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Sample records for pulse sequence corpse

  1. DNA typing of Calliphorids collected from human corpses in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, R; Tan, T C; Lee, H L; Nazni, W A; Sofian-Azirun, M

    2013-03-01

    Estimation of post-mortem interval (PMI) is crucial for time of death determination. The advent of DNA-based identification techniques forensic entomology saw the beginning of a proliferation of molecular studies into forensically important Calliphoridae (Diptera). The use of DNA to characterise morphologically indistinguishable immature calliphorids was recognised as a valuable molecular tool with enormous practical utility. The local entomofauna in most cases is important for the examination of entomological evidences. The survey of the local entomofauna has become a fundamental first step in forensic entomological studies, because different geographical distributions, seasonal and environmental factors may influence the decomposition process and the occurrence of different insect species on corpses. In this study, calliphorids were collected from 13 human corpses recovered from indoors, outdoors and aquatic conditions during the post-mortem examination by pathologists from the government hospitals in Malaysia. Only two species, Chrysomya megacephala and Chrysomya rufifacies were recovered from human corpses. DNA sequencing was performed to study the mitochondrial encoded COI gene and to evaluate the suitability of the 1300 base pairs of COI fragments for identification of blow fly species collected from real crime scene. The COI gene from blow fly specimens were sequenced and deposited in GenBank to expand local databases. The sequenced COI gene was useful in identifying calliphorids retrieved from human corpses.

  2. An Iconography of the Flesh: How Corpses Mean As Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Shwartz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The structuring relationship between the material world and the world of culture is variously embodied in the figure of the corpse. To ask how corpses mean as matter is to attend to them as “things themselves”—by bracketing the freighted assumptions and naturally mixed feelings we have when we encounter something that cannot but remind us of our own mortality. Corpses force us to think of putrefaction—and allow us, via a complex system of cultural and representational practices, to just as quickly disavow this unpleasantness. Wherever the corpse appears, then, it brings with it ideas about the relationship between representation and the real, or, more precisely, about the matter of subjectivity. This materiality also crucially constitutes the corpse’s difference from the identity of the deceased, and it is here where the corpse may thus do more than simply reference the past. The end point of the argument, then, is to work towards a vocabulary that allows this difference—this material remainder—to figure meaningfully in practices of grief and mourning that may not point exclusively back towards the deceased (and inevitably a particular version of that person’s legacy but towards the future and towards polysemic, even conflicting ideas of the responsibility placed upon us by this death. This paper opens a discussion of corpses as “vibrant matter” (to borrow Jane Bennett’s provocative term whose materiality is an equal partner to their cultural significance. My reading opens a conversation about the very real work of corpses as things capable of organizing diverse affect that in turn may become considered action. Following Bennett’s reading of Deleuze and Latour, I account for the corpse as both deceased subject and material object by framing it as a kind of assemblage. As remains, the corpse is essentially referential, the remains of someone. But remains are also material, matter that functions as an actant in concert with

  3. Arbitrarily accurate twin composite π -pulse sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torosov, Boyan T.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2018-04-01

    We present three classes of symmetric broadband composite pulse sequences. The composite phases are given by analytic formulas (rational fractions of π ) valid for any number of constituent pulses. The transition probability is expressed by simple analytic formulas and the order of pulse area error compensation grows linearly with the number of pulses. Therefore, any desired compensation order can be produced by an appropriate composite sequence; in this sense, they are arbitrarily accurate. These composite pulses perform equally well as or better than previously published ones. Moreover, the current sequences are more flexible as they allow total pulse areas of arbitrary integer multiples of π .

  4. Pulse sequences for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequences following the administration of an exogenous contrast agent are discussed. Pulse sequences are categorised according to the contrast agent mechanism: changes in proton density, relaxivity, magnetic susceptibility and resonant frequency shift. Applications in morphological imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, dynamic imaging and cell labelling are described. The importance of optimising the pulse sequence for each application is emphasised

  5. Use of the Frank sequence in pulsed EPR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tseitlin, Mark; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2011-01-01

    The Frank polyphase sequence has been applied to pulsed EPR of triarylmethyl radicals at 256MHz (9.1mT magnetic field), using 256 phase pulses. In EPR, as in NMR, use of a Frank sequence of phase steps permits pulsed FID signal acquisition with very low power microwave/RF pulses (ca. 1.5m......W in the application reported here) relative to standard pulsed EPR. A 0.2mM aqueous solution of a triarylmethyl radical was studied using a 16mm diameter cross-loop resonator to isolate the EPR signal detection system from the incident pulses. Keyword: Correlation spectroscopy,Multi-pulse EPR,Low power pulses,NMR,EPR...

  6. Study of the fast inversion recovery pulse sequence. With reference to fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery and fast short TI inversion recovery pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Maki, Toshio; Suzuki, Takeshi

    1997-01-01

    The fast inversion recovery (fast IR) pulse sequence was evaluated. We compared the fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (fast FLAIR) pulse sequence in which inversion time (TI) was established as equal to the water null point for the purpose of the water-suppressed T 2 -weighted image, with the fast short TI inversion recovery (fast STIR) pulse sequence in which TI was established as equal to the fat null point for purpose of fat suppression. In the fast FLAIR pulse sequence, the water null point was increased by making TR longer. In the FLAIR pulse sequence, the longitudinal magnetization contrast is determined by TI. If TI is increased, T 2 -weighted contrast improves in the same way as increasing TR for the SE pulse sequence. Therefore, images should be taken with long TR and long TI, which are longer than TR and longer than the water null point. On the other hand, the fat null point is not affected by TR in the fast STIR pulse sequence. However, effective TE was affected by variation of the null point. This increased in proportion to the increase in effective TE. Our evaluation indicated that the fast STIR pulse sequence can control the extensive signals from fat in a short time. (author)

  7. The mummified corpse in a domestic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campobasso, Carlo P; Falamingo, Rosa; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Vinci, Francesco

    2009-09-01

    A mummified body of an 86-year-old white man with a history of coronary atherosclerosis was found in the reception-room of his apartment located in a condominium of the city-center of Bari (Southern Italy) approximately 7 years after disappearance. Unpaid electricity bills caused the power stations to turn off electricity while unpaid condominium bills forced the manager of the condominium to open the apartment where the body was found. The corpse was well preserved through the mummification process and no external injuries were observed. Signs of a very low insect activity were also present, reasonably consistent with a rapid skin dehydration. The body was sitting on the carpet in front of an easy-chair, fully clothed by a woollen vest with dark paints and shoes. The head was lying face down on the easy-chair. The corpse was very light in weight, fixed in the sitting position by the brittle dehydrated tissues. The carpet on which the body was sitting and the covering tissue of the easy-chair on which the head was lying absorbed most of the early putrefactive fluids coming from the corpse. The internal organs were grossly identifiable but essentially unremarkable. On histologic examination most of the tissues were found to be autolyzed. Toxicology studies revealed only decompositional products. The cause of death was undetermined but presumed natural. Based on the ante-mortem data available the corpse was soon identified by dental comparison to be that one of the apartment owner missing 7 years before. The delayed recovery of elderly people who lived alone, incapacitated or unable to get help, or even of lonely deaths of nobody seems to miss are often explained by the isolation os such people even in urban areas in addition to a deficient family support, missing social and neighborly relationships, worsening of the health and financial conditions.

  8. Fat suppression in MR imaging with binomial pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudovin, C.J.; Bryant, D.J.; Bydder, G.M.; Young, I.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a study to develop pulse sequences allowing suppression of fat signal on MR images without eliminating signal from other tissues with short T1. They have developed such a technique involving selective excitation of protons in water, based on a binomial pulse sequence. Imaging is performed at 0.15 T. Careful shimming is performed to maximize separation of fat and water peaks. A spin-echo 1,500/80 sequence is used, employing 90 degrees pulse with transit frequency optimized for water with null excitation of 20 H offset, followed by a section-selective 180 degrees pulse. With use of the binomial sequence for imagining, reduction in fat signal is seen on images of the pelvis and legs of volunteers. Patient studies show dramatic improvement in visualization of prostatic carcinoma compared with standard sequences

  9. Modular pulse sequencing in a tokamak system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, A.C.; Lee, S.; Saw, S.H.

    1992-01-01

    Pulse technique applied in the timing and sequencing of the various part of the MUT tokamak system are discussed. The modular architecture of the pulse generating device highlights the versatile application of the simple physical concepts in precise and complicated research experiment. (author)

  10. Natural Disasters, Corpses and the Risk of Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM Conly

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent occurrence of the category 4 Hurricane Katrina devastated the United States? Gulf Coast. The hurricane caused widespread destruction and flooding, and left hundreds of thousands of people homeless. The mounting death toll was reported at almost 300 deaths as of September 8, 2005 (1,2. The unfolding events and high death toll have left an unusual situation in which there are many decomposing corpses either lying on the streets or floating in the flood waters. The presence of these corpses in open settings, such as in public places and in the water that has inundated much of the city of New Orleans, naturally raises concerns about the occurrence of infectious disease epidemics (3. In the aftermath of large natural disasters, instinctive uncertainties arise among workers and the general population with respect to the appropriate handling and disposal of dead bodies and human remains. Given the recent occurrence of Hurricane Katrina as a large natural disaster and the unprecedented setting of the numerous corpses requiring disposal, it was considered timely to review the infectious disease risks associated with the handling of dead bodies.

  11. Detection of Metabolism Function of Microbial Community of Corpses by Biolog-Eco Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, X Y; Wang, J F; Zhu, G H; Ma, M Y; Lai, Y; Zhou, H

    2016-06-01

    To detect the changes of microbial community functional diversity of corpses with different postmortem interval (PMI) and to evaluate forensic application value for estimating PMI. The cultivation of microbial community from the anal swabs of a Sus scrofa and a human corpse placed in field environment from 0 to 240 h after death was performed using the Biolog-Eco Microplate and the variations of the absorbance values were also monitored. Combined with the technology of forensic pathology and flies succession, the metabolic characteristics and changes of microbial community on the decomposed corpse under natural environment were also observed. The diversity of microbial metabolism function was found to be negatively correlated with the number of maggots in the corpses. The freezing processing had the greatest impact on average well color development value at 0 h and the impact almost disappeared after 48 h. The diversity of microbial metabolism of the samples became relatively unstable after 192 h. The principal component analysis showed that 31 carbon sources could be consolidated for 5 principal components (accumulative contribution ratio >90%).The carbon source tsquare-analysis showed that N -acetyl- D -glucosamine and L -serine were the dominant carbon sources for estimating the PMI (0=240 h) of the Sus scrofa and human corpse. The Biolog-Eco method can be used to reveal the metabolic differences of the carbon resources utilization of the microbial community on the corpses during 0-240 h after death, which could provide a new basis for estimating the PMI. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  12. Neural-network-designed pulse sequences for robust control of singlet-triplet qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu-Chen; Yung, Man-Hong; Wang, Xin

    2018-04-01

    Composite pulses are essential for universal manipulation of singlet-triplet spin qubits. In the absence of noise, they are required to perform arbitrary single-qubit operations due to the special control constraint of a singlet-triplet qubit, while in a noisy environment, more complicated sequences have been developed to dynamically correct the error. Tailoring these sequences typically requires numerically solving a set of nonlinear equations. Here we demonstrate that these pulse sequences can be generated by a well-trained, double-layer neural network. For sequences designed for the noise-free case, the trained neural network is capable of producing almost exactly the same pulses known in the literature. For more complicated noise-correcting sequences, the neural network produces pulses with slightly different line shapes, but the robustness against noises remains comparable. These results indicate that the neural network can be a judicious and powerful alternative to existing techniques in developing pulse sequences for universal fault-tolerant quantum computation.

  13. Investigation of the Effect of Finite Pulse Errors on BABA Pulse Sequence Using Floquet-Magnus Expansion Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene S; Reid, Alicia E

    This paper presents the study of finite pulse widths for the BABA pulse sequence using the Floquet-Magnus expansion (FME) approach. In the FME scheme, the first order F 1 is identical to its counterparts in average Hamiltonian theory (AHT) and Floquet theory (FT). However, the timing part in the FME approach is introduced via the Λ 1 ( t ) function not present in other schemes. This function provides an easy way for evaluating the spin evolution during "the time in between" through the Magnus expansion of the operator connected to the timing part of the evolution. The evaluation of Λ 1 ( t ) is useful especially for the analysis of the non-stroboscopic evolution. Here, the importance of the boundary conditions, which provides a natural choice of Λ 1 (0) is ignored. This work uses the Λ 1 ( t ) function to compare the efficiency of the BABA pulse sequence with δ - pulses and the BABA pulse sequence with finite pulses. Calculations of Λ 1 ( t ) and F 1 are presented.

  14. Programmable pulse sequence generator with multiple output lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabczyk, Hubert

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents a novel concept of pulse sequence generator and its prototype as an electronic circuit testing laboratory tool. The generator has multiple output lines and is capable of using control data defining different pulse sequences to be given to the outputs. It is also possible to use different voltage levels in output signal and switch output lines for reading data from driven system. The pulse sequence generator can be used for runtime environment simulation, as hardware tester or auxiliary tool in new designs. Important design factors were to keep cost of the tool low and allow integration with other projects by using flexible architecture. The prototype was based on universal programmer with adjustable power supply, '51 microcontroller and Altera Cyclone chip. The generator communicates witch PC computer via RS232 port. Dedicated software was developed in the course of this project, to control the tool and data transmission. The prototype confirmed the possibility to create an inexpensive multipurpose laboratory tool for programming, testing and simulation of digital devices.

  15. MR pulse sequences for selective relaxation time measurements: a phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Jensen, M

    1990-01-01

    a Siemens Magnetom wholebody magnetic resonance scanner operating at 1.5 Tesla was used. For comparison six imaging pulse sequences for relaxation time measurements were tested on the same phantom. The spectroscopic pulse sequences all had an accuracy better than 10% of the reference values....

  16. First survey of forensically important insects from human corpses in Shiraz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moemenbellah-Fard, Mohammad D; Keshavarzi, Davood; Fereidooni, Mehran; Soltani, Aboozar

    2018-02-01

    The presence of insects on human cadavers has potential judicial value in medicolegal cases. This research emphasized the important role of insects in postmortem decomposition. It was conducted to investigate the composition and abundance of insects from human corpses during autopsies in legal medicine. It was implemented in the city of Shiraz, south Iran. Insects associated with human corpses were carefully collected and put into labelled vials. They were then identified using valid taxonomic keys. Fifteen outdoor (67%) and indoor discovered cadavers were examined. All but one was covered at the time of discovery. From these several species of entomofauna played important roles in the minimum postmortem interval (minPMI) estimate. Insects included the orders of Diptera and Coleoptera. Overall, 14 different species of arthropods were identified. Within Diptera, 2 families of Sarcophagidae and Calliphoridae were present in 73% of the cases with Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy and Chrysomya albiceps Wiedemann accounting for about half of the cases. The latter family members, Calliphoridae, were more frequently (52%) collected in autumn and winter. Only 4/15 outdoor cadavers had beetles. Four species of Coleopterans; namely Dermestes frischii Kugelann, Nitidula flavomaculata Rossi, Creophilus maxillosus Linnaeus and Saprinus chalcites Illiger; were recorded for the first time from 3 corpses in Iran. The presence and diversity of different insects on human corpses could contribute to the advancement of forensic entomology knowledge and the refined estimates of minPMI in medicolegal cases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Study of {sup 14}N NQR response to SORC pulse sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konnai, A., E-mail: konnai@nmri.go.jp; Odano, N. [National Maritime Research Institute, Department of Navigation and System Engineering (Japan); Asaji, T. [Nihon University, Department of Chemistry, College of Humanities and Sciences (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    The behavior of nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signals between RF pulses of the strong off-resonance comb (SORC) as well as the spin-locking spin-echo (SLSE) pulse sequences was studied as for {sup 14}N NQR line {nu}{sub +} of dimethylnitramine (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}NNO{sub 2} at 77 K. The periodic variation of the signal amplitude observed by using SORC pulse sequence could be reasonably explained by the theoretical expression reported in the literature.

  18. Outdoor post-mortem bite injuries by Tapinoma nigerrimum (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) on a human corpse: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacci, Teresa; Vercillo, Vannio

    2015-07-01

    Ants are among the insects that colonize exposed human and animal corpses during the early stage of decomposition. In Calabria, Italy (as well as in other countries), Formicidae have been observed preying on immature stages of Diptera and other insects, as well as causing irregular scalloped areas of superficial skin loss on human corpses and animal carcasses. We present a case of injuries on a human corpse caused by ant feeding. The macroscopic appearance is described and the results of a histochemical investigation of the skin lesions caused by worker ants are reported for the first time. The investigation was carried out on the fresh corpse of a 53-year-old man discovered in a rural area of Cosenza province (Calabria, southern Italy). Numerous irregular areas of superficial skin loss caused by the ant Tapinoma nigerrimum (Nylander 1856) (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) were observed on the body surface, inflicted very early in the post-mortem period. Because the classification of lesions is of crucial importance for forensic investigations, the macroscopic appearance and distribution pattern of the lesions on the corpse are illustrated. The histochemical investigation of the damaged skin explains, for the first time, the mechanism of production of the lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  19. Microbial community assembly and metabolic function during mammalian corpse decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalf, J. L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Weiss, S.; Lax, S.; Van Treuren, W.; Hyde, E. R.; Song, S. J.; Amir, A.; Larsen, P.; Sangwan, N.; Haarmann, D.; Humphrey, G. C.; Ackermann, G.; Thompson, L. R.; Lauber, C.; Bibat, A.; Nicholas, C.; Gebert, M. J.; Petrosino, J. F.; Reed, S. C.; Gilbert, J. A.; Lynne, A. M.; Bucheli, S. R.; Carter, D. O.; Knight, R.

    2015-12-10

    Vertebrate corpse decomposition provides an important stage in nutrient cycling in most terrestrial habitats, yet microbially mediated processes are poorly understood. Here we combine deep microbial community characterization, community-level metabolic reconstruction, and soil biogeochemical assessment to understand the principles governing microbial community assembly during decomposition of mouse and human corpses on different soil substrates. We find a suite of bacterial and fungal groups that contribute to nitrogen cycling and a reproducible network of decomposers that emerge on predictable time scales. Our results show that this decomposer community is derived primarily from bulk soil, but key decomposers are ubiquitous in low abundance. Soil type was not a dominant factor driving community development, and the process of decomposition is sufficiently reproducible to offer new opportunities for forensic investigations.

  20. Microbial community assembly and metabolic function during mammalian corpse decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Jessica L; Xu, Zhenjiang Zech; Weiss, Sophie; Lax, Simon; Van Treuren, Will; Hyde, Embriette R.; Song, Se Jin; Amir, Amnon; Larsen, Peter; Sangwan, Naseer; Haarmann, Daniel; Humphrey, Greg C; Ackermann, Gail; Thompson, Luke R; Lauber, Christian; Bibat, Alexander; Nicholas, Catherine; Gebert, Matthew J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Reed, Sasha C.; Gilbert, Jack A; Lynne, Aaron M; Bucheli, Sibyl R; Carter, David O; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate corpse decomposition provides an important stage in nutrient cycling in most terrestrial habitats, yet microbially mediated processes are poorly understood. Here we combine deep microbial community characterization, community-level metabolic reconstruction, and soil biogeochemical assessment to understand the principles governing microbial community assembly during decomposition of mouse and human corpses on different soil substrates. We find a suite of bacterial and fungal groups that contribute to nitrogen cycling and a reproducible network of decomposers that emerge on predictable time scales. Our results show that this decomposer community is derived primarily from bulk soil, but key decomposers are ubiquitous in low abundance. Soil type was not a dominant factor driving community development, and the process of decomposition is sufficiently reproducible to offer new opportunities for forensic investigations.

  1. [Decomposition of corpses--a microbial degradation process with special reference to mummification, formation of adipocere and incomplete putrified corpes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenen, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Decomposition of the human body is a microbial process. It is influenced by the environmental situation and it depends to a high degree on the exchange of substances between the corpse and the environment. Mummification occurs at low humidity or frost. Adipocere arises from lack of oxygen, incomplete putrified corpses develop when there is no exchange of air or water between the corpse and the environment.

  2. Investigation of the effect of finite pulse errors on the BABA pulse sequence using the Floquet-Magnus expansion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene S.; Reid, Alicia E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study of finite pulse widths for the BABA pulse sequence using the Floquet-Magnus expansion (FME) approach. In the FME scheme, the first order ? is identical to its counterparts in average Hamiltonian theory (AHT) and Floquet theory (FT). However, the timing part in the FME approach is introduced via the ? function not present in other schemes. This function provides an easy way for evaluating the spin evolution during the time in between' through the Magnus expansion of the operator connected to the timing part of the evolution. The evaluation of ? is particularly useful for the analysis of the non-stroboscopic evolution. Here, the importance of the boundary conditions, which provide a natural choice of ? , is ignored. This work uses the ? function to compare the efficiency of the BABA pulse sequence with ? and the BABA pulse sequence with finite pulses. Calculations of ? and ? are presented.

  3. Study and realisation of a programmable generator of pulse sequences, for nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Daniel

    1974-01-01

    After having recalled the operation of pulse-based nuclear magnetic resonance and the use of pulse sequences in NMR-based measurements, and outlined the need for a pulse sequence generator, the author reports the design and realisation of such a device. He describes its general organisation with its base sequence, base clock, sequence start, duration, displays, data transfers, data processing, and signal distribution. He presents the chosen technology (ECL logics), the sequence base set, time bases, multiplexers, comparison sets, the distribution set, the sequence programming, the sampling and output set. He reports tests and the use of the so-designed generator [fr

  4. A dispersion-balanced Discrete Fourier Transform of repetitive pulse sequences using temporal Talbot effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Pousa, Carlos R.

    2017-11-01

    We propose a processor based on the concatenation of two fractional temporal Talbot dispersive lines with balanced dispersion to perform the DFT of a repetitive electrical sequence, for its use as a controlled source of optical pulse sequences. The electrical sequence is used to impart the amplitude and phase of a coherent train of optical pulses by use of a modulator placed between the two Talbot lines. The proposal has been built on a representation of the action of fractional Talbot effect on repetitive pulse sequences and a comparison with related results and proposals. It is shown that the proposed system is reconfigurable within a few repetition periods, has the same processing rate as the input optical pulse train, and requires the same technical complexity in terms of dispersion and pulse width as the standard, passive pulse-repetition rate multipliers based on fractional Talbot effect.

  5. A report on the pupae of Desmometopa sp. (Diptera: Milichiidae) recovered from a human corpse in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumara, T K; Abu Hassan, A; Che Salmah, M R; Bhupinder, S

    2010-04-01

    The pupae of Desmometopa sp. (Diptera: Milichiidae) were collected from a human corpse found indoor in active decay stage together with the larvae of Sarcophagidae, Synthesiomyia nudiseta (Wulp), Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) and Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart). This research note is the first report of the Desmometopa sp. recovered from a human corpse in Malaysia.

  6. Estimate of pulse-sequence data acquisition system for multi-dimensional measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Yasunori; Sakae, Takeji; Nohtomi, Akihiro; Matoba, Masaru [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Matsumoto, Yuzuru

    1996-07-01

    A pulse-sequence data acquisition system has been newly designed and estimated for the measurement of one- or multi-dimensional pulse train coming from radiation detectors. In this system, in order to realize the pulse-sequence data acquisition, the arrival time of each pulse is recorded to a memory of a personal computer (PC). For the multi-dimensional data acquisition with several input channels, each arrival-time data is tagged with a `flag` which indicates the input channel of arriving pulse. Counting losses due to the existence of processing time of the PC are expected to be reduced by using a First-In-First-Out (FIFO) memory unit. In order to verify this system, a computer simulation was performed, Various sets of random pulse trains with different mean pulse rate (1-600 kcps) were generated by using Monte Carlo simulation technique. Those pulse trains were dealt with another code which simulates the newly-designed data acquisition system including a FIFO memory unit; the memory size was assumed to be 0-100 words. And the recorded pulse trains on the PC with the various FIFO memory sizes have been observed. From the result of the simulation, it appears that the system with 3 words FIFO memory unit works successfully up to the pulse rate of 10 kcps without any severe counting losses. (author)

  7. Estimate of pulse-sequence data acquisition system for multi-dimensional measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Yasunori; Sakae, Takeji; Nohtomi, Akihiro; Matoba, Masaru; Matsumoto, Yuzuru.

    1996-01-01

    A pulse-sequence data acquisition system has been newly designed and estimated for the measurement of one- or multi-dimensional pulse train coming from radiation detectors. In this system, in order to realize the pulse-sequence data acquisition, the arrival time of each pulse is recorded to a memory of a personal computer (PC). For the multi-dimensional data acquisition with several input channels, each arrival-time data is tagged with a 'flag' which indicates the input channel of arriving pulse. Counting losses due to the existence of processing time of the PC are expected to be reduced by using a First-In-First-Out (FIFO) memory unit. In order to verify this system, a computer simulation was performed, Various sets of random pulse trains with different mean pulse rate (1-600 kcps) were generated by using Monte Carlo simulation technique. Those pulse trains were dealt with another code which simulates the newly-designed data acquisition system including a FIFO memory unit; the memory size was assumed to be 0-100 words. And the recorded pulse trains on the PC with the various FIFO memory sizes have been observed. From the result of the simulation, it appears that the system with 3 words FIFO memory unit works successfully up to the pulse rate of 10 kcps without any severe counting losses. (author)

  8. New MR pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, S.E.; Flamig, D.P.; Griffey, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method for fat suppression for three-dimensional MR imaging. The FATS (fat-suppressed acquisition with echo time shortened) sequence employs a pair of opposing adiabatic half-passage RF pulses tuned on fat resonance. The imaging parameters are as follows: TR, 20 msec; TE, 21.7-3.2 msec; 1,024 x 128 x 128 acquired matrix; imaging time, approximately 11 minutes. A series of 54 examinations were performed. Excellent fat suppression with water excitation is achieved in all cases. The orbital images demonstrate superior resolution of small orbital lesions. The high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in cranial studies demonstrates excellent petrous bone and internal auditory canal anatomy

  9. From the Anticipatory Corpse to the Participatory Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaught, M Therese

    2016-12-01

    Jeffrey Bishop's The Anticipatory Corpse demonstrates how death is present in and cloaked by contemporary practices of end-of-life care. A key to Bishop's argument is that for modern medicine the cadaver has become epistemologically normative and that a metaphysics shorn of formal and final causes now shapes contemporary healthcare practices. The essays of this symposium laud and interrogate Bishop's argument in three ways. First, they raise critical methodological challenges from the perspectives of human rights, Charles Taylor's concept of social imaginaries, and economics. Second, they demonstrate the analytical power of his argument by detailing how it might be extended to additional issues beyond simply end-of-life care and how it might be brought into conversation with sociology. Third, they engage the constructive turn Bishop takes at the end of the book. Bishop himself also updates readers on the reception of The Anticipatory Corpse, as well as the way his thinking has evolved over the past 5 years since its publication. He also engages the questions, challenges, and openings provided by our authors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Optimized, unequal pulse spacing in multiple echo sequences improves refocusing in magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenista, Elizabeth R; Stokes, Ashley M; Branca, Rosa Tamara; Warren, Warren S

    2009-11-28

    A recent quantum computing paper (G. S. Uhrig, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 100504 (2007)) analytically derived optimal pulse spacings for a multiple spin echo sequence designed to remove decoherence in a two-level system coupled to a bath. The spacings in what has been called a "Uhrig dynamic decoupling (UDD) sequence" differ dramatically from the conventional, equal pulse spacing of a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) multiple spin echo sequence. The UDD sequence was derived for a model that is unrelated to magnetic resonance, but was recently shown theoretically to be more general. Here we show that the UDD sequence has theoretical advantages for magnetic resonance imaging of structured materials such as tissue, where diffusion in compartmentalized and microstructured environments leads to fluctuating fields on a range of different time scales. We also show experimentally, both in excised tissue and in a live mouse tumor model, that optimal UDD sequences produce different T(2)-weighted contrast than do CPMG sequences with the same number of pulses and total delay, with substantial enhancements in most regions. This permits improved characterization of low-frequency spectral density functions in a wide range of applications.

  11. The Dante pulse sequence description by product operators formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velloso, Marcia Helena Rodrigues; Villar, Daniel Figueroa

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this work is to supply a didactic example of the application of the product operators formalism for the description of the DANTE (delays alternating with mutation for tailored excitation) pulse sequence

  12. Experimental measurement of flexion-extension movement in normal and corpse prosthetic elbow joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TarniŢă, Daniela; TarniŢă, DănuŢ Nicolae

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative experimental study of flexion-extension movement in healthy elbow and in the prosthetic elbow joint fixed on an original experimental bench. Measurements were carried out in order to validate the functional morphology and a new elbow prosthesis type ball head. The three-dimensional (3D) model and the physical prototype of our experimental bench used to test elbow endoprosthesis at flexion-extension and pronation-supination movements is presented. The measurements were carried out on a group of nine healthy subjects and on the prosthetic corpse elbow, the experimental data being obtained for flexion-extension movement cycles. Experimental data for the two different flexion-extension tests for the nine subjects and for the corpse prosthetic elbow were acquired using SimiMotion video system. Experimental data were processed statistically. The corresponding graphs were obtained for all subjects in the experimental group, and for corpse prosthetic elbow for both flexion-extension tests. The statistical analysis has proved that the flexion angles of healthy elbows were significantly close to the values measured at the prosthetic elbow fixed on the experimental bench. The studied elbow prosthesis manages to re-establish the mobility for the elbow joint as close to the normal one.

  13. A new RF tagging pulse based on the Frank poly-phase perfect sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer; Greferath, Marcus; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) spectrally selective multiband pulses or tagging pulses, are applicable in a broad range of magnetic resonance methods. We demonstrate through simulations and experiments a new phase-modulation-only RF pulse for RF tagging based on the Frank poly-phase perfect sequence...

  14. Hypercapnic normalization of BOLD fMRI: comparison across field strengths and pulse sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Eric R.; Rostrup, Egill; Sidaros, Karam

    2004-01-01

    to be more accurately localized and quantified based on changes in venous blood oxygenation alone. The normalized BOLD signal induced by the motor task was consistent across different magnetic fields and pulse sequences, and corresponded well with cerebral blood flow measurements. Our data suggest...... size, as well as experimental, such as pulse sequence and static magnetic field strength (B(0)). Thus, it is difficult to compare task-induced fMRI signals across subjects, field strengths, and pulse sequences. This problem can be overcome by normalizing the neural activity-induced BOLD fMRI response...... for global stimulation, subjects breathed a 5% CO(2) gas mixture. Under all conditions, voxels containing primarily large veins and those containing primarily active tissue (i.e., capillaries and small veins) showed distinguishable behavior after hypercapnic normalization. This allowed functional activity...

  15. PuLSE: Quality control and quantification of peptide sequences explored by phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shave, Steven; Mann, Stefan; Koszela, Joanna; Kerr, Alastair; Auer, Manfred

    2018-01-01

    The design of highly diverse phage display libraries is based on assumption that DNA bases are incorporated at similar rates within the randomized sequence. As library complexity increases and expected copy numbers of unique sequences decrease, the exploration of library space becomes sparser and the presence of truly random sequences becomes critical. We present the program PuLSE (Phage Library Sequence Evaluation) as a tool for assessing randomness and therefore diversity of phage display libraries. PuLSE runs on a collection of sequence reads in the fastq file format and generates tables profiling the library in terms of unique DNA sequence counts and positions, translated peptide sequences, and normalized 'expected' occurrences from base to residue codon frequencies. The output allows at-a-glance quantitative quality control of a phage library in terms of sequence coverage both at the DNA base and translated protein residue level, which has been missing from toolsets and literature. The open source program PuLSE is available in two formats, a C++ source code package for compilation and integration into existing bioinformatics pipelines and precompiled binaries for ease of use.

  16. Pulse sequences and visualization of instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, E.M.; Ulm Univ.; Wendt, M.; Chung, Y.C.; Duerk, J.L.; University Hospitals of Cleveland and Case Western Reserve University, OH; Lewin, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    While initially advocated primarily for intrasurgical visualization (e.g., craniotomy), interventional MRI rapidly evolved into roles in image-guided localization for needle-based procedures, minimally invasive neurosurgical procedures, and thermal ablation of cancer. In this contest, MRI pulse sequences and scanning methods serve one of four primary roles: (1) speed improvement, (2) device localization, (3) anatomy/lesion differentiation and (4) temperature sensitivity. The first part of this manuscript deals with passive visualization of MR-compatible needles and the effects of field strength, sequence design, and orientation of the needle relative to the static magnetic field of the scanner. Issues and recommendations are given for low-field as well as high-field scanners. The second part contains methods reported to achieve improved acquisition efficiency over conventional phase encoding (wavelets, locally focused imaging, singular value decomposition and keyhole imaging). Finally, the last part of the manuscrpt reports the current status of thermosensitive sequences and their dependence on spinlattice relaxation time (T1), water diffusion coefficient (D) and proton chemical shift (δ). (orig.) [de

  17. Preliminary study of pseudorandom binary sequence pulsing of ORELA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, N.M.; Olsen, D.K.

    1980-03-01

    It has been suggested that pseudorandom binary sequence (PRBS) pulsing might enhance the performance of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) for neutron-induced, time-of-flight (TOF) cross-section measurements. In this technical memorandum, equations are developed for expected count rates, statistical variances, and backgrounds for a pulsing scheme in which a PRBS is superimposed on the periodic equalintensity ORELA bursts. Introduction of the PRBS modification permits neutrons of different energies originating from different bursts to reach the detector simultaneously, and the signal corresponding to a unique flight time to be extracted mathematically. Relative advantages and disadvantages of measurements from conventional and PRBS pulsing modes are discussed in terms of counting statistics and backgrounds. Computer models of TOF spectra are generated for both pulsing modes, using as examples a 20-meter 233 U fission-chamber measurement and a 155-meter 238 U sample-in transmission measurement. Detailed comparisons of PRBS vs conventional results are presented. This study indicates that although PRBS pulsing could enhance ORELA performance for selected measurements, for general ORELA operation the disadvantages from PRBS pulsing probably outweigh the advantages

  18. Searching the soil: forensic importance of edaphic fauna after the removal of a corpse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloña, Marta I; Moraza, M Lourdes; Carles-Tolrá, Miguel; Iraola, Victor; Bahillo, Pablo; Yélamos, Tomás; Outerelo, Raimundo; Alcaraz, Rafael

    2010-11-01

    Arthropods at different stages of development collected from human remains in an advanced stage of decomposition (following autopsy) and from the soil at the scene are reported. The corpse was found in a mixed deciduous forest of Biscay (northern Spain). Soil fauna was extracted by sieving the soil where the corpse lay and placing the remains in Berlese-Tullgren funnels. Necrophagous fauna on the human remains was dominated by the fly Piophilidae: Stearibia nigriceps (Meigen, 1826), mites Ascidae: Proctolaelaps epuraeae (Hirschmann, 1963), Laelapidae: Hypoaspis (Gaeolaelaps) aculeifer (Canestrini, 1884), and the beetle Cleridae: Necrobia rufipes (de Geer, 1775). We confirm the importance of edaphic fauna, especially if the deceased is discovered in natural environs. Related fauna may remain for days after corpse removal and reveal information related to the circumstances of death. The species Nitidulidae: Omosita depressa (Linnaeus, 1758), Acaridae: Sancassania berlesei (Michael, 1903), Ascidae: Zerconopsis remiger (Kramer, 1876) and P. epuraeae, Urodinychidae: Uroobovella pulchella (Berlese, 1904), and Macrochelidae: Glyptholaspis americana (Berlese, 1888) were recorded for the first time in the Iberian Peninsula. 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Published 2010. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  19. Chirped pulse digital holography for measuring the sequence of ultrafast optical wavefronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Naoki

    2018-04-01

    Optical setups for measuring the sequence of ultrafast optical wavefronts using a chirped pulse as a reference wave in digital holography are proposed and analyzed. In this method, multiple ultrafast object pulses are used to probe the temporal evolution of ultrafast phenomena and they are interfered with a chirped reference wave to record a digital hologram. Wavefronts at different times can be reconstructed separately from the recorded hologram when the reference pulse can be treated as a quasi-monochromatic wave during the pulse width of each object pulse. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated by numerical simulation.

  20. Optimal pulse sequence for ferumoxides-enhanced MR imaging used in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma: a comparative study using seven pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hoon; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Jae Hoon; Lee, Won Jae; Jang, Hyun Jung; Lim, Kyo Keun; Lee, Soon Jin; Cho, Jae Min; Kim, Seung Kwon; Kim, Gab Chul

    2002-01-01

    To identify the optimal pulse sequence for ferumoxides-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of hepatocelluar carcinomas (HCCs). Sixteen patients with 25 HCCs underwent MR imaging following intravenous infusion of ferumoxides. All MR studies were performed on a 1.5-T MR system, using a phased-array coil. Ferumoxides (Feridex IV) at a dose of 15 μmol/Kg was slowly infused intravenously, and axial images of seven sequences were obtained 30 minutes after the end of infusion. The MR protocol included fast spin-echo (FSE) with two echo times (TR3333-8571/TE18 and 90-117), singleshot FSE (SSFSE) with two echo times (TR∞/TE39 and 98), T2-weighted gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state (GRASS) (TR216/TE20), T2-weighted fast multiplanar GRASS (FMPGR) (TR130/TE8.4-9.5), and T2-weighted fast multiplanar spoiled GRASS (FMPSPGR) (TR130/TE8.4-9.5). Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of HCCs determined during the imaging sequences formed the basis of quantitative analysis, and images were qualitatively assessed in terms of lesion conspicuity and image artifacts. The diagnostic accuracy of all sequences was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Quantitative analysis revealed that the CNRs of T2-weighted FMPGR and T2-weighted FMPSPGR were significantly higher than those of the other sequences, while qualitative analysis showed that image artifacts were prominent at T2-weighted GRASS imaging. Lesion conspicuity was statistically significantly less clear at SSFSE imaging. In term of lesion detection, T-weighted FMPGR, T2- weighted FMPSPGR, and proton density FSE imaging were statistically superior to the others. T2-weighted FMPGR, T2- weighted FMPSPGR, and proton density FSE appear to be the optimal pulse sequences for ferumoxidesenhanced MR imaging in the detection of HCCs

  1. From Anticipatory Corpse to Posthuman God.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Jeffrey P

    2016-12-01

    The essays in this issue of JMP are devoted to critical engagement of my book, The Anticipatory Corpse The essays, for the most part, accept the main thrust of my critique of medicine. The main thrust of the criticism is whether the scope of the critique is too totalizing, and whether the proposed remedy is sufficient. I greatly appreciate these interventions because they allow me this occasion to respond and clarify, and to even further extend the argument of my book. In this response essay, I maintain that the regnant social imaginary of medicine is the regnant social imaginary of our time. It is grounded in a specific ontotheology: where ontology is a power ontology; where material is malleable to the open-ended organization of power and dependent only on working out the efficient mechanisms of its enactment; where ethically it is oriented only to the immanent telos of utility maximization in the short run, and ultimately to some posthuman future in the long run. This ontotheology originates in the anticipatory corpse and is ordered toward some god-like posthuman being. The entire ontotheology finds enactment through the political economy of neoliberalism. This social imaginary constantly works to insulate itself from other social imaginaries through the use of its institutional power, through marginalization, circumscription, or absorption. The modern social imaginary of neoliberal societies marginalizes and politically isolates other social imaginaries, or transforms them into something acceptable to the neoliberal imaginary. Yet, these other social imaginaries could influence the larger social imaginary in novel ways, sometimes through withdrawal and sometimes through challenges. These other practices-again, usually practices ordered according to different ontological and teleological purposes-might serve as a source of renewal and transformation, but only if the practitioners of these other social imaginaries understand the ontotheological powers that they

  2. Selection of optimal pulse sequences for conventional and dynamic MR imaging with Gd-DTPA; A fundamental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Miho; Kita, Keisuke; Maeda, Masayuki (Wakayama Medical Coll. (Japan)) (and others)

    1989-11-01

    Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) enhances contrast between tissues in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The enhancement of tissues depends partly upon the pulse sequences, and the optimal pulse sequence is also influenced by the tissue cncentration of Gd-DTPA. We prepared phantoms of 25% albumin solutions with various concentrations of Gd-DTPA, and imaged them using various pulse sequences with 1.5-T MR system. We also performed MR imaging of 16 patients with tumors (10 brain tumors and 6 hepatic tumors) before and after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg); 6 patients with hepatic tumors underwent dynamic MR imaging during suspended respiration. We made a theoretical equation to calculate the concentration of Gd-DTPA and estimated its tissue concentration in tumors at 0{approx}0.2 mmol/kg. Within these tissue concentrations, the enhancement-to-noise (E/N) ratio was larger in FISP (flip angle of 90deg, TR pf 300 msec, minimal TE) and SE (TR of 400 msec, minimal TE) sequences than in other sequences observed. These sequences may be preferable for conventional enhanced-MRI. Among the pulse sequences with TR of less than 100 msec, FISP (flip angle of 90deg, TR of less than 100 msec, minimal TE) had the largest E/N ratio; which may be useful for dynamic MRI during suspended respiration. The importance of selecting the optimal pulse sequences according to the imaging modality used will be discussed. (author).

  3. High dimensional and high resolution pulse sequences for backbone resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawadzka-Kazimierczuk, Anna; Kozminski, Wiktor, E-mail: kozmin@chem.uw.edu.pl [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland); Sanderova, Hana; Krasny, Libor [Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics of Bacteria, Department of Bacteriology (Czech Republic)

    2012-04-15

    Four novel 5D (HACA(N)CONH, HNCOCACB, (HACA)CON(CA)CONH, (H)NCO(NCA)CONH), and one 6D ((H)NCO(N)CACONH) NMR pulse sequences are proposed. The new experiments employ non-uniform sampling that enables achieving high resolution in indirectly detected dimensions. The experiments facilitate resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins. The novel pulse sequences were successfully tested using {delta} subunit (20 kDa) of Bacillus subtilis RNA polymerase that has an 81-amino acid disordered part containing various repetitive sequences.

  4. Comparison of ompP5 sequence-based typing and pulsed-filed gel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, comparison of the outer membrane protein P5 gene (ompP5) sequence-based typing with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for the genotyping of Haemophilus parasuis, the 15 serovar reference strains and 43 isolates were investigated. When comparing the two methods, 31 ompP5 sequence types ...

  5. Investigation of timing effects in modified composite quadrupolar echo pulse sequences by mean of average Hamiltonian theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane

    2018-01-01

    The utility of the average Hamiltonian theory and its antecedent the Magnus expansion is presented. We assessed the concept of convergence of the Magnus expansion in quadrupolar spectroscopy of spin-1 via the square of the magnitude of the average Hamiltonian. We investigated this approach for two specific modified composite pulse sequences: COM-Im and COM-IVm. It is demonstrated that the size of the square of the magnitude of zero order average Hamiltonian obtained on the appropriated basis is a viable approach to study the convergence of the Magnus expansion. The approach turns to be efficient in studying pulse sequences in general and can be very useful to investigate coherent averaging in the development of high resolution NMR technique in solids. This approach allows comparing theoretically the two modified composite pulse sequences COM-Im and COM-IVm. We also compare theoretically the current modified composite sequences (COM-Im and COM-IVm) to the recently published modified composite pulse sequences (MCOM-I, MCOM-IV, MCOM-I_d, MCOM-IV_d).

  6. Generalized min-max bound-based MRI pulse sequence design framework for wide-range T1 relaxometry: A case study on the tissue specific imaging sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new design strategy for optimizing MRI pulse sequences for T1 relaxometry. The design strategy optimizes the pulse sequence parameters to minimize the maximum variance of unbiased T1 estimates over a range of T1 values using the Cramér-Rao bound. In contrast to prior sequences optimized for a single nominal T1 value, the optimized sequence using our bound-based strategy achieves improved precision and accuracy for a broad range of T1 estimates within a clinically feasible scan time. The optimization combines the downhill simplex method with a simulated annealing process. To show the effectiveness of the proposed strategy, we optimize the tissue specific imaging (TSI sequence. Preliminary Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the optimized TSI sequence yields improved precision and accuracy over the popular driven-equilibrium single-pulse observation of T1 (DESPOT1 approach for normal brain tissues (estimated T1 700-2000 ms at 3.0T. The relative mean estimation error (MSE for T1 estimation is less than 1.7% using the optimized TSI sequence, as opposed to less than 7.0% using DESPOT1 for normal brain tissues. The optimized TSI sequence achieves good stability by keeping the MSE under 7.0% over larger T1 values corresponding to different lesion tissues and the cerebrospinal fluid (up to 5000 ms. The T1 estimation accuracy using the new pulse sequence also shows improvement, which is more pronounced in low SNR scenarios.

  7. Quantum Logic with Composite Pulse Sequences on Sr^+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewmon, Ruth; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Ge, Yufei; Wang, Shannon; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2008-03-01

    The optical 5S1/2->4D1/2 transition in Sr^+ is an attractive qubit because it can be addressed by diode lasers, which are relatively inexpensive and easy to operate. We characterize single-qubit rotations as well as a CNOT gate on a Sr^+ ion in a surface electrode Paul trap. To improve these operations, the frequency of the clock laser is stabilized to a high-finesse optical cavity. The resulting linewidth of the laser is approximately 300Hz. Composite pulse sequences, a technique adapted from NMR, have been shown to reduce the effects of systematic errors in a variety of quantum systems. We demonstrate several composite sequences that improve the fidelity of quantum logic operations on Sr^+.

  8. Correction of echo shift in reconstruction processing for ultra-short TE pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Masahiro; Ootsuka, Takehiro; Abe, Takayuki; Takahashi, Tetsuhiko

    2010-01-01

    An ultra-short echo time (TE) pulse sequence is composed of a radial sampling that acquires echo signals radially in the K-space and a half-echo acquisition that acquires only half of the echo signal. The shift in the position of the echo signal (echo shift) caused by the timing errors in the gradient magnetic field pulses affects the image quality in the radial sampling with the half-echo acquisition. To improve image quality, we have developed a signal correction algorithm that detects and eliminates this echo shift during reconstruction by performing a pre-scan within 10 seconds. The results showed that image quality is improved under oblique and/or off-centering conditions that frequently cause image distortion due to hardware error. In conclusion, we have developed a robust ultra-short TE pulse sequence that allows wide latitude in the scan parameters, including oblique and off-centering conditions. (author)

  9. Compact field programmable gate array-based pulse-sequencer and radio-frequency generator for experiments with trapped atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned, E-mail: thaned.pruttivarasin@riken.jp [Quantum Metrology Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Katori, Hidetoshi [Quantum Metrology Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Innovative Space-Time Project, ERATO, JST, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    We present a compact field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based pulse sequencer and radio-frequency (RF) generator suitable for experiments with cold trapped ions and atoms. The unit is capable of outputting a pulse sequence with at least 32 transistor-transistor logic (TTL) channels with a timing resolution of 40 ns and contains a built-in 100 MHz frequency counter for counting electrical pulses from a photo-multiplier tube. There are 16 independent direct-digital-synthesizers RF sources with fast (rise-time of ∼60 ns) amplitude switching and sub-mHz frequency tuning from 0 to 800 MHz.

  10. Optimal pulse-sequence parameters for MR imaging of the immature brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowell, M.A.; Hackney, D.B.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Grossman, R.I.; Goldberg, H.I.

    1986-01-01

    Appropriate spin-echo pulse sequence parameters generate MR images with very high gray matter/white matter contrast in neonates and young infants. Low-contrast images appear to result from utilization of ''adult-type'' parameters to investigate tissues that have relaxation characteristics quite different than those of adult brain. In these young patients long spin-echo sequences with repetition times of 3,000-3,500 msec and multiple echoes with the longest echo time set at 120-160 msec are employed to yield high-contrast ''T2-weighted'' images

  11. Optimization of parameter values for complex pulse sequences by simulated annealing: application to 3D MP-RAGE imaging of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, F H; Mugler, J P; Brookeman, J R

    1994-02-01

    A number of pulse sequence techniques, including magnetization-prepared gradient echo (MP-GRE), segmented GRE, and hybrid RARE, employ a relatively large number of variable pulse sequence parameters and acquire the image data during a transient signal evolution. These sequences have recently been proposed and/or used for clinical applications in the brain, spine, liver, and coronary arteries. Thus, the need for a method of deriving optimal pulse sequence parameter values for this class of sequences now exists. Due to the complexity of these sequences, conventional optimization approaches, such as applying differential calculus to signal difference equations, are inadequate. We have developed a general framework for adapting the simulated annealing algorithm to pulse sequence parameter value optimization, and applied this framework to the specific case of optimizing the white matter-gray matter signal difference for a T1-weighted variable flip angle 3D MP-RAGE sequence. Using our algorithm, the values of 35 sequence parameters, including the magnetization-preparation RF pulse flip angle and delay time, 32 flip angles in the variable flip angle gradient-echo acquisition sequence, and the magnetization recovery time, were derived. Optimized 3D MP-RAGE achieved up to a 130% increase in white matter-gray matter signal difference compared with optimized 3D RF-spoiled FLASH with the same total acquisition time. The simulated annealing approach was effective at deriving optimal parameter values for a specific 3D MP-RAGE imaging objective, and may be useful for other imaging objectives and sequences in this general class.

  12. Multishot versus single-shot pulse sequences in very high field fMRI: a comparison using retinotopic mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jascha D Swisher

    Full Text Available High-resolution functional MRI is a leading application for very high field (7 Tesla human MR imaging. Though higher field strengths promise improvements in signal-to-noise ratios (SNR and BOLD contrast relative to fMRI at 3 Tesla, these benefits may be partially offset by accompanying increases in geometric distortion and other off-resonance effects. Such effects may be especially pronounced with the single-shot EPI pulse sequences typically used for fMRI at standard field strengths. As an alternative, one might consider multishot pulse sequences, which may lead to somewhat lower temporal SNR than standard EPI, but which are also often substantially less susceptible to off-resonance effects. Here we consider retinotopic mapping of human visual cortex as a practical test case by which to compare examples of these sequence types for high-resolution fMRI at 7 Tesla. We performed polar angle retinotopic mapping at each of 3 isotropic resolutions (2.0, 1.7, and 1.1 mm using both accelerated single-shot 2D EPI and accelerated multishot 3D gradient-echo pulse sequences. We found that single-shot EPI indeed led to greater temporal SNR and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR than the multishot sequences. However, additional distortion correction in postprocessing was required in order to fully realize these advantages, particularly at higher resolutions. The retinotopic maps produced by both sequence types were qualitatively comparable, and showed equivalent test/retest reliability. Thus, when surface-based analyses are planned, or in other circumstances where geometric distortion is of particular concern, multishot pulse sequences could provide a viable alternative to single-shot EPI.

