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Sample records for pulse-compressing ion accelerator

  1. Developing The Physics Desing for NDCS-II, A Unique Pulse-Compressing Ion Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J -; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-09-24

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (a collaboration of LBNL, LLNL, and PPPL) is using intense ion beams to heat thin foils to the 'warm dense matter' regime at {approx}< 1 eV, and is developing capabilities for studying target physics relevant to ion-driven inertial fusion energy. The need for rapid target heating led to the development of plasma-neutralized pulse compression, with current amplification factors exceeding 50 now routine on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX). Construction of an improved platform, NDCX-II, has begun at LBNL with planned completion in 2012. Using refurbished induction cells from the Advanced Test Accelerator at LLNL, NDCX-II will compress a {approx}500 ns pulse of Li{sup +} ions to {approx} 1 ns while accelerating it to 3-4 MeV over {approx} 15 m. Strong space charge forces are incorporated into the machine design at a fundamental level. We are using analysis, an interactive 1D PIC code (ASP) with optimizing capabilities and centroid tracking, and multi-dimensional Warpcode PIC simulations, to develop the NDCX-II accelerator. This paper describes the computational models employed, and the resulting physics design for the accelerator.

  2. Possibility of Ion Beam Pulse Compression by X-Ray Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Takashi

    1985-02-01

    A previously proposed scheme for ion beam pulse compression is reexamined from a different viewpoint. It is shown that the criticisms made by Unterseer and Meyer-ter-Vehn are not reasonable in a real target configuration. In addition, the spherically converging effect is shown to offer further advantages.

  3. Application of magnetic pulse compression to the grid system of the ETA/ATA accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birx, D.L.; Cook, E.G.; Reginato, L.L.; Schmidt, J.A.; Smith, M.W.

    1982-11-02

    During the past year, several magnetic pulse compression systems have been built and applied to the ETA accelerator. In view of their excellent performance, a non-linear magnetic system has been adopted for the ATA grid drive in place of the spark gap driven Blumlein. The magnetic system will give us a much higher reliability and greater flexibility by being independent of the high pressure gas blown system. A further advantage of this system will be the capability of achieving higher rep-rates in case of a future upgrade. System design and performance under burst mode will be described.

  4. Radio frequency pulse compression experiments at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Spalek, G.; Wilson, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed future positron-electron linear colliders would be capable of investigating fundamental processes of interest in the 0.5--5 TeV beam-energy range. At the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) gradient of about 20 MV/m this would imply prohibitive lengths of about 50--250 kilometers per linac. We can reduce the length by increasing the gradient but this implies high peak power, on the order of 400-- to 1000-MW at X-Band. One possible way to generate high peak power is to generate a relatively long pulse at a relatively low power and compress it into a short pulse with higher peak power. It is possible to compress before DC to RF conversion, as is done using magnetic switching for induction linacs, or after DC to RF conversion, as is done for the SLC. Using RF pulse compression it is possible to boost the 50-- to 100-MW output that has already been obtained from high-power X-Band klystrons the levels required by the linear colliders. In this note only radio frequency pulse compression (RFPC) is considered.

  5. Beam dynamics analysis in pulse compression using electron beam compact simulator for Heavy Ion Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Takashi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In a final stage of an accelerator system for heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF, pulse shaping and beam current increase by bunch compression are required for effective pellet implosion. A compact simulator with an electron beam was constructed to understand the beam dynamics. In this study, we investigate theoretically and numerically the beam dynamics for the extreme bunch compression in the final stage of HIF accelerator complex. The theoretical and numerical results implied that the compact experimental device simulates the beam dynamics around the stagnation point for initial low temperature condition.

  6. Short-pulse, compressed ion beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.; Davidson, R. C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D.; Ji, Q.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Persaud, A.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.

    2016-05-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted on the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynamics of radiation-induced damage in materials with pump-probe experiments, and to stabilize novel metastable phases of materials when short-pulse heating is followed by rapid quenching. First experiments used a lithium ion source; a new plasma-based helium ion source shows much greater charge delivered to the target.

  7. Short-Pulse, Compressed Ion Beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Seidl, Peter A; Davidson, Ronald C; Friedman, Alex; Gilson, Erik P; Grote, David; Ji, Qing; Kaganovich, I D; Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L; Schenkel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted on the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynam...

  8. RF pulse compression for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1995-05-01

    Future (nonsuperconducting) linear colliders will require very high values of peak rf power per meter of accelerating structure. The role of rf pulse compression in producing this power is examined within the context of overall rf system design for three future colliders at energies of 1.0--1.5 TeV, 5 TeV and 25 TeV. In order keep the average AC input power and the length of the accelerator within reasonable limits, a collider in the 1.0--1.5 TeV energy range will probably be built at an x-band rf frequency, and will require a peak power on the order of 150--200 MW per meter of accelerating structure. A 5 TeV collider at 34 GHz with a reasonable length (35 km) and AC input power (225 MW) would require about 550 MW per meter of structure. Two-beam accelerators can achieve peak powers of this order by applying dc pulse compression techniques (induction linac modules) to produce the drive beam. Klystron-driven colliders achieve high peak power by a combination of dc pulse compression (modulators) and rf pulse compression, with about the same overall rf system efficiency (30--40%) as a two-beam collider. A high gain (6.8) three-stage binary pulse compression system with high efficiency (80%) is described, which (compared to a SLED-11 system) can be used to reduce the klystron peak power by about a factor of two, or alternately, to cut the number of klystrons in half for a 1.0--1.5 TeV x-band collider. For a 5 TeV klystron-driven collider, a high gain, high efficiency rf pulse compression system is essential.

  9. Progress at SLAC on high-power rf pulse compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, P.B.; Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Nantista, C.; Ruth, R.D. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kroll, N.M. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)]|[California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-06-01

    Rf pulse compression is a technique for augmenting the peak power output of a klystron (typically 50--100 MW) to obtain the high peak power required to drive a linear collider at a high accelerating gradient (typically 200 MW/m is required for a gradient of 100 MV/m). The SLED pulse compression system, with a power gain of about 2.6, has been operational on the SLAC linac for more than a decade. Recently, a binary pulse-compression system with a power gain of about 5.2 has been tested up to an output power of 120 MW. Further high-power tests are in progress. Our current effort is focused on prototyping a so-called SLED-II pulse-compression system with a power gain of four. Over-moded TE{sub 01}-mode circular waveguide components, some with novel technical features, are used to reduce losses at the 11.4-GHz operating frequency.

  10. Progress at SLAC on high-power rf pulse compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, P.B.; Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Nantista, C.; Ruth, R.D. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Kroll, N.M. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States) California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1992-06-01

    Rf pulse compression is a technique for augmenting the peak power output of a klystron (typically 50--100 MW) to obtain the high peak power required to drive a linear collider at a high accelerating gradient (typically 200 MW/m is required for a gradient of 100 MV/m). The SLED pulse compression system, with a power gain of about 2.6, has been operational on the SLAC linac for more than a decade. Recently, a binary pulse-compression system with a power gain of about 5.2 has been tested up to an output power of 120 MW. Further high-power tests are in progress. Our current effort is focused on prototyping a so-called SLED-II pulse-compression system with a power gain of four. Over-moded TE[sub 01]-mode circular waveguide components, some with novel technical features, are used to reduce losses at the 11.4-GHz operating frequency.

  11. Pulse Compression Technique of Radio Fuze

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiu-juan; DENG Jia-hao; SANG Hui-ping

    2006-01-01

    The advantages of using phase-coded pulse compression technique for radio fuze systems are evaluated. With building mathematical models a matched filter has be en implemented successfully. Various simulations for pulse compression waveform coding were done to evaluate the performance of fuze system under noisy environment. The results of the simulation and the data analysis show that the phase-coded pulse compression gets a good result in the signal identification of the radio fuze with matched filter. Simultaneously, a suitable sidelobe suppression filter is established by simulation, the suppressed sidelobe level is acceptable to radio fuze application.

  12. Evolution Strategies for Laser Pulse Compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monmarché, Nicolas; Fanciulli, Riccardo; Willmes, Lars; Talbi, El-Ghazali; Savolainen, Janne; Collet, Pierre; Schoenauer, Marc; van der Walle, P.; Lutton, Evelyne; Back, Thomas; Herek, Jennifer Lynn

    2008-01-01

    This study describes first steps taken to bring evolutionary optimization technology from computer simulations to real world experimentation in physics laboratories. The approach taken considers a well understood Laser Pulse Compression problem accessible both to simulation and laboratory experiment

  13. Binary rf pulse compression experiment at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavine, T.L.; Spalek, G.; Farkas, Z.D.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    Using rf pulse compression it will be possible to boost the 50- to 100-MW output expected from high-power microwave tubes operating in the 10- to 20-GHz frequency range, to the 300- to 1000-MW level required by the next generation of high-gradient linacs for linear for linear colliders. A high-power X-band three-stage binary rf pulse compressor has been implemented and operated at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In each of three successive stages, the rf pulse-length is compressed by half, and the peak power is approximately doubled. The experimental results presented here have been obtained at low-power (1-kW) and high-power (15-MW) input levels in initial testing with a TWT and a klystron. Rf pulses initially 770 nsec long have been compressed to 60 nsec. Peak power gains of 1.8 per stage, and 5.5 for three stages, have been measured. This corresponds to a peak power compression efficiency of about 90% per stage, or about 70% for three stages, consistent with the individual component losses. The principle of operation of a binary pulse compressor (BPC) is described in detail elsewhere. We recently have implemented and operated at SLAC a high-power (high-vacuum) three-stage X-band BPC. First results from the high-power three-stage BPC experiment are reported here.

  14. Bucharest heavy ion accelerator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceausescu, V.; Dobrescu, S.; Duma, M.; Indreas, G.; Ivascu, M.; Papureanu, S.; Pascovici, G.; Semenescu, G.

    1986-02-15

    The heavy ion accelerator facility of the Heavy Ion Physics Department at the Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering in Bucharest is described. The Tandem accelerator development and the operation of the first stage of the heavy ion postaccelerating system are discussed. Details are given concerning the resonance cavities, the pulsing system matching the dc beam to the RF cavities and the computer control system.

  15. Observations of Collective Ion Acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    possible benefit can be listed. In cancer therapy, radiation produced by ion beams may be more selectively directed into tumors. Ion beams in spallation...34Autoresonant Accelerator Concept," Phys. Rev. Lett. 31, 1234 (1973). 50. S. Humphries, J. J. Lee, and R. N. Sudan, "Generation of Incense Pulsed Ion Beams

  16. The Toledo heavy ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haar, R.R. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Beideck, D.J. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Curtis, L.J. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Kvale, T.J. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Sen, A. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Schectman, R.M. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)); Stevens, H.W. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States))

    1993-06-01

    The recently installed 330 kV electrostatic positive ion accelerator at the University of Toledo is described. Experiments have been performed using ions ranging from H[sup +] to Hg[sup 2+] and exotic molecules such as HeH[sup +]. Most of these experiments involve the beam-foil studies of the lifetimes of excited atomic states and the apparatus used for these experiments is also described. Another beamline is available for ion-implantation. The Toledo heavy ion accelerator facility welcomes outside users. (orig.)

  17. Collective Ion Acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Bostick, Appl. Phys. Lett. 35, 296 (1979). 3. S. Humphries, R.N. Sudan, and IV. Condit, Appl. Phys. Lett. 26, 667 (1975). 4. D.S. Prono , J.M. Creedon, I...and to provide a good ion depenently by Creedon, Smith, and Prono ." In both source at the second anode A2. The ion flux from the of these approaches...and Ion Beam Research and Technology, (Ith- Let. 37, 1236 (1977). ac, New York,1977), Vol. 11, p. 819. 72. D. S. Prono , J. W. Shearer, and X J. Briggs

  18. High reflection mirrors for pulse compression gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmier, S; Neauport, J; Baclet, N; Lavastre, E; Dupuy, G

    2009-10-26

    We report an experimental investigation of high reflection mirrors used to fabricate gratings for pulse compression application at the wavelength of 1.053microm. Two kinds of mirrors are studied: the mixed Metal MultiLayer Dielectric (MMLD) mirrors which combine a gold metal layer with some e-beam evaporated dielectric bilayers on the top and the standard e-beam evaporated MultiLayer Dielectric (MLD) mirrors. Various samples were manufactured, damage tested at a pulse duration of 500fs. Damage sites were subsequently observed by means of Nomarski microscopy and white light interferometer microscopy. The comparison of the results evidences that if MMLD design can offer damage performances rather similar to MLD design, it also exhibits lower stresses; being thus an optimal mirror substrate for a pulse compression grating operating under vacuum.

  19. A high-power SLED 2 pulse compression system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroll, N.M. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Ruth, R.D.; Wilson, P.B. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nantista, C. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-03-01

    The enhancement of peak power by means of RF pulse compression has found important application for driving high energy electron linacs, the SLAC linac in particular. The SLAC Energy Doubler (SLED), however, yields a pulse shape in the form of a decaying exponential which limits the applicability of the method. Two methods of improving this situation have been suggested: binary pulse compression (BPC), in which the pulse is compressed by successive factors of two, and SLED II in which the pair of resonant cavities of SLED are replaced by long resonant delay lines (typically waveguides). Intermediate schemes in which the cavity pair is replaced by sequences of coupled cavities have also been considered. In this paper we describe our efforts towards the design and construction of high-power SLED II systems, which are intended to provide drivers for various advanced accelerator test facilities and potentially for the Next Linear Collider itself. The design path we have chosen requires the development of a number of microwave components in overmoded waveguide, and the bulk of this paper will be devoted to reporting our progress.

  20. International magnetic pulse compression workshop: (Proceedings)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirbie, H.C.; Newton, M.A.; Siemens, P.D.

    1991-04-01

    A few individuals have tried to broaden the understanding of specific and salient pulsed-power topics. One such attempt is this documentation of a workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation), affording a truly international perspective by its participants under the initiative and leadership of Hugh Kirbie and Mark Newton of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and supported by other interested organizations. During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card--its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  1. High-power rf pulse compression with SLED-II at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nantista, C. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kroll, N.M. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Ruth, R.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Increasing the peak rf power available from X-band microwave tubes by means of rf pulse compression is envisioned as a way of achieving the few-hundred-megawatt power levels needed to drive a next-generation linear collider with 50--100 MW klystrons. SLED-II is a method of pulse compression similar in principal to the SLED method currently in use on the SLC and the LEP injector linac. It utilizes low-los resonant delay lines in place of the storage cavities of the latter. This produces the added benefit of a flat-topped output pulse. At SLAC, we have designed and constructed a prototype SLED-II pulse-compression system which operates in the circular TE{sub 01} mode. It includes a circular-guide 3-dB coupler and other novel components. Low-power and initial high-power tests have been made, yielding a peak power multiplication of 4.8 at an efficiency of 40%. The system will be used in providing power for structure tests in the ASTA (Accelerator Structures Test Area) bunker. An upgraded second prototype will have improved efficiency and will serve as a model for the pulse compression system of the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator).

  2. High-power rf pulse compression with SLED-II at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nantista, C. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kroll, N.M. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Ruth, R.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Increasing the peak rf power available from X-band microwave tubes by means of rf pulse compression is envisioned as a way of achieving the few-hundred-megawatt power levels needed to drive a next-generation linear collider with 50--100 MW klystrons. SLED-II is a method of pulse compression similar in principal to the SLED method currently in use on the SLC and the LEP injector linac. It utilizes low-los resonant delay lines in place of the storage cavities of the latter. This produces the added benefit of a flat-topped output pulse. At SLAC, we have designed and constructed a prototype SLED-II pulse-compression system which operates in the circular TE{sub 01} mode. It includes a circular-guide 3-dB coupler and other novel components. Low-power and initial high-power tests have been made, yielding a peak power multiplication of 4.8 at an efficiency of 40%. The system will be used in providing power for structure tests in the ASTA (Accelerator Structures Test Area) bunker. An upgraded second prototype will have improved efficiency and will serve as a model for the pulse compression system of the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator).

  3. Using electric fields for pulse compression and group velocity control

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Qian; Thuresson, Axel; Rippe, Lars; Kröll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we experimentally demonstrate a new way of controlling the group velocity of an optical pulse by using a combination of spectral hole burning, slow light effect and linear Stark effect in a rare-earth-ion-doped crystal. The group velocity can be changed continuously by a factor of 20 without significant pulse distortion or absorption of the pulse energy. With a similar technique, an optical pulse can also be compressed in time. Theoretical simulations were developed to simulate the group velocity control and the pulse compression processes. The group velocity as well as the pulse reshaping are solely controlled by external voltages which makes it promising in quantum information and quantum communication processes. It is also proposed that the group velocity can be changed even more in an Er doped crystal while at the same time having a transmission band matching the telecommunication wavelength.

  4. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; George, E.V.; Miller, J.L.; Krupke, W.F.

    1993-11-09

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

  5. High-Power Multimode X-Band RF Pulse Compression System for Future Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Pearson, C.; Nelson, J.; Jobe, K.; Chan, J.; Fant, K.; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Atkinson, D.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2005-08-10

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  6. Compact RF ion source for industrial electrostatic ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Jung, E-mail: hjkwon@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Il; Cho, Yong-Sub [Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Gyeongsangbukdo 38180 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex is developing a single-ended electrostatic ion accelerator to irradiate gaseous ions, such as hydrogen and nitrogen, on materials for industrial applications. ELV type high voltage power supply has been selected. Because of the limited space, electrical power, and robust operation, a 200 MHz RF ion source has been developed. In this paper, the accelerator system, test stand of the ion source, and its test results are described.

  7. Controllability of intense-laser ion acceleration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shigeo; Kawata; Toshihiro; Nagashima; Masahiro; Takano; Takeshi; Izumiyama; Daiki; Kamiyama; Daisuke; Barada; Qing; Kong; Yan; Jun; Gu; Ping; Xiao; Wang; Yan; Yun; Ma; Wei; Ming; Wang; Wu; Zhang; Jiang; Xie; Huiran; Zhang; Dongbo; Dai

    2014-01-01

    An ion beam has the unique feature of being able to deposit its main energy inside a human body to kill cancer cells or inside material. However, conventional ion accelerators tend to be huge in size and cost. In this paper, a future intenselaser ion accelerator is discussed to make the laser-based ion accelerator compact and controllable. The issues in the laser ion accelerator include the energy efficiency from the laser to the ions, the ion beam collimation, the ion energy spectrum control, the ion beam bunching, and the ion particle energy control. In the study, each component is designed to control the ion beam quality by particle simulations. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical-density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching are successfully realized by a multi-stage laser–target interaction.

  8. Pulse Compression And Raman Amplification In Optical Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Kevin C.

    1988-06-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on Raman amplification in fibres have been carried out and simultaneous amplification and pulse compression observed. With a fibre design optimised for amplification high gain may be obtained at practical pump power levels.

  9. Pulse-compression ghost imaging lidar via coherent detection

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Chenjin; Han, Shensheng

    2016-01-01

    Ghost imaging (GI) lidar, as a novel remote sensing technique,has been receiving increasing interest in recent years. By combining pulse-compression technique and coherent detection with GI, we propose a new lidar system called pulse-compression GI lidar. Our analytical results, which are backed up by numerical simulations, demonstrate that pulse-compression GI lidar can obtain the target's spatial intensity distribution, range and moving velocity. Compared with conventional pulsed GI lidar system, pulse-compression GI lidar, without decreasing the range resolution, is easy to obtain high single pulse energy with the use of a long pulse, and the mechanism of coherent detection can eliminate the influence of the stray light, which can dramatically improve the detection sensitivity and detection range.

  10. Pulse-compression ghost imaging lidar via coherent detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chenjin; Gong, Wenlin; Han, Shensheng

    2016-11-14

    Ghost imaging (GI) lidar, as a novel remote sensing technique, has been receiving increasing interest in recent years. By combining pulse-compression technique and coherent detection with GI, we propose a new lidar system called pulse-compression GI lidar. Our analytical results, which are backed up by numerical simulations, demonstrate that pulse-compression GI lidar can obtain the target's spatial intensity distribution, range and moving velocity. Compared with conventional pulsed GI lidar system, pulse-compression GI lidar, without decreasing the range resolution, is easy to obtain high single pulse energy with the use of a long pulse, and the mechanism of coherent detection can eliminate the influence of the stray light, which is helpful to improve the detection sensitivity and detection range.

  11. The Pulse Line Ion Accelerator Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Richard J.

    2006-02-15

    The Pulse Line Ion Accelerator concept was motivated by the desire for an inexpensive way to accelerate intense short pulse heavy ion beams to regimes of interest for studies of High Energy Density Physics and Warm Dense Matter. A pulse power driver applied at one end of a helical pulse line creates a traveling wave pulse that accelerates and axially confines the heavy ion beam pulse. Acceleration scenarios with constant parameter helical lines are described which result in output energies of a single stage much larger than the several hundred kilovolt peak voltages on the line, with a goal of 3-5 MeV/meter acceleration gradients. The concept might be described crudely as an ''air core'' induction linac where the PFN is integrated into the beam line so the accelerating voltage pulse can move along with the ions to get voltage multiplication.

  12. Laser ion acceleration for hadron therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Wilkens, J. J.; Esirkepov, T. Zh; Korn, G.; Kraft, G.; Kraft, S. D.; Molls, M.; Khoroshkov, V. S.

    2014-12-01

    The paper examines the prospects of using laser plasma as a source of high-energy ions for the purpose of hadron beam therapy — an approach which is based on both theory and experimental results (ions are routinely observed to be accelerated in the interaction of high-power laser radiation with matter). Compared to therapy accelerators like synchrotrons and cyclotrons, laser technology is advantageous in that it is more compact and is simpler in delivering ions from the accelerator to the treatment room. Special target designs allow radiation therapy requirements for ion beam quality to be satisfied.

  13. Electron Acceleration by Transient Ion Foreshock Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Turner, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Particle acceleration is a topic of considerable interest in space, laboratory, and astrophysical plasmas as it is a fundamental physical process to all areas of physics. Recent THEMIS [e.g., Turner et al., 2014] and Wind [e.g., Wilson et al., 2013] observations have found evidence for strong particle acceleration at macro- and meso-scale structures and/or pulsations called transient ion foreshock phenomena (TIFP). Ion acceleration has been extensively studied, but electron acceleration has received less attention. Electron acceleration can arise from fundamentally different processes than those affecting ions due to differences in their gyroradii. Electron acceleration is ubiquitous, occurring in the solar corona (e.g., solar flares), magnetic reconnection, at shocks, astrophysical plasmas, etc. We present new results analyzing the dependencies of electron acceleration on the properties of TIFP observed by the THEMIS spacecraft.

  14. High power microwave system based on power combining and pulse compression of conventional klystrons

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, Zheng-Feng; Cheng, Cheng; Ning, Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    A high power microwave system based on power combining and pulse compression of conventional klystrons is introduced in this paper. This system mainly consists of pulse modulator, power combiner, driving source of klystrons and pulse compressor. A solid state induction modulator and pulse transformer were used to drive two 50 MW S-band klystrons with pulse widths 4 {\\mu}s in parallel, after power combining and pulse compression, the tested peak power had reached about 210 MW with pulse widths nearly 400 ns at 25 Hz, while the experimental maximum output power was just limited by the power capacity of loads. This type of high power microwave system has widely application prospect in RF system of large scale particle accelerators, high power radar transmitters and high level electromagnetic environment generators.

  15. SLED II: A new method of rf pulse compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, P.B.; Farkas, Z.D.; Ruth, R.D.

    1990-09-01

    In the SLED method of RF pulse compression, two high Q resonators store energy from an RF source for a relatively long time interval (typically 3 to 5 {mu}sec). Triggered by a reversal in RF phase, this stored energy is then released during a much shorter interval equal to the filling time of the accelerating structure. A peak power gain on the order of three and a compression efficiency on the order of 60% are typically attained. The shape of the output pulse is, however, a sharply decaying exponential. In SLED-II the two cavities are replaced by two lengths of resonant line, forming a Resonant Line SLED (RELS) and resulting in a flat output pulse. Therefore, RELS stages can be cascaded to give a greater peak power gain. Using two stages, a peak power gain greater than ten can be achieved with a reasonable compression efficiency. Unlike the BEC, the RELS compression factor per stage is not limited to two, albeit at the expense of intrinsic efficiency. Like the BEC, it uses long lines rather than short cavities.

  16. SLED II: A new method of rf pulse compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, P.B.; Farkas, Z.D.; Ruth, R.D.

    1990-09-01

    In the SLED method of RF pulse compression, two high Q resonators store energy from an RF source for a relatively long time interval (typically 3 to 5 {mu}sec). Triggered by a reversal in RF phase, this stored energy is then released during a much shorter interval equal to the filling time of the accelerating structure. A peak power gain on the order of three and a compression efficiency on the order of 60% are typically attained. The shape of the output pulse is, however, a sharply decaying exponential. In SLED-II the two cavities are replaced by two lengths of resonant line, forming a Resonant Line SLED (RELS) and resulting in a flat output pulse. Therefore, RELS stages can be cascaded to give a greater peak power gain. Using two stages, a peak power gain greater than ten can be achieved with a reasonable compression efficiency. Unlike the BEC, the RELS compression factor per stage is not limited to two, albeit at the expense of intrinsic efficiency. Like the BEC, it uses long lines rather than short cavities.

  17. Radar Range Sidelobe Reduction Using Adaptive Pulse Compression Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lihua; Coon, Michael; McLinden, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Pulse compression has been widely used in radars so that low-power, long RF pulses can be transmitted, rather than a highpower short pulse. Pulse compression radars offer a number of advantages over high-power short pulsed radars, such as no need of high-power RF circuitry, no need of high-voltage electronics, compact size and light weight, better range resolution, and better reliability. However, range sidelobe associated with pulse compression has prevented the use of this technique on spaceborne radars since surface returns detected by range sidelobes may mask the returns from a nearby weak cloud or precipitation particles. Research on adaptive pulse compression was carried out utilizing a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) waveform generation board and a radar transceiver simulator. The results have shown significant improvements in pulse compression sidelobe performance. Microwave and millimeter-wave radars present many technological challenges for Earth and planetary science applications. The traditional tube-based radars use high-voltage power supply/modulators and high-power RF transmitters; therefore, these radars usually have large size, heavy weight, and reliability issues for space and airborne platforms. Pulse compression technology has provided a path toward meeting many of these radar challenges. Recent advances in digital waveform generation, digital receivers, and solid-state power amplifiers have opened a new era for applying pulse compression to the development of compact and high-performance airborne and spaceborne remote sensing radars. The primary objective of this innovative effort is to develop and test a new pulse compression technique to achieve ultrarange sidelobes so that this technique can be applied to spaceborne, airborne, and ground-based remote sensing radars to meet future science requirements. By using digital waveform generation, digital receiver, and solid-state power amplifier technologies, this improved pulse compression

  18. Laser ion source for particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Sherwood, T R

    1995-01-01

    There is an interest in accelerating atomic nuclei to produce particle beams for medical therapy, atomic and nuclear physics, inertial confinement fusion and particle physics. Laser Ion Sources, in which ions are extracted from plasma created when a high power density laser beam pulse strikes a solid surface in a vacuum, are not in common use. However, some new developments in which heavy ions have been accelerated show that such sources have the potential to provide the beams required for high-energy accelerator systems.

  19. Process in high energy heavy ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinev, D.

    2009-03-01

    A review of processes that occur in high energy heavy ion acceleration by synchrotrons and colliders and that are essential for the accelerator performance is presented. Interactions of ions with the residual gas molecules/atoms and with stripping foils that deliberately intercept the ion trajectories are described in details. These interactions limit both the beam intensity and the beam quality. The processes of electron loss and capture lie at the root of heavy ion charge exchange injection. The review pays special attention to the ion induced vacuum pressure instability which is one of the main factors limiting the beam intensity. The intrabeam scattering phenomena which restricts the average luminosity of ion colliders is discussed. Some processes in nuclear interactions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions that could be dangerous for the performance of ion colliders are represented in the last chapter.

  20. Perpendicular ion acceleration in whistler turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, S. [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furocho, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Nariyuki, Y. [Faculty of Human Development, University of Toyama, 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    Whistler turbulence is an important contributor to solar wind turbulence dissipation. This turbulence contains obliquely propagating whistler waves at electron scales, and these waves have electrostatic components perpendicular to the mean magnetic field. In this paper, a full kinetic, two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation shows that whistler turbulence can accelerate ions in the direction perpendicular to the mean magnetic field. When the ions pass through wave-particle resonances region in the phase space during their cyclotron motion, the ions are effectively accelerated in the perpendicular direction. The simulation results suggest that whistler turbulence contributes to the perpendicular heating of ions observed in the solar wind.

  1. Ion Acceleration by Short Chirped Laser Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Xing Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Direct laser acceleration of ions by short frequency chirped laser pulses is investigated theoretically. We demonstrate that intense beams of ions with a kinetic energy broadening of about 1% can be generated. The chirping of the laser pulse allows the particles to gain kinetic energies of hundreds of MeVs, which is required for hadron cancer therapy, from pulses of energies in the order of 100 J. It is shown that few-cycle chirped pulses can accelerate ions more efficiently than long ones, i.e., higher ion kinetic energies are reached with the same amount of total electromagnetic pulse energy.

  2. Ion Acceleration by Short Chirped Laser Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jian-Xing; Keitel, Christoph H; Harman, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Direct laser acceleration of ions by short frequency-chirped laser pulses is investigated theoretically. We demonstrate that intense beams of ions with a kinetic energy broadening of about 1 % can be generated. The chirping of the laser pulse allows the particles to gain kinetic energies of hundreds of MeVs, which is required for hadron cancer therapy, from pulses of energies of the order of 100 J. It is shown that few-cycle chirped pulses can accelerate ions more efficiently than long ones, i.e. higher ion kinetic energies are reached with the same amount of total electromagnetic pulse energy.

  3. High-power multimode X-band rf pulse compression system for future linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami G. Tantawi

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC. The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  4. Diffusive Acceleration of Ions at Interplanetary Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Baring, Matthew G.; Summerlin, Errol J.

    2005-01-01

    Heliospheric shocks are excellent systems for testing theories of particle acceleration in their environs. These generally fall into two classes: (1) interplanetary shocks that are linear in their ion acceleration characteristics, with the non-thermal ions serving as test particles, and (2) non-linear systems such as the Earth's bow shock and the solar wind termination shock, where the accelerated ions strongly influence the magnetohydrodynamic structure of the shock. This paper explores the modelling of diffusive acceleration at a particular interplanetary shock, with an emphasis on explaining in situ measurements of ion distribution functions. The observational data for this event was acquired on day 292 of 1991 by the Ulysses mission. The modeling is performed using a well-known kinetic Monte Carlo simulation, which has yielded good agreement with observations at several heliospheric shocks, as have other theoretical techniques, namely hybrid plasma simulations, and numerical solution of the diffusion-conv...

  5. Excitation Waveform Design for Lamb Wave Pulse Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Hua, Jiadong; Zeng, Liang; Luo, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Most ultrasonic guided wave methods focus on tone burst excitation to reduce the effect of dispersion so as to facilitate signal interpretation. However, the resolution of the output cannot attain a very high value because time duration of the excitation waveform cannot be very small. To overcome this limitation, a pulse compression technique is introduced to Lamb wave propagation to achieve a δ-like correlation so as to obtain a high resolution for inspection. Ideal δ-like correlation is impossible as only a finite frequency bandwidth can propagate. The primary purpose of this paper is to design a proper excitation waveform for Lamb wave pulse compression, which shortens the correlation as close as possible to a δ function. To achieve this purpose, the performance of some typical signals is discussed in pulse compression, which include linear chirp (L-Chirp) signal, nonlinear chirp (NL-Chirp) signal, Barker code (BC), and Golay complementary code (GCC). In addition, how the excitation frequency range influences inspection resolution is investigated. A strategy for the frequency range determination is established subsequently. Finally, an experiment is carried out on an aluminum plate where these typical signals are used as excitations at different frequency ranges. The quantitative comparisons of the pulse compression responses validate the theoretical findings. By utilizing the experimental data, the improvement of pulse compression in resolution compared with tone burst excitation is also validated, and the robustness of the waveform design method to inaccuracies in the dispersion compensation is discussed as well.

  6. All-optical three-dimensional electron pulse compression

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Liang Jie; Rohwer, Timm; Gedik, Nuh; Johnson, Steven G

    2014-01-01

    We propose an all-optical, three-dimensional electron pulse compression scheme in which Hermite-Gaussian optical modes are used to fashion a three-dimensional optical trap in the electron pulse's rest frame. We show that the correct choices of optical incidence angles are necessary for optimal compression. We obtain analytical expressions for the net impulse imparted by Hermite-Gaussian free-space modes of arbitrary order. Although we focus on electrons, our theory applies to any charged particle and any particle with non-zero polarizability in the Rayleigh regime. We verify our theory numerically using exact solutions to Maxwell's equations for first-order Hermite-Gaussian beams, demonstrating single-electron pulse compression factors of $>10^{2}$ in both longitudinal and transverse dimensions with experimentally realizable optical pulses. The proposed scheme is useful in ultrafast electron imaging for both single- and multi-electron pulse compression, and as a means of circumventing temporal distortions in ...

  7. Heavy ion acceleration using femtosecond laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, G M; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K; Beg, F N

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from ultrathin (<200 nm) gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations the time history of the laser bullet is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 mkm and energy 27 Joules the calculated reflection, transmission and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80 %, 5 % and 15 %, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8 %. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon and flux . Analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the Radiation Pressure Acceleration regime and the onset of the Target Normal Sheath Acceleratio...

  8. Nanostructured targets for TNSA laser ion acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrisi Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured targets, based on hydrogenated polymers with embedded nanostructures, were prepared as thin micrometric foils for high-intensity laser irradiation in TNSA regime to produce high-ion acceleration. Experiments were performed at the PALS facility, in Prague, by using 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration and an intensity of 1016 W/cm2 and at the IPPLM, in Warsaw, by using 800 nm wavelength, 40 fs pulse duration, and an intensity of 1019 W/cm2. Forward plasma diagnostic mainly uses SiC detectors and ion collectors in time of flight (TOF configuration. At these intensities, ions can be accelerated at energies above 1 MeV per nucleon. In presence of Au nanoparticles, and/or under particular irradiation conditions, effects of resonant absorption can induce ion acceleration enhancement up to values of the order of 4 MeV per nucleon.

  9. Time-lens based optical packet pulse compression and retiming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laguardia Areal, Janaina; Hu, Hao; Palushani, Evarist;

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new optical circuit that performs both pulse compression and frame synchronization and retiming. Our design aims at directly multiplexing several 10G Ethernet data packets (frames) to a high-speed OTDM link. This scheme is optically transparent and does not require clock...

  10. Observation of soliton pulse compression in photonic crystal waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Colman, P; Combrié, S; Sagnes, I; Wong, C W; De Rossi, A

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate soliton-effect pulse compression in mm-long photonic crystal waveguides resulting from strong anomalous dispersion and self-phase modulation. Compression from 3ps to 580fs, at low pulse energies(~10pJ), is measured via autocorrelation.

  11. Acceleration of generalized adaptive pulse compression with parallel GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jingxiao; Zhang, Yan R.

    2015-05-01

    Super-computing based on Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) has become a booming field both in research and industry. In this paper, GPU is applied as the main computing device on traditional RADAR super resolution algorithms. Comparison is provided between GPU and CPU as computing architecture and MATLAB, as a widely used scientific implementation, is also included as well as C++ implementation in demonstrations of CPU part in the comparison. Fundamental RADAR algorithms as matched filter and least square estimation (LSE) are used as standard procedure to measure the efficiency of each implementation. Based on the result in this paper, GPU shows an enormous potential to expedite the traditional process of RADAR super-resolution applications.

  12. Heavy Ion Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德焴

    2002-01-01

    The abundance enhancements of heavy ions Ne, Mg, Si and Fe in impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) eventsare explained by a plasma acceleration mechanism. In consideration of the fact that the coronal plasma is mainlycomposed of hydrogen and helium ions, we think that theion-ion hybrid wave and quasi-perpendicular wave can.be excited by the energetic electron beam in impulsive solar flares. These waves may resonantly be absorbed byheavy ions when the frequencies of these waves are close to the second-harmonic gyrofrequencies of these heavyions. This requires the coronal plasma temperature to be located in the range ofT ~ (5 - 9) × 106 K in impulsivesolar flares and makes the average ionic charge state of these heavy ions in impulsive SEP events higher than theaverage ionic charge state of these heavy ions in gradual SEP events. These pre-heated and enhanced heavy ionsin impulsive SEP events.

  13. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE). The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator.

  14. Induction accelerator development for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reginato, L.L.

    1993-05-01

    For approximately a decade, the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at LBL has been exploring the use of induction accelerators with multiple beams as the driver for inertial fusion targets. Scaled experiments have investigated the transport of space charge dominated beams (SBTE), and the current amplification and transverse emittance control in induction linacs (MBE-4) with very encouraging results. In order to study many of the beam manipulations required by a driver and to further develop economically competitive technology, a proposal has been made in partnership with LLNL to build a 10 MeV accelerator and to conduct a series of experiments collectively called the Induction Linac System Experiments (ILSE).The major components critical to the ILSE accelerator are currently under development. We have constructed a full scale induction module and we have tested a number of amorphous magnetic materials developed by Allied Signal to establish an overall optimal design. The electric and magnetic quadrupoles critical to the transport and focusing of heavy ion beams are also under development. The hardware is intended to be economically competitive for a driver without sacrificing any of the physics or performance requirements. This paper will concentrate on the recent developments and tests of the major components required by the ILSE accelerator.

  15. Negative hydrogen ion sources for accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moehs, D.P.; /Fermilab; Peters, J.; /DESY; Sherman, J.; /Los Alamos

    2005-08-01

    A variety of H{sup -} ion sources are in use at accelerator laboratories around the world. A list of these ion sources includes surface plasma sources with magnetron, Penning and surface converter geometries as well as magnetic-multipole volume sources with and without cesium. Just as varied is the means of igniting and maintaining magnetically confined plasmas. Hot and cold cathodes, radio frequency, and microwave power are all in use, as well as electron tandem source ignition. The extraction systems of accelerator H{sup -} ion sources are highly specialized utilizing magnetic and electric fields in their low energy beam transport systems to produce direct current, as well as pulsed and/or chopped beams with a variety of time structures. Within this paper, specific ion sources utilized at accelerator laboratories shall be reviewed along with the physics of surface and volume H{sup -} production in regard to source emittance. Current research trends including aperture modeling, thermal modeling, surface conditioning, and laser diagnostics will also be discussed.

  16. Helical Pulseline Structures for Ion Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Briggs, R J; Waldron, William

    2005-01-01

    The basic concept of the "Pulseline Ion Accelerator" involves launching a ramped high voltage pulse on a broad band traveling wave (slow-wave) structure. An applied voltage pulse at the input end with a segment rising linearly in time becomes a linear voltage ramp in space that propagates down the line, corresponding to a (moving) region of constant axial accelerating electric field. The ions can "surf" on this traveling wave, experiencing a total energy gain that can greatly exceed the peak of the applied voltage. The applied voltage waveform can also be shaped to longitudinally confine the beam against its own space charge forces, and (in the final stage) to impart an inward compression to the beam for neutralized drift compression in heavy ion HEDP applications. In the first stages of a heavy ion accelerator, the pulseline velocity needs to be the order of 1% of the speed of light and the line must be sufficiently non-dispersive for the broad band voltage pulse propagating down the line to have minimal dis...

  17. Synchronized ion acceleration by ultraintense slow light

    CERN Document Server

    Brantov, A V; Kovalev, V F; Bychenkov, V Yu

    2015-01-01

    An effective scheme of synchronized laser-triggered ion acceleration and the corresponding theoretical model are proposed for a slow light pulse of relativistic intensity, which penetrates into a near-critical-density plasma, strongly slows, and then increases its group velocity during propagation within a target. The 3D PIC simulations confirm this concept for proton acceleration by a femtosecond petawatt-class laser pulse experiencing relativistic self-focusing, quantify the characteristics of the generated protons, and demonstrate a significant increase of their energy compared with the proton energy generated from optimized ultrathin solid dense foils.

  18. Linear induction accelerator for heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keefe, D.

    1976-09-01

    There is considerable recent interest in the use of high energy (..gamma.. = 1.1), heavy (A greater than or equal to 100) ions to irradiate deuterium--tritium pellets in a reactor vessel to constitute a power source at the level of 1 GW or more. Various accelerator configurations involving storage rings have been suggested. A discussion is given of how the technology of Linear Induction Accelerators--well known to be matched to high current and short pulse length--may offer significant advantages for this application.

  19. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Boytsov, A Yu; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Katagiri, K; Noda, K; Ponkin, D O; Ramzdorf, A Yu; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B

    2015-01-01

    The Electron String type of Ion Sources (ESIS) was developed, constructed and tested first in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. These ion sources can be the appropriate sources for production of pulsed C4+ and C6+ ion beams which can be used for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact the test ESIS Krion-6T already now at the solenoid magnetic field only 4.6 T provides more than 10^10 C4+ ions per pulse and about 5*10^9 C6+ ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable for application at synchrotrons. It was also found, that Krion-6T can provide more than 10^11 C6+ ions per second at 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. As for production of 11C radioactive ion beams ESIS can be the most economic kind of ion source. To proof that the special cryogenic cell for pulse injection of gaseous species into electron string was successfully tested using the ESIS Krion-2M.

  20. CAS Accelerator Physics (Ion Sources) in Slovakia

    CERN Multimedia

    CAS School

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and the Slovak University of Technology jointly organised a specialised course on ion sources, held at the Hotel Senec, Senec, Slovakia, from 29 May to 8 June, 2012.   Following some background lectures on accelerator physics and the fundamental processes of atomic and plasma physics, the course covered a wide range of topics related to ion sources and highlighted the latest developments in the field. Realistic case studies and topical seminars completed the programme. The school was very successful, with 69 participants representing 25 nationalities. Feedback from the participants was extremely positive, reflecting the high standard of the lectures. The case studies were performed with great enthusiasm and produced some excellent results. In addition to the academic programme, the participants were able to take part in a one-day excursion consisting of a guided tour of Bratislava and free time. A welcome event was held at the Hotel Senec, with s...

  1. Heavy ion acceleration in the Breakout Afterburner regime

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, G M; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K; Beg, F N

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from an ultrathin (20 nm) gold foil irradiated by sub-picosecond lasers is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations we identified two highly efficient ion acceleration schemes. By varying the laser pulse duration we observed a transition from Radiation Pressure Acceleration to the Breakout Afterburner regime akin to light ions. The underlying physics and ion acceleration regimes are similar to that of light ions, however, nuances of the acceleration process make the acceleration of heavy ions more challenging. Two laser systems are studied in detail: the Texas Petawatt Laser and the Trident laser, the former having pulse duration 180 fs, intermediate between very short femtosecond pulses and picosecond pulses. Both laser systems generated directional gold ions beams (~10 degrees half-angle) with fluxes in excess of 1011 ion/sr and normalized energy >10 MeV/nucleon.

  2. Cyclotron resonance effects on stochastic acceleration of light ionospheric ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The production of energetic ions with conical pitch angle distributions along the auroral field lines is a subject of considerable current interest. There are several theoretical treatments showing the acceleration (heating) of the ions by ion cyclotron waves. The quasi-linear theory predicts no acceleration when the ions are nonresonant. In the present investigation, it is demonstrated that the cyclotron resonances are not crucial for the transverse acceleration of ions by ion cyclotron waves. It is found that transverse energization of ionospheric ions, such as He(+), He(++), O(++), and O(+), is possible by an Electrostatic Hydrogen Cyclotron (EHC) wave even in the absence of cyclotron resonance. The mechanism of acceleration is the nonresonant stochastic heating. However, when there are resonant ions both the total energy gain and the number of accelerated ions increase with increasing parallel wave number.

  3. Laser-driven Ion Acceleration using Nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Hauthuille, Luc; Nguyen, Tam; Dollar, Franklin

    2016-10-01

    Interactions of high-intensity lasers with mass-limited nanoparticles enable the generation of extremely high electric fields. These fields accelerate ions, which has applications in nuclear medicine, high brightness radiography, as well as fast ignition for inertial confinement fusion. Previous studies have been performed with ensembles of nanoparticles, but this obscures the physics of the interaction due to the wide array of variables in the interaction. The work presented here looks instead at the interactions of a high intensity short pulse laser with an isolated nanodiamond. Specifically, we studied the effect of nanoparticle size and intensity of the laser on the interaction. A novel target scheme was developed to isolate the nanodiamond. Particle-in-cell simulations were performed using the EPOCH framework to show the sheath fields and resulting energetic ion beams.

  4. High-power radio-frequency binary pulse-compression experiment at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavine, T.L.; Farkas, Z.D.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Spalek, G.; Wilson, P.B.

    1991-05-01

    Using rf pulse compression it will be possible to boost the 50- to 100-MW output expected from high-power microwave tubes operating in the 10- to 20-GHz frequency range to the 300- to 1000-MW level required by the next generation of high-gradient linacs for linear colliders. A high-power X-band three-stage binary rf pulse compressor has been implemented and operated at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). In each of three successive stages, the rf pulse-length is compressed by half, and the peak power is approximately doubled. The experimental results presented here have been obtained at power levels up to 25-MW input (from an X-Band klystron) and up to 120-MW output (compressed to 60 nsec). Peak power gains greater than 5.2 have been measured. 5 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Linear optical pulse compression based on temporal zone plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Li, Ming; Lou, Shuqin; Azaña, José

    2013-07-15

    We propose and demonstrate time-domain equivalents of spatial zone plates, namely temporal zone plates, as alternatives to conventional time lenses. Both temporal intensity zone plates, based on intensity-only temporal modulation, and temporal phase zone plates, based on phase-only temporal modulation, are introduced and studied. Temporal zone plates do not exhibit the limiting tradeoff between temporal aperture and frequency bandwidth (temporal resolution) of conventional linear time lenses. As a result, these zone plates can be ideally designed to offer a time-bandwidth product (TBP) as large as desired, practically limited by the achievable temporal modulation bandwidth (limiting the temporal resolution) and the amount of dispersion needed in the target processing systems (limiting the temporal aperture). We numerically and experimentally demonstrate linear optical pulse compression by using temporal zone plates based on linear electro-optic temporal modulation followed by fiber-optics dispersion. In the pulse-compression experiment based on temporal phase zone plates, we achieve a resolution of ~25.5 ps over a temporal aperture of ~5.77 ns, representing an experimental TBP larger than 226 using a phase-modulation amplitude of only ~0.8π rad. We also numerically study the potential of these devices to achieve temporal imaging of optical waveforms and present a comparative analysis on the performance of different temporal intensity and phase zone plates.

  6. Heavy ion acceleration at parallel shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Galinsky

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A study of alpha particle acceleration at parallel shock due to an interaction with Alfvén waves self-consistently excited in both upstream and downstream regions was conducted using a scale-separation model (Galinsky and Shevchenko, 2000, 2007. The model uses conservation laws and resonance conditions to find where waves will be generated or damped and hence where particles will be pitch-angle scattered. It considers the total distribution function (for the bulk plasma and high energy tail, so no standard assumptions (e.g. seed populations, or some ad-hoc escape rate of accelerated particles are required. The heavy ion scattering on hydromagnetic turbulence generated by both protons and ions themselves is considered. The contribution of alpha particles to turbulence generation is important because of their relatively large mass-loading parameter Pα=nαmα/npmp (mp, np and mα, nα are proton and alpha particle mass and density that defines efficiency of wave excitation. The energy spectra of alpha particles are found and compared with those obtained in test particle approximation.

  7. Ion sources for high-power hadron accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Faircloth, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Ion sources are a critical component of all particle accelerators. They create the initial beam that is accelerated by the rest of the machine. This paper will introduce the many methods of creating a beam for high-power hadron accelerators. A brief introduction to some of the relevant concepts of plasma physics and beam formation is given. The different types of ion source used in accelerators today are examined. Positive ion sources for producing H+ ions and multiply charged heavy ions are covered. The physical principles involved with negative ion production are outlined and different types of negative ion sources are described. Cutting edge ion source technology and the techniques used to develop sources for the next generation of accelerators are discussed.

  8. Recent progress in the development of pulse compression gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hocquet S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The PETAL facility uses chirped pulse amplification (CPA technique. This system needs large pulse compression gratings that request damage threshold better than 4 J/cm2 in normal beam at 1.053 μm for 500 fs pulses. In this paper, we will show recent grating designs with either multilayer dielectrics or hybrid metal-dielectric structures. We have shown in previous works that damage threshold is driven by the enhancement of the near electric field inside the pillars of the grating. This was evidenced from a macroscopic point of view by means of laser damage testing. We will show that damage morphology during damage initiation at the scale of the grating groove is also consistent with this electric field dependence.

  9. Pulse compression radar reflectometry for density measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costley, A.; Prentice, R. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Laviron, C. [Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires (COGEMA), 78 - Velizy-Villacoublay (France); Prentice, R. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d`Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements

    1994-07-01

    On tokamaks and other toroidal machines, reflectometry is a very rapidly developing technique for density profile measurements, particularly near the edge. Its principle relies on the total reflection of an electromagnetic wave at a cutoff layer, where the critical density is reached and the local refractive index goes to zero. With the new fast frequency synthesizers now available, a method based on pulse compression radar is proposed for plasma reflectometry, overcoming the limitations of the previous reflectometry methods. The measurement can be made on a time-scale which is effectively very short relatively to the plasma fluctuations, and the very high reproducibility and stability of the source allows an absolute calibration of the waveguides to be made, which corrects for the effects of the parasitic reflections. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Two-klystron Binary Pulse Compression at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, Z.D.; Lavine, T.L.; Menegat, A.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.

    1993-04-01

    The Binary Pulse Compression system installed at SLAC was tested using two klystrons, one with 10 MW and the other with 34 MW output. By compressing 560 ns klystron pulses into 70 ns, the measured BPC output was 175 MW, limited by the available power from the two klystrons. This output was used to provide 100-MW input to a 30-cell X-band structure in which a 100-MV/m gradient was obtained. This system, using the higher klystron outputs expected in the future has the potential to deliver the 350 MW needed to obtain 100 MV/m gradients in the 1.8-m NLC prototype structure. This note describes the timing, triggering, and phase coding used in the two-klystron experiment, and the expected and measured net-work response to three- or two-stage modulation.

  11. Folded tandem ion accelerator facility at Trombay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Singh

    2001-08-01

    The folded tandem ion accelerator (FOTIA) project at BARC has been commissioned. The analysed carbon beams of 40 nA(3+) and 25 nA(4+), at terminal voltage of 2.5 MV with N2 + CO2 as insulating gas, were obtained. The beams were characterized by performing the Rutherford back scattering (RBS) on gold, tin and iron targets. The beam energy of 12.5 MeV for 12C4+ was consistent with the terminal voltage of 2.5 MV. The N2 + CO2 mixture is being replaced by SF6 gas in order to achieve 6 MV on the terminal. In this paper, some of the salient features of the FOTIA and its present status are discussed.

  12. Pulse Compression with Very Low Sidelobes in an Airborne Rain Mapping Rada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, A.; Durden, S.; Im, E.; Li, F.; Ricketts, W.; Wilsons, W.

    1993-01-01

    The pulse compression system for an airborne rain mapping rada is described. This system uses time domain weighting of the transmit pulse and is able to achive a pulse compression sidelobe level of -55 dB. This is significantly lower than any values previously reported in the open literature.

  13. Staging and laser acceleration of ions in underdense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Antonio; Hafizi, Bahman; Helle, Michael; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Gordon, Daniel; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Markus; Miao, Chenlong; Dover, Nicholas; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Ettlinger, Oliver

    2017-03-01

    Accelerating ions from rest in a plasma requires extra considerations because of their heavy mass. Low phase velocity fields or quasi-electrostatic fields are often necessary, either by operating above or near the critical density or by applying other slow wave generating mechanisms. Solid targets have been a favorite and have generated many good results. High density gas targets have also been reported to produce energetic ions. It is interesting to consider acceleration of ions in laser-driven plasma configurations that will potentially allow continuous acceleration in multiple consecutive stages. The plasma will be derived from gaseous targets, producing plasma densities slightly below the critical plasma density (underdense) for the driving laser. Such a plasma is experimentally robust, being repeatable and relatively transparent to externally injected ions from a previous stage. When optimized, multiple stages of this underdense laser plasma acceleration mechanism can progressively accelerate the ions to a high final energy. For a light mass ion such as the proton, relativistic velocities could be reached, making it suitable for further acceleration by high phase velocity plasma accelerators to energies appropriate for High Energy Physics applications. Negatively charged ions such as antiprotons could be similarly accelerated in this multi-staged ion acceleration scheme.

  14. Ion Acceleration at the Quasi-Parallel Shock: Injection Unveiled

    CERN Document Server

    Sundberg, Torbjörn; Burgess, David; Mazelle, Christian X

    2015-01-01

    Collisionless shocks are efficient particle accelerators. At Earth, ions with energies exceeding 100 keV are seen upstream of the bow shock when the magnetic geometry is quasi-parallel, and large-scale supernova remnant shocks can accelerate ions into cosmic rays energies. This energization is attributed to diffusive shock acceleration, however, for this process to become active the ions must first be sufficiently energized. How and where this initial acceleration takes place has been one of the key unresolved issues in shock acceleration theory. Using Cluster spacecraft observations, we study the signatures of ion reflection events in the turbulent transition layer upstream of the shock, and with the support of a hybrid simulation of the shock, we show that these reflection signatures are characteristic of the first step in the ion injection process. These reflection events develop in particular in the region where the trailing edge of large-amplitude upstream waves intercept the local shock ramp and the ups...

  15. Heavy ion accelerator and associated developments in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G K Mehta

    2002-11-01

    Developments of ion accelerator and associated facilities in India are presented. Various types of accelerator facilities which are systematically built in the country through sustained development and research programs at various research centres and institutions are highlighted. Impact of accelerator in different interdisciplinary fields of research are highlighted.

  16. Laser-driven multicharged heavy ion beam acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Z.; Nishio, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Y.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Imai, K.; Nagamiya, S.

    2015-05-01

    Experimental demonstration of multi-charged heavy ion acceleration from the interaction between the ultra-intense short pulse laser system and the metal target is presented. The laser pulse of ions accelerated up to 0.9 GeV are demonstrated. This is achieved by the high intensity laser field of ˜ 1021Wcm-2 interacting with the solid density target. The demonstrated iron ions with high charge to mass ratio (Q/M) is difficult to be achieved by the conventional heavy ion source technique in the accelerators.

  17. "Super-acceleration" of ions in a stationary plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardakov, Vladimir; Ivanov, Sergey; Kazantsev, Alexander; Strokin, Nikolay; Stupin, Aleksey

    2016-10-01

    We report on the detection of the acceleration effect of the bulk of ions in a stationary plasma E × B discharge to energies exceeding considerably the value equivalent to the discharge voltage. We determined the conditions necessary for the generation of high-energy ions, and ascertained the influence exerted on the value of the ion energies by pressure (flow rate) and the kind of plasma-producing gas, and by the value of discharge current. The possible acceleration mechanism is suggested.

  18. The production of accelerated radioactive ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, D.K.

    1993-11-01

    During the last few years, substantial work has been done and interest developed in the scientific opportunities available with accelerated radioactive ion beams (RIBs) for nuclear physics, astrophysics, and applied research. This interest has led to the construction, development, and proposed development of both first- and second-generation RIB facilities in Asia, North America, and Europe; international conferences on RIBs at Berkeley and Louvain-la-Neuve; and many workshops on specific aspects of RIB production and science. This paper provides a discussion of both the projectile fragmentation, PF, and isotope separator on-line, ISOL, approach to RIB production with particular emphasis on the latter approach, which employs a postaccelerator and is most suitable for nuclear structure physics. The existing, under construction, and proposed facilities worldwide are discussed. The paper draws heavily from the CERN ISOLDE work, the North American IsoSpin Laboratory (ISL) study, and the operating first-generation RIB facility at Louvain-la-Neuve, and the first-generation RIB project currently being constructed at ORNL.

  19. Conception design of helium ion FFAG accelerator with induction accelerating cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Huan-Li; XU Yu-Cun; WANG Xiang-Qi; XU Hong-Liang

    2013-01-01

    In the recent decades of particle accelerator R&D area,the fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator has become a highlight for some advantages of its higher beam intensity and lower cost,although there are still some technical challenges.In this paper,the FFAG accelerator is adopted to accelerate a helium ion beam on the one hand for the study of helium embrittlement on fusion reactor envelope material and on the other hand for promoting the conception research and design of the FFAG accelerator and exploring the possibility of developing high power FFAG accelerators.The conventional period focusing unit of the helium ion FFAG accelerator and threedimensional model of the large aperture combinatorial magnet by OPERA-TOSCA are given.For low energy and low revolution frequency,induction acceleration is proposed to replace conventional radio frequency (RF) acceleration for the helium ion FFAG accelerator,which avoids the potential breakdown of the acceleration field caused by the wake field and improves the acceleration repetition frequency to gain higher beam intensity.The main parameters and three-dimensional model of induction cavity are given.Two special constraint waveforms are proposed to refrain from particle accelerating time slip (AT) caused by accelerating voltage drop of flat top and energy deviation.The particle longitudinal motion in two waveforms is simulated.

  20. ASIC Design and Implementation for Digital Pulse Compression Chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高俊峰; 韩月秋; 王巍

    2004-01-01

    A novel ASIC design of changeable-point digital pulse compression (DPC) chip is presented. System hardware resource is reduced to one third of the traditional design method through operations sharing hardware, i.e. let FFT, complex multiplication and IFFT be fulfilled with the same hardware structure. Block-floating-point scaling is used to enhance the dynamic range and computation accuracy. This design applies parallel pipeline structure and the radix-4 butterfly operation to improve the processing speed. In addition, a triple-memory-space(TMS) configuration is used that allows input, computation and output operations to be overlapped, so that the dual-butterfly unit is never left in an idle state waiting for I/O operation. The whole design is implemented with only one chip of XC2V500-5 FPGA. It can implement 1 024-point DPC within 91.6 μs.The output data is converted to floating-point formation to achieve seamless interface with TMS320C6701. The validity of the design is verified by simulation and measurement results.

