WorldWideScience

Sample records for pulsed fusion reactors

  1. Pulsed fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  2. Pulse Star inertial confinement fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blink, J.A.; Hogan, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Pulse Star is a pool-type ICF reactor that emphasizes low cost and high safety levels. The reactor consists of a vacuum chamber (belljar) submerged in a compact liquid metal (Li 17 Pb 83 or lithium) pool which also contains the heat exchangers and liquid metal pumps. The shielding efficiency of the liquid metal pool is high enough to allow hands-on maintenance of (removed) pumps and heat exchangers. Liquid metal is allowed to spray through the 5.5 m radius belljar at a controlled rate, but is prohibited from the target region by a 4 m radius mesh first wall. The wetted first wall absorbs the fusion x-rays and debris while the spray region absorbs the fusion neutrons. The mesh allows vaporized liquid metal to blow through to the spray region where it can quickly cool and condense. Preliminary calculations show that a 2 m thick first wall could handle the mechanical (support, buckling, and x-ray-induced hoop) loads. Wetting and gas flow issues are in an initial investigation stage

  3. Efficient modeling for pulsed activation in inertial fusion energy reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz, J.; Yuste, P.; Reyes, S.; Latkowski, J.F.

    2000-01-01

    First structural wall material (FSW) materials in inertial fusion energy (IFE) power reactors will be irradiated under typical repetition rates of 1-10 Hz, for an operation time as long as the total reactor lifetime. The main objective of the present work is to determine whether a continuous-pulsed (CP) approach can be an efficient method in modeling the pulsed activation process for operating conditions of FSW materials. The accuracy and practicability of this method was investigated both analytically and (for reaction/decay chains of two and three nuclides) by computational simulation. It was found that CP modeling is an accurate and practical method for calculating the neutron-activation of FSW materials. Its use is recommended instead of the equivalent steady-state method or the exact pulsed modeling. Moreover, the applicability of this method to components of an IFE power plant subject to repetition rates lower than those of the FSW is still being studied. The analytical investigation was performed for 0.05 Hz, which could be typical for the coolant. Conclusions seem to be similar to those obtained for the FSW. However, further future work is needed for a final answer

  4. A system dynamics model for tritium cycle of pulsed fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Zuolong; Nie, Baojie [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Chen, Dehong, E-mail: dehong.chen@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2017-05-15

    As great challenges and uncertainty exist in achieving steady plasma burning, pulsed plasma burning may be a potential scenario for fusion engineering test reactor, even for fusion DEMOnstration reactor. In order to analyze dynamic tritium inventory and tritium self-sufficiency for pulsed fusion systems, a system dynamics model of tritium cycle was developed on the basis of earlier version of Tritium Analysis program for fusion System (TAS). The model was verified with TRIMO, which was developed by KIT in Germany. Tritium self-sufficiency and dynamic tritium inventory assessment were performed for a typical fusion engineering test reactor. The verification results show that the system dynamics model can be used for tritium cycle analysis of pulsed fusion reactor with sufficient reliability. The assessment results of tritium self-sufficiency indicate that the fusion reactor might only need several hundred gram tritium to startup if achieved high efficient tritium handling ability (Referred ITER: 1 h). And the initial tritium startup inventory in pulsed fusion reactor is determined by the combined influence of pulse length, burn availability, and tritium recycle time. Meanwhile, tritium self-sufficiency can be achieved under the defined condition.

  5. A system dynamics model for tritium cycle of pulsed fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Zuolong; Nie, Baojie; Chen, Dehong

    2017-01-01

    As great challenges and uncertainty exist in achieving steady plasma burning, pulsed plasma burning may be a potential scenario for fusion engineering test reactor, even for fusion DEMOnstration reactor. In order to analyze dynamic tritium inventory and tritium self-sufficiency for pulsed fusion systems, a system dynamics model of tritium cycle was developed on the basis of earlier version of Tritium Analysis program for fusion System (TAS). The model was verified with TRIMO, which was developed by KIT in Germany. Tritium self-sufficiency and dynamic tritium inventory assessment were performed for a typical fusion engineering test reactor. The verification results show that the system dynamics model can be used for tritium cycle analysis of pulsed fusion reactor with sufficient reliability. The assessment results of tritium self-sufficiency indicate that the fusion reactor might only need several hundred gram tritium to startup if achieved high efficient tritium handling ability (Referred ITER: 1 h). And the initial tritium startup inventory in pulsed fusion reactor is determined by the combined influence of pulse length, burn availability, and tritium recycle time. Meanwhile, tritium self-sufficiency can be achieved under the defined condition.

  6. Public acceptance of fusion energy and scientific feasibility of a fusion reactor. Design of inductively driven long pulse tokamak reactors: IDLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yuichi

    1998-01-01

    Based on scientific data based adopted for designing ITER plasmas and on the advancement of fusion nuclear technology from the recent R and D program, the scientific feasibility of inductively-driven tokamak fusion reactors is studied. A low wall-loading DEMO fusion reactor is designed, which utilizes an austenitic stainless steel in conjunction with significant data bases and operating experiences, since we have given high priority to the early and reliable realization of a tokamak fusion plasma over the cost performance. Since the DEMO reactor with the relatively large volume (i.e., major radius of 10 m) is employed, plasma ignition is achievable with a low fusion power of 0.8 GW, and an operation period of 4 - 5 hours is available only with inductive current drive. Disadvantages of pulsed operation in commercial fusion reactors include fatigue in structural materials and the necessity of an energy storage system to compensate the electric power during the dwell time. To overcome these disadvantages, a pulse length is prolonged up to about 10 hours, resulting in the remarkable reduction of the total cycle number to 10 4 during the life of the fusion plant. (author)

  7. Heat pulse propagation studies on DIII-D and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Austin, M. E.; Groebner, R.; Manickam, J.; Rice, B.; Schmidt, G.; Snider, R.

    2000-12-01

    Sawtooth phenomena have been studied on DIII-D and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [D. Meade and the TFTR Group, in Proceedings of the International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion, Washington, DC, 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 1, pp. 9-24]. In the experiments the sawtooth characteristics were studied with fast electron temperature (ECE) and soft x-ray diagnostics. For the first time, measurements of a strong ballistic electron heat pulse were made in a shaped tokamak (DIII-D) [J. Luxon and DIII-D Group, in Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Kyoto (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 159] and the "ballistic effect" was stronger than was previously reported on TFTR. Evidence is presented in this paper that the ballistic effect is related to the fast growth phase of the sawtooth precursor. Fast, 2 ms interval, measurements on DIII-D were made of the ion temperature evolution following sawteeth and partial sawteeth to document the ion heat pulse characteristics. It is found that the ion heat pulse does not exhibit the very fast, "ballistic" behavior seen for the electrons. Further, for the first time it is shown that the electron heat pulses from partial sawtooth crashes (on DIII-D and TFTR) are seen to propagate at speeds close to those expected from the power balance calculations of the thermal diffusivities whereas heat pulses from fishbones propagate at rates more consistent with sawtooth induced heat pulses. These results suggest that the fast propagation of sawtooth-induced heat pulses is not a feature of nonlinear transport models, but that magnetohydrodynamic events can have a strong effect on electron thermal transport.

  8. Nonperturbative measurement of the local magnetic field using pulsed polarimetry for fusion reactor conditions (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    A novel diagnostic technique for the remote and nonperturbative sensing of the local magnetic field in reactor relevant plasmas is presented. Pulsed polarimetry [Patent No. 12/150,169 (pending)] combines optical scattering with the Faraday effect. The polarimetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR)-like diagnostic has the potential to be a local B pol diagnostic on ITER and can achieve spatial resolutions of millimeters on high energy density (HED) plasmas using existing lasers. The pulsed polarimetry method is based on nonlocal measurements and subtle effects are introduced that are not present in either cw polarimetry or Thomson scattering LIDAR. Important features include the capability of simultaneously measuring local T e , n e , and B || along the line of sight, a resiliency to refractive effects, a short measurement duration providing near instantaneous data in time, and location for real-time feedback and control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and the realization of a widely applicable internal magnetic field diagnostic for the magnetic fusion energy program. The technique improves for higher n e B || product and higher n e and is well suited for diagnosing the transient plasmas in the HED program. Larger devices such as ITER and DEMO are also better suited to the technique, allowing longer pulse lengths and thereby relaxing key technology constraints making pulsed polarimetry a valuable asset for next step devices. The pulsed polarimetry technique is clarified by way of illustration on the ITER tokamak and plasmas within the magnetized target fusion program within present technological means.

  9. Nonperturbative measurement of the local magnetic field using pulsed polarimetry for fusion reactor conditions (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger J

    2008-10-01

    A novel diagnostic technique for the remote and nonperturbative sensing of the local magnetic field in reactor relevant plasmas is presented. Pulsed polarimetry [Patent No. 12/150,169 (pending)] combines optical scattering with the Faraday effect. The polarimetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR)-like diagnostic has the potential to be a local B(pol) diagnostic on ITER and can achieve spatial resolutions of millimeters on high energy density (HED) plasmas using existing lasers. The pulsed polarimetry method is based on nonlocal measurements and subtle effects are introduced that are not present in either cw polarimetry or Thomson scattering LIDAR. Important features include the capability of simultaneously measuring local T(e), n(e), and B(parallel) along the line of sight, a resiliency to refractive effects, a short measurement duration providing near instantaneous data in time, and location for real-time feedback and control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and the realization of a widely applicable internal magnetic field diagnostic for the magnetic fusion energy program. The technique improves for higher n(e)B(parallel) product and higher n(e) and is well suited for diagnosing the transient plasmas in the HED program. Larger devices such as ITER and DEMO are also better suited to the technique, allowing longer pulse lengths and thereby relaxing key technology constraints making pulsed polarimetry a valuable asset for next step devices. The pulsed polarimetry technique is clarified by way of illustration on the ITER tokamak and plasmas within the magnetized target fusion program within present technological means.

  10. Pulse*Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor: heat transfer loop and balance of plant considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, M.W.; Murray, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual heat transfer loop and balance of plant design for the Pulse*Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor has been investigated and results are presented. The Pulse*Star reaction vessel, a perforated steel bell jar approximately 11 m in diameter, is immersed in Li 17 Pb 83 coolant which flows through the perforations and forms a 1.5 m thick plenum of droplets around an 8 m diameter inner chamber. The reactor and associated pumps, piping, and steam generators are contained within a 17 m diameter pool of Li 17 Pb 83 coolant to minimize structural requirements and occupied space, resulting in reduced cost. Four parallel heat transfer loops with flow rates of 5.5 m 3 /s each are necessary to transfer 3300 MWt of power. The steam generator design was optimized by finding the most cost-effective combination of heat exchanger area and pumping power. Power balance calculations based on an improved electrical conversion efficiency revealed a net electrical output of 1260 MWe to the bus bar and a resulting net efficiency of 39%. Suggested balance-of-plant layouts are also presented

  11. Heat transfer in the lithium-cooled blanket of a pulsed fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cort, G.E.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    The transient temperature distribution in the lithium-cooled blanket of a pulsed fusion reactor has been calculated using a finite-element heat-conduction computer program. An auxiliary program was used to predict the coolant transient velocity in a network of parallel and series flow passages with constant driving pressure and varying magnetic field. The coolant velocity was calculated by a Runge-Kutta numerical integration of the conservation equations. The lithium coolant was part of the finite-element heat-conduction mesh with the velocity terms included in the total matrix. The matrix was solved implicitly at each time step for the nodal point temperatures. Slug flow was assumed in the coolant passages and the Boussinesq analogy was used to calculate turbulent heat transfer when the magnetic field was not present

  12. Development of dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of fusion reactor. 1. Single pulse operation simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Isao; Seki, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Sasaki, Makoto; Shintani, Kiyonori; Kim, Yeong-Chan

    1997-11-01

    A dynamic simulation code for the fuel cycle of a fusion experimental reactor has been developed. The code follows the fuel inventory change with time in the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system during a single pulse operation. The time dependence of the fuel inventory distribution is evaluated considering the fuel burn and exhaust in the plasma chamber, purification and supply functions. For each subsystem of the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system, the fuel inventory equation is written based on the equation of state considering the function of fuel burn, exhaust, purification, and supply. The processing constants of subsystem for the steady states were taken from the values in the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) report. Using the code, the time dependence of the fuel supply and inventory depending on the burn state and subsystem processing functions are shown. (author)

  13. Pulse Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor: Heat transfer loop and balance-of-plant considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, M.W.; Blink, J.A.; Curlander, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual heat transfer loop and balance-of-plant design for the Pulse Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor has been investigated and the results are presented. The Pulse Star reaction vessel, a perforated steel bell jar about11 m in diameter, is immersed in Li 17 Pb 83 coolant, which flows through the perforations and forms a 1.5-m-thick plenum of droplets around a 8-m-diameter inner chamber. The bell jar and associated pumps, piping, and steam generators are contained within a 17-m-diameter pool of Li 17 Pb 83 coolant to minimize structural requirements and occupied space, resulting in reduced cost. Four parallel heat transfer loops, each with a flow rate of 5.5 m 3 /s, are necessary to transfer 3300 MWt of power. Liquid metal is pumped to the top of the pool, where it flows downward through eight vertical steam generators. Double-walled tubes are used in the steam generators to assure tritium containment without intermediate heat transfer loops. Each pump is a mixed flow type and has a required NPSH of 3.4 m, a speed of 278 rpm, and an impeller diameter of 1.2 m. The steam generator design was optimized by finding the most cost-effective combination of heat exchanger area and pumping power. The design minimizes the total cost (heat exchanger area plus pumping) for the plant lifetime. The power required for the pumps is 36 MWe. Each resulting steam generator is 12 m high and 1.6 m in diameter, with 2360 tubes. The steam generators and pumps fit easily in the pool between the reactor chamber and the pool wall

  14. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The results of nuclear fusion researches in JAERI are summarized. In this report, following themes are collected: the concept of fusion reactor (including ITER), fusion reactor safety, plasma confinement, fusion reactor equipment, and so on. Includes glossary. (J.P.N.)

  15. Fusion reactor design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the ARIES tokamak: systems; plasma power balance; impurity control and fusion ash removal; fusion product ripple loss; energy conversion; reactor fueling; first wall design; shield design; reactor safety; and fuel cost and resources

  16. Fusion reactors - types - problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitter, K.H.

    1979-07-01

    A short account is given of the principles of fusion reactions and of the expected advantages of fusion reactors. Descriptions are presented of various Tokamak experimental devices being developed in a number of countries and of some mirror machines. The technical obstacles to be overcome before a fusion reactor could be self-supporting are discussed. (U.K.)

  17. Transient temperature response of in-vessel components due to pulsed operation in tokamak fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Akio; Tone, Tatsuzo

    1985-12-01

    A transient temperature response of the in-vessel components (first wall, blanket, divertor/limiter and shielding) surrounding plasma in Tokamak Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) has been analysed. Transient heat load during start up/shut down and pulsed operation cycles causes the transient temperature response in those components. The fatigue lifetime of those components significantly depends upon the resulting cyclic thermal stress. The burn time affects the temperature control in the solid breeder (Li 2 O) and also affects the thermo-mechanical design of the blanket and shielding which are constructed with thick structure. In this report, results of the transient temperature response obtained by the heat transfer and conduction analyses for various pulsed operation scenarios (start up, shut down, burn and dwell times) have been investigated in view of thermo-mechanical design of the in-vessel components. (author)

  18. The fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, M.H.

    1974-01-01

    Basic principles of the fusion reactor are outlined. Plasma heating and confinement schemes are described. These confinement systems include the linear Z pinch, magnetic mirrors and Tokamaks. A fusion reactor is described and a discussion is given of its environmental impact and its fuel situation. (R.L.)

  19. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Conceptual design studies were made of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror-confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid and a small pilot-plant hybrid based on standard mirror confinement. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000-MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single-cell pilot plant

  20. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Moir, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    We have carried out conceptual design studies of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fission fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid based on standard mirror confinement, and also a small pilot plant hybrid. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000 MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single cell pilot plant

  1. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed

  2. Pulsed power for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.H.

    1976-01-01

    A review which traces the development of high power pulsed accelerators from the original inception at the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment, Aldermaston, England, for Bremsstrahlung output, through the low impedance accelerators, to the double-sided accelerators for fusion will be given. Proto II is presently being assembled at Sandia and preliminary testing on the Marx has been completed. Examples of various techniques will be shown from Sandia accelerators. Requirements for accelerators capable of achieving fusion levels will be developed and problem areas outlined. The diode insulator flashover problem presently limits the maximum current available from the accelerators

  3. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components during and after irradiation. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; and the study of dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are discussed

  4. Materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Kaletta, D.

    1978-03-01

    The following report describes five papers which were given during the IMF seminar series summer 1977. The purpose of this series was to discuss especially the irradiation behaviour of materials intended for the first wall of future fusion reactors. The first paper deals with the basic understanding of plasma physics relating to the fusion reactor and presents the current state of art of fusion technology. The next two talks discuss the metals intended for the first wall and structural components of a fusion reactor. Since 14 MeV neutrons play an important part in the process of irradiation damage their role is discussed in detail. The question which machines are presently available to simulate irradiation damage under conditions similar to the ones found in a fusion reactor are investigated in the fourth talk which also presents the limitations of the different methods of simulation. In this context also discussed is the importance future intensive neutron sources and materials test reactors will have for this problem area. The closing paper has as a theme the review of the present status of research of metallic and non-metallic materials in view of the quite different requirements for different fusion systems; a closing topic is the world supply on rare materials required for fusion reactors. (orig) [de

  5. Possible fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1976-05-01

    A scheme to improve performance characteristics of a tokamak-type fusion reactor is proposed. Basically, the tokamak-type plasma could be moved around so that the plasma could be heated by compression, brought to the region where the blanket surrounds the plasma, and moved so as to keep wall loading below the acceptable limit. This idea should be able to help to economize a fusion reactor

  6. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are briefly discussed: (1) surface blistering studies on fusion reactor materials, (2) TFTR design support activities, (3) analysis of samples bombarded in-situ in PLT, (4) chemical sputtering effects, (5) modeling of surface behavior, (6) ion migration in glow discharge tube cathodes, (7) alloy development for irradiation performance, (8) dosimetry and damage analysis, and (9) development of tritium migration in fusion devices and reactors

  7. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, V.K.; Scholz, R.; Nolfi, F.V. Jr.; Turner, A.P.L.

    1980-01-01

    Data are given for each of the following areas: (1) effects of irradiation on fusion reactor materials, (2) hydrogen permeation and materials behavior in alloys, (3) carbon coatings for fusion applications, (4) surface damage of TiB 2 coatings under energetic D + and 4 He + irradiations, and (5) neutron dosimetry

  8. Fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    Nuclear fusion could soon become a viable energy source. Work in plasma physics, fusion technology and fusion safety is progressing rapidly in a number of Member States and international collaboration continues on work aiming at the demonstration of fusion power generation. Safety of fusion reactors and technological and radiological aspects of waste management are important aspects in the development and design of fusion machines. In order to provide an international forum to review and discuss the status and the progress made since 1983 in programmes related to operational safety aspects of fusion reactors, their waste management and decommissioning concepts, the IAEA had organized the Technical Committee on ''Fusion Reactor Safety'' in Culham, 3-7 November 1986. All presentations of this meeting were divided into four sessions: 1. Statements on National-International Fusion Safety Programmes (5 papers); 2. Operation and System Safety (15 papers); 3. Waste Management and Decommissioning (5 papers); 4. Environmental Impacts (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 31 papers. Refs, figs, tabs

  9. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Burn, G.L.; Knee', S.S.; Dowker, C.L.

    1994-02-01

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  10. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  11. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed.

  12. Fusion reactor radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaser, J.D.; Postma, A.K.; Bradley, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Quantities and compositions of non-tritium radioactive waste are estimated for some current conceptual fusion reactor designs, and disposal of large amounts of radioactive waste appears necessary. Although the initial radioactivity of fusion reactor and fission reactor wastes are comparable, the radionuclides in fusion reactor wastes are less hazardous and have shorter half-lives. Areas requiring further research are discussed

  13. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2000-01-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on fusion reactor materials includes: (1) the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation (including steels, inconel, molybdenum, chromium); (2) the determination and modelling of the characteristics of irradiated first wall materials such as beryllium; (3) the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; (4) the study of the dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors.; (5) a feasibility study for the testing of blanket modules under neutron radiation. Main achievements in these topical areas in the year 1999 are summarised

  14. Small mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Schultz, K.R.; Smith, A.C. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Basic requirements for the pilot plants are that they produce a net product and that they have a potential for commercial upgrade. We have investigated a small standard mirror fusion-fission hybrid, a two-component tandem mirror hybrid, and two versions of a field-reversed mirror fusion reactor--one a steady state, single cell reactor with a neutral beam-sustained plasma, the other a moving ring field-reversed mirror where the plasma passes through a reaction chamber with no energy addition

  15. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2000-07-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on fusion reactor materials includes: (1) the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation (including steels, inconel, molybdenum, chromium); (2) the determination and modelling of the characteristics of irradiated first wall materials such as beryllium; (3) the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; (4) the study of the dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors.; (5) a feasibility study for the testing of blanket modules under neutron radiation. Main achievements in these topical areas in the year 1999 are summarised.

  16. Radioactivity computation of steady-state and pulsed fusion reactors operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaya, H.

    1994-06-01

    Different mathematical methods are used to calculate the nuclear transmutation in steady-state and pulsed neutron irradiation. These methods are the Schuer decomposition, the eigenvector decomposition, and the Pade approximation of the matrix exponential function. In the case of the linear decay chain approximation, a simple algorithm is used to evaluate the transition matrices

  17. Fusion reactor development: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This paper is a review of the current prospects for fusion reactor development based upon the present status in plasma physics research, fusion technology development and reactor conceptual design for the tokamak magnetic confinement concept. Recent advances in tokamak plasma research and fusion technology development are summarized. The direction and conclusions of tokamak reactor conceptual design are discussed. The status of alternate magnetic confinement concept research is reviewed briefly. A feasible timetable for the development of fusion reactors is presented

  18. Radioactivity computation of steady-state and pulsed fusion reactors operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaya, H.

    1994-11-01

    The International Thermonuclear Report (ITER) is expected to operate in a pulsed operational mode. Accurate radioactivity calculations, that take into account this mode of operation, are required in order to determine precisely the different safety aspects of ITER. The authors previous examined analytically the effect of pulsed operation in ITER and showed how it depends on the burn time, the dwell time, and the half-lives. That analysis showed also that for ITER's low duty factor, using the continuous operation assumption would considerably overestimate the radioactivities, for a wide range of half-lives. At the same time, the large improvements in the quality and the quantity of the decay and the cross-section data libraries has considerably increased the computation times of the radioactivity calculations. For both reasons it is imperative to seek different methods of solution that reduce the computational time and can be easily adopted to the treatment of the pulsed operation. In this work, they have developed algorithms based on several mathematical methods that were chosen based on their generality, reliability, stability, accuracy, and efficiency. These methods are the matrix Schuer decomposition, the eigenvector decomposition, and the Pade approximation for the matrix exponential functions

  19. Fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  20. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics

  1. Fusion reactor wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    The fusion reactor currently is being developed as a clean source of electricity with an essentially infinite source of fuel. These reactors are visualized as using a fusion reaction to generate large quantities of high temperature energy which can be used as process heat or for the generation of electricity. The energy would be created primarily as the kinetic energy of neutrons or other reaction products. Neutron energy could be converted to high-temperature heat by moderation and capture of the neutrons. The energy of other reaction products could be converted to high-temperature heat by capture, or directly to electricity by direct conversion electrostatic equipment. An analysis to determine the wastes released as a result of operation of fusion power plants is presented

  2. Conceptual design of a 20 Tesla pulsed solenoid for a laser solenoid fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, J.J.; Averill, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    Design considerations are described for a strip wound solenoid which is pulsed to 20 tesla while immersed in a 20 tesla bias field so as to achieve within the bore of the pulsed solenoid at net field sequence starting at 20 tesla and going first down to zero, then up to 40 tesla, and finally back to 20 tesla in a period of about 5 x 10 -3 seconds. The important parameters of the solenoid, e.g., aperture, build, turns, stored and dissipated energy, field intensity and powering circuit, are given. A numerical example for a specific design is presented. Mechanical stresses in the solenoid and the subsequent choice of materials for coil construction are discussed. Although several possible design difficulties are not discussed in this preliminary report of a conceptual magnet design, such as uniformity of field, long-term stability of insulation under neutron bombardment and choice of structural materials of appropriate tensile strength and elasticity to withstand magnetic forces developed, these questions are addressed in detail in the complete design report and in part in reference one. Furthermore, the authors feel that the problems encountered in this conceptual design are surmountable and are not a hindrance to the construction of such a magnet system

  3. Fusion reactor problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruthers, R.

    It is pointed out that plasma parameters for a fusion reactor have been fairly accurately defined for many years, and the real plasma physics objective must be to find the means of achieving and maintaining these specifiable parameters. There is good understanding of the generic technological problems: breading blankets and shields, radiation damage, heat transfer and methods of magnet design. The required plasma parameters for fusion self-heated reactors are established at ntausub(E) approximately 2.10 14 cm -3 sec, plasma radius 1.5 to 3 m, wall loading 5 to 10 MW cm -2 , temperature 15 keV. Within this model plasma control by quasi-steady burn as a key problem is studied. It is emphasized that the future programme must interact more closely with engineering studies and should concentrate upon research which is relevant to reactor plasmas. (V.P.)

  4. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser is described comprising: a toroidal fusion reactor, the reactor generating energetic neutrons; an annular gas cell disposed around the outer periphery of the reactor, the cell including an annular reflecting mirror disposed at the bottom of the cell and an annular output window disposed at the top of the cell; a gas lasing medium disposed within the annular cell for generating output laser radiation; neutron reflector material means disposed around the annular cell for reflecting neutrons incident thereon back into the gas cell; neutron moderator material means disposed between the reactor and the gas cell and between the gas cell and the neutron reflector material for moderating the energy of energetic neutrons from the reactor; converting means for converting energy from the moderated neutrons to energy pumping means for pumping the gas lasing medium; and beam compactor means for receiving output laser radiation from the annular output window and generating a single output laser beam therefrom

  5. Advanced fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Yukihiro

    2003-01-01

    The main subjects on fusion research are now on D-T fueled fusion, mainly due to its high fusion reaction rate. However, many issues are still remained on the wall loading by the 14 MeV neutrons. In the case of D-D fueled fusion, the neutron wall loading is still remained, though the technology related to tritium breeding is not needed. The p- 6 Li and p- 11 B fueled fusions are not estimated to be the next generation candidate until the innovated plasma confinement technologies come in useful to achieve the high performance plasma parameters. The fusion reactor of D- 3 He fuels has merits on the smaller neutron wall loading and tritium handling. However, there are difficulties on achieving the high temperature plasma more than 100 keV. Furthermore the high beta plasma is needed to decrease synchrotron radiation loss. In addition, the efficiency of the direct energy conversion from protons coming out from fusion reaction is one of the key parameters in keeping overall power balance. Therefore, open magnetic filed lines should surround the plasma column. In this paper, we outlined the design of the commercial base reactor (ARTEMIS) of 1 GW electric output power configured by D- 3 He fueled FRC (Field Reversed Configuration). The ARTEMIS needs 64 kg of 3 He per a year. On the other hand, 1 million tons of 3 He is estimated to be in the moon. The 3 He of about 10 23 kg are to exist in gaseous planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. (Y. Tanaka)

  6. Advanced fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Yukihiro [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    The main subjects on fusion research are now on D-T fueled fusion, mainly due to its high fusion reaction rate. However, many issues are still remained on the wall loading by the 14 MeV neutrons. In the case of D-D fueled fusion, the neutron wall loading is still remained, though the technology related to tritium breeding is not needed. The p-{sup 6}Li and p-{sup 11}B fueled fusions are not estimated to be the next generation candidate until the innovated plasma confinement technologies come in useful to achieve the high performance plasma parameters. The fusion reactor of D-{sup 3}He fuels has merits on the smaller neutron wall loading and tritium handling. However, there are difficulties on achieving the high temperature plasma more than 100 keV. Furthermore the high beta plasma is needed to decrease synchrotron radiation loss. In addition, the efficiency of the direct energy conversion from protons coming out from fusion reaction is one of the key parameters in keeping overall power balance. Therefore, open magnetic filed lines should surround the plasma column. In this paper, we outlined the design of the commercial base reactor (ARTEMIS) of 1 GW electric output power configured by D-{sup 3}He fueled FRC (Field Reversed Configuration). The ARTEMIS needs 64 kg of {sup 3}He per a year. On the other hand, 1 million tons of {sup 3}He is estimated to be in the moon. The {sup 3}He of about 10{sup 23} kg are to exist in gaseous planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. (Y. Tanaka)

  7. Inertial fusion reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, a variety of reactor concepts are proposed. One of the prime concerns is dealing with the x-rays and debris that are emitted by the target. Internal neutron shielding can reduce radiation damage and activation, leading to longer life systems, reduced activation and fewer safety concerns. There is really no consensus on what the best reactor concept is at this point. There has been virtually no chamber technology development to date. This is the flip side of the coin of the separability of the target physics and the reactor design. Since reactor technology has not been required to do target experiments, it's not being developed. Economic analysis of conceptual designs indicates that ICF can be economically competitive with magnetic fusion, fission and fossil plants

  8. Advanced spheromak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1996-01-01

    The spheromak has no toroidal magnetic field coils or other structure along its geometric axis, and is thus more attractive than the leading magnetic fusion reactor concept, the tokamak. As a consequence of this and other attributes, the spheromak reactor may be compact and produce a power density sufficiently high to warrant consideration of a liquid 'blanket' that breeds tritium, converts neutron kinetic energy to heat, and protects the reactor vessel from severe neutron damage. However, the physics is more complex, so that considerable research is required to learn how to achieve the reactor potential. Critical physics problems and possible ways of solving them are described. The opportunities and issues associated with a possible liquid wall are considered to direct future research

  9. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.

    1998-01-01

    SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials includes studies (1) to investigate fracture mechanics of neutron-irradiated beryllium; (2) to describe the helium behaviour in irradiated beryllium at atomic scale; (3) to define the kinetics of beryllium reacting with air or steam; (3) to perform a feasibility study for the testing of integrated blanket modules under neutron irradiation. Progress and achievements in 1997 are reported

  10. Material for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abhishek, Anuj; Ranjan, Prem

    2011-01-01

    To make nuclear fusion power a reality, the scientists are working restlessly to find the materials which can confine the power generated by the fusion of two atomic nuclei. A little success in this field has been achieved, though there are still miles to go. Fusion reaction is a special kind of reaction which must occur at very high density and temperature to develop extremely large amount of energy, which is very hard to control and confine within using the present techniques. As a whole it requires the physical condition that rarely exists on the earth to carry out in an efficient manner. As per the growing demand and present scenario of the world energy, scientists are working round the clock to make effective fusion reactions to real. In this paper the work presently going on is considered in this regard. The progress of the Joint European Torus 2010, ITER 2005, HiPER and minor works have been studied to make the paper more object oriented. A detailed study of the technological and material requirement has been discussed in the paper and a possible suggestion is provided to make a contribution in the field of building first ever nuclear fusion reactor

  11. Progress in pulsed power fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintenz, J P; Adams, R G; Bailey, J E [Sandia Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); and others

    1997-12-31

    Pulsed power offers an efficient, high energy, economical source of x-rays for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. Two main approaches to ICF driven with pulsed power accelerators are pursued: intense light ion beams and z-pinches. Recent progress in each approach and plans for future development is described. (author). 2 figs., 10 refs.

  12. Progress in pulsed power fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintenz, J.P.; Adams, R.G.; Bailey, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed power offers an efficient, high energy, economical source of x-rays for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. Two main approaches to ICF driven with pulsed power accelerators are pursued: intense light ion beams and z-pinches. Recent progress in each approach and plans for future development is described. (author). 2 figs., 10 refs

  13. Directions for improved fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Delene, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Conceptual fusion reactor studies over the past 10 to 15 years have projected systems that may be too large, complex, and costly to be of commercial interest. One main direction for improved fusion reactors points towards smaller, higher-power-density approaches. First-order economic issues (i.e., unit direct cost and cost of electricity) are used to support the need for more compact fusion reactors. A generic fusion physics/engineering/costing model is used to provide a quantiative basis for these arguments for specific fusion concepts

  14. Fusion reactor fuel processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.F.

    1972-06-01

    For thermonuclear power reactors based on the continuous fusion of deuterium and tritium the principal fuel processing problems occur in maintaining desired compositions in the primary fuel cycled through the reactor, in the recovery of tritium bred in the blanket surrounding the reactor, and in the prevention of tritium loss to the environment. Since all fuel recycled through the reactor must be cooled to cryogenic conditions for reinjection into the reactor, cryogenic fractional distillation is a likely process for controlling the primary fuel stream composition. Another practical possibility is the permeation of the hydrogen isotopes through thin metal membranes. The removal of tritium from the ash discharged from the power system would be accomplished by chemical procedures to assure physiologically safe concentration levels. The recovery process for tritium from the breeder blanket depends on the nature of the blanket fluids. For molten lithium the only practicable possibility appears to be permeation from the liquid phase. For molten salts the process would involve stripping with inert gas followed by chemical recovery. In either case extremely low concentrations of tritium in the melts would be desirable to maintain low tritium inventories, and to minimize escape of tritium through unwanted permeation, and to avoid embrittlement of metal walls. 21 refs

  15. Coatings for fusion reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattox, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The internal surfaces of a tokamak fusion reactor control the impurity injection and gas recycling into the fusion plasma. Coating of internal surfaces may provide a desirable and possibly necessary design flexibility for achieving the temperatures, ion densities and containment times necessary for net energy production from fusion reactions to take place. In this paper the reactor environments seen by various componentare reviewed along with possible materials responses. Characteristics of coating-substrate systems, important to fusion applications, are delineated and the present status of coating development for fusion applications is reviewed. Coating development for fusion applications is just beginning and poses a unique and important challenge for materials development

  16. Fusion-fission hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses the range of characteristics attainable from hybrid reactor blankets; blanket design considerations; hybrid reactor designs; alternative fuel hybrid reactors; multi-purpose hybrid reactors; and hybrid reactors and the energy economy. Hybrid reactors are driven by a fusion neutron source and include fertile and/or fissile material. The fusion component provides a copious source of fusion neutrons which interact with a subcritical fission component located adjacent to the plasma or pellet chamber. Fissile fuel and/or energy are the main products of hybrid reactors. Topics include high F/M blankets, the fissile (and tritium) breeding ratio, effects of composition on blanket properties, geometrical considerations, power density and first wall loading, variations of blanket properties with irradiation, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical design considerations, safety considerations, tokamak hybrid reactors, tandem-mirror hybrid reactors, inertial confinement hybrid reactors, fusion neutron sources, fissile-fuel and energy production ability, simultaneous production of combustible and fissile fuels, fusion reactors for waste transmutation and fissile breeding, nuclear pumped laser hybrid reactors, Hybrid Fuel Factories (HFFs), and scenarios for hybrid contribution. The appendix offers hybrid reactor fundamentals. Numerous references are provided

  17. Radioisotope production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engholm, B.A.; Cheng, E.T.; Schultz, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    Radioisotope production in fusion reactors is being investigated as part of the Fusion Applications and Market Evaluation (FAME) study. /sup 60/Co is the most promising such product identified to date, since the /sup 60/Co demand for medical and food sterilization is strong and the potential output from a fusion reactor is high. Some of the other radioisotopes considered are /sup 99/Tc, /sup 131/l, several Eu isotopes, and /sup 210/Po. Among the stable isotopes of interest are /sup 197/Au, /sup 103/Rh and Os. In all cases, heat or electricity can be co-produced from the fusion reactor, with overall attractive economics

  18. Hydrogen production in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    As one of methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors without having a conventional turbine-type generator, an efficient use of radiation produced in a fusion reactor with utilizing semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas are studied. Taking the candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a concept of plant system are investigated. (author).

  19. Hydrogen production in fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    As one of the methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors (that do not include a conventional turbine-type generator), the efficient use of fusion-reactor radiation and semiconductors to supply clean fuel in the form of hydrogen gas is studied. Taking the reactor candidates such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a plant system concept are investigated.

  20. Hydrogen production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    As one of methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors without having a conventional turbine-type generator, an efficient use of radiation produced in a fusion reactor with utilizing semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas are studied. Taking the candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a concept of plant system are investigated. (author)

  1. Tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, Kiyohiko

    2009-01-01

    The structural material is one of key issues for the development of reliable superconducting magnets and peripheral equipments of fusion reactors. Standard stainless steels like SUS 304 and 316 steels available at present do not meet requirements. We are developing a new austenitic steel that has proposed target properties named 'JAERI BOX'. Additions of N and V at different amounts were tested to improve strength and fracture toughness of a base alloy SUS316LN at 4.2 K. Mechanical properties of the developed steel were examined. It is found that the charpy absorbed energy and the fracture toughness of the developed steel at 4.2 K are within JAERI BOX. (T.I.)

  2. Pulsed power systems for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanDevender, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    Sandis's Particle Beam Fusion Program is investigating pulsed electron and light ion beam accelerators with the goal of demonstrating the practical application of such drivers as igniters in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactors. The power and energy requirements for net energy gain are 10 14 to 10 15 W and 1 to 10 MJ. Recent advances in pulsed power and power flow technologies permit suitable accelerators to be built. The first accelerator of this new generation is PBFA I. It operates at 2 MV, 15 MA, 30 TW for 35 ns and is scheduled for completion in June 1980. The principles of this new accelerator technology and their application to ICF will be presented

  3. Engineering design of a direct-cycle steam-generating blanket for a long-pulse fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cort, G.E.; Hagenson, R.L.; Teasdale, R.W.; Fox, W.E.; Soran, P.D.; Cullingford, H.S.; Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive neutronics, thermohydraulic, and mechanical design of a tritium-breeding blanket for use by a conceptual long-pulse Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR) is described. On the basis of constraints imposed by cost and the desire to use existing technology, a direct-cycle steam system and stainless-steel construction were used. For reasons of plasma stability, the RFPR blanket supports a 20-mm-thick copper first wall. Located behind the 1.5-m-radius first wall is a 0.50-m-thick stainless-steel blanket containing a granular bed of Li 2 O through which flows low-pressure helium (0.1 MPa) for tritium extraction. Water/steam tubes radially penetrate this packed bed. The large thermal capacity and low thermal diffusivity of the Li 2 O blanket are sufficient to maintain a nearly constant temperature during the approx. 25-s burn period

  4. Overview of fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.; Crocker, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Use of deuterium-tritium burning fusion reactors requires examination of several major safety and environmental issues: (1) tritium inventory control, (2) neutron activation of structural materials, fluid streams and reactor hall environment, (3) release of radioactivity from energy sources including lithium spill reactions, superconducting magnet stored energy release, and plasma disruptions, (4) high magnetic and electromagnetic fields associated with fusion reactor superconducting magnets and radio frequency heating devices, and (5) handling and disposal of radioactive waste. Early recognition of potential safety problems with fusion reactors provides the opportunity for improvement in design and materials to eliminate or greatly reduce these problems. With an early start in this endeavor, fusion should be among the lower risk technologies for generation of commercial electrical power

  5. EBFA: pulsed power for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.H.; VanDevender, J.P.; Barr, G.W.; Johnson, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    This paper will describe the EBFA I accelerator under construction for inertial confinement fusion studies with particle beams and will update previous publications concerning particle beam fusion accelerators. Previous information included Proto I, a triggered oil insulated 1 TW accelerator; Proto II, a water insulated 10 TW accelerator; and EBFA I, a 30 TW, 1 MJ accelerator. Some modifications to the original design have occurred. A new pulse-forming-line concept has been developed which increases the flexibility of the accelerator. The major problem of vacuum interface flashover has been solved by the use of long, magnetically-insulated, transmission lines. The first production module of EBFA I has been received, assembled, and is now undergoing extensive testing. The technology is extendable to at least a factor of ten above the projected EBFA capabilities of 30 TW and 1 MJ output. Progress on facilities associated with the Sandia Particle Beam fusion program is reported

  6. Pulsed Compression Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roestenberg, T. [University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2012-06-07

    The advantages of the Pulsed Compression Reactor (PCR) over the internal combustion engine-type chemical reactors are briefly discussed. Over the last four years a project concerning the fundamentals of the PCR technology has been performed by the University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands. In order to assess the feasibility of the application of the PCR principle for the conversion methane to syngas, several fundamental questions needed to be answered. Two important questions that relate to the applicability of the PCR for any process are: how large is the heat transfer rate from a rapidly compressed and expanded volume of gas, and how does this heat transfer rate compare to energy contained in the compressed gas? And: can stable operation with a completely free piston as it is intended with the PCR be achieved?.

  7. Fusion reactors and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancox, R.

    1990-04-01

    Fusion power, based on the nuclear fusion of light elements to yield a net gain of energy, has the potential to extend the world's resources in a way which is environmentally attractive. Nevertheless, the easiest route to fusion - the reaction between deuterium and tritium - involves hazards from the use of tritium and the neutron activation of the structural materials. These hazards have been considered on the basis of simple conceptual reactor designs, both in relation to normal operation and decommissioning and to potential accident situations. Results from several studies are reviewed and suggest that fusion reactors appear to have an inherently lower environmental impact than fission reactors. However, the realization of this potential has yet to be demonstrated. (author)

  8. Technical issues in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohatgi, V.K.; Vijayan, T.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the issues in fusion reactor technology are examined. Rapid progress in fusion technology research in recent years can be attributed to the advances in various technologies. The commercial generation of fusion power greatly depends on the evolution and improvements in these technologies. With better understanding of plasma physics, fusion reactor designs are becoming more and more realistic and comprehensive. It is now possible to compare various concepts within the framework of established technologies. The technological issues needing better understanding and solutions to problem areas are identified. Various instabilities and energy losses are major problem areas. Extensive developments in reactor-relevant advanced materials, compact and powerful superconducting magnets, high-power systems, and plasma heating drivers need to be undertaken and emphasized

  9. Polymer materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, H.

    1993-01-01

    The radiation-resistant polymer materials have recently drawn much attention from the viewpoint of components for fusion reactors. These are mainly applied to electrical insulators, thermal insulators and structural supports of superconducting magnets in fusion reactors. The polymer materials used for these purposes are required to withstand the synergetic effects of high mechanical loads, cryogenic temperatures and intense nuclear radiation. The objective of this review is to summarize the anticipated performance of candidate materials including polymer composites for fusion magnets. The cryogenic properties and the radiation effects of polymer materials are separately reviewed, because there is only limited investigation on the above-mentioned synergetic effects. Additional information on advanced polymer materials for fusion reactors is also introduced with emphasis on recent developments. (orig.)

  10. Environmental aspects of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffman, F.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    With the continued depletion of fossil and uranium resources in the coming decades, the U. S. will be forced to look more toward renewable energy resources (e.g., wind, tidal, geothermal, and solar power) and toward such longer-term and nondepletable energy resources as fissile fast breeder reactors and fusion power. Several reference reactor designs have been completed for full-scale fusion power reactors that indicate that the environmental impacts from construction, operation, and eventual decommissioning of fusion reactors will be quite small. The principal environmental impact from fusion reactor operation will be from thermal discharges. Some of the safety and environmental characteristics that make fusion reactors appear attractive include an effectively infinite fuel supply at low cost, inherent incapability for a ''nuclear explosion'' or a ''nuclear runaway,'' the absence of fission products, the flexibility of selecting low neutron-cross-section structural materials so that emergency core cooling for a loss-of-coolant or other accident will not be necesary, and the absence of special nuclear materials such as 235 U or 239 Pu, so that diversion of nuclear weapons materials will not be possible and nuclear blackmail will not be a serious concern

  11. Magnet design considerations for Tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, J.R.; Chen, W.; Thomas, R.

    1976-01-01

    Design problems for superconducting ohmic heating and toroidal field coils for large Tokamak fusion reactors are discussed. The necessity for making these coils superconducting is explained, together with the functions of these coils in a Tokamak reactor. Major problem areas include materials related aspects and mechanical design and cryogenic considerations. Projections and comparisons are made based on existing superconducting magnet technology. The mechanical design of large-scale coils, which can contain the severe electromagnetic loading and stress generated in the winding, are emphasized. Additional major tasks include the development of high current conductors for pulsed applications to be used in fabricating the ohmic heating coils. It is important to note, however, that no insurmountable technical barriers are expected in the course of developing superconducting coils for Tokamak fusion reactors. (Auth.)