  13. Minimization of Dead-Periods in MRI Pulse Sequences for Imaging Oblique Planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalar, Ergin; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    With the advent of breath-hold MR cardiac imaging techniques, the minimization of TR and TE for oblique planes has become a critical issue. The slew rates and maximum currents of gradient amplifiers limit the minimum possible TR and TE by adding dead-periods to the pulse sequences. We propose a method of designing gradient waveforms that will be applied to the amplifiers instead of the slice, readout, and phase encoding waveforms. Because this method ensures that the gradient amplifiers will always switch at their maximum slew rate, it results in the minimum possible dead-period for given imaging parameters and scan plane position. A GRASS pulse sequence has been designed and ultra-short TR and TE values have been obtained with standard gradient amplifiers and coils. For some oblique slices, we have achieved shorter TR and TE values than those for nonoblique slices. PMID:7869900

  14. MR imaging pulse sequence rationale: SD-, T1-, and T2-weighted images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sax, S.; Weathers, S.W.; Schneiders, N.J.; Horowitz, B.L.; Mawad, M.E.; Sandlin, M.E.; Blackwell, R.; Bryan, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    Over 500 patients have been examined with a pulse sequence designed to provide spin-density (SD)-weighted images (TR=3 sec, TE=35 msec), T1-weighted images (TR=0.3 sec, TE=35msec), and T2-weighted images (TR=3 sec, TE=105 msec) from which calculated ''synthesized'' images and SD, T1, and T2 calculated images could be obtained. Each image contributes unique information. SD-weighted images optimally display anatomy and often best highlight pathology. T1-weighted images are critical in assessing cerebral hemorrhages. T2-weighted images best display most lesions, but yield incomplete information in 35% of cases. All three types of ''weighted'' images are necessary to optimally display anatomy and fully characterize a lesion. Computerized calculations and simulations suggest that no other combination of pulse sequences yields equal information for a given examination time

  15. Anomalous diffusion measured by a twice-refocused spin echo pulse sequence: analysis using fractional order calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qing; Srinivasan, Girish; Magin, Richard L; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe

    2011-05-01

    To theoretically develop and experimentally validate a formulism based on a fractional order calculus (FC) diffusion model to characterize anomalous diffusion in brain tissues measured with a twice-refocused spin-echo (TRSE) pulse sequence. The FC diffusion model is the fractional order generalization of the Bloch-Torrey equation. Using this model, an analytical expression was derived to describe the diffusion-induced signal attenuation in a TRSE pulse sequence. To experimentally validate this expression, a set of diffusion-weighted (DW) images was acquired at 3 Tesla from healthy human brains using a TRSE sequence with twelve b-values ranging from 0 to 2600 s/mm(2). For comparison, DW images were also acquired using a Stejskal-Tanner diffusion gradient in a single-shot spin-echo echo planar sequence. For both datasets, a Levenberg-Marquardt fitting algorithm was used to extract three parameters: diffusion coefficient D, fractional order derivative in space β, and a spatial parameter μ (in units of μm). Using adjusted R-squared values and standard deviations, D, β, and μ values and the goodness-of-fit in three specific regions of interest (ROIs) in white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid, respectively, were evaluated for each of the two datasets. In addition, spatially resolved parametric maps were assessed qualitatively. The analytical expression for the TRSE sequence, derived from the FC diffusion model, accurately characterized the diffusion-induced signal loss in brain tissues at high b-values. In the selected ROIs, the goodness-of-fit and standard deviations for the TRSE dataset were comparable with the results obtained from the Stejskal-Tanner dataset, demonstrating the robustness of the FC model across multiple data acquisition strategies. Qualitatively, the D, β, and μ maps from the TRSE dataset exhibited fewer artifacts, reflecting the improved immunity to eddy currents. The diffusion-induced signal attenuation in a TRSE pulse sequence

  16. A checklist of arthropods associated with pig carrion and human corpses in Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LML Carvalho

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrophagous insects, mainly Diptera and Coleoptera, are attracted to specific stages of carcass decomposition, in a process of faunistic succession. They are very important in estimating the postmortem interval, the time interval between the death and the discovery of the body. In studies done with pig carcasses exposed to natural conditions in an urban forest (Santa Genebra Reservation, located in Campinas, State of São Paulo, southeastern Brazil, 4 out of 36 families of insects collected - Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, Muscidae (Diptera and Dermestidae (Coleoptera - were considered of forensic importance, because several species were collected in large numbers both visiting and breeding in pig carcasses. Several species were also observed and collected on human corpses at the Institute of Legal Medicine. The species belonged to 17 different families, 6 being of forensic importance because they were reared from human corpses or pig carcasses: Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, Muscidae, Piophilidae (Diptera, Dermestidae, Silphidae and Cleridae (Coleoptera. The most important species were: Diptera - Chrysomya albiceps, Chrysomya putoria, Hemilucilia segmentaria, Hemilucilia semidiaphana (Calliphoridae, Pattonella intermutans (Sarcophagidae, Ophyra chalcogaster (Muscidae, Piophila casei (Piophilidae; Coleoptera - Dermestes maculatus (Dermestidae, Oxyletrum disciolle (Silphidae and Necrobia rufipes (Cleridae.

  17. [Practicability of the mobile one-finger scanner Cross Match MV5 in fingerprinting of corpses: are mobile fingerprinting scanners suitable for use in mass disasters?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitmeier, Dirk; Landmesser, Britta; Schulz, Yvonne; Albrecht, Knut

    2008-01-01

    Dactyloscopy is a special field in the police records department and a suitable means for identifying unknown dead persons as well as solving crimes by taking fingerprints from living persons. Apart from the conventional methods of dactyloscopy, mobile and more compact instruments are to facilitate taking prints of fingertips and palms also at the scene of mass disasters. In the presented study, living persons and corpses were examined to find out the possible uses and limits of mobile one-finger scanners. The concrete issue of the investigation was whether the mobile one-finger scanner Cross Match MV5 is suitable for application in mass disasters. The device was used in 12 corpses aged 5 weeks to 76 years (mean postmortem interval 5.5 days) and in 28 living persons aged 6 weeks to 87 years. In summary, the scanner produced qualitatively good prints in all age groups of the living individuals. In the corpses, the prints were only partly evaluable. In particular, fingers and fingertips with soot blackening and livid discoloration were difficult to analyse. Postmortem rigidity also complicated the handling of the scanner. In fresh corpses, the scanner can be recommended without reservation. Even if the epidermis was detached, the scanner was able to produce evaluable prints of the dermis of the hypothenar.

  18. Detection of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage at Acute and Subacute/Chronic Stages: Comparison of Four Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pulse Sequences and Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Kang Yuan

    2005-03-01

    Conclusion: FLAIR and GE T2* MRI pulse sequences, and CT scans, are all statistically significant indicators of acute SAH. GE T2*-weighted images are statistically significant indicators of subacute-to-chronic SAH, whereas other MRI pulse sequences, and CT scans, are not.

  19. Design of high-power, broadband 180o pulses and mixing sequences for fast MAS solid state chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, Christian; Herbst, Jirada; Kirschstein, Anika; Leppert, Joerg; Ohlenschlaeger, Oliver; Goerlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2009-01-01

    An approach for the design of high-power, broadband 180 o pulses and mixing sequences for generating dipolar and scalar coupling mediated 13 C- 13 C chemical shift correlation spectra of isotopically labelled biological systems at fast magic-angle spinning frequencies without 1 H decoupling during mixing is presented. Considering RF field strengths in the range of 100-120 kHz, as typically available in MAS probes employed at high spinning speeds, and limited B 1 field inhomogeneities, the Fourier coefficients defining the phase modulation profile of the RF pulses were optimised numerically to obtain broadband inversion and refocussing pulses and mixing sequences. Experimental measurements were carried out to assess the performance characteristics of the mixing sequences reported here

  20. MRI of the brain stem using fluid attenuated inversion recivery pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Coene, B.; Hajnal, J.V.; Pennock, J.M.; Bydder, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    Heavily T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences with inversion times of 2000-2500 ms and echo times of 130-200 ms were used to image the brain stem of a normal adult and five patients. These sequences produce high signal from many white matter tracts and display high lesion contrast. The corticospinal and parietopontine tracts, lateral and medial lemnisci, superior and inferior cerebellar peduncles, medial longitudinal fasciculi, thalamo-olivary tracts the cuneate and gracile fasiculi gave high signal and were directly visualised. The oculomotor and trigeminal nerves were demonstrated within the brain stem. Lesions not seen with conventional T2-weighted spin echo sequences were seen with high contrast in patients with infarction, multiple sclerosis, sarcoidosis, chunt obstruction and metastatic tumour. The anatomical detail and high lesion contrast given by the FLAIR pulse sequence appear likely to be of value in diagnosis of disease in the brain stem. (orig.)

  1. Zero sequence blocking transformers for multi-pulse rectifier in aerospace applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Wenli; Blaabjerg, Frede; Zhang, Xiaobin

    2014-01-01

    The power electronics technology plays an even more important role in the aerospace applications of More Electric Aircrafts (MEA). AutoTransformer Rectifier Units (ATRU) have been widely adopted in aircrafts due to its simplicity and reliability. In this paper, Zero Sequence Blocking Transformers...... (ZSBT) are employed in the DC link to realize parallel rectifier bridges for ATRU, being the proposed 24-pulse rectifier. A star-connected autotransformer is used in this topology to divide the primary side voltage into four three-phase voltage groups, among which there is a phase shift of 15......°. The autotransformer then feeds the load through rectifier bridges, which are in parallel with ZSBTs. Compared to the traditional method that is using six interphase transformers to parallel the rectifier bridges; the proposed 24-pulse rectifier only requires four ZSBTs. This will contribute to a reduction of weight...

  2. [Biometric method for the description of the head of an unrecognized corpse for the purpose of personality individualization and identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zviagin, V N; Galitskaia, O I; Negasheva, M A

    2012-01-01

    We have determined absolute dimensions of the head and the relationship between the dimensions of its selected parts. The study enrolled adult subjects (mostly of Russian ethnicity) at the age from 17 to 22 years (1108 men and 1153 women). We calculated the normal values for the estimation of real dimensional characteristics and the frequency of their occurrence in the population. The proposed approach makes it possible to reliably identify the dimensional features of human appearance in terms of the quantitative verbal description (categories 1-5) and to reveal its most characteristic features. The results of this biometric study of the heads of unrecognized corpses obtained by the specially developed technology may be used in operational and search investigations, in the procedure of corpse identification, and forensic medical personality identification of a missing subject.

  3. PET Imaging Stability Measurements During Simultaneous Pulsing of Aggressive MR Sequences on the SIGNA PET/MR System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, Timothy W; Khalighi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jansen, Floris P; Glover, Gary H

    2018-01-01

    The recent introduction of simultaneous whole-body PET/MR scanners has enabled new research taking advantage of the complementary information obtainable with PET and MRI. One such application is kinetic modeling, which requires high levels of PET quantitative stability. To accomplish the required PET stability levels, the PET subsystem must be sufficiently isolated from the effects of MR activity. Performance measurements have previously been published, demonstrating sufficient PET stability in the presence of MR pulsing for typical clinical use; however, PET stability during radiofrequency (RF)-intensive and gradient-intensive sequences has not previously been evaluated for a clinical whole-body scanner. In this work, PET stability of the GE SIGNA PET/MR was examined during simultaneous scanning of aggressive MR pulse sequences. Methods: PET performance tests were acquired with MR idle and during simultaneous MR pulsing. Recent system improvements mitigating RF interference and gain variation were used. A fast recovery fast spin echo MR sequence was selected for high RF power, and an echo planar imaging sequence was selected for its high heat-inducing gradients. Measurements were performed to determine PET stability under varying MR conditions using the following metrics: sensitivity, scatter fraction, contrast recovery, uniformity, count rate performance, and image quantitation. A final PET quantitative stability assessment for simultaneous PET scanning during functional MRI studies was performed with a spiral in-and-out gradient echo sequence. Results: Quantitation stability of a 68 Ge flood phantom was demonstrated within 0.34%. Normalized sensitivity was stable during simultaneous scanning within 0.3%. Scatter fraction measured with a 68 Ge line source in the scatter phantom was stable within the range of 40.4%-40.6%. Contrast recovery and uniformity were comparable for PET images acquired simultaneously with multiple MR conditions. Peak noise equivalent count

  4. MR imaging of the knee: Improvement of signal and contrast efficiency of T1-weighted turbo spin echo sequences by applying a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radlbauer, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.radlbauer@stpoelten.lknoe.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Lomoschitz, Friedrich, E-mail: friedrich.lomoschitz@stpoelten.lknoe.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Salomonowitz, Erich, E-mail: erich.salomonowitz@stpoelten.lknoe.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Eberhardt, Knut E., E-mail: info@mrt-kompetenzzentrum.d [MRT Competence Center Schloss Werneck, Balthasar-Neumann-Platz 2, 97440 Werneck (Germany); Stadlbauer, Andreas, E-mail: andi@nmr.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse incorporated in a standard T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence as used in our routine MRI protocol for examination of pathologies of the knee. Sixteen consecutive patients with knee disorders were examined using the routine MRI protocol, including T1-weighted TSE-sequences with and without a DRIVE pulse. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of anatomical structures and pathologies were calculated and compared for both sequences. The differences in diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images with and without DRIVE pulse were assessed. SNR was significantly higher on images acquired with DRIVE pulse for fluid, effusion, cartilage and bone. Differences in the SNR of meniscus and muscle between the two sequences were not statistically significant. CNR was significantly increased between muscle and effusion, fluid and cartilage, fluid and meniscus, cartilage and meniscus, bone and cartilage on images acquired using the DRIVE pulse. Diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images was found to be improved for delineation of anatomic structures and for diagnosing a variety of pathologies when a DRIVE pulse is incorporated in the sequence. Incorporation of a DRIVE pulse into a standard T1-weighted TSE-sequence leads to significant increase of SNR and CNR of both, anatomical structures and pathologies, and consequently to an increase in diagnostic value within the same acquisition time.

  5. MR imaging of the knee: Improvement of signal and contrast efficiency of T1-weighted turbo spin echo sequences by applying a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radlbauer, Rudolf; Lomoschitz, Friedrich; Salomonowitz, Erich; Eberhardt, Knut E.; Stadlbauer, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse incorporated in a standard T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence as used in our routine MRI protocol for examination of pathologies of the knee. Sixteen consecutive patients with knee disorders were examined using the routine MRI protocol, including T1-weighted TSE-sequences with and without a DRIVE pulse. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of anatomical structures and pathologies were calculated and compared for both sequences. The differences in diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images with and without DRIVE pulse were assessed. SNR was significantly higher on images acquired with DRIVE pulse for fluid, effusion, cartilage and bone. Differences in the SNR of meniscus and muscle between the two sequences were not statistically significant. CNR was significantly increased between muscle and effusion, fluid and cartilage, fluid and meniscus, cartilage and meniscus, bone and cartilage on images acquired using the DRIVE pulse. Diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images was found to be improved for delineation of anatomic structures and for diagnosing a variety of pathologies when a DRIVE pulse is incorporated in the sequence. Incorporation of a DRIVE pulse into a standard T1-weighted TSE-sequence leads to significant increase of SNR and CNR of both, anatomical structures and pathologies, and consequently to an increase in diagnostic value within the same acquisition time.

  6. Frequency-locked pulse sequencer for high-frame-rate monochromatic tissue motion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Reza Zahiri; Baghani, Ali; Salcudean, Septimiu E; Rohling, Robert

    2011-04-01

    To overcome the inherent low frame rate of conventional ultrasound, we have previously presented a system that can be implemented on conventional ultrasound scanners for high-frame-rate imaging of monochromatic tissue motion. The system employs a sector subdivision technique in the sequencer to increase the acquisition rate. To eliminate the delays introduced during data acquisition, a motion phase correction algorithm has also been introduced to create in-phase displacement images. Previous experimental results from tissue- mimicking phantoms showed that the system can achieve effective frame rates of up to a few kilohertz on conventional ultrasound systems. In this short communication, we present a new pulse sequencing strategy that facilitates high-frame-rate imaging of monochromatic motion such that the acquired echo signals are inherently in-phase. The sequencer uses the knowledge of the excitation frequency to synchronize the acquisition of the entire imaging plane to that of an external exciter. This sequencing approach eliminates any need for synchronization or phase correction and has applications in tissue elastography, which we demonstrate with tissue-mimicking phantoms. © 2011 IEEE

  7. Comparison of different pulse sequences for in vivo determination of T1 relaxation times in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Henriksen, O

    1988-01-01

    ). T1 measurements were performed on the human brain using a whole body MR scanner operating at 1.5 tesla. Three different pulse sequences were compared including two 6-points inversion recovery (IR) sequences with TR = 2.0 s and 4.0, respectively, and a 12-points partial saturation inversion recovery...

  8. Influence of crosstalk on the fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Tohru; Nonoshita, Koji; Miyazaki, Takayuki; Arima, Akira

    2000-01-01

    The influence of crosstalk on the fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (fast FLAIR) pulse sequence was studied. On multislice fast FLAIR images, the water null point was shortened in comparison with that on single slice images owing to the crosstalk received from adjacent slices. That influence became greater with decreases in the slice gap and increases in the number of slices. The timing of crosstalk in each slice varied according to excitation order. The process of recovery of longitudinal magnetization changed according to differences in timing; thus, it was possible that the water null point changed in each slice. In brain images with thinner slice gaps, the signal intensity of CSF is increased by the effect of crosstalk. In order to eliminate changes in the water null point caused by crosstalk on fast FLAIR, the multislice sequence requires a sequence with interleaving based on the premise that slice gaps are set for more than 100% of slice thickness. (author)

  9. Influence of crosstalk on the fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery pulse sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Tohru; Nonoshita, Koji; Miyazaki, Takayuki; Arima, Akira [Funabashi Municipal Medical Center, Chiba (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    The influence of crosstalk on the fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (fast FLAIR) pulse sequence was studied. On multislice fast FLAIR images, the water null point was shortened in comparison with that on single slice images owing to the crosstalk received from adjacent slices. That influence became greater with decreases in the slice gap and increases in the number of slices. The timing of crosstalk in each slice varied according to excitation order. The process of recovery of longitudinal magnetization changed according to differences in timing; thus, it was possible that the water null point changed in each slice. In brain images with thinner slice gaps, the signal intensity of CSF is increased by the effect of crosstalk. In order to eliminate changes in the water null point caused by crosstalk on fast FLAIR, the multislice sequence requires a sequence with interleaving based on the premise that slice gaps are set for more than 100% of slice thickness. (author)

  10. Intensity stabilisation of optical pulse sequences for coherent control of laser-driven qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Joseph; Yuen, Ben; Wilpers, Guido; Riis, Erling; Sinclair, Alastair G.

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate a system for intensity stabilisation of optical pulse sequences used in laser-driven quantum control of trapped ions. Intensity instability is minimised by active stabilisation of the power (over a dynamic range of > 104) and position of the focused beam at the ion. The fractional Allan deviations in power were found to be logic gates to be below 10^{-6} per gate.

  11. European Council of Legal Medicine (ECLM) principles for on-site forensic and medico-legal scene and corpse investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, D; Ferrara, S D; Keller, E; Ludes, B; Mangin, P; Väli, M; Vieira, N

    2017-07-01

    Forensic medical practitioners need to define the general principles governing procedures to be used for the on-site examination of a body where the death has occurred in unnatural, violent or suspicious circumstances. These principles should be followed whenever a medical expert is required to perform an on-site corpse inspection and should be utilised as a set of general guidelines to be adapted to the specific situation in hand and interpreted using common sense and scientific knowledge of the relevant procedures and facts of the case. The aim of these principles is to ensure that forensic evidence at the scene of a death is properly observed and assessed and all necessary relevant evidence gathered in order to ensure that a comprehensive report is available to the judicial authority (investigating judge or coroner) in the justice system. The on-site corpse inspection by a forensic practitioner is a mandatory and essential stage of the forensic and medico-legal autopsy, as it may provide important information for subsequent investigation stages.

  12. WE-DE-206-04: MRI Pulse Sequences - Spin Echo, Gradient Echo, EPI, Non-Cartesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pooley, R. [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential part of clinical imaging due to its ability to render high soft tissue contrast. Instead of ionizing radiation, MRI use strong magnetic field, radio frequency waves and field gradients to create diagnostic useful images. It can be used to image the anatomy and also functional and physiological activities within the human body. Knowledge of the basic physical principles underlying MRI acquisition is vitally important to successful image production and proper image interpretation. This lecture will give an overview of the spin physics, imaging principle of MRI, the hardware of the MRI scanner, and various pulse sequences and their applications. It aims to provide a conceptual foundation to understand the image formation process of a clinical MRI scanner. Learning Objectives: Understand the origin of the MR signal and contrast from the spin physics level. Understand the main hardware components of a MRI scanner and their purposes Understand steps for MR image formation including spatial encoding and image reconstruction Understand the main kinds of MR pulse sequences and their characteristics.

  13. [Entomologic fauna and its importance in the determination of the age of corpses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolný, A; Loyka, S

    1993-04-01

    The authors summarize results of research conducted in 1990-1992, the aim of which was to test the accuracy of practical application of forensic entomology in medical practice. Based on the results of laboratory breeding of necrophagic Diptera collected from corpses and based on time characteristics of subsequent stages, the authors assessed the assumed time of death. In all instances where there was the first generation of necrophagic species of Diptera in the first and second stage of succession the results were very accurate, in the remaining cases the data of death was estimated correctly but less accurately.

  14. Pulse sequences for suppressing leakage in single-qubit gate operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Joydip; Coppersmith, S. N.; Friesen, Mark

    2017-06-01

    Many realizations of solid-state qubits involve couplings to leakage states lying outside the computational subspace, posing a threat to high-fidelity quantum gate operations. Mitigating leakage errors is especially challenging when the coupling strength is unknown, e.g., when it is caused by noise. Here we show that simple pulse sequences can be used to strongly suppress leakage errors for a qubit embedded in a three-level system. As an example, we apply our scheme to the recently proposed charge quadrupole (CQ) qubit for quantum dots. These results provide a solution to a key challenge for fault-tolerant quantum computing with solid-state elements.

  15. Education or business? - exhibition of human corpses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Wróbel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Exhibition "BODY WORLDS" which are presented exhibits of human remains are presented all over the world and are a major problem for the modern man, as presented on the preparations of the human not only serve scientific research, are not transferred to the medical schools to educate future doctors, but they were made available to the general public in the form of commercial and ambiguous. The aim of this study was to assess the ethical commercialization of human corpses "BODY WORLDS" exhibitions. Individual approach to the problems presented the dignity and value of human remains after death, of course, strongly related to the professed worldview. In the exhibits can be seen in both the scientific interest anatomical structures, as well as desecrated human remains or beautiful by its functional perfection of the body, understood also in terms of art. The question of ethics determines the right to decide for themselves, on the other hand, allows you to protect bodily integrity even after death. "BODY WORLDS" exhibition goes for the moral and ethical boundaries. In terms of people Gunther von Hagens for plastination of human remains which became a very profitable business, and its current activities defined as "plastination business" should be firmly said about the lack of moral principles.

  16. Hominin skeletal part abundances and claims of deliberate disposal of corpses in the Middle Pleistocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Charles P; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Pickering, Travis Rayne; Menter, Colin G; Heaton, Jason L

    2018-05-01

    Humans are set apart from other organisms by the realization of their own mortality. Thus, determining the prehistoric emergence of this capacity is of significant interest to understanding the uniqueness of the human animal. Tracing that capacity chronologically is possible through archaeological investigations that focus on physical markers that reflect "mortality salience." Among these markers is the deliberate and culturally mediated disposal of corpses. Some Neandertal bone assemblages are among the earliest reasonable claims for the deliberate disposal of hominins, but even these are vigorously debated. More dramatic assertions center on the Middle Pleistocene sites of Sima de los Huesos (SH, Spain) and the Dinaledi Chamber (DC, South Africa), where the remains of multiple hominin individuals were found in deep caves, and under reported taphonomic circumstances that seem to discount the possibility that nonhominin actors and processes contributed to their formation. These claims, with significant implications for charting the evolution of the "human condition," deserve scrutiny. We test these assertions through machine-learning analyses of hominin skeletal part representation in the SH and DC assemblages. Our results indicate that nonanthropogenic agents and abiotic processes cannot yet be ruled out as significant contributors to the ultimate condition of both collections. This finding does not falsify hypotheses of deliberate disposal for the SH and DC corpses, but does indicate that the data also support partially or completely nonanthropogenic formational histories.

  17. Media and Propaganda: The Northcliffe Press and the Corpse Factory Story of World War I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randal Marlin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Demonization of Germans was an early feature of British propaganda in World War I, with numerous atrocities reported in the Bryce Report, 1915. But in April, 1917, a particularly gripping, gruesome, and odium-inducing tale was given credence by the press of Lord Northcliffe, notably The Times and The Daily Mail.These papers seemed to provide convincing proof that the Germans boiled down corpses of their own soldiers for the purpose of producing useful products such as fats, bone meal, pig food and the like. The story is well known, but significant details have been obscured or misrepresented with regard to the way in which it came to be so widely believed. Our purpose here is to straighten out key elements of the record, based on archival findings, and to draw attention to the techniques employed to ensure widespread credence in this false tale. These techniques, and the principles behind their use, have recent and contemporary parallels, some of which are drawn in this paper. The Corpse Factory story succeeded in its goal, but may have made a lasting peace more difficult. Also, official repudiation of the story in 1925 encouraged later disbelief when early reports circulated about the Holocaust under Hitler, thus contributing to the early lack of response by nations asked to accept Jewish refugees.

  18. ‘We Demand Dignity for the Victims’ – Reflections on the Legal Qualification of the Indecent Disposal of Corpses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fournet, Caroline; Siller, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    ‘We demand dignity for the victims’. Such was the pledge of the Dutch Minister of Foreign Affairs following the crash of Malaysia Airlines flight mh17 in rebel-held territory in eastern Ukraine and the looting of the corpses of the 298 victims. Although not an isolated instance, the indecent

  19. Suppression of Protonated Organic Solvents in NMR Spectroscopy Using a Perfect Echo Low-Pass Filtration Pulse Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Peter W A

    2018-04-03

    Proton NMR spectra are usually acquired using deuterated solvents, but in many cases it is necessary to obtain spectra on samples in protonated solvents. In these cases, the intense resonances of the protonated solvents need to be suppressed to maximize sensitivity and spectral quality. A wide range of highly effective solvent suppression methods have been developed, but additional measures are needed to suppress the 13 C satellites of the solvent. Because the satellites represent 1.1% of the original solvent signal, they remain problematic if unsuppressed. The recently proposed DISPEL pulse sequences suppress 13 C satellites extremely effectively, and this Technical Note demonstrates that combining DISPEL and presaturation results in exceptionally effective solvent suppression. An important element in the effectiveness is volume selection, which is inherent within the DISPEL sequence. Spectra acquired in protonated dimethlysulfoxide and tetrahydrofuran show that optimum results are obtained by modifying the phase cycle, cycling the pulse-field gradients, and using broadband 13 C inversion pulses to reduce the effects of radiofrequency offset and inhomogeneity.

  20. First contribution of mites (Acari) to the forensic analysis of hanged corpses: a case study from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloña-Bordas, Marta I; Perotti, M Alejandra

    2014-11-01

    This case study from North Spain, highlights the importance of the collection of mites in addition to insects, from crime scenes or corpses subjected to environmental constraints that reduce or minimise insect activity, such as hanged corpses. In addition, this analysis highlights the relevance of arthropods' collection in the field, even after the corpse has been moved away for autopsy. Four species of mites, phoretic on carrion (Silphidae) and rove (Staphylinidae) beetles, complemented and reinforced the autopsy analysis as well as the scarce information provided by insect activity. Poecilochirus carabi Canestrini & Canestrini, 1882 and Poecilochirus (Physoparasitus) davydovae Hyatt, 1980 (Mesostigmata: Parasitidae) were found in association with two Silphidae, Nicrophorus Fabricius, 1775 and Necrodes Leach, 1815, only when sampled in the autopsy room; this is suggestive of host-switching of mites and was likely due to the lack of availability of specific carriers in the field. The interpretation of the activity of Parasitidae mites both in the field and the autopsy room allows a better understanding of the timing and circumstances of decomposition. Phoretic deutonymphs of Pelzneria Scheucher 1957 (Astigmata: Histiostomatidae) were highly abundant, mostly P. crenulata Oudemans, 1909 and are reported for the first time on a Staphylinidae rove beetle, Creophilus maxillosus (L., 1758). Surprisingly, in this case study no Pelzneria were associated with the Silphidae found, which are their most common hosts, such as Necrodes littoralis (L., 1758) and Nicrophorus interruptus (Stephens, 1830). All histiostomatids were removed from the staphylinid (rove beetle) collected from the soil, at the scene of death, suggesting a recent arrival of the beetle. The occurrence of Staphylinidae beetles and their associated mites, such as Parasitidae and Pelzneria, and the information they provided would have been easily overlooked or lost if only the autopsy sampling would have been

  1. Pulseq-Graphical Programming Interface: Open source visual environment for prototyping pulse sequences and integrated magnetic resonance imaging algorithm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Keerthi Sravan; Potdar, Sneha; Poojar, Pavan; Reddy, Ashok Kumar; Kroboth, Stefan; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik; Zaitsev, Maxim; Venkatesan, Ramesh; Geethanath, Sairam

    2018-03-11

    To provide a single open-source platform for comprehensive MR algorithm development inclusive of simulations, pulse sequence design and deployment, reconstruction, and image analysis. We integrated the "Pulseq" platform for vendor-independent pulse programming with Graphical Programming Interface (GPI), a scientific development environment based on Python. Our integrated platform, Pulseq-GPI, permits sequences to be defined visually and exported to the Pulseq file format for execution on an MR scanner. For comparison, Pulseq files using either MATLAB only ("MATLAB-Pulseq") or Python only ("Python-Pulseq") were generated. We demonstrated three fundamental sequences on a 1.5 T scanner. Execution times of the three variants of implementation were compared on two operating systems. In vitro phantom images indicate equivalence with the vendor supplied implementations and MATLAB-Pulseq. The examples demonstrated in this work illustrate the unifying capability of Pulseq-GPI. The execution times of all the three implementations were fast (a few seconds). The software is capable of user-interface based development and/or command line programming. The tool demonstrated here, Pulseq-GPI, integrates the open-source simulation, reconstruction and analysis capabilities of GPI Lab with the pulse sequence design and deployment features of Pulseq. Current and future work includes providing an ISMRMRD interface and incorporating Specific Absorption Ratio and Peripheral Nerve Stimulation computations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pulse sequence optimization for superparamagnetic iron oxide-enhaced MR imaging in the detection of hepatic VX2 tumors in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Hyun Jung; Han, Joon Koo; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Se Hyung; Choi, Byung Ihn; Kim, Tae Kyoung

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to determine the optimal pulse sequences for SPIO-enhanced MR imaging in the evaluation of multiple hepatic tumors. Twelve rabbits with multiple VX2 liver tumors underwent SPOI-enhanced MRI using the following nine pulse sequences: TSE T2-weighted imaging (T2W1), TSE proton density-weighted imaging(PDWI), and GRE T2*-weighted imaging (T2*W1) with seven different echo times (TE). Liver-lesion contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated, and images were also assessed qualitatively by two radiologists, who reached a consensus as to lesion conspicuity and imaging artifacts using a four-level scale. By means of pathologic correlation, the sensitivity and positive predictive value of each sequence was calculated. TSE T2W1 and long-TE (35 msec) FLASH T2*W1 showed the highest liver-lesion CNR. The best lesion conspicuity was seen at TSE T2W1 and medium-TE (12 msec) GRE T2*W1. Short TE GRE T2*W1 showed the least imaging artifacts. The four sequences which demonstrated the best sensitivity were medium-TE (12 msec), GRE T2*W1 (FLASH, 84%; FISP, 82%), TSE W2T1 (79%), and TSE PDWI (76%). All nine sequences showed overall high positive predictive value (86-97%), with no statistically significant difference (p>0.05). In terms of image quality and the detection of sensitivity, TSE T2W1 and medium TE (12 msec) GRE T2*W1 were the top two pulse sequences among the various sequences used for no SPIO-enhanced MRI. They are thus considered to be optimal sequences for evaluating multiple malignant hepatic tumors

  3. System for increasing laser pulse rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A technique of static elements is disclosed for combining a plurality of laser beams having time sequenced, pulsed radiation to achieve an augmented pulse rate. The technique may also be applied in a system for combining both time sequenced pulses and frequency distinct pulses for use in a system for isotope enrichment. (author)

  4. Basic evaluation of the new pulse sequence for simultaneous acquisition of T1- and T2-weighted images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurose, Atsunari; Takahashi, Tohru; Ohishi, Tae; Ishikawa, Akihiro

    2006-01-01

    A novel pulse sequence that enables simultaneous acquisition of T1-weighted (T1W) and T2-weighted (T2W) images is presented. In this new technique, the inversion recovery (IR) pulse of conventional fast inversion recovery (Fast IR) is replaced with a pulse train that consists of a fast spin echo (FSE) and 180(y)+90(x) for driven inversion (DI). By using a shorter T1 and independent k-space ordering, the first part of the sequence provides T2W images and the second part provides T1W images, thereby enabling simultaneous acquisition in a single scan time comparable to that of Fast IR. Signal simulation also was conducted, and this was compared with conventional scanning techniques using normal volunteers. In the human studies, both T1W and T2W images showed the same image quality as conventional images, suggesting the potential for this technique to replace the combination of Fast IR and T2W FSE for scan-time reduction. (author)

  5. May Ingestion of Leachate from Decomposed Corpses Cause Appendicitis? A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Domingues-Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The general consensus is that appendicitis is basically provoked by fecaliths or lymphoid hyperplasic obstruction. Several studies based on histological diagnosis have not confirmed this hypothesis. On the contrary, obstruction has been proved in only a minority of cases. Diverse infections by parasites, bacteria, fungus, and noninfective agents have been associated with appendicitis in the medical literature. We describe a firefighter, who ingested a small quantity of leachate from decomposing corpses while working and developed enteritis a few hours later, which lasted several days and evolved to appendicitis. This case raises the possibility that the high quantity of bacteria concentration present in the leachate could have provoked enteritis and the subsequent appendicitis due to a direct effect of the bacteria on the appendix.

  6. [Biometric ranging of the corpses destroyed at the site of a catastrophe in terms of gender, longitudinal and circumferencial dimensions, and the degree of subcutaneous fat distribution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zviagin, V N; Galitskaia, O I; Negasheva, M A

    2012-01-01

    The quantitative criteria for biometric ranging of destroyed corpses in terms of anatomical localization, gender, longitudinal length, trunk circumference, and the folds of subcutaneous fat are proposed. The wealth of anthropometric materials obtained in the studies of various Caucasoid populations was used to calculate the normative tables for biometric ranging of the decomposed corpses. The proposed technology excludes the subjective assessments for the purpose of such classification at the sites of catastrophes. Moreover, it promotes the accumulation of the variety of valuable information, such as the size of the collar, headwear, and footwear, clothing size and height, and portrait features, that can be used for victim identification.

  7. Genotypic characterization of Salmonella by multilocus sequence typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and amplified fragment length polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torpdahl, Mia; Skov, Marianne N.; Sandvang, Dorthe

    2005-01-01

    subspecies enterica isolates. A total of 25 serotypes were investigated that had been isolated from humans or veterinary sources in Denmark between 1995 and 2001. All isolates were genotyped by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and amplified fragment length...

  8. Observation of the human fetal corpses with maxillofacial malformations. 1. CT and MRI examinations of the fetal cleft lip and/or palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Chikara; Nakano, Yoko; Shigematsu, Shiro

    1999-01-01

    Of the various types of congenital malformations, the cleft lip and/or palate is one of the most frequent. Observation of human fetal corpses exhibiting cleft lip and palate is very important to research on its onset of its mechanism and development. In recent years, some of researchers have performed clinical studies on prenatal diagnosis and surgical treatment for the entirety. However, there have hardly been any reports on detailed observations of the maxillofacial structure of a fetus with cleft lip and palate. We seized an opportunity of observing the maxillofacial structure of fetuses with cleft lip and/or palate using three-dimensional CT (3D-CT) and MR imaging as non-disjunctive methods. In the present study, nine fetal corpses having cleft lip and/or palate were examined. The results were as follows: CT and MRI were useful for non-invasive observation of the maxillofacial structure, including soft tissues. Because the osseous tissues of young fetus tissue is not fully mature, observation of bone structures was slightly difficult. When corpses were immersed in formalin for a long time, osseous tissue was decalcified, thus making it difficult to obtain clear images. We could observe the details of the maxillofacial structures such as the alveolar process, the hard palate, the maxillary sinus, the nasal cavity, the nasal bone, and the vomer, in some of the cases. 3D-CT and MR findings observed in the fetuses with cleft lip and/or palate should provide some basement of the imaging diagnosis of congenital disorder. (author))

  9. Observation of the human fetal corpses with maxillofacial malformations. 1. CT and MRI examinations of the fetal cleft lip and/or palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Chikara; Nakano, Yoko; Shigematsu, Shiro [Tokyo Dental Coll., Chiba (Japan)] (and others)

    1999-06-01

    Of the various types of congenital malformations, the cleft lip and/or palate is one of the most frequent. Observation of human fetal corpses exhibiting cleft lip and palate is very important to research on its onset of its mechanism and development. In recent years, some of researchers have performed clinical studies on prenatal diagnosis and surgical treatment for the entirey. However, there have hardly been any reports on detailed observations of the maxillofacial structure of a fetus with cleft lip and palate. We seized an opportunity of observing the maxillofacial structure of fetuses with cleft lip and/or palate using three-dimensional CT (3D-CT) and MR imaging as non-disjunctive methods. In the present study, nine fetal corpses having cleft lip and/or palate were examined. The results were as follows: CT and MRI were useful for non-invasive observation of the maxillofacial structure, including soft tissues. Because the osseous tissues of young fetus tissue is not fully mature, observation of bone structures was slightly difficult. When corpses were immersed in formalin for a long time, osseous tissue was decalcified, thus making it difficult to obtain clear images. We could observe the details of the maxillofacial structures such as the alveolar process, the hard palate, the maxillary sinus, the nasal cavity, the nasal bone, and the vomer, in some of the cases. 3D-CT and MR findings observed in the fetuses with cleft lip and/or palate should provide some basement of the imaging diagnosis of congenital disorder. (author)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal pituitary gland using ultrashort TE (UTE) pulse sequences (REV 1.0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portman, Olivia; Flemming, Stephen; Cox, Jeremy P.D.; Johnston, Desmond G.; Bydder, Graeme M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the normal pituitary gland in male subjects with ultrashort echo time (TE) pulse sequences, describe its appearance and measure its signal intensity before and after contrast enhancement. Eleven male volunteers (mean age 57.1 years; range 36-81 years) were examined with a fat-suppressed ultrashort TE (= 0.08 ms) pulse sequence. The studies were repeated after the administration of intravenous gadodiamide. The MR scans were examined for gland morphology and signal intensity before and after enhancement. Endocrinological evaluation included baseline pituitary function tests and a glucagon stimulatory test to assess pituitary cortisol and growth hormone reserve. High signal intensity was observed in the anterior pituitary relative to the brain in nine of the 11 subjects. These regions involved the whole of the anterior pituitary in three subjects, were localised to one side in two examples and were seen inferiorly in three subjects. Signal intensities relative to the brain increased with age, with a peak around the sixth or seventh decade and decreasing thereafter. Overall, the pituitary function tests were considered to be within normal limits and did not correlate with pituitary gland signal intensity. The anterior pituitary shows increased signal intensity in normal subjects when examined with T 1 -weighted ultrashort TE pulse sequences. The cause of this increased intensity is unknown, but fibrosis and iron deposition are possible candidates. The variation in signal intensity with age followed the temporal pattern of iron content observed at post mortem. No relationship with endocrine status was observed. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal pituitary gland using ultrashort TE (UTE) pulse sequences (REV 1.0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portman, Olivia; Flemming, Stephen; Cox, Jeremy P.D.; Johnston, Desmond G. [Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, St Mary' s Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolic Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Bydder, Graeme M. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the normal pituitary gland in male subjects with ultrashort echo time (TE) pulse sequences, describe its appearance and measure its signal intensity before and after contrast enhancement. Eleven male volunteers (mean age 57.1 years; range 36-81 years) were examined with a fat-suppressed ultrashort TE (= 0.08 ms) pulse sequence. The studies were repeated after the administration of intravenous gadodiamide. The MR scans were examined for gland morphology and signal intensity before and after enhancement. Endocrinological evaluation included baseline pituitary function tests and a glucagon stimulatory test to assess pituitary cortisol and growth hormone reserve. High signal intensity was observed in the anterior pituitary relative to the brain in nine of the 11 subjects. These regions involved the whole of the anterior pituitary in three subjects, were localised to one side in two examples and were seen inferiorly in three subjects. Signal intensities relative to the brain increased with age, with a peak around the sixth or seventh decade and decreasing thereafter. Overall, the pituitary function tests were considered to be within normal limits and did not correlate with pituitary gland signal intensity. The anterior pituitary shows increased signal intensity in normal subjects when examined with T{sub 1}-weighted ultrashort TE pulse sequences. The cause of this increased intensity is unknown, but fibrosis and iron deposition are possible candidates. The variation in signal intensity with age followed the temporal pattern of iron content observed at post mortem. No relationship with endocrine status was observed. (orig.)

  12. Manipulating femtosecond spin-orbit torques with laser pulse sequences to control magnetic memory states and ringing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingos, P. C.; Wang, J.; Perakis, I. E.

    2015-05-01

    Femtosecond (fs) coherent control of collective order parameters is important for nonequilibrium phase dynamics in correlated materials. Here, we propose such control of ferromagnetic order based on using nonadiabatic optical manipulation of electron-hole (e -h ) photoexcitations to create fs carrier-spin pulses with controllable direction and time profile. These spin pulses are generated due to the time-reversal symmetry breaking arising from nonperturbative spin-orbit and magnetic exchange couplings of coherent photocarriers. By tuning the nonthermal populations of exchange-split, spin-orbit-coupled semiconductor band states, we can excite fs spin-orbit torques that control complex magnetization pathways between multiple magnetic memory states. We calculate the laser-induced fs magnetic anisotropy in the time domain by using density matrix equations of motion rather than the quasiequilibrium free energy. By comparing to pump-probe experiments, we identify a "sudden" out-of-plane magnetization canting displaying fs magnetic hysteresis, which agrees with switchings measured by the static Hall magnetoresistivity. This fs transverse spin-canting switches direction with magnetic state and laser frequency, which distinguishes it from the longitudinal nonlinear optical and demagnetization effects. We propose that sequences of clockwise or counterclockwise fs spin-orbit torques, photoexcited by shaping two-color laser-pulse sequences analogous to multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, can be used to timely suppress or enhance magnetic ringing and switching rotation in magnetic memories.

  13. The Optimization of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pulse Sequences in Order to Better Detection of Multiple Sclerosis Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshidfar, Z; Faeghi, F; Haghighatkhah, H R; Abdolmohammadi, J

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most sensitive technique to detect multiple sclerosis (MS) plaques in central nervous system. In some cases, the patients who were suspected to MS, Whereas MRI images are normal, but whether patients don't have MS plaques or MRI images are not enough optimized enough in order to show MS plaques? The aim of the current study is evaluating the efficiency of different MRI sequences in order to better detection of MS plaques. In this cross-sectional study which was performed at Shohada-E Tajrish in Tehran - Iran hospital between October, 2011 to April, 2012, included 20 patients who suspected to MS disease were selected by the method of random sampling and underwent routine brain Pulse sequences (Axial T2w, Axial T1w, Coronal T2w, Sagittal T1w, Axial FLAIR) by Siemens, Avanto, 1.5 Tesla system. If any lesion which is suspected to the MS disease was observed, additional sequences such as: Sagittal FLAIR Fat Sat, Sagittal PDw-fat Sat, Sagittal PDw-water sat was also performed. This study was performed in about 52 lesions and the results in more than 19 lesions showed that, for the Subcortical and Infratentorial areas, PDWw sequence with fat suppression is the best choice, And in nearly 33 plaques located in Periventricular area, FLAIR Fat Sat was the most effective sequence than both PDw fat and water suppression pulse sequences. Although large plaques may visible in all images, but important problem in patients with suspected MS is screening the tiny MS plaques. This study showed that for revealing the MS plaques located in the Subcortical and Infratentorial areas, PDw-fat sat is the most effective sequence, and for MS plaques in the periventricular area, FLAIR fat Sat is the best choice.

  14. Detection of hepatic VX2 carcinomas with ferucarbotran-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rabbits: Comparison of nine pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Hyun; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Hyo K.; Kim, Min Ju; Jang, Kyung Mi; Kim, Seung Hoon; Lee, Won Jae; Lee, Jongmee; Jeon, Yong Hwan; Lim, Jae Hoon

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic performance of a variety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences, in order to identify the most effective ferucarbotran-enhanced sequence for the detection of multiple small hepatic VX2 carcinomas in rabbits. Methods: Fifteen rabbits with experimentally induced 135 VX2 carcinomas in the liver underwent ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI using the following nine pulse sequences: a fat-suppressed fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence with two echo times (TE) (proton density- and T2-weighted images), four different T2*-weighted fast multiplanar GRASS (gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state) (FMPGR) with the combination of three TEs (9, 12, 15 ms, respectively) and two flip angles (20 deg., 80 deg., respectively), T2*-weighted fast multiplanar spoiled GRASS (FMPSPGR), T1-weighted FMPSPGR, and dynamic T1-weighted FMPSPGR. All images were reviewed by three radiologists with quantitative and qualitative analysis. Results: Tumor-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio of the proton density-weighted FSE sequence was significantly higher than those of the others (p o ) images were superior to those of the others and for the detection of very small hepatic tumors of less than 5 mm, the sensitivities of these sequences were less than 30%. Conclusion: Ferucarbotran-enhanced T2- and proton density-weighted FSE and T2*-weighed FMPGR (TE/flip angle, 12/20 o ) images were found to be the most effective pulse sequences for the detection of multiple small hepatic VX2 carcinomas but these sequences were limited in the detection of very small hepatic tumors of less than 5 mm in size

  15. Lung MRI at 1.5 and 3 Tesla: observer preference study and lesion contrast using five different pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Christian; Puderbach, Michael; Biederer, Juergen; Fabel, Michael; Dietrich, Olaf; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Reiser, Maximilian F; Schönberg, Stefan O

    2007-06-01

    To compare the image quality and lesion contrast of lung MRI using 5 different pulse sequences at 1.5 T and 3 T. Lung MRI was performed at 1.5 T and 3 T using 5 pulse sequences which have been previously proposed for lung MRI: 3D volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE), true fast imaging with steady-state precession (TrueFISP), half-Fourier single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE), short tau inversion recovery (STIR), T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE). In addition to 4 healthy volunteers, 5 porcine lungs were examined in a dedicated chest phantom. Lung pathology (nodules and infiltrates) was simulated in the phantom by intrapulmonary and intrabronchial injections of agarose. CT was performed in the phantom for correlation. Image quality of the sequences was ranked in a side-by-side comparison by 3 blinded radiologists regarding the delineation of pulmonary and mediastinal anatomy, conspicuity of pulmonary nodules and infiltrates, and presence of artifacts. The contrast of nodules and infiltrates (CNODULES and CINFILTRATES) defined by the ratio of the signal intensities of the lesion and adjacent normal lung parenchyma was determined. There were no relevant differences regarding the preference for the individual sequences between both field strengths. TSE was the preferred sequence for the visualization of the mediastinum at both field strengths. For the visualization of lung parenchyma the observers preferred TrueFISP in volunteers and TSE in the phantom studies. At both field strengths VIBE achieved the best rating for the depiction of nodules, whereas HASTE was rated best for the delineation of infiltrates. TrueFISP had the fewest artifacts in volunteers, whereas STIR showed the fewest artifacts in the phantom. For all but the TrueFISP sequence the lesion contrast increased from 1.5 T to 3 T. At both field strengths VIBE showed the highest CNODULES (6.6 and 7.1) and HASTE the highest CINFILTRATES (6.1 and 6.3). The imaging characteristics of different

  16. B1 mapping for bias-correction in quantitative T1 imaging of the brain at 3T using standard pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Mathieu; Tardif, Christine L; Stikov, Nikola; Sled, John G; Lee, Wayne; Pike, G Bruce

    2017-12-01

    B 1 mapping is important for many quantitative imaging protocols, particularly those that include whole-brain T 1 mapping using the variable flip angle (VFA) technique. However, B 1 mapping sequences are not typically available on many magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners. The aim of this work was to demonstrate that B 1 mapping implemented using standard scanner product pulse sequences can produce B 1 (and VFA T 1 ) maps comparable in quality and acquisition time to advanced techniques. Six healthy subjects were scanned at 3.0T. An interleaved multislice spin-echo echo planar imaging double-angle (EPI-DA) B 1 mapping protocol, using a standard product pulse sequence, was compared to two alternative methods (actual flip angle imaging, AFI, and Bloch-Siegert shift, BS). Single-slice spin-echo DA B 1 maps were used as a reference for comparison (Ref. DA). VFA flip angles were scaled using each B 1 map prior to fitting T 1 ; the nominal flip angle case was also compared. The pooled-subject voxelwise correlation (ρ) for B 1 maps (BS/AFI/EPI-DA) relative to the reference B 1 scan (Ref. DA) were ρ = 0.92/0.95/0.98. VFA T 1 correlations using these maps were ρ = 0.86/0.88/0.96, much better than without B 1 correction (ρ = 0.53). The relative error for each B 1 map (BS/AFI/EPI-DA/Nominal) had 95 th percentiles of 5/4/3/13%. Our findings show that B 1 mapping implemented using product pulse sequences can provide excellent quality B 1 (and VFA T 1 ) maps, comparable to other custom techniques. This fast whole-brain measurement (∼2 min) can serve as an excellent alternative for researchers without access to advanced B 1 pulse sequences. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1673-1682. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Hyaline articular cartilage: relaxation times, pulse-sequence parameters and MR appearance at 1.5 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalkias, S.M. [Dept. of Radiology, A.H.E.P.A. General Hospital of the Aristotelian Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece); Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste (Italy); Pozzi-Mucelli, M. [Orthopaedic Clinic, Univ. of Trieste (Italy); Frezza, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste (Italy); Longo, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste (Italy)

    1994-08-01

    In order to optimize the parameters for the best visualization of the internal architecture of the hyaline articular cartilage a study both ex vivo and in vivo was performed. Accurate T1 and T2 relaxation times of articular cartilage were obtained with a particular mixed sequence and then used for the creation of isocontrast intensity graphs. These graphs subsequently allowed in all pulse sequences (spin echo, SE and gradient echo, GRE) the best combination of repetition time (TR), echo time (TE) and flip angle (FA) for optimization of signal differences between MR cartilage zones. For SE sequences maximum contrast between cartilage zones can be obtained by using a long TR (> 1,500 ms) with a short TE (< 30 ms), whereas for GRE sequences maximum contrast is obtained with the shortest TE (< 15 ms) combined with a relatively long TR (> 400 ms) and an FA greater than 40 . A trilaminar appearance was demonstrated with a superficial and deep hypointense zone in all sequences and an intermediate zone that was moderately hyperintense on SE T1-weighted images, slightly more hyperintense on proton density Rho and SE T2-weighted images and even more hyperintense on GRE images. (orig.)

  18. Discriminatory usefulness of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and sequence-based typing in Legionella outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, Sara; García-Núñez, Marian; Párraga-Niño, Noemí; Barrabeig, Irene; Pedro-Botet, Maria L; de Simon, Mercè; Sopena, Nieves; Sabrià, Miquel

    2016-06-01

    To compare the discriminatory power of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequence-based typing (SBT) in Legionella outbreaks for determining the infection source. Twenty-five investigations of Legionnaires' disease were analyzed by PFGE, SBT and Dresden monoclonal antibody. The results suggested that monoclonal antibody could reduce the number of Legionella isolates to be characterized by molecular methods. The epidemiological concordance PFGE-SBT was 100%, while the molecular concordance was 64%. Adjusted Wallace index (AW) showed that PFGE has better discriminatory power than SBT (AWSBT→PFGE = 0.767; AWPFGE→SBT = 1). The discrepancies appeared mostly in sequence type (ST) 1, a worldwide distributed ST for which PFGE discriminated different profiles. SBT discriminatory power was not sufficient verifying the infection source, especially in worldwide distributed STs, which were classified into different PFGE patterns.