  1. Nonlinear femtosecond pulse compression in cholesteric liquid crystals (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yikun; Zhou, Jianying; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Khoo, Iam-Choon

    2016-09-01

    Liquid crystals materials have the advantage of having a large nonlinear coefficient, but the response time is slow, normally up to several minisecond. This makes it is hard to apply in ultra fast optical devices. Recently, fentosecond (fs) nonlinear effect in choleteric liquid crystals is reported, nonlinear coefficient in the scale of 10-12 cm2/W is achieved. Base on this effect, in this work, fentosecond pulse compression technique in a miniature choleteric liquid crystal is demonstrated1,2. Cholesteric liquid crystals (CLC) is a kind of 1-dimensional phontonic structure with helical periodic. In a 10 μm thick CLC, femtosecond pulse with 100 fs is compressed to about 50 fs. CLC sample in planar texture with 500μm thick cell gap is further fabricated. In this sample, femtosecond pulse with 847 fs can be compressed to 286 fs. Due to the strong dispersion at the edge of photonic band gap, femtosecond pulse stretching and compensation can be achieve. In this experiment, laser pulse with duration 90 fs is stretched to above 2 picosecond in the first CLC sample and re-compressed to 120 fs in the second sample. Such technique might be applied in chirp pulse amplification. In conclusion, we report ultra fast nonlinear effect in cholesteric liquid crystals. Due to the strong dispersion and nonlinearity of CLC, femtosecond pulse manipulating devices can be achieved in the scale of micrometer.

  2. Suppression of stimulated Brillouin scattering with phase modulator in soliton pulse compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Lü; Taorong Gong; Ming Chen; Muguang Wang; Tangjun Li; Genxiang Chen; Shuisheng Jian

    2009-01-01

    A phase modulator is employed in the scheme of soliton pulse compression with dispersion shifted fiber (DSF). Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) effect, as a negative influence here, can be dramatically suppressed after optical phase modulation. The experimental result shows that the launched power required for high-order soliton pulse compression has been significantly increased by 11 dB under the condition of 100-MHz phase modulation. Accordingly, the experiment of picosecond pulse compression generated from electro-absorption sampling window (EASW) has also been implemented.

  3. Three-wave mixing mediated femtosecond pulse compression in β-barium borate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, A; Austin, Dane R; Cousin, Seth L; Biegert, J

    2015-10-15

    Nonlinear pulse compression mediated by three-wave mixing is demonstrated for ultrashort Ti:sapphire pulses in a type II phase-matched β-barium borate (BBO) crystal using noncollinear geometry. 170 μJ pulses at 800 nm with a pulse duration of 74 fs are compressed at their sum frequency to 32 fs with 55 μJ of pulse energy. Experiments and computer simulations demonstrate the potential of sum-frequency pulse compression to match the group velocities of the interacting waves to crystals that were initially not considered in the context of nonlinear pulse compression.

  4. Development of ultra-short high voltage pulse technology using magnetic pulse compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Byung Heon; Kim, S. G.; Nam, S. M.; Lee, B. C.; Lee, S. M.; Jeong, Y. U.; Cho, S. O.; Jin, J. T.; Choi, H. L

    1998-01-01

    The control circuit for high voltage switches, the saturable inductor for magnetic assist, and the magnetic pulse compression circuit were designed, constructed, and tested. The core materials of saturable inductors in magnetic pulse compression circuit were amorphous metal and ferrite and total compression stages were 3. By the test, in high repetition rate, high pulse compression were certified. As a result of this test, it became possible to increase life-time of thyratrons and to replace thyratrons by solid-state semiconductor switches. (author). 16 refs., 16 tabs.

  5. The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiquan [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2008-12-01

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  6. Laser Ion Acceleration Toward Future Ion Beam Cancer Therapy - Numerical Simulation Sudy-

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, Shigeo; Nagashima, Toshihiro; Takano, Masahiro; Barada, Daisuke; Kong, Qing; Gu, Yan Jun; Wang, Ping Xiao; Ma, Yan Yun; Wang, Wei Ming

    2013-01-01

    Ion beam has been used in cancer treatment, and has a unique preferable feature to deposit its main energy inside a human body so that cancer cell could be killed by the ion beam. However, conventional ion accelerator tends to be huge in its size and its cost. In this paper a future intense-laser ion accelerator is proposed to make the ion accelerator compact. An intense femtosecond pulsed laser was employed to accelerate ions. The issues in the laser ion accelerator include the energy efficiency from the laser to the ions, the ion beam collimation, the ion energy spectrum control, the ion beam bunching and the ion particle energy control. In the study particle computer simulations were performed to solve the issues, and each component was designed to control the ion beam quality. When an intense laser illuminates a target, electrons in the target are accelerated and leave from the target; temporarily a strong electric field is formed between the high-energy electrons and the target ions, and the target ions ...

  7. Acceleration schedules for a recirculating heavy-ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, W.M.; Grote, D.P.

    2002-05-01

    Recent advances in solid-state switches have made it feasible to design programmable, high-repetition-rate pulsers for induction accelerators. These switches could lower the cost of recirculating induction accelerators, such as the ''small recirculator'' at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), by substantially reducing the number of induction modules. Numerical work is reported here to determine what effects the use of fewer pulsers at higher voltage would have on the beam quality of the LLNL small recirculator. Lattices with different numbers of pulsers are examined using the fluid/envelope code CIRCE, and several schedules for acceleration and compression are compared for each configuration. For selected schedules, the phase-space dynamics is also studied using the particle-in-cell code WARP3d.

  8. Laser-plasma booster for ion post acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoh D.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A remarkable ion energy increase is demonstrated for post acceleration by a laser-plasma booster. An intense short-pulse laser generates a strong current by high-energy electrons accelerated, when this intense short-pulse laser illuminates a plasma target. The strong electric current creates a strong magnetic field along the high-energy electron current in plasma. During the increase phase in the magnetic field, a longitudinal inductive electric field is induced for the forward ion acceleration by the Faraday law. Our 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate a remarkable increase in ion energy by several tens of MeV.

  9. Localized Ionospheric Particle Acceleration and Wave Acceleration of Auroral Ions: Amicist Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Kristina A.

    1999-01-01

    Research supported by this grant covered two main topics: auroral ion acceleration from ELF-band wave activity, and from VLF-spikelet (lower hybrid solitary structure) wave activity. Recent auroral sounding rocket data illustrate the relative significance of various mechanisms for initiating auroral ion outflow. Two nightside mechanisms are shown in detail. The first mechanism is ion acceleration within lower hybrid solitary wave events. The new data from this two payload mission show clearly that: (1) these individual events are spatially localized to scales approximately 100 m wide perpendicular to B, in agreement with previous investigations of these structures, and (2) that the probability of occurrence of the events is greatest at times of maximum VLF wave intensity. The second mechanism is ion acceleration by broadband, low frequency electrostatic waves, observed in a 30 km wide region at the poleward edge of the arc. The ion fluxes from the two mechanisms are compared and it is shown that while lower hybrid solitary structures do indeed accelerate ions in regions of intense VLF waves, the outflow from the electrostatic ion wave acceleration region is dominant for the aurora investigated by this sounding rocket, AMICIST. The fluxes are shown to be consistent with DE-1 and Freja outflow measurements, indicating that the AMICIST observations show the low altitude, microphysical signatures of nightside auroral outflow. In this paper, we present a review of sounding rocket observations of the ion acceleration seen nightside auroral zone lower hybrid solitary structures. Observations from Topaz3, Amicist, and Phaze2 are presented on various spatial scales, including the two-point measurements of the Amicist mission. From this collection of observations, we will demonstrate the following characteristics of transverse ion acceleration (TAI) in LHSS. The ion acceleration process is narrowly confined to 90 degrees pitch angle, in spatially confined regions of up to a

  10. Installation of the Ion Accelerator for the Surface Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Kim, Han-Sung; Chung, Bo-Hyun; Ahn, Tae-Sung; Kim, Dae-Il; Kim, Cho-Rong; Cho, Yong-Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, an introduction to the accelerator, an installation status at KOMAC and the operation plan of the accelerator are discussed. A pelletron, which has been used over 25 years at KIGAM, is moved and installed at KOMAC in order to supply a qualified service to ion beam users. The system will be installed in September and component tests will be carried. The operation of the system starts in 2016 after it gets operation license from Nuclear Safety and Security Commission. Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) is operating several ion beam accelerators to provide various ion beams to users. Those are a 100 MeV proton linear accelerator, a 220 keV ion implanter for gaseous ion beams, a 150 keV metal ion implanter and a 20 keV high-current ion implanter. All of those are the machine for user service and it is important to qualify the results of the irradiation conditions for user service. For this reason, an electrostatic tandem accelerator, which has been operating over 25 years at Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), is moved to KOMAC in order to supply the qualified and quantified data on the irradiation species.

  11. Nonlinear Pulse Compression and Reshaping Using Cross-Phase Modulation in a Dispersion-Shifted Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.; W.; Chan; K.; K.; Chow; C.; Shu

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear pulse compression has been demonstrated by cross-phase modulation in a dispersion-shifted fiber. The output is obtained from filtering of the broadened optical spectrum and a pulse width reduction from 61 to 28 ps is achieved.

  12. Selective Deuterium Ion Acceleration Using the Vulcan PW Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Krygier, AG; Kar, S; Ahmed, H; Alejo, A; Clarke, R; Fuchs, J; Green, A; Jung, D; Kleinschmidt, A; Najmudin, Z; Nakamura, H; Norreys, P; Notley, M; Oliver, M; Roth, M; Vassura, L; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M; Freeman, RR

    2015-01-01

    We report on the successful demonstration of selective acceleration of deuterium ions by target-normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) with a high-energy petawatt laser. TNSA typically produces a multi-species ion beam that originates from the intrinsic hydrocarbon and water vapor contaminants on the target surface. Using the method first developed by Morrison, et al., \\cite{Morrison:POP2012} an ion beam with $>$99$\\%$ deuterium ions and peak energy 28 MeV is produced with a 200 J, 700fs, $>10^{20} W/cm^{2}$ laser pulse by cryogenically freezing heavy water (D$_{2}$O) vapor onto the rear surface of the target prior to the shot. The estimated total yield of deuterium ions in an assumed 10$^{\\circ}$ half-angle cone was 3.0 $\\mu$C (1.9 $\\times 10^{13}$ ions) with 6.6$\\%$ laser-to-deuterium ion energy conversion efficiency.

  13. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  14. Beam optics of the folded tandem ion accelerator at BARC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Santra; P Singh

    2002-07-01

    The beam optics of the 6 MV folded tandem ion accelerator, that has recently been commissioned at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, is presented. Typical beam trajectories for proton and 12C beams under different conditions, are shown. The constraints on the design due to the use of the infrastructure of the Van de Graaff accelerator, which existed earlier, are discussed.

  15. Accelerated Ions from a Laser Driven Z-pinch

    CERN Document Server

    Helle, Michael H; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Chen, Yu-hsin; Palastro, John P; Ting, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Intense laser acceleration of ions is inherently difficult due to the velocity mismatch between laser pulses moving at the speed of light and slowly moving massive ions. Instead of directly accelerating the ions, current approaches rely on TV/m laser fields to ionize and drive out electrons. The ions are then accelerated by the resulting electrostatic fields from charge separation. Here we report experimental and numerical acceleration of ions by means of laser driven Z-pinch exiting a sharp plasma interface. This is achieved by first driving a plasma wakefield in the self-modulated bubble regime. Cold return currents are generated to maintain quasi-neutrality of the plasma. The opposite current repel and form an axial fast current and a cylindrical-shell cold return current with a large (100 MG) azithmuthal field in between. These conditions produce a Z-pinch that compresses the fast electrons and ions on axis. If this process is terminated at a sharp plasma interface, a beam of ions are then accelerated in ...

  16. Ion acceleration from relativistic laser nano-target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Daniel

    2012-01-06

    Laser-ion acceleration has been of particular interest over the last decade for fundamental as well as applied sciences. Remarkable progress has been made in realizing laser-driven accelerators that are cheap and very compact compared with conventional rf-accelerators. Proton and ion beams have been produced with particle energies of up to 50 MeV and several MeV/u, respectively, with outstanding properties in terms of transverse emittance and current. These beams typically exhibit an exponentially decaying energy distribution, but almost all advanced applications, such as oncology, proton imaging or fast ignition, require quasimonoenergetic beams with a low energy spread. The majority of the experiments investigated ion acceleration in the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) regime with comparably thick targets in the {mu}m range. In this thesis ion acceleration is investigated from nm-scaled targets, which are partially produced at the University of Munich with thickness as low as 3 nm. Experiments have been carried out at LANL's Trident high-power and high-contrast laser (80 J, 500 fs, {lambda}=1054 nm), where ion acceleration with these nano-targets occurs during the relativistic transparency of the target, in the so-called Breakout afterburner (BOA) regime. With a novel high resolution and high dispersion Thomson parabola and ion wide angle spectrometer, thickness dependencies of the ions angular distribution, particle number, average and maximum energy have been measured. Carbon C{sup 6+} energies reached 650 MeV and 1 GeV for unheated and heated targets, respectively, and proton energies peaked at 75 MeV and 120 MeV for diamond and CH{sub 2} targets. Experimental data is presented, where the conversion efficiency into carbon C{sup 6+} (protons) is investigated and found to have an up to 10fold (5fold) increase over the TNSA regime. With circularly polarized laser light, quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions have been generated from the same nm-scaled foil

  17. Advanced approaches to high intensity laser-driven ion acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henig, Andreas

    2010-04-26

    Since the pioneering work that was carried out 10 years ago, the generation of highly energetic ion beams from laser-plasma interactions has been investigated in much detail in the regime of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA). Creation of ion beams with small longitudinal and transverse emittance and energies extending up to tens of MeV fueled visions of compact, laser-driven ion sources for applications such as ion beam therapy of tumors or fast ignition inertial con finement fusion. However, new pathways are of crucial importance to push the current limits of laser-generated ion beams further towards parameters necessary for those applications. The presented PhD work was intended to develop and explore advanced approaches to high intensity laser-driven ion acceleration that reach beyond TNSA. In this spirit, ion acceleration from two novel target systems was investigated, namely mass-limited microspheres and nm-thin, free-standing diamond-like carbon (DLC) foils. Using such ultrathin foils, a new regime of ion acceleration was found where the laser transfers energy to all electrons located within the focal volume. While for TNSA the accelerating electric field is stationary and ion acceleration is spatially separated from laser absorption into electrons, now a localized longitudinal field enhancement is present that co-propagates with the ions as the accompanying laser pulse pushes the electrons forward. Unprecedented maximum ion energies were obtained, reaching beyond 0.5 GeV for carbon C{sup 6+} and thus exceeding previous TNSA results by about one order of magnitude. When changing the laser polarization to circular, electron heating and expansion were shown to be efficiently suppressed, resulting for the first time in a phase-stable acceleration that is dominated by the laser radiation pressure which led to the observation of a peaked C{sup 6+} spectrum. Compared to quasi-monoenergetic ion beam generation within the TNSA regime, a more than 40 times

  18. Electrostatic quadrupole accelerator for the heavy ion fusion project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.; Eylon, S.

    1994-07-01

    A full scale (2 MeV, 800 mA, K{sup +}), low emittance injector for the Heavy Ion Fusion Project has been built at LBL It consists of a 750 key diode pre-injector followed by an electrostatic quadrupole accelerator (ESQ) which provide strong (alternating gradient) focusing for the space-charge dominated beam and simultaneously accelerates the ions to 2 MeV. The actual operation of this new machine has exceeded design parameters. Design of the accelerator, report on experiments performed in connection with the evaluation and characterization of the ESQ and corresponding 3D Particle in Cell simulations will be presented.

  19. Towards Polarization Measurements of Laser-accelerated Helium-3 Ions

    OpenAIRE

    Engin, Ilhan

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis, preparatory investigations for the spin-polarization measurement of 3He ions from laser-induced plasmas have been performed.Therefore, experiments aiming at an efficient laser-induced ion acceleration out of a 4He gas target were carried out at two high-intensity laser facilities: the Arcturus laser at Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf as well as PHELIX at GSI Darmstadt. The scientific goal of both experiments was to investigate the ion-acceleration proces...

  20. Microsecond pulse width, intense, light-ion beam accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rej, D. J.; Bartsch, R. R.; Davis, H. A.; Faehl, R. J.; Greenly, J. B.; Waganaar, W. J.

    1993-10-01

    A relatively long-pulse width (0.1-1 μs) intense ion beam accelerator has been built for materials processing applications. An applied Br, magnetically insulated extraction ion diode with dielectric flashover ion source is installed directly onto the output of a 1.2 MV, 300-kJ Marx generator. The diode is designed with the aid of multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Initial operation of the accelerator at 0.4 MV indicates satisfactory performance without the need for additional pulse shaping. The effect of a plasma opening switch on diode behavior is considered.

  1. Ion Acceleration by the Radiation Pressure of Slow Electromagnetic Wave

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S V; Kando, M; Pegoraro, F; Bulanov, S S; Geddes, C G R; Schroeder, C; Esarey, E; Leemans, W

    2012-01-01

    When the ions are accelerated by the radiation pressure of the laser pulse, their velocity can not exceed the laser group velocity, in the case when it is less than the speed of light in vacuum. This is demonstrated in two cases corresponding to the thin foil target irradiated by a high intensity laser light and to the hole boring by the laser pulse in the extended plasma accompanied by the collisionless shock wave formation. It is found that the beams of accelerated at the collisionless shock wave front ions are unstable against the Buneman-lke and the Weibel-like instabilities which result in the ion energy spectrum broadening.

  2. A review of ion sources for medical accelerators (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, M; Kitagawa, A

    2012-02-01

    There are two major medical applications of ion accelerators. One is a production of short-lived isotopes for radionuclide imaging with positron emission tomography and single photon emission computer tomography. Generally, a combination of a source for negative ions (usually H- and/or D-) and a cyclotron is used; this system is well established and distributed over the world. Other important medical application is charged-particle radiotherapy, where the accelerated ion beam itself is being used for patient treatment. Two distinctly different methods are being applied: either with protons or with heavy-ions (mostly carbon ions). Proton radiotherapy for deep-seated tumors has become widespread since the 1990s. The energy and intensity are typically over 200 MeV and several 10(10) pps, respectively. Cyclotrons as well as synchrotrons are utilized. The ion source for the cyclotron is generally similar to the type for production of radioisotopes. For a synchrotron, one applies a positive ion source in combination with an injector linac. Carbon ion radiotherapy awakens a worldwide interest. About 6000 cancer patients have already been treated with carbon beams from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan. These clinical results have clearly verified the advantages of carbon ions. Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center and Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center have been successfully launched. Several new facilities are under commissioning or construction. The beam energy is adjusted to the depth of tumors. It is usually between 140 and 430 MeV∕u. Although the beam intensity depends on the irradiation method, it is typically several 10(8) or 10(9) pps. Synchrotrons are only utilized for carbon ion radiotherapy. An ECR ion source supplies multi-charged carbon ions for this requirement. Some other medical applications with ion beams attract developer's interests. For example, the several types of accelerators are

  3. Bursts of transverse ion acceleration at rocket altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldy, R. L.; Lynch, K. A.; Kintner, P. M.; Vago, J.; Chesney, S.; Moore, T. E.; Pollock, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    High-time-resolution ion mass spectrometer distribution function measurements and wave data from a sounding rocket flight over an aurora have revealed the fine structure of the transverse ion acceleration mechanism in the upper ionosphere. The transversely accelerated ion (TAI) events can occur in a volume with a cross-field dimension as small as several tens of meters and thus appear as 50-100 ms ion bursts due to the rocket payload motion. Bulk heating to a characteristic energy of several eV and tail heating in the direction perpendicular to B of a few percent of ambient ions to a characteristic energy the order of 10 eV occur for both hydrogen and oxygen ions. The TAI at 90 deg pitch angle occur in localized regions of intense lower hybrid waves and in regions of density depletion. On close examination of the correlation between the wave bursts and the TAI it is believed that the waves produce the ion acceleration. The TAI occur during periods of field-aligned auroral electron bursts. Finally, near 1000 km altitude they occur about once every second. If the event presented here is considered average, the flux of TAI oxygen ions above 7 eV could account for the ion conic fluxes measured by the ISIS spacecraft.

  4. Characterization of ion accelerating systems on NASA LeRC's ion thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlin, Vincent K.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation is conducted regarding ion-accelerating systems for two NASA thrusters to study the limits of ion-extraction capability or perveance. A total of nine two-grid ion-accelerating systems are tested with the 30- and 50-cm-diam ring-cusp inert-gas ion thrusters emphasizing the extension of ion-extraction. The vacuum-tank testing is described using xenon, krypton, and argon propellants, and thruster performance is computed with attention given to theoretical design considerations. Reductions in perveance are noted with decreasing accelerator-hole-to-screen-hole diameter ratios. Perveance values vary indirectly with the ratio of discharge voltage to total accelerating voltage, and screen/accelerator electrode hole-pair alignment is also found to contribute to perveance values.

  5. Current Status of the Daejeon Ion Accelerator Complex at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Sung-Ryul; Chang, Dae-Sik; Hwang, Churl-Kew; Lee, Seok-Kwan; Jin, Jeong-Tae; Oh, Byung-Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The Daejeon ion accelerator complex (DIAC) is being constructed at Korea atomic energy research institute (KAERI) in order to fulfill an increasing demand for heavy ion beam facilities for various purposes including structural material study, biological research and nanomaterial treatment. The accelerators in the DIAC are designed to produce heavy ion beams with energies up to 1 MeV/u and beam currents up to 300 μA. [1–4] In this article, current status of the DIAC construction is presented and discussed. The DIAC facilities are designed to handle stable non-radioactive beams. According to user demand, the separated two ECR sources (i.e., an 18 GHz KEK – the high energy accelerator research organization ECR ion source with a metal oven and a 14.5 GHz KAERI ECR ion source) together with low energy beam transport line (LEBT) can supply linacs with both metal and non-metal ions. From the successful full-power test results, we confirmed that the IH and RFQ linacs work properly and then they are ready to accelerate heavy ions up to 1.09 MeV/nucleon. Since all tests and reorganization of the integrated control system were successful, it is supposed that the DIAC is now ready for beam tuning. Presently, construction of radiation shielded walls and radiation safety licensing are now in progress.

  6. Overview of LANL short-pulse ion acceleration activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flippo, Kirk A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schmitt, Mark J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Offermann, Dustin [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cobble, James A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gautier, Donald [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kline, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Workman, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Archuleta, Fred [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gonzales, Raymond [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hurry, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Johnson, Randall [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Letzring, Samuel [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reid, Sha-Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shimada, Tsutomu [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gaillard, Sandrine A. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Sentoku, Yasuhiko [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Bussman, Michael [Forschungszentrum Dresden (Germany); Kluge, Thomas [Forschungszentrum Dresden (Germany); Cowan, Thomas E. [Forschungszentrum Dresden (Germany); Rassuchine, Jenny M. [Forschungszentrum Dresden - Rossendorf (Germany); Lowenstern, Mario E. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mucino, J. Eduardo [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gall, Brady [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Korgan, Grant [Nanolabz, Reno, NV (United States); Malekos, Steven [Nanolabz, Reno, NV (United States); Adams, Jesse [Nanolabz, Reno, NV (United States); Bartal, Teresa [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Chawla, Surgreev [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Higginson, Drew [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Beg, Farhat [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Nilson, Phil [Lab. for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY (United States); Mac Phee, Andrew [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Le Pape, Sebastien [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hey, Daniel [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mac Kinnon, Andy [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Geissel, Mattias [Sandia National Lab. (SNL), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schollmeier, Marius [Sandia National Lab. (SNL), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stephens, Rich [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2009-12-02

    An overview of Los Alamos National Laboratory's activities related to short-pulse ion acceleration is presented. LANL is involved is several projects related to Inertial Confinement Fusion (Fast Ignition) and Laser-Ion Acceleration. LANL has an active high energy X-ray backlighter program for radiographing ICF implosions and other High Energy Density Laboratory Physics experiments. Using the Trident 200TW laser we are currently developing high energy photon (>10 keV) phase contrast imaging techniques to be applied on Omega and the NIF. In addition we are engaged in multiple programs in laser ion acceleration to boost the ion energies and efficiencies for various potential applications including Fast Ignition, active material interrogation, and medical applications. Two basic avenues to increase ion performance are currently under study: one involves ultra-thin targets and the other involves changing the target geometry. We have recently had success in boosting proton energies above 65 MeV into the medical application range. Highlights covered in the presentation include: The Trident Laser System; X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging for ICF and HEDLP; Improving TNSA Ion Acceleration; Scaling Laws; Flat Targets; Thin Targets; Cone Targets; Ion Focusing;Trident; Omega EP; Scaling Comparisons; and, Conclusions.

  7. Acceleration of 3HE and heavy ions at interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.; Dwyer, J. R.; Mazur, J. E.; Smith, C. W.; Koug, R. M.

    2001-08-01

    We have surveyed the 0.5-2.0 MeV nucleon-1 ion composition of 56 interplanetary shocks (IP) observed with the Ultra-Low-Energy Isotope Spectrometer (ULEIS) on board the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) from 1997 October 1 through 2000 November 30. Our results show the first ever measurement (25 cases) of 3 He ions being accelerated at IP shocks. The 3 He/4 He ratio at the 25 shocks exhibited a wide range of values between 0.00140.24; the ratios were enhanced between factors of ~3-600 over the solar wind value. During the survey period, the occurrence probability of 3 He-rich shocks increased with rising solar activity as measured in terms of the daily occurrence rates of sunspots and X-ray flares. The 3 He enhancements at IP shocks cannot be attributed to rigidity dependent acceleration of solar wind ions and are better explained if the shocks accelerate ions from multiple sources, one being remnant impulsive solar flare material enriched in 3 He ions. Our results also indicate that the contribution of impulsive flares to the seed population for IP shocks varies from event to event, and that the interplanetary medium is being replenished with impulsive material more frequently during periods of increased solar activity. 1. Introduction Enhancements in the intensities of energetic ions associated with transient interplanetary (IP) shocks have been observed routinely at 1 AU since the 1960's (e.g., Reames 1999). It is presently believed that the majority of such IP shocks are driven by fast coronal mass ejections or CMEs as they propagate through interplanetary space (e.g., Gosling 1993), and that the associated ion intensity enhancements are due to diffusive shock acceleration of solar wind ions (Lee 1983; Jones and Ellison 1991; Reames 1999). However, the putative solar wind origin of the IP-shock accelerated ions is based on composition measurements associated with a very limited number of individual IP shocks (Klecker et al. 1981; Hovestadt et al. 1982; Tan et

  8. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agosteo, S. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Anania, M.P. [INFN LNF Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Caresana, M. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); De Martinis, C. [Physics Department, University of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Delle Side, D. [LEAS, University of Salento and INFN, Lecce (Italy); Fazzi, A. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Gatti, G. [INFN LNF Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Giove, D. [Physics Department, University of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Giulietti, D. [Physics Department, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Gizzi, L.A.; Labate, L. [INO-CNR and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Londrillo, P. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Maggiore, M. [INFN LNL, Legnaro (Italy); Nassisi, V., E-mail: vincenzo.nassisi@le.infn.it [LEAS, University of Salento and INFN, Lecce (Italy); Sinigardi, S. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Scuderi, V. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Turchetti, G. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); and others

    2014-07-15

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50–75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given.

  9. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, S.; Anania, M. P.; Caresana, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; De Martinis, C.; Delle Side, D.; Fazzi, A.; Gatti, G.; Giove, D.; Giulietti, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Londrillo, P.; Maggiore, M.; Nassisi, V.; Sinigardi, S.; Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Turchetti, G.; Varoli, V.; Velardi, L.

    2014-07-01

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50-75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given.

  10. A Variable Energy CW Compact Accelerator for Ion Cancer Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnstone, Carol J. [Fermilab; Taylor, J. [Huddersfield U.; Edgecock, R. [Huddersfield U.; Schulte, R. [Loma Linda U.

    2016-03-10

    Cancer is the second-largest cause of death in the U.S. and approximately two-thirds of all cancer patients will receive radiation therapy with the majority of the radiation treatments performed using x-rays produced by electron linacs. Charged particle beam radiation therapy, both protons and light ions, however, offers advantageous physical-dose distributions over conventional photon radiotherapy, and, for particles heavier than protons, a significant biological advantage. Despite recognition of potential advantages, there is almost no research activity in this field in the U.S. due to the lack of clinical accelerator facilities offering light ion therapy in the States. In January, 2013, a joint DOE/NCI workshop was convened to address the challenges of light ion therapy [1], inviting more than 60 experts from diverse fields related to radiation therapy. This paper reports on the conclusions of the workshop, then translates the clinical requirements into accelerat or and beam-delivery technical specifications. A comparison of available or feasible accelerator technologies is compared, including a new concept for a compact, CW, and variable energy light ion accelerator currently under development. This new light ion accelerator is based on advances in nonscaling Fixed-Field Alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator design. The new design concepts combine isochronous orbits with long (up to 4m) straight sections in a compact racetrack format allowing inner circulating orbits to be energy selected for low-loss, CW extraction, effectively eliminating the high-loss energy degrader in conventional CW cyclotron designs.

  11. Collective acceleration of ions in picosecond pinched electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshnikov, V. I.; Paperny, V. L.; Shipayev, I. V.

    2017-10-01

    Сharacteristics of intense electron–ion beams emitted by a high-voltage (280 kV) electron accelerator with a pulse duration of 200 ps and current 5 kA are studied. The capture phenomena and the subsequent collective acceleration of multi charged ions of the cathode material by the electric field of the electron beam are observed. It is shown that the electron–ion beam diameter does not exceed 30 µm therein in the case of lighter ions, and the decay of the pinched beam occurs at a shorter distance from the cathode. It is established that the ions of the cathode material Tin+ captured by the electron beam are accelerated up to an energy of  ⩽10 MeV, and the ion fluence reaches 1017 ion cm‑2 in the pulse. These ions are effectively embedded into the lattice sites of the irradiated substrate (sapphire crystal), forming the luminescent areas of the micron scale.

  12. Ge and Ti post-ion acceleration from laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L., E-mail: Lorenzo.Torrisi@unime.i [INFN-LNS di Catania, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, Ctr. Papardo 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Giuffrida, L. [INFN-LNS di Catania, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, Ctr. Papardo 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Rosinski, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, 23 Hery Str. 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Schallhorn, C. [Department of Physics, University of California, Portola Plaza 430, 90095 Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Laser ion sources (LIS) are employed with success to generate, in vacuum, Ge and Ti ion beams with high current, ion energy, charge states and directivity. Nanoseconds infrared laser pulses, with intensities of the order of 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2}, induce high ablation in Ge and Ti targets. Ions are produced in vacuum with energy distribution following the Coulomb-Boltzmann-shifted distribution and they are ejected mainly along the normal to the target surface. The free ion expansion process occurs in a constant-potential chamber placed at 30 kV positive voltage. An electric field of 5 kV/cm was used to accelerate the ions emitted from the plasma at INFN-LNS laser facility. Time-of-flight technique is employed to measure the mean ion energies of the post-accelerated particles. Ion charge states and energy distributions were measured through an ion energy spectrometer.

  13. Ge and Ti post-ion acceleration from laser ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Giuffrida, L.; Rosinski, M.; Schallhorn, C.

    2010-09-01

    Laser ion sources (LIS) are employed with success to generate, in vacuum, Ge and Ti ion beams with high current, ion energy, charge states and directivity. Nanoseconds infrared laser pulses, with intensities of the order of 10 10 W/cm 2, induce high ablation in Ge and Ti targets. Ions are produced in vacuum with energy distribution following the Coulomb-Boltzmann-shifted distribution and they are ejected mainly along the normal to the target surface. The free ion expansion process occurs in a constant-potential chamber placed at 30 kV positive voltage. An electric field of 5 kV/cm was used to accelerate the ions emitted from the plasma at INFN-LNS laser facility. Time-of-flight technique is employed to measure the mean ion energies of the post-accelerated particles. Ion charge states and energy distributions were measured through an ion energy spectrometer.

  14. Low- to medium-β cavities for heavy ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facco, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    Acceleration of low- and medium-β heavy ions by means of superconducting (SC) linear accelerators (linacs) was made possible by the development, during four decades, of a particular class of cavities characterized by low operation frequency, several different shapes and different electromagnetic modes of operation. Their performance, initially rather poor in operating accelerators, have steadily increased along with the technological progress and nowadays the gap with the high-β, elliptical cavities is close to be filled. Initially confined to a very small number of applications, this family of cavities evolved in many directions becoming one of the most widespread in linacs. Nowadays it is present in the majority of superconducting radio-frequency ion linac projects worldwide. An overview of low- and medium-β SC cavities for heavy ions, focused on their recent evolution and achievements, will be given.

  15. Laser Accelerated Ions from a Shock Compressed Gas Foil

    CERN Document Server

    Helle, M H; Kaganovich, D; Chen, Y; Palastro, J P; Ting, A

    2016-01-01

    We present results of energetic laser-ion acceleration from a tailored, near solid density gas target. Colliding hydrodynamic shocks compress a pure hydrogen gas jet into a 70 {\\mu}m thick target prior to the arrival of the ultra-intense laser pulse. A density scan reveals the transition from a regime characterized by a wide angle, low energy beam to one of a more focused beam with a high energy halo. In the latter case, three dimensional simulations show the formation of a Z-pinch driven by the axial current resulting from laser wakefield accelerated electrons. Ions at the rear of the target are then accelerated by a combination of space charge fields from accelerated electrons and Coulombic repulsion as the pinch dissipates.

  16. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Magnetized Collisionless Electron-Ion Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sironi, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We investigate shock structure and particle acceleration in relativistic magnetized collisionless electron-ion shocks by means of 2.5D particle-in-cell simulations with ion-to-electron mass ratios (m_i/m_e) ranging from 16 to 1000. We explore a range of inclination angles between the pre-shock magnetic field and the shock normal. In "subluminal" shocks, where relativistic particles can escape ahead of the shock along the magnetic field lines, ions are efficiently accelerated via a Fermi-like mechanism. The downstream ion spectrum consists of a relativistic Maxwellian and a high-energy power-law tail, which contains ~5% of ions and ~30% of ion energy. Its slope is -2.1. Upstream electrons enter the shock with lower energy than ions, so they are more strongly tied to the field. As a result, only ~1% of the incoming electrons are Fermi-accelerated at the shock before being advected downstream, where they populate a steep power-law tail (with slope -3.5). For "superluminal" shocks, where relativistic particles ca...

  17. A study of light ion accelerators for cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prelec, K.

    1997-07-01

    This review addresses several issues, such as possible advantages of light ion therapy compared to protons and conventional radiation, the complexity of such a system and its possible adaptation to a hospital environment, and the question of cost-effectiveness compared to other modalities for cancer treatment or to other life saving procedures. Characteristics and effects of different types of radiation on cells and organisms will be briefly described; this will include conventional radiation, protons and light ions. The status of proton and light ion cancer therapy will then be described, with more emphasis on the latter; on the basis of existing experience the criteria for the use of light ions will be listed and areas of possible medical applications suggested. Requirements and parameters of ion beams for cancer treatment will then be defined, including ion species, energy and intensity, as well as parameters of the beam when delivered to the target (scanning, time structure, energy spread). Possible accelerator designs for light ions will be considered, including linear accelerators, cyclotrons and synchrotrons and their basic features given; this will be followed by a review of existing and planned facilities for light ions. On the basis of these considerations a tentative design for a dedicated light ion facility will be suggested, a facility that would be hospital based, satisfying the clinical requirements, simple to operate and reliable, concluding with its cost-effectiveness in comparison with other modalities for treatment of cancer.

  18. Status report on the folded tandem ion accelerator at BARC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Singh; S K Gupta; M J Kansara; A Agarwal; S Santra; Rajesh Kumar; A Basu; P Sapna; S P Sarode; N B V Subrahmanyam; J P Bhatt; P J Raut; S S Pol; P V Bhagwat; S Kailas; B K Jain

    2002-11-01

    The folded tandem ion accelerator (FOTIA) facility set up at BARC has become operational. At present, it is used for elemental analysis studies using the Rutherford backscattering technique. The beams of 1H, 7Li, 12C, 16O and 19F have been accelerated up to terminal voltages of about 3 MV and are available for experiments. The terminal voltage is stable within ± 2 kV. In this paper, present status of the FOTIA and future plans are discussed.

  19. Simulations of ion acceleration at non-relativistic shocks: i) Acceleration efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Caprioli, Damiano

    2013-01-01

    We use 2D and 3D hybrid (kinetic ions - fluid electrons) simulations to investigate particle acceleration and magnetic field amplification at non-relativistic astrophysical shocks. We show that diffusive shock acceleration operates for quasi-parallel configurations (i.e., when the background magnetic field is almost aligned with the shock normal) and, for large sonic and Alfv\\'enic Mach numbers, produces universal power-law spectra proportional to p^(-4), where p is the particle momentum. The maximum energy of accelerated ions increases with time, and it is only limited by finite box size and run time. Acceleration is mainly efficient for parallel and quasi-parallel strong shocks, where 10-20% of the bulk kinetic energy can be converted to energetic particles, and becomes ineffective for quasi-perpendicular shocks. Also, the generation of magnetic turbulence correlates with efficient ion acceleration, and vanishes for quasi-perpendicular configurations. At very oblique shocks, ions can be accelerated via shoc...

  20. Ion acceleration through radiation pressure in quanto-electrodynamical regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sorbo, Dario; Ridgers, Chris; Laser Plasmas; Fusion Team

    2016-10-01

    The strong radiation pressure carried by high-intensity lasers interacting with plasmas can accelerate ions over very short distances. The resulting compact particle accelerator could find applications in medical physics (radiotherapy) as well as in fundamental physics (hadron interactions). With next-generation multi-petawatt lasers, reaching focused intensity 1023Wcm-2 , ions could potentially reach GeV energies. However, the physics of laser-matter interactions at these extreme intensities is not well understood. In particular, on acceleration by the electromagnetic fields of the laser, the electrons in the plasma start to radiate hard photons prolifically. These hard photons can decay to electron-positron pairs, a cascade of pair production can ensue leading to the formation of an over-dense pair plasma which can absorb the laser-pulse. We have developed a self-consistent theory for both hole boring and light sail radiation pressure ion-acceleration, accounting for radiation-reaction and pair-creation. We show that the key role is played by a pair plasma that arises between the laser and the accelerated ions, strongly modifying the laser absorption.

  1. Few-cycle fiber pulse compression and evolution of negative resonant radiation

    CERN Document Server

    McLenaghan, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    We present numerical simulations and experimental observations of the spectral expansion of fs-pulses compressing in optical fibers. Using the input pulse frequency chirp we are able to scan through the pulse compression spectra and observe in detail the emergence of negative-frequency resonant radiation (NRR), a recently discovered pulse instability coupling to negative frequencies [Rubino et al., PRL 108, 253901 (2012)]. We observe how the compressing pulse is exciting NRR as long as it overlaps spectrally with the resonant frequency. Furthermore, we observe that optimal pulse compression can be achieved at an optimal input chirp and for an optimal fiber length. The results are important for Kerr-effect pulse compressors, to generate novel light sources, as well as for the observation of quantum vacuum radiation.

  2. Stochastic Acceleration of Ions Driven by Pc1 Wave Packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Sibeck, D. G.; Tel'nikhin, A. A.; Kronberg, T. K.

    2015-01-01

    The stochastic motion of protons and He(sup +) ions driven by Pc1 wave packets is studied in the context of resonant particle heating. Resonant ion cyclotron heating typically occurs when wave powers exceed 10(exp -4) nT sq/Hz. Gyroresonance breaks the first adiabatic invariant and energizes keV ions. Cherenkov resonances with the electrostatic component of wave packets can also accelerate ions. The main effect of this interaction is to accelerate thermal protons to the local Alfven speed. The dependencies of observable quantities on the wave power and plasma parameters are determined, and estimates for the heating extent and rate of particle heating in these wave-particle interactions are shown to be in reasonable agreement with known empirical data.

  3. Laser-driven shock acceleration of monoenergetic ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Fiuza, F; Boella, E; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O; Haberberger, D; Tochitsky, S; Gong, C; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2012-01-01

    We show that monoenergetic ion beams can be accelerated by moderate Mach number collisionless, electrostatic shocks propagating in a long scale-length exponentially decaying plasma profile. Strong plasma heating and density steepening produced by an intense laser pulse near the critical density can launch such shocks that propagate in the extended plasma at high velocities. The generation of a monoenergetic ion beam is possible due to the small and constant sheath electric field associated with the slowly decreasing density profile. The conditions for the acceleration of high-quality, energetic ion beams are identified through theory and multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The scaling of the ion energy with laser intensity shows that it is possible to generate $\\sim 200$ MeV proton beams with state-of-the-art 100 TW class laser systems.

  4. Accelerator physics in ERL based polarized electron ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Yue [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    This talk will present the current accelerator physics challenges and solutions in designing ERL-based polarized electron-hadron colliders, and illustrate them with examples from eRHIC and LHeC designs. These challenges include multi-pass ERL design, highly HOM-damped SRF linacs, cost effective FFAG arcs, suppression of kink instability due to beam-beam effect, and control of ion accumulation and fast ion instabilities.

  5. Prompt Gas Desorption Due to Ion Impact on Accelerator Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Sagar; Seidl, Peter A.; Faltens, Andy; Lidia, Steven M.

    2011-10-01

    The repetition rate and peak current of high intensity ion accelerators for inertial fusion or other applications may be limited under certain conditions by the desorption of gas molecules and atoms due to stray ions striking the accelerator structure. We have measured the prompt yield of atoms in close proximity to the point of impact of the ions on a surface. Using the 300-keV, K+ ion beam of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-I), ions strike a metal target in a 5-10 microsecond bunch. The collector of a Bayert-Alpert style ionization gauge is used to detect the local pressure burst several centimeters away. Pressure transients are observed on a micro-second time scale due to the initial burst of desorbed gas, and on a much longer (~1 second) timescale, corresponding to the equilibration of the pressure after many ``bounces'' of atoms in the vacuum chamber. We report on these time dependent pressure measurements, modeling of the pressure transient, and implications for high-intensity ion accelerators. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DOE by LBNL under Contract DE-AC02-05CH1123.

  6. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, Adrienne [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-08-16

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high-power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. However, this mechanism is not ideal for creating the high-energy proton beams needed for future applications. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for exploring new regimes of ion acceleration. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we achieved a pure proton beam with evidence of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the possibility of transforming our liquid cryogenic

  7. Optimal Design and Experimental characterisation of short optical pulse compression using CDPF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yujun, Qian; Quist, S.

    1999-01-01

    We present optimal design and experimental characterisation ofoptical pulse compression using a comblike dispersion-profiled fibre(CDPF). A pulse train at 10GHz with puslewidth of 1ps and side-lobesuppression of 30dB can be obtained.......We present optimal design and experimental characterisation ofoptical pulse compression using a comblike dispersion-profiled fibre(CDPF). A pulse train at 10GHz with puslewidth of 1ps and side-lobesuppression of 30dB can be obtained....

  8. Enhanced soliton-effect pulse compression by cross-phase modulation in optical fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹文华; 刘颂豪

    2000-01-01

    A new method is proposed to enhance the soliton-effect compression of optical pulses. It consists of copropagating two optical pulses with close wavelengths in the anomalous group-velocity dispersion regime of single-mode fibers. Numerical simulations show that, as compared with the traditional single pulse compression method, cross-phase modulation can not only dramatically increase the compression ratio but also decrease the optimum fiber length. The effects of initial pulse-width mismatch, Raman self-scattering, and pulse walk-off on the pulse compression are also discussed.

  9. Pulse chirp increasing pulse compression followed by positive resonant radiation in fibers

    CERN Document Server

    McLenaghan, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Pulse self-compression followed by the generation of resonant radiation is a well known phenomenon in non-linear optics. Resonant radiation is important as it allows for efficient and tunable wavelength conversion. We vary the chirp of the initial pulse and find in simulations and experiments that a small positive chirp enhances the pulse compression and strongly increases the generation of resonant radiation. This result corroborates previously published simulation results indicating an improved degree of pulse compression for a small positive chirp [1]. It also demonstrates how pulse evolution can be studied without cutting back the fiber.

  10. Progress toward a prototype recirculating ion induction accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cable, M.D. [and others

    1996-06-01

    The U.S. Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) Program is developing the physics and technology of ion induction accelerators, with the goal of electric power production by means of heavy ion beam-driven inertial fusion (commonly called heavy ion fusion, or HIF). Such accelerators are the principal candidates for inertial fusion power production applications, because they are expected to enjoy high efficiency, inherently high pulse repetition frequency (power plants are expected to inject and burn several fusion targets per second), and high reliability. In addition (and in contrast with laser beams, which are focused with optical lenses) heavy-ion beams will be focused onto the target by magnetic fields, which cannot be damaged by target explosions. Laser beams are used in present-day and planned near-term facilities (such as LLNUs Nova and the National Ignition Facility, which is being designed) because they can focus beams onto very small, intensely illuminated spots for scaled experiments and because the laser technology is already available. An induction accelerator works by passing the beam through a series of accelerating modules, each of which applies an electromotive force to the beam as it goes by; effectively, the beam acts as the secondary winding of a series of efficient one-turn transformers. The authors present plans for and progress toward the development of a small (4.5-m-diam) prototype recirculator, which will accelerate singly charged potassium ions through 15 laps, increasing the ion energy from 80 to 320 keV and the beam current from 2 to 8 mA. Beam confinement and bending are effected with permanent-magnet quadrupoles and electric dipoles, respectively. The design is based on scaling laws and on extensive particle and fluid simulations of the behavior of the space charge-dominated beam.

  11. Heavy ion acceleration in the radiation pressure acceleration and breakout afterburner regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2017-07-01

    We present a theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from ultrathin (20 nm) gold foil irradiated by high-intensity sub-picosecond lasers. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, three laser systems are modeled that cover the range between femtosecond and picosecond pulses. By varying the laser pulse duration we observe a transition from radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) to the relativistic induced transparency (RIT) regime for heavy ions akin to light ions. The underlying physics of beam formation and acceleration is similar for light and heavy ions, however, nuances of the acceleration process make the heavy ions more challenging. A more detailed study involving variation of peak laser intensity I 0 and pulse duration τFWHM revealed that the transition point from RPA to RIT regime depends on the peak laser intensity on target and occurs for pulse duration {τ }{{F}{{W}}{{H}}{{M}}}{{R}{{P}}{{A}}\\to {{R}}{{I}}{{T}}}[{{f}}{{s}}]\\cong 210/\\sqrt{{I}0[{{W}} {{{cm}}}-2]/{10}21}. The most abundant gold ion and charge-to-mass ratio are Au51+ and q/M ≈ 1/4, respectively, half that of light ions. For ultrathin foils, on the order of one skin depth, we established a linear scaling of the maximum energy per nucleon (E/M)max with (q/M)max, which is more favorable than the quadratic one found previously. The numerical simulations predict heavy ion beams with very attractive properties for applications: high directionality (high fluxes (>1011 ions sr-1) and energy (>20 MeV/nucleon) from laser systems delivering >20 J of energy on target.

  12. Observations of transverse ion acceleration in the topside auroral ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbe, G.P.; Arnoldy, R.L. (Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham (United States)); Moore, T.E. (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (United States)); Kintner, P.M.; Vago, J.L. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Data obtained from a sounding rocket flight which reached an apogee of 927 km and passed through several auroral arcs are reported. During portions of the flight when the rocket was not in an energetic auroral structure, the ion data are fit to a Maxwellian function which yields the plasma parameters. Throughout the middle portion of the flight when above 700 km altitude, ion distributions having a superthermal tail were measured. These ion distributions generally coexisted with a cold thermal core distribution and peaked at pitch angles slightly greater than 90{degree}, which identifies them as conic distributions. These ions can be modeled using a bi-Maxwellian distribution function with a perpendicular (to B) temperature about 10 times greater than the parallel temperature of 0.15 eV. When the rocket was immersed in energetic auroral electron precipitation, two other ion distributions were observed. Transversely accelerated ions which represented bulk heating of the ambient population were observed. Transversely accelerated ions which represented bulk heating of the ambient population were observed continuously in these arcs. The characteristic perpendicular energy of the transversely bulk heated ions reached as high as 3 eV compared to typically less than 0.4 eV during nonauroral times. Cold ions flowing down the magnetic field were also continuously observed when the rocket was immersed in auroral electron precipitation and had downward speeds between 3 and 5 km/s. If one balances electric and collisional forces, these speeds translate to an electric field pointing into the atmosphere of magnitude 0.01 mV/m. A close correlation between auroral electron precipitation, measured electrostatic oxygen cyclotron waves, cold downflowing ions and transversely bulk heated ions will be shown.

  13. The intense neutron generator and future factory type ion accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W.B

    1968-07-01

    A neutron factory is likely to sell its product in the form of isotopes. To ay neutron factories are nuclear reactors. Ion accelerators may also produce isotopes by direct interaction and, at high enough energies, mesons and hyperons. The challenge of the electrical production of neutrons goes far beyond the isotope market. It challenges the two popular concepts for long term large scale energy, the fast breeder reactor and controlled thermonuclear fusion. For this use about 4% of nuclear generated power would be applied in a feedback loop generating extra neutrons. Competition rests on operating and processing costs. The Intense Neutron Generator proposal now cancelled would have been full scale for such a use, but much further advance in accelerator engineering is required and anticipated. Perhaps most promising is the application of the ion drag principle in which rings of fast electrons are accelerated along their axis dragging ions with them by electrostatic attraction. Due to the much larger mass of the ions they can acquire much higher energy than the electrons and the process could be efficient. Such accelerators have not yet been made but experimental and theoretical studies are promising. (author)

  14. Laser-driven ion accelerators for tumor therapy revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, Ute; Alonso, Jose

    2016-12-01

    Ten years ago, the authors of this report published a first paper on the technical challenges that laser accelerators need to overcome before they could be applied to tumor therapy. Among the major issues were the maximum energy of the accelerated ions and their intensity, control and reproducibility of the laser-pulse output, quality assurance and patient safety. These issues remain today. While theoretical progress has been made for designing transport systems, for tailoring the plumes of laser-generated protons, and for suitable dose delivery, today's best lasers are far from reaching performance levels, in both proton energy and intensity to seriously consider clinical ion beam therapy (IBT) application. This report details these points and substantiates that laser-based IBT is neither superior to IBT with conventional particle accelerators nor ready to replace it.

  15. Design study of electron cyclotron resonance-ion plasma accelerator for heavy ion cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, T., E-mail: ttinoue@juntendo.ac.jp; Sugimoto, S.; Sasai, K. [Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo 113–8421 (Japan); Hattori, T. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263–0024 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance-Ion Plasma Accelerator (ECR-IPAC) device, which theoretically can accelerate multiple charged ions to several hundred MeV with short acceleration length, has been proposed. The acceleration mechanism is based on the combination of two physical principles, plasma electron ion adiabatic ejection (PLEIADE) and Gyromagnetic Autoresonance (GYRAC). In this study, we have designed the proof of principle machine ECR-IPAC device and simulated the electromagnetic field distribution generating in the resonance cavity. ECR-IPAC device consisted of three parts, ECR ion source section, GYRAC section, and PLEIADE section. ECR ion source section and PLEIADE section were designed using several multi-turn solenoid coils and sextupole magnets, and GYRAC section was designed using 10 turns coil. The structure of ECR-IPAC device was the cylindrical shape, and the total length was 1024 mm and the maximum diameter was 580 mm. The magnetic field distribution, which maintains the stable acceleration of plasma, was generated on the acceleration center axis throughout three sections. In addition, the electric field for efficient acceleration of electrons was generated in the resonance cavity by supplying microwave of 2.45 GHz.

  16. Micro structure processing on plastics by accelerated hydrogen molecular ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Nishikawa, H.

    2017-08-01

    A proton has 1836 times the mass of an electron and is the lightest nucleus to be used for accelerator in material modification. We can setup accelerator with the lowest acceleration voltage. It is preferable characteristics of Proton Beam Writer (PBW) for industrial applications. On the contrary ;proton; has the lowest charge among all nuclei and the potential impact to material is lowest. The object of this research is to improve productivity of the PBW for industry application focusing on hydrogen molecular ions. These ions are generated in the same ion source by ionizing hydrogen molecule. There is no specific ion source requested and it is suitable for industrial use. We demonstrated three dimensional (3D) multilevel micro structures on polyester base FPC (Flexible Printed Circuits) using proton, H2+ and H3+. The reactivity of hydrogen molecular ions is much higher than that of proton and coincident with the level of expectation. We can apply this result to make micro devices of 3D multilevel structures on FPC.

  17. Radiation Pressure Acceleration: the factors limiting maximum attainable ion energy

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S S; Schroeder, C B; Bulanov, S V; Esirkepov, T Zh; Kando, M; Pegoraro, F; Leemans, W P

    2016-01-01

    Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is a highly efficient mechanism of laser-driven ion acceleration, with with near complete transfer of the laser energy to the ions in the relativistic regime. However, there is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. The tightly focused laser pulses have group velocities smaller than the vacuum light speed, and, since they offer the high intensity needed for the RPA regime, it is plausible that group velocity effects would manifest themselves in the experiments involving tightly focused pulses and thin foils. However, in this case, finite spot size effects are important, and another limiting factor, the transverse expansion of the target, may dominate over the group velocity effect. As the laser pulse diffracts after passing the focus, the target expands accordingly due to the transverse intensity profile of the laser. Due to this expansion, the areal density of the target decreases, making it trans...

  18. On the effects of quantization on mismatched pulse compression filters designed using L-p norm minimization techniques

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cilliers, Jacques E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In [1] the authors introduced a technique for generating mismatched pulse compression filters for linear frequency chirp signals. The technique minimizes the sum of the pulse compression sidelobes in a p L –norm sense. It was shown that extremely...

  19. High Voltage Operation of Helical Pulseline Structures for Ion Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Waldron, William; Reginato, Lou

    2005-01-01

    The basic concept for the acceleration of heavy ions using a helical pulseline requires the launching of a high voltage traveling wave with a waveform determined by the beam transport physics in order to maintain stability and acceleration.* This waveform is applied to the front of the helix, creating over the region of the ion bunch a constant axial acceleration electric field that travels down the line in synchronism with the ions. Several methods of driving the helix have been considered. Presently, the best method of generating the waveform and also maintaining the high voltage integrity appears to be a transformer primary loosely coupled to the front of the helix, generating the desired waveform and achieving a voltage step-up from primary to secondary (the helix). This can reduce the drive voltage that must be brought into the helix enclosure through the feedthroughs by factors of 5 or more. The accelerating gradient is limited by the voltage holding of the vacuum insulator, and the material and helix g...

  20. Generation of monoenergetic ion beams with a laser accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfotenhauer, Sebastian M.

    2009-01-29

    A method for the generation of monoenergetic proton and ion beams from a laser-based particle accelerator is presented. This method utilizes the unique space-charge effects occurring during relativistic laser-plasma interactions on solid targets in combination with a dot-like particle source. Due to this unique interaction geometry, MeV proton beams with an intrinsically narrow energy spectrum were obtained, for the first time, from a micrometer-scale laser accelerator. Over the past three years, the acceleration scheme has been consistently improved to enhance both the maximum particle energy and the reliability of the setup. The achieved degree of reliability allowed to derive the first scaling laws specifically for monoenergetic proton beams. Furthermore, the acceleration scheme was expanded on other target materials, enabling the generation of monoenergetic carbon beams. The experimental work was strongly supported by the parallel development of a complex theoretical model, which fully accounts for the observations and is in excellent agreement with numerical simulations. The presented results have an extraordinarily broad scope way beyond the current thesis: The availability of monoenergetic ion beams from a compact laser-plasma beam source - in conjunction with the unique properties of laser-produced particle beams - addresses a number of outstanding applications in fundamental research, material science and medical physics, and will help to shape a new generation of accelerators. (orig.)

  1. Laser-ion acceleration via anomalous electron heating

    CERN Document Server

    Yogo, A; Iwata, N; Tosaki, S; Morace, A; Arikawa, Y; Fujioka, S; Nishimura, H; Sagisaka, A; Johzaki, T; Matsuo, K; Kamitsukasa, N; Kojima, S; Nagatomo, H; Nakai, M; Shiraga, H; Murakami, M; Tokita, S; Kawanaka, J; Miyanaga, N; Yamanoi, K; Norimatsu, T; Sakagami, H; Bulanov, S V; Kondo, K; Azechi, H

    2016-01-01

    Using a kilojoule class laser, we demonstrate for the first time that high-contrast picosecond pulses are advantageous for ion acceleration. We show that a laser pulse with optimum duration and a large focal spot accelerates electrons beyond the ponderomotive energy. This anomalous electron heating enables efficient ion acceleration reaching 52 MeV at an intensity of 1.2X10^19 Wcm^-2. The proton energy observed agrees quantitatively with a one-dimensional plasma expansion model newly developed by taking the anomalous heating effect into account. The heating process is confirmed by both measurements with an electron spectrometer and a one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. By extending the pulse duration to 6 ps, 5% energy conversion efficiency to protons (50 J out of 1 kJ laser energy) is achieved with an intensity of 10^18-Wcm^-2. The present results are quite encouraging for realizing ion-driven fast ignition and novel ion beamlines.

  2. Development of an ion beam analyzing system for the KBSI heavy-ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahng, Jungbae [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566 (Korea, Republic of); Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jonggi; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Seyong; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob, E-mail: bslee@kbsi.re.kr [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 46241 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-San, E-mail: eskim1@korea.ac.kr [Department of Accelerator Science, Korea University Sejong Campus, Sejong 339-770 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI) has been developing a heavy ion accelerator system to accelerate high current, multi-charge state ions produced by a 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron ion source. A beam analyzing system as a part of the low energy beam transport apparatus was developed to select charged particles with desirable charge states from the ion beams. The desired species of ion, which is generated and extracted from the ECR ion source including various ion particles, can be selected by 90° dipole electromagnet. Due to the non-symmetrical structure in the coil as well as the non-linear permeability of the yoke material coil, a three dimensional analysis was carried out to confirm the design parameters. In this paper, we present the experimental results obtained as result of an analysis of KBSI accelerator. The effectiveness of beam selection was confirmed during the test of the analyzing system by injecting an ion beam from an ECR ion source.

  3. Development of an ion beam analyzing system for the KBSI heavy-ion accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahng, Jungbae; Hong, Jonggi; Park, Jin Yong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Choi, Seyong; Shin, Chang Seouk; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Won, Mi-Sook; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Kim, Eun-San

    2016-02-01

    The Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI) has been developing a heavy ion accelerator system to accelerate high current, multi-charge state ions produced by a 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron ion source. A beam analyzing system as a part of the low energy beam transport apparatus was developed to select charged particles with desirable charge states from the ion beams. The desired species of ion, which is generated and extracted from the ECR ion source including various ion particles, can be selected by 90° dipole electromagnet. Due to the non-symmetrical structure in the coil as well as the non-linear permeability of the yoke material coil, a three dimensional analysis was carried out to confirm the design parameters. In this paper, we present the experimental results obtained as result of an analysis of KBSI accelerator. The effectiveness of beam selection was confirmed during the test of the analyzing system by injecting an ion beam from an ECR ion source.