  12. Prospects for spheromak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.; Hua, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    The reactor study of Hagenson and Krakowski demonstrated the attractiveness of the spheromak as a compact fusion reactor, based on physics principles confirmed in CTX experiments in many respects. Most uncertain was the energy confinement time and the role of magnetic turbulence inherent in the concept. In this paper, a one-dimensional model of heat confinement, calibrated by CTX, predicts negligible heat loss by magnetic turbulence at reactor scale

  13. Overview of fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.; Crocker, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    Present trends in magnetic fusion research and development indicate the promise of commercialization of one of a limited number of inexhaustible energy options early in the next century. Operation of the large-scale fusion experiments, such as the Joint European Torus (JET) and Takamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) now under construction, are expected to achieve the scientific break even point. Early design concepts of power producing reactors have provided problem definition, whereas the latest concepts, such as STARFIRE, provide a desirable set of answers for commercialization. Safety and environmental concerns have been considered early in the development of magnetic fusion reactor concepts and recognition of proplem areas, coupled with a program to solve these problems, is expected to provide the basis for safe and environmentally acceptable commercial reactors. First generation reactors addressed in this paper are expected to burn deuterium and tritium fuel because of the relatively high reaction rates at lower temperatures compared to advanced fuels such as deuterium-deuterium. This paper presents an overwiew of the safety and environmental problems presently perceived, together with some of the programs and techniques planned and/or underway to solve these problems. A preliminary risk assessment of fusion technology relative to other energy technologies is made. Improvements based on material selection are discussed. Tritium and neutron activation products representing potential radiological hazards in fusion reactor are discussed, and energy sources that can lead to the release of radioactivity from fusion reactors under accident conditions are examined. The handling and disposal of radioactive waste are discussed; the status of biological effects of magnetic fields are referenced; and release mechanisms for tritium and activation products, including analytical methods, are presented. (orig./GG)

  14. Magnetic fusion reactor economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission → fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ''burner'' far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ''implementation-by-default'' plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant

  15. Recent designs for advanced fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.

    1994-06-01

    A series of reactor design studies based on the Tokamak configuration have been carried out under the direction of Professor Robert Conn of UCLA. They are called ARIES-1 through 4 and PULSAR 1 and 2. The key mission of these studies is to evaluate the attractiveness of fusion assuming different degrees of advancement in either physics or engineering development. Also, the requirements of engineering and physics systems for a pulsed reactor were evaluated by the PULSAR design studies. This paper discusses the directions and conclusions of the blanket and related engineering systems for those design studies

  16. Pulsed power particle beam fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonas, G.

    1979-01-01

    Although substantial progress has been made in the last few years in developing the technology of intense particle beam drivers, there are still several unanswered questions which will determine their ultimate feasibility as fusion ignition systems. The questions of efficiency, cost, and single pulse scalability appear to have been answered affirmatively but repetitive pulse technology is still in its infancy. The allowable relatively low pellet gains and high available beam energies should greatly ease questions of pellet implosion physics. Insofar as beam-target coupling is concerned, ion deposition is thought to be understood and our measurements of enhanced electron deposition agree with theory. With the development of plasma discharges for intense beam transport and concentration it appears that light ion beams will be the preferred approach for reactors

  17. Survey of fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, M.K.; Kang, H.D.; Oh, Y.K.; Lee, K.W.; In, S.Y.; Kim, Y.C.

    1983-01-01

    The present object of the fusion research is to accomplish the scientific break even by the year of 1986. In view of current progress in the field of Fusion reactor development, we decided to carry out the conceptual design of Tokamak-type fusion reactor during the year of 82-86 in order to acquire the principles of the fusion devices, find the engineering problems and establish the basic capabilities to develop the key techniques with originality. In this year the methods for calculating the locations of the poloidal coils and distribution of the magnetic field, which is one of the most essential and complicated task in the fusion reactor design works, were established. Study on the optimization of the design method of toroidal field coil was also done. Through this work, we established the logic for the design of the toroidal field coil in tokamak and utilize this technique to the design of small compact tokamak. Apart from the development work as to the design technology of tokamak, accelerating column and high voltage power supply (200 KVDC, 100 mA) for intense D-T neutron generator were constructed and now beam transport systems are under construction. This device will be used to develop the materials and the components for the tokamak fusion reactor. (Author)

  18. Mirror fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neef, W.S. Jr.; Carlson, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    Recent conceptual reactor designs based on mirror confinement are described. Four components of mirror reactors for which materials considerations and structural mechanics analysis must play an important role in successful design are discussed. The reactor components are: (a) first-wall and thermal conversion blanket, (b) superconducting magnets and their force restraining structure, (c) neutral beam injectors, and (d) plasma direct energy converters

  19. Tritium management in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, T.R.

    1978-05-01

    This is a review paper covering the key environmental and safety issues and how they have been handled in the various magnetic and inertial confinement concepts and reference designs. The issues treated include: tritium accident analyses, tritium process control, occupational safety, HTO formation rate from the gas-phase, disposal of tritium contaminated wastes, and environmental impact--each covering the Joint European Tokamak (J.E.T. experiment), Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Russian T-20, The Next Step (TNS) designs by Westinghouse/ORNL and General Atomic/ANL, the ANL and ORNL EPR's, the G.A. Doublet Demonstration Reactor, the Italian Fintor-D and the ORNL Demo Studies. There are also the following full scale plant reference designs: UWMAK-III, LASL's Theta Pinch Reactor Design (RTPR), Mirror Fusion Reactor (MFR), Tandem Mirror Reactor (TMR), and the Mirror Hybrid Reactor (MHR). There are four laser device breakeven experiments, SHIVA-NOVA, LLL reference designs, ORNL Laser Fusion power plant, the German ''Saturn,'' and LLL's Laser Fusion EPR I and II

  20. Reactor concepts for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.; Maniscalco, J.A.

    1977-07-01

    Scoping studies were initiated to identify attractive reactor concepts for producing electric power with laser fusion. Several exploratory reactor concepts were developed and are being subjected to our criteria for comparing long-range sources of electrical energy: abundance, social costs, technical feasibility, and economic competitiveness. The exploratory concepts include: a liquid-lithium-cooled stainless steel manifold, a gas-cooled graphite manifold, and fluidized wall concepts, such as a liquid lithium ''waterfall'', and a ceramic-lithium pellet ''waterfall''. Two of the major reactor vessel problems affecting the technical feasibility of a laser fusion power plant are: the effects of high-energy neutrons and cyclical stresses on the blanket structure and the effects of x-rays and debris from the fusion microexplosion on the first-wall. The liquid lithium ''waterfall'' concept is presented here in more detail as an approach which effectively deals with these damaging effects

  1. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant

  2. Fusion neutronics plan in the development of fusion reactor. With the aim of realizing electric power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Morimoto, Yuichi; Ochiai, Kentarou; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Nishitani, Takeo; Takeuchi, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-10-01

    On June 1992, Atomic Energy Commission in Japan has settled Third Phase Program of Fusion Research and Development to achieve self-ignition condition, to realize long pulse burning plasma and to establish basis of fusion engineering for demonstration reactor. This report describes research plan of Fusion Neutron Laboratory in JAERI toward a development of fusion reactor with an aim of realizing electric power. The fusion neutron laboratory has a fusion neutronics facility (FNS), intense fusion neutron source. The plan includes research items in the FNS; characteristics of shielding and breeding materials, nuclear characteristics of materials, fundamental irradiation process of insulator, diagnostics materials and structural materials, and development of in-vessel diagnostic technology. Upgrade of the FNS is also described. Also, the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) for intense neutron source to develop fusion materials is described. (author)

  3. Review of fusion DEMO reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Yasushi

    1996-01-01

    Fusion DEMO Reactor is defined and the Steady State Tokamak Reactor (SSTR) concept is introduced as a typical example of a DEMO reactor. Recent DEMO reactor studies in Japan and abroad are introduced. The DREAM Reactor concept is introduced as an ultimate target of fusion research. (author)

  4. Advances in fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    The author addresses the tokamak as a power reactor. Contrary to popular opinion, there are still a few people that think a tokamak might make a good fusion power reactor. In thinking about advances in fusion reactor design, in the U.S., at least, that generally means advances relevant to the Starfire design. He reviews some of the features of Starfire. Starfire is the last major study done of the tokamak as a reactor in this country. It is now over eight years old in the sense that eight years ago was really the time in which major decisions were made as to its features. Starfire was a tokamak with a major radius of seven meters, about twice the linear dimensions of a machine like TIBER

  5. Fusion reactors as a future energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    A detailed update of fusion research concepts is given. Discussions are given for the following areas: (1) the magnetic confinement principle, (2) UWMAK I: conceptual design for a fusion reactor, (3) the inertial confinement principle, (4) the laser fusion power plant, (5) electron-induced fusion, (6) the long-term development potential of fusion reactors, (7) the symbiosis between fusion and fission reactors, (8) fuel supply for fusion reactors, (9) safety and environmental impact, and (10) accidents, and (11) waste removal and storage

  6. Repetitive pulsed power technology for inertial-confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prestwich, K.R.; Buttram, M.T.

    1983-01-01

    The pulsed power requirements for inertial-confinement fusion reactors are defined for ion-beam and laser drivers. Several megajoule beams with 100's of terrawatt peak powers must be delivered to the reactor chamber 1 to 10 times per second. Ion-beam drivers are relatively efficient requiring less energy storage in the pulsed-power system but more time compression in the power flow chain than gas lasers. These high peak powers imply very large numbers of components for conventional pulse-power systems. A new design that significantly reduces the number of components is presented

  7. Fusion reactors and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrixon, A.D.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is given of the report of a study group set up in 1971 by the Director of the UKAEA Culham Laboratory to investigate environmental and safety aspects of future commercial fusion reactors (1975, Carruthers, R., Dunster, H.J., Smith, R.D., Watson, C.J.H., and Mitchell, J.T.D., Culham Study Group Report on Fusion Reactors and the Environment, CLM-R148, HMSO, London). This report was originally issued in 1973 under limited distribution, but has only recently been made available for open circulation. Deuterium/tritium fusion is thought to be the most likely reaction to be used in the first generation of reactors. Estimates were made of the local and world-wide population hazards from the release of tritium, both under normal operating conditions and in the event of an accident. One serious type of accident would be a lithium metal fire in the blanket region of the reactor. The use of a fusible lithium salt (FLIBE), eliminating the lithium fire risk, is considered but the report concentrates on lithium metal in the blanket region. The main hazards to operating staff arise both from tritium and from neutron activation of the construction materials. Remote servicing of the reactor structure will be essential, but radioactive waste management seems less onerous than for fission reactors. Meaningful comparison of the overall hazards associated with fusion and fission power programmes is not yet possible. The study group emphasized the need for more data to aid the safety assessments, and the need for such assessments to keep pace with fusion power station design. (U.K.)

  8. Controlled thermonuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walstrom, P.L.

    1976-01-01

    Controlled production of energy by fusion of light nuclei has been the goal of a large portion of the physics community since the 1950's. In order for a fusion reaction to take place, the fuel must be heated to a temperature of 100 million degrees Celsius. At this temperature, matter can exist only in the form of an almost fully ionized plasma. In order for the reaction to produce net power, the product of the density and energy confinement time must exceed a minimum value of 10 20 sec m -3 , the so-called Lawson criterion. Basically, two approaches are being taken to meet this criterion: inertial confinement and magnetic confinement. Inertial confinement is the basis of the laser fusion approach; a fuel pellet is imploded by intense laser beams from all sides and ignites. Magnetic confinement devices, which exist in a variety of geometries, rely upon electromagnetic forces on the charged particles of the plasma to keep the hot plasma from expanding. Of these devices, the most encouraging results have been achieved with a class of devices known as tokamaks. Recent successes with these devices have given plasma physicists confidence that scientific feasibility will be demonstrated in the next generation of tokamaks; however, an even larger effort will be required to make fusion power commercially feasible. As a result, emphasis in the controlled thermonuclear research program is beginning to shift from plasma physics to a new branch of nuclear engineering which can be called fusion engineering, in which instrumentation and control engineers will play a major role. Among the new problem areas they will deal with are plasma diagnostics and superconducting coil instrumentation

  9. Physical model of reactor pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, A.; Ravnik, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pulse experiments have been performed at J. Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor since 1991. In total, more than 130 pulses have been performed. Extensive experimental information on the pulse physical characteristics has been accumulated. Fuchs-Hansen adiabatic model has been used for predicting and analysing the pulse parameters. The model is based on point kinetics equation, neglecting the delayed neutrons and assuming constant inserted reactivity in form of step function. Deficiencies of the Fuchs-Hansen model and systematic experimental errors have been observed and analysed. Recently, the pulse model was improved by including the delayed neutrons and time dependence of inserted reactivity. The results explain the observed non-linearity of the pulse energy for high pulses due to finite time of pulse rod withdrawal and the contribution of the delayed neutrons after the prompt part of the pulse. The results of the improved model are in good agreement with experimental results. (author)

  10. Helium cooling of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Baxi, C.; Bourque, R.; Dahms, C.; Inamati, S.; Ryder, R.; Sager, G.; Schleicher, R.

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of worldwide design experience and in coordination with the evolution of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, the application of helium as a coolant for fusion appears to be at the verge of a transition from conceptual design to engineering development. This paper presents a review of the use of helium as the coolant for fusion reactor blanket and divertor designs. The concept of a high-pressure helium cooling radial plate design was studied for both ITER and PULSAR. These designs can resolve many engineering issues, and can help with reaching the goals of low activation and high performance designs. The combination of helium cooling, advanced low-activation materials, and gas turbine technology may permit high thermal efficiency and reduced costs, resulting in the environmental advantages and competitive economics required to make fusion a 21st century power source. ((orig.))

  11. On fusion and fission breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, B.; Schuurman, W.; Klippel, H.Th.

    1981-02-01

    Fast breeder reactors and fusion reactors are suitable candidates for centralized, long-term energy production, their fuel reserves being practically unlimited. The technology of a durable and economical fusion reactor is still to be developed. Such a development parallel with the fast breeder is valuable by reasons of safety, proliferation, new fuel reserves, and by the very broad potential of the development of the fusion reactor. In order to facilitate a discussion of these aspects, the fusion reactor and the fast breeder reactor were compared in the IIASA-report. Aspects of both reactor systems are compared

  12. Radiation shielding for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation shielding requirements for fusion reactors present different problems than those for fission reactors and accelerators. Fusion devices, particularly tokamak reactors, are complicated by geometry constraints that complicate disposition of fully effective shielding. This paper reviews some of these shielding issues and suggested solutions for optimizing the machine and biological shielding. Radiation transport calculations are essential for predicting and confirming the nuclear performance of the reactor and, as such, must be an essential part of the reactor design process. Development and optimization of reactor components from the first wall and primary shielding to the penetrations and containment shielding must be carried out in a sensible progression. Initial results from one-dimensional transport calculations are used for scoping studies and are followed by detailed two- and three-dimensional analyses to effectively characterize the overall radiation environment. These detail model calculations are essential for accounting for the radiation leakage through ports and other penetrations in the bulk shield. Careful analysis of component activation and radiation damage is cardinal for defining remote handling requirements, in-situ replacement of components, and personnel access at specific locations inside the reactor containment vessel. (author)

  13. Prospects for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak has refined understanding of the realities of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning magnetic fusion reactor. An ITER-like tokamak reactor using ITER costs and performance would lead to a cost of electricity (COE) of about 130 mills/kWh. Advanced tokamak physics to be tested in the Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX), coupled with moderate components in engineering, technology, and unit costs, should lead to a COE comparable with best existing fission systems around 60 mills/kWh. However, a larger unit size, ∼2000 MW(e), is favored for the fusion system. Alternative toroidal configurations to the conventional tokamak, such as the stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and field-reversed configuration, offer some potential advantage, but are less well developed, and have their own challenges

  14. Fusion reactor critical issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    The document summarizes the results of a series of INTOR-related meetings organized by the IAEA in 1985-1986 with the following topics: Impurity control modelling, non-inductive current-drive, confinement in tokamaks with intense heating and DEMO requirements. These results are useful to the specialists involved in research on large fusion machines or in the design activity on the next generation tokamaks. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Assessment of tritium breeding requirements for fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents an assessment of tritium-breeding requirements for fusion power reactors. The analysis is based on an evaluation of time-dependent tritium inventories in the reactor system. The method presented can be applied to any fusion systems in operation on a steady-state mode as well as on a pulsed mode. As an example, the UWMAK-I design was analyzed and it has been found that the startup inventory requirement calculated by the present method significantly differs from those previously calculated. The effect of reactor-parameter changes on the required tritium breeding ratio is also analyzed for a variety of reactor operation scenarios

  16. Review of mirror fusion reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Three magnetic confinement concepts, based on the mirror principle, are described. These mirror concepts are summarized as follows: (1) fusion-fission hybrid reactor, (2) tandem mirror reactor, and (3) reversed field mirror reactor

  17. Structural materials for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, M.; Baluc, N.; Spaetig, P.

    2001-01-01

    In order to preserve the condition of an environmentally safe machine, present selection of materials for structural components of a fusion reactor is made not only on the basis of adequate mechanical properties, behavior under irradiation and compatibility with other materials and cooling media, but also on their radiological properties, i.e. activity, decay heat, radiotoxicity. These conditions strongly limit the number of materials available to a few families of alloys, generically known as low activation materials. We discuss the criteria for deciding on such materials, the alloys resulting from the application of the concept and the main issues and problems of their use in a fusion environment. (author)

  18. Synfuels production from fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60 percent and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approximately 50 to 70 percent are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  19. Vacuum engineering for fusion research and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittenger, L.C.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are described: (1) surface pumping by cryogenic condensation, (2) operation of large condensing cryopumps, (3) pumping for large fusion experiments, and (4) vacuum technology for fusion reactors

  20. Fusion reactor systems studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Fusion Technology Institute personnel actively participated in the ARIES/PULSAR project during the present contract period. Numerous presentations were made at PULSAR project meetings, major contributions were written for the ARIES-II/IV Final Report presentations and papers were given at technical conferences contributions were written for the ARIES Lessons Learned report and a very large number of electronic-mail and regular-mail communications were sent. The remaining sections of this progress report win summarize the work accomplished and in progress for the PULSAR project during the contract period. The main areas of effort are: PULSAR Research; ARIES-II/IV Report Contributions; ARIES Lessons Learned Report Contributions; and Stellarator Study

  1. Fusion reactor high vacuum pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedgley, D.W.; Walthers, C.R.; Jenkins, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on recent experiments which have shown the practicality of using activated carbon (coconut charcoal) at 4K to pump helium and hydrogen isotopes for a fusion reactor. Both speed and capacity for deuterium/helium and tritium/helium-3 mixtures were satisfactory. The long-term effects of tritium on the charcoal/cement system developed by Grumman and LLNL was now known; therefore a program was undertaken to see what, if any, effect long-term tritium exposure has on the cryosorber. Several charcoal on aluminum test samples were subjected to six months exposure of tritium at approximately 77 K. The tritium was scanned several times with a residual gas analyzer and the speed-capacity performance of the samples was measured before, approximately one-third way through, and after the exposure. Modest effects were noted which would not seriously restrict the use of charcoal as a cryosorber for fusion reactor high-vacuum pumping applications

  2. Tritium in fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, J.S.; Fisher, P.W.; Talbot, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    When tritium is used in a fusion energy experiment or reactor, several implications affect and usually restrict the design and operation of the system and involve questions of containment, inventory, and radiation damage. Containment is expected to be particularly important both for high-temperature components and for those components that are prone to require frequent maintenance. Inventory is currently of major significance in cases where safety and environmental considerations limit the experiments to very low levels of tritium. Fewer inventory restrictions are expected as fusion experiments are placed in more-remote locations and as the fusion community gains experience with the use of tritium. However, the advent of power-producing experiments with high-duty cycle will again lead to serious difficulties based principally on tritium availability; cyclic operations with significant regeneration times are the principal problems

  3. Assessment of fusion reactor development. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, N.; Tazima, T.

    1994-04-01

    Symposium on assessment of fusion reactor development was held to make clear critical issues, which should be resolved for the commercial fusion reactor as a major energy source in the next century. Discussing items were as follows. (1) The motive force of fusion power development from viewpoints of future energy demand, energy resources and earth environment for 'Sustainable Development'. (2) Comparison of characteristics with other alternative energy sources, i.e. fission power and solar cell power. (3) Future planning of fusion research and advanced fuel fusion (D 3 He). (4) Critical issues of fusion reactor development such as Li extraction from the sea water, structural material and safety. (author)

  4. Tokamak fusion reactor exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, M.F.A.; Harbour, P.J.; Hotston, E.S.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents a compilation of papers dealing with reactor exhaust which were produced as part of the TIGER Tokamak Installation for Generating Electricity study at Culham. The papers are entitled: (1) Exhaust impurity control and refuelling. (2) Consideration of the physical problems of a self-consistent exhaust and divertor system for a long burn Tokamak. (3) Possible bundle divertors for INTOR and TIGER. (4) Consideration of various magnetic divertor configurations for INTOR and TIGER. (5) A appraisal of divertor experiments. (6) Hybrid divertors on INTOR. (7) Refuelling and the scrape-off layer of INTOR. (8) Simple modelling of the scrape-off layer. (9) Power flow in the scrape-off layer. (10) A model of particle transport within the scrape-off plasma and divertor. (11) Controlled recirculation of exhaust gas from the divertor into the scrape-off plasma. (U.K.)

  5. Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor nucleonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, M.R.; Abdou, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor nucleonics are reviewed and the present status of data are assessed. The discussion is divided into broad categories dealing with data for Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT), D-T Fusion Reactors, Alternate Fuel Cycles and the Evaluated Data Files that are available or would be available in the near future

  6. Generic magnetic fusion reactor cost assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Fusion Energy Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discusses ''generic'' magnetic fusion reactors. The author comments on DT burning magnetic fusion reactor models being possibly operational in the 21st century. Representative parameters from D-T reactor studies are given, as well as a shematic diagram of a generic fusion reactor. Values are given for winding pack current density for existing and future superconducting coils. Topics included are the variation of the cost of electricity (COE), the dependence of the COE on the net electric power of the reactor, and COE formula definitions

  7. Conceptual design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) being developed at JAERI as a next generation tokamak to JT-60 has a major mission of realizing a self-ignited long-burning DT plasma and demonstrating engineering feasibility. During FY82 and FY83 a comprehensive and intensive conceptual design study has been conducted for a pulsed operation FER as a reference option which employs a conventional inductive current drive and a double-null divertor. In parallel with the reference design, studies have been carried out to evaluate advanced reactor concepts such as quasi-steady state operation and steady state operation based on RF current drive and pumped limiter, and comparative studies for single-null divertor/pumped limiter. This report presents major results obtained primarily from FY83 design studies, while the results of FY82 design studies are described in previous references (JAERI-M 83-213--216). (author)

  8. Advances in laser solenoid fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Quimby, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    The laser solenoid is an alternate fusion concept based on a laser-heated magnetically-confined plasma column. The reactor concept has evolved in several systems studies over the last five years. We describe recent advances in the plasma physics and technology of laser-plasma coupling. The technology advances include progress on first walls, inner magnet design, confinement module design, and reactor maintenance. We also describe a new generation of laser solenoid fusion and fusion-fission reactor designs

  9. Prospect of realizing nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This Report describes the results of the research work on nuclear fusion, which CRIEPI has carried out for about ten years from the standpoint of electric power utilities, potential user of its energy. The principal points are; (a) economic analysis (calculation of costs) based on Japanese analysis procedures and database of commercial fusion reactors, including fusion-fission hybrid reactors, and (b) conceptual design of two types of hybrid reactors, that is, fission-fuel producing DMHR (Demonstration Molten-Salt Hybrid Reactor) and electric-power producing THPR (Tokamak Hybrid Power Reactor). The Report consists of the following chapters: 1. Introduction. 2. Conceptual Design of Hybrid Reactors. 3. Economic Analysis of Commercial Fusion Reactors. 4. Basic Studies Applicable Also to Nuclear Fusion Technology. 5. List of Published Reports and Papers; 6. Conclusion. Appendices. (author)

  10. Confinement inertial fusion. Power reactors of nuclear fusion by lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, G.; Ahnert, C.; Aragones, J.M.; Leira, G; Martinez-Val, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The energy crisis and the need of the nuclear fusion energy are analized. The nuclear processes in the laser interation with the ablator material are studied, as well as the thermohydrodinamic processes in the implossion, and the neutronics of the fusion. The fusion reactor components are described and the economic and social impact of its introduction in the future energetic strategies.(author)

  11. Estimation of accumulated individual doses from waterborne pulse releases of tritium and activation products into the Baltic Sea from a hypothetical fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edlund, O

    1995-04-01

    The committed effective dose to a critical group during 50 years attributed to pulse unit releases of tritium and activation products (in total 66 nuclides) from a thought postulated fusion power plant into Tvaeren Bay, a part of the Baltic Sea with brackish water, outside Studsvik, Sweden, is calculated. The purpose of this work is to obtain (simple) relationships between release and dose for relevant nuclides for use in the future when realistic source terms are known. 26 refs, 8 tabs, 4 figs.

  12. Estimation of accumulated individual doses from waterborne pulse releases of tritium and activation products into the Baltic Sea from a hypothetical fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edlund, O.

    1995-04-01

    The committed effective dose to a critical group during 50 years attributed to pulse unit releases of tritium and activation products (in total 66 nuclides) from a thought postulated fusion power plant into Tvaeren Bay, a part of the Baltic Sea with brackish water, outside Studsvik, Sweden, is calculated. The purpose of this work is to obtain (simple) relationships between release and dose for relevant nuclides for use in the future when realistic source terms are known. 26 refs, 8 tabs, 4 figs

  13. PUSPATI Triga Reactor pulsing parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auu, Gui Ah; Abu, Puad Haji; Yunus, Yaziz [PUSPATI, Selangor (Malaysia)

    1984-06-01

    The pulsing experiment was carried out as part of the commissioning activites of PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (PTR). Several parameters of PTR were deduced from the experiment. It was found that the maximum temperature of the fuel was far below the safety limit when the maximum allowable positive reactivity of $3.00 was inserted into the core. The peak power achieved was 1354 Mw.

  14. What have fusion reactor studies done for you today?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulchinski, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin examines the fusion program and puts into perspective what return is being made on investments in fusion reactor studies. Illustations show financial support for fusion research from the four major programs, FY'82 expenditures on fusion research, and the total expenditures on fusion research since 1951. Topics discussed include the estimated number of scientists conducting fusion research, the conceptual design study of a fusion reactor, scoping study of a reactor, the chronology of fusion reactor design studies, published fusion reactor studies 1967-1983, conceptual fusion reactor design studies, STARFIRE reference design, MARS central cell, HYLIFE reaction chamber, and selected contributions of reactor design studies to base programs

  15. Modular Stellarator Fusion Reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    A preliminary conceptual study is made of the Modular Stellarator Reactor (MSR). A steady-state ignited, DT-fueled, magnetic fusion reactor is proposed for use as a central electric-power station. The MSR concept combines the physics of the classic stellarator confinement topology with an innovative, modular-coil design. Parametric tradeoff calculations are described, leading to the selection of an interim design point for a 4-GWt plant based on Alcator transport scaling and an average beta value of 0.04 in an l = 2 system with a plasma aspect ratio of 11. The physics basis of the design point is described together with supporting magnetics, coil-force, and stress computations. The approach and results presented herein will be modified in the course of ongoing work to form a firmer basis for a detailed conceptual design of the MSR

  16. Vanadium recycling for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, T.J.; Butterworth, G.J.

    1994-04-01

    Very stringent purity specifications must be applied to low activation vanadium alloys, in order to meet recycling goals requiring low residual dose rates after 50--100 years. Methods of vanadium production and purification which might meet these limits are described. Following a suitable cooling period after their use, the vanadium alloy components can be melted in a controlled atmosphere to remove volatile radioisotopes. The aim of the melting and decontamination process will be the achievement of dose rates low enough for ''hands-on'' refabrication of new reactor components from the reclaimed metal. The processes required to permit hands-on recycling appear to be technically feasible, and demonstration experiments are recommended. Background information relevant to the use of vanadium alloys in fusion reactors, including health hazards, resources, and economics, is provided

  17. Tritium production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.

    1981-08-01

    The present analyses on the possibilities of extracting tritium from the liquid and solid fusion reactor blankets show up many problems. A consistent ensemble of materials and devices for extracting the heat and the tritium has not yet been integrated in a fusion reactor blanket project. The dimensioning of the many pipes required for shifting the tritium can only be done very approximately and the volume taken up by the blanket is difficult to evaluate, etc. The utilization of present data leads to over-dimensioning the installations by prudence and perhaps rejecting the best solutions. In order to measure the parameters of the most promising materials, work must be carried out on well defined samples and not only determine the base physical-chemical coefficients, such as thermal conductivity, scattering coefficients, Sievert parameters, but also the kinetic parameters conventional in chemical engineering, such as the hourly space rates of degassing. It is also necessary to perform long duration experiments under radiation and at operating temperatures, or above, in order to study the ageing of the bodies employed [fr

  18. Decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) will complete its experimental lifetime with a series of deuterium-tritium pulses in 1994. As a result, the machine structures will become radioactive, and vacuum components will also be contaminated with tritium. Dose rate levels will range from less than 1 mr/h for external structures to hundreds of mr/h for the vacuum vessel. Hence, decommissioning operations will range from hands on activities to the use of remotely operated equipment. After 21 months of cool down, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations will commence and continue for approximately 15 months. The primary objective is to render the test cell complex re-usable for the next machine, the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). This paper presents an overview of decommissioning TFTR and discusses the D and D objectives

  19. PUSPATI Triga Reactor pulsing parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui Ah Auu; Puad Haji Abu; Yaziz Yunus

    1984-01-01

    The pulsing experiment was carried out as part of the commissioning activites of PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (PTR). Several parameters of PTR were deduced from the experiment. It was found that the maximum temperature of the fuel was far below the safety limit when the maximum allowable positive reactivity of $3.00 was inserted into the core. The peak power achieved was 1354 Mw. (author)

  20. Advanced nuclear reactor and nuclear fusion power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    This book comprised of two issues. The first one is a advanced nuclear reactor which describes nuclear fuel cycle and advanced nuclear reactor like liquid-metal reactor, advanced converter, HTR and extra advanced nuclear reactors. The second one is nuclear fusion for generation energy, which explains practical conditions for nuclear fusion, principle of multiple magnetic field, current situation of research on nuclear fusion, conception for nuclear fusion reactor and economics on nuclear fusion reactor.

  1. Lower activation materials and magnetic fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Bloom, E.E.; Davis, J.W.; Gold, R.E.; Little, R.; Schultz, K.R.; Smith, D.L.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactivity in fusion reactors can be effectively controlled by materials selection. The detailed relationship between the use of a material for construction of a magnetic fusion reactor and the material's characteristics important to waste disposal, safety, and system maintainability has been studied. The quantitative levels of radioactivation are presented for many materials and alloys, including the role of impurities, and for various design alternatives. A major outcome has been the development of quantitative definitions to characterize materials based on their radioactivation properties. Another key result is a four-level classification scheme to categorize fusion reactors based on quantitative criteria for waste management, system maintenance, and safety. A recommended minimum goal for fusion reactor development is a reference reactor that (a) meets the requirements for Class C shallow land burial of waste materials, (b) permits limited hands-on maintenance outside the magnet's shield within 2 days of a shutdown, and (c) meets all requirements for engineered safety. The achievement of a fusion reactor with at least the characteristics of the reference reactor is a realistic goal. Therefore, in making design choices or in developing particular materials or alloys for fusion reactor applications, consideration must be given to both the activation characteristics of a material and its engineering practicality for a given application

  2. Activation product transport in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.C.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    Activated corrosion and neutron sputtering products will enter the coolant and/or tritium breeding material of fusion reactor power plants and experiments and cause personnel access problems. Radiation levels around plant components due to these products will cause difficulties with maintenance and repair operations throughout the plant. A computer code, RAPTOR, has been developed to determine the transport of these products in fusion reactor coolant/tritium breeding materials. Without special treatment, it is likely that fusion reactor power plant operators could experience dose rates as high as 8 rem per hour around a number of plant components after only a few years of operation. (orig.)

  3. Intense pulsed ion beams for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    The subject of this review paper is the field of intense pulsed ion beam generation and the potential application of the beams to fusion research. Considerable progress has been made over the past six years. The ion injectors discussed utilize the introduction of electrons into vacuum acceleration gaps in conjunction with high voltage pulsed power technology to achieve high output current. Power levels from injectors exceeding 1000 MW/cm 2 have been obtained for pulse lengths on the order of 10 -7 sec. The first part of the paper treats the physics and technology of intense ion beams. The second part is devoted to applications of intense ion beams in fusion research. A number of potential uses in magnetic confinement systems have been proposed

  4. Fusion--fission hybrid reactors based on the laser solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.; Taussig, R.T.; Quimby, D.C.

    1976-01-01

    Fusion-fission reactors, based on the laser solenoid concept, can be much smaller in scale than their pure fusion counterparts, with moderate first-wall loading and rapid breeding capabilities (1 to 3 tonnes/yr), and can be designed successfully on the basis of classical plasma transport properties and free-streaming end-loss. Preliminary design information is presented for such systems, including the first wall, pulse coil, blanket, superconductors, laser optics, and power supplies, accounting for the desired reactor performance and other physics and engineering constraints. Self-consistent point designs for first and second generation reactors are discussed which illustrate the reactor size, performance, component parameters, and the level of technological development required

  5. Progress of nuclear fusion research and review on development of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Set up in October 1971, the ad hoc Committee on Survey of Nuclear Fusion Reactors has worked on overall fusion reactor aspects and definition of the future problems under four working groups of core, nuclear heat, materials and system. The presect volume is intended to provide reference materials in the field of fusion reactor engineering, prepared by members of the committee. Contents are broadly the following: concept of the nuclear fusion reactor, fusion core engineering, fusion reactor blanket engineering, fusion reactor materials engineering, and system problems in development of fusion reactors. (Mori, K.)

  6. Designing the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The primary goal in designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactors is to produce electrical power as inexpensively as possible, with minimum activation and without compromising safety. This paper discusses a method for designing the Cascade rotating ceramic-granule-blanket reactor (Pitts, 1985) and its associated power plant (Pitts and Maya, 1985). Although focus is on the cascade reactor, the design method and issues presented are applicable to most other ICF reactors

  7. SOLASE: a conceptual laser fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Moses, G.A.

    1977-12-01

    The SOLASE conceptual laser fusion reactor has been designed to elucidate the technological problems posed by inertial confinement fusion reactors. This report contains a detailed description of all aspects of the study including the physics of pellet implosion and burn, optics and target illumination, last mirror design, laser system analysis, cavity design, pellet fabrication and delivery, vacuum system requirements, blanket design, thermal hydraulics, tritium analysis, neutronics calculations, radiation effects, stress analysis, shield design, reactor and plant building layout, maintenance procedures, and power cycle design. The reactor is designed as a 1000 MW/sub e/ unit for central station electric power generation

  8. Introduction to magnetic fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kenji

    1988-01-01

    Trend of the tokamak reactor design works so far carried out is reviewed, and method of conceptual design for commercial fusion reactor is critically considered concerning the black-box conpepts. System-framework of the engineering of magnetic fusion (commercial) reactor design is proposed as four steps. Based on it the next design studies are recommended in parallel approaches for making real-overcome of reactor material problem, from the view point of technological realization and not from the economical one. Real trials are involved. (author)

  9. Inertial fusion reactors and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornwell, J.B.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The application of magnetic fields of simple configurations and modest strengths to direct target debris ions out of cavities can alleviate recognized shortcomings of several classes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactors. Complex fringes of the strong magnetic fields of heavy-ion fusion (HIF) focusing magnets may intrude into reactor cavities and significantly affect the trajectories of target debris ions. The results of an assessment of potential benefits from the use of magnetic fields in ICF reactors and of potential problems with focusing-magnet fields in HIF reactors conducted to set priorities for continuing studies are reported. Computational tools are described and some preliminary results are presented

  10. Safety and environmental aspects of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilic, H.; Jensen, B.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with those problems concerning safety and environmental aspects of the future fusion reactors (e.g. fuel cycle, magnetic failure, after heat disturbances, radioactive waste and magnetic field)

  11. Fuel cycle problems in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Fuel cycle problems of fusion reactors evolve around the breeding, recovery, containment, and recycling of tritium. These processes are described, and their implications and alternatives are discussed. Technically, fuel cycle problems are solvable; economically, their feasibility is not yet known

  12. Communication links for fusion reactor maintenance operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Uffelen, M.

    2005-01-01

    Different architectures are envisaged for data transmission with fibre optic links in a radiation environment, as proposed in literature for both space and high energy physics applications. Their needs and constraints differ from those encountered for maintenance tasks in the future ITER environment, not only in terms of temperature and radiation levels, but also with respect to transmission speed requirements. Our approach attempts to limit the use of radiation-sensitive electronics for transmission of both digital and/or analogue data to the control room, using glass fibres as transport medium. We therefore assessed the radiation behaviour of a cost-effective fibre optic transmitter at 850 nm, consisting of a PWM (pulse width modulator), a radiation tolerant current driver (previously developed at SCK-CEN) and a VCSEL (Vertical-Cavity Surface Emitting Laser assembly, up to 10 MGy at 60 degrees Celsius. The PWM enables to transform an analogue sensor signal into a pseudo numerical signal, with a pulse width proportional to the incoming signal. The main objective of this task is to contribute to the major design of the maintenance equipment and strategy needed for the remote replacement of the divertor system in the future ITER fusion reactor, with particular attention to the implications of radiation hardening rules and recommendations. Next to the radiation assessment studies of remote handling tools, including actuators and sensors, we also develop radiation tolerant communication links with multiplexing capabilities

  13. Fusion reactor safety studies, FY 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darby, J.B. Jr.

    1978-04-01

    This report reviews the technical progress in the fusion reactor safety studies performed during FY 1977 in the Fusion Power Program at the Argonne National Laboratory. The subjects reported on include safety considerations of the vacuum vessel and first-wall design for the ANL/EPR, the thermal responses of a tokamak reactor first wall, the vacuum wall electrical resistive requirements in relationship to magnet safety, and a major effort is reported on considerations and experiments on air detritiation

  14. Conceptual design of imploding liner fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turchi, P.J.; Robson, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    The basic new ingredient is the concept of rotationally stabilized liquid metal liners accelerated with free pistons. The liner motion is constrained on its outer surface by the pistons, laterally by channel walls, during acceleration, and on its inner surface, where megagauss field levels are attained by the centrifugal motion of the liner material. In this way, stable, reversible motion of the liner should be possible, permitting repetitive, pulsed operation at interior pressures far greater than can be allowed in static conductor systems. Such higher operating pressures permit the use of simple plasma geometries, such as theta pinches, with greatly reduced dimensions. Furthermore, the implosion of thick, lithium-bearing liners with large radial compression ratios inherently provides the plasma with a surrounding blanket of neutron absorbing liquid metal, thereby substantially reducing the problems of induced radioactivity and first wall damage that haunt conventional fusion reactor designs. The following article discusses the basic operation of liner reactors and several important features influencing their design

  15. High temperature fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, S.D.; dePaz, J.F.; Gohar, M.Y.; Stevens, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    Fusion energy may have unique advantages over other systems as a source for high temperature process heat. A conceptual design of a blanket for a 7 m tokamak reactor has been developed that is capable of producing 1100 0 C process heat at a pressure of approximately 10 atmospheres. The design is based on the use of a falling bed of MgO spheres as the high temperature heat transfer system. By preheating the spheres with energy taken from the low temperature tritium breeding part of the blanket, 1086 MW of energy can be generated at 1100 0 C from a system that produces 3000 MW of total energy while sustaining a tritium breeding ratio of 1.07. The tritium breeding is accomplished using Li 2 O modules both in front of (6 cm thick) and behind (50 cm thick) the high temperature ducts. Steam is used as the first wall and front tritium breeding module coolant while helium is used in the rear tritium breeding region. The system produces 600 MW of net electricity for use on the grid

  16. Trends in fusion reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J.S.; Holland, D.F.; Piet, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion has the potential to be an attractive energy source. From the safety and environmental perspective, fusion must avoid concerns about catastrophic accidents and unsolvable waste disposal. In addition, fusion must achieve an acceptable level of risk from operational accidents that result in public exposure and economic loss. Finally, fusion reactors must control routine radioactive effluent, particularly tritium. Major progress in achieving this potential rests on development of low-activation materials or alternative fuels. The safety and performance of various material choices and fuels for commercial fusion reactors can be investigated relatively inexpensively through reactor design studies. These studies bring together experts in a wide range of backgrounds and force the group to either agree on a reactor design or identify areas for further study. Fusion reactors will be complex with distributed radioactive inventories. The next generation of experiments will be critical in demonstrating that acceptable levels of safe operation can be achieved. These machines will use materials which are available today and for which a large database exists (e.g. for 316 stainless steel). Researchers have developed a good understanding of the risks associated with operation of these devices. Specifically, consequences from coolant system failures, loss of vacuum events, tritium releases, and liquid metal reactions have been studied. Recent studies go beyond next step designs and investigate commercial reactor concerns including tritium release and liquid metal reactions. 18 refs

  17. ITER: a technology test bed for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, M.; Green, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    The ITER Project aims to establish nuclear fusion as an energy source that has potential safety and environmental advantages, and to develop the technologies required for a fusion reactor. ITER is a collaborative project between the European Union, Japan, the Russian Federation and the United States of America. During the current phase of the Project, an R and D programme of about 850 million dollars is underway to develop the technologies required for ITER. This technological effort should culminate in the construction of the components and systems of the ITER machine and its auxiliaries. The main areas of technological development include the first wall and divertor technology, the blanket technology and tritium breeding, superconducting magnet technology, pulsed power technology and remote handling. ITER is a test bed and an essential step to establish the technology of future fusion reactors. Many of the ITER technologies are of potential interest to other fields and their development is expected to benefit the industries involved. (author)

  18. Tritium problems in fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    A brief introduction is given to the role tritium will play in the development of fusion power. The biological and worldwide environmental behavior of tritium is reviewed. The tritium problems expected in fusion power reactors are outlined. A few thoughts on tritium permeation and recent results for tritium cleanup and CT 4 accumulation are presented. Problems involving the recovery of tritium from the breeding blanket in fusion power reactors are also considered, including the possible effect of impurities in lithium blankets and the use of lithium as a regenerable getter pump. (auth)

  19. Composites as structural materials in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megusar, J.

    1989-01-01

    In fusion reactors, materials are used under extreme conditions of temperature, stress, irradiation, and chemical environment. The absence of adequate materials will seriously impede the development of fusion reactors and might ultimately be one of the major difficulties. Some of the current materials problems can be solved by proper design features. For others, the solution will have to rely on materials development. A parallel and balanced effort between the research in plasma physics and fusion-related technology and in materials research is, therefore, the best strategy to ultimately achieve economic, safe, and environmentally acceptable fusion. The essential steps in developing composites for structural components of fusion reactors include optimization of mechanical properties followed by testing under fusion-reactor-relevant conditions. In optimizing the mechanical behavior of composite materials, a wealth of experience can be drawn from the research on ceramic matrix and metal matrix composite materials sponsored by the Department of Defense. The particular aspects of this research relevant to fusion materials development are methodology of the composite materials design and studies of new processing routes to develop composite materials with specific properties. Most notable examples are the synthesis of fibers, coatings, and ceramic materials in their final shapes form polymeric precursors and the infiltration of fibrous preforms by molten metals

  20. Open-ended fusion devices and reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabe, T.; Nariai, H.

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual design studies on fusion reactors based upon open-ended confinement schemes, such as the tandem mirror and rf plugged cusp, have been carried out in Japan. These studies may be classified into two categories: near-term devices (Fusion Engineering Test Facility), and long-term fusion power recators. In the first category, a two-component cusp neutron source was proposed. In the second category, the GAMMA-R, a tandem-mirror power reactor, and the RFC-R, an axisymetric mirror and cusp, reactor studies are being conducted at the University of Tsukuba and the Institute of Plasma Physics. Mirror Fusion Engineering Facility parameters and a schematic are shown. The GAMMA-R central-cell design schematic is also shown

  1. Studies of conceptual spheromak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsurai, M.; Yamada, M.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary design studies are carried out for a spheromak fusion reactor. Simplified circuit theory is applied to obtain the characteristic relations among various parameters of the spheromak configuration for an aspect ratio of A >or approx. 1.6. These relations are used to calculate the parameters for the conceptual designs of three types of fusion reactor: (1) the DT reactor with two-component-type operation, (2) the ignited DT reactor, and (3) the ignited catalysed-type DD reactor. With a total wall loading of approx. 4 MW.m -2 , it is found that edge magnetic fields of only approx. 4 T (DT) and approx. 9 T (Cat. DD) are required for ignited reactors of 1 m plasma (minor) radius with output powers in the gigawatt range. An assessment of various schemes of generation, compression and translation of spheromak plasmas is presented. (author)

  2. Breeder control fusion reactor. Topical interview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlueter, A [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching/Muenchen (Germany, F.R.)

    1977-09-01

    The energy sources of the future are extremely controversial. The consumption of fossil fuel shall decrease during the next decades, because exhaustion of the resources, pollution, increase of CO/sub 2/ in the atmosphere and other reasons. But at present the question it not yet settled which alternative energy system should replace the fossil fuel. First of all nuclear energy in the form of fission reactions seems to come into operation to a larger extent. The next step may be the controlled thermonuclear fusion reaction. Furthermore, a comparison between fusion and fission is given which shows that fusion would bring about less risks than the breeders. An advantage of the fusion reactor would be the fact that the fuel cycle is closed. Unfortunately, the physical questions are not as yet satisfactorily clarified so that one cannot be sure whether a fusion reactor can really be built.