  19. Homicides with corpse dismemberment in the material collected by the Department of Forensic Medicine, Krakow, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Tomasz; Bolechała, Filip; Strona, Marcin; Kopacz, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study: To determine the circumstances which can be useful for offenders profiling in homicide cases with victim's body dismemberment. Material and methods: Study of all homicide cases with victim's corpse dismemberment examined in Krakow Department of Forensic Medicine over the last 50 years. Results: Within the past 50 years, a total number of 30 cases of homicides with dismembered bodies were examined in Krakow. 22 cases represent defensive mutilations performed by offender, 3 cases can be classified as offensive muti-lations and 3 cases represent aggressive mutilations - decapitation as a method of committing homicide. In this period the only 1 case of necrophilic mutilations was examined, when the body was dismembered without murder. In most cases the background of homicide was the family conflict, 6 was cause of mental illness of perpetrator and in 3 was sexual motive. Only in 3 cases (from 25 when the offender was known) perpetrator kill a stranger. In the other the offender belonged to the family or friends of the victim. In all cases where the perpetrator was determined, homicide and dismemberment was performed in his place of residence. The findings of the Police investigations indicate that in most cases homicides were not planned, occurred under the influence of emotion, only two have been previously scheduled. Conclusions: Homicides with corpses dismemberment usually are committed by offenders who is in close relationship with victim (family or friend). Dismemberment is almost always performed in the same place as murder - home of perpetrator. This type of homicide usually is not planned.

  20. Comparative study and application of MR sialography using different pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Ruihua; Qi Jianping; Feng Dingyi; Zou Mingli; Hu Junwu; Zhu Wenzhen; Xia Liming; Wang Chengyuan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of MR sialography in demonstrating the main salivary duct systems by using a series of pulse sequences and stimulation of salivation by vitamin C. Methods: MR sialography was prospectively performed with STIR, heavily T 2 weighted FSE, and SS FSE sequences in 17 patients suspected with salivary duct abnormalities and 13 volunteers, respectively, and MR sialography was further performed in 16 patients after vitamin C stimulation. The results of the above three sequences were compared with each other. Results: The main salivary gland duct was depicted in all cases by any of the mentioned sequence. The STIR images were significantly superior to SS FSE and heavily T 2 weighted FSE images for demonstrating the salivary duct system, followed by heavily T 2 weighted FSE images. On STIR images, first- and second- order intraglandular branches were clearly depicted in all cases, and the thinnest branches were about 0.8 mm. On heavily T 2 weighted FSE images, the first-order and the second-order intraglandular branches were delineated in 25 of 30 and 18 of 30 cases, respectively. But on SS FSE images, only 20 to 30 first-order and 10 of 30 second-order intraglandular branches could be detected. MR sialography with vitamin C stimulation revealed the good visualization of the salivary duct system, and the ducts became wider than before. In 7 cases with acute sialadenitis, the main duct became slightly wider and the distal ducts were dilated; In 7 cases with benign tumor, the ducts were displaced but remained continuous; The duct in one patients with submandibular gland cancer showed destruction and discontinuity. The ducts of one patient with Sjogren syndrome and one with sialidosis displayed normal. Conclusion: MR sialography with evoked salivation is noninvasive and allows delineation of both normal and abnormal parotid and submandibular gland duct systems, and the images are especially better on STIR sequence

  1. Efficient and controllable thermal ablation induced by short-pulsed HIFU sequence assisted with perfluorohexane nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nan; Lu, Shukuan; Qin, Dui; Xu, Tianqi; Han, Meng; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2018-07-01

    A HIFU sequence with extremely short pulse duration and high pulse repetition frequency can achieve thermal ablation at a low acoustic power using inertial cavitation. Because of its cavitation-dependent property, the therapeutic outcome is unreliable when the treatment zone lacks cavitation nuclei. To overcome this intrinsic limitation, we introduced perfluorocarbon nanodroplets as extra cavitation nuclei into short-pulsed HIFU-mediated thermal ablation. Two types of nanodroplets were used with perfluorohexane (PFH) as the core material coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) or an anionic fluorosurfactant (FS) to demonstrate the feasibility of this study. The thermal ablation process was recorded by high-speed photography. The inertial cavitation activity during the ablation was revealed by sonoluminescence (SL). The high-speed photography results show that the thermal ablation volume increased by ∼643% and 596% with BSA-PFH and FS-PFH, respectively, than the short-pulsed HIFU alone at an acoustic power of 19.5 W. Using nanodroplets, much larger ablation volumes were created even at a much lower acoustic power. Meanwhile, the treatment time for ablating a desired volume significantly reduced in the presence of nanodroplets. Moreover, by adjusting the treatment time, lesion migration towards the HIFU transducer could also be avoided. The SL results show that the thermal lesion shape was significantly dependent on the inertial cavitation in this short-pulsed HIFU-mediated thermal ablation. The inertial cavitation activity became more predictable by using nanodroplets. Therefore, the introduction of PFH nanodroplets as extra cavitation nuclei made the short-pulsed HIFU thermal ablation more efficient by increasing the ablation volume and speed, and more controllable by reducing the acoustic power and preventing lesion migration. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Quantum theory of NMR adiabatic pulses and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Recently explosive developments of in vivo NMR spectroscopy (NMRS) and imaging (NMRI) in biological and medical sciences have resulted in the establishment of NMR as one of the most advanced major technique in life sciences. These developments have created huge demands for a variety of NMR adiabatic pulses with play a very important role in NMR experiments in vivo. In order to develop new NMR adiabatic pulses, a rigorous systematical quantum theory for this kind of pulses is greatly needed. Providing such a theory is one of the important goals of this dissertation. Quantum density matrix theory and product operator method have been used throughout this dissertation. Another goal, which is the major goal of this thesis research, is to use the quantum theory as a guide to develop new NMR adiabatic pulses and their applications. To fill this goal, a technique to construct a new type of adiabatic pulses, narrow band selective adiabatic pulses, has been invented, which is described through the example of constructing an adiabatic DANTE inversion pulse. This new adiabatic pulse is the first narrow band selective adiabatic pulses: Adiabatic homonuclear and heteronuclear spectral editing sequences. Unique to the first pulse sequence is a B 1 -field filter which is built by using two non-refocusing adiabatic full passage pulses to refocus the wanted signal and dephase unwanted signals. This extra filter greatly enhance the editing efficiency. Unlike commonly used heteronuclear spectral editing sequences which depend on the polarization transfer or spectral subtraction by phase cycling techniques, the second pulse sequences accomplishes the editing of heteronuclear J-coupled signals based on the fact that this sequence is transparent to the uncoupled spins and is equivalent a 90 degrees excitation pulse to the heteronuclear J-coupled spins. Experimental results have confirmed the ability of spectral editing with these two new sequences

  3. Population Genetic Structure of Listeria monocytogenes Strains as Determined by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Multilocus Sequence Typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henri, Clémentine; Félix, Benjamin; Guillier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    on the basis of different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) clusters, serotypes, and strain origins and typed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and the MLST results were supplemented with MLST data available from Institut Pasteur, representing human and additional food strains from France....... The distribution of sequence types (STs) was compared between food and clinical strains on a panel of 675 strains. High congruence between PFGE and MLST was found. Out of 73 PFGE clusters, the two most prevalent corresponded to ST9 and ST121. Using original statistical analysis, we demonstrated that (i...

  4. Cultures of Death and Politics of Corpse Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buklijas, Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    Summary Nineteenth-century Vienna is well known to medical historians as a leading centre of medical research and education, offering easy access to patients and corpses to students from all over the world. This article seeks to explain how this enviable supply with cadavers was achieved, why it provoked so little opposition at a time when Britain and the United States saw widespread protests against dissection, and how it was threatened from mid-century. To understand permissive Viennese attitudes we need to place them in a longue durée history of death and dissection, and to pay close attention to the city’s political geography as it was transformed into a major imperial capital. The tolerant stance of the Roman Catholic Church, strong links to Southern Europe and the weak position of individuals in the absolutist state all contributed to an idiosyncratic anatomical culture. But as the fame of the Vienna medical school peaked in the later 1800s, the increased demand created by rising student numbers combined with intensified interdisciplinary competition to produce a shortfall that professors found increasingly difficult to meet. Around 1900, new religious groups and mass political parties challenged the long-standing anatomical practice by refusing to supply cadavers and making dissection into an instrument of political struggle. This study of the material preconditions for anatomy at one of Europe’s most influential medical schools provides a contrast to the dominant Anglo-American histories of death and dissection. PMID:18791297

  5. Percutaneous vertebroplasty: an experimental study in adult corpses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Shicheng; Teng Gaojun; Zeng Shuilin; Guo Jinhe; Fang Wen; Zhu Guangyu; Liu Zhentian

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the key technique factors and the mechanisms of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP). Methods: PMMA was classified into three groups according to the ratio of powder/liquid as 1:1, 3:2 and 2:1. Polymerizing process in vitro was measured respectively in each group, which included 10 samples. Twenty vertebrae from T12-L4 in 4 adult corpses were randomly distributed into 2 groups. In one group, PVP was performed under monitoring by combined CT and C-arm X-ray machines. All vertebrae were dissected into individual vertebra and the ultimate compressive strength was measured in double-blind tests. Results: The period of the polymerizing process and the temperature changes during the polymerizing among 3 groups with different ratio of powder/liquid were significantly different. The ratio of 3/2 was the proper regimen for injection. Punctures were successfully reached in one set of puncture in all vertebrae but one, with 4.5 ml of PMMA in average injected in each vertebra. Pre-vertebral leakage of PMMA was demonstrated in 4 of 20 vertebrae. The ultimate compressive strength increased in 38% in the experimental group compared with that of the control group. Conclusions: Proper ratio of powder/liquid and injection time of PMMA is the key technique for PVP. The puncture route of trans-arch of vertebra is accessible for PVP. It is proven in this study that the ultimate compressive strength of vertebra enhances greatly after PVP

  6. Versatile pulse programmer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adduci, D.J.

    1979-05-01

    A description of the sequence of events and the decisions leading to the design of a versatile pulse programmer for pulsed NMR are presented. Background and application information is discussed in order that the reader might better understand the role of the pulse programmer in a NMR spectrometer. Various other design approaches are presented as a basis for comparison. Specifications for this design are proposed, the hardware implementation of the specifications is discussed, and the software operating system is presented

  7. Versatile pulse programmer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adduci, D.J.

    1979-05-01

    A description of the sequence of events and the decisions leading to the design of a versatile pulse programmer for pulsed NMR are presented. Background and application information is discussed in order that the reader might better understand the role of the pulse programmer in a NMR spectrometer. Various other design approaches are presented as a basis for comparison. Specifications for this design are proposed, the hardware implementation of the specifications is discussed, and the software operating system is presented.

  8. Homicides with corpse dismemberment in the material collected by the Department of Forensic Medicine, Krakow, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Konopka

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study : To determine the circumstances which can be useful for offenders profiling in homicide cases with victim’s body dismemberment. Material and methods: Study of all homicide cases with victim’s corpse dismemberment examined in Krakow Department of Forensic Medicine over the last 50 years. Results : Within the past 50 years, a total number of 30 cases of homicides with dismembered bodies were examined in Krakow. 22 cases represent defensive mutilations performed by offender, 3 cases can be classified as offensive muti­lations and 3 cases represent aggressive mutilations – decapitation as a method of committing homicide. In this period the only 1 case of necrophilic mutilations was examined, when the body was dismembered without murder. In most cases the background of homicide was the family conflict, 6 was cause of mental illness of perpetrator and in 3 was sexual motive. Only in 3 cases (from 25 when the offender was known perpetrator kill a stranger. In the other the offender belonged to the family or friends of the victim. In all cases where the perpetrator was determined, homicide and dismemberment was performed in his place of residence. The findings of the Police investigations indicate that in most cases homicides were not planned, occurred under the influence of emotion, only two have been previously scheduled. Conclusions : Homicides with corpses dismemberment usually are committed by offenders who is in close relationship with victim (family or friend. Dismemberment is almost always performed in the same place as murder – home of perpetrator. This type of homicide usually is not planned.

  9. Reply to 'Comments on 'Radioiodine therapy: care of the helpless patient and handling of the radioactive corpse' '

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tindale, Claire Greaves and Wendy

    2002-09-01

    The recently published medical and dental guidance notes provide advice on dealing with patients who die following the administration of a radioactive substance. The guidance notes deal with cremation of radioactive patients and provide limits above which special precautions (and advice from the radiation protection advisor) may be required. For Sr-89 special precautions are required once the administered activity exceeds 200 MBq. In 1989 an assessment of the radiological impact of cremating a corpse containing up to 500 MBq of Sr-89 was undertaken by the NRPB. The results were published by the Institute of Physical Sciences in Medicine and are also discussed in Mountford's 'Exposure of critical groups to nuclear medicine patients'. Cremation of one corpse contaminated at a reference level of 500 MBq resulted in a maximum individual dose equivalent to an adult member of the public of less than 0.1 {mu}Sv (mostly from inhalation). A skin dose of less than 2 {mu}Sv would be expected in conditions of moderate rain (mostly from direct deposition on the skin). A crematorium worker would receive a maximum individual effective dose equivalent of about 0.3 {mu}Sv from inhalation and 0.4 {mu}Sv from ingestion. The maximum doses to an adult members of the public scattering contaminated ashes are unknown but are extremely unlikely to exceed those calculated for the crematorium worker per cremation. The maximum dose equivalents to a child or infant who may come into contact with the ash shortly after being scattered is similarly unknown and subject to considerable uncertainty. Pessimistic estimates based on a reference intake (1 mg) are greatest for an infant ingesting ash inadvertently (3 {mu}Sv). It was noted that although a person may be exposed to an atmospheric discharge of Sr-89 on more than one occasion, direct exposure to contaminated ash is very unlikely to occur more than once. The conclusion was that the levels of dose likely to be encountered in

  10. Quality improvement of fingerprints of decayed corpses by local thanatopractical processing (Thanatoprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gahr, Britta

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Thanatopractical processing allows morphological reconstruction of even advanced decayed bodies. By extracting fluids from the body’s tissue antemortem tenseness and volume can be restored. If bodies are partly subject to thanatopractical processing in the hand region (“Thanatoprint”, fingerprints of high quality can be gathered even in cases of advanced decay. Without this treatment fingerprinting can be extremely difficult, if not impossible. Thanatopractical processing could be applied successfully in cases of partial to subtotal detachment of the epidermis as well. In an interdisciplinary study 400 fingerprints of bodies in various states of decay were examined after application of Thanatoprint. In 76.75% fingerprints were applicable for data entry into AFIS (Automated Fingerprint Identification System; another 11.00% of the fingerprints could be used for the process of non-elimination. Further advantages of the method are low invasivity while maintaining the integrity of the corpse, less time- and material requirement as well as its long-lasting effect.

  11. Acousto-optic replication of ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushkov, Konstantin B.; Molchanov, Vladimir Ya.; Ovchinnikov, Andrey V.; Chefonov, Oleg V.

    2017-10-01

    Precisely controlled sequences of ultrashort laser pulses are required in various scientific and engineering applications. We developed a phase-only acousto-optic pulse shaping method for replication of ultrashort laser pulses in a TW laser system. A sequence of several Fourier-transform-limited pulses is generated from a single femtosecond laser pulse by means of applying a piecewise linear phase modulation over the whole emission spectrum. Analysis demonstrates that the main factor which limits maximum delay between the pulse replicas is spectral resolution of the acousto-optic dispersive delay line used for pulse shaping. In experiments with a Cr:forsterite laser system, we obtained delays from 0.3 to 3.5 ps between two replicas of 190 fs transform-limited pulses at the central wavelength of laser emission, 1230 nm.

  12. Pulsed magnetization transfer contrast MRI by a sequence with water selective excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schick, F. [Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany)

    1996-01-01

    A water selective SE imaging sequence was developed providing suitable properties for the assessment of magnetization transfer (MT) effects in tissues with considerable amounts of fat. The sequence with water selective excitation and slice selective refocusing combines the following features: The RIF exposure on the macromolecular protons is relatively low for single slice imaging without MT prepulses, since no additional pulses for fat saturation are necessary. Water selection by frequency selective excitation diminishes faults in the subtraction of images recorded with and without MT prepulses (which might arise from movements). High differences in the signal amplitudes from hyaline cartilage and muscle tissue were obtained comparing images recorded with irradiation of the series of prepulses for MT and those lacking MT prepulses. Utilizations of the described water selective approach for the assessment of MT effects in lesions of cartilage and bone are demonstrated. MT saturation was also examined in muscles with fatty degeneration of patients suffering from progressive muscular dystrophy. The described technique allows determination of MT effects with good precision in a single slice, especially in regions with dominating fat signals. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Determination of pseudo multi-pulse production rate in GM counters by correlation analysis between signal pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Kengo; Ueda, Taizou

    1996-01-01

    A technique, based on the correlation analysis of signal pulses in time sequence, is proposed to determine the production rate of the pseudo multi-pulse in Geiger-Mueller (GM) counter. With a multi-channel scaler initiated by a signal pulse, subsequent pulses are recorded in sequence. The production of the multi-pulse increases the counting probability immediately after the initiation. By examining the deviation of the measured probability from the ideal counting probability, the production rate and the average lag time to produce the multi-pulse can be determined. By the use of the present technique, the production rate and the average lag time were obtained for the various GM tubes. These results indicate that the consumption of the quench gas results in a significant increase in the production rate but little variation in the lag time, and that the lag time strongly depends on the tube diameter. (author)

  14. Multi-qubit compensation sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Y; Merrill, J T; Brown, K R

    2010-01-01

    The Hamiltonian control of n qubits requires precision control of both the strength and timing of interactions. Compensation pulses relax the precision requirements by reducing unknown but systematic errors. Using composite pulse techniques designed for single qubits, we show that systematic errors for n-qubit systems can be corrected to arbitrary accuracy given either two non-commuting control Hamiltonians with identical systematic errors or one error-free control Hamiltonian. We also examine composite pulses in the context of quantum computers controlled by two-qubit interactions. For quantum computers based on the XY interaction, single-qubit composite pulse sequences naturally correct systematic errors. For quantum computers based on the Heisenberg or exchange interaction, the composite pulse sequences reduce the logical single-qubit gate errors but increase the errors for logical two-qubit gates.

  15. 1H HR-MAS NMR and S180 cells: metabolite assignment and evaluation of pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Aline L. de; Martinelli, Bruno César B.; Lião, Luciano M.; Pereira, Flávia C.; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisangela P.; Alcantara, Glaucia B.

    2014-01-01

    High resolution magic angle spinning 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS NMR) is a useful technique for evaluation of intact cells and tissues. However, optimal NMR parameters are crucial in obtaining reliable results. To identify the key steps for the optimization of HR-MAS NMR parameters, we assessed different pulse sequences and NMR parameters using sarcoma 180 (S180) cells. A complete assignment of the metabolites of S180 is given to assist future studies. (author)

  16. Transformed composite sequences for improved qubit addressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, J. True; Doret, S. Charles; Vittorini, Grahame; Addison, J. P.; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2014-10-01

    Selective laser addressing of a single atom or atomic ion qubit can be improved using narrow-band composite pulse sequences. We describe a Lie-algebraic technique to generalize known narrow-band sequences and introduce sequences related by dilation and rotation of sequence generators. Our method improves known narrow-band sequences by decreasing both the pulse time and the residual error. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate these composite sequences using 40Ca+ ions trapped in a surface-electrode ion trap.

  17. Comparison of MRI pulse sequences for investigation of lesions of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campi, A.; Pontesilli, S.; Gerevini, S.; Scotti, G.

    2000-01-01

    Small spinal cord lesions, even if clinically significant, can be due to the low sensitivity of some pulse sequences. We compared T2-weighted fast (FSE), and conventional (CSE) spin-echo and short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR)-FSE overlooked on MRI sequences to evaluate their sensitivity to and specificity for lesions of different types. We compared the three sequences in MRI of 57 patients with cervical spinal symptoms. The image sets were assessed by two of us individually for final diagnosis, lesion detectability and image quality. Both readers arrived at the same final diagnoses with all sequences, differentiating four groups of patients. Group 1 (30 patients, 53 %), with a final diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Demyelinating lesions were better seen on STIR-FSE images, on which the number of lesions was significantly higher than on FSE, while the FSE and CSE images showed approximately equal numbers of lesions; additional lesions were found in 9 patients. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of 17 demyelinating lesions was significantly higher on STIR-FSE images than with the other sequences. Group 2, 19 patients (33 %) with cervical pain, 15 of whom had disc protrusion or herniation: herniated discs were equally well delineated with all sequences, with better myelographic effect on FSE. In five patients with intrinsic spinal cord abnormalities, the conspicuity and demarcation of the lesions were similar with STIR-FSE and FSE. Group 3, 4 patients (7 %) with acute myelopathy of unknown aetiology. In two patients, STIR-FSE gave better demarcation of lesions and in one a questionable additional lesions. Group 4, 4 patients (7 %) with miscellaneous final diagnoses. STIR-FSE had high sensitivity to demyelinating lesions, can be considered quite specific and should be included in spinal MRI for assessment of suspected demyelinating disease. (orig.)

  18. {sup 1}H HR-MAS NMR and S180 cells: metabolite assignment and evaluation of pulse sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Aline L. de; Martinelli, Bruno César B.; Lião, Luciano M. [Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG), Goiânia, GO (Brazil). Instituto de Química. Lab. de RMN; Pereira, Flávia C.; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisangela P. [Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG), Goiânia, GO (Brazil). Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Laboratório Genética Molecular e Citogenética; Alcantara, Glaucia B., E-mail: glaucia.alcantara@ufms.br [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Inst. de Química

    2014-07-01

    High resolution magic angle spinning {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS NMR) is a useful technique for evaluation of intact cells and tissues. However, optimal NMR parameters are crucial in obtaining reliable results. To identify the key steps for the optimization of HR-MAS NMR parameters, we assessed different pulse sequences and NMR parameters using sarcoma 180 (S180) cells. A complete assignment of the metabolites of S180 is given to assist future studies. (author)

  19. [The coordination of the forensic medical service with the medical criminology subdivisions of internal affairs organs in the personal identification of unidentified corpses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashinian, G A; Tuchik, E S

    1997-01-01

    In order to improve the cooperation between medical criminology departments of the organs of home affairs and forensic medical service in personality identification of unidentified corpses, the authors propose amendments to the routine procedure regulated by documents of the Ministry of Home Affairs of the Russian Federation, for these documents are in need of serious correction and revision, so that they conform to the judicial legislation and other documents.

  20. Programmes of cell death and autolysis in tracheary elements: when a suicidal cell arranges its own corpse removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamez, Sacha; Tuominen, Hannele

    2014-03-01

    Tracheary element (TE) differentiation represents a unique system to study plant developmental programmed cell death (PCD). TE PCD occurs after deposition of the secondary cell walls when an unknown signal induces tonoplast rupture and the arrest of cytoplasmic streaming. TE PCD is tightly followed by autolysis of the protoplast and partial hydrolysis of the primary cell walls. This review integrates TE differentiation, programmed cell death (PCD), and autolysis in a biological and evolutionary context. The collective evidence from the evolutionary and molecular studies suggests that TE differentiation consists primarily of a programme for cell death and autolysis under the direct control of the transcriptional master switches VASCULAR NAC DOMAIN 6 (VND6) and VND7. In this scenario, secondary cell walls represent a later innovation to improve the water transport capacity of TEs which necessitates transcriptional regulators downstream of VND6 and VND7. One of the most fascinating features of TEs is that they need to prepare their own corpse removal by expression and accumulation of hydrolases that are released from the vacuole after TE cell death. Therefore, TE differentiation involves, in addition to PCD, a programmed autolysis which is initiated before cell death and executed post-mortem. It has recently become clear that TE PCD and autolysis are separate processes with separate molecular regulation. Therefore, the importance of distinguishing between the cell death programme per se and autolysis in all plant PCD research and of careful description of the morphological, biochemical, and molecular sequences in each of these processes, is advocated.

  1. Corpses of Metaphor. Images of Death in David Leavitt and Jamaica Kincaid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorenzo Iuliano

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This essay analyzes two works, My Brother by Jamaica Kincaid, and "Saturn Street" by David Leavitt, investigating the construction of homosexuality as a process accomplished by resorting to illness (AIDS and death. In both works, indeed, the slow and dramatic course of AIDS amounts to the progressive unveiling of homosexuality as a social threat or a cause of anxiety and repulsion. The two works are set in different contexts: whereas Jamaica Kincaid refers to the problematic situation of homosexuality in the Caribbean, David Leavitt explores the social and cultural scenario of the 1990s Los Angeles, in the wake of a by now ended utopian confidence in science and technology.  This comparative approach helps us understand the political dynamics through which, in different and, to some extents, opposite realities, the social stigma of AIDS worked as a means to construct homosexual identity and set it apart from the sanitized spectrum of normal and sanctioned sexual behaviors. The point I want to make in this essay is that the corpse is used as an effective metaphor for a dehumanized depiction of male homosexual and ill subjects.

  2. Controlling semiconductor nanoparticle size distributions with tailored ultrashort pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hergenroeder, R; Miclea, M; Hommes, V

    2006-01-01

    The laser generation of size-controlled semiconductor nanoparticle formation under gas phase conditions is investigated. It is shown that the size distribution can be changed if picosecond pulse sequences of tailored ultra short laser pulses (<200 fs) are employed. By delivering the laser energy in small packages, a temporal energy flux control at the target surface is achieved, which results in the control of the thermodynamic pathway the material takes. The concept is tested with silicon and germanium, both materials with a predictable response to double pulse sequences, which allows deduction of the materials' response to complicated pulse sequences. An automatic, adaptive learning algorithm was employed to demonstrate a future strategy that enables the definition of more complex optimization targets such as particle size on materials less predictable than semiconductors

  3. Efficient theory of dipolar recoupling in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance of rotating solids using Floquet-Magnus expansion: application on BABA and C7 radiofrequency pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene S; Reid, Alicia E; Charpentier, Thibault

    2012-02-01

    This article describes the use of an alternative expansion scheme called Floquet-Magnus expansion (FME) to study the dynamics of spin system in solid-state NMR. The main tool used to describe the effect of time-dependent interactions in NMR is the average Hamiltonian theory (AHT). However, some NMR experiments, such as sample rotation and pulse crafting, seem to be more conveniently described using the Floquet theory (FT). Here, we present the first report highlighting the basics of the Floquet-Magnus expansion (FME) scheme and hint at its application on recoupling sequences that excite more efficiently double-quantum coherences, namely BABA and C7 radiofrequency pulse sequences. The use of Λ(n)(t) functions available only in the FME scheme, allows the comparison of the efficiency of BABA and C7 sequences. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The meaning and classification of tattoos in the context of their suitability to identify corpses of unknown identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Wojciech A; Borowska-Solonynko, Aleksandra B

    2017-01-01

    To present the most popular types of tattoos, their meaning and classification, and to assess the suitability of different forms of tattoos in the process of identification of corpses of unknown identity. The tattoos found on 729 cadavers who underwent post mortem examinations at the Department of Forensic Medicine in Warsaw in the years 2012-2015 were analyzed. The tattoos were photographed and identified in terms of their meaning domain and classified into groups. Tattoos belonging to all groups were found, according to the most popular tattoo classification, which is based on their nature and includes: criminal and prison tattoos (defining the prison hierarchy, criminal profession as well as intentions and goals, erotic tattoos, environmental, penitentiary), military and artistic. The novel classification, focusing on the utility of certain kinds of tattoos for identyfying corpses of unknown identity, was also developed. According to the above mentioned classification the following kinds of tattoos are distinguished: individual (artistic), group (e.g. penitentiary - indicating the fact of being imprisoned in a penitentiary institution or belonging to a "prison kites" subculture, or presenting criminal profession; group confined tattoo (indicating a staying in a specific penitentiary institution), group tattoo with individual data (indicating the fact of staying in a penitentiary institution as well as dates of imprisonment), and others (e.g. names of relatives, military tattoo, etc.). Analysis of individual types of tattoo can accelerate the process of identification of the cadavers. The proposed classification allows to quickly determine whether a particular tattoo can be helpful in initial individual identification (in the case of individual tattoos) or whether it can be used to reduce the group of people considered (in cases of different types of group tattoos).

  5. Tracing outbreaks of Streptococcus equi infection (strangles) in horses using sequence variation in the seM gene and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Susanne; Söderlund, Robert; Frosth, Sara; Pringle, John; Båverud, Viveca; Aspán, Anna

    2011-11-21

    Strangles is a serious respiratory disease in horses caused by Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi). Transmission of the disease occurs by direct contact with an infected horse or contaminated equipment. Genetically, S. equi strains are highly homogenous and differentiation of strains has proven difficult. However, the S. equi M-protein SeM contains a variable N-terminal region and has been proposed as a target gene to distinguish between different strains of S. equi and determine the source of an outbreak. In this study, strains of S. equi (n=60) from 32 strangles outbreaks in Sweden during 1998-2003 and 2008-2009 were genetically characterized by sequencing the SeM protein gene (seM), and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Swedish strains belonged to 10 different seM types, of which five have not previously been described. Most were identical or highly similar to allele types from strangles outbreaks in the UK. Outbreaks in 2008/2009 sharing the same seM type were associated by geographic location and/or type of usage of the horses (racing stables). Sequencing of the seM gene generally agreed with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. Our data suggest that seM sequencing as a epidemiological tool is supported by the agreement between seM and PFGE and that sequencing of the SeM protein gene is more sensitive than PFGE in discriminating strains of S. equi. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamic pulse difference circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    A digital electronic circuit of especial use for subtracting background activity pulses in gamma spectrometry is disclosed which comprises an up-down counter connected to count up with signal-channel pulses and to count down with background-channel pulses. A detector responsive to the count position of the up-down counter provides a signal when the up-down counter has completed one scaling sequence cycle of counts in the up direction. In an alternate embodiment, a detector responsive to the count position of the up-down counter provides a signal upon overflow of the counter

  7. Simulations of NMR pulse sequences during equilibrium and non-equilibrium chemical exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgstrand, Magnus; Haerd, Torleif; Allard, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The McConnell equations combine the differential equations for a simple two-state chemical exchange process with the Bloch differential equations for a classical description of the behavior of nuclear spins in a magnetic field. This equation system provides a useful starting point for the analysis of slow, intermediate and fast chemical exchange studied using a variety of NMR experiments. The McConnell equations are in the mathematical form of an inhomogeneous system of first-order differential equations. Here we rewrite the McConnell equations in a homogeneous form in order to facilitate fast and simple numerical calculation of the solution to the equation system. The McConnell equations can only treat equilibrium chemical exchange. We therefore also present a homogeneous equation system that can handle both equilibrium and non-equilibrium chemical processes correctly, as long as the kinetics is of first-order. Finally, the same method of rewriting the inhomogeneous form of the McConnell equations into a homogeneous form is applied to a quantum mechanical treatment of a spin system in chemical exchange. In order to illustrate the homogeneous McConnell equations, we have simulated pulse sequences useful for measuring exchange rates in slow, intermediate and fast chemical exchange processes. A stopped-flow NMR experiment was simulated using the equations for non-equilibrium chemical exchange. The quantum mechanical treatment was tested by the simulation of a sensitivity enhanced 15 N-HSQC with pulsed field gradients during slow chemical exchange and by the simulation of the transfer efficiency of a two-dimensional heteronuclear cross-polarization based experiment as a function of both chemical shift difference and exchange rate constants

  8. Simulating Metabolite Basis Sets for in vivo MRS Quantification; Incorporating details of the PRESS Pulse Sequence by means of the GAMMA C++ library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Veen, J.W.; Van Ormondt, D.; De Beer, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we report on generating/using simulated metabolite basis sets for the quantification of in vivo MRS signals, assuming that they have been acquired by using the PRESS pulse sequence. To that end we have employed the classes and functions of the GAMMA C++ library. By using several

  9. Recent Pulse Sequences for Heteronuclear Long-Range Correlation and More

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole W.

    This talk will give an overview of the key elements and principles of experiments listed on http://www.crc.dk/nmr/, from where also pulse programs in Bruker and Varian format can be downloaded.......This talk will give an overview of the key elements and principles of experiments listed on http://www.crc.dk/nmr/, from where also pulse programs in Bruker and Varian format can be downloaded....

  10. Light storage in a doped solid enhanced by feedback-controlled pulse shaping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beil, F.; Buschbeck, M.; Heinze, G.; Halfmann, T.

    2010-01-01

    We report on experiments dealing with feedback-controlled pulse shaping to optimize the efficiency of light storage by electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a Pr 3+ :Y 2 SiO 5 crystal. A learning loop in combination with an evolutionary algorithm permits the automatic determination of optimal temporal profiles of intensities and frequencies in the driving laser pulses (i.e., the probe and coupling pulses). As a main advantage, the technique finds optimal solutions even in the complicated multilevel excitation scheme of a doped solid, involving large inhomogeneous broadening. The learning loop experimentally determines optimal temporal intensity profiles of the coupling pulses for a given probe pulse. The optimized intensity pulse shapes enhance the light-storage efficiency in the doped solid by a factor of 2. The learning loop also determines a fast and efficient preparation pulse sequence, which serves to optically prepare the crystal prior to light-storage experiments. The optimized preparation sequence is 5 times faster than standard preparation sequences. Moreover, the optimized preparation sequence enhances the optical depth in the medium by a factor of 5. As a consequence, the efficiency of light storage also increases by another factor of 3. Our experimental data clearly demonstrate the considerable potential of feedback-controlled pulse shaping, applied to EIT-driven light storage in solid media.

  11. Real-time flow - determination of vena cava inferior on two different levels via 'RACE' pulse sequence in MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helzel, M.V.; Mueller, E.

    1993-01-01

    A new and simple parameter for quantiative evaluation of liver perfusion is outlined: Post-sinusoidal quantitative measurement of the entire liver venous flow: This is a result of the differences in evaluated flow volumes at two different levels in the inferior V.cava. The first level is the height of diaphragm, and the second is situated just cranial of the renal vessels. Normal values obtained from a group of healthy volunteers are presented. A gradient-echo pulse sequence called RACE, enabling flow measurements in real-time, is outlined. (orig.) [de

  12. The effective reflection of a pulse sequence from a four-wave mirror with thermal nonlinearity under parametric feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barashkov, M. S.; Bel'Diugin, I. M.; Zolotarev, M. V.; Kruzhilin, Iu. I.; Krymskii, M. I.

    1989-04-01

    A four-wave mirror with thermal nonlinearity has been experimentally realized with the interaction of corunning waves under parametric feedback with a nonreciprocal element. The effective reflection of a sequence of pulses with duration of about 300 ns from a neodymium-glass laser with maximal reflection coefficients greater than 30 has been demonstrated. The quality of the radiation reflected from the mirror is studied. A significant reduction in the steady-state lasing threshold has been shown with thermal nonlinearity at small angles of the interacting beam convergence, compared to the case of counterrunning convergence.

  13. Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme versus Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis for Typing Mycobacterium abscessus Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Gabriel Esquitini; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Chimara, Erica; Duarte, Rafael da Silva; de Freitas, Denise; Palaci, Moises; Hadad, David Jamil; Lima, Karla Valéria Batista; Lopes, Maria Luiza; Ramos, Jesus Pais; Campos, Carlos Eduardo; Caldas, Paulo César; Heym, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Outbreaks of infections by rapidly growing mycobacteria following invasive procedures, such as ophthalmological, laparoscopic, arthroscopic, plastic, and cardiac surgeries, mesotherapy, and vaccination, have been detected in Brazil since 1998. Members of the Mycobacterium chelonae-Mycobacterium abscessus group have caused most of these outbreaks. As part of an epidemiological investigation, the isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In this project, we performed a large-scale comparison of PFGE profiles with the results of a recently developed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for M. abscessus. Ninety-three isolates were analyzed, with 40 M. abscessus subsp. abscessus isolates, 47 M. abscessus subsp. bolletii isolates, and six isolates with no assigned subspecies. Forty-five isolates were obtained during five outbreaks, and 48 were sporadic isolates that were not associated with outbreaks. For MLST, seven housekeeping genes (argH, cya, glpK, gnd, murC, pta, and purH) were sequenced, and each isolate was assigned a sequence type (ST) from the combination of obtained alleles. The PFGE patterns of DraI-digested DNA were compared with the MLST results. All isolates were analyzable by both methods. Isolates from monoclonal outbreaks showed unique STs and indistinguishable or very similar PFGE patterns. Thirty-three STs and 49 unique PFGE patterns were identified among the 93 isolates. The Simpson's index of diversity values for MLST and PFGE were 0.69 and 0.93, respectively, for M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and 0.96 and 0.97, respectively, for M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. In conclusion, the MLST scheme showed 100% typeability and grouped monoclonal outbreak isolates in agreement with PFGE, but it was less discriminative than PFGE for M. abscessus. PMID:24899019

  14. Adenosine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance with variable-density spiral pulse sequences accurately detects coronary artery disease: initial clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Michael; Taylor, Angela; Yang, Yang; Kuruvilla, Sujith; Ragosta, Michael; Meyer, Craig H; Kramer, Christopher M

    2014-07-01

    Adenosine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance perfusion imaging can be limited by motion-induced dark-rim artifacts, which may be mistaken for true perfusion abnormalities. A high-resolution variable-density spiral pulse sequence with a novel density compensation strategy has been shown to reduce dark-rim artifacts in first-pass perfusion imaging. We aimed to assess the clinical performance of adenosine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance using this new perfusion sequence to detect obstructive coronary artery disease. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance perfusion imaging was performed during adenosine stress (140 μg/kg per minute) and at rest on a Siemens 1.5-T Avanto scanner in 41 subjects with chest pain scheduled for coronary angiography. Perfusion images were acquired during injection of 0.1 mmol/kg Gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentacetate at 3 short-axis locations using a saturation recovery interleaved variable-density spiral pulse sequence. Significant stenosis was defined as >50% by quantitative coronary angiography. Two blinded reviewers evaluated the perfusion images for the presence of adenosine-induced perfusion abnormalities and assessed image quality using a 5-point scale (1 [poor] to 5 [excellent]). The prevalence of obstructive coronary artery disease by quantitative coronary angiography was 68%. The average sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 89%, 85%, and 88%, respectively, with a positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 93% and 79%, respectively. The average image quality score was 4.4±0.7, with only 1 study with more than mild dark-rim artifacts. There was good inter-reader reliability with a κ statistic of 0.67. Spiral adenosine stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance results in high diagnostic accuracy for the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease with excellent image quality and minimal dark-rim artifacts. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Seasonal Blowfly Distribution and Abundance in Fragmented Landscapes. Is It Useful in Forensic Inference about Where a Corpse Has Been Decaying?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabala, Jabi; Díaz, Beatriz; Saloña-Bordas, Marta I.

    2014-01-01

    Blowflies are insects of forensic interest as they may indicate characteristics of the environment where a body has been laying prior to the discovery. In order to estimate changes in community related to landscape and to assess if blowfly species can be used as indicators of the landscape where a corpse has been decaying, we studied the blowfly community and how it is affected by landscape in a 7,000 km2 region during a whole year. Using baited traps deployed monthly we collected 28,507 individuals of 10 calliphorid species, 7 of them well represented and distributed in the study area. Multiple Analysis of Variance found changes in abundance between seasons in the 7 analyzed species, and changes related to land use in 4 of them (Calliphora vomitoria, Lucilia ampullacea, L. caesar and L. illustris). Generalised Linear Model analyses of abundance of these species compared with landscape descriptors at different scales found only a clear significant relationship between summer abundance of C. vomitoria and distance to urban areas and degree of urbanisation. This relationship explained more deviance when considering the landscape composition at larger geographical scales (up to 2,500 m around sampling site). For the other species, no clear relationship between land uses and abundance was found, and therefore observed changes in their abundance patterns could be the result of other variables, probably small changes in temperature. Our results suggest that blowfly community composition cannot be used to infer in what kind of landscape a corpse has decayed, at least in highly fragmented habitats, the only exception being the summer abundance of C. vomitoria. PMID:24918607

  16. Laser pulses for coherent xuv Raman excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Loren; Koch, Christiane P.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-07-01

    We combine multichannel electronic structure theory with quantum optimal control to derive femtosecond-time-scale Raman pulse sequences that coherently populate a valence excited state. For a neon atom, Raman target populations of up to 13% are obtained. Superpositions of the ground and valence Raman states with a controllable relative phase are found to be reachable with up to 4.5% population and arbitrary phase control facilitated by the pump pulse carrier-envelope phase. Analysis of the optimized pulse structure reveals a sequential mechanism in which the valence excitation is reached via a fast (femtosecond) population transfer through an intermediate resonance state in the continuum rather than avoiding intermediate-state population with simultaneous or counterintuitive (stimulated Raman adiabatic passage) pulse sequences. Our results open a route to coupling valence excitations and core-hole excitations in molecules and aggregates that locally address specific atoms and represent an initial step towards realization of multidimensional spectroscopy in the xuv and x-ray regimes.

  17. Three-level system driven by delayed pulses of finite duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishkhanyan, Artur; Suominen, Kalle-Antti

    2002-01-01

    We find the exact solution to the three-state problem for a class of intuitive and counterintuitive sequences of delayed pulses of finite duration in terms of the Clausen's generalized hypergeometric function, which reduces to simple analytic expressions, involving elementary functions only, for final occupation probabilities. These analytic results show that the sequence of delayed pulses, independently of the pulse order and applied detunings, can completely remove the population from the initially populated state (thus creating a quantum superposition of two other involved states). This conclusion extends the original result of Vitanov and Stenholm [Phys. Rev. A 55, 648 (1997)], to the case of nonzero two-photon detuning and more general pulse shapes

  18. An analysis of the uncertainty and bias in DCE-MRI measurements using the spoiled gradient-recalled echo pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subashi, Ergys; Choudhury, Kingshuk R.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI have been used in more than 100 phase I trials and investigator led studies. A comparison of the absolute values of these quantities requires an estimation of their respective probability distribution function (PDF). The statistical variation of the DCE-MRI measurement is analyzed by considering the fundamental sources of error in the MR signal intensity acquired with the spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) pulse sequence. Methods: The variance in the SPGR signal intensity arises from quadrature detection and excitation flip angle inconsistency. The noise power was measured in 11 phantoms of contrast agent concentration in the range [0–1] mM (in steps of 0.1 mM) and in onein vivo acquisition of a tumor-bearing mouse. The distribution of the flip angle was determined in a uniform 10 mM CuSO 4 phantom using the spin echo double angle method. The PDF of a wide range of T1 values measured with the varying flip angle (VFA) technique was estimated through numerical simulations of the SPGR equation. The resultant uncertainty in contrast agent concentration was incorporated in the most common model of tracer exchange kinetics and the PDF of the derived pharmacokinetic parameters was studied numerically. Results: The VFA method is an unbiased technique for measuringT1 only in the absence of bias in excitation flip angle. The time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent measured in vivo is within the theoretically predicted uncertainty. The uncertainty in measuring K trans with SPGR pulse sequences is of the same order, but always higher than, the uncertainty in measuring the pre-injection longitudinal relaxation time (T1 0 ). The lowest achievable bias/uncertainty in estimating this parameter is approximately 20%–70% higher than the bias/uncertainty in the measurement of the pre-injection T1 map. The fractional volume parameters derived from the extended Tofts model were found to be

  19. Beyond The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying: A Theoretical and Methodological Intervention into the Sociology of Brain Implant Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Black Hawk; Morrison, Daniel R

    2016-12-01

    Drawing on and extending the Foucaultian philosophical framework that Jeffrey Bishop develops in his masterful book, The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying, we undertake a sociological analysis of the neurological procedure-deep brain stimulation (DBS)-which implants electrodes in the brain, powered by a pacemaker-like device, for the treatment of movement disorders. Following Bishop's work, we carry out this analysis through a two-fold strategy. First, we examine how a multidisciplinary team evaluates candidates for this implant at a major medical center. We present excerpts from an ethnographic study of the "case conference" where disease entities are presented, contested, ratified, and made objects for intervention with this technology. The case conference becomes the key site in the transition from "person-with-illness" to "person-with-brain-implant" as a team of health professionals determines a plan of action by interpreting both statistical and "quality of life" data regarding their patients. Second, this article explores these decision-making processes through Bishop's conceptualization of evidence-based medicine, which relies on statistical approaches as the ultimate authority in knowledge production and medical decisions. We then reflect on Bishop's critique of the social sciences and the methodological, analytical, and substantive ramifications that The Anticipatory Corpse can offer future sociological work. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Distinction among the puparia of three blowfly species (Diptera: Calliphoridae frequently found on unburied corpses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JA Amorim

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Calliphorid larvae are important in the decomposition of carrion. Since these larvae are present in the primary stages of succession on carcasses, they may be important indicators of death time and the movement of corpses in homicide investigations. In this study we examined the morphological differences among puparia of Chrysomya megacephala, C. putoria and Cochliomyia macellaria. Puparia of the three species (N=30, each were obtained from the F2 generation bred in culture medium at 25° C, and 60% relative humidity on a 12 h photoperiod. The interspecific differences found were related to the conspicuousness of six tubercles located in the region near the posterior spiracles and to the distance between the two peritrema involving the spiracles. The latter were (mean ± SD 15.2 ± 3.1 mum for C. megacephala, 18.8 ± 2.8 mum for C. putoria and 16.5 ± 3.5 mum for C. macellaria. The results of the present study may be useful in forensic entomology.

  1. Neural Sequence Generation Using Spatiotemporal Patterns of Inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Cannon

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stereotyped sequences of neural activity are thought to underlie reproducible behaviors and cognitive processes ranging from memory recall to arm movement. One of the most prominent theoretical models of neural sequence generation is the synfire chain, in which pulses of synchronized spiking activity propagate robustly along a chain of cells connected by highly redundant feedforward excitation. But recent experimental observations in the avian song production pathway during song generation have shown excitatory activity interacting strongly with the firing patterns of inhibitory neurons, suggesting a process of sequence generation more complex than feedforward excitation. Here we propose a model of sequence generation inspired by these observations in which a pulse travels along a spatially recurrent excitatory chain, passing repeatedly through zones of local feedback inhibition. In this model, synchrony and robust timing are maintained not through redundant excitatory connections, but rather through the interaction between the pulse and the spatiotemporal pattern of inhibition that it creates as it circulates the network. These results suggest that spatially and temporally structured inhibition may play a key role in sequence generation.

  2. Neural Sequence Generation Using Spatiotemporal Patterns of Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jonathan; Kopell, Nancy; Gardner, Timothy; Markowitz, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    Stereotyped sequences of neural activity are thought to underlie reproducible behaviors and cognitive processes ranging from memory recall to arm movement. One of the most prominent theoretical models of neural sequence generation is the synfire chain, in which pulses of synchronized spiking activity propagate robustly along a chain of cells connected by highly redundant feedforward excitation. But recent experimental observations in the avian song production pathway during song generation have shown excitatory activity interacting strongly with the firing patterns of inhibitory neurons, suggesting a process of sequence generation more complex than feedforward excitation. Here we propose a model of sequence generation inspired by these observations in which a pulse travels along a spatially recurrent excitatory chain, passing repeatedly through zones of local feedback inhibition. In this model, synchrony and robust timing are maintained not through redundant excitatory connections, but rather through the interaction between the pulse and the spatiotemporal pattern of inhibition that it creates as it circulates the network. These results suggest that spatially and temporally structured inhibition may play a key role in sequence generation.

  3. Controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulator with enhanced circuit topology and pulse shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; DʼOstilio, Kevin; Rothwell, John C.; Murphy, David L.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. This work aims at flexible and practical pulse parameter control in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which is currently very limited in commercial devices. Approach. We present a third generation controllable pulse parameter device (cTMS3) that uses a novel circuit topology with two energy-storage capacitors. It incorporates several implementation and functionality advantages over conventional TMS devices and other devices with advanced pulse shape control. cTMS3 generates lower internal voltage differences and is implemented with transistors with a lower voltage rating than prior cTMS devices. Main results. cTMS3 provides more flexible pulse shaping since the circuit topology allows four coil-voltage levels during a pulse, including approximately zero voltage. The near-zero coil voltage enables snubbing of the ringing at the end of the pulse without the need for a separate active snubber circuit. cTMS3 can generate powerful rapid pulse sequences (\\lt 10 ms inter pulse interval) by increasing the width of each subsequent pulse and utilizing the large capacitor energy storage, allowing the implementation of paradigms such as paired-pulse and quadripulse TMS with a single pulse generation circuit. cTMS3 can also generate theta (50 Hz) burst stimulation with predominantly unidirectional electric field pulses. The cTMS3 device functionality and output strength are illustrated with electrical output measurements as well as a study of the effect of pulse width and polarity on the active motor threshold in ten healthy volunteers. Significance. The cTMS3 features could extend the utility of TMS as a research, diagnostic, and therapeutic tool.

  4. Method for pulse to pulse dose reproducibility applied to electron linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ighigeanu, D.; Martin, D.; Oproiu, C.; Cirstea, E.; Craciun, G.

    2002-01-01

    An original method for obtaining programmed beam single shots and pulse trains with programmed pulse number, pulse repetition frequency, pulse duration and pulse dose is presented. It is particularly useful for automatic control of absorbed dose rate level, irradiation process control as well as in pulse radiolysis studies, single pulse dose measurement or for research experiments where pulse-to-pulse dose reproducibility is required. This method is applied to the electron linear accelerators, ALIN-10 of 6.23 MeV and 82 W and ALID-7, of 5.5 MeV and 670 W, built in NILPRP. In order to implement this method, the accelerator triggering system (ATS) consists of two branches: the gun branch and the magnetron branch. ATS, which synchronizes all the system units, delivers trigger pulses at a programmed repetition rate (up to 250 pulses/s) to the gun (80 kV, 10 A and 4 ms) and magnetron (45 kV, 100 A, and 4 ms).The accelerated electron beam existence is determined by the electron gun and magnetron pulses overlapping. The method consists in controlling the overlapping of pulses in order to deliver the beam in the desired sequence. This control is implemented by a discrete pulse position modulation of gun and/or magnetron pulses. The instabilities of the gun and magnetron transient regimes are avoided by operating the accelerator with no accelerated beam for a certain time. At the operator 'beam start' command, the ATS controls electron gun and magnetron pulses overlapping and the linac beam is generated. The pulse-to-pulse absorbed dose variation is thus considerably reduced. Programmed absorbed dose, irradiation time, beam pulse number or other external events may interrupt the coincidence between the gun and magnetron pulses. Slow absorbed dose variation is compensated by the control of the pulse duration and repetition frequency. Two methods are reported in the electron linear accelerators' development for obtaining the pulse to pulse dose reproducibility: the method

  5. Multilocus sequence typing scheme versus pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for typing Mycobacterium abscessus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Gabriel Esquitini; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Chimara, Erica; Duarte, Rafael da Silva; de Freitas, Denise; Palaci, Moises; Hadad, David Jamil; Lima, Karla Valéria Batista; Lopes, Maria Luiza; Ramos, Jesus Pais; Campos, Carlos Eduardo; Caldas, Paulo César; Heym, Beate; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso

    2014-08-01

    Outbreaks of infections by rapidly growing mycobacteria following invasive procedures, such as ophthalmological, laparoscopic, arthroscopic, plastic, and cardiac surgeries, mesotherapy, and vaccination, have been detected in Brazil since 1998. Members of the Mycobacterium chelonae-Mycobacterium abscessus group have caused most of these outbreaks. As part of an epidemiological investigation, the isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In this project, we performed a large-scale comparison of PFGE profiles with the results of a recently developed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for M. abscessus. Ninety-three isolates were analyzed, with 40 M. abscessus subsp. abscessus isolates, 47 M. abscessus subsp. bolletii isolates, and six isolates with no assigned subspecies. Forty-five isolates were obtained during five outbreaks, and 48 were sporadic isolates that were not associated with outbreaks. For MLST, seven housekeeping genes (argH, cya, glpK, gnd, murC, pta, and purH) were sequenced, and each isolate was assigned a sequence type (ST) from the combination of obtained alleles. The PFGE patterns of DraI-digested DNA were compared with the MLST results. All isolates were analyzable by both methods. Isolates from monoclonal outbreaks showed unique STs and indistinguishable or very similar PFGE patterns. Thirty-three STs and 49 unique PFGE patterns were identified among the 93 isolates. The Simpson's index of diversity values for MLST and PFGE were 0.69 and 0.93, respectively, for M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and 0.96 and 0.97, respectively, for M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. In conclusion, the MLST scheme showed 100% typeability and grouped monoclonal outbreak isolates in agreement with PFGE, but it was less discriminative than PFGE for M. abscessus. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Conceptual Design and Simulation of a Semi-Automatic Cell for the Washing and Preparation of a Corpse Prior to an Islamic Burial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Meghdari

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Washing the corpse and dressing the body prior to burial is an act of love and necessity in many religions. Applying robotics and automation technologies for the washing and preparation of a deceased Muslim in accordance with the Islamic Shari'at laws has been the challenging foundation of this research. With an increasing annual population growth resulting in an increase in the number of deaths (historically and/or immediately after a national disaster, automating part of this procedure to increase the speed of operation, reducing the health risks to the personnel of washing rooms “Ghassalkhaneh” at the cemeteries and enhancing their quality of life have been the primary objectives of this project. We have named and patented this semi-automated corpse preparation machine as the “PaakShooy” or “پاک شوی” in Persian (Farsi which means purifying the deceased. The whole process is composed of three operational units lined up in a series; the automatic washing chamber, drying cell and the semi-automatic shrouding table. This paper covers an introductory concept of the subject in Islam, a conceptual design of various machines and mechanisms to automate the important tasks in accordance with Islamic laws, and the final detailed design, graphic simulation and animation of the PaakShooy machine. In doing so, consultation with Islamic scholars has been a priority from the beginning of the project to the end and a few Fatwa have been issued by some high ranking Ayatollahs in support of the project. With a few modifications, the semi-automated PaakShooy machine may now be updated to conform to other religions/customs.

