which is downstream of the throat. Flow from the second scroll is regulated by a sliding piston. The first scroll can be optimized for low-flow conditions such that the turbocharger can operate effectively like a small fixed-geometry turbocharger when the piston is closed. The turbine housing defines an inlet that is divided by a dividing wall into two portions respectively feeding gas to the two scrolls, a leading edge of the dividing wall being downstream of the inlet mouth.

  14. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Bromberger, H.; Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Liu, H.; Calegari, F.; Chavez-Cervantes, M.; Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Cavalleri, A.; Travers, J. C.; Gierz, I.

    2015-01-01

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few {\\mu}J energy generate vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 with a signal to noise ratio comparable to ...

  15. Electrical and optical properties of thin indium tin oxide films produced by pulsed laser ablation in oxygen or rare gas atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup, B.; Schou, Jørgen; Nordskov, A.

    1999-01-01

    Films of indium tin oxide (ITO) have been produced in different background gases by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The Films deposited in rare gas atmospheres on room temperature substrates were metallic, electrically conductive, but had poor transmission of visible light. For substrate temperatu......Films of indium tin oxide (ITO) have been produced in different background gases by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The Films deposited in rare gas atmospheres on room temperature substrates were metallic, electrically conductive, but had poor transmission of visible light. For substrate...

  16. Stabilization of the composition of the gas medium of a repetitively pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser by means of hopcalite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranov, V.IU.; Drokov, G.F.; Kuzmenko, V.A.; Mezhevov, V.S.; Pigulskaia, V.V.

    1986-05-01

    Results of experiments in which hopcalite was used to stabilize the composition of the gas medium of repetitively pulsed and monopulse CO/sub 2/ lasers are reported. In particular, the mechanisms of the decrease in the catalyst activity with time under conditions for catalyst regeneration are determined. It is shown that the use of hopcalite has made it possible to achieve long-term operation of a high-power repetitively pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser without changing the gas mixture in a closed circuit. Some details related to the use of hopcalite are discussed. 11 references.

  17. Laser-assisted nanostructuring of Tungsten in liquid environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barmina, E.V., E-mail: barminaev@gmail.com [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Stratakis, E. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, Heraklion 711 10 (Greece); Materials Science and Technology Department, University of Crete, Heraklion 710 03 (Greece); Barberoglou, M. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, Heraklion 711 10 (Greece); Physics Department, University of Crete, Heraklion 714 09 (Greece); Stolyarov, V.N.; Stolyarov, I.N. [Roentgenprom, 35 Lenin str., Protvino, 1442281 Moscow region (Russian Federation); Fotakis, C. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, Heraklion 711 10 (Greece); Physics Department, University of Crete, Heraklion 714 09 (Greece); Shafeev, G.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-15

    Formation of surface nanostructures on Tungsten target immersed into liquids is experimentally studied under its exposure to femtosecond laser pulses with different durations. In particular, nanotexturing of Tungsten upon its exposure to delayed femtosecond pulses is investigated. Two different types of morphological features are observed, namely periodic ripples and nanostructures. Field emission scanning electron microscopy shows that the density of nanostructures as well as their morphology depends on the time delay between pulses and reaches its maximum at 1 ps delay. Thermionic emission of nano-structured W cathode is investigated. The work function of nanostructured W surface is measured to be 0.3 eV lower than that of the pristine surface.

  18. Materials Survey: Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    1956-12-01

    Columbia, from which tungsten production is planned approximately 60 miles east fromSkagway, were estimated at the end of 1951 to be Alaska. Reserves...of the principal mines inimportant producers. 1952 halted expansion programs planned by Production in Argentina reached a maxi- Patiffo Mines and...government.Concentrates International Mining Co. (W. R. Grace & from small producers are collected and Co.), La Paz; Chojlla Mine; type ore-- marketed by Banco Minero

  19. Activation of peroxydisulfate by gas-liquid pulsed discharge plasma to enhance the degradation of p-nitrophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Kefeng; Wang, Hao; Li, Jie; Lu, Na; Jiang, Nan; Wu, Yan

    2017-06-01

    Pulsed discharge in water and over water surfaces generates ultraviolet radiation, local high temperature, shock waves, and chemical reactive species, including hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone. Pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) can oxidize and mineralize pollutants very efficiently, but high energy consumption restricts its application for industrial wastewater treatment. A novel method for improving the energy efficiency of wastewater treatment by PDP was proposed, in which peroxydisulfate (PDS) was added to wastewater and PDS was activated by PDP to produce more strong oxidizing radicals, including sulfate radicals and hydroxyl radicals, leading to a higher oxidation capacity for the PDP system. The experimental results show that the increase in solution conductivity slightly decreased the discharge power of the pulse discharge over the water surface. An increase in the discharge intensity improved the activation of PDS and therefore the degradation efficiency and energy efficiency of p-nitrophenol (PNP). An increase in the addition dosage of PDS greatly facilitated the degradation of PNP at a molar ratio of PDS to PNP of lower than 80:1, but the performance enhancement was no longer obvious at a dosage of more than 80:1. Under an applied voltage of 20 kV and a gas discharge gap of 2 mm, the degradation efficiency and energy efficiency of the PNP reached 90.7% and 45.0 mg kWh-1 for the plasma/PDS system, respectively, which was 34% and 18.0 mg kWh-1 higher than for the discharge plasma treatment alone. Analysis of the physical and chemical effects indicated that ozone and hydrogen peroxide were important for PNP degradation and UV irradiation and heat from the discharge plasma might be the main physical effects for the activation of PDS.

  20. Digital pulse-shape discrimination applied to an ultra-low-background gas-proportional counting system. First results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalseth, C.E.; Day, A.R.; Fuller, E.S.; Hoppe, E.W.; Keillor, M.E.; Mace, E.K.; Myers, A.W.; Overman, C.T.; Panisko, M.E.; Seifert, A.

    2013-01-01

    A new ultra-low-background proportional counter design was recently developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This design, along with an ultra-low-background counting system which provides passive and active shielding with radon exclusion, has been developed to complement a new shallow underground laboratory (∼30 m water-equivalent) constructed at PNNL. After these steps to mitigate dominant backgrounds (cosmic rays, external gamma-rays, radioactivity in materials), remaining background events do not exclusively arise from ionization of the proportional counter gas. Digital pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) is thus employed to further improve measurement sensitivity. In this work, a template shape is generated for each individual sample measurement of interest, a 'self-calibrating' template. Differences in event topology can also cause differences in pulse shape. In this work, the temporal region analyzed for each event is refined to maximize background discrimination while avoiding unwanted sensitivity to event topology. This digital PSD method is applied to sample and background data, and initial measurement results from a biofuel methane sample are presented in the context of low-background measurements currently being developed. (author)

  1. The flip-over effect in pulsed laser deposition: Is it relevant at high background gas pressures?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojeda-G-P, Alejandro; Schneider, Christof W.; Döbeli, Max; Lippert, Thomas; Wokaun, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The flip-over effect in PLD is observed up to high deposition pressures. • Consistent congruent transfer of the target composition is generally not correct. • The choice of deposition pressure can change the film composition strongly. • Large compositional changes appear at high off-axis angles and large spot sizes. - Abstract: In pulsed laser deposition the use of a rectangular or elliptical beam spot with a non 1:1 aspect ratio leads to the so called flip-over effect. Here, the longest dimension of the laser spot results in the shortest direction of plasma plume expansion. This effect has been mainly reported for vacuum depositions of single element targets and is particularly noticeable when the aspect ratio of the beam spot is large. We investigate the flip-over effect in vacuum and at three relevant background-gas pressures for pulsed laser deposition using a La 0.4 Ca 0.6 MnO 3 target by measuring the thickness dependence of the deposited material as a function of angle. The film thicknesses and compositions are determined by Rutherford backscattering and argon is used to reduce the influence of additional chemical reactions in the plasma. The results show the prevalence of the flip-over effect for all pressures except for the highest, i.e. 1 × 10 −1 mbar, where the film thickness is constant for all angles. The composition profiles show noticeable compositional variations of up to 30% with respect to the target material depending on the background gas pressure, the angular location, and the laser spot dimensions.

  2. The flip-over effect in pulsed laser deposition: Is it relevant at high background gas pressures?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda-G-P, Alejandro [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Schneider, Christof W., E-mail: christof.schneider@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Döbeli, Max [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Lippert, Thomas; Wokaun, Alexander [Paul Scherrer Institut, General Energy Research Department, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The flip-over effect in PLD is observed up to high deposition pressures. • Consistent congruent transfer of the target composition is generally not correct. • The choice of deposition pressure can change the film composition strongly. • Large compositional changes appear at high off-axis angles and large spot sizes. - Abstract: In pulsed laser deposition the use of a rectangular or elliptical beam spot with a non 1:1 aspect ratio leads to the so called flip-over effect. Here, the longest dimension of the laser spot results in the shortest direction of plasma plume expansion. This effect has been mainly reported for vacuum depositions of single element targets and is particularly noticeable when the aspect ratio of the beam spot is large. We investigate the flip-over effect in vacuum and at three relevant background-gas pressures for pulsed laser deposition using a La{sub 0.4}Ca{sub 0.6}MnO{sub 3} target by measuring the thickness dependence of the deposited material as a function of angle. The film thicknesses and compositions are determined by Rutherford backscattering and argon is used to reduce the influence of additional chemical reactions in the plasma. The results show the prevalence of the flip-over effect for all pressures except for the highest, i.e. 1 × 10{sup −1} mbar, where the film thickness is constant for all angles. The composition profiles show noticeable compositional variations of up to 30% with respect to the target material depending on the background gas pressure, the angular location, and the laser spot dimensions.

  3. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz

  4. Configuration of a pulse radiolysis system for the study of gas-phase reactions and kinetic investigations of the reactions of hydroxyl radicals with methyl and ethyl radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagerstroem, K.

    1993-01-01

    The work that is presented in this thesis deals with the assembling and testing of a pulse radiolysis system for kinetic studies of gas-phase reactions as well as with the kinetics of the gas-phase reactions of hydroxyl radicals with methyl and ethyl radicals. These radicals are very important as these are formed at an early stage in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The two studied reactions are key reactions in those processes. (6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.)

  5. Proportional counters for measuring plutonium-239 'in vivo' - The choice of counting gas and the use of pulse shape discrimination techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, R.A.; Ramsden, D.

    1969-08-01

    The system for determining insoluble plutonium 'in vivo', now in routine use at A.E.E-. Winfrith, has a limit of detection of the order of 4 nCi plutonium - 239. The method of reducing background by using pulse shape discrimination techniques whilst retaining a high detection efficiency is described. The choice of a counting gas mixture to obtain optimum performance is discussed as are the techniques of gas handling. (author)

  6. Electrical properties of tungsten trioxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Z.; Vetelino, J.F.; Lec, R.; Parker, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    Selectively doped semiconducting metal oxide (SMO) films have been shown to have applications as the sensing element in gas microsensors. Critical to the design and operation of these sensors is the SMO film. In the present work, the electrical properties of both intrinsic and extrinsic (doped with gold) tungsten trioxide (WO 3 ) films, which selectively sorb hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), are investigated. Hall effect measurements are performed as a function of film thickness, temperature, gold-doping concentration, and H 2 S gas concentration. The conductivity was found to be n type and strongly dependent on temperature, gold doping concentration, and H 2 S gas concentration and less dependent on film thickness. The mobility was relatively high while the intrinsic carrier concentration was low when compared to typical semiconductor materials. The conductivity was shown to exhibit anomalous behavior at certain temperatures and H 2 S gas concentrations

  7. Characterization of aluminum/aluminum nitride coatings sputter deposited using the pulsed-gas process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, R.W.; Hosford, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    A dc triode magnetron has been used to produce freestanding Al/Al + AlN lamellar foils by sputter deposition. The 5-μm-thick foils produced on both flat substrates as well as curved substrates exhibited good specularity as well as excellent mechanical properties. The pulse spacing was varied from none to 100-nm spacing. The yield strength of the material was found to obey the Hall-Petch relation sigma/sub ys/ = 230 + .07/d/sup 1/2/, where sigma/sub ys/ is in MPa. Auger electron Spectroscopy and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy indicate that the large flow stress of 230 MPa must be due to grain refinement of the extended source and not an impurity effect. The result is that limitations of masking found in uniaxial flux sources for curved surfaces can be removed allowing the high quality coating of more general shapes

  8. Application of accelerator sources for pulsed neutron logging of oil and gas wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Dresser Atlas introduced the first commercial pulsed neutron oil well log in the early 1960s. This log had the capability of differentiating oil from salt water in a completed well. In the late 1970s the first continuous carbon/oxygen (C/O) log capable of differentiating oil from fresh water was introduced. The sources used in these commercial logs are radial geometry deuterium-tritium reaction devices with Cockcroft-Walton voltage multipliers providing the accelerator voltage. The commercial logging tools using these accelerators are comprised of scintillators detectors, power supplies, line drivers and receivers, and various timing and communication electronics. They are used to measure either the time decay or energy spectra of neutron-induced gamma events. The time decay information is useful in determining the neutron capture cross section, and the energy spectra is used to characterize inelastic neutron events. (orig.)

  9. Application of accelerator sources for pulsed neutron logging of oil and gas wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, R. R.

    1985-05-01

    Dresser Atlas introduced the first commercial pulsed neutron oil well log in the early 1960s. This log had the capability of differentiating oil from salt water in a completed well. In the late 1970s the first continuous carbon/oxygen (C/O) log capable of differentiating oil from fresh water was introduced. The sources used in these commercial logs are radial geometry deuterium-tritium reaction devices with Cockcroft-Walton voltage multipliers providing the accelerator voltage. The commercial logging tools using these accelerators are comprised of scintillators detectors, power supplies, line drivers and receivers, and various timing and communications electronics. They are used to measure either the time decay or energy spectra of neutron-induced gamma events. The time decay information is useful in determining the neutron capture cross section, and the energy spectra is used to characterize inelastic neutron events.

  10. Investigation into relative temperature measurement of pulsed constrained gas flow using passive acoustic means

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, Joseph Brian

    2011-01-01

    peer-reviewed The requirement to measure the real time, dynamic temperature of exhaust system gases is becoming more and more important in the areas of aeronautics, automotive (cars, trucks, etc), marine and industrial/environmental applications, in particular on a cycleby-cycle (CBC) basis. Monitoring exhaust gas temperatures of any power-plant can give important diagnostic information for the monitoring of fuel mixture, combustion efficiency etc. This 'diagnostic' information can b...

  11. Deuterium desorption from tungsten using laser heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Retention and desorption of hydrogenic species need to be accurately modeled to predict the tritium inventory of next generation fusion devices, which is needed both for tritium fuel recovery and for tritium safety concerns. In this paper, experiments on thermal desorption of deuterium from intrinsic polycrystalline tungsten defects using laser heating are compared to TMAP-7 modeling. The samples during deuterium plasma exposure were at a temperature of 373K for this benchmark study with ion fluence of 0.7–1.0 ×1024Dm−2. Following plasma exposure, a fiber laser (λ= 1100nm heated the samples to peak surface temperatures ranging from ∼500 to 1400K with pulse widths from 10ms to 1s, and 1 to 10 pulses applied to each sample. The remaining deuterium retention was measured using temperature programmed desorption (TPD. Results show that > 95% of deuterium is desorbed when the peak surface temperature reached ∼950K for > 1s. TMAP-7 is used to predict deuterium desorption from tungsten for a range of surface temperatures and heating durations, and is compared to previous work on desorption from beryllium codeposits.

  12. Gas ultrasonic flow rate measurement through genetic-ant colony optimization based on the ultrasonic pulse received signal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Huirang; Zheng, Dandan; Nie, Laixiao

    2015-04-01

    For gas ultrasonic flowmeters, the signals received by ultrasonic sensors are susceptible to noise interference. If signals are mingled with noise, a large error in flow measurement can be caused by triggering mistakenly using the traditional double-threshold method. To solve this problem, genetic-ant colony optimization (GACO) based on the ultrasonic pulse received signal model is proposed. Furthermore, in consideration of the real-time performance of the flow measurement system, the improvement of processing only the first three cycles of the received signals rather than the whole signal is proposed. Simulation results show that the GACO algorithm has the best estimation accuracy and ant-noise ability compared with the genetic algorithm, ant colony optimization, double-threshold and enveloped zero-crossing. Local convergence doesn’t appear with the GACO algorithm until -10 dB. For the GACO algorithm, the converging accuracy and converging speed and the amount of computation are further improved when using the first three cycles (called GACO-3cycles). Experimental results involving actual received signals show that the accuracy of single-gas ultrasonic flow rate measurement can reach 0.5% with GACO-3 cycles, which is better than with the double-threshold method.

  13. Gas ultrasonic flow rate measurement through genetic-ant colony optimization based on the ultrasonic pulse received signal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Huirang; Zheng, Dandan; Nie, Laixiao

    2015-01-01

    For gas ultrasonic flowmeters, the signals received by ultrasonic sensors are susceptible to noise interference. If signals are mingled with noise, a large error in flow measurement can be caused by triggering mistakenly using the traditional double-threshold method. To solve this problem, genetic-ant colony optimization (GACO) based on the ultrasonic pulse received signal model is proposed. Furthermore, in consideration of the real-time performance of the flow measurement system, the improvement of processing only the first three cycles of the received signals rather than the whole signal is proposed. Simulation results show that the GACO algorithm has the best estimation accuracy and ant-noise ability compared with the genetic algorithm, ant colony optimization, double-threshold and enveloped zero-crossing. Local convergence doesn’t appear with the GACO algorithm until –10 dB. For the GACO algorithm, the converging accuracy and converging speed and the amount of computation are further improved when using the first three cycles (called GACO-3cycles). Experimental results involving actual received signals show that the accuracy of single-gas ultrasonic flow rate measurement can reach 0.5% with GACO-3 cycles, which is better than with the double-threshold method. (paper)

  14. [Determination of 44 organophosphorus pesticides in food by SPE disk extraction-capillary gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao-Fei; Yang, Yuan; Sun, Cheng-Jun

    2012-01-01

    To develop a method for the simultaneous determination of 44 organophosphorus pesticides in food by SPE disk extraction-capillary gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detection. Organophosphorus pesticides in food were extracted ultrasonically with water. Then the extract was cleaned-up with SPE disk and eluted with ethyl acetate. Finally the eluent was condensed to 1mL under N2 at 55 degrees C. Gas chromatography was applied for quantitative detection of the organophosphorus pesticides in the sample. The linear range of the method for all the pesticides were in the range of 0.01-0.5 mg/kg with correlation coefficients of 0.992-1.000. The detection limits of the method were in the range of 0.0005-0.01 mg/kg. The recoveries for most pesticides were 60%-120% with relative standard deviations of less than 15%. The method is simple, sensitive, environmentally friendly and suitable for the determination of organophosphorous pesticides in food.

  15. On the use of pulsed Dielectric Barrier Discharges to control the gas-phase composition of atmospheric pressure air plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barni, R.; Biganzoli, I.; Dell'Orto, E.; Riccardi, C.