  3. SOLASE: a conceptual laser fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Moses, G.A.

    1977-12-01

    The SOLASE conceptual laser fusion reactor has been designed to elucidate the technological problems posed by inertial confinement fusion ractors. This report contains a detailed description of all aspects of the study including the physics of pellet implosion and burn, optics and target illumination, last mirror design, laser system analysis, cavity design, pellet fabrication and delivery, vacuum system requirements, blanket design, thermal hydraulics, tritium analysis, neutronics calculations, radiation effects, stress analysis, shield design, reactor and plant building layout, maintenance procedures, and power cycle design. The reactor is designed as a 1000 MW/sub e/ unit for central station electric power generation

  4. Status of fusion reactor blanket design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.

    1986-02-01

    The recent Blanket Comparison and Selection Study (BCSS), which was a comprehensive evaluation of fusion reactor blanket design and the status of blanket technology, serves as an excellent basis for further development of blanket technology. This study provided an evaluation of over 130 blanket concepts for the reference case of electric power producing, DT fueled reactors in both Tokamak and Tandem Mirror (TMR) configurations. Based on a specific set of reactor operating parameters, the current understanding of materials and blanket technology, and a uniform evaluation methodology developed as part of the study, a limited number of concepts were identified that offer the greatest potential for making fusion an attractive energy source

  5. A look at the fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohatgi, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    The prospects of fusion energy have been summarised in this paper. The rapid progress in the field in recent years can be attributed to the advances in various technologies. The commercial fusion energy depends more heavily on the evolution and improvement in these technologies. With better understanding of plasma physics, the fusion reactor designs have become more realistic and comprehensive. It is now possible to make intercomparison between various concepts within the frame work of the established technologies. Assuming certain growth rate of the technological development, it is estimated that fusion energy can become available during the early part of the next century. (author)

  6. Extrap conceptual fusion reactor design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eninger, J.E; Lehnert, B.

    1987-12-01

    A study has recently been initiated to asses the fusion reactor potential of the Extrap concept. A reactor model is defined that fulfills certain economic and environmental criteria. This model is applied to Extrap and a reference reactor is outlined. The design is optimized by varying parameters subject to both physics and engineering constraints. Several design options are examined and key engineering issues are identified and addressed. Some preliminary results and conclusions of this work are summarized. (authors)

  7. Space Propulsion via Spherical Torus Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Craig H.; Juhasz, Albert J.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2003-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle design enabling fast outer solar system travel was produced predicated on a small aspect ratio spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor. Analysis revealed that the vehicle could deliver a 108 mt crew habitat payload to Saturn rendezvous in 204 days, with an initial mass in low Earth orbit of 1630 mt. Engineering conceptual design, analysis, and assessment were performed on all major systems including nuclear fusion reactor, magnetic nozzle, power conversion, fast wave plasma heating, fuel pellet injector, startup/re-start fission reactor and battery, and other systems. Detailed fusion reactor design included analysis of plasma characteristics, power balance and utilization, first wall, toroidal field coils, heat transfer, and neutron/X-ray radiation

  8. Sandia Pulse Reactor-IV Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuscher, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed, designed and operated fast burst reactors for over 20 years. These reactors have been used for a variety of radiation effects programs. During this period, programs have required larger irradiation volumes primarily to expose complex electronic systems to postulated threat environments. As experiment volumes increased, a new reactor was built so that these components could be tested. The Sandia Pulse Reactor-IV is a logical evolution of the two decades of fast burst reactor development at Sandia

  9. Heat transfer in inertial confinement fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.

    1979-01-01

    The transfer of energy produced by the interaction of the intense pulses of short-ranged fusion microexplosion products with materials is one of the most difficult problems in inertially-confined fusion (ICF) reactor design. The short time and deposition distance for the energy results in local peak power densities on the order of 10 18 watts/m 3 . High local power densities may cause change of state or spall in the reactor materials. This will limit the structure lifetimes for ICF reactors of economic physical sizes, increasing operating costs including structure replacement and radioactive waste management. Four basic first wall protection methods have evolved: a dry-wall, a wet-wall, a magnetically shielded wall, and a fluid wall. These approaches are distinguished by the way the reactor wall interfaces with fusion debris as well as the way the ambient cavity conditions modify the fusion energy forms and spectra at the first wall. Each of these approaches requires different heat transfer considerations

  10. New materials in nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Shuichi

    1988-01-01

    In the autumn of 1987, the critical condition was attained in the JET in Europe and Japanese JT-60, thus the first subject in the physical verification of nuclear fusion reactors was resolved, and the challenge to the next attainment of self ignition condition started. As the development process of nuclear fusion reactors, there are the steps of engineering, economical and social verifications after this physical verification, and in respective steps, there are the critical problems related to materials, therefore the development of new materials must be advanced. The condition of using nuclear fusion reactors is characterized by high fluence, high thermal flux and strong magnetic field, and under such extreme condition, the microscopic structures of materials change, and they behave much differently from usual case. The subjects of material development for nuclear fusion reactors, the material data base being built up, the materials for facing plasma and high thermal flux, first walls, blanket structures, electric insulators and others are described. The serious effect of irradiation and the rate of defect inducement must be taken in consideration in the structural materials for nuclear fusion reactors. (Kako, I.)

  11. Colliding beam fusion reactor space propulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessel, Frank J.; Binderbauer, Michl W.; Rostoker, Norman; Rahman, Hafiz Ur; O'Toole, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    We describe a space propulsion system based on the Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor (CBFR). The CBFR is a high-beta, field-reversed, magnetic configuration with ion energies in the range of hundreds of keV. Repetitively-pulsed ion beams sustain the plasma distribution and provide current drive. The confinement physics is based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equation, including a Fokker Planck collision operator and all sources and sinks for energy and particle flow. The mean azimuthal velocities and temperatures of the fuel ion species are equal and the plasma current is unneutralized by the electrons. The resulting distribution functions are thermal in a moving frame of reference. The ion gyro-orbit radius is comparable to the dimensions of the confinement system, hence classical transport of the particles and energy is expected and the device is scaleable. We have analyzed the design over a range of 10 6 -10 9 Watts of output power (0.15-150 Newtons thrust) with a specific impulse of, I sp ∼10 6 sec. A 50 MW propulsion system might involve the following parameters: 4-meters diameterx10-meters length, magnetic field ∼7 Tesla, ion beam current ∼10 A, and fuels of either D-He 3 ,P-B 11 ,P-Li 6 ,D-Li 6 , etc

  12. Reversed-field pinch fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual engineering design of a fusion reactor based on plasma confinement in a toroidal Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) configuration is described. The plasma is ohmically ignited by toroidal plasma currents which also inherently provide the confining magnetic fields in a toroidal chamber having major and minor radii of 12.7 and 1.5 m, respectively. The DT plasma ignites in 2 to 3 s and undergoes a transient, unrefueled burn at 10 to 20 keV for approx. 20 s to give a DT burnup of approx. 50%. The 5-s dwell period between burn pulses for plasma quench and refueling allows steady-state operation of all thermal systems outside the first wall; no auxiliary thermal capacity is required. Tritium breeding occurs in a granular Li 2 O blanket which is packed around an array of radially oriented water/steam coolant tubes. The slightly superheated steam emerging from this blanket directly drives a turbine that produces electrical power at an efficiency of 30%. A borated-water shield is located immediately outside the thermal blanket to protect the superconducting magnet coils. Both the superconducting poloidal and toroidal field coils are energized by homopolar motor/generators. Accounting for all major energy sinks yields a cost-optimized system with a recirculating power fraction of 0.17; the power output is 750 MWe

  13. Mirror hybrid (fusion--fission) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, D.J.; Lee, J.D.; Neef, W.S.; Devoto, R.S.; Galloway, T.R.; Fink, J.H.; Schultz, K.R.; Culver, D.; Rao, S.

    1977-10-01

    The reference mirror hybrid reactor design performed by LLL and General Atomic is summarized. The reactor parameters have been chosen to minimize the cost of producing fissile fuel for consumption in fission power reactors. As in the past, we have emphasized the use of existing technology where possible and a minimum extrapolation of technology otherwise. The resulting reactor may thus be viewed as a comparatively near-term goal of the fusion program, and we project improved performance for the hybrid in the future as more advanced technology becomes available

  14. Conceptual design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report describes the engineering conceptual design of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) which is to be built as a next generation tokamak machine. This design covers overall reactor systems including MHD equilibrium analysis, mechanical configuration of reactor, divertor, pumped limiter, first wall/breeding blanket/shield, toroidal field magnet, poloidal field magnet, cryostat, electromagnetic analysis, vacuum system, power handling and conversion, NBI, RF heating device, tritium system, neutronics, maintenance, cooling system and layout of facilities. The engineering comparison of a divertor with pumped limiters and safety analysis of reactor systems are also conducted. (author)

  15. Fusion reactor remote maintenance study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sniderman, M.

    1979-04-01

    An analysis of a major maintenance operation, the remote replacement of a modular sector of a tokamak reactor, was performed in substantial detail. Specific assumptions were developed which included concepts from various existing designs so that the operation which was studied includes some design features generic to any fusion reactor design. Based on the work performed in this study, the principal conclusions are: (1) It appears feasible to design a tokamak fusion reactor plant with availability comparable to existing fossil and fission plants, but this will require diligence and comprehensive planning during the complete design phase. (2) Since the total fusion program is paced by the success of each device, maintenance considerations must be incorporated into each device during design, even if the device is an experimental unit. (3) Innovative approaches, such as automatic computer controlled operations, should be developed so that large step reductions in planned maintenance times can be achieved

  16. Fusion-Fission hybrid reactors and nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1984-09-01

    New options for the development of the nuclear energy economy which might become available by a successful development of fusion-breeders or fusion-fission hybrid power reactors, identified and their nonproliferative attributes are discussed. The more promising proliferation-resistance ettributes identified include: (1) Justification for a significant delay in the initiation of fuel processing, (2) Denaturing the plutonium with 238 Pu before its use in power reactors of any kind, and (3) Making practical the development of denatured uranium fuel cycles and, in particular, denaturing the uranium with 232 U. Fuel resource utilization, time-table and economic considerations associated with the use of fusion-breeders are also discussed. It is concluded that hybrid reactors may enable developing a nuclear energy economy which is more proliferation resistant than possible otherwise, whileat the same time, assuring high utilization of t he uranium and thorium resources in an economically acceptable way. (author)

  17. Remote assembly and maintenance of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becquet, M.C.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper intend to present the state of the art in the field of remote assembly and maintenance, including system analysis design and operation for controlled fusion device such as JET, and the next NET and ITER reactors. The operational constraints of fusion reactors with respect to temperature, radiations dose rates and cumulated doses are considered with the resulting design requirements. Concepts like articulated boom, in-vessel vehicle and blanket handling device are presented. The close relations between computer simulations and experimental validation of those concepts are emphasized to ensure reliability of the operational behavior. Mockups and prototypes in reduced and full scale, as operating machines are described to illustrate the progress in remote operations for fusion reactors. The developments achieved at the Institute for System Engineering and Informatics of the Joint Research Center, in the field of remote blanket maintenance, reliability assessment of RH systems and remote cut and welding of lips joints are considered. (author)

  18. Nuclear data needs for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear design of fusion components (e.g., first wall, blanket, shield, magnet, limiter, divertor, etc.) requires an accurate prediction of the radiation field, the radiation damage parameters, and the activation analysis. The fusion nucleonics for these tasks are reviewed with special attention to point out nuclear data needs and deficiencies which effect the design process. The main areas included in this review are tritium breeding analyses, nuclear heating calculations, radiation damage in reactor components, shield designs, and results of uncertainty analyses as applied to fusion reactor studies. Design choices and reactor parameters that impact the neutronics performance of the blanket are discussed with emphasis on the tritium breeding ratio. Nuclear data required for kerma factors, shielding analysis, and radiation damage are discussed. Improvements in the evaluated data libraries are described to overcome the existing problems. 84 refs., 11 figs., 9 tabs

  19. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed

  20. Nuclear data for fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The meeting was organized in four sessions and four working groups devoted to the following topics: Requirements of nuclear data for fusion reactor technology (6 papers); Status of experimental and theoretical investigations of microscopic nuclear data (10 papers); Status of existing libraries for fusion neutronic calculations (5 papers); and Status of integral experiments and benchmark tests (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  1. Health physics in fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.Y.; Dinner, P.J.

    1984-06-01

    Experience in the control of tritium exposures to workers and the public gained through the design and operation of Ontario Hydro's nuclear stations has been applied to fusion projects and to design studies on emerging fusion reactor concepts. Ontario Hydro performance in occupational tritium exposure control and environmental impact is reviewed. Application of tritium control technologies and dose management methodology during facility design is highlighted

  2. TORFA - toroidal reactor for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.

    1980-09-01

    The near-term goal of the US controlled fusion program should be the development, for practical applications, of an intense, quasi-steady, reliable 14-MeV neutron source with an electrical utilization efficiency at least 10 times larger than the value characterizing beam/solid-target neutron generators. This report outlines a method for implementing that goal, based on tokamak fusion reactors featuring resistive toroidal-field coils designed for ease of demountability

  3. Compact approach to fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) for development into an efficient, compact, copper-coil fusion reactor has been quantified by comprehensive parametric tradeoff studies. These compact systems promise to be competitive in size, power density, and cost to alternative energy sources. Conceptual engineering designs that largely substantiate these promising results have since been completed. This 1000-MWe(net) design is described along with a detailed rationale and physics/technology assessment for the compact approach to fusion

  4. Prospects for improved fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Ideally, a new energy source must be capable of displacing old energy sources while providing both economic opportunities and enhanced environmental benefits. The attraction of an essentially unlimited fuel supply has generated a strong impetus to develop advanced fission breeders and, even more strongly, the exploitation of nuclear fusion. Both fission and fusion systems trade a reduced fuel charge for a more capital-intensive plant needed to utilize a cheaper and more abundant fuel. Results from early conceptual designs of fusion power plants, however, indicated a capital intensiveness that could override cost savings promised by an inexpensive fuel cycle. Early warnings of these problems appeared, and generalized routes to more economically attractive systems have been suggested; specific examples have also recently been given. Although a direct reduction in the cost (and mass) of the fusion power core (FPC, i.e., plasma chamber, first wall, blanket, shield, coils, and primary structure) most directly reduces the overall cost of fusion power, with the mass power density (MPD, ratio of net electric power to FPC mass, kWe/tonne) being suggested as a figure-of-merit in this respect, other technical, safety/environmental, and institutional issues also enter into the definition of and direction for improved fusion concepts. These latter issues and related tradeoffs are discussed

  5. Light ion driven inertial fusion reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.L.; Sweeney, M.A.; Buttram, M.T.; Prestwich, K.R.; Moses, G.A.; peterson, R.R.; Lovell, E.G.; Englestad, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility of designing fusion reactor systems using intense beams of light ions has been investigated. concepts for beam production, transport, and focusing on target have been analyzed in light of more conservative target performance estimates. Analyses of the major criteria which govern the design of the beam-target-cavity tried indicate the feasibility of designing power systems at the few hundred megawatt (electric) level. This paper discusses light ion fusion reactor (LIFR) concepts and presents an assessment of the design limitations through quantitative examples

  6. Progress of electromagnetic analysis for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, T.; Ruatto, P.; Boccaccini, L.V.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the recent progress of electromagnetic analysis research for fusion reactors including methods, codes, verification tests and some applications. Due to the necessity of the research effort for the structural design of large tokamak devices since the 1970's with the help of the introduction of new numerical methods and the advancement of computer technologies, three-dimensional analysis methods have become as practical as shell approximation methods. The electromagnetic analysis is now applied to the structural design of new fusion reactors. Some more modeling and verification tests are necessary when the codes are applied to new materials with nonlinear material properties. (orig.)

  7. Present status of fusion reactor materials, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, Ryukichi; Shiraishi, Kensuke; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Murakami, Yoshio; Takamura, Saburo

    1982-01-01

    Recently, the design of fusion reactors such as Intor has been carried out, and various properties that fusion reactor materials should have been clarified. In the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the research and development of materials aiming at a tokamak type experimental fusion reactor are in progress. In this paper, the problems, the present status of research and development and the future plan about the surface materials and structural materials for the first wall, blanket materials and magnet materials are explained. The construction of the critical plasma testing facility JT-60 developed by JAERI has progressed smoothly, and the operation is expected in 1985. The research changes from that of plasma physics to that of reactor technology. In tokamak type fusion reactors, high temperature D-T plasma is contained with strong magnetic field in vacuum vessels, and the neutrons produced by nuclear reaction, charged particles diffusing from plasma and neutral particles by charge exchange strike the first wall. The PCA by improving 316 stainless steel is used as the structural material, and TiC coating techniques are developed. As the blanket material, Li 2 O is studied, and superconducting magnets are developed. (Koko, I.)

  8. Blankets for fusion reactors : materials and neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, S.H. de.

    1980-03-01

    The studies about Fusion Reactors have lead to several problems for which there is no general agreement about the best solution. Nevertheless, several points seem to be well defined, at least for the first generation of reactors. The fuel, for example, should be a mixture of deuterium and tritium. Therefore, the reactor should be able to generate the tritium to be burned and also to transform kinetic energy of the fusion neutrons into heat in a process similar to the fission reactors. The best materials for the composition of the blanket were first selected and then the neutronics for the proposed system was developed. The neutron flux in the blanket was calculated using the discrete ordinates transport code, ANISN. All the nuclides cross sections came from the DLC-28/CTR library, that processed the ENDF/B data, using the SUPERTOG Program. (Author) [pt

  9. Occupational health physics at a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shank, K.E.; Easterly, C.E.; Shoup, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    Future generation of electrical power using controlled thermonuclear reactors will involve both traditional and new concerns for health protection. A review of the problems associated with exposures to tritium and magnetic fields is presented with emphasis on the occupational worker. The radiological aspects of tritium, inventories and loss rates of tritium for fusion reactors, and protection of the occupational worker are discussed. Magnetic fields in which workers may be exposed routinely and possible biological effects are also discussed

  10. Tritium resources available for fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovari, M.; Coleman, M.; Cristescu, I.; Smith, R.

    2018-02-01

    The tritium required for ITER will be supplied from the CANDU production in Ontario, but while Ontario may be able to supply 8 kg for a DEMO fusion reactor in the mid-2050s, it will not be able to provide 10 kg at any realistic starting time. The tritium required to start DEMO will depend on advances in plasma fuelling efficiency, burnup fraction, and tritium processing technology. It is in theory possible to start up a fusion reactor with little or no tritium, but at an estimated cost of 2 billion per kilogram of tritium saved, it is not economically sensible. Some heavy water reactor tritium production scenarios with varying degrees of optimism are presented, with the assumption that only Canada, the Republic of Korea, and Romania make tritium available to the fusion community. Results for the tritium available for DEMO in 2055 range from zero to 30 kg. CANDU and similar heavy water reactors could in theory generate additional tritium in a number of ways: (a) adjuster rods containing lithium could be used, giving 0.13 kg per year per reactor; (b) a fuel bundle with a burnable absorber has been designed for CANDU reactors, which might be adapted for tritium production; (c) tritium production could be increased by 0.05 kg per year per reactor by doping the moderator with lithium-6. If a fusion reactor is started up around 2055, governments in Canada, Argentina, China, India, South Korea and Romania will have the opportunity in the years leading up to that to take appropriate steps: (a) build, refurbish or upgrade tritium extraction facilities; (b) extend the lives of heavy water reactors, or build new ones; (c) reduce tritium sales; (d) boost tritium production in the remaining heavy water reactors. All of the alternative production methods considered have serious economic and regulatory drawbacks, and the risk of diversion of tritium or lithium-6 would also be a major concern. There are likely to be serious problems with supplying tritium for future

  11. Scyllac fusion test reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudziak, D.J.; Gerstl, S.A.; Houck, D.L.; Jalbert, R.A.; Krakowski, R.A.; Linford, R.K.; McDonald, T.E.; Rogers, J.D.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1975-01-01

    A general design of the system is given. The implosion heating and compression systems (METS) are described. Tritium handling, shielding and activation of the reactor, and safety and environmental aspects are discussed

  12. Effects of pulse-to-pulse residual species on discharges in repetitively pulsed discharges through packed bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszelnicki, Juliusz; Engeling, Kenneth W.; Foster, John E.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in packed bed reactors (PBRs) are being investigated for conversion of toxic and waste gases, and CO2 removal. These discharges are repetitively pulsed having varying flow rates and internal geometries, which results in species from the prior pulse still being in the discharge zone at the time the following discharge pulse occurs. A non-negligible residual plasma density remains, which effectively acts as preionization. This residual charge changes the discharge properties of subsequent pulses, and may impact important PBR properties such as chemical selectivity. Similarly, the residual neutral reactive species produced during earlier pulses will impact the reaction rates on subsequent pulses. We report on results of a computational investigation of a 2D PBR using the plasma hydrodynamics simulator nonPDPSIM. Results will be discussed for air flowing though an array of dielectric rods at atmospheric pressure. The effects of inter-pulse residual species on PBR discharges will be quantified. Means of controlling the presence of residual species in the reactor through gas flow rate, pulse repetition, pulse width and geometry will be described. Comparisons will be made to experiments. Work supported by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  13. Tritium breeding in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1982-10-01

    Key technological problems that influence tritium breeding in fusion blankets are reviewed. The breeding potential of candidate materials is evaluated and compared to the tritium breeding requirements. The sensitivity of tritium breeding to design and nuclear data parameters is reviewed. A framework for an integrated approach to improve tritium breeding prediction is discussed with emphasis on nuclear data requirements

  14. Materials problems associated with fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, R.

    This paper outlines the principles of design and operation of conceptual fusion reactors, indicates the level of research funding and activity being proposed at major centres and reviews the major materials problems which have been identified, together with an outline of the experimental techniques which have been suggested for investigating these problems. (author)

  15. Standard mirror fusion reactor design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    This report covers the work of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Division's reactor study group during FY 1976 on the standard mirror reactor. The ''standard'' mirror reactor is characterized as a steady state, neutral beam sustained, D-T fusioning plasma confined by a Yin-Yang magnetic mirror field. The physics parameters are obtained from the same physics model that explains the 2XIIB experiment. The model assumes that the drift cyclotron loss cone mode occurs on the boundary of the plasma, and that it is stabilized by warm plasma with negligible energy investment. The result of the study was a workable mirror fusion power plant, steady-state blanket removal made relatively simple by open-ended geometry, and no impurity problem due to the positive plasma potential. The Q (fusion power/injected beam power) turns out to be only 1.1 because of loss out the ends from Coulomb collisions, i.e., classical losses. This low Q resulted in 77% of the gross electrical power being used to power the injectors, thereby causing the net power cost to be high. The low Q stimulated an intensive search for Q-enhancement concepts, resulting in the LLL reactor design effort turning to the field reversal mirror and the tandem mirror, each having Q of order 5

  16. Waste management for JAERI fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobita, K.; Nishio, S.; Konishi, S.; Jitsukawa, S.

    2004-01-01

    In the fusion reactor design study at Japan Atomic Energy Institute (JAERI), several waste management strategies were assessed. The assessed strategies are: (1) reinforced neutron shield to clear the massive ex-shielding components from regulatory control; (2) low aspect ratio tokamak to reduce the total waste; (3) reuse of liquid metal breeding material and neutron shield. Combining these strategies, the weight of disposal waste from a low aspect ratio reactor VECTOR is expected to be comparable with the metal radwaste from a light water reactor (∼4000 t)

  17. Optical design considerations for laser fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.; Maniscalco, J.A.

    1977-09-01

    The plan for the development of commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power plants is discussed, emphasizing the utilization of the unique features of laser fusion to arrive at conceptual designs for reactors and optical systems which minimize the need for advanced materials and techniques requiring expensive test facilities. A conceptual design for a liquid lithium fall reactor is described which successfully deals with the hostile x-ray and neutron environment and promises to last the 30 year plant lifetime. Schemes for protecting the final focusing optics are described which are both compatible with this reactor system and show promise of surviving a full year in order to minimize costly downtime. Damage mechanisms and protection techniques are discussed, and a recommendation is made for a high f-number metal mirror final focusing system

  18. Materials design data for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavassoli, A.A.F.

    1998-01-01

    Design data needed for fusion reactors are characterized by the diversity of materials and the complexity of loading situations found in these reactors. In addition, advanced fabrication techniques, such as hot isostatic pressing, envisaged for fabrication of single and multilayered in-vessel components, could significantly change the original materials properties for which the current design rules are written. As a result, additional materials properties have had to be generated for fusion reactors and new structural design rules formulated. This paper recalls some of the materials properties data generated for ITER and DEMO, and gives examples of how these are converted into design criteria. In particular, it gives specific examples for the properties of 316LN-IG and modified 9Cr-1Mo steels, and CuCrZr alloy. These include, determination of tension, creep, isochronous, fatigue, and creep-fatigue curves and their analysis and conversion into design limits. (orig.)

  19. Neutronic study of fusion reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, F.

    1983-06-01

    The problem of effective regeneration is a crucial issue for the fusion reactor, specially for the power reactor because of the conflicting requirements of heat removal and tritium breeding. For that, calculations are performed to evaluate blanket materials. Precise techniques are herein developed to improve the accuracy of the tritium production and the neutron and gamma transport calculations. Many configurations are studied with realistic breeder, structure, and coolant proportions. Accuracy of the results are evaluated from the sensitivity theory and uncertainty study using covariance matrices. At the end of this work, we presented the needs of nuclear data for fusion reactors and we give some advices for improving our knowledge of these data [fr

  20. Neutronic study of fusion reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, F.

    1984-02-01

    The problem of effective regeneration is a crucial issue for the fusion reactor, specially for the power reactor because of the conflicting requirements of heat removal and tritium breeding. For that, calculations are performed to evaluate blanket materials. Precise techniques are herein developed to improve the accuracy of the tritium production and the neutron and gamma transport calculations. Many configurations are studied with realistic breeder, structure, and coolant proportions. Accuracy of the results are evaluated from the sensitivity theory and uncertainty study using covariance matricies. At the end of this work, we presented the needs of nuclear data for fusion reactors and we give some advices for improving our knowledge of these data [fr

  1. Materials design data for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, A.A.F. [CEA Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Gif sur Yvette (France). CEREM

    1998-10-01

    Design data needed for fusion reactors are characterized by the diversity of materials and the complexity of loading situations found in these reactors. In addition, advanced fabrication techniques, such as hot isostatic pressing, envisaged for fabrication of single and multilayered in-vessel components, could significantly change the original materials properties for which the current design rules are written. As a result, additional materials properties have had to be generated for fusion reactors and new structural design rules formulated. This paper recalls some of the materials properties data generated for ITER and DEMO, and gives examples of how these are converted into design criteria. In particular, it gives specific examples for the properties of 316LN-IG and modified 9Cr-1Mo steels, and CuCrZr alloy. These include, determination of tension, creep, isochronous, fatigue, and creep-fatigue curves and their analysis and conversion into design limits. (orig.) 19 refs.

  2. Tritium management for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouyer, J.L.; Djerassi, H.

    1985-01-01

    To determine a waste management strategy, one has to identify first the wastes (quantities, activities, etc.), then to define options, and to compare these options by appropriate criteria and evaluations. Two European Associations are working together, i.e., Studsvik and CEA, on waste treatment and tritium problems. A contribution to fusion specific tritiated waste management strategy is presented. It is demonstrated that the best strategy is to retain tritium (outgas and recover, or immobilize it) so that residual tritium releases are kept to a minimum. For that, wastes are identified, actual regulations are described and judged inadequate without amendments for fusion problems. Appropriate criteria are defined. Options for treatment and disposal of tritiated wastes are proposed and evaluated. A tritium recovery solution is described

  3. Radiation environment of fusion experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Seiji; Seki, Yasushi

    1988-01-01

    Next step device (experimental reactor), which is planned to succeed the large plasma experimental devices such as JT-60, JET and TFTR, generates radiation (neutron + gamma ray) during its operation. Radiation (neutronic) properties of the material are basis for the study on neutron utilization (energy recovery and tritium breeding), material selection (irradiation damage and lifetime evaluation) and radiation safety (personnel exposure and radiation waste). It is necessary, therefore, to predict radiation behaviour in the reactor correctly for the engineering design of the reactor. This report describes the outline of the radiation environment of the reactor based on the information obtained by the neutronic and shielding design calculation of the fusion experimental reactor (FER). (author)

  4. Conceptual design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Conceptual Design of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) of which the objective will be to realize self-ignition with D-T reaction is reported. Mechanical Configurations of FER are characterized with a noncircular plasma and a double-null divertor. The primary aim of design studies is to demonstrate fissibility of reactor structures as compact and simple as possible with removable torus sectors. The structures of each component such as a first-wall, blanket, shielding, divertor, magnet and so on have been designed. It is also discussed about essential reactor plant system requirements. In addition to the above, a brief concept of a steady-state reactor based on RF current drive is also discussed. The main aim, in this time, is to examine physical studies of a possible RF steady-state reactor. (author)

  5. Mirror Fusion Test Facility: an intermediate device to a mirror fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpenko, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) now under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory represents more than an order-of-magnitude step from earlier magnetic-mirror experiments toward a future mirror fusion reactor. In fact, when the device begins operating in 1986, the Lawson criteria of ntau = 10 14 cm -3 .s will almost be achieved for D-T equivalent operation, thus signifying scientific breakeven. Major steps have been taken to develop MFTF-B technologies for tandem mirrors. Steady-state, high-field, superconducting magnets at reactor-revelant scales are used in the machine. The 30-s beam pulses, ECRH, and ICRH will also introduce steady-state technologies in those systems

  6. Economic, safety and environmental prospects of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Holdren, J.P.; Sharafat, S.

    1990-01-01

    Controlled fusion energy is one of the long term, non-fossil energy sources available to mankind. It has the potential of significant advantages over fission nuclear power in that the consequences of severe accidents are predicted to be less and the radioactive waste burden is calculated to be smaller. Fusion can be an important ingredient in the future world energy mix as a hedge against environmental, supply or political difficulties connected with the use of fossil fuel and present-day nuclear power. Progress in fusion reactor technology and design is described for both magnetic and inertial fusion energy systems. The projected economic prospects show that fusion will be capital intensive, and the historical trend is towards greater mass utilization efficiency and more competitive costs. Recent studies emphasizing safety and environmental advantages show that the competitive potential of fusion can be further enhanced by specific choices of materials and design. The safety and environmental prospects of fusion appear to exceed substantially those of advanced fission and coal. Clearly, a significant and directed technology effort is necessary to achieve these advantages. Typical parameters have been established for magnetic fusion energy reactors, and a tokamak at moderately high magnetic field (about 7 T on axis) in the first regime of MHD stability (β ≤ 3.5 I/aB) is closest to present experimental achievement. Further improvements of the economic and technological performance of the tokamak are possible. In addition, alternative, non-tokamak magnetic fusion approaches may offer substantive economic and operational benefits, although at present these concepts must be projected from a less developed physics base. For inertial fusion energy, the essential requirements are a high efficiency (≥ 10%) repetitively pulsed pellet driver capable of delivering up to 10 MJ of energy on target, targets capable of an energy gain of about 100, reactor chambers capable of

  7. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, J D

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered.

  8. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, J.D.

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered

  9. Pulsed power ion accelerators for inertially confined fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, C.L.

    1976-01-01

    Current research is described on pulsed power ion accelerators for inertial fusion, i.e., ion diodes and collective accelerators. Particle beam energy and power requirements for fusion, and basic deposition characteristics of charged particle beams are discussed. Ion diodes and collective accelerators for fusion are compared with existing conventional accelerators

  10. From reactors to long pulse sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, F.

    1995-01-01

    We will show, that by using an adapted instrumentation concept, the performance of a continuous source can be emulated by one switch on in long pulses for only about 10% of the total time. This 10 fold gain in neutron economy opens up the way for building reactor like sources with an order of magnitude higher flux than the present technological limits. Linac accelerator driven spallation lends itself favorably for the realization of this kind of long pulse sources, which will be complementary to short pulse spallation sources, the same way continuous reactor sources are

  11. Advanced fuels for nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, J.R. Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Should magnetic confinement of hot plasma prove satisfactory at high β (16 πnkT//sub B 2 / greater than 0.1), thermonuclear fusion fuels other than D.T may be contemplated for future fusion reactors. The prospect of the advanced fusion fuels D.D and 6 Li.D for fusion reactors is quite promising provided the system is large, well reflected and possesses a high β. The first generation reactions produce the very active, energy-rich fuels t and 3 He which exhibit a high burnup probability in very hot plasmas. Steady state burning of D.D can ensue in a 60 kG field, 5 m reactor for β approximately 0.2 and reflectivity R/sub mu/ = 0.9 provided the confinement time is about 38 sec. The feasibility of steady state burning of 6 Li.D has not yet been demonstrated but many important features of such systems still need to be incorporated in the reactivity code. In particular, there is a need for new and improved nuclear cross section data for over 80 reaction possibilities

  12. Neutron personnel dosimetry considerations for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, T.P.; Easterly, C.E.

    1979-07-01

    The increasing development of fusion reactor technology warrants an evaluation of personnel neutron dosimetry systems to aid in the concurrent development of a radiation protection program. For this reason, current state of knowledge neutron dosimeters have been reviewed with emphasis placed on practical utilization and the problems inherent in each type of dosimetry system. Evaluations of salient parameters such as energy response, latent image instability, and minimum detectable dose equivalent are presented for nuclear emulsion films, track etch techniques, albedo and other thermoluminescent dosimetry techniques, electrical conductivity damage effects, lyoluminescence, thermocurrent, and thermally stimulated exoelectron emission. Brief summaries of dosimetry regulatory requirements and intercomparison study results help to establish compliance and recent trends, respectively. Spectrum modeling data generated by the Neutron Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Facility have been analyzed by both International Commission on Radiological Protection fluence to dose conversion factors and an adjoint technique of radiation dosimetry, in an attempt to determine the applicability of current neutron dosimetry systems to deuterium and tritium fusion reactor leakage spectra. Based on the modeling data, a wide range of neutron energies will probably be present in the leakage spectra of the TFTR facility, and no appreciable risk of somatic injury to occupationally exposed workers is expected. The relative dose contributions due to high energy and thermal neutrons indicate that neutron dosimetry will probably not be a serious limitation in the development of fusion power

  13. Maintenance of fission and fusion reactors. 10. workshop on fusion reactor engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This report contains copies of OHP presented at the title meeting. The presented topics are as follows, maintenance of nuclear power plants and ITER, exchange of shroud in BWR type reactors, deterioration of fission and fusion reactor materials, standards of pressure vessels, malfunction diagnosis method with neural network. (J.P.N.)

  14. Tritium monitor for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalbert, R.A.

    1982-08-01

    This report describes the design, operation, and performance of a flow-through ion-chamber instrument designed to measure tritium concentrations in air containing /sup 13/N, /sup 16/N, and /sup 41/Ar produced by neutrons generated by D-T fusion devices. The instrument employs a chamber assembly consisting of two coaxial ionization chambers. The inner chamber is the flow-through measuring chamber and the outer chamber is used for current subtraction. A thin wall common to both chambers is opaque to the tritium betas. Currents produced in the two chambers by higher energy radiation are automatically subtracted, leaving only the current due to tritium.

  15. Cermet coatings for magnetic fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.F.; Whitley, J.B.; McDonald, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Cermet coatings consisting of SiC particles in an aluminum matrix were produced by a low pressure chamber plasma spray process. Properties of these coatings are being investigated to evaluate their suitability for use in the next generation of magnetic confinement fusion reactors. Although this preliminary study has focused primarily upon SiC-Al cermets, the deposition process can be adapted to other ceramic-metal combinations. Potential applications for cermet coatings in magnetic fusion devices are presented along with experimental results from thermal tests of candidate coatings. (Auth.)

  16. Fusion reactors for hydrogen production via electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

    1979-01-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  17. Conceptual design of laser fusion reactor KOYO-fast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomabechi, K.; Kozaki, Y.; Norimatsu, T.

    2006-01-01

    A conceptual design of the laser fusion reactor KOYO-F based on the fast ignition scheme is reported including the target design, the laser system and the design for chamber. A Yb-YAG ceramic laser operated at 200 K is the primary candidate for the compression laser and an OPCPA (optical parametric chirped pulse amplification) system is the one for the ignition laser. The chamber is basically a wet wall type but the fire position is vertically off-set to simplify the protection scheme of the ceiling. The target consists of foam insulated, cryogenic DT shells with a LiPb, reentrant guide-cone. (authors)

  18. ITER: the first experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project is a multiphased project, at present proceeding under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency according to the terms of a four-party agreement between the European Atomic Energy Community, the Government of Japan, the Government of the USA and the Government of Russia (''the parties''). The project is based on the tokamak, a Russian invention which has been brought to a high level of development and progress in all major fusion programs throughout the world.The objective of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy for commercial energy production and to test technologies for a demonstration fusion power plant. During the extended performance phase of ITER, it will demonstrate the characteristics of a fusion power plant, producing more than 1500MW of fusion power.The objective of the engineering design activity (EDA) phase is to produce a detailed, complete and fully integrated engineering design of ITER and all technical data necessary for the future decision on the construction of ITER.The ITER device will be a major step from present fusion experiments and will encompass all the major elements required for a fusion reactor. It will also require the development and the implementation of major new components and technologies.The inside surface of the plasma containment chamber will be designed to withstand temperature of up to 500 C, although normal operating temperatures will be substantially lower. Materials will have to be carefully chosen to withstand these temperatures, and a high neutron flux. In addition, other components of the device will be composed of state-of-the-art metal alloys, ceramics and composites, many of which are now in the early stage of development of testing. (orig.)

  19. High current pulsed linear ion accelerators for inertial fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Yonas, G.; Poukey, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    Pulsed ion beams have a number of advantages for use as inertial fusion drivers. Among these are classical interaction with targets and good efficiency of production. As has been pointed out by members of the accelerator community, multistage accelerators are attractive in this context because of lower current requirements, low power flow per energy conversion stage and low beam divergence at higher ion energies. On the other hand, current transport limits in conventional accelerators constrain them to the use of heavy ions at energies much higher than those needed to meet the divergence requirements, resulting in large, costly systems. We have studied methods of neutralizing ion beams with electrons within the accelerator volume to achieve higher currents. The aim is to arrive at an inexpensive accelerator that can advantageously use existing pulsed voltage technology while being conservative enough to achieve a high repetition rate. Typical output parameters for reactor applications would be an 0 + beam of 30 kA at 300 MeV. We will describe reactor scaling studies and the physics of neutralized linear accelerators using magnetic fields to control the electron dynamics. Recent results are discussed from PULSELAC, a five stage multikiloampere device being tested at Sandia Laboratories

  20. Reactor potential for magnetized target fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlin, J.E.

    2001-06-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a possible pathway to thermonuclear fusion different from both magnetic fusion and inertial confinement fusion. An imploding cylindrical metal liner compresses a preheated and magnetized plasma configuration until thermonuclear conditions are achieved. In this report the Magnetized Target Fusion concept is evaluated and a zero-dimensional computer model of the plasma, liner and circuit as a connected system is designed. The results of running this code are that thermonuclear conditions are achieved indeed, but only during a very short time. At peak compression the pressure from the compressed plasma and magnetic field is so large reversing the liner implosion into an explosion. The time period of liner motion reversal is termed the dwell time and is crucial to the performance of the fusion system. Parameters as liner thickness and plasma density are certainly of significant importance to the dwell time, but it seems like a reactor based on the MTF principle hardly can become economic if not innovative solutions are introduced. In the report two such solutions are presented as well

  1. Hybrid fission-fusion nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid could contribute to all components of nuclear power - fuel supply, electricity production, and waste management. The idea of the fusion-fission hybrid is many decades old. Several ideas, both new and revisited, have been investigated by hybrid proponents. These ideas appear to have attractive features, but they require various levels of advances in plasma science and fusion and nuclear technology. As a first step towards the development of hybrid reactors, fusion neutron sources can be considered as an option. Compact high-field tokamaks can be a candidate for being the neutron source in a fission-fusion hybrid, essentially due to their design characteristics, such as compact dimensions, high magnetic field, flexibility of operation. This study presents the development of a tokamak neutron source for a material testing facility using an Ignitor-based concept. The computed values show the potential of this neutron-rich device for fusion materials testing. Some full-power months of operation are sufficient to obtain relevant radiation damage values in terms of dpa. (Author)

  2. Reactor potential for magnetized target fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, J.E

    2001-06-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a possible pathway to thermonuclear fusion different from both magnetic fusion and inertial confinement fusion. An imploding cylindrical metal liner compresses a preheated and magnetized plasma configuration until thermonuclear conditions are achieved. In this report the Magnetized Target Fusion concept is evaluated and a zero-dimensional computer model of the plasma, liner and circuit as a connected system is designed. The results of running this code are that thermonuclear conditions are achieved indeed, but only during a very short time. At peak compression the pressure from the compressed plasma and magnetic field is so large reversing the liner implosion into an explosion. The time period of liner motion reversal is termed the dwell time and is crucial to the performance of the fusion system. Parameters as liner thickness and plasma density are certainly of significant importance to the dwell time, but it seems like a reactor based on the MTF principle hardly can become economic if not innovative solutions are introduced. In the report two such solutions are presented as well.

  3. Conceptual design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    A conceptual design study (option C) has been carried out for the fusion experimental reactor (FER). In addition to design of the tokamak reactor and associated systems based on the reference design specifications, feasibility of a water-shield reactor concept was examined as a topical study. The design study for the reference tokamak reactor has produced a reactor concept for the FER, along with major R D items for the concept, based on close examinations on thermal design, electromagnetics, neutronics and remote maintenance. Particular efforts have been directed to the area of electromagnetics. Detailed analyses with close simulation models have been performed on PF coil arrangements and configurations, shell effects of the blanket for plasma position unstability, feedback control, and eddy currents during disruptions. The major design specifications are as follows; Peak fusion power 437 MW Major radius 5.5 m Minor radius 1.1 m Plasma elongation 1.5 Plasma current 5.3 MA Toroidal beta 4 % Field on axis 5.7 T (author)

  4. Reduction of surface erosion in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossing, T.D.; Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.

    1976-01-01

    Some of the major processes leading to surface erosion in fusion reactors are reviewed briefly, including blistering by implanted gas, sputtering by ions, atoms, and neutrons, and vaporization by local heating. Surface erosion affects the structural integrity and limits the lifetime of reactor components exposed to plasma radiation. In addition, some of the processes leading to surface erosion also cause the release of plasma contaminants. Methods proposed to reduce surface erosion have included control of surface temperature, selection of materials with a favorable microstructure, chemical and mechanical treatment of surfaces, and employment of protective surface coatings, wall liners, and divertors. The advantages and disadvantages of some of these methods are discussed

  5. Nuclear data requirements for fusion reactor shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    The nuclear data requirements for experimental, demonstration and commercial fusion reactors are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to the shield as well as major reactor components of concern to the nuclear performance. The nuclear data requirements are defined as a result of analyzing four key areas. These are the most likely candidate materials, energy range, types of needed nuclear data, and the required accuracy in the data. Deducing the latter from the target goals for the accuracy in prediction is also discussed. A specific proposal of measurements is recommended. Priorities for acquisition of data are also assigned. (author)

  6. FRESCO: fusion reactor simulation code for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantsinen, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    The study of the dynamics of tokamak fusion reactors, a zero-dimensional particle and power balance code FRESCO (Fusion Reactor Simulation Code) has been developed at the Department of Technical Physics of Helsinki University of Technology. The FRESCO code is based on zero-dimensional particle and power balance equations averaged over prescribed plasma profiles. In the report the data structure of the FRESCO code is described, including the description of the COMMON statements, program input, and program output. The general structure of the code is described, including the description of subprograms and functions. The physical model used and examples of the code performance are also included in the report. (121 tabs.) (author)

  7. Overview of materials research for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Gasparotto, M.; Zinkle, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Materials research for fusion reactors is overviewed from Japanese, EU and US perspectives. Emphasis is placed on programs and strategies for developing blanket structural materials, and recent highlights in research and development for reduced activation ferritic martensitic steels, vanadium alloys and SiC/SiC composites, and in mechanistic experimental and modeling studies. The common critical issue for the candidate materials is the effect of irradiation with helium production. For the qualification of materials up to the full lifetime of a DEMO and Power Plant reactors, an intense neutron source with relevant fusion neutron spectra is crucial. Elaborate use of the presently available irradiation devices will facilitate efficient and sound materials development within the required time scale

  8. Conceptual design study of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    Since 1980 the design study has been conducted at JAERI for the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) which has been proposed to be the next machine to JT-60 in the Japanese long term program of fusion reactor development. During two years from 1984 to 1985 FER concept was reviewed and redesigned. This report is the summary of the results obtained in the review and redesign activities in 1984 and 85. In the first year FER concept was discussed again and its frame work was reestablished. According to the new frame work the major reactor components of FER were designed. In the second year the whole plant system design including plant layout plan was conducted as well as the more detailed design analysis of the reactor conponents. The newly established frame for FER design is as follows: 1) Plasma : Self-ignition. 2) Operation scenario : Quasi-steady state operation with long burn pulse. 3) Neutron fluence on the first wall : 0.3 MWY/M 2 . 4) Blanket : Non-tritium breeding blanket with test modules for breeding blanket development. 5) Magnets : Superconducting Magnets. (author)

  9. Environmental aspects of fusion reactors 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casini, G.; Ponti, C.; Rocco, P.