  7. A new phase modulated binomial-like selective-inversion sequence for solvent signal suppression in NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Johnny; Zheng, Gang; Price, William S

    2017-02-01

    A new 8-pulse Phase Modulated binomial-like selective inversion pulse sequence, dubbed '8PM', was developed by optimizing the nutation and phase angles of the constituent radio-frequency pulses so that the inversion profile resembled a target profile. Suppression profiles were obtained for both the 8PM and W5 based excitation sculpting sequences with equal inter-pulse delays. Significant distortions were observed in both profiles because of the offset effect of the radio frequency pulses. These distortions were successfully reduced by adjusting the inter-pulse delays. With adjusted inter-pulse delays, the 8PM and W5 based excitation sculpting sequences were tested on an aqueous lysozyme solution. The 8 PM based sequence provided higher suppression selectivity than the W5 based sequence. Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy experiments were also performed on the lysozyme sample with 8PM and W5 based water signal suppression. The 8PM based suppression provided a spectrum with significantly increased (~ doubled) cross-peak intensity around the suppressed water resonance compared to the W5 based suppression. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Effect of pulse sequence parameter selection on signal strength in positive-contrast MRI markers for MRI-based prostate postimplant assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Tze Yee [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas at Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J., E-mail: rkudchad@mdanderson.org; Wang, Jihong; Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Stafford, R. Jason [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); MacLellan, Christopher [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas at Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 6767 Bertner Avenue, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Rao, Arvind [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Frank, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: For postimplant dosimetric assessment, computed tomography (CT) is commonly used to identify prostate brachytherapy seeds, at the expense of accurate anatomical contouring. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is superior to CT for anatomical delineation, but identification of the negative-contrast seeds is challenging. Positive-contrast MRI markers were proposed to replace spacers to assist seed localization on MRI images. Visualization of these markers under varying scan parameters was investigated. Methods: To simulate a clinical scenario, a prostate phantom was implanted with 66 markers and 86 seeds, and imaged on a 3.0T MRI scanner using a 3D fast radiofrequency-spoiled gradient recalled echo acquisition with various combinations of scan parameters. Scan parameters, including flip angle, number of excitations, bandwidth, field-of-view, slice thickness, and encoding steps were systematically varied to study their effects on signal, noise, scan time, image resolution, and artifacts. Results: The effects of pulse sequence parameter selection on the marker signal strength and image noise were characterized. The authors also examined the tradeoff between signal-to-noise ratio, scan time, and image artifacts, such as the wraparound artifact, susceptibility artifact, chemical shift artifact, and partial volume averaging artifact. Given reasonable scan time and managable artifacts, the authors recommended scan parameter combinations that can provide robust visualization of the MRI markers. Conclusions: The recommended MRI pulse sequence protocol allows for consistent visualization of the markers to assist seed localization, potentially enabling MRI-only prostate postimplant dosimetry.

  9. Design of auto-control high-voltage control system of pulsed neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Juntao

    2008-01-01

    It is difficult to produce multiple anode controlling time sequences under different logging mode for the high-voltage control system of the conventional pulsed neutron generator. It is also difficult realize sequential control among anode high-voltage, filament power supply and target voltage to make neutron yield stable. To these problems, an auto-control high-voltage system of neutron pulsed generator was designed. It not only can achieve anode high-voltage double blast time sequences, which can measure multiple neutron blast time sequences such as Σ, activated spectrum, etc. under inelastic scattering mode, but also can realize neutron generator real-time measurement of multi-state parameters and auto-control such as target voltage pulse width modulation (PWM), filament current, anode current, etc., there by it can produce stable neutron yield and realize stable and accurate measurement of the pulsed neutron full spectral loging tool. (authors)

  10. Random noise effects in pulse-mode digital multilayer neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y C; Shanblatt, M A

    1995-01-01

    A pulse-mode digital multilayer neural network (DMNN) based on stochastic computing techniques is implemented with simple logic gates as basic computing elements. The pulse-mode signal representation and the use of simple logic gates for neural operations lead to a massively parallel yet compact and flexible network architecture, well suited for VLSI implementation. Algebraic neural operations are replaced by stochastic processes using pseudorandom pulse sequences. The distributions of the results from the stochastic processes are approximated using the hypergeometric distribution. Synaptic weights and neuron states are represented as probabilities and estimated as average pulse occurrence rates in corresponding pulse sequences. A statistical model of the noise (error) is developed to estimate the relative accuracy associated with stochastic computing in terms of mean and variance. Computational differences are then explained by comparison to deterministic neural computations. DMNN feedforward architectures are modeled in VHDL using character recognition problems as testbeds. Computational accuracy is analyzed, and the results of the statistical model are compared with the actual simulation results. Experiments show that the calculations performed in the DMNN are more accurate than those anticipated when Bernoulli sequences are assumed, as is common in the literature. Furthermore, the statistical model successfully predicts the accuracy of the operations performed in the DMNN.

  11. Radioiodine Therapy: Care of the Helpless Patient and Handling of the Radioactive Corpse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geaves, C. D.; Tendale, W. B.

    2016-01-01

    Nurses caring for a helpless patient following a nominal 800 MBq administration of radioiodine were concerned about their radiation dose. Using published data, a nurse could receive an estimated 650 micro Sv per shift. A regime to restrict their dose was planned using a 500 micro Sv dose constraint. Thermoluminescent dosimeters indicated a maximum whole body effective dose of 250 micro Sv. Three days post 131 I administration the patient died (estimated activity in the body 400 MBq). A minimum delay of two weeks was advised prior to a post-mortem. Special precautions were issued to minimise contamination. Dose rates (micro Sv h-1), measured one day after the patient died, at the level of the thyroid, chest and bladder at 0.01 m from the corpse were 1800, 290 and 73 respectively. At 1.0 m the dose rate was 26 micro Sv h-1 at all levels. The pathologist was estimated to have received a maximum whole-body dose of 400 micro Sv during the postmortem. Contamination measurements (Bq cm-2) made following the postmortem were as follows: pathologist's hands 5, clothes 0, towels 1.8, saw 5, instruments 0.5, plastic sheet 0.8, scales 0.4 and floors/walls 1.1. These data indicate that with appropriate radiation protection guidelines, staff can be reassured that their doses in these circumstances are very low. (author)

  12. SU-E-J-224: Using UTE and T1 Weighted Spin Echo Pulse Sequences for MR-Only Treatment Planning; Phantom Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, H; Fatemi, A [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, A [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Investigating a new approach in MRI based treatment planning using the combination of (Ultrashort Echo Time) UTE and T1 weighted spin echo pulse sequences to delineate air, bone and water (soft tissues) in generating pseudo CT images comparable with CT. Methods: A gel phantom containing chicken bones, ping pang balls filled with distilled water and air bubbles, was made. It scanned with MRI using UTE and 2D T1W SE pulse sequences with (in plane resolution= 0.53mm, slice thickness= 2 mm) and CT with (in plane resolution= 0.5 mm and slice thickness= 0.75mm) as a ground truth for geometrical accuracy. The UTE and T1W SE images were registered with CT using mutual information registration algorithm provided by Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The phantom boundaries were detected using Canny edge detection algorithm for CT, and MR images. The bone, air bubbles and water in ping pong balls were segmented from CT images using threshold 300HU, - 950HU and 0HU, respectively. These tissue inserts were automatically segmented from combined UTE and T1W SE images using edge detection and relative intensity histograms of the phantom. The obtained segmentations of air, bone and water inserts were evaluated with those obtained from CT. Results: Bone and air can be clearly differentiated in UTE images comparable to CT. Combining UTE and T1W SE images successfully segmented the air, bone and water. The maximum segmentation differences from combine MRI images (UTE and T1W SE) and CT are within 1.3 mm, 1.1mm for bone, air, respectively. The geometric distortion of UTE sequence is small less than 1 pixel (0.53 mm) of MR image resolution. Conclusion: Our approach indicates that MRI can be used solely for treatment planning and its quality is comparable with CT.

  13. Economic, human and environmental health benefits of replacing formaldehyde in the preservation of corpses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha Ferreira, Jussara; Cardoso Rezende, Lorenna; Barbosa, Abel De Souza; De Carvalho, Phellip; De Lima, Natácia Evangelista; Assis Carvalho, Alexandre

    2017-11-01

    Formaldehyde has been prominent in preserving biological tissues since the nineteenth century. Despite being admittedly harmful to health and to the environment, it is still widely used. The Morphology Department of the University of Brasília - Brazil, applied the rethink, reduce, reuse, recycle and responsibility methodology to their activities in an effort to protect the health of laboratory workers and users, save resources and reduce damage to the environment. Here we evaluate the results obtained a decade after the implementation of this proposal (2005-2015). Formaldehyde was replaced by alcohol and glycerol solutions in corpse conservation. Over five thousand dollars in public funds that would have been destined to buying preserving substances were saved annually, and over a hundred thousand liters of water that would have been contaminated and thrown into the sewage system were spared. The environment used to implement the study was improved and anatomical parts kept for study had their lifespan extended. It is noteworthy that such simple adjustments could cause pronounced changes in laboratory activities. We would avoid contaminating billions of liters of water and it would be possible to save millions if similar practices were implemented in all educational institutions having similar routines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Criteria to average out the chemical shift anisotropy in solid-state NMR when irradiated with BABA I, BABA II, and C7 radiofrequency pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephane Mananga, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Floquet-Magnus expansion is used to study the effect of chemical shift anisotropy in solid-state NMR of rotating solids. The chemical shift interaction is irradiated with two types of radiofrequency pulse sequences: BABA and C7. The criteria for the chemical shift anisotropy to be averaged out in each rotor period are obtained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Alignment enhancement of a symmetric top molecule by two short laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Christer Z; Viftrup, Simon; Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    equation. It is shown that the strongest degree of one-dimensional (single axis) field-free alignment obtainable with a single pulse can be enhanced using the two-pulse sequence in a parallel polarization geometry. The conditions for alignment enhancement are: (1) The second pulse must be sent near...

  16. Clinical usefulness of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences in intracranial lesions focusing on emergent cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramochi, Masashi; Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Wada, Mitsuyoshi

    1997-06-01

    Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) Pulse Sequences with inversion times of 1700 ms and echo times of 110 ms were used to demonstrate the brain of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and brain trauma. The long inversion times and long echo times nulls the signal from cerebrospinal fluid and produces heavy T{sub 2} weighting images. We compared FLAIR Pulse Sequences with T{sub 2} weighted image Pulse Sequences for signal intensities of CVD and trauma. FLAIR Pulse Sequences is useful to detect at the periphery of the cerebral hemispheres, but infratentorial small infarctions often cannot be detected for its iso-intensity and slight intensity changes. In all patient of traumatic-subarachnoid hemorrhage (t-SAH) can be definitely detected high signal intensity of the cerebral hemispheres. (author)

  17. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the abdomen with pulse triggering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muertz, P.; Pauleit, D.; Traeber, F.; Kreft, B.P.; Schild, H.H.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to reduce the influence of motion on diffusion-weighted MR images of the abdomen by pulse triggering of single-shot sequences. Methods: Five healthy volunteers were examined both without and with finger pulse-triggering of a diffusion-weighted single-shot echo planar MR imaging sequence at 1.5 T. Series of diffusion-weighted images were acquired at different phases of the cardiac cycle by varying the time delay between finger pulse and sequence acquisition. The measurements were repeated three times. The diffusion weighted images were analysed by measuring the signal intensities and by determining the ADC values within the spleen, kidney and liver. Results: The magnitude of motion artifacts on diffusion weighted images shows a strong dependence on the trigger delay. The optimum trigger delay is found to be between 500 and 600 ms. For these values the abdominal organs appear homogeneous on all diffusion weighted images and the strongest signal intensities are detected. At optimum triggering the accuracy of the apparent diffusion coefficients is up to 10 times better than without triggering. Moreover, the standard deviation of the repeated measurements is smaller than 12% for all volunteers and for all organs. Without triggering the standard deviation is larger by a factor of 4 on average. Conclusion: Pulse triggering of single-shot sequences leads to significant reduction of motion related artifacts on diffusion weighted images of the abdomen and provides more accurate and reproducible ADC values. (orig.) [de

  18. Cultures of death and politics of corpse supply: anatomy in Vienna, 1848-1914.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buklijas, Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    Nineteenth-century Vienna is well known to medical historians as a leading center of medical research and education, offering easy access to patients and corpses to students from all over the world. The author seeks to explain how this enviable supply of cadavers was achieved, why it provoked so little opposition at a time when Britain and the United States saw widespread protests against dissection, and how it was threatened from mid-century onward. To understand permissive Viennese attitudes, we need to place them in a longue durée history of death and dissection and to pay close attention to the city's political geography as it was transformed into a major imperial capital. The tolerant stance of the Roman Catholic Church, strong links to Southern Europe, and the weak position of individuals in the absolutist state all contributed to an idiosyncratic anatomical culture. But as the fame of the Vienna medical school peaked in the later 1800s, the increased demand created by rising numbers of students combined with intensified interdisciplinary competition to produce a shortfall that professors found increasingly difficult to meet. Around 1900, new religious groups and mass political parties challenged long-standing anatomical practice by refusing to supply cadavers and making dissection into an instrument of political struggle. This study of the material preconditions for anatomy at one of Europe's most influential medical schools provides a contrast to the dominant Anglo-American histories of death and dissection.

  19. Optimal MR pulse sequences for hepatic hemangiomas : comparison of T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo, T2-weighted breath-hold turbo-spin-echo, and T1-weighted FLASH dynamic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wen Chao; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Cho, Soon Gu

    1997-01-01

    To optimize MR imaging pulse sequences in the imaging of hepatic hemangioma and to evaluate on dynamic MR imaging the enhancing characteristics of the lesions. Twenty patients with 35 hemangiomas were studied by using Turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequence (T2-weighted, T2- and heavily T2-weighted breath-hold) and T1-weighted FLASH imaging acquired before, immediately on, and 1, 3 and 5 minutes after injection of a bolus of Gd-DTPA (0.1mmol/kg). Phased-array multicoil was employed. Images were quantitatively analyzed for lesion-to-liver signal difference to noise ratios (SD/Ns), and lesion-to-liver signal ratios (H/Ls), and qualitatively analyzed for lesion conspicuity. The enhancing characteristics of the hemangiomas were described by measuring the change of signal intensity as a curve in T1-weighted FLASH dynamic imaging. For T2-weighted images, breath-hold T2-weighted TSE had a slightly higher SD/N than other pulse sequences, but there was no statistical difference in three fast pulse sequences (p=0.211). For lesion conspicuity, heavily T2-weighted breath-hold TSE images was superior to T2-weighted breath-hold or non-breath-hold TSE (H/L, 5.75, 3.81, 2.87, respectively, p<0.05). T2-weighted breath-hold TSE imaging was more effective than T2-weighted TSE imaging in removing lesion blurring or lack of sharpness, and there was a 12-fold decrease in acquisition time (20sec versus 245 sec). T1-weighted FLASH dynamic images of normal liver showed peak enhancement at less than 1 minute, and of hemangioma at more than 3 minutes;the degree of enhancement for hemangioma decreased after a 3 minute delay. T2-weighed breath-hold TSE imaging and Gd-DTPA enhanced FLASH dynamic imaging with 5 minutes delay are sufficient for imaging hepatic hemangiomas

  20. Effect of sequential isoproturon pulse exposure on Scenedesmus vacuolatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallotton, Nathalie; Eggen, Rik Ilda Lambertus; Chèvre, Nathalie

    2009-04-01

    Aquatic organisms are typically exposed to fluctuating concentrations of herbicides in streams. To assess the effects on algae of repeated peak exposure to the herbicide isoproturon, we subjected the alga Scenedesmus vacuolatus to two sequential pulse exposure scenarios. Effects on growth and on the inhibition of the effective quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) were measured. In the first scenario, algae were exposed to short, 5-h pulses at high isoproturon concentrations (400 and 1000 microg/l), each followed by a recovery period of 18 h, while the second scenario consisted of 22.5-h pulses at lower concentrations (60 and 120 microg/l), alternating with short recovery periods (1.5 h). In addition, any changes in the sensitivity of the algae to isoproturon following sequential pulses were examined by determining the growth rate-EC(50) prior to and following exposure. In both exposure scenarios, we found that algal growth and its effective quantum yield were systematically inhibited during the exposures and that these effects were reversible. Sequential pulses to isoproturon could be considered a sequence of independent events. Nevertheless, a consequence of inhibited growth during the repeated exposures is the cumulative decrease in biomass production. Furthermore, in the second scenario, when the sequence of long pulses began to approach a scenario of continuous exposure, a slight increase in the tolerance of the algae to isoproturon was observed. These findings indicated that sequential pulses do affect algae during each pulse exposure, even if algae recover between the exposures. These observations could support an improved risk assessment of fluctuating exposures to reversibly acting herbicides.

  1. Investigations on the pulse operation of YAYOI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-04-01

    This report is composed of ten independent documents concerning the pulse operation of YAYOI, which were prepared in the period between July, 1976, and March, 1977. The titles of the documents included in this report are: (1) the operational sequence of the linac neutron generating facility, (2) safety systems of linac pulse operation and the treatment and preservation of neutron generating targets, (3) nuclear calculation concerning linac pulse operation, (4) simulated natural uranium core, (5) linac neutron target system, (6) computer processing accompanying linac pulse operation, (7) fundamental concept of electron beam generation within the reactor room, (8) reactor room shielding requirements for the linac neutron source, (9) TOF measuring room, and (10) utilization of low energy neutrons from P-YAYOI operation. (Aoki, K.)

  2. Direct generation of all-optical random numbers from optical pulse amplitude chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pu; Wang, Yun-Cai; Wang, An-Bang; Yang, Ling-Zhen; Zhang, Ming-Jiang; Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2012-02-13

    We propose and theoretically demonstrate an all-optical method for directly generating all-optical random numbers from pulse amplitude chaos produced by a mode-locked fiber ring laser. Under an appropriate pump intensity, the mode-locked laser can experience a quasi-periodic route to chaos. Such a chaos consists of a stream of pulses with a fixed repetition frequency but random intensities. In this method, we do not require sampling procedure and external triggered clocks but directly quantize the chaotic pulses stream into random number sequence via an all-optical flip-flop. Moreover, our simulation results show that the pulse amplitude chaos has no periodicity and possesses a highly symmetric distribution of amplitude. Thus, in theory, the obtained random number sequence without post-processing has a high-quality randomness verified by industry-standard statistical tests.

  3. Design of Optical Pulse Position Modulation (PPM) Translating Receiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez, A J; Hernandez, V J; Gagliardi, R M; Bennett, C V

    2009-06-19

    M-ary pulse position modulation (M-ary PPM) signaling is a means of transmitting multiple bits per symbol in an intensity modulated/direct detection (IM/DD) system. PPM is used in applications with average power limitations. In optical communication systems, PPM becomes challenging to implement at gigabit rates and/or large M, since pulsed signaling requires higher electronic processing bandwidths than the fundamental transmission rate. they have thus been exploring techniques for PPM communications using optical processing. Previous work described a transmitter algorithm that directly translates a bit sequence of N digital bits to the optical pulse position m for any M = 2{sup N}. It has been considerably more difficult to define a similar receiver algorithm that translates the received optical pulse position directly back to a bit sequence with minimal electronic processing. Designs for specific Ms (e.g., 4-ary) have been shown and implemented, but are difficult to scale to larger M. In this work, they present for the first time a generalized PPM translating receiver that is applicable to all M and data rates.

  4. Statistical approach of measurement of signal to noise ratio in according to change pulse sequence on brain MRI meningioma and cyst images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eul Kyu; Choi, Kwan Woo; Jeong, Hoi Woun; Jang, Seo Goo; Kim, Ki Won; Son, Soon Yong; Min, Jung Whan; Son, Jin Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to needed basis of measure MRI CAD development for signal to noise ratio (SNR) by pulse sequence analysis from region of interest (ROI) in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast. We examined images of brain MRI contrast enhancement of 117 patients, from January 2005 to December 2015 in a University-affiliated hospital, Seoul, Korea. Diagnosed as one of two brain diseases such as meningioma and cysts SNR for each patient's image of brain MRI were calculated by using Image J. Differences of SNR among two brain diseases were tested by SPSS Statistics21 ANOVA test for there was statistical significance (p < 0.05). We have analysis socio-demographical variables, SNR according to sequence disease, 95% confidence according to SNR of sequence and difference in a mean of SNR. Meningioma results, with the quality of distributions in the order of T1CE, T2 and T1, FLAIR. Cysts results, with the quality of distributions in the order of T2 and T1, T1CE and FLAIR. SNR of MRI sequences of the brain would be useful to classify disease. Therefore, this study will contribute to evaluate brain diseases, and be a fundamental to enhancing the accuracy of CAD development

  5. Statistical approach of measurement of signal to noise ratio in according to change pulse sequence on brain MRI meningioma and cyst images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eul Kyu [Inje Paik University Hospital Jeo-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kwan Woo [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [The Baekseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Seo Goo [The Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Won [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gang-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Soon Yong [The Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Whan; Son, Jin Hyun [The Shingu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to needed basis of measure MRI CAD development for signal to noise ratio (SNR) by pulse sequence analysis from region of interest (ROI) in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast. We examined images of brain MRI contrast enhancement of 117 patients, from January 2005 to December 2015 in a University-affiliated hospital, Seoul, Korea. Diagnosed as one of two brain diseases such as meningioma and cysts SNR for each patient's image of brain MRI were calculated by using Image J. Differences of SNR among two brain diseases were tested by SPSS Statistics21 ANOVA test for there was statistical significance (p < 0.05). We have analysis socio-demographical variables, SNR according to sequence disease, 95% confidence according to SNR of sequence and difference in a mean of SNR. Meningioma results, with the quality of distributions in the order of T1CE, T2 and T1, FLAIR. Cysts results, with the quality of distributions in the order of T2 and T1, T1CE and FLAIR. SNR of MRI sequences of the brain would be useful to classify disease. Therefore, this study will contribute to evaluate brain diseases, and be a fundamental to enhancing the accuracy of CAD development.

  6. Efficacy of the fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence of MRI as a preoperative diagnosis of hippocampal sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Takato; Nishio, Shunji; Mihara, Futoshi; Muraishi, Mitsuteru; Hisada, Kei; Hasuo, Kanehiro; Fukui, Masashi

    1998-01-01

    A newly advanced MRI pulse sequence, the FLAIR (fluid attenuated inversion recovery) imaging, in which a long TE spin echo sequence is used with suppression of the CSF with an inversion pulse, displays the CSF space as a no-signal intensity area. There have been only a few reports on the FLAIR pulse sequence of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) as yet. We examined 9 cases of intractable TLE by FLAIR images and analyzed the advantages and disadvantages of the FLAIR pulse sequence for decision making on temporal lobectomy. All patients underwent anterior temporal lobectomy with hippocampectomy, and the diagnoses were confirmed histologically after surgery. Abnormally high T2 signals (HT2S) were more conspicuous with the FLAIR sequence than with any of the conventional sequences. Tilted axial plane, orientated along to the long axis of the hippocampal body, clearly demonstrated hippocampal atrophy (HA). Selection of a FLAIR sequence into the routine MR examination of patients with TLE is recommended. (author)

  7. Arbitrary digital pulse sequence generator with delay-loop timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hošák, Radim; Ježek, Miroslav

    2018-04-01

    We propose an idea of an electronic multi-channel arbitrary digital sequence generator with temporal granularity equal to two clock cycles. We implement the generator with 32 channels using a low-cost ARM microcontroller and demonstrate its capability to produce temporal delays ranging from tens of nanoseconds to hundreds of seconds, with 24 ns timing granularity and linear scaling of delay with respect to the number of delay loop iterations. The generator is optionally synchronized with an external clock source to provide 100 ps jitter and overall sequence repeatability within the whole temporal range. The generator is fully programmable and able to produce digital sequences of high complexity. The concept of the generator can be implemented using different microcontrollers and applied for controlling of various optical, atomic, and nuclear physics measurement setups.

  8. Clinical Comparison of Pulse and Chirp Excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Høgholm; Misaridis, T.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    Coded excitation (CE) using frequency modulated signals (chirps) combined with modified matched filtering has earlier been presented showing promising results in simulations and in-vitro. In this study an experimental ultrasound system is evaluated in a clinical setting, where image sequences...... and short pulse excitation to simultaneously produce identical image sequences using both techniques. Nine healthy male volunteers were scanned in abdominal locations. All sequences were evaluated by 3 skilled medical doctors, blinded to each other and to the technique used. They assessed the depth (1...

  9. Optimal time-domain technique for pulse width modulation in power electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mayergoyz

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Optimal time-domain technique for pulse width modulation is presented. It is based on exact and explicit analytical solutions for inverter circuits, obtained for any sequence of input voltage rectangular pulses. Two optimal criteria are discussed and illustrated by numerical examples.

  10. Pulse height model for deuterated scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Haitang; Enqvist, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An analytical model of light pulse height distribution for finite deuterated scintillation detectors is created using the impulse approximation. Particularly, the energy distribution of a scattered neutron is calculated based on an existing collision probability scheme for general cylindrical shaped detectors considering double differential cross-sections. The light pulse height distribution is analytically and numerically calculated by convoluting collision sequences with the light output function for an EJ-315 detector from our measurements completed at Ohio University. The model provides a good description of collision histories capturing transferred neutron energy in deuterium-based scintillation materials. The resulting light pulse height distribution details pulse compositions and their corresponding contributions. It shows that probabilities of neutron collision with carbon and deuterium nuclei are comparable, however the light pulse amplitude due to collisions with carbon nuclei is small and mainly located at the lower region of the light pulse distribution axis. The model can explore those neutron interaction events that generate pulses near or below a threshold that would be imposed in measurements. A comparison is made between the light pulse height distributions given by the analytical model and measurements. It reveals a significant probability of a neutron generating a small light pulse due to collisions with carbon nuclei when compared to larger light pulse generated by collisions involving deuterium nuclei. This model is beneficial to understand responses of scintillation materials and pulse compositions, as well as nuclei information extraction from recorded pulses.

  11. Incubation behaviour in triazenepolymer thin films upon near-infrared femtosecond laser pulse irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonse, J; Wiggins, S M; Solis, J; Sturm, H; Urech, L; Wokaun, A; Lippert, T

    2007-01-01

    The effects of laser radiation induced by a sequence of ultrashort (130 fs), near-infrared (800 nm) Ti:sapphire laser pulses in ∼1 μm thick triazenepolymer films on glass substrates have been investigated by means of in-situ real-time reflectivity measurements featuring a ps-resolution streak camera and a ns-resolution photodiode set-up. The polymer films show incubation effects when each laser pulse in the sequence has a fluence below the single-pulse damage threshold. Non-damage conditions are maintained for several incubation pulses such that the reflectivity of the film shows a rapid decrease of up to 30% within 1 ns but subsequently recovers to its initial value on a ms timescale. Additional pulses lead to a permanent film damage. The critical number of laser pulses needed to generate a permanent damage of the film has been studied as a function of the laser fluence. Once damage is created, further laser pulses cause a partial removal of the film material from the glass substrate. Scanning force microscopy has been used to characterise ex-situ the irradiated surface areas. Based on these complementary measurements possible incubation mechanisms are discussed

  12. The design of nuclear magnetic resonance programmable pulsed source based SOPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qingshun; Zhang Yakun; Wang Wenli

    2012-01-01

    The design of pulse source in the equipment of pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance is studied based on SOPC. The strong processing power of Nios Ⅱ embedded processor and the design flexibility of FPGA are fully used. The SOPC system is built. The overall design plan for the pulse source is described. The design of programmable multi-pulse generation logic user-defined components in the FPGA is introduced mainly. Part of the implementation program and the task logic simulation waveforms are presented. The pulse source has better application value because a clear, stable and good quality multi-pulse output waveform can be shown on the oscilloscope finally. The system software and hardware are easy to be modified and upgraded, meeting different application of pulsed NMR pulse sequence in variety of requirements. (authors)

  13. Lung MRI of invasive fungal infection at 3 Tesla: evaluation of five different pulse sequences and comparison with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Chenggong; Tan, Xiangliang; Li, Caixia; Wu, Yuankui; Hao, Peng; Xiong, Wei; Xu, Yikai [Southern Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging Center, Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Wei, Qi; Feng, Ru; Xu, Jun [Southern Medical University, Department of Hematology, Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, New Territories (China)

    2014-09-18

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of five MR sequences to detect pulmonary infectious lesions in patients with invasive fungal infection (IFI), using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as the reference standard. Thirty-four immunocompromised patients with suspected IFI underwent MDCT and MRI. The MR studies were performed using five pulse sequences at 3.0 T: T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE), short-tau inversion recovery (STIR), spectrally selective attenuated inversion recovery (SPAIR), T1-weighted high resolution isotropic volume excitation (e-THRIVE) and T1-weighted fast field echo (T1-FFE). The size, lesion-to-lung contrast ratio and the detectability of pulmonary lesions on MR images were assessed. Image quality and artefacts on different sequences were also rated. A total of 84 lesions including nodules (n = 44) and consolidation (n = 40) were present in 75 lobes. SPAIR and e-THRIVE images achieved high overall lesion-related sensitivities for the detection of pulmonary abnormalities (90.5 % and 86.9 %, respectively). STIR showed the highest lesion-to-lung contrast ratio for nodules (21.8) and consolidation (17.0), whereas TSE had the fewest physiological artefacts. MRI at 3.0 T can depict clinically significant pulmonary IFI abnormalities with high accuracy compared to MDCT. SPAIR and e-THRIVE are preferred sequences for the detection of infectious lesions of 5 mm and larger. (orig.)

  14. Molecular spinning by a chiral train of short laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floß, Johannes; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2012-12-01

    We provide a detailed theoretical analysis of molecular rotational excitation by a chiral pulse train, a sequence of linearly polarized pulses with the polarization direction rotating from pulse to pulse by a controllable angle. Molecular rotation with a preferential rotational sense (clockwise or counterclockwise) can be excited by this scheme. We show that the directionality of the rotation is caused by quantum interference of different excitation pathways. The chiral pulse train is capable of selective excitation of molecular isotopologs and nuclear spin isomers in a mixture. We demonstrate this using 14N2 and 15N2 as examples for isotopologs and para- and ortho-nitrogen as examples for nuclear-spin isomers.

  15. Absorption of short-pulse electromagnetic energy by a resistively loaded straight wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, E.K.; Deadrick, F.J.; Landt, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption of short-pulse electromagnetic energy by a resistively loaded straight wire is examined. Energy collected by the wire, load energy, peak load currents, and peak load voltages are found for a wide range of parameters, with particular emphasis on nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) phenomena. A series of time-sequenced plots is used to illustrate pulse propagation on wires when loads and wire ends are encountered

  16. Fabrication of nonfouling, bactericidal, and bacteria corpse release multifunctional surface through surface-initiated RAFT polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bailiang; Ye, Zi; Tang, Yihong; Han, Yuemei; Lin, Quankui; Liu, Huihua; Chen, Hao; Nan, Kaihui

    Infections after surgery or endophthalmitis are potentially blinding complications caused by bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation on the intraocular lens. Neither single-function anti-adhesion surface nor contacting killing surface can exhibit ideal antibacterial function. In this work, a novel (2-(dimethylamino)-ethyl methacrylate- co -2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (p (DMAEMA- co -MPC)) brush was synthesized by "grafting from" method through reversible-addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. 1-Bromoheptane was used to quaternize the p (DMAEMA- co -MPC) brush coating and to endow the surface with bactericidal function. The success of the surface functionalization was confirmed by atomic force microscopy, water contact angle, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The quaternary ammonium salt units were employed as efficient disinfection that can eliminate bacteria through contact killing, whereas the 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine units were introduced to suppress unwanted nonspecific adsorption. The functionalized poly(dimethyl siloxane) surfaces showed efficiency in reducing bovine serum albumin adsorption and in inhibiting bacteria adhesion and biofilm formation. The copolymer brushes also demonstrated excellent bactericidal function against gram-positive ( Staphylococcus aureus ) bacteria measured by bacteria live/dead staining and shake-flask culture methods. The surface biocompatibility was evaluated by morphology and activity measurement with human lens epithelial cells in vitro. The achievement of the p (DMAEMA + - co -MPC) copolymer brush coating with nonfouling, bactericidal, and bacteria corpse release properties can be used to modify intraocular lenses.

  17. Dynamical suppression of nuclear-spin decoherence time in Si and GaAs using inversion pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, S.; Harada, J.; Sasaki, S.; Hirayama, Y.

    2007-01-01

    We found that nuclear-spin decoherence is suppressed by applying inversion pulses such as alternating phase Carr-Purcell (APCP) and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequences in silicon and GaAs. The decoherence time reaches ∼1.3s by applying inversion pulses, which is ∼200 times as long as the characteristic decay time obtained from the Hahn echo sequence (∼6ms) in silicon

  18. Exploiting ecology in drug pulse sequences in favour of population reduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Bauer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A deterministic population dynamics model involving birth and death for a two-species system, comprising a wild-type and more resistant species competing via logistic growth, is subjected to two distinct stress environments designed to mimic those that would typically be induced by temporal variation in the concentration of a drug (antibiotic or chemotherapeutic as it permeates through the population and is progressively degraded. Different treatment regimes, involving single or periodical doses, are evaluated in terms of the minimal population size (a measure of the extinction probability, and the population composition (a measure of the selection pressure for resistance or tolerance during the treatment. We show that there exist timescales over which the low-stress regime is as effective as the high-stress regime, due to the competition between the two species. For multiple periodic treatments, competition can ensure that the minimal population size is attained during the first pulse when the high-stress regime is short, which implies that a single short pulse can be more effective than a more protracted regime. Our results suggest that when the duration of the high-stress environment is restricted, a treatment with one or multiple shorter pulses can produce better outcomes than a single long treatment. If ecological competition is to be exploited for treatments, it is crucial to determine these timescales, and estimate for the minimal population threshold that suffices for extinction. These parameters can be quantified by experiment.

  19. Gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MR of VX2 carcinoma in rabbit liver: usefulness of the delayed phase imaging and optimal pulse sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seung Il; Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Young Kon; Kim, Chong Soo [College of Medicine, Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of delayed imaging using gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance) and to determine the optimal pulse sequence for the detection of VX2 carcinoma lesions in the rabbit. Twelve VX2 carcinomas implanted in the livers of eleven New Zealand rabbits were studied. All patients underwent an MR protocal consisting of precontrast T2-and T1-weighted sequences, followed by repetition of the T1-weighted sequence at 0 to 30 (arterial phase). 31-60 (portal phase), and 40 minutes (delayed phase) after the intravenous administration of 0.1 mmol/kg of gadobenate dimeglumine. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the liver and VX2 tumor, and the lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of precontrast and postcontrast MR images were quantitatively analyzed, and two experienced radiologists evaluated image quality in terms of lesion conspicuity, artifact, mass delineation, and vascular anatomy. Liver SNR was significantly higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast, arterial, and portal imaging (p<0.05), while lesion SNR was significantly higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast imaging (p<0.05). Lesion CNR was higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast and portal phase imaging (p<0.05), but there was no difference between arterial and delayed imaging. The latter provided better mass delineation than precontrast, arterial and portal phase imaging (p<0.05). While in terms of lesion conspicuity and vascular anatomy, the delayed phase was better than the arterial phase (p<0.05) but similar to the precontrast and portal phase. During the delayed phase, the gradient-echo sequence showed better results than the spin-echo in terms of liver SNR, and lesion SNR and CNR (p<0.05). Because it provides better lesion conspicuity and mass delineation by improving liver SNR and lesion-to-liver CNR, the addition of the delayed phase to a dynamic MRI sequence after gadobenate dimeglumine adminstration facilitates lesion detection. For delayed-phase imaging, the

  20. Gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MR of VX2 carcinoma in rabbit liver: usefulness of the delayed phase imaging and optimal pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seung Il; Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Young Kon; Kim, Chong Soo

    2002-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of delayed imaging using gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance) and to determine the optimal pulse sequence for the detection of VX2 carcinoma lesions in the rabbit. Twelve VX2 carcinomas implanted in the livers of eleven New Zealand rabbits were studied. All patients underwent an MR protocal consisting of precontrast T2-and T1-weighted sequences, followed by repetition of the T1-weighted sequence at 0 to 30 (arterial phase). 31-60 (portal phase), and 40 minutes (delayed phase) after the intravenous administration of 0.1 mmol/kg of gadobenate dimeglumine. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the liver and VX2 tumor, and the lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of precontrast and postcontrast MR images were quantitatively analyzed, and two experienced radiologists evaluated image quality in terms of lesion conspicuity, artifact, mass delineation, and vascular anatomy. Liver SNR was significantly higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast, arterial, and portal imaging (p<0.05), while lesion SNR was significantly higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast imaging (p<0.05). Lesion CNR was higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast and portal phase imaging (p<0.05), but there was no difference between arterial and delayed imaging. The latter provided better mass delineation than precontrast, arterial and portal phase imaging (p<0.05). While in terms of lesion conspicuity and vascular anatomy, the delayed phase was better than the arterial phase (p<0.05) but similar to the precontrast and portal phase. During the delayed phase, the gradient-echo sequence showed better results than the spin-echo in terms of liver SNR, and lesion SNR and CNR (p<0.05). Because it provides better lesion conspicuity and mass delineation by improving liver SNR and lesion-to-liver CNR, the addition of the delayed phase to a dynamic MRI sequence after gadobenate dimeglumine adminstration facilitates lesion detection. For delayed-phase imaging, the

  1. Pulse Design in Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palani, Ravi Shankar

    , where the former is the most widely used approach in NMR. AHT and Floquet theory, which use mathematical tools namely, Magnus expansion and Van Vleck transformations respectively, yield the same effective Hamiltonian that is valid for stroboscopic observation. The equivalence between the theories has...... coupling) interactions are referred to as dipolar recoupling pulse sequences and forms the subject of this dissertation. NMR experiments, that involve repeating (periodic) pulse sequences, are generally understood by finding an average or effective Hamiltonian (interaction, in the language of physics...... been discussed in the past in literature. Generalised expressions for the effective Hamiltonian using AHT are derived in the frequency domain in this dissertation, to allow for appreciation of the equivalence with Floquet theory mediated effective Hamiltonian. The derivation relies on the ability...

  2. A peripheral component interconnect express-based scalable and highly integrated pulsed spectrometer for solution state dynamic nuclear polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yugui; Liu, Chaoyang, E-mail: chyliu@wipm.ac.cn [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); State Key Laboratory of Magnet Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Feng, Jiwen; Wang, Dong; Chen, Fang; Liu, Maili [State Key Laboratory of Magnet Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Chao [State Key Laboratory of Magnet Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100048 (China)

    2015-08-15

    High sensitivity, high data rates, fast pulses, and accurate synchronization all represent challenges for modern nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers, which make any expansion or adaptation of these devices to new techniques and experiments difficult. Here, we present a Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (PCIe)-based highly integrated distributed digital architecture pulsed spectrometer that is implemented with electron and nucleus double resonances and is scalable specifically for broad dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhancement applications, including DNP-magnetic resonance spectroscopy/imaging (DNP-MRS/MRI). The distributed modularized architecture can implement more transceiver channels flexibly to meet a variety of MRS/MRI instrumentation needs. The proposed PCIe bus with high data rates can significantly improve data transmission efficiency and communication reliability and allow precise control of pulse sequences. An external high speed double data rate memory chip is used to store acquired data and pulse sequence elements, which greatly accelerates the execution of the pulse sequence, reduces the TR (time of repetition) interval, and improves the accuracy of TR in imaging sequences. Using clock phase-shift technology, we can produce digital pulses accurately with high timing resolution of 1 ns and narrow widths of 4 ns to control the microwave pulses required by pulsed DNP and ensure overall system synchronization. The proposed spectrometer is proved to be both feasible and reliable by observation of a maximum signal enhancement factor of approximately −170 for {sup 1}H, and a high quality water image was successfully obtained by DNP-enhanced spin-echo {sup 1}H MRI at 0.35 T.

  3. Chaotic parametric soliton-like pulses in ferromagnetic-film active ring resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishin, S. V.; Golova, T. M.; Morozova, M. A.; Romanenko, D. V.; Seleznev, E. P.; Sysoev, I. V.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of quasi-periodic sequences of parametric soliton-like pulses in an active ring resonator with a ferromagnetic film via the three-wave parametric instability of a magnetostatic surface wave is studied theoretically and experimentally. These dissipative structures form in time due to the competition between the cubic nonlinearity caused by parametric coupling between spin waves and the time dispersion caused by the resonant cavity that is present in a self-oscillatory system. The development of dynamic chaos due to the parametric instability of a magnetostatic surface wave results in irregular behavior of a phase. However, this behavior does not break a quasi-periodic pulse sequence when the gain changes over a wide range. The generated soliton-like pulses have a chaotic nature, which is supported by the maximum Lyapunov exponent estimated from experimental time series

  4. Phase-alternated composite π/2 pulses for solid state quadrupole echo NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramamoorthy, A.; Narasimhan, P.T.

    1991-01-01

    Phase-alternated composite π/2 pulses have been constructed for spin I=1 to overcome quadrupole interaction effects in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) spectroscopy. Magnus expansion approach is used to design these sequences in a manner similar to the NMR coherent averaging theory. It is inferred that the symmetric phase-alternated composite π/2 pulses reported here are quite successful in producing quadrupole echo free phase distortions. This effectiveness of the present composite pulses is due to the fact that most of them are of shorter durations as compared to the ones reported in literature. In this theoretical procedure, irreducible spherical tensor operator formalism is employed to simplify the complexity involved in the evaluation of Magnus expansion terms. It has been argued in this paper that composite π/2 pulse sequences for this purpose can also be derived from the broadband inversion π pulses which are designed to compensate electric field gradient(efg) inhomogeniety in spin I=1 nuclear quadrupole resonance(NQR) spectroscopy. (author). 28 refs

  5. The depletion of protein signals in metabonomics analysis with the WET-CPMG pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van, Que N.; Chmurny, Gwendolyn N.; Veenstra, Timothy D.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful analytical tool capable of providing a comprehensive metabolic profile of biofluids such as urine, plasma, and serum. Unfortunately, when measuring serum and plasma, the high protein concentration can obscure the signals originating from low molecular weight metabolites. We evaluated the use of different parameters within the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse train of fast spin-echoes to remove the macromolecular signal contribution in one-dimensional proton ( 1 H) NMR spectra. Experimental parameters such as the refocusing delay in the CPMG pulse train, pulse miscalibration, and recycle time were examined to assess the ability to remove the protein signals from the spectrum without causing a deleterious effect on the signals originating from free, low molecular weight metabolites. The 1 H-NMR spectra of a variety of serum samples spiked with 2 ' -deoxyadenosine were acquired using various acquisition parameters. Our results show that the delay used in the CPMG spin-echo and the combination of the acquisition pulse flip angle and recycle time are the two major factors affecting the observed metabolite signal amplitudes in the resulting 1 H-NMR spectrum

  6. Robust efficient estimation of heart rate pulse from video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuchang; Sun, Lingyun; Rohde, Gustavo Kunde

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple but robust algorithm for estimating the heart rate pulse from video sequences containing human skin in real time. Based on a model of light interaction with human skin, we define the change of blood concentration due to arterial pulsation as a pixel quotient in log space, and successfully use the derived signal for computing the pulse heart rate. Various experiments with different cameras, different illumination condition, and different skin locations were conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm. Examples computed with normal illumination show the algorithm is comparable with pulse oximeter devices both in accuracy and sensitivity. PMID:24761294

  7. Protecting unknown two-qubit entangled states by nesting Uhrig's dynamical decoupling sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhtar, Musawwadah; Soh, Wee Tee; Saw, Thuan Beng; Gong, Jiangbin

    2010-01-01

    Future quantum technologies rely heavily on good protection of quantum entanglement against environment-induced decoherence. A recent study showed that an extension of Uhrig's dynamical decoupling (UDD) sequence can (in theory) lock an arbitrary but known two-qubit entangled state to the Nth order using a sequence of N control pulses [Mukhtar et al., Phys. Rev. A 81, 012331 (2010)]. By nesting three layers of explicitly constructed UDD sequences, here we first consider the protection of unknown two-qubit states as superposition of two known basis states, without making assumptions of the system-environment coupling. It is found that the obtained decoherence suppression can be highly sensitive to the ordering of the three UDD layers and can be remarkably effective with the correct ordering. The detailed theoretical results are useful for general understanding of the nature of controlled quantum dynamics under nested UDD. As an extension of our three-layer UDD, it is finally pointed out that a completely unknown two-qubit state can be protected by nesting four layers of UDD sequences. This work indicates that when UDD is applicable (e.g., when the environment has a sharp frequency cutoff and when control pulses can be taken as instantaneous pulses), dynamical decoupling using nested UDD sequences is a powerful approach for entanglement protection.

  8. Two-pulse and stimulated nuclear-quadrupole-resonance echoes in YAlO3:Pr3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    The dephasing of trivalent praseodymium dilute in yttrium aluminum oxide (YAlO 3 ) in the ground electronic state 3 H 4 state is evaluated using an optically detected method, to measure two-rf-pulse- and three-rf-pulse-stimulated nuclear quadrupole echoes. The magnitude of the echo is obtained by detecting the weak Raman optical field generated by the interaction of the magnetic moment of the echo and a light beam resonant with the 3 H 4 (0 cm 1 ) to 1 D 2 (16 374 cm -1 ) optical transition. This same light beam is used as an optical pump (37-ms duration) prior the rf-pulse sequence to increase the population difference of the hyperfine energy levels, thereby improving the echo signal. The light is turned off 9 ms before the rf-pulse sequence and remains off until the echo to avoid optical-pumping effects on the measured nuclear-quadrupole-resonance (NQR) echo lifetime. The dephasing time T 2 from two-pulse nuclear-quadrupole-echo measurement is found to be 366±29 μs

  9. Implementing quantum logic gates with gradient ascent pulse engineering: principles and practicalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Benjamin; Jones, Jonathan A

    2012-10-13

    We briefly describe the use of gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) pulses to implement quantum logic gates in nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computers, and discuss a range of simple extensions to the core technique. We then consider a range of difficulties that can arise in practical implementations of GRAPE sequences, reflecting non-idealities in the experimental systems used.

  10. Evaluation of short repetition time, partial flip angle, gradient recalled echo pulse sequences in cervical spine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enzmann, D.; Rubin, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    A short repetition time (TR), partial flip angle, gradient recalled echo pulse sequence (GRASS) was prospectively studied to optimize it for the diagnosis of cervical disk and cord disease in 98 patients. Changes in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast were measured as the following parameters were varied: flip angle (3 0 to 18 0 ), TR (22-60 msec), and echo time (TE) (12.5-25 msec). Flip angle was the single most important parameter. For disk disease, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) SNR peaked at an 8 0 flip angle in the axial view but at a 4 0 flip angle in the sagittal view. In the sagittal view, disk-CSF contrast decreased progressively from a flip angle of 3 0 , while in the axial view it peaked at 10 0 . For cord lesions the findings were similar except that lesion-cord contrast could be increased by lengthening both TR and TE. No one combination of parameters proved greatly superior for either disk disease or cord disease. The selection of parameters required balancing of several factors that often had opposing effects

  11. Particle-in-cell simulation of Trichel pulses in pure oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria-Hoyo, C; Pontiga, F; Castellanos, A

    2007-01-01

    The development and propagation of Trichel pulses in oxygen have been numerically simulated using an improved fluid particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The numerical method has been optimized to accurately reproduce sequences of about 100 Trichel pulses (∼1 ms). A classical one-dimensional model of negative corona in sphere-to-plane geometry has been used to formulate the continuity equations for electrons and ions. The effects of ionization, attachment and secondary-electron emission from the cathode have all been considered. The electric field has been obtained from the solution of Poisson's equation in two dimensions. Using this model, the temporal and electrical characteristics of Trichel pulses have been investigated, in particular, the relation between applied voltage, pulse frequency and time-averaged current intensity and charge

  12. Jump-and-return sandwiches: A new family of binomial-like selective inversion sequences with improved performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Tom; Chen, Johnny; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Zheng, Gang; Matsukawa, Shingo; Price, William S.

    2018-03-01

    A new family of binomial-like inversion sequences, named jump-and-return sandwiches (JRS), has been developed by inserting a binomial-like sequence into a standard jump-and-return sequence, discovered through use of a stochastic Genetic Algorithm optimisation. Compared to currently used binomial-like inversion sequences (e.g., 3-9-19 and W5), the new sequences afford wider inversion bands and narrower non-inversion bands with an equal number of pulses. As an example, two jump-and-return sandwich 10-pulse sequences achieved 95% inversion at offsets corresponding to 9.4% and 10.3% of the non-inversion band spacing, compared to 14.7% for the binomial-like W5 inversion sequence, i.e., they afforded non-inversion bands about two thirds the width of the W5 non-inversion band.