    2014-11-01

    We presents results obtained from the numerical simulation of the gas-phase chemical kinetics in atmospheric pressure air non-equilibrium plasmas. In particular we have addressed the effect of pulsed operation mode of a plane dielectric barrier discharge. It was conjectured that the large difference in the time scales involved in the fast dissociation of oxygen molecules in plasma and their subsequent reactions to produce ozone and nitrogen oxides, makes the presence of a continuously repeated plasma production unnecessary and a waste of electrical power and thus efficiency. In order to test such suggestion we have performed a numerical study of the composition and the temporal evolution of the gas-phase of atmospheric pressure air non-equilibrium plasmas. Comparison with experimental findings in a dielectric barrier discharge with an electrode configuration symmetrical and almost ideally plane is briefly addressed too, using plasma diagnostics to extract the properties of the single micro-discharges and a sensor to measure the concentration of ozone produced by the plasma.

  16. [Gas chromatography with a Pulsed discharge helium ionization detector for measurement of molecular hydrogen(H2) in the atmosphere].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Tian; Fang, Shuang-xi; Zhou, Ling-xi; Wang, Hong-yang; Zhang, Gen

    2015-01-01

    A high precision GC system with a pulsed discharge helium ionization detector was set up based on the commercial Agilent 7890A gas chromatography. The gas is identified by retention time and the concentration is calculated through the peak height. Detection limit of the system is about 1 x 10(-9) (mole fraction, the same as below). The standard deviation of 140 continuous injections with a standard cylinder( concentration is roughly 600 x 10(-9)) is better than 0.3 x 10(-9). Between 409.30 x 10(-9) and 867.74 x 10(-9) molecular hydrogen mole fractions and peak height have good linear response. By using two standards to quantify the air sample, the precision meets the background molecular hydrogen compatibility goal within the World Meteorological Organization/Global Atmosphere Watch (WMO/GAW) program. Atmospheric molecular hydrogen concentration at Guangzhou urban area was preliminarily measured by this method from January to November 2013. The results show that the atmospheric molecular hydrogen mole fraction varies from 450 x 10(-9) to 700 x 10(-9) during the observation period, with the lowest value at 14:00 (Beijing time, the same as below) and the peak value at 20:00. The seasonal variation of atmospheric hydrogen at Guangzhou area was similar with that of the same latitude stations in northern hemisphere.

  17. Decline of the self-focusing of a pulsed high intensity electron beam owing to gas breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, H.; Arai, H.

    1977-01-01

    The self-focusing of a pulsed high-intensity electron beam in a gas declines in the intermediate pressure region owing to gas breakdown. The degree of the self-focusing of a beam from a Febetron 706 in monatomic gases increases by increasing the breakdown time (t/sub B/), which is defined as the time when the plasma conductivity becomes 10 mho/cm. Secondary electrons are consumed appreciably in polyatomic gases after t/sub B/ through their reactions with ions and neutral molecules. Therefore, in such gases, the amount of the consumption must be estimated to analyze the self-focusing. For the estimation of the consumption, we must remark that the mean energy of secondary electrons is quite different between before and after t/sub B/ because of the different strength of induced longitudinal electric field. As a result of the numerical analyses, we obtain the equation t/sub B/-t/sub N/ =12/w (α-eta) (t/sub N/ is neutralization time, w is electron drift velocity, α is the first Townsend ionization coefficient, and eta is the electron attachment coefficient). Since eta is usually negligibly small before t/sub B/ and t/sub N/ is also negligibly small above a certain pressure, t/sub B/ is approximately inversely proportional to wα. The t/sub B/ in polyatomic gases, however, must be corrected for the consumption described above

  18. On the use of pulsed Dielectric Barrier Discharges to control the gas-phase composition of atmospheric pressure air plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barni, R; Biganzoli, I; Dell'Orto, E; Riccardi, C

    2014-01-01

    We presents results obtained from the numerical simulation of the gas-phase chemical kinetics in atmospheric pressure air non-equilibrium plasmas. In particular we have addressed the effect of pulsed operation mode of a plane dielectric barrier discharge. It was conjectured that the large difference in the time scales involved in the fast dissociation of oxygen molecules in plasma and their subsequent reactions to produce ozone and nitrogen oxides, makes the presence of a continuously repeated plasma production unnecessary and a waste of electrical power and thus efficiency. In order to test such suggestion we have performed a numerical study of the composition and the temporal evolution of the gas-phase of atmospheric pressure air non-equilibrium plasmas. Comparison with experimental findings in a dielectric barrier discharge with an electrode configuration symmetrical and almost ideally plane is briefly addressed too, using plasma diagnostics to extract the properties of the single micro-discharges and a sensor to measure the concentration of ozone produced by the plasma

  19. Can we Replace Arterial Blood Gas Analysis by Pulse Oximetry in Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome, who are Treated According to INSURE Protocol?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Niknafs

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Neonates with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, who are treated according to INSURE protocol; require arterial blood gas (ABG analysis to decide on appropriate management. We conducted this study to investigate the validity of pulse oximetry instead of frequent ABG analysis in the evaluation of these patients. From a total of 193 blood samples obtained from 30 neonates <1500 grams with RDS, 7.2% were found to have one or more of the followings: acidosis, hypercapnia, or hypoxemia. We found that pulse oximetry in the detection of hyperoxemia had a good validity to appropriately manage patients without blood gas analysis. However, the validity of pulse oximetry was not good enough to detect acidosis, hypercapnia, and hypoxemia.

  20. Pulsed X-ray radiography of a gas jet target for laser-matter interaction experiments with the use of a CCD detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakowski, R.; Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; MikoIajczyk, J.; Szczurek, A.; Szczurek, M.; Foeldes, I.B.; Toth, Zs.

    2005-01-01

    Characterization of gas jet targets has been carried out using pulsed X-ray radiography. A laser-plasma X-ray source was applied for backlighting of the targets to obtain X-ray shadowgraphs registered with a CCD detector. From the shadowgraphs, characteristics of the targets were determined

  1. Demonstration and evaluation of the pulsed ultraviolet-irradiation gas-treatment system, Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.; Wilkey, M.; Peters, R.; Tomczyk, N.; Friedlund, J.; Farber, P.

    1994-10-01

    Argonne National Laboratory was asked to demonstrate and evaluate a pulsed ultraviolet-irradiation system developed by Purus, Inc., at the Volatile Organic Compounds Non-Arid Integrated Demonstration at the Savannah River Site near aiken, South Carolina. The Purus system consists of four reactor chambers, each containing a xenon flash lamp. During the two weeks of testing, samples were taken and analyzed from the inlet and outlet sides of the Purus system. The contaminants of concern on the inlet were tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA); the contaminants of concern on the outlet were PCE, TCE, TCA, carbon tetrachloride (CT), and chloroform. The evaluation of the Purus system included an examination of the reduction of both TCE and PCE and a search for any change in the concentrations. (Operating conditions included flow rates, ranging from 25 to 100 standard cubic feet per minute; inlet concentration of PCE, ranging from 360 to 10,700 parts per million volume; and flash lamp rates, ranging from 1 to 30 hertz.) The Purus system was quite efficient at reducing the concentrations of both PCE and TCE. The potential by-products, TCA, CT, and chloroform, showed no significant increases throughout the range of the various operating parameters. Overall, the Purus system appears to be a cost-efficient means of reducing the concentrations of PCE and TCE, while the removal of the initial photo-oxidation products and TCA is slower and needs further evaluation

  2. Self diffusion in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundy, J.N.; Rothman, S.J.; Lam, N.Q.; Nowicki, L.J.; Hoff, H.A.

    1978-01-01

    The lack of understanding of self-diffusion in Group VI metals together with the wide scatter in the measured values of tungsten self-diffusion has prompted the present measurements to be made over a wide temperature range (1/2Tsub(m) to Tsub(m)). The diffusion coefficients have been measured in the temperature range 1430-2630 0 C. The present measurements show non-linear Arrhenius behavior but a reliable two-exponential fit of the data should await further measurements. (Auth.)

  3. Reduction of blue tungsten oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilken, T.; Wert, C.; Woodhouse, J.; Morcom, W.

    1975-01-01

    A significant portion of commercial tungsten is produced by hydrogen reduction of oxides. Although several modes of reduction are possible, hydrogen reduction is used where high purity tungsten is required and where the addition of other elements or compounds is desired for modification of the metal, as is done for filaments in the lamp industry. Although several investigations of the reduction of oxides have been reported (1 to 5), few principles have been developed which can aid in assessment of current commercial practice. The reduction process was examined under conditions approximating commercial practice. The specific objectives were to determine the effects of dopants, of water vapor in the reducing atmosphere, and of reduction temperature upon: (1) the rate of the reaction by which blue tungsten oxide is reduced to tungsten metal, (2) the intermediate oxides associated with reduction, and (3) the morphology of the resulting tungsten powder

  4. Selective ablation of a titanium nitride film on tungsten carbide substrate using ultrashort laser pulses; Ablação seletiva de um filme de nitreto de titânio em substrato de carboneto de tungstênio utilizando laser de pulsos ultracurtos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Eduardo Spinelli

    2017-07-01

    Surface coatings are applied to many cutting tools in the metallurgical industry in order to improve cutting efficiency and extend its useful life. In this work, tests were performed to remove the coating of titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) pellets, using an ultrashort laser pulses beam. After determination of the damage thresholds of the film and the substrate, were ablated on the surface of the coating lines using two ablation conditions, it was initially operated on the low fluence regime for the film, and later on the low fluence regime of the substrate, far below the threshold of the film, applying high overlapping pulses. A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was set up to monitor the materials present in the plasma generated by the laser, but the system did not present sufficient sensitivity to read the low intensity of the plasma generated in the process and was not used. After the analysis of the traces by electron microscopy, optical profilometer and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, it was not possible to determine a safe process to carry out the selective removal of the film in question, however, due to the data obtained and observations of the results in some traces, new possibilities were raised, opening the discussion for future work. (author)

  5. Magnetic Ignition of Pulsed Gas Discharges in Air of Low Pressure in a Coaxial Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Karlheinz; Norwood, Joseph, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The effect of an axial magnetic field on the breakdown voltage of a coaxial system of electrodes has been investigated by earlier workers. For low values of gas pressure times electrode spacing, the breakdown voltage is decreased by the application of the magnetic field. The electron cyclotron radius now assumes the role held by the mean free path in nonmagnetic discharges and the breakdown voltage becomes a function of the magnetic flux density. In this paper the dependence of the formative time lag as a function of the magnetic flux density is established and the feasibility of using a magnetic field for igniting high-voltage, high-current discharges is shown through theory and experiment. With a 36 microfarad capacitor bank charged to 48,000 volts, a peak current of 1.3 x 10( exp 6) amperes in a coaxial type of plasma gun was achieved with a current rise time of only 2 microseconds.

  6. Instrumentation of dynamic gas pulse loading system. Technical progress report, first quarter 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohaupt, H.

    1992-04-14

    The overall goal of this work is to further develop and field test a system of stimulating oil and gas wells, which increases the effective radius of the well bore so that more oil can flow into it, by recording pressure during the gas generation phase in real time so that fractures can be induced more predictably in the producing formation. Task 1: Complete the laboratory studies currently underway with the prototype model of the instrumentation currently being studied. Task 2: Perform field tests of the model in the Taft/Bakersfield area, utilizing operations closest to the engineers working on the project, and optimize the unit for various conditions encountered there. Task 3: Perform field test of the model in DGPL jobs which are scheduled in the mid-continent area, and optimize the unit for downhole conditions encountered there. Task 4: Analyze and summarize the results achieved during the complete test series, documenting the steps for usage of downhole instrumentation in the field, and compile data specifying use of the technology by others. Task 5: Prepare final report for DOE, and include also a report on the field tests completed. Describe and estimate the probability of the technology being commercialized and in what time span. The project has made substantial technical progress, though we are running about a month behind schedule. Expenditures are in line with the schedule. Increased widespread interest in the use of DGPL stimulation has kept us very busy. The computer modeling and test instrumentation developed under this program is already being applied to commercial operations.

  7. Ion cyclotron resonance heating for tungsten control in various JET H-mode scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goniche, M.; Dumont, R. J.; Bobkov, V.; Buratti, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Challis, C.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Drewelow, P.; Fedorczak, N.; Garcia, J.; Giroud, C.; Graham, M.; Graves, J. P.; Hobirk, J.; Jacquet, P.; Lerche, E.; Mantica, P.; Monakhov, I.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Nave, M. F. F.; Noble, C.; Nunes, I.; Pütterich, T.; Rimini, F.; Sertoli, M.; Valisa, M.; Van Eester, D.; Contributors, JET

    2017-05-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in the hydrogen minority scheme provides central ion heating and acts favorably on the core tungsten transport. Full wave modeling shows that, at medium power level (4 MW), after collisional redistribution, the ratio of power transferred to the ions and the electrons vary little with the minority (hydrogen) concentration n H/n e but the high-Z impurity screening provided by the fast ions temperature increases with the concentration. The power radiated by tungsten in the core of the JET discharges has been analyzed on a large database covering the 2013-2014 campaign. In the baseline scenario with moderate plasma current (I p = 2.5 MA) ICRH modifies efficiently tungsten transport to avoid its accumulation in the plasma centre and, when the ICRH power is increased, the tungsten radiation peaking evolves as predicted by the neo-classical theory. At higher current (3-4 MA), tungsten accumulation can be only avoided with 5 MW of ICRH power with high gas injection rate. For discharges in the hybrid scenario, the strong initial peaking of the density leads to strong tungsten accumulation. When this initial density peaking is slightly reduced, with an ICRH power in excess of 4 MW,very low tungsten concentration in the core (˜10-5) is maintained for 3 s. MHD activity plays a key role in tungsten transport and modulation of the tungsten radiation during a sawtooth cycle is correlated to the fishbone activity triggered by the fast ion pressure gradient.

  8. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberger, H.; Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Liu, H.; Calegari, F.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Cavalleri, A.; Travers, J. C.; Gierz, I.

    2015-08-01

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  9. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromberger, H.; Liu, H.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Gierz, I.; Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Travers, J. C.; Calegari, F.; Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T.; Cavalleri, A.

    2015-01-01

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi 2 Se 3 with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials

  10. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with 9-eV photon-energy pulses generated in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberger, H., E-mail: Hubertus.Bromberger@mpsd.mpg.de; Liu, H.; Chávez-Cervantes, M.; Gierz, I. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Ermolov, A.; Belli, F.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.; Travers, J. C. [Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Günther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Calegari, F. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies, IFN-CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Li, M. T.; Lin, C. T. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Cavalleri, A. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Rd. Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-31

    A recently developed source of ultraviolet radiation, based on optical soliton propagation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, is applied here to angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Near-infrared femtosecond pulses of only few μJ energy generate vacuum ultraviolet radiation between 5.5 and 9 eV inside the gas-filled fiber. These pulses are used to measure the band structure of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} with a signal to noise ratio comparable to that obtained with high order harmonics from a gas jet. The two-order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency promises time-resolved ARPES measurements at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz or even MHz, with photon energies that cover the first Brillouin zone of most materials.

  11. Experimental study of parallel multi-tungsten wire Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xianbin; China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang; Lin Libin; Yang Libing; Deng Jianjun; Gu Yuanchao; Ye Shican; Yue Zhengpu; Zhou Shaotong; Li Fengping; Zhang Siqun

    2005-01-01

    The study of three parallel tungsten wire loads and five parallel tungsten wire loads implosion experiment on accelerator 'Yang' are reported. Tungsten wires (φ17 μm) with separation of 1 mm were used. The pinch was driven by a 350 kA peak current, 80 ns 10%-90% rise time. By means of pinhole camera and X-ray diagnostics technology, a non-uniform plasma column is formed among the wires and soft X-ray pulse are observed. the change of load current are analyzed, the development of sausage instability and kink instability, 'hot spot' effect and dispersion spot for plasma column are also discussed. (authors)

  12. Numerical investigation of energy transfer for fast gas heating in an atmospheric nanosecond-pulsed DBD under different negative slopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yifei; Wu, Yun; Cui, Wei; Li, Yinghong; Jia, Min

    2013-01-01

    A validated one-dimensional air plasma kinetics model (13 species and 37 processes) for a nanosecond discharge under atmospheric pressure was developed to reveal the energy transfer mechanism for fast gas heating of a plane-to-plane dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). Calculations for voltage profiles with three different negative slopes were performed. Results have shown that 72% of the total heating energy goes to quench heating, which results in a temperature rise across the gap, the remaining 28% goes to ion collisions, thus heating the cathode sheath in a higher power density. The relationships between ion collision heating, quench heating and reduced electric field are given as two functions, which indicates that 10 13  W m −3 is the peak magnitude of power density produced by ion collisions in the nanosecond-pulsed DBD under atmospheric pressure, and a further increase in E/N does not increase the higher quench heating power. The steepness of the negative slope mainly affects the energy transfer efficiency, and the percentage of two heating sources in the total heating power. A short pulse will couple positive and negative slopes and provide a higher transient total heating power but lower energy transfer efficiency. By uncoupling the positive slope, steady stage and negative slope, the energy transfer efficiency under a certain voltage amplitude (20 kV in this paper) is found to have a maximum value of 68.5%. Two wave crests of temperature rise near the cathode sheath are observed, one is caused by a positive slope and the other by a negative slope. (paper)

  13. Accuracy of noninvasive multiwave pulse oximetry compared with carboxyhemoglobin from blood gas analysis in unselected emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Dominik; Herkner, Harald; Schreiber, Wolfgang; Hubmann, Nina; Gamper, Gunnar; Laggner, Anton N; Havel, Christof

    2011-07-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is difficult because of nonspecific symptoms. Multiwave pulse oximetry might facilitate the screening for occult poisoning by noninvasive measurement of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), but its reliability is still unknown. We assess bias and precision of COHb oximetry compared with the criterion standard blood gas analysis. This was a prospective diagnostic accuracy study according to STARD (Standards for the Reporting of Diagnostic accuracy studies) criteria, performed at a tertiary care hospital emergency department. We included all patients for whom both invasive and noninvasive measurement within 60 minutes was available, regardless of their complaints, during a 1-year period. One thousand five hundred seventy-eight subjects were studied, of whom 17 (1.1%) received a diagnosis of CO poisoning. In accordance with this limited patient cohort, we found a bias of 2.99% COHb (1.50% for smokers, 4.33% for nonsmokers) and a precision of 3.27% COHb (2.90% for smokers, 2.98% for nonsmokers), limits of agreement from -3.55% to 9.53% COHb (-4.30% to 7.30% for smokers, -1.63% to 10.29% for nonsmokers). Upper limit of normal cutoff of 6.6% COHb had the highest sensitivity in screening for CO poisoning. Smoking status and COHb level had the most influence on the deviation between measurements. Multiwave pulse oximetry was found to measure COHb with an acceptable bias and precision. These results suggest it can be used to screen large numbers of patients for occult CO poisoning. Copyright © 2011 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intrinsic gas-phase reactivity toward methanol of trinuclear tungsten W(3)S(4) complexes bearing W-X (X = Br, OH) groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicent, Cristian; Feliz, Marta; Llusar, Rosa

    2008-12-11

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry is used to investigate the gas-phase dissociation of trinuclear sulfide W(3)S(4) complexes containing three diphosphane ligands and three terminal bromine atoms, namely, [W(3)S(4)(dmpe)(3)(Br)(3)](+) (1(+)) or hydroxo groups, [W(3)S(4)(dmpe)(3)(OH)(3)](+) (2(+)) (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphanyl)ethane). Sequential evaporation of two diphosphane ligands is the sole fragmentation channel for the 1(+) cation that yields product ions with one or two unsaturated W-Br functional groups, respectively. Conversely, evaporation of one diphosphane ligand followed by two water molecules is observed for cation 2(+). Complementary deuterium-labeling experiments in conjunction with computational studies provide deep insight into the thermodynamically favored product ion structures found along the fragmentation pathways. From these results, the formation of a series of cluster cations with WBr, WOH, and WO functional groups either on saturated or unsaturated metal sites is proposed. The effect of the properties of these cluster cations, among them chemical composition and coordinative saturation, on their reactivity toward methanol is discussed.