    1986-01-01

    The aspects of the environmental impact as expected from future fusion reactors are reviewed. The radioactive inventories consist in tritium and neutron-induced radioactivity in the structures. An analysis is performed of the radioactive releases from the different plant's systems in normal and accident conditions and typical emissions to the ambient are defined. Information is given on the waste management problems. Two appendixes give general information on tritium and safety guidelines

  10. Designs of tandem-mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Barr, W.L.; Boghosian, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    We have completed a comparative evaluation of several end plug configurations for tandem mirror fusion reactors with thermal barriers. The axi-cell configuration has been selected for further study and will be the basis for a detailed conceptual design study to be carried out over the next two years. The axi-cell end plug has a simple mirror cell produced by two circular coils followed by a transition coil and a yin-yang pair, which provides for MHD stability

  11. The spheromak as a compact fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    After summarizing the economic and utility-based rationale for compact, higher-power-density fusion reactors, the gun-sustained spheromak concept is explored as one of a number of poloidal-field-dominated confinement configurations that might improve the prospects for economically attractive and operationally simplified fusion power plants. Using a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model for the spheromak, guided by realistic engineering constraints and physics extrapolation, a range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported. The results presented herein provide the basis for conceptual engineering designs of key fusion-power-core (FPC) subsystems and more detailed plasma modeling of this promising, high mass-power-density concept, which stresses single-piece FPC maintenance, steady-state current drive through electrostatic magnetic helicity injection, a simplified co-axial electrode-divertor, and efficient resistive-coal equilibrium-field coils. The optimal FPC size and the cost estimates project a system that competes aggressively with the best offered by alternative energy sources while simplifying considerably the complexity that has generally been associated with most approaches to magnetic fusion energy

  12. The spheromak as a compact fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    After summarizing the economic and utility-based rationale for compact, higher-power-density fusion reactors, the gun-sustained spheromak concept is explored as one of a number of poloidal-field-dominated confinement configurations that might improve the prospects for economically attractive and operationally simplified fusion power plants. Using a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model for the spheromak, guided by realistic engineering constraints and physics extrapolation, a range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported. The results presented herein provide the basis for conceptual engineering designs of key fusion-power-core (FPC) subsystems and more detailed plasma modeling of this promising, high mass-power-density concept, which stresses single-piece FPC maintenance, steady-state current drive through electrostatic magnetic helicity injection, a simplified co-axial electrode-divertor, and efficient resistive-coal equilibrium-field coils. The optimal FPC size and the cost estimates project a system that competes aggressively with the best offered by alternative energy sources while simplifying considerably the complexity that has generally been associated with most approaches to magnetic fusion energy.

  13. Materials needs for compact fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The economic prospects for magnetic fusion energy can be dramatically improved if for the same total power output the fusion neutron first-wall (FW) loading and the system power density can be increased by factors of 3 to 5 and 10 to 30, respectively. A number of compact fusion reactor embodiments have been proposed, all of which would operate with increased FW loadings, would use thin (0.5 to 0.6 m) blankets, and would confine quasi-steady-state plasma with resistive, water-cooled copper or aluminum coils. Increased system power density (5 to 15 MWt/m 3 versus 0.3 to 0.5 MW/m 3 ), considerably reduced physical size of the fusion power core (FPC), and appreciably reduced economic leverage exerted by the FPC and associated physics result. The unique materials requirements anticipated for these compact reactors are outlined against the well documented backdrop provided by similar needs for the mainline approaches. Surprisingly, no single materials need that is unique to the compact systems is identified; crucial uncertainties for the compact approaches must also be addressed by the mainline approaches, particularly for in-vacuum components (FWs, limiters, divertors, etc.)

  14. The ICRH tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, F.W.

    1976-01-01

    A Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor where the ion are maintained at Tsub(i) approximately 20keV>Tsub(e) approximately 7keV by ion-cyclotron resonance heating is shown to produce an energy amplification of Q>2 provided the principal ion energy loss channel is via collisional transfer to the electrons. Such a reactor produces 19MW of fusion power to the electrons. Such a reactor produces 19MW of fusion power and requires a 50MHz radio-frequency generator capable of 50MW peak power; it is otherwise compatible with the conceptual design for the Princeton TFTR. The required n tausub(E) values for electrons and ions are respectively ntausub(Ee)>1.5.10 13 cm -3 -sec and ntausub(Ei)>4.10 13 cm -3 -sec. The principal areas where research is needed to establish this concept are: tokamak transport calculations, ICRH physics, trapped-particle instability energy losses, tokamak equilibria with high values of βsub(theta), and, of course, impurities

  15. Tritium containment of controlled thermonuclear fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Tsukumo, Kiyohiko; Suzuki, Tatsushi

    1979-01-01

    It is well known that tritium is used as the fuel for nuclear fusion reactors. The neutrons produced by the nuclear fusion reaction of deuterium and tritium react with lithium in blankets, and tritium is produced. The blankets reproduce the tritium consumed in the D-T reaction. Tritium circulates through the main cooling system and the fuel supply and evacuation system, and is accumulated. Tritium is a radioactive substance emitting β-ray with 12.6 year half-life, and harmful to human bodies. It is an isotope of hydrogen, and apt to diffuse and leak. Especially at high temperature, it permeates through materials, therefore it is important to evaluate the release of tritium into environment, to treat leaked tritium to reduce its release, and to select the method of containing tritium. The permeability of tritium and its solubility in structural materials are discussed. The typical blanket-cooling systems of nuclear fusion reactors are shown, and the tungsten coating of steam generator tubes and tritium recovery system are adopted for reducing tritium leak. In case of the Tokamak type reactor of JAERI, the tritium recovery system is installed, in which the tritium gas produced in blankets is converted to tritium steam with a Pd-Pt catalytic oxidation tower, and it is dehydrated and eliminated with a molecular sieve tower, then purified and recovered. (Kako, I.)

  16. Real-time control of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, B.; Sousa, J.; Varandas, C.A.F.

    2010-01-01

    The next generation fusion experiments, e.g. ITER, will be highly complex and raise new challenges in the field of control and data acquisition systems. The more advanced operation scenarios have to be capable of sustaining long pulse steady-state plasma and to suppress plasma instabilities almost completely. Such scenarios will heavily rely on Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output (MIMO) fast control systems. To ensure safety for the operation these systems have to be robust and resilient to faults while ensuring high availability. Mindful of the importance of such features for future fusion experiments ATCA based systems have been successfully used in fusion experiment as MIMO fast controller. This is the most promising architecture to substantially enhance the performance and capability of existing standard systems delivering well high throughput as well as high availability. The real-time control needs of a fusion experiment, the rational for the presently pursued solutions, the existing problems and the broad scientific and technical questions that need to be addressed on the path to a fusion power plant will be discussed.

  17. Fusion reactors-high temperature electrolysis (HTE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a study to identify and develop a reference design for synfuel production based on fusion reactors are given. The most promising option for hydrogen production was high-temperature electrolysis (HTE). The main findings of this study are: 1. HTE has the highest potential efficiency for production of synfuels from fusion; a fusion to hydrogen energy efficiency of about 70% appears possible with 1800 0 C HTE units and 60% power cycle efficiency; an efficiency of about 50% possible with 1400 0 C HTE units and 40% power cycle efficiency. 2. Relative to thermochemical or direct decomposition methods HTE technology is in a more advanced state of development, 3. Thermochemical or direct decomposition methods must have lower unit process or capital costs if they are to be more attractive than HTE. 4. While design efforts are required, HTE units offer the potential to be quickly run in reverse as fuel cells to produce electricity for restart of Tokamaks and/or provide spinning reserve for a grid system. 5. Because of the short timescale of the study, no detailed economic evaluation could be carried out.A comparison of costs could be made by employing certain assumptions. For example, if the fusion reactor-electrolyzer capital installation is $400/(KW(T) [$1000/KW(E) equivalent], the H 2 energy production cost for a high efficiency (about 70 %) fusion-HTE system is on the same order of magnitude as a coal based SNG plant based on 1976 dollars. 6. The present reference design indicates that a 2000 MW(th) fusion reactor could produce as much at 364 x 10 6 scf/day of hydrogen which is equivalent in heating value to 20,000 barrels/day of gasoline. This would fuel about 500,000 autos based on average driving patterns. 7. A factor of three reduction in coal feed (tons/day) could be achieved for syngas production if hydrogen from a fusion-HTE system were used to gasify coal, as compared to a conventional syngas plant using coal-derived hydrogen

  18. Reactor kinetics - pulse and steady state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, B F; Morris, F M [Sandia Laboratories (United States)

    1974-07-01

    An analytical model has been developed which couples the nuclear and thermal characteristics of the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) into a solution which describes both the neutron kinetics of the reactor and the temperature behavior of a fuel-moderator element. The model describes both pulse and steady state operations. This paper describes the important aspects of the reactor, the fuel- moderator elements, the neutron kinetic equations of the reactor, and the time-temperature behavior of a fuel-moderator element that is being subjected to the maximum power density in the core. The parameters which are utilized in the equations are divided into two classes, those that can be measured directly and those that are assumed to be known (each is described briefly). Some of the solutions which demonstrate the versatility of the analytical model are described. (author)

  19. Status of fusion reactor concept development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji-Iio, Shunji

    1996-01-01

    Fusion power reactor studies in Japan based on magnetic confinement schemes are reviewed. As D-T fusion reactors, a steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR) was proposed and extensively studied at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and an inductively operated day-long tokamak reactor (IDLT) was proposed by a group at the University of Tokyo. The concept of a drastically easy maintenance (DREAM) tokamak reactor is being developed at JAERI. A high-field tokamak reactor with force-balanced coils as a volumetric neutron source is being studied by our group at Tokyo Institute of Technology. The conceptual design of a force-free helical reactor (FFHR) is under way at the National Institute for Fusion Science. A design study of a D- 3 He field-reversed configuration (FRC) fusion reactor called ARTEMIS was conducted by the FRC fusion working group of research committee of lunar base an lunar resources. (author)

  20. Modular Stellarator Fusion Reactor (MSR) concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    A preliminary conceptual study has been made of the Modulator Stellarator Reactor (MSR) as a stedy-state, ignited, DT-fueled, magnetic fusion reactor. The MSR concept combines the physics of classic stellarator confinement with an innovative, modular-coil design. Parametric tradeoff calculations are described, leading to the selection of an interim design point for a 4.8-GWt plant based on Alcator transport scaling and an average beta value of 0.04 in an l = 2 system with a plasma aspect ratio of 11. Neither an economic analysis nor a detailed conceptual engineering design is presented here, as the primary intent of this scoping study is the elucidation of key physics tradeoffs, constraints, and uncertainties for the ultimate power-reactor embodiment

  1. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author)

  2. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.

    1994-01-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author)

  3. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are: (1) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons; (2) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles; (3) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas; and (4) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising.

  4. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author).

  5. SEBREZ: an inertial-fusion-reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    The neutronic aspects of an inertial fusion reactor concept that relies on asymmetrical neutronic effects to enhance the tritium production in the breeding zones have been studied. We find that it is possible to obtain a tritium breeding ratio greater than 1.0 with a chamber configuration in which the breeding zones subtend only a fraction of the total solid angle. This is the origin of the name SEBREZ which stands for SEgregated BREeding Zones. It should be emphasized that this is not a reactor design study; rather this study illustrates certain neutronic effects in the context of a particular reactor concept. An understanding of these effects forms the basis of a design technique which has broader application than just the SEBREZ concept

  6. Interatomic potentials for fusion reactor material simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerkas, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, the behaviour of a material situated in a fusion reactor was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulations of processes in the next generation fusion reactor ITER include the reactor materials beryllium, carbon and tungsten as well as the plasma hydrogen isotopes. This means that interaction models, i.e. interatomic potentials, for this complicated quaternary system are needed. The task of finding such potentials is nonetheless nearly at its end, since models for the beryllium-carbon-hydrogen interactions were constructed in this thesis and as a continuation of that work, a beryllium-tungsten model is under development. These potentials are combinable with the earlier tungsten-carbon-hydrogen ones. The potentials were used to explain the chemical sputtering of beryllium due to deuterium plasma exposure. During experiments, a large fraction of the sputtered beryllium atoms were observed to be released as BeD molecules, and the simulations identified the swift chemical sputtering mechanism, previously not believed to be important in metals, as the underlying mechanism. Radiation damage in the reactor structural materials vanadium, iron and iron chromium, as well as in the wall material tungsten and the mixed alloy tungsten carbide, was also studied in this thesis. Interatomic potentials for vanadium, tungsten and iron were modified to be better suited for simulating collision cascades that are formed during particle irradiation, and the potential features affecting the resulting primary damage were identified. Including the often neglected electronic effects in the simulations was also shown to have an impact on the damage. With proper tuning of the electronphonon interaction strength, experimentally measured quantities related to ion-beam mixing in iron could be reproduced. The damage in tungsten carbide alloys showed elemental asymmetry, as the major part of the damage consisted of carbon defects. On the other hand, modelling the damage

  7. Deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosea, J.; Adler, J.H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.

    1994-09-01

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) experimental program on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is underway and routine tritium operations have been established. The technology upgrades made to the TFTR facility have been demonstrated to be sufficient for supporting both operations and maintenance for an extended D-T campaign. To date fusion power has been increased to ∼9 MW and several physics results of importance to the D-T reactor regime have been obtained: electron temperature, ion temperature, and plasma stored energy all increase substantially in the D-T regime relative to the D-D regime at the same neutral beam power and comparable limiter conditioning; possible alpha electron heating is indicated and energy confinement improvement with average ion mass is observed; and alpha particle losses appear to be classical with no evidence of TAE mode activity up to the PFUS ∼6 MW level. Instability in the TAE mode frequency range has been observed at PFUS > 7 MW and its effect on performance in under investigation. Preparations are underway to enhance the alpha particle density further by increasing fusion power and by extending the neutral beam pulse length to permit alpha particle effects of relevance to the ITER regime to be more fully explored

  8. Pulsed reactors: A dissenting view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganev, I.Kh.; Orlov, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    The preceding article, by G.A. Ivanov et al., contains interesting estimates of the expanded production of plutonium in thermonuclear explosions initiated by plutonium charges. It must be noted that more than 40 years of efforts, despite some technical successes, have not led to a fast-reactor technology suitable for large-scale power production. This explains the incessant search for a nuclear technology for the future and the renewed interest in accelerator, hybrid, and explosive approaches to plutonium production. The success of such efforts will depend largely on the formulation of goals and the choice of the principal criteria. It is appropriate to discuss these issues here because the adoption of the rate of plutonium production or the plutonium doubling time as the principal criterion sets the stage for the repetition of previous errors. However, as a preliminary, I would like to question some categorical assertions that were made by Ivanov et al. without the presentation of adequate supporting data (the assertions that open-quotes the creation of an power industry on the basis of ordinary breeder reactors is practically impossibleclose quotes and that open-quotes adequate power generation in the 21st centuryclose quotes is impossible). In fact, it is simple to calculate that, given a realistic doubling time for fast reactors of ∼10 years and the plutonium produced by thermal reactors (around 10 12 W), it would be possible, if so desired, to introduce power far exceeding 10 14 W in the 21st century

  9. Fusion performance analysis of plasmas with reversed magnetic shear in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruskov, E.; Bell, M.; Budny, R.V.; McCune, D.C.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Synakowski, E.J.; Goeler, S. von; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    A case for substantial loss of fast ions degrading the performance of tokamak fusion test reactor plasmas [Phys. Plasmas 2, 2176 (1995)] with reversed magnetic shear (RS) is presented. The principal evidence is obtained from an experiment with short (40 - 70 ms) tritium beam pulses injected into deuterium beam heated RS plasmas [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 924 (1999)]. Modeling of this experiment indicates that up to 40% beam power is lost on a time scale much shorter than the beam - ion slowing down time. Critical parameters which connect modeling and experiment are: The total 14 MeV neutron emission, its radial profile, and the transverse stored energy. The fusion performance of some plasmas with internal transport barriers is further deteriorated by impurity accumulation in the plasma core. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  10. Survey of the laser-solenoid fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amherd, N.A.

    1975-09-01

    This report surveys the prospects for a laser-solenoid fusion reactor. A sample reactor and scaling laws are used to describe the concept's characteristics. Experimental results are reviewed, and the laser and magnet technologies that undergird the laser-solenoid concept are analyzed. Finally, a systems analysis of fusion power reactors is given, including a discussion of direct conversion and fusion-fission effects, to ascertain the system attributes of the laser-solenoid configuration

  11. Nuclear Fusion Blast and Electrode Lifetimes in a PJMIF Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Witherspoon, F. D.; Case, A.; Brockington, S.; Cruz, E.; Luna, M.; Hsu, S. C.

    2017-10-01

    We present an analysis and numerical simulation of the nuclear blast from the micro-explosion following the completion of the fusion burn for a baseline design of a PJMIF fusion reactor with a fusion gain of 20. The stagnation pressure from the blast against the chamber wall defines the engineering requirement for the structural design of the first wall and the plasma guns. We also present an analysis of the lifetimes of the electrodes of the plasma guns which are exposed to (1) the high current, and (2) the neutron produced by the fusion reactions. We anticipate that the gun electrodes are made of tungsten alloys as plasma facing components reinforced structurally by appropriate steel alloys. Making reasonable assumptions about the electrode erosion rate (100 ng/C transfer), the electrode lifetime limited by the erosion rate is estimated to be between 19 and 24 million pulses before replacement. Based on known neutron radiation effects on structural materials such as steel alloys and plasma facing component materials such as tungsten alloys, the plasma guns are expected to survive some 22 million shots. At 1 Hz, this equal to about 6 months of continuous operation before they need to be replaced. Work supported by Strong Atomics, LLC.

  12. Tritium chemistry in fission and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.; Masson, M.; Briec, M.

    1986-09-01

    We are interested in the behaviour of tritium inside the solids where it is generated both in the case of fission nuclear reactor fuel elements, and in that of blankets of future fusion reactor. In the first case it is desirable to be able to predict whether tritium will be found in the hulls or in the uranium oxide, and under what chemical form, in order to take appropriate steps for it's removal in reprocessing plants. In fusion reactors breeding large amounts of tritium and burning it in the plasma should be accomplished in as short a cycle as possible in order to limit inventories that are associated with huge activities. Mastering the chemistry of every step is therefore essential. Amounts generated are not of the same order of magnitude in the two cases studied. Ternary fissions produce about 66 10 13 Bq (18 000 Ci) per year of tritium in a 1000 MWe fission generator, i.e., about 1.8 10 10 Bq (0.5 Ci) per day per ton of fuel

  13. Investigation of materials for fusion power reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhaddane, A.; Slugeň, V.; Sojak, S.; Veterníková, J.; Petriska, M.; Bartošová, I.

    2014-06-01

    The possibility of application of nuclear-physical methods to observe radiation damage to structural materials of nuclear facilities is nowadays a very actual topic. The radiation damage to materials of advanced nuclear facilities, caused by extreme radiation stress, is a process, which significantly limits their operational life as well as their safety. In the centre of our interest is the study of the radiation degradation and activation of the metals and alloys for the new nuclear facilities (Generation IV fission reactors, fusion reactors ITER and DEMO). The observation of the microstructure changes in the reactor steels is based on experimental investigation using the method of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). The experimental part of the work contains measurements focused on model reactor alloys and ODS steels. There were 12 model reactor steels and 3 ODS steels. We were investigating the influence of chemical composition on the production of defects in crystal lattice. With application of the LT 9 program, the spectra of specimen have been evaluated and the most convenient samples have been determined.

  14. Series lecture on advanced fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The problems concerning fusion reactors are presented and discussed in this series lecture. At first, the D-T tokamak is explained. The breeding of tritium and the radioactive property of tritium are discussed. The hybrid reactor is explained as an example of the direct use of neutrons. Some advanced fuel reactions are proposed. It is necessary to make physics consideration for burning advanced fuel in reactors. The rate of energy production and the energy loss are important things. The bremsstrahlung radiation and impurity radiation are explained. The simple estimation of the synchrotron radiation was performed. The numerical results were compared with a more detailed calculation of Taimor, and the agreement was quite good. The calculation of ion and electron temperature was made. The idea to use the energy more efficiently is that one can take X-ray or neutrons, and pass them through a first wall of a reactor into a second region where they heat the material. A method to convert high temperature into useful energy is the third problem of this lecture. The device was invented by A. Hertzberg. The lifetime of the reactor depends on the efficiency of energy recovery. The idea of using spin polarized nuclei has come up. The spin polarization gives a chance to achieve a large multiplication factor. The advanced fuel which looks easiest to make go is D plus He-3. The idea of multipole is presented to reduce the magnetic field inside plasma, and discussed. Two other topics are explained. (Kato, T.)

  15. Conceptual design of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, T.; Fujisawa, N.

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual design studies of the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) have been performed. The FER has an objective of achieving selfignition and demonstrating engineering feasibility as a next generation tokamak to JT-60. Various concepts of the FER have been considered. The reference design is based on a double-null divertor. Optional design studies with some attractive features based on advanced concepts such as pumped limiter and RF current drive have been carried out. Key design parameters are; fusion power of 440 MW, average neutron wall loading of 1MW/m 2 , major radius of 5.5m, plasma minor radius of 1.1m, plasma elongation of 1.5, plasma current of 5.3MA, toroidal beta of 4%, toroidal field on plasma axis of 5.7T and tritium breeding ratio of above unity

  16. Assessment of materials needs for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, G.S.

    1976-07-01

    This report has the goal of presenting for the CTR designer and material supplier potentially significant problem areas in materials manufacturing and in structural material resources projected for potential application in fusion power reactor construction. The projected material requirements are based on presently available bills-of-materials for conceptual CTR designs used for constructing a hypothetical fusion power generating capacity of 10 6 MW(e) maturing exponentially over a 20-year period. The projected elemental requirements, the ratio of these requirements to the projected total U.S. demand, and the salient problems currently identified with the CTR use of these elements are summarized. The projected requirements are based upon a ''model'' industry, which is described, and the estimated potential use of molybdenum, niobium, vanadium, and tantalum as blanket structural materials

  17. Assessment of materials needs for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, G.S. (comp.)

    1976-07-01

    This report has the goal of presenting for the CTR designer and material supplier potentially significant problem areas in materials manufacturing and in structural material resources projected for potential application in fusion power reactor construction. The projected material requirements are based on presently available bills-of-materials for conceptual CTR designs used for constructing a hypothetical fusion power generating capacity of 10/sup 6/ MW(e) maturing exponentially over a 20-year period. The projected elemental requirements, the ratio of these requirements to the projected total U.S. demand, and the salient problems currently identified with the CTR use of these elements are summarized. The projected requirements are based upon a ''model'' industry, which is described, and the estimated potential use of molybdenum, niobium, vanadium, and tantalum as blanket structural materials.

  18. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors

  19. Afterheat assessment of a conceptual fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayatissa, S.P.; Goddard, A.J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Structural activation and decay heat deposition calculations have been undertaken for the DEMO fusion reactor design. The DEMO design was based on an earlier conceptual design of a blanket sector which could breed tritium and generate electricity. These calculations have taken account of the redistribution of energy by the transport of γ radiation. Calculated heat deposition patterns have been used as data for simplified heat transfer calculations to judge temperature rises in relation to materials limits in a severe accident involving complete coolant flow failure. (author)

  20. Dust removal system for fusion experimental reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, M.; Ueda, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Oda, Y.; Seki, Y.; Ueda, S.; Aoki, I.

    1995-01-01

    Development of a dust removal system using static electricity has been conducted. It is envisioned that the system can collect and transport dust under vacuum. In the system, the dust is charged by dielectric polarization and floated by an electrostatic attraction force that is generated by the DC electric field. The dust is then transported by the electric curtain formed by the three-phase AC electric field. Experimental investigation has been conducted to examine the characteristics of the system. Current research results indicate that the dust removal system using static electricity can be used for fusion experimental reactors

  1. Dust removal system for fusion experimental reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, M.; Ueda, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Oda, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Seki, Y.; Ueda, S.; Aoki, I. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Development of a dust removal system using static electricity has been conducted. It is envisioned that the system can collect and transport dust under vacuum. In the system, the dust is charged by dielectric polarization and floated by an electrostatic attraction force that is generated by the DC electric field. The dust is then transported by the electric curtain formed by the three-phase AC electric field. Experimental investigation has been conducted to examine the characteristics of the system. Current research results indicate that the dust removal system using static electricity can be used for fusion experimental reactors.

  2. Organic materials for fusion-reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, G.F.; Coltman, R.R. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    Organic materials requirements for fusion-reactor magnets are described with reference to the temperature, radiation, and electrical and mechanical stress environment expected in these magnets. A review is presented of the response to gamma-ray and neutron irradiation at low temperatures of candidate organic materials; i.e. laminates, thin films, and potting compounds. Lifetime-limiting features of this response as well as needed testing under magnet operating conditions not yet adequately investigated are identified and recomendations for future work are made

  3. The tritium and the controlled fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leger, D.; Rouyer, J.L.

    1986-04-01

    It is shown how tritium is used how it is circulating in a fusion reactor. The great functions of tritium circuits are detailed: reprocessing of burnt gases, reprocessing of gases coming from neutral injectors, reprocessing from gaseous wastes, detritiation of cooling fluids. Current technologic developments are quoted. Then tritium confinement and containment, in normal or accidental situations, are displayed. Limitation devices of effluents and release for normal operating (noticeably the reprocessing systems of atmosphere) and safety and protection systems in case of accident are described [fr

  4. Vanadium alloys for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattas, R.F.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that fusion reactors will produce a severe operating environment for structural materials. The material should have good mechanical strength and ductility to high temperature, be corrosion resistant to the local environment, have attractive thermophysical properties to accommodate high heat loads, and be resistant to neutron damage. Vanadium alloys are being developed for such applications, and they exhibit desirable properties in many areas Recent progress in vanadium alloy development indicates good strength and ductility to 700 degrees C, minimal degradation by neutron irradiation, and reduced radioactivity compared with other candidate alloy systems

  5. Environmental considerations for alternative fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Young, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Comparisons of alternative fusion reactor blanket/coolant systems suggest that environmental considerations will enter strongly into selection of design and materials. Liquid blankets and coolants tend to maximize transport of radioactive corrosion products. Liquid lithium interacts strongly with tritium, minimizing permeation and escape of gaseous tritium in accidents. However, liquid lithium coolants tend to create large tritium inventories and have a large fire potential compared to flibe and solid blankets. Helium coolants minimize radiation transport, but do not have ability to bind the tritium in case of accidental releases. (auth)

  6. Trends and developments in magnetic confinement fusion reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.; Carlson, G.A.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    An overview is presented of recent design trends and developments in reactor concepts for magnetic confinement fusion. The paper emphasizes the engineering and technology considerations of commercial fusion reactor concepts. Emphasis is placed on reactors that operate on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. Recent developments in tokamak, mirror, and Elmo Bumpy Torus reactor concepts are described, as well as a survey of recent developments on a wide variety of alternate magnetic fusion reactor concepts. The paper emphasizes recent developments of these concepts within the last two to three years

  7. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, E.; Chrzanowski, J.; Gentile, C.; Parsells, R.; Rule, K.; Strykowsky, R.; Viola, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D and D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D and D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget

  8. Tritium permeation in fusion reactors: INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskes, M.I.; Bauer, W.; Kerst, R.A.; Swansiger, W.A.; Wilson, K.L.

    1981-12-01

    Tritium permeation through the first wall of advanced fusion reactors is examined. A fraction of the D-T which bombards the first wall as charge exchange neutral particles will permeate through the first wall and enter the coolant. Calculations of the steady state permeation rate for the US INTOR Tokamak design result in values of less than or equal to 0.002 grams of tritium per day under the most favorable conditions. For unfavorable surface conditions the rate is greater than or equal to 0.1 g/day. The magnitude of these permeation rates is critically dependent on the temperatures and surface conditions of the wall. The introduction of permeation barriers at the wall-coolant interface can significantly reduce permeation rates and hence may be desirable for reactor applications

  9. Activation product transport in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    Activated corrosion and neutron sputtering products will enter the coolant and/or tritium breeding material of fusion reactor power plants and experiments and cause personnel access problems. Radiation levels around plant components due to these products will cause difficulties with maintenance and repair operations throughout the plant. Similar problems are experienced around fission reactor systems. The determination of the transport of radioactive corrosion and neutron sputtering products through the system is achieved using the computer code RAPTOR. This code calculates the mass transfer of a number of activation products based on the corrosion and sputtering rates through the system, the deposition and release characteristics of various plant components, the neturon flux spectrum, as well as other plant parameters. RAPTOR assembles a system of first order linear differential equations into a matrix equation based upon the reactor system parameters. Included in the transfer matrix are the deposition and erosion coefficients, and the decay and activation data for the various plant nodes and radioactive isotopes. A source vector supplies the corrosion and neutron sputtering source rates. This matrix equation is then solved using a matrix operator technique to give the specific activity distribution of each radioactive species throughout the plant. Once the amount of mass transfer is determined, the photon transport due to the radioactive corrosion and sputtering product sources can be evaluated, and dose rates around the plant components of interest as a function of time can be determined. This method has been used to estimate the radiation hazards around a number of fusion reactor system designs

  10. SBS pulse compression for excimer inertial fusion energy drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, G.J. [TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA (United States). Space and Technology Div.

    1994-12-31

    A key requirement for the development of commercial fusion power plants utilizing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) as a source of thermonuclear power is the availability of reliable, efficient laser drivers. These laser drivers must be capable of delivering UV optical pulses having energies of the order of 5MJ to cryogenic deuterium-tritium (D/T) ICF targets. The current requirements for laser ICF target irradiation specify the laser wavelength, {lambda} ca. 250 nm, pulse duration, {tau}{sub p} ca. 6 ns, bandwidth, {Delta}{lambda} ca. 0.1 nm, polarization state, etc. Excimer lasers are a leading candidate to fill these demanding ICF driver requirements. However, since excimer lasers are not storage lasers, the excimer laser pulse duration, {tau}{sub pp}, is determined primarily by the length of the excitation pulse delivered to the excimer laser amplifier. Pulsed power associated with efficiently generating excimer laser pulses has a time constant, {tau}{sub pp} which falls in the range, 30 {tau}{sub p}<{tau}{sub pp}<100{tau}{sub p}. As a consequence, pulse compression is needed to convert the long excimer laser pulses to pulses of duration {tau}{sub p}. These main ICF driver pulses require, in addition, longer, lower power precursor pulses delivered to the ICF target before the arrival of the main pulse. Although both linear and non-linear optical (NLO) pulse compression techniques have been developed, computer simulations have shown that a ``chirped,`` self-seeded, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) pulse compressor cell using SF{sub 6} at a density, {rho} ca. 1 amagat can efficiently compress krypton fluoride (KrF) laser pulses at {lambda}=248 nm. In order to avoid the generation of output pulses substantially shorter than {tau}{sub p}, the optical power in the chirped input SBS ``seed`` beams was ramped. Compressed pulse conversion efficiencies of up to 68% were calculated for output pulse durations of {tau}{sub p} ca. ns.

  11. SBS pulse compression for excimer inertial fusion energy drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    A key requirement for the development of commercial fusion power plants utilizing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) as a source of thermonuclear power is the availability of reliable, efficient laser drivers. These laser drivers must be capable of delivering UV optical pulses having energies of the order of 5MJ to cryogenic deuterium-tritium (D/T) ICF targets. The current requirements for laser ICF target irradiation specify the laser wavelength, λ ca. 250 nm, pulse duration, τ p ca. 6 ns, bandwidth, Δλ ca. 0.1 nm, polarization state, etc. Excimer lasers are a leading candidate to fill these demanding ICF driver requirements. However, since excimer lasers are not storage lasers, the excimer laser pulse duration, τ pp , is determined primarily by the length of the excitation pulse delivered to the excimer laser amplifier. Pulsed power associated with efficiently generating excimer laser pulses has a time constant, τ pp which falls in the range, 30 τ p pp p . As a consequence, pulse compression is needed to convert the long excimer laser pulses to pulses of duration τ p . These main ICF driver pulses require, in addition, longer, lower power precursor pulses delivered to the ICF target before the arrival of the main pulse. Although both linear and non-linear optical (NLO) pulse compression techniques have been developed, computer simulations have shown that a ''chirped,'' self-seeded, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) pulse compressor cell using SF 6 at a density, ρ ca. 1 amagat can efficiently compress krypton fluoride (KrF) laser pulses at λ=248 nm. In order to avoid the generation of output pulses substantially shorter than τ p , the optical power in the chirped input SBS ''seed'' beams was ramped. Compressed pulse conversion efficiencies of up to 68% were calculated for output pulse durations of τ p ca. ns

  12. Present status of inertial confinement fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mima, Kunioki; Ido, Shunji; Nakai, Sadao.

    1986-01-01

    Since inertial nuclear fusion reactors do not require high vacuum and high magnetic field, the structure of the reactor cavity becomes markedly simple as compared with tokamak type fusion reactors. In particular, since high vacuum is not necessary, liquid metals such as lithium and lead can be used for the first wall, and the damage of reactor structures by neutrons can be prevented. As for the core, the energy efficiency of lasers is not very high, accordingly it must be designed so that the pellet gain due to nuclear fusion becomes sufficiently high, and typically, the gain coefficient from 100 to 200 is necessary. In this paper, the perspective of pellet gain, the plan from the present status to the practical reactors, and the conceptual design of the practical reactors are discussed. The plan of fuel ignition, energy break-even and high gain by the implosion mode, of which the uncertain factor due to uneven irradiation and instability was limited to the minimum, was clarified. The scenario of the development of laser nuclear fusion reactors is presented, and the concept of the reactor system is shown. The various types of nuclear fusion-fission hybrid reactors are explained. As for the design of inertial fusion power reactors, the engineering characteristics of the core, the conceptual design, water fall type reactors and DD fuel reactors are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  13. SOLASE conceptual laser fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, G.A.; Conn, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Cooper, G.W.; Howard, J.; Magelssen, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    A conceptual laser fusion reactor for electric power, SOLASE, has been designed. The SOLASE design utilizes a 1 MJ, 6.7% efficient laser to implode 20 fusion targets per second. The target gain is 150 and produces a net electrical power of 1000 MW. The reactor cavity is spherical with a 6 m radius. The first wall is graphite and has a neutron wall loading of 5 MW/m 2 . It is protected from the target debris by low pressure xenon gas that is introduced into the cavity. The blanket structure is a honeycombed graphite composite. The tritium breeding and heat transport medium is Li 2 O in the form of pellets that flow through the blanket. The tritium breeding ration is 1.34. Temperature decoupling of the graphite structure and the Li 2 O coolant enables the structure to operate at temperatures that minimize radiation damage effects. The graphite blanket is replaced every year but exhibits low levels of radioactivity so that limited hands on maintenance is possible two weeks after shutdown, thus facilitating rapid replacement

  14. Power balance in an Ohmically heated fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.P.; Roberts, K.V.

    1982-01-01

    A simplified power-balance equation (zero-dimensional model) is used to study the performance of an Ohmically heated fusion reactor with emphasis on a pulsed reversed-field pinch concept (RFP). The energy confinement time tausub(E) is treated as an adjustable function, and empirical tokamak scaling laws are employed in the numerical estimates, which are supplemented by 1-D ATHENE code calculations. The known heating rates and energy losses are represented by the net energy replacement time tausub(W), which is exhibited as a surface in density (n) and temperature (T) space with a saddle point (nsub(*), Tsub(*)), the optimum ignition point. It is concluded that i) ignition by Ohmic heating is more practicable for the RFP reactor than for a tokamak reactor with the same tausub(E), (ii) if at fixed current the minor radius can be reduced or at fixed minor radius the current can be increased, then it is found that Ohmic ignition becomes more likely when present tokamak scaling laws are used. More definitive estimates require, however, a knowledge of tausub(E), which can only be obtained by establishing a reliable set of experimental RFP scaling laws and, in particular, by extending RFP experiments closer to the reactor regime. (author)

  15. Towards diagnostics for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costley, A. E.

    2009-01-01

    The requirements for measurements on modern tokamak fusion plasmas are outlined, and the techniques and systems used to make the measurements, usually referred to as 'diagnostics', are introduced. The basics of three particular diagnostics - magnetics, neutron systems and a laser based optical system - are outlined as examples of modern diagnostic systems, and the implementation of these diagnostics on a current tokamak (JET) are described. The next major step in magnetic confinement fusion is the construction and operation of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which is a joint project of China, Europe, Japan, India, Korea, the Russian Federation, and the United States. Construction has begun in Cadarache, France. It is expected that ITER will operate at the 500 MW level. Because of the harsh environment in the vacuum vessel where many diagnostic components are located, the development of diagnostics for ITER is a major challenge - arguably the most difficult challenge ever undertaken in the field of diagnostics. The main elements in the diagnostic step are outlined using the three chosen techniques as examples. Finally, the step beyond ITER to a demonstration reactor, DEMO, that is expected to produce several GWs of fusion power is considered and the impact on diagnostics outlined. It is shown that the applicability and development steps needed for the individual diagnostics techniques will differ. The challenges for DEMO diagnostics are substantial and a dedicated effort should be made to find and develop new techniques, and especially techniques appropriate to the DEMO environment. It is argued that the limitations and difficulties in diagnostics should be a consideration in the optimization and designs of DEMO. (author)

  16. Design considerations for epithermal pulse reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostensen, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    Simplified design criteria were developed for scoping analyses of epithermal pulse reactors for use in LMFBR safety testing. By using these criteria, materials and designs were investigated to determine performance limits of moderately sized reactor cores. Several designs are suggested for further study. These are a gas-cooled core fueled with a heterogeneous mixture of Fe-UO 2 cermet and BeO-UO 2 ceramic fuels, and a heavy-water-cooled core fueled with an Fe-UO 2 cermet

  17. Neutronics issues in fusion-fission hybrid reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chengan

    1995-01-01

    The coupled neutron and γ-ray transport equations and nuclear number density equations, and its computer program systems concerned in fusion-fission hybrid reactor design are briefly described. The current status and focal point for coming work of nuclear data used in fusion reactor design are explained

  18. Hydrogen production from high temperature electrolysis and fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, J.F.; Issacs, H.S.; Lazareth, O.; Powell, J.R.; Salzano, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    Production of hydrogen from high temperature electrolysis of steam coupled with a fusion reactor is studied. The process includes three major components: the fusion reactor, the high temperature electrolyzer and the power conversion cycle each of which is discussed in the paper. Detailed process design and analysis of the system is examined. A parametric study on the effect of process efficiency is presented

  19. Graphs of neutron cross section data for fusion reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asami, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Shigeya

    1979-03-01

    Graphs of neutron cross section data relevant to fusion reactor development are presented. Nuclides and reaction types in the present compilation are based on a WRENDA request list from Japan for fusion reactor development. The compilation contains various partial cross sections for 55 nuclides from 6 Li to 237 Np in the energy range up to 20 MeV. (author)

  20. LIBRA - a light ion beam fusion conceptual reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badger, B.; Moses, G.A.; Engelstad, R.L.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Lovell, E.; MacFarlane, J.; Peterson, R.R.; Sawan, M.E.; Sviatovslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Cook, D.L.; Olson, R.E.; Stinnett, R.W.; Ehrhardt, J.; Kessler, G.; Stein, E.

    1990-08-01

    The LIBRA light ion beam fusion commercial reactor study is a self-consistent conceptual design of a 330 MWe power plant with an accompanying economic analysis. Fusion targets are imploded by 4 MJ shaped pulses of 30 MeV Li ions at a rate of 3 Hz. The target gain is 80, leading to a yield of 320 MJ. The high intensity part of the ion pulse is delivered by 16 diodes through 16 separate z-pinch plasma channels formed in 100 torr of helium with trace amounts of lithium. The blanket is an array of porous flexible silicon carbind tubes with Li 17 Pb 83 flowing downward through them. These tubes (INPORT units) shield the target chamber wall from both neutron damage and the shock overpressure of the target explosion. The target chamber is 'self-pumped' by the target explosion generated overpressure into a surge tank partially filled with Li 17 Pb 83 that surrounds the target chamber. This scheme refreshes the chamber at the desired 3 Hz frequently without excessive pumping demands. The blanket multiplication is 1.2 and the tritium breeding ratio is 1.4. The direct capital cost of a 331 MWe LIBRA design is estimated to be 2843 Dollar/kWe while a 1200 MWe LIBRA design will cost approximately 1300 Dollar/kWe. (orig.) [de

  1. Upgrade of the Annular Core Pulse Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuscher, J A [Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1976-07-01

    The Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) is a TRIGA type reactor which has been in operation at Sandia Laboratories since 1967. The reactor is utilized in a wide variety of experimental programs which include radiation effects, neutron radiography, activation analysis, and fast reactor safety. During the past two years, the ACPR has become an important experimental facility for the United States Fast Reactor Safety Research Program and questions of interest to the safety of the LMFBR are being addressed. In order to enhance the capabilities of the ACPR for reactor safety experiments, a project to improve the performance of the reactor was initiated. It is anticipated that the pulse fluence can be increased by a factor of 2.0 to 2.5 by utilizing a two-region core concept with high heat capacity fuel elements around the central irradiation cavity. In addition, the steady-state power of the reactor will be increased by about a factor of two. Preliminary studies have identified several potential approaches to the ACPR performance improvement. The most promising approach appears to be the two-region core concept. The inner region, surrounding the irradiation cavity, would consist of a high-heat capacity fuel capable of absorbing the fission energy associated with a large nuclear pulse. The number of fissions occurring near the cavity would be greatly increased which, in turn, would significantly increase the fluence in the cavity. The outer region would consist of a U-ZrH fuel to provide an overall negative temperature coefficient for the two region core. Two candidate high heat capacity fuels [(BeO-UO{sub 2} and UC-ZrC) - graphite] are under consideration. Since this reactor upgrade represents a modification to an existing facility, it can be achieved in a relatively short time. It is anticipated that most of the existing reactor structure can be used for the upgrade. The present core occupies about one-half of the location in the grid plate. The high-heat capacity fuel

  2. The ARIES tokamak fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlit, J.R.; Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Beecraft, W.R.; Hogan, J.T.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Reid, R.L.; Strickler, D.J.; Whitson, J.C.; Blanchard, J.P.; Emmert, G.A.; Santarius, J.F.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of the tokamak as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine their potential economics, safety, and environmental features and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak in 2nd stability regime and employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering; and ARIES-III is a conceptual D 3 He reactor. This paper focuses on the ARIES-I design. Parametric systems studies show that the optimum 1st stability tokamak has relatively low plasma current (∼ 12 MA), high plasma aspect ratio (∼ 4-6), and high magnetic field (∼ 24 T at the coil). ARIES-I is 1,000 MWe (net) reactor with a plasma major radius of 6.5 m, a minor radius of 1.4 m, a neutron wall loading of about 2.8 MW/m 2 , and a mass power density of about 90 kWe/ton. The ARIES-I reactor operates at steady state using ICRF fast waves to drive current in the plasma core and lower-hybrid waves for edge-plasma current drive. The current-drive system supplements a significant (∼ 57%) bootstrap current contribution. The impurity control system is based on high-recycling poloidal divertors. Because of the high field and large Lorentz forces in the toroidal-field magnets, innovative approaches with high-strength materials and support structures are used. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  3. The need and prospects for improved fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.; Miller, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Conceptual fusion reactor studies over the past 10-15 yr have projected systems that may be too large, complex, and costly to be of commercial interest. One main direction for improved fusion reactors points toward smaller, higher-power-density approaches. First-order economic issues (i.e., unit direct cost and cost of electricity) are used to support the need for more compact fusion reactors. The results of a number of recent conceptual designs of reversed-field pinch, spheromak, and tokamak fusion reactors are summarized as examples of more compact approaches. While a focus has been placed on increasing the fusion-power-core mass power density beyond the minimum economic threshold of 100-200 kWe/tonne, other means by which the overall attractiveness of fusion as a long-term energy source are also addressed

  4. The fusion reactor - a chance to solve the energy problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wienecke, R.