  4. Note: A pulsed laser ion source for linear induction accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H., E-mail: bamboobbu@hotmail.com [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-106, Mianyang 621900 (China); School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, K.; Shen, Y.; Jiang, X.; Dong, P.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Y.; Chen, D.; Pan, H.; Wang, W.; Jiang, W.; Long, J.; Xia, L.; Shi, J.; Zhang, L.; Deng, J. [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-106, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-01-15

    We have developed a high-current laser ion source for induction accelerators. A copper target was irradiated by a frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser (266 nm) with relatively low intensities of 10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2}. The laser-produced plasma supplied a large number of Cu{sup +} ions (∼10{sup 12} ions/pulse) during several microseconds. Emission spectra of the plasma were observed and the calculated electron temperature was about 1 eV. An induction voltage adder extracted high-current ion beams over 0.5 A/cm{sup 2} from a plasma-prefilled gap. The normalized beam emittance measured by a pepper-pot method was smaller than 1 π mm mrad.

  5. Selective deuterium ion acceleration using the Vulcan petawatt laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krygier, A. G. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, École Polytechnique, 91128 Palasiseau (France); Physics Department, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Morrison, J. T. [Propulsion Systems Directorate, Air Force Research Lab, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Kar, S., E-mail: s.kar@qub.ac.uk; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Green, A.; Jung, D. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Clarke, R.; Notley, M. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Fuchs, J.; Vassura, L. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, École Polytechnique, 91128 Palasiseau (France); Kleinschmidt, A.; Roth, M. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstrasse 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H. [The John Adams Institute, Blackett Laboratory, Department of Physics, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Norreys, P. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Oliver, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Zepf, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Helmholtz Institute Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Borghesi, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Freeman, R. R. [Physics Department, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We report on the successful demonstration of selective acceleration of deuterium ions by target-normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) with a high-energy petawatt laser. TNSA typically produces a multi-species ion beam that originates from the intrinsic hydrocarbon and water vapor contaminants on the target surface. Using the method first developed by Morrison et al. [Phys. Plasmas 19, 030707 (2012)], an ion beam with >99% deuterium ions and peak energy 14 MeV/nucleon is produced with a 200 J, 700 fs, >10{sup 20}W/cm{sup 2} laser pulse by cryogenically freezing heavy water (D{sub 2}O) vapor onto the rear surface of the target prior to the shot. Within the range of our detectors (0°–8.5°), we find laser-to-deuterium-ion energy conversion efficiency of 4.3% above 0.7 MeV/nucleon while a conservative estimate of the total beam gives a conversion efficiency of 9.4%.

  6. Techniques to produce and accelerate radioactive ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Penescu, Liviu Constantin; Lettry, Jacques; Cata-Danil, Gheorghe

    The production and acceleration of the Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) continues the long line of nuclear investigations started in the XIXth century by Pierre and Marie Curie, Henri Becquerel and Ernest Rutherford. The contemporary applications of the RIBs span a wide range of physics fields: nuclear and atomic physics, solid-state physics, life sciences and material science. ISOLDE is a world-leading Isotope mass-Separation On-Line (ISOL) facility hosted at CERN in Geneva for more than 40 years, offering the largest variety of radioactive ion beams with, until now, more than 1000 isotopes of more than 72 elements (with Z ranging from 2 to 88), with half-lives down to milliseconds and intensities up to 1011 ions/s. The post acceleration of the full variety of beams allows reaching final energies between 0.8 and 3.0 MeV/u. This thesis describes the development of a new series of FEBIAD (“Forced Electron Beam Induced Arc Discharge”) ion sources at CERN-ISOLDE. The VADIS (“Versatile Arc Discharge Ion Source�...

  7. On the trade-off between mainlobe width and peak sidelobe level of mismatched pulse compression filters for linear chirp waveforms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cilliers, Jacques E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In previous paper the authors introduced a technique for generating mismatched pulse compression filters for linear frequency chirp signals. The technique minimizes the sum of the pulse compression sidelobes in an Lp norm sense. It was shown...

  8. CCD based beam loss monitor for ion accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousov, A.; Mustafin, E.; Ensinger, W.

    2014-04-01

    Beam loss monitoring is an important aspect of proper accelerator functioning. There is a variety of existing solutions, but each has its own disadvantages, e.g. unsuitable dynamic range or time resolution, high cost, or short lifetime. Therefore, new options are looked for. This paper shows a method of application of a charge-coupled device (CCD) video camera as a beam loss monitor (BLM) for ion beam accelerators. The system was tested with a 500 MeV/u N+7 ion beam interacting with an aluminum target. The algorithms of camera signal processing with LabView based code and beam loss measurement are explained. Limits of applicability of this monitor system are discussed.

  9. Double ion beams and accelerated ions observed by SWIDs on Chang'E-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Linggao; Zhang, Aibing; Wang, Shijin

    2012-07-01

    Chang'E-1 is the first Chinese lunar exploration spacecraft launced in 2007. Solar Wind Ion Detectors(SWIDs) are two scientific instruments on Chang'E-1 to measure the solar wind and the plasma environment around the Moon. Some cases of double ion beams in solar wind were observed by SWIDs. These double ion beams present double proton beams with a single alpha beam. Another insteresting phenomenon observed by SWIDs is the accelerated ions when the spacecraft was over the magnetic anomalies. The magnetic anomaly may induce mini-magnetosphere, which was confirmed both by simulation and measurement of some other lunar exploration spacecrafts. The accelerated ions observed by Chang'E-1 may be the result of the interaction of the solar wind and the mini-magnetosphere of the Moon.

  10. High Energy Ion Acceleration by Extreme Laser Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-14

    was used instead. This code makes the assumption that the background ion and electron behaviour can be approximated with a fluid model whilst...electron behaviour occurring from this aperture was also published in High Power Laser Science and Engineering [4]. A significant breakthrough was also...acceleration to transparency. This was published in Physics of Plasmas [12]. Through one- dimensional modelling of the interaction, it was also

  11. Optimizing direct intense-field laser acceleration of ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, Zoltan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Salamin, Yousef I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, American University of Sharjah, POB 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); Galow, Benjamin J.; Keitel, Christoph H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    The dynamics of ion acceleration in tightly focused laser beams is investigated in relativistic simulations. Studies are performed to find the optimal parameters which maximize the energy gain, beam quality, and flux. The exit ionic kinetic energy and its uncertainty are improved and the number of accelerated particles is increased by orders of magnitude over our earlier results, especially when working with a longer laser wavelength. Laser beams of powers of 0.1-10 petawatts and focused to subwavelength spot radii are shown to directly accelerate protons and bare nuclei of helium, carbon, and oxygen from a few to several hundred MeV/nucleon. Variation of the volume of the initial ionic ensemble, as well as the introduction of a pulse shape on the laser fields, have been investigated and are shown to influence the exit particle kinetic energies only slightly.

  12. Heavy-ion acceleration with a superconducting linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    This year, 1988, is the tenth anniversary of the first use of RF superconductivity to accelerate heavy ions. In June 1978, the first two superconducting resonators of the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) were used to boost the energy of a /sup 19/F beam from the tandem, and by September 1978 a 5-resonator linac provided an /sup 16/O beam for a nuclear-physics experiment. Since then, the superconducting linac has grown steadily in size and capability until now there are 42 accelerating structures and 4 bunchers. Throughout this period, the system was used routinely for physics research, and by now the total time with beam on target is 35,000 hours. Lessons learned from this long running experience and some key technical developments that made it possible are reviewed in this paper. 19 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. LIGHT - from laser ion acceleration to future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Markus; Light Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Creation of high intensity multi-MeV ion bunches by high power lasers became a reliable tool during the last 15 years. The laser plasma source provides for TV/m accelerating field gradients and initially sub-ps bunch lengths. However, the large envelope divergence and the continuous exponential energy spectrum are substential drawbacks for many possible applications. To face this problem, the LIGHT collaboration was founded (Laser Ion Generation, Handling and Transport). The collaboration consists of several university groups and research centers, namely TU Darmstadt, JWGU Frankfurt, HI Jena, HZDR Dresden and GSI Darmstadt. The central goal is building a test beamline for merging laser ion acceleration with conventional accelerator infrastructure at the GSI facility. In the latest experiments, low divergent proton bunches with a central energy of up to 10 MeV and containing >109 particles could be provided at up to 2.2 m behind the plasma source, using a pulsed solenoid. In a next step, a radiofrequency cavity will be added to the beamline for phase rotation of these bunches, giving access to sub-ns bunch lengths and reaching highest intensities. An overview of the LIGHT objectives and the recent experimental results will be given. This work was supported by HIC4FAIR.

  14. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Shepard, K.W.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Fuerst, J.D.; Waldschmidt, G.; /Argonne; Gonin, I.V.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006 < v/c < 0.06. Superconducting TEM-class cavities have been widely applied to CW acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently-phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front-end of such linacs, particularly for the post-acceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008 < {beta} = v/c < 0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3-4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  15. Reducing ion energy spread in hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration by using two-ion-species targets

    CERN Document Server

    Weng, S M; Sheng, Z M

    2014-01-01

    The generation of fast ion beams in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration by intense laser pulses has been studied for targets with different ion components. We find that the oscillation of the longitudinal electric field for accelerating ions can be effectively suppressed by using a two-ion-species target, because fast ions from a two-ion-species target are distributed into more bunches and each bunch bears less charge. Consequently, the energy spread of ion beams generated in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration can be greatly reduced down to 3.7% according to our numerical simulation.

  16. Laser ion acceleration from a double-layer metal foil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecz, Zsolt

    2013-11-12

    The laser-ion acceleration with ultra-intense and ultra-short laser pulses has opened a new field of accelerator physics over the last decade. Fast development in laser systems are capable of delivering short pulses of a duration of a few hundred femtoseconds at intensities between 10{sup 18}-10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. At these high intensities the laser-matter interaction induces strong charge separation, which leads to electric fields exceeding the acceleration gradients of conventional devices by 6 orders of magnitude. The particle dynamics and energy absorption of the laser pulse can be understood by means of high-performance simulation tools. In the framework of the LIGHT (Laser Ion Generation, Handling and Transport) project our goal is to provide an analytical description of the 3D distribution of the protons accelerated via TNSA (Target Normal Sheath Acceleration). In this acceleration mechanism the short pulse impinging on a metal foil heats the electrons to relativistic energies, which triggers the strong charge separation field on the opposite target surface (Debye-sheath). The accelerated light ions (proton, carbon, oxygen) observed in the experiments originate from the contamination layer deposited on the surface. The thickness of this layer in the experiments is not known exactly. According to our study these ions can be accelerated in three different regimes depending on layer thickness: quasi-static acceleration (QSA, for thin layers), plasma expansion (for thick layers) and a not well understood intermediate (or combined) regime. In a laser-plasma simulations time-dependent hot electron density and temperature are observed, therefore we performed plasma simulations with a well defined and constant initial hot electron distribution. Thus the simulation results are easier to compare with analytical models. In our case the theoretical investigation of the TNSA involves the understanding of the charge separation effects at the surface of a two

  17. Simulating Electron Clouds in Heavy-Ion Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik,A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J-L.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2005-04-07

    Contaminating clouds of electrons are a concern for most accelerators of positive-charged particles, but there are some unique aspects of heavy-ion accelerators for fusion and high-energy density physics which make modeling such clouds especially challenging. In particular, self-consistent electron and ion simulation is required, including a particle advance scheme which can follow electrons in regions where electrons are strongly-, weakly-, and un-magnetized. They describe their approach to such self-consistency, and in particular a scheme for interpolating between full-orbit (Boris) and drift-kinetic particle pushes that enables electron time steps long compared to the typical gyro period in the magnets. They present tests and applications: simulation of electron clouds produced by three different kinds of sources indicates the sensitivity of the cloud shape to the nature of the source; first-of-a-kind self-consistent simulation of electron-cloud experiments on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in which the machine can be flooded with electrons released by impact of the ion beam and an end plate, demonstrate the ability to reproduce key features of the ion-beam phase space; and simulation of a two-stream instability of thin beams in a magnetic field demonstrates the ability of the large-timestep mover to accurately calculate the instability.

  18. Acceleration of cluster and molecular ions by TIARA 3 MV tandem accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Saitoh, Y; Tajima, S

    2000-01-01

    We succeeded in accelerating molecular and cluster ions (B sub 2 sub - sub 4 , C sub 2 sub - sub 1 sub 0 , O sub 2 , Al sub 2 sub - sub 4 , Si sub 2 sub - sub 4 , Cu sub 2 sub - sub 3 , Au sub 2 sub - sub 3 , LiF, and AlO) to MeV energies with high-intensity beam currents by means of a 3 MV tandem accelerator in the TIARA facility. These cluster ions were generated by a cesium sputter-type negative ion source. We tested three types of carbon sputter cathodes in which graphite powder was compressed with different pressures. The pressure difference affected the generating ratio of clusters generated to single atom ions extracted from the source and it appeared that the high-density cathode was suitable. We also investigated the optimum gas pressure for charge exchange in the tandem high-voltage terminal. Clusters of larger size tend to require lower pressure than do smaller ones. In addition, we were able to obtain doubly charged AlO molecular ions. (authors)

  19. The Acceleration of Ions in Solar Flares During Magnetic Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Knizhnik, Kalman; Drake, James F

    2011-01-01

    The acceleration of solar flare ions during magnetic reconnection is explored via particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently follow the motions of both protons and $\\alpha$ particles. We demonstrate that the dominant ion heating during reconnection with a guide field (a magnetic component perpendicular to the reconnection plane) results from pickup behavior during the entry into reconnection exhausts. In contrast with anti-parallel reconnection, the temperature increment is dominantly transverse, rather than parallel, to the local magnetic field. The comparison of protons and alphas reveals a mass-to-charge ($M/Q$) threshold in pickup behavior that favors heating of high $M/Q$ ions over protons, which is consistent with impulsive flare observations.

  20. Performance characteristics of an induction linac magnetic pulse compression modulator at multi-kilohertz pulse repetition frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampayan, S.E.; Chambers, F.W.; Deadrick, F.J. [and others

    1991-05-01

    The ETA-II linear induction accelerator utilizes four pulse power conditioning chains. Magnetic pulse compression modulators (MAG1-Ds) form the last stage of each chain. A single power conditioning chain is used to drive the injector; the remaining three are used to drive 60 accelerator cells. Nominal parameters of the MAG1-D are an output voltage of greater than 120 kV, pulse width of 70 ns, and an output impedance of 2 ohms. Our operations goal for ETA-II is stable high average power operation at 5 kHz PRF. We have begun upgrading and characterizing the power conditioning chain on our High Average Power Test Stand (HAPTS). On HAPTS, the pulse to pulse amplitude stability has been improved to less than 0.7% (one sigma) and of order 3-5 ns random jitter about a systematic timing variation. In this paper we describe the status of our work to achieve the this paper we describe the status of our work to achieve the average power operation of ETA-II

  1. Towards polarization measurements of laser-accelerated helium-3 ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engin, Ilhan

    2015-08-28

    In the framework of this thesis, preparatory investigations for the spin-polarization measurement of {sup 3}He ions from laser-induced plasmas have been performed. Therefore, experiments aiming at an efficient laser-induced ion acceleration out of a {sup 4}He gas target were carried out at two high-intensity laser facilities: the Arcturus laser at Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf as well as PHELIX at GSI Darmstadt. The scientific goal of both experiments was to investigate the ion-acceleration process in underdense plasmas by measuring the ion energy spectra and the angular distribution of the ion signal around the gas-jet target. Laser-accelerated MeV-He-ions could successfully be detected. The main acceleration direction at large angles with regard to the laser propagation direction was determined. In a second step, unpolarized {sup 3}He gas was attached in order to cross-check the experimental results with those of {sup 4}He. With the help of the achieved ion yield data, the expected rates of the fusion reaction D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He in the polarized case have been estimated: the information regarding the fusion proton yield from this nuclear reaction allows an experimentally based estimation for future experiments with pre-polarized {sup 3}He gas as plasma target. The experimental data is in line with supporting Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations performed on the Juelich supercomputers. For this purpose, the simulated target was defined as a neutral gas. The use of pre-polarized {sup 3}He gas demands a special preparation of a polarized {sup 3}He target for laser-acceleration experiments. This layout includes an (external) homogeneous magnetic holding field (field strength of ∝1.4 mT) for storing the pre-polarized gas for long time durations inside the PHELIX target chamber. For this purpose, a precise Halbach array consisting of horizontally arranged rings with built-in permanent magnets had to be designed, optimized, and constructed to deliver high

  2. Ambipolar ion acceleration in an expanding magnetic nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longmier, Benjamin W; Carter, Mark D; Cassady, Leonard D; Chancery, William J; Diaz, Franklin R Chang; Glover, Tim W; Ilin, Andrew V; McCaskill, Greg E; Olsen, Chris S; Squire, Jared P [Ad Astra Rocket Company, 141 W. Bay Area Blvd, Webster, TX (United States); Bering, Edgar A III [Department of Physics and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Houston, 617 Science and Research Building 1, Houston, TX (United States); Hershkowitz, Noah [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The helicon plasma stage in the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR (registered)) VX-200i device was used to characterize an axial plasma potential profile within an expanding magnetic nozzle region of the laboratory based device. The ion acceleration mechanism is identified as an ambipolar electric field produced by an electron pressure gradient, resulting in a local axial ion speed of Mach 4 downstream of the magnetic nozzle. A 20 eV argon ion kinetic energy was measured in the helicon source, which had a peak magnetic field strength of 0.17 T. The helicon plasma source was operated with 25 mg s{sup -1} argon propellant and 30 kW of RF power. The maximum measured values of plasma density and electron temperature within the exhaust plume were 1 x 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} and 9 eV, respectively. The measured plasma density is nearly an order of magnitude larger than previously reported steady-state helicon plasma sources. The exhaust plume also exhibits a 95% to 100% ionization fraction. The size scale and spatial location of the plasma potential structure in the expanding magnetic nozzle region appear to follow the size scale and spatial location of the expanding magnetic field. The thickness of the potential structure was found to be 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 5} {lambda}{sub De} depending on the local electron temperature in the magnetic nozzle, many orders of magnitude larger than typical laboratory double layer structures. The background plasma density and neutral argon pressure were 10{sup 15} m{sup -3} and 2 x 10{sup -5} Torr, respectively, in a 150 m{sup 3} vacuum chamber during operation of the helicon plasma source. The agreement between the measured plasma potential and plasma potential that was calculated from an ambipolar ion acceleration analysis over the bulk of the axial distance where the potential drop was located is a strong confirmation of the ambipolar acceleration process.

  3. The fast extraction kicker for J-PARC with a novel pulse compression system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koseki, Kunio, E-mail: kunio.koseki@kek.jp; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    A fast extraction kicker magnet for the main ring of J-PARC has been developed. A lumped constant type magnet is employed for its structural simplicity and stability in high-voltage operation. A disadvantage of the lumped constant type, a slow rise time, was alleviated by the adoption of a newly developed magnetic pulse compression system. The effectiveness of the magnetic pulse compression system in sharpening the excitation current was confirmed both by a circuit simulation and experimentally. The newly developed fast extraction kicker system was operated successfully with a 30 kV charging voltage of the pulsed power supply. The required rise time of less than 1.1 μs was achieved in the measurement.

  4. High-degree pulse compression and high-coherence supercontinuum generation in a convex dispersion profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Kutz, J. Nathan; Wai, P. K. A.

    2013-08-01

    We consider the non-adiabatic pulse compression of cascaded soliton propagating in three consecutive optical fiber segments, each of which has a convex dispersion profile with two zero-dispersion wavelengths. The convex dispersion profile provides an accurate description of the chromatic dispersion over the whole frequency range, thus allowing for a comprehensive theoretical treatment of the cascaded third order soliton compression when ultrashort pulses (DFDF) has a convex curvature in its dispersion profile which varies along length of fiber. Compared to DFDF, the cascading of fiber segments with convex dispersion that stays constant along the fiber length greatly reduces the manufacture difficulties and provides a much simpler engineering design in practice. High-degree pulse compression and high-coherence supercontinuum generation are demonstrated.

  5. High-contrast linear optical pulse compression using a temporal hologram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Fernández-Ruiz, Maria R; Lou, Shuqin; Azaña, José

    2015-03-01

    Temporal holograms can be realized by temporal amplitude-only modulation devices and used for generation and processing of complex (amplitude and phase) time-domain signals. Based on the temporal hologram concept, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate a novel design for linear optical pulse compression using temporal modulation of continuous-wave light combined with dispersion. The newly introduced scheme overcomes the undesired background problem that is intrinsic to designs based on temporal zone plates, while also offering an energy efficiency of ~25%. This pulse compression scheme can ideally provide an arbitrarily high time-bandwidth product using a low peak-power modulation driving signal, though in practice it is limited by the achievable modulation bandwidth and dispersion amount.

  6. A scheme of pulse compression lidar with enhanced modulated bandwidth for detection through scattering media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-hua; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Chen-fei; Xu, Lu; Yang, Xu; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Yue-hao; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a scheme of pulse compression lidar with enhanced electrical modulated bandwidth. An ultra-wideband linear frequency modulated signal with a bandwidth of 50 GHz is generated using femtosecond laser and superimposed linear chirp fiber Bragg gratings in the transmitter, which separates the echo of the target from the backward scattered noise with low modulated frequency. An optical pulse compression system based on a negative dispersion fiber Bragg grating is used to compress the ultra-wideband linear frequency modulated signal in the receiver. SNR and range resolution of the proposed scheme are numerically simulated to prove its feasibility. The simulation results indicate that an enhancement of SNR by 15.8 dB can be achieved using the scheme, and the range resolution of the scheme increases from 0.68 m to 0.0027 m. It is therefore concluded that the proposed scheme is suitable for detection through scattering media.

  7. Generation of heavy ion beams using femtosecond laser pulses in the target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from sub-micron gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, the time history of the laser pulse is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity 3 × 10 21 W / cm 2 , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 μm, and energy 27 J, the calculated reflection, transmission, and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80%, 5%, and 15%, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8%. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon, and flux 2 × 10 11 ions / sr . An analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the radiation pressure acceleration regime and the onset of the target normal sheath acceleration regime. The numerical simulations and analytical model point to at least four technical challenges hindering the heavy ion acceleration: low charge-to-mass ratio, limited number of ions amenable to acceleration, delayed acceleration, and high reflectivity of the plasma. Finally, a regime suitable for heavy ion acceleration has been identified in an alternative approach by analyzing the energy absorption and distribution among participating species and scaling of conversion efficiency, maximum energy, and flux with laser intensity.

  8. Superconducting accelerating structures for very low velocity ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents designs for four types of very-low-velocity superconducting (SC accelerating cavity capable of providing several MV of accelerating potential per cavity, and suitable for particle velocities in the range 0.006acceleration of ion beams. SC linacs can be formed as an array of independently phased cavities, enabling a variable velocity profile to maximize the output energy for each of a number of different ion species. Several laboratories in the U.S. and Europe are planning exotic beam facilities based on SC linacs. The cavity designs presented here are intended for the front end of such linacs, particularly for the postacceleration of rare isotopes of low charge state. Several types of SC cavities have been developed recently to cover particle velocities above 0.06c. Superconducting four-gap quarter-wave resonators for velocities 0.008<β=v/c<0.05 were developed about two decades ago and have been successfully operated at the ATLAS SC linac at Argonne National Laboratory. Since that time, progress in simulation tools, cavity fabrication, and processing have increased SC cavity gradients by a factor of 3–4. This paper applies these tools to optimize the design of a four-gap quarter-wave resonator for exotic beam facilities and other low-velocity applications.

  9. Optimization of the output power of a pulsed gas laser by using magnetic pulse compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louhibi, D.; Ghobrini, Mourad; Bourai, K.

    1999-12-01

    In pulsed gas lasers, the excitation of the active medium is produced through the discharge of a storage capacitor. Performances of these lasers were essentially linked to the type of switch used and also to its mode of operation. Thyratrons are the most common switches. Nevertheless, their technological limitations do not allow a high repetition rate, necessary for optimization of the output power of this type of laser. These limitations can be surpassed by combining the thyratron to a one stage of a magnetic pulse compression circuit. The mpc driver can improve the laser excitation pulse rise time and increase the repetition rate, increasing the laser output power of pulsed gas laser such as; nitrogen, excimer and copper vapor lasers. We have proposed in this paper a new configuration of magnetic pulse compression, the magnetic switch is place in our case in the charge circuit, and while in the typical utilization of magnetic pulse compression, it is placed in the discharge circuit. In this paper, we are more particularly interested in the design and the modeling of a saturate inductance that represents the magnetic switch in the proposed configuration of a thyratron - mpc circuit combination.

  10. Effects of Ions Charge-Mass Ratio on Energy and Energy Spread of Accelerated Ions in Laser Driven Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SANG Hai-Bo; DENG Shi-Qiang; XIE Bai-Song

    2013-01-01

    Effects of ions charge-mass ratio on energy and energy spread of accelerated ions in laser driven plasma are investigated in detail by proposing a simple double-layer model for a foil target driven by an ultrastrong laser.The radiation pressure acceleration mechanism plays an important role on the studied problem.For the ions near the plasma mirror,i.e.electrons layer,the dependence of ions energy on their charge-mass ratio is derived theoretically.It is found that the larger the charge-mass ratio is,the higher the accelerated ions energy gets.For those ions far away from the layer,the dependence of energy and energy spread on ions charge-mass ratio are also obtained by numerical performance.It exhibits that,as ions charge-mass ratio increases,not only the accelerated ions energy but also the energy spread will become large.

  11. Resistance-driven bunching mode of an accelerated ion pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E.P.

    1981-10-16

    Amplification of a longitudinal perturbation of an ion pulse in a linear induction accelerator is calculated. The simplified accelerator model consists only of an applied field (E/sub a/), distributed gap impedance per meter (R) and beam-pipe capacity per meter (C). The beam is treated as a cold, one-dimensional fluid. It is found that normal mode frequencies are nearly real, with only a very small damping rate proportional to R. This result is valid for a general current profile and is not restricted to small R. However, the mode structure exhibits spatial amplification from pulse head to tail by the factor exp(RCLv/sub o//2), where L is pulse length and v/sub 0/ is drift velocity. This factor is very large for typical HIF parameters. An initially small disturbance, when expanded in terms of the normal modes, is found to oscillate with maximum amplitude proportional to the amplification factor.

  12. Beam brilliance investigation of high current ion beams at GSI heavy ion accelerator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adonin, A. A., E-mail: a.adonin@gsi.de; Hollinger, R. [Linac and Operations/Ion Sources, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    In this work the emittance measurements of high current Ta-beam provided by VARIS (Vacuum Arc Ion Source) ion source are presented. Beam brilliance as a function of beam aperture at various extraction conditions is investigated. Influence of electrostatic ion beam compression in post acceleration gap on the beam quality is discussed. Use of different extraction systems (single aperture, 7 holes, and 13 holes) in order to achieve more peaked beam core is considered. The possible ways to increase the beam brilliance are discussed.

  13. FAIR: The accelerator facility for antiproton and ion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkov, Boris [FAIR JCR GSI, Darmstad (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation outlines the current status of the facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR). It is expected that the actual construction of the facility will commence in 2010 as the project has raised more than one billion euro in funding. The sequence and scope of the construction of the accelerator modules in accordance with modularized start version are described. Outstanding research opportunities offered by the modularized start version for all scientific FAIR communities from early on will allow to bridge the time until FAIR's completion with a world-leading research program. The green paper outlining a realistic path to achieve this goal is discussed.

  14. Electromagnetic Simulations of Helical-Based Ion Acceleration Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Scott D; Caporaso, George; Friedman, Alex; Poole, Brian R; Waldron, William

    2005-01-01

    Helix structures have been proposed* for accelerating low energy ion beams using MV/m fields in order to increase the coupling effeciency of the pulsed power system and to tailor the electromagnetic wave propagation speed with the particle beam speed as the beam gains energy. Calculations presented here show the electromagnetic field as it propagates along the helix structure, field stresses around the helix structure (for voltage breakdown determination), optimizations to the helix and driving pulsed power waveform, and simulations showing test particles interacting with the simulated time varying fields.

  15. Negative hydrogen ion source research and beam parameters for accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolkin, Timofey V.; /Fermilab

    2006-09-01

    H{sup -} beams are useful for multi-turn charge-exchange stripping injection into circular accelerators. Studies on a modified ion source for this purpose are presented. This paper includes some theory about a H{sup -} magnetron discharge, ion-electron emission, emittance and problems linked with emittance measurement and calculations. Investigated parameters of the emittance probe for optimal performance give a screen voltage of 150 V and a probe step of about 5 mil. Normalized 90% emittance obtained for this H{sup -} source is 0.22 {pi} mm-mr, for an extraction voltage of 18 kV at a beam energy of 30 keV and a beam current of 11 mA.

  16. Boosting laser-ion acceleration with multi-picosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogo, A.; Mima, K.; Iwata, N.; Tosaki, S.; Morace, A.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Johzaki, T.; Sentoku, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Sagisaka, A.; Matsuo, K.; Kamitsukasa, N.; Kojima, S.; Nagatomo, H.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Murakami, M.; Tokita, S.; Kawanaka, J.; Miyanaga, N.; Yamanoi, K.; Norimatsu, T.; Sakagami, H.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Azechi, H.

    2017-01-01

    Using one of the world most powerful laser facility, we demonstrate for the first time that high-contrast multi-picosecond pulses are advantageous for proton acceleration. By extending the pulse duration from 1.5 to 6 ps with fixed laser intensity of 1018 W cm−2, the maximum proton energy is improved more than twice (from 13 to 33 MeV). At the same time, laser-energy conversion efficiency into the MeV protons is enhanced with an order of magnitude, achieving 5% for protons above 6 MeV with the 6 ps pulse duration. The proton energies observed are discussed using a plasma expansion model newly developed that takes the electron temperature evolution beyond the ponderomotive energy in the over picoseconds interaction into account. The present results are quite encouraging for realizing ion-driven fast ignition and novel ion beamlines. PMID:28211913

  17. Boosting laser-ion acceleration with multi-picosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogo, A.; Mima, K.; Iwata, N.; Tosaki, S.; Morace, A.; Arikawa, Y.; Fujioka, S.; Johzaki, T.; Sentoku, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Sagisaka, A.; Matsuo, K.; Kamitsukasa, N.; Kojima, S.; Nagatomo, H.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Murakami, M.; Tokita, S.; Kawanaka, J.; Miyanaga, N.; Yamanoi, K.; Norimatsu, T.; Sakagami, H.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Azechi, H.

    2017-02-01

    Using one of the world most powerful laser facility, we demonstrate for the first time that high-contrast multi-picosecond pulses are advantageous for proton acceleration. By extending the pulse duration from 1.5 to 6 ps with fixed laser intensity of 1018 W cm‑2, the maximum proton energy is improved more than twice (from 13 to 33 MeV). At the same time, laser-energy conversion efficiency into the MeV protons is enhanced with an order of magnitude, achieving 5% for protons above 6 MeV with the 6 ps pulse duration. The proton energies observed are discussed using a plasma expansion model newly developed that takes the electron temperature evolution beyond the ponderomotive energy in the over picoseconds interaction into account. The present results are quite encouraging for realizing ion-driven fast ignition and novel ion beamlines.

  18. Feasibility of using laser ion accelerators in proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, S V

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of using the laser plasma as a source of the high-energy ions for the proton radiation therapy is discussed. The proposal is based on the recent inventions of the effective ions acceleration in the experiments and through numerical modeling of the powerful laser radiation interaction with the gaseous and solid state targets. The principal peculiarity of the dependence of the protons energy losses in the tissues (the Bragg peak of losses) facilities the solution of one of the most important problems of the radiation therapy, which consists in realizing the tumor irradiation by sufficiently high and homogeneous dose with simultaneous minimization of the irradiation level, relative to the healthy and neighbouring tissues and organs

  19. Measurement of heat load density profile on acceleration grid in MeV-class negative ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi, E-mail: hiratsuka.junichi@jaea.go.jp; Hanada, Masaya; Kojima, Atsushi; Umeda, Naotaka; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Yoshida, Masafumi; Nishikiori, Ryo; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tobari, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Miyamoto, Kenji [Naruto University of Education, 748 Nakashima, Takashima, Naruto-cho, Naruto-shi, Tokushima 772-8502 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    To understand the physics of the negative ion extraction/acceleration, the heat load density profile on the acceleration grid has been firstly measured in the ITER prototype accelerator where the negative ions are accelerated to 1 MeV with five acceleration stages. In order to clarify the profile, the peripheries around the apertures on the acceleration grid were separated into thermally insulated 34 blocks with thermocouples. The spatial resolution is as low as 3 mm and small enough to measure the tail of the beam profile with a beam diameter of ∼16 mm. It was found that there were two peaks of heat load density around the aperture. These two peaks were also clarified to be caused by the intercepted negative ions and secondary electrons from detailed investigation by changing the beam optics and gas density profile. This is the first experimental result, which is useful to understand the trajectories of these particles.

  20. Experimental Study of an ion cyclon resonance accelerator presentation of his thesis

    CERN Document Server

    Ramsell, C T

    1999-01-01

    The Ion Cyclotron Resonance Accelerator (ICRA) uses the operating principles of cyclotrons and gyrotrons. The novel geometry of the ICRA allows an ion beam to drift axially while being accelerated in the azimuthal direction. Previous work on electron cyclotron resonance acceleration used waveguide modes to accelerate an electron beam [5]. This research extends cyclotron resonance acceleration to ions by using a high field superconducting magnet and an rf driven magnetron operating at a harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. The superconducting solenoid provides an axial magnetic field for radial confinement and an rf driven magnetron provides azimuthal electric fields for acceleration. The intent of the ICRA concept is to create an ion accelerator which is simple, compact, lightweight, and inexpensive. Furthermore, injection and extraction are inherently simple since the beam drifts through the acceleration region. However, use of this convenient geometry leads to an accelerated beam with a large energy spread....

  1. Cluster-jet targets for laser induced ion acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieser, S.; Bonaventura, D.; Hergemoeller, A.K.; Koehler, E.; Taeschner, A.; Khoukaz, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Buescher, M.; Schlueter, F. [Peter Gruenberg Institut (PGI), FZ Juelich (Germany); Engin, I. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, (IKP), FZ Juelich (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The directed ion acceleration induced by high-energy laser pulses is a strongly increasing research field. In such experiments ultra-short laser pulses focussed on a target create a plasma, in which strong secondary electric fields can accelerate protons and ions to multi-MeV energies. A major drawback of the commonly used targets, like gas-jets or foils, is their low density or the need to be replaced after each laser pulse. An innovative perspective for high-flux and high-repetition-rate experiments is the application of a cluster-jet source, which continuously produces a flux of cryogenic solid clusters by the expansion of pre-cooled gases within fine Laval nozzles. Therefore, a cluster-jet target was built up and set successfully into operation at the University of Muenster and will be used for experiments on laser and plasma physics at the University of Duesseldorf. Systematic measurements were done to determine the target beam thickness, possible beam structures, the stability, and the position within the scattering chamber to ensure the ideal requirements for the experiments. For this purpose, the cluster beam was illuminated by a diode laser 33 cm behind the Laval nozzle and observed by a CCD camera. The results on the cluster beam properties are presented and discussed.

  2. Acceleration of oxygen ions in the dynamic magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Birn

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The substorm-related acceleration and flux increases of energetic oxygen ions are studied on the basis of test particle orbits in the fields obtained from an MHD simulation of plasmoid formation and ejection and the collapse (dipolarization of the inner tail. The simulated fluxes show large anisotropies and nongyrotropic effects, phase bunching, and spatially and temporally localized beams. The energy distribution of O+ in the region of an earthward beam in the near tail becomes significantly harder, more pronounced than for protons, in qualitative agreement with observations. The simulation also shows tailward beams of energetic O+ions closely associated with the passage of a plasmoid, both inside the plasma sheet boundary and inside the central plasma sheet, consistent with observations in the far tail. The acceleration at the near-Earth x-type neutral line produces a narrow duskward beam of energetic O+ in the duskward extension of the x-line, which was not found to be as pronounced in proton test particle simulations.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, trapped; magnetotail; storms and substorms

  3. Mutagenic effect of accelerated heavy ions on bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreyko, A. V.; Krasavin, E. A.

    2011-11-01

    The heavy ion accelerators of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research were used to study the regularities and mechanisms of formation of different types of mutations in prokaryote cells. The induction of direct (lac-, ton B-, col B) mutations for Esherichia coli cells and reverse his- → His+ mutations of Salmonella typhimurium, Bacillus subtilis cells under the action of radiation in a wide range of linear energy transfer (LET) was studied. The regularities of formation of gene and structural (tonB trp-) mutations for Esherichia coli bacteria under the action of accelerated heavy ions were studied. It was demonstrated that the rate of gene mutations as a function of the dose under the action of Γ rays and accelerated heavy ions is described by linear-quadratic functions. For structural mutations, linear "dose-effect" dependences are typical. The quadratic character of mutagenesis dose curves is determined by the "interaction" of two independent "hitting" events in the course of SOS repair of genetic structures. The conclusion made was that gene mutations under the action of accelerated heavy ions are induced by δ electron regions of charged particle tracks. The methods of SOS chromotest, SOS lux test, and λ prophage induction were used to study the regularities of SOS response of cells under the action of radiations in a wide LET range. The following proposition was substantiated: the molecular basis for formation of gene mutations are cluster single-strand DNA breaks, and that for structural mutations, double-strand DNA breaks. It was found out that the LET dependence of the relative biological efficiency of accelerated ions is described by curves with a local maximum. It was demonstrated that the biological efficiency of ionizing radiations with different physical characteristics on cells with different genotype, estimated by the lethal action, induction of gene and deletion mutations, precision excision of transposons, is determined by the specific

  4. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Electron-Ion Outlfows

    CERN Document Server

    Lloyd-Ronning, Nicole M

    2016-01-01

    We use the Los Alamos VPIC code to investigate particle acceleration in relativistic, unmagnetized, collisionless electron-ion plasmas. We run our simulations both with a realistic proton-to-electron mass ratio m_p/m_e = 1836, as well as commonly employed mass ratios of m_p/m_e =100 and 25, and show that results differ among the different cases. In particular, for the physically accurate mass ratio, electron acceleration occurs efficiently in a narrow region of a few hundred inertial lengths near the flow front, producing a power law dN/dgamma ~ gamma^(-p) with p ~ -2 developing over a few decades in energy, while acceleration is weak in the region far downstream. We find 20%, 10%, and 0.2% of the total energy given to the electrons for mass ratios of 25, 100, and 1836 respectively at a time of 2500 (w_p)^-1. Our simulations also show significant magnetic field generation just ahead of and behind the the flow front, with about 1% of the total energy going into the magnetic field for a mass ratio of 25 and 100...

  5. Ion-acoustic shocks with self-regulated ion reflection and acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkov, M. A.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Dudnikova, G. I.; Liseykina, T. V.; Diamond, P. H.; Papadopoulos, K.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    An analytic solution describing an ion-acoustic collisionless shock, self-consistently with the evolution of shock-reflected ions, is obtained. The solution extends the classic soliton solution beyond a critical Mach number, where the soliton ceases to exist because of the upstream ion reflection. The reflection transforms the soliton into a shock with a trailing wave and a foot populated by the reflected ions. The solution relates parameters of the entire shock structure, such as the maximum and minimum of the potential in the trailing wave, the height of the foot, as well as the shock Mach number, to the number of reflected ions. This relation is resolvable for any given distribution of the upstream ions. In this paper, we have resolved it for a simple "box" distribution. Two separate models of electron interaction with the shock are considered. The first model corresponds to the standard Boltzmannian electron distribution in which case the critical shock Mach number only insignificantly increases from M ≈1.6 (no ion reflection) to M ≈1.8 (substantial reflection). The second model corresponds to adiabatically trapped electrons. They produce a stronger increase, from M ≈3.1 to M ≈4.5 . The shock foot that is supported by the reflected ions also accelerates them somewhat further. A self-similar foot expansion into the upstream medium is described analytically.

  6. Linear_Accelerator_C+6_Ions_as_Injector_for_a_Synchrotron, Intended for Hadrons Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Dolya, S N

    2013-01-01

    We consider acceleration light ions by the field of a traveling-wave in a helical waveguide. The frequency of the accelerating RF field f = 100 MHz, generator power P = 2 MW. Ion focusing is provided by a solenoidal magnetic field with the intensity B = 3.5 Tesla. With increasing the accelerator length up to L = 15 m, the final energy of the ions can be increased up to a value of E = 7 MeV / nucleon.

  7. Ion Acceleration in Solar Flares Determined by Solar Neutron Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Solar Neutron Observation Group

    2013-05-01

    Large amounts of particles can be accelerated to relativistic energy in association with solar flares and/or accompanying phenomena (e.g., CME-driven shocks), and they sometimes reach very near the Earth and penetrate the Earth's atmosphere. These particles are observed by ground-based detectors (e.g., neutron monitors) as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs). Some of the GLEs originate from high energy solar neutrons which are produced in association with solar flares. These neutrons are also observed by ground-based neutron monitors and solar neutron telescopes. Recently, some of the solar neutron detectors have also been operating in space. By observing these solar neutrons, we can obtain information about ion acceleration in solar flares. Such neutrons were observed in association with some X-class flares in solar cycle 23, and sometimes they were observed by two different types of detectors. For example, on 2005 September 7, large solar neutron signals were observed by the neutron monitor at Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia and Mexico City, and by the solar neutron telescopes at Chacaltaya and Mt. Sierra Negra in Mexico in association with an X17.0 flare. The neutron signal continued for more than 20 minutes with high statistical significance. Intense gamma-ray emission was also registered by INTEGRAL, and by RHESSI during the decay phase. We analyzed these data using the solar-flare magnetic-loop transport and interaction model of Hua et al. (2002), and found that the model could successfully fit the data with intermediate values of loop magnetic convergence and pitch angle scattering parameters. These results indicate that solar neutrons were produced at the same time as the gamma-ray line emission and that ions were continuously accelerated at the emission site. In this paper, we introduce some of the solar neutron observations in solar cycle 23, and discuss the tendencies of the physical parameters of solar neutron GLEs, and the energy spectrum and population of the

  8. Pulse Compression Based on Laser-Induced Optical Breakdown in Suspension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HASI Wu-Li-Ji; FU Mei-Ling; LU Huan-Huan; GONG Sheng; LU Zhi-Wei; LIN Dian-Yang; HE Wei-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Pulse compression based on laser-induced optical breakdown in suspension is investigated.The physical mechanism behind it is analyzed theoretically and validated in the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser system.A 12-ns pump pulse is suppressed to 5 ns with good fidelity in the front edge and sharp steepness in the trailing edge.The HT-270,which has a small gain coemcient and absorption coefficient,is used as a solvent,and therefore the disturbance induced by stimulated Brillouin scattering and absorption are minimized and the transmittivity is enhanced.

  9. High Resolution Pulse Compression Imaging Using Super Resolution FM-Chirp Correlation Method (SCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, M.; Okubo, K.; Tagawa, N.

    This study addresses the issue of the super-resolution pulse compression technique (PCT) for ultrasound imaging. Time resolution of multiple ultrasonic echoes using the FM-Chirp PCT is limited by the bandwidth of the sweep-frequency. That is, the resolution depends on the sharpness of auto-correlation function. We propose the Super resolution FM-Chirp correlation Method (SCM) and evaluate its performance. This method is based on the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm. Our simulations were made for the model assuming multiple signals reflected from some scatterers. We confirmed that SCM detects time delay of complicated reflected signals successfully with high resolution.

  10. Ion accelerator system mounting design and operating characteristics for a 5 kW 30-cm xenon ion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Graeme; Brophy, John R.

    1987-01-01

    Results from a series of experiments to determine the effect of accelerator grid mount geometry on the performance of the J-series ion optics assembly are described. Three mounting schemes, two flexible and one rigid, are compared for their relative ion extraction capability over a range of total accelerating voltages. The largest ion beam current, for the maximum total voltage investigated, is shown to occur using one of the flexible grid mounting geometries. However, at lower total voltages and reduced engine input power levels, the original rigid J-series ion optics accelerator grid mounts result in marginally better grid system performance at the same cold interelectrode gap.

  11. Ion acceleration in a solitary wave by an intense picosecond laser pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, A; Uesaka, M; Sasaki, A; Daido, H

    2002-11-18

    Acceleration of ions in a solitary wave produced by shock-wave decay in a plasma slab irradiated by an intense picosecond laser pulse is studied via particle-in-cell simulation. Instead of exponential distribution as in known mechanisms of ion acceleration from the target surface, these ions accelerated forwardly form a bunch with relatively low energy spread. The bunch is shown to be a solitary wave moving over expanding plasma; its velocity can exceed the maximal velocity of ions accelerated forward from the rear side of the target.

  12. Modification of semiconductor materials using laser-produced ion streams additionally accelerated in the electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, M.; Badziak, B.; Parys, P.; Wołowski, J.; Pisarek, M.

    2009-03-01

    The laser-produced ion stream may be attractive for direct ultra-low-energy ion implantation in thin layer of semiconductor for modification of electrical and optical properties of semiconductor devices. Application of electrostatic fields for acceleration and formation of laser-generated ion stream enables to control the ion stream parameters in broad energy and current density ranges. It also permits to remove the useless laser-produced ions from the ion stream designed for implantation. For acceleration of ions produced with the use of a low fluence repetitive laser system (Nd:glass: 2 Hz, pulse duration: 3.5 ns, pulse energy:˜0.5 J, power density: 10 10 W/cm 2) in IPPLM the special electrostatic system has been prepared. The laser-produced ions passing through the diaphragm (a ring-shaped slit in the HV box) have been accelerated in the system of electrodes. The accelerating voltage up to 40 kV, the distance of the diaphragm from the target, the diaphragm diameter and the gap width were changed for choosing the desired parameters (namely the energy band of the implanted ions) of the ion stream. The characteristics of laser-produced Ge ion streams were determined with the use of precise ion diagnostic methods, namely: electrostatic ion energy analyser and various ion collectors. The laser-produced and post-accelerated Ge ions have been used for implantation into semiconductor materials for nanocrystal fabrication. The characteristics of implanted samples were measured using AES.

  13. Universal scalings for laser acceleration of electrons in ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudik, Vladimir; Arefiev, Alexey; Zhang, Xi; Shvets, Gennady

    2016-10-01

    We analytically investigate the acceleration of electrons undergoing betatron oscillations in an ion channel, driven by a laser beam propagating with superluminal (or luminal) phase velocity. The universal scalings for the maximum attainable electron energy are found for arbitrary laser and plasma parameters by deriving a set of dimensionless equations for paraxial ultra-relativistic electron motion. One of our analytic predictions is the emergence of forbidden zones in the electrons' phase space. For an individual electron, these give rise to a threshold-type dependence of the final energy gain on the laser intensity. The universal scalings are also generalized to the resonant laser interaction with the third harmonic of betatron motion and to the case when the laser beam is circularly polarized.

  14. Scintillator diagnostics for the detection of laser accelerated ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, N.; Tresca, O.; Lefferts, R.

    2014-09-01

    Laser plasma interaction with ultraintense pulses present exciting schemes for accelerating ions. One of the advantages conferred by using a gaseous laser and target is the potential for a fast (several Hz) repetition rate. This requires diagnostics which are not only suited for a single shot configuration, but also for repeated use. We consider several scintillators as candidates for an imaging diagnostic for protons accelerated to MeV energies by a CO2 laser focused on a gas jet target. We have measured the response of chromium-doped alumina (chromox) and polyvinyl toluene (PVT) screens to protons in the 2-8 MeV range. We have calibrated the luminescent yield in terms of photons emitted per incident proton for each scintillator. We also discuss how light scattering and material properties affect detector resolution. Furthermore, we consider material damage and the presence of an afterglow under intense exposures. Our analysis reveals a near order of magnitude greater yield from chromox in response to proton beams at > 8 MeV energies, while scattering effects favor PVT-based scintillators at lower energies.

  15. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ions accelerated parallel to the plane of a sandwich target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J. W., E-mail: wang-jw@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Murakami, M.; Weng, S. M. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Xu, H. [National Laboratory for Parallel and Distributed Processing, School of Computer Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Ju, J. J.; Luan, S. X.; Yu, W. [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-12-15

    A new ion acceleration scheme, namely, target parallel Coulomb acceleration, is proposed in which a carbon plate sandwiched between gold layers is irradiated with intense linearly polarized laser pulses. The high electrostatic field generated by the gold ions efficiently accelerates the embedded carbon ions parallel to the plane of the target. The ion beam is found to be collimated by the concave-shaped Coulomb potential. As a result, a quasi-monoenergetic and collimated C{sup 6+}-ion beam with an energy exceeding 10 MeV/nucleon is produced at a laser intensity of 5 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}.

  16. Final Progress Report - Heavy Ion Accelerator Theory and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, Irving

    2009-10-31

    The use of a beam of heavy ions to heat a target for the study of warm dense matter physics, high energy density physics, and ultimately to ignite an inertial fusion pellet, requires the achievement of beam intensities somewhat greater than have traditionally been obtained using conventional accelerator technology. The research program described here has substantially contributed to understanding the basic nonlinear intense-beam physics that is central to the attainment of the requisite intensities. Since it is very difficult to reverse intensity dilution, avoiding excessive dilution over the entire beam lifetime is necessary for achieving the required beam intensities on target. The central emphasis in this research has therefore been on understanding the nonlinear mechanisms that are responsible for intensity dilution and which generally occur when intense space-charge-dominated beams are not in detailed equilibrium with the external forces used to confine them. This is an important area of study because such lack of detailed equilibrium can be an unavoidable consequence of the beam manipulations such as acceleration, bunching, and focusing necessary to attain sufficient intensity on target. The primary tool employed in this effort has been the use of simulation, particularly the WARP code, in concert with experiment, to identify the nonlinear dynamical characteristics that are important in practical high intensity accelerators. This research has gradually made a transition from the study of idealized systems and comparisons with theory, to study the fundamental scaling of intensity dilution in intense beams, and more recently to explicit identification of the mechanisms relevant to actual experiments. This work consists of two categories; work in direct support beam physics directly applicable to NDCX and a larger effort to further the general understanding of space-charge-dominated beam physics.

  17. Enhanced pulse compression induced by the interaction between the third-order dispersion and the cross-phase modulation in birefringent fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐文成; 陈伟成; 张书敏; 罗爱平; 刘颂豪

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the enhanced pulse compression due to the interaction between the positive third-order dispersion (TOD) and the nonlinear effect (cross-phase modulation effect) in birefringent fibres. Polarization soliton compression along the slow axis can be enhanced in a birefringent fibre with positive third-order dispersion. while the polarization soliton compression along the fast axis can be enhanced in the fibre with negative third-order dispersion.Moreover, there is an optimal third-order dispersion parameter for obtaining the optimal pulse compression.Redshifted initial chirp is helpful to the pulse compression, while blueshifted chirp is detrimental to the pulse compression. There is also an optimal chirp parameter to reach maximum pulse compression. The optimal pulse compression for TOD parameters under different N-order solitons is also found.

  18. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyojae; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-01

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  19. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyojae, E-mail: lkcom@ibs.re.kr; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  20. Ion source memory in {sup 36}Cl accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavetich, Stefan; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg [HZDR, Dresden (Germany); Arnold, Maurice; Aumaitre, Georges; Bourles, Didier; Martschini, Martin [ASTER, Aix-en-Provence (France); Buchriegler, Josef; Golser, Robin; Keddadouche, Karim; Steier, Peter [VERA, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    Since the DREAMS (Dresden Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) facility went operational in 2011, constant effort was put into enabling routine measurements of long-lived radionuclides as {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 41}Ca. For precise AMS-measurements of the volatile element Cl the key issue is the minimization of the long term memory effect. For this purpose one of the two original HVE sources was mechanically modified, allowing the usage of bigger cathodes with individual target apertures. Additionally a more open geometry was used to improve the vacuum level. To evaluate this improvement in comparison to other up-to-date ion sources, a small inter-laboratory comparison had been initiated. The long-term memory effect in the Cs sputter ion sources of the AMS facilities VERA, ASTER and DREAMS had been investigated by running samples of natural {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl-ratio and samples containing highly enriched {sup 35}Cl({sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl > 500). Primary goals of the research are the time constants of the recovery from the contaminated sample ratio to the initial ratio of the sample and the level of the long-term memory effect in the sources.

  1. Investigation of a pulse compression technique for medical ultrasound: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N A

    1994-03-01

    Pulse compression techniques that are capable of producing a large signal-to-noise (SNR) enhancement, have been used successfully in many different fields. For medical applications, frequency-dependent attenuation in soft tissue can limit the usefulness of this method. In the paper, this issue is examined through model-simulation studies. Frequency-modulation (FM) chirp, considered in the study, is just one form of pulse coding technique. Pulse propagation effects in soft tissue are modelled as a linear zero phase filter. A method to perform simulations and estimate the effective time-bandwidth product K is outlined. K describes the SNR enhancement attainable under limitations imposed by the soft-tissue medium. An effective time-bandwidth product is evaluated as a function of soft-tissue linear attenuation coefficient alpha o, scatterer depth z and the bandwidth of the interrogating FM pulse, under realistic conditions. Results indicate that, under certain conditions, K can be significantly lower than its expected value in a non-attenuating medium. It is argued that although limitations exist, pulse compression techniques can still be used to improve resolution or increase penetrational depth. The real advantage over conventional short-pulse imaging comes from the possibility that these improvements can be accomplished without increasing the peak intensity of the interrogating pulse above any threshold levels set by possible bio-effect considerations.

  2. Performance characteristics of an excimer laser (XeCl) with single-stage magnetic pulse compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshnay, N. K.; Singh, A.; Benerji, N. S.

    2017-02-01

    Performance characteristics of an excimer laser (XeCl) with single-stage magnetic pulse compression suitable for material processing applications are presented here. The laser incorporates in-built compact gas circulation and gas cooling to ensure fresh gas mixture between the electrodes for repetitive operation. A magnetically coupled tangential blower is used for gas circulation inside the laser chamber for repetitive operation. The exciter consists of C-C energy transfer circuit and thyratron is used as a high-voltage main switch with single-stage magnetic pulse compression (MPC) between thyratron and the laser electrodes. Low inductance of the laser head and uniform and intense pre-ionization are the main features of the electric circuit used in the laser. A 250 ns rise time voltage pulse was compressed to 100 ns duration with a single-stage magnetic pulse compressor using Ni-Zn ferrite cores. The laser can generate about 150 mJ at ˜100 Hz rep-rate reliably from a discharge volume of 100 cm 3. 2D spatial laser beam profile generated is presented here. The profile shows that the laser beam is completely filled with flat-top which is suitable for material processing applications. The SEM image of the microhole generated on copper target is presented here.

  3. A pulse-compression-ring circuit for high-efficiency electric propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Thomas L

    2008-03-01

    A highly efficient, highly reliable pulsed-power system has been developed for use in high power, repetitively pulsed inductive plasma thrusters. The pulsed inductive thruster ejects plasma propellant at a high velocity using a Lorentz force developed through inductive coupling to the plasma. Having greatly increased propellant-utilization efficiency compared to chemical rockets, this type of electric propulsion system may one day propel spacecraft on long-duration deep-space missions. High system reliability and electrical efficiency are extremely important for these extended missions. In the prototype pulsed-power system described here, exceptional reliability is achieved using a pulse-compression circuit driven by both active solid-state switching and passive magnetic switching. High efficiency is achieved using a novel ring architecture that recovers unused energy in a pulse-compression system with minimal circuit loss after each impulse. As an added benefit, voltage reversal is eliminated in the ring topology, resulting in long lifetimes for energy-storage capacitors. System tests were performed using an adjustable inductive load at a voltage level of 3.3 kV, a peak current of 20 kA, and a current switching rate of 15 kA/micros.

  4. Performance characteristics of an excimer laser (XeCl) with single-stage magnetic pulse compression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N K VARSHNAY; A A SINGH; N S BENERJI

    2017-02-01

    Performance characteristics of an excimer laser (XeCl) with single-stage magnetic pulse compression suitable for material processing applications are presented here. The laser incorporates in-built compact gas circulation and gas cooling to ensure fresh gas mixture between the electrodes for repetitive operation. A magnetically coupled tangential blower is used for gas circulation inside the laser chamber for repetitive operation. The exciter consists of C–C energy transfer circuit and thyratron is used as a high-voltage main switch with singlestage magnetic pulse compression (MPC) between thyratron and the laser electrodes. Low inductance of the laser head and uniform and intense pre-ionization are the main features of the electric circuit used in the laser. A 250 ns rise time voltage pulse was compressed to 100 ns duration with a single-stage magnetic pulse compressor using Ni–Zn ferrite cores. The laser can generate about 150 mJ at ∼100 Hz rep-rate reliably from a discharge volumeof 100 cm$^3$. 2D spatial laser beam profile generated is presented here. The profile shows that the laser beam is completely filled with flat-top which is suitable for material processing applications. The SEM image of the microhole generated on copper target is presented here.

  5. Reflected solar wind ions and downward accelerated ionospheric ions during the January 1997 magnetic cloud event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, D. L.; Burch, J. L.; Huddleston, M. M.; Pollock, C. J.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Wüest, M.; Moore, T. E.; Shelley, E. G.

    On January 11, 1997, at 03:40:00 UT, while Polar was traveling up the dusk flank toward apogee, two ion instruments, TIDE and TIMAS, detected upflowing H+ with an energy/pitch-angle dispersion resembling an ionospheric reflection of freshly injected solar wind ions. In the same region of space, TIDE and TIMAS observed cold beams of O+ and H+ traveling down the field line with equal bulk velocities. We interpret these ion signatures as concurrent observations of mirrored solar wind ions and downward accelerated ionospheric ions. By 03:42:00, an energy/pitch-angle dispersion of downward moving ions at very low energies was clearly evident in the TIDE data. This additional signature is interpreted as an indication of reconnection on the same field line in the southern hemisphere. We explain this unique combination of plasma distributions in terms of high-latitude reconnection and magnetic field line convection during northward-IMF conditions associated with the January 1997 magnetic cloud event.

  6. Long-pulse beam acceleration of MeV-class H(-) ion beams for ITER NB accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, N; Kashiwagi, M; Taniguchi, M; Tobari, H; Watanabe, K; Dairaku, M; Yamanaka, H; Inoue, T; Kojima, A; Hanada, M

    2014-02-01

    In order to realize neutral beam systems in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor whose target is to produce a 1 MeV, 200 A/m(2) during 3600 s D(-) ion beam, the electrostatic five-stages negative ion accelerator so-called "MeV accelerator" has been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. To extend pulse length, heat load of the acceleration grids was reduced by controlling the ion beam trajectory. Namely, the beam deflection due to the residual magnetic field of filter magnet was suppressed with the newly developed extractor with a 0.5 mm off-set aperture displacement. The new extractor improved the deflection angle from 6 mrad to 1 mrad, resulting in the reduction of direct interception of negative ions from 23% to 15% of the total acceleration power, respectively. As a result, the pulse length of 130 A/m(2), 881 keV H(-) ion beam has been successfully extended from a previous value of 0.4 s to 8.7 s. This is the first long pulse negative ion beam acceleration over 100 MW/m(2).