  15. Tungsten carbide and tungsten-molybdenum carbides as automobile exhaust catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, L.; Daubrege, F.; Gengembre, L.; Leclercq, G.; Prigent, M.

    1987-01-01

    Several catalyst samples of tungsten carbide and W, Mo mixed carbides with different Mo/W atom ratios, have been prepared to test their ability to remove carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and propane from a synthetic exhaust gas simulating automobile emissions. Surface characterization of the catalysts has been performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and selective chemisorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Tungsten carbide exhibits good activity for CO and NO conversion, compared to a standard three-way catalyst based on Pt and Rh. However, this W carbide is ineffective in the oxidation of propane. The Mo,W mixed carbides are markedly different having only a very low activity. 9 refs.; 10 figs.; 5 tabs

  16. Investigation of Peculiarities of a High-Voltage Pulsing Corona Discharge in Carbonic Gas and an Feature Using of Such Discharge for CO2 Dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezina, G.P.; Mirny, V.I.; Omelaenko, O.L.; Us, V.S.

    2006-01-01

    On laboratory stand of plasmochemical reactor the feature of CO 2 dissociation with the purpose of CO production in high-voltage pulsing corona discharge is investigated at a voltage up to 120 kV, a pulse length of a current 0,5 μs a repetition rate up to 100 Hz. Peculiarities of volt-ampere characteristics of such discharge are studied at different pressures of air and carbonic gas in the discharge chamber and construction of an interior electrode. It is established that in conditions of the carried out experiments a maximum efficiency of CO accretion does not exceed 3,5%

  17. Multi-level modelling of the response of the ultraminiature proportional counter: gas gain phenomena and pulse height spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olko, P.; Moutarde, C.; Segur, P.

    1995-01-01

    The ultraminiature proportional counters, UMC, unique radiation detectors for monitoring high intensity therapy fields, designed by Kliauga and operated at Columbia University (USA), have yielded a number of pulse height distributions for photons, neutrons and ions at simulated diameters of 5-50 nm. Monte Carlo calculations of the gas gain in such a counter questioned the possibility of achieving proportionally at such low simulated diameters. The response of the UMC has now been modelled taking into account both fluctuations of energy deposited in the counter volume and its calculated gas gain. Energy deposition was calculated using the MOCA-14, MOCA-8 and TRION codes, whereby distributions of ionisations d(j) after irradiations with 137 Cs, 15 MeV neutrons and 7 MeV.amu -1 deuterons were obtained. Monte Carlo calculations of electron avalanches in UMC show that the size of the single-electron avalanche P(n) reaching the anode depends strongly on the location of the primary ionisation within the counter volume. Distributions of the size of electron avalanches for higher numbers of primary ionisations, P *j (n), were obtained by successive convolutions of P(n). Finally, the counter response was obtained by weighting P *j (n) over d(j) distributions. On comparing the measured and calculated spectra it was concluded that the previously proposed single-electron peak calibration method might not be valid for the UMC due to the excessive width and overlap of electron avalanche distributions. Better agreement between the measured and calculated spectra is found if broader electron avalanche distributions than those used in the present calculations, are assumed. (author)

  18. Width of electromagnetic wave instability spectrum in tungsten plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinkevich, A.B.

    1995-01-01

    Based on the study of high-frequency signal modulation and spectrum analysis of the envelope a measurement of spectrum width for electromagnetic wave instability was carried out under conditions of current pulse action on tungsten plate in magnetic field. The existence of amplitude-frequency wave modulation was revealed. The width of current disturbance spectrum in a specimen was evaluated. Current disturbances are shown to cause the instability of electromagnetic wave. 11 refs.; 6 figs

  19. Clamp and Gas Nozzle for TIG Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gue, G. B.; Goller, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Tool that combines clamp with gas nozzle is aid to tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding in hard-to-reach spots. Tool holds work to be welded while directing a stream of argon gas at weld joint, providing an oxygen-free environment for tungsten-arc welding.

  20. A quantification method for peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) using gas chromatography (GC) with a non-radioactive pulsed discharge detector (PDD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Jaffe, Daniel A.; Gao, Xin; McClure, Crystal D.

    2018-04-01

    In this study, we developed a method for continuous PAN measurements by gas chromatography (GC) with a non-radioactive pulsed discharge detector (PDD). Operational parameters were optimized based on the ratio of peak height over baseline noise (P/N ratio). The GC/PDD system was compared with a traditional radioactive electron-capture detector (ECD). In the lab, the method detection limit (MDL) of the new GC/PDD method (9 pptv) was lower than the radioactive GC/ECD method (15 pptv), demonstrating its excellent potential. The MDL of GC/PDD in the field campaign at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (MBO) was 23 pptv, higher than in the lab. This was caused in part by the decreased slope of the calibration curve resulting from the low air pressure level at MBO. However, the MDL level of GC/PDD at MBO is still low enough for accurate PAN measurements, although special attention should be paid to its application at high-elevation sites. Observations of PAN were conducted at MBO in the summer of 2016 with the GC/PDD system, and provided more evidence of the performance of the system. PAN was found to be highly correlated with CO. The promising performance of GC/PDD which does not require a radioactive source makes it a useful approach for accurate PAN measurements in the field.

  1. Preliminary design of the cooling system for a gas-cooled, high-fluence fast pulsed reactor (HFFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteith, H.C.

    1978-10-01

    The High-Fluence Fast Pulsed Reactor (HFFPR) is a research reactor concept currently being evaluated as a source for weapon effects experimentation and advanced reactor safety experiments. One of the designs under consideration is a gas-cooled design for testing large-scale weapon hardware or large bundles of full-length, fast reactor fuel pins. This report describes a conceptual cooling system design for such a reactor. The primary coolant would be helium and the secondary coolant would be water. The size of the helium-to-water heat exchanger and the water-to-water heat exchanger will be on the order of 0.9 metre (3 feet) in diameter and 3 metres (10 feet) in length. Analysis indicates that the entire cooling system will easily fit into the existing Sandia Engineering Reactor Facility (SERF) building. The alloy Incoloy 800H appears to be the best candidate for the tube material in the helium-to-water heat exchanger. Type 316 stainless steel has been recommended for the shell of this heat exchanger. Estimates place the cost of the helium-to-water heat exchanger at approximately $100,000, the water-to-water heat exchanger at approximately $25,000, and the helium pump at approximately $450,000. The overall cost of the cooling system will approach $2 million

  2. Pulsed laser facilities operating from UV to IR at the Gas Laser Lab of the Lebedev Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionin, Andrei; Kholin, Igor; Vasil'Ev, Boris; Zvorykin, Vladimir

    2003-05-01

    Pulsed laser facilities developed at the Gas Lasers Lab of the Lebedev Physics Institute and their applications for different laser-matter interactions are discussed. The lasers operating from UV to mid-IR spectral region are as follows: e-beam pumped KrF laser (λ= 0.248 μm) with output energy 100 J; e-beam sustained discharge CO2(10.6 μm) and fundamental band CO (5-6 μm) lasers with output energy up to ~1 kJ; overtone CO laser (2.5-4.2 μm) with output energy ~ 50 J and N2O laser (10.9 μm) with output energy of 100 J; optically pumped NH3 laser (11-14 μm). Special attention is paid to an e-beam sustained discharge Ar-Xe laser (1.73 μm ~ 100 J) as a potential candidate for a laser-propulsion facility. The high energy laser facilities are used for interaction of laser radiation with polymer materials, metals, graphite, rocks, etc.

  3. Pulsed electron-beam-sustained discharge in oxygen-containing gas mixtures: electrical characteristics, spectroscopy,and singlet oxygen yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagin, Nikolai P; Ionin, Andrei A; Klimachev, Yu M; Kotkov, A A; Podmar'kov, Yu P; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Frolov, M P; Yuryshev, Nikolai N; Kochetov, Igor' V; Napartovich, A P; Hager, G D

    2004-01-01

    The electrical and spectroscopic characteristics of electron-beam-sustained discharge (EBSD) in oxygen and oxygen-containing gas mixtures are studied experimentally under gas pressures up to 100 Torr in a large excitation volume (∼18 L). It is shown that the EBSD in pure oxygen and its mixtures with inert gases is unstable and is characterised by a small specific energy contribution. The addition of small amounts (∼1%-10%) of carbon monoxide or hydrogen to oxygen or its mixtures with inert gases considerably improves the stability of the discharge, while the specific energy contribution W increases by more then an order of magnitude, achieving ∼6.5 kJ L -1 atm -1 per molecular component of the gas mixture. A part of the energy supplied to the EBSD is spent to excite vibrational levels of molecular additives. This was demonstrated experimentally by the initiation of a CO laser based on the O 2 : Ar : CO = 1 : 1 : 0.1 mixture. Experimental results on spectroscopy of the excited electronic states O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) and O 2 (b 1 Σ g + ), of oxygen formed in the EBSD are presented. A technique was worked out for measuring the concentration of singlet oxygen in the O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) state in the afterglow of the pulsed EBSD by comparing with the radiation intensity of singlet oxygen of a given concentration produced in a chemical generator. Preliminary measurements of the singlet-oxygen yield in the EBSD show that its value ∼3% for W ∼ 1.0 kJ L -1 atm -1 is in agreement with the theoretical estimate. Theoretical calculations performed for W ∼ 6.5 kJ L -1 atm -1 at a fixed temperature show that the singlet-oxygen yield may be ∼20%, which is higher than the value required to achieve the lasing threshold in an oxygen-iodine laser at room temperature. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Tungsten and optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reglero, V.; Velasco, T.; Rodrigo, J.; Gasent, L.J.; Alamo, J.; Chato, R.; Ruiz Urien, I.; Santos, I.; Zarauz, J.

    2001-01-01

    High energy astronomy research requires accurate location to perform multiwavelength studies of the cosmic gamma-ray emitters. New technologies have been developed to achieve this goal, the use of large spatial signal multiplexing systems (Masks). The optical system based on the use of coded Masks together with solid stated pixelated planes provide a point source location capability of 1 arc min, that is 3600 times better than of the last NASA CGRO mission. Different materials were considered to modulate the high energy signals, tungsten was selected for implementing the codes due to both its high density and large atomic number that provide the required stooping power. An overview of the programme carried out to design and manufacture the coded Masks is provided. (nevyjel)

  5. Tungsten transport and sources control in JET ITER-like wall H-mode plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorczak, N., E-mail: nicolas.fedorczak@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Monier-Garbet, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Pütterich, T. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Brezinsek, S. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Jlich, Assoc EURATOM-FZJ, Jlich (Germany); Devynck, P.; Dumont, R.; Goniche, M.; Joffrin, E. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lerche, E. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lipschultz, B. [York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Luna, E. de la [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusin, Asociacin EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Maddison, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Maggi, C. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Matthews, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Nunes, I. [Istituto de plasmas e fusao nuclear, Lisboa (Portugal); Rimini, F. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Solano, E.R. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusin, Asociacin EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Tamain, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Tsalas, M. [Association EURATOM-Hellenic Republic, NCSR Demokritos 153 10, Attica (Greece); Vries, P. de [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-08-15

    A set of discharges performed with the JET ITER-like wall is investigated with respect to control capabilities on tungsten sources and transport. In attached divertor regimes, increasing fueling by gas puff results in higher divertor recycling ion flux, lower divertor tungsten source, higher ELM frequency and lower core plasma radiation, dominated by tungsten ions. Both pedestal flushing by ELMs and divertor screening (including redeposition) are possibly responsible. For specific scenarios, kicks in plasma vertical position can be employed to increase the ELM frequency, which results in slightly lower core radiation. The application of ion cyclotron radio frequency heating at the very center of the plasma is efficient to increase the core electron temperature gradient and flatten electron density profile, resulting in a significantly lower central tungsten peaking. Beryllium evaporation in the main chamber did not reduce the local divertor tungsten source whereas core radiation was reduced by approximately 50%.

  6. Effect of pulsed current welding on fatigue behaviour of high strength aluminium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2008-01-01

    High strength aluminium alloys (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys) have gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength aluminium alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Rolled plates of 6 mm thickness have been used as the base material for preparing single pass welded joints. Single V butt joint configuration has been prepared for joining the plates. The filler metal used for joining the plates is AA 5356 (Al-5Mg (wt%)) grade aluminium alloy. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW) and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. Argon (99.99% pure) has been used as the shielding gas. Fatigue properties of the welded joints have been evaluated by conducting fatigue test using rotary bending fatigue testing machine. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in gas tungsten arc (GTA) and gas metal arc (GMA) welds. In contrast, conventional continuous current welding resulted in predominantly columnar grain structures. Grain refinement is accompanied by an increase in fatigue life and endurance limit

  7. Proton beam induced dynamics of tungsten granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; O'Dell, J.; Davenne, T.; Fitton, M.; Atherton, A.; Densham, C.; Charitonidis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Guinchard, M.; Lacny, L. J.; Lindstrom, B.

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the results from single-pulse experiments of a 440 GeV /c proton beam interacting with granular tungsten samples in both vacuum and helium environments. Remote high-speed photography and laser Doppler vibrometry were used to observe the effect of the beam on the sample grains. The majority of the results were derived from a trough containing ˜45 μ m diameter spheres (not compacted) reset between experiments to maintain the same initial conditions. Experiments were also carried out on other open and contained samples for the purposes of comparison both with the 45 μ m grain results and with a previous experiment carried out with sub-250 μ m mixed crystalline tungsten powder in helium [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 17, 101005 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.17.101005]. The experiments demonstrate that a greater dynamic response is produced in a vacuum than in a helium environment and in smaller grains compared with larger grains. The examination of the dynamics of the grains after a beam impact leads to the hypothesis that the grain response is primarily the result of a charge interaction of the proton beam with the granular medium.

  8. Proton beam induced dynamics of tungsten granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Caretta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results from single-pulse experiments of a 440  GeV/c proton beam interacting with granular tungsten samples in both vacuum and helium environments. Remote high-speed photography and laser Doppler vibrometry were used to observe the effect of the beam on the sample grains. The majority of the results were derived from a trough containing ∼45  μm diameter spheres (not compacted reset between experiments to maintain the same initial conditions. Experiments were also carried out on other open and contained samples for the purposes of comparison both with the 45  μm grain results and with a previous experiment carried out with sub-250  μm mixed crystalline tungsten powder in helium [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 17, 101005 (2014PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.17.101005]. The experiments demonstrate that a greater dynamic response is produced in a vacuum than in a helium environment and in smaller grains compared with larger grains. The examination of the dynamics of the grains after a beam impact leads to the hypothesis that the grain response is primarily the result of a charge interaction of the proton beam with the granular medium.

  9. Tungsten--carbide critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, G.E.; Paxton, H.C.

    1975-06-01

    The tungsten--carbide critical assembly mainly consists of three close-fitting spherical shells: a highly enriched uranium shell on the inside, a tungsten--carbide shell surrounding it, and a steel shell on the outside. Ideal critical specifications indicate a rather low computed value of k/sub eff/. Observed and calculated fission-rate distributions for 235 U, 238 U, and 237 Np are compared, and calculated leakage neutrons per fission in various energy groups are given. (U.S.)

  10. Suppression of tungsten accumulation during ELMy H-mode by lower hybrid wave heating in the EAST tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available EAST tokamak has been equipped with upper tungsten divertor since 2014. The tungsten accumulation has been often observed in NBI-heated H-mode discharges suggesting deleterious tungsten confinement in the plasma core. It causes not only H-L back transition but also plasma disruption in several discharges. Suppression of the tungsten accumulation is therefore the most important issue in EAST to achieve a long pulse H-mode discharge. In order to study the tungsten behavior in the long pulse discharge, tungsten spectra have been measured at 20–140Å. The tungsten density, nw, is evaluated from the intensity of tungsten unresolved transition array (W-UTA in a wavelength range of 45–70Å which is composed of several ionization stages of tungsten, e.g. W27+-W45+ at Te0∼2.5keV. It is found that the tungsten accumulation can be suppressed when the 4.6GHz LHW with PLHW∼0.8MW is superimposed on the NBI phase (PNBI= 1.9MW. During the superimposed phase the ELM frequency, fELM, increases from ∼30Hz to ∼60Hz and the tungsten density is halved compared to the NBI-heated discharge. The H-mode discharge can be thus steadily sustained for longer period. It is found that the nw is a large function of the ratio of LHW power to the total injection power, PLHW/(PLHW+PNBI, and the nw can be reduced, at least, in an order of magnitude smaller than that in NBI-heated discharges at PLHW/(PLHW+PNBI≥0.8. The result strongly suggests a possible way toward the steady H-mode discharge.

  11. Micro creep mechanisms of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levoy, R.; Hugon, I.; Burlet, H.; Baillin, X.; Guetaz, L.

    2000-01-01

    Due to its high melting point (3410 deg C), tungsten offers good mechanical properties at elevated temperatures for several applications in non-oxidizing environment. The creep behavior of tungsten is well known between 1200 and 2500 deg C and 10 -3 to 10 -1 strain. However, in some applications when dimensional stability of components is required, these strains are excessive and it is necessary to know the creep behavior of the material for micro-strains (between 10 -4 and 10 -6 ). Methods and devices used to measure creep micro-strains are presented, and creep equations (Norton and Chaboche laws) were developed for wrought, annealed and recrystallized tungsten. The main results obtained on tungsten under low stresses are: stress exponent 1, symmetry of micro-strains in creep-tension and creep-compression, inverse creep (threshold stress), etc. TEM, SEM and EBSD studies allow interpretation of the micro-creep mechanism of tungsten under low stresses and low temperature (∼0.3 K) like the Harper-Dorn creep. In Harper-Dorn creep, micro-strains are associated with the density and the distribution of dislocations existing in the crystals before creep. At 975 deg C, the initial dislocation structure moves differently whether or not a stress is applied. To improve the micro-creep behavior of tungsten, a heat treatment is proposed to create the optimum dislocation structure. (authors)

  12. Experimental and numerical study of the chemical composition of WSex thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition in vacuum and in a buffer gas atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, S.N.; Fominski, V.Yu.; Gnedovets, A.G.; Romanov, R.I.

    2012-01-01

    WSe x thin films were obtained by pulsed laser deposition in vacuum and at various Ar gas pressures up to 10 Pa. Stoichiometry and chemical state of the WSe x films were studied by means of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In the case of pulsed laser deposition of WSe x films in vacuum the value of stoichiometric coefficient x was 1.3. During the deposition in argon at pressures of 2-10 Pa the value of x varied from 1.5 to 2.2. To explain the influence of the buffer gas, a model was used that takes into account the following processes: (1) congruent pulsed laser evaporation of the WSe 2.2 target; (2) scattering of laser-evaporated W and Se atoms in Ar; (3) sputtering of the deposited film by high-energy atoms from the laser plume. Experimentally, the velocity distributions of laser-evaporated W and Se atoms in vacuum were determined by the time-of-flight measurements. Collision Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantify the impact of the buffer gas on the energy and the incidence angle distributions of the deposited W and Se atoms. Model distributions were used to determine the chemical composition of the WSe x films, depending on the efficiency of the preferential sputtering of Se atoms.