  13. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the rat pelvis using 3D water-excitation MP-RAGE MR sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numano, Tomokazu; Homma, Kazuhiro; Hyodo, Koji; Nitta, Naotaka; Iwasaki, Nobuaki

    2008-01-01

    We developed a novel technique for fat-saturated, 3-dimensional (3D) diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequencing based upon the 3D magnetization-prepared, rapid gradient-echo (3D-MP-RAGE) method. We saturated fat using 2 techniques, chemical shift selective (CHESS; FatSat)-3D-DWI sequence versus water excitation (WE)-3D-DWI method, then compared the 2 sequences in terms of degree of fat suppression. In preparing the FatSat-3D-DWI sequence, we used a ''CHESS-90deg radiofrequency (RF)-motion probing gradient (MPG)-180deg RFMPG-90deg RF'' pulse-train, to sensitize the magnetization to fat-saturated diffusion. In contrast, in the WE-3D-DWI sequence, we selected a RAGE-excitation pulse with a binominal-pulse 1-1 or 1-2-1 for water-excited (fat-saturated) diffusion imaging. Experimental results in a phantom confirmed the effects of diffusion weighting and of fat saturation. Fat saturation was much better in the WE-3D-DWI sequence than the CHESS-3D-DWI sequence. From results from animal (rat pelvis) experiments using WE-3D-DWI, we obtained fat-saturated DWI. This sequence was useful for in vivo imaging. (author)

  14. Recoupling and decoupling of nuclear spin interactions at high MAS frequencies: numerical design of CNnν symmetry-based RF pulse schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, Christian; Herbst, Jirada; Kirschstein, Anika; Leppert, Joerg; Ohlenschlaeger, Oliver; Goerlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2009-01-01

    The CN n ν class of RF pulse schemes, commonly employed for recoupling and decoupling of nuclear spin interactions in magic angle spinning solid state NMR studies of biological systems, involves the application of a basic 'C' element corresponding to an RF cycle with unity propagator. In this study, the design of CN n ν symmetry-based RF pulse sequences for achieving 13 C- 13 C double-quantum dipolar recoupling and through bond scalar coupling mediated 13 C- 13 C chemical shift correlation has been examined at high MAS frequencies employing broadband, constant-amplitude, phase-modulated basic 'C' elements. The basic elements were implemented as a sandwich of a small number of short pulses of equal duration with each pulse characterised by an RF phase value. The phase-modulation profile of the 'C' element was optimised numerically so as to generate efficient RF pulse sequences. The performances of the sequences were evaluated via numerical simulations and experimental measurements and are presented here

  15. Theoretical and Experimental Investigations of Coincidences in Poisson Distributed Pulse Trains and Spectral Distortion Caused by Pulse Pileup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Quentin

    1990-01-01

    Part one of this two-part study is concerned with the multiple coincidences in pulse trains from X-ray and gamma radiation detectors which are the cause of pulse pileup. A sequence of pulses with inter-arrival times less than tau, the resolving time of the pulse-height analysis system used to acquire spectra, is called a multiple pulse string. Such strings can be classified on the basis of the number of pulses they contain, or the number of resolving times they cover. The occurrence rates of such strings are derived from theoretical considerations. Logic circuits were devised to make experimental measurements of multiple pulse string occurrence rates in the output from a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector over a wide range of count rates. Markov process theory was used to predict state transition rates in the logic circuits, enabling the experimental data to be checked rigorously for conformity with those predicted for a Poisson distribution. No fundamental discrepancies were observed. Part two of the study is concerned with a theoretical analysis of pulse pileup and the development of a discrete correction algorithm, based on the use of a function to simulate the coincidence spectrum produced by partial sums of pulses. Monte Carlo simulations, incorporating criteria for pulse pileup inherent in the operation of modern ADC's, were used to generate pileup spectra due to coincidences between two pulses, (1st order pileup) and three pulses (2nd order pileup), for different semi-Gaussian pulse shapes. Coincidences between pulses in a single channel produced a basic probability density function spectrum which can be regarded as an impulse response for a particular pulse shape. The use of a flat spectrum (identical count rates in all channels) in the simulations, and in a parallel theoretical analysis, showed the 1st order pileup distorted the spectrum to a linear ramp with a pileup tail. The correction algorithm was successfully applied to correct entire spectra for 1st and

  16. Knee implant imaging at 3 Tesla using high-bandwidth radiofrequency pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachschmidt, Theresa J; Sutter, Reto; Jakob, Peter M; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Nittka, Mathias

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the impact of high-bandwidth radiofrequency (RF) pulses used in turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences or combined with slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) on artifact reduction at 3 Tesla in the knee in the presence of metal. Local transmit/receive coils feature increased maximum B1 amplitude, reduced SAR exposition and thus enable the application of high-bandwidth RF pulses. Susceptibility-induced through-plane distortion scales inversely with the RF bandwidth and the view angle, hence blurring, increases for higher RF bandwidths, when SEMAC is used. These effects were assessed for a phantom containing a total knee arthroplasty. TSE and SEMAC sequences with conventional and high RF bandwidths and different contrasts were tested on eight patients with different types of implants. To realize scan times of 7 to 9 min, SEMAC was always applied with eight slice-encoding steps and distortion was rated by two radiologists. A local transmit/receive knee coil enables the use of an RF bandwidth of 4 kHz compared with 850 Hz in conventional sequences. Phantom scans confirm the relation of RF bandwidth and through-plane distortion, which can be reduced up to 79%, and demonstrate the increased blurring for high-bandwidth RF pulses. In average, artifacts in this RF mode are rated hardly visible for patients with joint arthroplasties, when eight SEMAC slice-encoding steps are applied, and for patients with titanium fixtures, when TSE is used. The application of high-bandwidth RF pulses by local transmit coils substantially reduces through-plane distortion artifacts at 3 Tesla. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. LAPU2: a laser pulse propagation code with diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.C.; Dickman, D.O.

    1978-03-01

    Complete descriptions of the mathematical models and numerical methods used in the code LAPU2 are presented. This code can be used to study the propagation with diffraction of a temporally finite pulse through a sequence of resonant media and simple optical components. The treatment assumes cylindrical symmetry and allows nonlinear refractive indices. An unlimited number of different media can be distributed along the propagation path of the pulse. A complete users guide to input data is given as well as a FORTRAN listing of the code

  18. Particle-in-cell simulation of Trichel pulses in pure oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria-Hoyo, C [Dpto. Electronica y Electromagnetismo, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes s/n, Sevilla 41012 (Spain); Pontiga, F [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes s/n, Sevilla 41012 (Spain); Castellanos, A [Dpto. Electronica y Electromagnetismo, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes s/n, Sevilla 41012 (Spain)

    2007-08-07

    The development and propagation of Trichel pulses in oxygen have been numerically simulated using an improved fluid particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The numerical method has been optimized to accurately reproduce sequences of about 100 Trichel pulses ({approx}1 ms). A classical one-dimensional model of negative corona in sphere-to-plane geometry has been used to formulate the continuity equations for electrons and ions. The effects of ionization, attachment and secondary-electron emission from the cathode have all been considered. The electric field has been obtained from the solution of Poisson's equation in two dimensions. Using this model, the temporal and electrical characteristics of Trichel pulses have been investigated, in particular, the relation between applied voltage, pulse frequency and time-averaged current intensity and charge.

  19. Comparison of multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for Salmonella spp. identification in surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chun Wei; Hao Huang, Kuan; Hsu, Bing Mu; Tsai, Hsien Lung; Tseng, Shao Feng; Kao, Po Min; Shen, Shu Min; Chou Chiu, Yi; Chen, Jung Sheng

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella is one of the most important pathogens of waterborne diseases with outbreaks from contaminated water reported worldwide. In addition, Salmonella spp. can survive for long periods in aquatic environments. To realize genotypes and serovars of Salmonella in aquatic environments, we isolated the Salmonella strains by selective culture plates to identify the serovars of Salmonella by serological assay, and identify the genotypes by Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) based on the sequence data from University College Cork (UCC), respectively. The results show that 36 stream water samples (30.1%) and 18 drinking water samples (23.3%) were confirmed the existence of Salmonella using culture method combined PCR specific invA gene amplification. In this study, 24 cultured isolates of Salmonella from water samples were classified to fifteen Salmonella enterica serovars. In addition, we construct phylogenetic analysis using phylogenetic tree and Minimum spanning tree (MST) method to analyze the relationship of clinical, environmental, and geographical data. Phylogenetic tree showed that four main clusters and our strains can be distributed in all. The genotypes of isolates from stream water are more biodiversity while comparing the Salmonella strains genotypes from drinking water sources. According to MST data, we can found the positive correlation between serovars and genotypes of Salmonella. Previous studies revealed that the result of Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method can predict the serovars of Salmonella strain. Hence, we used the MLST data combined phylogenetic analysis to identify the serovars of Salmonella strain and achieved effectiveness. While using the geographical data combined phylogenetic analysis, the result showed that the dominant strains were existed in whole stream area in rainy season. Keywords: Salmonella spp., MLST, phylogenetic analysis, PFGE

  20. A SiGe Quadrature Pulse Modulator for Superconducting Qubit State Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwende, Randy; Bardin, Joseph

    Manipulation of the quantum states of microwave superconducting qubits typically requires the generation of coherent modulated microwave pulses. While many off-the-shelf instruments are capable of generating such pulses, a more integrated approach is likely required if fault-tolerant quantum computing architectures are to be implemented. In this work, we present progress towards a pulse generator specifically designed to drive superconducing qubits. The device is implemented in a commercial silicon process and has been designed with energy-efficiency and scalability in mind. Pulse generation is carried out using a unique approach in which modulation is applied directly to the in-phase and quadrature components of a carrier signal in the 1-10 GHz frequency range through a unique digital-analog conversion process designed specifically for this application. The prototype pulse generator can be digitally programmed and supports sequencing of pulses with independent amplitude and phase waveforms. These amplitude and phase waveforms can be digitally programmed through a serial programming interface. Detailed performance of the pulse generator at room temperature and 4 K will be presented.

  1. Contrast Enhancement in TOF cerebral angiography at 7 T using Saturation and MT pulses under SAR constraints: impact of VERSE and sparse pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitter, Sebastian; Bock, Michael; Johst, Sören; Auerbach, Edward J.; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Van de Moortele, Pierre-François

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral 3D time of flight (TOF) angiography significantly benefits from ultra high fields, mainly due to higher SNR and to longer T1 relaxation time of static brain tissues, however, SAR significantly increases with B0. Thus, additional RF pulses commonly used at lower field strengths to improve TOF contrast such as saturation of venous signal and improved background suppression by magnetization transfer typically cannot be used at higher fields. In this work we aimed at reducing SAR for each RF pulse category in a TOF sequence. We use the VERSE principle for the slab selective TOF excitation as well as the venous saturation RF pulses. Additionally, MT pulses are implemented by sparsely applying the pulses only during acquisition of the central k-space lines to limit their SAR contribution. Image quality, angiographic contrast and SAR reduction were investigated as a function of VERSE parameters and of the total number of MT pulses applied. Based on these results, a TOF protocol was generated that increases the angiographic contrast by more than 50% and reduces subcutaneous fat signal while keeping the resulting SAR within regulatory limits. PMID:22139829

  2. Formation of nanograting in fused silica by temporally delayed femtosecond double-pulse irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haodong; Song, Juan; Li, Qin; Zeng, Xianglong; Dai, Ye

    2018-04-01

    A 1 kHz femtosecond double-pulse sequence irradiation is used to study the temporal evolution of nanograting in fused silica by controlling the delay times and polarization combinations of two independent beams from a Mach–Zehnder interferometer. A lateral laser-scan experiment with speed at 5 µm s‑1 and each pulse energy of 1 µJ is firstly performed with the delay time from sub-picosecond to 10 ps, and then the written nanostructures are systematically studied under a cross-polarized microscope because the intensity of birefringence signal nearly corresponds to optical retardance and development level of the induced nanograting. The trend shows that the induced nanogratings can continue developing with a decrease of delay time in the case of the linear polarization pulse arriving before. In another vertical laser-scan experiment at the same speed and pulse energy, the morphologies of nanogratings embedded in the lines are characterized by scanning electron microscope after mechanical polishing and chemical etching. The self-organized patterns have a commonly spatial period of 200–300 nm and the orientation is always perpendicular to the polarization of the first laser pulse, and the second pulse in each sequence seems to promote the as-formed nanograting developing further even if the polarized direction is different from the previous pulse. These new findings verify again that a localized memory effect can make positive feedback to reinforce the patterned nanostripes. In that process, the impact ionization from the seed electrons left by the first pulse excitation and the photoionization of self-trapped excitons with lower ionization threshold results in an increase of the re-excited carriers during the second pulse irradiation and the subsequent development of the as-formed nanograting. Our result provides further proofs for understanding the physical mechanism of nanograting strongly connection with the interplay on multiple ionization channels.

  3. Random Sequence for Optimal Low-Power Laser Generated Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangi, D.; Virga, A.; Gulino, M. S.

    2017-08-01

    Low-power laser generated ultrasounds are lately gaining importance in the research world, thanks to the possibility of investigating a mechanical component structural integrity through a non-contact and Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) procedure. The ultrasounds are, however, very low in amplitude, making it necessary to use pre-processing and post-processing operations on the signals to detect them. The cross-correlation technique is used in this work, meaning that a random signal must be used as laser input. For this purpose, a highly random and simple-to-create code called T sequence, capable of enhancing the ultrasound detectability, is introduced (not previously available at the state of the art). Several important parameters which characterize the T sequence can influence the process: the number of pulses Npulses , the pulse duration δ and the distance between pulses dpulses . A Finite Element FE model of a 3 mm steel disk has been initially developed to analytically study the longitudinal ultrasound generation mechanism and the obtainable outputs. Later, experimental tests have shown that the T sequence is highly flexible for ultrasound detection purposes, making it optimal to use high Npulses and δ but low dpulses . In the end, apart from describing all phenomena that arise in the low-power laser generation process, the results of this study are also important for setting up an effective NDT procedure using this technology.

  4. A novel method for fat suppression in RARE sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Nobuya

    1999-01-01

    Rapid acquisition relaxation-enhanced (RARE) sequences utilize one or several Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) echo trains to sample a number of k-space lines each repetition time TR. The technique can rapidly generate multislice T2-weighted images which, as a rule, are strikingly similar in contrast to conventional T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) images. An exception to this rule is the appearance of very bright signal from fat in T2-weighted RARE images as compared to conventional T2-weighted SE images. To reduce this fat signal, we introduce a time delay, τc, between the 90 degrees x and first 180 degrees y pulse of each echo train such that a phase angle of pi/2 develops between fat and the reference (water) line at echo maxima. The technique leads to single-acquisition fat suppression without the use of frequency-selective saturation pulses and concomitant loss of slices per TR. A Bloch equation analysis is used to identify two major mechanisms contributing to suppression of off-resonance spins such that w τc =pi/2. Namely, the CPMG sequence becomes a CP sequence with no self-correction properties for imperfect 180 degrees pulses leading to enhanced signal decay, and the raw k-space data matrix become segmented into blocks alternately multiplied by +/- i, leading to signal dispersion following Fourier transformation. (K.H.)

  5. Efficacy of Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Repetitive Element Sequence-Based PCR in Typing of Salmonella Isolates from Assam, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Purnima; Borah, Probodh; Hussain, Iftikar; Das, Leena; Hazarika, Girin; Tamuly, Shantanu; Barkalita, Luit Moni

    2018-05-01

    A total of 12 Salmonella isolates belonging to different serovars, viz , Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis ( n = 4), Salmonella enterica serovar Weltevreden ( n = 4), Salmonella enterica serovar Newport ( n = 1), Salmonella enterica serovar Litchifield ( n = 1), and untypeable strains ( n = 2) were isolated from 332 diarrheic fecal samples collected from animals, birds, and humans. Of the two molecular typing methods applied, viz , repetitive element sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), PFGE could clearly differentiate the strains belonging to different serovars as well as differentiate between strains of the same serovar with respect to their source of isolation, whereas REP-PCR could not differentiate between strains of the same serovar. Thus, it can be suggested that PFGE is more useful and appropriate for molecular typing of Salmonella isolates during epidemiological investigations than REP-PCR. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Increasing flexibility in two-dimensional liquid chromatography by pulsed elution of the first dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Simon S.; Christensen, Jan H.; Verdier, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    This work demonstrates the development of an online two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) method where the first dimension column is eluted by a sequence of pulses of increasing eluotropic strength generated by the LC pumps (pulsed-elution 2D-LC). Between the pulses, the first dimension...... online comprehensive 2D-LC: undersampling, difficulties in refocusing, and lack of flexibility in the selection of column dimensions and flow rates because the two dimensions constrain each other. The pulsed-elution 2D-LC was applied for the analysis of a basic fraction of vacuum gas oil. Peak capacity...

  7. Comparison of MRI pulse sequences in defining prostate volume after permanent implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, P.W.; Narayana, V.; Drake, D.G.; Miller, B.M.; Marsh, L.; Chan, J.; Gonda, R.; Winfield, R.J.; Roberson, P.L.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relative value of three MRI pulse sequences in defining the prostate volume after permanent implantation. Methods and Materials: A total of 45 patients who received a permanent 125 I implant were studied. Two weeks after implantation, an axial CT scan (2 mm thickness) and T 1 -weighted, T 1 -weighted fat saturation, and T 2 -weighted axial MRI (3-mm) studies were obtained. The prostate volumes were compared with the initial ultrasound planning volumes, and subsequently the CT, T 1 -weighted, and T 1 -weighted fat saturation MRI volumes were compared with the T 2 -weighted volumes. Discrepancies in volume were evaluated by visual inspection of the registered axial images and the registration of axial volumes on the sagittal T 2 -weighted volumes. In a limited set of patients, pre- and postimplant CT and T 2 -weighted MRI studies were available for comparison to determine whether prostate volume changes after implant were dependent on the imaging modality. Results: T 1 -weighted and T 1 -weighted fat saturation MRI and CT prostate volumes were consistently larger than the T 2 -weighted MRI prostate volumes, with a volume on average 1.33 (SD 0.24) times the T 2 -weighted volume. This discrepancy was due to the superiority of T 2 -weighted MRI for prostate definition at the following critical interfaces: membranous urethra, apex, and anterior base-bladder and posterior base-seminal vesicle interfaces. The differences in prostate definition in the anterior base region suggest that the commonly reported underdose may be due to overestimation of the prostate in this region by CT. The consistent difference in volumes suggests that the degree of swelling observed after implantation is in part a function of the imaging modality. In patients with pre- and postimplant CT and T 2 -weighted MRI images, swelling on the T 2 -weighted images was 1.1 times baseline and on CT was 1.3 times baseline, confirming the imaging modality dependence of prostate

  8. SU-F-J-112: Clinical Feasibility Test of An RF Pulse-Based MRI Method for the Quantitative Fat-Water Segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, S; Wloch, J; Pirkola, M [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative fat-water segmentation is important not only because of the clinical utility of fat-suppressed MRI images in better detecting lesions of clinical significance (in the midst of bright fat signal) but also because of the possible physical need, in which CT-like images based on the materials’ photon attenuation properties may have to be generated from MR images; particularly, as in the case of MR-only radiation oncology environment to obtain radiation dose calculation or as in the case of hybrid PET/MR modality to obtain attenuation correction map for the quantitative PET reconstruction. The majority of such fat-water quantitative segmentations have been performed by utilizing the Dixon’s method and its variations, which have to enforce the proper settings (often predefined) of echo time (TE) in the pulse sequences. Therefore, such methods have been unable to be directly combined with those ultrashort TE (UTE) sequences that, taking the advantage of very low TE values (∼ 10’s microsecond), might be beneficial to directly detect bones. Recently, an RF pulse-based method (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mri.2015.11.006), termed as PROD pulse method, was introduced as a method of quantitative fat-water segmentation that does not have to depend on predefined TE settings. Here, the clinical feasibility of this method is verified in brain tumor patients by combining the PROD pulse with several sequences. Methods: In a clinical 3T MRI, the PROD pulse was combined with turbo spin echo (e.g. TR=1500, TE=16 or 60, ETL=15) or turbo field echo (e.g. TR=5.6, TE=2.8, ETL=12) sequences without specifying TE values. Results: The fat-water segmentation was possible without having to set specific TE values. Conclusion: The PROD pulse method is clinically feasible. Although not yet combined with UTE sequences in our laboratory, the method is potentially compatible with UTE sequences, and thus, might be useful to directly segment fat, water, bone and air.

  9. Minimum TE gradient-recalled phosphorus imaging sequence on a whole-body imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Listerud, J.; Lenkinski, R.E.; Axel, L.

    1989-01-01

    To define the lower limits of spatial resolution in gradient-recalled echo phosphorus studies at 1.5 T, the authors have implemented a phosphorus gradient-recalled imaging sequence on the Signa imager. All gradient ramps for the section-selective rephasing lobe, the phase-encoding pulse, and the dephasing pulse of the frequency-encoding gradient are slowed at the maximal rate. Consequently, with a field of view of 24 cm, an in-plane resolution of 3 cm, an echo appropriately offset, an RF bandwidth of 1.2 KHz, and a section thickness of 5 cm, the echo time may be reduced to 1.35 msec. The reconstruction algorithm has been modified to support oversampled data of low spatial resolution appropriate for phosphorus imaging. The sequence will acquire H-1 images and supports the automatic and manual prescan features of the commercial instrument. To facilitate setup in the phosphorus imaging mode the sequence supports the product spectroscopic mode with a DRESS (depth recalled surface coil spectroscopy) sequence and a section profile sequence for appropriate shimming, receiver characteristics, and averaging requirements. The suitability for adaptation of this sequence to three-dimensional chemical shift imaging is discussed

  10. One-dimensional "atom" with zero-range potential perturbed by finite sequence of zero-duration laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, A. A.; Chuluunbaatar, O.; Popov, Yu. V.; Vinitsky, S. I.; Derbov, V. L.; Lovetskiy, K. P.

    2018-04-01

    The exactly soluble model of a train of zero-duration electromagnetic pulses interacting with a 1D atom with short-range interaction potential modelled by a δ-function is considered. The model is related to the up-to-date laser techniques providing the duration of pulses as short as a few attoseconds and the intensities higher than 1014 W/cm2.

  11. Dynamics of a pulsed continuous-variable quantum memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantan, Aurelien Romain; Cviklinski, Jean; Pinard, Michel

    2006-01-01

    We study the transfer dynamics of nonclassical fluctuations of light to the ground-state collective spin components of an atomic ensemble during a pulsed quantum memory sequence, and evaluate the relevant physical quantities to be measured in order to characterize such a quantum memory. We show...... in particular that the fluctuations stored into the atoms are emitted in temporal modes which are always different from those of the readout pulse, but which can nevertheless be retrieved efficiently using a suitable temporal mode-matching technique. We give a simple toy model—a cavity with variable...... transmission—that accounts for the behavior of the atomic quantum memory....

  12. Peculiarities of biological effect of pulsed laser radiation and 60Co γ rays on microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petin, V.G.; Rusina, L.K.; Sebrant, Yu.V.; Baranov, V.Yu.; Malyuta, D.D.; Nyz'ev, V.G.

    1978-01-01

    The sensitivity of yeast cells of different ploidy and bacterial cells of different strains to pulsed laser radiation and combined action of laser and ionizing radiation has been studied. Laser preirradiation of yeast cells did not change the cell sensitivity to the ionizing radiation. The biological effect was non-additive after the exposure to sequence of pulses in comparison with the exposure to a single pulse. The failure of cell reproductive ability after laser irradiation was irrepairable

  13. Contributions of an adiabatic initial inversion pulse and K-space Re-ordered by inversion-time at each slice position (KRISP) to control of CSF artifacts and visualization of the brain in FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curati, Walter L.; Oatridge, Angela; Herlihy, Amy H.; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Puri, Basant K.; Bydder, Graeme M.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the performance of three fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) pulse sequences for control of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood flow artifacts in imaging of the brain. The first of these sequences had an initial sinc inversion pulse which was followed by conventional k-space mapping. The second had an initial sinc inversion pulse followed by k-space re-ordered by inversion time at each slice position (KRISP) and the third had an adiabatic initial inversion pulse followed by KRISP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients with established disease were studied with all three pulse sequences. Seven were also studied with the adiabatic KRISP sequence after contrast enhancement. Their images were evaluated for patient motion artifact, CSF and blood flow artifact as well as conspicuity of the cortex, meninges, ventricular system, brainstem and cerebellum. The conspicuity of lesions and the degree of enhancement were also evaluated. RESULTS: Both the sinc and adiabatic KRISP FLAIR sequences showed better control of CSF and blood flow artifacts than the conventional FLAIR sequence. In addition the adiabatic KRISP FLAIR sequence showed better control of CSF artifact at the inferior aspect of the posterior fossa. The lesion conspicuity was similar for each of the FLAIR sequences as was the degree of contrast enhancement to that shown with a T 1 weighted spin echo sequence. CONCLUSION: The KRISP FLAIR sequence controls high signal artifacts from CSF flow and blood flow and the adiabatic pulse controls high signal artifacts due to inadequate inversion of the CSF magnetization at the periphery of the head transmitter coil. The KRISP FLAIR sequence also improves cortical and meningeal definition as a result of an edge enhancement effect. The effects are synergistic and can be usefully combined in a single pulse sequence. Curati, W.L. et al. (2001)

  14. Ultrawide spectral broadening and compression of single extremely short pulses in the visible, uv-vuv, and middle infrared by high-order stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalosha, V. P.; Herrmann, J.

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of a comprehensive analytical and numerical study of ultrawide spectral broadening and compression of isolated extremely short visible, uv-vuv and middle infrared (MIR) pulses by high-order stimulated Raman scattering in hollow waveguides. Spectral and temporal characteristics of the output pulses and the mechanism of pulse compression using dispersion of the gas filling and output glass window are investigated without the slowly varying envelope approximation. Physical limitations due to phase mismatch, velocity walk off, and pump-pulse depletion as well as improvements through the use of pump-pulse sequences and dispersion control are studied. It is shown that phase-locked pulses as short as ∼2 fs in the visible and uv-vuv, and 6.5 fs in the MIR can be generated by coherent scattering in impulsively excited Raman media without the necessity of external phase control. Using pump-pulse sequences, shortest durations in the range of about 1 fs for visible and uv-vuv probe pulses are predicted

  15. Intestinal lesions in pediatric Crohn disease: comparative detectability among pulse sequences at MR enterography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Beomseok; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung; Koh, Hong; Han, Kyung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Variable sequences can be used in MR enterography, and no consensus exists for the best protocol in children with Crohn disease. To compare the lesion detectability of various MR enterography sequences and to correlate the findings of these sequences with the Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) in children with Crohn disease. Children with clinically or pathologically confirmed Crohn disease underwent MR enterography, including a single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence, motility imaging (coronal 2-D balanced fast field echo), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic contrast enhancement imaging (including arterial, portal and delayed phases). The lesion detectability of each sequence was graded 0-2 for each involved bowel segment. The lesion detectability and PCDAI result on different sequences were compared using the weighted least squares method and Student's t-test, respectively. Fifteen children (11 boys, 4 girls, mean age 13.7 ± 1.4 years) with a total of 41 lesions were included in this study. All lesions detected in more than two sequences were visible on the single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence. The relative lesion detection rate was 78.1% on motility imaging, 90.2% on DWI, and 92.7% on arterial, 95.1% on portal and 95.1% on delayed phase imaging. Compared to the SSFSE sequence, motility imaging (P < 0.001) and DWI (P = 0.039) demonstrated lower detectability. The mean PCDAI result in the detected lesions was statistically higher only on dynamic enhancement imaging (P < 0.001). All MR enterography sequences were found to have relatively high lesion detectability in children with Crohn disease, while motility imaging showed the lowest lesion detectability. Lesions detected on dynamic enhancement imaging showed a higher PCDAI result, which suggests that this sequence is specific for active inflammation. (orig.)

  16. Pulse pile-up. I: Short pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, D.H.

    1990-07-01

    The search for rare large pulses against an intense background of smaller ones involves consideration of pulse pile-up. Approximate methods are presented, based on ruin theory, by which the probability of such pile-up may be estimated for pulses of arbitrary form and of arbitrary pulse-height distribution. These methods are checked against cases for which exact solutions are available. The present paper is concerned chiefly with short pulses of finite total duration. (Author) (5 refs., 24 figs.)

  17. Pulsed ultrasound modulated optical tomography with harmonic lock-in holography detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Haowen; Mather, Melissa L; Morgan, Stephen P

    2013-07-01

    A method that uses digital heterodyne holography reconstruction to extract scattered light modulated by a single-cycle ultrasound (US) burst is demonstrated and analyzed. An US burst is used to shift the pulsed laser frequency by a series of discrete harmonic frequencies which are then locked on a CCD. The analysis demonstrates that the unmodulated light's contribution to the detected signal can be canceled by appropriate selection of the pulse repetition frequency. It is also shown that the modulated signal can be maximized by selecting a pulse sequence which consists of a pulse followed by its inverted counterpart. The system is used to image a 12 mm thick chicken breast with 2 mm wide optically absorbing objects embedded at the midplane. Furthermore, the method can be revised to detect the nonlinear US modulated signal by locking at the second harmonic US frequency.

  18. Method for automatic localization of MR-visible markers using morphological image processing and conventional pulse sequences: feasibility for image-guided procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Harald; Trampel, Robert; Gründer, Wilfried; Moche, Michael; Kahn, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of an automated method to determine the 3D position of MR-visible markers. Inductively coupled RF coils were imaged in a whole-body 1.5T scanner using the body coil and two conventional gradient echo sequences (FLASH and TrueFISP) and large imaging volumes up to (300 mm(3)). To minimize background signals, a flip angle of approximately 1 degrees was used. Morphological 2D image processing in orthogonal scan planes was used to determine the 3D positions of a configuration of three fiducial markers (FMC). The accuracies of the marker positions and of the orientation of the plane defined by the FMC were evaluated at various distances r(M) from the isocenter. Fiducial marker detection with conventional equipment (pulse sequences, imaging coils) was very reliable and highly reproducible over a wide range of experimental conditions. For r(M)

  19. Adding a dimension to the infrared spectra of interfaces: 2D SFG spectroscopy via mid-IR pulse shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanni, Martin

    2012-02-01

    Sum-frequency generation spectroscopy provides an infrared spectrum of interfaces and thus has widespread use in the materials and chemical sciences. In this presentation, I will present our recent work in developing a 2D pulse sequence to generate 2D SFG spectra of interfaces, in analogy to 2D infrared spectra used to measure bulk species. To develop this spectroscopy, we have utilized many of the tricks-of-the-trade developed in the 2D IR and 2D Vis communities in the last decade, including mid-IR pulse shaping. With mid-IR pulse shaping, the 2D pulse sequence is manipulated by computer programming in the desired frequency resolution, rotating frame, and signal pathway. We believe that 2D SFG will become an important tool in the interfacial sciences in an analogous way that 2D IR is now being used in many disciplines.

  20. Compact generator with semiconductor current interrupter, voltage to 300 kV and pulse repetition rate to 2 kHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyubutin, S.K.; Rukin, S.N.; Slovikovskij, B.G.

    2000-01-01

    Compact generator with a semiconductor current interrupter (SOS-diode), forming on the resistive load pulses with the amplitude up to 300 kV, duration from 30 up to 50 ns and the pulse sequence frequency 300 Hz by long operation and up to 2 kHz in the 30-second packet, is described. The generator contains a thyristor charge unit, magnetic compressor and inductive storage with a semiconductor current interrupter on the SOS-diode basis. The generator mean output capacity by the pulse maximum sequence frequency and 250 kV voltage equals 16 kw. The generator dimensions are 0.85 x 0.65 x 0.42 m, its mass equals approximately 115 kg [ru

  1. General solution to inhomogeneous dephasing and smooth pulse dynamical decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Junkai; Deng, Xiu-Hao; Russo, Antonio; Barnes, Edwin

    2018-03-01

    In order to achieve the high-fidelity quantum control needed for a broad range of quantum information technologies, reducing the effects of noise and system inhomogeneities is an essential task. It is well known that a system can be decoupled from noise or made insensitive to inhomogeneous dephasing dynamically by using carefully designed pulse sequences based on square or delta-function waveforms such as Hahn spin echo or CPMG. However, such ideal pulses are often challenging to implement experimentally with high fidelity. Here, we uncover a new geometrical framework for visualizing all possible driving fields, which enables one to generate an unlimited number of smooth, experimentally feasible pulses that perform dynamical decoupling or dynamically corrected gates to arbitrarily high order. We demonstrate that this scheme can significantly enhance the fidelity of single-qubit operations in the presence of noise and when realistic limitations on pulse rise times and amplitudes are taken into account.

  2. Synchronized and configurable source of electrical pulses for x-ray pump-probe experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, J. P.; Chembrolu, V.; Yu, X. W.; Tyliszczak, T.; Acremann, Y.

    2007-01-01

    A method is described for the generation of software tunable patterns of nanosecond electrical pulses. The bipolar, high repetition rate (up to 250 MHz), fast rise time (<30 ps), square pulses are suitable for applications such as the excitation sequence in dynamic pump-probe experiments. Synchronization with the time structure of a synchrotron facility is possible as well as fine control of the relative delay in steps of 10 ps. The pulse generator described here is used to excite magnetic nanostructures with current pulses. Having an excitation system which can match the high repetition rate of a synchrotron allows for utilization of the full x-ray flux and is needed in experiments which require a large photon flux. The fast rise times allow for picosecond time resolution in pump-probe experiments. All pulse pattern parameters are configurable by software

  3. Single-chip pulse programmer for magnetic resonance imaging using a 32-bit microcontroller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Shinya; Domalain, Thierry; Kose, Katsumi

    2007-08-01

    A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse programmer has been developed using a single-chip microcontroller (ADmicroC7026). The microcontroller includes all the components required for the MRI pulse programmer: a 32-bit RISC CPU core, 62 kbytes of flash memory, 8 kbytes of SRAM, two 32-bit timers, four 12-bit DA converters, and 40 bits of general purpose I/O. An evaluation board for the microcontroller was connected to a host personal computer (PC), an MRI transceiver, and a gradient driver using interface circuitry. Target (embedded) and host PC programs were developed to enable MRI pulse sequence generation by the microcontroller. The pulse programmer achieved a (nominal) time resolution of approximately 100 ns and a minimum time delay between successive events of approximately 9 micros. Imaging experiments using the pulse programmer demonstrated the effectiveness of our approach.

  4. Fabrication of nonfouling, bactericidal, and bacteria corpse release multifunctional surface through surface-initiated RAFT polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang B

    2016-12-01

    bacteria corpse release properties can be used to modify intraocular lenses. Keywords: anti-fouling, poly(dimethylsiloxane, intraocular lenses, endophthalmitis, biofilms

  5. Analysis on the arcelin expression in bruchid pest resistant wild pulses using real time RT-qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivelkumar, Shanmugavel; Veeramani, Velayutham; Hilda, Karuppiah; Arumugam, Munusamy; Janarthanan, Sundaram

    2014-12-01

    Arcelin, the antimetabolic protein from wild pulses is a known natural insecticidal molecule. Wild pulses with high arcelin content could serve as potential source to. increase the levels of insect resistance in cultivated pulse crops. In this study, arcelin (Arl) gene expression was screened in seven stored product insect pest resistant wild pulse varieties using real time RT-qPCR. Arcelin gene specific real time PCR primers were synthesized from arcelin mRNA sequence of the wild pulse variety, Lablab purpureus. The results revealed different levels of arcelin gene expression in the tested varieties. Canavalia virosa registered significantly high content indicating its suitability for utilization of arcelin gene in developing stored product insect pest resistance with other cultivated pulses.

  6. Quantum entanglement and teleportation in pulsed cavity optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, Sebastian G. [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Institute for Gravitational Physics, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Wieczorek, Witlef; Aspelmeyer, Markus [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Hammerer, Klemens [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Institute for Gravitational Physics, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Entangling a mechanical oscillator with an optical mode is an enticing and yet a very challenging goal in cavity optomechanics. Here we consider a pulsed scheme to create Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-type entanglement between a traveling-wave light pulse and a mechanical oscillator. The entanglement can be verified unambiguously by a pump-probe sequence of pulses. In contrast to schemes that work in a steady-state regime under a continuous-wave drive, this protocol is not subject to stability requirements that normally limit the strength of achievable entanglement. We investigate the protocol's performance under realistic conditions, including mechanical decoherence, in full detail. We discuss the relevance of a high mechanical Qf product for entanglement creation and provide a quantitative statement on which magnitude of the Qf product is necessary for a successful realization of the scheme. We determine the optimal parameter regime for its operation and show it to work in current state-of-the-art systems.

  7. Pulse-burst PIV in a high-speed wind tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beresh, Steven; Kearney, Sean; Wagner, Justin; Guildenbecher, Daniel; Henfling, John; Spillers, Russell; Pruett, Brian; Jiang, Naibo; Slipchenko, Mikhail; Mance, Jason; Roy, Sukesh

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) has been achieved in a high-speed wind tunnel, providing velocity field movies of compressible turbulence events. The requirements of high-speed flows demand greater energy at faster pulse rates than possible with the TR-PIV systems developed for low-speed flows. This has been realized using a pulse-burst laser to obtain movies at up to 50 kHz, with higher speeds possible at the cost of spatial resolution. The constraints imposed by use of a pulse-burst laser are limited burst duration of 10.2 ms and a low duty cycle for data acquisition. Pulse-burst PIV has been demonstrated in a supersonic jet exhausting into a transonic crossflow and in transonic flow over a rectangular cavity. The velocity field sequences reveal the passage of turbulent structures and can be used to find velocity power spectra at every point in the field, providing spatial distributions of acoustic modes. The present work represents the first use of TR-PIV in a high-speed ground-test facility. (paper)

  8. Pulse stuttering as a remedy for aliased ground backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowhill, S. A.

    1983-12-01

    An algorithm that aides in the removal of ground scatter from low frequency Mesosphere, Stratosphere, Troposphere (MST) radar signals is examined. The unwanted ground scatter is shown as a sequence of velocity plots which are almost typical at the various altitudes. The interpulse period is changed in a cyclic way, thereby destroying the coherence of the unwanted signal. The interpulse period must be changed by an amount at least equal to the transmitted pulse width, and optimum performance is obtained when the number of different interpulse period occupies a time span greater than the coherence time of the unwanted signal. Since a 20-msec pulse width is used, it was found convenient to cycle through 50 pulses, the interpulse period changing from 2 msec to 3 msec during the 1/8-second time. This particular pattern of interpulse periods was provided by a software radar controller. With application of this algorithm, the unwanted scatter signal becomes incoherent from one pulse to the next, and therefore is perceived as noise by the coherent integrator and correlator.

  9. The effect of excitation and preparation pulses on nonslice selective 2D UTE bicomponent analysis of bound and free water in cortical bone at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shihong [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States); Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Yancheng Medical College, Jiangsu (China); The First People' s Hospital of Yancheng City, Jiangsu 224005 (China); Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California 92161 and Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States); Bae, Won C.; Du, Jiang, E-mail: jiangdu@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92103-8226 (United States); Hua, Yanqing [Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Zhou, Yi [The First People' s Hospital of Yancheng City, Jiangsu 224005 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of excitation, fat saturation, long T2 saturation, and adiabatic inversion pulses on ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging with bicomponent analysis of bound and free water in cortical bone for potential applications in osteoporosis. Methods: Six bovine cortical bones and six human tibial midshaft samples were harvested for this study. Each bone sample was imaged with eight sequences using 2D UTE imaging at 3T with half and hard excitation pulses, without and with fat saturation, long T2 saturation, and adiabatic inversion recovery (IR) preparation pulses. Single- and bicomponent signal models were utilized to calculate the T2{sup *}s and/or relative fractions of short and long T2{sup *}s. Results: For all bone samples UTE T2{sup *} signal decay showed bicomponent behavior. A higher short T2{sup *} fraction was observed on UTE images with hard pulse excitation compared with half pulse excitation (75.6% vs 68.8% in bovine bone, 79.9% vs 73.2% in human bone). Fat saturation pulses slightly reduced the short T2{sup *} fraction relative to regular UTE sequences (5.0% and 2.0% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 6.3% and 8.2% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). Long T2 saturation pulses significantly reduced the long T2{sup *} fraction relative to regular UTE sequence (18.9% and 17.2% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 26.4% and 27.7% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). With IR-UTE preparation the long T2{sup *} components were significantly reduced relative to regular UTE sequence (75.3% and 66.4% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 87.7% and 90.3% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). Conclusions: Bound and free water T2{sup *}s and relative fractions can

  10. The effect of excitation and preparation pulses on nonslice selective 2D UTE bicomponent analysis of bound and free water in cortical bone at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shihong; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B.; Bae, Won C.; Du, Jiang; Hua, Yanqing; Zhou, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of excitation, fat saturation, long T2 saturation, and adiabatic inversion pulses on ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging with bicomponent analysis of bound and free water in cortical bone for potential applications in osteoporosis. Methods: Six bovine cortical bones and six human tibial midshaft samples were harvested for this study. Each bone sample was imaged with eight sequences using 2D UTE imaging at 3T with half and hard excitation pulses, without and with fat saturation, long T2 saturation, and adiabatic inversion recovery (IR) preparation pulses. Single- and bicomponent signal models were utilized to calculate the T2 * s and/or relative fractions of short and long T2 * s. Results: For all bone samples UTE T2 * signal decay showed bicomponent behavior. A higher short T2 * fraction was observed on UTE images with hard pulse excitation compared with half pulse excitation (75.6% vs 68.8% in bovine bone, 79.9% vs 73.2% in human bone). Fat saturation pulses slightly reduced the short T2 * fraction relative to regular UTE sequences (5.0% and 2.0% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 6.3% and 8.2% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). Long T2 saturation pulses significantly reduced the long T2 * fraction relative to regular UTE sequence (18.9% and 17.2% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 26.4% and 27.7% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). With IR-UTE preparation the long T2 * components were significantly reduced relative to regular UTE sequence (75.3% and 66.4% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for bovine bone, 87.7% and 90.3% reduction, respectively, with half and hard excitation pulses for human bone). Conclusions: Bound and free water T2 * s and relative fractions can be assessed using UTE bicomponent

  11. Nine-channel mid-power bipolar pulse generator based on a field programmable gate array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haylock, Ben, E-mail: benjamin.haylock2@griffithuni.edu.au; Lenzini, Francesco; Kasture, Sachin; Fisher, Paul; Lobino, Mirko [Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Brisbane (Australia); Queensland Micro and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University, Brisbane (Australia); Streed, Erik W. [Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Brisbane (Australia); Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University, Gold Coast (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Many channel arbitrary pulse sequence generation is required for the electro-optic reconfiguration of optical waveguide networks in Lithium Niobate. Here we describe a scalable solution to the requirement for mid-power bipolar parallel outputs, based on pulse patterns generated by an externally clocked field programmable gate array. Positive and negative pulses can be generated at repetition rates up to 80 MHz with pulse width adjustable in increments of 1.6 ns across nine independent outputs. Each channel can provide 1.5 W of RF power and can be synchronised with the operation of other components in an optical network such as light sources and detectors through an external clock with adjustable delay.

  12. Measurement of solute proton spin-lattice relaxation times in water using the 1,3,3,1 sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, S.S.; Mole, P.A.; Coulson, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    1 H NMR spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of the N-CH3 proton resonances of phosphocreatine (PCr) and creatine (Cr) in water solutions were obtained using the 1,3,3,1 pulse sequence. These T1 values were equivalent to those obtained in D 2 O and water using either the conventional inversion-recovery experiment or the 1,3,3,1 pulse sequence. Thus, the 1,3,3,1 sequence of proton NMR can provide an independent means along with phosphorous NMR for assess PCr and for the study of the creatine kinase reaction (PCr + ADP in equilibrium ATP + Cr) in aqueous solutions and perhaps in biological preparations

  13. Realtime aspects of pulse-to-pulse modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.; Riedel, C.; Roesch, W.

    1992-01-01

    The pulse-to-pulse modulation of the SIS-ESR control system is described. Fast response to operator interaction and to changes in process conditions is emphasized as well as the essential part played by the timing system in pulse-to-pulse modulation. (author)

  14. Interference Mitigation Technique for Coexistence of Pulse-Based UWB and OFDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohno Kohei

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ultra-wideband (UWB is a useful radio technique for sharing frequency bands between radio systems. It uses very short pulses to spread spectrum. However, there is a potential for interference between systems using the same frequency bands at close range. In some regulatory systems, interference detection and avoidance (DAA techniques are required to prevent interference with existing radio systems. In this paper, the effect of interference on orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM signals from pulse-based UWB is discussed, and an interference mitigation technique is proposed. This technique focuses on the pulse repetition cycle of UWB. The pulse repetition interval is set the same or half the period of the OFDM symbol excluding the guard interval to mitigate interference. These proposals are also made for direct sequence (DS-UWB. Bit error rate (BER performance is illustrated through both simulation and theoretical approximations.

  15. Design of universal parallel-transmit refocusing kT -point pulses and application to 3D T2 -weighted imaging at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Vincent; Mauconduit, Franck; Vignaud, Alexandre; Amadon, Alexis; Le Bihan, Denis; Stöcker, Tony; Boulant, Nicolas

    2018-07-01

    T 2 -weighted sequences are particularly sensitive to the radiofrequency (RF) field inhomogeneity problem at ultra-high-field because of the errors accumulated by the imperfections of the train of refocusing pulses. As parallel transmission (pTx) has proved particularly useful to counteract RF heterogeneities, universal pulses were recently demonstrated to save precious time and computational efforts by skipping B 1 calibration and online RF pulse tailoring. Here, we report a universal RF pulse design for non-selective refocusing pulses to mitigate the RF inhomogeneity problem at 7T in turbo spin-echo sequences with variable flip angles. Average Hamiltonian theory was used to synthetize a single non-selective refocusing pulse with pTx while optimizing its scaling properties in the presence of static field offsets. The design was performed under explicit power and specific absorption rate constraints on a database of 10 subjects using a 8Tx-32Rx commercial coil at 7T. To validate the proposed design, the RF pulses were tested in simulation and applied in vivo on 5 additional test subjects. The root-mean-square rotation angle error (RA-NRMSE) evaluation and experimental data demonstrated great improvement with the proposed universal pulses (RA-NRMSE ∼8%) compared to the standard circularly polarized mode of excitation (RA-NRMSE ∼26%). This work further completes the spectrum of 3D universal pulses to mitigate RF field inhomogeneity throughout all 3D MRI sequences without any pTx calibration. The approach returns a single pulse that can be scaled to match the desired flip angle train, thereby increasing the modularity of the proposed plug and play approach. Magn Reson Med 80:53-65, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Optimal pulse spacing for dynamical decoupling in the presence of a purely dephasing spin bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajoy, Ashok; Alvarez, Gonzalo A.; Suter, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining quantum coherence is a crucial requirement for quantum computation; hence protecting quantum systems against their irreversible corruption due to environmental noise is an important open problem. Dynamical decoupling (DD) is an effective method for reducing decoherence with a low control overhead. It also plays an important role in quantum metrology, where, for instance, it is employed in multiparameter estimation. While a sequence of equidistant control pulses [the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence] has been ubiquitously used for decoupling, Uhrig recently proposed that a nonequidistant pulse sequence [the Uhrig dynamic decoupling (UDD) sequence] may enhance DD performance, especially for systems where the spectral density of the environment has a sharp frequency cutoff. On the other hand, equidistant sequences outperform UDD for soft cutoffs. The relative advantage provided by UDD for intermediate regimes is not clear. In this paper, we analyze the relative DD performance in this regime experimentally, using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. Our system qubits are 13 C nuclear spins and the environment consists of a 1 H nuclear spin bath whose spectral density is close to a normal (Gaussian) distribution. We find that in the presence of such a bath, the CPMG sequence outperforms the UDD sequence. An analogy between dynamical decoupling and interference effects in optics provides an intuitive explanation as to why the CPMG sequence performs better than any nonequidistant DD sequence in the presence of this kind of environmental noise.

  17. Pulse Splitting for Harmonic Beamforming in Time-Modulated Linear Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Poli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel strategy for harmonic beamforming in time-modulated linear arrays is proposed. The pulse splitting technique is exploited to simultaneously generate two harmonic patterns, one at the central frequency and another at a preselected harmonic of arbitrary order, while controlling the maximum level of the remaining sideband radiations. An optimization strategy based on the particle swarm optimizer is developed in order to determine the optimal parameters describing the pulse sequence used to modulate the excitation weights of the array elements. Representative numerical results are reported and discussed to point out potentialities and limitations of the proposed approach.

  18. Dynamic complexities in a seasonal prevention epidemic model with birth pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shujing; Chen Lansun; Sun Lihua

    2005-01-01

    In most of population dynamics, increases in population due to birth are assumed to be time-dependent, but many species reproduce only during a single period of the year. In this paper, we propose an epidemic model with density-dependent birth pulses and seasonal prevention. Using the discrete dynamical system determined by stroboscopic map, we obtain the local or global stability, numerical simulation shows there is a characteristic sequence of bifurcations, leading to chaotic dynamics, which implies that the dynamical behaviors of the epidemic model with birth pulses and seasonal prevention are very complex, including small amplitude oscillations, large-amplitude multi-annual cycles and chaos. This suggests that birth pulse, in effect, provides a natural period or cyclicity that may lead a period-doubling route to chaos

  19. Pulsed rf excited spectrometer having improved pulse width control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    RF excitation for a spectrometer is obtained by pulse width modulating an RF carrier to produce the desired broadband RF exciting spectrum. The RF excitation includes a train of composite RF pulses, each composite pulse having a primary pulse portion of a first RF phase and a second pulse portion of a second RF phase opposite that of the first. In this manner, the finite rise and fall times of the primary pulse portion are compensated for by the corresponding rise and fall times of the secondary pulse portion. The primary pulse portion is lengthened by an amount equal to the secondary pulse portion so that the secondary pulse portion cancels the added primary pulse portion. In a spectrometer, the compensating second pulse component removes certain undesired side bands of the RF excitation caused by the finite rise and fall times of the applied RF pulses. The compensating second pulse component removes certain undesired side bands associated with each of the resonant lines of the excited resonance spectrum of the sample under analysis, particularly for wide band RF excitation

  20. The influence of wavelength, temporal sequencing, and pulse duration on resonant infrared matrix-assisted laser processing of polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, S. M.; Schoeffling, Jonathan; Jimenez, Richard; Zinderman, Brian; Yi, SunYong; Bubb, D. M.

    2014-06-01

    We have carried out a systematic investigation of laser ablation plume interactions in resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation. The laser source utilized in this study was a mid-infrared OPO capable of dual sequential ns pulses with adjustable delay ranging from 1 to 100 μs. This unique capability enabled us both to probe the ablation plume with a second laser pulse, and to effectively double the laser fluence. The primary ablation target used for this study consisted of poly(methyl methacrylate) dissolved in a binary mixture of methanol and toluene. Both the critical thermodynamic and optical properties of the binary mixture were determined and used to interpret our results. We found that deposition rates associated with single pulse irradiation tracks with the optical absorption coefficient in the spectral range from 2,700 to 3,800 nm. In the case of dual sequential pulses, discrepancies in this trend have been linked to the rate of change in the optical absorption coefficient with temperature. The influence of fluence on deposition rate was found to follow a sigmoidal dependence. Surface roughness was observed to have a diametrically opposed trend with pulse delay depending on whether the OH or CH vibrational mode was excited. In the case of CH excitation, we suggest that the rougher films are due to the absorbance of the second pulse by droplets within the plume containing residual solvent which leads to the formation of molecular balloons and hence irregularly shaped features on the substrate.

  1. Some characteristics of the digitization pulses from high pressure neon-helium flash tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, D.S.K.; Leung, S.K.; Ng, L.K.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of the digitization output pulses from high pressure neon-helium flash tubes were studied under various operation conditions using square ultra-high voltage pulses. Properties reported by previous workers were compared. Two discharge mechanisms, the Townsend avalanche discharge and the streamer discharge, were observed to occur in sequence in some events. The output waveforms for both discharge mechanisms were studied in detail. The charge induced on a detecting probe was also estimated from the measured data. (Auth.)

  2. Bipolar pulse generator for intense pulsed ion beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, H.; Igawa, K.; Kitamura, I.; Masugata, K.