  7. Accelerated radiation damage test facility using a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wady, P.T., E-mail: paul.wady@manchester.ac.uk [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Draude, A.; Shubeita, S.M.; Smith, A.D.; Mason, N. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Pimblott, S.M. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Jimenez-Melero, E. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); School of Materials, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-11

    We have developed a new irradiation facility that allows to perform accelerated damage tests of nuclear reactor materials at temperatures up to 400 °C using the intense proton (<100 μA) and heavy ion (≈10 μA) beams produced by a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator. The dedicated beam line for radiation damage studies comprises: (1) beam diagnosis and focusing optical components, (2) a scanning and slit system that allows uniform irradiation of a sample area of 0.5–6 cm{sup 2}, and (3) a sample stage designed to be able to monitor in-situ the sample temperature, current deposited on the sample, and the gamma spectrum of potential radio-active nuclides produced during the sample irradiation. The beam line capabilities have been tested by irradiating a 20Cr–25Ni–Nb stabilised stainless steel with a 3 MeV proton beam to a dose level of 3 dpa. The irradiation temperature was 356 °C, with a maximum range in temperature values of ±6 °C within the first 24 h of continuous irradiation. The sample stage is connected to ground through an electrometer to measure accurately the charge deposited on the sample. The charge can be integrated in hardware during irradiation, and this methodology removes uncertainties due to fluctuations in beam current. The measured gamma spectrum allowed the identification of the main radioactive nuclides produced during the proton bombardment from the lifetimes and gamma emissions. This dedicated radiation damage beam line is hosted by the Dalton Cumbrian Facility of the University of Manchester.

  8. SETUP AND PERFORMANCE OF THE RHIC INJECTOR ACCELERATORS FOR THE 2005 RUN WITH COPPER IONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AHRENS, L.; ALESSI, J.; GARDNER, C.J.

    2005-05-16

    Copper ions for the 2005 run [1] of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are accelerated in the Tandem, Booster and AGS prior to injection into RHIC. The setup and performance of these accelerators with copper are reviewed in this paper.

  9. Effects of laser polarization on electrostatic shock ion acceleration in near-critical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Kuk; Kang, Teyoun; Hur, Min Sup

    2016-10-01

    Collisionless electrostatic shock ion acceleration has become a major regime of laser-driven ion acceleration owing to generation of quasi-monoenergetic ion beams from moderate parametric conditions of lasers and plasmas in comparison with target-normal-sheath-acceleration or radiation pressure acceleration. In order to construct the shock, plasma heating is an essential condition for satisfying Mach number condition 1.5 Weibel instability. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program (NRF- 2013R1A1A2006353) and the Creative Allied Project (CAP-15-06-ETRI).

  10. Guided post-acceleration of laser-driven ions by a miniature modular structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Satyabrata; Ahmed, Hamad; Prasad, Rajendra; Cerchez, Mirela; Brauckmann, Stephanie; Aurand, Bastian; Cantono, Giada; Hadjisolomou, Prokopis; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; Macchi, Andrea; Nersisyan, Gagik; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Schroer, Anna M.; Swantusch, Marco; Zepf, Matt; Willi, Oswald; Borghesi, Marco

    2016-04-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Although characterized by exceptional transverse and longitudinal emittance, laser-driven ion beams currently have limitations in terms of peak ion energy, bandwidth of the energy spectrum and beam divergence. Here we introduce the concept of a versatile, miniature linear accelerating module, which, by employing laser-excited electromagnetic pulses directed along a helical path surrounding the laser-accelerated ion beams, addresses these shortcomings simultaneously. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a university-scale system, we demonstrate post-acceleration of laser-driven protons from a flat foil at a rate of 0.5 GeV m-1, already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications.

  11. Alignment of Ion Accelerator for Surface Analysis using Theodolite and Laser Tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Tae Sung; Seo, Dong Hyuk; Kim, Dae Il; Kim, Han Sung; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The method of ion accelerator alignment is used two ways which are a theodolite and laser tracker. For the alignment and maintenance of the proton linear accelerator, the laser tracker is typically used at KOMAC. While the device for alignment by using laser tracker is not installed in all ion accelerator components, it was used in parallel in two methods. In this paper, alignment methods are introduced and the result and comparison of each alignment method are presented. The ion accelerator for surface analysis has aligned using theodolite and laser tracker. The two ways for alignment have advantage as well as weakness. But alignment using laser tracker is stronger than using theodolite. Because it is based on alignment and position data and it is more detailed. Also since the beam distribution is smaller than accelerator component that is direction of beam progress, main component (ex. Magnet, Chamber, Pelletron tank, etc.) alignment using laser tracker is enough to align the ion accelerator.

  12. Direct High-Power Laser Acceleration of Ions for Medical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Salamin, Y I; Keitel, C H

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical investigations show that linearly and radially polarized multiterawatt and petawatt laser beams, focused to subwavelength waist radii, can directly accelerate protons and carbon nuclei, over micron-size distances, to the energies required for hadron cancer therapy. Ions accelerated by radially polarized lasers have generally a more favorable energy spread than those accelerated by linearly polarized lasers of the same intensity.

  13. Shaping laser accelerated ions for future applications – The LIGHT collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busold, S., E-mail: s.busold@gsi.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstraße 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Almomani, A. [Institut für angewandte Physik, Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Max von Laue Straße 1, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Bagnoud, V. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07734 Jena (Germany); Barth, W. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bedacht, S. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstraße 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Blažević, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07734 Jena (Germany); Boine-Frankenheim, O. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstraße 8, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2014-03-11

    The generation of intense ion beams from high-intensity laser-generated plasmas has been the focus of research for the last decade. In the LIGHT collaboration the expertise of heavy ion accelerator scientists and laser and plasma physicists has been combined to investigate the prospect of merging these ion beams with conventional accelerator technology and exploring the possibilities of future applications. We report about the goals and first results of the LIGHT collaboration to generate, handle and transport laser driven ion beams. This effort constitutes an important step in research for next generation accelerator technologies.

  14. Acceleration of one ampere negative ion beams to energies up to 120 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, C.; Sluyters, T.

    1977-01-01

    One of the objectives of the BNL Neutral Beam Development Group is to accelerate negative hydrogen ion beams to energies of several hundreds of kilovolts. In a first attempt, negative ions, produced from surface plasma sources, are extracted at around 15 keV and accelerated across a single gap to energies of 120 keV. Beam currents in excess of one ampere have been accelerated.

  15. Transmission electron microscope interfaced with ion accelerators and its application to materials science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroaki; Naramoto, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Hojou, Kiichi; Furuno, Shigemi; Tsukamoto, Tetsuo

    1997-03-01

    We have developed the transmission/analytical electron microscope interfaced with two sets of ion accelerators (TEM-Accelerators Facility) at JAERI-Takasaki. The facility is expected to provide quantitative insights into radiation effects, such as damage evolution, irradiation-induced phase transformation and their stability, through in-situ observation and analysis under ion and/or electron irradiation. The TEM-Accelerators Facility and its application to materials research are reviewed. (author)

  16. Subpicosecond pulse compression in nonlinear photonic crystal waveguides based on the formation of high-order optical solitons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xiong-Wen; Lin Xu-Sheng; Lan Sheng

    2005-01-01

    We investigate by numerical simulation the compression of subpicosecond pulses in two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal (PC) waveguides. The compression originates from the generation of high-order optical solitons through the interplay of the huge group-velocity dispersion and the enhanced self-phase modulation in nonlinear PC waveguides.Both the formation of Bragg grating solitons and gap solitons can lead to efficient pulse compression. The compression factors under different excitation power densities and the optimum length for subpicosecond pulse compression have been determined. As a compressor, the total length of the nonlinear PC waveguide is only ten micrometres and therefore can be easily incorporated into PC integrated circuits.

  17. Observation of ion acceleration and heating during collisionless magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Myers, Clayton E

    2013-05-24

    The ion dynamics in a collisionless magnetic reconnection layer are studied in a laboratory plasma. The measured in-plane plasma potential profile, which is established by electrons accelerated around the electron diffusion region, shows a saddle-shaped structure that is wider and deeper towards the outflow direction. This potential structure ballistically accelerates ions near the separatrices toward the outflow direction. Ions are heated as they travel into the high-pressure downstream region.

  18. Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion: Summary Report of the Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidl, P.A.; Barnard, J.J.

    2011-04-29

    The Workshop on Accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory May 23-26, 2011. The workshop began with plenary sessions to review the state of the art in HIF (heavy ion fusion), followed by parallel working groups, and concluded with a plenary session to review the results. There were five working groups: IFE (inertial fusion energy) targets, RF approach to HIF, induction accelerator approach to HIF, chamber and driver interface, ion sources and injectors.

  19. Optical pulse compression using a nonlinear optical loop mirror constructed from dispersion decreasing fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO; Wenhua; LIU; Songhao

    2004-01-01

    A novel scheme to compress optical pulses is proposed and demonstrated numerically, which is based on a nonlinear optical loop mirror constructed from dispersion decreasing fiber (DDF). We show that, in contrast to the conventional soliton-effect pulse compression in which compressed pulses are always accompanied by pedestals and frequency chirps owning to nonlinear effects, the proposed scheme can completely suppress pulse pedestals and frequency chirps. Unlike the adiabatic compression technique in which DDF length must increase exponentially with input pulsewidth, the proposed scheme does not require adiabatic condition and therefore can be used to compress long pulses by using reasonable fiber lengths. For input pulses with peak powers higher than a threshold value, the compressed pulses can propagate like fundamental solitons. Furthermore, the scheme is fairly insensitive to small variations in the loop length and is more robust to higher-order nonlinear effects and initial frequency chirps than the adiabatic compression technique.

  20. Analysis of Doppler Effect on the Pulse Compression of Different Codes Emitted by an Ultrasonic LPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Morera

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses the effect of the receiver movement on the detection by pulse compression of different families of codes characterizing the emissions of an Ultrasonic Local Positioning System. Three families of codes have been compared: Kasami, Complementary Sets of Sequences and Loosely Synchronous, considering in all cases three different lengths close to 64, 256 and 1,024 bits. This comparison is first carried out by using a system model in order to obtain a set of results that are then experimentally validated with the help of an electric slider that provides radial speeds up to 2 m/s. The performance of the codes under analysis has been characterized by means of the auto-correlation and cross-correlation bounds. The results derived from this study should be of interest to anyone performing matched filtering of ultrasonic signals with a moving emitter/receiver.

  1. Analysis of Doppler effect on the pulse compression of different codes emitted by an ultrasonic LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, José A; Aguilera, Teodoro; Alvarez, Fernando J; Lozano, Jesús; Morera, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This work analyses the effect of the receiver movement on the detection by pulse compression of different families of codes characterizing the emissions of an ultrasonic local positioning system. Three families of codes have been compared: Kasami, Complementary Sets of Sequences and Loosely Synchronous, considering in all cases three different lengths close to 64, 256 and 1,024 bits. This comparison is first carried out by using a system model in order to obtain a set of results that are then experimentally validated with the help of an electric slider that provides radial speeds up to 2 m/s. The performance of the codes under analysis has been characterized by means of the auto-correlation and cross-correlation bounds. The results derived from this study should be of interest to anyone performing matched filtering of ultrasonic signals with a moving emitter/receiver.

  2. Preliminary performance analysis of the advanced pulse compression noise radar waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govoni, Mark A.; Moyer, Lee R.

    2012-06-01

    Noise radar systems encounter target fluctuation behavior similar to that of conventional systems. For noise radar systems, however, the fluctuations are not only dictated by target composition and geometry, but also by the non-uniform power envelope of their random transmit signals. This third dependency is of interest and serves as the basis for the preliminary analysis conducted in this manuscript. General conclusions are drawn on the implications of having a random power envelope and the impacts it could have on both the transmit and receive processes. Using an advanced pulse compression noise (APCN) radar waveform as the constituent signal, a computer simulation aids in quantifying potential losses and the impacts they might have on the detection performance of a real radar system.

  3. Recent developments of ion sources for life-science studies at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitagawa, A.; Drentje, A. G.; Fujita, T.; Muramatsu, M. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Fukushima, K.; Shiraishi, N.; Suzuki, T.; Takahashi, K.; Takasugi, W. [Accelerator Engineering Corporation, Chiba (Japan); Biri, S.; Rácz, R. [Institute for Nuclear Research (Atomki), Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Bem tér 18/C, H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Kato, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Uchida, T.; Yoshida, Y. [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, Kawagoe (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    With about 1000-h of relativistic high-energy ion beams provided by Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, about 70 users are performing various biology experiments every year. A rich variety of ion species from hydrogen to xenon ions with a dose rate of several Gy/min is available. Carbon, iron, silicon, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, and oxygen ions were utilized between 2012 and 2014. Presently, three electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs) and one Penning ion source are available. Especially, the two frequency heating techniques have improved the performance of an 18 GHz ECRIS. The results have satisfied most requirements for life-science studies. In addition, this improved performance has realized a feasible solution for similar biology experiments with a hospital-specified accelerator complex.

  4. Temporal and lateral electron pulse compression by a compact spherical electrostatic capacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzelakowski, Krzysztof P., E-mail: kgrzelakowski@op.pl [OPTICON Nanotechnology, Muchoborska 18, PL54-424 Wrocław (Poland); Tromp, Rudolf M. [IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    A novel solution for high intensity electron pulse compression in both space and time is proposed in this paper. Based on the unique properties of the central-force electrostatic field of a spherical electrostatic capacitor, the newly developed α-Spherical Deflector Analyzer (α-SDA) with 2π total deflection is utilized for the practical realization of femtosecond electron pulse compression. The mirror symmetry of the system at π deflection causes not only the cancellation of the geometrical and chromatic aberrations at 2π, but also leads to aberration-free time reversal of the electron pulse in the exit plane. As a consequence, the time-divergent electrons at the input are transformed to a time-convergent pulse at the output. In the symmetric case with the first time compression exactly at π, the shortest electron pulse behind the α-SDA analyzer is a mirror symmetric to the original electron pulse at the photocathode. It results in extremely short final electron pulses that are limited only by the duration of the laser pulse, the emittance of the electron bunch, and by imperfections of the real system. - Highlights: • We propose a new method for spatial and temporal compression of ultrafast electron pulses. • Compact in-line construction is based on the idea of the spherical electrostatic capacitor (α-SDA). • It is free of chromatic, geometrical and temporal aberrations after 2π deflection. • Contrary to other methods it enables time reversal of the pulse with static electric fields only. • Spatial and temporal focus can be independently fine-adjusted at the target position.

  5. Development of a Real-Time Ion Spectrometer with a Scintillator for Laser-Driven Ion Acceleration Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Miao-Hua; David Neely; Paul McKenna; WANG Zhao-Hua; WEI Zhi-Yi; YAN Xue-Qing; LI Yu-Tong; LI Ying-Jun; ZHANG Jie; LI Hong-Wei; LIU Bi-Cheng; LIU Feng; SU Lu-Ning; DU Fei; ZHANG Lu; ZHENG Yi; MA Jing-Long

    2011-01-01

    A real-time ion spectrometer mainly based on a high-resolution Thomson parabola and a plastic scintillator is designed and developed. The spectrometer is calibrated by protons from an electrostatic accelerator. The feasibility and reliability of the diagnostics ore demonstrated in laser-driven ion acceleration experiments performed on the XL-H laser facility. The proton spectrum extrapolated from the scintillator data is in excellent agreement with the CR39 spectrum in terms of beam temperature and the cutoff energy. This real-time spectrometer allows an online measurement of the ion spectra in single shot, which enables efficient and statistical studies and applications in high-repetition-rate laser acceleration experiments.%@@ A real-time ion spectrometer mainly based on a high-resolution Thomson parabola and a plastic scintillator is designed and developed.The spectrometer is calibrated by protons from an electrostatic accelerator.The feasi-bility and reliability of the diagnostics are demonstrated in laser-driven ion acceleration experiments performed on the XL-Ⅱ laser facility.The proton spectrum extrapolated from the scintillator data is in excellent agreement with the CR39 spectrum in terms of beam temperature and the cutoff energy.This real-time spectrometer allows an online measurement of the ion spectra in single shot,which enables efficient and statistical studies and applications in high-repetition-rate laser acceleration experiments.

  6. POLYMERS CONTAINING Cu NANOPARTICLES IRRADIATED BY LASER TO ENHANCE THE ION ACCELERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariapompea Cutroneo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Target Normal Sheath Acceleration method was employed at PALS to accelerate ions from laser-generated plasma at intensities above 1015 W/cm2. Laser parameters, irradiation conditions and target geometry and composition control the plasma properties and the electric field driving the ion acceleration. Cu nanoparticles deposited on the polymer promote resonant absorption effects increasing the plasma electron density and enhancing the proton acceleration. Protons can be accelerated in forward direction at kinetic energies up to about 3.5 MeV. The optimal target thickness, the maximum acceleration energy and the angular distribution of emitted particles have been measured using ion collectors, X-ray CCD streak camera, SiC detectors and Thomson Parabola Spectrometer.

  7. Theoretical benchmarking of laser-accelerated ion fluxes by 2D-PIC simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Mackenroth, Felix; Marklund, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    There currently exists a number of different schemes for laser based ion acceleration in the literature. Some of these schemes are also partly overlapping, making a clear distinction between the schemes difficult in certain parameter regimes. Here, we provide a systematic numerical comparison between the following schemes and their analytical models: light-sail acceleration, Coulomb explosions, hole boring acceleration, and target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA). We study realistic laser parameters and various different target designs, each optimized for one of the acceleration schemes, respectively. As a means of comparing the schemes, we compute the ion current density generated at different laser powers, using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, and benchmark the particular analytical models for the corresponding schemes against the numerical results. Finally, we discuss the consequences for attaining high fluxes through the studied laser ion-acceleration schemes.

  8. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1--September 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-12-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification --both new features in a linac -- without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target.

  9. Ion acceleration and plasma jet formation in ultra-thin foils undergoing expansion and relativistic transparency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, M.; Gray, R.J.; Powell, H.W.; MacLellan, D.A.; Gonzalez-Izquierdo, B. [SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Stockhausen, L.C. [Centro de Laseres Pulsados (CLPU), Parque Cientifico, Calle del Adaja, s/n. 37185 Villamayor, Salamanca (Spain); Hicks, G.S.; Dover, N.P. [The John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Rusby, D.R. [SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Carroll, D.C. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Padda, H. [SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Torres, R. [Centro de Laseres Pulsados (CLPU), Parque Cientifico, Calle del Adaja, s/n. 37185 Villamayor, Salamanca (Spain); Kar, S. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Clarke, R.J.; Musgrave, I.O. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Najmudin, Z. [The John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Borghesi, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Neely, D. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); McKenna, P., E-mail: paul.mckenna@strath.ac.uk [SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    At sufficiently high laser intensities, the rapid heating to relativistic velocities and resulting decompression of plasma electrons in an ultra-thin target foil can result in the target becoming relativistically transparent to the laser light during the interaction. Ion acceleration in this regime is strongly affected by the transition from an opaque to a relativistically transparent plasma. By spatially resolving the laser-accelerated proton beam at near-normal laser incidence and at an incidence angle of 30°, we identify characteristic features both experimentally and in particle-in-cell simulations which are consistent with the onset of three distinct ion acceleration mechanisms: sheath acceleration; radiation pressure acceleration; and transparency-enhanced acceleration. The latter mechanism occurs late in the interaction and is mediated by the formation of a plasma jet extending into the expanding ion population. The effect of laser incident angle on the plasma jet is explored.

  10. Acceleration of dust grains by means of the high energy ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khorashadizadeh, S.M., E-mail: smkhorashadi@birjand.ac.ir [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sabzinezhad, F. [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A.R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-08

    The acceleration of charged dust grains by a high energy ion beam is investigated by obtaining the dispersion relation. The Cherenkov and cyclotron acceleration mechanisms of dust grains are compared with each other. The role of dusty plasma parameters and the magnetic field strength in the acceleration process are discussed. In addition, the stimulated waves by an ion beam in a fully magnetized dust–ion plasma are studied. It is shown that these waves are unstable at different angles with respect to the external magnetic field. It is also indicated that the growth rates increase by either increasing the ion and dust densities or decreasing the magnetic field strength. Finally, the results of our research show that the high energy ion beam can accelerate charged dust grains.

  11. Modification of semiconductor materials using laser-produced ion streams additionally accelerated in the electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosinski, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, P.O. Box 49, Hery Street 23, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)], E-mail: rosinski@ifpilm.waw.pl; Badziak, B.; Parys, P.; Wolowski, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, P.O. Box 49, Hery Street 23, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Pisarek, M. [Warsaw University of Technology, Material Science and Engineering Faculty, Warsaw (Poland)

    2009-03-01

    The laser-produced ion stream may be attractive for direct ultra-low-energy ion implantation in thin layer of semiconductor for modification of electrical and optical properties of semiconductor devices. Application of electrostatic fields for acceleration and formation of laser-generated ion stream enables to control the ion stream parameters in broad energy and current density ranges. It also permits to remove the useless laser-produced ions from the ion stream designed for implantation. For acceleration of ions produced with the use of a low fluence repetitive laser system (Nd:glass: 2 Hz, pulse duration: 3.5 ns, pulse energy:{approx}0.5 J, power density: 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2}) in IPPLM the special electrostatic system has been prepared. The laser-produced ions passing through the diaphragm (a ring-shaped slit in the HV box) have been accelerated in the system of electrodes. The accelerating voltage up to 40 kV, the distance of the diaphragm from the target, the diaphragm diameter and the gap width were changed for choosing the desired parameters (namely the energy band of the implanted ions) of the ion stream. The characteristics of laser-produced Ge ion streams were determined with the use of precise ion diagnostic methods, namely: electrostatic ion energy analyser and various ion collectors. The laser-produced and post-accelerated Ge ions have been used for implantation into semiconductor materials for nanocrystal fabrication. The characteristics of implanted samples were measured using AES.

  12. Ion acceleration and heating by kinetic Alfvén waves associated with magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ji; Lin, Yu; Johnson, Jay R.; Wang, Zheng-Xiong; Wang, Xueyi

    2017-10-01

    Our previous study on the generation and signatures of kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) associated with magnetic reconnection in a current sheet revealed that KAWs are a common feature during reconnection [Liang et al. J. Geophys. Res.: Space Phys. 121, 6526 (2016)]. In this paper, ion acceleration and heating by the KAWs generated during magnetic reconnection are investigated with a three-dimensional (3-D) hybrid model. It is found that in the outflow region, a fraction of inflow ions are accelerated by the KAWs generated in the leading bulge region of reconnection, and their parallel velocities gradually increase up to slightly super-Alfvénic. As a result of wave-particle interactions, an accelerated ion beam forms in the direction of the anti-parallel magnetic field, in addition to the core ion population, leading to the development of non-Maxwellian velocity distributions, which include a trapped population with parallel velocities consistent with the wave speed. The ions are heated in both parallel and perpendicular directions. In the parallel direction, the heating results from nonlinear Landau resonance of trapped ions. In the perpendicular direction, however, evidence of stochastic heating by the KAWs is found during the acceleration stage, with an increase of magnetic moment μ. The coherence in the perpendicular ion temperature T⊥ and the perpendicular electric and magnetic fields of KAWs also provides evidence for perpendicular heating by KAWs. The parallel and perpendicular heating of the accelerated beam occur simultaneously, leading to the development of temperature anisotropy with T⊥>T∥ . The heating rate agrees with the damping rate of the KAWs, and the heating is dominated by the accelerated ion beam. In the later stage, with the increase of the fraction of the accelerated ions, interaction between the accelerated beam and the core population also contributes to the ion heating, ultimately leading to overlap of the beams and an overall

  13. Investigation on target normal sheath acceleration through measurements of ions energy distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tudisco, S., E-mail: tudisco@lns.infn.it; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Mascali, D.; Schillaci, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Altana, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Enna “Kore,” Via delle Olimpiadi, 94100 Enna (Italy); Muoio, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Brandi, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Cristoforetti, G.; Ferrara, P.; Fulgentini, L.; Koester, P. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Labate, L.; Gizzi, L. A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); and others

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming at investigating the ion acceleration mechanisms through laser-matter interaction in femtosecond domain has been carried out at the Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory facility with a laser intensity of up to 2 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. A Thomson parabola spectrometer was used to obtain the spectra of the ions of the different species accelerated. Here, we show the energy spectra of light-ions and we discuss their dependence on structural characteristics of the target and the role of surface and target bulk in the acceleration process.

  14. Coulomb-driven energy boost of heavy ions for laser-plasma acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braenzel, J; Andreev, A A; Platonov, K; Klingsporn, M; Ehrentraut, L; Sandner, W; Schnürer, M

    2015-03-27

    An unprecedented increase of kinetic energy of laser accelerated heavy ions is demonstrated. Ultrathin gold foils have been irradiated by an ultrashort laser pulse at a peak intensity of 8×10^{19}  W/  cm^{2}. Highly charged gold ions with kinetic energies up to >200  MeV and a bandwidth limited energy distribution have been reached by using 1.3 J laser energy on target. 1D and 2D particle in cell simulations show how a spatial dependence on the ion's ionization leads to an enhancement of the accelerating electrical field. Our theoretical model considers a spatial distribution of the ionization inside the thin target, leading to a field enhancement for the heavy ions by Coulomb explosion. It is capable of explaining the energy boost of highly charged ions, enabling a higher efficiency for the laser-driven heavy ion acceleration.

  15. Characteristics of perfluorinated amine media for stimulated Brillouin scattering in hundreds of picoseconds pulse compression at 532 nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wuliji Hasi; Hang Zhao; Dianyang Lin; Weiming He; Zhiwei Lü

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in perfluorinated amine media and the experimental structure used in hundreds of picoseconds pulse compression at 532 nm are demonstrated.A two-stage SBS pulse compression structure is adopted for this work.The compact double-cell SBS compression structure and the scattering media FC-70 are chosen to compress the incident light from 9.5 to about 1 ns in the first stage.Then,the light is used as the pumping source for the second pulse compression.In the second stage,using a single-cell SBS structure in a pulse compression system,perfluorinated amine media with different phonon lifetimes,such as FC-3283,FC-40,FC-43,and FC-70,are chosen to run the comparative experimental study.The narrowest compressed pulse times obtained are 294,274,277,and 194 ps;they respectively correspond to the above listed media.The average width of the compressed pulse width is 320 ps for FC-3283,with a fluctuation range of 87 ps.For FC-40,the average pulse width is 320 ps,with a fluctuation range of 72 ps.And for FC-43,the average pulse width is 335 ps,with a fluctuation range of 88 ps.However,the average pulse width is only 280 ps for FC-70,with a fluctuation range of 57 ps.The highest energy reflectivity is more than 80% for all of the media.The experimental results show that a two-stage SBS pulse compression system has lower pump energy requirements,thus making it easier to achieve a compressed pulse waveform.The results also show that the shorter the phonon lifetime of the medium,the narrower the obtained compressed pulse width.

  16. Effects of energetic electrons on ion acceleration in a quasi-static model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahache, Abdelkadrer; Bennaceur-Doumaz, Djamila; Djebli, Mourad

    2017-08-01

    Based on the Passoni-Lontano model [M. Lontano and M. Passoni, Phys. Plasmas 13(4), 042102 (2006)], the expansion of an intense laser produced plasma into vacuum is analyzed, assuming that hot and energetic electrons responsible for ion acceleration, in the framework of a TNSA mechanism, are nonthermal and modelled by the Cairns distribution function. Due to the presence of energetic nonthermal electron population, the electric potential, electrical field, ion maximum energy, and ion spectrum energy are enhanced during the ion acceleration process.

  17. Influence of fs-laser desorption on target normal sheath accelerated ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Hoffmeister

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We report on the effects of fs-laser desorption on the ion acceleration induced by the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA mechanism. The experiment was performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL using the 100 TW Callisto laser of the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF. Thin metal foils (Au, Cu, and Al with thicknesses ranging from 10 to 20  μm were irradiated by a variable number of low intensity (∼10^{12}  W/cm^{2} laser pulses, the last one arriving 100 ms before the main pulse. With these short pulses water vapor and hydrocarbon contaminations could stepwise be removed from the target surface. Substantial modifications of the TNSA-ion energy spectra were observed such as diminished proton energy and intensity, the absence of low-charged ion states, increased particle numbers for C^{4+} and O^{6+} ions in the higher energetic part of their particle spectra as well as the acceleration of target ions. The controlled application of fs-laser desorption on the laser-ion acceleration thus strongly influences the ion spectra and offers the possibility of selecting a targeted range of ion species for the acceleration to higher energies due to the systematic removal of contamination layers.

  18. The Origin and Acceleration of 3He and Heavy Ions in the 2000 July 14 Event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Ping Wu; Guang-Li Huang; Yu-Hua Tang; Yu Dai

    2007-01-01

    According to the evolutionary properties of the flare, halo coronal mass ejection (CME), enrichments of 3He ions in the energy range of 3.5-26 MeV nucl-1 and Ne, Mg, Si and Fe ions in the energy range of 8.5-15 MeV nucl-1, we argue that the 3He and heavy ions originate in the middle corona (~0.1-1 R⊙) with well-connected open field lines to the Earth,where the magnetic reconnection leads to acceleration of the electrons and the production of type-Ⅲ burst during the decay phase of the soft X-ray emission. The acceleration of 3He and heavy ions may have been accomplished in two stages: first H-He ion-ion hybrid waves may be easily excited by the energetic electron beams produced in the middle corona, and these waves are preferentially absorbed by 3He and heavy ions due to their frequency being near the fundamental gyro frequency of the 3He ions and harmonic gyro frequency of Ne, Mg, Si and Fe ions. These preheated ions escape into interplanetary space along the open field lines and may be further accelerated to tens of MeV nucl-1 by CME-driven shock. The theoretical calculations show that the 3He and heavy ions may be accelerated to the energy of ~ MeV nucl-1 by the ion-ion hybrid waves and be further accelerated to the energy of ~ 100 MeV nucl- 1 by the shock wave: these are basically consistent with the observations.

  19. Direction for the Future - Successive Acceleration of Positive and Negative Ions Applied to Space Propulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Aanesland, A.; Popelier, L.; Chabert, P.

    2013-12-16

    Electrical space thrusters show important advantages for applications in outer space compared to chemical thrusters, as they allow a longer mission lifetime with lower weight and propellant consumption. Mature technologies on the market today accelerate positive ions to generate thrust. The ion beam is neutralized by electrons downstream, and this need for an additional neutralization system has some drawbacks related to stability, lifetime and total weight and power consumption. Many new concepts, to get rid of the neutralizer, have been proposed, and the PEGASES ion-ion thruster is one of them. This new thruster concept aims at accelerating both positive and negative ions to generate thrust, such that additional neutralization is redundant. This chapter gives an overview of the concept of electric propulsion and the state of the development of this new ion-ion thruster.

  20. Energy exchange via multi-species streaming in laser-driven ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M.; Gray, R. J.; Powell, H. W.; Capdessus, R.; McKenna, P.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the complex electron dynamics and multiple ion acceleration mechanisms that can take place in the interaction of an ultra-intense laser pulse with a thin foil, it is possible for multiple charged particle populations to overlap in space with varying momentum distributions. In certain scenarios this can drive streaming instabilities such as the relativistic Buneman instability and the ion-ion acoustic instability. The potential for such instabilities to occur are demonstrated using particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that if a population of ions can be accelerated such that it can propagate through other slowly expanding ion populations, energy exchange can occur via the ion-ion acoustic instability.

  1. Development of high intensity linear accelerator for heavy ion inertial fusion driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Liang, E-mail: luliang@riken.jp [Institute of Modern Physics, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Riken Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hattori, Toshiyuki [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan); Hayashizaki, Noriyosu [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, N1-25 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Ishibashi, Takuya [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Takeuchi, Takeshi [Accelerator Engineering Corporation, 301, 6-18-1 Konakadai, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-0043 (Japan); Zhao, Hongwei; He, Yuan [Institute of Modern Physics, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2013-11-21

    In order to verify the direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS), an acceleration test was carried out in 2001 using a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) heavy ion linear accelerator (linac) and a CO{sub 2}-laser ion source (LIS) (Okamura et al., 2002) [1]. The accelerated carbon beam was observed successfully and the obtained current was 9.22 mA for C{sup 4+}. To confirm the capability of the DPIS, we succeeded in accelerating 60 mA carbon ions with the DPIS in 2004 (Okamura et al., 2004; Kashiwagi and Hattori, 2004) [2,3]. We have studied a multi-beam type RFQ with an interdigital-H (IH) cavity that has a power-efficient structure in the low energy region. We designed and manufactured a two-beam type RFQ linac as a prototype for the multi-beam type linac; the beam acceleration test of carbon beams showed that it successfully accelerated from 5 keV/u up to 60 keV/u with an output current of 108 mA (2×54 mA/channel) (Ishibashi et al., 2011) [4]. We believe that the acceleration techniques of DPIS and the multi-beam type IH-RFQ linac are technical breakthroughs for heavy-ion inertial confinement fusion (HIF). The conceptual design of the RF linac with these techniques for HIF is studied. New accelerator-systems using these techniques for the HIF basic experiment are being designed to accelerate 400 mA carbon ions using four-beam type IH-RFQ linacs with DPIS. A model with a four-beam acceleration cavity was designed and manufactured to establish the proof of principle (PoP) of the accelerator.

  2. Laser-Accelerated Ions from a Shock-Compressed Gas Foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, M. H.; Gordon, D. F.; Kaganovich, D.; Chen, Y.; Palastro, J. P.; Ting, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present results of energetic laser-ion acceleration from a tailored, near solid density gas target. Colliding hydrodynamic shocks compress a pure hydrogen gas jet into a 70 μ m thick target prior to the arrival of the ultraintense laser pulse. A density scan reveals the transition from a regime characterized by a wide angle, low-energy beam (target normal sheath acceleration) to one of a more focused beam with a high-energy halo (magnetic vortex acceleration). In the latter case, three-dimensional simulations show the formation of a Z pinch driven by the axial current resulting from laser wakefield accelerated electrons. Ions at the rear of the target are then accelerated by a combination of space charge fields from accelerated electrons and Coulombic repulsion as the pinch dissipates.

  3. Fast ion mass spectrometry and charged particle spectrography investigations of transverse ion acceleration and beam-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, W. C.; Tomlinson, W. M.; Marshall, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    Ion acceleration transverse to the magnetic field in the topside ionosphere was investigated. Transverse acceleration is believed to be responsible for the upward-moving conical ion distributions commonly observed along auroral field lines at altitudes from several hundred to several thousand kilometers. Of primary concern in this investigation is the extent of these conic events in space and time. Theoretical predictions indicate very rapid initial heating rates, depending on the ion species. These same theories predict that the events will occur within a narrow vertical region of only a few hundred kilometers. Thus an instrument with very high spatial and temporal resolution was required; further, since different heating rates were predicted for different ions, it was necessary to obtain composition as well as velocity space distributions. The fast ion mass spectrometer (FIMS) was designed to meet these criteria. This instrument and its operation is discussed.

  4. Heavy-ion Acceleration and Self-generated Waves in Coronal Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Battarbee, Markus; Vainio, Rami; 10.1051/0004-6361/201117507

    2013-01-01

    Context: Acceleration in coronal mass ejection driven shocks is currently considered the primary source of large solar energetic particle events. Aims: The solar wind, which feeds shock-accelerated particles, includes numerous ion populations, which offer much insight into acceleration processes. We present first simulations of shock-accelerated minor ions, in order to explore trapping dynamics and acceleration timescales in detail. Methods: We have simulated diffusive shock acceleration of minor ions (3He2+, 4He2+, 16O6+ and 56Fe14+) and protons using a Monte Carlo method, where self-generated Alfv\\'enic turbulence allows for repeated shock crossings and acceleration to high energies. Results: We present the effect of minor ions on wave generation, especially at low wavenumbers, and show that it is significant. We find that maximum ion energy is determined by the competing effects of particle escape due to focusing in an expanding flux tube and trapping due to the amplified turbulence. We show the dependence...

  5. Coulomb driven energy boost of heavy ions for laser plasma acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Braenzel, J; Platonov, K; Klingsporn, M; Ehrentraut, L; Sandner, W; Schnürer, M

    2014-01-01

    An unprecedented increase of kinetic energy of laser accelerated heavy ions is demonstrated. Ultra thin gold foils have been irradiated by an ultra short laser pulse at an intensity of $6\\times 10^{19}$ W/cm$^{2}$. Highly charged gold ions with kinetic energies up to $> 200$ MeV and a bandwidth limited energy distribution have been reached by using $1.3$ Joule laser energy on target. $1$D and $2$D Particle in Cell simulations show how a spatial dependence on the ions ionization leads to an enhancement of the accelerating electrical field. Our theoretical model considers a varying charge density along the target normal and is capable of explaining the energy boost of highly charged ions, leading to a higher efficiency in laser acceleration of heavy ions.

  6. Sub-Nyquist sampling and detection in Costas coded pulse compression radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Adnan; Mansoor, Atif Bin; Imran, Ali Shariq

    2016-12-01

    Modern pulse compression radar involves digital signal processing of high bandwidth pulses modulated with different coding schemes. One of the limiting factors in the radar's design to achieve desired target range and resolution is the need of high rate analog-to-digital (A/D) conversion fulfilling the Nyquist sampling criteria. The high sampling rates necessitate huge storage capacity, more power consumption, and extra processing requirement. We introduce a new approach to sample wideband radar waveform modulated with Costas sequence at a sub-Nyquist rate based upon the concept of compressive sensing (CS). Sub-Nyquist measurements of Costas sequence waveform are performed in an analog-to-information (A/I) converter based upon random demodulation replacing traditional A/D converter. The novel work presents an 8-order Costas coded waveform with sub-Nyquist sampling and its reconstruction. The reconstructed waveform is compared with the conventionally sampled signal and depicts high-quality signal recovery from sub-Nyquist sampled signal. Furthermore, performance of CS-based detections after reconstruction are evaluated in terms of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and compared with conventional Nyquist-rate matched filtering scheme.

  7. Development of heavy-ion accelerators as drivers for inertially confined fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1979-06-01

    The commercialization of inertial confinement fusion is discussed in terms of power costs. A chapter on heavy ion accelerators covers the prinicpal components, beam loss mechanisms, and theoretical considerations. Other tyopics discussed include the following: (1) heavy ion fusion implementation plan, (2) driver with accumulator rings fed by an rf LINAC, (3) single pass driver with an induction LINAC, and (4) implementation scenarios.

  8. Pulsed ion hall accelerator for investigation of reactions between light nuclei in the astrophysical energy range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Bystritsky, Vit. M.; Dudkin, G. N.; Nechaev, B. A.; Padalko, V. N.

    2017-07-01

    The factors defining the constraints on the current characteristics of the magnetically insulated ion diode (IDM) are considered. The specific current parameters close to the maximum possible ones are obtained for the particular IDM-40 design assigned for acceleration of light ions and investigation of nuclear reactions with small cross sections in the astrophysical energy range (2-40 keV) in the entrance channel. It is experimentally demonstrated that the chosen optimal operation conditions for IDM-40 units provide high stability of the parameters (energy distribution and composition of accelerated particle beams, degree of neutralization) of the accelerated particle flux, which increases during the working pulse.

  9. Cyclinac medical accelerators using pulsed C6+/H2+ ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garonna, A.; Amaldi, U.; Bonomi, R.; Campo, D.; Degiovanni, A.; Garlasché, M.; Mondino, I.; Rizzoglio, V.; Verdú Andrés, S.

    2010-09-01

    Charged particle therapy, or so-called hadrontherapy, is developing very rapidly. There is large pressure on the scientific community to deliver dedicated accelerators, providing the best possible treatment modalities at the lowest cost. In this context, the Italian research Foundation TERA is developing fast-cycling accelerators, dubbed `cyclinacs'. These are a combination of a cyclotron (accelerating ions to a fixed initial energy) followed by a high gradient linac boosting the ions energy up to the maximum needed for medical therapy. The linac is powered by many independently controlled klystrons to vary the beam energy from one pulse to the next. This accelerator is best suited to treat moving organs with a 4D multipainting spot scanning technique. A dual proton/carbon ion cyclinac is here presented. It consists of an Electron Beam Ion Source, a superconducting isochronous cyclotron and a high-gradient linac. All these machines are pulsed at high repetition rate (100-400 Hz). The source should deliver both C6+ and H2+ ions in short pulses (1.5 μs flat-top) and with sufficient intensity (at least 108 fully stripped carbon ions per pulse at 300 Hz). The cyclotron accelerates the ions to 120 MeV/u. It features a compact design (with superconducting coils) and a low power consumption. The linac has a novel C-band high-gradient structure and accelerates the ions to variable energies up to 400 MeV/u. High RF frequencies lead to power consumptions which are much lower than the ones of synchrotrons for the same ion extraction energy. This work is part of a collaboration with the CLIC group, which is working at CERN on high-gradient electron-positron colliders.

  10. Cyclinac medical accelerators using pulsed C{sup 6+}/H{sub 2}{sup +} ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garonna, A; Amaldi, U; Bonomi, R; Campo, D; Degiovanni, A; Garlasche, M; Mondino, I; Rizzoglio, V; Andres, S Verdu, E-mail: Adriano.Garonna@cern.c [TERA Foundation, via G. Puccini 11, 28100 Novara (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    Charged particle therapy, or so-called hadrontherapy, is developing very rapidly. There is large pressure on the scientific community to deliver dedicated accelerators, providing the best possible treatment modalities at the lowest cost. In this context, the Italian research Foundation TERA is developing fast-cycling accelerators, dubbed 'cyclinacs'. These are a combination of a cyclotron (accelerating ions to a fixed initial energy) followed by a high gradient linac boosting the ions energy up to the maximum needed for medical therapy. The linac is powered by many independently controlled klystrons to vary the beam energy from one pulse to the next. This accelerator is best suited to treat moving organs with a 4D multipainting spot scanning technique. A dual proton/carbon ion cyclinac is here presented. It consists of an Electron Beam Ion Source, a superconducting isochronous cyclotron and a high-gradient linac. All these machines are pulsed at high repetition rate (100-400 Hz). The source should deliver both C{sup 6+} and H{sub 2}{sup +} ions in short pulses (1.5 {mu}s flat-top) and with sufficient intensity (at least 10{sup 8} fully stripped carbon ions per pulse at 300 Hz). The cyclotron accelerates the ions to 120 MeV/u. It features a compact design (with superconducting coils) and a low power consumption. The linac has a novel C-band high-gradient structure and accelerates the ions to variable energies up to 400 MeV/u. High RF frequencies lead to power consumptions which are much lower than the ones of synchrotrons for the same ion extraction energy. This work is part of a collaboration with the CLIC group, which is working at CERN on high-gradient electron-positron colliders.

  11. Collisionless electrostatic shock formation and ion acceleration in intense laser interactions with near critical density plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, M; Li, Y T; Yuan, D W; Chen, M; Mulser, P; Sheng, Z M; Murakami, M; Yu, L L; Zheng, X L; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Laser-driven collisonless electrostatic shock formation and the subsequent ion acceleration have been studied in near critical density plasmas. Particle-in-cell simulations show that both the speed of laser-driven collisionless electrostatic shock and the energies of shock-accelerated ions can be greatly enhanced due to fast laser propagation in near critical density plasmas. However, a response time longer than tens of laser wave cycles is required before the shock formation in a near critical density plasma, in contrast to the quick shock formation in a highly overdense target. More important, we find that some ions can be reflected by the collisionless shock even if the electrostatic potential jump across the shock is smaller than the ion kinetic energy in the shock frame, which seems against the conventional ion-reflection condition. These anomalous ion reflections are attributed to the strongly time-oscillating electric field accompanying laser-driven collisionless shock in a near critical density plasma...

  12. Ion acceleration in shell cylinders irradiated by a short intense laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, A. [Max-Born Institute, Berlin (Germany); ELI-ALPS, Szeged (Hungary); Platonov, K. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Sharma, A. [ELI-ALPS, Szeged (Hungary); Murakami, M. [ILE, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    The interaction of a short high intensity laser pulse with homo and heterogeneous shell cylinders has been analyzed using particle-in-cell simulations and analytical modeling. We show that the shell cylinder is proficient of accelerating and focusing ions in a narrow region. In the case of shell cylinder, the ion energy exceeds the ion energy for a flat target of the same thickness. The constructed model enables the evaluation of the ion energy and the number of ions in the focusing region.

  13. Spectral control of laser accelerated ions via deuterium vapour deposition onto cryogenically cooled targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Graeme

    2016-10-01

    A widely perceived criticism of the best understood laser driven ion acceleration mechanism, TNSA, is that the energy spectra routinely obtained are Maxwellian in nature, and are non-ideal for some of the long term envisaged applications of a laser accelerated ion source such as ion driven fast ignition or hadrontherapy. We, however, demonstrate a novel method to accelerate a quasi-monoenergetic deuterium beam in the TNSA regime of ion acceleration. This is made possible by recent developments in cryogenic targetry at the Central Laser Facility, and is achieved by cooling a gold target to approximately 7-8 K and introducing overcoats of isotopic deuterium layers on top of the hydrogen contaminant layer present on the original target. The presence of a lower charge to mass ion on top of the high charge to mass hydrogen, alters the sheath dynamics during the acceleration such that the high energy portion of the deuterium beam exhibits a full width at half maximum energy spread of δɛ / ɛ 0.3-0.5. Experimental results and multidimensional numerical modelling will be presented describing this effect. Further than this, experimental results show that the accelerated deuterium beam is found to significantly enhance the number of neutrons produced when fielded in a pitcher/catcher configuration, and provides avenues for investigation on the production of a high brightness neutron source.

  14. Ion acceleration from intense laser-generated plasma: methods, diagnostics and possible applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrisi Lorenzo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many parameters of non-equilibrium plasma generated by high intensity and fast lasers depend on the pulse intensity and the laser wavelength. In conditions favourable for the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA regime the ion acceleration from the rear side of the target can be enhanced by increasing the thin foil absorbance through the use of nanoparticles and nanostructures promoting the surface plasmon resonance effect. In conditions favourable for the backward plasma acceleration (BPA regime, when thick targets are used, a special role is played by the laser focal position with respect to the target surface, a proper choice of which may result in induced self-focusing effects and non-linear acceleration enhancement. SiC detectors employed in the time-of-flight (TOF configuration and a Thomson parabola spectrometer permit on-line diagnostics of the ion streams emitted at high kinetic energies. The target composition and geometry, apart from the laser parameters and to the irradiation conditions, allow further control of the plasma characteristics and can be varied by using advanced targets to reach the maximum ion acceleration. Measurements using advanced targets with enhanced the laser absorption effect in thin films are presented. Applications of accelerated ions in the field of ion source, hadrontherapy and nuclear physics are discussed.

  15. Theory of laser ion acceleration from a foil target of nanometers

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, X Q; Hegelich, M; Yin, L; Habs, D

    2009-01-01

    A theory for laser ion acceleration is presented to evaluate the maximum ion energy in the interaction of ultrahigh contrast (UHC) intense laser with a nanometer-scale foil. In this regime the energy of ions may be directly related to the laser intensity and subsequent electron dynamics. Significantly, higher energies for thin targets than for thicker targets are predicted. Theory is concretized to the details of recent experiments which may find its way to compare with these results.

  16. Longitudinal Ion Acceleration from High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Underdense Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Willingale, L; Nilson, P M; Clarke, R J; Dangor, A E; Kaluza, M C; Karsch, S; Lancaster, K L; Mori, W B; Schreiber, J; Thomas, A G R; Wei, M S; Krushelnick, K; Najmudin, Z

    2007-01-01

    Longitudinal ion acceleration from high-intensity (I ~ 10^20 Wcm^-2) laser interactions with helium gas jet targets (n_e ~ 0.04 n_c) have been observed. The ion beam has a maximum energy for He^2+ of approximately 40 MeV and was directional along the laser propagation path, with the highest energy ions being collimated to a cone of less than 10 degrees. 2D particle-in-cell simulations have been used to investigate the acceleration mechanism. The time varying magnetic field associated with the fast electron current provides a contribution to the accelerating electric field as well as providing a collimating field for the ions. A strong correlation between the plasma density and the ion acceleration was found. A short plasma scale-length at the vacuum interface was observed to be beneficial for the maximum ion energies, but the collimation appears to be improved with longer scale-lengths due to enhanced magnetic fields in the ramp acceleration region.

  17. Electron distribution function behavior during localized transverse ion acceleration events in the topside auroral zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, K.A.; Arnoldy, R.L. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Kintner, P.M. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Vago, J.L. [European Space Agency, Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    1994-02-01

    The Topaz3 auroral sounding rocket made the following observations concerning the transfer of precipitating auroral electron energy to transverse ion acceleration in the topside auroral zone. During the course of the flight, the precipitating electron beam was modified to varying degrees by interaction with VLF hiss, at times changing the beam into a field-aligned plateau. The electron distribution functions throughout the flight are classified according to the extent of this modification, and correspondences with ion acceleration events are sought. The hiss power during most of this rocket flight apparently exceeded the threshold for collapse into solitary structures. At the times of plateaued electron distributions, the collapse of these structures was limited by Landau damping through the ambient ions, resulting in a velocity-dependent acceleration of both protons and oxygen. This initial acceleration is sufficient to supply the number flux of upflowing ions observed at satellite altitudes. The bursty ion acceleration was anticorrelated, on 1-s or smaller timescales, with dispersive bursts of precipitating field-aligned electrons, although on longer timescales the bursty ions and the bursty electrons are correlated. 45 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Ion acceleration beyond 100MeV/amu from relativistic laser-matter interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Daniel; Gautier, Cort; Johnson, Randall; Letzring, Samuel; Shah, Rahul; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; Shimada, Tsutomu; Fernandez, Juan; Hegelich, Manuel; Yin, Lin; Albright, Brian; Habs, Dieter

    2012-10-01

    In the past 10 years laser acceleration of protons and ions was mainly achieved by laser light interacting with micrometer scaled solid matter targets in the TNSA regime, favoring acceleration of protons. Ion acceleration based on this acceleration mechanism seems to have stagnated in terms of particle energy, remaining too low for most applications. The high contrast and relativistic intensities available at the Trident laser allow sub-micron solid matter laser interaction dominated by relativistic transparency of the target. This interaction efficiently couples laser momentum into all target ion species, making it a promising alternative to conventional accelerators. However, little experimental research has up to now studied conversion efficiency or beam distributions, which are essential for application, such as ion based fast ignition (IFI) or hadron cancer therapy. We here present experimental data addressing these aspects for C^6+ ions and protons in comparison with the TNSA regime. Unique measurements of angularly resolved ion energy spectra for targets ranging from 30 nm to 25 micron are presented. While the measured conversion efficiency for C^6+ reaches up to ˜7%, peak energies of 1 GeV and 120 MeV have been measured for C^6+ and protons, respectively.

  19. A review of ion sources for medical accelerators (invited)a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.

    2012-02-01

    There are two major medical applications of ion accelerators. One is a production of short-lived isotopes for radionuclide imaging with positron emission tomography and single photon emission computer tomography. Generally, a combination of a source for negative ions (usually H- and/or D-) and a cyclotron is used; this system is well established and distributed over the world. Other important medical application is charged-particle radiotherapy, where the accelerated ion beam itself is being used for patient treatment. Two distinctly different methods are being applied: either with protons or with heavy-ions (mostly carbon ions). Proton radiotherapy for deep-seated tumors has become widespread since the 1990s. The energy and intensity are typically over 200 MeV and several 1010 pps, respectively. Cyclotrons as well as synchrotrons are utilized. The ion source for the cyclotron is generally similar to the type for production of radioisotopes. For a synchrotron, one applies a positive ion source in combination with an injector linac. Carbon ion radiotherapy awakens a worldwide interest. About 6000 cancer patients have already been treated with carbon beams from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan. These clinical results have clearly verified the advantages of carbon ions. Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center and Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center have been successfully launched. Several new facilities are under commissioning or construction. The beam energy is adjusted to the depth of tumors. It is usually between 140 and 430 MeV/u. Although the beam intensity depends on the irradiation method, it is typically several 108 or 109 pps. Synchrotrons are only utilized for carbon ion radiotherapy. An ECR ion source supplies multi-charged carbon ions for this requirement. Some other medical applications with ion beams attract developer's interests. For example, the several types of accelerators are under

  20. Studies of acceleration processes in the corona using ion measurements on the solar probe mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloeckler, G.

    1978-01-01

    The energy spectra and composition of particles escaping from the Sun provide essential information on mechanisms responsible for their acceleration, and may also be used to characterize the regions where they are accelerated and confined and through which they propagate. The suprathermal energy range, which extends from solar wind energies (approximately 1 KeV) to about 1 MeV/nucleon, is of special interest to studies of nonthermal acceleration processes because a large fraction of particles is likely to be accelerated into this energy range. Data obtained from near earth observations of particles in the suprathermal energy range are reviewed. The necessary capabilities of an a ion composition experiment in the solar probe mission and the required ion measurements are discussed. A possible configuration of an instrument consisting of an electrostatic deflection system, modest post acceleration, and a time of flight versus energy system is described as well as its possible location on the spacecraft.

  1. Simulations of ion acceleration at non-relativistic shocks: ii) magnetic field amplification and particle diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Caprioli, Damiano

    2014-01-01

    We use large hybrid (kinetic ions-fluid electrons) simulations to study ion acceleration and generation of magnetic turbulence due to the streaming of energetic particles that are self-consistently accelerated at non-relativistic shocks. When acceleration is efficient (at quasi-parallel shocks), we find that the magnetic field develops transverse components and is significantly amplified in the pre-shock medium. The total amplification factor is larger than 10 for shocks with Mach number $M=100$, and scales with the square root of $M$. We find that in the shock precursor the energy spectral density of excited magnetic turbulence is proportional to spectral energy distribution of accelerated particles at corresponding resonant momenta, in good agreement with the predictions of quasilinear theory of diffusive shock acceleration. We discuss the role of Bell's instability, which is predicted and found to grow faster than resonant instability in shocks with $M\\gtrsim 30$. Ahead of these strong shocks we distinguis...

  2. Longitudinal instabilities affecting the moving critical layer laser-plasma ion accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash Ajit

    2014-01-01

    In this work we analyze the longitudinal instabilities of propagating acceleration structures that are driven by a relativistically intense laser at the moving plasma critical layer [1]. These instabilities affect the energy-spectra of the accelerated ion-beams in propagating critical layer acceleration schemes [2][3]. Specifically, using analytical theory and PIC simulations we look into three fundamental physical processes and their interplay that are crucial to the understanding of energy spectral control by making the laser-plasma ion accelerators stable. The interacting processes are (i) Doppler-shifted ponderomotive bunching [1][4] (ii) potential quenching by beam-loading [2] and (iii) two-stream instabilities. These phenomenon have been observed in simulations analyzing these acceleration processes [5][6][7]. From the preliminary models and results we present in this work, we can infer measures by which these instabilities can be controlled [8] for improving the energy-spread of the beams.

  3. ACCELERATORS Control system for the CSNS ion source test stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan-Hua; Li, Gang; Ouyang, Hua-Fu

    2010-12-01

    A penning plasma surface H- ion source test stand for the CSNS has just been constructed at the IHEP. In order to achieve a safe and reliable system, nearly all devices of the ion source are designed to have the capability of both local and remote operation function. The control system consists of PLCs and EPICS real-time software tools separately serving device control and monitoring, PLC integration and OPI support. This paper summarizes the hardware and software implementation satisfying the requirements of the ion source control system.

  4. Controlled high-energy ion acceleration with intense chirped standing waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenroth, Felix; Gonoskov, Arkady; Marklund, Mattias

    2016-10-01

    We present the latest results of the recently proposed ion acceleration mechanism ``chirped standing wave acceleration''. This mechanism is based on locking the electrons of a thin plasma layer to the moving nodes of a standing wave formed by a chirped laser pulse reflected from a mirror behind the thin layer. The resulting longitudinal charge separation field between the displaced electrons and the residual ions then accelerates the latter. Since the plasma layer is stabilized by the standing wave, the formation of plasma instabilities is suppressed. Furthermore, the experimentally accessible laser chirp provides a versatile tool for manipulating the resulting ion beam in terms of maximum particle energy, particle number and spectral distribution. Through this scheme, proton beams, with energy spectra peaked around 100 MeV, were shown to be feasible for pulse energies at the level of 10 J. Wallenberg Foundation within the Grant ''Plasma based compact ion sources'' (PLIONA).

  5. Accelerator and Ion Beam Tradeoffs for Studies of Warm Dense Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Barnard, John J; Callahan, Debra; Davidson, Ronald C; Friedman, Alex; Grant-Logan, B; Grisham, Larry; Lee, Edward; Lee, Richard; Olson, Craig; Rose, David; Santhanam, Parthiban; Sessler, Andrew M; Staples, John W; Tabak, Max; Welch, Dale; Wurtele, Jonathan; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    One approach to heat a target to "Warm Dense Matter" conditions (similar, for example, to the interiors of giant planets or certain stages in Inertial Confinement Fusion targets), is to use intense ion beams as the heating source. By consideration of ion beam phase space constraints, both at the injector, and at the final focus, and consideration of simple equations of state, approximate conditions at a target foil may be calculated. Thus target temperature and pressure may be calculated as a function of ion mass, ion energy, pulse duration, velocity tilt, and other accelerator parameters. We examine the variation in target performance as a function of various beam and accelerator parameters, in the context of several different accelerator concepts, recently proposed for WDM studies.

  6. Direct acceleration of ions to low and medium energies by a crossed-laser-beam configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef I. Salamin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Calculations show that 10 keV helium and carbon ions, injected midway between two identical 1 TW-power crossed laser beams of radial polarization, can be accelerated in vacuum to energies of utility in ion lithography. As examples, identical laser beams, crossed at 10° and focused to waist radii of 7.42  μm, accelerate He^{2+} and C^{6+} ions to average kinetic energies near 75 and 165 keV over distances averaging less than 7 and 6 mm, respectively. The spread in kinetic energy in both cases is less than 1% and the particle average angular deflection is less than 7 mrad. More energy-demanding industrial applications require higher-power laser beams for their direct ion laser acceleration.