  13. Detectors for alpha particles and X-rays operating in ambient air in pulse counting mode and/or with gas amplification

    CERN Document Server

    Charpak, Georges; Breuil, P; Peskov, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Ionization chambers working in ambient air in current detection mode are widely used in several applications such as smoke detection, dosimetry, therapeutic beam monitoring and cetera. The aim of this work was to investigate if gaseous detectors can operate in ambient air in pulse counting mode as well as with gas amplification. . To investigate the feasibility of this method two types of open- end gaseous detectors were build and successfully tested. The first one was a single wire or multiwire cylindrical geometry detector operating in pulse mode at a gas gain of 1. The second type alpha detector was an innovative GEM-like detector with resistive electrodes operating in air in avalanche mode at high gas gains (up to 10E4). A detailed comparison between these two detectors is given as well as comparison with the commercially available alpha detectors. The main advantages of gaseous detectors operating in air in a pulse detection mode are their simplicity, low cost and high sensitivity. One of the possible ap...

  14. Enhanced ozone production in a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet with addition of argon to a He-O2 flow gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Brian; Ganguly, Biswa; Scofield, James

    2013-09-01

    Ozone production in a plasma jet DBD driven with a 20-ns risetime unipolar pulsed voltage can be significantly enhanced using helium as the primary flow gas with an O2 coflow. The overvolted discharge can be sustained with up to a 5% O2 coflow at pulse repetition frequency at 13 kV applied voltage. Ozone production scales with the pulse repetition frequency up to a ``turnover frequency'' that depends on the O2 concentration, total gas flow rate, and applied voltage. For example, peak ozone densities >1016 cm-3 were measured with 3% O2 admixture and discharge current and 777 nm O(5 P) emission, but decreased ozone production and is followed by a transition to a filamentary discharge mode. The addition of argon at concentrations >=5% reduces the channel conductivity and shifts the turnover frequency to higher frequencies. This results in increased ozone production for a given applied voltage and gas flow rate. Time-resolved Ar(1s5) and He(23S1) metastable densities were acquired along with discharge current and ozone density measurements to gain insight into the mechanisms of optimum ozone production.

  15. Pulsed Nd-YAG laser welding of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh Varma, P.V.; Gupta, Amit; Amit, K.; Bhatt, R.B.; Afzal, Mohd.; Panakkal, J.P.; Kamath, H.S.

    2009-02-01

    End plug welding of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) fuel elements involves welding of fully Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASS) of grade D9 clad tube with 316M end plug. Pulsed Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) is being used for the production of PFBR fuel elements at Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility (AFFF). GTAW is an established process for end plug welding and hence adopted by many countries. GTAW has got certain limitations like heat input, arc gap sensitivity and certain sporadic defects like tungsten inclusion. Experiments have been carried out at AFFF to use Laser Beam Welding (LBW) technique as LBW offers a number of advantages over the former process. This report mainly deals with the optimization of laser parameters for welding of PFBR fuel elements. To facilitate pulsed Nd-YAG laser spot welding, parameters like peak power, pulse duration, pulse energy, frequency and defocusing of laser beam on to the work piece have been optimized. On the basis of penetration requirement laser welding parameters have been optimized. (author)

  16. Light electric transformer to transform the size of particles contained in a gas flow into electrical pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berber, V.A.; Zolotenko, V.A.; Naguev, E.N.; Pavlov, V.V.; Sokolov, V.E.; Syromyatnikov, A.N.; Eremenko, A.I.

    1979-08-09

    The equipment measures the air dust. The aerosol flow is hence irradiated with a convergent light bundle. Using mirrors and mechanically operable screens, it is possible to divert part of the light onto a photo receiver to produce electric pulses of the dispersly composed aerosols and another part onto a former for standardized light pulses. The accuracy of the measurement is increased by the stability of the standardized light pulses.

  17. An effective approach to synthesize monolayer tungsten disulphide crystals using tungsten halide precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thangaraja, Amutha; Shinde, Sachin M.; Kalita, Golap, E-mail: kalita.golap@nitech.ac.jp; Tanemura, Masaki [Department of Frontier Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    The synthesis of large-area monolayer tungsten disulphide (WS{sub 2}) single crystal is critical for realistic application in electronic and optical devices. Here, we demonstrate an effective approach to synthesize monolayer WS{sub 2} crystals using tungsten hexachloride (WCl{sub 6}) as a solid precursor in atmospheric chemical vapor deposition process. In this technique, 0.05M solution of WCl{sub 6} in ethanol was drop-casted on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate to create an even distribution of the precursor, which was reduced and sulfurized at 750 °C in Ar atmosphere. We observed growth of triangular, star-shaped, as well as dendritic WS{sub 2} crystals on the substrate. The crystal geometry evolves with the shape and size of the nuclei as observed from the dendritic structures. These results show that controlling the initial nucleation and growth process, large WS{sub 2} single crystalline monolayer can be grown using the WCl{sub 6} precursor. Our finding shows an easier and effective approach to grow WS{sub 2} monolayer using tungsten halide solution-casting, rather than evaporating the precursor for gas phase reaction.

  18. An effective approach to synthesize monolayer tungsten disulphide crystals using tungsten halide precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thangaraja, Amutha; Shinde, Sachin M.; Kalita, Golap; Tanemura, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of large-area monolayer tungsten disulphide (WS 2 ) single crystal is critical for realistic application in electronic and optical devices. Here, we demonstrate an effective approach to synthesize monolayer WS 2 crystals using tungsten hexachloride (WCl 6 ) as a solid precursor in atmospheric chemical vapor deposition process. In this technique, 0.05M solution of WCl 6 in ethanol was drop-casted on SiO 2 /Si substrate to create an even distribution of the precursor, which was reduced and sulfurized at 750 °C in Ar atmosphere. We observed growth of triangular, star-shaped, as well as dendritic WS 2 crystals on the substrate. The crystal geometry evolves with the shape and size of the nuclei as observed from the dendritic structures. These results show that controlling the initial nucleation and growth process, large WS 2 single crystalline monolayer can be grown using the WCl 6 precursor. Our finding shows an easier and effective approach to grow WS 2 monolayer using tungsten halide solution-casting, rather than evaporating the precursor for gas phase reaction

  19. Pulsed flow modulation two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliak, Marina; Fialkov, Alexander B; Amirav, Aviv

    2008-11-07

    Pulsed flow modulation (PFM) two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography (GC x GC) was combined with quadrupole-based mass spectrometry (MS) via a supersonic molecular beam (SMB) interface using a triple-quadrupole system as the base platform, which enabled tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS). PFM is a simple GC x GC modulator that does not consume cryogenic gases while providing tunable second GC x GC column injection time for enabling the use of quadrupole-based mass spectrometry regardless its limited scanning speed. The 20-ml/min second column flow rate involved with PFM is handled, splitless, by the SMB interface without affecting the sensitivity. The combinations of PFM GC x GC-MS with SMB and PFM GC x GC-MS-MS with SMB were explored with the analysis of diazinon and permethrin in coriander. PFM GC x GC-MS with SMB is characterized by enhanced molecular ion and tailing-free fast ion source response time. It enables universal pesticide analysis with full scan and data analysis with reconstructed single ion monitoring on the enhanced molecular ion and another prominent high mass fragment ion. The elimination of the third fragment ion used in standard three ions method results in significantly reduced matrix interference. GC x GC-MS with SMB improves the GC separation, and thereby our ability for sample identification using libraries. GC-MS-MS with SMB provides better reduction (elimination) of matrix interference than GC x GC-MS. However, it is a target method, which is not always applicable. GC x GC-MS-MS does not seem to further reduce matrix interferences over GC-MS-MS and unlike GC x GC-MS, it is incompatible with library identification, but it is beneficial to have both GC x GC and MS-MS capabilities in the same system.

  20. Tungsten Z-Pinch Long Implosions on the Saturn Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOUGLAS, MELISSA R.; DEENEY, Christopher; SPIELMAN, RICK B.; COVERDALE, CHRISTINE A.; RODERICK, N.F.; HAINES, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    Recent success on the Saturn and Z accelerators at Sandia National Laboratories have demonstrated the ability to scale z-pinch parameters to increasingly larger current pulsed power facilities. Next generation machines will require even larger currents (>20 MA), placing further demands on pulsed power technology. To this end, experiments have been carried out on Saturn operating in a long pulse mode, investigating the potential of lower voltages and longer implosion times while still maintaining pinch fidelity. High wire number, 25 mm diameter tungsten arrays were imploded with implosion times ranging from 130 to 240 ns. The results were comparable to those observed in the Saturn short pulse mode, with risetimes on the order of 4.5 to 6.5 ns. Experimental data will be presented, along with two dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations used to explain and reproduce the experiment

  1. Fabrication of tungsten probe for hard tapping operation in atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Guebum, E-mail: hanguebum@live.co.kr [Department of Physics and Optical Engineering, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, 5500 Wabash Avenue, Terre Haute, Indiana 47803 (United States); Department of Mechanical Design and Robot Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, 232 Gongneung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-743 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hyo-Sok, E-mail: hsahn@seoultech.ac.kr [Manufacturing Systems and Design Engineering Programme, Seoul National University of Science & Technology, 232 Gongneung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    We propose a method of producing a tungsten probe with high stiffness for atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to acquire enhanced phase contrast images and efficiently perform lithography. A tungsten probe with a tip radius between 20 nm and 50 nm was fabricated using electrochemical etching optimized by applying pulse waves at different voltages. The spring constant of the tungsten probe was determined by finite element analysis (FEA), and its applicability as an AFM probe was evaluated by obtaining topography and phase contrast images of a Si wafer sample partly coated with Au. Enhanced hard tapping performance of the tungsten probe compared with a commercial Si probe was confirmed by conducting hard tapping tests at five different oscillation amplitudes on single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). To analyze the damaged graphene sample, the test areas were investigated using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). The test results demonstrate that the tungsten probe with high stiffness was capable of inducing sufficient elastic and plastic deformation to enable obtaining enhanced phase contrast images and performing lithography, respectively. - Highlights: • We propose a method of producing highly stiff tungsten probes for hard tapping AFM. • Spring constant of tungsten probe is determined by finite element method. • Enhanced hard tapping performance is confirmed. • Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is used to identify damage to graphene.

  2. Fabrication of tungsten probe for hard tapping operation in atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Guebum; Ahn, Hyo-Sok

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method of producing a tungsten probe with high stiffness for atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to acquire enhanced phase contrast images and efficiently perform lithography. A tungsten probe with a tip radius between 20 nm and 50 nm was fabricated using electrochemical etching optimized by applying pulse waves at different voltages. The spring constant of the tungsten probe was determined by finite element analysis (FEA), and its applicability as an AFM probe was evaluated by obtaining topography and phase contrast images of a Si wafer sample partly coated with Au. Enhanced hard tapping performance of the tungsten probe compared with a commercial Si probe was confirmed by conducting hard tapping tests at five different oscillation amplitudes on single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). To analyze the damaged graphene sample, the test areas were investigated using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). The test results demonstrate that the tungsten probe with high stiffness was capable of inducing sufficient elastic and plastic deformation to enable obtaining enhanced phase contrast images and performing lithography, respectively. - Highlights: • We propose a method of producing highly stiff tungsten probes for hard tapping AFM. • Spring constant of tungsten probe is determined by finite element method. • Enhanced hard tapping performance is confirmed. • Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is used to identify damage to graphene.

  3. Further development of the tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gietl, Hanns; Hoeschen, Till; Riesch, Johann [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Aumann, Martin; Coenen, Jan [Forschungszentrum Juelich, IEK4, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Huber, Philipp [Lehrstuhl fuer Textilmaschinenbau und Institut fuer Textiltechnik (ITA), 52062 Aachen (Germany); Neu, Rudolf [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    For the use in a fusion device tungsten has a unique property combination. The brittleness below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature and the embrittlement during operation e.g. by overheating, neutron irradiation are the main drawbacks for the use of pure tungsten. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites utilize extrinsic mechanisms to improve the toughness. After proofing that this idea works in principle the next step is the conceptual proof for the applicability in fusion reactors. This will be done by producing mock-ups and testing them in cyclic high heat load tests. For this step all constituents of the composite, which are fibre, matrix and interface, and all process steps need to be investigated. Tungsten fibres are investigated by means of tension tests to find the optimum diameter and pretreatment. New interface concepts are investigated to meet the requirements in a fusion reactor, e.g. high thermal conductivity, low activation. In addition weaving processes are evaluated for their use in the fibre preform production. This development is accompanied by an extensive investigation of the materials properties e.g. single fibre tension tests.

  4. Study of neutron induced outgassing from tungsten alloy for ATLAS FCAL

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, C; Cheplakov, A P; Golikov, V; Golubyh, S M; Kulagin, E; Kukhtin, V; Luschikov, V

    1999-01-01

    The use of sintered tungsten alloy slugs as absorber in the ATLAS Forward Calorimeter (FCAL) raised concern that it could possibly poison the liquid argon during the detector operation in the hard radiation environment expected at LHC. A vacuum container filled with tungsten slugs was exposed to the fast neutron fluence of 1.5$\\cdot$10$^{16}$~n~cm$^{-2}$ at the IBR-30 reactor of JINR, Dubna. The residual gas pressure was analysed. The study was completed by mass spectrometer measurements. An upper limit value of 0.1~ppm was determined for the pollution of liquid argon in FCAL due to outgassing from tungsten slugs under irradiation.

  5. Preparation of tungsten coatings on graphite by electro-deposition via Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}–WO{sub 3} molten salt system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Ning-bo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Ying-chun, E-mail: zycustb@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Jiang, Fan; Lang, Shao-ting [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Xia, Min [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Institute of Powder Metallurgy and Advanced Ceramics, Southwest Jiaotong University, 111, 1st Section, Northern 2nd Ring Road, Chengdu (China)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Tungsten coatings on graphite were firstly obtained by electro-deposition method via Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}–WO{sub 3} molten salt system. • Uniform and dense tungsten coatings could be easily prepared in each face of the sample, especially the complex components. • The obtained tungsten coatings are with high purity, ultra-low oxygen content (about 0.022 wt%). • Modulate pulse parameters can get tungsten coatings with different thickness and hardness. - Abstract: Tungsten coating on graphite substrate is one of the most promising candidate materials as the ITER plasma facing components. In this paper, tungsten coatings on graphite substrates were fabricated by electro-deposition from Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}–WO{sub 3} molten salt system at 1173 K in atmosphere. Tungsten coatings with no impurities were successfully deposited on graphite substrates under various pulsed current densities in an hour. By increasing the current density from 60 mA cm{sup −2} to 120 mA cm{sup −2} an increase of the average size of tungsten grains, the thickness and the hardness of tungsten coatings occurs. The average size of tungsten grains can reach 7.13 μm, the thickness of tungsten coating was in the range of 28.8–51 μm, and the hardness of coating was higher than 400 HV. No cracks or voids were observed between tungsten coating and graphite substrate. The oxygen content of tungsten coating is about 0.022 wt%.

  6. In-situ field-ion microscope study of the recovery behavior of heavy metal ion-irradiated tungsten, tungsten (rhenium) alloys and molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, C.H.

    1977-06-01

    Three field ion microscope (FIM) experiments were carried out to study the annealing behavior of heavy ion irradiated tungsten, tungsten (rhenium) alloys and molybdenum. The first experiment dealt with the stage I long-range migration of tungsten self interstitial atoms (SIAs) in high purity tungsten of resistivity ratio, R = 24,000 (R = rho 300 /rho 4 . 2 , where rho 300 and rho 4 . 2 are the room temperature and 0 0 C resistivities). The FIM specimens were irradiated in situ at 18 K with 30 keV W + ions to an average dose of 5 x 10 12 ions cm -2 and subsequently examined by the pulsed-field evaporation technique. The second experiment dealt with the phenomenon of impurity atom trapping of SIAs during long-range migration. It was shown that rhenium atoms in a tungsten matrix tend to capture tungsten SIAs and remain bound up to temperatures as high as 390 K. The final experiment was concerned with the low temperature annealing kinetics of irradiated molybdenum. High purity molybdenum of resistivity ratio R = 5700 was irradiated at 10 K with 30 keV Mo + ions to a dose of approximately 5 x 10 12 ions cm -2 . The results indicated that the electric field has only a minimal effect on the SIA annealing kinetics. This tends to strengthen the contention that the molybdenum SIA becomes mobile at 32 K

  7. Toughness enhancement of tungsten reinforced with short tungsten fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhang, L.H. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Fang, Q.F., E-mail: qffang@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhang, T.; Wang, X.P.; Hao, T.; Liu, C.S. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2017-04-06

    The feasibility and toughening efficiency of the short tungsten fibre reinforcement on tungsten were investigated in W{sub f}/W composites fabricated by powder metallurgy method of spark plasma sintering. Fibres in the composites presented a Z-free laminar structure. Partial recrystallization of fibre grains occurred but fibre crack or damage was not detected. Fracture energy of W{sub f}/W composites was estimated in tensile tests, and the results indicated great toughness improvement over pure tungsten in virtue of frictional pullout and plastic deformation of fibres, and matrix-fibres interfacial debonding since 873 K. The specimen with mass fraction of 10% and fibre diameter of 100 µm exhibits the largest elongation of 9±1.1% and the highest ultimate strength of 482±13 MPa at 873 K.

  8. Production of simplex RNS and ROS by nanosecond pulse N2/O2 plasma jets with homogeneous shielding gas for inducing myeloma cell apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijie; Xu, Dehui; Liu, Dingxin; Cui, Qingjie; Cai, Haifeng; Li, Qiaosong; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, atmospheric pressure N2/O2 plasma jets with homogeneous shielding gas excited by nanosecond pulse are obtained to generate simplex reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), respectively, for the purpose of studying the simplex RNS and ROS to induce the myeloma cell apoptosis with the same discharge power. The results reveal that the cell death rate by the N2 plasma jet with N2 shielding gas is about two times that of the O2 plasma jet with O2 shielding gas for the equivalent treatment time. By diagnosing the reactive species of ONOO-, H2O2, OH and \\text{O}2- in medium, our findings suggest the cell death rate after plasma jets treatment has a positive correlation with the concentration of ONOO-. Therefore, the ONOO- in medium is thought to play an important role in the process of inducing myeloma cell apoptosis.

  9. Surface energy anisotropy of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R; Grenga, H E [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta (USA). School of Chemical Engineering

    1976-10-01

    Field-ion microscopy was used to study the faceting behavior and/or surface energy anisotropy of tungsten in vacuum and in hydrogen. In vacuum below 1700 K the activation energy for (110) facet growth agreed with values previously reported for surface diffusion on tungsten. The observed anisotropy values at 0.5 Tsub(m), where Tsub(m) is the absolute melting temperature of tungsten (approximately 3680 K), were different from those previously reported at higher temperatures and more nearly agreed with broken bond calculations based on Mie potential using m=5, n=8, and a 1.5% lattice expansion. Hydrogen appeared to have a negligible effect on surface energy anisotropy, but did preferentially increase surface diffusion rates on (310) regions.