    1975-01-01

    The work deals with the physical fundamentals of nuclear fusion and the properties of the necessary plasma and gives a survey on the arrangements used today for magnetic confinement such as tokamak, stellarator, high-beta experiments and laser fusion. Finally, the technology of the fusion reactor and its potential advantages are explained. (RW/LH) [de

  5. Roles of plasma neutron source reactor in development of fusion reactor engineering: Comparison with fission reactor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Shoichi; Kawabe, Takaya

    1995-01-01

    The history of development of fusion power reactor has come to a turning point, where the main research target is now shifting from the plasma heating and confinement physics toward the burning plasma physics and reactor engineering. Although the development of fusion reactor system is the first time for human beings, engineers have experience of development of fission power reactor. The common feature between them is that both are plants used for the generation of nuclear reactions for the production of energy, nucleon, and radiation on an industrial scale. By studying the history of the development of the fission reactor, one can find the existence of experimental neutron reactors including irradiation facilities for fission reactor materials. These research neutron reactors played very important roles in the development of fission power reactors. When one considers the strategy of development of fusion power reactors from the points of fusion reactor engineering, one finds that the fusion neutron source corresponds to the neutron reactor in fission reactor development. In this paper, the authors discuss the roles of the plasma-based neutron source reactors in the development of fusion reactor engineering, by comparing it with the neutron reactors in the history of fission power development, and make proposals for the strategy of the fusion reactor development. 21 refs., 6 figs

  6. Fusion reactor design and technology 1986. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The first volume of the Proceedings of the Fourth Technical Committee Meeting and Workshop on Fusion Reactor Design and Technology organized by the IAEA (Yalta, 26 May - 6 June 1986) includes 36 papers devoted to the following topics: fusion programmes (3 papers), tokamaks (15 papers), non-tokamak reactors and open systems (9 papers), inertial confinement concepts (5 papers), fission-fusion hybrids (4 papers). Each of these papers has a separate abstract. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Past, present and future of the fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum P, M.

    1992-01-01

    Among the alternate technologies that have acquired a special interest in the present decade, we find the nuclear fusion. Within this, the fusion reactors by magnetic confinement of the Tokamak type have shown an increasing technological progress during this period. For this reason, a new strategy, coordinated at international level, has been implemented for the specific development of the nuclear fusion reactors, aimed to face those scientific and technological aspects which still remain, and which will determine their future economic feasibility. (Author)

  8. Symbiosis of near breeder HTR's with hybrid fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1978-07-01

    In this contribution to INFCE a symbiotic fusion/fission reactor system, consisting of a hybrid beam-driven micro-explosion fusion reactor (HMER) and associated high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR) with a coupled fuel cycle, is proposed. This system is similar to the well known Fast Breeder/Near Breeder HTR symbiosis except that the fast fission breeder - running on the U/Pu-cycle in the core and the axial blankets and breeding the surplus fissile material as U-233 in its radial thorium metal or thorium oxide blankets - is replaced by a hybrid micro-explosion DT fusion reactor

  9. SAFIRE: A systems analysis code for ICF [inertial confinement fusion] reactor economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarville, T.J.; Meier, W.R.; Carson, C.F.; Glasgow, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    The SAFIRE (Systems Analysis for ICF Reactor Economics) code incorporates analytical models for scaling the cost and performance of several inertial confinement fusion reactor concepts for electric power. The code allows us to vary design parameters (e.g., driver energy, chamber pulse rate, net electric power) and evaluate the resulting change in capital cost of power plant and the busbar cost of electricity. The SAFIRE code can be used to identify the most attractive operating space and to identify those design parameters with the greatest leverage for improving the economics of inertial confinement fusion electric power plants

  10. Development of dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Isao; Seki, Yasushi [Department of Fusion Engineering Research, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Shintani, Kiyonori; Kim, Yeong-Chan

    1999-02-01

    A dynamic simulation code for fuel cycle of a fusion experimental reactor has been developed. The code follows the fuel inventory change with time in the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system during 2 days pulse operation cycles. The time dependence of the fuel inventory distribution is evaluated considering the fuel burn and exhaust in the plasma chamber, purification and supply functions. For each subsystem of the plasma chamber and the fuel cycle system, the fuel inventory equation is written based on the equation of state considering the fuel burn and the function of exhaust, purification, and supply. The processing constants of subsystem for steady states were taken from the values in the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) report. Using this code, the time dependence of the fuel supply and inventory depending on the burn state and subsystem processing functions are shown. (author)

  11. Recent designs for advanced fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    A series of reactor design studies based on the Tokamak configuration have been carried out under the direction of Professor Robert Conn of UCLA. They are called ARIES-I through IV. The key mission of these studies is to evaluate the attractiveness of fusion assuming different degrees of advancement in either physics or engineering development. This paper discusses the directions and conclusions of the blanket and related engineering systems for those design studies. ARIES-1 investigated the use of SiC composite as the structural material to increase the blanket temperature and reduce the blanket activation. Li 2 ZrO 3 was used as the breeding material due to its high temperature stability and good tritium recovery characteristics. The ARIES-IV is a modification of ARIES-1. The plasma was in the second stability regime. Li 2 O was used as the breeding material to remove Zr. A gaseous divertor was used to replace the conventional divertor so that high Z divertor target is not required. The physics of ARIES-II was the same as ARIES-IV. The engineering design of the ARIES-II was based on a self-cooled lithium blanket with a V-alloy as the structural material. Even though it was assumed that the plasma was in the second stability regime, the plasma beta was still rather low (3.4%). The ARIES-III is an advanced fuel (D- 3 He) tokamak reactor. The reactor design assumed major advancement on the physics, with a plasma beta of 23.9%. A conventional structural material is acceptable due to the low neutron wall loading. From the radiation damage point of view, the first wall can last the life of the reactor, which is expected to be a major advantage from the engineering design and waste disposal point of view

  12. Blanket materials for DT fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the critical materials issues that must be considered in the development of a tritium breeding blanket for a tokamak fusion reactor that operates on the D-T-Li fuel cycle. The primary requirements of the blanket system are identified and the important criteria that must be considered in the development of blanket technology are summarized. The candidate materials are listed for the different blanket components, e.g., breeder, coolant, structure and neutron multiplier. Three blanket concepts that appear to offer the most potential are: (1) liquid-metal breeder/coolant, (2) liquid-metal breeder/separate coolant, and (3) solid breeder/separate coolant. The major uncertainties associated with each of the design concepts are discussed and the key materials R and D requirements for each concept are identified

  13. Burning nuclear wastes in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meldner, H.W.; Howard, W.M.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made up of actinide burn-up in ICF reactor pellets; i.e. 14 Mev neutron fission of the very long-lived actinides that pose storage problems. A major advantage of pellet fuel region burn-up is safety: only milligrams of highly toxic and active material need to be present in the fusion chamber, whereas blanket burn-up requires the continued presence of tons of actinides in a small volume. The actinide data tables required for Monte Carlo calculations of the burn-up of /sup 241/Am and /sup 243/Am are discussed in connection with a study of the sensitivity to cross section uncertainties. More accurate and complete cross sections are required for realistic quantitative calculations. 13 refs

  14. Intelligible seminar on fusion reactors. (12) Next step toward the realization of fusion reactors. Future vision of fusion energy research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Kunihiko; Kurihara, Kenichi; Tobita, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    In the last session of this seminar the progress of research and development for the realization of fusion reactors and future vision of fusion energy research and development are summarized. The some problems to be solved when the commercial fusion reactors would be realized, (1) production of deuterium as the fuel, (2) why need the thermonuclear reactors, (3) environmental problems, and (4) ITER project, are described. (H. Mase)

  15. Tests of vacuum interrupters for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.; Parsons, M.; Honig, E.; Lindsay, J.

    1979-04-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project at Princeton University requires the insertion of a resistor in an excited ohmic-heating coil circuit to produce a plasma initiation pulse (PIP). It is expected that the maximum duty for the switching system will be an interruption of 24 kA with an associated recovery voltage of 25 kV. Vacuum interrupters were selected as the most economical means to satisfy these requirements. However, it was felt that some testing of available systems should be performed to determine their reliability under these conditions. Two interrupter systems were tested for over 1000 interruptions each at 24 kA and 25 kV. One system employed special Westinghouse type WL-33552 interrupters in a circuit designed by LASL. This circuit used a commercially available actuator and a minimum size counterpulse bank and saturable reactor. The other used Toshiba type VGB2-D20 interrupters actuated by a Toshiba mechanism in a Toshiba circuit using a larger counterpulse bank and saturable reactor

  16. Early fusion reactor neutronic calculations: A reevaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, R.T.

    1996-01-01

    Several fusion power plant design studies were made at a number of universities and laboratories in the late 1960s and early 1970s. These studies included such designs as the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Fusion Power Plan and the University of Wisconsin UWMAK-I Reactor Neutronic analyses of the blankets and shields were part of the studies. During this time there were dissertations written on neutronic analysis systems and the results of neutronic analysis on several blanket and shield designs. The results were presented in the literature. Now in the fifth decade of fusion research, investigators often return to the earlier analyses for the neutronic results that are applicable to current blanket and shield designs, with the idea of using the older work as a basis for the new. However, the analyses of the past were made with cross-section data sets that have long been replaced with more modern versions. In addition, approximations were often made to the cross sections used because more exact data were not available. Because these results are used as guides, it is important to know if they are reproducible using more modern data. In this paper, several of the neutronic calculations made in the early studies are repeated using the MATXS-11 data library. This library is the ENDF/B-VI version of the MATXS-5 library. The library has 80 neutron groups. Tritium breeding ratios, heating rates, and fluxes are calculated and compared. This transport code used here is the one- dimensional S n code, ONEDANT. It is important to note that the calculations here are not to be considered as benchmarks because parameter and sensitivity studies were not made. They are used only to see if the results of older calculations are in reasonable agreement with a more modern library

  17. Introduction to Nuclear Fusion Power and the Design of Fusion Reactors. An Issue-Oriented Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillo, J. A.

    This three-part module focuses on the principles of nuclear fusion and on the likely nature and components of a controlled-fusion power reactor. The physical conditions for a net energy release from fusion and two approaches (magnetic and inertial confinement) which are being developed to achieve this goal are described. Safety issues associated…

  18. The LOFA analysis of fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z.-C.; Xie, H.

    2014-01-01

    The fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor can produce energy, breed nuclear fuel, and handle the nuclear waste, etc, with the fusion neutron source striking the subcritical blanket. The passive safety system, consisting of passive residual heat removal system, passive safety injection system and automatic depressurization system, was adopted into the fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor in this paper. Modeling and nodalization of primary loop, passive core cooling system and partial secondary loop of the fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor using RELAP5 were conducted and LOFA (Loss of Flow Accident) was analyzed. The results of key transient parameters indicated that the PRHRs could mitigate the accidental consequence of LOFA effectively. It is also concluded that it is feasible to apply the passive safety system concept to fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor. (author)

  19. Fusion reactor design studies: standard accounts for cost estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, S.C.; Willke, T.L.; Young, J.R.

    1978-05-01

    The fusion reactor design studies--standard accounts for cost estimates provides a common format from which to assess the economic character of magnetically confined fusion reactor design concepts. The format will aid designers in the preparation of design concept costs estimates and also provide policymakers with a tool to assist in appraising which design concept may be economically promising. The format sets forth a categorization and accounting procedure to be used when estimating fusion reactor busbar energy cost that can be easily and consistently applied. Reasons for developing the procedure, explanations of the procedure, justifications for assumptions made in the procedure, and the applicability of the procedure are described in this document. Adherence to the format when evaluating prospective fusion reactor design concepts will result in the identification of the more promising design concepts thus enabling the fusion power alternatives with better economic potential to be quickly and efficiently developed

  20. Application of Bondarenko formalism to fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soran, P.D.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    The Bondarenko formalism used to account for resonance self-shielding effects (temperature and composition) in a Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor is reviewed. A material of interest in the RTPR blanket is 93 Nb, which exhibits a large number of capture resonance in the energy region below 800 keV. Although Nb constitutes a small volume fraction of the blanket, its presence significantly affects the nucleonic properties of the RTPR blanket. The effects of self-shielding in 93 Nb on blanket parameters such as breeding ratio, total afterheat, radioactivity, magnet-coil heating and total energy depositions have been studied. Resonance self-shielding of 93 Nb, as compared to unshielded cross sections, will increase tritium breeding by approximately 7 percent in the RTPR blanket and will decrease blanket radioactivity, total recoverable energy, and magnet-coil heating. Temperature effects change these parameters by less than 2 percent. The method is not restricted to the RTPR, as a single set of Bondarenko f-factors is suitable for application to a variety of fusion reactor designs

  1. Fusion reactor blanket-main design aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strebkov, Yu.; Sidorov, A.; Danilov, I.

    1994-01-01

    The main function of the fusion reactor blanket is ensuring tritium breeding and radiation shield. The blanket version depends on the reactor type (experimental, DEMO, commercial) and its parameters. Blanket operation conditions are defined with the heat flux, neutron load/fluence, cyclic operation, dynamic heating/force loading, MHD effects etc. DEMO/commercial blanket design is distinguished e.g. by rather high heat load and neutron fluence - up to 100 W/cm 2 and 7 MWa/m 2 accordingly. This conditions impose specific requirements for the materials, structure, maintenance of the blanket and its most loaded components - FW and limiter. The liquid Li-Pb eutectic is one of the possible breeder for different kinds of blanket in view of its advantages one of which is the blanket convertibility that allow to have shielding blanket (borated water) or breeding one (Li-Pb eutectic). Using Li-Pb eutectic for both ITER and DEMO blankets have been considered. In the conceptual ITER design the solid eutectic blanket was carried out. The liquid eutectic breeder/coolant is suggested also for the advanced (high parameter) blanket

  2. Superconductors for fusion magnets tested under pulsed field in SULTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzzone, P.; Bottura, L.; Katheder, H.; Blau, B.; Rohleder, I.; Vecsey, G.

    1995-01-01

    The SULTAN III test facility has been upgraded with a pair of pulsed field coils to carry out AC losses and stability experiments under full operating loads on large size, fusion conductors for ITER. A fast data aquisition system records the conductor behaviour under fast field transient. The commissioning results of the pulsed coils and instrumentation are critically discussed and the test capability of the set up is assessed. (orig.)

  3. Fusion reactor start-up without an external tritium source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, S., E-mail: Shanliang.Zheng@ccfe.ac.uk; King, D.B.; Garzotti, L.; Surrey, E.; Todd, T.N.

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Investigated the feasibility (including plasma physics, neutronics and economics) of starting a fusion reactor from running pure D–D fusion reactor to gradually move towards the D–T operation. • Proposed building up tritium from making use of neutrons generated by D–D fusion reactions. • Studied plasma physics feasibility for pure D–D operation and provided consistent fusion power and neutron yield in the plasma with different mixture of deuterium and tritium. • Discussed the economics aspect for operating a pure D–D fusion reactor towards a full-power D–T fusion reactor. - Abstract: It has long been recognised that the shortage of external tritium sources for fusion reactors using D–T, the most promising fusion fuel, requires all such fusion power plants (FPP) to breed their own tritium. It is also recognised that the initial start-up of a fusion reactor will require several kilograms of tritium within a scenario in which radioactive decay, ITER and subsequent demonstrator reactors are expected to have consumed most of the known tritium stockpile. To circumvent this tritium fuel shortage and ultimately achieve steady-state operation for a FPP, it is essential to first accumulate sufficient tritium to compensate for loss due to decay and significant retention in the materials in order to start a new FPP. In this work, we propose to accumulate tritium starting from D–D fusion reactions, since D exists naturally in water, and to gradually build up the D–T plasma targeted in fusion reactor designs. There are two likely D–D fusion reaction channels, (1) D + D → T + p, and (2) D + D → He3 + n. The tritium can be generated via the reaction channel ‘(1)’ and the 2.45 MeV neutrons from ‘(2)’ react with lithium-6 in the breeding blanket to produce more tritium to be fed back into plasma fuel. Quantitative evaluations are conducted for two blanket concepts to assess the feasibility and suitability of this approach to FPP

  4. Self-sustaining nuclear pumped laser-fusion reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boody, F.P.; Choi, C.K.; Miley, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    The features of a neutron feedback nuclear pumped (NFNP) laser-fusion reactor equipment were studied with the intention of establishing the feasibility of the concept. The NFNP laser-fusion concept is compared schematically to electrically pumped laser fusion. The study showed that, once a method of energy storage has been demonstrated, a self-sustaining fusion-fission hybrid reactor with a ''blanket multiplication'' of two would be feasible using nuclear pumped Xe F* excimer lasers having efficiencies of 1 to 2 percent and D-D-T pellets with gains of 50 to 100

  5. Pulsed fission/fusion hybrid engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, G.C.

    1979-01-01

    Research into high-thrust, high-specific impulse rocket engines using energy from nuclear reactions which has been conducted at this organization will be discussed. The engines are all conceptual in nature, yet are within the realization of conventional or near-term technology. The engine concepts under study at Foundation, Inc. are designed to obviate or minimize these negative effects of the ORION scheme. By using non-chemical triggers to initiate a non-breakeven fusion reaction at the core of a target composed of both fission and fusion fuel, it should be possible to employ the fusion neutrons thus produced to begin a fission reaction in U-235 or Pu-239. Since the density of the target can be increased by as much as a factor of 250 through compression of the pellet, the amount of fission material necessary to produce a critical mass can be greatly reduced. (This also means that the amount of fission products produced for a giventhrust level is also reduced from the ORION levels.) Coupling this eeffect to the large number of 14 MeV fusion neutrons produced early in the compression process and subsequently to the heating of some additional fusion fuel surrounding the critical mass leads to the very efficient burnup of the target. This insures both high yield from the target as well as low cost per MJ energy released. Finally, the use of such small pellets allows the scale of the energy released to be tailored to a level usable in rocket engines of a few tens of tons thrust level. (orig.) [de

  6. Numerical analysis of magnetoelastic coupled buckling of fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demachi, K.; Yoshida, Y.; Miya, K.

    1994-01-01

    For a tokamak fusion reactor, it is one of the most important subjects to establish the structural design in which its components can stand for strong magnetic force induced by plasma disruption. A number of magnetostructural analysis of the fusion reactor components were done recently. However, in these researches the structural behavior was calculated based on the small deformation theory where the nonlinearity was neglected. But it is known that some kinds of structures easily exceed the geometrical nonlinearity. In this paper, the deflection and the magnetoelastic buckling load of fusion reactor components during plasma disruption were calculated

  7. Robust stabilization of burn conditions in subignited fusion reactors using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitela, E. Javier; Martinell, J. Julio

    2000-01-01

    In this work it is shown that robust burn control in long pulse operations of thermonuclear reactors can be successfully achieved with artificial neural networks. The results reported here correspond to a volume averaged zero-dimensional nonlinear model of a subignited fusion device using the design parameters of the tokamak EDA-ITER group. A Radial Basis Neural Network (RBNN) was trained to provide feedback stabilization at a fixed operating point independently of any particular scaling law that the reactor confinement time may follow. A numerically simulated transient is used to illustrate the stabilization capabilities of the resulting RBNN when the reactor follows an ELMy scaling law corrupted with Gaussian noise. (author)

  8. First preliminary design of an experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    A preliminary design of a tokamak experimental fusion reactor to be built in the near future is under way. The goals of the reactor are to achieve reactor-level plasma conditions for a sufficiently long operation period and to obtain design, construction and operational experience for the main components of full-scale power reactors. This design covers overall reactor system including plasma characteristics, reactor structure, blanket neutronics, shielding, superconducting magnets, neutral beam injector, electric power supply system, fuel circulating system, reactor cooling system, tritium recovery system and maintenance scheme. The main design parameters are as follows: the reactor fusion power 100 MW, torus radius 6.75 m, plasma radius 1.5 m, first wall radius 1.75 m, toroidal magnet field on axis 6 T, blanket fertile material Li 2 O, coolant He, structural material 316SS and tritium breeding ratio 0.9. (auth.)

  9. Engineering the fusion reactor first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurden, Glen; Scott, Willms

    2008-01-01

    Recently the National Academy of Engineering published a set of Grand Challenges in Engineering in which the second item listed was entitled 'Provide energy from fusion'. Clearly a key component of this challenge is the science and technology associated with creating and maintaining burning plasmas. This is being vigorously addressed with both magnetic and inertial approaches with various experiments such as ITER and NIF. Considerably less attention is being given to another key component of this challenge, namely engineering the first wall that will contain the burning plasma. This is a daunting problem requiring technologies and materials that can not only survive, but also perform multiple essential functions in this extreme environment. These functions are (1) shield the remainder of the device from radiation. (2) convert of neutron energy to useful heat and (3) breed and extract tritium to maintain the reactor fuel supply. The first wall must not contaminate the plasma with impurities. It must be infused with cooling to maintain acceptable temperatures on plasma facing and structural components. It must not degrade. It must avoid excessive build-up of tritium on surfaces, and, if surface deposits do form, must be receptive to cleaning techniques. All these functions and constraints must be met while being subjected to nuclear and thermal radiation, particle bombardment, high magnetic fields, thermal cycling and occasional impingement of plasma on the surface. And, operating in a nuclear environment, the first wall must be fully maintainable by remotely-operated manipulators. Elements of the first wall challenge have been studied since the 1970' s both in the US and internationally. Considerable foundational work has been performed on plasma facing materials and breeding blanket/shield modules. Work has included neutronics, materials fabrication and joining, fluid flow, tritium breeding, tritium recovery and containment, energy conversion, materials damage and

  10. Control of tritium permeation through fusion reactor strucural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroni, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to provide a brief synopsis of the status of understanding and technology pertaining to the dissolution and permeation of tritium in fusion reactor materials. The following sections of this paper attempt to develop a simple perspective for understanding the consequences of these phenomena and the nature of the technical methodology being contemplated to control their impact on fusion reactor operation. Considered in order are: (1) the occurrence of tritium in the fusion fuel cycle, (2) a set of tentative criteria to guide the analysis of tritium containment and control strategies, (3) the basic mechanisms by which tritium may be released from a fusion plant, and (4) the methods currently under development to control the permeation-related release mechanisms. To provide background and support for these considerations, existing solubility and permeation data for the hydrogen isotopes are compared and correlated under conditions to be expected in fusion reactor systems

  11. Comparative study of pulsed and steady-state tokamak reactor burn cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K.; Hassanein, A.M.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1984-05-01

    Four distinct operating modes have been proposed for tokamaks. Our study focuses on capital costs and lifetime limitations of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas considered include: thermal fatigue on first wall, limiter/divertor; thermal energy storage; fatigue in pulsed poloidal field coils; out-of-plant fatigue and eddy current heating in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive driver costs. We assume a high availability and low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, and we characterize improvements in physics and engineering which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles

  12. Plutonium-239 production rate study using a typical fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, F.; Havasi, H.; Amin-Mozafari, M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to compute fissile 239 Pu material by supposed typical fusion reactor operation to make the fuel requirement for other purposes (e.g. MOX fissile fuel, etc.). It is assumed that there is a fusion reactor has a cylindrical geometry and uses uniformly distributed deuterium-tritium as fuel so that neutron wall load is taken at 10(MW)/(m 2 ) . Moreover, the reactor core is surrounded by six suggested blankets to make best performance of the physical conditions described herein. We determined neutron flux in each considered blanket as well as tritium self-sufficiency using two groups neutron energy and then computation is followed by the MCNP-4C code. Finally, material depletion according to a set of dynamical coupled differential equations is solved to estimate 239 Pu production rate. Produced 239 Pu is compared with two typical fission reactors to find performance of plutonium breeding ratio in the case of the fusion reactor. We found that 0.92% of initial U is converted into fissile Pu by our suggested fusion reactor with thermal power of 3000 MW. For comparison, 239 Pu yield of suggested large scale PWR is about 0.65% and for LMFBR is close to 1.7%. The results show that the fusion reactor has an acceptable efficiency for Pu production compared with a large scale PWR fission reactor type

  13. Plutonium-239 production rate study using a typical fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faghihi, F. [Research Center for Radiation Protection, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: faghihif@shirazu.ac.ir; Havasi, H.; Amin-Mozafari, M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, 71348-51154 Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of the present paper is to compute fissile {sup 239}Pu material by supposed typical fusion reactor operation to make the fuel requirement for other purposes (e.g. MOX fissile fuel, etc.). It is assumed that there is a fusion reactor has a cylindrical geometry and uses uniformly distributed deuterium-tritium as fuel so that neutron wall load is taken at 10(MW)/(m{sup 2}) . Moreover, the reactor core is surrounded by six suggested blankets to make best performance of the physical conditions described herein. We determined neutron flux in each considered blanket as well as tritium self-sufficiency using two groups neutron energy and then computation is followed by the MCNP-4C code. Finally, material depletion according to a set of dynamical coupled differential equations is solved to estimate {sup 239}Pu production rate. Produced {sup 239}Pu is compared with two typical fission reactors to find performance of plutonium breeding ratio in the case of the fusion reactor. We found that 0.92% of initial U is converted into fissile Pu by our suggested fusion reactor with thermal power of 3000 MW. For comparison, {sup 239}Pu yield of suggested large scale PWR is about 0.65% and for LMFBR is close to 1.7%. The results show that the fusion reactor has an acceptable efficiency for Pu production compared with a large scale PWR fission reactor type.

  14. Alternative fusion concepts and the prospects for improved reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Past trends, present status, and future directions in the search for an improved fusion reactor are reviewed, and promising options available to boh the principle tokamak and other supporting concept are summarized

  15. Nuclear data for structural materials of fission and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulo, V.

    1989-06-01

    The document presents the status of nuclear reaction theory concerning optical model development, level density models and pre-equilibrium and direct processes used in calculation of neutron nuclear data for structural materials of fission and fusion reactors. 6 refs

  16. Health physics aspects of activation products from fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoup, R.L.; Poston, J.W.; Easterly, C.E.; Jacobs, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the activation products from fusion reactors and their attendant impacts is discussed. This includes a discussion on their production, expected inventories, and the status of metabolic data on these products

  17. Nuclear characteristics of D-D fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hideki; Ohta, Masao

    1978-01-01

    Fusion reactors operating on deuterium (D-D) cycle are considered to be of long range interest for their freedom from tritium breeding in the blanket. The present paper discusses the various possibilities of D-D fusion reactor blanket designs mainly from the standpoint of the nuclear characteristics. Neutronic and photonic calculations are based on presently available data to provide a basis of the optimal blanket design in D-D fusion reactors. It is found that it appears desirable to design a blanket with blanket/shield (BS) concept in D-D fusion reactors. The BS concept is designed to obtain reasonable shielding characteristics for superconducting magnet (SCM) by using shielding materials in the compact blanket. This concept will open the possibility of compact radiation shield design based on assured technology, and offer the advantage from the system economics point of view. (auth.)

  18. New technology and neo-science on the nuclear fusion reactor engineering. ITER and super high speed phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    This research meeting has been held under cooperation of the ''nuclear fusion reactor engineering research group'' and ''nuclear fusion reactor materials research group'' of the Yayoi Research Group. This meeting was planned and conducted for 2 days under the following predominant thema: Present status of research on thermo-nuclear fusion experimental reactor engineering design (ITER/EDA) and its promoting method in Japan, and a new scientific side in the research and development of nuclear fusion reactor materials or the super high speed phenomena. In the former item, the following reports were published: Creative period of R and D on the nuclear fusion reactor, present statue and future development of ITER/EDA, meanings of ITER under realization of the nuclear fusion energy, and others. And in the latter item, the following reports were published: Nuclear fusion materials engineering and system quantum engineering, dynamic imagination of atom and molecule using pulse snap shot method, laser wake field acceleration and ultra short x-ray pulse generation, development of T-cube laser in JAERI, and others. (G.K.)

  19. Fusion-reactor blanket and coolant material compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppson, D.W.; Keough, R.F.

    1981-01-01

    Fusion reactor blanket and coolant compatibility tests are being conducted to aid in the selection and design of safe blanket and coolant systems for future fusion reactors. Results of scoping compatibility tests to date are reported for blanket material and water interactions at near operating temperatures. These tests indicate the quantitative hydrogen release, the maximum temperature and pressures produced and the rates of interactions for selected blanket materials

  20. Influence of Impurities on the Fuel Retention in Fusion Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhart, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the influence of plasma impurities on the hydrogen retentionin metals, in the scope of plasma-wall-interaction research for fusion reactors.This is addressed experimentally and by modelling. The mechanisms of the hydrogenretention are influenced by various parameters like the wall temperature, ionenergy, flux and fluence as well as the plasma composition. The plasma compositionis a relevant factor for hydrogen retention in fusion reactors, as their plasma willalso ...

  1. An analysis of the estimated capital cost of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, A.A.

    1981-06-01

    The cost of building a fusion reactor similar to the Culham Conceptual Tokamak reactor Mark IIB is assessed and compared with other published capital costs of fusion and fission reactors. It is concluded that capital-investment and structure-renewal costs for a typical fusion reactor as presently conceived are likely to be higher than for thermal-fission reactors. (author)

  2. An analysis of the estimated capital cost of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, A.A.; Evans, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    The cost of building a fusion reactor similar to the Culham Conceptual Tokamak reactor Mark IIB is assessed and compared with other published capital costs of fusion and fission reactors. It is concluded that capital-investment and structure-renewal costs for a typical fusion reactor as presently conceived are likely to be higher than for thermal-fission reactors. (author)

  3. Tritium-related materials problems in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Pressing materials problems that must be solved before tritium can be used to produce energy economically in fusion reactors are discussed. The following topics are discussed: (1) breeding tritium, (2) recovering bred tritium, (3) containing tritium, (4) fuel recycling, and (5) laser-fusion fueling

  4. Thermal aspects of a superconducting coil for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.T.

    1975-01-01

    Computer models are used to simulate both localized and extensive thermal excursions in a large superconducting magnet for fusion reactor. Conditions for the failure of fusion magnet due to thermal excursion are delineated. Designs to protect the magnet against such thermal excursion are evaluated

  5. Fission-suppressed hybrid reactor: the fusion breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Coops, M.S.

    1982-12-01

    Results of a conceptual design study of a 233 U-producing fusion breeder are presented. The majority of the study was devoted to conceptual design and evaluation of a fission-suppressed blanket and to fuel cycle issues such as fuel reprocessing, fuel handling, and fuel management. Studies in the areas of fusion engineering, reactor safety, and economics were also performed

  6. Safety vessels for explosive fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineev, V.

    1994-01-01

    The failure of several types of geometrically similar cylindrical and spherical steel and glass fibers vessels filled with water or air was investigated when an explosive charge of TNT was detonated in the center. Vessels had radius 50-1000 mm, thickness of walls 2-20%. The detonation on TNT imitated energy release. The parameter: K = M/mf is a measure of the strength of the vessel where M is the mass of the vessel, and mf is the mass of TNT for which the vessel fails. This demanded 2-4 destroyed and nondestroyed shots. It may be showed that: K=A/σ f where σ f is the fracture stress of the material vessel, and A = const = F(energy TNT, characteristic of elasticity of vessel material). The chief results are the following: (1) A similar increase in the geometrical dimensions of steel vessels by a factor of 10 leads to the increase of parameter K in about 5 times and to decrease of failure deformation in 7 times (scale effect). (2) For glass fibers, scale effect is absent. (3) This problem is solved in terms of theory energetic scale effect. (4) The concept of TNT equivalent explosive makes it possible to use these investigations to evaluate the response of safety vessels for explosive fusion reactor

  7. Superconducting magnets for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.

    1980-01-01

    Fusion reactors will soon be employing superconducting magnets to confine plasma in which deuterium and tritium (D-T) are fused to produce usable energy. At present there is one small confinement experiment with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils: Tokamak 7 (T-7), in the USSR, which operates at 4 T. By 1983, six different 2.5 x 3.5-m D-shaped coils from six manufacturers in four countries will be assembled in a toroidal array in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing at fields up to 8 T. Soon afterwards ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT-P) will begin operation at Oak Ridge with superconducting TF coils. At the same time there will be tokamaks with superconducting TF coils 2 to 3 m in diameter in the USSR and France. Toroidal field strength in these machines will range from 6 to 9 T. NbTi and Nb 3 Sn, bath cooling and forced flow, cryostable and metastable - various designs are being tried in this period when this new application of superconductivity is growing and maturing

  8. Fusion reactor horizontal versus vertical maintenance approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charruyer, Ph.; Djerassi, H.; Leger, D.; Maupou, M.; Rouillard, J.; Salpietro, E.; Holloway, C.; Suppan, A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper concerns the comparison of horizontal versus vertical maintenance options of internal components (blanket and segment) of fusion reactors NET (Next European Torus) and INTOR Design. The described mechanical options are taken to ensure the handling of internals with the required precision, taking into account the problems raised by the safety and confinement requirements. Handling is obviously performed remotely. The option comparisons are performed according to the criteria of feasibility, building size, duration of maintenance operations, safety, flexibility, availability and cost. The first conclusions point on that the vertical handling option offers advantages, as regards the ease of handling and confinement possibilities. From the building size point of view, the two solutions are almost equivalent, while other criteria do not provide a basis for choice. It is emphasized that the confinement option C.T.U. (Containment Transfer Unit) or T.I.C. (Tight Intermediate Confinement) should be the major factor in determining the best options. In additions, a cost comparative analysis emphasizes the best cost/benefit ratio for the different options studied

  9. Parameter study toward economical magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tomoaki; Okano, Kunihiko; Nanahara, Toshiya; Hatayama, Akiyoshi; Yamaji, Kenji; Takuma, Tadashi.

    1996-01-01

    Although the R and D of nuclear fusion reactors has made a steady progress as seen in ITER project, it has become of little doubt that fusion power reactors require hugeness and enormous amount of construction cost as well as surmounting the physics and engineering difficulties. Therefore, it is one of the essential issues to investigate the prospect of realizing fusion power reactors. In this report we investigated the effects of physics and engineering improvements on the economics of ITER-like steady state tokamak fusion reactors using our tokamak system and costing analysis code. With the results of this study, we considered what is the most significant factor for realizing economical competitive fusion reactors. The results show that with the conventional TF coil maximum field (12T), physics progress in β-value (or Troyon coefficient) has the most considerable effect on the reduction of fusion plant COE (Cost of Electricity) while the achievement of H factor = 2-3 and neutron wall load =∼5MW/m 2 is necessary. The results also show that with the improvement of TF coil maximum field, reactors with a high aspect ratio are economically advantageous because of low plasma current driving power while the improvement of current density in the conductors and yield strength of support structures is indispensable. (author)

  10. Nuclear design of a very-low-activation fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.; Hopkins, G.R.

    1983-06-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the nuclear design aspects of using very-low-activation materials, such as SiC, MgO, and aluminum for fusion-reactor first wall, blanket, and shield applications. In addition to the advantage of very-low radioactive inventory, it was found that the very-low-activation fusion reactor can also offer an adequate tritium-breeding ratio and substantial amount of blanket nuclear heating as a conventional-material-structured reactor does. The most-stringent design constraint found in a very-low-activation fusion reactor is the limited space available in the inboard region of a tokamak concept for shielding to protect the superconducting toroidal field coil. A reference design was developed which mitigates the constraint by adopting a removable tungsten shield design that retains the inboard dimensions and gives the same shield performance as the reference STARFIRE tokamak reactor design

  11. ITER, the 'Broader Approach', a DEMO fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeschitz, G.; Bahm, W.

    2007-01-01

    Fusion is a very promising future energy option, which is characterized by almost unlimited fuel reserves, favourable safety features and environmental sustainability. The aim of the worldwide fusion research is a fusion power station which imitates the process taking place in the sun and thus gains energy from the fusion of light atomic nuclei. The experimental reactor ITER which will be built in Cadarache, France, marks a breakthrough in the worldwide fusion research: For the first time an energy multiplication factor of at least 10 will be achieved, the factor by which the fusion power exceeds the external plasma heating. Partners in this project are the European Union, Japan, the Russian Federation, USA, China, South Korea and India as well as Brazil as associated partner. The facility is supposed to demonstrate a long burning, reactor-typical plasma and to test techniques such as plasma heating, plasma confinement by superconducting magnets, fuel cycle as well as energy transition, tritium breeding and remote handling technologies. The next step beyond ITER will be the demonstration power station DEMO which requires further developments in order to create the basis for its design and construction. The roadmap to fusion energy is described. It consists of several elements which are needed to develop the knowledge required for a commercial fusion reactor. The DEMO time schedule depends on the efforts in terms of personnel and budget resources the society is willing to invest in fusion taking into account the long term energy supply and its environmental impact. (orig.)

  12. Progress in the pulsed power Inertial Confinement Fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintenz, J.P.; Matzen, M.K.; Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed power accelerators are being used in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. In order to achieve our goal of a fusion yield in the range of 200 - 1000 MJ from radiation-driven fusion capsules, it is generally believed that ∼10 MJ of driver energy must be deposited within the ICF target in order to deposit ∼1 MJ of radiation energy in the fusion capsule. Pulsed power represents an efficient technology for producing both these energies and these radiation environments in the required short pulses (few tens of ns). Two possible approaches are being developed to utilize pulsed power accelerators in this effort: intense beams of light ions and z- pinches. This paper describes recent progress in both approaches. Over the past several years, experiments have successfully answered many questions critical to ion target design. Increasing the ion beam power and intensity are our next objectives. Last year, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator H (PBFA II) was modified to generate ion beams in a geometry that will be required for high yield applications. This 2048 modification has resulted in the production of the highest power ion beam to be accelerated from an extraction ion diode. We are also evaluating fast magnetically-driven implosions (z-pinches) as platforms for ICF ablator physics and EOS experiments. Z-pinch implosions driven by the 20 TW Saturn accelerator have efficiently produced high x- ray power (> 75 TW) and energy (> 400 kJ). Containing these x-ray sources within a hohlraum produces a unique large volume (> 6000 mm 3 ), long lived (>20 ns) radiation environment. In addition to studying fundamental ICF capsule physics, there are several concepts for driving ICF capsules with these x-ray sources. Progress in increasing the x-ray power on the Saturn accelerator and promise of further increases on the higher power PBFA II accelerator will be described

  13. First wall response to energy disposition in conceptual laser fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.

    1976-02-01

    Discussed are energy depositions in the first wall of various proposed laser-fusion reactors and the effect of pulse time on the stress and temperature in the first wall. Simple models can be used to estimate the temperature and stress rise from x-rays and neutrons. More complex analysis is needed to estimate the response of the first wall to reflected laser light and the pellet debris

  14. Advanced materials: The key to attractive magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fusion is one of the most attractive central station power sources from the viewpoint of potential safety and environmental impact characteristics. Studies also indicate that fusion can be economically competitive with other options such as fission reactors and fossil-fired power stations. However, to achieve this triad of characteristics we must develop advanced materials with properties tailored for performance in the various fusion reactor systems. This paper discusses the desired characteristics of materials and the status of materials technology in four critical areas: (1) structural material for the first wail and blanket (FWB), (2) plasma-facing materials, (3) materials for superconducting magnets, and (4) ceramics for electrical and structural applications

  15. Fusion reactor design: On the road to commercialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcinski, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    The worldwide effort in fusion is now approximately 2 billion dollars per year and over 12 billion dollars has been invested since 1951 in developing this energy source for the 21st century. A vital component of the past efforts in fusion research has been the conceptual design activities performed by scientists and engineers around the world. Almost 80 such major designs of Tokamak, Mirror, Laser and Ion Beam Reactors have been published and this article discusses how recent conceptual designs have afftected our perception of future fusion reactor performance. (orig.) [de

  16. Advanced materials - the key to attractive magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fusion is one of the most attractive central station power sources from the viewpoint of potential safety and environmental impact characteristics. Studies also indicate that fusion can be economically competitive with other options such as fission reactors and fossil-fired power stations. However, to achieve this triad of characteristics we must develop advanced materials with properties tailored for performance in the various fusion reactor systems. This paper discusses the desired characteristics of materials and the status of materials technology in four critical areas: (1) structural materials for the first wall and blanket (FWB), (2) plasmafacing materials, (3) materials for superconducting magnets, and (4) ceramics for electrical and structural applications. (author)

  17. Fusion reactor nucleonics: status and needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.; Engholm, B.A.; Dudziak, D.J.; Haight, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    The national fusion technology effort has made a good start at addressing the basic nucleonics issues, but only a start. No fundamental nucleonics issues are seen as insurmountable barriers to the development of commercial fusion power. To date the fusion nucleonics effort has relied almost exclusively on other programs for nuclear data and codes. But as we progress through and beyond ETF type design studies the fusion program will need to support a broad based nucleonics effort including code development, sensitivity studies, integral experiments, data acquisition etc. It is clear that nucleonics issues are extremely important to fusion development and that we have only scratched the surface

  18. Feasibility study of a magnetic fusion production reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, R. W.

    1986-12-01

    A magnetic fusion reactor can produce 10.8 kg of tritium at a fusion power of only 400 MW —an order of magnitude lower power than that of a fission production reactor. Alternatively, the same fusion reactor can produce 995 kg of plutonium. Either a tokamak or a tandem mirror production plant can be used for this purpose; the cost is estimated at about 1.4 billion (1982 dollars) in either case. (The direct costs are estimated at 1.1 billion.) The production cost is calculated to be 22,000/g for tritium and 260/g for plutonium of quite high purity (1%240Pu). Because of the lack of demonstrated technology, such a plant could not be constructed today without significant risk. However, good progress is being made in fusion technology and, although success in magnetic fusion science and engineering is hard to predict with assurance, it seems possible that the physics basis and much of the needed technology could be demonstrated in facilities now under construction. Most of the remaining technology could be demonstrated in the early 1990s in a fusion test reactor of a few tens of megawatts. If the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program constructs a fusion test reactor of approximately 400 MW of fusion power as a next step in fusion power development, such a facility could be used later as a production reactor in a spinoff application. A construction decision in the late 1980s could result in an operating production reactor in the late 1990s. A magnetic fusion production reactor (MFPR) has four potential advantages over a fission production reactor: (1) no fissile material input is needed; (2) no fissioning exists in the tritium mode and very low fissioning exists in the plutonium mode thus avoiding the meltdown hazard; (3) the cost will probably be lower because of the smaller thermal power required; (4) and no reprocessing plant is needed in the tritium mode. The MFPR also has two disadvantages: (1) it will be more costly to operate because it consumes rather than sells

  19. Brief review of the fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenney, F.H.

    1977-01-01

    Much of the conceptual framework of present day fusion-fission hybrid reactors is found in the original work of the early 1950's. Present day motivations for development are quite different. The role of the hybrid reactor is discussed as well as the current activities in the development program

  20. ELMO Bumpy Torus fusion-reactor design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    A complete power plant design of a 1200-MWe ELMO Bumpy Torus Reactor (EBTR) is described that emphasizes those features that are unique to the EBT confinement concept, with subsystems and balance-of-plant items that are generic to magnetic fusion being adopted from past, more extensive tokamak reactor designs

  1. An evaluation on environment radiation impact of pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yingwei; Pu Gongxu; Li Jian

    1991-01-01

    The dose regulation, assessment scope and assessment method adopted by the environment impact evaluation for the pulsed reactor are discussed. The compute model, the compute programme and the compute result of the dose adopted for the model pulsed reactor are introduced. The probable environment radiation impact under normal status and accident status are also appraised

  2. New facilities in Japan materials testing reactor for irradiation test of fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Sagawa, H.; Ishitsuka, E.; Sakamoto, N.; Niiho, T.

    1996-01-01

    The testing and evaluation of fusion reactor components, i.e. blanket, plasma facing components (divertor, etc.) and vacuum vessel with neutron irradiation is required for the design of fusion reactor components. Therefore, four new test facilities were developed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor: an in-pile functional testing facility, a neutron multiplication test facility, an electron beam facility, and a re-weldability facility. The paper describes these facilities

  3. Laser fusion reactor design in a fast ignition with a dry wall chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yichi; Goto, Takuya; Ninomiya, Daisuke; Hiwatari, Ryoji; Asaoka, Yoshiyuki; Okano, Kunihiko

    2007-01-01

    One of the critical issues in laser fusion reactor design is high pulse heat load on the first wall by the X-rays and the fast/debris ions from fusion burn. There are mainly two concepts for the first wall of laser fusion reactor, a dry wall and a liquid metal wall. We should notice that the fast ignition method can achieve sufficiently high pellet gain with smaller (about 1/10 of the conventional central ignition method) input energy. To take advantage of this property, the design of a laser fusion reactor with a small size dry wall chamber may become possible. Since a small fusion pulse leads to a small electric power, high repetition of laser irradiation is required to keep sufficient electric power. Then we tried to design a laser fusion reactor with a dry wall chamber and a high repetition laser. This is a new challenging path to realize a laser fusion plant. Based on the point model of the core plasma, we have estimated that fusion energy in one pulse can be reduced to be 40 MJ with a pellet gain around G>100. To evaluate the validity of this simple estimation and to optimize the pellet design and the pulse shaping for the fast ignition scenario, we have introduced 1-D hydrodynamic simulation code ILESTA-1D and carried out implosion simulations. Since the code is one-dimensional, the detailed physics process of fast heating cannot be reproduced. Thus the fast heating is reflected in the code as the additional artificial heating source in the energy equation. It is modeled as a homogeneous heating of electrons in core region at the time just before when the maximum compression is achieved. At present we obtained the pellet gain G∝100 with the same input energy as the above estimation by a simple point model (350kJ for implosion, 50kJ for heating and assuming 20% coupling of heating laser). A dry wall is exposed to several threats due to the cyclic load by the high energy X-ray and charged particles: surface melting, physical and chemical sputtering

  4. 8th International School of Fusion Reactor Technology "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    Leotta, G G; Muon-catalyzed fusion and fusion with polarized nuclei

    1988-01-01

    The International School of Fusion Reactor Technology started its courses 15 years ago and since then has mantained a biennial pace. Generally, each course has developed the subject which was announced in advance at the closing of the previous course. The subject to which the present proceedings refer was chosen in violation of that rule so as to satisfy the recent and diffuse interest in cold fusion among the main European laboratories involved in controlled thermonuclear research (CTR). In the second half of 1986 we started to prepare a workshop aimed at assessing the state of the art and possibly of the perspectives of muon- catalyzed fusion. Research in this field has recently produced exciting experimental results open to important practical applications. We thought it worthwhile to consider also the beneficial effects and problems of the polarization ofthe nuclei in both cold and thermonuclear fusion. In preparing the 8th Course on Fusion Reactor Technology, it was necessary to abandon the tradi...