    2007-01-01

    A new type of pulsed ion beam accelerator named ''bipolar pulse accelerator'' (BPA) has been proposed in order to improve the purity of intense pulsed ion beams. To confirm the principle of the BPA, we developed a bipolar pulse generator for the bipolar pulse experiment, which consists of a Marx generator and a pulse forming line (PFL) with a rail gap switch on its end. In this article, we report the first experimental result of the bipolar pulse and evaluate the electrical characteristics of the bipolar pulse generator. When the bipolar pulse generator was operated at 70% of the full charge condition of the PFL, the bipolar pulse with the first (-138 kV, 72 ns) and the second pulse (+130 kV, 70 ns) was successfully obtained. The evaluation of the electrical characteristics indicates that the developed generator can produce the bipolar pulse with fast rise time and sharp reversing time

  3. Interaction with the lower ionosphere of electromagnetic pulses from lightning: Heating, attachment, and ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taranenko, Y.N.; Inan, U.S.; Bell, T.F.

    1993-01-01

    The authors model the interaction of lightning flashes with the lower ionosphere. They use a Boltzmann formulation of the electron distribution function, and use Maxwells equations for the electromagnetic fields. Electromagnetic pulses from lightning have pulse lengths of 50 to 150 μs and produce peak fields of 50 V/m at distances of 100 km from the discharges. Fields greater than 16 V/m can cause avalanche ionization of neutrals at elevations of 100 km, where typical mean free paths for electrons are at least a meter. Modeling the lightning flash as a 100 μs pulse of 10 kHz radiation emitted at 70km altitude, they find that in nighttime skies the pulse can affect the electron density in the range of 1 to 30%. A sequence of pulses can lead to substantial impact on the electron density. The propagation characteristics of the pulses are such as to result in a steepening of the boundary of the lower ionosphere

  4. Magnetic resonance visualization of conductive structures by sequence-triggered direct currents and spin-echo phase imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eibofner, Frank; Wojtczyk, Hanne; Graf, Hansjörg, E-mail: hansjoerg.graf@med.uni-tuebingen.de, E-mail: drGraf@t-online.de [Section on Experimental Radiology, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen D-72076 (Germany); Clasen, Stephan [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen D-72076 (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Instrument visualization in interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is commonly performed via susceptibility artifacts. Unfortunately, this approach suffers from limited conspicuity in inhomogeneous tissue and disturbed spatial encoding. Also, susceptibility artifacts are controllable only by sequence parameters. This work presents the basics of a new visualization method overcoming such problems by applying sequence-triggered direct current (DC) pulses in spin-echo (SE) imaging. SE phase images allow for background free current path localization. Methods: Application of a sequence-triggered DC pulse in SE imaging, e.g., during a time period between radiofrequency excitation and refocusing, results in transient field inhomogeneities. Dependent on the additional z-magnetic field from the DC, a phase offset results despite the refocusing pulse. False spatial encoding is avoided by DC application during periods when read-out or slice-encoding gradients are inactive. A water phantom containing a brass conductor (water equivalent susceptibility) and a titanium needle (serving as susceptibility source) was used to demonstrate the feasibility. Artifact dependence on current strength and orientation was examined. Results: Without DC, the brass conductor was only visible due to its water displacement. The titanium needle showed typical susceptibility artifacts. Applying triggered DC pulses, the phase offset of spins near the conductor appeared. Because SE phase images are homogenous also in regions of persistent field inhomogeneities, the position of the conductor could be determined with high reliability. Artifact characteristic could be easily controlled by amperage leaving sequence parameters unchanged. For an angle of 30° between current and static field visualization was still possible. Conclusions: SE phase images display the position of a conductor carrying pulsed DC free from artifacts caused by persistent field inhomogeneities. Magnitude and phase

  5. Label-free screening of single biomolecules through resistive pulse sensing technology for precision medicine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrer, S.; Kim, S. C.; Schieber, C.; Kannam, S.; Gunn, N.; Moore, S.; Scott, D.; Bathgate, R.; Skafidas, S.; Wagner, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    Employing integrated nano- and microfluidic circuits for detecting and characterizing biological compounds through resistive pulse sensing technology is a vibrant area of research at the interface of biotechnology and nanotechnology. Resistive pulse sensing platforms can be customized to study virtually any particle of choice which can be threaded through a fluidic channel and enable label-free single-particle interrogation with the primary read-out signal being an electric current fingerprint. The ability to perform label-free molecular screening with single-molecule and even single binding site resolution makes resistive pulse sensing technology a powerful tool for analyzing the smallest units of biological systems and how they interact with each other on a molecular level. This task is at the core of experimental systems biology and in particular ‘omics research which in combination with next-generation DNA-sequencing and next-generation drug discovery and design forms the foundation of a novel disruptive medical paradigm commonly referred to as personalized medicine or precision medicine. DNA-sequencing has approached the 1000-Dollar-Genome milestone allowing for decoding a complete human genome with unmatched speed and at low cost. Increased sequencing efficiency yields massive amounts of genomic data. Analyzing this data in combination with medical and biometric health data eventually enables understanding the pathways from individual genes to physiological functions. Access to this information triggers fundamental questions for doctors and patients alike: what are the chances of an outbreak for a specific disease? Can individual risks be managed and if so how? Which drugs are available and how should they be applied? Could a new drug be tailored to an individual’s genetic predisposition fast and in an affordable way? In order to provide answers and real-life value to patients, the rapid evolvement of novel computing approaches for analyzing big data in

  6. Label-free screening of single biomolecules through resistive pulse sensing technology for precision medicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrer, S; Kim, S C; Schieber, C; Kannam, S; Gunn, N; Moore, S; Scott, D; Bathgate, R; Skafidas, S; Wagner, J M

    2015-05-08

    Employing integrated nano- and microfluidic circuits for detecting and characterizing biological compounds through resistive pulse sensing technology is a vibrant area of research at the interface of biotechnology and nanotechnology. Resistive pulse sensing platforms can be customized to study virtually any particle of choice which can be threaded through a fluidic channel and enable label-free single-particle interrogation with the primary read-out signal being an electric current fingerprint. The ability to perform label-free molecular screening with single-molecule and even single binding site resolution makes resistive pulse sensing technology a powerful tool for analyzing the smallest units of biological systems and how they interact with each other on a molecular level. This task is at the core of experimental systems biology and in particular 'omics research which in combination with next-generation DNA-sequencing and next-generation drug discovery and design forms the foundation of a novel disruptive medical paradigm commonly referred to as personalized medicine or precision medicine. DNA-sequencing has approached the 1000-Dollar-Genome milestone allowing for decoding a complete human genome with unmatched speed and at low cost. Increased sequencing efficiency yields massive amounts of genomic data. Analyzing this data in combination with medical and biometric health data eventually enables understanding the pathways from individual genes to physiological functions. Access to this information triggers fundamental questions for doctors and patients alike: what are the chances of an outbreak for a specific disease? Can individual risks be managed and if so how? Which drugs are available and how should they be applied? Could a new drug be tailored to an individual's genetic predisposition fast and in an affordable way? In order to provide answers and real-life value to patients, the rapid evolvement of novel computing approaches for analyzing big data in

  7. Comparison of double-locus sequence typing (DLST) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for the investigation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholley, Pascal; Stojanov, Milos; Hocquet, Didier; Thouverez, Michelle; Bertrand, Xavier; Blanc, Dominique S

    2015-08-01

    Reliable molecular typing methods are necessary to investigate the epidemiology of bacterial pathogens. Reference methods such as multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) are costly and time consuming. Here, we compared our newly developed double-locus sequence typing (DLST) method for Pseudomonas aeruginosa to MLST and PFGE on a collection of 281 isolates. DLST was as discriminatory as MLST and was able to recognize "high-risk" epidemic clones. Both methods were highly congruent. Not surprisingly, a higher discriminatory power was observed with PFGE. In conclusion, being a simple method (single-strand sequencing of only 2 loci), DLST is valuable as a first-line typing tool for epidemiological investigations of P. aeruginosa. Coupled to a more discriminant method like PFGE or whole genome sequencing, it might represent an efficient typing strategy to investigate or prevent outbreaks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. High repetition rate tunable femtosecond pulses and broadband amplification from fiber laser pumped parametric amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, T V; Schmidt, O; Bruchmann, C; Limpert, J; Aguergaray, C; Cormier, E; Tünnermann, A

    2006-05-29

    We report on the generation of high energy femtosecond pulses at 1 MHz repetition rate from a fiber laser pumped optical parametric amplifier (OPA). Nonlinear bandwidth enhancement in fibers provides the intrinsically synchronized signal for the parametric amplifier. We demonstrate large tunability extending from 700 nm to 1500 nm of femtosecond pulses with pulse energies as high as 1.2 muJ when the OPA is seeded by a supercontinuum generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Broadband amplification over more than 85 nm is achieved at a fixed wavelength. Subsequent compression in a prism sequence resulted in 46 fs pulses. With an average power of 0.5 W these pulses have a peak-power above 10 MW. In particular, the average power and pulse energy scalability of both involved concepts, the fiber laser and the parametric amplifier, will enable easy up-scaling to higher powers.

  9. Numerical design of RNnν symmetry-based RF pulse schemes for recoupling and decoupling of nuclear spin interactions at high MAS frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, Christian; Herbst, Jirada; Leppert, Joerg; Ohlenschlaeger, Oliver; Goerlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai

    2009-01-01

    An approach for the efficient implementation of RN n ν symmetry-based pulse schemes that are often employed for recoupling and decoupling of nuclear spin interactions in biological solid state NMR investigations is demonstrated at high magic-angle spinning frequencies. RF pulse sequences belonging to the RN n ν symmetry involve the repeated application of the pulse sandwich {R φ R -φ }, corresponding to a propagator U RF = exp(-i4φI z ), where φ = πν/N and R is typically a pulse that rotates the nuclear spins through 180 o about the x-axis. In this study, broadband, phase-modulated 180 o pulses of constant amplitude were employed as the initial 'R' element and the phase-modulation profile of this 'R' element was numerically optimised for generating RN n ν symmetry-based pulse schemes with satisfactory magnetisation transfer characteristics. At representative MAS frequencies, RF pulse sequences were implemented for achieving 13 C- 13 C double-quantum dipolar recoupling and through bond scalar coupling mediated chemical shift correlation and evaluated via numerical simulations and experimental measurements. The results from these investigations are presented here

  10. Pulse on pulse: modulation and signification in Rafael Lozano-Hemmer's Pulse Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merete Carlson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the relation between signifying processes and non-signifying material dynamism in the installation Pulse Room (2006 by Mexican Canadian artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer. In Pulse Room the sense of pulse is ambiguous. Biorhythms are transmitted from the pulsing energy of the visitor's beating heart to the flashing of a fragile light bulb, thereby transforming each light bulb into a register of individual life. But at the same time the flashing light bulbs together produce a chaotically flickering light environment composed by various layers of repetitive rhythms, a vibrant and pulsating “room”. Hence, the visitor in Pulse Room is invited into a complex scenario that continuously oscillates between various aspects of signification (the light bulbs representing individual lives; the pulse itself as the symbolic “rhythm of life” and instants of pure material processuality (flickering light bulbs; polyrhythmic layers. Taking our point of departure in a discussion of Gilles Deleuze's concepts of modulation and signaletic material in relation to electronic media, we examine how the complex orchestration of pulsation between signification and material modulation produces a multilayered sense of time and space that is central to the sensory experience of Pulse Room as a whole. Pulse Room is, at the very same time, a relational subject–object intimacy and an all-encompassing immersive environment modulating continuously in real space-time.

  11. A Quantitative Analysis of Pulsed Signals Emitted by Wild Bottlenose Dolphins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Luís

    Full Text Available Common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus, produce a wide variety of vocal emissions for communication and echolocation, of which the pulsed repertoire has been the most difficult to categorize. Packets of high repetition, broadband pulses are still largely reported under a general designation of burst-pulses, and traditional attempts to classify these emissions rely mainly in their aural characteristics and in graphical aspects of spectrograms. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of pulsed signals emitted by wild bottlenose dolphins, in the Sado estuary, Portugal (2011-2014, and test the reliability of a traditional classification approach. Acoustic parameters (minimum frequency, maximum frequency, peak frequency, duration, repetition rate and inter-click-interval were extracted from 930 pulsed signals, previously categorized using a traditional approach. Discriminant function analysis revealed a high reliability of the traditional classification approach (93.5% of pulsed signals were consistently assigned to their aurally based categories. According to the discriminant function analysis (Wilk's Λ = 0.11, F3, 2.41 = 282.75, P < 0.001, repetition rate is the feature that best enables the discrimination of different pulsed signals (structure coefficient = 0.98. Classification using hierarchical cluster analysis led to a similar categorization pattern: two main signal types with distinct magnitudes of repetition rate were clustered into five groups. The pulsed signals, here described, present significant differences in their time-frequency features, especially repetition rate (P < 0.001, inter-click-interval (P < 0.001 and duration (P < 0.001. We document the occurrence of a distinct signal type-short burst-pulses, and highlight the existence of a diverse repertoire of pulsed vocalizations emitted in graded sequences. The use of quantitative analysis of pulsed signals is essential to improve classifications and to better assess the

  12. Coherent control of atoms and diatomic molecules with shaped ultrashort pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degert, J.

    2002-12-01

    This thesis deals with the theoretical and experimental study of coherent control of atomic and molecular systems with shaped pulses. At first, we present several experiments of control of coherent transients in rubidium. These transients appear when a two-level system is excited by a perturbative chirped pulse, and are characterized by oscillations in the excited state population. For a strong chirp, we show that a phase step in the spectrum modifies the phase of the oscillations. Then, by direct analogy with Fresnel zone lens, we conceive a chirped pulse with a highly modulated amplitude, allowing to suppress destructive contributions to the population transfer. In a second set of experiments, we focus on quantum path interferences in two-photon transitions excited by linearly chirped pulses. Owing to the broad bandwidth of ultrashort pulses, sequential and direct excitation paths contribute to the excited state population. Oscillations resulting from interferences between these two paths are observed in atomic sodium. Moreover, we show that they are observable whatever the sign of chirp. Theoretically, we study the control of the predissociation of a benchmark diatomic molecule: NaI. Predissociation leads to matter wave interferences in the fragments distribution. First, we show that a suitably chosen probe pulse allows the observation of theses interferences. Next, using a sequence of control pulse inducing electronic transition, we demonstrate the possibility to manipulate fragment energy distribution. (author)

  13. HV discharge acceleration by sequences of UV laser filaments with visible and near-infrared pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Elise; Rastegari, Ali; Feng, Chengyong; Mongin, Denis; Kamer, Brian; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Arissian, Ladan; Diels, Jean-Claude

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the triggering and guiding of DC high-voltage discharges over a distance of 37 cm by filaments produced by ultraviolet (266 nm) laser pulses of 200 ps duration. The latter reduce the breakdown electric field by half and allow up to 80% discharge probability in an electric field of 920 kV m–1. This high efficiency is not further increased by adding nanosecond pulses in the Joule range at 532 and at 1064 nm. However, the latter statistically increases the guiding length, thereby accelerating the discharge by a factor of 2. This effect is due both to photodetachment and to the heating of the plasma channel, that increases the efficiency of avalanche ionization and reduces electron attachment and recombination.

  14. SPIDYAN, a MATLAB library for simulating pulse EPR experiments with arbitrary waveform excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribitzer, Stephan; Doll, Andrin; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2016-02-01

    Frequency-swept chirp pulses, created with arbitrary waveform generators (AWGs), can achieve inversion over a range of several hundreds of MHz. Such passage pulses provide defined flip angles and increase sensitivity. The fact that spectra are not excited at once, but single transitions are passed one after another, can cause new effects in established pulse EPR sequences. We developed a MATLAB library for simulation of pulse EPR, which is especially suited for modeling spin dynamics in ultra-wideband (UWB) EPR experiments, but can also be used for other experiments and NMR. At present the command line controlled SPin DYnamics ANalysis (SPIDYAN) package supports one-spin and two-spin systems with arbitrary spin quantum numbers. By providing the program with appropriate spin operators and Hamiltonian matrices any spin system is accessible, with limits set only by available memory and computation time. Any pulse sequence using rectangular and linearly or variable-rate frequency-swept chirp pulses, including phase cycling can be quickly created. To keep track of spin evolution the user can choose from a vast variety of detection operators, including transition selective operators. If relaxation effects can be neglected, the program solves the Liouville-von Neumann equation and propagates spin density matrices. In the other cases SPIDYAN uses the quantum mechanical master equation and Liouvillians for propagation. In order to consider the resonator response function, which on the scale of UWB excitation limits bandwidth, the program includes a simple RLC circuit model. Another subroutine can compute waveforms that, for a given resonator, maintain a constant critical adiabaticity factor over the excitation band. Computational efficiency is enhanced by precomputing propagator lookup tables for the whole set of AWG output levels. The features of the software library are discussed and demonstrated with spin-echo and population transfer simulations. Copyright © 2016

  15. Steering wave packet dynamics and population transfer between electronic states of the Na2 molecule by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Kaijun; Sun Zhigang; Cong Shulin; Wang Senming; Yu Jie; Lou Nanquan

    2005-01-01

    An approach used for steering the wave packet dynamics and the population transfer between electronic states of the Na 2 molecule by a pair of femtosecond laser pulses is demonstrated. Four controlling schemes, i.e., four different combinations of time delays (intuitive and counterintuitive sequences) and frequency detunings (positive and negative detunings), are discussed in detail. The light-induced potentials are used to describe the wave packet dynamics and population transfer. The numerical results show that the wave packet excited by femtosecond laser pulses oscillates drastically on 2 1 Π g state with time. The efficiency of controlling population transfer from the X 1 Σ g + to2 1 Π g states of Na 2 is nearly 100% for the schemes of the counterintuitive sequence pulses with positive and negative detunings

  16. Characterization of microsatellite loci in Phormia regina towards expanding molecular applications in forensic entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farncombe, K M; Beresford, D; Kyle, C J

    2014-07-01

    Forensic entomology involves the use of insects and arthropods to assist a spectrum of medico-criminal investigations that range from identifying cases of abuse, corpse movements, and most commonly, post mortem interval estimates. Many of these applications focus on the use of blowflies given their predicable life history characteristics in their larval stages. Molecular tools have become increasingly important in the unambiguous identification of larval blowfly species, however, these same tools have the potential to broaden the array of molecular applications in forensic entomology to include individual identifications and population assignments. Herein, we establish a microsatellite profiling system for the blowfly, Phormiaregina (Diptera: Calliphoridae). The goal being to create a system to identify the population genetic structure of this species and subsequently establish if these data are amenable to identifying corpse movements based on the geographic distribution of specific genetic clusters of blowflies. Using next generation sequencing technology, we screened a partial genomic DNA sequence library of P.regina, searching for di-, tetra-, and penta-nucleotide microsatellite loci. We identified and developed primers for 84 highly repetitive segments of DNA, of which 14 revealed consistent genotypes and reasonable levels of genetic variation (4-26 alleles/locus; heterozygosity ranged from 0.385 to 0.909). This study provides the first step in assessing the utility of microsatellite markers to track the movements and sources of corpses via blowflies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis and Suppression of Zero Sequence Circulating Current in Open Winding PMSM Drives With Common DC Bus

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, H.; Zhu, Z.Q.; Odavic, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the zero sequence circulating current in open winding permanent magnet synchronous machine (OW-PMSM) drives with common dc bus is systematically analyzed for the first time. It is revealed that the zero sequence circulating current is affected by zero sequence back-electromotive force, cross coupling voltages in zero sequence from the machine side, pulse-width modulation induced zero sequence voltage, and inverter nonlinearity from the inverter side. Particularly, the influence...

  18. A pulsed magnetic stress applied to Drosophila melanogaster flies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delle Side, D; Giuffreda, E; Nassisi, V; Velardi, L; Bozzetti, M P; Friscini, A; Specchia, V

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of a system to feed pulsed magnetic stress to biological samples. The device is based on a RLC circuit that transforms the energy stored in a high voltage capacitor into a magnetic field inside a coil. The field has been characterized and we found that charging the capacitor with 24 kV results in a peak field of 0.4 T. In order to test its effect, we applied such a stress to the Drosophila melanogaster model and we examined its bio-effects. We analysed, in the germ cells, the effects on the control of specific DNA repetitive sequences that are activated after different environmental stresses. The deregulation of these sequences causes genomic instability and chromosomes breaks leading to sterility. The magnetic field treatment did not produce effects on repetitive sequences in the germ cells of Drosophila. Hence, this field doesn't produce deleterious effects linked to repetitive sequences derepression.

  19. A pulsed magnetic stress applied to Drosophila melanogaster flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Side, D.; Bozzetti, M. P.; Friscini, A.; Giuffreda, E.; Nassisi, V.; Specchia, V.; Velardi, L.

    2014-04-01

    We report the development of a system to feed pulsed magnetic stress to biological samples. The device is based on a RLC circuit that transforms the energy stored in a high voltage capacitor into a magnetic field inside a coil. The field has been characterized and we found that charging the capacitor with 24 kV results in a peak field of 0.4 T. In order to test its effect, we applied such a stress to the Drosophila melanogaster model and we examined its bio-effects. We analysed, in the germ cells, the effects on the control of specific DNA repetitive sequences that are activated after different environmental stresses. The deregulation of these sequences causes genomic instability and chromosomes breaks leading to sterility. The magnetic field treatment did not produce effects on repetitive sequences in the germ cells of Drosophila. Hence, this field doesn't produce deleterious effects linked to repetitive sequences derepression.

  20. Pulsed arterial spin labeling using TurboFLASH with suppression of intravascular signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Gaby S; Lewis, David P; Branch, Craig A

    2003-02-01

    Accurate quantification of perfusion with the ADC techniques requires the suppression of the majority of the intravascular signal. This is normally achieved with the use of diffusion gradients. The TurboFLASH sequence with its ultrashort repetition times is not readily amenable to this scheme. This report demonstrates the implementation of a modified TurboFLASH sequence for FAIR imaging. Intravascular suppression is achieved with a modified preparation period that includes a driven equilibrium Fourier transform (DEFT) combination of 90 degrees-180 degrees-90 degrees hard RF pulses subsequent to the inversion delay. These pulses rotate the perfusion-prepared magnetization into the transverse plane where it can experience the suitably placed diffusion gradients before being returned to the longitudinal direction by the second 90 degrees pulse. A value of b = 20-30 s/mm(2) was thereby found to suppress the majority of the intravascular signal. For single-slice perfusion imaging, quantification is only slightly modified. The technique can be readily extended to multislice acquisition if the evolving flow signal after the DEFT preparation is considered. An advantage of the modified preparation scheme is evident in the multislice FAIR images by the preservation of the sign of the magnetization difference. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Pulse and entrainment to non-isochronous auditory stimuli: the case of north Indian alap.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Will

    Full Text Available Pulse is often understood as a feature of a (quasi- isochronous event sequence that is picked up by an entrained subject. However, entrainment does not only occur between quasi-periodic rhythms. This paper demonstrates the expression of pulse by subjects listening to non-periodic musical stimuli and investigates the processes behind this behaviour. The stimuli are extracts from the introductory sections of North Indian (Hindustani classical music performances (alap, jor and jhala. The first of three experiments demonstrates regular motor responses to both irregular alap and more regular jor sections: responses to alap appear related to individual spontaneous tempi, while for jor they relate to the stimulus event rate. A second experiment investigated whether subjects respond to average periodicities of the alap section, and whether their responses show phase alignment to the musical events. In the third experiment we investigated responses to a broader sample of performances, testing their relationship to spontaneous tempo, and the effect of prior experience with this music. Our results suggest an entrainment model in which pulse is understood as the experience of one's internal periodicity: it is not necessarily linked to temporally regular, structured sensory input streams; it can arise spontaneously through the performance of repetitive motor actions, or on exposure to event sequences with rather irregular temporal structures. Greater regularity in the external event sequence leads to entrainment between motor responses and stimulus sequence, modifying subjects' internal periodicities in such a way that they are either identical or harmonically related to each other. This can be considered as the basis for shared (rhythmic experience and may be an important process supporting 'social' effects of temporally regular music.

  2. Pulse and entrainment to non-isochronous auditory stimuli: the case of north Indian alap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Udo; Clayton, Martin; Wertheim, Ira; Leante, Laura; Berg, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Pulse is often understood as a feature of a (quasi-) isochronous event sequence that is picked up by an entrained subject. However, entrainment does not only occur between quasi-periodic rhythms. This paper demonstrates the expression of pulse by subjects listening to non-periodic musical stimuli and investigates the processes behind this behaviour. The stimuli are extracts from the introductory sections of North Indian (Hindustani) classical music performances (alap, jor and jhala). The first of three experiments demonstrates regular motor responses to both irregular alap and more regular jor sections: responses to alap appear related to individual spontaneous tempi, while for jor they relate to the stimulus event rate. A second experiment investigated whether subjects respond to average periodicities of the alap section, and whether their responses show phase alignment to the musical events. In the third experiment we investigated responses to a broader sample of performances, testing their relationship to spontaneous tempo, and the effect of prior experience with this music. Our results suggest an entrainment model in which pulse is understood as the experience of one's internal periodicity: it is not necessarily linked to temporally regular, structured sensory input streams; it can arise spontaneously through the performance of repetitive motor actions, or on exposure to event sequences with rather irregular temporal structures. Greater regularity in the external event sequence leads to entrainment between motor responses and stimulus sequence, modifying subjects' internal periodicities in such a way that they are either identical or harmonically related to each other. This can be considered as the basis for shared (rhythmic) experience and may be an important process supporting 'social' effects of temporally regular music.

  3. Double pulse laser ablation and plasma: Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babushok, V.I.; DeLucia, F.C.; Gottfried, J.L.; Munson, C.A.; Miziolek, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    A review of recent results of the studies of double laser pulse plasma and ablation for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy applications is presented. The double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy configuration was suggested with the aim of overcoming the sensitivity shortcomings of the conventional single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. Several configurations have been suggested for the realization of the double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique: collinear, orthogonal pre-spark, orthogonal pre-heating and dual pulse crossed beam modes. In addition, combinations of laser pulses with different wavelengths, different energies and durations were studied, thus providing flexibility in the choice of wavelength, pulse width, energy and pulse sequence. The double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy approach provides a significant enhancement in the intensity of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy emission lines up to two orders of magnitude greater than a conventional single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The double pulse technique leads to a better coupling of the laser beam with the plasma plume and target material, thus providing a more temporally effective energy delivery to the plasma and target. The experimental results demonstrate that the maximum effect is obtained at some optimum separation delay time between pulses. The optimum value of the interpulse delay depends on several factors, such as the target material, the energy level of excited states responsible for the emission, and the type of enhancement process considered. Depending on the specified parameter, the enhancement effects were observed on different time scales ranging from the picosecond time level (e.g., ion yield, ablation mass) up to the hundred microsecond level (e.g., increased emission intensity for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of submerged metal target in water). Several suggestions have been proposed to explain

  4. Assessment of myocardial infarction in mice by Late Gadolinium Enhancement MR imaging using an inversion recovery pulse sequence at 9.4T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herlihy Amy H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using an inversion recovery pulse sequence and to define the optimal inversion time (TI to assess myocardial infarction in mice by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE MRI at 9.4T, and to obtain the maximal contrast between the infarcted and the viable myocardium. Methods MRI was performed at 9.4T in mice, two days after induction of myocardial infarction (n = 4. For cardiovascular MR imaging, a segmented magnetization-prepared fast low angle shot (MP-FLASH sequence was used with varied TIs ranging from 40 to 420 ms following administration of gadolinium-DTPA at 0.6 mmol/kg. Contrast-to-noise (CNR and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR were measured and compared for each myocardial region of interest (ROI. Results The optimal TI, which corresponded to a minimum SNR in the normal myocardium, was 268 ms ± 27.3. The SNR in the viable myocardium was significantly different from that found in the infarcted myocardium (17.2 ± 2.4 vs 82.1 ± 10.8; p = 0.006 leading to a maximal relative SI (Signal Intensity between those two areas (344.9 ± 60.4. Conclusion Despite the rapid heart rate in mice, our study demonstrates that LGE MRI can be performed at 9.4T using a protocol similar to the one used for clinical MR diagnosis of myocardial infarction.

  5. Fast and Sequence-Adaptive Whole-Brain Segmentation Using Parametric Bayesian Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puonti, Oula; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen

    2016-01-01

    the performance of a segmentation algorithm designed to meet these requirements, building upon generative parametric models previously used in tissue classification. The method is tested on four different datasets acquired with different scanners, field strengths and pulse sequences, demonstrating comparable...

  6. Regional and temporal variability of melts during a Cordilleran magma pulse: Age and chemical evolution of the jurassic arc, eastern mojave desert, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.; Miller, David; Howard, Keith A.; Fox, Lydia; Schermer, Elizabeth R.; Jacobson, C.E.

    2017-01-01

    Intrusive rock sequences in the central and eastern Mojave Desert segment of the Jurassic Cordilleran arc of the western United States record regional and temporal variations in magmas generated during the second prominent pulse of Mesozoic continental arc magmatism. U/Pb zircon ages provide temporal control for describing variations in rock and zircon geochemistry that reflect differences in magma source components. These source signatures are discernible through mixing and fractionation processes associated with magma ascent and emplacement. The oldest well-dated Jurassic rocks defining initiation of the Jurassic pulse are a 183 Ma monzodiorite and a 181 Ma ignimbrite. Early to Middle Jurassic intrusive rocks comprising the main stage of magmatism include two high-K calc-alkalic groups: to the north, the deformed 183–172 Ma Fort Irwin sequence and contemporaneous rocks in the Granite and Clipper Mountains, and to the south, the 167–164 Ma Bullion sequence. A Late Jurassic suite of shoshonitic, alkali-calcic intrusive rocks, the Bristol Mountains sequence, ranges in age from 164 to 161 Ma and was emplaced as the pulse began to wane. Whole-rock and zircon trace-element geochemistry defines a compositionally coherent Jurassic arc with regional and secular variations in melt compositions. The arc evolved through the magma pulse by progressively greater input of old cratonic crust and lithospheric mantle into the arc magma system, synchronous with progressive regional crustal thickening.

  7. NGI-9 pulsed neutron generator with a fluence to 1010 n/s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allakhverdov, A.Sh.; Ogarkin, V.I.; Silicheva, G.P.; Timofeev, Yu.I.

    1975-01-01

    A neutron pulse generator with 14 MeV energy used for the activation analysis, is described. Its functional diagram and the technical characteristics are presented. The studies of the generator that resulted in determination of the effect of the accelerating voltage amplitude, the delay in the ion source firing with respect to the pulse of the accelerating voltage, the amount of operating ion sources and the energy imparted to them on the neutron flux magnitude are conducted. It is confirmed by the studies that the neutron generator operating in the nominal regime makes it possible to obtain a neutron flux of 5x10 9 -10 10 neutr./s. The dependence of the neutron flux variation on the frequency of pulse sequence for various ion sources is shown

  8. Dynamical decoupling sequences for multi-qubit dephasing suppression and long-time quantum memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz-Silva, Gerardo A; Lee, Seung-Woo; Green, Todd J; Viola, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    We consider a class of multi-qubit dephasing models that combine classical noise sources and linear coupling to a bosonic environment, and are controlled by arbitrary sequences of dynamical decoupling pulses. Building on a general transfer filter-function framework for open-loop control, we provide an exact representation of the controlled dynamics for arbitrary stationary non-Gaussian classical and quantum noise statistics, with analytical expressions emerging when all dephasing sources are Gaussian. This exact characterization is used to establish two main results. First, we construct multi-qubit sequences that ensure maximum high-order error suppression in both the time and frequency domain and that can be exponentially more efficient than existing ones in terms of total pulse number. Next, we show how long-time multi-qubit storage may be achieved by meeting appropriate conditions for the emergence of a fidelity plateau under sequence repetition, thereby generalizing recent results for single-qubit memory under Gaussian dephasing. In both scenarios, the key step is to endow multi-qubit sequences with a suitable displacement anti-symmetry property, which is of independent interest for applications ranging from environment-assisted entanglement generation to multi-qubit noise spectroscopy protocols. (paper)

  9. Short-pulse optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification for the generation of high-power few-cycle pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major, Zs.; Osterhoff, J.; Hoerlein, R.; Karsch, S.; Fuoloep, J.A.; Krausz, F.; Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet, Muenchen

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. In the quest for a way to generate ultrashort, high-power, few-cycle laser pulses the discovery of optical parametric amplification (OPA) has opened up to the path towards a completely new regime, well beyond that of conventional laser amplification technology. The main advantage of this parametric amplification process is that it allows for an extremely broad amplification bandwidth compared to any known laser amplifier medium. When combined with the chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) principle (i.e. OPCPA), on one hand pulses of just 10 fs duration and 8 mJ pulse energy have been demonstrated. On the other hand, pulse energies of up to 30 J were also achieved on a different OPCPA system; the pulse duration in this case, however, was 100 fs. In order to combine ultrashort pulse durations (i.e. pulses in the few-cycle regime) with high pulse energies (i.e. in the Joule range) we propose tu pump on OPCPA chain with TW-scale short pulses (100 fs - 1 ps instead of > 100 ps of previous OPCPA systems) delivered by a conventional CPA system. This approach inherently improves the conditions for generating high-power ultrashort pulses using OPCPA in the following ways. Firstly, the short pump pulse duration reduces the necessary stretching factor for the seed pulse, thereby increasing stretching and compression fidelity. Secondly, also due to the shortened pump pulse duration, a much higher contrast is achieved. Finally, the significantly increased pump power makes the use of thinner OPCPA crystals possible, which implies an even broader amplification bandwidth, thereby allowing for even shorter pulses. We carried out theoretical investigations to show the feasibility of such a set-up. Alongside these studies we will also present preliminary experimental results of an OPCPA system pumped by the output of our Ti:Sapphire ATLAS laser, currently delivering 350 mJ in 43 fs. An insight into the planned scaling of this technique to petawatt

  10. Pulsed electron beam generation with fast repetitive double pulse system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Surender Kumar; Deb, Pankaj; Shyam, Anurag, E-mail: surender80@gmail.com [Energetics and Electromagnetics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Visakhapatnam (India); Sharma, Archana [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-07-01

    Longer duration high voltage pulse (∼ 100 kV, 260 ns) is generated and reported using helical pulse forming line in compact geometry. The transmission line characteristics of the helical pulse forming line are also used to develop fast repetition double pulse system with very short inter pulse interval. It overcomes the limitations caused due to circuit parameters, power supplies and load characteristics for fast repetitive high voltage pulse generation. The high voltage double pulse of 100 kV, 100 ns with an inter pulse repetition interval of 30 ns is applied across the vacuum field emission diode for pulsed electron beam generation. The electron beam is generated from cathode material by application of negative high voltage (> 100 kV) across the diode by explosive electron emission process. The vacuum field emission diode is made of 40 mm diameter graphite cathode and SS mesh anode. The anode cathode gap was 6 mm and the drift tube diameter was 10 cm. The initial experimental results of pulsed electron beam generation with fast repetitive double pulse system are reported and discussed. (author)

  11. MRI in neuro-Behcet's syndrome: comparison of conventional spin-echo and FLAIR pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, H.R.; Albrecht, T.; Curati-Alasonatti, W.L.; Williams, E.J.; Haskard, D.O.

    1999-01-01

    We compared the sensitivity of a fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) sequence with that of a conventional dual-echo spin-echo (SE) sequence to brain lesions in 20 patients with Behcet's syndrome. They underwent 25 MRI examinations. The images were independently analysed for the number, type and anatomical location of lesions shown. There were 18 abnormal studies (13 initial and 5 follow-up). The FLAIR sequence detected significantly more lesions than the SE TE 80 (P < 0.05) and SE TE 20 (P < 0.01) sequences. It was particularly useful for demonstrating lesions in the juxtacortical white matter, which accounted for over half the lesions detected on the FLAIR images. Of patients presenting with nonspecific symptoms such as headache, seven had normal and five had abnormal studies. All patients presenting with focal neurological signs had abnormal imaging. We found supratentorial and, in particular, juxtacortical lesions to be more frequent than previously described. (orig.)

  12. Pure and Sn-doped ZnO films produced by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmelund, E.; Schou, Jørgen; Tougaard, S.

    2002-01-01

    A new technique, metronome doping, has been used for doping of films during pulsed laser deposition (PLD). This technique makes it possible to dope continuously during film growth with different concentrations of a dopant in one deposition sequence. Films of pure and doped ZnO have been produced...

  13. Oscillatory pulses and wave trains in a bistable reaction-diffusion system with cross diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemskov, Evgeny P; Tsyganov, Mikhail A; Horsthemke, Werner

    2017-01-01

    We study waves with exponentially decaying oscillatory tails in a reaction-diffusion system with linear cross diffusion. To be specific, we consider a piecewise linear approximation of the FitzHugh-Nagumo model, also known as the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol model. We focus on two types of traveling waves, namely solitary pulses that correspond to a homoclinic solution, and sequences of pulses or wave trains, i.e., a periodic solution. The effect of cross diffusion on wave profiles and speed of propagation is analyzed. We find the intriguing result that both pulses and wave trains occur in the bistable cross-diffusive FitzHugh-Nagumo system, whereas only fronts exist in the standard bistable system without cross diffusion.

  14. Pulse Distortion in Saturated Fiber Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Da Ros, Francesco; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification is experimentally compared for different chirped pulses in the picosecond regime. The amplified chirped pulses show distortion appearing as pedestals after recompression when the amplifier is operated in saturation.......Fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification is experimentally compared for different chirped pulses in the picosecond regime. The amplified chirped pulses show distortion appearing as pedestals after recompression when the amplifier is operated in saturation....

  15. Orientationally invariant metrics of apparent compartment eccentricity from double pulsed field gradient diffusion experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj; Lundell, Henrik; Sønderby, Casper Kaae

    2013-01-01

    Pulsed field gradient diffusion sequences (PFG) with multiple diffusion encoding blocks have been indicated to offer new microstructural tissue information, such as the ability to detect nonspherical compartment shapes in macroscopically isotropic samples, i.e. samples with negligible directional...

  16. Updating the induction module from single-pulse to double-pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Ziping; Wang Huacen; Deng Jianjun

    2002-01-01

    A double-pulse Linear Induced Accelerator (LIA) module is reconstructed based on a usual simple-pulse LIA module. By changing the length of one of the cables between the inductive cell and the Blumlein pulse forming line, two induction pulses with 90 ns FWHM and 150 kV pulse voltage are generated by the ferrite cores inductive cell. The interval time of the pulses is adjustable by changing the lengths of the cable

  17. Evaluation of bipolar pulse generator for high-purity pulsed ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, H.; Kitamura, I.; Masugata, K.

    2008-01-01

    A new type of pulsed ion beam accelerator named 'bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA)' has been proposed in order to improve the purity of intense pulsed ion beams. To confirm the principle of the BPA, we developed a bipolar pulse generator, which consists of a Marx generator and a pulse forming line (PFL) with a rail gap switch on its end. In this article, we report the experimental results of the bipolar pulse and evaluate the electrical characteristics of the bipolar pulse generator. When the bipolar pulse generator was operated at 70% of the full charge condition of the PEL, the bipolar pulse with the first (-138 kV, 72 ns) and the second pulse (+130 kV, 70 ns) was successfully obtained. The evaluation of the electrical characteristics indicates that the developed generator can produce the bipolar pulse with fast rise time and sharp reversing time. At present the bipolar pulse generator is installed in the B y type magnetically insulated ion diode and we carry out the experiment on the production of an intense pulsed ion beam by the bipolar pulse accelerator. (author)

  18. Extended RF shimming: Sequence-level parallel transmission optimization applied to steady-state free precession MRI of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beqiri, Arian; Price, Anthony N; Padormo, Francesco; Hajnal, Joseph V; Malik, Shaihan J

    2017-06-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at high field presents challenges because of the high specific absorption rate and significant transmit field (B 1 + ) inhomogeneities. Parallel transmission MRI offers the ability to correct for both issues at the level of individual radiofrequency (RF) pulses, but must operate within strict hardware and safety constraints. The constraints are themselves affected by sequence parameters, such as the RF pulse duration and TR, meaning that an overall optimal operating point exists for a given sequence. This work seeks to obtain optimal performance by performing a 'sequence-level' optimization in which pulse sequence parameters are included as part of an RF shimming calculation. The method is applied to balanced steady-state free precession cardiac MRI with the objective of minimizing TR, hence reducing the imaging duration. Results are demonstrated using an eight-channel parallel transmit system operating at 3 T, with an in vivo study carried out on seven male subjects of varying body mass index (BMI). Compared with single-channel operation, a mean-squared-error shimming approach leads to reduced imaging durations of 32 ± 3% with simultaneous improvement in flip angle homogeneity of 32 ± 8% within the myocardium. © 2017 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Pulse-voltammetric glucose detection at gold junction electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassaei, Liza; Marken, Frank

    2010-09-01

    A novel glucose sensing concept based on the localized change or "modulation" in pH within a symmetric gold-gold junction electrode is proposed. A paired gold-gold junction electrode (average gap size ca. 500 nm) is prepared by simultaneous bipotentiostatic electrodeposition of gold onto two closely spaced platinum disk electrodes. For glucose detection in neutral aqueous solution, the potential of the "pH-modulator" electrode is set to -1.5 V vs saturated calomel reference electrode (SCE) to locally increase the pH, and simultaneously, either cyclic voltammetry or square wave voltammetry experiments are conducted at the sensor electrode. A considerable improvement in the sensor electrode response is observed when a normal pulse voltammetry sequence is applied to the modulator electrode (to generate "hydroxide pulses") and the glucose sensor electrode is operated with fixed bias at +0.5 V vs SCE (to eliminate capacitive charging currents). Preliminary data suggest good linearity for the glucose response in the medically relevant 1-10 mM concentration range (corresponding to 0.18-1.8 g L(-1)). Future electroanalytical applications of multidimensional pulse voltammetry in junction electrodes are discussed.

  20. TOMROP: a sequence for determining the longitudinal relaxation time T1 in NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graumann, R.; Barfuss, H.; Fischer, H.; Hentschel, D.; Oppelt, A.

    1987-01-01

    We developed the pulse sequence TOMROP (T One by Multiple Read Out Pulses) for determining precisely the spatial distribution of the longitudinal relaxation time T 1 in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR): a series of small-angle selection pulses is used to read out longitudinal magnetization from its initial state till thermal equilibrium. Hence, one measurement will produce several images with different T 1 weightings whose pixel brilliance depends exponentially from read-out time. T 1 can be determined from these independent of initial magnetization and selection pulse angle. The measuring time corresponds to the time needed in multi-echo imaging for the determination of the transversal relaxation time T 2 . We demonstrate this new method using head images of volunteers produced with a 0.23 T test facility. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Pulse-shaping strategies in short-pulse fiber amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimpf, Damian Nikolaus

    2010-02-09

    Ultrashort pulse lasers are an important tool in scientific and industrial applications. However, many applications are demanding higher average powers from these ultrashort pulse sources. This can be achieved by combining direct diode pumping with novel gain media designs. In particular, ultrashort pulse fiber lasers are now delivering average powers in the kW range. However, the design of fiber lasers, producing pulses with high peak-powers, is challenging due to the impact of nonlinear effects. To significantly reduce these detrimental effects in ultrashort pulse fiber amplifers, the combination of chirped pulse amplification (CPA) and large mode area fibers is employed. Using these methods, the pulse energy of fiber lasers has been steadily increasing for the past few years. Recently, a fiber-based CPA-system has been demonstrated which produces pulse energies of around 1 mJ. However, both the stretching and the enlargement of the mode area are limited, and therefore, the impact of nonlinearity is still noticed in systems employing such devices. The aim of this thesis is the analysis of CPA-systems operated beyond the conventional nonlinear limit, which corresponds to accumulated nonlinear phase-shifts around 1 rad. This includes a detailed discussion of the influence of the nonlinear effect self-phase modulation on the output pulse of CPA-systems. An analytical model is presented. Emphasis is placed on the design of novel concepts to control the impact of self-phase modulation. Pulse-shaping is regarded as a powerful tool to accomplish this goal. Novel methods to control the impact of SPM are experimentally demonstrated. The design of these concepts is based on the theoretical findings. Both amplitude- and phase-shaping are studied. Model-based phase-shaping is implemented in a state-of-the-art fiber CPA-system. The influence of the polarization state is also highlighted. Additionally, existing techniques and recent advances are put into context. (orig.)

  2. Pulse-shaping strategies in short-pulse fiber amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimpf, Damian Nikolaus

    2010-01-01

    Ultrashort pulse lasers are an important tool in scientific and industrial applications. However, many applications are demanding higher average powers from these ultrashort pulse sources. This can be achieved by combining direct diode pumping with novel gain media designs. In particular, ultrashort pulse fiber lasers are now delivering average powers in the kW range. However, the design of fiber lasers, producing pulses with high peak-powers, is challenging due to the impact of nonlinear effects. To significantly reduce these detrimental effects in ultrashort pulse fiber amplifers, the combination of chirped pulse amplification (CPA) and large mode area fibers is employed. Using these methods, the pulse energy of fiber lasers has been steadily increasing for the past few years. Recently, a fiber-based CPA-system has been demonstrated which produces pulse energies of around 1 mJ. However, both the stretching and the enlargement of the mode area are limited, and therefore, the impact of nonlinearity is still noticed in systems employing such devices. The aim of this thesis is the analysis of CPA-systems operated beyond the conventional nonlinear limit, which corresponds to accumulated nonlinear phase-shifts around 1 rad. This includes a detailed discussion of the influence of the nonlinear effect self-phase modulation on the output pulse of CPA-systems. An analytical model is presented. Emphasis is placed on the design of novel concepts to control the impact of self-phase modulation. Pulse-shaping is regarded as a powerful tool to accomplish this goal. Novel methods to control the impact of SPM are experimentally demonstrated. The design of these concepts is based on the theoretical findings. Both amplitude- and phase-shaping are studied. Model-based phase-shaping is implemented in a state-of-the-art fiber CPA-system. The influence of the polarization state is also highlighted. Additionally, existing techniques and recent advances are put into context. (orig.)

  3. Pulse Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An apparatus and a computer-implemented method for generating pulses synchronized to a rising edge of a tachometer signal from rotating machinery are disclosed. For example, in one embodiment, a pulse state machine may be configured to generate a plurality of pulses, and a period state machine may be configured to determine a period for each of the plurality of pulses.

  4. Forensic use of a subtropical blowfly: the first case indicating minimum postmortem interval (mPMI) in southern Brazil and first record of Sarconesia chlorogaster from a human corpse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vairo, Karine P; Corrêa, Rodrigo C; Lecheta, Melise C; Caneparo, Maria F; Mise, Kleber M; Preti, Daniel; de Carvalho, Claudio J B; Almeida, Lucia M; Moura, Mauricio O

    2015-01-01

    Southern Brazil is unique due to its subtropical climate. Here, we report on the first forensic entomology case and the first record of Sarconesia chlorogaster (Wiedemann) in a human corpse in this region. Flies' samples were collected from a body indoors at 20°C. Four species were found, but only Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann) and S. chlorogaster were used to estimate the minimum postmortem interval (mPMI). The mPMI was calculated using accumulated degree hour (ADH) and developmental time. The S. chlorogaster puparium collected was light in color, so we used an experiment to establish a more accurate estimate for time since initiation of pupation where we found full tanning after 3 h. Development of C. albiceps at 20°C to the end of the third instar is 7.4 days. The mPMI based on S. chlorogaster (developmental time until the third instar with no more than 3 h of pupae development) was 7.6 days. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  5. A short TE gradient-echo sequence using asymmetric sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Norihiko; Harada, Kohshi; Sakurai, Kosuke; Nakanishi, Katsuyuki; Kim, Shyogen; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a gradient-echo pulse sequence with a short TE less than 4 msec using a data set of asymmetric off-center sampling with a broad bandwidth. The use of such a short TE significantly reduces T 2 * dephasing effect even in a two-dimensional mode, and by collecting an off-center echo, motion-induced phase dispersion is also considerably decreased. High immunity of this sequence to these dephasing effects permits clear visualization of anatomical details near the skull base where large local field inhomogeneities and rapid blood flow such as in the internal carotid artery are present. (author)

  6. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multi locus sequence typing for characterizing genotype variability of Yersinia ruckeri isolated from farmed fish in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvez, Ségolène; Fournel, Catherine; Douet, Diane-Gaëlle; Daniel, Patrick

    2015-06-23

    Yersinia ruckeri is a pathogen that has an impact on aquaculture worldwide. The disease caused by this bacterial species, yersiniosis or redmouth disease, generates substantial economic losses due to the associated mortality and veterinary costs. For predicting outbreaks and improving control strategies, it is important to characterize the population structure of the bacteria. The phenotypic and genetic homogeneities described previously indicate a clonal population structure as observed in other fish bacteria. In this study, the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi locus sequence typing (MLST) methods were used to describe a population of isolates from outbreaks on French fish farms. For the PFGE analysis, two enzymes (NotI and AscI) were used separately and together. Results from combining the enzymes showed the great homogeneity of the outbreak population with a similarity > 80.0% but a high variability within the cluster (cut-off value = 80.0%) with a total of 43 pulsotypes described and an index of diversity = 0.93. The dominant pulsotypes described with NotI (PtN4 and PtN7) have already been described in other European countries (Finland, Germany, Denmark, Spain and Italy). The MLST approach showed two dominant sequence types (ST31 and ST36), an epidemic structure of the French Y. ruckeri population and a preferentially clonal evolution for rainbow trout isolates. Our results point to multiple types of selection pressure on the Y. ruckeri population attributable to geographical origin, ecological niche specialization and movements of farmed fish.

  7. Pulsed water jet generated by pulse multiplication

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvorský, R.; Sitek, Libor; Sochor, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2016), s. 959-967 ISSN 1330-3651 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : high- pressure pulses * pulse intensifier * pulsed water jet * water hammer effect Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 0.723, year: 2016 http://hrcak.srce.hr/163752?lang=en

  8. Pulsed power accelerator for material physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Reisman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed the design of Thor: a pulsed power accelerator that delivers a precisely shaped current pulse with a peak value as high as 7 MA to a strip-line load. The peak magnetic pressure achieved within a 1-cm-wide load is as high as 100 GPa. Thor is powered by as many as 288 decoupled and transit-time isolated bricks. Each brick consists of a single switch and two capacitors connected electrically in series. The bricks can be individually triggered to achieve a high degree of current pulse tailoring. Because the accelerator is impedance matched throughout, capacitor energy is delivered to the strip-line load with an efficiency as high as 50%. We used an iterative finite element method (FEM, circuit, and magnetohydrodynamic simulations to develop an optimized accelerator design. When powered by 96 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 4.1 MA to a load, and achieves peak magnetic pressures as high as 65 GPa. When powered by 288 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 6.9 MA to a load, and achieves magnetic pressures as high as 170 GPa. We have developed an algebraic calculational procedure that uses the single brick basis function to determine the brick-triggering sequence necessary to generate a highly tailored current pulse time history for shockless loading of samples. Thor will drive a wide variety of magnetically driven shockless ramp compression, shockless flyer plate, shock-ramp, equation of state, material strength, phase transition, and other advanced material physics experiments.

  9. Pulsed TRIGA reactor as substitute for long pulse spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittemore, W.L.