  10. Fractographic peculiarities of cermet tungsten fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanenko, V.A.; Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1982-01-01

    Effect of test temperature on fracture peculiarities of cermets tungsten with initial cellular structure of deformation is shown. Tungsten crack resistance increases at temperatures to Tsub(x) (ductile-brittle transition temperature) and decreases at temperatures above Tsub(x). The degree of ceramics tungsten plasticity realization depends on its crack resistance

  11. Recrystallization and embrittlement of sintered tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bega, N.D.; Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1982-01-01

    The recrystallization of sintered tungsten with a cellular structure of deformation is studied as related to its embrittlement. It is stated that in case of preliminary recrystallization the sintered tungsten crack resistance does not depend on the testing temperature. The tungsten crack resistance is shown to lower with an increase of the structure tendency to primary recrystallization [ru

  12. Gleeble Testing of Tungsten Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    temperature on an Instron load frame with a 222.41 kN (50 kip) load cell . The samples were compressed at the same strain rate as on the Gleeble...ID % RE Initial Density (cm 3 ) Density after Compression (cm 3 ) % Change in Density Test Temperature NT1 0 18.08 18.27 1.06 1000 NT3 0...4.1 Nano-Tungsten The results for the compression of the nano-tungsten samples are shown in tables 2 and 3 and figure 5. During testing, sample NT1

  13. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  14. Influence of surface morphology and microstructure on performance of CVD tungsten coating under fusion transient thermal loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Youyun, E-mail: lianyy@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China); Liu, Xiang; Wang, Jianbao; Feng, Fan [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China); Lv, Yanwei; Song, Jiupeng [China National R& D Center for Tungsten Technology, Xiamen Tungsten Co. Ltd, 361026 Xiamen (China); Chen, Jiming [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Thick CVD-W coatingswere deposited at a rapid growth rate. • The polished CVD-W coatings have highly textured structure and exhibited a very strong preferred orientation. • The polished CVD tungsten coatings show superior thermal shock resistance as compared with that of the as-deposited coatings. • The crack formation of the polished CVD-W was almost suppressed at an elevated temperature. - Abstract: Thick tungsten coatings have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a rapid growth rate. A series of tungsten coatings with different thickness and surface morphology were prepared. The surface morphology, microstructure and preferred orientation of the CVD tungsten coatings were investigated. Thermal shock analyses were performed by using an electron beam facility to study the influence of the surface morphology and the microstructure on the thermal shock resistance of the CVD tungsten coatings. Repetitive (100 pulses) ELMs-like thermal shock loads were applied at various temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C with pulse duration of 1 ms and an absorbed power density of up to 1 GW/m{sup 2}. The results of the tests demonstrated that the specific surface morphology and columnar crystal structure of the CVD tungsten have significant influence on the surface cracking threshold and crack propagation of the materials. The CVD tungsten coatings with a polished surface show superior thermal shock resistance as compared with that of the as-deposited coatings with a rough surface.

  15. Gas-dynamic perturbations in an electric-discharge repetitively pulsed DF laser and the role of He in their suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evdokimov, P A; Sokolov, D V [Russian Federal Nuclear Center ' All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics' , Sarov, Nizhnii Novgorod region (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    The gas-dynamic perturbations in a repetitively pulsed DF laser are studied using a Michelson interferometer. Based on the analysis of experimental data obtained in two experimental sets (working medium without buffer gas and with up to 90% of He), it is concluded that such phenomena as isentropic expansion of a thermal plug, gas heating by shock waves and resonance acoustic waves do not considerably decrease the upper limit of the pulse repetition rate below a value determined by the time of the thermal plug flush out of the discharge gap. It is suggested that this decrease for a DF laser with the SF{sub 6} – D{sub 2} working mixture is caused by the development of overheat instability due to an increased energy deposition into the near-electrode regions and to the formation of electrode shock waves. Addition of He to the active media of the DF laser changes the discharge structure and improves its homogeneity over the discharge gape cross section, thus eliminating the reason for the development of this instability. A signification dilution of the active medium of a DF laser with helium up to the atmospheric pressure allowed us to achieve the limiting discharge initiation frequencies with the active medium replacement ratio K ∼ 1. (active media)

  16. Tungsten migration studies by controlled injection of volatile compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, M., E-mail: rubel@kth.se [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Association EURATOM-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Coenen, J. [IEK-4, Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Ivanova, D. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Association EURATOM-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Möller, S. [IEK-4, Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Petersson, P. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Association EURATOM-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Brezinsek, S.; Kreter, A.; Philipps, V.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Schweer, B. [IEK-4, Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Volatile tungsten hexa-fluoride was locally injected into the TEXTOR tokamak as a marker for material migration studies. The injection was accompanied by puffing N-15 rare isotope as a nitrogen tracer in discharges with edge cooling by impurity seeding. The objective was to assess material balance by qualitative and quantitative determination of a global and local deposition pattern, material mixing effects and fluorine residence in plasma-facing components. Spectroscopy and ex situ ion beam analysis techniques were used. Tungsten was detected on all types of limiter tiles and short-term probes retrieved from the vessel. Over 80% of the injected W was identified. The largest tungsten concentration, 1 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −2}, was in the vicinity of the gas inlet. Co-deposits contained tungsten and a mix of light isotopes: H, D, He-4, B-10, B-11, C-12, C-13, N-14, N-15, O-16 and small quantities of F-19 thus showing that both He and nitrogen are trapped following wall conditioning (He glow) and edge cooling.

  17. Tungsten and carbon surface change under high dose plasma exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, Y.V.; Khripunov, B.I.; Petrov, V.B.

    2009-01-01

    Study of surface composition dynamics has been made on the LENTA linear plasma simulator. Experiments have been made on tungsten and carbon materials subjected to steady-state plasma exposure. The achieved ion doses on the surface were 10 21 ion cm -2 . WL 10 tungsten containing 1% of La2O3 oxide and titanium-doped graphite RG-T were studied. The following experimental conditions were varied in these experiments: energy of ions, surface temperature, working gas. Irradiations of tungsten WL 10 were executed in deuterium plasma at low ion energies (about 20 eV) and at 200 eV for temperatures below 340 K. Graphite RG-T was exposed at 1300 K. Elevated surface temperature (about 1050K) was also characteristic of experiments on tungsten sample under nitrogen plasma impact (simulated inter-ELMs condition). Surface microstructure modification has been observed and surface composition changes were found on the materials showing influence of high dose plasma irradiations on element redistribution in the near surface layers. (author)

  18. Influence of HPPMS pulse length and inert gas mixture on the properties of (Cr,Al)N coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagcivan, N.; Bobzin, K. [Surface Engineering Institute, RWTH Aachen University, Kackertstr. 15, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Grundmeier, G.; Wiesing, M.; Ozcan, O.; Kunze, C. [University of Paderborn, Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, Warburger Str. 100, D-33098 Paderborn (Germany); Brugnara, R.H., E-mail: brugnara@iot.rwth-aachen.de [Surface Engineering Institute, RWTH Aachen University, Kackertstr. 15, D-52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2013-12-31

    During the production of plastic products by injection molding processes adhesion and abrasion wear as well as corrosion take place in the molding tools. Concerning this, (Cr,Al)N coatings deposited via physical vapor deposition (PVD) have a good potential to be used as protective coatings on injection tools. For an effective protection of coated tools a uniform layer of coating material is also required. In this regard, the HPPMS (high power pulse magnetron sputtering) technology offers possibilities to improve coating thickness uniformity as well as to adapt the chemical and mechanical properties. The present work deals with the investigation of influence of HPPMS pulse length and the argon/krypton ratio in the deposition process on (Cr,Al)N coating properties. For this reason, (Cr,Al)N coatings were deposited with HPPMS pulse length of 40, 80 and 200 μs at constant Ar/Kr ratio (120/80 sccm). The results were compared with a coating deposited with DC Magnetron Sputtering (DC-MS) with the same Ar/Kr ratio. Afterwards, a (Cr,Al)N coating was deposited with constant pulse length (200 μs) without Kr. The chemical composition, morphology and phase composition of the coatings were analyzed by means of EDS (Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy), SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) and XRD (X-ray Diffraction), respectively. The composition of the surface near region in the samples was investigated by means of XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). Mechanical properties were measured by means of nanoindentation. Decreasing of pulse length at constant mean power leads to a considerable increase of cathode current. It could be observed that the deposition rate of the HPPMS process reduces with decreasing pulse length. Nevertheless, short HPPMS pulse lengths and high peak currents lead to an increase of hardness from 25 GPa to 32 GPa while the DC-MS coating displays a hardness of 18 GPa. The use of krypton within the sputter process leads to a marginal increase of the deposition

  19. Toward Tungsten Plasma-Facing Components in KSTAR: Research on Plasma-Metal Wall Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, S. H.; Kim, K. M.; Song, J. H.; Bang, E. N.; Kim, H. T.; Lee, K. S.; Litnovsky, A.; Hellwig, M.; Seo, D. C.; van den Berg, M. A.; Lee, H. H.; Kang, C. S.; Lee, H. Y.; Hong, J. H.; Bak, J. G.; Kim, H. S.; Juhn, J. W.; Son, S. H.; Kim, H. K.; Douai, D.; Grisolia, C.; Wu, J.; Luo, G. N.; Choe, W. H.; Komm, M.; De Temmerman, G.; Pitts, R.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main missions of KSTAR is to develop long-pulse operation capability relevant to the production of fusion energy. After a full metal wall configuration was decided for ITER, a major upgrade for KSTAR was planned, to a tungsten first wall similar to the JET ITER-like wall (coatings and

  20. Production and correlation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in gas- and liquid-phase generated by helium plasma jets under different pulse widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijie; Zhou, Chunxi; Liu, Dingxin; Xu, Dehui; Xia, Wenjie; Cui, Qingjie; Wang, Bingchuan; Kong, Michael G.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present the effects of the pulse width (PW) on the plasma jet's discharge characteristics, particularly focusing on the production and correlation of the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in gas- and liquid-phase. It is found that the length of plasma jet plume first increases before the PW of 10 μs, then gradually decreases and finally almost remains unchanged beyond 150 μs. The plasma bullet disappears after the falling edge of the voltage pulse at low PW, while it terminates far ahead of the falling edge of voltage pulse at high PW. This is mainly attributed to accumulation of space charges that lead to weakening of the reduced electric field with an increase of PW from low to high. More important, it is found that the excited reactive species, the positive and negative ions from plasma jet, and the concentrations of NO2- and NO3- in deionized water exposed to plasma jet also display the first increasing and then decreasing change trend with increase of PW, while the concentration of H2O2 in water almost displays the linearly increasing trend. This mainly results from the formation of the H3O+ and HO2-, as well as their ion water clusters that can produce more OH radicals to be converted into H2O2, while the NO2- and NO3- in gas phase can transport into water and exist most stably in water. The water cluster formation at gas-liquid interface is an important key process that can affect the chemical nature and dose of aqueous RONS in water; this is beneficial for understanding how the RONS are formed in liquid-phase.

  1. Hydrogen retention properties of polycrystalline tungsten and helium irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, T.; Koyama, K.; Yamauchi, Y.; Hirohata, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The hydrogen retention properties of a polycrystalline tungsten and tungsten irradiated by helium ions with an energy of 5 keV were examined by using an ECR ion irradiation apparatus and a technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy, TDS. The polycrystalline tungsten was irradiated at RT with energetic hydrogen ions, with a flux of 10 15 H cm -2 and an energy of 1.7 keV up to a fluence of 5 x 10 18 H cm -2 . Subsequently, the amount of retained hydrogen was measured by TDS. The heating temperature was increased from RT to 1000 C, and the heating rate was 50 C min -1 . Below 1000 C, two distinct hydrogen desorption peaks were observed at 200 C and 400 C. The retained amount of hydrogen was observed to be five times smaller than that of graphite, but the concentration in the implantation layer was comparable with that of graphite. Also, the polycrystalline tungsten was irradiated with 5 keV helium ions up to a fluence of 1.4 x 10 18 He cm -2 , and then re-irradiated with 1.7 keV hydrogen ions. The amount of retained hydrogen in this later experiment was close to the value in the case without prior helium ion irradiation. However, the amount of hydrogen which desorbed around the low temperature peak, 200 C, was largely enhanced. The desorption amount at 200 C saturated for the helium fluence of more than 5 x 10 17 He cm -2 . The present data shows that the trapping state of hydrogen is largely changed by the helium ion irradiation. Additionally, 5 keV helium ion irradiation was conducted on a sample pre-implanted with hydrogen ions to simulate a helium ion impact desorption of hydrogen retained in tungsten. The amount of the hydrogen was reduced as much as 50%. (orig.)

  2. Pulsed sub-microsecond dielectric barrier discharge treatment of simulated glass manufacturing industry flue gas: removal of SO2 and NOx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khacef, A; Cormier, J M

    2006-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the removal of SO 2 and NOx from simulated glass manufacturing industry flue gas containing O 2 , N 2 , NO, NO 2 , CO 2 , SO 2 and H 2 O using a sub-microsecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure. Removal efficiencies of SO 2 and NOx (NO+NO 2 ) were achieved as a function of gas temperature for two specific energies and two initial NO, NO 2 and SO 2 concentrations. The higher SO 2 and NOx removal efficiencies were achieved in a gas stream containing 163 ppm of SO 2 , 523 ppm of NO, 49 ppm of NO 2 , 14% of CO 2 , 8% of O 2 , 16% of H 2 O and N 2 as balance. The experimental results were evaluated using the energy cost or W-value (eV/molecule removed). About 100% of SO 2 and 36% of NOx were removed at a gas temperature of 100 deg. C with an energy cost of about 45 eV/molecule removed and 36 eV/molecule removed, respectively. These results indicate that DBD plasmas have the potential to remove SO 2 and NOx from gas streams without additives

  3. Tungsten atomic layer deposition on polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); McCormick, J.A. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0424 (United States); Cavanagh, A.S. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States); Goldstein, D.N. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Weimer, A.W. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0424 (United States); George, S.M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0424 (United States)], E-mail: Steven.George@Colorado.Edu

    2008-07-31

    Tungsten (W) atomic layer deposition (ALD) was investigated on a variety of polymer films and polymer particles. These polymers included polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene, polycarbonate, polypropylene and polymethylmethacrylate. The W ALD was performed at 80 {sup o}C using WF{sub 6} and Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} as the gas phase reactants. W ALD on flat polymer films can eventually nucleate and grow after more than 60 AB cycles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of W ALD on polystyrene after 50 AB cycles suggested that tungsten nanoclusters are present in the W ALD nucleation regime. The W ALD nucleation is greatly facilitated by a few cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD. W ALD films were grown at 80 {sup o}C on spin-coated polymers on silicon wafers after 10 AB cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD. The W ALD film was observed to grow linearly with a growth rate of 3.9 A per AB cycle on the polymer films treated with the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD seed layer. The W ALD films displayed an excellent, mirror-like optical reflectivity. The resistivity was 100-400 {mu}{omega} cm for W ALD films with thicknesses from 95-845 A. W ALD was also observed on polymer particles after W ALD in a rotary reactor. Without the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD seed layer, the nucleation of W ALD directly on the polymer particles at 80 {sup o}C required > 50 AB cycles. In contrast, the polymer particles treated with only 5 AB cycles of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD were observed to blacken after 25 AB cycles of W ALD. W ALD on polymers may have applications for flexible optical mirrors, electromagnetic interference shielding and gas diffusion barriers.

  4. Thomson scattering diagnostics of steady state and pulsed welding processes without and with metal vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kühn-Kauffeldt, M; Schein, J; Marqués, J-L

    2015-01-01

    Thomson scattering is applied to measure temperature and density of electrons in the arc plasma of the direct current gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process. This diagnostic technique allows to determine these plasma parameters independent from the gas composition and heavy particles temperature. The experimental setup is adapted to perform measurements on stationary as well as transient processes. Spatial and temporal electron temperature and density profiles of a pure argon arc in the case of the GTAW process and argon arc with the presence of aluminum metal vapor in the case of the GMAW process were obtained. Additionally the data is used to estimate the concentration of the metal vapor in the GMAW plasma. (fast track communication)

  5. Hydrogen in tungsten as plasma-facing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Joachim; Schmid, Klaus

    2011-12-01

    Materials facing plasmas in fusion experiments and future reactors are loaded with high fluxes (1020-1024 m-2 s-1) of H, D and T fuel particles at energies ranging from a few eV to keV. In this respect, the evolution of the radioactive T inventory in the first wall, the permeation of T through the armour into the coolant and the thermo-mechanical stability after long-term exposure are key parameters determining the applicability of a first wall material. Tungsten exhibits fast hydrogen diffusion, but an extremely low solubility limit. Due to the fast diffusion of hydrogen and the short ion range, most of the incident ions will quickly reach the surface and recycle into the plasma chamber. For steady-state operation the solute hydrogen for the typical fusion reactor geometry and wall conditions can reach an inventory of about 1 kg. However, in short-pulse operation typical of ITER, solute hydrogen will diffuse out after each pulse and the remaining inventory will consist of hydrogen trapped in lattice defects, such as dislocations, grain boundaries and irradiation-induced traps. In high-flux areas the hydrogen energies are too low to create displacement damage. However, under these conditions the solubility limit will be exceeded within the ion range and the formation of gas bubbles and stress-induced damage occurs. In addition, simultaneous neutron fluxes from the nuclear fusion reaction D(T,n)α will lead to damage in the materials and produce trapping sites for diffusing hydrogen atoms throughout the bulk. The formation and diffusive filling of these different traps will determine the evolution of the retained T inventory. This paper will concentrate on experimental evidence for the influence different trapping sites have on the hydrogen inventory in W as studied in ion beam experiments and low-temperature plasmas. Based on the extensive experimental data, models are validated and applied to estimate the contribution of different traps to the tritium inventory in

  6. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN TUNGSTEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRANSENS, [No Value; ELKERIEM, MSA; PLEITER, F

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen-vacancy interaction in tungsten was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. Hydrogen trapping at an In-111-vacancy cluster manifests itself as a change of the local electric field gradient, which gives rise to an observable

  7. Fabrication of tungsten wire needles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roder, A.

    1983-02-01

    Fine point needles for field emissoin are conventionally produced by electrolytically or chemically etching tungsten wire. Points formed in this manner have a typical tip radius of about 0.5 microns and a cone angle of some 30 degrees. The construction of needle matrix detector chambers has created a need for tungsten needles whose specifications are: 20 mil tungsten wire, 1.5 inch total length, 3 mm-long taper (resulting in a cone angle of about 5 degrees), and 25 micron-radius point (similar to that found on sewing needles). In the process described here for producing such needles, tungsten wire, immersed in a NaOH solution and in the presence of an electrode, is connected first to an ac voltage and then to a dc supply, to form a taper and a point on the end of the wire immersed in the solution. The process parameters described here are for needles that will meet the above specifications. Possible variations will be discussed under each approprite heading

  8. Study of the interaction of a 10 TW femtosecond laser with a high-density long-scale pulsed gas jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monot, P.; D'Oliveira, P.; Hulin, S.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Dobosz, S.; Auguste, T.; Pikuz, T.A.; Magunov, A.I.; Skobelev, I.Yu.; Rosmej, F.; Andreev, N.E.; Lefebvre, E.