  5. Electromagnetic analysis for fusion reactors: status and needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    Electromagnetic effects have far-reaching implications for the design, operation, and maintenance of future fusion reactors. Two-dimensional (2-D) eddy current computer codes are available, but are of limited value in analyzing reactors. Three-dimensional (3-D) codes are needed, but are only beginning to be developed. Both 2-D and 3-D codes need verification against experimental data, such as that provided by the upcoming FELIX experiments. Coupling between eddy currents and deflections has application in fusion reactor design and is being studied both by analysis and experiment

  6. Tritium experience in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Hogan, J.

    1998-01-01

    Tritium management is a key enabling element in fusion technology. Tritium fuel was used in 3.5 years of successful deuterium-tritium (D-T) operations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The D-T campaign enabled TFTR to explore the transport, alpha physics, and MHD stability of a reactor core. It also provided experience with tritium retention and removal that highlighted the importance of these issues in future D-T machines. In this paper, the authors summarize the tritium retention and removal experience in TFTR and its implications for future reactors

  7. Second preliminary design of JAERI experimental fusion reactor (JXFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, Kiyoshi; Tone, Tatsuzo; Seki, Yasushi; Iida, Hiromasa; Yamato, Harumi

    1979-06-01

    Second preliminary design of a tokamak experimental fusion reactor to be built in the near future has been performed. This design covers overall reactor system including plasma characteristics, reactor structure, blanket neutronics radiation shielding, superconducting magnets, neutral beam injector, electric power supply system, fuel recirculating system, reactor cooling and tritium recovery systems and maintenance scheme. Safety analyses of the reactor system have been also performed. This paper gives a brief description of the design as of January, 1979. The feasibility study of raising the power density has been also studied and is shown as appendix. (author)

  8. Progress on the reference mirror fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Doggett, J.N.; Moir, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The design of a reference mirror fusion reactor is underway at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The reactor, rated at about 900 MWe, features steady-state operation, an absence of plasma impurity problems, and good accessibility for blanket maintenance. It is concluded that a mirror reactor appears workable, but its dollar/kWe cost will be considerably higher than present-day nuclear costs. The cost would be reduced most markedly by an increase in plasma Q

  9. Secret high-temperature reactor concept for inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of our SCEPTRE project was to create an advanced second-generation inertial fusion reactor that offers the potential for either of the following: (1) generating electricity at 50% efficiency, (2) providing high temperature heat (850 0 C) for hydrogen production, or (3) producing fissile fuel for light-water reactors. We have found that these applications are conceptually feasible with a reactor that is intrinsically free of the hazards of catastrophic fire or tritium release

  10. Cold fusion reactors and new modern physics

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-01-01

    The author of the "modern physics classical particle quantization orbital motion model general solution", referred to as the “new modern physics” a book. “The nuclear force constraint inertial guidance cold nuclear fusion collides” patent of invention referred to as the “cold nuclear fusion reactor” detailed technical data. Now provide to you, hope you help spread and the mainstream of modern physics of academic and fusion engineering academic communication. We work together to promote the c...

  11. Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility (SPRF) calculator-assisted pulse analysis and display system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, B.F.; Berry, D.T.

    1980-02-01

    Two solid-metal fast burst type reactors (SPR II and SPR III) are operated at the Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility. Since startup of the reactors, oscilloscope traces have been used to record (by camera) the pulse (power) shape while log N systems have measured initial reactor period. Virtually no other pulse information is available. A decision was made to build a system that could collect the basic input data available from the reactor - fission chambers, photodiodes, and thermocouples - condition the signals and output the various parameters such as power, energy, temperature, period and lifetime on hard copy that would provide a record for operations personnel as well as the experimenter. Because the reactors operate in short time frames - pulse operation - it is convenient to utilize the classical Nordheim-Fuchs approximation of the diffusion equation to describe reactor behavior. This report describes the work performed to date in developing the calculator system and analytical models for computing the desired parameters

  12. Updated comparison of economics of fusion reactors with advanced fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delene, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    The projected cost of electricity (COE) for fusion is compared with that from current and advanced nuclear fission and coal-fired plants. Fusion cost models were adjusted for consistency with advanced fission plants and the calculational methodology and cost factors follow guidelines recommended for cost comparisons of advanced fission reactors. The results show COEs of about 59--74 mills/kWh for the fusion designs considered. In comparison, COEs for future fission reactors are estimated to be in the 43--54 mills/kWh range with coal-fired plant COEs of about 53--69 mills/kWh ($2--3/GJ coal). The principal cost driver for the fusion plants relative to fission plants is the fusion island cost. Although the estimated COEs for fusion are greater than those for fission or coal, the costs are not so high as to preclude fusion's competitiveness as a safe and environmentally sound alternative

  13. LIB fusion. Plasma system and reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, K.

    1985-01-01

    Twelve Marx generators, whose total stored energy is 21MJ and diode voltage is 9MV or 4.1MV, supply the energy to diodes to extract proton beams. The combination of two types of diodes are used. One type of diode has the outer radius of 32.3cm and the inner radius of 30cm insulated by the radial magnetic field and extracts the rotating ring beam whose energy is 0.80MJ, pulse width is 40ns, propagation energy is 4.1MeV, mean rotation energy is 3.3MeV and electric current along the propagation direction is 1.4MA. The other type of diodes is the ordinal one, from which the proton beam of 0.52MJ, 40ns, 4.1MeV and 2.5MA is extracted and fills the inner hollow part of the rotating ring beam. The argon gas filling the reactor cavity with the number density of 10 22 /m 3 neutralizes the charge of proton beam during lns, but does not neutralize the current of the beam because the mean Larmor radius of electron in the argon gas is shorter than the electron mean free path. The proton beam pinches to the radius of 5.5mm by the action of self-induced magnetic field in the azimuthal direction and its propagation is stablized by the action of self-induced magnetic field in the propagation direction. The cryogenic hollow shell target of 6mm radius consists of three layers of Pb, Al and DT fuel

  14. Radioactive waste management and disposal scenario for fusion power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabara, Takashi; Yamano, Naoki [Sumitomo Atomic Energy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Seki, Yasushi; Aoki, Isao

    1997-10-01

    The environmental and economic impact of radioactive waste (radwaste) generated from fusion power reactors using five types of structural materials and a light water reactor (LWR) have been evaluated and compared. At first, the amount and the radioactive level of the radwaste generated in five fusion reactors ware evaluated by an activation calculation code. Next, a possible radwaste disposal scenario applicable to fusion radwaste in Japan is considered and the disposal cost evaluated under certain assumptions. The exposure doses are evaluated for the skyshine of gamma-rays during the disposal operation, groundwater migration scenario during the institutional control period of 300 years and future site use scenario after the institutional period. The radwaste generated from a typical LWR was estimated based on a literature survey and the disposal cost was evaluated using the same assumptions as for the fusion reactors. It is found that the relative cost of disposal is strongly dependent on the cost for interim storage of medium level waste of fusion reactors and the cost of high level waste for the LWR. (author)

  15. Cost assessment of a generic magnetic fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Dory, R.A.; Cohn, S.M.; Delene, J.G.; Parsly, L.F.; Ashby, D.E.T.F.; Reiersen, W.T.

    1986-03-01

    A generic reactor model is used to examine the economic viability of generating electricity by magnetic fusion. The simple model uses components that are representative of those used in previous reactor studies of deuterium-tritium-burning tokamaks, stellarators, bumpy tori, reversed-field pinches (RFPs), and tandem mirrors. Conservative costing assumptions are made. The generic reactor is not a tokamak; rather, it is intended to emphasize what is common to all magnetic fusion rectors. The reactor uses a superconducting toroidal coil set to produce the dominant magnetic field. To this extent, it is not as good an approximation to systems such as the RFP in which the main field is produced by a plasma current. The main output of the study is the cost of electricity as a function of the weight and size of the fusion core - blanket, shield, structure, and coils. The model shows that a 1200-MW(e) power plant with a fusion core weight of about 10,000 tonnes should be competitive in the future with fission and fossil plants. Studies of the sensitivity of the model to variations in the assumptions show that this result is not sensitively dependent on any given assumption. Of particular importance is the result that a fusion reactor of this scale may be realized with only moderate advances in physics and technology capabilities

  16. Pulsed TRIGA reactor as substitute for long pulse spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittemore, W.L.

    1999-01-01

    TRIGA reactor cores have been used to demonstrate various pulsing applications. The TRIGA reactor fuel (U-ZrH x ) is very robust especially in pulsing applications. The features required to produce 50 pulses per second have been successfully demonstrated individually, including pulse tests with small diameter fuel rods. A partially optimized core has been evaluated for pulses at 50 Hz with peak pulsed power up to 100 MW and an average power up to 10 MW. Depending on the design, the full width at half power of the individual pulses can range between 2000 μsec to 3000 μsec. Until recently, the relatively long pulses (2000 μsec to 3000 μsec) from a pulsed thermal reactor or a long pulse spallation source (LPSS) have been considered unsuitable for time-of-flight measurements of neutron scattering. More recently considerable attention has been devoted to evaluating the performance of long pulse (1000 to 4000 μs) spallation sources for the same type of neutron measurements originally performed only with short pulses from spallation sources (SPSS). Adequate information is available to permit meaningful comparisons between CW, SPSS, and LPSS neutron sources. Except where extremely high resolution is required (fraction of a percent), which does require short pulses, it is demonstrated that the LPSS source with a 1000 msec or longer pulse length and a repetition rate of 50 to 60 Hz gives results comparable to those from the 60 MW ILL (CW) source. For many of these applications the shorter pulse is not necessarily a disadvantage, but it is not an advantage over the long pulse system. In one study, the conclusion is that a 5 MW 2000 μsec LPSS source improves the capability for structural biology studies of macromolecules by at least a factor of 5 over that achievable with a high flux reactor. Recent studies have identified the advantages and usefulness of long pulse neutron sources. It is evident that the multiple pulse TRIGA reactor can produce pulses comparable to

  17. Individual dose due to radioactivity accidental release from fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Baojie [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Ni, Muyi, E-mail: muyi.ni@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Wei, Shiping [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China)

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • Conservative early dose of different unit fusion radioactivity release were assessed. • Data of accident level in INES for fusion reactor were proposed. • Method of environmental restoration time after fusion accident was proposed. • The maximum possible accident level for ITER like fusion reactor is 6. • We need 34–52 years to live after the fusion hypothetical accident. - Abstract: As an important index shaping the design of fusion safety system, evaluation of public radiation consequences have risen as a hot topic on the way to develop fusion energy. In this work, the comprehensive public early dose was evaluated due to unit gram tritium (HT/HTO), activated dust, activated corrosion products (ACPs) and activated gases accidental release from ITER like fusion reactor. Meanwhile, considering that we cannot completely eliminate the occurrence likelihood of multi-failure of vacuum vessel and tokamak building, we conservatively evaluated the public radiation consequences and environment restoration after the worst hypothetical accident preliminarily. The comparison results show early dose of different unit radioactivity release under different conditions. After further performing the radiation consequences, we find it possible that the hypothetical accident for ITER like fusion reactor would result in a level 6 accident according to INES, not appear level 7 like Chernobyl or Fukushima accidents. And from the point of environment restoration, we need at least 69 years for case 1 (1 kg HTO and 1000 kg dust release) and 34–52 years for case 2 (1 kg HTO and 10kg–100 kg dust release) to wait the contaminated zone drop below the general public safety limit (1mSv per year) before it is suitable for human habitation.

  18. The ITER fusion reactor and its role in the development of a fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, A.

    2002-01-01

    Energy from nuclear fusion is the future source of sustained, full life-cycle environmentally benign, intrinsically safe, base-load power production. The nuclear fusion process powers our sun, innumerable other stars in the sky, and some day, it will power the Earth, its cities and our homes. The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, ITER, represents the next step toward fulfilling that promise. ITER will be a test bed for key steppingstones toward engineering feasibility of a demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO) in a single experimental step. It will establish the physics basis for steady state Tokamak magnetic containment fusion reactors to follow it, exploring ion temperature, plasma density and containment time regimes beyond the breakeven power condition, and culminating in experimental fusion self-ignition. (author)

  19. Integrity of the first wall in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Ryoichi

    2004-07-01

    Future fusion power reactors DREAM and A-SSTR2, which have been conceptually designed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, use the SiC/SiC composite material as the first wall of the blanket because of its characteristics of high heat-resistance and low radiation material. DEMO reactor, which was conceptually designed in 2001, uses the low activation ferritic steel as the first-wall material of the blanket. The problems in the thermal structural design of the plasma facing component such as the blanket first wall and the divertor plate which receives very high heat flux were examined in the design of the fusion power reactors. Compact high fusion power reactor must give high heat flux and high-speed neutron flux from the plasma to the first wall and the divertor plate. In this environmental situation, the micro cracks should be generated in material of the first wall. Structural integrity of the first wall would be very low during the operation of the reactor, if those micro-cracks grow in a crack having significant size by the fatigue or the creep. The crack penetration in the first wall can be a factor which threatens the safety of the fusion power reactor. This paper summarizes the problems on the structural integrity in the first wall made of the SiC/SiC composite material or the ferritic steel. (author)

  20. Conceptual design of the SlimCS fusion DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobita, Kenji; Nishio, Satoshi; Enoeda, Mikio; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Utoh, Hiroyasu; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Nishitani, Takeo; Isono, Takaaki; Sakurai, Shinji; Kurita, Genichi; Hayashi, Takao; Oyama, Naoyuki; Liu Changle; Hamamatsu, Kiyotaka; Inoue, Takashi; Ozeki, Takahisa; Sato, Masayasu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Kawashima, Hisato; Ezato, Koichiro; Tsuru, Daigo; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Sakamoto, Keiji; Ando, Masami; Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Shibama, Yusuke; Suzuki, Takahiro; Takechi, Manabu; Takahashi, Koji; Hirose, Takanori; Sato, Satoru; Nozawa, Takashi; Tanigawa, Hisashi; Kakudate, Satoshi; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Hoshino, Tsuyoshi; Ochiai, Kentaro; Ide, Shunsuke; Aiba, Nobuyuki; Shimizu, Katsuhiro; Honda, Mitsuru; Nakamichi, Masaru; Nishi, Hiroshi; Seki, Yoji; Nakamura, Yukiharu; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Yoshida, Tohru; Song Yuntao

    2010-08-01

    This report describes the results of the conceptual design study of the SlimCS fusion DEMO reactor aiming at demonstrating fusion power production in a plant scale and allowing to assess the economic prospects of a fusion power plant. The design study has focused on a compact and low aspect ratio tokamak reactor concept with a reduced-sized central solenoid, which is novel compared with previous tokamak reactor concept such as SSTR (Steady State Tokamak Reactor). Owing to low aspect ratio, the reactor will be capable of having comparatively high beta limit and high elongation (which can elevate the Greenwald density limit), having potential for high power density. The reactor has the main parameters of a major radius of 5.5 m, aspect ratio of 2.6, elongation of 2.0, normalized beta of 4.3, fusion out put of 2.95 GW and average neutron wall load of 3 MW/m 2 . This report covers various aspects of design study including systematic design, physics design, torus configuration, blanket, superconducting magnet, maintenance and building, which were carried out increase the engineering feasibility of the concept. (author)

  1. Material Challenges For Plasma Facing Components in Future Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, J; Pintsuk, G.; Rödig, M.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing attention is directed towards thermonuclear fusion as a possible future energy source. Major advantages of this energy conversion technology are the almost inexhaustible resources and the option to produce energy without CO2-emissions. However, in the most advanced field of magnetic plasma confinement a number of technological challenges have to be met. In particular high-temperature resistant and plasma compatible materials have to be developed and qualified which are able to withstand the extreme environments in a commercial thermonuclear power reactor. The plasma facing materials (PFMs) and components (PFCs) in such fusion devices, i.e. the first wall (FW), the limiters and the divertor, are strongly affected by the plasma wall interaction processes and the applied intense thermal loads during plasma operation. On the one hand, these mechanisms have a strong influence on the plasma performance; on the other hand, they have major impact on the lifetime of the plasma facing armour. In present-day and next step devices the resulting thermal steady state heat loads to the first wall remain below 1 MWm-2; the limiters and the divertor are expected to be exposed to power densities being at least one order of magnitude above the FW-level, i.e. up to 20 MWm-2 for next step tokamaks such as ITER or DEMO. These requirements are responsible for high demands on the selection of qualified PFMs and heat sink materials as well as reliable fabrication processes for actively cooled plasma facing components. The technical solutions which are considered today are mainly based on the PFMs beryllium, carbon or tungsten joined to copper alloys or stainless steel heat sinks. In addition to the above mentioned quasi-stationary heat loads, short transient thermal pulses with deposited energy densities up to several tens of MJm-2 are a serious concern for next step tokamak devices. The most frequent events are so-called Edge Localized Modes (type I ELMs) and plasma disruptions

  2. Repetitive pulse accelerator technology for light ion inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttram, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    Successful ignition of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) pellet is calculated to require that several megajoules of energy be deposited in the pellet's centimeter-sized shell within 10 ns. This implies a driver power of several hundreds of terawatts and power density around 100 TW/cm 2 . The Sandia ICF approach is to deposit the energy with beams of 30 MV lithium ions. The first accelerator capable of producing these beams (PBFA II, 100 TW) will be used to study beam formation and target physics on a single pulse basis. To utilize this technology for power production, repetitive pulsing at rates that may be as high as 10 Hz will be required. This paper will overview the technologies being studied for a repetitively pulsed ICF accelerator. As presently conceived, power is supplied by rotating machinery providing 16 MJ in 1 ms. The generator output is transformed to 3 MV, then switched into a pulse compression system using laser triggered spark gaps. These must be synchronized to about 1 ns. Pulse compression is performed with saturable inductor switches, the output being 40 ns, 1.5 MV pulses. These are transformed to 30 MV in a self-magnetically insulated cavity adder structure. Space charge limited ion beams are drawn from anode plasmas with electron counter streaming being magnetically inhibited. The ions are ballistically focused into the entrances of guiding discharge channels for transport to the pellet. The status of component development from the prime power to the ion source will be reviewed

  3. Recent contributions to fusion reactor design and technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    The report contains a collection of 16 recent fusion technology papers on the STARFIRE Project, the study of alternate fusion fuel cycles, a maintainability study, magnet safety, neutral beam power supplies and pulsed superconducting magnets and energy transfer. This collection of papers contains contributions for Argonne National Laboratory, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, General Atomic Company, The Ralph M. Parsons Company, the University of Illinois, and the University of Wisconsin. Separate abstracts are presented for each paper

  4. Neutron irradiation experiments for fusion reactor materials through JUPITER program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Namba, C.; Wiffen, F.W.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    A Japan-USA program of irradiation experiments for fusion research, ''JUPITER'', has been established as a 6 year program from 1995 to 2000. The goal is to study ''the dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment''. This is phase-three of the collaborative program, which follows RTNS-II program (phase-1: 1982-1986) and FFTF/MOTA program (phase-2: 1987-1994). This program is to provide a scientific basis for application of materials performance data, generated by fission reactor experiments, to anticipated fusion environments. Following the systematic study on cumulative irradiation effects, done through FFTF/MOTA program. JUPITER is emphasizing the importance of dynamic irradiation effects on materials performance in fusion systems. The irradiation experiments in this program include low activation structural materials, functional ceramics and other innovative materials. The experimental data are analyzed by theoretical modeling and computer simulation to integrate the above effects. (orig.)

  5. Elemental volatility of HT-9 fusion reactor alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henslee, S.P.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The volatility of elemental constituents from HT-9, a ferritic steel, proposed for fusion reactor structures, was investigated. Tests were conducted in flowing air at temperatures from 800 to 1200 0 C for durations of 1 to 20 h. Elemental volatility was calculated in terms of the weight fraction of the element volatilized from the initial alloy; molybdenum, manganese, and nickel were the primary constituents volatilized. Comparisons with elemental volatilities observed for another candidate fusion reactor materials. Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA), an austenitic stainless steel, indicate significant differences between the volatilities of these steels that may impact fusion reactor safety analysis and alloy selection. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry were used to investigate the oxide layers formed on HT-9 and to measure elemental contents within these layers

  6. Conceptual design study of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FY87FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    The design study of Fusion Experimental Reactor(FER) which has been proposed to be the next step fusion device has been conducted by JAERI Reactor System Laboratory since 1982 and by FER design team since 1984. This is the final report of the FER design team program and describes the results obtained in FY1987 (partially in FY1986) activities. The contents of this report consist of the reference design which is based on the guideline in FY1986 by the Subcomitees set up in Nuclear Fusion Council of Atomic Energy Commission of Japan, the Low-Physics-Risk reactor design for achieving physics mission more reliably and the system study of FER design candidates including above two designs. (author)

  7. MINIMARS: An attractive small tandem mirror fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L.J.; Logan, B.G.; Doggett, J.N.; Devoto, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Through the innovative design of a novel end plug scheme employing octopole MHD stabilization, the authors present the conceptual design of ''MINIMARS'', a small commercial fusion reactor based on the tandem mirror principle. The current baseline for MINIMARS has a net electric output of 600 MWe and they have configured the design for short construction times, factory-built modules, inherently safe blanket systems, and multiplexing in station sizes of ≅ 600-2400 MWe. They demonstrate that the compact octopole end cell provides a number of advantages over the more conventional quadrupole (yin-yang) end cell encountered in the MARS tandem mirror reactor study, and enables ignition to be achieved with much shorter central cell lengths. Accordingly, being economic in small sizes, MINIMARS provides an attractive alternative to the more conventional larger conceptual fusion reactors encountered to date, and would contribute significantly to the lowering of utility financial risk in a developing fusion economy

  8. Japanese program of materials research for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasiguti, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Japanese program of materials research for fusion reactors is described based on the report to the Nuclear Fusion Council, the project research program of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, and other official documents. The alloy development for the first wall and its radiation damage are the main topics discussed in this paper. Materials viewpoints for the Japanese Tokamak facilities and the problems of irradiation facilities are also discussed. (orig.)

  9. Definition and conceptual design of a small fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate various mirror fusion reactor concepts that might result in small systems for the effective production of electrical power or stored energy (e.g., nuclear and chemical fuels). The basic two-year program goal is to select a particular concept and develop the conceptual design of a pilot plant that could provide a useful output from fusion. The pilot plant would be built and operated in the late 1980s

  10. Design and research of fuel element for pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Sheng

    1994-05-01

    The fuel element is the key component for pulsed reactor and its design is one of kernel techniques for pulsed reactor. Following the GA Company of US the NPIC (Nuclear Power Institute of China) has mastered this technique. Up to now, the first pulsed reactor in China (PRC-1) has been safely operated for about 3 years. The design and research of fuel element undertaken by NPIC is summarized. The verification and evaluation of this design has been carried out by using the results of measured parameters during operation and test of PRC-1 as well as comparing the design parameters published by others

  11. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor study is a multi-institutional research effort to determine the technical feasibility and key developmental issues of an RFP fusion reactor, especially at high power density, and to determine the potential economics, operations, safety, and environmental features of high-mass-power-density fusion systems. The TITAN conceptual designs are DT burning, 1000 MWe power reactors based on the RFP confinement concept. The designs are compact, have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m 2 and a mass power density of 700 kWe/tonne. The inherent characteristics of the RFP confinement concept make fusion reactors with such a high mass power density possible. Two different detailed designs have emerged: the TITAN-I lithium-vanadium design, incorporating the integrated-blanket-coil concept; and the TITAN-II aqueous loop-in-pool design with ferritic steel structure. This report contains a collection of 16 papers on the results of the TITAN study which were presented at the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology. This collection describes the TITAN research effort, and specifically the TITAN-I and TITAN-II designs, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions and recommendations. Overall, the basic conclusions are that high-mass power-density fusion reactors appear to be technically feasible even with neutron wall loadings up to 20 MW/m 2 ; that single-piece maintenance of the FPC is possible and advantageous; that the economics of the reactor is enhanced by its compactness; and the safety and environmental features need not to be sacrificed in high-power-density designs. The fact that two design approaches have emerged, and others may also be possible, in some sense indicates the robustness of the general findings

  12. Conceptual design of light ion beam inertia nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    Light ion beam, inertia nuclear fusion system drew attention recently as one of the nuclear fusion systems for power reactors in the history of the research on nuclear fusion. Its beginning seemed to be the judgement that the implosion of fusion fuel pellets with light ions can be realized with the light ions which can be obtained in view of accelerator techniques. Of course, in order to generate practically usable nuclear fusion reaction by this system and maintain it, many technical difficulties must be overcome. This research was carried out for the purpose of discovering such technical problems and searching for their solution. At the time of doing the works, the following policy was adopted. Though their is the difference of fine and rough, the design of a whole reactor system is performed conformably. In order to make comparison with other reactor types and nuclear fusion systems, the design is carried out as the power plant of about one million kWe output. As the extent of the design, the works at conceptual design stage are performed to present the concept of design which satisfies the required function. Basically, the design is made from conservative standpoint. This research of design was started in 1981, and in fiscal 1982, the mutual adjustment among the design of respective parts was performed on the basis of the results in 1981, and the possible revision and new proposal were investigated. (Kako, I.)

  13. Design of a tokamak fusion reactor first wall armor against neutral beam impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, R.A.

    1977-12-01

    The maximum temperatures and thermal stresses are calculated for various first wall design proposals, using both analytical solutions and the TRUMP and SAP IV Computer Codes. Beam parameters, such as pulse time, cycle time, and beam power, are varied. It is found that uncooled plates should be adequate for near-term devices, while cooled protection will be necessary for fusion power reactors. Graphite and tungsten are selected for analysis because of their desirable characteristics. Graphite allows for higher heat fluxes compared to tungsten for similar pulse times. Anticipated erosion (due to surface effects) and plasma impurity fraction are estimated. Neutron irradiation damage is also discussed. Neutron irradiation damage (rather than erosion, fatigue, or creep) is estimated to be the lifetime-limiting factor on the lifetime of the component in fusion power reactors. It is found that the use of tungsten in fusion power reactors, when directly exposed to the plasma, will cause serious plasma impurity problems; graphite should not present such an impurity problem

  14. Vanadium-base alloys for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Loomis, B.A.; Diercks, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    Vanadium-base alloys offer potentially significant advantages over other candidate alloys as a structural material for fusion reactor first wall/blanket applications. Although the data base is more limited than that for the other leading candidate structural materials, viz., austenitic and ferritic steels, vanadium-base alloys exhibit several properties that make them particularly attractive for the fusion reactor environment. This paper presents a review of the structural material requirements, a summary of the materials data base for selected vanadium-base alloys, and a comparison of projected performance characteristics compared to other candidate alloys. Also, critical research and development (R and D) needs are defined

  15. Vanadium-base alloys for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Loomis, B.A.; Diercks, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    Vanadium-base alloys offer potentially significant advantages over other candidate alloys as a structural material for fusion reactor first wall/blanket applications. Although the data base is more limited than that for the other leading candidate structural materials, viz., austenitic and ferritic steels, vanadium-base alloys exhibit several properties that make them particularly attractive for the fusion reactor environment. This paper presents a review of the structural material requirements, a summary of the materials data base for selected vanadium-base alloys, and a comparison of projected performance characteristics compared to other candidate alloys. Also, critical research and development (R and D) needs are defined.

  16. Revised graphs of activation data for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Yasushi; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Yamamuro, Nobuhiro; Iijima, Shungo.

    1991-06-01

    Activation data are required for calculation of induced activity in a fusion reactor. This report gives in graphical form, the activation data which have been evaluated based on recent measurements and calculations, for use in the activation calculation code system THIDA-2. It shows transmutation and decay chain data, activation cross sections and decay gamma-ray emission data for 152 nuclides of interest in terms of fusion reactor design. This report is an updated and enlarged version of a similar report compiled in 1982 for the activation data of 116 nuclides, which had been shown to be extremely effective in referring the activation data and in locating and correcting inappropriate data. (author)

  17. Utilization of fission reactors for fusion engineering testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Miller, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    Fission reactors can be used to conduct some of the fusion nuclear engineering tests identified in the FINESSE study. To further define the advantages and disadvantages of fission testing, the technical and programmatic constraints on this type of testing are discussed here. This paper presents and discusses eight key issues affecting fission utilization. Quantitative comparisons with projected fusion operation are made to determine the technical assets and limitations of fission testing. Capabilities of existing fission reactors are summarized and compared with technical needs. Conclusions are then presented on the areas where fission testing can be most useful

  18. Evaluation of the activity levels in fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, J.

    1977-05-01

    The activation of a fusion reactor blanket (316 SS or V-10Cr-10Ti as structure) with a minimum lithium inventory has been calculated for 0.83 MW/m 2 wall load. The resulting radiation levels and waste problems are discussed. The dose rate near the steel structure will always be higher than 0.1 rem/h due to its niobium content. After 200 to 100,000 years of decay the potential biological hazard originating from this high level fusion reactor waste (with plutonium recyclation). (orig.) [de

  19. ITER at the international conference on fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinin, G.; Barabash, V.; Matera, R.

    1998-01-01

    The reports summarizes the topics of the eighth International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-8) which was held in Sendai, Japan, on 26-31 October 1997. The ICFRM is focused on the whole spectrum of materials and technologies to be applied in fusion reactors and related facilities. The total number of conference participants was over 500, representing 24 countries and about 600 oral and poster papers were presented at the conference. Three sessions were devoted to ITER materials: (i) Design-Materials Interface and ITER (oral session); (ii) ITER, Irradiation Facility and Technology, (poster session); (iii) ITER and Beyond (discussion session)

  20. Pulsed irradiation of enriched UO{sub 2} in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, T R; Lucoff, D M; Reil, K O; Croucher, D W [Sandia Laboratories (United States)

    1974-07-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) to determine the energy deposition and behavior of enriched UO{sub 2} under pulse conditions. In the experiment single unirradiated pellets with enrichments up to 25 percent were pulse heated to melt temperatures. Temperature and fission product inventory measurements were made and compared with neutron transport calculations. (author)

  1. Vacuum pumping of tritium in fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    Compound cryopumps of three different designs will be tested with deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures under simulated fusion reactor conditions at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) now being constructed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). The first of these pumps is already in operation, and its preliminary performance is presented. The supporting vacuum facility necessary to regenerate these fusion facility cryopumps is also described. The next generation of fusion system vacuum pumps may include non-cryogenic or conventional-cryogenic hybrid systems, several of which are discussed

  2. Intense neutron irradiation facility for fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio; Kato, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Technical R and D of d-Li stripping type neutron irradiation facilities for development of fusion reactor materials was carried out in Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) project and Energy Selective Neutron Irradiation Test Facility (ESNIT) program. Conceptual design activity (CDA) of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), of which concept is an advanced version of FMIT and ESNIT concepts, are being performed. Progress of users` requirements and characteristics of irradiation fields in such neutron irradiation facilities, and outline of baseline conceptual design of IFMIF were described. (author)

  3. Neutron irradiation facilities for fission and fusion reactor materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The successful development of energy-conversion machines based upon nuclear fission or fusion reactors is critically dependent upon the behavior of the engineering materials used to construct the full containment and primary heat extraction systems. The development of radiation damage-resistant materials requires irradiation testing facilities which reproduce, as closely as possible, the thermal and neutronic environment expected in a power-producing reactor. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reference core design for the Center for Neutron Research (CNR) reactor provides for instrumented facilities in regions of both hard and mixed neutron spectra, with substantially higher fluxes than are currently available. The benefits of these new facilities to the development of radiation damage resistant materials are discussed in terms of the major US fission and fusion reactor programs

  4. Tritium instrumentation for a fusion reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shank, K.E.; Easterly, C.E.

    1976-09-01

    A review of tritium instrumentation is presented. This includes a discussion of currently available in-plant instrumentation and methods required for sampling stacks, monitoring process streams and reactor coolants, analyzing occupational work areas for air and surface contamination, and personnel monitoring. Off-site instrumentation and collection techniques are also presented. Conclusions are made concerning the adequacy of existing instrumentation in relation to the monitoring needs for fusion reactors

  5. Inertial-fusion-reactor studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1982-08-01

    We present results of our reactor studies for inertial-fusion energy production. Design studies of liquid-metal wall chambers have led to reactors that are remarkably simple in design, and that promise long life and low cost. Variants of the same basic design, called HYLIFE, can be used for electricity production, as a fissile-fuel factory, a dedicated tritium breeder, or hybrids of each

  6. In-vessel maintenance concepts for tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, V.P.; Berger, J.D.; Yount, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Concepts for rail-mounted and guided in-vessel handling machines (IVM) for remote maintenance inside tokamak fusion reactors are described. The IVM designs are based on concepts for tethered remotely operated vehicles and feature the use of multiple manipulator arms for remote handling and remote-controlled TV cameras for remote viewing. The concepts include IVMs for both single or dual rail systems located in the top or bottom of the reactor vessel

  7. Generation of short optical pulses for laser fusion. M.L. report No. 2451

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuizenga, D.J.

    1975-06-01

    This report considers some of the problems involved in generating the required short pulses for the laser-fusion program. Short pulses are required to produce the laser fusion, and pulses produced synchronously with this primary pulse are required for plasma diagnostics. The requirements of these pulses are first described. Several methods are considered in order to generate pulses at 1.064 μ to drive the Nd:Glass amplifiers to produce laser fusion. Conditions for optimum energy extraction per short pulse for Nd:YAG and Nd:Glass lasers are given. Four methods are then considered to produce these pulses: (1) using a fast switch to chop the required pulse out of a much longer Q-switched pulse; (2) active mode locking; (3) passive mode locking; and (4) a combination of active and passive mode locking. The use of cavity dumping is also considered to increase the energy per short pulse

  8. Reticulated Vitreous Carbon Electrodes for Gas Phase Pulsed Corona Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Locke, B

    1998-01-01

    A new design for gas phase pulsed corona reactors incorporating reticulated vitreous carbon electrodes is demonstrated to be effective for the removal of nitrogen oxides from synthetic air mixtures...

  9. Reticulated Vitreous Carbon Electrodes for Gas Phase Pulsed Corona Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LOCKE, B

    1999-01-01

    A new design for gas phase pulsed corona reactors incorporating reticulated vitreous carbon electrodes is demonstrated to be effective for the removal of nitrogen oxides from synthetic air mixtures...

  10. The investigation of enviromental radioactivity background around a pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Tenghui; Zhao Zhongli

    1990-01-01

    The radioactivity background level of enviromental medium around a pulsed reactor for 5 km and external penetrating radioactivity dose level for 10 km are given. mediums measured include air, water, soil, organisms, fallout, etc

  11. The investigation of enviromental radioactivity background around a pulsed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenghui, Xiao; Zhongli, Zhao [Southwest Inst. of Nuclear Reactor Engineering, Sichuan, SC (China)

    1990-06-01

    The radioactivity background level of enviromental medium around a pulsed reactor for 5 km and external penetrating radioactivity dose level for 10 km are given. mediums measured include air, water, soil, organisms, fallout, etc.

  12. Fast power cycle for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.; Fillo, J.; Makowitz, H.

    1978-01-01

    The unique, deep penetration capability of 14 MeV neutrons produced in DT fusion reactions allows the generation of very high temperature working fluid temperatures in a thermal power cycle. In the FAST (Fusion Augmented Steam Turbine) power cycle steam is directly superheated by the high temperature ceramic refractory interior of the blanket, after being generated by heat extracted from the relatively cool blanket structure. The steam is then passed to a high temperature gas turbine for power generation. Cycle studies have been carried out for a range of turbine inlet temperatures [1600 0 F to 3000 0 F (870 to 1650 0 C)], number of reheats, turbine mechanical efficiency, recuperator effectiveness, and system pressure losses. Gross cycle efficiency is projected to be in the range of 55 to 60%, (fusion energy to electric power), depending on parameters selected. Turbine inlet temperatures above 2000 0 F, while they do increase efficiency somewhat, are not necessarily for high cycle efficiency

  13. Fusion reactor design and technology program in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid reactor program was launched in 1987. The purpose of development of the hybrid reactor is twofold: to solve the problem of nuclear fuel supply for an expected large-scale development of fission reactor plants, and to maintain the momentum of fusion research. The program is described and the activities and progress of the program are presented. Two conceptual designs of an engineering test reactor with tokamak configuration were developed at the Southwestern Institute of Physics and the Institute of Plasma Physics. The results are a tokamak engineering test breeder (TETB) series design and a fusion-fission hybrid reactor design (SSEHR), characterized by a liquid-Li self-cooled blanket and an He-cooled solid tritium breeder blanket respectively. In parallel with the design studies, relevant technological experiments on a small or medium scale have been supported by this program. These include LHCD, ICRH and pellet injection in the area of plasma engineering; neutronics integral experiments with U, Pu, Fe and Be; various irradiation tests of austenitic and ferritic steels, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop experiments using a liquid metal loop; research into permeation barriers for tritium and hydrogen isotopes; solid tritium breeder tests using an in-situ loop in a fission reactor. All these experiments have proceeded successfully. The second step of this program is now starting. It seems reasonable that most of the research carried out in the first step will continue. ((orig.))

  14. The measurement of neutron and neutron induced photon spectra in fusion reactor related assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Unholzer, S; Klein, H; Seidel, K

    2002-01-01

    The spectral neutron and photon fluence (or flux) measured outside and inside of assemblies related to fusion reactor constructions are basic quantities of fusion neutronics. The comparison of measured spectra with the results of MCNP neutron and photon transport calculations allows a crucial test of evaluated nuclear data as generally used in fusion applications to be carried out. The experiments concern mixed neutron/photon fields with about the same intensity of the two components. An NE-213 scintillation spectrometer, well described by response matrices for both neutrons and photons, is used as proton-recoil and Compton spectrometer. The experiments described here in more detail address the background problematic of two applications, an iron benchmark experiment with an ns-pulsed neutron source and a deep penetration mock-up experiment for the investigation of the ITER in-board shield system. The measured spectral neutron and photon fluences are compared with spectra calculated with the MCNP code on the b...

  15. CFARMHD -- A MathCAD PC program to evaluate performance and economics of CFARII fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a PC computer program ''CFARMHD'', developed to evaluate the performance (MHD cycle efficiency) and economics (Cost-of-Electricity CoE) for pulsed fusion reactors using the Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine II (CFARII) MHD Balance of Plant (BoP). The CFARII concept to which this code applies is generic to any fusion driver which can be characterized by an assumed yield Y (GJ), target gain G, and unit cost ($/joule driver). The CFARMHD code models the sizes, masses, energies, mass flows and powers corresponding to the physical systems and optimizes them to minimize CoE for given Y, G, $/joule, and choice of material for the working fluid (cast as solid spherical shells around the target). A description of the models used in the CFARMHD code is given in Section 11, and the CoE minimization procedure used in the code is described in Section III

  16. Radiation damage related to fusion-reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brimhall, J.L.

    1982-03-01

    Three reasons why the fusion irradiation environment could produce different damage microstructure will be discussed: (1) the primary damage state induced by a higher energy primary knock-on-spectra; (2) increased helium generation due to high eta, α cross sections; and (3) pulsed operation of the irradiation environment. Examples of the microstructural damage caused by each of the above will be given

  17. A view of technology maturity assessment to realize fusion reactor by Japanese young researchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasada, Ryuta; Goto, Takuya; Miyazawa, Junichi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Hiwatari, Ryoji; Oyama, Naoyuki; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2013-01-01

    Japanese young researchers who have interest in realizing fusion reactor have analyzed Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) in Young Scientists Special Interest Group on Fusion Reactor Realization. In this report, brief introduction to TRL assessment and a view of TRL assessment against fusion reactor projects conducting in Japan. (J.P.N.)

  18. Utilization of fusion neutrons in the tokamak fusion test reactor for blanket performance testing and other nuclear engineering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, C.S.; Pettus, W.G.; Schmotzer, J.K.; Welfare, F.; Womack, R.

    1979-01-01

    In addition to developing a set of reacting-plasma/blanket-neutronics benchmark data, the TFTR fusion application experiments would provide operational experience with fast-neutron dosimetry and the remote handling of blanket modules in a tokamak reactor environment; neutron streaming and hot-spot information invaluable for the optimal design of penetrations in future fusion reactors; and the identification of the most damage-resistant insulators for a variety of fusion-reactor components

  19. Pellet design for a laser fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiessen, A.R.; Nuckolls, J.

    1974-01-01

    The requirements for laser fusion pellet design are discussed. Computer calculations are presented of a capsule consisting of a spherical solid drop of DT surrounded by a concentric shell of DT. Gains greater than 40 fold are achieved with laser energies of approximately 0.5 MJ, and peak powers of about 10 16 W. (U.S.)

  20. Economic, safety and environmental prospects of fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conn, R W; Holdren, J P; Sharafat, S [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Inst. of Plasma and Fusion Research; and others

    1990-09-01

    Controlled fusion energy is one of the long term, non-fossil energy sources available to mankind. It has the potential of significant advantages over fission nuclear power in that the consequences of severe accidents are predicted to be less and the radioactive waste burden is calculated to be smaller. Fusion can be an important ingredient in the future world energy mix as a hedge against environmental, supply or political difficulties connected with the use of fossil fuel and present-day nuclear power. Progress in fusion reactor technology and design is described for both magnetic and inertial fusion energy systems. The projected economic prospects show that fusion will be capital intensive, and the historical trend is towards greater mass utilization efficiency and more competitive costs. Recent studies emphasizing safety and environmental advantages show that the competitive potential of fusion can be further enhanced by specific choices of materials and design. The safety and environmental prospects of fusion appear to exceed substantially those of advanced fission and coal. Clearly, a significant and directed technology effort is necessary to achieve these advantages. Typical parameters have been established for magnetic fusion energy reactors, and a tokamak at moderately high magnetic field (about 7 T on axis) in the first regime of MHD stability ({beta} {le} 3.5 I/aB) is closest to present experimental achievement. Further improvements of the economic and technological performance of the tokamak are possible. In addition, alternative, non-tokamak magnetic fusion approaches may offer substantive economic and operational benefits, although at present these concepts must be projected from a less developed physics base. (Abstract Truncated)

  1. Austenitic stainless steel bulk property considerations for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattas, R.F.

    1979-04-01

    The bulk properties of annealed 304, 316, and 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steels are evaluated for the temperature and radiation conditions expected in a near-term fusion reactor. Of interest are the thermophysical properties, void swelling produced by neutron radiaion, and the tensile, creep, and fatigue properties before and after irradiation

  2. Can wall and limiter erosion be eliminated in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.H.

    1981-10-01

    A pump limiter system is described which is compatible with in-situ recoating of the limiter surface. The recoating could be done during normal tokamak operation. We have shown how this system is compatible with most of the constraints of fusion reactor operation and might provide a significant advantage over magnetic diverter and some other pump limiter geometries

  3. Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, E.; Chrzanowski, J.; Rule, K.; Viola, M.; Williams, M.; Strykowsky, R.

    1999-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the TFTR is scheduled to occur over a period of three years beginning in October 1999. This is not a typical Department of Energy D and D Project where a facility is isolated and cleaned up by ''bulldozing'' all facility and hardware systems to a greenfield condition. The mission of TFTR D and D is to: (a) surgically remove items which can be re-used within the DOE complex, (b) remove tritium contaminated and activated systems for disposal, (c) clear the test cell of hardware for future reuse, (d) reclassify the D-site complex as a non-nuclear facility as defined in DOE Order 420.1 (Facility Safety) and (e) provide data on the D and D of a large magnetic fusion facility. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The record-breaking deuterium-tritium experiments performed on TFTR resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 75 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size and shape of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling

  4. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. Final conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-02-01

    The TFTR is the first U.S. magnetic confinement device planned to demonstrate the fusion of D-T at reactor power levels. This report addresses the physics objectives and the engineering goals of the TFTR project. Technical, cost, and schedule aspects of the project are included

  5. Lifetime analysis for fusion reactor first walls and divertor plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horie, T.; Tsujimura, S.; Minato, A.; Tone, T.

    1987-01-01

    Lifetime analysis of fusion reactor first walls and divertor plates is performed by (1) a one-dimensional analytical plate model, and (2) a two-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element method. Life-limiting mechanisms and the limits of applicability for these analysis methods are examined. Structural design criteria are also discussed. (orig.)