  7. Oxygen foreshock of Mars and its implication on ion acceleration in the bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Lundin, Rickard; Frahm, Rudy; Sauvaud, Jean-Andre; Holmstrom, Mats; Barabash, Stas

    2016-04-01

    Ion acceleration inside the bow shock is one of the poorly understood phenomena that has been observed for more than 30 years as the foreshock phenomena. While the Fermi-acceleration mechanism explains the diffuse component of foreshock ions, we still do not know the detailed mechanism that produces the discrete intense ions flowing along the local magnetic field direction (with and without gyration). One of the reasons for such difficulty is that majority of the bow shock study was performed for the Earth's case where Oxygen ions cannot be used to understand the acceleration mechanisms. The planetary oxygen ions that reach the Earth's bow shock have already been significantly accelerated, and are not adequate for such a study. In this sense the Martian bow shock is an ideal place to study the acceleration mechanisms leading to foreshock ions, although the nature of the bow shock is slightly different between the Earth and Mars (Yamauchi et al., 2011). On 21 September 2008, the Mars Express (MEX) Ion Mass Analyser (IMA) detected foreshock-like discrete distributions of oxygen ions at around 1 keV in the solar wind attached to the bow shock. This was the first time that a substantial amount of planetary oxygen was observed upstream of the bow shock. The oxygen energy increased from low energy (< 300 keV) inside the magnetosheath (or it should be called an extended bow shock) to nearly 2 keV at more than 2000 km from the bow shock. Foreshock-like protons are also observed but at a shifted location from the oxygen by about 1000 km, at a slightly higher energy, and flowing in a slightly different direction than the oxygen ions. Both protons and oxygen ions are flowing anti-sunward at different angles with respect to the solar wind direction. The observation is consistent with an electric potential barrier at the bow shock that simultaneously accelerates the planetary oxygen ions outward (to form the foreshock oxygen ions) and reflects a portion of the solar wind (to

  8. Electrostatic acceleration and deflection system for modification of semiconductor materials in laser-produced ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, M.; Parys, P.; Wolowski, J.; Gasior, P.; Pisarek, M.

    2010-10-01

    To optimize the efficiency of laser ion implantation technology, it is advisable to properly select the laser beam characteristics (i.e. power density, target illumination geometry, etc.). In many applications, it is important to select a specific range of ion energy to implant the ions at a given depth and at a given density. To make it possible, the electrostatic system for acceleration and deflection of low-energy laser-produced ions can be used. This contribution provides a description of the experiments aimed at the implantation of Ge ions from a narrow energy band onto SiO2/Si substrates, which were conducted at IPPLM. As the source of irradiation, we used a Nd:YAG up to 10 Hz laser system with pulse duration of 3.5 ns and pulse energy ∼ 0.5 J, which gave a power density of 1010 W/cm2. The ion stream parameters were measured using the time-of-fight method. The laser-produced ions passing through the diaphragm have been accelerated in the system of electrodes. Due to the electrostatic field configuration provided by the electrode system and a diaphragm located at the axis of the system, the selected ions were focussed at the area of interest to increase implantation density. The accelerating voltage, the distance of the diaphragm from the target, the diaphragm diameter and the gap width between electrodes were changed for choosing the desired parameters of the ion stream.

  9. Ion reactions for isobar separation in accelerator mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Litherland, A E; Doupe, J P

    2003-01-01

    The use of resonant and near resonant keV ion reactions for isobar separation in AMS is discussed. It is shown that these and other ionic reactions can be useful provided that the multiple scattering is taken into account.

  10. Ion acceleration in a scalable MEMS RF-structure for a compact linear accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Persaud, A; Feinberg, E; Seidl, P A; Waldron, W L; Lal, A; Vinayakumar, K B; Ardanuc, S; Schenkel, T

    2016-01-01

    A new approach for a compact radio-frequency(rf) accelerator structure is presented. The idea is based on the Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear Accelerator (MEQALAC) structure that was first developed in the 1980s. The MEQALAC allowed scaling of rf-structure down to dimensions of centimeters while at the same time allowing for higher beam currents through parallel beamlets. Using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) for highly scalable fabrication, we reduce the critical dimension to the sub-millimeter regime, while massively scaling up the potential number of parallel beamlets. The technology is based on rf-acceleration components and electrostatic quadrupoles (ESQs) implemented in a silicon wafer based design where each beamlet passes through beam apertures in the wafer. The complete accelerator is then assembled by stacking these wafers. This approach allows fast and cheap batch fabrication of the components and flexibility in system design for different applications. For prototyping these ...

  11. Review of MEVVA ion source performance for accelerator injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, I.G.; Godechot, X. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Spaedtke, P.; Emig, H.; Rueck, D.M.; Wolf, B.H. (Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany, F.R.))

    1991-05-01

    The Mevva (metal vapor vacuum arc) ion source provides high current beams of multiply-charged metal ions suitable for use in heavy ion synchrotrons as well as for metallurgical ion implantation. Pulsed beam currents of up to several amperes can be produced at ion energies of up to several hundred keV. Operation has been demonstrate for 48 metallic ion species: Li, C, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ge, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Hf, Ta, W, Ir, Pt, Au, Pb, Bi, Th and U. When the source is operated optimally the rms fractional beam noise can be as low as 7% of the mean beam current; and when properly triggered the source operates reliably and reproducibly for many tens of thousands of pulses without failure. In this paper we review the source performance referred specifically to its use for synchrotron injection. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Bulk ion acceleration and particle heating during magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Myers, Clayton E. [Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Bulk ion acceleration and particle heating during magnetic reconnection are studied in the collisionless plasma of the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). The plasma is in the two-fluid regime, where the motion of the ions is decoupled from that of the electrons within the ion diffusion region. The reconnection process studied here is quasi-symmetric since plasma parameters such as the magnitude of the reconnecting magnetic field, the plasma density, and temperature are compatible on each side of the current sheet. Our experimental data show that the in-plane (Hall) electric field plays a key role in ion heating and acceleration. The electrostatic potential that produces the in-plane electric field is established by electrons that are accelerated near the electron diffusion region. The in-plane profile of this electrostatic potential shows a “well” structure along the direction normal to the reconnection current sheet. This well becomes deeper and wider downstream as its boundary expands along the separatrices where the in-plane electric field is strongest. Since the in-plane electric field is 3–4 times larger than the out-of-plane reconnection electric field, it is the primary source of energy for the unmagnetized ions. With regard to ion acceleration, the Hall electric field causes ions near separatrices to be ballistically accelerated toward the outflow direction. Ion heating occurs as the accelerated ions travel into the high pressure downstream region. This downstream ion heating cannot be explained by classical, unmagnetized transport theory; instead, we conclude that ions are heated by re-magnetization of ions in the reconnection exhaust and collisions. Two-dimensional (2-D) simulations with the global geometry similar to MRX demonstrate downstream ion thermalization by the above mechanisms. Electrons are also significantly heated during reconnection. The electron temperature sharply increases across the separatrices and peaks just outside of the

  13. ION ACCELERATION AT THE QUASI-PARALLEL BOW SHOCK: DECODING THE SIGNATURE OF INJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, Torbjörn; Haynes, Christopher T.; Burgess, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Mazelle, Christian X. [IRAP, Université Paul Sabatier Toulouse III-CNRS, 31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2016-03-20

    Collisionless shocks are efficient particle accelerators. At Earth, ions with energies exceeding 100 keV are seen upstream of the bow shock when the magnetic geometry is quasi-parallel, and large-scale supernova remnant shocks can accelerate ions into cosmic-ray energies. This energization is attributed to diffusive shock acceleration; however, for this process to become active, the ions must first be sufficiently energized. How and where this initial acceleration takes place has been one of the key unresolved issues in shock acceleration theory. Using Cluster spacecraft observations, we study the signatures of ion reflection events in the turbulent transition layer upstream of the terrestrial bow shock, and with the support of a hybrid simulation of the shock, we show that these reflection signatures are characteristic of the first step in the ion injection process. These reflection events develop in particular in the region where the trailing edge of large-amplitude upstream waves intercept the local shock ramp and the upstream magnetic field changes from quasi-perpendicular to quasi-parallel. The dispersed ion velocity signature observed can be attributed to a rapid succession of ion reflections at this wave boundary. After the ions’ initial interaction with the shock, they flow upstream along the quasi-parallel magnetic field. Each subsequent wavefront in the upstream region will sweep the ions back toward the shock, where they gain energy with each transition between the upstream and the shock wave frames. Within three to five gyroperiods, some ions have gained enough parallel velocity to escape upstream, thus completing the injection process.

  14. New methods for high current fast ion beam production by laser-driven acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margarone, D.; Krasa, J.; Prokupek, J.; Velyhan, A.; Laska, L.; Jungwirth, K.; Mocek, T.; Korn, G.; Rus, B. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., PALS Centre, Prague (Czech Republic); Torrisi, L.; Gammino, S.; Cirrone, P.; Cutroneo, M.; Romano, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Messina University (Italy); Picciotto, A.; Serra, E. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler - IRST, Trento (Italy); Giuffrida, L. [CELIA, Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (France); Mangione, A. [ITA - Istituto Tecnologie Avanzate, Trapani (Italy); Rosinski, M.; Parys, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); and others

    2012-02-15

    An overview of the last experimental campaigns on laser-driven ion acceleration performed at the PALS facility in Prague is given. Both the 2 TW, sub-nanosecond iodine laser system and the 20 TW, femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, recently installed at PALS, are used along our experiments performed in the intensity range 10{sup 16}-10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The main goal of our studies was to generate high energy, high current ion streams at relatively low laser intensities. The discussed experimental investigations show promising results in terms of maximum ion energy and current density, which make the laser-accelerated ion beams a candidate for new-generation ion sources to be employed in medicine, nuclear physics, matter physics, and industry.

  15. New methods for high current fast ion beam production by laser-driven acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margarone, D; Krasa, J; Prokupek, J; Velyhan, A; Torrisi, L; Picciotto, A; Giuffrida, L; Gammino, S; Cirrone, P; Cutroneo, M; Romano, F; Serra, E; Mangione, A; Rosinski, M; Parys, P; Ryc, L; Limpouch, J; Laska, L; Jungwirth, K; Ullschmied, J; Mocek, T; Korn, G; Rus, B

    2012-02-01

    An overview of the last experimental campaigns on laser-driven ion acceleration performed at the PALS facility in Prague is given. Both the 2 TW, sub-nanosecond iodine laser system and the 20 TW, femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, recently installed at PALS, are used along our experiments performed in the intensity range 10(16)-10(19) W∕cm(2). The main goal of our studies was to generate high energy, high current ion streams at relatively low laser intensities. The discussed experimental investigations show promising results in terms of maximum ion energy and current density, which make the laser-accelerated ion beams a candidate for new-generation ion sources to be employed in medicine, nuclear physics, matter physics, and industry.

  16. Influence of radiation reaction force on ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdessus, R; McKenna, P

    2015-05-01

    The role of the radiation reaction force in ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration is investigated. For laser intensities ∼10(23)W/cm(2), the action of this force on electrons is demonstrated in relativistic particle-in-cell simulations to significantly enhance the energy transfer to ions in relativistically transparent targets, but strongly reduce the ion energy in dense plasma targets. An expression is derived for the revised piston velocity, and hence ion energy, taking account of energy loses to synchrotron radiation generated by electrons accelerated in the laser field. Ion mass is demonstrated to be important by comparing results obtained with proton and deuteron plasma. The results can be verified in experiments with cryogenic hydrogen and deuterium targets.

  17. On the ions acceleration via collisionless magnetic reconnection in laboratory plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, E.; Curreli, D.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2016-11-01

    This work presents an analysis of the ion outflow from magnetic reconnection throughout fully kinetic simulations with typical laboratory plasma values. A symmetric initial configuration for the density and magnetic field is considered across the current sheet. After analyzing the behavior of a set of nine simulations with a reduced mass ratio and with a permuted value of three initial electron temperatures and magnetic field intensity, the best ion acceleration scenario is further studied with a realistic mass ratio in terms of the ion dynamics and energy budget. Interestingly, a series of shock wave structures are observed in the outflow, resembling the shock discontinuities found in recent magnetohydrodynamic simulations. An analysis of the ion outflow at several distances from the reconnection point is presented, in light of possible laboratory applications. The analysis suggests that magnetic reconnection could be used as a tool for plasma acceleration, with applications ranging from electric propulsion to production of ion thermal beams.

  18. Status of IH and RFQ linacs in the Daejeon Ion Accelerator Complex at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Sung Ryul; Chang, Dae Sik; Hwang, Churl Kew; Lee, Seok Kwan; Jin, Jeong Tae; Oh, Byung Hoon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The Daejeon ion accelerator complex (DIAC) is being built at Korea atomic energy research institute (KAERI) in order to fulfill an increasing demand for heavy ion beam facilities for various purposes including structural material study, biological research and nanomaterial treatment. Based on devices of the Tokai radioactive ion accelerator complex (TRIAC) given from the high energy accelerator research organization (KEK), Japan, the dedicated accelerators in the DIAC are designed to produce stable heavy ion beams with energies up to 1 MeV/u and beam currents up to 300 μA. In this article, recent construction status of the DIAC are presented and discussed. From the successful full-power test results, we confirmed that the IH and RFQ linacs work properly and then they are ready to accelerate heavy ions up to 1.09 MeV/nucleon. The construction of lead shields on DIAC devices is now in progress, and the beam tuning and test will be done soon until the end of this year.

  19. Trends and applications for MeV electrostatic ion beam accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, G. A.; Stodola, S. E.

    2014-08-01

    The 1970s into the 1980s saw a major broadening of applications for electrostatic accelerators. Prior to this time, all accelerators were used primarily for nuclear structure research. In the 70s there was a significant move into production ion implantation with the necessary MeV ion beam analysis techniques such as RBS and ERD. Accelerators are still being built for these materials analysis techniques today. However, there is still a great ongoing expansion of applications for these machines. At the present time, the demand for electrostatic accelerators is near an all time high. The number of applications continues to grow. This paper will touch on some of the current applications which are as diverse as nuclear fission reactor developments and pharmacokinetics. In the field of nuclear engineering, MeV ion beams from electrostatic accelerators are being used in material damage studies and for iodine and actinide accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). In the field of pharmacokinetics, electrostatic MeV accelerators are being used to detect extremely small amounts of above background 14C. This has significantly reduced the time required to reach first in human studies. These and other applications will be discussed.

  20. Ion Acceleration by Beating Electrostatic Waves: Theory, Experiments and Relevance to Spacecraft Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choueiri, Edgar

    2007-10-01

    After a brief overview of electrodeless plasma propulsion concepts, we will focus on a recently discovered ion acceleration mechanism, which appears to occur naturally in Earth's ionosphere, holds promise as an effective means to energize ions for applications in thermonuclear fusion and electrodeless space plasma propulsion. Unlike previously known mechanisms for energizing plasmas with electrostatic (ES) waves, and which accelerate only ions whose initial velocities are above a certain threshold (close to the wave's phase velocity), the new acceleration mechanism, involving pairs of beating ES waves, is non-resonant and can accelerate ions with arbitrarily small initial velocities, thus offering a more effective way to couple energy to plasmas. We will discuss the fundamentals of the nonlinear dynamics of a single magnetized ion interacting with a pair of beating ES waves and show that there exist necessary and sufficient conditions for the phenomenon to occur. We will see how these fundamental conditions are derived by analyzing the motion's Hamiltonian using a second-order perturbation technique in conjunction with Lie transformations. The analysis shows that when the Hamiltonian lies outside the energy barrier defined by the location of the elliptic and hyperbolic critical points of the motion, the electric field of the beating waves can accelerate ions regularly from low initial velocities, then stochastically, to high energies. We will then illustrate real plasma effects using Monte Carlo numerical simulation and discuss the recent results from a dedicated experiment in my lab in which laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of ion energies have provided the first laboratory observation of this acceleration mechanism. The talk will conclude with a few ideas on how the fundamental insight can be applied to develop novel plasma propulsion concepts.

  1. TNSA ion acceleration at 1016 W/cm2 sub-nanosecond laser intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Calcagno, L.; Rosinski, M.; Ullschmied, J.

    2014-04-01

    Micrometric thin targets have been irradiated in vacuum in TNSA (Target Normal Sheath Acceleration) configuration at PALS Laboratory in Prague by using 1016 W/cm2 laser intensity, 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration and different laser beam energies and focal positions. The plasmas produced were characterized by using ion collectors, semiconductor SiC detectors, X-ray streak camera and Thomson parabola spectrometer. Time of flight techniques, time resolved imaging and ion deflection spectrometry were used to characterize the laser-generated non-equilibrium plasma and the electric field driving ion acceleration developed at the rear side of the target. The maximum ion acceleration can be obtained for optimal film thickness depending on the laser energy and on the kind of irradiated targets. Special targets containing nanostructures, showing high absorption and low reflective coefficients, induce resonant absorption effects enhancing the electric acceleration field. The maximum kinetic energy measured for proton ions was above 5.0 MeV and the ion distributions can be fitted with Coulomb-Boltzmann shifted functions.

  2. Magnetic field design for a Penning ion source for a 200 keV electrostatic accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, A.; Feghhi, S. A. H.; Sadati, S. M.; Ebrahimibasabi, E.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the structure of magnetic field for a Penning ion source has been designed and constructed with the use of permanent magnets. The ion source has been designed and constructed for a 200 keV electrostatic accelerator. With using CST Studio Suite, the magnetic field profile inside the ion source was simulated and an appropriate magnetic system was designed to improve particle confinement. Designed system consists of two ring magnets with 9 mm distance from each other around the anode. The ion source was constructed and the cylindrical magnet and designed magnetic system were tested on the ion source. The results showed that the ignition voltage for ion source with the designed magnetic system is almost 300 V lower than the ion source with the cylindrical magnet. Better particle confinement causes lower voltage discharge to occur.

  3. Theory of laser ion acceleration from a foil target of nanometer thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X. Q.; Tajima, T.; Hegelich, M.; Yin, L.; Habs, D.

    2010-03-01

    A theory for ion acceleration by ultrashort laser pulses is presented to evaluate the maximum ion energy in the interaction of ultrahigh contrast (UHC) intense laser pulses with a nanometer-scale foil. In this regime, the ion energy may be directly related to the laser intensity and subsequent electron dynamics. This leads to a simple analytical expression for the ion energy gain under the laser irradiation of thin targets. Significantly higher energies for thin targets than for thicker targets are predicted. The theory is concretized with a view to compare with the results and their details of recent experiments.

  4. Summary I - accelerator ion sources, fundamentals and diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moehs, Douglas P.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    The 11th International Symposium on the Production and Neutralization of Negative Ions and Beams was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 12-15, 2006 and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This summary covers the first three oral sessions of the symposium.

  5. Method of ions acceleration for laser-induced implantation of semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, A.; Badziak, J.; Parys, P.; Rosinski, M.; Wołowski, J.

    The application of electrostatic fields for the formation of laser-generated ions makes it possible to control the ion stream parameters in broad energy and current density ranges. It also permits to remove the useless ions from the ion stream designed for laser-induced implantation and deposition of layers of semiconductor materials. For acceleration of ions a special electrostatic system has been completed and tested at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM). A repetitive Nd: glass laser with energy of ˜0.5 J in a 3.5 ns pulse, wavelength of 1.06 μm, repetition rate of up to 10 Hz and intensity on the target of up to 1011 W cm-2, has been recently employed to produce ions emitted from irradiated solid targets. The movable target holder was located inside the cylindrical box connected with a high-voltage source (up to 50 kV). The ions passing through the diaphragm in this box were accelerated in the system of electrodes in the electrostatic field formed in the gap between the box and a grid mounted at the end of the grounded cylindrical electrode. The parameters of the ion streams were measured with the use of several ion collectors and an electrostatic ion energy analyzer (IEA). The Ge ion stream attained energy of up to 30 keV and ion fluency 1011 ions/cm2 for one laser shot. The maximum ion charge state measured with the use of IEA was 3+.

  6. Investigation of ion acceleration mechanism through laser-matter interaction in femtosecond domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altana, C., E-mail: altana@lns.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Muoio, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Enna “Kore”, Via delle Olimpiadi, 94100 Enna (Italy); Tudisco, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Brandi, F. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cristoforetti, G. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Fazzi, A. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Ferrara, P.; Fulgentini, L. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Giove, D. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Koester, P. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Labate, L. [CNR, Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); and others

    2016-09-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the ion acceleration mechanisms through laser-matter interaction in the femtosecond domain has been carried out at the ILIL facility at a laser intensity of up to 2×10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. A Thomson Parabola Spectrometer was used to identify different ion species and measure the energy spectra and the corresponding temperature parameters. We discuss the dependence of the protons spectra upon the structural characteristics of the targets (thickness and atomic mass) and the role of surface versus target bulk during acceleration process. - Highlights: • Ion acceleration mechanism in TNSA regime was investigated. • The energy spectra and the corresponding temperature parameters were measured. • Dependence of the spectra upon the target structural characteristics was discussed.

  7. Particle Accelerator Applications: Ion and Electron Irradiation in Materials Science, Biology and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Luis

    2010-09-01

    Although the developments of particle accelerators are devoted to basic study of matter constituents, since the beginning these machines have been applied with different purposes in many areas also. Today particle accelerators are essential instruments for science and technology. This work presents an overview of the main application for direct particle irradiation with accelerator in material science, biology and medicine. They are used for material synthesis by ion implantation and charged particle irradiation; to make coatings and micromachining; to characterize broad kind of samples by ion beam analysis techniques; as mass spectrometers for atomic isotopes determination. In biomedicine the accelerators are applied for the study of effects by charged particles on cells. In medicine the radiotherapy by electron irradiation is widely used, while hadrontherapy is still under development. Also, they are necessary for short life radioisotopes production required in radiodiagnostic.

  8. Review of Heavy-ion Induced Desorption Studies for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E

    2008-01-01

    During high-intensity heavy-ion operation of several particle accelerators worldwide, large dynamic pressure rises of orders of magnitude were caused by lost beam ions that impacted under grazing angle onto the vacuum chamber walls. This ion-induced desorption, observed, for example, at CERN, GSI, and BNL, can seriously limit the ion intensity, luminosity, and beam lifetime of the accelerator. For the heavyion program at CERN's Large Hadron Collider collisions between beams of fully stripped lead (208Pb82+) ions with a beam energy of 2.76 TeV/u and a nominal luminosity of 10**27 cm**-2 s**-1 are foreseen. The GSI future project FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) aims at a beam intensity of 10**12 uranium (238U28+) ions per second to be extracted from the synchrotron SIS18. Over the past years an experimental effort has been made to study the observed dynamic vacuum degradations, which are important to understand and overcome for present and future particle accelerators. The paper reviews the resu...

  9. Magnetosheath Filamentary Structures Formed by Ion Acceleration at the Quasi-Parallel Bow Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi, N.; Sibeck, D.; Gutynska, O.; Trattner, K. J.

    2014-01-01

    Results from 2.5-D electromagnetic hybrid simulations show the formation of field-aligned, filamentary plasma structures in the magnetosheath. They begin at the quasi-parallel bow shock and extend far into the magnetosheath. These structures exhibit anticorrelated, spatial oscillations in plasma density and ion temperature. Closer to the bow shock, magnetic field variations associated with density and temperature oscillations may also be present. Magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) form primarily in the quasi-parallel sheath; however, they may extend to the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath. They occur over a wide range of solar wind Alfvénic Mach numbers and interplanetary magnetic field directions. At lower Mach numbers with lower levels of magnetosheath turbulence, MFS remain highly coherent over large distances. At higher Mach numbers, magnetosheath turbulence decreases the level of coherence. Magnetosheath filamentary structures result from localized ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock and the injection of energetic ions into the magnetosheath. The localized nature of ion acceleration is tied to the generation of fast magnetosonic waves at and upstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The increased pressure in flux tubes containing the shock accelerated ions results in the depletion of the thermal plasma in these flux tubes and the enhancement of density in flux tubes void of energetic ions. This results in the observed anticorrelation between ion temperature and plasma density.

  10. Development of the RF Ion Sources for Focused Ion Beam Accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Voznyi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of investigations of ion sources developed in the IAP of NAS of Ukraine for generation of high brightness ion beams with small energy spread. A series of RF ion sources operated at the frequency of 27.12 MHz were studied: the inductive RF ion source, the helicon ion source, the multi-cusp RF ion source, and the sputter type RF source of metal ions. A global model and transformer model were applied for calculation of RF source plasma parameters. Ion energy spread, ion mass, and ion current density of some sources were measured in the wide range of RF power, extraction voltage and gas pres-sure.

  11. Motion of the Plasma Critical Layer During Relativistic-electron Laser Interaction with Immobile and Comoving Ion Plasma for Ion Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash A

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the motion of the plasma critical layer by two different processes in the relativistic-electron laser-plasma interaction regime ($a_0>1$). The differences are highlighted when the critical layer ions are stationary in contrast to when they move with it. Controlling the speed of the plasma critical layer in this regime is essential for creating low-$\\beta$ traveling acceleration structures of sufficient laser-excited potential for laser ion accelerators (LIA). In Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) scheme the heavy plasma-ions are fixed and only trace-density light-ions are accelerated. The relativistic critical layer and the acceleration structure move longitudinally forward by laser inducing transparency through apparent relativistic increase in electron mass. In the Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) scheme the whole plasma is longitudinally pushed forward under the action of the laser radiation pressure, possible only when plasma ions co-propagate with the laser front. I...

  12. Radiation stability of iron nanoparticles irradiated with accelerated iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uglov, V.V., E-mail: uglov@bsu.by [Belarusian State University, Nezavisimosty ave., 4, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenina ave., 2a, Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation); Remnev, G.E., E-mail: remnev06@mail.ru [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenina ave., 2a, Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation); Kvasov, N.T.; Safronov, I.V.; Shymanski, V.I. [Belarusian State University, Nezavisimosty ave., 4, Minsk 220030 (Belarus)

    2015-07-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic processes in nanoparticles after ion irradiation were studied. • The mechanism of the enhanced radiation stability of nanoparticles was showed. • The criteria of the enhanced radiation stability of nanoparticles was proposed. - Abstract: In the present work the dynamic processes occurring in a nanoscale iron particle exposed to irradiation with iron ions of different energies are studied in detailed. It is shown that the elastic and thermoelastic crystal lattice responses to irradiation form force factors affecting the evolution of defect-impurity system, which, in turn, leads to a decrease in the number of structural defects. Quantitative estimations of the spatial distribution of defects resulting in their migration to the surface were obtained. Such self-organization of nanoparticles exposed to ionizing radiation can be used as a basis for the production of radiation-resistant nanostructured materials capable of sustaining a long-term radiation influence.

  13. Investigation of accelerated neutral atom beams created from gas cluster ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, A., E-mail: akirkpatrick@exogenesis.us [Exogenesis Corporation, 20 Fortune Drive, Billerica, MA 01821 (United States); Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Chau, S.; Mack, M.; Harrison, S.; Svrluga, R.; Khoury, J. [Exogenesis Corporation, 20 Fortune Drive, Billerica, MA 01821 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    A new concept for ultra-shallow processing of surfaces known as accelerated neutral atom beam (ANAB) technique employs conversion of energetic gas cluster ions produced by the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) method into intense collimated beams of coincident neutral gas atoms having controllable average energies from less than 10 eV per atom to beyond 100 eV per atom. A beam of accelerated gas cluster ions is first produced as is usual in GCIB, but conditions within the source ionizer and extraction regions are adjusted such that immediately after ionization and acceleration the clusters undergo collisions with non-ionized gas atoms. Energy transfer during these collisions causes the energetic cluster ions to release many of their constituent atoms. An electrostatic deflector is then used to eliminate charged species, leaving the released neutral atoms to still travel collectively at the same velocities they had as bonded components of their parent clusters. Upon target impact, the accelerated neutral atom beams produce effects similar to those normally associated with GCIB, but to shallower depths, with less surface damage and with superior subsurface interfaces. The paper discusses generation and characterization of the accelerated neutral atom beams, describes interactions of the beams with target surfaces, and presents examples of ongoing work on applications for biomedical devices.

  14. Investigation of accelerated neutral atom beams created from gas cluster ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, A.; Kirkpatrick, S.; Walsh, M.; Chau, S.; Mack, M.; Harrison, S.; Svrluga, R.; Khoury, J.

    2013-07-01

    A new concept for ultra-shallow processing of surfaces known as accelerated neutral atom beam (ANAB) technique employs conversion of energetic gas cluster ions produced by the gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) method into intense collimated beams of coincident neutral gas atoms having controllable average energies from less than 10 eV per atom to beyond 100 eV per atom. A beam of accelerated gas cluster ions is first produced as is usual in GCIB, but conditions within the source ionizer and extraction regions are adjusted such that immediately after ionization and acceleration the clusters undergo collisions with non-ionized gas atoms. Energy transfer during these collisions causes the energetic cluster ions to release many of their constituent atoms. An electrostatic deflector is then used to eliminate charged species, leaving the released neutral atoms to still travel collectively at the same velocities they had as bonded components of their parent clusters. Upon target impact, the accelerated neutral atom beams produce effects similar to those normally associated with GCIB, but to shallower depths, with less surface damage and with superior subsurface interfaces. The paper discusses generation and characterization of the accelerated neutral atom beams, describes interactions of the beams with target surfaces, and presents examples of ongoing work on applications for biomedical devices.

  15. Creation and characterization of free-standing cryogenic targets for laser-driven ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebartz, Alexandra; Bedacht, Stefan; Hesse, Markus; Astbury, Sam; Clarke, Rob; Ortner, Alex; Schaumann, Gabriel; Wagner, Florian; Neely, David; Roth, Markus

    2017-09-01

    A technique for the creation of free-standing cryogenic targets for laser-driven ion acceleration is presented, which allows us to create solid state targets consisting of initially gaseous materials. In particular, the use of deuterium and the methods for its preparation as a target material for laser-driven ion acceleration are discussed. Moving in the phase diagram through the liquid phase leads to the substance covering an aperture on a cooled copper frame where it is solidified through further cooling. An account of characterization techniques for target thickness is given, with a focus on deducing thickness values from distance values delivered by chromatic confocal sensors.

  16. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) half-year report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-06-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification --both new features in a linac -- without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; and final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target.

  17. Intra-pulse transition between ion acceleration mechanisms in intense laser-foil interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padda, Hersimerjit; King, Martin; Gray, Ross; Powell, Haydn; Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; Stockhausen, Luca; Wilson, Robbie; Carroll, David; Dance, Rachel; MacLellan, David; Yuan, Xiaohui; Butler, Nick; Capdessus, Remi; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Laser-driven sheath acceleration of ions has been widely studied and the recent move to ultra thin foil interactions enables promising new acceleration mechanisms. However, the acceleration dynamics in this regime are complex and over the course of the laser-foil interaction multiple ion acceleration mechanisms can occur, resulting in the dominant mechanism changing throughout the interaction. Measuring the spatial intensity distribution of the accelerated proton beam we investigate the transition from radiation pressure acceleration to transparency-driven processes. Using PIC simulations, the radiation pressure drives an increased expansion of the target ions, which results in a radial deflection of low MeV protons to form an annular distribution. By varying the thickness of the target, the opening angle of the ring is shown to be correlated to the point in time that transparency occurs and is maximised at the peak of the laser intensity profile. Measurements of the ring size as a function of target thickness are found to be in good agreement with the simulation results.

  18. Ion acceleration in non-equilibrium plasmas driven by fast drifting electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, G. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Di Bartolo, F., E-mail: fdibartolo@unime.it [Università di Messina, V.le F. Stagno D’Alcontres 31, 98166, Messina (Italy); Gambino, N. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per L’ingegneria, Viale A.Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Mascali, D. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Romano, F.P. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CNR-IBAM Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Anzalone, A.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Di Giugno, R. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Lanaia, D. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Miracoli, R. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Serafino, T. [CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Tudisco, S. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    We hereby present results on ion acceleration mechanisms in non equilibrium plasmas generated by microwaves or high intensity laser pulses. Experiments point out that in magnetized plasmas X–B conversion takes place for under resonance values of the magnetic field, i.e. an electromagnetic mode is converted into an electrostatic wave. The strong self-generated electric field, of the order of 10{sup 7} V/m, causes a E × B drift which accelerates both ions and electrons, as it is evident by localized sputtering in the plasma chamber. These fields are similar (in magnitude) to the ones obtainable in laser generated plasmas at intensity of 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. In this latter case, we observe that the acceleration mechanism is driven by electrons drifting much faster than plasma bulk, thus generating an extremely strong electric field ∼10{sup 7} V/m. The two experiments confirm that ions acceleration at low energy is possible with table-top devices and following complementary techniques: i.e. by using microwave-driven (producing CW beams) plasmas, or non-equilibrium laser-driven plasmas (producing pulsed beams). Possible applications involve ion implantation, materials surface modifications, ion beam assisted lithography, etc.

  19. On the ions acceleration via collisionless magnetic reconnection in laboratory plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Cazzola, Emanuele; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of the ion outflow from magnetic reconnection throughout fully kinetic simulations with typical laboratory plasmas values. A symmetric initial configuration for the density and magnetic field is considered across the current sheet. After analyzing the behavior of a set of nine simulations with a reduced mass ratio and with a permuted value of three initial electron temperature and magnetic field intensity, the best ion acceleration scenario is further studied with a realistic mass ratio in terms of the ion dynamics and energy budget. Interestingly, a series of shock waves structures are observed in the outflow, resembling the shock discontinuities found in recent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. An analysis of the ion outflow at several distances from the reconnection point is presented, in light of possible laboratory applications. The analysis suggests that magnetic reconnection could be used as a tool for plasma acceleration, with applications ranging from electric prop...

  20. A singly charged ion source for radioactive {sup 11}C ion acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katagiri, K.; Noda, A.; Nagatsu, K.; Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Muramatsu, M.; Suzuki, K.; Wakui, T.; Noda, K. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    A new singly charged ion source using electron impact ionization has been developed to realize an isotope separation on-line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive {sup 11}C ion beams. Low-energy electron beams are used in the electron impact ion source to produce singly charged ions. Ionization efficiency was calculated in order to decide the geometric parameters of the ion source and to determine the required electron emission current for obtaining high ionization efficiency. Based on these considerations, the singly charged ion source was designed and fabricated. In testing, the fabricated ion source was found to have favorable performance as a singly charged ion source.

  1. A singly charged ion source for radioactive 11C ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, K.; Noda, A.; Nagatsu, K.; Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Muramatsu, M.; Suzuki, K.; Wakui, T.; Noda, K.

    2016-02-01

    A new singly charged ion source using electron impact ionization has been developed to realize an isotope separation on-line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive 11C ion beams. Low-energy electron beams are used in the electron impact ion source to produce singly charged ions. Ionization efficiency was calculated in order to decide the geometric parameters of the ion source and to determine the required electron emission current for obtaining high ionization efficiency. Based on these considerations, the singly charged ion source was designed and fabricated. In testing, the fabricated ion source was found to have favorable performance as a singly charged ion source.

  2. Acceleration and Utilization of Highly Stripped Charge State Heavy Ions at HI-13 Acceleration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Even higher linear energy transfer (LET) values of the heavy ions are necessary as the investigationsof single event effects (SEE) of satellite devices are developing rapidly. For example, the researches aredeveloped from the single-event upset (SEU) which needs comparatively low LET values towards singleevent latch up (SEL) and single event burnout (SEB) which requires high LET values, namely LET’s arehigher than 80 MeV mg-1,cm-2 and range of the ions in the silicon should be large than 20 micrometers,

  3. H-mode accelerating structures with PMQ focusing for low-beta ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olivas, Eric R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We are developing high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures based on inter-digital H-mode (IH) cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. Such IH-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications, e.g. a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the energy of several MeV. Results of combined 3-D modeling for a full IH-PMQ accelerator tank - electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis - are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best beam propagation using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. A cold model of the IH-PMQ tank is being manufactured.

  4. Development of the C{sup 6+} laser ablation ion source for the KEK digital accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munemoto, Naoya, E-mail: munemoto.n.ad@m.titech.ac.jp [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Takayama, Ken [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Miura, Kanagawa 240-8550 (Japan); Takano, Susumu [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Okamura, Masahiro [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kumaki, Masahumi [RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0072 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    A laser ion source that provides a fully ionized carbon ion beam is under joint development at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Long-pulse (6 ns) and short-pulse (500 ps) laser systems were tested by using them to irradiate a graphite target. Notable differences between the systems were observed in these experiments. Preliminary experimental results, such as the charge-state spectrum, beam intensity, and stability, are discussed.

  5. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Micro Jets - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, Adrienne [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for this type of interaction, capable of producing the highest proton energies possible with today’s laser technologies. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis and investigate new, potentially more efficient mechanisms of ion acceleration, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we acheived a pure proton beam with an indiciation of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the

  6. Heavy-ion beams required for the RIA accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Pardo, Richard C; Nolen, J A; Rehm, K E; Savard, Guy

    2004-01-01

    A class of experiments which will be representative of the expected initial fields of study at the Rare Isotope Accelerator Facility (RIA), are discussed. Improvement in the understanding of the rapid neutron capture process that is responsible for the creation of most stable nuclei heavier than the iron-region nuclei, will be the most important areas of research with RIA. RIA will provide beams of nuclei far from stability at low energies and with excellent beam quality, similar to the properties of stable beams available from facilities such as ATLAS. A total of 21 driver beams are identified which are necessary to provide optimal population of the r-process path, and provide good production of light neutron-rich nuclei. (Edited abstract) 15 Refs.

  7. Bands of ions and angular V's - A conjugate manifestation of ionospheric ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winningham, J. D.; Burch, J. L.; Frahm, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Data from the hot plasma instruments on Dynamics Explorer 1 and 2 spacecraft have been used to study the injection, drift, and subsequent precipitation of suprathermal positive ions in the auroral zone. The observation at both high and low altitudes of electron inverted 'V' events in the boundary plasma sheet (BPS) and of ion 'bands' (energy decreasing with decreasing latitude) in the adjacent central plasma sheet (CPS) leads to the following ion injection model: upward-moving energetic ion beams are injected onto BPS magnetic field lines by the electrostatic potential drops associated with electron inverted V's. As the ion beams move toward the equator and into the conjugate hemisphere they are convected to lower latitudes and into the CPS. The energy-latitude dependence of the ion bands, coupled with concurrent ion convection measurements, indicate that the ion distributions are primarily O(+), in agreement with their postulated ionospheric source.

  8. Experimental control of the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Munib

    2008-12-15

    The laser generation of energetic high quality beams of protons and heavier ions has opened up the door to a plethora of applications. These beams are usually generated by the interaction of a short pulse high power laser with a thin metal foil target. They could already be applied to probe transient phenomena in plasmas and to produce warm dense matter by isochoric heating. Other applications such as the production of radioisotopes and tumour radiotherapy need further research to be put into practice. To meet the requirements of each application, the properties of the laser-accelerated particle beams have to be controlled precisely. In this thesis, experimental means to control the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions are investigated. The production and control of proton and carbon ion beams is studied using advanced ion source designs: Experiments concerning mass-limited (i.e. small and isolated) targets are conducted. These targets have the potential to increase both the number and the energy of laser-accelerated protons. Therefore, the influence of the size of a plane foil target on proton beam properties is measured. Furthermore, carbon ion sources are investigated. Carbon ions are of particular interest in the production of warm dense matter and in cancer radiotherapy. The possibility to focus carbon ion beams is investigated and a simple method for the production of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ion beams is presented. This thesis also provides an insight into the physical processes connected to the production and the control of laser-accelerated ions. For this purpose, laser-accelerated protons are employed to probe plasma phenomena on laser-irradiated targets. Electric fields evolving on the surface of laser-irradiated metal foils and hollow metal foil cylinders are investigated. Since these fields can be used to displace, collimate or focus proton beams, understanding their temporal and spatial evolution is crucial for the design of

  9. Radiation effects on semiconductor devices in high energy heavy ion accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belousov, Anton

    2014-10-20

    Radiation effects on semiconductor devices in GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research are becoming more and more significant with the increase of beam intensity due to upgrades. Moreover a new accelerator is being constructed on the basis of GSI within the project of facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR). Beam intensities will be increased by factor of 100 and energies by factor of 10. Radiation fields in the vicinity of beam lines will increase more than 2 orders of magnitude and so will the effects on semiconductor devices. It is necessary to carry out a study of radiation effects on semiconductor devices considering specific properties of radiation typical for high energy heavy ion accelerators. Radiation effects on electronics in accelerator environment may be divided into two categories: short-term temporary effects and long-term permanent degradation. Both may become critical for proper operation of some electronic devices. This study is focused on radiation damage to CCD cameras in radiation environment of heavy ion accelerator. Series of experiments with irradiation of devices under test (DUTs) by secondary particles produced during ion beam losses were done for this study. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to simulate the experiment conditions and conditions expected in future accelerator. Corresponding comparisons and conclusions were done. Another device typical for accelerator facilities - industrial Ethernet switch was tested in similar conditions during this study. Series of direct irradiations of CCD and MOS transistors with heavy ion beams were done as well. Typical energies of the primary ion beams were 0.5-1 GeV/u. Ion species: from Na to U. Intensities of the beam up to 10{sup 9} ions/spill with spill length of 200-300 ns. Criteria of reliability and lifetime of DUTs in specific radiation conditions were formulated, basing on experimental results of the study. Predictions of electronic device reliability and lifetime were

  10. Ion acceleration by petawatt class laser pulses and pellet compression in a fast ignition scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bologna, INFN sezione di Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: benedetti@bo.infn.it; Londrillo, P. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, INAF sezione di Bologna, INFN sezione di Bologna (Italy); Liseykina, T.V. [Institute for Computational Technologies, SD-RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Macchi, A. [polyLAB, CNR-INFM, Pisa (Italy); Sgattoni, A.; Turchetti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bologna, INFN sezione di Bologna (Italy)

    2009-07-11

    Ion drivers based on standard acceleration techniques have faced up to now several difficulties. We consider here a conceptual alternative to more standard schemes, such as HIDIF (Heavy Ion Driven Inertial Fusion), which are still beyond the present state of the art of particle accelerators, even though the requirements on the total beam energy are lowered by fast ignition scenarios. The new generation of petawatt class lasers open new possibilities: acceleration of electrons or protons for the fast ignition and eventually light or heavy ions acceleration for compression. The pulses of chirped pulse amplification (CPA) lasers allow ions acceleration with very high efficiency at reachable intensities (I{approx}10{sup 21}W/cm{sup 2}), if circularly polarized light is used since we enter in the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) regime. We analyze the possibility of accelerating carbon ion bunches by interaction of a circularly polarized pulses with an ultra-thin target. The advantage would be compactness and modularity, due to identical accelerating units. The laser efficiency required to have an acceptable net gain in the inertial fusion process is still far from the presently achievable values both for CPA short pulses and for long pulses used for direct illumination. Conversely the energy conversion efficiency from the laser pulse to the ion bunch is high and grows with the intensity. As a consequence the energy loss is not the major concern. For a preliminary investigation of the ions bunch production we have used the PIC code ALaDyn developed to analyze the results of the INFN-CNR PLASMONX experiment at Frascati National Laboratories (Rome, Italy) where the 0.3 PW laser FLAME will accelerate electrons and protons. We present the results of some 1D simulations and parametric scan concerning the acceleration of carbon ions that we suppose to be fully ionized. Circularly polarized laser pulses of 50 J and 50-100 fs duration, illuminating a 100{mu}m{sup 2} area

  11. Motion of the plasma critical layer during relativistic-electron laser interaction with immobile and comoving ion plasma for ion acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahai, Aakash A., E-mail: aakash.sahai@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    We analyze the motion of the plasma critical layer by two different processes in the relativistic-electron laser-plasma interaction regime (a{sub 0}>1). The differences are highlighted when the critical layer ions are stationary in contrast to when they move with it. Controlling the speed of the plasma critical layer in this regime is essential for creating low-β traveling acceleration structures of sufficient laser-excited potential for laser ion accelerators. In Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) scheme, the heavy plasma-ions are fixed and only trace-density light-ions are accelerated. The relativistic critical layer and the acceleration structure move longitudinally forward by laser inducing transparency through apparent relativistic increase in electron mass. In the Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) scheme, the whole plasma is longitudinally pushed forward under the action of the laser radiation pressure, possible only when plasma ions co-propagate with the laser front. In RPA, the acceleration structure velocity critically depends upon plasma-ion mass in addition to the laser intensity and plasma density. In RITA, mass of the heavy immobile plasma-ions does not affect the speed of the critical layer. Inertia of the bared immobile ions in RITA excites the charge separation potential, whereas RPA is not possible when ions are stationary.

  12. High-energy-throughput pulse compression by off-axis group-delay compensation in a laser-induced filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voronin, A. A. [Physics Department, International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Alisauskas, S.; Muecke, O. D.; Pugzlys, A.; Baltuska, A. [Photonics Institute, Vienna University of Technology, Gusshausstrasse 27-387, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Zheltikov, A. M. [Physics Department, International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3257 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Off-axial beam dynamics of ultrashort laser pulses in a filament enable a radical energy-throughput improvement for filamentation-assisted pulse compression. We identify regimes where a weakly diverging wave, produced on the trailing edge of the pulse, catches up with a strongly diverging component, arising in the central part of the pulse, allowing sub-100-fs millijoule infrared laser pulses to be compressed to 20-25-fs pulse widths with energy throughputs in excess of 70%. Theoretical predictions have been verified by experimental results on filamentation-assisted compression of 70-fs, 1.5-{mu}m laser pulses in high-pressure argon.

  13. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) year-end report, April 1, 1989--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-01

    This report contains the following topics on heavy ion fusion: MBE-4 drifting beam quadrupole operating range; transverse emittance growth in MBE-4; an improved ion source for MBE-4; drifting beam studies on MBE-4; 2-MV injector; improvements in lifetime of the C{sup +} source; injector control system; Maxwell spark gap test update; ILSE cosine 2{theta} quadrupole magnet development; electrostatic quadrupole prototype development activity; induction accelerator cell development; effect of a spread in beamlet currents on longitudinal stability; and heavy ion linac driver analysis.

  14. Computer simulation of 2-D and 3-D ion beam extraction and acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ido, Shunji; Nakajima, Yuji [Saitama Univ., Urawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    The two-dimensional code and the three-dimensional code have been developed to study the physical features of the ion beams in the extraction and acceleration stages. By using the two-dimensional code, the design of first electrode(plasma grid) is examined in regard to the beam divergence. In the computational studies by using the three-dimensional code, the axis-off model of ion beam is investigated. It is found that the deflection angle of ion beam is proportional to the gap displacement of the electrodes. (author)

  15. High-Energy Ion Acceleration Mechanisms in a Dense Plasma Focus Z-Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, D. P.; Link, A.; Schmidt, A.; Welch, D.

    2016-10-01

    The compression of a Z-pinch plasma, specifically in a dense plasma focus (DPF), is known to accelerate high-energy electrons, ions and, if using fusion-reactant ions (e.g. D, T), neutrons. The acceleration of particles is known to coincide with the peak constriction of the pinch, however, the exact physical mechanism responsible for the acceleration remains an area of debate and uncertainty. Recent work has suggested that this acceleration is linked to the growth of an m =0 (sausage) instability that evacuates a region of low-density, highly-magnetized plasma and creates a strong (>MV/cm) electric field. Using the fully kinetic particle-in-cell code LSP in 2D-3V, we simulate the compression of a 2 MA, 35 kV DPF plasma and investigate in detail the formation of the electric field. The electric field is found to be predominantly in the axial direction and driven via charge-separation effects related to the resistivity of the kinetic plasma. The strong electric and magnetic fields are shown to induce non-Maxwellian distributions in both the ions and electrons and lead to the acceleration of high-energy tails. We compare the results in the kinetic simulations to assumptions of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Performance of a compact injector for heavy-ion medical accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Y.; Yamada, S.; Murakami, T.; Fujimoto, T.; Fujisawa, T.; Ogawa, H.; Miyahara, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Hojo, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Muramatsu, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Mitsumoto, T.; Tsutsui, H.; Watanabe, T.; Ueda, T.

    2007-03-01

    A compact injector, designed for a heavy-ion medical accelerator complex, was constructed. It consists of an Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Ion-Source (ECRIS) and two linacs, which are a Radio-Frequency-Quadrupole linac and an Interdigital H-mode Drift-Tube-Linac (IH-DTL) having the same operating frequency of 200 MHz. For beam focusing of the IH-DTL, the method of Alternating-Phase-Focusing (APF) was employed. The compact injector can accelerate heavy ions having a charge-to-mass ratio of {q}/{m}={1}/{3} up to 4.0 MeV/u. Use of the APF IH-DTL and operating frequency of 200 MHz allowed us to design compact linacs; the total length of the two linacs is less than 6 m. Beam-acceleration tests of the compact injector system were performed. The measured intensity of accelerated C4+12 beams with the compact injector was 380 eμA. Beam transmission of the APF IH-DTL was estimated to be as high as 96%, which is comparable to the value calculated by a simulation code. Transverse phase-space and energy distributions of accelerated beams were measured and compared with those calculated by the simulation code, and we found that they were agreed well with each other.

  17. Acceleration of polarized protons and deuterons in the ion collider ring of JLEIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratenko, A. [Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation); Kondratenko, M. [Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation); Filatov, Yu. N. [Moscow Inst. of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Moscow (Russian Federation); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation); Lin, Fanglei [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Morozov, Vasily S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The figure-8-shaped ion collider ring of Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider (JLEIC) is transparent to the spin. It allows one to preserve proton and deuteron polarizations using weak stabilizing solenoids when accelerating the beam up to 100 GeV/c. When the stabilizing solenoids are introduced into the collider's lattice, the particle spins precess about a spin field, which consists of the field induced by the stabilizing solenoids and the zero-integer spin resonance strength. During acceleration of the beam, the induced spin field is maintained constant while the resonance strength experiences significant changes in the regions of "interference peaks". The beam polarization depends on the field ramp rate of the arc magnets. Its component along the spin field is preserved if acceleration is adiabatic. We present the results of our theoretical analysis and numerical modeling of the spin dynamics during acceleration of protons and deuterons in the JLEIC ion collider ring. We demonstrate high stability of the deuteron polarization in figure-8 accelerators. We analyze a change in the beam polarization when crossing the transition energy.

  18. A high energy, heavy ion microprobe for ion beam research on the tandem accelerator at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, D.D.; Siegele, R.; Dytlewski, N.

    1996-04-01

    A comprehensive review is given on the production and use of heavy ion beams with spot sizes of a few {mu}m. The development of a high energy, heavy ion microprobe at ANSTO and its possible applications are discussed. The microprobe is designed to focus a wide range of ion beam types, from light ions such as protons up to ions as heavy as iodine. Details of the ion beam optics, optical calculations and a description of the proposed microbeam design are given. The unique combination of high energy, heavy ions and improved detection systems will provide high sensitivity elemental composition and depth profiling information, allowing surface topography and 3D surface reconstruction to be performed on a broad range of materials. 86 refs., 5 tabs., 15 figs.

  19. Cyclinac Medical Accelerators Using Pulsed C6+/H2+ Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Garonna, A; Bonomi, R; Campo, D; Degiovanni, A; Garlasché, M; Mondino, I; Rizzoglio, V; Andrés, S Verdú

    2010-01-01

    Charged particle therapy, or so-called hadrontherapy, is developing very rapidly. There is huge pressure on the scientific community to deliver dedicated accelerators, providing the best possible treatment modalities at the lowest cost. In this context, the Italian Research Foundation TERA is developing fast-cycling accelerators, dubbed cyclinacs. These are a combination of a cyclotron (accelerating ions to a fixed initial energy) followed by a high gradient linac boosting the ions energy up to the maximum needed for medical therapy. The linac is powered by many independently controlled klystrons to vary the beam energy from one pulse to the next. This accelerator is best suited to treat moving organs with a 4D multi-painting spot scanning technique. A dual proton/carbon ion cyclinac is here presented. It consists of an Electron Beam Ion Source, a superconducting isochronous cyclotron and a high-gradient linac. All these machines are pulsed at high repetition rate (100-400 Hz). The source should deliver both ...

  20. Kinetic Modeling of Next-Generation High-Energy, High-Intensity Laser-Ion Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, Brian James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yin, Lin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stark, David James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-06

    One of the long-standing problems in the community is the question of how we can model “next-generation” laser-ion acceleration in a computationally tractable way. A new particle tracking capability in the LANL VPIC kinetic plasma modeling code has enabled us to solve this long-standing problem

  1. Development and testing of the improved focusing quadrupole for heavy ion fusion accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manahan, R R; Martovetsky, N N; Meinke, R B; Chiesa, L; Lietzke, A F; Sabbi, G L; Seidl, P A

    2003-10-23

    An improved version of the focusing magnet for a Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) accelerator was designed, built and tested in 2002-2003. This quadrupole has higher focusing power and lower error field than the previous version of the focusing quadrupoles successfully built and tested in 2001. We discuss the features of the new design, selected fabrication issues and test results.

  2. Biological and medical research with accelerated heavy ions at the Bevalac, 1977-1980. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirruccello, M.C.; Tobias, C.A. (eds.)

    1980-11-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 46 papers presented in this progress report. This report is a major review of studies with accelerated heavy ions carried out by the Biology and Medicine Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory from 1977 to 1980. (KRM)

  3. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L. R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-02-17

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  4. Accelerator mass spectrometer with ion selection in high-voltage terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastigeev, S. A.; Goncharov, A. D.; Klyuev, V. F.; Konstantinov, E. S.; Kutnyakova, L. A.; Parkhomchuk, V. V.; Petrozhitskii, A. V.; Frolov, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    The folded electrostatic tandem accelerator with ion selection in a high-voltage terminal is the basis of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at the BINP. Additional features of the BINP AMS are the target based on magnesium vapors as a stripper without vacuum deterioration and a time-of-flight telescope with thin films for reliable ion identification. The acceleration complex demonstrates reliable operation in a mode of 1 MV with 50 Hz counting rate of 14C+3 radiocarbon for modern samples (14C/12C 1.2 × 10-12). The current state of the AMS has been considered and the experimental results of the radiocarbon concentration measurements in test samples have been presented.

  5. A new beam loss detector for low-energy proton and heavy-ion accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengzheng; Crisp, Jenna; Russo, Tom; Webber, Robert; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be constructed at Michigan State University shall deliver a continuous, 400 kW heavy ion beam to the isotope production target. This beam is capable of inflicting serious damage on accelerator components, e.g. superconducting RF accelerating cavities. A Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is essential for detecting beam loss with sufficient sensitivity and promptness to inform the machine protection system (MPS) and operations personnel of impending dangerous losses. Radiation transport simulations reveal shortcomings in the use of ionization chambers for the detection of beam losses in low-energy, heavy-ion accelerators. Radiation cross-talk effects due to the folded geometry of the FRIB LINAC pose further complications to locating specific points of beam loss. We propose a newly developed device, named the Loss Monitor Ring (LMR1

  6. ESS-Bilbao light-ion linear accelerator and neutron source: design and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, E.; Arredondo, I.; Badillo, I.; Belver, D.; Bermejo, F. J.; Bustinduy, I.; Cano, D.; Cortazar, D.; de Cos, D.; Djekic, S.; Domingo, S.; Echevarria, P.; Eguiraun, M.; Etxebarria, V.; Fernandez, D.; Fernandez, F. J.; Feuchtwanger, J.; Garmendia, N.; Harper, G.; Hassanzadegan, H.; Jugo, J.; Legarda, F.; Magan, M.; Martinez, R.; Megia, A.; Muguira, L.; Mujika, G.; Muñoz, J. L.; Ortega, A.; Ortega, J.; Perlado, M.; Portilla, J.; Rueda, I.; Sordo, F.; Toyos, V.; Vizcaino, A.

    2011-10-01

    The baseline design for the ESS-Bilbao light-ion linear accelerator and neutron source has been completed and the normal conducting section of the linac is at present under construction. The machine has been designed to be compliant with ESS specifications following the international guidelines of such project as described in Ref. [1]. The new accelerator facility in Bilbao will serve as a base for support of activities on accelerator physics carried out in Spain and southern Europe in the frame of different ongoing international collaborations. Also, a number of applications have been envisaged in the new Bilbao facility for the outgoing light ion beams as well as from fast neutrons produced by low-energy neutron-capture targets, which are briefly described.

  7. First results of 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for KBSI accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Yong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Shin, Chang Seouk; Hong, Jonggi; Bahng, Jungbae; Won, Mi-Sook, E-mail: mswon@kbsi.re.kr [Busan Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed to produce a high current heavy ion for the linear accelerator at KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute). The objective of this study is to generate fast neutrons with a proton target via a p(Li,n)Be reaction. The design and fabrication of the essential components of the ECR ion source, which include a superconducting magnet with a liquid helium re-condensed cryostat and a 10 kW high-power microwave, were completed. The waveguide components were connected with a plasma chamber including a gas supply system. The plasma chamber was inserted into the warm bore of the superconducting magnet. A high voltage system was also installed for the ion beam extraction. After the installation of the ECR ion source, we reported the results for ECR plasma ignition at ECRIS 2014 in Russia. Following plasma ignition, we successfully extracted multi-charged ions and obtained the first results in terms of ion beam spectra from various species. This was verified by a beam diagnostic system for a low energy beam transport system. In this article, we present the first results and report on the current status of the KBSI accelerator project.

  8. First results of 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source for KBSI accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Yong; Lee, Byoung-Seob; Choi, Seyong; Kim, Seong Jun; Ok, Jung-Woo; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Kim, Hyun Gyu; Shin, Chang Seouk; Hong, Jonggi; Bahng, Jungbae; Won, Mi-Sook

    2016-02-01

    The 28 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed to produce a high current heavy ion for the linear accelerator at KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute). The objective of this study is to generate fast neutrons with a proton target via a p(Li,n)Be reaction. The design and fabrication of the essential components of the ECR ion source, which include a superconducting magnet with a liquid helium re-condensed cryostat and a 10 kW high-power microwave, were completed. The waveguide components were connected with a plasma chamber including a gas supply system. The plasma chamber was inserted into the warm bore of the superconducting magnet. A high voltage system was also installed for the ion beam extraction. After the installation of the ECR ion source, we reported the results for ECR plasma ignition at ECRIS 2014 in Russia. Following plasma ignition, we successfully extracted multi-charged ions and obtained the first results in terms of ion beam spectra from various species. This was verified by a beam diagnostic system for a low energy beam transport system. In this article, we present the first results and report on the current status of the KBSI accelerator project.

  9. Energetic Ion Acceleration by Small-scale Solar Wind Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.; Zank, G. P.; Khabarova, O.

    2015-09-01

    We consider different limits of our recently developed kinetic transport theory to investigate the potential of supersonic solar wind regions containing several small-scale flux ropes to explain the acceleration of suprathermal ions to power-law spectra as observations show. Particle acceleration is modeled in response to flux-rope activity involving contraction, merging (reconnection), and collisions in the limit where the particle gyoradius is smaller than the characteristic flux-rope scale length. The emphasis is mainly on the statistical variance in the electric fields induced by flux-rope dynamics rather than on the mean electric field induced by multiple flux ropes whose acceleration effects are discussed elsewhere. Our steady-state analytical solutions suggest that ion drift acceleration by flux ropes, irrespective of whether displaying incompressible or compressible behavior, can yield power laws asymptotically at higher energies whereas an exponential spectral rollover results asymptotically when field-aligned guiding center motion acceleration occur by reconnection electric fields from merging flux ropes. This implies that at sufficiently high particle energies, drift acceleration might dominate. We also expect compressive flux ropes to yield harder power-law spectra than incompressible flux ropes.