    2001-01-01

    A study on the interaction of a 10 TW, 60 fs, Ti-Sapphire laser with a high-density long-scale pulsed nitrogen gas jet is reported. Experimental data on the laser propagation are analyzed with the help of a ray-tracing model. The plasma dynamics is investigated by means of time-resolved shadowgraphy and time-integrated high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy. Shadowgrams show that the plasma does not expand during the first 55 ps, while x-ray spectra exhibit an unusual continuum-like structure attributed to hollow atoms produced by charge exchange process between bare nuclei expelled from the plasma and molecules of the surrounding gas. The interpretation of the results is supported by particle-in-cell simulations. The question of x-ray lasing is also examined using a hydrodynamic code to simulate the long lasting regime of recombination

  9. Prompt ignition of a unipolar arc on helium irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajita, Shin; Takamura, Shuichi; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2009-01-01

    A fibreform nanostructured layer is formed on a tungsten surface by helium plasma bombardment. The helium fluence was of the order of 10 26 m -2 , and the surface temperature and incident ion energy during helium irradiation were, respectively, 1900 K and 75 eV. By irradiating a laser pulse to the surface in the plasma, a unipolar arc, which many people have tried to verify in well-defined experiments, is promptly initiated and continued for a much longer time than the laser pulse width. The laser pulse width (∼0.6 ms) and power (∼5 MJ m -2 ) are similar to the heat load accompanied by type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) in ITER. The unipolar arc is verified from an increase in the floating potential, a moving arc spot detected by a fast camera and arcing traces on the surface. This result suggests that the nanostructure on the tungsten surface formed by the bombardment of helium, which is a fusion product, could significantly change the ignition property of arcing, and ELMs become a trigger of unipolar arcing, which would be a great impurity source in fusion devices. (letter)

  10. Molecular dynamics and density functional simulations of tungsten nanostructure formation by helium plasma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.M.; Takayama, A.; Oda, Y.

    2014-10-01

    For the purposes of long-term use of tungsten diverter walls, it is necessary to suppress the surface deterioration due to the helium ash which induces the formations of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures. In the present paper, the formation mechanisms of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures were explained by the four-step process which is composed of the penetration process, the diffusion and agglomeration process, the helium bubble growth process and the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure formation process. The first to third step processes of the four-step process were investigated by using binary collision approximation, density functional theory and molecular dynamics, respectively. Furthermore, newly developed molecular dynamics and Monte-Carlo hybrid simulation has successfully reproduced the early formation process of tungsten fuzzy nanostructure. From these simulations, we here suggest the following key mechanisms of the formations of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures: (1) By comparison between helium, neon, argon and hydrogen, the noble gas atoms can agglomerate limitlessly not only at a vacancy but also at an interstitial site. In particular, at the low incident energy, only helium atoms bring about the nucleation for helium bubble. (2) In the helium bubble growth process, the strain of the tungsten material around a helium atom is released as a dislocation loop, which is regarded as the loop punching phenomenon. (3) In the tungsten nanostructure formation process, the bursting of a helium bubble forms cavity and convexity in the surface. The helium bubbles tend to be grown and to burst at the cavity region, and then the difference of height between the cavity and convexity on the surface are enhanced. Consequently, the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure is formed. (author)

  11. Tensile behaviour of drawn tungsten wire used in tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesch, J; Feichtmayer, A; Fuhr, M; Gietl, H; Höschen, T; Neu, R; Almanstötter, J; Coenen, J W; Linsmeier, Ch

    2017-01-01

    In tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites (W f /W) the brittleness problem of tungsten is solved by utilizing extrinsic toughening mechanisms. The properties of the composite are very much related to the properties of the drawn tungsten wire used as fibre reinforcements. Its high strength and capability of ductile deformation are ideal properties facilitating toughening of W f /W. Tensile tests have been used for determining mechanical properties and study the deformation and the fracture behaviour of the wire. Tests of as-fabricated and straightened drawn wires with a diameter between 16 and 150 μ m as well as wire electrochemically thinned to a diameter of 5 μ m have been performed. Engineering stress–strain curves and a microscopic analysis are presented with the focus on the ultimate strength. All fibres show a comparable stress–strain behaviour comprising necking followed by a ductile fracture. A reduction of the diameter by drawing leads to an increase of strength up to 4500 MPa as a consequence of a grain boundary hardening mechanism. Heat treatment during straightening decreases the strength whereas electrochemical thinning has no significant impact on the mechanical behaviour. (paper)

  12. Diagnosis of high-intensity pulsed heavy ion beam generated by a novel magnetically insulated diode with gas puff plasma gun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, H; Miyake, H; Masugata, K

    2008-10-01

    Intense pulsed heavy ion beam is expected to be applied to materials processing including surface modification and ion implantation. For those applications, it is very important to generate high-purity ion beams with various ion species. For this purpose, we have developed a new type of a magnetically insulated ion diode with an active ion source of a gas puff plasma gun. When the ion diode was operated at a diode voltage of about 190 kV, a diode current of about 15 kA, and a pulse duration of about 100 ns, the ion beam with an ion current density of 54 A/cm(2) was obtained at 50 mm downstream from the anode. By evaluating the ion species and the energy spectrum of the ion beam via a Thomson parabola spectrometer, it was confirmed that the ion beam consists of nitrogen ions (N(+) and N(2+)) of energy of 100-400 keV and the proton impurities of energy of 90-200 keV. The purity of the beam was evaluated to be 94%. The high-purity pulsed nitrogen ion beam was successfully obtained by the developed ion diode system.

  13. Transition between trickle flow and pulse flow in a cocurrent gas-liquid trickle-bed reactor at elevated pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wammes, W.J.A.; Mechielsen, S.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of reactor pressure in the range of 0.2–2.0 MPa on the transition between the trickle-flow and the pulse-flow regime has been investigated for the non-foaming water—nitrogen and aqueous 40% ethyleneglycol—nitrogen systems. Most models and flow charts which are all based on atmospheric

  14. Time-resolved study of a pulsed dc discharge using quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy : NO and gas temperature kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welzel, S.; Gatilova, L.; Röpcke, J.; Rousseau, A.

    2007-01-01

    In a pulsed dc discharge of an Ar–N2 mixture containing 0.91% of NO the kinetics of the destruction of NO has been studied under static and flowing conditions, i.e. in a closed and open discharge tube (p = 266 Pa). For this purpose quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) in the

  15. Peculiarity of deuterium ions interaction with tungsten surface in the condition imitating combination of normal operation with plasma disruption in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guseva, M.I. E-mail: martyn@nfi.kiae.ru; Vasiliev, V.I.; Gureev, V.M.; Danelyan, L.S.; Khirpunov, B.I.; Korshunov, S.N.; Kulikauskas, V.S.; Martynenko, Yu.V.; Petrov, V.B.; Strunnikov, V.N.; Stolyarova, V.G.; Zatekin, V.V.; Litnovsky, A.M

    2001-03-01

    Tungsten is a candidate material for the ITER divertor. For the simulation of ITER normal operation conditions in combination with plasma disruptions samples of various types of tungsten were exposed to both steady-state and high power pulsed deuterium plasmas. Tungsten samples were first exposed in a steady-state plasma with an ion current density {approx}10{sup 21} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} up to a dose of 10{sup 25} m{sup -2} at a temperature of 770 K. The energy of deuterium ions was 150 eV. The additional exposure of the samples to 10 pulses of deuterium plasma was performed in the electrodynamical plasma accelerator with an energy flux 0.45 MJ/m{sup 2} per pulse. Samples of four types of tungsten (W-1%La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, W-13I, monocrystalline W(1 1 1) and W-10%Re) were investigated. The least destruction of the surface was observed for W(1 1 1). The concentration of retained deuterium in tungsten decreased from 2.5x10{sup 19} m{sup -2} to 1.07x10{sup 19} m{sup -2} (for W(1 1 1)) as a result of the additional pulsed plasma irradiation. Investigation of the tungsten erosion products after the high power pulsed plasma shots was also carried out.

  16. Study and development of solid fluxes for gas tungsten arc welding applied to titanium and its alloys and stainless steels; Etude et developpement des flux solides en vue d'application en soudage ATIG applique au titane et ses alliages ainsi qu'aux aciers inoxydables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, N

    2000-06-15

    Gas Tungsten Arc Welding uses an electric arc between the refractory tungsten electrode and the plates to be welded under an argon shielding gas. As a result, the joint quality is excellent, no pollution nor defects are to be feared, consequently this process is used in nuclear, aeronautic, chemical and food industries. Despite of this good qualities, GTAW is limited because of, on the one side, a poor penetrating weld pool and, on the other side, a week productivity rate. Indeed, up to 3 mm thick plates, machining and filler metal is needed. Multiple runs increase the defect's risks, the manufactory time and increase the deformations and the heat affected zone. The goal of this study is to break through this limits without any device investment. Active GTA welding (or ATIG) is a new technique with GTA device and an activating flux to be spread on the upper plate before welding. The arc, by plasma electrochemical equilibrium modifications, and the pool with the inner connective flows inversion, allow 7 mm thick joints in one run without edges machining or filler metal for both stainless steel and titanium alloys. This manuscript describes the development of these fluxes, highlights the several phenomena and presents the possibilities of this new process. This work, in collaboration with B.S.L. industries, leads to two flux formulations (stainless steel and titanium alloys) now in a commercial phase with CASTOLIN S.A. Moreover, B.S.L.industries produces a pressure device (nitrate column) with the ATIG process using more than 2800 ATIG welds. (author)

  17. Study and development of solid fluxes for gas tungsten arc welding applied to titanium and its alloys and stainless steels; Etude et developpement des flux solides en vue d'application en soudage ATIG applique au titane et ses alliages ainsi qu'aux aciers inoxydables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, N

    2000-06-15

    Gas Tungsten Arc Welding uses an electric arc between the refractory tungsten electrode and the plates to be welded under an argon shielding gas. As a result, the joint quality is excellent, no pollution nor defects are to be feared, consequently this process is used in nuclear, aeronautic, chemical and food industries. Despite of this good qualities, GTAW is limited because of, on the one side, a poor penetrating weld pool and, on the other side, a week productivity rate. Indeed, up to 3 mm thick plates, machining and filler metal is needed. Multiple runs increase the defect's risks, the manufactory time and increase the deformations and the heat affected zone. The goal of this study is to break through this limits without any device investment. Active GTA welding (or ATIG) is a new technique with GTA device and an activating flux to be spread on the upper plate before welding. The arc, by plasma electrochemical equilibrium modifications, and the pool with the inner connective flows inversion, allow 7 mm thick joints in one run without edges machining or filler metal for both stainless steel and titanium alloys. This manuscript describes the development of these fluxes, highlights the several phenomena and presents the possibilities of this new process. This work, in collaboration with B.S.L. industries, leads to two flux formulations (stainless steel and titanium alloys) now in a commercial phase with CASTOLIN S.A. Moreover, B.S.L.industries produces a pressure device (nitrate column) with the ATIG process using more than 2800 ATIG welds. (author)

  18. Detectors for alpha particles and X-rays operating in ambient air in pulse counting mode or/and with gas amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G; Benaben, P; Breuil, P; Peskov, V

    2008-01-01

    Ionization chambers working in ambient air in current detection mode are attractive due to their simplicity and low cost and are widely used in several applications such as smoke detection, dosimetry, therapeutic beam monitoring and so on. The aim of this work was to investigate if gaseous detectors can operate in ambient air in pulse counting mode as well as with gas amplification which potentially offers the highest possible sensitivity in applications like alpha particle detection or high energy X-ray photon or electron detection. To investigate the feasibility of this method two types of open- end gaseous detectors were build and successfully tested. The first one was a single wire or multiwire cylindrical geometry detector operating in pulse mode at a gas gain of one (pulse ionization chamber). This detector was readout by a custom made wide -band charge sensitive amplifier able to deal with slow induced signals generated by slow motion of negative and positive ions. The multiwire detector was able to detect alpha particles with an efficiency close to 22%. The second type of an alpha detector was an innovative GEM-like detector with resistive electrodes operating in air in avalanche mode at high gas gains (up to 10 4 ). This detector can also operate in a cascaded mode or being combined with other detectors, for example with MICROMEGAS. This detector was readout by a conventional charge -sensitive amplifier and was able to detect alpha particles with 100% efficiency. This detector could also detect X-ray photons or fast electrons. A detailed comparison between these two detectors is given as well as a comparison with commercially available alpha detectors. The main advantages of gaseous detectors operating in air in a pulse detection mode are their simplicity, low cost and high sensitivity. One of the possible applications of these new detectors is alpha particle background monitors which, due to their low cost can find wide application not only in houses, but

  19. Chemical behavior of tungsten trifluorophosphines following neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottomley, L.D.; Clark, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The chemical reactions that follow neutron capture have been studied for a series of tungsten trifluorophosphine carbonyls. The molecular distribution of 187 W was determined by gas chromatographic separation using scintillation detection. The chemical behavior of these compounds was examined in the condensed phase and the gas phase, both with and without excess PF 3 or CO. The retention of the parent species was measured as well as the formation of any scrambled species W(PF 3 ) x (CO) 6-x in all experiments. The results of irradiations done in condensed phase with no excess ligands were modeled by a Simplex iterative routine to calculate the distribution of recoil fragments. (orig.)

  20. Coke-free dry reforming of model diesel fuel by a pulsed spark plasma at low temperatures using an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Yasushi; Furukawa, Naotsugu; Matsukata, Masahiko; Kikuchi, Eiichi, E-mail: ysekine@waseda.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Waseda University, 65-301, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2011-07-13

    Dry reforming of diesel fuel, an endothermic reaction, is an attractive process for on-board hydrogen/syngas production to increase energy efficiency. For operating this dry reforming process in a vehicle, we can use the exhaust gas from an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system as a source of carbon dioxide. Catalytic dry reforming of heavy hydrocarbon is a very difficult reaction due to the high accumulation of carbon on the catalyst. Therefore, we attempted to use a non-equilibrium pulsed plasma for the dry reforming of model diesel fuel without a catalyst. We investigated dry reforming of model diesel fuel (n-dodecane) with a low-energy pulsed spark plasma, which is a kind of non-equilibrium plasma at a low temperature of 523 K. Through the reaction, we were able to obtain syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) and a small amount of C{sub 2} hydrocarbon without coke formation at a ratio of CO{sub 2}/C{sub fuel} = 1.5 or higher. The reaction can be conducted at very low temperatures such as 523 K. Therefore, it is anticipated as a novel and effective process for on-board syngas production from diesel fuel using an EGR system.

  1. Performance of a high repetition pulse rate laser system for in-gas-jet laser ionization studies with the Leuven laser ion source LISOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, R.; Sonnenschein, V.T.; Bastin, B.; Franchoo, S.; Huyse, M.; Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Kron, T.; Lecesne, N.; Moore, I.D.; Osmond, B.; Pauwels, D.; Radulov, D.; Raeder, S.; Rens, L.

    2012-01-01

    The laser ionization efficiency of the Leuven gas cell-based laser ion source was investigated under on- and off-line conditions using two distinctly different laser setups: a low-repetition rate dye laser system and a high-repetition rate Ti:sapphire laser system. A systematic study of the ion signal dependence on repetition rate and laser pulse energy was performed in off-line tests using stable cobalt and copper isotopes. These studies also included in-gas-jet laser spectroscopy measurements on the hyperfine structure of 63 Cu. A final run under on-line conditions in which the radioactive isotope 59 Cu (T 1/2 = 81.5 s) was produced, showed a comparable yield of the two laser systems for in-gas-cell ionization. However, a significantly improved time overlap by using the high-repetition rate laser system for in-gas-jet ionization was demonstrated by an increase of the overall duty cycle, and at the same time, pointed to the need for a better shaped atomic jet to reach higher ionization efficiencies.

  2. Tungsten recrystallization and cracking under ITER-relevant heat loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budaev, V.P., E-mail: Budaev@mail.ru [NRC «Kurchatov Institute», Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow (Russian Federation); Martynenko, Yu.V. [NRC «Kurchatov Institute», Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow (Russian Federation); Karpov, A.V.; Belova, N.E. [NRC «Kurchatov Institute», Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhitlukhin, A.M. [SRC RF TRINITI, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Klimov, N.S., E-mail: klimov@triniti.ru [SRC RF TRINITI, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow (Russian Federation); Podkovyrov, V.L.; Barsuk, V.A.; Putrik, A.B.; Yaroshevskaya, A.D. [SRC RF TRINITI, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Giniyatulin, R.N. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Safronov, V.M. [Institution «Project Center ITER», Moscow (Russian Federation); SRC RF TRINITI, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Khimchenko, L.N. [Institution «Project Center ITER», Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    The tungsten surface structure was analyzed after the test in the QSPA-T under heat loads relevant to those expected in the ITER during disruptions. Repeated pulses lead to the melting and the resolidification of the tungsten surface layer of ∼50 μm thickness. There is ∼50 μm thickness intermediate layer between the original structure and the resolidified layer. The intermediate layer is recrystallized and has a random grains’ orientation whereas the resolidified layer and basic structure have texture with preferable orientation 〈1 0 0〉 normal to the surface. The cracks which were normal to the surface were observed in the resolidified layer as well as the cracks which were parallel to the surface at the depth up to 300 μm. Such cracks can result in the brittle destruction which is a hazard for the full tungsten divertor of the ITER. The theoretical analysis of the crack formation reasons and a possible consequence for the ITER are given.

  3. Thermal shock behaviour of different tungsten grades under varying conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtz, Oliver Marius

    2012-07-19

    Thermonuclear fusion power plants are a promising option to ensure the energy supply for future generations, but in many fields of research enormous challenges have to be faced. A major step on the way to the prototype fusion reactor DEMO will be ITER which is build in Cadarache, southern France. One of the most critical issues is the field of in-vessel materials and components, in particular the plasma facing materials (PFM). PFMs that will be used in a device like ITER have to withstand severe environmental conditions in terms of steady state and transient thermal loads as well as high particle fluxes such as hydrogen, helium and neutrons. Candidate wall materials are beryllium, tungsten and carbon based materials like CFC (carbon fibre composite). Tungsten is the most promising material for an application in the divertor region with very severe loading conditions and it will most probably also be used as PFM for DEMO. Hence, this work focuses on the investigation of the thermal shock response of different tungsten grades in order to understand the damage mechanisms and to identify material parameters which influence this behaviour under ITER and DEMO relevant operation conditions. Therefore the microstructure and the mechanical and thermal properties of five industrially manufactured tungsten grades were characterised. All five tungsten grades were exposed to transient thermal events with very high power densities of up to 1.27 GWm{sup -2} at varying base temperatures between RT and 600 C in the electron beam device JUDITH 1. The pulse numbers were limited to a maximum of 1000 in order to avoid immoderate workload on the test facility and to have enough time to cover a wide range of loading conditions. The results of this damage mapping enable to define different damage and cracking thresholds for the investigated tungsten grades and to identify certain material parameters which influence the location of these thresholds and the distinction of the induced

  4. Thermal shock behaviour of different tungsten grades under varying conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirtz, Oliver Marius

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion power plants are a promising option to ensure the energy supply for future generations, but in many fields of research enormous challenges have to be faced. A major step on the way to the prototype fusion reactor DEMO will be ITER which is build in Cadarache, southern France. One of the most critical issues is the field of in-vessel materials and components, in particular the plasma facing materials (PFM). PFMs that will be used in a device like ITER have to withstand severe environmental conditions in terms of steady state and transient thermal loads as well as high particle fluxes such as hydrogen, helium and neutrons. Candidate wall materials are beryllium, tungsten and carbon based materials like CFC (carbon fibre composite). Tungsten is the most promising material for an application in the divertor region with very severe loading conditions and it will most probably also be used as PFM for DEMO. Hence, this work focuses on the investigation of the thermal shock response of different tungsten grades in order to understand the damage mechanisms and to identify material parameters which influence this behaviour under ITER and DEMO relevant operation conditions. Therefore the microstructure and the mechanical and thermal properties of five industrially manufactured tungsten grades were characterised. All five tungsten grades were exposed to transient thermal events with very high power densities of up to 1.27 GWm -2 at varying base temperatures between RT and 600 C in the electron beam device JUDITH 1. The pulse numbers were limited to a maximum of 1000 in order to avoid immoderate workload on the test facility and to have enough time to cover a wide range of loading conditions. The results of this damage mapping enable to define different damage and cracking thresholds for the investigated tungsten grades and to identify certain material parameters which influence the location of these thresholds and the distinction of the induced damages

  5. Manufacturing tungsten monocrystal tubes by electro-spark machining and study of machined surface structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdukarimov, Eh.T.; Ismailov, L.R.; Krakhmalev, V.A.; Fershtat, L.N.