  6. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injection system vacuum chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrotti, L.R.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the components of the Neutral Beam Lines of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will be enclosed in a 50 cubic meter box-shaped vacuum chamber. The chamber will have a number of unorthodox features to accomodate both neutral beam and TFTR requirements. The design constraints, and the resulting chamber design, are presented

  7. Mechanical design of a magnetic fusion production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neef, W.S.; Jassby, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanical aspects of a tandem mirror and tokamak concepts for the tritium production mission are compared, and a proposed breeding blanket configuration for each type of reactor is presented in detail, along with a design outline of the complete fusion reaction system. In both cases, the reactor design is developed sufficiently to permit preliminary cost estimates of all components. A qualitative comparison is drawn between both concepts from the view of mechanical design and serviceability, and suggestions are made for technology proof tests on unique mechanical features. Detailed cost breakdowns indicate less than 10% difference in the overall costs of the two reactors

  8. Minerals resource implications of a tokamak fusion reactor economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, E; Conn, R W; Kulcinski, G L; Sviatoslavsky, I

    1979-09-01

    The mineral resource implications of an economy of tokamak-type fusion reactors are assessed based upon the recent conceptual reactor design study, NUWMAK, developed at the University of Wisconsin. For comparative purposes, various structural alloys of vanadium and steel are assumed to be usable in the NUWMAK design in place of the titanium alloy originally selected. In addition, the inner blanket core and magnet system of the conceptual reactor, HFCTR, developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, are assumed to be interchangeable with the comparable components in NUWMAK. These variations permit a range of likely requirements to be assessed.

  9. Minerals resource implications of a tokamak fusion reactor economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, E.; Conn, R.W.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Sviatoslavsky, I.

    1979-09-01

    The mineral resource implications of an economy of tokamak-type fusion reactors are assessed based upon the recent conceptual reactor design study, NUWMAK, developed at the University of Wisconsin. For comparative purposes, various structural alloys of vanadium and steel are assumed to be usable in the NUWMAK design in place of the titanium alloy originally selected. In addition, the inner blanket core and magnet system of the conceptual reactor, HFCTR, developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, are assumed to be interchangeable with the comparable components in NUWMAK. These variations permit a range of likely requirements to be assessed

  10. Critical plasma-materials issues for fusion reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.L.; Bauer, W.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma-materials interactions are a dominant driving force in the design of fusion power reactors. This paper presents a summary of plasma-materials interactions research. Emphasis is placed on critical aspects related to reactor design. Particular issues to be addressed are plasma edge characterization, hydrogen recycle, impurity introduction, and coating development. Typical wall fluxes in operating magnetically confined devices are summarized. Recent calculations of tritium inventory and first wall permeation, based on laboratory measurements of hydrogen recycling, are given for various reactor operating scenarios. Impurity introduction/wall erosion mechanisms considered include sputtering, chemical erosion, and evaporation (melting). Finally, the advanced material development for in-vessel components is discussed. (author)

  11. An aqueous lithium salt blanket option for fusion power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, D.; Varsamis, G. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics); Deutsch, L.; Rathke, J. (Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (USA). Advanced Energy Systems); Gierszewski, P. (Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project (CFFTP), Mississauga, ON (Canada))

    1989-04-01

    An aqueous lithium salt blanket (ALSB) concept is proposed which could be the basis for either a power reactor blanket or a test module in an engineering test reactor. The design is based on an austenitic stainless steel structure, a beryllium multiplier, and a salt breeder concentration of about 32 g LiNO/sub 3/ per 100 cm/sup 3/ of H/sub 2/O. To limit tritium release rates, the salt breeder solution is separated from the water coolant circuit. The overall tritium system cost for a 2400 MW (fusion power) reactor is estimated to be 180 million Dollar US87 installed. (orig.).

  12. On the safety of conceptual fusion-fission hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Okrent, D.; Badham, V.; Caspi, S.; Chan, C.K.; Ferrell, W.J.; Frederking, T.H.K.; Grzesik, J.; Lee, J.Y.; McKone, T.E.; Pomraning, G.C.; Ullman, A.Z.; Ting, T.D.; Kim, Y.I.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary examination of some potential safety questions for conceptual fusion-fission hybrid reactors is presented in this paper. The study and subsequent analysis was largely based upon one design, a conceptual mirror fusion-fission reactor, operating on the deuterium-tritium plasma fusion fuel cycle and the uranium-plutonium fission fuel cycle. The major potential hazards were found to be: (a) fission products, (b) actinide elements, (c) induced radioactivity, and (d) tritium. As a result of these studies, it appears that highly reliable and even redundent decay heat removal must be provided. Loss of the ability to remove decay heat results in melting of fuel, with ultimate release of fission products and actinides to the containment. In addition, the studies indicate that blankets can be designed which will remain subcritical under extensive changes in both composition and geometry. Magnet safety and the effects of magnetic fields on thermal parameters were also considered. (Auth.)

  13. Fusion Reactor Safety Research Program annual report, FY-79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, J.G.; Cohen, S.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of the program is the development, coordination, and execution of activities related to magnetic fusion devices and reactors that will: (a) identify and evaluate potential hazards, (b) assess and disclose potential environmental impacts, and (c) develop design standards and criteria that eliminate, mitigate, or reduce those hazards and impacts. The program will provide a sound basis for licensing fusion reactors. Included in this report are portions of four reports from two outside contractors, discussions of the several areas in which EG and G Idaho is conducting research activities, a discussion of proposed program plan development, mention of special tasks, a review of fusion technology program coordination by EG and G with other laboratories, and a brief view of proposed FY-80 activities

  14. Kinetic studies on a repetitively pulsed fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.

    1982-01-01

    Neutronic analysis of an earlier proposed periodically pulsed fast reactor at Kalpakkam (KPFR) has been carried out numerically under equilibrium and transient conditions using the one-point model of reactor kinetics and the experimentally measured total worth of reactivity modulator, the parabolic coefficient of reactivity of the movable reflector and the mean prompt neutron lifetime. Results of steady-state calculations - treated on the basis of delayed neutron precursor and energy balances during a period of operation - have been compared with the analytical formulae of Larrimore for a parabolic reactivity input. Empirical relations for half-width of the fast neutron pulse, the peak pulse power and the power at first crossing of prompt criticality have been obtained and shown to be accurate enough for predicting steady-state power pulse characteristics of a periodically pulsed fast reactor. The concept of a subprompt-critical reactor has been used to calculate the fictitious delayed neutron fraction, β of the KPFR through a numerical experiment. Relative pulse height stability and pulse shape sensitivity to changes of maximum reactivity is discussed. With the aid of new safety concepts, the Power Amplification Factor (PAF) and the Pulse Growth Factor (Rsub(p)), the dynamics KPFR under accidental conditions has been studied for step and ramp reactivity perturbations. All the analysis has been done without taking account of reactivity feedback. (orig.)

  15. Fusion technology development: role of fusion facility upgrades and fission test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.; Deis, G.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Schmunk, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The near term national fusion program is unlikely to follow the aggressive logic of the Fusion Engineering Act of 1980. Faced with level budgets, a large, new fusion facility with an engineering thrust is unlikely in the near future. Within the fusion community the idea of upgrading the existing machines (TFTR, MFTF-B) is being considered to partially mitigate the lack of a design data base to ready the nation to launch an aggressive, mission-oriented fusion program with the goal of power production. This paper examines the cost/benefit issues of using fusion upgrades to develop the technology data base which will be required to support the design and construction of the next generation of fusion machines. The extent of usefulness of the nation's fission test reactors will be examined vis-a-vis the mission of the fusion upgrades. The authors show that while fission neutrons will provide a useful test environment in terms of bulk heating and tritium breeding on a submodule scale, they can play only a supporting role in designing the integrated whole modules and systems to be used in a nuclear fusion machine

  16. Fusion technology development: role of fusion facility upgrades and fission test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.; Deis, G.A.; Miller, L.G.; Longhurst, G.R.; Schmunk, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The near term national fusion program is unlikely to follow the aggressive logic of the Fusion Engineering Act of 1980. Faced with level budgets, a large, new fusion facility with an engineering thrust is unlikely in the near future. Within the fusion community the idea of upgrading the existing machines (TFTR, MFTF-B) is being considered to partially mitigate the lack of a design data base to ready the nation to launch an aggressive, mission-oriented fusion program with the goal of power production. This paper examines the cost/benefit issues of using fusion upgrades to develop the technology data base which will be required to support the design and construction of the next generation of fusion machines. The extent of usefulness of the nation's fission test reactors will be examined vis-a-vis the mission of the fusion upgrades. We will show that while fission neutrons will provide a useful test environment in terms of bulk heating and tritium breeding on a submodule scale, they can play only a supporting role in designing the integrated whole modules and systems to be used in a nuclear fusion machine

  17. Pulsed lower-hybrid wave penetration in reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    Providing lower-hybrid power in short, intense (GW) pulses allows enhanced wave penetration in reactor-grade plasmas. We examine nonlinear absorption, ray propagation, and parametric instability of the intense pulses. We find that simultaneously achieving good penetration while avoiding parametric instabilities is possible, but imposes restrictions on the peak power density, pulse duration, and/or r.f. spot shape. In particular, power launched in narrow strips, elongated along the field direction, is desired

  18. The European Fusion Energy Research Programme towards the realization of a fusion demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparotto, M.; Laesser, R.

    2006-01-01

    Since its inception, the European Fusion Programme has been orientated towards the establishment of the knowledge base needed for the definition of a reactor to be used for power production. Its ultimate goal is then to demonstrate the scientific and the technological feasibility of fusion power while incorporating the assessment of the safety, environmental, social and economic features of this type of energy source. At present, the JET device, the largest tokamak in the world, and the other medium-sized experimental machines are contributing essentially to the basic scientific phase of this development path. Their successful operation greatly contributed to support the design basis of ITER, the next step in fusion, which will aim to demonstrate the scientific and technical feasibility of fusion power production by achieving extended D-T burning plasma operation. Following ITER, the conception and construction of the DEMO device is planned. DEMO will be a demonstration power plant which will be the first fusion device to generate a significant amount of electrical power from fusion. This paper describes the status of fusion research and the European strategy for achievement of the ultimate goal of construction of a prototype reactor. (author)

  19. Conceptual design study of fusion experimental reactor (FY86 FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Yamada, Masao; Mizoguchi, Tadanori

    1987-09-01

    This report describes the results of the reactor configuration/structure design for the fusion experimental reactor (FER) performed in FY 1986. The design was intended to meet the physical and engineering mission of the next step device which was decided by the subcommittee on the next step device of the nuclear fusion council. The objectives of the design study in FY 1986 are to advance and optimize the design concept of the last year because the recommendation of the subcommittee was basically the same as the design philosophy of the last year. Six candidate reactor configurations which correspond to options C ∼ D presented by the subcommittee were extensively examined. Consequently, ACS reactor (Advanced Option-C with Single Null Divertor) was selected as the reference configuration from viewpoints of technical risks and cost performance. Regarding the reactor structure, the following items were investigated intensively: minimization of reactor size, protection of first wall against plasma disruption, simplification of shield structure, reactor configuration which enables optimum arrangement of poloidal field coils. (author)

  20. Cost assessment of demo fusion reactor with considering maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, Hidetoshi; Kitagoh, Kazutoshi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform cost assessment of nuclear fusion reactors in order to draw up commercial plants. A fusion reactor may have a complex configuration to achieve high beta value, which leads to low and instable availability when maintenance is taken into account. Therefore, reactor's availability must be evaluated with considering the influence of the configuration complexity. Furthermore the availability has the strong impact on COE (Cost of Electricity), that is, a fusion reactor with low availability will not be accepted as a commercial plant. Therefore, we developed a new method to calculate availabilities with random numbers, in which the complexity of reactor's configuration could become considered. In addition, we considered the reduction of superconducting coil's maintenance time by introducing remountable magnet system because the coil maintenance requires quite long time in the present technology. The results show that the availability becomes relatively large if the short maintenance time of coils could be achieved, for example, by remountable magnetic systems. (author)

  1. Safety and environmental advantages of breeding blanketless fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, M.; Merola, M.; Matera, R.

    1994-01-01

    Next-step reactors will use DT cycle. However, environmental advantage will be the main chance for fusion to compete with other energy sources. The environmental problems of DT cycle due to tritium and neutron activation, are examined. Fusion commercial reactors could be based on alternative fuel cycles like D-He3. Advantages and disadvantages of this fuel cycle are outlined. All the technologies related with the self-breeding of tritium and the concept of breeding blanket itself may be not reactor relevant. In the frame of the Next-step studies, the potential advantages of intermediate DT devices without breeding blanket are discussed. Simplified design, lower cost, higher safety are the main ones. The problem of the source of tritium is examined. (author)

  2. Repetition rates in heavy ion beam driven fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robert R.

    1986-01-01

    The limits on the cavity gas density required for beam propagation and condensation times for material vaporized by target explosions can determine the maximum repetition rate of Heavy Ion Beam (HIB) driven fusion reactors. If the ions are ballistically focused onto the target, the cavity gas must have a density below roughly 10-4 torr (3×1012 cm-3) at the time of propagation; other propagation schemes may allow densities as high as 1 torr or more. In some reactor designs, several kilograms of material may be vaporized off of the target chamber walls by the target generated x-rays, raising the average density in the cavity to 100 tor or more. A one-dimensional combined radiation hydrodynamics and vaporization and condensation computer code has been used to simulate the behavior of the vaporized material in the target chambers of HIB fusion reactors.

  3. Repetition rates in heavy ion beam driven fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The limits on the cavity gas density required for beam propagation and condensation times for material vaporized by target explosions can determine the maximum repetition rate of Heavy Ion Beam (HIB) driven fusion reactors. If the ions are ballistically focused onto the target, the cavity gas must have a density below roughly 10 -4 torr (3 x 10 12 cm -3 ) at the time of propagation; other propagation schemes may allow densities as high as 1 torr or more. In some reactor designs, several kilograms of material may be vaporized off of the target chamber walls by the target generated x-rays, raising the average density in the cavity to 100 tor or more. A one-dimensional combined radiation hydrodynamics and vaporization and condensation computer code has been used to simulate the behavior of the vaporized material in the target chambers of HIB fusion reactors

  4. Damage analysis and fundamental studies for fusion reactor materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.

    1991-09-01

    The philosophy of the program at the University of California Santa Barbara has been to develop a fundamental understanding of both the basic damage processes and microstructural evolution that take place in a material during neutron irradiation and the consequent dimensional and mechanical property changes. This fundamental understanding can be used in conjunction with empirical data obtained from a variety of irradiation facilities to develop physically-based models of neutron irradiation effects in structural materials. The models in turn can be used to guide alloy development and to help extrapolate the irradiation data base (expected to be largely fission reactor based) to the fusion reactor regime. This philosophy is consistent with that of the national and international programs for developing structural materials for fusion reactors

  5. Scoping of oil shale retorting with nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, T.R.

    1983-01-01

    An engineering scoping study was conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy's request to see if a feasible concept could be developed for using nuclear fusion heat to improve in situ extraction by retorting of underground oil shale. It was found that a fusion heated, oxygen-free inert gas could be used for driving modified, in situ retorts at a higher yield, using lower grade shale and producing less environmental problems than present-day processes. It was also found to be economically attractive with return on investments of 20 to 30%. Fusion blanket technology required was found to be reasonable at hot gas delivery temperatures of about650 0 C (920 K). The scale of a fusion reactor at 2.8 GW(thermal) producing 45 000 Mg/day (335 000 barrel/day) was also found to be reasonable

  6. 1st International School of Fusion Reactor Technology "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    Knoepfel, Heinz; Safety, Environmental Impact and Economic Prospects of Nuclear Fusion

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the lectures and the concluding discussion of the "Seminar on Safety, Environmental Impact, and Economic Prospects of Nuclear Fusion", which was held at Erice, August 6-12, 1989. In selecting the contributions to this 9th meeting held by the International School of Fusion Reactor Technology at the E. Majorana Center for Scientific Cul­ ture in Erice, we tried to provide a comprehensive coverage of the many interre­ lated and interdisciplinary aspects of what ultimately turns out to be the global acceptance criteria of our society with respect to controlled nuclear fusion. Consequently, this edited collection of the papers presented should provide an overview of these issues. We thus hope that this book, with its extensive subject index, will also be of interest and help to nonfusion specialists and, in general, to those who from curiosity or by assignment are required to be informed on these as­ pects of fusion energy.

  7. Tokamak fusion reactors with less than full tritium breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, K. Jr.; Gilligan, J.G.; Jung, J.

    1983-05-01

    A study of commercial, tokamak fusion reactors with tritium concentrations and tritium breeding ratios ranging from full deuterium-tritium operation to operation with no tritium breeding is presented. The design basis for these reactors is similar to those of STARFIRE and WILDCAT. Optimum operating temperatures, sizes, toroidal field strengths, and blanket/shield configurations are determined for a sequence of reactor designs spanning the range of tritium breeding, each having the same values of beta, thermal power, and first-wall heat load. Additional reactor parameters, tritium inventories and throughputs, and detailed costs are calculated for each reactor design. The disadvantages, advantages, implications, and ramifications of tritium-depleted operation are presented and discussed

  8. Simulation of fusion power in tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaber, F.A.; Elsharif, R.N.; Sayed, Y.A.

    1993-01-01

    The paper deals with the transient response of the fusion power against perturbation in the injection rate of the fuel to ± 10% step change. The steady state results are in good agreement with the references results. The adequacy of these study was tested by assessing the physical plausibility of the obtained result, as well as, comparison with other validated model. 2 fig., 2 tab

  9. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed

  10. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

  11. HYLIFE-II inertial confinement fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    The HYLIFE-2 inertial fusion power plant design study uses a liquid fall, in the form of jets to protect the first structural wall from neutron damage, x rays, and blast to provide a 30-y lifetime. HYLIFE-1 used liquid lithium. HYLIFE 2 avoids the fire hazard of lithium by using a molten salt composed of fluorine, lithium, and beryllium (Li 2 BeF 4 ) called Flibe. Access for heavy-ion beams is provided. Calculations for assumed heavy-ion beam performance show a nominal gain of 70 at 5 MJ producing 350 MJ, about 5.2 times less yield than the 1.8 GJ from a driver energy of 4.5 MJ with gain of 400 for HYLIFE-1. The nominal 1 GWe of power can be maintained by increasing the repetition rate by a factor of about 5.2, from 1.5 to 8 Hz. A higher repetition rate requires faster re-establishment of the jets after a shot, which can be accomplished in part by decreasing the jet fall height and increasing the jet flow velocity. Multiple chambers may be required. In addition, although not considered for HYLIFE-1, there is undoubtedly liquid splash that must be forcibly cleared because gravity is too slow, especially at high repetition rates. Splash removal can be accomplished by either pulsed or oscillating jet flows. The cost of electricity is estimated to be 0.09 $/kW·h in constant 1988 dollars, about twice that of future coal and light water reactor nuclear power. The driver beam cost is about one-half the total cost. 15 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Advanced nuclear fuel production by using fission-fusion hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kusayer, T.A.; Sahin, S.; Abdulraoof, M.

    1993-01-01

    Efforts are made at the College of Engineering, King Saud University, Riyadh to lay out the main structure of a prototype experimental fusion and fusion-fission (hybrid) reactor blanket in cylindrical geometry. The geometry is consistent with most of the current fusion and hybrid reactor design concepts in respect of the neutronic considerations. Characteristics of the fusion chamber, fusion neutrons and the blanket are provided. The studies have further shown that 1 GWe fission-fusion reactor can produce up to 957 kg/year which is enough to fuel five light water reactors of comparable power. Fuel production can be increased further. 29 refs

  13. Laser fusion power reactor system (LFPRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacik, W.P.

    1977-01-01

    This report gives detailed information for each of the following areas: (1) reference concept description, (2) nuclear design, (3) structural design, (4) thermal and fluid systems design, (5) materials design and analysis, (6) reactor support systems and balance of plant, (7) instrumentation and control, (8) environment and safety, (9) economics assessment, and (10) development requirements

  14. Remote maintenance for fusion experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Koichi; Takeda, Nobukazu

    2000-01-01

    Here was introduced on maintenance of reactor core portion operated by remote control among maintenance of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) begun on its design since 1988 under international cooperation of U.S.A., Europe, Russia and Japan. Every appliances constructing the reactor core portion is necessary to carry out all of their inspection and maintenance by using remote controlled apparatus because of their radiation due to neutron generated by DT combustion of plasma. For engineering design activity (EDA) in ITER, not only design and development of the remote control appliances but also design under consideration of remote maintenance for from structural design of maintained objective appliances to access method to appliances, transportation and preservation method of radiated matters, and out-reactor maintenance in a hot cell, is now under progress. Here were also reported on basic concept on maintenance and conservation of ITER, maintenance design of diverter and blanket with high maintenance frequency and present state on development of maintenance appliances. (G.K.)

  15. Recent developments in the design of conceptual fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribe, F.L.

    1977-01-01

    Since the first round of conceptual fusion reactor designs in 1973 - 1974, there has been considerable progress in design improvement. Two recent tokamak designs of the Wisconsin and Culham groups, with increased plasma beta and wall loading (power density), lead to more compact reactors with easier maintenance. The Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor has undergone considerable upgrading in the design of the first wall insulator and blanket. In addition, a conceptual homopolar energy storage and transfer system has been designed. In the case of the mirror reactor, there are design changes toward improved modular construction and ease of handling, as well as improved direct converters. Conceptual designs of toroidal-multiple-mirror, liner-compression, and reverse-field pinch reactors are also discussed. A design is presented of a toroidal multiple-mirror reactor that combines the advantages of steady-state operation and high-aspect ratio. The liner-compression reactor eliminates a major problem of radiation damage by using a liquid-metal first wall that also serves as a neutron-thermalizing blanket. The reverse-field pinch reactor operates at higher beta, larger current density and larger aspect ratio than a tokamak reactor. These properties allow the possibility of ignition by ohmic heating alone and greater ease of maintenance

  16. Muon catalyzed fusion - fission reactor driven by a recirculating beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliezer, S.; Tajima, T.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1986-01-01

    The recent experimentally inferred value of multiplicity of fusion of deuterium and tritium catalyzed by muons has rekindled interest in its application to reactors. Since the main energy expended is in pion (and consequent muon) productions, we try to minimize the pion loss by magnetically confining pions where they are created. Although it appears at this moment not possible to achieve energy gain by pure fusion, it is possible to gain energy by combining catalyzed fusion with fission blankets. We present two new ideas that improve the muon fusion reactor concept. The first idea is to combine the target, the converter of pions into muons, and the synthesizer into one (the synergetic concept). This is accomplished by injecting a tritium or deuterium beam of 1 GeV/nucleon into DT fuel contained in a magnetic mirror. The confined pions slow down and decay into muons, which are confined in the fuel causing little muon loss. The necessary quantity of tritium to keep the reactor viable has been derived. The second idea is that the beam passing through the target is collected for reuse and recirculated, while the strongly interacted portion of the beam is directed to electronuclear blankets. The present concepts are based on known technologies and on known physical processes and data. 29 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Thermal energy and bootstrap current in fusion reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.

    1993-01-01

    For DT fusion reactors with prescribed alpha particle heating power P α , plasma volume V and burn temperature i > ∼ 10 keV specific relations for the thermal energy content, bootstrap current, central plasma pressure and other quantities are derived. It is shown that imposing P α and V makes these relations independent of the magnitudes of the density and temperature, i.e. they only depend on P α , V and shape factors or profile parameters. For model density and temperature profiles analytic expressions for these shape factors and for the factor C bs in the bootstrap current formula I bs ∼ C bs (a/R) 1/2 β p I p are given. In the design of next-step devices and fusion reactors, the fusion power is a fixed quantity. Prescription of the alpha particle heating power and plasma volume results in specific relations which can be helpful for interpreting computer simulations and for the design of fusion reactors. (author) 5 refs

  18. Fusion reactor materials research in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jiapu

    1994-10-01

    The fusion materials research in China is introduced. Many kinds of structural materials (such as Ti-modified stainless steel, ferritic steel, HT-9, HT-7, oxide dispersion strengthening ferritic steel), tritium breeders (lithium, Li 2 O, γ-LiAlO 2 ) and plasma facing materials (PFMs) (graphite with TiC and SiC coatings) have been developed or being developed. A systematic research activities on irradiation effects, compatibility, plasma materials interaction, thermal shock during disruption, tritium production, release and permeation, neutron multiplication in Be and Pb, etc. have been performed. The research activities are summarized and some experimental results are also given

  19. Structural materials for fusion reactor blanket systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Smith, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Consideration of the required functions of the blanket and the general chemical, mechanical, and physical properties of candidate tritium breeding materials, coolants, structural materials, etc., leads to acceptable or compatible combinations of materials. The presently favored candidate structural materials are the austenitic stainless steels, martensitic steels, and vanadium alloys. The characteristics of these alloy systems which limit their application and potential performance as well as approaches to alloy development aimed at improving performance (temperature capability and lifetime) will be described. Progress towards understanding and improving the performance of structural materials has been substantial. It is possible to develop materials with acceptable properties for fusion applications

  20. Challenges of designing fusion reactors for remote maintainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    One of the major problems faced by the fusion community is the development of the high level of reliability required to assure that fusion will be a viable commercial power source. Much of the responsibility for solving this problem falls directly on the designer in developing concepts that have a high level of maintainability for the next generation engineering oriented reactors; and long range, in developing full maintainability for the more complicated commercial concepts with their required high level of on-line time. The near-term challenge will include development of unique design concepts to perform inspection, maintenance, replacement, and testing under the stringent conditions imposed by the next generation engineering oriented machines. The long range challenge will focus on basic design concepts that will enable the full maintainability required by commercial fusion. In addition to the purely technical challenges, the fusion community is also faced with the problem of developing programmatic means to assure that reactor maintenance issues are given proper and timely emphasis as the nuclear phase of fusion is approached

  1. Pulsed power for angular multiplexed laser fusion drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eninger, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using rare gas-halide lasers, in particular the KrF laser, as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) drivers has been assessed. These lasers are scalable to the required high energy (approx. =1-5 MJ) in a short pulse (approx. =10 ns) by optical angular multiplexing, and integration of the output from approx. =100 kJ laser amplifier subsystems. The e-beam current density (approx. =50A/cm 2 ) and voltage (approx. =800 kV) required for these power amplifiers lead to an e-beam impedance of approx. =0.2Ω for approx. =300 ns pump time. This impedance level requires modularization of the large area e-gun, a) to achieve a diode inductance consistent with fast current risetime, b) to circumvent dielectric breakdown constraints in the pulse forming lines, and c) to reduce the requirement for guide magnetic fields. Pulsed power systems requirements, design concepts, scalability, tradeoffs, and performance projections are discussed in this paper

  2. Beryllium neutron activation detector for pulsed DD fusion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talebitaher, A.; Springham, S.V.; Rawat, R.S.; Lee, P.

    2011-01-01

    A compact fast neutron detector based on beryllium activation has been developed to perform accurate neutron fluence measurements on pulsed DD fusion sources. It is especially well suited to moderate repetition-rate ( 9 Be(n,α) 6 He cross-section, energy calibration of the proportional counters, and numerical simulations of neutron interactions and beta-particle paths using MCNP5. The response function R(E n ) is determined over the neutron energy range 2-4 MeV. The count rate capability of the detector has been studied and the corrections required for high neutron fluence measurements are discussed. For pulsed DD neutron fluencies >3×10 4 cm -2 , the statistical uncertainty in the fluence measurement is better than 1%. A small plasma focus device has been employed as a pulsed neutron source to test two of these new detectors, and their responses are found to be practically identical. Also the level of interfering activation is found to be sufficiently low as to be negligible.

  3. Diamond Wire Cutting of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith Rule; Erik Perry; Robert Parsells

    2003-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. As a result, decommissioning commenced in October 1999. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The deuterium-tritium experiments resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 MeV neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies, while dose rates approach 50 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size of the tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) decided to investigate an alternate, innovative approach for dismantlement of the TFTR vacuum vessel: diamond wire cutting technology. In August 1999, this technology was successfully demonstrated and evaluated on vacuum vessel surrogates. Subsequently, the technology was improved and redesigned for the actual cutting of the vacuum vessel. Ten complete cuts were performed in a 6-month period to complete the removal of this unprecedented type of DandD (Decontamination and Decommissioning) activity

  4. Helium effect on mechanical property of fusion reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Norikazu; Chuto, Toshinori; Murase, Yoshiharu; Nakagawa, Johsei

    2004-01-01

    High-energy neutrons produced in fusion reactor core caused helium in the structural materials of fusion reactors, such as blankets. We injected alpha particles accelerated by the cyclotron to the samples of martensite steel (9Cr3WVTaB). Equivalent helium doses injected to the sample is estimated to be up to 300 ppm, which were estimated to be equivalent to helium accumulation after the 1-year reactor operation. Creep tests of the samples were made to investigate helium embrittlement. There were no appreciable changes in the relation between the stresses and the rupture time, the minimum creep rate and the applied stress. Grain boundary effect by helium was not observed in ruptured surfaces. Fatigue tests were made for SUS304 samples, which contain helium up to 150 ppm. After 0.05 Hz cyclic stress tests, it was shown that the fatigue lifetime (cycles to rupture and extension to failure) are 1/5 in 150 ppm helium samples compared with no helium samples. The experimental results suggest martensite steel is promising for structural materials of fusion reactors. (Y. Tanaka)

  5. Fusion reactors: physics and technology. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1983-08-01

    Fusion reactors are designed to operate at full power and generally at steady state. Yet experience shows the load variations, licensing constraints, and frequent sub-system failures often require a plant to operate at fractions of rated power. The aim of this study has been to assess the technology problems and design implications of startup and fractional power operation on fusion reactors. The focus of attention has been tandem mirror reactors (TMR) and we have concentrated on the plasma and blanket engineering for startup and fractional power operation. In this report, we first discuss overall problems of startup, shutdown and staged power operation and their influence on TMR design. We then present a detailed discussion of the plasma physics associated with TMR startup and various means of achieving staged power operation. We then turn to the issue of instrumentation and safety controls for fusion reactors. Finally we discuss the limits on transient power variations during startup and shutdown of Li 17 Pb 83 cooled blankets

  6. Core fusion accidents in nuclear power reactors. Knowledge review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentaib, Ahmed; Bonneville, Herve; Clement, Bernard; Cranga, Michel; Fichot, Florian; Koundy, Vincent; Meignen, Renaud; Corenwinder, Francois; Leteinturier, Denis; Monroig, Frederique; Nahas, Georges; Pichereau, Frederique; Van-Dorsselaere, Jean-Pierre; Cenerino, Gerard; Jacquemain, Didier; Raimond, Emmanuel; Ducros, Gerard; Journeau, Christophe; Magallon, Daniel; Seiler, Jean-Marie; Tourniaire, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    This reference document proposes a large and detailed review of severe core fusion accidents occurring in nuclear power reactors. It aims at presenting the scientific aspects of these accidents, a review of knowledge and research perspectives on this issue. After having recalled design and operation principles and safety principles for reactors operating in France, and the main studied and envisaged accident scenarios for the management of severe accidents in French PWRs, the authors describe the physical phenomena occurring during a core fusion accident, in the reactor vessel and in the containment building, their sequence and means to mitigate their effects: development of the accident within the reactor vessel, phenomena able to result in an early failure of the containment building, phenomena able to result in a delayed failure with the corium-concrete interaction, corium retention and cooling in and out of the vessel, release of fission products. They address the behaviour of containment buildings during such an accident (sizing situations, mechanical behaviour, bypasses). They review and discuss lessons learned from accidents (Three Mile Island and Chernobyl) and simulation tests (Phebus-PF). A last chapter gives an overview of software and approaches for the numerical simulation of a core fusion accident

  7. Laser fusion hybrid reactor systems study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-07-01

    The work was performed in three phases. The first phase included a review of the many possible laser-reactor-blanket combinations and resulted in the selection of a ''demonstration size'' 500 MWe plant for further study. A number of fast fission blankets using uranium metal, uranium-molybdenum alloy, and uranium carbide as fuel were investigated. The second phase included design of the reactor vessel and internals, heat transfer system, tritium processing system, and the balance of plant, excluding the laser building and equipment. A fuel management scheme was developed, safety considerations were reviewed, and capital and operating costs were estimated. Costs developed during the second phase were unexpectedly high, and a thorough review indicated considerable unit cost savings could be obtained by scaling the plant to a larger size. Accordingly, a third phase was added to the original scope, encompassing the redesign and scaling of the plant from 500 MWe to 1200 MWe

  8. Reactor design considerations for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The most challenging reactor design consideration is protection of the cavity wall from the various energy forms as released by the pellet and as affected by the reaction-chamber phenomena. These phenomena depend on both the design and the yield of the pellet, as well as on ambient conditions in the chamber at the time of the pellet microexplosion. The effects on pellet energy-release mechanisms of various reaction chamber atmosphere options are summarized

  9. Conceptual design study of a scyllac fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1975-07-01

    The report describes a conceptual design study of a fusion test reactor based on the Scyllac toroidal theta-pinch approach to fusion. It is not the first attempt to describe the physics and technology required for demonstrating scientific feasibility of the approach, but it is the most complete design in the sense that the physics necessary to achieve the device goals is extrapolated from experimentally tested MHD theories of toroidal systems,and it uses technological systems whose engineering performance has been carefully calculated to ensure that they meet the machine requirements

  10. Critical issues for the early introduction of commercial fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Kunihiko; Yoshida, Tomoaki

    1996-01-01

    Critical issues for the realization of commercial fusion reactor are discussed on the basis of a prediction of power source composition in the next century. The key issue is rather a relaxation in the construction site condition than a competitive cost in comparison with the nuclear fission power plant. It seems a logical conclusion that the competitor of the fusion plant in the cost will be a future CCT (Clean Coal Technology) and/or LNG plant loaded with a CO 2 recovery system. (author)

  11. Technology issues for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The approach for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor has evolved from a conservative plan based on cutting up and burying all of the systems, to one that considers the impact tritium contamination will have on waste disposal, how large size components may be used as their own shipping containers, and even the possibility of recycling the materials of components such as the toroidal field coils and the tokamak structure. In addition, the project is more carefully assessing the requirements for using remotely operated equipment. Finally, valuable cost database is being developed for future use by the fusion community

  12. Computer simulation of multi-elemental fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voertler, K.

    2011-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion is a sustainable energy solution, in which energy is produced using similar processes as in the sun. In this technology hydrogen isotopes are fused to gain energy and consequently to produce electricity. In a fusion reactor hydrogen isotopes are confined by magnetic fields as ionized gas, the plasma. Since the core plasma is millions of degrees hot, there are special needs for the plasma-facing materials. Moreover, in the plasma the fusion of hydrogen isotopes leads to the production of high energetic neutrons which sets demanding abilities for the structural materials of the reactor. This thesis investigates the irradiation response of materials to be used in future fusion reactors. Interactions of the plasma with the reactor wall leads to the removal of surface atoms, migration of them, and formation of co-deposited layers such as tungsten carbide. Sputtering of tungsten carbide and deuterium trapping in tungsten carbide was investigated in this thesis. As the second topic the primary interaction of the neutrons in the structural material steel was examined. As model materials for steel iron chromium and iron nickel were used. This study was performed theoretically by the means of computer simulations on the atomic level. In contrast to previous studies in the field, in which simulations were limited to pure elements, in this work more complex materials were used, i.e. they were multi-elemental including two or more atom species. The results of this thesis are in the microscale. One of the results is a catalogue of atom species, which were removed from tungsten carbide by the plasma. Another result is e.g. the atomic distributions of defects in iron chromium caused by the energetic neutrons. These microscopic results are used in data bases for multiscale modelling of fusion reactor materials, which has the aim to explain the macroscopic degradation in the materials. This thesis is therefore a relevant contribution to investigate the

  13. Study of startup conditions of a pulsed annular reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Mario Augusto Bezerra da

    2003-10-01

    A new concept of reactor, which combines features of pulsed and stationary reactors, was proposed so as to produce intense neutronic fluxes. Such a reactor, known as VICHFPR (Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor), consists of a subcritical core with an annular geometry and pulsed by a rotating reflector which acts as a reactivity modulator as it produces a short pulse (approximately equal to 1 ms) of high intensity, guiding the region near the pulser to super-prompt critical state. This dissertation intends to analyze the startup conditions of a Pulsed Annular Reactor. The evolution of the neutron pulse intensity is analyzed when the reactivity modulator is brought upwards according to a helicoidal path from its initial position (far away from the core), when the multiplication factor has a subcritical value, up to the final position (near the core), in which a super-prompt critical state is reached. Part of the analysis is based on the variation of neutron reflection, which is a uniform function of the exit and reflection angles between the core and the modulator. It must be emphasized that this work is an approximation of the real situation. As the initial and final reactor parameters are known, a programming code in Fortran is worked out to provide the multiplication factor and the flux intensity evolution. According to the results obtained with this code, the conditions under which the modulator must be lifted up during the startup are established. Basically, these conditions are related to the analysis of the rising and the rotation velocities, the reflector saving and the initial distance between the reactor and the modulator. The Pulsed Annular Reactor startup was divided into three stages. Because of its negative reactivity in the first two stages, the neutron multiplication is not large, while the last one, having a positive reactivity, shows an intense multiplication as is usually expected when handling pulsed systems. This last stage is quite

  14. Chamber transport of ''foot'' pulses for heavy-ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan-Miller, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.

    2002-02-20

    Indirect-drive targets for heavy-ion fusion must initially be heated by ''foot'' pulses that precede the main heating pulses by tens of nanoseconds. These pulses typically have a lower energy and perveance than the main pulses, and the fusion-chamber environment is different from that seen by later pulses. The preliminary particle-in-cell simulations of foot pulses here examine the sensitivity of the beam focusing to ion-beam perveance, background-gas density, and pre-neutralization by a plasma near the chamber entry port.

  15. Conceptual design of nuclear fusion power reactor DREAM. Reactor structures and remote maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Seki, Yasushi; Ueda, Shuzo; Kurihara, Ryoichi; Adachi, Junichi; Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Hashimoto, Toshiyuki.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear fusion reactors are required to be able to compete another energy sources in economy, reliability, safety and environmental integrity for commercial use. In the DREAM (DRastically EAsy Maintenance) reactor, a very low activated material of SiC/SiC composite has been introduced for the structural material, a reactor configuration for very easy maintenance and the helium gas of a high temperature for the cooling system, and hence DREAM has been proven to be very attractively as the commercial power reactor due to the high availability and efficiency of the plant and minimization of radioactive wastes. (author)

  16. HIP technologies for fusion reactor blankets fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Marois, G.; Federzoni, L.; Bucci, P.; Revirand, P.

    2000-01-01

    The benefit of HIP techniques applied to the fabrication of fusion internal components for higher performances, reliability and cost savings are emphasized. To demonstrate the potential of the techniques, design of new blankets concepts and mock-ups fabrication are currently performed by CEA. A coiled tube concept that allows cooling arrangement flexibility, strong reduction of the machining and number of welds is proposed for ITER IAM. Medium size mock-ups according to the WCLL breeding blanket concept have been manufactured. The fabrication of a large size mock-up is under progress. These activities are supported by numerical calculations to predict the deformations of the parts during HIP'ing. Finally, several HIP techniques issues have been identified and are discussed

  17. Tokamak fusion test reactor FELIX plate experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, T.O.; Nygren, R.E.; Turner, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    For a conducting material exposed to both a time-varying and a static magnetic field, such as a limiter blade in a tokamak, the induced eddy currents and the deflection arising from those eddy currents can be strongly coupled. The coupling effects reduce the currents and deflections markedly, sometimes an order of magnitude, from the values predicted if coupling is neglected. A series of experiments to study current-deflection coupling were performed using the Fusion Electromagnetic Inductance Experiment (FELIX) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Magnetic damping and magnetic stiffness resulting from the coupling are discussed, and analytical expressions for induced eddy current and rigid body rotation in the FELIX plate experiment are compared with the experimental results. Predictions for the degree of coupling based on various parameters are made using the analytical model

  18. Conceptual design of a fast-ignition laser fusion reactor based on a dry wall chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Y; Goto, T; Okano, K; Asaoka, Y; Hiwatari, R; Someya, Y

    2008-01-01

    The fast ignition is quite attractive for a compact laser fusion reactor, because a sufficiently high pellet gain is available with a small input energy. We designed an inertial fusion reactor based on Fast-ignition Advanced Laser fusion reactor CONcept, called FALCON-D, where a dry wall is employed for a chamber wall. A simple point model shows that the pellet gain G∼100 is available with laser energies of 350kJ for implosion, 50kJ for heating. This results in the fusion yield of 40 MJ in one shot. By increasing the repetition rate up to 30 Hz, the fusion power of 1.2 GWth becomes available. Plant system analysis shows the net electric power to be about 0.4 GWe In the fast ignition it is available to employ a low aspect ratio pellet, which is favorable for the stability during the implosion phase. Here the pellet aspect ratio is reduced to be 2 ∼ 4, and the optimization of the pulse shape for the implosion laser are carried out by using the 1-D hydrodynamic simulation code ILESTA-1D. A ferritic steel with a tungsten armour is employed for the chamber wall. The feasibility of this dry wall concept is studied from various engineering aspects such as surface melting, physical and chemical sputtering, blistering and exfoliation by helium retention, and thermo-mechanical fatigue, and it is found that blistering and exfoliation due to the helium retention and fatigue failure due to cyclic thermal load are major concerns. The cost analysis shows that the construction cost is moderate but the cost of electricity is slightly expensive

  19. Conceptual design of a fast-ignition laser fusion reactor based on a dry wall chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Y [High Temperature Plasma Center, University of Tokyo, Chiba (Japan); Goto, T; Okano, K [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Chiba (Japan); Asaoka, Y; Hiwatari, R [Central Research Institute for Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan); Someya, Y [Graduate School of Engineering, Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: ogawa@ppl.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2008-05-15

    The fast ignition is quite attractive for a compact laser fusion reactor, because a sufficiently high pellet gain is available with a small input energy. We designed an inertial fusion reactor based on Fast-ignition Advanced Laser fusion reactor CONcept, called FALCON-D, where a dry wall is employed for a chamber wall. A simple point model shows that the pellet gain G{approx}100 is available with laser energies of 350kJ for implosion, 50kJ for heating. This results in the fusion yield of 40 MJ in one shot. By increasing the repetition rate up to 30 Hz, the fusion power of 1.2 GWth becomes available. Plant system analysis shows the net electric power to be about 0.4 GWe In the fast ignition it is available to employ a low aspect ratio pellet, which is favorable for the stability during the implosion phase. Here the pellet aspect ratio is reduced to be 2 {approx} 4, and the optimization of the pulse shape for the implosion laser are carried out by using the 1-D hydrodynamic simulation code ILESTA-1D. A ferritic steel with a tungsten armour is employed for the chamber wall. The feasibility of this dry wall concept is studied from various engineering aspects such as surface melting, physical and chemical sputtering, blistering and exfoliation by helium retention, and thermo-mechanical fatigue, and it is found that blistering and exfoliation due to the helium retention and fatigue failure due to cyclic thermal load are major concerns. The cost analysis shows that the construction cost is moderate but the cost of electricity is slightly expensive.

  20. Conceptual design of a fast-ignition laser fusion reactor based on a dry wall chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Y.; Goto, T.; Okano, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Hiwatari, R.; Someya, Y.

    2008-05-01

    The fast ignition is quite attractive for a compact laser fusion reactor, because a sufficiently high pellet gain is available with a small input energy. We designed an inertial fusion reactor based on Fast-ignition Advanced Laser fusion reactor CONcept, called FALCON-D, where a dry wall is employed for a chamber wall. A simple point model shows that the pellet gain G~100 is available with laser energies of 350kJ for implosion, 50kJ for heating. This results in the fusion yield of 40 MJ in one shot. By increasing the repetition rate up to 30 Hz, the fusion power of 1.2 GWth becomes available. Plant system analysis shows the net electric power to be about 0.4 GWe In the fast ignition it is available to employ a low aspect ratio pellet, which is favorable for the stability during the implosion phase. Here the pellet aspect ratio is reduced to be 2 ~ 4, and the optimization of the pulse shape for the implosion laser are carried out by using the 1-D hydrodynamic simulation code ILESTA-1D. A ferritic steel with a tungsten armour is employed for the chamber wall. The feasibility of this dry wall concept is studied from various engineering aspects such as surface melting, physical and chemical sputtering, blistering and exfoliation by helium retention, and thermo-mechanical fatigue, and it is found that blistering and exfoliation due to the helium retention and fatigue failure due to cyclic thermal load are major concerns. The cost analysis shows that the construction cost is moderate but the cost of electricity is slightly expensive.

  1. Irradiation capsule for testing magnetic fusion reactor first-wall materials at 60 and 2000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlin, J.A.

    1985-08-01

    A new type of irradiation capsule has been designed, and a prototype has been tested in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) for low-temperature irradiation of Magnetic Fusion Reactor first-wall materials. The capsule meets the requirements of the joint US/Japanese collaborative fusion reactor materials irradiation program for the irradiation of first-wall fusion reactor materials at 60 and 200 0 C. The design description and results of the prototype capsule performance are presented

  2. Steady-state operation requirements of tokamak fusion reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobloch, A.F.