  10. Prompt pre-thermal laser ion sheath acceleration with ultra-short laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeil, Karl; Bussmann, Michael; Cowan, Thomas; Kluge, Thomas; Kraft, Stephan; Metzkes, Josefine; Schramm, Ulrich [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Recent laser-ion acceleration experiments performed at the 150 TW Draco laser in Dresden, Germany, have demonstrated the importance of a precise understanding of the electron dynamics in solids on an ultra-short time scale. For example, with ultra-short laser pulses a description based purely on the evolution of a thermal electron ensemble, as in standard TNSA models, is not sufficient anymore. Rather, non-thermal effects during the ultra-short intra-pulse phase of laser-electron interaction in solids become important for the acceleration of ions when the laser pulse duration is in the order of only a few tens of femtoseconds. While the established maximum ion energy scaling in the TNSA regime goes with the square root of the laser intensity, for such ultra short pulse durations the maximum ion energy is found to scale linear with laser intensity, motivating the interest in such laser systems. Investigating the influence of laser pulse contrast, laser polarization and laser incidence angle on the proton maximum energy and angular distribution, we present recent advances in the description of the laser interaction with solids, focusing on the implications of intra-pulse non-thermal phenomena on the ion acceleration.

  11. Interlaboratory study of the ion source memory effect in 36Cl accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavetich, Stefan; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Arnold, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Bourlès, Didier; Buchriegler, Josef; Golser, Robin; Keddadouche, Karim; Martschini, Martin; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg; Steier, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Understanding and minimization of contaminations in the ion source due to cross-contamination and long-term memory effect is one of the key issues for accurate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of volatile elements. The focus of this work is on the investigation of the long-term memory effect for the volatile element chlorine, and the minimization of this effect in the ion source of the Dresden accelerator mass spectrometry facility (DREAMS). For this purpose, one of the two original HVE ion sources at the DREAMS facility was modified, allowing the use of larger sample holders having individual target apertures. Additionally, a more open geometry was used to improve the vacuum level. To evaluate this improvement in comparison to other up-to-date ion sources, an interlaboratory comparison had been initiated. The long-term memory effect of the four Cs sputter ion sources at DREAMS (two sources: original and modified), ASTER (Accélérateur pour les Sciences de la Terre, Environnement, Risques) and VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) had been investigated by measuring samples of natural 35Cl/37Cl-ratio and samples highly-enriched in 35Cl (35Cl/37Cl ∼ 999). Besides investigating and comparing the individual levels of long-term memory, recovery time constants could be calculated. The tests show that all four sources suffer from long-term memory, but the modified DREAMS ion source showed the lowest level of contamination. The recovery times of the four ion sources were widely spread between 61 and 1390 s, where the modified DREAMS ion source with values between 156 and 262 s showed the fastest recovery in 80% of the measurements.

  12. Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitarin, G. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Department of Engineering and Management, University of Padova, Vicenza (Italy); Agostinetti, P.; Marconato, N.; Marcuzzi, D.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2012-02-15

    The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.

  13. Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitarin, G; Agostinetti, P; Marconato, N; Marcuzzi, D; Sartori, E; Serianni, G; Sonato, P

    2012-02-01

    The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.

  14. A multi-satellite study of accelerated ionospheric ion beams above the polar cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Maggiolo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of nearly field-aligned outflowing ion beams observed on the Cluster satellites over the polar cap. Data are taken at geocentric radial distances of the order of 5–9 RE. The distinction is made between ion beams originating from the polar cusp/cleft and beams accelerated almost along the magnetic field line passing by the spacecraft. Polar cusp beams are characterized by nearly field-aligned proton and oxygen ions with an energy ratio EO+ / EH+, of the order of 3 to 4, due to the ion energy repartition inside the source and to the latitudinal extension of the source. Rapid variations in the outflowing ion energy are linked with pulses/modifications of the convection electric field. Cluster data allow one to show that these perturbations of the convection velocity and the associated ion structures propagate at the convection velocity.

    In contrast, polar cap local ion beams are characterized by field-aligned proton and oxygen ions with similar energies. These beams show the typical inverted V structures usually observed in the auroral zone and are associated with a quasi-static converging electric field indicative of a field-aligned electric field. The field-aligned potential drop fits well the ion energy profile. The simultaneous observation of precipitating electrons and upflowing ions of similar energies at the Cluster orbit indicates that the spacecraft are crossing the mid-altitude part of the acceleration region. In the polar cap, the parallel electric field can thus extend to altitudes higher than 5 Earth radii. A detailed analysis of the distribution functions shows that the ions are heated during their parallel acceleration and that energy is exchanged between H+ and O+. Furthermore, intense electrostatic waves are observed simultaneously. These observations could be due to an ion-ion two-stream instability.

  15. Acceleration test of TIT-IHQ linac for heavy ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashi, Ito; Noriyosu, Hayashizaki; Shinjiro, Matsui; Kimikazu, Sasa; Schubert, H.; Osvath, E.; Toshiyuki, Hattori

    2000-03-01

    We have developed an interdigital-H quadrupole (IHQ) linac for industrial applications. This linac was designed to accelerate particles with charge to mass ratio greater than 1/16 from 21.8 up to 145 keV/u. The particles are focused by an electric quadrupole field exited by fingertips on the drift tubes. This IHQ linac was installed at Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1997 and some tests such as low power tuning and vacuum tests were done. Then, proton acceleration tests ware performed in 1998, and the proton beam was successfully accelerated up to the designed energy. As a result of this experiment, the effective shunt impedance was determined to be 210 MΩ/m, the required RF power consumption was 93 W and the beam transmission rate was about 9%. In this paper, the results of the high power acceleration test with H + ion are described.

  16. An air-cooled gradient resistor column for the KFUPM 350 kV ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raashid, M. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Energy Res. Lab.; Abdel-Aal, R.E. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Energy Res. Lab.; Naqvi, A.A. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Energy Res. Lab.; Al-Ohali, M.A. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Energy Res. Lab.; Nagadi, M.M. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Energy Res. Lab.

    1996-08-21

    An air-cooled gradient resistor column has been designed and implemented for the KFUPM 350 kV ion accelerator. The air-cooled column overcomes operational limitations on the acceleration voltages obtained with the old water-cooled column and improves on reliability and maintainability. The new column consists of five sections, each having sixteen 8 M{Omega} 15 W resistors connected in a series-parallel combination. Corona shields defining equipotential circular planes have been incorporated to maintain a uniform potential difference across the column sections. In order to protect the gradient column and accelerator tube against arcing, spark gaps are provided on each corona shield. The new column has been tested over the full range of 0-320 kV across the accelerator tube for extended durations without arcing. Both electrical and mechanical aspects of the new design are discussed, measurement techniques used during installation and testing are described, and performance data are given. (orig.).

  17. Laser energized traveling wave accelerator - a novel scheme for simultaneous focusing, energy selection and post-acceleration of laser-driven ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Satyabrata

    2015-11-01

    All-optical approaches to particle acceleration are currently attracting a significant research effort internationally. Where intense laser driven proton beams, mainly by the so called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism, have attractive properties such as brightness, laminarity and burst duration, overcoming some of the inherent shortcomings, such as large divergence, broad spectrum and slow ion energy scaling poses significant scientific and technological challenges. High power lasers are capable of generating kiloampere current pulses with unprecedented short duration (10s of picoseconds). The large electric field from such localized charge pulses can be harnessed in a traveling wave particle accelerator arrangement. By directing the ultra-short charge pulse along a helical path surrounding a laser-accelerated ion beams, one can achieve simultaneous beam shaping and re-acceleration of a selected portion of the beam by the components of the associated electric field within the helix. In a proof-of-principle experiment on a 200 TW university-scale laser, we demonstrated post-acceleration of ~108 protons by ~5 MeV over less than a cm of propagation - i.e. an accelerating gradient ~0.5 GeV/m, already beyond what can be sustained by conventional accelerator technologies, with dynamic beam collimation and energy selection. These results open up new opportunities for the development of extremely compact and cost-effective ion accelerators for both established and innovative applications.

  18. Application of wavelet filtering and Barker-coded pulse compression hybrid method to air-coupled ultrasonic testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhenggan; Ma, Baoquan; Jiang, Jingtao; Yu, Guang; Liu, Kui; Zhang, Dongmei; Liu, Weiping

    2014-10-01

    Air-coupled ultrasonic testing (ACUT) technique has been viewed as a viable solution in defect detection of advanced composites used in aerospace and aviation industries. However, the giant mismatch of acoustic impedance in air-solid interface makes the transmission efficiency of ultrasound low, and leads to poor signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio of received signal. The utilisation of signal-processing techniques in non-destructive testing is highly appreciated. This paper presents a wavelet filtering and phase-coded pulse compression hybrid method to improve the SNR and output power of received signal. The wavelet transform is utilised to filter insignificant components from noisy ultrasonic signal, and pulse compression process is used to improve the power of correlated signal based on cross-correction algorithm. For the purpose of reasonable parameter selection, different families of wavelets (Daubechies, Symlet and Coiflet) and decomposition level in discrete wavelet transform are analysed, different Barker codes (5-13 bits) are also analysed to acquire higher main-to-side lobe ratio. The performance of the hybrid method was verified in a honeycomb composite sample. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method is very efficient in improving the SNR and signal strength. The applicability of the proposed method seems to be a very promising tool to evaluate the integrity of high ultrasound attenuation composite materials using the ACUT.

  19. A study on the design of hexapole in an 18-GHz ECR ion source for heavy ion accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhan; Wei, Shaoqing; Lee, Sang Jin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Suk Jin [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    High charge state electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source is important on the performance of heavy ion accelerators. In this paper, a low temperature superconductor (LTS) was used to make a hexapole coil for an 18-GHz ECR ion source. Several hexapole structures, including racetrack, graded racetrack, and saddle were implemented and analyzed for the hexapole-in-solenoid ECR ion source system. Under the appropriate radial confinement field, the smaller outer radius of hexapole can be better for the solenoid design. Saddle hexapole was selected by comparing the wire length, maximum outer radius of the hexapole, the Lorentz force at the end part of the hexapole and the maximum magnetic field in the coil. Based on saddle hexapole, a new design for hexapoles, the snake hexapole, was developed in this paper. By comparative analysis of the Lorentz force at the end part of the saddle and snake hexapoles, the snake hexapole is much better in the ECR ion source system. The suggested design for the ECR ion source with the snake hexapole is presented in this paper.

  20. Proton and heavy ion acceleration by stochastic fluctuations in the Earth's magnetotail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catapano, Filomena; Zimbardo, Gaetano; Perri, Silvia; Greco, Antonella [Calabria Univ., Rende (Italy). Dept. of Physics; Artemyev, Anton V. [Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation). Space Research Inst.; California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth, Planetary, and Space Science and Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

    2016-07-01

    Spacecraft observations show that energetic ions are found in the Earth's magnetotail, with energies ranging from tens of keV to a few hundreds of keV. In this paper we carry out test particle simulations in which protons and other ion species are injected in the Vlasov magnetic field configurations obtained by Catapano et al. (2015). These configurations represent solutions of a generalized Harris model, which well describes the observed profiles in the magnetotail. In addition, three-dimensional time-dependent stochastic electromagnetic perturbations are included in the simulation box, so that the ion acceleration process is studied while varying the equilibrium magnetic field profile and the ion species. We find that proton energies of the order of 100 keV are reached with simulation parameters typical of the Earth's magnetotail. By changing the ion mass and charge, we can study the acceleration of heavy ions such as He{sup ++} and O{sup +}, and it is found that energies of the order of 100-200 keV are reached in a few seconds for He{sup ++}, and about 100 keV for O{sup +}.

  1. Collisionless electrostatic shock formation and ion acceleration in intense laser interactions with near critical density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M.; Weng, S. M.; Li, Y. T.; Yuan, D. W.; Chen, M.; Mulser, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Murakami, M.; Yu, L. L.; Zheng, X. L.; Zhang, J.

    2016-11-01

    Laser-driven collisionless electrostatic shock formation and the subsequent ion acceleration have been studied in near critical density plasmas. Particle-in-cell simulations show that both the speed of laser-driven collisionless electrostatic shock and the energies of shock-accelerated ions can be greatly enhanced due to fast laser propagation in near critical density plasmas. However, a response time longer than tens of laser wave cycles is required before the shock formation in a near critical density plasma, in contrast to the quick shock formation in a highly overdense target. More important, we find that some ions can be reflected by the collisionless shock even if the electrostatic potential jump across the shock is smaller than the ion kinetic energy in the shock frame, which seems against the conventional ion-reflection condition. These anomalous ion reflections are attributed to the strong time-oscillating electric field accompanying the laser-driven collisionless shock in a near critical density plasma.

  2. Enhanced ion acceleration in the transition regime from opaque to transparent plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rohini; Fiuza, Frederico; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2016-10-01

    Using Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations, we investigate ion acceleration in high-intensity laser-plasma interactions in for targets that become laser transparent to the laser during the interaction process. A theoretical model is developed to derive an optimal target electron areal density `n.L' as a function of laser normalized intensity and the pulse duration in the laser transparent regime. A large schematic parametric scan for a wide range of target electron density (n) and thickness (L) is performed and shown to be consistent with analytical prediction. Our simulations show that iIon acceleration in optimal conditions relies on the re-heating of the expanding sheath electrons by the laser and enhancing enhancement of the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) electric field after the plasma becomes transparent to the laser light. This enhanced TNSA field decays slower compared to conventional TNSA resulting in significantly higher proton energies. Our results open the way to the exploration of optimized ion acceleration in the transparency regime, not only with nm-scale foils but also with recently developed micron-scale hydrogen jets. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science (FWP 100182).

  3. AMS of heavy elements with an ECR ion source and the ATLAS linear accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, M; Ahmad, I; Borasi, F; Caggiano, J; Davids, C N; Greene, J P; Harss, B; Heinz, A; Henderson, D J; Henning, W F; Jiang, C L; Pardo, R C; Rehm, K E; Rejoub, R; Seweryniak, D; Sonzogni, A; Uusitalo, J; Vondrasek, R C

    2000-01-01

    Detection of heavy elements by accelerator mass spectrometry with the electron cyclotron resonance ion source, Argonne linear accelerator and fragment mass analyzer (ECRIS-ATLAS-FMA) system has been developed. The use of the ECR-ATLAS system for AMS of heavy elements has two interesting features: (i) the efficient production of high-charge state ions in the ECR source ensures the elimination of molecular ions at the source stage, a highly attractive feature for any mass-spectrometric use not exploited so far; (ii) the linear acceleration based on velocity matching and the beam transport system act as a powerful mass filter for background suppression. We have shown that our system reaches an abundance sensitivity of 1x10 sup - sup 1 sup 4 for Pb isotopes. The sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 U detection sensitivity is sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 U/U > or approx. 1x10 sup - sup 1 sup 2 , limited mainly by the ion source output.

  4. Simulation of diatomic gas-wall interaction and accommodation coefficients for negative ion sources and accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, E.; Brescaccin, L.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    Particle-wall interactions determine in different ways the operating conditions of plasma sources, ion accelerators, and beams operating in vacuum. For instance, a contribution to gas heating is given by ion neutralization at walls; beam losses and stray particle production—detrimental for high current negative ion systems such as beam sources for fusion—are caused by collisional processes with residual gas, with the gas density profile that is determined by the scattering of neutral particles at the walls. This paper shows that Molecular Dynamics (MD) studies at the nano-scale can provide accommodation parameters for gas-wall interactions, such as the momentum accommodation coefficient and energy accommodation coefficient: in non-isothermal flows (such as the neutral gas in the accelerator, coming from the plasma source), these affect the gas density gradients and influence efficiency and losses in particular of negative ion accelerators. For ideal surfaces, the computation also provides the angular distribution of scattered particles. Classical MD method has been applied to the case of diatomic hydrogen molecules. Single collision events, against a frozen wall or a fully thermal lattice, have been simulated by using probe molecules. Different modelling approximations are compared.

  5. In-terminal ECR Ion Source of the Tandem Accelerator at JAERI

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuda, M; Takeuchi, S

    1999-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source(ECRIS)s are able to produce intense beams of highly charged positive ions and used injection system for cyclotron, linac as well as experiments of atomic physics. The tandem accelerator system has been benefiting from use of an electron stripper at the high voltage terminal. The most probable charged state after a foil stripper is, however, much lower than the highest charge state of ions with an intensity of more than several emA from a high performance ECRIS. With respect to beam current, the life time of stripper foils decrease with increasing beam current. Especially for very heavy ions, it is difficult to obtain a stable and intense beam for a long time without foil exchange. Use of an ECRIS in a tandem accelerator is expected to increase beam intensity, beam energy and beam species. A small permanent magnet ECRIS has been installed in the high voltage terminal of the vertical and folded type 20UR Pelletron tandem accelerator at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institu...

  6. Interlaboratory study of the ion source memory effect in {sup 36}Cl accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavetich, Stefan, E-mail: s.pavetich@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Akhmadaliev, Shavkat [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Arnold, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Bourlès, Didier [Aix-Marseille Université, CEREGE CNRS-IRD, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Buchriegler, Josef [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01314 Dresden (Germany); University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Golser, Robin [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Keddadouche, Karim [Aix-Marseille Université, CEREGE CNRS-IRD, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Martschini, Martin [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Steier, Peter [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Währingerstraße 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Long-term memory effect in negative ion sources investigated for chlorine isotopes. • Interlaboratory comparison of four up-to date negative ion sources. • Ion source improvement at DREAMS for minimization of long-term memory effect. • Long-term memory effect is the limitation for precise AMS data of volatile elements. • Findings to be considered for samples with highly variable ratios of {sup 36}Cl/Cl and {sup 129}I/I. - Abstract: Understanding and minimization of contaminations in the ion source due to cross-contamination and long-term memory effect is one of the key issues for accurate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of volatile elements. The focus of this work is on the investigation of the long-term memory effect for the volatile element chlorine, and the minimization of this effect in the ion source of the Dresden accelerator mass spectrometry facility (DREAMS). For this purpose, one of the two original HVE ion sources at the DREAMS facility was modified, allowing the use of larger sample holders having individual target apertures. Additionally, a more open geometry was used to improve the vacuum level. To evaluate this improvement in comparison to other up-to-date ion sources, an interlaboratory comparison had been initiated. The long-term memory effect of the four Cs sputter ion sources at DREAMS (two sources: original and modified), ASTER (Accélérateur pour les Sciences de la Terre, Environnement, Risques) and VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) had been investigated by measuring samples of natural {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl-ratio and samples highly-enriched in {sup 35}Cl ({sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl ∼ 999). Besides investigating and comparing the individual levels of long-term memory, recovery time constants could be calculated. The tests show that all four sources suffer from long-term memory, but the modified DREAMS ion source showed the lowest level of contamination. The recovery times of the four ion

  7. Beam Profile Measurement of 300 kV Ion Source Test Stand for 1 MV Electrostatic Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Yu-Seok [Dongguk University, Gyeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae-Il; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Cho, Yong-Sub [Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, RF ion source, test stand of the ion source and its test results are presented. Beam profile was measured at the downstream from the accelerating tube and at the beam dump by using BPM and wire scanner. The RF ion source of the test stand is verified by measuring the total beam current with a faraday cup in the chamber. The KOMAC (KOrea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) has been developing a 300 kV ion source test stand for a 1 MV electrostatic accelerator. An ion source and accelerating tube will be installed in a high pressure vessel. The ion source in a high pressure vessel requires high reliability. To confirm the stable operation of the ion source, a test stand was proposed and developed. The ion source will be tested at the test stand to verify its long-term operation conditions. The test stand consists of a 300 kV high voltage terminal, a battery for the ion source power, a 60 Hz inverter, a 200 MHz RF power, a 5 kV extraction power supply, a 300 kV accelerating tube, and a vacuum system. The beam profile monitor was installed at the downstream from the accelerating tube. Wire scanner and faraday-cup was installed at the end of the chamber.

  8. Optical Tagging of Ion Beams Accelerated by Double Layers in Laboratory Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Timothy; Aguirre, Evan; Thompson, Derek; Scime, Earl

    2016-10-01

    Experiments in helicon sources that investigate plasma expansion into weakly magnetized, low density regions reveal the production of supersonic ion beams attributed to acceleration by spatially localized double layer structures. Current efforts are aimed at mapping the ion velocity flow field utilizing 2D spatially scanning laser induced fluorescence (LIF) probes that yield metastable ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) for velocities along and perpendicular to the flow. Observation of metastable ion beams by LIF renders plausible a Lagrangian approach to studying the field-ion interaction via optical tagging. We propose a tagging scheme in which metastable state ion populations are modulated by optical pumping upstream of the double layer and the synchronous detection of LIF at the ion beam velocity is recorded downstream. Besides the unambiguous identification of the source of beam ions, this method can provide detailed dynamical information through time of flight analysis. Preliminary results will be presented. Please include this poster in session that includes poster authored by Evan Aguirre et al.

  9. Far-field constant-gradient laser accelerator of electrons in an ion channel

    CERN Document Server

    Khudik, Vladimir; Shvets, Gennady

    2016-01-01

    We predict that electrons in an ion channel can gain ultra-relativistic energies by simultaneously interacting with a laser pulse and, counter-intuitively, with a decelerating electric field. The crucial role of the decelerating field is to maintain high-amplitude betatron oscillations, thereby enabling constant rate energy flow to the electrons via the direct laser acceleration mechanism. Multiple harmonics of the betatron motion can be employed. Injecting electrons into a decelerating phase of a laser wakefield accelerator is one practical implementation of the scheme.

  10. Off-normal and failure condition analysis of the MITICA negative-ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chitarin, Giuseppe, E-mail: chitarin@igi.cnr.it; Aprile, Daniele [Consorzio RFX, (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Strad. S. Nicola 3, 36100 Vicenza (Italy); Agostinetti, Piero; Marconato, Nicolò; Marcuzzi, Diego; Serianni, Gianluigi; Veltri, Pierluigi; Zaccaria, Pierluigi [Consorzio RFX, (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    The negative-ion accelerator for the MITICA neutral beam injector has been designed and optimized in order to reduce the thermo-mechanical stresses in all components below limits compatible with the required fatigue life. However, deviation from the expected beam performances can be caused by “off-normal” operating conditions of the accelerator. The purpose of the present work is to identify and analyse all the “off-normal” operating conditions, which could possibly become critical in terms of thermo-mechanical stresses or of degradation of the optical performances of the beam.

  11. Off-normal and failure condition analysis of the MITICA negative-ion accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitarin, Giuseppe; Agostinetti, Piero; Aprile, Daniele; Marconato, Nicolò; Marcuzzi, Diego; Serianni, Gianluigi; Veltri, Pierluigi; Zaccaria, Pierluigi

    2016-02-01

    The negative-ion accelerator for the MITICA neutral beam injector has been designed and optimized in order to reduce the thermo-mechanical stresses in all components below limits compatible with the required fatigue life. However, deviation from the expected beam performances can be caused by "off-normal" operating conditions of the accelerator. The purpose of the present work is to identify and analyse all the "off-normal" operating conditions, which could possibly become critical in terms of thermo-mechanical stresses or of degradation of the optical performances of the beam.

  12. Electron acceleration in an ion channel by a magnetized plasma wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kargarian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the acceleration of an electron in the interaction with a plasma wave and a magnetized ion-channel is analyzed. The electron dynamics is studied treated employing complete three-dimensional Lorentz force equations. A relativistic three dimensional single particle code is used to obtain the electron-trajectories. The results of numerical calculation show that the electrons can be accelerated in the magnetized channel. Furthermore, the electron energy gain with axial magnetic field is compared to that without axial magnetic field.

  13. Controls for a Pulsed Ion Accelerator Using Apache Cassandra (No-SQL) and ZMQ

    CERN Document Server

    Persaud, A; Stettler, M W; Vytla, V K

    2015-01-01

    We report on updates to the accelerator controls for the Neutral Drift Compression Experiment II, a pulsed accelerator for heavy ions. The control infrastructure is built around a LabVIEW interface combined with an Apache Cassandra (No-SQL) backend for data archiving. Recent upgrades added the storing and retrieving of device settings into the database, as well as adding ZMQ as a message broker that replaces LabVIEW's shared variables. Converting to ZMQ also allows easy access using other programming languages, such as Python.

  14. Detailed Experimental Study of Ion Acceleration by Interaction of an Ultra-Short Intense Laser with an Underdense Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, S; Sylla, F; Lifschitz, A; Flacco, A; Veltcheva, M; Malka, V

    2016-08-17

    Ion acceleration from intense (Iλ(2) > 10(18) Wcm(-2) μm(2)) laser-plasma interaction is experimentally studied within a wide range of He gas densities. Focusing an ultrashort pulse (duration  ion plasma period) on a newly designed submillimetric gas jet system, enabled us to inhibit total evacuation of electrons from the central propagation channel reducing the radial ion acceleration associated with ponderomotive Coulomb explosion, a mechanism predominant in the long pulse scenario. New ion acceleration mechanism have been unveiled in this regime leading to non-Maxwellian quasi monoenergetic features in the ion energy spectra. The emitted nonthermal ion bunches show a new scaling of the ion peak energy with plasma density. The scaling identified in this new regime differs from previously reported studies.

  15. New Statistical Multiparticle Approach to the Acceleration of Electrons by the Ion Field in Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Oks

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of the acceleration of the (perturbing electrons by the ion field (AEIF significantly reduces Stark widths and shifts in plasmas of relatively high densities and/or relatively low temperature. Our previous analytical calculations of the AEIF were based on the dynamical treatment: the starting point was the ion-microfield-caused changes of the trajectories and velocities of individual perturbing electrons. In the current paper, we employ a statistical approach: the starting point is the electron velocity distribution function modified by the ion microfield. The latter had been calculated by Romanovsky and Ebeling in the multiparticle description of the ion microfield. The result shows again the reduction of the electron Stark broadening. Thus two totally different analytical approaches (dynamical and statistical agree with each other and therefore disprove the corresponding recent fully-numerical simulations by Stambulchik et al. that claimed an increase of the electron Stark broadening.

  16. Selectively accelerated lithium ion transport to silicon anodes via an organogel binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chihyun; Cho, Yoon-Gyo; Kang, Na-Ri; Ko, Younghoon; Lee, Ungju; Ahn, Dongjoon; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Young-Jin; Song, Hyun-Kon

    2015-12-01

    Silicon, a promising high-capacity anode material of lithium ion batteries, suffers from its volume expansion leading to pulverization and low conductivities, showing capacity decay during cycling and low capacities at fast charging and discharging. In addition to popular active-material-modifying strategies, building lithium-ion-rich environments around silicon surface is helpful in enhancing unsatisfactory performances of silicon anodes. In this work, we accelerated lithium ion transport to silicon surface by using an organogel binder to utilize the electroactivity of silicon in a more efficient way. The cyanoethyl polymer (PVA-CN), characterized by high lithium ion transference number as well as appropriate elastic modulus with strong adhesion, enhanced cycle stability of silicon anodes with high coulombic efficiency even at high temperature (60 °C) as well as at fast charging/discharging rates.

  17. Intense laser driven collision-less shock and ion acceleration in magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mima, K.; Jia, Q.; Cai, H. B.; Taguchi, T.; Nagatomo, H.; Sanz, J. R.; Honrubia, J.

    2016-05-01

    The generation of strong magnetic field with a laser driven coil has been demonstrated by many experiments. It is applicable to the magnetized fast ignition (MFI), the collision-less shock in the astrophysics and the ion shock acceleration. In this paper, the longitudinal magnetic field effect on the shock wave driven by the radiation pressure of an intense short pulse laser is investigated by theory and simulations. The transition of a laminar shock (electro static shock) to the turbulent shock (electromagnetic shock) occurs, when the external magnetic field is applied in near relativistic cut-off density plasmas. This transition leads to the enhancement of conversion of the laser energy into high energy ions. The enhancement of the conversion efficiency is important for the ion driven fast ignition and the laser driven neutron source. It is found that the total number of ions reflected by the shock increases by six time when the magnetic field is applied.

  18. Effects of Prenatal Irradiation with an Accelerated Heavy-Ion Beam on Postnatal Development in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Murakami, M.; Eguchi-Kasai, K.; Nojima, K.; Shang, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Fujita, K.; Coffigny, H.; Hayata, I.

    Effects on postnatal neurophysiological development in offspring were studied following exposure of pregnant Wistar rats to accelerated neon-ion beams with a LET value of about 30 keV mu m at a dose range from 0 1 Gy to 2 0Gy on the 15th day of gestation The age at which four physiologic markers appeared and five reflexes were acquired was examined prior to weaning Gain in body weight was monitored until the offspring were 3 months old Male offspring were evaluated as young adults using two behavioral tests The effects of X-rays at 200 kVp measured for the same biological end points were studied for comparison Our previous study on carbon-ion beams with a LET value of about 13 keV mu m was also cited to elucidate a possible LET-related effect For most of the endpoints at early age significant alteration was even observed in offspring prenatally received 0 1 Gy of accelerated neon ions while neither X rays nor carbon-ions under the same dose resulted in such a significant alteration compared to that from the sham-irradiated dams All offspring whose mothers received 2 0 Gy died prior to weaning Offspring from dams irradiated with accelerated neon ions generally showed higher incidences of prenatal death and preweaning mortality markedly delayed accomplishment in their physiological markers and reflexes and gain in body weight compared to those exposed to X-rays or carbon ions at doses of 0 1 to 1 5 Gy Significantly reduced ratios of main organ weight to body weight at postnatal ages of 30 60 and 90 days were also observed

  19. Ion-acoustic Shocks with Self-Regulated Ion Reflection and Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Malkov, M A; Dudnikova, G I; Liseykina, T V; Diamond, P H; Papadopoulos, K; Liu, C-S; Su, J-J

    2015-01-01

    An analytic solution describing an ion-acoustic collisionless shock, self-consistently with the evolution of shock-reflected ions, is obtained. The solution extends the classic soliton solution beyond a critical Mach number, where the soliton ceases to exist because of the upstream ion reflection. The reflection transforms the soliton into a shock with a trailing wave and a foot populated by the reflected ions. The solution relates parameters of the entire shock structure, such as the maximum and minimum of the potential in the trailing wave, the height of the foot, as well as the shock Mach number, to the number of reflected ions. This relation is resolvable for any given distribution of the upstream ions. In this paper, we have resolved it for a simple "box" distribution. Two separate models of electron interaction with the shock are considered. The first model corresponds to the standard Boltzmannian electron distribution in which case the critical shock Mach number only insignificantly increases from M=1....

  20. Time- and space- resolved pyrometry of dense plasmas heated by laser accelerated ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Gilliss; Roycroft, Rebecca; McCary, Eddie; Wagner, Craig; Jiao, Xuejing; Kupfer, Rotem; Gauthier, D. Cort; Bang, Woosuk; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; Bradley, Paul A.; Hamilton, Christopher; Santiago Cordoba, Miguel A.; Vold, Erik L.; Yin, Lin; Fernandez, Juan C.; Alibright, Brian J.; Ditmire, Todd; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Laser driven ion sources have a variety of possible applications, including the rapid heating of matter to dense plasma states of several eV. Recent experiments at LANL and The University of Texas have explored ion heating in the context of mixing at high-Z / low-Z plasma interfaces, using different laser-based ion acceleration schemes. Quasi-monoenergetic and highly directed Al ions from ultra-thin foils were used in one set of experiments, while TNSA accelerated protons from an F/40 focused petawatt laser were used in the other. Using spatially and temporally resolved streaked optical pyrometry we have gained insight into the degree and uniformity of heating from various configurations of ion source and sample target. Here we present data and analysis from three experimental runs along with hydrodynamic modeling of the heated targets and geometric considerations. This work was supported by NNSA cooperative agreement DE- NA0002008 and the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program under the auspices of the U.S. DOE NNSAS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-0.

  1. Killing effect of Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to accelerated carbon ions and RBE determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIQiang; ZHOUGuang-Ming; 等

    2002-01-01

    Survival curves of Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to accelerated carbon ions with linear energy transfers of 125.5,200 and 700keV/um were measured,respectively,Inactivation cross sections corresponding to the irradiation above were deduced from the V79 cell survival curves.They are 7.86±0.17,10.44±1.11 and 32.32±3.59um2 in turn.With the surviving response of V79 cells to 60Co γ-rays as a reference value,relative biological effectiveness at 10%,20%,50%and 80% survival levels were given for the accelerated carbon ions,The results showed that carbon ions with LET of 125.5keV/um had a higher value of RBE at all the four survival levels than the carbon ions with other LETs.It was prompted that the maximum value of RBE for the V79 cell surviving as the biological endpoint emerged at the LET below 200keV/um for carbon ions.

  2. Enhancing Target Normal Sheath Accelerated Ions with Micro-structured Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Kevin; Snyder, Joseph; Ji, Liangliang; Rubin, Trevor; Handler, Abraham; Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Daskalova, Rebecca; Cochran, Ginevra; Schumacher, Douglass

    2016-10-01

    Laser driven target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) of ions has been widely studied due to its fundamental importance, use as a probe, and for possible applications such as cancer therapy and neutron generation. Much of this work has been conducted on thin foils with peak ion energy and yield optimized using laser parameters such as energy and spot size. Micro-structured targets, however, have demonstrated increased peak ion energy and yield by controlling and enhancing mechanisms preferential to TNSA. Novel micro-structured targets were developed using optical lithography techniques on thin substrates at the OSU NanoSystem Laboratory. Variable structure height (0.5-2 micron) and transverse patterning (up to 1 micron resolution) permit the survey of a range of structured target variables in the study of ion acceleration. We describe the development of these targets and an experiment investigating the enhancement of TNSA ions from lithography produced micro-structured targets conducted at the Scarlet Laser Facility. Experimental results show increased proton and Carbon yield >2 MeV and higher peak Carbon energy from structured targets. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  3. Ion acceleration at CME-driven shocks near the Earth and the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Mihir; Dayeh, Maher; Ebert, Robert; Smith, Charles; Mason, Glenn; Li, G. [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas, 78238 (United States); University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire, 03824 (United States); Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, Maryland, 20724 (United States); Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Al 35899 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    We compare the behavior of heavy ion spectra during an Energetic Storm Particle (ESP) event that exhibited clear evidence of wave excitation with that observed during an intense, large gradual Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) event in which the associated <0.2 MeV/nucleon ions are delayed >12 hr. We interpret that the ESP event is an example of the first-order Fermi acceleration process where enhancements in the magnetic field power spectral densities around local ion cyclotron frequency {nu}{sub pc} indicate the presence of Alfven waves excited by accelerated protons streaming away from the in-situ interplanetary shock. The softening or unfolding of the CNO energy spectrum below {approx}200 keV/nucleon and the systematic organization of the Fe and O spectral roll-overs with the E/q ratio during the ESP event are likely due to M/Q-dependent trapping and scattering of the heavy ions by the proton-excited waves. Based on striking similarities in the spectral behavior observed upstream of both, the ESP and the SEP event, we suggest that coupling between proton-generated Alfven waves and energetic ions is also operating at the distant CME shock during the large, gradual SEP event, thereby providing us with a new, powerful tool to remotely probe the roles of shock geometries and wave-particle interactions at near-Sun CME-driven shocks.

  4. Stable radiation pressure acceleration of ions by suppressing transverse Rayleigh-Taylor instability with multiple Gaussian pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, M. L.; Liu, B.; Hu, R. H.; Shou, Y. R.; Lin, C.; Lu, H. Y.; Lu, Y. R.; Gu, Y. Q.; Ma, W. J.; Yan, X. Q.

    2016-08-01

    In the case of a thin plasma slab accelerated by the radiation pressure of an ultra-intense laser pulse, the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) will destroy the acceleration structure and terminate the acceleration process much sooner than theoretical limit. In this paper, a new scheme using multiple Gaussian pulses for ion acceleration in a radiation pressure acceleration regime is investigated with particle-in-cell simulation. We found that with multiple Gaussian pulses, the instability could be efficiently suppressed and the divergence of the ion bunch is greatly reduced, resulting in a longer acceleration time and much more collimated ion bunch with higher energy than using a single Gaussian pulse. An analytical model is developed to describe the suppression of RTI at the laser-plasma interface. The model shows that the suppression of RTI is due to the introduction of the long wavelength mode RTI by the multiple Gaussian pulses.

  5. Ion acceleration with a narrow energy spectrum by nanosecond laser-irradiation of solid target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altana, C., E-mail: altana@lns.infn.it [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Enna “Kore,” Via delle Olimpiadi, 94100 Enna (Italy); Mascali, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Tudisco, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Muoio, A. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    In laser-driven plasma, ion acceleration of aluminum with the production of a quasi-monoenergetic beam has occurred. A useful device to analyze the ions is the Thomson parabolas spectrometer, a well-known diagnostic that is able to obtain information on charge-to-mass ratio and energy distribution of the charged particles. At the LENS (Laser Energy for Nuclear Science) laboratory of INFN-LNS in Catania, experimental measures were carried out; the features of LENS are: Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with 2 J laser energy, 1064 nm fundamental wavelengths, and 6 ns pulse duration.

  6. Preliminary results of ion trajectory tracking in the acceleration region of the VINCY cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Anđelija Ž.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In an accelerating region of a cyclotron, an ion makes a large number of turns; thus, its n the Runge-Kutta method of the fourth order with the adaptive time step has been developed. The accuracy requirement is simultaneously set on position and momentum calculation. Magnetic fields used as inputs, have been evaluated in terms of the radial fluctuations of the orbital frequency, i.e. their isochronisms. Ion trajectory tracking has been performed for the following four test beams: H-, H+3, 4He+, He+, and 40Ar6+.

  7. Advanced high brightness ion rf accelerator applications in the nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The capability of modern rf linear accelerators to provide intense high quality beams of protons, deuterons, or heavier ions is opening new possibilities for transmuting existing nuclear wastes, for generating electricity from readily available fuels with minimal residual wastes, for building intense neutron sources for materials research, for inertial confinement fusion using heavy ions, and for other new applications. These are briefly described, couched in a perspective of the advances in the understanding of the high brightness beams that has enabled these new programs. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-09-09

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant β-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  9. Acceleration of solar wind ions to 1 MeV by electromagnetic structures upstream of the Earth's bow shock

    CERN Document Server

    Stasiewicz, K; Eliasson, B; Strumik, M; Yamauchi, M

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements from the ESA/NASA Cluster mission that show in situ acceleration of ions to energies of 1 MeV outside the bow shock. The observed heating can be associated with the presence of electromagnetic structures with strong spatial gradients of the electric field that lead to ion gyro-phase breaking and to the onset of chaos in ion trajectories. It results in rapid, stochastic acceleration of ions in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The electric potential of the structures can be compared to a field of moguls on a ski slope, capable of accelerating and ejecting the fast running skiers out of piste. This mechanism may represent the universal mechanism for perpendicular acceleration and heating of ions in the magnetosphere, the solar corona and in astrophysical plasmas. This is also a basic mechanism that can limit steepening of nonlinear electromagnetic structures at shocks and foreshocks in collisionless plasmas.

  10. Resonant absorption effects induced by polarized laser light irradiating thin foils in the TNSA regime of ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Badziak, J.; Rosinski, M.; Zaras-Szydlowska, A.; Pfeifer, M.; Torrisi, A.

    2016-04-01

    Thin foils were irradiated by short pulsed lasers at intensities of 1016-19W/cm2 in order to produce non-equilibrium plasmas and ion acceleration from the target-normal-sheath-acceleration (TNSA) regime. Ion acceleration in forward direction was measured by SiC detectors and ion collectors used in the time-of-flight configuration. Laser irradiations were employed using p-polarized light at different incidence angles with respect to the target surface and at different focal distances from the target surface. Measurements demonstrate that resonant absorption effects, due to the plasma wave excitations, enhance the plasma temperature and the ion acceleration with respect to those performed without to use of p-polarized light. Dependences of the ion flux characteristics on the laser energy, wavelength, focal distance and incidence angle will be reported and discussed.

  11. Laser acceleration of electrons to giga-electron-volt energies using highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S X; Starace, Anthony F

    2006-06-01

    The recent proposal to use highly charged ions as sources of electrons for laser acceleration [S. X. Hu and A. F. Starace, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 245003 (2002)] is investigated here in detail by means of three-dimensional, relativistic Monte Carlo simulations for a variety of system parameters, such as laser pulse duration, ionic charge state, and laser focusing spot size. Realistic laser focusing effects--e.g., the existence of longitudinal laser field components-are taken into account. Results of spatial averaging over the laser focus are also presented. These numerical simulations show that the proposed scheme for laser acceleration of electrons from highly charged ions is feasible with current or near-future experimental conditions and that electrons with GeV energies can be obtained in such experiments.

  12. Density bunching effects in a laser-driven, near-critical density plasma for ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettlinger, Oliver; Sahai, Aakash; Hicks, George; Ditter, Emma-Jane; Dover, Nicholas; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Helle, Michael; Gordon, Daniel; Ting, Antonio; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Marcus; Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2016-10-01

    We present work investigating the interaction of relativistic laser pulses with near-critical density gas targets exhibiting pre-plasma scale lengths of several laser wavelengths. Analytical and computational modelling suggest that the interaction dynamics in a low-Z plasma is a direct result of induced density bunching up to the critical surface. In fact, these bunches can themselves become overcritical and experience significant radiation pressure, accelerating ions to higher energies compared to an ``idealised'' plasma slab target. This work will be used to help explain the observation of ion energies exceeding those predicted by radiation pressure driven hole-boring in recent experiments using the TW CO2 laser at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  13. Transverse ion acceleration by localized lower hybrid waves in the topside auroral ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vago, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Up to now, observations had been unable to show conclusively a one-to-one correspondence between perpendicular ion acceleration and a particular type of plasma wave within the O(+) source region below 2000 km. In this thesis, the author demonstrates that intense (100-300 mV/m) lower hybrid waves are responsible for transversely accelerating H(+) and O(+) ions to characteristic energies of up to 6 eV. This wave-particle interaction takes place in thin filamentary density cavities oriented along geomagnetic field lines. The measurements discussed were conducted in the nightside auroral zone at altitudes between 500 km and 1100 km. The results are consistent with theories of lower hybrid wave condensation and collapse.

  14. Transverse ion acceleration by localized lower hybrid waves in the topside auroral ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vago, J.L.; Kintner, P.M.; Chesney, S.W.; Arnoldy, R.L.; Lynch, K.A.; Moore, T.E.; Pollock, C.J. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States) New Hampshire Univ., Durham (United States) NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (United States))

    1992-11-01

    Up to now, observations had been unable to show conclusively a one-to-one correspondence between perpendicular ion acceleration and a particular type of plasma wave within the O(+) source region below 2000 km. In this paper we demonstrate that intense (100-300 mV/m) lower hybrid waves are responsible for transversely accelerating H(+) and O(+) ions to characteristic energies of up to 6 eV. This wave-particle interaction takes place in thin filamentary density cavities oriented along geomagnetic field lines. The measurements we discuss were conducted in the nightside auroral zone at latitudes between 500 km and 1100 km. Our results are consistent with theories of lower hybrid wave condensation and collapse. 50 refs.

  15. Transverse ion acceleration by localized lower hybrid waves in the topside auroral ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, J. L.; Kintner, P. M.; Chesney, S. W.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Lynch, K. A.; Moore, T. E.; Pollock, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    Up to now, observations had been unable to show conclusively a one-to-one correspondence between perpendicular ion acceleration and a particular type of plasma wave within the O(+) source region below 2000 km. In this paper we demonstrate that intense (100-300 mV/m) lower hybrid waves are responsible for transversely accelerating H(+) and O(+) ions to characteristic energies of up to 6 eV. This wave-particle interaction takes place in thin filamentary density cavities oriented along geomagnetic field lines. The measurements we discuss were conducted in the nightside auroral zone at latitudes between 500 km and 1100 km. Our results are consistent with theories of lower hybrid wave condensation and collapse.

  16. WarpIV: In Situ Visualization and Analysis of Ion Accelerator Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubel, Oliver; Loring, Burlen; Vay, Jean-Luc; Grote, David P; Lehe, Remi; Bulanov, Stepan; Vincenti, Henri; Bethel, E Wes

    2016-01-01

    The generation of short pulses of ion beams through the interaction of an intense laser with a plasma sheath offers the possibility of compact and cheaper ion sources for many applications--from fast ignition and radiography of dense targets to hadron therapy and injection into conventional accelerators. To enable the efficient analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations using the Warp simulation suite, the authors introduce the Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV). WarpIV integrates state-of-the-art in situ visualization and analysis using VisIt with Warp, supports management and control of complex in situ visualization and analysis workflows, and implements integrated analytics to facilitate query- and feature-based data analytics and efficient large-scale data analysis. WarpIV enables for the first time distributed parallel, in situ visualization of the full simulation data using high-performance compute resources as the data is being generated by Warp. The authors describe the application of WarpIV to study and compare large 2D and 3D ion accelerator simulations, demonstrating significant differences in the acceleration process in 2D and 3D simulations. WarpIV is available to the public via https://bitbucket.org/berkeleylab/warpiv. The Warp In situ Visualization Toolkit (WarpIV) supports large-scale, parallel, in situ visualization and analysis and facilitates query- and feature-based analytics, enabling for the first time high-performance analysis of large-scale, high-fidelity particle accelerator simulations while the data is being generated by the Warp simulation suite. This supplemental material https://extras.computer.org/extra/mcg2016030022s1.pdf provides more details regarding the memory profiling and optimization and the Yee grid recentering optimization results discussed in the main article.

  17. Changes in acceleration rate of chloride ions depending on climatic conditions. Influence of rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corvo, F.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Mild steel, copper and aluminium samples were exposed outdoors in two atmospheric test stations located in Havana, Cuba and Medellín, Colombia. Two parallel group of samples were formed, one for each station. They were submitted to accelerated outdoor test by intermittent spraying of a salt solution (SCAB test according to ISO 11474:98, receiving also the influence of the open atmosphere. The acceleration of corrosion rate of the three metals caused by the presence of chloride ions in both stations was determined. As expected, steel shows the higher corrosion rate and acceleration by chlorides, particularly at Cuban corrosion station. A remarkable difference in the acceleration rate of chloride ions for mild steel and copper between Cuban and Colombian acceleration rate of chloride ions of steel and copper. Steel corrosion products were analyzed by Mössbauer Spectroscopy. Water absorption was also studied. The presence of magnetite, goethite and other Iron compounds was determined.

    Probetas de acero de bajo carbono, cobre y aluminio se expusieron a la intemperie en dos estaciones de ensayo localizadas en la Habana, Cuba y Medellín, Colombia. Se formaron dos grupos paralelos de probetas, tomándose uno para cada estación. Ambos grupos fueron sometidos a ensayos acelerados a la intemperie mediante la aplicación de una niebla salina (SCAB TEST de acuerdo a la Norma ISO 11474:98, recibiendo también la influencia de la atmósfera abierta. Se determinó la aceleración de la velocidad de corrosión de los tres metales causada por la presencia de iones cloruro en ambas estaciones. Como era de esperar, el acero muestra la mayor velocidad de corrosión y aceleración por los iones cloruro, particularmente en la estación de ensayos cubana. Se determinó una notable diferencia en la velocidad de aceleración provocada por los cloruros para el acero de bajo carbono y el cobre entre las estaciones cubana y colombiana. La influencia de la lluvia

  18. Ion acceleration in a helicon source due to the self-bias effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebold, Matt; Sung, Yung-Ta; Scharer, John E. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Time-averaged plasma potential differences up to 165 V over several hundred Debye lengths are observed in low pressure (p{sub n} < 1 mTorr) expanding argon plasmas in the Madison Helicon eXperiment (MadHeX). The potential gradient leads to ion acceleration greater than that predicted by ambipolar expansion, exceeding E{sub i} Almost-Equal-To 7 kT{sub e} in some cases. RF power up to 500 W at 13.56 MHz is supplied to a half-turn, double-helix antenna in the presence of a nozzle magnetic field, adjustable up to 1 kG. A retarding potential analyzer (RPA) measures the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) and a swept emissive probe measures the plasma potential. Single and double probes measure the electron density and temperature. Two distinct mode hops, the capacitive-inductive (E-H) and inductive-helicon (H-W) transitions, are identified by jumps in density as RF power is increased. In the capacitive (E) mode, large fluctuations of the plasma potential (V{sub p-p} Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 140V, V{sub p-p}/V{sub p} Almost-Equal-To 150%) exist at the RF frequency and its harmonics. The more mobile electrons can easily respond to RF-timescale gradients in the plasma potential whereas the inertially constrained ions cannot, leading to an initial flux imbalance and formation of a self-bias voltage between the source and expansion chambers. In the capacitive mode, the ion acceleration is not well described by an ambipolar relation, while in the inductive and helicon modes the ion acceleration more closely follows an ambipolar relation. The scaling of the potential gradient with the argon flow rate and RF power are investigated, with the largest potential gradients observed for the lowest flow rates in the capacitive mode. The magnitude of the self-bias voltage agrees with that predicted for RF self-bias at a wall. Rapid fluctuations in the plasma potential result in a time-dependent axial electron flux that acts to 'neutralize' the accelerated ion

  19. Modelling of radiation losses for ion acceleration at ultra-high laser intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capdessus Remi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiation losses of charged particles can become important in ultra high intensity laser plasma interaction. This process is described by the radiation back reaction term in the electron equation of motion. This term is implemented in the relativistic particle-in-cell code by using a renormalized Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac model. In the hole boring regime case of laser ion acceleration it is shown that radiation losses results in a decrease of the piston velocity.

  20. A simple model for cavity-enhanced laser-driven ion acceleration from thin foil targets

    CERN Document Server

    Rączka, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    A scenario for the laser-driven ion acceleration off a solid target is considered, where the reflected laser pulse is redirected towards the target by reflection at the inner cavity wall, thus recycling to some extent the incident laser energy. This scenario is discussed in the context of sub-wavelength foil acceleration in the radiation pressure regime, when plasma dynamics is known to be reasonably well described by the laser-sail model. A semi-analytic extension of the 1D laser-sail model is constructed, which takes into account the effect of reflections at the inner cavity wall. The effect of cavity reflections on sub-wavelength foil acceleration is then illustrated with two concrete examples of intense laser pulses of picosecond and femtosecond duration.

  1. A Pulse Power Modulator System for Commercial High Power Ion Beam Surface Treatment Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, D.M.; Cockreham, B.D.; Dragt, A.J.; Ives, H.C.; Neau, E.L.; Reed, K.W.; White, F.E.

    1999-05-24

    The Ion Beam Surface Treatment (lBESTrM) process utilizes high energy pulsed ion beams to deposit energy onto the surface of a material allowing near instantaneous melting of the surface layer. The melted layer typically re-solidifies at a very rapid rate which forms a homogeneous, fine- grained structure on the surface of the material resulting in significantly improved surface characteristics. In order to commercialize the IBESTTM process, a reliable and easy-to-operate modulator system has been developed. The QM-I modulator is a thyratron-switched five-stage magnetic pulse compression network which drives a two-stage linear induction adder. The adder provides 400 kV, 150 ns FWHM pulses at a maximum repetition rate of 10 pps for the acceleration of the ion beam. Special emphasis has been placed upon developing the modulator system to be consistent with long-life commercial service.

  2. Laser-Driven Ion Acceleration from Plasma Micro-Channel Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, D. B.; Pukhov, A.; Yi, L. Q.; Zhou, H. B.; Yu, T. P.; Yin, Y.; Shao, F. Q.

    2017-02-01

    Efficient energy boost of the laser-accelerated ions is critical for their applications in biomedical and hadron research. Achiev-able energies continue to rise, with currently highest energies, allowing access to medical therapy energy windows. Here, a new regime of simultaneous acceleration of ~100 MeV protons and multi-100 MeV carbon-ions from plasma micro-channel targets is proposed by using a ~1020 W/cm2 modest intensity laser pulse. It is found that two trains of overdense electron bunches are dragged out from the micro-channel and effectively accelerated by the longitudinal electric-field excited in the plasma channel. With the optimized channel size, these “superponderomotive” energetic electrons can be focused on the front surface of the attached plastic substrate. The much intense sheath electric-field is formed on the rear side, leading to up to ~10-fold ionic energy increase compared to the simple planar geometry. The analytical prediction of the optimal channel size and ion maximum energies is derived, which shows good agreement with the particle-in-cell simulations.

  3. Optimized ion acceleration using high repetition rate, variable thickness liquid crystal targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Cochran, Ginevra; Andereck, C. David; Schumacher, Douglass

    2015-11-01

    Laser-based ion acceleration is a widely studied plasma physics topic for its applications to secondary radiation sources, advanced imaging, and cancer therapy. Recent work has centered on investigating new acceleration mechanisms that promise improved ion energy and spectrum. While the physics of these mechanisms is not yet fully understood, it has been observed to dominate for certain ranges of target thickness, where the optimum thickness depends on laser conditions including energy, pulse width, and contrast. The study of these phenomena is uniquely facilitated by the use of variable-thickness liquid crystal films, first introduced in P. L. Poole et al. PoP21, 063109 (2014). Control of the formation parameters of these freely suspended films such as volume, temperature, and draw speed allows on-demand thickness variability between 10 nanometers and several 10s of microns, fully encompassing the currently studied thickness regimes with a single target material. The low vapor pressure of liquid crystal enables in-situ film formation and unlimited vacuum use of these targets. Details on the selection and optimization of ion acceleration mechanism with target thickness will be presented, including recent experiments on the Scarlet laser facility and others. This work was performed with support from the DARPA PULSE program through a grant from AMRDEC and by the NNSA under contract DE-NA0001976.

  4. Front versus rear side light-ion acceleration from high-intensity laser-solid interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingale, L.; Petrov, G. M.; Maksimchuk, A.; Davis, J.; Freeman, R. R.; Matsuoka, T.; Murphy, C. D.; Ovchinnikov, V. M.; Van Woerkom, L.; Krushelnick, K.

    2011-01-01

    The source of ions accelerated from high-intensity laser interactions with thin foil targets is investigated by coating a deuterated plastic layer either on the front, rear or both surfaces of thin foil targets. The originating surface of the deuterons is therefore known and this method is used to assess the relative source contributions and maximum energies using a Thomson parabola spectrometer to obtain high-resolution light-ion spectra. Under these experimental conditions, laser intensity of (0.5-2.5) × 1019 W cm-2, pulse duration of 400 fs and target thickness of 6-13 µm, deuterons originating from the front surface can gain comparable maximum energies as those from the rear surface and spectra from either side can deviate from Maxwellian. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations model the acceleration and show that any presence of a proton rich contamination layer over the surface is detrimental to the deuteron acceleration from the rear surface, whereas it is likely to be less influential on the front side acceleration mechanism.

  5. Reduction of angular divergence of laser-driven ion beams during their acceleration and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakova, M.; Pšikal, Jan; Margarone, Daniele; Maggiore, Mario; Korn, G.

    2015-05-01

    Laser plasma physics is a field of big interest because of its implications in basic science, fast ignition, medicine (i.e. hadrontherapy), astrophysics, material science, particle acceleration etc. 100-MeV class protons accelerated from the interaction of a short laser pulse with a thin target have been demonstrated. With continuing development of laser technology, greater and greater energies are expected, therefore projects focusing on various applications are being formed, e.g. ELIMAIA (ELI Multidisciplinary Applications of laser-Ion Acceleration). One of the main characteristic and crucial disadvantage of ion beams accelerated by ultra-short intense laser pulses is their large divergence, not suitable for the most of applications. In this paper two ways how to decrease beam divergence are proposed. Firstly, impact of different design of targets on beam divergence is studied by using 2D Particlein-cell simulations (PIC). Namely, various types of targets include at foils, curved foil and foils with diverse microstructures. Obtained results show that well-designed microstructures, i.e. a hole in the center of the target, can produce proton beam with the lowest divergence. Moreover, the particle beam accelerated from a curved foil has lower divergence compared to the beam from a flat foil. Secondly, another proposed method for the divergence reduction is using of a magnetic solenoid. The trajectories of the laser accelerated particles passing through the solenoid are modeled in a simple Matlab program. Results from PIC simulations are used as input in the program. The divergence is controlled by optimizing the magnetic field inside the solenoid and installing an aperture in front of the device.

  6. 30 years of high-intensity negative ion sources for accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadim Dudnikov

    2001-07-25

    Thirty years ago, July 1, 1971, significant enhancement of negative ion emission from a gas discharge following an admixture of cesium was observed for the first time. This observation became the basis for the development of Surface Plasma Sources (SPS) for efficient production of negative ions from the interaction of plasma particles with electrodes on which adsorbed cesium reduced the surface work-function. The emission current density of negative ions increased rapidly from j {approximately} 10 mA/cm{sup 2} to 3.7 A/cm{sup 2} with a flat cathode and up to 8 A/cm{sup 2} with an optimized geometrical focusing in the long pulse SPS, and to 0.3 A/cm{sup 2} for DC SPS, recently increased up to 0.7 A/cm{sup 2}. Discovery of charge-exchange cooling helped decrease the negative ion temperature T below 1 eV, and increase brightness by many orders to a level compatible with the best proton sources, B = j/T> 1 A/cm{sup 2} eV. The combination of the SPS with charge-exchange injection improved large accelerators operation and has permitted beam accumulation up to space-charge limit and overcome this limit several times. The early SPS for accelerators have been in operation without modification for {approximately} 25 years. Advanced version of the SPS for accelerators is described. Features of negative ion beam formation, transportation, space-charge neutralization-overneutralization, and instability damping is considered. Practical aspects of SPS operation and high brightness beam production is discussed.

  7. Towards swift ion bunch acceleration by high-power laser pulses at the Centre for Advanced Laser Applications (CALA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, F. H.; Haffa, D.; Bin, J. H.; Englbrecht, F.; Gao, Y.; Gebhard, J.; Hartmann, J.; Hilz, P.; Kreuzer, C.; Lehrack, S.; Ostermayr, T. M.; Rösch, T. F.; Speicher, M.; Würl, M.; Parodi, K.; Schreiber, J.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2017-07-01

    Laser-driven acceleration of ions has inspired novel applications, that can benefit from ion bunch properties different from conventionally (non-laser based) accelerated particle beams. Those differences range from extremely short bunch durations, broad energy spectra, large divergence angles and small source sizes to ultra-high ion bunch densities. So far, the main focus of research has been concentrating on the physics of the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasmas and the related mechanisms of ion acceleration. Now, the new Centre for Advanced Laser Applications (CALA) near Munich aims at pushing these ion bunches towards applications, including radiation therapy of tumors and the development of heavy ion bunches with solid-state-like density. These are needed for novel reaction mechanisms ('fission-fusion') to study the origin of heavy elements in the universe and to prepare for related studies at the upcoming EU-funded high-power laser facility ELI - Nuclear Physics in Bucharest.