    1999-01-01

    TRIGA reactor cores have been used to demonstrate various pulsing applications. The TRIGA reactor fuel (U-ZrH x ) is very robust especially in pulsing applications. The features required to produce 50 pulses per second have been successfully demonstrated individually, including pulse tests with small diameter fuel rods. A partially optimized core has been evaluated for pulses at 50 Hz with peak pulsed power up to 100 MW and an average power up to 10 MW. Depending on the design, the full width at half power of the individual pulses can range between 2000 μsec to 3000 μsec. Until recently, the relatively long pulses (2000 μsec to 3000 μsec) from a pulsed thermal reactor or a long pulse spallation source (LPSS) have been considered unsuitable for time-of-flight measurements of neutron scattering. More recently considerable attention has been devoted to evaluating the performance of long pulse (1000 to 4000 μs) spallation sources for the same type of neutron measurements originally performed only with short pulses from spallation sources (SPSS). Adequate information is available to permit meaningful comparisons between CW, SPSS, and LPSS neutron sources. Except where extremely high resolution is required (fraction of a percent), which does require short pulses, it is demonstrated that the LPSS source with a 1000 msec or longer pulse length and a repetition rate of 50 to 60 Hz gives results comparable to those from the 60 MW ILL (CW) source. For many of these applications the shorter pulse is not necessarily a disadvantage, but it is not an advantage over the long pulse system. In one study, the conclusion is that a 5 MW 2000 μsec LPSS source improves the capability for structural biology studies of macromolecules by at least a factor of 5 over that achievable with a high flux reactor. Recent studies have identified the advantages and usefulness of long pulse neutron sources. It is evident that the multiple pulse TRIGA reactor can produce pulses comparable to

  10. Quantification of liver iron concentration with magnetic resonance imaging by combining T1-, T2-weighted spin echo sequences and a gradient echo sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreeftenberg, HG; Mooyaart, EL; Sluiter, WJ; Kreeftenberg, HG; Huizenga, Reint

    Background: The aim of the study was to quantify hepatic iron by MRI for practical use. Methods: In twenty-three patients with various degrees of iron overload, measurements were carried out with a 1.5 Tesla MR unit. A combination of pulse sequences (T1, T2 and gradient echo) enabled us to quantify

  11. Narrowband pulse-enhanced upconversion of chirped broadband pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Kun; Yuan, Peng; Zhong, Haizhe; Zhang, Dongfang; Zhu, Heyuan; Qian, Liejia; Chen, Liezun; Wen, Shuangchun

    2010-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate an efficient sum-frequency mixing scheme based on narrowband and chirped broadband pulses. It combines the advantages of wider spectral acceptance bandwidth and of alleviating the temporal walk-off, which are both beneficial to higher conversion efficiency. Chirped sum-frequency pulses at 455 nm with energy up to 360 µJ, corresponding to a conversion efficiency of ∼ 40%, are obtained and the pulses can be compressed to ∼ 110 fs. The sum-frequency mixing scheme may provide a promising route to the efficient generation of deep-ultraviolet femtosecond pulses

  12. Synchronization of 67 MJ, 50 kV pulsed power capacitor banks operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besuglov, V G; Galakhov, I V; Gasheev, A S; Grusin, I A; Gudov, S N; Kirillov, G A; Murugov, V M; Osin, V A; Petrakov, V N [All-Russian Scientific Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    A sync system for the 67 MJ, 50 kV pulse power capacitor bank of the ISKRA-5 facility`s iodine laser is described. This system is to provide synchronism (a jitter within 0.3 {mu}s) in firing of 665 spark gaps, 476 electric discharge pumping sources and 513 flash lamps. The sync system is designed as series-voltage pulse generators to be fired at specifically predetermined times. Also, the system ensures switching of spark gaps in a sequence as required by the experiment and reliable operation of the pumping sources. Procedures to maintain high interference immunity for the system are also addressed. (author). 2 tabs., 2 figs., 2 refs.

  13. International Year of Pulses 2016 | 2016 International Year of Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    the Year in collaboration with Governments, relevant organizations, non-governmental organizations and the composition of pulses Image 4 Wrapping up the International Year of Pulses The 5 key messages to food security Infographic Pulses and climate change International Year of Pulses 2016 The 68th UN

  14. Programmable pulse generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Zhihua; Lou Binqiao; Duan Xiaohui

    2002-01-01

    The author introduces the design of programmable pulse generator that is based on a micro-controller and controlled by RS232 interface of personal computer. The whole system has good stability. The pulse generator can produce TTL pulse and analog pulse. The pulse frequency can be selected by EPLD. The voltage amplitude and pulse width of analog pulse can be adjusted by analog switches and digitally-controlled potentiometers. The software development tools of computer is National Instruments LabView5.1. The front panel of this virtual instrumentation is intuitive and easy-to-use. Parameters can be selected and changed conveniently by knob and slide

  15. Study and realisation of a femtosecond dye laser operating at different wavelengths. Ultrashort pulses compression and amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georges, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    We present the study and the realization of a passively mode-locked dye laser producing pulses shorter than 100 femto-seconds (10 -13 s). In a ring cavity with an amplifier medium (Rhodamine 60) and a saturable absorber (DODCI), a sequence of four prisms controls the group velocity dispersion and allows the generation of very short pulses. Then we have studied the production of femtosecond pulses at other wavelengths directly from the femtosecond dye laser. For the first rime, 60 fs pulses at 685 nm and pulses shorter than 50 fs between 775 nm and 800 nm have been produced by passive mode locking. These near infrared pulses have been used to study the absorption saturation kinetics in semiconductors multiple quantum wells GaAs/GaAlAs. We have observed a singular behavior of the laser operating at 685 nm and analyzed the produced pulses in terms of optical solitons. To perform time resolved spectroscopy with shortest pulses, we have studied a pulse compressor and a multipass amplifier to increase the pulses energy. Pulses of 20 fs and 10 micro-joules (peak power: 0.5 GW) have been obtained at low repetition rate (10 Hz) and pulses of 16 fs and 0.6 micro-joules pulses have been generated at high repetition rate (11 kHz) using a copper vapor laser. These pulses have been used to study the absorption saturation kinetics of an organic dye (the Malachite Green). (author) [fr

  16. A novel time-to-pulse height converter for fast-neutron time-of-flight techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.

    1962-01-01

    An electronic time-to-pulse height converter is described which uses a multiplicative method instead of the usual one of adding overlapping pulses. This is achieved by a coincidence of a linear sawtooth and a sharply clipped needle-pulse. The sawtooth is fed to the grid of a beam-deflecting tube (E80T) and the needle-pulse is applied to the deflecting plates and opens the tube only during a time-interval of about 5.10 -9 s. The plate gets a charge proportional to the time-difference between the start of the sawtooth and the needle pulse. The plate-pulse is stretched and amplified and its height represents a measurement of the time-difference. With this method we got a time resolution of 2τ = 7 x 10 -12 s with artificial pulses, 2τ = 3 x 10 -10 s with Co 60 γ-coincidences by using NE 102 plastic crystals and 2τ = 1.4 x 10 -9 s with 511-keV γ-coincidences using NaI(Te) crystals. The method was also used with pulsed beam techniques. In this case we got from the pulsing RF an 8-Mc, sharply-peaked pulse-sequence, which was fed to the E80T plates. We had a time-resolution of 2τ = 1.1 x 10 -9 s with 4-MeV neutrons using plastic crystals 0.7 in long. Normally the region of linear response was 30 ns but it was possible to go up to 120 ns. (author) [fr

  17. Effects of pulse-to-pulse residual species on discharges in repetitively pulsed discharges through packed bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszelnicki, Juliusz; Engeling, Kenneth W.; Foster, John E.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in packed bed reactors (PBRs) are being investigated for conversion of toxic and waste gases, and CO2 removal. These discharges are repetitively pulsed having varying flow rates and internal geometries, which results in species from the prior pulse still being in the discharge zone at the time the following discharge pulse occurs. A non-negligible residual plasma density remains, which effectively acts as preionization. This residual charge changes the discharge properties of subsequent pulses, and may impact important PBR properties such as chemical selectivity. Similarly, the residual neutral reactive species produced during earlier pulses will impact the reaction rates on subsequent pulses. We report on results of a computational investigation of a 2D PBR using the plasma hydrodynamics simulator nonPDPSIM. Results will be discussed for air flowing though an array of dielectric rods at atmospheric pressure. The effects of inter-pulse residual species on PBR discharges will be quantified. Means of controlling the presence of residual species in the reactor through gas flow rate, pulse repetition, pulse width and geometry will be described. Comparisons will be made to experiments. Work supported by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  18. Driven equilibrium (drive) MR imaging of the cranial nerves V-VIII: comparison with the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciftci, E. E-mail: eciftcis7@hotmail.com; Anik, Yonca; Arslan, Arzu; Akansel, Gur; Sarisoy, Tahsin; Demirci, Ali

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the driven equilibrium radio frequency reset pulse (DRIVE) on image quality and nerve detection when used in adjunction with T2-weighted 3D turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients with cranial nerve symptoms referable to the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) were examined using a T2-weighted 3D TSE pulse sequence with and without DRIVE. MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. In addition to the axial resource images, reformatted oblique sagittal, oblique coronal and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the inner ear were evaluated. The nerve identification and image quality were graded for the cranial nerves V-VIII as well as inner ear structures. These structures were chosen because fluid-solid interfaces existed due to the CSF around (the cranial nerves V-VIII) or the endolymph within (the inner ear structures). Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon test. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The addition of the DRIVE pulse shortens the scan time by 25%. T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence with DRIVE performed slightly better than the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence without DRIVE in identifying the individual nerves. The image quality was also slightly better with DRIVE. Conclusion: The addition of the DRIVE pulse to the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence is preferable when imaging the cranial nerves surrounded by the CSF, or fluid-filled structures because of shorter scan time and better image quality due to reduced flow artifacts.

  19. Driven equilibrium (drive) MR imaging of the cranial nerves V-VIII: comparison with the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftci, E.; Anik, Yonca; Arslan, Arzu; Akansel, Gur; Sarisoy, Tahsin; Demirci, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the driven equilibrium radio frequency reset pulse (DRIVE) on image quality and nerve detection when used in adjunction with T2-weighted 3D turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients with cranial nerve symptoms referable to the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) were examined using a T2-weighted 3D TSE pulse sequence with and without DRIVE. MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. In addition to the axial resource images, reformatted oblique sagittal, oblique coronal and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the inner ear were evaluated. The nerve identification and image quality were graded for the cranial nerves V-VIII as well as inner ear structures. These structures were chosen because fluid-solid interfaces existed due to the CSF around (the cranial nerves V-VIII) or the endolymph within (the inner ear structures). Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon test. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The addition of the DRIVE pulse shortens the scan time by 25%. T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence with DRIVE performed slightly better than the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence without DRIVE in identifying the individual nerves. The image quality was also slightly better with DRIVE. Conclusion: The addition of the DRIVE pulse to the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence is preferable when imaging the cranial nerves surrounded by the CSF, or fluid-filled structures because of shorter scan time and better image quality due to reduced flow artifacts

  20. Multi-pulse shadowgraphic RGB illumination and detection for flow tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menser, Jan; Schneider, Florian; Dreier, Thomas; Kaiser, Sebastian A.

    2018-06-01

    This work demonstrates the application of a multi-color LED and a consumer color camera for visualizing phase boundaries in two-phase flows, in particular for particle tracking velocimetry. The LED emits a sequence of short light pulses, red, green, then blue (RGB), and through its color-filter array, the camera captures all three pulses on a single RGB frame. In a backlit configuration, liquid droplets appear as shadows in each color channel. Color reversal and color cross-talk correction yield a series of three frozen-flow images that can be used for further analysis, e.g., determining the droplet velocity by particle tracking. Three example flows are presented, solid particles suspended in water, the penetrating front of a gasoline direct-injection spray, and the liquid break-up region of an "air-assisted" nozzle. Because of the shadowgraphic arrangement, long path lengths through scattering media lower image contrast, while visualization of phase boundaries with high resolution is a strength of this method. Apart from a pulse-and-delay generator, the overall system cost is very low.

  1. MR-based attenuation correction in brain PET based on UTE sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabello, Jorge; Nekolla, Stephan G; Ziegler, Sibylle I [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München (Germany)

    2014-07-29

    Attenuation correction (AC) in brain PET/MR has recently emerged as one of the challenging tasks in the PET/MR field. It has been shown that to ignore the attenuation produced by bone can lead to errors ranging from 5-30% in regions close to bone structures. Since the information provided by the MR signal is not directly related to tissue attenuation, alternative methods have to be developed. Signal from bone tissue is difficult to measure given its short transverse relaxation time (T2). Ultrashort-echo time (UTE) pulse sequences were developed to measure signal from tissues with short T2. A combination of two consecutive UTE echoes has been used in several works to measure signal from bone tissue. The first echo is able to measure signal from bone tissue in addition to soft tissue, while the second echo contains most of the soft tissue contained in the first echo but not bone. In this work we extract the attenuation information from the difference between the logarithm of two images obtained after applying two consecutive UTE pulse sequences using the mMR scanner (Siemens Healthcare). Subsequently, image processing techniques are applied to reduce the noise and extract air cavities within the head. The resulting image is converted to linear attenuation coefficients, generating what is known as µ-map, to be used during reconstruction. For comparison purposes PET/CT scans of the same patients were acquired prior to the PET/MR scan. Additional µ-maps obtained for comparison were extracted from a Dixon sequence (used in clinical routine) and an additional µ-map calculated by the scanner based on UTE pulse sequences. Preliminary quantitative results measured in the cerebellum, using the value obtained with CT-based AC as reference, show differences of 34% without AC, 13% using the Dixon-based and UTE-based provided by the scanner, and 0.8% with the AC strategy presented here.

  2. Control of periodic surface structures on silicon by combined temporal and polarization shaping of femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraggelakis, F.; Stratakis, E.; Loukakos, P. A.

    2018-06-01

    We demonstrate the capability to exercise advanced control on the laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on silicon by combining the effect of temporal shaping, via tuning the interpulse temporal delay between double femtosecond laser pulses, along with the independent manipulation of the polarization state of each of the individual pulses. For this, cross-polarized (CP) as well as counter-rotating (CR) double circularly polarized pulses have been utilized. The pulse duration was 40 fs and the central wavelength of 790 nm. The linearly polarized double pulses are generated by a modified Michelson interferometer allowing the temporal delay between the pulses to vary from Δτ = -80 ps to Δτ = +80 ps with an accuracy of 0.2 fs. We show the significance of fluence balance between the two pulse components and its interplay with the interpulse delay and with the order of arrival of the individually polarized pulse components of the double pulse sequence on the final surface morphology. For the case of CR pulses we found that when the pulses are temporally well separated the surface morphology attains no axial symmetry. But strikingly, when the two CP pulses temporally overlap, we demonstrate, for the first time in our knowledge, the detrimental effect that the phase delay has on the ripple orientation. Our results provide new insight showing that temporal pulse shaping in combination with polarization control gives a powerful tool for drastically controlling the surface nanostructure morphology.

  3. Comparative melting and healing of B-DNA and Z-DNA by an infrared laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man, Viet Hoang; Pan, Feng; Sagui, Celeste; Roland, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    We explore the use of a fast laser melting simulation approach combined with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in order to determine the melting and healing responses of B-DNA and Z-DNA dodecamers with the same d(5′-CGCGCGCGCGCG-3′) 2 sequence. The frequency of the laser pulse is specifically tuned to disrupt Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds, thus inducing melting of the DNA duplexes. Subsequently, the structures relax and partially refold, depending on the field strength. In addition to the inherent interest of the nonequilibrium melting process, we propose that fast melting by an infrared laser pulse could be used as a technique for a fast comparison of relative stabilities of same-sequence oligonucleotides with different secondary structures with full atomistic detail of the structures and solvent. This could be particularly useful for nonstandard secondary structures involving non-canonical base pairs, mismatches, etc.

  4. Comparative melting and healing of B-DNA and Z-DNA by an infrared laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Man, Viet Hoang; Pan, Feng; Sagui, Celeste, E-mail: sagui@ncsu.edu; Roland, Christopher, E-mail: cmroland@ncsu.edu [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States)

    2016-04-14

    We explore the use of a fast laser melting simulation approach combined with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in order to determine the melting and healing responses of B-DNA and Z-DNA dodecamers with the same d(5′-CGCGCGCGCGCG-3′){sub 2} sequence. The frequency of the laser pulse is specifically tuned to disrupt Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds, thus inducing melting of the DNA duplexes. Subsequently, the structures relax and partially refold, depending on the field strength. In addition to the inherent interest of the nonequilibrium melting process, we propose that fast melting by an infrared laser pulse could be used as a technique for a fast comparison of relative stabilities of same-sequence oligonucleotides with different secondary structures with full atomistic detail of the structures and solvent. This could be particularly useful for nonstandard secondary structures involving non-canonical base pairs, mismatches, etc.

  5. Research on temperature characteristics of laser energy meter absorber irradiated by ms magnitude long pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Qiao, Chunhong; Fan, Chengyu; Zhang, Jinghui; Yang, Gaochao

    2017-10-01

    The research on temperature characteristics for large-energy laser energy meter absorber is about continuous wave (CW) laser before. For the measuring requirements of millisecond magnitude long pulse laser energy, the temperature characteristics for absorber are numerically calculated and analyzed. In calculation, the temperature field distributions are described by heat conduction equations, and the metal cylinder cavity is used for absorber model. The results show that, the temperature of absorber inwall appears periodic oscillation with pulse structure, the oscillation period and amplitude respectively relate to the pulse repetition frequency and single pulse energy. With the wall deep increasing, the oscillation amplitude decreases rapidly. The temperature of absorber outerwall is without periodism, and rises gradually with time. The factors to affect the temperature rise of absorber are single pulse energy, pulse width and repetition frequency. When the laser irradiation stops, the temperature between absorber inwall and outerwall will reach agreement rapidly. After special technology processing to enhance the capacity of resisting laser damage for absorber inwall, the ms magnitude long pulse laser energy can be obtained with the method of measuring the temperature of absorber outerwall. Meanwhile, by optimization design of absorber structure, when the repetition frequency of ms magnitude pulse laser is less than 10Hz, the energy of every pulse for low repetition frequency pulse sequence can be measured. The work offers valuable references for the design of ms magnitude large-energy pulse laser energy meter.

  6. Base adsorption calorimetry for characterising surface acidity: a comparison between pulse flow and conventional ''static'' techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felix, S.P.; Savill-Jowitt, C.; Brown, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    A pulsed flow adsorption microcalorimeter (pulse-FMC) has been developed by modifying a Setaram 111. It is tested in comparison with a conventional pulsed static adsorption microcalorimeter (pulse-SMC) for characterising surface acidity of solid acid catalysts. Small pulses of 1% ammonia in helium are delivered to an activated catalyst sample and its surface acidity is differentially profiled in terms of the molar enthalpy of ammonia adsorption (ΔH ads o ) using a combination of differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and a downstream thermal conductivity detector (TCD). The pulsing action and its sequences are controlled by in-house developed software and the TCD output also is logged into a PC. Thus, the pulse-FMC is fully automated. Two sulfonated polystyrene resin-type catalysts, Amberlyst 15 and Amberlyst 35, a zeolite of the type H + -ZSM-5 (CT 410) and an acid activated clay (Fulcat 220) are characterised at appropriate temperatures using both the new technique and the conventional static base adsorption method. ΔH ads o versus surface coverage profiles of all the four catalysts obtained from both pulse-FMC and the conventional method are found to be comparable. Results are interpreted in terms of the extent to which NH 3 adsorption on the catalysts surface is under thermodynamic control in the two methods

  7. Microjet formation and hard x-ray production from a liquid metal target irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lar' kin, A., E-mail: alexeylarkin@yandex.ru; Uryupina, D.; Ivanov, K.; Savel' ev, A., E-mail: abst@physics.msu.ru [International Laser Center and Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Bonnet, T.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M. [Centre d' Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, University of Bordeaux-CNRS-IN2P3, 33170 Gradignan (France); Spohr, K. [School of Engineering, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, Scotland PA1 2BE (United Kingdom); Breil, J.; Chimier, B.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Leguay, P.-M.; Tikhonchuk, V. T. [Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications, University of Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, Talence 33405 (France)

    2014-09-15

    By using a liquid metal as a target one may significantly enhance the yield of hard x-rays with a sequence of two intense femtosecond laser pulses. The influence of the time delay between the two pulses is studied experimentally and interpreted with numerical simulations. It was suggested that the first arbitrary weak pulse produces microjets from the target surface, while the second intense pulse provides an efficient electron heating and acceleration along the jet surface. These energetic electrons are the source of x-ray emission while striking the target surface. The microjet formation is explained based on the results given by both optical diagnostics and hydrodynamic modeling by a collision of shocks originated from two distinct zones of laser energy deposition.

  8. Microjet formation and hard x-ray production from a liquid metal target irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lar'kin, A.; Uryupina, D.; Ivanov, K.; Savel'ev, A.; Bonnet, T.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Spohr, K.; Breil, J.; Chimier, B.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Leguay, P.-M.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2014-01-01

    By using a liquid metal as a target one may significantly enhance the yield of hard x-rays with a sequence of two intense femtosecond laser pulses. The influence of the time delay between the two pulses is studied experimentally and interpreted with numerical simulations. It was suggested that the first arbitrary weak pulse produces microjets from the target surface, while the second intense pulse provides an efficient electron heating and acceleration along the jet surface. These energetic electrons are the source of x-ray emission while striking the target surface. The microjet formation is explained based on the results given by both optical diagnostics and hydrodynamic modeling by a collision of shocks originated from two distinct zones of laser energy deposition

  9. Microjet formation and hard x-ray production from a liquid metal target irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lar'kin, A.; Uryupina, D.; Ivanov, K.; Savel'ev, A.; Bonnet, T.; Gobet, F.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Spohr, K.; Breil, J.; Chimier, B.; Dorchies, F.; Fourment, C.; Leguay, P.-M.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2014-09-01

    By using a liquid metal as a target one may significantly enhance the yield of hard x-rays with a sequence of two intense femtosecond laser pulses. The influence of the time delay between the two pulses is studied experimentally and interpreted with numerical simulations. It was suggested that the first arbitrary weak pulse produces microjets from the target surface, while the second intense pulse provides an efficient electron heating and acceleration along the jet surface. These energetic electrons are the source of x-ray emission while striking the target surface. The microjet formation is explained based on the results given by both optical diagnostics and hydrodynamic modeling by a collision of shocks originated from two distinct zones of laser energy deposition.

  10. Optimal initiation of electronic excited state mediated intramolecular H-transfer in malonaldehyde by UV-laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandipati, K. R.; Singh, H.; Nagaprasad Reddy, S.; Kumar, K. A.; Mahapatra, S.

    2014-12-01

    Optimally controlled initiation of intramolecular H-transfer in malonaldehyde is accomplished by designing a sequence of ultrashort (~80 fs) down-chirped pump-dump ultra violet (UV)-laser pulses through an optically bright electronic excited [ S 2 ( π π ∗)] state as a mediator. The sequence of such laser pulses is theoretically synthesized within the framework of optimal control theory (OCT) and employing the well-known pump-dump scheme of Tannor and Rice [D.J. Tannor, S.A. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 83, 5013 (1985)]. In the OCT, the control task is framed as the maximization of cost functional defined in terms of an objective function along with the constraints on the field intensity and system dynamics. The latter is monitored by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The initial guess, laser driven dynamics and the optimized pulse structure (i.e., the spectral content and temporal profile) followed by associated mechanism involved in fulfilling the control task are examined in detail and discussed. A comparative account of the dynamical outcomes within the Condon approximation for the transition dipole moment versus its more realistic value calculated ab initio is also presented.

  11. Multiple current peaks in room-temperature atmospheric pressure homogenous dielectric barrier discharge plasma excited by high-voltage tunable nanosecond pulse in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Wen-Chun; Zhang, Shuai; Tang, Kai; Liu, Zhi-jie; Wang, Sen [Key Lab of Materials Modification, Dalian University of Technology, Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-05-13

    Room temperature homogenous dielectric barrier discharge plasma with high instantaneous energy efficiency is acquired by using nanosecond pulse voltage with 20-200 ns tunable pulse width. Increasing the voltage pulse width can lead to the generation of regular and stable multiple current peaks in each discharge sequence. When the voltage pulse width is 200 ns, more than 5 organized current peaks can be observed under 26 kV peak voltage. Investigation also shows that the organized multiple current peaks only appear in homogenous discharge mode. When the discharge is filament mode, organized multiple current peaks are replaced by chaotic filament current peaks.

  12. The fluid dynamics of microjet explosions caused by extremely intense X-ray pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Claudiu; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond; Milathianaki, Despina; Koglin, Jason; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth; Demirci, Hasan; Botha, Sabine; Nass, Karol; Stone, Howard; Schlichting, Ilme; Shoeman, Robert; Boutet, Sebastien

    2014-11-01

    Femtosecond X-ray scattering experiments at free-electron laser facilities typically requires liquid jet delivery methods to bring samples to the region of interaction with X-rays. We have imaged optically the damage process in water microjets due to intense hard X-ray pulses at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), using time-resolved imaging techniques to record movies at rates up to half a billion frames per second. For pulse energies larger than a few percent of the maximum pulse energy available at LCLS, the X-rays deposit energies much larger than the latent heat of vaporization in water, and induce a phase explosion that opens a gap in the jet. The LCLS pulses last a few tens of femtoseconds, but the full evolution of the broken jet is orders of magnitude slower - typically in the microsecond range - due to complex fluid dynamics processes triggered by the phase explosion. Although the explosion results in a complex sequence of phenomena, they lead to an approximately self-similar flow of the liquid in the jet.

  13. Source coherence impairments in a direct detection direct sequence optical code-division multiple-access system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fsaifes, Ihsan; Lepers, Catherine; Lourdiane, Mounia; Gallion, Philippe; Beugin, Vincent; Guignard, Philippe

    2007-02-01

    We demonstrate that direct sequence optical code- division multiple-access (DS-OCDMA) encoders and decoders using sampled fiber Bragg gratings (S-FBGs) behave as multipath interferometers. In that case, chip pulses of the prime sequence codes generated by spreading in time-coherent data pulses can result from multiple reflections in the interferometers that can superimpose within a chip time duration. We show that the autocorrelation function has to be considered as the sum of complex amplitudes of the combined chip as the laser source coherence time is much greater than the integration time of the photodetector. To reduce the sensitivity of the DS-OCDMA system to the coherence time of the laser source, we analyze the use of sparse and nonperiodic quadratic congruence and extended quadratic congruence codes.

  14. Source coherence impairments in a direct detection direct sequence optical code-division multiple-access system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fsaifes, Ihsan; Lepers, Catherine; Lourdiane, Mounia; Gallion, Philippe; Beugin, Vincent; Guignard, Philippe

    2007-02-01

    We demonstrate that direct sequence optical code- division multiple-access (DS-OCDMA) encoders and decoders using sampled fiber Bragg gratings (S-FBGs) behave as multipath interferometers. In that case, chip pulses of the prime sequence codes generated by spreading in time-coherent data pulses can result from multiple reflections in the interferometers that can superimpose within a chip time duration. We show that the autocorrelation function has to be considered as the sum of complex amplitudes of the combined chip as the laser source coherence time is much greater than the integration time of the photodetector. To reduce the sensitivity of the DS-OCDMA system to the coherence time of the laser source, we analyze the use of sparse and nonperiodic quadratic congruence and extended quadratic congruence codes.

  15. Characteristics of bipolar-pulse generator for intense pulsed heavy ion beam acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igawa, K.; Tomita, T.; Kitamura, I.; Ito, H.; Masugata, K.

    2006-01-01

    Intense pulsed heavy ion beams are expected to be applied to the implantation technology for semiconductor materials. In the application it is very important to purify the ion beam. In order to improve the purity of an intense pulsed ion beams we have proposed a new type of pulsed ion beam accelerator named 'bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA)'. A prototype of the experimental system has been developed to perform proof of principle experiments of the accelerator. A bipolar pulse generator has been designed for the generation of the pulsed ion beam with the high purity via the bipolar pulse acceleration and the electrical characteristics of the generator were evaluated. The production of the bipolar pulse has been confirmed experimentally. (author)

  16. Myocardial tagging by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance: evolution of techniques--pulse sequences, analysis algorithms, and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim El-Sayed H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR tagging has been established as an essential technique for measuring regional myocardial function. It allows quantification of local intramyocardial motion measures, e.g. strain and strain rate. The invention of CMR tagging came in the late eighties, where the technique allowed for the first time for visualizing transmural myocardial movement without having to implant physical markers. This new idea opened the door for a series of developments and improvements that continue up to the present time. Different tagging techniques are currently available that are more extensive, improved, and sophisticated than they were twenty years ago. Each of these techniques has different versions for improved resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, scan time, anatomical coverage, three-dimensional capability, and image quality. The tagging techniques covered in this article can be broadly divided into two main categories: 1 Basic techniques, which include magnetization saturation, spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM, delay alternating with nutations for tailored excitation (DANTE, and complementary SPAMM (CSPAMM; and 2 Advanced techniques, which include harmonic phase (HARP, displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE, and strain encoding (SENC. Although most of these techniques were developed by separate groups and evolved from different backgrounds, they are in fact closely related to each other, and they can be interpreted from more than one perspective. Some of these techniques even followed parallel paths of developments, as illustrated in the article. As each technique has its own advantages, some efforts have been made to combine different techniques together for improved image quality or composite information acquisition. In this review, different developments in pulse sequences and related image processing techniques are described along with the necessities that led to their invention

  17. Development of the pulse transformer for NLC klystron pulse modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akemoto, M.; Gold, S.; Koontz, R.; Krasnykh, A.

    1997-05-01

    We have studied a conventional pulse transformer for the NLC klystron pulse modulator. The transformer has been analyzed using a simplified lumped circuit model. It is found that a fast rise time requires low leakage inductance and low distributed capacitance and can be realized by reducing the number of secondary turns, but it produces larger pulse droop and core size. After making a tradeoff among these parameters carefully, a conventional pulse transformer with a rise time of 250ns and pulse droop of 3.6% has been designed and built. The transmission characteristics and pulse time-response were measured. The data were compared with the model. The agreement with the model was good when the measured values were used in the model simulation. The results of the high voltage tests are also presented

  18. Dynamic Characterization of Fiber Optical Chirped Pulse Amplification for Sub-ps Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina; Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Rishøj, Lars Søgaard

    2013-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the propagation of sub-picosecond pulses in fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers, showing a significant broadening of the pulses from 450 fs up to 720 fs due to dispersion and self-phase modulation.......We investigate experimentally the propagation of sub-picosecond pulses in fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers, showing a significant broadening of the pulses from 450 fs up to 720 fs due to dispersion and self-phase modulation....

  19. Contrast generation in the nuclear-spin tomography by pulsed ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehms, Ole Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis a combined method of ultrasound and nuclear-spin tomography is presented. Via ultrasound pulses by the sound-radiation force in liquids and tissue phantoms motions are generated, which depend on ther viscoelastic properties. This motions are made visible by a motion-sensitive tomograph sequence in the phase image of the tomograph in form of a phase change. The first measurements on simple phantoms and liquids are presented. [de

  20. LIDAR pulse coding for high resolution range imaging at improved refresh rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gunzung; Park, Yongwan

    2016-10-17

    In this study, a light detection and ranging system (LIDAR) was designed that codes pixel location information in its laser pulses using the direct- sequence optical code division multiple access (DS-OCDMA) method in conjunction with a scanning-based microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirror. This LIDAR can constantly measure the distance without idle listening time for the return of reflected waves because its laser pulses include pixel location information encoded by applying the DS-OCDMA. Therefore, this emits in each bearing direction without waiting for the reflected wave to return. The MEMS mirror is used to deflect and steer the coded laser pulses in the desired bearing direction. The receiver digitizes the received reflected pulses using a low-temperature-grown (LTG) indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) based photoconductive antenna (PCA) and the time-to-digital converter (TDC) and demodulates them using the DS-OCDMA. When all of the reflected waves corresponding to the pixels forming a range image are received, the proposed LIDAR generates a point cloud based on the time-of-flight (ToF) of each reflected wave. The results of simulations performed on the proposed LIDAR are compared with simulations of existing LIDARs.

  1. Petawatt pulsed-power accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stygar, William A.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Headley, Daniel I.; Ives, Harry C.; Ives, legal representative; Berry Cottrell; Leeper, Ramon J.; Mazarakis, Michael G.; Olson, Craig L.; Porter, John L.; Wagoner; Tim C.

    2010-03-16

    A petawatt pulsed-power accelerator can be driven by various types of electrical-pulse generators, including conventional Marx generators and linear-transformer drivers. The pulsed-power accelerator can be configured to drive an electrical load from one- or two-sides. Various types of loads can be driven; for example, the accelerator can be used to drive a high-current z-pinch load. When driven by slow-pulse generators (e.g., conventional Marx generators), the accelerator comprises an oil section comprising at least one pulse-generator level having a plurality of pulse generators; a water section comprising a pulse-forming circuit for each pulse generator and a level of monolithic triplate radial-transmission-line impedance transformers, that have variable impedance profiles, for each pulse-generator level; and a vacuum section comprising triplate magnetically insulated transmission lines that feed an electrical load. When driven by LTD generators or other fast-pulse generators, the need for the pulse-forming circuits in the water section can be eliminated.

  2. Pulse transformer R and D for NLC klystron pulse modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akemoto, M.; Gold, S.; Krasnykh, A.; Koontz, R.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied a conventional pulse transformer for the NLC klystron pulse modulator. The transformer has been analyzed using a simplified lumped circuit model. It is found that a fast rise time requires low leakage inductance and low distributed capacitance and can be realized by reducing the number of secondary turns, but it produces larger pulse droop and requires a larger core size. After making a tradeoff among these parameters carefully, a conventional pulse transformer with a rise time of 250ns and a pulse droop of 3.6% has been designed and built. The transmission characteristics and pulse time-response were measured. The data were compared with the model. The agreement with the model was good when the measured values were used in the model simulation. The results of the high voltage tests using a klystron load are also presented

  3. Random pulse generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Ya'nan; Jin Dapeng; Zhao Dixin; Liu Zhen'an; Qiao Qiao; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

    2007-01-01

    Due to the randomness of radioactive decay and nuclear reaction, the signals from detectors are random in time. But normal pulse generator generates periodical pulses. To measure the performances of nuclear electronic devices under random inputs, a random generator is necessary. Types of random pulse generator are reviewed, 2 digital random pulse generators are introduced. (authors)

  4. Fiber Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification of Sub-Picosecond Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina; Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Da Ros, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally, for the first time to our knowledge, fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification of 400-fs pulses. The 400-fs signal is stretched, amplified by 26 dB and compressed back to 500 fs.......We demonstrate experimentally, for the first time to our knowledge, fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification of 400-fs pulses. The 400-fs signal is stretched, amplified by 26 dB and compressed back to 500 fs....

  5. Control of concerted two bond versus single bond dissociation in CH3Co(CO)4 via an intermediate state using pump-dump laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosek, David; González, Leticia

    2007-10-01

    Wavepacket propagations on ab initio multiconfigurational two-dimensional potential energy surfaces for CH3Co(CO)4 indicate that after irradiation to the lowest first and second electronic excited states, concerted dissociation of CH3 and the axial CO ligand takes place. We employ a pump-dump sequence of pulses with appropriate frequencies and time delays to achieve the selective breakage of a single bond by controlling the dissociation angle. The pump and dump pulse sequence exploits the unbound surface where dissociation occurs in a counterintuitive fashion; stretching of one bond in an intermediate state enhances the single dissociation of the other bond.

  6. Control of concerted two bond versus single bond dissociation in CH(3)Co(CO)(4) via an intermediate state using pump-dump laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosek, David; González, Leticia

    2007-10-07

    Wavepacket propagations on ab initio multiconfigurational two-dimensional potential energy surfaces for CH(3)Co(CO)(4) indicate that after irradiation to the lowest first and second electronic excited states, concerted dissociation of CH(3) and the axial CO ligand takes place. We employ a pump-dump sequence of pulses with appropriate frequencies and time delays to achieve the selective breakage of a single bond by controlling the dissociation angle. The pump and dump pulse sequence exploits the unbound surface where dissociation occurs in a counterintuitive fashion; stretching of one bond in an intermediate state enhances the single dissociation of the other bond.

  7. Pulse-to-pulse variations in accreting X-ray pulsars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kretschmar Peter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In most accreting X-ray pulsars, the periodic signal is very clear and easily shows up as soon as data covering sufficient pulse periods (a few ten are available. The mean pulse profile is often quite typical for a given source and with minor variations repeated and recognisable across observations done years or even decades apart. At the time scale of individual pulses, significant pulse-to-pulse variations are commonly observed. While at low energies some of these variations might be explained by absorption, in the hard X-rays they will reflect changes in the accretion and subsequent emission. The amount of these variations appears to be quite different between sources and contains information about the surrounding material as well ass possibly interactions at the magnetosphere. We investigate such variations for a sample of well-known sources.

  8. Digital coherent detection research on Brillouin optical time domain reflectometry with simplex pulse codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Yun-Qi; Ye Qing; Pan Zheng-Qing; Cai Hai-Wen; Qu Rong-Hui

    2014-01-01

    The digital coherent detection technique has been investigated without any frequency-scanning device in the Brillouin optical time domain reflectometry (BOTDR), where the simplex pulse codes are applied in the sensing system. The time domain signal of every code sequence is collected by the data acquisition card (DAQ). A shift-averaging technique is applied in the frequency domain for the reason that the local oscillator (LO) in the coherent detection is fix-frequency deviated from the primary source. With the 31-bit simplex code, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) has 3.5-dB enhancement with the same single pulse traces, accordant with the theoretical analysis. The frequency fluctuation for simplex codes is 14.01 MHz less than that for a single pulse as to 4-m spatial resolution. The results are believed to be beneficial for the BOTDR performance improvement. (general)

  9. Pulse to pulse klystron diagnosis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, J.; Davidson, V.; Genova, L.; Johnson, R.; Reagan, D.

    1981-03-01

    This report describes a system used to study the behavior of SLAC high powered klystrons operating with a twice normal pulse width of 5 μs. At present, up to eight of the klystrons installed along the accelerator can be operated with long pulses and monitored by this system. The report will also discuss some of the recent findings and investigations

  10. Efficient chirped-pulse amplification of sub-20 fs laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, Shinichi; Yamakawa, Koichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    We have developed a model for ultrabroadband and ultrashort pulse amplification including the effects of a pulse shaper for regenerative pulse shaping, gain narrowing and gain saturation in the amplifiers. Thin solid etalons are used to control both gain narrowing and gain saturation during amplification. This model has been used to design an optimized Ti:sapphire amplifier system for producing efficiently pulses of < 20-fs duration with approaching peak and average powers of 100 TW and 20 W. (author)

  11. Patterns of digital volume pulse waveform and pulse transit time in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study the digital volume pulse wave and the pulse transit time of the thumb and big toe were analyzed in young and older subjects some of whom were hypertensive. We aimed to study the components and patterns of the pulse waveform and the pulse transit time and how they might change. Material and Methods: ...

  12. Suppression of Repeat-Intensive False Targets Based on Temporal Pulse Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Lu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of suppressing the repeat-intensive false targets produced by a deception electronic attack (EA system equipped with a Digital Radio Frequency Memory (DRFM device. Different from a conventional repeat jammer, this type of jamming intensively retransmits the intercepted signal stored in a DRFM to the victim radar in a very short time-delay interval relative to a radar pulse wide. A multipeak matched-filtering output is then produced other than the merely expected true target. An electronic protection (EP algorithm based on the space time block code (STBC is proposed to suppress the adverse effects of this jammer. By transmitting a pulse sequence generated from the STBC in succession and the following cancellation process applied upon the received signal, this algorithm performs successfully in a single antenna system provided that the target models are nonfluctuating or slow fluctuating and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF is comparatively high. The performance in white and correlated Gaussian disturbance is evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. A 350 KV nanosecond pulse voltage generator with adjustable pulsed-width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Wang, M.; Chen, Y.Q.; Zeng, L.G.; Han, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a 350 kV nanosecond pulse voltage generator (NPVG). The voltage pulsed-width can be adjusted from 30 to 160 ns. The generator consists of: Marx generator, pulsed forming line (PFL), main switch and matched impedance. The output voltage of Marx generator is over than nU c (n- the stage number of Marx generator, U c -the charging voltage of capacitor). When the pulse forming line is terminated with an impedance that is over than the characteristic impedance of PFL, the higher voltage pulse was provided for the load

  14. Pulsed hydrogen fluoride laser oscillator-amplifier experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schott, G.L.

    1975-01-01

    Pulsed HF chemical laser oscillator energies were scaled from millijoules to several kilojoules over the period 1970-1974, reaching approximately 10 J with SF 6 and transverse discharges, and using electron-beam initiation and elemental F 2 above 1000J. This demonstrated scalability to large energy with acceptable electrical efficiency is only one prerequisite for application of this gas laser in fusion; equally important matters are achievement of focusable, approximately 1 ns pulses, couplable to light-element targets, all from an affordable system. Exploratory MOPA experiments are reported which address control of HF laser beam focusability and pulse duration, using SF 6 -based experimental oscillator--amplifier sequences and Pockels' cell switching. Simultaneous multiline lasing with 2.6 less than or equal to lambda less than or equal to 3.1 μm and high specific gain and energy density are particularly important factors encountered with HF, where amplifier pumping and lasing occur in a substantially cw temporal relationship, even in less than 100 ns bursts. Time-resolved SF 6 --HI oscillator spectra contain 27 simultaneous lines from six vibrational bands. An apertured, SF 6 -hydrocarbon pin-discharge oscillator generates approximately 10 mJ of TEM 00 radiation, which is amplified to approximately 1 J in approximately 150 ns by a TEA amplifier and p []opagated tens of meters. A three-stage system coupling these elements through an approximately 1 ns electrooptic gate to a greater than 10 J, e-beam energized amplifier is under development. (auth)

  15. Modified Hermite Pulse-Based Wideband Communication for High-Speed Data Transfer in Wireless Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushal P. Pradhan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With technological advances in the field of communication, the need for reliable high-speed data transfer is increasing. The deployment of large number of wireless sensors for remote monitoring and control and streaming of high definition video, voice and image data, etc. are imposing a challenge to the existing network bandwidth allocation for reliable communication. Two novel schemes for ultra-wide band (UWB communication technology have been proposed in this paper with the key objective of intensifying the data rate by taking advantage of the orthogonal properties of the modified Hermite pulse (MHP. In the first scheme, a composite pulse is transmitted and in the second scheme, a sequence of multi-order orthogonal pulses is transmitted in the place of a single UWB pulse. The MHP pulses exhibit a mutually orthogonal property between different ordered pulses and due to this property, simultaneous transmission is achieved without collision in the UWB system, resulting in an increase in transmission capacity or improved bit error rate. The proposed schemes for enhanced data rate will offer high volume data monitoring, assessment, and control of wireless devices without overburdening the network bandwidth and pave the way for new platforms for future high-speed wireless sensor applications.

  16. Communication: Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms: Controlling the photoisomerization yield of retinal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, R. D., E-mail: rdguerrerom@unal.edu.co [Department of Physics, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia); Arango, C. A., E-mail: caarango@icesi.edu.co [Department of Chemical Sciences, Universidad Icesi, Cali (Colombia); Reyes, A., E-mail: areyesv@unal.edu.co [Department of Chemistry, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia)

    2016-07-21

    We recently proposed a Quantum Optimal Control (QOC) method constrained to build pulses from analytical pulse shapes [R. D. Guerrero et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143(12), 124108 (2015)]. This approach was applied to control the dissociation channel yields of the diatomic molecule KH, considering three potential energy curves and one degree of freedom. In this work, we utilized this methodology to study the strong field control of the cis-trans photoisomerization of 11-cis retinal. This more complex system was modeled with a Hamiltonian comprising two potential energy surfaces and two degrees of freedom. The resulting optimal pulse, made of 6 linearly chirped pulses, was capable of controlling the population of the trans isomer on the ground electronic surface for nearly 200 fs. The simplicity of the pulse generated with our QOC approach offers two clear advantages: a direct analysis of the sequence of events occurring during the driven dynamics, and its reproducibility in the laboratory with current laser technologies.

  17. Interaction with the lower ionosphere of electromagnetic pulses from lightning - Heating, attachment, and ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranenko, Y. N.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    A Boltzmann formulation of the electron distribution function and Maxwell's equations for the EM fields are used to simulate the interaction of lightning radiated EM pulses with the lower ionosphere. Ionization and dissociative attachment induced by the heated electrons cause significant changes in the local electron density, N(e). Due to 'slow' field changes of typical lightning EM pulses over time scales of tens of microsec, the distribution function follows the quasi-equilibrium solution of the Boltzmann equation in the altitude range of interest (70 to 100 km). The EM pulse is simulated as a planar 100 microsec long single period oscillation of a 10 kHz wave injected at 70 km. Under nighttime conditions, individual pulses of intensity 10-20 V/m (normalized to 100 km horizontal distance) produce changes in N(e) of 1-30 percent while a sequence of pulses leads to strong modification of N(e) at altitudes less than 95 km. The N(e) changes produce a 'sharpening' of the lower ionospheric boundary by causing a reduction in electron density at 75-85 km (due to attachment) and a substantial increase at 85-95 km (due to ionization) (e.g., the scale height decreases by a factor of about 2 at about 85 km for a single 20 V/m EM pulse). No substantial N(e) changes occur during daytime.

  18. Enhancement of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Heating by Short-Pulse Generated Cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Yoshizawa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A target tissue can be thermally coagulated in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU treatment noninvasively. HIFU thermal treatments have been clinically applied to various solid tumors. One of the problems in HIFU treatments is a long treatment time. Acoustically driven microbubbles can accelerate the ultrasonic heating, resulting in the significant reduction of the treatment time. In this paper, a method named “trigger HIFU exposure” which employs cavitation microbubbles is introduced and its results are reviewed. A trigger HIFU sequence consists of high-intensity short pulses followed by moderate-intensity long bursts. Cavitation bubbles induced in a multiple focal regions by rapidly scanning the focus of high-intensity pulses enhanced the temperature increase significantly and produced a large coagulation region with high efficiency.

  19. Optical pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The interest in using large lasers to achieve a very short and intense pulse for generating fusion plasma has provided a strong impetus to reexamine the possibilities of optical pulse compression at high energy. Pulse compression allows one to generate pulses of long duration (minimizing damage problems) and subsequently compress optical pulses to achieve the short pulse duration required for specific applications. The ideal device for carrying out this program has not been developed. Of the two approaches considered, the Gires--Tournois approach is limited by the fact that the bandwidth and compression are intimately related, so that the group delay dispersion times the square of the bandwidth is about unity for all simple Gires--Tournois interferometers. The Treacy grating pair does not suffer from this limitation, but is inefficient because diffraction generally occurs in several orders and is limited by the problem of optical damage to the grating surfaces themselves. Nonlinear and parametric processes were explored. Some pulse compression was achieved by these techniques; however, they are generally difficult to control and are not very efficient. (U.S.)

  20. Psychological Stress In First Year Medical Students In Response To The Dissection Of A Human Corpse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Veronika; Rothkötter, Hermann Josef; Kasten, Erich

    2012-01-01

    the confrontation with corpses. Furthermore, personality tests were shown to be only partly reliable for selecting affected people in advance. With regard to these results capabilities to provide support to the first year medical students should be discussed. PMID:22403597

  1. Pulse induction heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, A S; Kachanov, B Y; Kogan, B V

    1993-12-31

    Induction heating and three types of pulse processes were studied. It was found that in pulse processes the frequency and pulse duration of heat treatments do not remain constant. High frequency pulse heat treatments can be used on sprayed coatings; such treatments will result in stronger surfaces with no cracks. For induction hardening, the rate of specific power was 1 to 1.5 kW/sq.cm, for forging it was 0.2 to 0.3 kW/sq.cm and for melting it was 0.05 to 0.1 kW/sq.cm. The application of pulse heating will result in higher rates of specific power.

  2. Pulse-shaping mechanism in colliding-pulse mode-locked laser diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Svend; Sørensen, Mads Peter; Mørk, J.

    1995-01-01

    The large signal dynamics of passively colliding pulse mode-locked laser diodes is studied. We derive a model which explains modelocking via the interplay of gain and loss dynamics; no bandwidth limiting element is necessary for pulse formation. It is found necessary to have both fast and slow...... absorber dynamics to achieve mode-locking. Significant chirp is predicted for pulses emitted from long lasers, in agreement with experiment. The pulse width shows a strong dependence on both cavity and saturable absorber length. (C) 1995 American Institute of Physics....

  3. Generation of brain pseudo-CTs using an undersampled, single-acquisition UTE-mDixon pulse sequence and unsupervised clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Kuan-Hao; Hu, Lingzhi; Traughber, Melanie; Stehning, Christian; Helle, Michael; Qian, Pengjiang; Thompson, Cheryl L.; Pereira, Gisele C.; Traughber, Bryan J.; Jordan, David W.; Herrmann, Karin A.; Muzic, Raymond F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: MR-based pseudo-CT has an important role in MR-based radiation therapy planning and PET attenuation correction. The purpose of this study is to establish a clinically feasible approach, including image acquisition, correction, and CT formation, for pseudo-CT generation of the brain using a single-acquisition, undersampled ultrashort echo time (UTE)-mDixon pulse sequence. Methods: Nine patients were recruited for this study. For each patient, a 190-s, undersampled, single acquisition UTE-mDixon sequence of the brain was acquired (TE = 0.1, 1.5, and 2.8 ms). A novel method of retrospective trajectory correction of the free induction decay (FID) signal was performed based on point-spread functions of three external MR markers. Two-point Dixon images were reconstructed using the first and second echo data (TE = 1.5 and 2.8 ms). R2 ∗ images (1/T2 ∗ ) were then estimated and were used to provide bone information. Three image features, i.e., Dixon-fat, Dixon-water, and R2 ∗ , were used for unsupervised clustering. Five tissue clusters, i.e., air, brain, fat, fluid, and bone, were estimated using the fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm. A two-step, automatic tissue-assignment approach was proposed and designed according to the prior information of the given feature space. Pseudo-CTs were generated by a voxelwise linear combination of the membership functions of the FCM. A low-dose CT was acquired for each patient and was used as the gold standard for comparison. Results: The contrast and sharpness of the FID images were improved after trajectory correction was applied. The mean of the estimated trajectory delay was 0.774 μs (max: 1.350 μs; min: 0.180 μs). The FCM-estimated centroids of different tissue types showed a distinguishable pattern for different tissues, and significant differences were found between the centroid locations of different tissue types. Pseudo-CT can provide additional skull detail and has low bias and absolute error of estimated CT

  4. S100 lathe bed pulse generator applied to pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernicchiaro, G.R.C.; Rudge, M.G.; Albuquerque, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The project and construction of four channel pulse generator in the S100 standard plate and its control software for microcomputer are described. The microcomputer has total control on the pulse generator, which has seven programable parameters, defining the position of four pulses and the width for the three first ones. This pulse generator is controlled by a software developed in c language, and is used in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance experiences. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Pulse Compression Techniques for Laser Generated Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, R. F.; Madaras, E. I.

    1999-01-01

    Laser generated ultrasound for nondestructive evaluation has an optical power density limit due to rapid high heating that causes material damage. This damage threshold limits the generated ultrasound amplitude, which impacts nondestructive evaluation inspection capability. To increase ultrasound signal levels and improve the ultrasound signal-to-noise ratio without exceeding laser power limitations, it is possible to use pulse compression techniques. The approach illustrated here uses a 150mW laser-diode modulated with a pseudo-random sequence and signal correlation. Results demonstrate the successful generation of ultrasonic bulk waves in aluminum and graphite-epoxy composite materials using a modulated low-power laser diode and illustrate ultrasound bandwidth control.