    1981-01-01

    A technique to manufacture tubes from tungsten monocrystals with low consumption of electrodes has been developed. Regimes of obtaining deep and through holes of different diameters with the productivity of 1 mm/min and with the minimum deviation from cylindrical shape are worked out using a specially designed electric pulse installation. X-ray and metallographical analyses have shown that as a result of electrospark machining a cold hardened layer is formed up to hundreds micrometers thick, pierced by the network of microcracks. Simultaneous use of electrospark and electrochemical machining permitted to manufacture tubes from tungsten monocrystals with non-distorted monocrystal surface and without a network of microcracks

  6. Thermodynamics of the hydrogen-carbon-oxygen-tungsten system, as applied to the manufacture of tungsten and tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenke, G.K.

    2001-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the quaternary hydrogen-carbon oxygen-tungsten system and its binary and ternary sub-systems are reviewed. Published thermodynamic data are evaluated, and expression for free energies of formation are chosen. These expressions are integrated with and equilibrium-calculating algorithm, producing a powerful tool for understanding and improving the manufacture of tungsten and tungsten carbide. Three examples are presented: reduction/carburization of tungstic oxide with hydrogen, carbon, and methane. (author)

  7. Hydrogen and helium trapping in tungsten deposition layers formed by RF plasma sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazunari Katayama; Kazumi Imaoka; Takayuki Okamura; Masabumi Nishikawa

    2006-01-01

    Understanding of tritium behavior in plasma facing materials is an important issue for fusion reactor from viewpoints of fuel control and radiation safety. Tungsten is used as a plasma facing material in the divertor region of ITER. However, investigation of hydrogen isotope behavior in tungsten deposition layer is not sufficient so far. It is also necessary to evaluate an effect of helium on a formation of deposition layer and an accumulation of hydrogen isotopes because helium generated by fusion reaction exists in fusion plasma. In this study, tungsten deposition layers were formed by sputtering method using hydrogen and helium RF plasma. An erosion rate and a deposition rate of tungsten were estimated by weight measurement. Hydrogen and helium retention were investigated by thermal desorption method. Tungsten deposition was performed using a capacitively-coupled RF plasma device equipped with parallel-plate electrodes. A tungsten target was mounted on one electrode which is supplied with RF power at 200 W. Tungsten substrates were mounted on the other electrode which is at ground potential. The plasma discharge was continued for 120 hours where pressure of hydrogen or helium was controlled to be 10 Pa. The amounts of hydrogen and helium released from deposition layers was quantified by a gas chromatograph. The erosion rate of target tungsten under helium plasma was estimated to be 1.8 times larger than that under hydrogen plasma. The deposition rate on tungsten substrate under helium plasma was estimated to be 4.1 times larger than that under hydrogen plasma. Atomic ratio of hydrogen to tungsten in a deposition layer formed by hydrogen plasma was estimated to be 0.17 by heating to 600 o C. From a deposition layer formed by helium plasma, not only helium but also hydrogen was released by heating to 500 o C. Atomic ratios of helium and hydrogen to tungsten were estimated to be 0.080 and 0.075, respectively. The trapped hydrogen is probably impurity hydrogen

  8. Simulations of tungsten, tungsten-coated and tungsten-doped targets at low KrF laser intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombant, D.; Klapisch, M.; Lehecka, T.; Seely, J.; Schmitt, A.; Obenschain, S.

    1998-11-01

    High-Z coatings can be used to create X-rays to preheat the ablator, thus reducing the laser imprint and the R-T instability. Targets with tungsten coated on the surface or mixed with CH have recently been irradiated using Nike at intensities of a few 10^12W/cm^2, typical of the foot of a laser fusion pulse. The present simulations in 1D have been carried out to provide an interpretation of these experiments and to validate the code for radiation-preheated target designs(S. E. Bodner et al., Phys. Plasmas, 5, 1901 (1998).). All computations were performed in non-LTE(M. Busquet, Phys. Fluids B, 5, 4191 (1993); M. Klapisch, A. Bar-Shalom, J. Oreg and D. Colombant, Phys. Plasmas, 5, 1919 (1998).). Low resolution X-ray spectra obtained from on-line computations are compared to time-integrated experimental spectra between 100 eV and 500 eV. Agreements and differences between computations and experiments will be discussed.

  9. Thermal shock tests to qualify different tungsten grades as plasma facing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, M.; Linke, J.; Loewenhoff, Th; Pintsuk, G.; Uytdenhouwen, I.

    2016-02-01

    The electron beam device JUDITH 1 was used to establish a testing procedure for the qualification of tungsten as plasma facing material. Absorbed power densities of 0.19 and 0.38 GW m-2 for an edge localized mode-like pulse duration of 1 ms were chosen. Furthermore, base temperatures of room temperature, 400 °C and 1000 °C allow investigating the thermal shock performance in the brittle, ductile and high temperature regime. Finally, applying 100 pulses under all mentioned conditions helps qualifying the general damage behaviour while with 1000 pulses for the higher power density the influence of thermal fatigue is addressed. The investigated reference material is a tungsten product produced according to the ITER material specifications. The obtained results provide a general overview of the damage behaviour with quantified damage characteristics and thresholds. In particular, it is shown that the damage strongly depends on the microstructure and related thermo-mechanical properties.

  10. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications – Joining of tungsten foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, Jens, E-mail: jens.reiser@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP) (Germany); Rieth, Michael; Möslang, Anton; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Jan [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP) (Germany); Mrotzek, Tobias; Hoffmann, Andreas [PLANSEE SE, Reutte (Austria); Armstrong, D.E.J.; Yi, Xiaoou [University of Oxford, Department of Materials (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    This paper is the fourth in our series on tungsten laminates. The aim of this paper is to discuss laminate synthesis, meaning the joining of tungsten foils. It is obvious that the properties of the tungsten laminate strongly depend on the combination of (i) interlayer and (ii) joining technology, as this combination defines (i) the condition of the tungsten foil after joining (as-received or recrystallised) as well as (ii) the characteristics of the interface between the tungsten foil and the interlayer (wettability or diffusion leading to a solid solution or the formation of intermetallics). From the example of tungsten laminates joined by brazing with (i) an eutectic silver copper brazing filler, (ii) copper, (iii) titanium, and (iv) zirconium, the microstructure will be discussed, with special focus on the interface. Based on our assumptions of the mechanism of the extraordinary ductility of tungsten foil we present three syntheses strategies and make recommendations for the synthesis of high temperature tungsten laminates.

  11. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications - Joining of tungsten foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Jens; Rieth, Michael; Möslang, Anton; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Jan; Mrotzek, Tobias; Hoffmann, Andreas; Armstrong, D. E. J.; Yi, Xiaoou

    2013-05-01

    This paper is the fourth in our series on tungsten laminates. The aim of this paper is to discuss laminate synthesis, meaning the joining of tungsten foils. It is obvious that the properties of the tungsten laminate strongly depend on the combination of (i) interlayer and (ii) joining technology, as this combination defines (i) the condition of the tungsten foil after joining (as-received or recrystallised) as well as (ii) the characteristics of the interface between the tungsten foil and the interlayer (wettability or diffusion leading to a solid solution or the formation of intermetallics). From the example of tungsten laminates joined by brazing with (i) an eutectic silver copper brazing filler, (ii) copper, (iii) titanium, and (iv) zirconium, the microstructure will be discussed, with special focus on the interface. Based on our assumptions of the mechanism of the extraordinary ductility of tungsten foil we present three syntheses strategies and make recommendations for the synthesis of high temperature tungsten laminates.

  12. Quasi physisorptive two dimensional tungsten oxide nanosheets with extraordinary sensitivity and selectivity to NO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Hareem; Zavabeti, Ali; Wang, Yichao; Harrison, Christopher J; Carey, Benjamin J; Mohiuddin, Md; Chrimes, Adam F; De Castro, Isabela Alves; Zhang, Bao Yue; Sabri, Ylias M; Bhargava, Suresh K; Ou, Jian Zhen; Daeneke, Torben; Russo, Salvy P; Li, Yongxiang; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2017-12-14

    Attributing to their distinct thickness and surface dependent physicochemical properties, two dimensional (2D) nanostructures have become an area of increasing interest for interfacial interactions. Effectively, properties such as high surface-to-volume ratio, modulated surface activities and increased control of oxygen vacancies make these types of materials particularly suitable for gas-sensing applications. This work reports a facile wet-chemical synthesis of 2D tungsten oxide nanosheets by sonication of tungsten particles in an acidic environment and thermal annealing thereafter. The resultant product of large nanosheets with intrinsic substoichiometric properties is shown to be highly sensitive and selective to nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) gas, which is a major pollutant. The strong synergy between polar NO 2 molecules and tungsten oxide surface and also abundance of active surface sites on the nanosheets for molecule interactions contribute to the exceptionally sensitive and selective response. An extraordinary response factor of ∼30 is demonstrated to ultralow 40 parts per billion (ppb) NO 2 at a relatively low operating temperature of 150 °C, within the physisorption temperature band for tungsten oxide. Selectivity to NO 2 is demonstrated and the theory behind it is discussed. The structural, morphological and compositional characteristics of the synthesised and annealed materials are extensively characterised and electronic band structures are proposed. The demonstrated 2D tungsten oxide based sensing device holds the greatest promise for producing future commercial low-cost, sensitive and selective NO 2 gas sensors.

  13. Influence of surrounding gas, composition and pressure on plasma plume dynamics of nanosecond pulsed laser-induced aluminum plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud S. Dawood

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present a comprehensive study of the plume dynamics of plasmas generated by laser ablation of an aluminum target. The effect of both ambient gas composition (helium, nitrogen or argon and pressure (from ∼5 × 10−7 Torr up to atmosphere is studied. The time- and space- resolved observation of the plasma plume are performed from spectrally integrated images using an intensified Charge Coupled Device (iCCD camera. The iCCD images show that the ambient gas does not significantly influence the plume as long as the gas pressure is lower than 20 Torr and the time delay below 300 ns. However, for pressures higher than 20 Torr, the effect of the ambient gas becomes important, the shortest plasma plume length being observed when the gas mass species is highest. On the other hand, space- and time- resolved emission spectroscopy of aluminum ions at λ = 281.6 nm are used to determine the Time-Of-Flight (TOF profiles. The effect of the ambient gas on the TOF profiles and therefore on the propagation velocity of Al ions is discussed. A correlation between the plasma plume expansion velocity deduced from the iCCD images and that estimated from the TOF profiles is presented. The observed differences are attributed mainly to the different physical mechanisms governing the two diagnostic techniques.

  14. Development and characterisation of a tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesch, Johann

    2012-01-01

    In tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten, tungsten wire is combined with a tungsten matrix. The outstanding ductility of the fibres and extrinsic mechanisms of energy dissipation lead to an intense toughening. With extensive analytical and experimental investigations a manufacturing method based on chemical vapour infiltration is developed and first material is produced. The toughening mechanisms are shown by means of sophisticated mechanical experiments i.a. X-ray microtomography.

  15. Potentiometric determination of the tungsten content of tantalum-tungsten alloys with chromium II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavra, Z.; Ronen, S.; Levin, R.

    1977-05-01

    A method was developed for the potentiometric determination of the tungsten content of tantalum-tungsten alloys of different compositions. These were dissolved under conditions that enabled the tungsten content to be determined with chromium (II). Phosphoric acid was selected as a suitable complexing agent for the prevention of the precipitation of tungsten and tantalum compounds. The use of chromium (II) required an oxygen-tight system and therefore the work was carried out in suitable vessels for storage and tritation

  16. Effect of continuous and pulsed currents on microstructural evolution of stainless steel joined by TIG welding; Einfluss des Einsatzes von Dauerstrom und Impulsstrom auf die Mikrostrukturentwicklung bei durch das WIG-Schweissverfahren gefuegtem rostfreiem Stahl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durgutlu, Ahmet; Findik, Tayfun; Guelenc, Behcet [Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering; Cevik, Bekir [Duezce Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Welding Technology; Kaya, Yakup; Kahraman, Nizamettin [Karabuek Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Manufacturing Engineering

    2015-07-01

    In this study, AISI 316L series austenitic stainless steel sheets were joined by tungsten inert gas welding method in continuous and pulsed currents. Regarding microstructural investigation and hardness values of weld metal, samples were welded to investigate the effect of current type on grain structures of weld metal. Results showed that samples welded by using pulsed current had considerable different properties compared to the samples welded by using continuous current. While the weld metals of joinings obtained by using continuous current displayed a coarse-grained and columnar structure, weld metals obtained by using pulsed current had a finer-grained structure. It was also found that hardness values of samples, which were welded with continuous and pulsed current, were quite different.

  17. Tungsten Speciation in Firing Range Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    satisfactorily, such as: which tungsten mineral phase is present in soil and to what extent is adsorption important in regu- lating soil solution concentrations... soil solution rather than discrete mineral phases. Information provided in this report will assist the following organizations in future decision...the soil solution ERDC TR-11-1 43 must affect tungsten speciation in other ways. The precipitation of soil minerals also would limit tungsten

  18. Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The French government has decided to modify the conditions of extension of local natural gas authorities to neighbouring districts. The European Union is studying the conditions of internal gas market with the objective of more open markets although considering public service requirements

  19. Effect of oxygen partial pressure on the microstructural, optical and gas sensing characterization of nanostructured Gd doped ceria thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraju P.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Microstructural properties of 10 mol% gadolinium doped ceria (CeO2 thin films that were deposited on quartz substrate at substrate temperature of 1023 K by using pulsed laser deposition with different oxygen partial pressures in the range of 50–200 mTorr. The influence of oxygen partial pressure on microstructural, morphological, optical and gas sensing characterization of the thin films was systematically studied. The microstructure of the thin films was investigated using X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Morphological studies have been carried out using scanning electron microscope. The experimental results confirmed that the films were polycrystalline in nature with cubic fluorite structure. Optical properties of the thin films were examined using UV–vis spectrophotometer. The optical band gap calculated from Tauc’s relation. Gas sensing characterization has been carried at different operating temperatures (room temperature to 523 K for acetone gas. Response and recovery times of the sensor were calculated using transient response plot.

  20. Development of microheaters for gas sensor with an AT-Mega 8535 temperature controller using a PWM (pulse width modulation) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megayanti, Meti; Panatarani, Camellia; Joni, I. Made

    2016-03-01

    Microheater is the main component in gas sensor characterized by their sensitivity, selectivity, and time response of gas sensor which is depend on the microheater temperature stability. A Cu microheater was developed and utilized AT-Mega 8535 controller using a PWM (pulse width modulation) method. This control system is interfaced to the PC to observe the real time temperature response of the microheater. Three initial resistance (R0) variations of microheater were developed in an open loop control system. The power characteristic of designed microheater depends on the specified microheater initial resistance. The smaller R0, the less power required to reach a temperature setting value. The developed microheater was designed to reach a temperature setting value of 250°C having resistance 0.531 Ω for 1.979 Watt and 0.265 Ω for 1.072 Watt respectively. The results of the investigation on the control performances shows microheater-control system achieved operating temperature up to 250°C. The response of the temperature control shows smallest R0 resulted in a high stability with short settling time, short delay time and small ripple for temperature setting values higher than 150°C. The obtained error of microheater temperature with R0 = 0.265 is 8.596 %. It is concluded that the developed microheater can be utilized as a component of a gas sensor.

  1. Development of microheaters for gas sensor with an AT-Mega 8535 temperature controller using a PWM (pulse width modulation) method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megayanti, Meti; Panatarani, Camellia; Joni, I. Made, E-mail: imadejoni@phys.unpad.ac.id [Instrumentation System and Functional Material Processing Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Padjadjaran Jalan Raya Bandung-Sumedang KM 21, Jatinangor 45363, West Java (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Microheater is the main component in gas sensor characterized by their sensitivity, selectivity, and time response of gas sensor which is depend on the microheater temperature stability. A Cu microheater was developed and utilized AT-Mega 8535 controller using a PWM (pulse width modulation) method. This control system is interfaced to the PC to observe the real time temperature response of the microheater. Three initial resistance (R0) variations of microheater were developed in an open loop control system. The power characteristic of designed microheater depends on the specified microheater initial resistance. The smaller R0, the less power required to reach a temperature setting value. The developed microheater was designed to reach a temperature setting value of 250°C having resistance 0.531 Ω for 1.979 Watt and 0.265 Ω for 1.072 Watt respectively. The results of the investigation on the control performances shows microheater-control system achieved operating temperature up to 250°C. The response of the temperature control shows smallest R0 resulted in a high stability with short settling time, short delay time and small ripple for temperature setting values higher than 150°C. The obtained error of microheater temperature with R0 = 0.265 is 8.596 %. It is concluded that the developed microheater can be utilized as a component of a gas sensor.

  2. Degradation mechanisms of 4-chlorophenol in a novel gas-liquid hybrid discharge reactor by pulsed high voltage system with oxygen or nitrogen bubbling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Minghua; Hao, Xiaolong; Lei, Lecheng

    2007-03-01

    The effect of gas bubbling on the removal efficiency of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) in aqueous solution has been investigated using a novel pulsed high voltage gas-liquid hybrid discharge reactor, which generates gas-phase discharge above the water surface simultaneously with the spark discharge directly in the liquid. The time for 100% of 4-CP degradation in the case of oxygen bubbling (7 min) was much shorter than that in the case of nitrogen bubbling (25 min) as plenty of hydrogen peroxide and ozone formed in oxygen atmosphere enhanced the removal efficiency of 4-CP. Except for the main similar intermediates (4-chlorocatechol, hydroquinone and 1,4-benzoquinone) produced in the both cases of oxygen and nitrogen bubbling, special intermediates (5-chloro-3-nitropyrocatechol, 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol, nitrate and nitrite ions) were produced in nitrogen atmosphere. The reaction pathway of 4-CP in the case of oxygen bubbling was oxygen/ozone attack on the radical hydroxylated derivatives of 4-CP. However, in the case of nitrogen bubbling, hydroxylation was the main reaction pathway with effect of N atom on degradation of 4-CP.