  8. Ion-driver fast ignition: Reducing heavy-ion fusion driver energy and cost, simplifying chamber design, target fab, tritium fueling and power conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, G.; Callahan-Miller, D.; Perkins, J.; Caporaso, G.; Tabak, M.; Moir, R.; Meier, W.; Bangerter, Roger; Lee, Ed

    1998-04-01

    Ion fast ignition, like laser fast ignition, can potentially reduce driver energy for high target gain by an order of magnitude, while reducing fuel capsule implosion velocity, convergence ratio, and required precisions in target fabrication and illumination symmetry, all of which should further improve and simplify IFE power plants. From fast-ignition target requirements, we determine requirements for ion beam acceleration, pulse-compression, and final focus for advanced accelerators that must be developed for much shorter pulses and higher voltage gradients than today's accelerators, to deliver the petawatt peak powers and small focal spots ({approx}100 {micro}m) required. Although such peak powers and small focal spots are available today with lasers, development of such advanced accelerators is motivated by the greater likely efficiency of deep ion penetration and deposition into pre-compressed 1000x liquid density DT cores. Ion ignitor beam parameters for acceleration, pulse compression, and final focus are estimated for two examples based on a Dielectric Wall Accelerator; (1) a small target with {rho}r {approx} 2 g/cm{sup 2} for a small demo/pilot plant producing {approx}40 MJ of fusion yield per target, and (2) a large target with {rho}r {approx} 10 g/cm{sup 2} producing {approx}1 GJ yield for multi-unit electricity/hydrogen plants, allowing internal T-breeding with low T/D ratios, >75 % of the total fusion yield captured for plasma direct conversion, and simple liquid-protected chambers with gravity clearing. Key enabling development needs for ion fast ignition are found to be (1) ''Close-coupled'' target designs for single-ended illumination of both compressor and ignitor beams; (2) Development of high gradient (>25 MV/m) linacs with high charge-state (q {approx} 26) ion sources for short ({approx}5 ns) accelerator output pulses; (3) Small mm-scale laser-driven plasma lens of {approx}10 MG fields to provide steep focusing angles

  9. High Compact, High Quality Single Longitudinal Mode Hundred Picoseconds Laser Based on Stimulated Brillouin Scattering Pulse Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxu Bai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A high beam quality hundred picoseconds single-longitudinal-mode (SLM laser is demonstrated based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS pulse compression and aberration compensation. Flash-lamp-pumped Q-switched Nd3+:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG SLM laser with Cr4+:Y3Al5O12 (Cr4+:YAG as a saturable absorber is used as the seed source. By combining master-oscillator-power-amplifier (MOPA, a compact single-cell with FC-770 as working medium is generated as pulse compressor. The 7.8 ns SLM laser is temporally compressed to about 450 ps, and 200 mJ energy is obtained at 1064 nm without optical damage. The energy stability is better than 3% with beam quality factor M2 less than 1.8, which makes this laser system an attractive source for scientific and industrial applications.

  10. Proton and Ion Acceleration on the Contrast Upgraded Texas Petawatt Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCary, Edward; Roycroft, Rebecca; Jiao, Xuejing; Kupfer, Rotem; Tiwari, Ganesh; Wagner, Craig; Yandow, Andrew; Franke, Philip; Dyer, Gilliss; Gaul, Erhard; Toncian, Toma; Ditmire, Todd; Hegelich, Bjorn; CenterHigh Energy Density Science Team

    2016-10-01

    Recent upgrades to the Texas Petawatt (TPW) laser system have eliminated pre-pulses and reduced the laser pedestal, resulting in improved laser contrast. Previously unwanted pre-pulses and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) would ionize targets thinner than 1 micron, leaving an under-dense plasma which was not capable of accelerating ions to high energies. After the upgrade the contrast was drastically improved allowing us to successfully shoot targets as thin as 20 nm without plasma mirrors. We have also observed evidence of relativistic transparency and Break-Out Afterburner (BOA) ion acceleration when shooting ultra-thin, nanometer scale targets. Data taken with a wide angle ion spectrometer (IWASP) showed the characteristic asymmetry of BOA in the plane orthogonal to the laser polarization on thin targets but not on micron scale targets. Thick micron scale targets saw improvement as well; shots on 2 μm thick gold targets saw ions with energies up to 100 MeV, which broke the former record proton energy on the TPW. Switching the focusing optic from an f/3 parabolic mirror to an f/40 spherical mirror showed improvement in the number of low energy protons created, and provided a source for hundreds of picosecond heating of aluminum foils for warm dense matter measurements.

  11. The proton injector for the accelerator facility of antiproton and ion research (FAIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullmann, C., E-mail: c.ullmann@gsi.de; Kester, O. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut für Angewandte Physik, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Berezov, R.; Fils, J.; Hollinger, R.; Vinzenz, W. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, IRFU, F-91191-Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-02-15

    The new international accelerator facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, is one of the largest research projects worldwide and will provide an antiproton production rate of 7 × 10{sup 10} cooled pbars per hour. This is equivalent to a primary proton beam current of 2 × 10{sup 16} protons per hour. For this request a high intensity proton linac (p-linac) will be built with an operating rf-frequency of 325 MHz to accelerate a 35 mA proton beam at 70 MeV, using conducting crossed-bar H-cavities. The repetition rate is 4 Hz with beam pulse length of 36 μs. The microwave ion source and low energy beam transport developed within a joint French-German collaboration GSI/CEA-SACLAY will serve as an injector of the compact proton linac. The 2.45 GHz ion source allows high brightness ion beams at an energy of 95 keV and will deliver a proton beam current of 100 mA at the entrance of the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) within an acceptance of 0.3π mm mrad (norm., rms)

  12. Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection as an Ion Acceleration Mechanism of Low- β Laboratory Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, Emanuele; Curreli, Davide; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    In this work we present the results from a series of fully-kinetic simulations of magnetic reconnection under typical laboratory plasma conditions. The highly-efficient energy conversion obtained from this process is of great interest for applications such as future electric propulsion systems and ion beam accelerators. We analysed initial configurations in low-beta conditions with reduced mass ratio of mi = 512me at magnetic fields between 200G and 5000G and electron temperatures between 0.5 and 10eV. The initial ion density and temperature are kept uniform and equal to 1019 m-3 and 0.0215eV (room temperature) respectively. The analysis has shown that the reconnection process under these conditions can accelerate ions up to velocities as high as a significant fraction of the inflow Alfven speed. The configuration showing the best scenario is further studied with a realistic mass ratio in terms of energetics and outflow ion momentum, with the latter featured by the traditionally used specific impulse. Finally, a more detailed analysis of the reconnection outflow has revealed the formation of different interesting set of shock structures, also recently seen from MHD simulations of relativistic plasmas and certainly subject of future more careful attention. The present work has been possible thanks to the Illinois-KULeuven Faculty/PhD Candidate Exchange Program. Computational resources provided by the PRACE Tier-0 machines.

  13. Cellular and molecular effects for mutation induction in normal human cells irradiated with accelerated neon ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masao; Tsuruoka, Chizuru; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kato, Takeshi; Yatagai, Fumio; Watanabe, Masami

    2006-02-22

    We investigated the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of mutation induction on the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus in normal human fibroblast-like cells irradiated with accelerated neon-ion beams. The cells were irradiated with neon-ion beams at various LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/microm. Neon-ion beams were accelerated by the Riken Ring Cyclotron at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research in Japan. Mutation induction at the HPRT locus was detected to measure 6-thioguanine-resistant clones. The mutation spectrum of the deletion pattern of exons of mutants was analyzed using the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The dose-response curves increased steeply up to 0.5 Gy and leveled off or decreased between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, compared to the response to (137)Cs gamma-rays. The mutation frequency increased up to 105 keV/microm and then there was a downward trend with increasing LET values. The deletion pattern of exons was non-specific. About 75-100% of the mutants produced using LETs ranging from 63 to 335 keV/mum showed all or partial deletions of exons, while among gamma-ray-induced mutants 30% showed no deletions, 30% partial deletions and 40% complete deletions. These results suggested that the dose-response curves of neon-ion-induced mutations were dependent upon LET values, but the deletion pattern of DNA was not.

  14. Design and testing of a dc ion injector suitable for accelerator-driven transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, J.D.; Meyer, E.; Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Hansborough, L.; Sherman, J.

    1994-08-01

    For a number of years, Los Alamos have collaborated with a team of experimentalists at Chalk River Labs who were pursuing the development of the front end of a high power cw proton accelerator. With the help of internal laboratory funding and modest defense conversion funds, we have set up and operated the accelerator at Los Alamos Operational equipment includes a slightly modified Chalk River Injector Test Stand (CRITS) including a 50 keV proton injector and a 1.25 MeV radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) with a klystrode rf power system. Many of the challenges involved in operating an rf linear accelerator to provide neutrons for an accelerator-driven reactor are encountered at the front (low energy) end of this system. The formation of the ion beam, the control of the beam parameters, and the focusing and matching of a highly space-charge-dominated beam are major problems. To address the operating problems in this critical front end, the Accelerator Operations and Technology Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has designed the APDF (Accelerator Prototype Demonstration Facility). The front end of this facility is a 75 keV, high-current, ion injector which has been assembled and is now being tested. This paper discusses the design modifications required in going from the 50 keV CRITS injector to the higher current, 75 keV injector. Major innovative changes were made in the design of this injector. This design eliminates all the control electronics and most of the ion source equipment at high potential. Also, a new, high-quality, ion-extractor system has been built. A dual-solenoid lens will be used in the low energy beam transport (LEBT) line to provide the capability of matching the extracted beam to a high-current ADTT linac. This new injector is the first piece of hardware in the APDF program and will be used to develop the long-term, reliable cw beam operation required for ADIT applications.

  15. Determination of molecular-ion structures through the use of accelerated beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, D. S.

    In this talk we report on recent research on molecular-ion structures using fast molecular-ion beams provided by Argonne's 5-MV Dynamitron accelerator. The method has become known as the Coulomb-explosion technique. When molecular-ion projectiles travelling at velocities of a few percent of the velocity of light strike a foil, the electrons that bind the molecular projectiles are almost always totally stripped off within the first few Angstroms of penetration into the solid target. This leaves a cluster of bare (or nearly bare) nuclei which separate rapidly as a result of their mutual Coulomb repulsion. This violent dissociation process in which the initial electrostatic potential energy is converted into kinetic energy of relative motion in the center-of-mass, was termed a Coulomb explosion.

  16. Simulation studies of the ion beam transport system in a compact electrostatic accelerator-based D-D neutron generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Basanta Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of an ion beam transport mechanism contributes to the production of a good quality ion beam with a higher current and better beam emittance. The simulation of an ion beam provides the basis for optimizing the extraction system and the acceleration gap for the ion source. In order to extract an ion beam from an ion source, a carefully designed electrode system for the required beam energy must be used. In our case, a self-extracted penning ion source is used for ion generation, extraction and acceleration with a single accelerating gap for the production of neutrons. The characteristics of the ion beam extracted from this ion source were investigated using computer code SIMION 8.0. The ion trajectories from different locations of the plasma region were investigated. The simulation process provided a good platform for a study on optimizing the extraction and focusing system of the ion beam transported to the required target position without any losses and provided an estimation of beam emittance.

  17. Interphase Death of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells Exposed to Accelerated Heavy Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mehnati

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heavy ions are nucleus of elements of iron, argon, carbon and neon that all carry positive electrical charges. For these particles to be useful in radiotherapy they need to accelerated to high energy by more than thousand mega volts. Also the cosmic environment is considered to be a complicated mixture of highly energetic photons and heavy ions such as iron. Therefore, the health risks to astronauts during long mission should be considered.  Materials and Methods: The induction of interphase death was tested on Chinese hamster ovary cells by exposing them to accelerated heavy ions (carbon, neon, argon and iron of 10-2000 linear energy transfers (LETs. The fraction of cells that underwent interphase death was determined by observing individual cells with time-lapse photography (direct method as well as by the indirect method of counting cells undergoing interphase death made visible by the addition of caffeine (indirect method. Results: The interphase death due to the exposure to X- rays is increased linearly as the dose exceeds the threshold dose of 10 Gy. Whereas the interphase death increases at a higher rate due to the exposure to high LET heavy ions and no threshold dose was observed. The range of LET values corresponding to the maximum RBE for the interphase death is 120-230 keV/µm. The probability of inducing the interphase death by a single heavy ion traversing through the nucleus is about 0.04-0.08. Discussion and Conclusion: The relative biological effectiveness (RBE of heavy ions as compared to X- rays as determined at the 50% level of induction is increased with LET. It reached a maximum value at a LET of approximately 230 keV/µm and then decreased with further increase in LET. The range of LET values corresponding to the maximum RBE appears to be narrower for interphase death than for reproductive death.

  18. Controlled supercontinuum generation for optimal pulse compression : a time-warp analysis of nonlinear propagation of ultra-broad-band pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanner, M; Pshenichnikov, M; Olvo, [No Value; Ivanov, M

    2003-01-01

    We describe the virtues of the pump-probe approach for controlled supercontinuum generation in nonlinear media, using the example of pulse compression by cross-phase modulation in dielectrics. Optimization of a strong (pump) pulse and a weak (probe) pulse at the input into the medium opens the route

  19. Long pulse acceleration of MeV class high power density negative H{sup −} ion beam for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeda, N., E-mail: umeda.naotaka@jaea.go.jp; Kojima, A.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Hiratsuka, J.; Watanabe, K.; Dairaku, M.; Yamanaka, H.; Hanada, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka-shi, Ibaraki 311-0193 Japan (Japan)

    2015-04-08

    R and D of high power density negative ion beam acceleration has been carried out at MeV test facility in JAEA to realize ITER neutral beam accelerator. The main target is H{sup −} ion beam acceleration up to 1 MeV with 200 A/m{sup 2} for 60 s whose pulse length is the present facility limit. For long pulse acceleration at high power density, new extraction grid (EXG) has been developed with high cooling capability, which electron suppression magnet is placed under cooling channel similar to ITER. In addition, aperture size of electron suppression grid (ESG) is enlarged from 14 mm to 16 mm to reduce direct interception on the ESG and emission of secondary electron which leads to high heat load on the upstream acceleration grid. By enlarging ESG aperture, beam current increased 10 % at high current beam and total acceleration grid heat load reduced from 13 % to 10 % of input power at long pulse beam. In addition, heat load by back stream positive ion into the EXG is measured for the first time and is estimated as 0.3 % of beam power, while heat load by back stream ion into the source chamber is estimated as 3.5 ~ 4.0 % of beam power. Beam acceleration up to 60 s which is the facility limit, has achieved at 683 keV, 100 A/m{sup 2} of negative ion beam, whose energy density increases two orders of magnitude since 2011.

  20. Effect of plasma inhomogeneity on ion acceleration when an ultra-intense laser pulse interacts with a foil target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, A.A.; Platonov, K.Yu. [Institute for Laser Physics, SC Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zhidkov, A.G. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Sasaki, A. [Advanced Photon Research Center JAERI, Kizu-cho, Soraku-gun, Kyoto (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Fast electrons generated via the interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with a solid target can produce multi-MeV ions from laser-induced plasmas. These fast ions can be used for various applications ranging from the ion implantation to the stimulation of nuclear reactions. The most important point here is the efficiency of production of such fast ions. We analyse in detail, with the help of an analytical model and particle-in-cell simulations, the most efficient acceleration mechanisms including the ponderomotive force driving and acceleration by the shock wave, and compare the electrostatic ion acceleration at the front side and at the rear side of a foil target. We also determine the optimal plasma density distribution shaped by the laser pre-pulse. (author)

  1. Accelerating Solutions of Perfect Fluid Hydrodynamics for Initial Energy Density and Life-Time Measurements in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Csörgö, T; Csanad, M

    2007-01-01

    A new class of accelerating, exact, explicit and simple solutions of relativistic hydrodynamics is presented. Since these new solutions yield a finite rapidity distribution, they lead to an advanced estimate of the initial energy density and life-time of high energy heavy ion reactions. Accelerating solutions are also given for spherical expansions in arbitrary number of spatial dimensions.

  2. Status and Control Requirements of the Planned Heavy Ion Tumor Therapy Accelerator Facility HICAT

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, R C; Haberer, T; Baer, Ralph C.; Eickhoff, Hartmut; Haberer, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    The HICAT project is a Heavy Ion accelerator for light ion Cancer Treatment to be built for the clinics in Heidelberg, Germany. It consists of a 7 MeV/u linac, a compact synchrotron and three treatment places, one of them equipped with a 360 degree gantry beam-line. The facility will implement the intensity controlled raster-scanning technique that was developed and successfully demonstrated at GSI with over 100 patients at present. In order to produce the beams with the characteristics requested by the treatment sequencer, the accelerator must operate on a pulse-to-pulse basis with different settings. This concept imposes strict and challenging demands on the operation of the accelerators and hence the control system of the facility. The control system should be developed, installed and maintained by and under the complete responsibility of an industrial system provider, using a state-of-the-art system and wide-spread industrial components wherever possible. The presentation covers the status of the project ...

  3. Development of superconducting crossbar-H-mode cavities for proton and ion accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dziuba

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The crossbar-H-mode (CH structure is the first superconducting multicell drift tube cavity for the low and medium energy range operated in the H_{21} mode. Because of the large energy gain per cavity, which leads to high real estate gradients, it is an excellent candidate for the efficient acceleration in high power proton and ion accelerators with fixed velocity profile. A prototype cavity has been developed and tested successfully with a gradient of 7  MV/m. A few new superconducting CH cavities with improved geometries for different high power applications are under development at present. One cavity (f=325  MHz, β=0.16, seven cells is currently under construction and studied with respect to a possible upgrade option for the GSI UNILAC. Another cavity (f=217  MHz, β=0.059, 15 cells is designed for a cw operated energy variable heavy ion linac application. Furthermore, the EUROTRANS project (European research program for the transmutation of high level nuclear waste in an accelerator driven system, 600 MeV protons, 352 MHz is one of many possible applications for this kind of superconducting rf cavity. In this context a layout of the 17 MeV EUROTRANS injector containing four superconducting CH cavities was proposed by the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP Frankfurt. The status of the cavity development related to the EUROTRANS injector is presented.

  4. Intra-pulse transition between ion acceleration mechanisms in intense laser-foil interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padda, H.; King, M.; Gray, R. J.; Powell, H. W.; Gonzalez-Izquierdo, B.; Wilson, R.; Dance, R. J.; MacLellan, D. A.; Butler, N. M. H.; Capdessus, R.; McKenna, P., E-mail: paul.mckenna@strath.ac.uk [SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Stockhausen, L. C. [Centro de Laseres Pulsados (CLPU), Parque Cientifico, Calle del Adaja s/n. 37185 Villamayor, Salamanca (Spain); Carroll, D. C. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Yuan, X. H. [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of IFSA (CICIFSA), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Borghesi, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Neely, D. [SUPA Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Multiple ion acceleration mechanisms can occur when an ultrathin foil is irradiated with an intense laser pulse, with the dominant mechanism changing over the course of the interaction. Measurement of the spatial-intensity distribution of the beam of energetic protons is used to investigate the transition from radiation pressure acceleration to transparency-driven processes. It is shown numerically that radiation pressure drives an increased expansion of the target ions within the spatial extent of the laser focal spot, which induces a radial deflection of relatively low energy sheath-accelerated protons to form an annular distribution. Through variation of the target foil thickness, the opening angle of the ring is shown to be correlated to the point in time transparency occurs during the interaction and is maximized when it occurs at the peak of the laser intensity profile. Corresponding experimental measurements of the ring size variation with target thickness exhibit the same trends and provide insight into the intra-pulse laser-plasma evolution.

  5. RF Pulse compression stabilization at the CTF3 CLIC test facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovskiy, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    In the CTF3 accelerator, the RF produced by each of ten 3 GHz klystrons goes through waveguides, RF pulse compressors and splitters. The RF phase and power transformation of these devices depend on their temperature. The quantitative effect of the room temperature variation on the RF was measured. It is the major source of undesired changes during the CTF3 operation. An RF phaseloop and a compressor temperature stabilization are developed to suppress the phase fluctuation and the power profile change due to the temperature variation. The implementation is transparent for operators, it does not limit anyhow the flexibility of RF manipulations. Expected and measured suppression characteristics will be given.

  6. Complete temporal characterisation of asymmetric pulse compression in a laser wakefield

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiber, J; Mangles, S P D; Kamperidis, C; Kneip, S; Nagel, S R; Palmer, C A J; Rajeev, P P; Najmudin, Z

    2010-01-01

    We present complete experimental characterisation of the temporal shape of an intense ultrashort 200-TW laser pulse driving a laser wakefield. The phase of the pulse was uniquely measured using (second order) frequency resolved optical gating (FROG). The pulses are asymmetrically compressed, and exhibit a positive chirp consistent with the expected asymmetric self-phase modulation due to photon acceleration/deceleration in a relativistic plasma wave. The measured pulse duration decreases linearly with increasing length and density of the plasma, in quantitative agreement with the intensity dependent group velocity variation in the plasma wave.

  7. Killing effect of Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to accelerated carbon ions and RBE determination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Survival curves of Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to accclerated carbon ions with linear energy transfers of 125.5, 200 and 700 keV/μm were measured, respectively. Inactivation cross sections corresponding to the irradiation above were deduced from the V79 cell survival curves. They are 7.86±0.17, 10.44±1.11 and 32.32±3.58 μm2 in turn. With the surviving response of V79 cells to 60Co γ-rays as a reference value, relative biological effectiveness at 10%, 20%, 50% and 80% survival levels were given for the accelerated carbon ions. The results showed that carbon ions with LET of 125.5 keV/μm had a higher value of RBE at all the four survival levels than the carbon ions with other LETs. It was prompted that the maximum value of RBE for the V79 cell surviving as the biological endpoint emerged at the LET below 200 keV/μm for carbon ions.

  8. Effects of dimensionality on computer simulations of laser-ion acceleration: When are three-dimensional simulations needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L.; Stark, D. J.; Albright, B. J.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-ion acceleration via relativistic induced transparency provides an effective means to accelerate ions to tens of MeV/nucleon over distances of 10s of μm. These ion sources may enable a host of applications, from fast ignition and x-rays sources to medical treatments. Understanding whether two-dimensional (2D) PIC simulations can capture the relevant 3D physics is important to the development of a predictive capability for short-pulse laser-ion acceleration and for economical design studies for applications of these accelerators. In this work, PIC simulations are performed in 3D and in 2D where the direction of the laser polarization is in the simulation plane (2D-P) and out-of-plane (2D-S). Our studies indicate modeling sensitivity to dimensionality and laser polarization. Differences arise in energy partition, electron heating, ion peak energy, and ion spectral shape. 2D-P simulations are found to over-predict electron heating and ion peak energy. The origin of these differences and the extent to which 2D simulations may capture the key acceleration dynamics will be discussed. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  9. Optimizing a microwave gas ion source for continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Reden, K F; Roberts, M L; Burton, J R; Beaupré, S R

    2012-02-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source coupled with a magnesium charge exchange canal (C × C) has been successfully adapted to a large acceptance radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry system at the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. CO(2) samples from various preparation sources are injected into the source through a glass capillary at 370 μl∕min. Routine system parameters are about 120-140 μA of negative (12)C current after the C × C, leading to about 400 (14)C counts per second for a modern sample and implying a system efficiency of 0.2%. While these parameters already allow us to perform high-quality AMS analyses on large samples, we are working on ways to improve the output of the ion source regarding emittance and efficiency. Modeling calculations suggest modifications in the extraction triode geometry, shape, and size of the plasma chamber could improve emittance and, hence, ion transport efficiency. Results of experimental tests of these modifications are presented.

  10. Effects of laser polarization on electrostatic shock ion acceleration in near-critical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Kuk; Kang, Teyoun; Hur, Min Sup

    2016-10-01

    Ion acceleration from laser-driven collisionless electrostatic shock (CES) is attracting much attention, as quasi-monoenergetic, tens of MeV ion beams are expected to be available from relatively moderate laser power and near-critical density plasmas. For generation of a high-speed shock by a laser pulse, it is important to compress a high-contrast density layer by hole-boring process, and to heat the electrons in the upstream, where the hole-boring speed should match the Mach number condition 1.5 boring speed is higher in lower density plasmas, we observed consistently higher speed of the shock and accelerated ion energy when driven by CP pulses. Interesting point is that the CP-shock generation is determined predominantly by the transmittance only, while the LP-shock formation depends on other parameters such as plasma scale length. In 2D simulations, we found that Weibel instability is less effective in CP than LP, which enables more stable shock formation for given conditions of the laser and plasma. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program (NRF-2013R1A1A2006353) and the Creative Allied Project (CAP-15-06-ETRI).

  11. Laser-accelerated high-energy ions: state of-the-art and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghesi, M [School of Mathematics and Physics, The Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Fuchs, J [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Willi, O [Institut fuer Laser-und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2007-03-01

    The acceleration of high-energy ion beams (up to several tens of MeV per nucleon) following the interaction of short (t < 1ps) and intense (I{lambda}{sup 2}> 10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2} {mu}m{sup -2}) laser pulses with solid targets has been one of the most important results of recent laser-plasma research. The acceleration is driven by relativistic electrons, which acquire energy directly from the laser pulse and set up extremely large ({approx}TV/m) space charge fields at the target interfaces. In view of a number of advantageous properties, laser-driven ion beams can be employed in a number of innovative applications in the scientific, technological and medical areas. Among these, their possible use in hadrontherapy, with potential reduction of facility costs, has been proposed recently. This paper will briefly review the current state-of-the-art in laser-driven proton/ion source development, and will discuss the progress needed in order to implement some of the above applications. Recent results relating to the optimization of beam energy, spectrum and collimation will be presented.

  12. MMS Observation of Inverse Energy Dispersion in Shock Drift Acceleration Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. H.; Sibeck, D. G.; Hwang, K. J.; Wang, Y.; Silveira, M. D.; Mauk, B.; Cohen, I. J.; Chu, C. S.; Mason, G. M.; Gold, R. E.; Burch, J. L.; Giles, B. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Wei, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft observed bursts of energetic ions (50 keV-1000 keV) both in the foreshock and in the magnetosheath near the bow shock on December 6, 2015. Three species (protons, helium, and oxygen) exhibit inverse energy dispersions. Angular distributions for all three species indicate acceleration at the perpendicular bow shock. Acceleration that energizes the seed solar population by a factor of 2 and 4 is required for the protons and helium ions, respectively. The energy of the ions increases with θBn (the angle between the IMF and the local shock normal) since the induced electric field that energizes the charged particles increases as θBn increases towards 90°. We compare events upstream and downstream from the bow shock. We compare the MMS observations with those of the solar wind seed populations by the Ultra Low Energy Isotope Spectrometer (ULEIS) instrument on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission and by the WIND 3-D Plamsa and Energetic Particle Experiment.

  13. ACCELERATOR SYSTEMS MODIFICATIONS FOR A SECOND TARGET STATION AT THE OAK RIDGE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, John D [ORNL; Kim, Sang-Ho [ORNL; Plum, Michael A [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A second target station is planned for the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source. The ion source will be upgraded to increase the peak current from 38 to 49 mA, additional superconducting RF cavities will be added to the linac to increase the H beam energy from 938 to 1300 MeV, and the accumulator ring will receive modifications to the injection and extraction systems to accommodate the higher beam energy. After pulse compression in the storage ring one sixth of the beam pulses (10 out of 60 Hz) will be diverted to the second target by kicker and septum magnets added to the existing Ring to Target Beam Transport (RTBT) line. No further modifications will be made to the RTBT so that when the kicker and septum magnets are turned off the original beam transport lattice will be unaffected. In this paper we will discuss these and other planned modifications and upgrades to the accelerator facility.

  14. Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) of Protons and Light-ions with Ultrashort Laser Interaction with Heavy-ion Plasma Density Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash A; Tableman, A R; Mori, W B; Katsouleas, T C

    2014-01-01

    The relativistically induced transparency acceleration (RITA) scheme of proton and ion acceleration using laser-plasma interactions is introduced, modeled, and compared to the existing schemes. Protons are accelerated with femtosecond relativistic pulses to produce quasimonoenergetic bunches with controllable peak energy. The RITA scheme works by a relativistic laser inducing transparency to densities higher than the cold-electron critical density, while the background heavy ions are stationary. The rising laser pulse creates a traveling acceleration structure at the relativistic critical density by ponderomotively driving a local electron density inflation, creating an electron snowplow and a co-propagating electrostatic potential. The snowplow advances with a velocity determined by the rate of the rise of the laser's intensity envelope and the heavy-ion-plasma density gradient scale length. The rising laser is incrementally rendered transparent to higher densities such that the relativistic-electron plasma ...

  15. The drive beam pulse compression system for the CLIC RF power source

    CERN Document Server

    Corsini, R

    1999-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) is a high energy (0.5 to 5 TeV) e ± linear collider that uses a high- current electron beam (the drive beam) for 30 GHz RF power production by the Two-Beam Acceleration (TBA) method. Recently, a new cost­effective and efficient generation scheme for the drive beam has been developed. A fully­loaded normal­conducting linac operating at lower frequency (937 MHz) generates and accelerates the drive beam bunches, and a compression system composed of a delay­line and two combiner rings produces the proper drive beam time structure for RF power generation in the drive beam decelerator. In this paper, a preliminary design of the whole compression system is presented. In particular, the fundamental issue of preserving the bunch quality along the complex is studied and its impact on the beam parameters and on the various system components is assessed. A first design of the rings and delay­line lattice, including path length tuning chicanes, injection and extraction regions is a...

  16. Alternating-phase-focused IH-DTL for an injector of heavy-ion medical accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Y.; Yamada, S.; Murakami, T.; Fujimoto, T.; Fujisawa, T.; Ogawa, H.; Miyahara, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Hojo, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Muramatsu, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Mitsumoto, T.; Tsutsui, H.; Watanabe, T.; Ueda, T.

    2006-12-01

    A compact Drift-Tube-Linac (DTL) using an Interdigital H-mode (IH) cavity was designed for an injector of medical accelerators. For beam focusing, the method of Alternating-Phase-Focusing (APF) was applied. The APF IH-DTL can accelerate heavy ions having a charge-to-mass ratio of q/m={1}/{3} up to 4.0 MeV/u. Having optimized an array of synchronous phases for cells, namely arranging drift tubes and gaps appropriately, both longitudinal and transverse focusing strengths were produced just with the rf acceleration field, and therefore no focusing element or cooling equipments had to be installed in the cavity. This allowed us to employ a rather high operating frequency, and hence to design a compact and cost-effective cavity. A further advantage of the APF linac can be found in its operation. Since the parameters to be adjusted are just the level and phase of the input rf, beam tuning can be made with ease. Consequently, the APF linac is suitable for an injector for medical accelerators. Tuning methods of the gap voltages and cavity frequency as well as the design of the cavity for APF IH-DTL have been developed. After constructing the cavity, measurements of the electric field and tuning of the gap voltages were performed. Finally, the rf power was fed into the cavity. In this paper, the design and results of the measurements are described.

  17. Computer simulations for a deceleration and radio frequency quadrupole instrument for accelerator ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliades, J.A., E-mail: j.eliades@alum.utoronto.ca; Kim, J.K.; Song, J.H.; Yu, B.Y.

    2015-10-15

    Radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) technology incorporated into the low energy ion beam line of an accelerator system can greatly broaden the range of applications and facilitate unique experimental capabilities. However, ten’s of keV kinetic energy negative ion beams with large emittances and energy spreads must first be decelerated down to <100 eV for ion–gas interactions, placing special demands on the deceleration optics and RFQ design. A system with large analyte transmission in the presence of gas has so far proven challenging. Presented are computer simulations using SIMION 8.1 for an ion deceleration and RFQ ion guide instrument design. Code included user-defined gas pressure gradients and threshold energies for ion–gas collisional losses. Results suggest a 3 mm diameter, 35 keV {sup 36}Cl{sup −} ion beam with 8 eV full-width half maximum Gaussian energy spread and 35 mrad angular divergence can be efficiently decelerated and then cooled in He gas, with a maximum pressure of 7 mTorr, to 2 eV within 450 mm in the RFQs. Vacuum transmissions were 100%. Ion energy distributions at initial RFQ capture are shown to be much larger than the average value expected from the deceleration potential and this appears to be a general result arising from kinetic energy gain in the RFQ field. In these simulations, a potential for deceleration to 25 eV resulted in a 30 eV average energy distribution with a small fraction of ions >70 eV.

  18. Enhanced laser-driven ion acceleration in the relativistic transparency regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henig, Andreas; Kiefer, Daniel; Jung, Daniel; Habs, Dietrich [Max-Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); LMU Muenchen, Department fuer Physik, Garching (Germany); Flippo, Kirk; Gautier, Cord; Letzring, Sam; Johnson, Randy; Shimada, Tom; Yin, Lin; Albright, Brian; Fernandez, Juan [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States); Rykovanov, Sergey [Max-Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Moscow Physics Engineering Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Wu, Hui-Chun [Max-Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Markey, Keith; Zepf, Matt [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queen' s University, Belfast (United Kingdom); Liechtenstein, Vitaly [LMU Muenchen, Department fuer Physik, Garching (Germany); RRC, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Schreiber, Joerg [Max-Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); LMU Muenchen, Department fuer Physik, Garching (Germany); Plasma Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Hegelich, Manuel [LMU Muenchen, Department fuer Physik, Garching (Germany); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States)

    2009-07-01

    We report on the acceleration of ion beams from ultra-thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) foils of thickness 50, 30 and 10 nm irradiated by ultra-high contrast laser pulses at intensities of {proportional_to}7 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. An unprecedented maximum energy of 185 MeV (>15 MeV/u) for fully ionized carbon atoms is observed at the optimum thickness of 30 nm. The enhanced acceleration is attributed to self-induced transparency, leading to strong volumetric heating of the classically over-dense electron population in the bulk of the target. Our experimental results are supported by one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations.

  19. Harmonic analysis and field quality improvement of an HTS quadrupole magnet for a heavy ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhan; Wei, Shaoqing; Lee, Sang Jin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Hyun Chul; Kim, Do Gyun; Kim, Jong Won [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In recent years, the iron-dominated high-temperature superconductor (HTS) quadrupole magnets are being developed for heavy ion accelerators. Field analyses for iron-dominated quadrupole magnets were based on the normal-conducting (NC) quadrupole magnet early in the development for accelerators. Some conclusions are still in use today. However, the magnetic field of iron-dominated HTS quadrupole magnets cannot fully follow these conclusions. This study established an HTS quadrupole magnet model and an NC quadrupole magnet model, respectively. The harmonic characteristics of two magnets were analyzed and compared. According to the comparison, the conventional iron-dominated quadrupole magnets can be designed for maximum field gradient; the HTS quadrupole magnet, however, should be considered with varying field gradient. Finally, the HTS quadrupole magnet was designed for the changing field gradient. The field quality of the design was improved comparing with the result of the previous study. The new design for the HTS quadrupole magnet has been suggested.

  20. Beam Dynamics Design Studies of a Superconducting Radioactive Ion Beam Post-accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, MA; Pasini, M

    2011-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE project at CERN proposes a superconducting upgrade to increase the energy range and quality of the radioactive ion beams produced at ISOLDE, which are currently post- accelerated by the normal conducting REX linac. The specification and design choices for the HIE-ISOLDE linac are outlined along with a comprehensive beam dynamics study undertaken to understand and mitigate the sources of beam emittance dilution. The dominant cause of transverse emittance growth was attributed to the coupling between the transverse and longitudinal motions through the phase dependence of the rf defocusing force in the accelerating cavities. A parametric resonance induced by the coupling was observed and its excitation surveyed as a function of trans- verse phase advance using numerical simulations and analytic models to understand and avoid the regions of transverse beam instability. Other sources of emittance growth were studied and where necessary ameliorated, including the beam steering force in the quarter-wa...

  1. Reforming perpendicular shocks in the presence of pickup protons: initial ion acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Lee

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Acceleration processes associated with the heliospheric termination shock may provide a source of anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs. Recent kinetic simulations of supercritical, quasi-perpendicular shocks have yielded time varying shock solutions that cyclically reform on the spatio-temporal scales of the incoming protons. Whether a shock solution is stationary or reforming depends upon the plasma parameters which, for the termination shock, are ill defined but believed to be within the time-dependent regime. Here we present results from high phase space resolution particle-in-cell simulations for a three-component plasma (solar wind protons, electrons and pickup protons appropriate for the termination shock. We find reforming shock solutions which generate suprathermal populations for both proton components, with the pickup ions reaching energies of order twenty times the solar wind inflow energy. This suprathermal "injection" population is required as a seed population for subsequent acceleration at the shock which can in turn generate ACRs.

  2. Electric field simulation and measurement of a pulse line ion accelerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Xiao-Kang; ZHANG Zi-Min; CAO Shu-Chun; ZHAO Hong-Wei; WANG Bo; SHEN Xiao-Li; ZHAO Quan-Tang; LIU Ming; JING Yi

    2012-01-01

    An oil dielectric helical pulse line to demonstrate the principles of a Pulse Line Ion Accelerator (PL1A) has been designed and fabricated.The simulation of the axial electric field of an accelerator with CST code has been completed and the simulation results show complete agreement with the theoretical calculations.To fully understand the real value of the electric field excited from the helical line in PLIA,an optical electric integrated electric field measurement system was adopted.The measurement result shows that the real magnitude of axial electric field is smaller than that calculated,probably due to the actual pitch of the resister column which is much less than that of helix.

  3. Potential clinical impact of laser-accelerated beams in cancer ion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obcemea, Ceferino

    2016-09-01

    In this article, I present three advantages of plasma-accelerated ion beams for cancer therapy. I discuss how: 1. low-emittance and well-collimated beams are advantageous in proximal normal tissue-sparing; 2. highly-peaked quasi-monoenergetic beams are ideal for fast energy selection and switching in Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) as a treatment delivery; 3. high fluence and ultra-short pulse delivery produce collective excitations in the medium and enhance the stopping power. This in turn produces denser ionization track signatures (spurs, blobs, etc.) in target tumors, higher linear energy transfer, higher Bragg peak, and higher radiobiological effectiveness at the micro-level.

  4. Induction of the Tn10 Precise Excision in E. coli Cells after Accelerated Heavy Ions Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuravel, D V

    2003-01-01

    The influence of the irradiation of different kinds on the indication of the structural mutations in the bacteria Escherichia coli is considered. The regularities of the Tn10 precise excision after accelerated ^{4}He and ^{12}C ions irradiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) were investigated. Dose dependences of the survival and relative frequency of the Tn10 precise excision were obtained. It was shown, that the relative frequency of the Tn10 precise excision is the exponential function from the irradiation dose. Relative biological efficiency (RBE), and relative genetic efficiency (RGE) were calculated, and were treated as the function of the LET.

  5. On the possibility of accelerating multiply charged ions in the CERN Synchrocyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Giannini, R

    1975-01-01

    Some problems relating to the possibility of accelerating light ions in the CERN SC are studied. Deuteron capture conditions and the optimum radio-frequency versus time curve are calculated. Internal beam currents of some micro-amperes seem obtainable when using the calutron source as for protons. The same calculations were repeated for N/sup 5+/ taking into account the charge exchange process in the vacuum. A transmission of between 5 and 10% has been calculated, giving some 10/sup 10/ particles per second with a PIG source.

  6. Overview of Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research in the U.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A

    2002-09-01

    This article provides an overview of current U.S. research on accelerators for Heavy Ion Fusion, that is, inertial fusion driven by intense beams of heavy ions with the goal of energy production. The concept, beam requirements, approach, and major issues are introduced. An overview of a number of new experiments is presented. These include: the High Current Experiment now underway at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; studies of advanced injectors (and in particular an approach based on the merging of multiple beamlets), being investigated experimentally at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; the Neutralized (chamber) Transport Experiment being assembled at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; and smaller experiments at the University of Maryland and at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The comprehensive program of beam simulations and theory is outlined. Finally, prospects and plans for further development of this promising approach to fusion energy are discussed.

  7. Physical Mechanism of the Transverse Instability in Radiation Pressure Ion Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Y.; Pai, C.-H.; Zhang, C. J.; Li, F.; Wu, Y. P.; Hua, J. F.; Lu, W.; Gu, Y. Q.; Silva, L. O.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.

    2016-12-01

    The transverse stability of the target is crucial for obtaining high quality ion beams using the laser radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) mechanism. In this Letter, a theoretical model and supporting two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are presented to clarify the physical mechanism of the transverse instability observed in the RPA process. It is shown that the density ripples of the target foil are mainly induced by the coupling between the transverse oscillating electrons and the quasistatic ions, a mechanism similar to the oscillating two stream instability in the inertial confinement fusion research. The predictions of the mode structure and the growth rates from the theory agree well with the results obtained from the PIC simulations in various regimes, indicating the model contains the essence of the underlying physics of the transverse breakup of the target.

  8. Physical mechanism of the transverse instability in radiation pressure ion acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Y; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wu, Y P; Hua, J F; Lu, W; Gu, Y Q; Silva, L O; Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2016-01-01

    The transverse stability of the target is crucial for obtaining high quality ion beams using the laser radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) mechanism. In this letter, a theoretical model and supporting two-dimensional (2D) Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations are presented to clarify the physical mechanism of the transverse instability observed in the RPA process. It is shown that the density ripples of the target foil are mainly induced by the coupling between the transverse oscillating electrons and the quasi-static ions, a mechanism similar to the transverse two stream instability in the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The predictions of the mode structure and the growth rates from the theory agree well with the results obtained from the PIC simulations in various regimes, indicating the model contains the essence of the underlying physics of the transverse break-up of the target.

  9. High-intensity ion sources for accelerators with emphasis on H-beam formation and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Roderich [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    This paper lays out the fundamental working principles of a variety of high-current ion sources for accelerators in a tutorial manner, and gives examples of specific source types such as d. c. discharge- and rf-driven multicusp sources. Penning-type and ECR-based sources while discussing those principles, pointing out general performance limits as well as the performance parameters of specific sources. Laser-based, two-chamber-. and surface-ionization sources are briefly mentioned. Main aspects of this review are particle feed. ionization mechanism, beam formation and beam transport. Issues seen with beam formation and low-energy transport of negative hydrogen-ion beams are treated in detail.

  10. Problems raised by radioactive ion acceleration in the SPIRAL project. Accelerator tuning and stabilisation; Problemes poses par l`acceleration d`ions radioactifs dans le project SPIRAL. Reglage et stabilisation de l`accelerateur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boy, L. [Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France)

    1997-12-31

    This study is related to the SPIRAL project. This facility uses a cyclotron to accelerate radioactive ion beams produced in a thick target by the Grant Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds primary beam. The low intensity of radioactive beams and the mixing of several species imply special tuning methods and associated diagnostics. Also, a cyclotron and the beam line will be used to switch from this tuning beam to the radioactive one. We present a theoretical study and a numerical simulation of the tuning of five radioactive beams using three different methods. the beam dynamic is performed through the injection beam line and the cyclotron up to the electrostatic deflector. Within the frame of these methods we have described all the SPIRAL beam diagnostics. Construction and test of a new low intensity diagnosis based on a plastic scintillator for phase measurement inside the cyclotron is described in details. (author). 63 refs.

  11. GPU-accelerated automatic identification of robust beam setups for proton and carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammazzalorso, F.; Bednarz, T.; Jelen, U.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate acceleration on graphic processing units (GPU) of automatic identification of robust particle therapy beam setups, minimizing negative dosimetric effects of Bragg peak displacement caused by treatment-time patient positioning errors. Our particle therapy research toolkit, RobuR, was extended with OpenCL support and used to implement calculation on GPU of the Port Homogeneity Index, a metric scoring irradiation port robustness through analysis of tissue density patterns prior to dose optimization and computation. Results were benchmarked against an independent native CPU implementation. Numerical results were in agreement between the GPU implementation and native CPU implementation. For 10 skull base cases, the GPU-accelerated implementation was employed to select beam setups for proton and carbon ion treatment plans, which proved to be dosimetrically robust, when recomputed in presence of various simulated positioning errors. From the point of view of performance, average running time on the GPU decreased by at least one order of magnitude compared to the CPU, rendering the GPU-accelerated analysis a feasible step in a clinical treatment planning interactive session. In conclusion, selection of robust particle therapy beam setups can be effectively accelerated on a GPU and become an unintrusive part of the particle therapy treatment planning workflow. Additionally, the speed gain opens new usage scenarios, like interactive analysis manipulation (e.g. constraining of some setup) and re-execution. Finally, through OpenCL portable parallelism, the new implementation is suitable also for CPU-only use, taking advantage of multiple cores, and can potentially exploit types of accelerators other than GPUs.

  12. Laser generated Ge ions accelerated by additional electrostatic field for implantation technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, M.; Gasior, P.; Fazio, E.; Ando, L.; Giuffrida, L.; Torrisi, L.; Parys, P.; Mezzasalma, A. M.; Wolowski, J.

    2013-05-01

    The paper presents research on the optimization of the laser ion implantation method with electrostatic acceleration/deflection including numerical simulations by the means of the Opera 3D code and experimental tests at the IPPLM, Warsaw. To introduce the ablation process an Nd:YAG laser system with repetition rate of 10 Hz, pulse duration of 3.5 ns and pulse energy of 0.5 J has been applied. Ion time of flight diagnostics has been used in situ to characterize concentration and energy distribution in the obtained ion streams while the postmortem analysis of the implanted samples was conducted by the means of XRD, FTIR and Raman Spectroscopy. In the paper the predictions of the Opera 3D code are compared with the results of the ion diagnostics in the real experiment. To give the whole picture of the method, the postmortem results of the XRD, FTIR and Raman characterization techniques are discussed. Experimental results show that it is possible to achieve the development of a micrometer-sized crystalline Ge phase and/or an amorphous one only after a thermal annealing treatment.

  13. Accelerated lifetime testing methodology for lifetime estimation of Lithium-ion batteries used in augmented wind power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroe, Daniel Ioan; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Stan, Ana-Irina

    2013-01-01

    The development of lifetime estimation models for Lithium-ion battery cells, which are working under highly variable mission profiles characteristic for wind power plant applications, requires a lot of expenditures and time resources. Therefore, batteries have to be tested under accelerated...... lifetime ageing conditions. This paper presents a three-stage methodology used for accelerated lifetime testing of Lithium-ion batteries. The results obtained at the end of the accelerated ageing process can be used for the parametrization of a performance-degradation lifetime model. In the proposed...... methodology both calendar and cycling lifetime tests are considered since both components are influencing the lifetime of Lithium-ion batteries. The methodology proposes also a lifetime model verification stage, where Lithium-ion battery cells are tested at normal operating conditions using an application...

  14. Alternative uses of a megavolt tandem accelerator for few-keV studies with ion-source SIMS monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, S. L. A.; Codeço, C. F. S.; Magnani, B. F.; Sant'Anna, M. M.

    2016-06-01

    We increase the versatility of a tandem electrostatic accelerator by implementing simple modifications to the standard operation procedure. While keeping its ability to deliver MeV ion beams, we show that the experimental setup can (i) provide good quality ion beams in the few-keV energy range and (ii) be used to study ion-beam surface modification with simultaneous secondary ion mass spectrometry. This latter task is accomplished without using any chamber connected to the accelerator exit. We perform mass spectrometry of the few-keV anions produced in the ion source by measuring their neutral counterparts at the accelerator exit with energies up to 1.7 MeV. With an additional modification, a high-current few-keV regime is obtained, using the ion source as an irradiation chamber and the accelerator itself only as a mass spectrometer. As an example of application, we prepare a sample for the study of ion-beam assisted dewetting of a thin Au film on a Si substrate.

  15. Preliminary Research Results for the Generation and Diagnostics of High Power Ion Beams on FLASH II Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hailiang; Qiu, Aici; Sun, Jianfeng; He, Xiaoping; Tang, Junping; Wang, Haiyang; Li, Hongyu; Li, Jingya; Ren, Shuqing; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Guoguang

    2004-12-01

    The preliminary experimental results of the generation and diagnostics of high-power ion beams of FLASH II accelerator are reported. The high-power ion beams presently are being produced in a pinched diode. The method for enhancing the ratio of ion to electron current is to increase the electron residing time by pinching the electron flow. Furthermore, electron beam pinching can be combined with electron reflexing to achieve ion beams with even higher efficiency and intensity. The anode plasma is generated by anode foil bombarded with electron and anode foil surface flashover. In recent experiments on FLASH II accelerator, ion beams have been produced with a current of 160 kA and an energy of 500 keV corresponding to an ion beam peak power of about 80 GW. The ion number and current of high power ion beams were determined by monitoring delayed radioactivity from nuclear reactions induced in a 12C target by the proton beams. The prompt γ-rays and diode bremsstrahlung x-rays were measured with a PIN semi-conductor detector and a plastic scintillator detector. The current density distribution of ion beam were measured with a biased ion collector array. The ion beams were also recorded with a CR-39 detector.

  16. Preliminary Research Results for the Generation and Diagnostics of High Power Ion Beams on FLASH II Accelerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨海亮; 邱爱慈; 孙剑锋; 何小平; 汤俊萍; 王海洋; 李洪玉; 李静雅; 任书庆; 欧阳小平; 张国光

    2004-01-01

    The preliminary experimental results of the generation and diagnostics of high power ion beams on FLASH II accelerator are reported. The high-power ion beams presently are being produced in a pinched diode. The method for enhancing the ratio of ion to electron current is to increase the electron residing time by pinching the electron flow. Furthermore, electron beam pinching can be combined with electron reflexing to achieve ion beams with even higher efficiency and intensity. The anode plasma is generated by anode foil bombarded with electronand anode foil surface flashover. In recent experiments on FLASH II accelerator, ion beams have been produced with a current of 160 kA and anen ergy of 500 keV corresponding to an ion beam peak power of about 80 GW. The ion number ard current of high power ion beams were determined by monitoring delayed radioactivity from nuclear reactions induced in a 12C target by the proton beams. The prompt γ-rays and diode bremsstrahlung X-rays were measured with a PIN semi-conductor detector and a plastic scintillator detector. The current density distribution of ion beam were measured with a biased ion collector array. The ion beams were also recorded with a CR-39 detector.

  17. Relativistic Tennis with Photons: Frequency Up-Shifting, Light Intensification and Ion Acceleration with Flying Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Koga, J. K.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Rosanov, N. N.; Zhidkov, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    We formulate the Flying Mirror Concept for relativistic interaction of ultra-intense electromagnetic waves with plasmas, present its theoretical description and the results of computer simulations and laboratory experiments. In collisionless plasmas, the relativistic flying mirrors are thin and dense electron or electron-ion layers accelerated by the high intensity electromagnetic waves up to velocity close to the speed of light in vacuum; in nonlinear-media and in nonlinear vacuum they are the ionization fronts and the refraction index modulations induced by a strong electromagnetic wave. The reflection of the electromagnetic wave at the relativistic mirror results in its energy and frequency change due to the double Doppler effect. In the co-propagating configuration, in the radiation pressure dominant regime, the energy of the electromagnetic wave is transferred to the ion energy providing a highly efficient acceleration mechanism. In the counter-propagation configuration the frequency of the reflected wave is multiplied by the factor proportional to the gamma-factor squared. If the relativistic mirror performs an oscillatory motion as in the case of the electron motion at the plasma-vacuum interface, the reflected light spectrum is enriched with high order harmonics.

  18. Collection and focusing of laser accelerated ion beams for therapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Ingo; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, Jürgen; Yan, Xueqing; Orzhekhovskaya, Anna; Yaramyshev, Stepan

    2011-03-01

    Experimental results in laser acceleration of protons and ions and theoretical predictions that the currently achieved energies might be raised by factors 5-10 in the next few years have stimulated research exploring this new technology for oncology as a compact alternative to conventional synchrotron based accelerator technology. The emphasis of this paper is on collection and focusing of the laser produced particles by using simulation data from a specific laser acceleration model. We present a scaling law for the “chromatic emittance” of the collector—here assumed as a solenoid lens—and apply it to the particle energy and angular spectra of the simulation output. For a 10 Hz laser system we find that particle collection by a solenoid magnet well satisfies requirements of intensity and beam quality as needed for depth scanning irradiation. This includes a sufficiently large safety margin for intensity, whereas a scheme without collection—by using mere aperture collimation—hardly reaches the needed intensities.

  19. Collection and focusing of laser accelerated ion beams for therapy applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Hofmann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results in laser acceleration of protons and ions and theoretical predictions that the currently achieved energies might be raised by factors 5–10 in the next few years have stimulated research exploring this new technology for oncology as a compact alternative to conventional synchrotron based accelerator technology. The emphasis of this paper is on collection and focusing of the laser produced particles by using simulation data from a specific laser acceleration model. We present a scaling law for the “chromatic emittance” of the collector—here assumed as a solenoid lens—and apply it to the particle energy and angular spectra of the simulation output. For a 10 Hz laser system we find that particle collection by a solenoid magnet well satisfies requirements of intensity and beam quality as needed for depth scanning irradiation. This includes a sufficiently large safety margin for intensity, whereas a scheme without collection—by using mere aperture collimation—hardly reaches the needed intensities.

  20. Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) - laser-plasma accelerated quasi-monoenergetic GeV ion-beams with existing lasers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Aakash A.

    2013-10-01

    Laser-plasma ion accelerators have the potential to produce beams with unprecedented characteristics of ultra-short bunch lengths (100s of fs) and high bunch-charge (1010 particles) over acceleration length of about 100 microns. However, creating and controlling mono-energetic bunches while accelerating to high-energies has been a challenge. If high-energy mono-energetic beams can be demonstrated with minimal post-processing, laser (ω0)-plasma (ωpe) ion accelerators may be used in a wide-range of applications such as cancer hadron-therapy, medical isotope production, neutron generation, radiography and high-energy density science. Here we demonstrate using analysis and simulations that using relativistic intensity laser-pulses and heavy-ion (Mi ×me) targets doped with a proton (or light-ion) species (mp ×me) of trace density (at least an order of magnitude below the cold critical density) we can scale up the energy of quasi-mono-energetically accelerated proton (or light-ion) beams while controlling their energy, charge and energy spectrum. This is achieved by controlling the laser propagation into an overdense (ω0 <ωpeγ = 1) increasing plasma density gradient by incrementally inducing relativistic electron quiver and thereby rendering them transparent to the laser while the heavy-ions are immobile. Ions do not directly interact with ultra-short laser that is much shorter in duration than their characteristic time-scale (τp <<√{mp} /ω0 <<√{Mi} /ω0). For a rising laser intensity envelope, increasing relativistic quiver controls laser propagation beyond the cold critical density. For increasing plasma density (ωpe2 (x)), laser penetrates into higher density and is shielded, stopped and reflected where ωpe2 (x) / γ (x , t) =ω02 . In addition to the laser quivering the electrons, it also ponderomotively drives (Fp 1/γ∇za2) them forward longitudinally, creating a constriction of snowplowed e-s. The resulting longitudinal e--displacement from laser

  1. Efficient Spectral Broadening in the 100-W Average Power Regime Using Gas Filled Kagome HC-PCF and Pulse Compression

    CERN Document Server

    Emaury, Florian; Debord, Benoit; Ghosh, Debashri; Diebold, Andreas; Gerome, Frederic; Suedmeyer, Thomas; Benabid, Fetah; Keller, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    We present nonlinear pulse compression of a high-power SESAM-modelocked thin-disk laser (TDL) using an Ar-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber (HC-PCF). The output of the modelocked Yb:YAG TDL with 127 W average power, a pulse repetition rate of 7 MHz, and a pulse duration of 740 fs was spectrally broadened 16-fold while propagating in a Kagome HC-PCF containing 13 bar of static Argon gas. Subsequent compression tests performed using 8.4% of the full available power resulted in a pulse duration as short as 88 fs using the spectrally broadened output from the fiber. Compressing the full transmitted power through the fiber (118 W) could lead to a compressed output of >100 W of average power and >100 MW of peak power with an average power compression efficiency of 88%. This simple laser system with only one ultrafast laser oscillator and a simple single-pass fiber pulse compressor, generating both high peak power >100 MW and sub-100-fs pulses at megahertz repetition rate, is very int...

  2. Comparison of accelerated ion populations observed upstream of the bow shocks at Venus and Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yamauchi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Foreshock ions are compared between Venus and Mars at energies of 0.6~20 keV using the same ion instrument, the Ion Mass Analyser, on board both Venus Express and Mars Express. Venus Express often observes accelerated protons (2~6 times the solar wind energy that travel away from the Venus bow shock when the spacecraft location is magnetically connected to the bow shock. The observed ions have a large field-aligned velocity compared to the perpendicular velocity in the solar wind frame, and are similar to the field-aligned beams and intermediate gyrating component of the foreshock ions in the terrestrial upstream region. Mars Express does not observe similar foreshock ions as does Venus Express, indicating that the Martian foreshock does not possess the intermediate gyrating component in the upstream region on the dayside of the planet. Instead, two types of gyrating protons in the solar wind frame are observed very close to the Martian quasi-perpendicular bow shock within a proton gyroradius distance. The first type is observed only within the region which is about 400 km from the bow shock and flows tailward nearly along the bow shock with a similar velocity as the solar wind. The second type is observed up to about 700 km from the bow shock and has a bundled structure in the energy domain. A traversal on 12 July 2005, in which the energy-bunching came from bundling in the magnetic field direction, is further examined. The observed velocities of the latter population are consistent with multiple specular reflections of the solar wind at the bow shock, and the ions after the second reflection have a field-aligned velocity larger than that of the de Hoffman-Teller velocity frame, i.e., their guiding center has moved toward interplanetary space out from the bow shock. To account for the observed peculiarity of the Martian upstream region, finite gyroradius effects of the solar wind protons compared to the radius of the bow shock curvature and

  3. Intense laser-driven ion beams in the relativistic-transparency regime: acceleration, control and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Juan C.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-plasma interactions in the novel regime of relativistically-induced transparency have been harnessed to generate efficiently intense ion beams with average energies exceeding 10 MeV/nucleon (>100 MeV for protons) at ``table-top'' scales. We have discovered and utilized a self-organizing scheme that exploits persisting self-generated plasma electric ( 0.1 TV/m) and magnetic ( 104 Tesla) fields to reduce the ion-energy (Ei) spread after the laser exits the plasma, thus separating acceleration from spread reduction. In this way we routinely generate aluminum and carbon beams with narrow spectral peaks at Ei up to 310 MeV and 220 MeV, respectively, with high efficiency ( 5%). The experimental demonstration has been done at the LANL Trident laser with 0.12 PW, high-contrast, 0.65 ps Gaussian laser pulses irradiating planar foils up to 250 nm thick. In this regime, Ei scales empirically with laser intensity (I) as I 1 / 2. Our progress is enabled by high-fidelity, massive computer simulations of the experiments. This work advances next-generation compact accelerators suitable for new applications. E . g ., a carbon beam with Ei 400 MeV and 10% energy spread is suitable for fast ignition (FI) of compressed DT. The observed scaling suggests that is feasible with existing target fabrication and PW-laser technologies, using a sub-ps laser pulse with I 2.5 ×1021 W/cm2. These beams have been used on Trident to generate warm-dense matter at solid-densities, enabling us to investigate its equation of state and mixing of heterogeneous interfaces purely by plasma effects distinct from hydrodynamics. They also drive an intense neutron-beam source with great promise for important applications such as active interrogation of shielded nuclear materials. Considerations on controlling ion-beam divergence for their increased utility are discussed. Funded by the LANL LDRD program.