    1991-06-01

    In the last two decades tokamak conceptual reactor design studies have been deriving benefit from progressing plasma physics experiments, more depth in theory and increasing detail in technology and engineering. Recent full-scale reactor extrapolations such as the US ARIES-I and the EC Reference Reactor study provide information on rather advanced concepts that are called for when economic boundary conditions are imposed. The ITER international reactor design activity concentrated on defining the next step after the JET generation of experiments. For steady-state operation as required for any future commercial tokamak fusion power plants it is essential to have non-inductive current drive. The current drive power and other internal power requirements specific to magnetic confinement fusion have to be kept as low as possible in order to attain a competitive overall power conversion efficiency. A high plasma Q is primarily dependent on a high current drive efficiency. Since such conditions have not yet been attained in practice, the present situation and the degree of further development required are characterized. Such development and an appropriately designed next-step tokamak reactor make the gradual realization of high-Q operation appear feasible. (orig.)

  3. Laser-fusion targets for reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.H.; Thiessen, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a target having a centrally located substantially spherically configured quantity of solid fuel for implosion by a pulse of laser energy and having no material therein with a Z of over about 13. The improvement consists of: means in spaced apart and non-contiguous relationship surrounding the fuel for at least providing an atmosphere about the fuel for ensuring electron transport around the fuel and enhancing subsequent implosion symmetry of the fuel, the fuel being configured as a hollow shell; the means consisting of at least one outer layer of substantially solid atmosphere forming material having a Z of 1-13. The atmosphere forms material comprising a shell positioned about the fuel defining a space therebetween, the space being filled with He, the fuel and the shell of atmosphere forming material being each composed of DT, the layer of atmosphere forming material being impacted and at least partially exploded by at least one separate and distinct laser prepulse to produce the atmosphere about the fuel prior to implosion of the fuel by the pulse of laser energy

  4. Electric power from near-term fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Deis, G.A.; Miller, L.G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper examines requirements and possbilities of electric power production on near-term fusion reactors using low temperature cycle technology similar to that used in some geothermal power systems. Requirements include the need for a working fluid with suitable thermodynamics properties and which is free of oxygen and hydrogen to facilitate tritium management. Thermal storage will also be required due to the short system thermal time constants on near-time reactors. It is possbile to use the FED shield in a binary power cycle, and results are presented of thermodynamic analyses of this system

  5. Conceptual design of the JAERI demonstration fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, K.; Tone, T.; Seki, Y.

    1976-01-01

    Conceptual design of a tokamak demonstration fusion reactor is carried out. This design is an extended and improved version of the previous design which was presented at the 5th IAEA Conference. The main design parameters are as follows: the reactor thermal power 2000 MW, torus radius 10.5 m, plasma radius 2.7 m, first wall radius 3.0 m, toroidal magnetic field on axis 6T, blanket fertile material Li 2 O, coolant He, structural material Mo-alloy and tritium breeding ratio 1.2

  6. Development of Al-Mg-Li alloys for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Yoshifusa; Yoshida, Hideo; Uno, Teruo; Baba, Yoshio; Kamada, Koji.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum-magnesium-lithium alloys featuring low residual induced radioactivity and high electrical resistivity have been developed for fusion reactor structural materials. The addition of lithium in aluminum and Al-Mg alloys markedly increases electrical resistivity and tensile strength of them. However the elongation of Al-Mg-Li alloys containing more than 2 mass% lithium are less than 10 %. The Al-4--5 mass%Mg-1 mass%Li alloys are optimum for fusion reactor materials, and exhibit high resistivity (86 nΩm: 20 %IACS), medium strength (300 MPa) and good formability (22 % elongation). The variation of electrical resistivity of Al-Li and Al-Mg-Li alloys in solid solution can be approximated by the Matthiessen's rule. (author)

  7. Materials data base for fusion reactors-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, S.; Nogami, A.; Ishino, S.; Mishima, Y.; Takao, Y.; Aruga, T.; Shiraishi, K.

    1982-01-01

    The materials data base is a set of experimental and/or calculated data being compiled to meet the broad needs for materials data by taking advantage of the data base management systems. In this paper the objective of such computerized data base is described and the characteristics of fusion reactor materials are discussed from the viewpoint of the data base development. The near-term emphasis of the development has been put on the irradiation data for 316 type stainless steels. Through the test of this small data base, it can be concluded that this approach is promising for materials data base management and for the establishment of the interface between fusion reactor designer and materials investigator. (orig.)

  8. Conceptual design of neutron diagnostic systems for fusion experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, T.; Kaneko, J.; Nakazawa, M.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron measurement in fusion experimental reactors is very important for burning plasma diagnostics and control, monitoring of irradiation effects on device components, neutron source characterization for in-situ engineering tests, etc. A conceptual design of neutron diagnostic systems for an ITER-like fusion experimental reactor has been made, which consists of a neutron yield monitor, a neutron emission profile monitor and a 14-MeV spectrometer. Each of them is based on a unique idea to meet the required performances for full power conditions assumed at ITER operation. Micro-fission chambers of 235 U (and 238 U) placed at several poloidal angles near the first wall are adopted as a promising neutron yield monitor. A collimated long counter system using a 235 U fission chamber and graphite neutron moderators is also proposed to improve the calibration accuracy of absolute neutron yield determination

  9. Neutronics design for a spherical tokamak fusion-transmutation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Meigen; Feng Kaiming; Yang Bangchao

    2002-01-01

    Based on studies of the spherical tokamak fusion reactors, a concept of fusion-transmutation reactor is put forward. By using the one-dimension transport and burn-up code BISON3.0 to process optimized design, a set of plasma parameters and blanket configuration suitable for the transmutation of MA (Minor Actinides) nuclear waste is selected. Based on the one-dimension calculation, two-dimension calculation has been carried out by using two-dimension neutronics code TWODANT. Combined with the neutron flux given by TWODANT calculation, burn-up calculation has been processed by using the one-dimension radioactivity calculation code FDKR and some useful and reasonable results are obtained

  10. Biomagnetic effects: a consideration in fusion reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahlum, D.D.

    1976-02-01

    Fusion as a power source is receiving an increasing amount of attention. Several designs have been proposed and the feasibility of each alternative is being studied. As we move closer to a working design, attention can be paid to potential biological hazards. Large magnetic fields and the emission of tritium and lithium are unique to some fusion reactor designs. The results of a review of the current state of knowledge concerning the biological effects of magnetic fields alone and in combination with ionizing radiation are summarized in this report. The purpose of the review is to help identify areas where additional biomedical research is needed for establishing guidelines for reactor design and operation. 64 references

  11. Nuclear characteristics of D-D fusion reactor blankets, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hideki; Ohta, Masao; Seki, Yasushi.

    1977-01-01

    Fusion reactors operating on the deuterium (D-D) cycle are considered promising for their freedom from tritium breeding in the blanket. In this paper, neutronic and photonic calculations are undertaken covering several blanket models of the D-D fusion reactor, using presently available data, with a view to comparing the nuclear characteristics of these models, in particular, the nuclear heating rates and their spatial distributions. Nine models are taken up for the study, embodying various combinations of coolant, blanket, structural and reflector materials. About 10 MeV is found to be a typical value for the total nuclear energy deposition per source neutron in the models considered here. The realization of high energy gain is contingent upon finding a favorable combination of blanket composition and configuration. The resulting implications on the thermal design aspect are briefly discussed. (auth.)

  12. Application of vanadium alloys to a fusion reactor blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethin, J.; Tobin, A. (Grumman Aerospace Corp., Bethpage, NY (USA). Research and Development Center)

    1984-05-01

    Vanadium and vanadium alloys are of interest in fusion reactor blanket applications due to their low induced radioactivity and outstanding elevated temperature mechanical properties during neutron irradiation. The major limitation to the use of vanadium is its sensitivity to oxygen impurities in the blanket environment, leading to oxygen embrittlement. A quantitative analysis was performed of the interaction of gaseous impurities in a helium coolant with vanadium and the V-15Cr-5Ti alloy under conditions expected in a fusion reactor blanket. It was shown that the use of unalloyed V would impose severe restrictions on the helium gas cleanup system due to excessive oxygen buildup and embrittlement of the metal. However, internal oxidation effects and the possibly lower terminal oxygen solubility in the alloy would impose much less severe cleanup constraints. It is suggested that V-15Cr-5Ti is a promising candidate for certain blanket applications and deserves further consideration.

  13. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor D-T results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meade, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    Temperatures, densities and confinement of deuterium plasmas confined in tokamaks have been achieved within the last decade that are approaching those required for a D-T reactor. As a result, the unique phenomena present in a D-T reactor plasma (D-T plasma confinement, α confinement, α heating and possible α-driven instabilities) can now be studied in the laboratory. Recent experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been the first magnetic fusion experiments to study plasmas with reactor fuel concentrations of tritium. The injection of about 20MW of tritium and 14MW of deuterium neutral beams into the TFTR produced a plasma with a T-to-D density ratio of about 1 and yielding a maximum fusion power of about 9.2MW. The fusion power density in the core of the plasma was about 1.8MWm -3 , approximating that expected in a D-T fusion reactor. A TFTR plasma with a T-to-D density ratio of about 1 was found to have about 20% higher energy confinement time than a comparable D plasma, indicating a confinement scaling with average ion mass A of τ E ∝A 0.6 . The core ion temperature increased from 30 to 37keV owing to a 35% improvement of ion thermal conductivity. Using the electron thermal conductivity from a comparable deuterium plasma, about 50% of the electron temperature increase from 9 to 10.6keV can be attributed to electron heating by the α particles. The approximately 5% loss of α particles, as observed on detectors near the bottom edge of the plasma, was consistent with classical first orbit loss without anomalous effects. Initial measurements have been made of the confined high energy α particles and the resultant α ash density. At fusion power levels of 7.5MW, fluctuations at the toroidal Alfven eigen-mode frequency were observed by the fluctuation diagnostics. However, no additional α loss due to the fluctuations was observed. (orig.)

  14. Direct energy conversion of radiation energy in fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    Direct energy conversion from plasma heat flux has been studied. Since major parts of fusion energy in the advanced fusion reactor are radiation and charged particle energies, the flexible design of the blanket is possible. We discuss the potentiality of the thermoelectric element that generates electricity by temperature gradient in conductors. A strong magnetic field is used to confine the fusion plasma, therefore, it is appropriate to consider the effect of the magnetic field. We propose a new element which is called Nernst element. The new element needs the magnetic field and the temperature gradient. We compare the efficiency of these two elements in a semiconductor model. Finally, a direct energy conversion are mentioned. (author)

  15. Challenges of designing fusion reactors for remote maintainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    One of the major problems faced by the fusion community is the development of the high level of reliability required to assure that fusion will be a viable commercial power source. Much of the responsibility for solving this problem falls directly on the designer in developing concepts that have a high level of maintainability. The problems are both near-term, in developing maintainability for next generation engineering oriented reactors; and long range, in developing full maintainability for the more commercial concepts with their required high level of on-line time. The near-time challenge will include development of unqiue design concepts to perform inspection, maintenance, replacement, and testing under the stringent conditions imposed by the next generation engineering oriented machines. The long range challenge will focus on basic design concepts that will enable the full mainatability required by commerical fusion

  16. Analysis of Confinement Strategies for a Tokamak Fusion Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Christian; Gaillard, Jean-Philippe; Marbach, Gabriel; Cambi, Gilio; Cook, Ian; Johansson, Lise-Lotte; Meyder, Rainer; Mustoe, Julian; Pinna, Tonio

    2001-01-15

    The Safety and Environmental Assessment of Fusion Power (SEAFP) was performed in the framework of the European fusion program, whose results have already been published. The European Commission decided to continue this program for some identified issues that required development. One of these issues was the analysis and specification of the containment concepts that minimize accidental releases to the environment.To perform such an assessment, a methodology was followed to identify the most challenging accidental sequences in terms of containment integrity.The results of the accident selection and analysis that were performed during the extension of the SEAFP-2 program are given. Preliminary recommendations for the definition of a confinement strategy for tokamak fusion reactors are established.

  17. Analysis of Confinement Strategies for a Tokamak Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, Christian; Gaillard, Jean-Philippe; Marbach, Gabriel; Cambi, Gilio; Cook, Ian; Johansson, Lise-Lotte; Meyder, Rainer; Mustoe, Julian; Pinna, Tonio

    2001-01-01

    The Safety and Environmental Assessment of Fusion Power (SEAFP) was performed in the framework of the European fusion program, whose results have already been published. The European Commission decided to continue this program for some identified issues that required development. One of these issues was the analysis and specification of the containment concepts that minimize accidental releases to the environment.To perform such an assessment, a methodology was followed to identify the most challenging accidental sequences in terms of containment integrity.The results of the accident selection and analysis that were performed during the extension of the SEAFP-2 program are given. Preliminary recommendations for the definition of a confinement strategy for tokamak fusion reactors are established

  18. Direct energy conversion of radiation energy in fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    Direct energy conversion from plasma heat flux has been studied. Since major parts of fusion energy in the advanced fusion reactor are radiation and charged particle energies, the flexible design of the blanket is possible. We discuss the potentiality of the thermoelectric element that generates electricity by temperature gradient in conductors. A strong magnetic field is used to confine the fusion plasma, therefore, it is appropriate to consider the effect of the magnetic field. We propose a new element which is called Nernst element. The new element needs the magnetic field and the temperature gradient. We compare the efficiency of these two elements in a semiconductor model. Finally, a direct energy conversion are mentioned.

  19. Direct energy conversion of radiation energy in fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    Direct energy conversion from plasma heat flux has been studied. Since major parts of fusion energy in the advanced fusion reactor are radiation and charged particle energies, the flexible design of the blanket is possible. We discuss the potentiality of the thermoelectric element that generates electricity by temperature gradient in conductors. A strong magnetic field is used to confine the fusion plasma, therefore, it is appropriate to consider the effect of the magnetic field. We propose a new element which is called Nernst element. The new element needs the magnetic field and the temperature gradient. We compare the efficiency of these two elements in a semiconductor model. Finally, a direct energy conversion are mentioned. (author).

  20. Direct energy conversion of radiation energy in fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1994-12-31

    Direct energy conversion from plasma heat flux has been studied. Since major parts of fusion energy in the advanced fusion reactor are radiation and charged particle energies, the flexible design of the blanket is possible. We discuss the potentiality of the thermoelectric element that generate electricity by temperature gradient in conductors. A Strong magnetic field is used to confine the fusion plasma, therefore, it is appropriate to consider the effect of the magnetic field. We propose a new element which is called Nernst element. The new element needs the magnetic field and the temperature gradient. We compare the efficiency of these two elements in a semiconductor model. Finally, a direct energy converter are mentioned. (author).

  1. Direct energy conversion of radiation energy in fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1994-01-01

    Direct energy conversion from plasma heat flux has been studied. Since major parts of fusion energy in the advanced fusion reactor are radiation and charged particle energies, the flexible design of the blanket is possible. We discuss the potentiality of the thermoelectric element that generate electricity by temperature gradient in conductors. A Strong magnetic field is used to confine the fusion plasma, therefore, it is appropriate to consider the effect of the magnetic field. We propose a new element which is called Nernst element. The new element needs the magnetic field and the temperature gradient. We compare the efficiency of these two elements in a semiconductor model. Finally, a direct energy converter are mentioned. (author)

  2. Hydrogen production from fusion reactors coupled with high temperature electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and complement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Processes which may be considered for this purpose include electrolysis, thermochemical decomposition or thermochemical-electrochemical hybrid cycles. Preliminary studies at Brookhaven indicate that high temperature electrolysis has the highest potential efficiency for production of hydrogen from fusion. Depending on design electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60 percent and hydrogen production efficiencies of approximately 50 to 70 percent are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  3. Physics design of an ultra-long pulsed tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Y.; Inoue, N.; Wang, J.; Yamamoto, T.; Okano, K.

    1993-01-01

    A pulsed tokamak reactor driven only by inductive current drive has recently revived, because the non-inductive current drive efficiency seems to be too low to realize a steady-state tokamak reactor with sufficiently high energy gain Q. Essential problems in pulsed operation mode is considered to be material fatigue due to cyclic operation and expensive energy storage system to keep continuous electric output during a dwell time. To overcome these problems, we have proposed an ultra-long pulsed tokamak reactor called IDLT (abbr. Inductively operated Day-Long Tokamak), which has the major and minor radii of 10 m and 1.87 m, respectively, sufficiently to ensure the burning period of about ten hours. Here we discuss physical features of inductively operated tokamak plasmas, employing the similar constraints with ITER CDA design for engineering issues. (author) 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  4. Stress analysis of superconducting magnets for magnetic fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akin, J.E.; Gray, W.H.; Baudry, T.V.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting devices involve several factors that normally are not encountered in the structural analysis of more common systems. Several of these factors ae noted and methods for including them in an analysis are cited. To illustrate the state of the analysis art for superconducting magnets, in magnetic fusion reactors, two specific projects are illustrated. They are the Large Coil Program (LCP) and the Engineering Test Facility (ETF).

  5. Fusion reactor passive safety and ignitor risk-based regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, M.

    1995-01-01

    Passive design features are more reliable than operator action of successful operation of active safety systems. Passive safety has usually been adopted for fission. The achievement of an inventory-based passive safety is difficult if the fusion reactor uses neutronic reactions. Ignitor is a high-magnetic field tokamak designed to study the physics of ignited plasmas. The safety goal for Ignitor is classification as a mobility-based passively safe machine

  6. Design study of blanket structure for tokamak experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    Design study of the blanket structure for JAERI Experimental Fusion Reactor (JXFR) has been carried out. Studied here were fabrication and testing of the blanket structure (blanket cells, blanket rings, piping and blanket modules), assembly and disassembly of the blanket module, and monitering and testing technique. Problems in design and fabrication of the blanket structure could be revealed. Research and development problems for the future were also disclosed. (author)

  7. Performance of the Cascade inertial-confinement-fusion conceptual reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    A 4.5-m-radius rotating fusion reactor made of silicon carbide and containing a moving 1-m-thick lithium-ceramic granular blanket can produce 3000 MW/sub t/. The blanket operates at high temperature (>1200 K) leading to gross plant efficiencies of up to 60% using a combined helium-gas turbine (Brayton cycle) with a vapor bottoming cycle

  8. Hydrogen isotopes transport parameters in fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, E.; Ogorodnikova, O.V.

    1998-01-01

    This work presents a review of hydrogen isotopes-materials interactions in various materials of interest for fusion reactors. The relevant parameters cover mainly diffusivity, solubility, trap concentration and energy difference between trap and solution sites. The list of materials includes the martensitic steels (MANET, Batman and F82H-mod.), beryllium, aluminium, beryllium oxide, aluminium oxide, copper, tungsten and molybdenum. Some experimental work on the parameters that describe the surface effects is also mentioned. (orig.)

  9. Towards the detection of magnetohydrodynamics instabilities in a fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sozzi, Carlo, E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Alessi, E., E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Figini, L., E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Galperti, G., E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Lazzaro, E., E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Marchetto, C., E-mail: sozzi@ifp.cnr.it; Nowak, S. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, CNR, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Milano (Italy); Mosconi, M. [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2014-08-21

    Various active control strategies of the Neoclassical tearing modes are being studied in present tokamaks using established detection techniques which exploit the measurements of the fluctuations of the magnetic field and of the electron temperature. The extrapolation of such techniques to the fusion reactor scale is made problematic by the neutron fluence and by the physics conditions related to the high plasma temperature and density which degrade the spatial resolution of such measurements.

  10. Contributions to the sixth international conference on fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-11-15

    The ICFRM series has documented progress in the field of fusion reactor materials since the first conference held in Tokyo in 1984. The conference series has continually increased its coverage to the point where it now includes the comprehensive range of materials science and technology areas that enable systems designers to meet the needs of current experiments and to present innovative solutions for future energy systems. This publication contains five contributions to the sixth international conference which have each been indexed separately.

  11. Combined development of international nuclear fusion test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Ambassadors of the four most important partners (Common Market, Japan, USA and USSR) in the IAEA sponsored INTOR project, met on the 15 and 16 March 1987 in Vienna under the auspices of the IAEA. A press release was issued acknowledging the considerable technical progress made in magnetic nuclear fusion research. Future design concepts, assistance in research and development work and other activities towards the provision of an international experimental thermonuclear reactor were discussed. (G.T.H.)

  12. Mechanical properties along interfaces of bonded structures in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.H.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    Proper assessment of the mechanical properties along interfaces of bonded structures currently used in many fusion reactor designs is essential to compare the different fabrication techniques. A Mechanical Properties Microprobe (MPM) was used to measure hardness and Young's modules along the interfaces of Be/Cu bonded structure. The MPM was able to distinguish different fabrication techniques by a direct measurement of the hardness, Young's modules, and H/E 2 which reflects the ability of deformation of the interfacial region

  13. Miniature tensile test specimens for fusion reactor irradiation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Three miniature sheet-type tensile specimens and a miniature rod-type specimen are being used to determine irradiated tensile properties for alloy development for fusion reactors. The tensile properties of type 316 stainless steel were determined with these different specimens, and the results were compared. Reasonably good agreement was observed. However, there were differences that led to recommendations on which specimens are preferred. 4 references, 9 figures, 6 tables

  14. Stress analysis of superconducting magnets for magnetic fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, J.E.; Gray, W.H.; Baudry, T.V.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting devices involve several factors that normally are not encountered in the structural analysis of more common systems. Several of these factors ae noted and methods for including them in an analysis are cited. To illustrate the state of the analysis art for superconducting magnets, in magnetic fusion reactors, two specific projects are illustrated. They are the Large Coil Program (LCP) and the Engineering Test Facility

  15. Neutral-beam systems for magnetic-fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    Neutral beams for magnetic fusion reactors are at an early stage of development, and require considerable effort to make them into the large, reliable, and efficient systems needed for future power plants. To optimize their performance to establish specific goals for component development, systematic analysis of the beamlines is essential. Three ion source characteristics are discussed: arc-cathode life, gas efficiency, and beam divergence, and their significance in a high-energy neutral-beam system is evaluated

  16. Limitations of power conversion systems under transient loads and impact on the pulsed tokamak power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, G.T.; Wong, C.P.C.; Kapich, D.D.; McDonald, C.F.; Schleicher, R.W.

    1993-11-01

    The impact of cyclic loading of the power conversion system of a helium-cooled, pulsed tokamak power plant is assessed. Design limits of key components of heat transport systems employing Rankie and Brayton thermodynamic cycles are quantified based on experience in gas-cooled fission reactor design and operation. Cyclic loads due to pulsed tokamak operation are estimated. Expected performance of the steam generator is shown to be incompatible with pulsed tokamak operation without load leveling thermal energy storage. The close cycle gas turbine is evaluated qualitatively based on performance of existing industrial and aeroderivative gas turbines. Advances in key technologies which significantly improve prospects for operation with tokamak fusion plants are reviewed

  17. Neutron dosimetry for radiation damage in fission and fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    The properties of materials subjected to the intense neutron radiation fields characteristic of fission power reactors or proposed fusion energy devices is a field of extensive current research. These investigations seek important information relevant to the safety and economics of nuclear energy. In high-level radiation environments, neutron metrology is accomplished predominantly with passive techniques which require detailed knowledge about many nuclear reactions. The quality of neutron dosimetry has increased noticeably during the past decade owing to the availability of new data and evaluations for both integral and differential cross sections, better quantitative understanding of radioactive decay processes, improvements in radiation detection technology, and the development of reliable spectrum unfolding procedures. However, there are problems caused by the persistence of serious integral-differential discrepancies for several important reactions. There is a need to further develop the data base for exothermic and low-threshold reactions needed in thermal and fast-fission dosimetry, and for high-threshold reactions needed in fusion-energy dosimetry. The unsatisfied data requirements for fission reactor dosimetry appear to be relatively modest and well defined, while the needs for fusion are extensive and less well defined because of the immature state of fusion technology. These various data requirements are examined with the goal of providing suggestions for continued dosimetry-related nuclear data research

  18. Neutronic assessment of strontium-90 transmutation in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parish, T.A.

    1979-01-01

    Transmutation of 90 Sr using fusion neutrons has been suggested as a possible technique for disposing of this waste nuclide. For transmutation to be attractive, high transmutation rates relative to natural decay are required. Effective half-lives for 90 Sr were computed for fusion reactor blankets constructed of various materials. To obtain satisfactory transmutation rates, fusion reactors with high first wall neutron currents and with highly moderating blankets were found to be necessary. An effective half-life for 90 Sr of 90 Sr inventory and the number of burners required for various fission usage scenarios. Efficient and fast chemical separations were needed to reap the benefits of a short effective half-life. For the fusion burners considered, it was found that the 90 Sr inventory could not be reduced to less than one-fourth of the inventory without transmutation if fission usage continued at a constant rate. Such a reduction is not sufficient to justify the transmutation disposal of 90 Sr

  19. High density, high magnetic field concepts for compact fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    One rather discouraging feature of our conventional approaches to fusion energy is that they do not appear to lend themselves to a small reactor for developmental purposes. This is in contrast with the normal evolution of a new technology which typically proceeds to a full scale commercial plant via a set of graduated steps. Accordingly' several concepts concerned with dense plasma fusion systems are being studied theoretically and experimentally. A common aspect is that they employ: (a) high to very high plasma densities (∼10 16 cm -3 to ∼10 26 cm -3 ) and (b) magnetic fields. If they could be shown to be viable at high fusion Q, they could conceivably lead to compact and inexpensive commercial reactors. At least, their compactness suggests that both proof of principle experiments and development costs will be relatively inexpensive compared with the present conventional approaches. In this paper, the following concepts are considered: (1) The staged Z-pinch, (2) Liner implosion of closed-field-line configurations, (3) Magnetic ''fast'' ignition of inertial fusion targets, (4) The continuous flow Z-pinch

  20. Experimental studies of tritium barrier concepts for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroni, V.A.; Van Deventer, E.H.; Renner, T.A.; Pelto, R.H.; Wierdak, C.J.

    1976-01-01

    Ongoing experimental studies at ANL aimed at the development of methods to reduce tritium migration in fusion reactor systems currently include (1) work on the development of multilayered metal composites and impurity-coated refractory metals as barriers to tritium permeation in elevated temperature (greater than 300 0 C) structures and (2) investigations of the kinetics of tritium trapping reactions in inert gas purge streams under conditions that emulate fusion reactor environments. Significant results obtained thus far are (1) demonstration of greater than 50-fold reductions in the hydrogen permeability of stainless steel structures by using stainless steel-clad composites containing an intermediate layer of a selected copper alloy and (2) verification that surface-oxide coatings lead to greater than 100-fold reductions in the hydrogen permeability of vanadium, but that severe oxygen penetration and embrittlement of the vanadium occur at temperatures in the range from 300 to 800 0 C and under conditions of extremely low oxygen potential. Other considerations pertaining to the large-scale use of metal composites in fusion reactors are discussed, and progress in efforts to demonstrate the fabricability of metal composites is reviewed. Also presented are results of studies of the efficiencies of (1) CuO and CuO--MnO 2 beds in converting HT to HTO and (2) magnesium metal beds in converting HTO to HT

  1. Electrical insulator requirements for mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condit, R.H.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    The requirements for mirror fusion electrical insulators are discussed. Insulators will be required at the neutral beam injectors, injector power supplies, direct converters, and superconducting magnets. Insulators placed at the neutral beam injectors will receive the greatest radiation exposure, 10 14 to 10 16 neutrons/m 2 .s and 0.3 to 3 Gy/s (10 5 to 10 6 R/h) of gamma rays, with shielding. Direct converter insulators may receive the highest temperature (up to 1300 0 K), but low voltage holding requirements. Insulators made from organic materials (e.g., plastics) for the magnet coils may be satisfactory. Immediate conductivity increases of all insulators result from gamma irradiation. With an upper limit to gamma flux exposures of 300 Gy/s in a minimally shielded region, the conductivity could reach 10 -6 S/m. Damage from neutron irradiation may not be serious during several years' exposure. Surface changes in ceramics at the neutral beam injector may be serious. The interior of the injector will contain atomic hydrogen, and sputtering may transfer material away from or onto the ceramic insulators. Unknown and potentially damaging interactions between irradiation, electric fields, temperature gradients, cycling of temperature, surface and joint reactions, sputtering, polarization, and electrotransport in the dielectrics are of concern. Materials research to deal with these problems is needed

  2. Transmutation of actinide 237Np with a fusion reactor and a hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, K.M.; Huang, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    The use of fusion reactors to transmute fission reactor wastes to stable species is an attractive concept. In this paper, the feasibility of transmutation of the long-lived actinide radioactive waste Np-237 with a fusion reactor and a hybrid reactor has been investigated. A new waste management concept of burning HLW (High Level Waste), utilizing released energy and converting Np-237 into fissile fuel Pu-239 through transmutation has been adopted. The detailed neutronics and depletion calculation of waste inventories was carried out with a modified version of one-dimensional neutron transport and burnup calculation code system BISON1.5 in this study. The transmutation rate of Np with relationship to neutron wall loading, Pu and Np with relationship to neutron wall load, Pu and Np concentration in the transmutation zone have been explored as well as relevant results are also given

  3. Irradiation devices for fusion reactor materials results obtained from irradiated lithium aluminate at the OSIRIS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, F.; Thevenot, G.; Rasneur, B.; Botter, F.

    1986-06-01

    Studies about controlled fusion reactor of the Tokamak type require the examination of the radiation effects on the behaviour of various potential materials. Thus, in the first part of this paper, are presented the devices adapted to these materials studies and used in the OSIRIS reactor. In a second part, is described an experiment of irradiation ceramics used as candidates for breeding material and are given the first results

  4. Characteristics of irradiation creep in the first wall of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coghlan, W.A.; Mansur, L.K.

    1981-01-01

    A number of significant differences in the irradiation environment of a fusion reactor are expected with respect to the fission reactor irradiation environment. These differences are expected to affect the characteristics of irradiation creep in the fusion reactor. Special conditions of importance are identified as the (1) large number of defects produced per pka, (2) high helium production rate, (3) cyclic operation, (4) unique stress histories, and (5) low temperature operations. Existing experimental data from the fission reactor environment is analyzed to shed light on irradiation creep under fusion conditions. Theoretical considerations are used to deduce additional characteristics of irradiation creep in the fusion reactor environment for which no experimental data are available

  5. Fusion reactor development using high power particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The present paper outlines major applications of the ion source/accelerator to fusion research and also addresses the present status and future plans for accelerator development. Applications of ion sources/accelerators for fusion research are discussed first, focusing on plasma heating, plasma current drive, plasma current profile control, and plasma diagnostics. The present status and future plan of ion sources/accelerators development are then described focusing on the features of existing and future tokamak equipment. Positive-ion-based NBI systems of 100 keV class have contributed to obtaining high temperature plasmas whose parameters are close to the fusion break-even condition. For the next tokamak fusion devices, a MeV class high power neutral beam injector, which will be used to obtain a steady state burning plasma, is considered to become the primary heating and current drive system. Development of such a system is a key to realize nuclear fusion reactor. It will be entirely indebted to the development of a MeV class high current negative deuterium ion source/accelerator. (N.K.)

  6. Energy balance and efficiency of power stations with a pulsed Tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davenport, P.A.; Mitchell, J.T.D.; Darvas, J.; Foerster, S.; Sack, B.

    1976-06-01

    The energy balance of a fusion power station based on the TOKAMAK concept is examined with the aid of a model comprising three distinct elements: the reactor, the energy converter and the reactor operation equipment. The efficiency of each element is expressed in terms of the various energy flows and the product of these efficiencies gives the net station efficiency. The analysis takes account of pulsed operation and has general applicability. Numerical values for the net station efficiency are derived from detailed estimates of the energy flows for a TOKAMAK reactor and its auxiliary equipment operating with advanced energy converters. The derivation of these estimates is given in eleven appendices. The calculated station efficiencies span ranges similar to those quoted for the current generation of fission reactors, though lower than those predicted for HTGR and LMFBR stations. Credible parameter domains for pulsed TOKAMAK operation are firmly delineated and factors inimical to improved performance are indicated. It is concluded that the net thermal efficiency of a TOKAMAK reactor power station based on present designs and using advanced thermal converters will be approximately 0.3 and is unlikely to exceed 0.33. (orig.) [de

  7. Fuel and helium confinement in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    An expanded macroscopic model for particle confinement is used to investigate both fuel and helium confinement in reactor plasmas. The authors illustrate the relative effects of external sources of fuel, divertor pumping, and wall and divertory recycle on core, edge and scrape-off layer densities by using separate particle confinement times for open-quote core close-quote fueling (deep pellet or beam penetration, τ c ), open-quote shallow close-quote fueling (shallow pellet penetration or neutral atoms that penetrate the scrape-off layer, τ s ) and fueling in the scrape-off layer (τ sol ). Because τ s is determined by the parallel flow velocity and characteristic distance to the divertor plate, it can be orders of magnitude lower than either τ c or τ sol . A dense scrape-off region, desirable for reduced divertor erosion, leads to a high fraction of the recycled neutrals being ionized in the scrape-off region and poor core fueling efficiency. The overall fueling efficiency can then be dramatically improved with either shallow or deep auxillary fueling. Helium recycle is nearly always coupled to the scrape-off region and does not lead to strong core accumulation unless the helium pumping efficiency is much less than the fuel pumping efficiency, or the plasma preferentially retains helium over hydrogenic ions. Differences between the results of this model, single-τ p macroscopic models, and 1-D and 2-D models are discussed in terms of assumptions and boundary conditions

  8. Neutron streaming evaluation for the DREAM fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Yasushi; Nishio, Satoshi; Ueda, Shuzo; Kurihara, Ryoichi

    2000-01-01

    Aiming at high degree of safety and benign environmental effect, we have proposed a tokamak fusion reactor concept called DREAM, which stands for DRastically EAsy Maintenance Reactor. The blanket structure of the reactor is made from very low activation SiC/SiC composites and cooled by non-reactive helium gas. High net thermal efficiency of about 50% is realized by 900 C helium gas and high plant availability is possible with simple maintenance scheme. In the DREAM Reactor, neutron streaming is a big problem because cooling pipes with diameter larger than 80 cm are used for blanket heat removal. Neutron streaming through the cooling pipes could cause hot spots in the superconducting magnets adjacent to the cooling pipes to shorten the magnet lifetime or increase cryogenic cooling requirement. Neutron streaming could also activate components such as gas turbine further away from the fusion plasma. The effect of neutron streaming through the helium cooling pipes was evaluated for the two types of cooling pipe extraction scheme. The result of a preliminary calculation indicates the gas turbine activation prohibits personnel access in the case of inboard pipe extraction while with additional shielding measures, limited contact maintenance is possible in the case of outboard extraction. (author)

  9. Metrology/viewing system for next generation fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Barry, R.E.; Chesser, J.B.; Menon, M.M.; Dagher, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Next generation fusion reactors require accurate measuring systems to verify sub-millimeter alignment of plasma-facing components in the reactor vessel. A metrology system capable of achieving such accuracy must be compatible with the vessel environment of high gamma radiation, high vacuum, elevated temperature, and magnetic field. This environment requires that the system must be remotely deployed. A coherent, frequency modulated laser radar system is being integrated with a remotely operated deployment system to meet these requirements. The metrology/viewing system consists of a compact laser transceiver optics module which is linked through fiber optics to the laser source and imaging units that are located outside of the harsh environment. The deployment mechanism is a telescopic-mast positioning system. This paper identifies the requirements for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor metrology and viewing system, and describes a remotely operated precision ranging and surface mapping system

  10. Conceptual design study of fusion experimental reactor (FY86 FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Ryusei; Kashihara, Shin-ichiro; Itoh, Shin-ichi

    1987-08-01

    This report describes the results of conceptual design study on plant systems for the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FY86 FER). Design studies for FER plant systems have been continued from FY85, especially for design modifications made in accordance with revisions of plasma scaling parameters and system improvements. This report describes 1) system construction, 2) site and reactor building plan, 3) repaire and maintenance system, 4) tritium circulation system, 5) heating, ventilation and air conditioning system, 6) tritium clean-up system, 7) cooling and baking system, 8) waste treatment and storage system, 9) control system, 10) electric power system, 11) site factory plan, all of which are a part of FY86 design work. The plant systems described in this report generally have been based on the FY86 FER (ACS Reactor) which is an one of the six candidates for FER. (author)

  11. Liquid jet experiments: relevance to inertial confinement fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    In order to try to find a reactor design which offered protection against neutron damage, studies were undertaken at LLNL (the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) of self-healing, renewable liquid-wall reactor concepts. In conjuction with these studies, were done a seris of small-scale aer jet experiments were done over the past several years at UCD (University of California, Davis Campus) to simulate the behavior of liquid lithium (or lithium-lead) jets in these liquid-wall fusion reactor concepts. Extropolating the results of these small-scale experiments to the large-scale lithium jets, tentatively concluded that the lithium jet can be re-established after the microexplosion, and with careful design the jets should not breakup due to instabilities during the relatively quiscent period between MICROEXPLOSIONS

  12. A conceptual design of LIB fusion reactor: UTLIF(2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madarame, Haruki; Kondo, Shunsuke; Iwata, Shuichi; Oka, Yoshiaki; Miya, Kenzo.

    1984-01-01

    UTLIF(2) is a conceptual design study on a light ion beam driven fusion reactor based on a concept of rod-bundle blanket. Survivability and maintainability of the first wall and the blanket are regarded as of major importance in the design. The blanket rod is composed of a thick tube which has enough stiffness, a thin wrapping wall which receives high heat flux, and liquid lithium which breeds tritium and removes generated heat. The rod can be pulled out from the outside of the reactor vessel, hence the replacement is very easy. Nuclear and thermal analysis have been made and the performance of the reactor has been shown to be satisfactory. (author)

  13. Material options for a commercial fusion reactor first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabiri, A.E.

    1986-05-01

    A study has been conducted to evaluate the potential of various materials for use as first walls in high-power-density commercial fusion reactors. Operating limits for each material were obtained based on a number of criteria, including maximum allowable structural temperatures, critical heat flux, ultimate tensile strength, and design-allowable stress. The results with water as a coolant indicate that a modified alloy similar to HT-9 may be a suitable candidate for low- and medium-power-density reactor first walls with neutron loads of up to 6 MW/m 2 . A vanadium or copper alloy must be used for high-power-density reactors. The neutron wall load limit for vanadium alloys is about 14 MW 2 , provided a suitable coating material is chosen. The extremely limited data base for radiation effects hinders any quantitative assessment of the limits for copper alloys

  14. The mechanical performance of the fusion reactor first wall. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daenner, W.; Raeder, J.

    1977-03-01

    While the first part of this report was concerned with the steady-state mechanical analysis of the fusion reactor first wall, this part deals with the analysis based upon pulsed load conditions. In a first section we elaborate various solutions of the non-stationary heat conduction problem in plane geometry capable of describing the temperature response of the wall due to characteristic plasma pulse sequences. these solutions are input to a quasi-steady-state stress and strain analysis. Finally, the results of this analysis are set in relation to the fatigue properties of the wall material. A further section presents a description of a computer program which uses the mathematical procedure described. The results of some test runs are followed by those of detailed parameter studies. In the course of these calculations the influences of a number of design and operational quantities of a fusion reactor were investigated. It turned out that the choice of wall thickness and wall loading are of predominant importance for the first wall fatigue life. (orig.) [de

  15. Calculation of neutron and gamma ray energy spectra for fusion reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1980-08-01

    Integral experiments that measure the transport of approx. 14 MeV D-T neutrons through laminated slabs of proposed fusion reactor shield materials have been carried out. Measured and calculated neutron and gamma ray energy spectra are compared as a function of the thickness and composition of stainless steel type 304, borated polyethylene, and Hevimet (a tungsten alloy), and as a function of detector position behind these materials. The measured data were obtained using a NE-213 liquid scintillator using pulse-shape discrimination methods to resolve neutron and gamma ray pulse height data and spectral unfolding methods to convert these data to energy spectra. The calculated data were obtained using two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport methods in a complex calculational network that takes into account the energy-angle dependence of the D-T neutrons and the nonphysical anomalies of the S/sub n/ method

  16. Repair welding of fusion reactor components. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, B.A.; Wang, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The exposure of metallic materials, such as structural components of the first wall and blanket of a fusion reactor, to neutron irradiation will induce changes in both the material composition and microstructure. Along with these changes can come a corresponding deterioration in mechanical properties resulting in premature failure. It is, therefore, essential to expect that the repair and replacement of the degraded components will be necessary. Such repairs may require the joining of irradiated materials through the use of fusion welding processes. The present ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) conceptual design is anticipated to have about 5 km of longitudinal welds and ten thousand pipe butt welds in the blanket structure. A recent study by Buende et al. predict that a failure is most likely to occur in a weld. The study is based on data from other large structures, particularly nuclear reactors. The data used also appear to be consistent with the operating experience of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This reactor has a fuel pin area comparable with the area of the ITER first wall and has experienced one unanticipated fuel pin failure after two years of operation. The repair of irradiated structures using fusion welding will be difficult due to the entrapped helium. Due to its extremely low solubility in metals, helium will diffuse and agglomerate to form helium bubbles after being trapped at point defects, dislocations, and grain boundaries. Welding of neutron-irradiated type 304 stainless steels has been reported with varying degree of heat-affected zone cracking (HAZ). The objectives of this study were to determine the threshold helium concentrations required to cause HAZ cracking and to investigate techniques that might be used to eliminate the HAZ cracking in welding of helium-containing materials

  17. Activation and Radiation Damage Behaviour of Russian Structural Materials for Fusion Reactors in the Fission and Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokhin, A.; Demin, N.; Chernov, V.; Leonteva-Smirnova, M.; Potapenko, M.

    2006-01-01

    Various structural low (reduced) activated materials have been proposed as a candidate for the first walls-blankets of fusion reactors. One of the main problems connected with using these materials - to minimise the production of long-lived radionuclides from nuclear transmutations and to provide with good technological and functional properties. The selection of materials and their metallurgical and fabrication technologies for fusion reactor components is influenced by this factor. Accurate prediction of induced radioactivity is necessary for the development of the fusion reactor materials. Low activated V-Ti-Cr alloys and reduced activated ferritic-martensitic steels are a leading candidate material for fusion first wall and blanket applications. At the present time a range of compositions and an impurity level are still being investigated to better understand the sensitive of various functional and activation properties to small compositional variations and impurity level. For the two types of materials mentioned above (V-Ti-Cr alloys and 9-12 % Cr f/m steels) and manufactured in Russia (Russia technologies) the analysis of induced activity, hydrogen and helium-production as well as the accumulation of such elements as C, N, O, P, S, Zn and Sn as a function of irradiation time was performed. Materials '' were irradiated '' by fission (BN-600, BOR-60) and fusion (Russian DEMO-C Reactor Project) typical neutron spectra with neutron fluency up to 10 22 n/cm 2 and the cooling time up to 1000 years. The calculations of the transmutation of elements and the induced radioactivity were carried out using the FISPACT inventory code, and the different activation cross-section libraries like the ACDAM, FENDL-2/A and the decay data library FENDL-2/D. It was shown that the level of impurities controls a long-term behaviour of induced activity and contact dose rate for materials. From this analysis the concentration limits of impurities were obtained. The generation of gas

  18. A remote maintenance robot system for a pulsed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thunborg, S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a remote maintenance robot system for use in a hazardous environment. The system consists of turntable, robot and hoist subsystems which operate under the control of a supervisory computer to perform coordinated programmed maintenance operations on a pulsed nuclear reactor. The system is operational

  19. New tritium monitor for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    At DT-fueled fusion reactors, there will be a need for tritium monitors that can simultaneously measure in real time the concentrations of HTO, HT and the activated air produced by fusion neutrons. Such a monitor has been developed, tested and delivered to the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for use at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). It uses semipermeable membranes to achieve the removal of HTO from the sampled air for monitoring and a catalyst to convert the HT to HTO, also for removal and monitoring. The remaining air, devoid of tritium, is routed to a third detector for monitoring the activated air. The sensitivities are those that would be expected from tritium instruments employing conventional flow-through ionization chambers: 1 to 3 μCi/m 3 . Its discriminating ability is approximately 10 -3 for any of the three components (HTO, HT and activated air) in any of the other two channels. For instance, the concentration of HT in the HTO channel is 10 -3 times its original concentration in the sampled air. This will meet the needs of TFTR

  20. Reactor potential of the magnetically insulated inertial fusion (MICF) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kammash, T.; Galbraith, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Magnetically Insulated Inertial Confinement Fusion (MICF) scheme is examined with regard to its potential as a power-producing reactor. This approach combines the favorable aspects of both magnetic and inertial fusions in that physical containment of the plasma is provided by a metallic shell while thermal insulation of its energy is provided by a strong, self-generated magnetic field. The plasma is created at the core of the target as a result of irradiation of the fuel-coated inner surface by a laser beam that enters through a hole in the spherical shell. The instantaneous magnetic field is generated by the current loops formed by the laser-heated, laser-ablated electrons, and preliminary experimental results at Osaka University have confirmed the presence of such a field. These same experiments have also yielded a Lawson parameter of about 5x10 12 cm -3 sec, and because of these unique properties, the plasma lifetimes in MICF have been shown to be about two orders of magnitude longer than conventional, pusher type inertial fusion schemes. In this paper a quasi one dimensional, time dependent set of particle and energy balance equations for the thermal species, namely, electrons, ions and thermal alphas which also allows for an appropriate set of fast alpha groups is utilized to assess the reactor prospects of a DT-burning MICF system. (author) [pt