  3. Effects of fibre-form nanostructures on particle emissions from a tungsten surface in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, S.; Miyamoto, T.; Ohno, N.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of fibre-form nanostructure of a tungsten surface on both electron emission and sputtering in helium/argon plasmas are represented. Generally, a nano-fibre forest, the so-called ‘fuzz’, made of tungsten with helium gas inside is found to have the tendency of suppressing the particle emission substantially. The electron emission comes from the impact of high-energy primary electrons. In addition, a deeply biased tungsten target, which inhibits the influx of even energetic primary electrons, seems to produce an electron emission, and it may be suppressed on the way to nanostructure formation on the surface of the W target. Such an emission process is discussed here. The sputtering yield of the He-damaged tungsten surface with the fibre-form nanostructure depends on the surface morphology while the sputtering itself changes the surface morphology, so that the time evolutions of sputtering yield from the W surface with an originally well-developed nanostructure are found to show a minimum in sputtering yield, which is about a half for the fresh nanostructured tungsten and roughly one-fifth of the yield for the original flat normal tungsten surface. The surface morphology at that time is, for the first time, made clear with field emission scanning electron microscopy observation. The physical mechanism for the appearance of such a minimum in sputtering yield is discussed. (paper)

  4. Plasma exposure of different tungsten grades with plasma accelerators under ITER-relevant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhlaj, Vadym A; Garkusha, Igor E; Aksenov, Nikolay N; Byrka, Oleg V; Bazylev, Boris; Landman, Igor; Linke, Jochen; Wirtz, Marius; Malykhin, Sergey V; Pugachov, Anatoliy T; Sadowski, Marek J; Skladnik-Sadowska, Elzbieta

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of tungsten irradiation experiments performed with three plasma facilities: the QSPA Kh-50 quasi-steady-state plasma accelerator, the PPA pulsed plasma gun and the magneto-plasma compressor. Targets made of different kinds of tungsten (sintered, rolled and deformed) were irradiated with powerful plasma streams at heat fluxes relevant to edge-localized modes in ITER. The irradiated targets were analyzed and two different meshes of cracks were identified. It has been shown that the major cracks do not depend on the tungsten grade. This has been attributed to ductile-to-brittle transition effects. Meshes of inter-granular micro-cracks were detected for energy loads above the melting threshold and these were probably caused by the re-solidification process. The blister-like and cellular-like structures were observed on sample surfaces exposed to helium and hydrogen plasmas. (paper)

  5. Emission characteristics of dispenser cathodes with a fine-grained tungsten top layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, S.; Higuchi, T.; Ouchi, Y.; Uda, E.; Nakamura, O.; Sudo, T.; Koyama, K.

    1997-02-01

    In order to improve the emission stability of the Ir-coated dispenser cathode under ion bombardment, a fine-grained tungsten top layer was applied on the substrate porous tungsten plug before Ir coating. The emission characteristics were studied after being assembled in a CRT gun. Cathode current was measured under pulse operation in a range of 0.1-9% duty. Remarkable anti-ion bombardment characteristics were observed over the range of 1-6% duty. The improved cathode showed 1.5 times higher emission current than that of a conventional Ir-coated dispenser cathode at 4% duty. AES analysis showed that the recovering rates of surface Ba and O atoms after ion bombardment were 2.5 times higher. From these results it is confirmed that the Ir coated cathode with a fine-grained tungsten top layer is provided with a good tolerance against the ion bombardment.

  6. Heat load and deuterium plasma effects on SPS and WSP tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilémová Monika

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten is a prime choice for armor material in future nuclear fusion devices. For the realization of fusion, it is necessary to address issues related to the plasma–armor interactions. In this work, several types of tungsten material were studied, i.e. tungsten prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS and by water stabilized plasma spraying (WSP technique. An intended surface porosity was created in the samples to model hydrogen/helium bubbles. The samples were subjected to a laser heat loading and a radiation loading of deuterium plasma to simulate edge plasma conditions of a nuclear fusion device (power density of 108 W/cm2 and 107 W/cm2, respectively, in the pulse intervals up to 200 ns. Thermally induced changes in the morphology and the damage to the studied surfaces are described. Possible consequences for the fusion device operation are pointed out.

  7. Measuring arterial oxygenation in a high altitude field environment: comparing portable pulse oximetry with blood gas analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Elliot M; Matteucci, Michael J; Shepherd, Matthew; Barker, Matthew; Orr, Lance

    2013-06-01

    High altitude environments present unique medical treatment challenges. Medical providers often use small portable pulse oximetry devices to help guide their clinical decision making. A significant body of high altitude research is based on the use of these devices to monitor hypoxia, yet there is a paucity of evidence that these devices are accurate in these environments. We studied whether these devices perform accurately and reliably under true mountain conditions. Healthy unacclimatized active-duty military volunteers participating in mountain warfare training at 2100 m (6900 feet) above sea level were evaluated with several different pulse oximetry devices while in a cold weather, high altitude field environment and then had arterial blood gases (ABG) drawn using an i-STAT for comparison. The pulse oximeter readings were compared with the gold standard ABG readings. A total of 49 individuals completed the study. There was no statistically significant difference between any of the devices and the gold standard of ABG. The best performing device was the PalmSAT (PS) 8000SM finger probe with a mean difference of 2.17% and SD of 2.56 (95% CI, 1.42% to 2.92%). In decreasing order of performance were the PS 8000AA finger probe (mean ± SD, 2.54% ± 2.68%; 95% CI, 1.76% to 3.32%), the PS 8000Q ear probe (2.47% ± 4.36%; 95% CI, 1.21% to 3.75%), the Nonin Onyx 9500 (3.29% ± 3.12%; 95% CI, 2.39% to 4.20%), and finally the PS 8000R forehead reflectance sensor (5.15% ± 2.97%; 95% CI, 4.28% to 6.01%). Based on the results of this study, results of the newer portable pulse oximeters appear to be closely correlated to that of the ABG measurements when tested in true mountain conditions. Copyright © 2013 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimization of pulsed TIG cladding process of stellite alloy on carbon steel using RSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madadi, F., E-mail: f.madadi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafizadeh, F. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, M., E-mail: shamanian@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-01-05

    Highlights: > This study is useful to optimize the welding process variables in order to control the heat input and cooling rates such that the hardness and dilution of the clad could be estimated. > Central composite rotatable design technique with five-level, four-factor full-factorial design matrix and mathematical models was used to predict hardness and dilution of pulsed gas tungsten arc weld cladding of stellite6 on carbon steel with high accuracy. > The welding current is an effective parameter affecting heat input and melting. In this regard, it is the most important process parameter which influences the dilution. Increase welding current leads to increase in dilution percentage and vice versa. The effect of percentage on time is less important when compared to the other factors. > The results predicted by mathematical models were close to those obtained by experiments. The confirmation tests also indicated high correlation between the mentioned values. > All of the chosen pulse GTAW parameters were significant and showed a noticeable influence on clad dilution. - Abstract: Stellite 6 is a cobalt-base alloy which is resistant to wear and corrosion and retains these properties at high temperatures. The exceptional wear resistance of Stellite 6 is mainly due to the unique inherent characteristics of the hard carbides dispersed in a Co-Cr alloy matrix. In this study, pulsed tungsten inert gas (TIG) cladding process was carried out to deposit Stellite 6 on plain carbon steel plate. The beneficial effects of this cladding process are low heat input, low distortion, controlled weld bead volume, less hot cracking tendency, less absorption of gases by weld pool and better control of the fusion zone. The dilution effect is a key issue in the quality of cladded layers and, in this regard, the pulsed current tungsten inert gas (PCTIG) was performed to decrease excess heat input and melting of substrate. This paper deals with the investigation of the hardness and

  9. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurement of a small fraction of rhenium in bulk tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, D.; Ueda, Y.; Doerner, R. P.; Baldwin, M. J.; Ibano, K.

    2018-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of bulk rhenium (Re) and tungsten (W)-Re alloy has been performed using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (wavelength = 1064 nm, pulse width ∼4-6 ns, laser energy = 115 mJ). It is found that the electron temperature, Te, of laser-induced Re plasma is lower than that of W plasma, and that Te of W-Re plasma is in between Re and W plasmas. This indicates that material properties affect Te in a laser-induced plasma. For analysis of W-3.3%Re alloy, only the strongest visible Re I 488.9 nm line is found to be used because of the strong enough intensity without contamination with W lines. Using the calibration-free LIBS method, the atomic fraction of Re, cRe, is evaluated as a function of the ambient Ar gas pressure, PAr. At PAr 10 Torr due to spectral overlapping of the Re I 488.9 nm line by an Ar II 488.9 nm line.

  10. Effect of pulse parameter on preparation of W coating on V alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Fan, E-mail: jiangfan1109@163.com; Zhang, Yingchun, E-mail: zycustb@163.com; Li, Xuliang, E-mail: lixuliang0715@qq.com; Sun, Ningbo, E-mail: suningbo682@163.com; Wang, Lili, E-mail: 751083268@qq.com

    2014-06-15

    Highlights: • Tungsten coatings were electroplated on vanadium alloy by pulse plating. • The influence degree of current parameters was investigated by orthogonal experimental. • The pulse parameters affected the performance of tungsten coatings. • The effects of duty cycle on morphology were investigated. • The effects of period on morphology were investigated. - Abstract: The tungsten coatings were prepared on vanadium alloy substrate by pulse electroplating in Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}–WO{sub 3} molten salt. A series of tungsten coatings with compact and smooth morphologies were successfully obtained under various conditions. Orthogonal experimental design method was used to analysis the influence degree of current density, duty cycle and period on tungsten grain size, coatings thickness and current efficiency. The results demonstrated that current density was the most important factor influencing tungsten grain size and tungsten coatings thickness, which all had a positive correlation with current density. The pulse duty was the most important factor influencing current efficiency; the result also showed a positive correlation between current efficiency and pulse duty factor.

  11. Optical, electrical and mechanical properties of the tantalum oxynitride thin films deposited by pulsing reactive gas sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Dreo, H.; Banakh, O.; Keppner, H.; Steinmann, P.-A.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N.F. de

    2006-01-01

    Thin films of tantalum oxynitride were prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering using a Ta target and N 2 and O 2 as reactive gases. The nitrogen flow was kept constant while the oxygen flow was pulsed periodically. The film composition evolves progressively from TaO 0.25 N 1.51 to TaO 2.42 N 0.25 while increasing the oxygen pulse duty cycle without any abrupt change in the elemental content. The optical transmission spectra of the films deposited on glass show a 'blue shift' of the absorption edge with increasing oxygen content. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of all films exhibit broad peaks typical for nanocrystalline materials. Cross-section film morphology is rather featureless and surface topography is smooth exhibiting very small grains, in agreement with the results obtained by XRD. The optical properties of the films are very sensitive to their chemical composition. All films exhibit semiconducting behaviour with an optical band gap changing from 1.85 to 4.0 eV with increasing oxygen content. In order to evaluate the potential of the tantalum oxynitride films for microelectronic applications some Ta-O-N films were integrated in a MOS structure. The results of the capacitance-voltage measurements of the system Al//Ta-O-N//p-Si are discussed with respect to the chemical composition of the Ta-O-N films

  12. Investigation of Gas Heating by Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Glow Discharges Used for Actuation of a Laminar Methane-Air Flame

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna

    2017-05-24

    This paper reports on the quantification of the heating induced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) glow discharges on a lean premixed methane-air flame. The flame, obtained at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, has an M-shape morphology. The equivalence ratio is 0.95 and the thermal power released by the flame is 113 W. The NRP glow discharges are produced by high voltage pulses of 10 ns duration, 7 kV amplitude, applied at a repetition frequency of 10 kHz. The average power of the plasma, determined from current and voltage measurements, is 1 W, i.e. about 0.9 % of the thermal power of the flame. Broadband vibrational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy of nitrogen is used to determine the temperature of the flame with and without plasma enhancement. The temperature evolution in the flame area shows that the thermal impact of NRP glow discharges is in the uncertainty range of the technique, i.e., +/- 40 K.

  13. Generation of ozone by pulsed corona discharge over water surface in hybrid gas-liquid electrical discharge reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukeš, Petr; Člupek, Martin; Babický, Václav; Šunka, Pavel; Janda, V.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 3 (2005), s. 409-416 ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/02/1026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Corona discharge * hybrid reactor * ozone * water treatment Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.957, year: 2005

  14. Direct Analysis of Organic Compounds in Liquid Using a Miniature Photoionization Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer with Pulsed Carrier-Gas Capillary Inlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinqiong; Yu, Quan; Zhang, Qian; Ni, Kai; Qian, Xiang; Tang, Fei; Wang, Xiaohao

    2017-08-01

    A miniature ion trap mass spectrometer with capillary direct sampling and vacuum ultraviolet photoionization source was developed to conduct trace analysis of organic compounds in liquids. Self-aspiration sampling is available where the samples are drawn into the vacuum chamber through a capillary with an extremely low flow rate (less than 1 μL/min), which minimizes sample consumption in each analysis to tens of micrograms. A pulsed gas-assisted inlet was designed and optimized to promote sample transmission in the tube and facilitate the cooling of ions, thereby improving instrument sensitivity. A limit of detection of 2 ppb could be achieved for 2,4-dimethylaniline in a methanol solution. The sampling system described in the present study is specifically suitable for a miniature photoionization ion trap mass spectrometer that can perform rapid and online analysis for liquid samples. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Mechanism of the electrochemical hydrogen reaction on smooth tungsten carbide and tungsten electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesener, K.; Winkler, E.; Schneider, W.

    1985-01-01

    The course of the electrochemical hydrogen reaction on smooth tungsten-carbide electrodes in hydrogen saturated 2.25 M H 2 SO 4 follows a electrochemical sorption-desorption mechanism in the potential range of -0.4 to +0.1 V. At potentials greater than +0.1 V the hydrogen oxidation is controlled by a preliminary chemical sorption step. Concluding from the similar behaviour of tungsten-carbide and tungsten electrodes after cathodic pretreatment, different tungsten oxides should be involved in the course of the hydrogen reaction on tungsten carbide electrodes. (author)

  16. High excitation of the species in nitrogen–aluminum plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance microwave discharge of N2 gas and pulsed laser ablation of Al target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Peipei; Li, Yanli; Cai, Hua; You, Qinghu; Yang, Xu; Huang, Feiling; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2014-01-01

    A reactive nitrogen–aluminum plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge of N 2 gas and pulsed laser ablation of an Al target is characterized spectroscopically by time-integrated and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The vibrational and rotational temperatures of N 2 species are determined by spectral simulation. The generated plasma strongly emits radiation from a variety of excited species including ambient nitrogen and ablated aluminum and exhibits unique features in optical emission and temperature evolution compared with the plasmas generated by a pure ECR discharge or by the expansion of the ablation plume. The working N 2 gas is first excited by ECR discharge and the excitation of nitrogen is further enhanced due to the fast expansion of the aluminum plume induced by target ablation, while the excitation of the ablated aluminum is prolonged during the plume expansion in the ECR nitrogen plasma, resulting in the formation of strongly reactive nitrogen–aluminum plasma which contains highly excited species with high vibrational and rotational temperatures. The enhanced intensities and the prolonged duration of the optical emissions of the combined plasma would provide an improved analytical capability for spectrochemical analysis. - Highlights: • ECR discharge and pulsed laser ablation generate highly excited ECR–PLA plasma. • The expansion of PLA plasma results in excitation enhancement of ECR plasma species. • The ECR plasma leads to excitation prolongation of PLA plasma species. • The ECR–PLA plasma emits strong emissions from a variety of excited species. • The ECR–PLA plasma maintains high vibrational–rotational temperatures for a long time

  17. Dilution and Ferrite Number Prediction in Pulsed Current Cladding of Super-Duplex Stainless Steel Using RSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Raeissi, Keyvan

    2013-12-01

    Super-duplex stainless steels have an excellent combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance at relatively low temperatures and can be used as a coating to improve the corrosion and wear resistance of low carbon and low alloy steels. Such coatings can be produced using weld cladding. In this study, pulsed current gas tungsten arc cladding process was utilized to deposit super-duplex stainless steel on high strength low alloy steel substrates. In such claddings, it is essential to understand how the dilution affects the composition and ferrite number of super-duplex stainless steel layer in order to be able to estimate its corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In the current study, the effect of pulsed current gas tungsten arc cladding process parameters on the dilution and ferrite number of super-duplex stainless steel clad layer was investigated by applying response surface methodology. The validity of the proposed models was investigated by using quadratic regression models and analysis of variance. The results showed an inverse relationship between dilution and ferrite number. They also showed that increasing the heat input decreases the ferrite number. The proposed mathematical models are useful for predicting and controlling the ferrite number within an acceptable range for super-duplex stainless steel cladding.

  18. Effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded high strength aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan

    2007-01-01

    This paper reveals the effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded AA7075 aluminium alloy. This alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to-weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength aluminium alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW) and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. As welded joint strength is much lower than the base metal strength and hence, a simple aging treatment has been given to improve the tensile strength of the joints. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in GTA and GMA welds. In contrast, conventional continuous current welding resulted in predominantly columnar grain structures. Post weld aging treatment is accompanied by an increase in tensile strength and tensile ductility

  19. Hypervelocity impact of tungsten cubes on spaced armour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandel, Pradeep S; Sood, Dharmanshu; Kumar, Rajeev; Sharma, Prince; Sewak, Bhupinder; Bhardwaj, Vikas; Athwal, Manoj; Mangla, Vikas; Biswas, Ipsita; Singh, Manjit

    2012-01-01

    The paper summarizes the experimental observations and simulation studies of damage potential of tungsten alloy cubes on relatively thin mild steel spaced armour target plates in the velocity regime 1300 – 4000 ms −1 using Two Stage Light Gas Gun technique. The cubes of size 9.5 mm and 12 mm having mass 15 g and 30 g respectively were made to impact normally on three target plates of size 300 mm × 300 mm of thickness 4, 4 and 10 mm at 100 mm distance apart. Flash radiography has been used to image the projectile-target interaction in the nitrogen environment at 300 mbar vacuum at room temperature. The results reveal clear perforation by 9.5 mm cube in all the three target plates up to impact velocity of about 2000 m/s. While 12 mm cube can perforate the spaced armour upto impact velocity of 4000 m/s. This shows that 9.5mm tungsten alloy cube is not effective beyond 2000 m/s while 12 mm tungsten alloy cube can defeat the spaced armour upto 4000 m/s. The simulation studies have been carried out using Autodyn 3D nonlinear code using Lagrange solver at velocities 1200 – 4000 m/s. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental findings.

  20. A field ion microscope study of the surface reaction of tungsten with n-octanol under an applied positive voltage: reaction conditions for the 'splitting' of (110) plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, T.; Iwatsu, F.; Morikawa, H.

    1993-01-01

    Field ion microscopy is a powerful tool for the study of surface phenomena on an atomic scale, especially when they are crystal plane dependent, because the microscope shows many crystal planes of the sample tip simultaneously. Although a large number of FIM studies on vapor deposition, surface diffusion and surface reactions at a metal-gas interface have been reported, those on reactions at a metal-liquid interface are few. The authors have studied the corrosion or tungsten with aqueous solutions and found that water corroded the tungsten tips very severely to reduce the radius of curvature of the tip cap drastically. The reaction was so severe that it was not possible to trace it back to the very initial stages. They adopted, as a weaker reagent, one of the higher alcohols, n-octanol(C 8 H 17 OH), and found that it reacted with tungsten tips when an electrical pulse with a positive voltage between 5 and 10V was applied to the tip, giving very interesting field ion images in which the central (110) plane was divided into two parts located side by side across the [001] zone line. This means that some anisotropic surface reaction occurred which made a groove along the [001] zone line going through the (110) plane, usually the most stable plane chemically for bcc metals. They named this phenomenon 'splitting'. This reaction was less severe than that with water and some results on the morphology of the groove and on the reaction sequence have been reported. In the present paper more detailed reaction conditions which give rise to the splitting are described