  4. Demonstration of long-pulse acceleration of high power positive ion beam with JT-60 positive ion source in Japan–Korea joint experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, A., E-mail: kojima.atsushi@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan); Hanada, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan); Jeong, S.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Y.S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, D.H.; Kim, T.S.; Lee, K.W.; Park, M.; Jung, B.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Mogaki, K.; Komata, M.; Dairaku, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    The long-pulse acceleration of the high-power positive ion beam has been demonstrated with the JT-60 positive ion source in the joint experiment among Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) under the collaboration program for the development of plasma heating and current drive systems. In this joint experiment, the increase of the heat load and the breakdowns induced by the degradation of the beam optics due to the gas accumulation was one of the critical issues for the long-pulse acceleration. As a result of development of the long-pulse operation techniques of the ion source and facilities of the neutral beam test stand in KAERI, 2 MW 100 s beam has been achieved for the first time. The achieved beam performance satisfies the JT-60SA requirement which is designed to be a 1.94 MW ion beam power from an ion source corresponding to total neutral beam power of 20 MW with 24 ion sources. Therefore, it was found that the JT-60 positive ion sources were applicable in the JT-60SA neutral beam injectors. Moreover, because this ion source is planned to be a backup ion source for KSTAR, the operational region and characteristic has been clarified to apply to the KSTAR neutral beam injector.

  5. ELUTION OF TUNGSTEN BY SODIUM COMPOUNDS AND ACCELERATION EFFECTS OF COEXISTENT COUNTER IONS IN MIXED ELUANT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WanLinsheng; DengZuoGuo

    1995-01-01

    The elution of WO42- ions by NaOH、NaNO3、NaCl and NH4Cl on strong basic anion exchange resins in quaternary ammonium form I and the adsorption properties after elution were studied.In addition,the elution curve,the permeation curve and the exchange capacities of operation were presented.The eluate containing tungsten with high content and excessive eluant of low content were obtained by employing the process of eluting using mixed solution of NaCl and NaOH.It′s possible to obtain Na2WO4·2H2O with high purity by evaporating and crystallizing the eluate.The results of mixed elution showed that the diffusion coefficients of Cl-、OH- and WO42- ions in solution or exchange agent varied due to the coexistence of counter ions and then the exchange velocity of WO42-→Cl- and WO42-→OH- was accelerated.

  6. Installation, tests and start up of the Tandetron positive ions accelerator; Instalacion, pruebas y arranque del acelerador de iones positivos Tandetron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdovinos A, M.A.; Hernandez M, V. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The National Institute of Nuclear Research acquired a Positive ions accelerator type Tandetron 2MV of the Dutch Company High Voltage Engineering, Europe B.V. (H.V.E.E.) which was installed in the building named Irradiator Nave which is occupied by the Gamma irradiator and the Pelletron accelerator. Starting from the accelerator selection it was defined the conditions required for the operation of this as well as: electric feeding, water quality and quantity, air compressed, temperature, humidity, etc.; as well as the necessary modifications of the installation area. (Author)

  7. Advanced treatment planning methods for efficient radiation therapy with laser accelerated proton and ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J

    2010-10-01

    Laser plasma acceleration can potentially replace large and expensive cyclotrons or synchrotrons for radiotherapy with protons and ions. On the way toward a clinical implementation, various challenges such as the maximum obtainable energy still remain to be solved. In any case, laser accelerated particles exhibit differences compared to particles from conventional accelerators. They typically have a wide energy spread and the beam is extremely pulsed (i.e., quantized) due to the pulsed nature of the employed lasers. The energy spread leads to depth dose curves that do not show a pristine Bragg peak but a wide high dose area, making precise radiotherapy impossible without an additional energy selection system. Problems with the beam quantization include the limited repetition rate and the number of accelerated particles per laser shot. This number might be too low, which requires a high repetition rate, or it might be too high, which requires an additional fluence selection system to reduce the number of particles. Trying to use laser accelerated particles in a conventional way such as spot scanning leads to long treatment times and a high amount of secondary radiation produced when blocking unwanted particles. The authors present methods of beam delivery and treatment planning that are specifically adapted to laser accelerated particles. In general, it is not necessary to fully utilize the energy selection system to create monoenergetic beams for the whole treatment plan. Instead, within wide parts of the target volume, beams with broader energy spectra can be used to simultaneously cover multiple axially adjacent spots of a conventional dose delivery grid as applied in intensity modulated particle therapy. If one laser shot produces too many particles, they can be distributed over a wider area with the help of a scattering foil and a multileaf collimator to cover multiple lateral spot positions at the same time. These methods are called axial and lateral

  8. To Break or to Brake Neuronal Network Accelerated by Ammonium Ions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V Dynnik

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to investigate the effects of ammonium ions on in vitro neuronal network activity and to search alternative methods of acute ammonia neurotoxicity prevention.Rat hippocampal neuronal and astrocytes co-cultures in vitro, fluorescent microscopy and perforated patch clamp were used to monitor the changes in intracellular Ca2+- and membrane potential produced by ammonium ions and various modulators in the cells implicated in neural networks.Low concentrations of NH4Cl (0.1-4 mM produce short temporal effects on network activity. Application of 5-8 mM NH4Cl: invariably transforms diverse network firing regimen to identical burst patterns, characterized by substantial neuronal membrane depolarization at plateau phase of potential and high-amplitude Ca2+-oscillations; raises frequency and average for period of oscillations Ca2+-level in all cells implicated in network; results in the appearance of group of «run out» cells with high intracellular Ca2+ and steadily diminished amplitudes of oscillations; increases astrocyte Ca2+-signalling, characterized by the appearance of groups of cells with increased intracellular Ca2+-level and/or chaotic Ca2+-oscillations. Accelerated network activity may be suppressed by the blockade of NMDA or AMPA/kainate-receptors or by overactivation of AMPA/kainite-receptors. Ammonia still activate neuronal firing in the presence of GABA(A receptors antagonist bicuculline, indicating that «disinhibition phenomenon» is not implicated in the mechanisms of networks acceleration. Network activity may also be slowed down by glycine, agonists of metabotropic inhibitory receptors, betaine, L-carnitine, L-arginine, etc.Obtained results demonstrate that ammonium ions accelerate neuronal networks firing, implicating ionotropic glutamate receptors, having preserved the activities of group of inhibitory ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. This may mean, that ammonia neurotoxicity might be prevented by

  9. Ion Acceleration from the Interaction of Ultra-Intense Lasers with Solid Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Matthew M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The discovery that ultra-intense laser pulses (I > 1018 W/cm2) can produce short pulse, high energy proton beams has renewed interest in the fundamental mechanisms that govern particle acceleration from laser-solid interactions. Experiments have shown that protons present as hydrocarbon contaminants on laser targets can be accelerated up to energies > 50 MeV. Different theoretical models that explain the observed results have been proposed. One model describes a front-surface acceleration mechanism based on the ponderomotive potential of the laser pulse. At high intensities (I > 1018 W/cm2), the quiver energy of an electron oscillating in the electric field of the laser pulse exceeds the electron rest mass, requiring the consideration of relativistic effects. The relativistically correct ponderomotive potential is given by Up = ([1 + Iλ2/1.3 x 1018]1/2 - 1) m{sub o}c2, where Iλ2 is the irradiance in W μm2/cm2 and moc2 is the electron rest mass. At laser irradiance of Iλ2 ~ 1020 W μm2/cm2, the ponderomotive potential can be of order several MeV. A few recent experiments--discussed in Chapter 3 of this thesis--consider this ponderomotive potential sufficiently strong to accelerate protons from the front surface of the target to energies up to tens of MeV. Another model, known as Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA), describes the mechanism as an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the laser target. According to the TNSA model, relativistic hot electrons created at the laser-solid interaction penetrate the foil where a few escape to infinity. The remaining hot electrons are retained by the target potential and establish an electrostatic sheath on the back surface of the target. In this thesis we present several experiments that study the accelerated ions by

  10. Ionization and acceleration of heavy ions in high-Z solid target irradiated by high intensity laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahito, D.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2016-05-01

    In the interaction between high intensity laser and solid film, an ionization dynamics inside the solid is dominated by fast time scale convective propagation of the internal sheath field and the slow one by impact ionization due to heated high energy electrons coupled with nonlocal heat transport. Furthermore, ionization and acceleration due to the localized external sheath field which co- propagates with Al ions constituting the high energy front in the vacuum region. Through this process, the maximum charge state and then q/A increase in the rear side, so that ions near the front are further accelerated to high energy.

  11. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, M., E-mail: maxence.gauthier@stanford.edu; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Propp, A.; Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Aurand, B.; Willi, O. [Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf (Germany); Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Pak, A.; Ruby, J.; Williams, G. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Kerr, S. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1R1 (Canada); Ramakrishna, B. [Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad (India); Rödel, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Jena (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  12. Strategy Selection of Film Irradiation by Accelerated ^{40}Ar^{8+} Ions for Manufacturing of Track Membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, Yu N; Kalinichenko, V V; Karamysheva, G A; Fedorenko, S B

    2004-01-01

    The industrial cyclotron CYTRACK is dedicated to the production of the track membranes. It is the basic instrument for the industry of membrane products to be consumed in medicine, biotechnology, pharmacology, microelectronics and many other industries. The cyclotron CYTRACK started working in the August of 2002. Argon ions were accelerated to a project energy of 2.4 MeV/nucleon, the extracted beam intensity was about 200 nA, the extraction efficiency totaled \\sim 50 %. In starting up operation the film was exposed in various controlled ways to charged particles with a view to achieving the values of parameters required for production of "Rosa" membranous plasmafilters. The pore uniformity in transverse direction was provided by beam scanning with a scanning magnet voltage of 73 V, the one in the longitudinal direction was provided by constancy of the film motion rate and stability of beam intensity during all the time of exposition.

  13. Size of lethality target in mouse immature oocytes determined with accelerated heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, T; Dobson, R L; Kwan, T C

    1989-01-01

    Mouse immature oocytes were irradiated in vivo with highly charged, heavy ions from the Bevalac accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The particles used were 670-MeV/nucleon Si14+, 570-MeV/nucleon Ar18+, and 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+. The cross-sectional area of the lethality target in these extremely radiosensitive cells was determined from fluence-response curves and information on energy deposition by delta rays. Results indicate a target cross-section larger than that of the nucleus, one which closely approximates the cross-sectional area of the entire oocyte. For 450-MeV/nucleon Fe26+ particles, the predicted target cross-sectional area is 120 +/- 16 microns2, comparing well with the microscopically determined cross-sectional area of 111 +/- 12 microns2 for these cells. The present results are in agreement with our previous target studies which implicate the oocyte plasma membrane.

  14. What causes the variations of the peak intensity of CIR accelerated energetic ion fluxes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Keppler

    Full Text Available The variation of the peak intensity of energetic ions accelerated at CIR related shocks in the interplanetary medium as observed by instruments on board of ULYSSES during its pass towards the south polar region and from the north polar region back to its aphelium is discussed. From ULYSSES measurements alone it cannot be decided whether the observed variation is a function of latitude or of radial distance, as its orbit changes distance and latitude at the same time. Therefore ULYSSES data is compared with earlier observations by the PIONEER and VOYAGER spacecraft and concluded that the major part of the observed variation of the peak intensity seems to be due to a radial distance change, on to which, however, at higher latitudes a latitude dependent feature is superimposed.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (Energetic particles; interplanetary shocks; general

  15. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, M.; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Aurand, B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Kerr, S.; Pak, A.; Propp, A.; Ramakrishna, B.; Ruby, J.; Willi, O.; Williams, G. J.; Rödel, C.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  16. Ion motion effects on the generation of short-cycle relativistic laser pulses during radiation pressure acceleration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.P.Wang; X.M.Zhang; X.F.Wang; X.Y.Zhao; J.C.Xu; Y.H.Yu; L.Q.Yi; Y.Shi; L.G.Zhang; T.J.Xu; C.Liu; Z.K.Pei; B.F.Shen

    2014-01-01

    The effects of ion motion on the generation of short-cycle relativistic laser pulses during radiation pressure acceleration are investigated by analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulations. Studies show that the rear part of the transmitted pulse modulated by ion motion is sharper compared with the case of the electron shutter only. In this study, the ions further modulate the short-cycle pulses transmitted. A 3.9 fs laser pulse with an intensity of 1.33×1021W cm-2is generated by properly controlling the motions of the electron and ion in the simulations. The short-cycle laser pulse source proposed can be applied in the generation of single attosecond pulses and electron acceleration in a small bubble regime.

  17. Kinetic effects on the transition to relativistic self-induced transparency in laser-driven ion acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Siminos, E; Grech, M; Fülöp, T

    2016-01-01

    We study kinetic effects responsible for the transition to relativistic self-induced transparency in the interaction of a circularly-polarized laser-pulse with an overdense plasma and their relation to hole-boring and ion acceleration. It is shown, using particle-in-cell simulations and an analysis of separatrices in single-particle phase-space, that this transition is mediated by the complex interplay of fast electron dynamics and ion motion at the initial stage of the interaction. It thus depends on the ion charge-to-mass ratio and can be controlled by varying the laser temporal profile. Moreover, we find a new regime in which a transition from relativistic transparency to hole-boring occurs dynamically during the course of the interaction. It is shown that, for a fixed laser intensity, this dynamic transition regime allows optimal ion acceleration in terms of both energy and energy spread.

  18. Comparative study of ion acceleration by linearly polarized laser pulses from optimized targets of solid and near-critical density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychenkov, V. Yu; Brantov, A. V.; Govras, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of a 3D optimization study of ion acceleration from ultrathin solid density foils (Brantov et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Spec. Top. Accel. Beams 18 021301) are complemented with an improved analytic model of the directed Coulomb explosion. Similarly to optimizing overdense targets, we also optimize low-density targets to obtain maximum ion energy, motivated by progress in producing a new generation of low-density slab targets whose density can be very homogeneous and as low as the relativistic critical density. Using 3D simulations, we show that for the same laser pulse, the ion energy can be significantly increased with low-density targets. A new acceleration mechanism is responsible for such an increase. This mechanism is described qualitatively, and it explains an advantage of low-density targets for high-energy ion production by lasers.

  19. Ion Acceleration via "Nonlinear Vacuum Heating" by the Laser Pulse Obliquely Incident on a Thin Foil Target

    CERN Document Server

    Yogo, A; Mori, M; Ogura, K; Esirkepov, T Zh; Pirozhkov, A S; Kanasaki, M; Sakaki, H; Fukuda, Y; Bolton, P R; Nishimura, H; Kondo, K

    2015-01-01

    Dependence of the energy of ions accelerated during interaction of the laser pulse obliquelly incident on the thin foil target on the laser polarization is studied experimentally and theoretically. We found that the ion energy being maximal for the p-polarization gradually decreases when the pulse becomes s-polarized. The experimentally found dependences of the ion energy are explained by invoking the anomalous electron heating which results in high electrostatic potential formation at the target surface. Anomalous heating of electrons beyond the energy of quiver motion in the laser field is described within the framework of theoretical model of driven oscillator with a step-like nonlinearity. We have demonstrated that the electron anomalous heating can be realized in two regimes: nonlinear resonance and stochastic heating, depending on the extent of stochasticity. We have found the accelerated ion energy scaling determined by the laser intensity, pulse duration, polarization angle and incident angle.

  20. Nonlinear pulse compression of picosecond parabolic-like pulses synthesized with a long period fiber grating filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krcmarík, David; Slavík, Radan; Park, Yongwoo; Azaña, José

    2009-04-27

    tract: We demonstrate high quality pulse compression at high repetition rates by use of spectral broadening of short parabolic-like pulses in a normally-dispersive highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF) followed by linear dispersion compensation with a conventional SMF-28 fiber. The key contribution of this work is on the use of a simple and efficient long-period fiber grating (LPFG) filter for synthesizing the desired parabolic-like pulses from sech(2)-like input optical pulses; this all-fiber low-loss filter enables reducing significantly the required input pulse power as compared with the use of previous all-fiber pulse re-shaping solutions (e.g. fiber Bragg gratings). A detailed numerical analysis has been performed in order to optimize the system's performance, including investigation of the optimal initial pulse shape to be launched into the HNLF fiber. We found that the pulse shape launched into the HNLF is critically important for suppressing the undesired wave breaking in the nonlinear spectral broadening process. The optimal shape is found to be independent on the parameters of normally dispersive HNLFs. In our experiments, 1.5-ps pulses emitted by a 10-GHz mode-locked laser are first reshaped into 3.2-ps parabolic-like pulses using our LPFG-based pulse reshaper. Flat spectrum broadening of the amplified initial parabolic-like pulses has been generated using propagation through a commercially-available HNLF. Pulses of 260 fs duration with satellite peak and pedestal suppression greater than 17 dB have been obtained after the linear dispersion compensation fiber. The generated pulses exhibit a 20-nm wide supercontinuum energy spectrum that has almost a square-like spectral profile with >85% of the pulse energy contained in its FWHM spectral bandwidth.

  1. Non-linear Ion-Wake Excitation by Plasma Electron Wakefields of an Electron or Positron Beam for Positron Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsouleas, Thomas; Sahai, Aakash

    2015-11-01

    The excitation of a non-linear ion-wake by a train of non-linear electron wake of an electron and a positron beam is modeled and its use for positron acceleration is explored. The ion-wake is shown to be a driven non-linear ion-acoustic wave in the form of a cylindrical ion-soliton similar to the solution of the cKdV equation. The phases of the oscillating radial electric fields of the slowly-propagating electron wake are asymmetric in time and excite time-averaged inertial ion motion radially. The radial field of the electron compression region sucks-in the ions and the field of space-charge region of the wake expels them, driving a cylindrical ion-soliton structure with on-axis and bubble-edge density-spikes. Once formed, the channel-edge density-spike is driven radially outwards by the thermal pressure of the thermalized wake energy. Its channel-like structure due to the flat-residue left behind by the propagating ion-soliton, is independent of the energy-source driving the non-linear electron wake. We explore the use of the partially-filled channel formed by the cylindrical ion-soliton for a novel regime of positron acceleration. PIC simulations are used to study the ion-wake soliton structure, its driven propagation and its use for positron acceleration (arXiv:1504.03735). Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-SC0010012 and the National Science Foundation under NSF-PHY-0936278.

  2. Electron and Ion Acceleration in Relativistic Shocks with Applications to GRB Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Donald C; Bykov, Andrei M; Lee, Shiu-Hang

    2015-01-01

    We have modeled the simultaneous first-order Fermi shock acceleration of protons, electrons, and helium nuclei by relativistic shocks. By parameterizing the particle diffusion, our steady-state Monte Carlo simulation allows us to follow particles from particle injection at nonthermal thermal energies to above PeV energies, including the nonlinear smoothing of the shock structure due to cosmic-ray (CR) backpressure. We observe the mass-to-charge (A/Z) enhancement effect believed to occur in efficient Fermi acceleration in non-relativistic shocks and we parameterize the transfer of ion energy to electrons seen in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. For a given set of environmental and model parameters, the Monte Carlo simulation determines the absolute normalization of the particle distributions and the resulting synchrotron, inverse-Compton, and pion-decay emission in a largely self-consistent manner. The simulation is flexible and can be readily used with a wide range of parameters typical of gamma-ray burst ...

  3. Detailed design optimization of the MITICA negative ion accelerator in view of the ITER NBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinetti, P.; Aprile, D.; Antoni, V.; Cavenago, M.; Chitarin, G.; de Esch, H. P. L.; De Lorenzi, A.; Fonnesu, N.; Gambetta, G.; Hemsworth, R. S.; Kashiwagi, M.; Marconato, N.; Marcuzzi, D.; Pilan, N.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Singh, M.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Toigo, V.; Veltri, P.; Zaccaria, P.

    2016-01-01

    The ITER Neutral Beam Test Facility (PRIMA) is presently under construction at Consorzio RFX (Padova, Italy). PRIMA includes two experimental devices: an ITER-size ion source with low voltage extraction, called SPIDER, and the full prototype of the whole ITER Heating Neutral Beams (HNBs), called MITICA. The purpose of MITICA is to demonstrate that all operational parameters of the ITER HNB accelerator can be experimentally achieved, thus establishing a large step forward in the performances of neutral beam injectors in comparison with the present experimental devices. The design of the MITICA extractor and accelerator grids, here described in detail, was developed using an integrated approach, taking into consideration at the same time all the relevant physics and engineering aspects. Particular care was taken also to support and validate the design on the basis of the expertise and experimental data made available by the collaborating neutral beam laboratories of CEA, IPP, CCFE, NIFS and JAEA. Considering the operational requirements and the other physics constraints of the ITER HNBs, the whole design has been thoroughly optimized and improved. Furthermore, specific innovative concepts have been introduced.

  4. Tests of a niobium split-ring superconducting heavy ion accelerating structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benaroya, R.; Bollinger, L.M.; Jaffey, A.H.; Khoe, T.K.; Olesen, M.C.; Scheibelhut, C.H.; Shepard, K.W.; Wesolowski, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    A niobium split-ring accelerating structure designed for use in the Argonne superconducting heavy-ion energy booster was successfully tested. The superconducting resonator has a resonant frequency of 97 MHz and an optimum particle velocity ..beta.. = 0.11. Ultimate performance is expected to be limited by peak surface fields, which in this structure are 4.7 E/sub a/ electric and 170 E/sub a/ (Gauss) magnetic, where E/sub a/ is the effective accelerating gradient in MV/m. The rf losses in two demountable superconducting joints severely limited performance in initial tests. Following independent measurements of the rf loss properties of several types of demountable joints, one demountable joint was eliminated and the other modified. Subsequently, the resonator could be operated continuously at E/sub a/ = 3.6 MV/m (corresponding to an energy gain of 1.3 MeV per charge) with 10W rf input power. Maximum field level was limited by electron loading. The mechanical stability of the resonator under operating conditions is excellent: vibration induced eigenfrequency noise is less than 120 Hz peak to peak, and the radiation pressure induced frequency shift is ..delta..f/f = 1.6 x 10/sup -6/ E/sub a//sup 2/.

  5. First Results from a Principal Component Analysis of Tycho's SNR: Evidence for Cosmic Ray Ion Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, J. S.; Hughes, J. P.; Badenes, C.

    2005-12-01

    We present results from a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR). PCA is a statistical technique we implemented to characterize X-ray spectra extracted from distinct spatial regions across the entire image of the remnant. We used the PCA to determine the location of the contact discontinuity (CD) in Tycho, which marks the boundary between shocked ejecta and shocked interstellar material, and found an azimuthal-angle-averaged radius of 241". For the average radius of the outer blast wave (BW) we found 251". Taking account of projection effects, the ratio of BW:CD is 1:0.93, which is inconsistent with adiabatic hydrodynamic models of SNR evolution. The BW:CD ratio can be explained if cosmic ray acceleration of ions is occurring at the forward shock. Such a scenario is further supported by evidence from the morphology and spectral nature of the BW emission for the acceleration of cosmic ray electrons. We also present PCA results regarding the ranges in Si and Fe composition in Tycho, and a newly uncovered spectral variation in the form of a low energy excess that has not been previously noted.

  6. A superconducting CW-LINAC for heavy ion acceleration at GSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Winfried; Aulenbacher, Kurt; Basten, Markus; Dziuba, Florian; Gettmann, Viktor; Miski-Oglu, Maksym; Podlech, Holger; Yaramyshev, Stepan

    2017-03-01

    Recently the Universal Linear Accelerator (UNILAC) serves as a powerful high duty factor (25%) heavy ion beam accelerator for the ambitious experiment program at GSI. Beam time availability for SHE (Super Heavy Element)-research will be decreased due to the limitation of the UNILAC providing Uranium beams with an extremely high peak current for FAIR simultaneously. To keep the GSI-SHE program competitive on a high level and even beyond, a standalone superconducting continuous wave (100% duty factor) LINAC in combination with the upgraded GSI High Charge State injector is envisaged. In preparation for this, the first LINAC section (financed by HIM and GSI) will be tested with beam in 2017, demonstrating the future experimental capabilities. Further on the construction of an extended cryo module comprising two shorter Crossbar-H cavities is foreseen to test until end of 2017. As a final R&D step towards an entire LINAC three advanced cryo modules, each comprising two CH cavities, should be built until 2019, serving for first user experiments at the Coulomb barrier.

  7. Acceleration of highly charged GeV Fe ions from a low-Z substrate by intense femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiuchi, M., E-mail: nishiuchi.mamiko@jaea.go.jp; Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Kando, M.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto (Japan); Nishio, K.; Orlandi, R.; Koura, H.; Imai, K. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-49 Muramatsu, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto (Japan); Joint Institute for High Temperature of RAS, Izhorskaya St. 13 Bd. 2, Moscow (Russian Federation); Skobelev, I. Yu. [Joint Institute for High Temperature of RAS, Izhorskaya St. 13 Bd. 2, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Sako, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-49 Muramatsu, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); J-PARC Center, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Matsukawa, K. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto (Japan); Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Kobe University, 5-1-1 Fukae-minami, Higashinada, Kobe (Japan); and others

    2015-03-15

    Almost fully stripped Fe ions accelerated up to 0.9 GeV are demonstrated with a 200 TW femtosecond high-intensity laser irradiating a micron-thick Al foil with Fe impurity on the surface. An energetic low-emittance high-density beam of heavy ions with a large charge-to-mass ratio can be obtained, which is useful for many applications, such as a compact radio isotope source in combination with conventional technology.

  8. Acceleration of highly charged GeV Fe ions from a low-Z substrate by intense femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Nishio, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Orlandi, R.; Sako, H.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Matsukawa, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Koura, H.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Imai, K.; Nagamiya, S.

    2015-03-01

    Almost fully stripped Fe ions accelerated up to 0.9 GeV are demonstrated with a 200 TW femtosecond high-intensity laser irradiating a micron-thick Al foil with Fe impurity on the surface. An energetic low-emittance high-density beam of heavy ions with a large charge-to-mass ratio can be obtained, which is useful for many applications, such as a compact radio isotope source in combination with conventional technology.

  9. Simulations of radiation pressure ion acceleration with the VEGA Petawatt laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockhausen, Luca C.; Torres, Ricardo; Conejero Jarque, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    The Spanish Pulsed Laser Centre (CLPU) is a new high-power laser facility for users. Its main system, VEGA, is a CPA Ti:Sapphire laser which, in its final phase, will be able to reach Petawatt peak powers in pulses of 30 fs with a pulse contrast of 1 :1010 at 1 ps. The extremely low level of pre-pulse intensity makes this system ideally suited for studying the laser interaction with ultrathin targets. We have used the particle-in-cell (PIC) code OSIRIS to carry out 2D simulations of the acceleration of ions from ultrathin solid targets under the unique conditions provided by VEGA, with laser intensities up to 1022 W cm-2 impinging normally on 20 - 60 nm thick overdense plasmas, with different polarizations and pre-plasma scale lengths. We show how signatures of the radiation pressure-dominated regime, such as layer compression and bunch formation, are only present with circular polarization. By passively shaping the density gradient of the plasma, we demonstrate an enhancement in peak energy up to tens of MeV and monoenergetic features. On the contrary linear polarization at the same intensity level causes the target to blow up, resulting in much lower energies and broader spectra. One limiting factor of Radiation Pressure Acceleration is the development of Rayleigh-Taylor like instabilities at the interface of the plasma and photon fluid. This results in the formation of bubbles in the spatial profile of laser-accelerated proton beams. These structures were previously evidenced both experimentally and theoretically. We have performed 2D simulations to characterize this bubble-like structure and report on the dependency on laser and target parameters.

  10. Direct Acceleration of Pickup Ions at the Solar Wind Termination Shock the Production of Anomalous Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, D C; Baring, M G; Ellison, Donald C.; Jones, Frank C.; Baring, Matthew G.

    1999-01-01

    We have modeled the injection and acceleration of pickup ions at the solar wind termination shock and investigated the parameters needed to produce the observed Anomalous Cosmic Ray (ACR) fluxes. A non-linear Monte Carlo technique was employed, which in effect solves the Boltzmann equation and is not restricted to near-isotropic particle distribution functions. This technique models the injection of thermal and pickup ions, the acceleration of these ions, and the determination of the shock structure under the influence of the accelerated ions. The essential effects of injection are treated in a mostly self-consistent manner, including effects from shock obliquity, cross-field diffusion, and pitch-angle scattering. Using recent determinations of pickup ion densities, we are able to match the absolute flux of hydrogen in the ACRs by assuming that pickup ion scattering mean free paths, at the termination shock, are much less than an AU and that modestly strong cross-field diffusion occurs. Simultaneously, we mat...

  11. Response of sensitive human ataxia and resistant T-1 cell lines to accelerated heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Chang, P.Y.; Lommel, L.; Roots, R.

    1983-07-01

    The radiation dose responses of fibroblast from a patient with Ataxia telangiectasis (AT-2SF) and an established line of human T-1 cells were studied. Nearly monoenergetic accelerated neon and argon ions were used at the Berkeley Bevalac with various residual range values. The LET of the particles varied from 30 keV/..mu..m to over 1000 keV/..mu..m. All Ataxia survival curves were exponential functions of the dose. Their radiosensitivity reached peak values at 100 to 200 keV/..mu..m. Human T-1 cells have effective sublethal damage repair as has been evidenced by split dose experiments, and they are much more resistant to low LET than to high LET radiation. The repair-misrepair model has been used to interpret these results. We have obtained mathematical expressions that describe the cross sections and inactivation coefficients for both human cell lines as a function of the LET and the type of particle used. The results suggest either that high-LET particles induce a greater number of radiolesions per track or that heavy-ions at high LET induce lesions that kill cells more effectively and that are different from those produced at low LET. We assume that the lesions induced in T-1 and Ataxia cells are qualitatively similar and that each cell line attempts to repair these lesions. The result in most irradiated Ataxia cells, however, is either lethal misrepair or incomplete repair leading to cell death. 63 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  12. Accelerated calendar and pulse life analysis of lithium-ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungst, Rudolph G.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Case, Herbert L.; Liaw, Bor Yann; Urbina, Angel; Paez, Thomas L.; Doughty, Daniel H.

    Sandia National Laboratories has been studying calendar and pulse discharge life of prototype high-power lithium-ion cells as part of the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program. One of the goals of ATD is to establish validated accelerated life test protocols for lithium-ion cells in the hybrid electric vehicle application. In order to accomplish this, aging experiments have been conducted on 18650-size cells containing a chemistry representative of these high-power designs. Loss of power and capacity are accompanied by increasing interfacial impedance at the cathode. These relationships are consistent within a given state-of-charge (SOC) over the range of storage temperatures and times. Inductive models have been used to construct detailed descriptions of the relationships between power fade and aging time and to relate power fade, capacity loss and impedance rise. These models can interpolate among the different experimental conditions and can also describe the error surface when fitting life prediction models to the data.

  13. Induction core alloys for heavy-ion inertial fusion-energy accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur W. Molvik

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Induction core alloys are evaluated that are appropriate for heavy-ion induction accelerators to drive heavy-ion inertial fusion (HIF power plants. Parameters evaluated include the usable flux swing and the energy loss over a range of magnetization rates of ∼10^{5}–10^{7} T/s, corresponding to pulse durations of ∼20 to 0.2 μs, respectively. The usable flux swing, for minimum core losses, extends from near the reversed remanent field to about 80% of the saturation field. The usable flux swing is enhanced, with little increase in losses, by annealing the core after winding. Maintaining low energy loss at high magnetization rates requires insulation to block interlaminar eddy currents. To obtain annealed cores with a high ratio of remanent to saturation magnetic field, the insulation must withstand annealing temperatures and apply minimum mechanical stress to the core during cooldown. We find that commercially available insulating coatings for amorphous metals either break down near 10^{6} T/s (a factor of 10 below the requirement, or do not achieve the maximum remanent field and hence the usable flux swing after annealing. More satisfactory coatings are available for silicon steel and nanocrystalline alloys, which could have applications in HIF. Amorphous alloys are capable of meeting most HIF needs, especially with improved coatings.

  14. Ion acceleration enhancement in laser-generated plasmas by metallic doped hydrogenated polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Mezzasalma

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Laser-generated plasmas in vacuum were obtained by ablating hydrogenated polymers at the Physics Department of the University of Messina and at the PALS Laboratory in Prague. In the first case a 3 ns,532 nm Nd:Yag laser, at 1010 W/cm2 intensity was employed.In the second case a 300 ps, 438 nm iodine laser, at 5x1014W/cm2 intensity was employed. Different ion collectors were usedin a time-of-flight configuration to monitor the ejected ions from theplasma at different angles with respect to the direction normal tothe target surface. Measurements demonstrated that the mean ionvelocity, directed orthogonally to the target surface, increases forablation of polymers doped with metallic elements with respect tothe nondoped one. The possible mechanism explaining theresults can be found in the different electron density of theplasma, due to the higher number of electrons coming from the dopingelements. This charge enhancement increases the equivalent ionvoltage acceleration, i.e. the electric field generated in the non-equilibrium plasma placed in front of the ablated target surface.

  15. Analysis of efficient ion acceleration with multi-picosecond LFEX laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Natsumi; Yogo, Akifumi; Mima, Kunioki; Tosaki, Shota; Koga, Keisuke; Nagatomo, Hideo; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Azechi, Horishi

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate an efficient proton acceleration reaching 30 MeV by using high contrast, kilojoule, picosecond laser LFEX at the peak intensity of 2.3 ×1018 W/cm2. Owing to the large spot size of 70 μm FWHM, the target foil expands one-dimensionally during the multi-picosecond pulse duration time, which yields the electron heating beyond the ponderomotive scaling observed in the experiment. We present by a 1D PIC simulation that the electron temperature evolves in time while the electrons recirculate between the front and rear surfaces of the expanding plasma. A theoretical calculation for the ion maximum energy that takes the temperature evolution into account agrees with the experimental result quantitatively. Being supported by the experiment and simulation, our theoretical model for the non-isothermal plasma expansion dynamics will provide an important basis for understanding the multi-picosecond high intensity laser-plasma interactions and for various applications such as energetic ion beam generation for medical applications and fast ignition-based laser fusion.

  16. Ion Acceleration at Earth, Saturn and Jupiter and its Global Impact on Magnetospheric Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Pontus

    2016-07-01

    The ion plasma pressures at Earth, Saturn and Jupiter are significant players in the electrodynamic force-balance that governs the structure and dynamics of these magnetospheres. There are many similarities between the physical mechanisms that are thought to heat the ion plasma to temperatures that even exceed those of the solar corona. In this presentation we compare the ion acceleration mechanisms at the three planetary magnetospheres and discuss their global impacts on magnetopsheric structure. At Earth, bursty-bulk flows, or "bubbles", have been shown to accelerate protons and O+ to high energies by the earthward moving magnetic dipolarization fronts. O+ ions display a more non-adiabatic energization in response to these fronts than protons do as they are energized and transported in to the ring-current region where they reach energies of several 100's keV. We present both in-situ measurements from the NASA Van Allen Probes Mission and global Energetic Neutral (ENA) images from the High-Energy Neutral Atom (HENA) Camera on board the IMAGE Mission, that illustrate these processes. The global impact on the magnetospheric structure is explored by comparing the empirical magnetic field model TS07d for given driving conditions with global plasma pressure distributions derived from the HENA images. At Saturn, quasi-periodic energization events, or large-scale injections, occur beyond about 9 RS around the post-midnight sector, clearly shown by the Ion and Neutral Atom Camera (INCA) on board the Cassini mission. In contrast to Earth, the corotational drift dominates even the energetic ion distributions. The large-scale injections display similar dipolarization front features can be found and there are indications that like at Earth the O+ responds more non-adiabatically than protons do. However, at Saturn there are also differences in that there appears to be energization events deep in the inner magnetosphere (6-9 RS) preferentially occurring in the pre

  17. Spatial Pulse Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    50epotr100t) i Toi deerinefndune the proper wavfomortanmting anrtenorws Fudiven0with a9 2E nOD(anosec o imuer&ieiesr and hensutibylkng avefrm hc a hr )~~ BdD ...zero- Phase at Fitted Points one polarity ) crossings) Number of Fitted Points --- 22. 48. Number of Individual Time-Measurements --- --- 22. 122...clear reversal of polarity , cutting definitively through zero voltage. In other words, from a practical waveform standpoint, N = 1 will actually be the

  18. Accelerated Lifetime Testing Methodology for Lifetime Estimation of Lithium-ion Batteries used in Augmented Wind Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroe, Daniel Ioan; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Stan, Ana-Irina;

    2014-01-01

    The development of lifetime estimation models for Lithium-ion battery cells, which are working under highly variable mission profiles characteristic for wind power plant applications, requires a lot of expenditures and time resources. Therefore, batteries have to be tested under accelerated...... both the capacity fade and the power capability decrease of the selected Lithium-ion battery cells. In the proposed methodology both calendar and cycling lifetime tests were considered since both components are influencing the lifetime of Lithium-ion batteries. Furthermore, the proposed methodology...

  19. Toward integrated laser-driven ion accelerator systems at the photo-medical research center in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolton, P.R., E-mail: bolton.paul@jaea.go.j [Photo-Medical Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Hori, T.; Kiriyama, H.; Mori, M.; Sakaki, H. [Photo-Medical Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Sutherland, K. [Hokkaido University, School of Medicine, Sapporo-shi, Kita-ku, Kita 12 Jo, Nishi 5 Chome 060-0812 (Japan); Suzuki, M. [Photo-Medical Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Wu, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Yogo, A. [Photo-Medical Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2010-08-01

    Goals and early progress at the Photo-Medical Research Center are summarized. Laser-driven ion beam radiotherapy can require compact repetition-rated laser systems with peak powers approaching the PW level. Laser development at PMRC is outlined. Our parallel experimental and simulation efforts aimed at the development of a prototype ion beamline as an integrated laser-driven ion accelerator system are presented. In addition some of our first medical and radiobiological experimental investigations, proton-induced double strand breaking in human cancer cells and simulations of optimum dose distributions for ocular melanoma are discussed. Recommended components of a balanced and comprehensive PMRC agenda are given.

  20. Investigation of Ion Beam Production and Acceleration Using Linear Electron Beams and a Pulse Powered Plasma Focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    propagation and of the correlation between propagation and collective ion acceleration, we initiated a systematic experiEntal investigation, the first...edited by N. Rostoker and M. Reiser (Harwood Academic Publishers, New York, 1979), p. 509. 12) W.W. Destler, private communication . 13) W.W. Destler

  1. TL Dosimetry on the Tandetron Ion Accelerator area of the ININ; Dosimetria TL en el area del Acelerador de iones Tandetron del ININ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdovinos A, M.A.; Gonzalez M, P.R. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    For the fulfilment of the operation tests of the Positive Ions type Tandetron 4120 MC, 2 MV, it was obtained the permission consented by the National Commission of Nuclear safety and safeguards (CNSNS). During the stage of tests were arranged Tl dosemeters in the Tandetron Accelerator area, as well as toward to the beam exit. In this work, it was presented the results obtained of the measurement of radiation levels, as much in the area as in the beam exit. This Accelerator is useful in different fields of science such as: biology, radiochemistry, materials, solid state physics, archaeology and environmental sciences between others. (Author)

  2. Study of the laser-plasma acceleration of ion beams with enhanced quality: The effects of nanostructured targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Reza

    2017-06-01

    Production of high-quality ion beams by intense laser-plasma interactions represents a rapidly evolving field of interest. In this paper, a nanostructured target is proposed to generate laser-driven quasi-monoenergetic ion beams with considerably reduced energy spread and enhanced peak energy. Linearly polarized, 40-fs laser pulses of intensity 8.5 × 1020 W cm-2 were considered to irradiate simple carbon foil and nanostructured targets. The proposed target consists of a thin layer of relatively high-Z atom (Ti) with a depression on its back surface which is filled by a nanosize disc of a low-Z atom (C). Reliable and reproducible results of multi-parametric Particle-in-Cell simulations show that by using a composed nanostructured target with optimum physical properties, a quasi-monoenergetic ion beam can be generated with a narrow band energy spectrum peaking at energies higher than 20 MeV. In addition, the forward-accelerated beam of low-Z carbon ions exhibits a considerably reduced transverse emittance in comparison with the ion beam obtained in the condition of a simple foil. The proposed nanostructured target can efficiently contribute to the generation of high-quality ion beams which are critical in newly growing applications and physics of laser-plasma accelerators.

  3. Pulse compression below 40fs at 1μm: The first step towards a short-pulse, high-energy beam line at LULI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaowei; Zou, Jiping; Martin, Luc; Simon, Francois; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Audebert, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    We present the upgrading project ELFIE (Equipement Laser de Forte Intensité et Energie) based on the "100TW" mixed Nd:glass CPA laser system at 1μm at LULI, which includes an energy enhancement and the development of a short-pulse, high-energy, good temporal contrast beam line (50fs/5J). We report the first experimental step towards the short-pulse, high-energy beam line: spectral broadening above 60nm from 7nm and temporal pulse compression below 40fs from 300fs at 1μm through a Krypton-filled hollow fiber compressor.

  4. Developments in the design of proton and ion accelerators for medical use

    CERN Document Server

    Bryant, P J

    1998-01-01

    Accelerators and medicine have been close companions since cyclotrons first made biological studies with particle beams possible in the 1930s. Later improvements, such as H-minus (H-) extraction, made cyclotrons the foremost, commercially-available producer of medical isotopes. Although the world's first hospital-based proton treatment centre, Loma Linda, uses a synchrotron, the cyclotron is now al so establishing a dominance in proton centres using passive beam spreading. However, two trends indicate a slightly different direction. The first is towards light ions and the second is towards 'penc il' beam scanning with active energy control. Together, these point to a new generation of synchrotrons with slow-beam-extraction systems that allow time for on-line dosimetry and provide very smooth spills. There are several variants for the slow extraction including the use of a betatron core and rf knockout. There are also methods for improving the spill quality such as rf channelling buckets a nd rf noise. The use...

  5. Lattice design and beam dynamics studies of the high energy beam transport line in the RAON heavy ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hyunchang, E-mail: hcjin@ibs.re.kr; Jang, Ji-Ho; Jang, Hyojae; Jeon, Dong-O

    2015-12-01

    In RAON heavy ion accelerator, beams generated by superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECR-IS) or Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) system are accelerated by lower energy superconducting linac and high energy superconducting linac. The accelerated beams are used in the high energy experimental hall which includes bio-medical and muon-SR facilities, after passing through the high energy beam transport lines. At the targets of those two facilities, the stable and small beams meeting the requirements rigorously are required in the transverse plane. Therefore the beams must be safely sent to the targets and simultaneously satisfy the two requirements, the achromatic condition and the mid-plane symmetric condition, of the targets. For this reason, the lattice design of the high energy beam transport lines in which the long deflecting sections are included is considered as a significant issue in the RAON accelerator. In this paper, we will describe the calculated beam optics satisfying the conditions and present the result of particle tracking simulations with the designed lattice of the high energy beam transport lines in the RAON accelerator. Also, the orbit distortion caused by the machine imperfections and the orbit correction with correctors will be discussed.

  6. Fundamental principles, measurement techniques and data analysis in a ion accelerator; Principios fundamentales, tecnicas de medicion y analisis de datos en un acelerador de iones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez M, O. [Facultad de Ciencias, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gleason, C. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Hinojosa, G. [Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: hinojosa@fis.unam.mx

    2008-07-01

    The present work is intended to be a general reference for students and professionals interested in the field. Here, we present an introduction to the analysis techniques and fundamental principles for data processing and operation of a typical ion accelerator that operates in the low energy range. We also present a detailed description of the apparatus and propose new analysis methods for the results. In addition, we introduce illustrative simulations of the ion's trajectories in the different components of the apparatus performed with specialized software and, a new computer data acquisition and control interface. (Author)

  7. Magnetic discharge accelerating diode for the gas-filled pulsed neutron generators based on inertial confinement of ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovskij, K. I.; Shikanov, A. E.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Shatokhin, V. L.; Isaev, A. A.; Martynenko, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with magnetic discharge diode module with inertial electrostatic ions confinement for the gas-filled pulsed neutron generators. The basis of the design is geometry with the central hollow cathode surrounded by the outer cylindrical anode and electrodes made of permanent magnets. The induction magnitude about 0.1-0.4 T in the central region of the discharge volume ensures the confinement of electrons in the space of hollow (virtual) cathode and leads to space charge compensation of accelerated ions in the centre. The research results of different excitation modes in pulsed high-voltage discharge are presented. The stable form of the volume discharge preserveing the shape and amplitude of the pulse current in the pressure range of 10-3-10-1 Torr and at the accelerating voltage up to 200 kV was observed.

  8. Beam delivery and pulse compression to sub-50 fs of a modelocked thin-disk laser in a gas-filled Kagome-type HC-PCF fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emaury, Florian; Dutin, Coralie Fourcade; Saraceno, Clara J; Trant, Mathis; Heckl, Oliver H; Wang, Yang Y; Schriber, Cinia; Gerome, Frederic; Südmeyer, Thomas; Benabid, Fetah; Keller, Ursula

    2013-02-25

    We present two experiments confirming that hypocycloid Kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs) are excellent candidates for beam delivery of MW peak powers and pulse compression down to the sub-50 fs regime. We demonstrate temporal pulse compression of a 1030-nm Yb:YAG thin disk laser providing 860 fs, 1.9 µJ pulses at 3.9 MHz. Using a single-pass grating pulse compressor, we obtained a pulse duration of 48 fs (FWHM), a spectral bandwidth of 58 nm, and an average output power of 4.2 W with an overall power efficiency into the final polarized compressed pulse of 56%. The pulse energy was 1.1 µJ. This corresponds to a peak power of more than 10 MW and a compression factor of 18 taking into account the exact temporal pulse profile measured with a SHG FROG. The compressed pulses were close to the transform limit of 44 fs. Moreover, we present transmission of up to 97 µJ pulses at 10.5 ps through 10-cm long fiber, corresponding to more than twice the critical peak power for self-focusing in silica.

  9. Construction and Test of a 10 Kv Ion Accelerator in the Faculty of Science of U.N.A.M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, B. E.; Yousif, F. B.; López-Patiaño, J.

    A low energy accelerator was constructed in the Faculty of Science of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) for atomic and molecular experiments in the energy range 1.0 - 10.0 keV. We present a general description as well as results of experiments performed by undergraduate and graduate physics students in different stages of the construction. Experiments include characterization of the velocity filter, identification of hydrogen ions and TOF spectra.

  10. Ionization and acceleration of heavy ions in high-Z solid target irradiated by high intensity laser

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahito, D.; Kishimoto, Y

    2016-01-01

    In the interaction between high intensity laser and solid film, an ionization dynamics inside the solid is dominated by fast time scale convective propagation of the internal sheath field and the slow one by impact ionization due to heated high energy electrons coupled with nonlocal heat transport. Furthermore, ionization and acceleration due to the localized external sheath field which co- propagates with Al ions constituting the high energy front in the vacuum region. Through this process, ...

  11. Elastic wave velocity inspection for rocks by pulse compression method%脉冲压缩方法检测岩石弹性波速度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李长征; 张碧星; 师芳芳

    2013-01-01

    On account of existing problems in rock elastic wave velocity inspecting,such as low signal to noise ratio(SNR),difficulty in reading the prime time of echo and inspecting large volume rock,pulse compression method is proposed.Linear frequency modulation (LFM) signal is mostly used as exciting source due to its remarkable properties,such as wide bandwidth,high energy and high SNR.While receiving terminal,echo signal is filtered by a matched filter,and the compression signal of high SNR is obtained.The wide time and band characteristics of LFM signal are introduced.In addition,the pulse compression principle and digital implementation process are also analyzed.The influence of the bandwidth of transducer on exciting signal is studied; elastic wave velocity of several rocks is inspected with a conventional method and pulse compression method.The wave velocity differences of two testing methods show a limited error.The detailed implementation and calculating process of pulse compression inspecting method are also described.The advantages and prospects of the method are analyzed.Results show that pulse compression method can be applied to inspect the elastic wave velocity in rock and access engineering quality.%针对岩石弹性波速度检测信噪比低、回波信号初至时间不易判读,以及较长岩石(或混凝土)超声检测难以穿透问题,提出用脉冲压缩方法检测弹性波速度.该方法与超声脉冲法检测的不同之处是在发射端采用编码信号激励,在接收端进行匹配滤波,得到高信噪比的压缩信号.介绍线性调频信号的宽时宽带特性,分析了脉冲压缩的基本原理和数字实现过程.试验研究了换能器带宽对激发信号的影响.用常规的单脉冲法和脉冲压缩方法检测了多个岩样的弹性波速度,试验结果表明,两种检测结果差异较小.给出了脉冲压缩方法用于岩石弹性波速度检测的具体步骤和计算过程.综合分析,脉冲压缩方法检

  12. Suprathermal Ion Acceleration in Multiple Contracting and Reconnecting Inertial-scale Flux Ropes in the Supersonic Solar Wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, J. A.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    3D and 2D MHD turbulence simulations with a strong large-scale magnetic field show that the turbulence is filled with quasi-2D inertial-scale flux ropes that intermittently reconnect, while test particle simulations stress how suprathermal particles can be efficiently accelerated to produce power law spectra (kappa distributions) when traversing multiple flux ropes. Solar wind observations indicate that the statistical properties of the turbulence agree well with the MHD turbulence simulation. In addition, recent observations show the presence of different size inertial-scale magnetic islands in the slow solar wind near the heliospheric current sheet, evidence of island merging, and of heating of ions and electrons in their vicinity. At the same time, observations in the supersonic solar wind suggest the existence of suprathermal ion spectra in the solar wind frame where the distribution function is a power law in momentum with a -5 exponent. We present a new statistical transport theory to model the acceleration of superthermal ions traversing multiple contracting and reconnecting inertial-scale quasi-2D flux ropes in the supersonic solar wind. Steady-state analytical solutions for the accelerated suprathermal particle spectrum in a radially expanding solar wind will be explored to show under what conditions one can reproduce the observed superthermal power-law slope.

  13. Superthermal Ion Transport and Acceleration in Multiple Contracting and Reconnecting Inertial-scale Flux Ropes in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Jakobus; Zank, Gary; Webb, Gary

    2014-10-01

    MHD turbulence simulations with a strong large-scale magnetic field show that the turbulence is filled with quasi-2D inertial-scale flux ropes that intermittently reconnect. Solar wind observations indicate that the statistical properties of the turbulence agree well with the MHD turbulence simulations, while particle simulations stress how ions can be efficiently accelerated to produce power law spectra when traversing multiple flux ropes. Recent observations show the presence of different size inertial-scale magnetic islands in the slow solar wind near the heliospheric current sheet, evidence of island merging, and of heating of ions and electrons in the vicinity. We will present a new statistical transport theory designed to model the acceleration and transport of superthermal ions traversing multiple contracting and reconnecting inertial-scale quasi-2D flux ropes in the supersonic slow solar wind. A steady-state solution for the accelerated particle spectrum in a radially expanding solar wind will discussed, showing that the theory potentially can explain naturally the existence of superthermal power-law spectra observed during quiet solar wind conditions.

  14. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic heavy ion beams via staged shock wave acceleration driven by intense laser pulses in near-critical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. L.; Qiao, B.; Shen, X. F.; You, W. Y.; Huang, T. W.; Yan, X. Q.; Wu, S. Z.; Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T.

    2016-09-01

    Laser-driven ion acceleration potentially offers a compact, cost-effective alternative to conventional accelerators for scientific, technological, and health-care applications. A novel scheme for heavy ion acceleration in near-critical plasmas via staged shock waves driven by intense laser pulses is proposed, where, in front of the heavy ion target, a light ion layer is used for launching a high-speed electrostatic shock wave. This shock is enhanced at the interface before it is transmitted into the heavy ion plasmas. Monoenergetic heavy ion beam with much higher energy can be generated by the transmitted shock, comparing to the shock wave acceleration in pure heavy ion target. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that quasi-monoenergetic {{{C}}}6+ ion beams with peak energy 168 MeV and considerable particle number 2.1 × {10}11 are obtained by laser pulses at intensity of 1.66 × {10}20 {{W}} {{cm}}-2 in such staged shock wave acceleration scheme. Similarly a high-quality {{Al}}10+ ion beam with a well-defined peak with energy 250 MeV and spread δ E/{E}0=30 % can also be obtained in this scheme.

  15. Invited Review Article: "Hands-on" laser-driven ion acceleration: A primer for laser-driven source development and potential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, J.; Bolton, P. R.; Parodi, K.

    2016-07-01

    An overview of progress and typical yields from intense laser-plasma acceleration of ions is presented. The evolution of laser-driven ion acceleration at relativistic intensities ushers prospects for improved functionality and diverse applications which can represent a varied assortment of ion beam requirements. This mandates the development of the integrated laser-driven ion accelerator system, the multiple components of which are described. Relevant high field laser-plasma science and design of controlled optimum pulsed laser irradiation on target are dominant single shot (pulse) considerations with aspects that are appropriate to the emerging petawatt era. The pulse energy scaling of maximum ion energies and typical differential spectra obtained over the past two decades provide guidance for continued advancement of laser-driven energetic ion sources and their meaningful applications.

  16. Invited Review Article: “Hands-on” laser-driven ion acceleration: A primer for laser-driven source development and potential applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, J. [Lehrstuhl für Medizinphysik, Fakultät für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Am Coulombwall 1, 85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik Garching, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, 85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Bolton, P. R.; Parodi, K. [Lehrstuhl für Medizinphysik, Fakultät für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Am Coulombwall 1, 85748 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    An overview of progress and typical yields from intense laser-plasma acceleration of ions is presented. The evolution of laser-driven ion acceleration at relativistic intensities ushers prospects for improved functionality and diverse applications which can represent a varied assortment of ion beam requirements. This mandates the development of the integrated laser-driven ion accelerator system, the multiple components of which are described. Relevant high field laser-plasma science and design of controlled optimum pulsed laser irradiation on target are dominant single shot (pulse) considerations with aspects that are appropriate to the emerging petawatt era. The pulse energy scaling of maximum ion energies and typical differential spectra obtained over the past two decades provide guidance for continued advancement of laser-driven energetic ion sources and their meaningful applications.

  17. Kinetic effects on the transition to relativistic self-induced transparency in laser-driven ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminos, Evangelos; Svedung Wettervik, Benjamin; Grech, Mickael; Fülöp, Tünde

    2016-10-01

    We study kinetic effects responsible for the transition to relativistic self-induced transparency in the interaction of a circularly-polarized laser-pulse with an overdense plasma and their relation to hole-boring and ion acceleration. It is shown, using particle-in-cell simulations and an analysis of separatrices in single-particle phase-space, that this transition is mediated by the complex interplay of fast electron dynamics and ion motion at the initial stage of the interaction. It thus depends on the ion charge-to-mass ratio and can be controlled by varying the laser temporal profile. Moreover, we find a new regime in which a transition from relativistic transparency to hole-boring occurs dynamically during the course of the interaction. It is shown that, for a fixed laser intensity, this dynamic transition regime allows optimal ion acceleration in terms of both energy and energy spread. This work was supported by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (pliona project) and the European Research Council (ERC-2014-CoG Grant 647121).

  18. Effect of a short weak prepulse on laser-triggered front-surface heavy-ion acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochkarev, S. G.; Bychenkov, V. Yu. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Golovin, G. V.; Uryupina, D. S.; Shulyapov, S. A.; Savel' ev, A. B. [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, International Laser Centre and Faculty of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Andriyash, A. V. [The All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-15

    A suppression of light-ion acceleration (from surface water contaminants) was observed when a moderate-intensity subpicosecond laser pulse was focused on a thick metal target. Simultaneously, an effective generation of high-energy multicharge ions of the target material (Fe) was experimentally observed. A numerical simulation based on the Boltzmann-Vlasov-Poisson model revealed that this is due to the very specific regime of cleaning contaminants from the target surface by the short weak prepulse preceding the main pulse by more than 10 ns and having an intensity below the surface breakdown threshold. Because this prepulse causes the contaminant layer to boil explosively, a low-density gap forms above the target surface. These conditions are consequently favorable for boosting the energy of heavy ions.

  19. Accelerating Rate Calorimetry Tests of Lithium-Ion Cells Before and After Storage Degradation at High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendoza-Hernandez Omar Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the behavior of Li-ion cells during thermal runaway is critical to evaluate the safety of these energy storage devices under outstanding conditions. Li-ion cells possess a high energy density and are used to store and supply energy to many aerospace applications. Incidents related to the overheating or thermal runaway of these cells can cause catastrophic damages that could end up costly space missions; therefore, thermal studies of Li-ion cells are very important for ensuring safety and reliability of space missions. This work evaluates the thermal behavior of Li-ion cells before and after storage degradation at high temperature using accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC equipment to analyze the thermal behavior of Li-ion cells under adiabatic conditions. Onset temperature points of self-heating and thermal runaway reactions are obtained. The onset points are used to identify non-self-heating, self-heating and thermal runaway regions as a function of state of charge. The results obtained can be useful to develop accurate thermo-electrochemical models of Li-ion cells.

  20. Relativistically induced transparency acceleration of light ions by an ultrashort laser pulse interacting with a heavy-ion-plasma density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Aakash A.; Tsung, Frank S.; Tableman, Adam R.; Mori, Warren B.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.

    2013-10-01

    The relativistically induced transparency acceleration (RITA) scheme of proton and ion acceleration using laser-plasma interactions is introduced, modeled, and compared to the existing schemes. Protons are accelerated with femtosecond relativistic pulses to produce quasimonoenergetic bunches with controllable peak energy. The RITA scheme works by a relativistic laser inducing transparency [Akhiezer and Polovin, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz 30, 915 (1956); Kaw and Dawson, Phys. FluidsPFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1692942 13, 472 (1970); Max and Perkins, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.27.1342 27, 1342 (1971)] to densities higher than the cold-electron critical density, while the background heavy ions are stationary. The rising laser pulse creates a traveling acceleration structure at the relativistic critical density by ponderomotively [Lindl and Kaw, Phys. FluidsPFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1693437 14, 371 (1971); Silva , Phys. Rev. E1063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.59.2273 59, 2273 (1999)] driving a local electron density inflation, creating an electron snowplow and a co-propagating electrostatic potential. The snowplow advances with a velocity determined by the rate of the rise of the laser's intensity envelope and the heavy-ion-plasma density gradient scale length. The rising laser is incrementally rendered transparent to higher densities such that the relativistic-electron plasma frequency is resonant with the laser frequency. In the snowplow frame, trace density protons reflect off the electrostatic potential and get snowplowed, while the heavier background ions are relatively unperturbed. Quasimonoenergetic bunches of velocity equal to twice the snowplow velocity can be obtained and tuned by controlling the snowplow velocity using laser-plasma parameters. An analytical model for the proton energy as a function of laser intensity, rise time, and plasma density gradient is developed and compared to 1D and 2D PIC OSIRIS [Fonseca , Lect. Note Comput. Sci.9783