  6. MR arthrography of the shoulder: Optimizing pulse sequence protocols for the evaluation of cartilage and labrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guermazi, Ali, E-mail: Ali.Guermazi@aspetar.com [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Jomaah, Nabil [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Hayashi, Daichi [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Department of Radiology, Bridgeport Hospital, Yale University School of Medicine, 267 Grant Street, Bridgeport, CT 06610 (United States); Jarraya, Mohamed [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Silva, Jose Roberto [Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Niu, Jingbo [Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, 650 Albany Street, Suite 200, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Almusa, Emad; Landreau, Philippe [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); and others

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To compare axial T1weighted fat-saturated (T1w fs) and T1w non-fs sequences, and coronal T1w-fs and T2w-fs sequences, for evaluation of cartilage and labrum using CT arthrography (CTA) as the reference. Methods: Patients had MR arthrography (MRA) and CTA of the shoulder on the same day. Cartilage was assessed for superficial and full thickness focal and diffuse damage. Labral lesions were graded for Bankart variants and SLAP lesions. CTA images were read for the same features. The diagnostic performance of MRA including area under the curve (AUC) was evaluated against CTA. Results: When comparing axial sequences, the diagnostic performance for cartilage lesion detection on T1w non-fs was 61.9% (sensitivity) 93.6% (specificity) and 89.5% (accuracy) with AUC 0.782, while that for T1w fs was 61.9%, 94.0%, 89.8% and 0.783. For labral assessment, it was 89.1%, 93.0%, 91.4% and 0.919 for T1w non-fs, and 89.9%, 94.0%, 92.6% and 0.922 for T1w fs. Comparing coronal sequences, diagnostic performance for cartilage was 42.5%, 97.5%, 89.8% and 0.702 for T1w fs, and 38.4%, 98.7%, 90.2%, and 0.686 for T2w fs. For the labrum it was 85.1%, 87.5%, 86.2%, and 0.868 for T1w fs, and 75.7%, 97.5%, 80.8% and 0.816 for T2w fs. Conclusions: Axial T1w fs and T1w non-fs sequences are comparable in their ability to diagnose cartilage and labral lesions. Coronal T1w fs sequence offers slightly higher sensitivity but slightly lower specificity than T2w fs sequence for diagnosis of cartilage and labral lesions.

  7. MR arthrography of the shoulder: Optimizing pulse sequence protocols for the evaluation of cartilage and labrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guermazi, Ali; Jomaah, Nabil; Hayashi, Daichi; Jarraya, Mohamed; Silva, Jose Roberto; Niu, Jingbo; Almusa, Emad; Landreau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare axial T1weighted fat-saturated (T1w fs) and T1w non-fs sequences, and coronal T1w-fs and T2w-fs sequences, for evaluation of cartilage and labrum using CT arthrography (CTA) as the reference. Methods: Patients had MR arthrography (MRA) and CTA of the shoulder on the same day. Cartilage was assessed for superficial and full thickness focal and diffuse damage. Labral lesions were graded for Bankart variants and SLAP lesions. CTA images were read for the same features. The diagnostic performance of MRA including area under the curve (AUC) was evaluated against CTA. Results: When comparing axial sequences, the diagnostic performance for cartilage lesion detection on T1w non-fs was 61.9% (sensitivity) 93.6% (specificity) and 89.5% (accuracy) with AUC 0.782, while that for T1w fs was 61.9%, 94.0%, 89.8% and 0.783. For labral assessment, it was 89.1%, 93.0%, 91.4% and 0.919 for T1w non-fs, and 89.9%, 94.0%, 92.6% and 0.922 for T1w fs. Comparing coronal sequences, diagnostic performance for cartilage was 42.5%, 97.5%, 89.8% and 0.702 for T1w fs, and 38.4%, 98.7%, 90.2%, and 0.686 for T2w fs. For the labrum it was 85.1%, 87.5%, 86.2%, and 0.868 for T1w fs, and 75.7%, 97.5%, 80.8% and 0.816 for T2w fs. Conclusions: Axial T1w fs and T1w non-fs sequences are comparable in their ability to diagnose cartilage and labral lesions. Coronal T1w fs sequence offers slightly higher sensitivity but slightly lower specificity than T2w fs sequence for diagnosis of cartilage and labral lesions

  8. Laser pulse stacking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  9. Analysis on the use of Multi-Sequence MRI Series for Segmentation of Abdominal Organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selver, M A; Selvi, E; Kavur, E; Dicle, O

    2015-01-01

    Segmentation of abdominal organs from MRI data sets is a challenging task due to various limitations and artefacts. During the routine clinical practice, radiologists use multiple MR sequences in order to analyze different anatomical properties. These sequences have different characteristics in terms of acquisition parameters (such as contrast mechanisms and pulse sequence designs) and image properties (such as pixel spacing, slice thicknesses and dynamic range). For a complete understanding of the data, computational techniques should combine the information coming from these various MRI sequences. These sequences are not acquired in parallel but in a sequential manner (one after another). Therefore, patient movements and respiratory motions change the position and shape of the abdominal organs. In this study, the amount of these effects is measured using three different symmetric surface distance metrics performed to three dimensional data acquired from various MRI sequences. The results are compared to intra and inter observer differences and discussions on using multiple MRI sequences for segmentation and the necessities for registration are presented

  10. Experimental Investigation of Pulsed Nanosecond Streamer Discharges for CO2 Reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachuilo, Michael; Levko, Dima; Raja, Laxminarayan; Varghese, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Rapid global industrialization has led to an increase in atmospheric greenhouse gases, specifically carbon dioxide levels. Plasmas present a great potential for efficient reforming of greenhouse gases. There are several plasma discharges which have been reported for reforming process: dielectric barrier discharges (DBD), microwave discharges, and glide-arcs. Microwave discharges have CO2 conversion energy efficiency of up to 40% at atmospheric conditions, while glide-arcs have 43% and DBD 2-10%. In our study, we analyze a single nanosecond pulsed cathode directed streamer discharge in CO2 at atmospheric pressure and temperature. We have conducted time resolved imaging with spectral bandpass filters of a streamer discharge with an applied negative polarity pulse. The image sequences have been correlated to the applied voltage and current pulses. From the spectral filters we can determine where spatially and temporally excited species are formed. In this talk we report on spectroscopic studies of the discharge and estimate plasma properties such as temperature and density of excited species and electrons. Furthermore, we report on the effects of pulse polarity as well as anodic streamer discharges on the CO2 conversion efficiency. Finally, we will focus on the effects of vibrational excitation on carbon dioxide reforming efficiency for streamer discharges. Our experimental results will be compared with an accompanying plasma computational model studies.

  11. Quasi-Coherent Noise Jamming to LFM Radar Based on Pseudo-random Sequence Phase-modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Tai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel quasi-coherent noise jamming method is proposed against linear frequency modulation (LFM signal and pulse compression radar. Based on the structure of digital radio frequency memory (DRFM, the jamming signal is acquired by the pseudo-random sequence phase-modulation of sampled radar signal. The characteristic of jamming signal in time domain and frequency domain is analyzed in detail. Results of ambiguity function indicate that the blanket jamming effect along the range direction will be formed when jamming signal passes through the matched filter. By flexible controlling the parameters of interrupted-sampling pulse and pseudo-random sequence, different covering distances and jamming effects will be achieved. When the jamming power is equivalent, this jamming obtains higher process gain compared with non-coherent jamming. The jamming signal enhances the detection threshold and the real target avoids being detected. Simulation results and circuit engineering implementation validate that the jamming signal covers real target effectively.

  12. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  13. Exact solution to the problem of nonlinear pulse propagation through random layered media and its connection with number triangles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolow, Adam; Sen, Surajit

    2007-01-01

    An energy pulse refers to a spatially compact energy bundle. In nonlinear pulse propagation, the nonlinearity of the relevant dynamical equations could lead to pulse propagation that is nondispersive or weakly dispersive in space and time. Nonlinear pulse propagation through layered media with widely varying pulse transmission properties is not wave-like and a problem of broad interest in many areas such as optics, geophysics, atmospheric physics and ocean sciences. We study nonlinear pulse propagation through a semi-infinite sequence of layers where the layers can have arbitrary energy transmission properties. By assuming that the layers are rigid, we are able to develop exact expressions for the backscattered energy received at the surface layer. The present study is likely to be relevant in the context of energy transport through soil and similar complex media. Our study reveals a surprising connection between the problem of pulse propagation and the number patterns in the well known Pascal's and Catalan's triangles and hence provides an analytic benchmark in a challenging problem of broad interest. We close with comments on the relationship between this study and the vast body of literature on the problem of wave localization in disordered systems

  14. Optimal pulse fishing policy in stage-structured models with birth pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shujing; Chen Lansun; Sun Lihua

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose exploited models with stage structure for the dynamics in a fish population for which periodic birth pulse and pulse fishing occur at different fixed time. Using the stroboscopic map, we obtain an exact cycle of system, and obtain the threshold conditions for its stability. Bifurcation diagrams are constructed with the birth rate (or pulse fishing time or harvesting effort) as the bifurcation parameter, and these are observed to display complex dynamic behaviors, including chaotic bands with period windows, period-doubling, multi-period-halving and incomplete period-doubling bifurcation, pitch-fork and tangent bifurcation, non-unique dynamics (meaning that several attractors or attractor and chaos coexist) and attractor crisis. This suggests that birth pulse and pulse fishing provide a natural period or cyclicity that make the dynamical behaviors more complex. Moreover, we show that the pulse fishing has a strong impact on the persistence of the fish population, on the volume of mature fish stock and on the maximum annual-sustainable yield. An interesting result is obtained that, after the birth pulse, the population can sustain much higher harvesting effort if the mature fish is removed as early as possible

  15. A compact bipolar pulse-forming network-Marx generator based on pulse transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huibo; Yang, Jianhua; Lin, Jiajin; Yang, Xiao

    2013-11-01

    A compact bipolar pulse-forming network (PFN)-Marx generator based on pulse transformers is presented in this paper. The high-voltage generator consisted of two sets of pulse transformers, 6 stages of PFNs with ceramic capacitors, a switch unit, and a matched load. The design is characterized by the bipolar pulse charging scheme and the compact structure of the PFN-Marx. The scheme of bipolar charging by pulse transformers increased the withstand voltage of the ceramic capacitors in the PFNs and decreased the number of the gas gap switches. The compact structure of the PFN-Marx was aimed at reducing the parasitic inductance in the generator. When the charging voltage on the PFNs was 35 kV, the matched resistive load of 48 Ω could deliver a high-voltage pulse with an amplitude of 100 kV. The full width at half maximum of the load pulse was 173 ns, and its rise time was less than 15 ns.

  16. Development of bipolar pulse accelerator for intense pulsed ion beam acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Y.; Mitsui, C.; Kitamura, I.; Takahashi, T.; Masugata, K.; Tanoue, H.; Arai, K.

    2003-01-01

    To improve the purity of an intense pulsed ion beams a new type of pulsed ion beam accelerator named 'bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA)' was proposed. In the accelerator purity of the beam is expected. To confirm the principle of the accelerator experimental system was developed. The system utilizes B y type magnetically insulated acceleration gap and operated with single polar negative pulse. A coaxial gas puff plasma gun placed in the grounded anode was used as an ion source, and source plasma (nitrogen) of current density approx. = 25 A/cm 2 , duration approx. = 1.5 μs was injected into the acceleration gap. The ions are successfully accelerated from the grounded anode to the drift tube by applying negative pulse of voltage 180 kV, duration 60 ns to the drift tube. Pulsed ion beam of current density approx. = 40 A/cm 2 , duration approx. 60 ns was obtained at 42 mm downstream from the anode surface. (author)

  17. Producing High Intense Attosecond Pulse Train by Interaction of Three-Color Pulse and Overdense Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, M.; Mirzanejad, S.

    2017-05-01

    Amplifying the attosecond pulse by the chirp pulse amplification method is impossible. Furthermore, the intensity of attosecond pulse is low in the interaction of laser pulse and underdense plasma. This motivates us to propose using a multi-color pulse to produce the high intense attosecond pulse. In the present study, the relativistic interaction of a three-color linearly-polarized laser-pulse with highly overdense plasma is studied. We show that the combination of {{ω }}1, {{ω }}2 and {{ω }}3 frequencies decreases the instance full width at half maximum reflected attosecond pulse train from the overdense plasma surface. Moreover, we show that the three-color pulse increases the intensity of generated harmonics, which is explained by the relativistic oscillating mirror model. The obtained results demonstrate that if the three-color laser pulse interacts with overdense plasma, it will enhance two orders of magnitude of intensity of ultra short attosecond pulses in comparison with monochromatic pulse.

  18. Concave pulse shaping of a circularly polarized laser pulse from non-uniform overdense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, Min Sup [School of Natural Science, UNIST, BanYeon-Ri 100, Ulju-gun, Ulsan, 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Kulagin, Victor V. [Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow State University, Universitetsky prosp. 13, Moscow, 119992 (Russian Federation); Suk, Hyyong, E-mail: hysuk@gist.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Photon Science, GIST, 123 Cheomdan-gwangiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju, 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-20

    Pulse shaping of circularly polarized laser pulses in nonuniform overdense plasmas are investigated numerically. Specifically we show by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations the generation of a concave pulse front of a circularly polarized, a few tens of petawatt laser pulse from a density-tapered, overdense plasma slab. The concept used for the transverse-directional shaping is the differential transmittance depending on the plasma density, and the laser intensity. For suitable selection of the slab parameters for the concave pulse shaping, we studied numerically the pulse transmittance, which can be used for further parameter design of the pulse shaping. The concavely shaped circularly polarized pulse is expected to add more freedom in controlling the ion-beam characteristics in the RPDA regime. - Highlights: • Laser pulse shaping for a concave front by non-uniform overdense plasma was studied. • Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations were used for the investigation. • A laser pulse can be shaped by a density-tapered overdense plasma. • The concave and sharp pulse front are useful in many laser–plasma applications. • They are important for ion acceleration, especially in the radiation pressure dominant regime.

  19. Nanosecond time-resolved EPR in pulse radiolysis via the spin echo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.; Norris, J.R.; Lawler, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    The design and operation of a time-resolved electron spin echo spectrometer suitable for detecting transient radicals produced by 3 MeV electron radiolysis is described. Two modes of operation are available: Field swept mode which generates a normal EPR spectrum and kinetic mode in which the time dependence of a single EPR line is monitored. Techniques which may be used to minimize the effects of nonideal microwave pulses and overlapping sample tube signals are described. The principal advantages of the spin echo method over other time-resolved EPR methods are: (1) Improved time resolution (presently approx.30--50 nsec) allows monitoring of fast changes in EPR signals of transient radicals, (2) Lower susceptibility to interference between the EPR signal and the electron beam pulse at short times, and (3) Lack of dependence of transient signals on microwave field amplitude or static field inhomogeneity at short times. The performance of the instrument is illustrated using CIDEP from acetate radical formed in pulsed radiolysis of aqueous solutions of potassium acetate. The relaxation time and CIDEP enhancement factor obtained for this radical using the spin echo method compare favorably with previous determinations using direct detection EPR. Radical decay rates yield estimates of initial radical concentrations of 10 -4 10 -3 M per electron pulse. The Bloch equations are solved to give an expression for the echo signal for samples exhibiting CIDEP using arbitrary microwave pulse widths and distributions of Larmor frequencies. Conditions are discussed under which the time-dependent signal would be distorted by deviations from an ideal nonselective 90 0 --tau--180 0 pulse sequence

  20. Long-pulse applications of pulse-forming lines for high-power linac application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeberling, R.F.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    The ever present demands for high efficiency in the RF power stations for particle accelerators have caused increased interest in longer RF pulses (ten's of microseconds) for linacs such as the Pion Generator for Medical Irradiation (PIGMI) and Free Electron Laser (FEL). For either RF power station, a fundamental decision is whether to use a modulating anode/hard-tube driver or pulsed cathode/line-type pulser configuration. The choices in the extremes of low power for very long pulses or for very-high-power, short pulses are, respectively, a modulated anode/hard tube modulator and pulsed cathode/pulse forming line. However, the demarcation between these two extremes is not clearcut. The criteria (cost, flexibility performance, reliability, efficiency) that resulted in the RF station definition of these two specific systems will be described

  1. Charge and spin dynamics driven by ultrashort extreme broadband pulses: A theory perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalenko, Andrey S., E-mail: andrey.moskalenko@uni-konstanz.de [Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06099 Halle (Germany); Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Zhu, Zhen-Gang, E-mail: zgzhu@ucas.ac.cn [Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06099 Halle (Germany); School of Electronic, Electrical and Communication Engineering, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Berakdar, Jamal, E-mail: jamal.berakdar@physik.uni-halle.de [Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06099 Halle (Germany)

    2017-02-17

    This article gives an overview on recent theoretical progress in controlling the charge and spin dynamics in low-dimensional electronic systems by means of ultrashort and ultrabroadband electromagnetic pulses. A particular focus is put on sub-cycle and single-cycle pulses and their utilization for coherent control. The discussion is mostly limited to cases where the pulse duration is shorter than the characteristic time scales associated with the involved spectral features of the excitations. The relevant current theoretical knowledge is presented in a coherent, pedagogic manner. We work out that the pulse action amounts in essence to a quantum map between the quantum states of the system at an appropriately chosen time moment during the pulse. The influence of a particular pulse shape on the post-pulse dynamics is reduced to several integral parameters entering the expression for the quantum map. The validity range of this reduction scheme for different strengths of the driving fields is established and discussed for particular nanostructures. Acting with a periodic pulse sequence, it is shown how the system can be steered to and largely maintained in predefined states. The conditions for this nonequilibrium sustainability are worked out by means of geometric phases, which are identified as the appropriate quantities to indicate quasistationarity of periodically driven quantum systems. Demonstrations are presented for the control of the charge, spin, and valley degrees of freedom in nanostructures on picosecond and subpicosecond time scales. The theory is illustrated with several applications to one-dimensional semiconductor quantum wires and superlattices, double quantum dots, semiconductor and graphene quantum rings. In the case of a periodic pulsed driving the influence of the relaxation and decoherence processes is included by utilizing the density matrix approach. The integrated and time-dependent spectra of the light emitted from the driven system deliver

  2. Development of bipolar-pulse accelerator for intense pulsed ion beam acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masugata, Katsumi [Department of Electrical and Electronic System Engineering, Toyama University, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: masugata@eng.toyama-u.ac.jp; Shimizu, Yuichro [Department of Electrical and Electronic System Engineering, Toyama University, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Fujioka, Yuhki [Department of Electrical and Electronic System Engineering, Toyama University, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Kitamura, Iwao [Department of Electrical and Electronic System Engineering, Toyama University, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Tanoue, Hisao [National Institute of Advanced Industry Science and Technology, 1-1-1, Umezono, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Arai, Kazuo [National Institute of Advanced Industry Science and Technology, 1-1-1, Umezono, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2004-12-21

    To improve the purity of intense pulsed ion beams, a new type of pulsed ion beam accelerator named 'bipolar pulse accelerator' was proposed. To confirm the principle of the accelerator a prototype of the experimental system was developed. The system utilizes By type magnetically insulated acceleration gap and operated with single polar negative pulse. A coaxial gas puff plasma gun was used as an ion source, which was placed inside the grounded anode. Source plasma (nitrogen) of current density {approx}25A/cm2, duration {approx}1.5{mu}s was injected into the acceleration gap by the plasma gun. The ions were successfully accelerated from the grounded anode to the drift tube by applying negative pulse of voltage 240kV, duration 100ns to the drift tube. Pulsed ion beam of current density {approx}40A/cm2, duration {approx}50ns was obtained at 41mm downstream from the anode surface. To evaluate the irradiation effect of the ion beam to solid material, an amorphous silicon thin film of thickness {approx}500nm was used as the target, which was deposited on the glass substrate. The film was found to be poly-crystallized after 4-shots of the pulsed nitrogen ion beam irradiation.

  3. SU-E-J-231: Comparison of Delineation Variability of Soft Tissue Volume and Position in Head-And-Neck Between Two T1-Weighted Pulse Sequences Using An MR-Simulator with Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, O; Lo, G; Yuan, J; Law, M; Ding, A; Cheng, K; Chan, K; Cheung, K; Yu, S [Hong Kong Sanatorium & Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There is growing interests in applying MR-simulator(MR-sim) in radiotherapy but MR images subject to hardware, patient and pulse sequence dependent geometric distortion that may potentially influence target definition. This study aimed to evaluate the influence on head-and-neck tissue delineation, in terms of positional and volumetric variability, of two T1-weighted(T1w) MR sequences on a 1.5T MR-sim Methods: Four healthy volunteers were scanned (4 scans for each on different days) using both spin-echo (3DCUBE, TR/TE=500/14ms, TA=183s) and gradient-echo sequences (3DFSPGR, TE/TR=7/4ms, TA=173s) with identical coverage, voxel-size(0.8×0.8×1.0mm3), receiver-bandwidth(62.5kHz/pix) and geometric correction on a 1.5T MR-sim immobilized with personalized thermoplastic cast and head-rest. Under this setting, similar T1w contrast and signal-to-noise ratio were obtained, and factors other than sequence that might bias image distortion and tissue delineation were minimized. VOIs of parotid gland(PGR, PGL), pituitary gland(PIT) and eyeballs(EyeL, EyeR) were carefully drawn, and inter-scan coefficient-of-variation(CV) of VOI centroid position and volume were calculated for each subject. Mean and standard deviation(SD) of the CVs for four subjects were compared between sequences using Wilcoxon ranksum test. Results: The mean positional(<4%) and volumetric(<7%) CVs varied between tissues, majorly dependent on tissue inherent properties like volume, location, mobility and deformability. Smaller mean volumetric CV was found in 3DCUBE, probably due to its less proneness to tissue susceptibility, but only PGL showed significant difference(P<0.05). Positional CVs had no significant differences for all VOIs(P>0.05) between sequences, suggesting volumetric variation might be more sensitive to sequence-dependent delineation difference. Conclusion: Although 3DCUBE is considered less prone to tissue susceptibility-induced artifact and distortion, our preliminary data showed

  4. A high voltage pulse generator based on silicon-controlled rectifier for field-reversed configuration experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Munan; Liu, Ming; Zhu, Guanghui; Wang, Yanpeng; Shi, Peiyun; Sun, Xuan

    2017-08-01

    A high voltage pulse generator based on a silicon-controlled rectifier has been designed and implemented for a field reversed configuration experiment. A critical damping circuit is used in the generator to produce the desired pulse waveform. Depending on the load, the rise time of the output trigger signal can be less than 1 μs, and the peak amplitudes of trigger voltage and current are up to 8 kV and 85 A in a single output. The output voltage can be easily adjusted by changing the voltage on a capacitor of the generator. In addition, the generator integrates an electrically floating heater circuit so it is capable of triggering either pseudosparks (TDI-type hydrogen thyratron) or ignitrons. Details of the circuits and their implementation are described in the paper. The trigger generator has successfully controlled the discharging sequence of the pulsed power supply for a field reversed configuration experiment.

  5. Advanced materials for the optical delay line of frequency pulse modulator on the basis of semiconductor laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrarov, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    In the paper some materials which can be sued as an optical delay line of the pulse frequency modulator are considered. The structure and the principle are described as a modulator consisting of a laser diode with two Fabry Perot resonators and an optical wave guide providing a feedback loop. The optical wave guide fulfills the function of delay line and links the two resonators. The pulse sequence of the radiation of the semiconductor laser arises due to failure and recovery of optical generation. The pulse frequency modulation can be carried out by the action of electrical tension field on the electro optic martial of the wave guide. The selection of three electro-optic crystals for making of the optical wave guide of the considered modulator is justified. (author)

  6. MR of normal pancreas : comparison of five pulse sequences and enhancing patterns on dynamic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Hyun Jung; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Hong, Sung Hwan; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    1997-01-01

    To compare T1-weighted FLASH and turbo spin echo (SE) T2-weighted sequences with conventional T1- and T2-weighted sequences in imaging normal pancreas and to describe the enhancing patterns on dynamic MR imging. Forty-four patients with presumed hepatic hemangiomas were studied at 1.0T or 1.5T by using conventional SE sequences (T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and heavily T2-weighted), turbo-SE T2-weighted sequences, and breath-hold T1-weighted FLASH sequences acquired before, immediately on, and at 1, 2, 3, and 5 or 10 minutes after injection of a bolus of gadopentetate dimeglumine. No patients had either a history or its clinical features of pancreatic disease. Images were quantitatively analyzed for signal-difference-to noise ratios (SD/Ns) between the pancreas and peripancreatic fat. Percentage enhancement of the pancreas was measured on each dynamic MR image. Conspicuity of the pancreatic border was qualitatively evaluated according to a consensus, reached by three radiologists. Turbo-SE T2-weighted images had a significantly higher SD/N ratio (p<0.001) and better conspicuity of the pancreatic border (p<0.001) than SE T2- and heavily T2-weighted images;T1-weighted SE images had a significantly higher SD/N ratio than T1-weighted FLASH images (p<0.001), but there was no significant difference between tham in qualitative analysis (p=0.346). Percentage enhancement immediately on and at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 10 minutes after administration of contrast material was 39.9%, 44.5%, 42.9%, 40.8%, 36.3%, 29.9%, respectively, with peak enhancement at 1 minute. In MR imaging of normal pancreas, turbo-SE T2-weighted imaging is superior to SE T2- and heavily T2- weighted imaging, and SE T1-weighted imaging is superior to T1-weighted FLASH imaging. On serial gadolinium-enhanced FLASH imaging, normal pancreas shows peak enhancement at 1 minute

  7. Erbium:ytterbium fiber-laser system delivering watt-level femtosecond pulses using divided pulse amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herda, Robert; Zach, Armin

    2015-03-01

    We present an Erbium:Ytterbium codoped fiber-amplifer system based on Divided-Pulses-Amplification (DPA) for ultrashort pulses. The output from a saturable-absorber mode-locked polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber oscillator is amplified in a PM normal-dispersion Erbium-doped fiber. After this stage the pulses are positively chirped and have a duration of 2.0 ps at an average power of 93 mW. A stack of 5 birefringent Yttrium-Vanadate crystals divides these pulses 32 times. We amplify these pulses using a double-clad Erbium:Ytterbium codoped fiber pumped through a multimode fiber combiner. The pulses double pass the amplifier and recombine in the crystals using non-reciprocal polarization 90° rotation by a Faraday rotating mirror. Pulses with a duration of 144 fs are obtained after separation from the input beam using a polarizing beam splitter cube. These pulses have an average power of 1.85 W at a repetition rate of 80 MHz. The generation of femtosecond pulses directly from the amplifier was enabled by a positively chirped seed pulse, normally dispersive Yttrium-Vanadate crystals, and anomalously dispersive amplifier fibers. Efficient frequency doubling to 780 nm with an average power of 725 mW and a pulse duration of 156 fs is demonstrated. In summary we show a DPA setup that enables the generation of femtosecond pulses at watt-level at 1560 nm without the need for further external dechirping and demonstrate a good pulse quality by efficient frequency doubling. Due to the use of PM fiber components and a Faraday rotator the setup is environmentally stable.

  8. DogPulse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Christoffer; Thomsen, Josephine Raun; Verdezoto, Nervo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents DogPulse, an ambient awareness system to support the coordination of dog walking among family members at home. DogPulse augments a dog collar and leash set to activate an ambient shape-changing lamp and visualize the last time the dog was taken for a walk. The lamp gradually...... changes its form and pulsates its lights in order to keep the family members aware of the dog walking activity. We report the iterative prototyping of DogPulse, its implementation and its preliminary evaluation. Based on our initial findings, we present the limitations and lessons learned as well...

  9. Time-domain SFG spectroscopy using mid-IR pulse shaping: practical and intrinsic advantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaser, Jennifer E; Xiong, Wei; Zanni, Martin T

    2011-03-24

    Sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy is a ubiquitous tool in the surface sciences. It provides infrared transition frequencies and line shapes that probe the structure and environment of molecules at interfaces. In this article, we apply techniques learned from the multidimensional spectroscopy community to SFG spectroscopy. We implement balanced heterodyne detection to remove scatter and the local oscillator background. Heterodyning also separates the resonant and nonresonant signals by acquiring both the real and imaginary parts of the spectrum. We utilize mid-IR pulse shaping to control the phase and delay of the mid-IR pump pulse. Pulse shaping allows phase cycling for data collection in the rotating frame and additional background subtraction. We also demonstrate time-domain data collection, which is a Fourier transform technique, and has many advantages in signal throughput, frequency resolution, and line shape accuracy over existing frequency domain methods. To demonstrate time-domain SFG spectroscopy, we study an aryl isocyanide on gold, and find that the system has an inhomogeneous structural distribution, in agreement with computational results, but which was not resolved by previous frequency-domain SFG studies. The ability to rapidly and actively manipulate the mid-IR pulse in an SFG pules sequence makes possible new experiments and more accurate spectra. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  10. Automatic inverse methods for the analysis of pulse tests: application to four pulse tests at the Leuggern borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, J.; Samper, J.; Vives, L.; Kuhlmann, U.

    1989-07-01

    Four pulse tests performed for NAGRA at the Leuggern borehole were analyzed using automatic test sequence matching techniques. Severe identifiability problems were unveiled during the process. Because of these problems, the identifiability of aquifer parameters (hydraulic conductivity, storativity and skin conductivity) from pulse tests similar to those performed in the Leuggern borehole was studied in two synthetic examples. The first of these had a positive skin effect and the second had a negative skin effect. These synthetic examples showed that, for the test conditions at the Leuggern borehole, estimating formation hydraulic conductivity may be nearly impossible for the cases of positive and negative skin factors. In addition, identifiability appears to be quite sensitive to the values of the parameters and to other factors such as skin thickness. Nevertheless, largely because of the manner in which the tests were conducted (i.e. relatively long injection time and performance of both injection and withdrawal), identifiability of the actual tests was much better than suggested by the synthetic examples. Only one of the four tests was nearly nonidentifiable. In all, the match between measured and computed aquifer responses was excellent for all the tests, and formation hydraulic conductivities were estimated within a relatively narrow uncertainty interval. (author) 19 refs., 59 figs., 28 tabs

  11. Optimization methods of pulse-to-pulse alignment using femtosecond pulse laser based on temporal coherence function for practical distance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Linghui; Guo, Yin; Lin, Jiarui; Cui, Pengfei; Zhu, Jigui

    2018-02-01

    An interferometer technique based on temporal coherence function of femtosecond pulses is demonstrated for practical distance measurement. Here, the pulse-to-pulse alignment is analyzed for large delay distance measurement. Firstly, a temporal coherence function model between two femtosecond pulses is developed in the time domain for the dispersive unbalanced Michelson interferometer. Then, according to this model, the fringes analysis and the envelope extraction process are discussed. Meanwhile, optimization methods of pulse-to-pulse alignment for practical long distance measurement are presented. The order of the curve fitting and the selection of points for envelope extraction are analyzed. Furthermore, an averaging method based on the symmetry of the coherence function is demonstrated. Finally, the performance of the proposed methods is evaluated in the absolute distance measurement of 20 μ m with path length difference of 9 m. The improvement of standard deviation in experimental results shows that these approaches have the potential for practical distance measurement.

  12. Pulse frequency in pulsed brachytherapy based on tissue repair kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sminia, Peter; Schneider, Christoph J.; Koedooder, Kees; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Blank, Leo E.C.M.; Gonzalez Gonzalez, Dionisio

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Investigation of normal tissue sparing in pulsed brachytherapy (PB) relative to continuous low-dose rate irradiation (CLDR) by adjusting pulse frequency based on tissue repair characteristics. Method: Using the linear quadratic model, the relative effectiveness (RE) of a 20 Gy boost was calculated for tissue with an α/β ratio ranging from 2 to 10 Gy and a half-time of sublethal damage repair between 0.1 and 3 h. The boost dose was considered to be delivered either in a number of pulses varying from 2 to 25, or continuously at a dose rate of 0.50, 0.80, or 1.20 Gy/h. Results: The RE of 20 Gy was found to be identical for PB in 25 pulses of 0.80 Gy each h and CLDR delivered at 0.80 Gy/h for any α/β value and for a repair half-time > 0.75 h. When normal tissue repair half-times are assumed to be longer than tumor repair half-times, normal tissue sparing can be obtained, within the restriction of a fixed overall treatment time, with higher dose per pulse and longer period time (time elapsed between start of pulse n and start of pulse n + 1). An optimum relative normal tissue sparing larger than 10% was found with 4 pulses of 5 Gy every 8 h. Hence, a therapeutic gain might be obtained when changing from CLDR to PB by adjusting the physical dose in such a way that the biological dose on the tumor is maintained. The normal tissue-sparing phenomenon can be explained by an increase in RE with longer period time for tissue with high α/β ratio and fast or intermediate repair half-time, and the RE for tissue with low α/β ratio and long repair half-time remains almost constant. Conclusion: Within the benchmark of the LQ model, advantage in normal tissue-sparing is expected when matching the pulse frequency to the repair kinetics of the normal tissue exposed. A period time longer than 1 h may lead to a reduction of late normal tissue complications. This theoretical advantage emphasizes the need for better knowledge of human tissue-repair kinetics

  13. Achievement of radiative feedback control for long-pulse operation on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K.; Yuan, Q. P.; Xiao, B. J.; Wang, L.; Duan, Y. M.; Chen, J. B.; Zheng, X. W.; Liu, X. J.; Zhang, B.; Xu, J. C.; Luo, Z. P.; Zang, Q.; Li, Y. Y.; Feng, W.; Wu, J. H.; Yang, Z. S.; Zhang, L.; Luo, G.-N.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Hu, J. S.; Li, J.

    2018-05-01

    The active feedback control of radiated power to prevent divertor target plates overheating during long-pulse operation has been developed and implemented on EAST. The radiation control algorithm, with impurity seeding via a supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) system, has shown great success in both reliability and stability. By seeding a sequence of short neon (Ne) impurity pulses with the SMBI from the outer mid-plane, the radiated power of the bulk plasma can be well controlled, and the duration of radiative control (feedforward and feedback) is 4.5 s during a discharge of 10 s. Reliable control of the total radiated power of bulk plasma has been successfully achieved in long-pulse upper single null (USN) discharges with a tungsten divertor. The achieved control range of {{f}rad} is 20%–30% in L-mode regimes and 18%–36% in H-mode regimes. The temperature of the divertor target plates was maintained at a low level during the radiative control phase. The peak particle flux on the divertor target was decreased by feedforward Ne injection in the L-mode discharges, while the Ne pulses from the SMBI had no influence on the peak particle flux because of the very small injecting volume. It is shown that although the radiated power increased, no serious reduction of plasma-stored energy or confinement was observed during the control phase. The success of the radiation control algorithm and current experiments in radiated power control represents a significant advance for steady-state divertor radiation and heat flux control on EAST for near-future long-pulse operation.

  14. Controlling output pulse and prepulse in a resonant microwave pulse compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlapakovski, A.; Artemenko, S.; Chumerin, P.; Yushkov, Yu.

    2013-01-01

    A resonant microwave pulse compressor with a waveguide H-plane-tee-based energy extraction unit was studied in terms of its capability to produce output pulses that comprise a low-power long-duration (prepulse) and a high-power short-duration part. The application of such combined pulses with widely variable prepulse and high-power pulse power and energy ratios is of interest in the research area of electronic hardware vulnerability. The characteristics of output radiation pulses are controlled by the variation of the H-plane tee transition attenuation at the stage of microwave energy storage in the compressor cavity. Results of theoretical estimations of the parameters tuning range and experimental investigations of the prototype S-band compressor (1.5 MW, 12 ns output pulse; ∼13.2 dB gain) are presented. The achievable maximum in the prepulse power is found to be about half the power of the primary microwave source. It has been shown that the energy of the prepulse becomes comparable with that of the short-duration (nanosecond) pulse, while the power of the latter decreases insignificantly. The possible range of variation of the prepulse power and energy can be as wide as 40 dB. In the experiments, the prepulse level control within the range of ∼10 dB was demonstrated.

  15. Dynamics of traveling reaction pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovzhenko, A. Yu.; Rumanov, E. N.

    2007-01-01

    The growth of activator losses is accompanied by the decay of a traveling reaction pulse. In a ring reactor, this propagation threshold is present simultaneously with a threshold related to the ring diameter. The results of numerical experiments with pulses of an exothermal reaction reveal the transition from pulse propagation to a homogeneous hot regime, established regimes with periodic variations of the pulse velocity, and oscillatory decay of the pulse. When the medium becomes 'bistable' as a result of the variation in parameters, this factor does not prevent the propagation of pulses, but leads to changes in the pulse structure

  16. Diagnostics system for the 67 MJ, 50 kV pulsed power capacitor bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galakhov, I V; Gasheev, A S; Gruzin, I A; Gudov, S N; Murugov, V M; Osin, V A; Pankratov, V I; Pegoev, I N [All-Russian Scientific Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The diagnostics system is designed for charging and discharging to the load of the large 67 MJ and 50 kV capacitor bank for the iodine laser pulse power of ISKRA-5 facility. Discharging diagnostics of the capacitor bank uses a technique to measure a sequence of times between representative discharge events for 665 discharge circuits of the bank. Benefits of the measurement techniques are discussed. (author). 3 figs., 3 refs.

  17. Diagnostics system for the 67 MJ, 50 kV pulsed power capacitor bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galakhov, I.V.; Gasheev, A.S.; Gruzin, I.A.; Gudov, S.N.; Murugov, V.M.; Osin, V.A.; Pankratov, V.I.; Pegoev, I.N.

    1996-01-01

    The diagnostics system is designed for charging and discharging to the load of the large 67 MJ and 50 kV capacitor bank for the iodine laser pulse power of ISKRA-5 facility. Discharging diagnostics of the capacitor bank uses a technique to measure a sequence of times between representative discharge events for 665 discharge circuits of the bank. Benefits of the measurement techniques are discussed. (author). 3 figs., 3 refs

  18. Sine-squared shifted pulses for recoupling interactions in solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mukul G.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Equbal, Asif; Mote, Kaustubh R.; Agarwal, Vipin; Madhu, P. K.

    2017-06-01

    Rotational-Echo DOuble-Resonance (REDOR) is a versatile experiment for measuring internuclear distance between two heteronuclear spins in solid-state NMR. At slow to intermediate magic-angle spinning (MAS) frequencies, the measurement of distances between strongly coupled spins is challenging due to rapid dephasing of magnetisation. This problem can be remedied by employing the pulse-shifted version of REDOR known as Shifted-REDOR (S-REDOR) that scales down the recoupled dipolar coupling. In this study, we propose a new variant of the REDOR sequence where the positions of the π pulses are determined by a sine-squared function. This new variant has scaling properties similar to S-REDOR. We use theory, numerical simulations, and experiments to compare the dipolar recoupling efficiencies and the experimental robustness of the three REDOR schemes. The proposed variant has advantages in terms of radiofrequency field requirements at fast MAS frequencies.

  19. River water remediation using pulsed corona, pulsed spark or ozonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izdebski, T.; Dors, M. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Szewalski Inst. of Fluid Flow Machiney, Fiszera (Poland). Centre for Plasma and Laser Engineering; Mizeraczyk, J. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Szewalski Inst. of Fluid Flow Machiney, Fiszera (Poland). Centre for Plasma and Laser Engineering; Gdynia Maritime Univ., Morska (Poland). Dept. of Marine Electronics

    2010-07-01

    The most common reason for epidemic formation is the pollution of surface and drinking water by wastewater bacteria. Pathogenic microorganisms that form the largest part of this are fecal bacteria, such as escherichia coli (E. coli). Wastewater treatment plants reduce the amount of the fecal bacteria by 1-3 orders of magnitude, depending on the initial number of bacteria. There is a lack of data on waste and drinking water purification by the electrohydraulic discharges method, which causes the destruction and inactivation of viruses, yeast, and bacteria. This paper investigated river water cleaning from microorganisms using pulsed corona, spark discharge and ozonization. The paper discussed the experimental setup and results. It was concluded that ozonization is the most efficient method of water disinfection as compared with pulsed spark and pulsed corona discharges. The pulsed spark discharge in water was capable of killing all microorganism similarly to ozonization, but with much lower energy efficiency. The pulsed corona discharge was found to be the less effective method of water disinfection. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Physical model of reactor pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, A.; Ravnik, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pulse experiments have been performed at J. Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor since 1991. In total, more than 130 pulses have been performed. Extensive experimental information on the pulse physical characteristics has been accumulated. Fuchs-Hansen adiabatic model has been used for predicting and analysing the pulse parameters. The model is based on point kinetics equation, neglecting the delayed neutrons and assuming constant inserted reactivity in form of step function. Deficiencies of the Fuchs-Hansen model and systematic experimental errors have been observed and analysed. Recently, the pulse model was improved by including the delayed neutrons and time dependence of inserted reactivity. The results explain the observed non-linearity of the pulse energy for high pulses due to finite time of pulse rod withdrawal and the contribution of the delayed neutrons after the prompt part of the pulse. The results of the improved model are in good agreement with experimental results. (author)

  1. Dual-Pulse Pulse Position Modulation (DPPM) for Deep-Space Optical Communications: Performance and Practicality Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Hylton, Alan; Budinger, James; Nappier, Jennifer; Downey, Joseph; Raible, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Due to its simplicity and robustness against wavefront distortion, pulse position modulation (PPM) with photon counting detector has been seriously considered for long-haul optical wireless systems. This paper evaluates the dual-pulse case and compares it with the conventional single-pulse case. Analytical expressions for symbol error rate and bit error rate are first derived and numerically evaluated, for the strong, negative-exponential turbulent atmosphere; and bandwidth efficiency and throughput are subsequently assessed. It is shown that, under a set of practical constraints including pulse width and pulse repetition frequency (PRF), dual-pulse PPM enables a better channel utilization and hence a higher throughput than it single-pulse counterpart. This result is new and different from the previous idealistic studies that showed multi-pulse PPM provided no essential information-theoretic gains than single-pulse PPM.

  2. Controlled generation of a single Trichel pulse and a series of single Trichel pulses in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizeraczyk, Jerzy; Berendt, Artur; Akishev, Yuri

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a simple method for the controlled generation of a single Trichel pulse or a series of single Trichel pulses of a regulated repetition frequency in air is proposed. The concept of triggering a single Trichel pulse or a series of such pulses is based on the precise controlling the voltage inception of the negative corona, which can be accomplished through the use of a ramp voltage pulse or a series of such pulses with properly chosen ramp voltage pulse parameters (rise and fall times, and ramp voltage pulse repetition frequency). The proposal has been tested in experiments using a needle-to-plate electrode arrangement in air, and reproducible Trichel pulses (single or in a series) were obtained by triggering them with an appropriately designed voltage waveform. The proposed method and results obtained have been qualitatively analysed. The analysis provides guidance for designing the voltage ramp pulse in respect of the generation of a single Trichel pulse or a series of single Trichel pulses. The controlled generation of a single Trichel pulse or a series of such pulses would be a helpful research tool for the refined studies of the fundamental processes in a negative corona discharge in a single- (air is an example) and multi-phase gaseous fluids. The controlled generation of a single Trichel pulse or a series of Trichel pulses can also be attractive for those corona treatments which need manipulation of the electric charge and heat portions delivered by the Trichel pulses to the object.

  3. A high pulsed power supply system designed for pulsed high magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kefu; Wang Shaorong; Zhong Heqing; Xu Yan; Pan Yuan

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces the design of high pulsed power supply system for producing pulsed high magnetic field up to 70 T. This system consists of 58 sets of 55 μF of capacitor bank which provides 1.0 MJ energy storage. A set of vacuum closing switch is chosen as main switch for energy discharge into magnetic coil. A crowbar circuit with high power diodes in series with resistor is used to absorb the redundant energy and adjust pulse width. The resistance of magnetic coil changing with current is deduced by energy balance equations. A capacitor-charging power supply using a series-resonant, constant on-time variable frequency control, and zero-current switching charges the capacitor bank in one minute time with high efficiency. The pulsed power supply provides adjustable current and pulse width with 30 kA peak and 30 ms maximum. The primary experiments demonstrate the system reliability. This work provides an engineering guidance for future development of pulsed high magnetic field. (authors)

  4. Probing spatial properties of electronic excitation in water after interaction with temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulses: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, Thomas; Sarpe, Cristian; Jelzow, Nikolai [Institute of Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Lillevang, Lasse H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Götte, Nadine; Zielinski, Bastian [Institute of Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Balling, Peter [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Senftleben, Arne [Institute of Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Baumert, Thomas, E-mail: baumert@physik.uni-kassel.de [Institute of Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Temporally asymmetric shaped femtosecond laser pulses lead to excitation over smaller area and larger depth in water. • Transient optical properties are measured radially resolved by spectral interference in an imaging geometry. • Radially resolved spectral interference shows indications of nonlinear propagation effects at high fluences. - Abstract: In this work, laser excitation of water under ambient conditions is investigated by radially resolved common-path spectral interferometry. Water, as a sample system for dielectric materials, is excited by ultrashort bandwidth-limited and temporally asymmetric shaped femtosecond laser pulses, where the latter start with an intense main pulse followed by a decaying pulse sequence, i.e. a temporal Airy pulse. Spectral interference in an imaging geometry allows measurements of the transient optical properties integrated along the propagation through the sample but radially resolved with respect to the transverse beam profile. Since the optical properties reflect the dynamics of the free-electron plasma, such measurements reveal the spatial characteristics of the laser excitation. We conclude that temporally asymmetric shaped laser pulses are a promising tool for high-precision laser material processing, as they reduce the transverse area of excitation, but increase the excitation inside the material along the beam propagation.

  5. Pulse energy evolution for high-resolution Lamb wave inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, Jiadong; Zeng, Liang; Gao, Fei; Lin, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Generally, tone burst excitation methods are used to reduce the effect of dispersion in Lamb wave inspection. In addition, algorithms for dispersion compensation are required to simplify responses, especially in long-range inspection. However, the resolution is always limited by the time duration of tone burst excitation. A pulse energy evolution method is established to overcome this limitation. In this method, a broadband signal with a long time (e.g. a chirp, white noise signal, or a pseudo-random sequence) is used as excitation to actuate Lamb waves. First of all, pulse compression is employed to estimate system impulse response with a high signal-to-noise ratio. Then, dispersion compensation is applied repeatedly with systemically varied compensation distances, obtaining a series of compensated signals. In these signals, amplitude (or energy) evolution associated with the change of compensation distance is utilized to estimate the actual propagation distance of the interested wave packet. Finally, the defect position is detected by an imaging algorithm. Several experiments are given to validate the proposed method. (paper)

  6. A paradoxical signal intensity increase in fatty livers using opposed-phase gradient echo imaging with fat-suppression pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulkern, Robert V.; Voss, Stephan; Loeb Salsberg, Sandra; Krauel, Marta Ramon; Ludwig, David S.

    2008-01-01

    With the increase in obese and overweight children, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has become more prevalent in the pediatric population. Appreciating subtleties of magnetic resonance (MR) signal intensity behavior from fatty livers under different imaging conditions thus becomes important to pediatric radiologists. We report an initially confusing signal behavior - increased signal from fatty livers when fat-suppression pulses are applied in an opposed-phase gradient echo imaging sequence - and seek to explain the physical mechanisms for this paradoxical signal intensity behavior. Abdominal MR imaging at 3 T with a 3-D volumetric interpolated breath-hold (VIBE) sequence in the opposed-phase condition (TR/TE 3.3/1.3 ms) was performed in five obese boys (14±2 years of age, body mass index >95th percentile for age and sex) with spectroscopically confirmed fatty livers. Two VIBE acquisitions were performed, one with and one without the use of chemical shift selective (CHESS) pulse fat suppression. The ratios of fat-suppressed over non-fat-suppressed signal intensities were assessed in regions-of-interest (ROIs) in five tissues: subcutaneous fat, liver, vertebral marrow, muscle and spleen. The boys had spectroscopically estimated hepatic fat levels between 17% and 48%. CHESS pulse fat suppression decreased subcutaneous fat signals dramatically, by more than 85% within regions of optimal fat suppression. Fatty liver signals, in contrast, were elevated by an average of 87% with CHESS pulse fat suppression. Vertebral marrow signal was also significantly elevated with CHESS pulse fat suppression, while spleen and muscle signals demonstrated only small signal increases on the order of 10%. We demonstrated that CHESS pulse fat suppression actually increases the signal intensity from fatty livers in opposed-phase gradient echo imaging conditions. The increase can be attributed to suppression of one partner of the opposed-phase pair that normally contributes to the

  7. A paradoxical signal intensity increase in fatty livers using opposed-phase gradient echo imaging with fat-suppression pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulkern, Robert V.; Voss, Stephan [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Loeb Salsberg, Sandra; Krauel, Marta Ramon; Ludwig, David S. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Medicine, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-10-15

    With the increase in obese and overweight children, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has become more prevalent in the pediatric population. Appreciating subtleties of magnetic resonance (MR) signal intensity behavior from fatty livers under different imaging conditions thus becomes important to pediatric radiologists. We report an initially confusing signal behavior - increased signal from fatty livers when fat-suppression pulses are applied in an opposed-phase gradient echo imaging sequence - and seek to explain the physical mechanisms for this paradoxical signal intensity behavior. Abdominal MR imaging at 3 T with a 3-D volumetric interpolated breath-hold (VIBE) sequence in the opposed-phase condition (TR/TE 3.3/1.3 ms) was performed in five obese boys (14{+-}2 years of age, body mass index >95th percentile for age and sex) with spectroscopically confirmed fatty livers. Two VIBE acquisitions were performed, one with and one without the use of chemical shift selective (CHESS) pulse fat suppression. The ratios of fat-suppressed over non-fat-suppressed signal intensities were assessed in regions-of-interest (ROIs) in five tissues: subcutaneous fat, liver, vertebral marrow, muscle and spleen. The boys had spectroscopically estimated hepatic fat levels between 17% and 48%. CHESS pulse fat suppression decreased subcutaneous fat signals dramatically, by more than 85% within regions of optimal fat suppression. Fatty liver signals, in contrast, were elevated by an average of 87% with CHESS pulse fat suppression. Vertebral marrow signal was also significantly elevated with CHESS pulse fat suppression, while spleen and muscle signals demonstrated only small signal increases on the order of 10%. We demonstrated that CHESS pulse fat suppression actually increases the signal intensity from fatty livers in opposed-phase gradient echo imaging conditions. The increase can be attributed to suppression of one partner of the opposed-phase pair that normally contributes to the

  8. CW seeded optical parametric amplifier providing wavelength and pulse duration tunable nearly transform limited pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hädrich, S; Gottschall, T; Rothhardt, J; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2010-02-01

    An optical parametric amplifier that delivers nearly transform limited pulses is presented. The center wavelength of these pulses can be tuned between 993 nm and 1070 nm and, at the same time, the pulse duration is varied between 206 fs and 650 fs. At the shortest pulse duration the pulse energy was increased up to 7.2 microJ at 50 kHz repetition rate. Variation of the wavelength is achieved by applying a tunable cw seed while the pulse duration can be varied via altering the pump pulse duration. This scheme offers superior flexibility and scaling possibilities.

  9. Nonlinear Pulse Shaping in Fibres for Pulse Generation and Optical Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Boscolo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of new all-optical technologies for data processing and signal manipulation is a field of growing importance with a strong potential for numerous applications in diverse areas of modern science. Nonlinear phenomena occurring in optical fibres have many attractive features and great, but not yet fully explored, potential in signal processing. Here, we review recent progress on the use of fibre nonlinearities for the generation and shaping of optical pulses and on the applications of advanced pulse shapes in all-optical signal processing. Amongst other topics, we will discuss ultrahigh repetition rate pulse sources, the generation of parabolic shaped pulses in active and passive fibres, the generation of pulses with triangular temporal profiles, and coherent supercontinuum sources. The signal processing applications will span optical regeneration, linear distortion compensation, optical decision at the receiver in optical communication systems, spectral and temporal signal doubling, and frequency conversion.

  10. Pulsed neutron generator for use with pulsed neutron activation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochau, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    A high-output, transportable, pulsed neutron generator has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories for use with Pulsed Neutron Activation (PNA) techniques. The PNA neutron generator generates > 10 10 14 MeV D-T neutrons in a 1.2 millisecond pulse. Each operation of the unit will produce a nominal total neutron output of 1.2 x 10 10 neutrons. The generator has been designed to be easily repaired and modified. The unit requires no additional equipment for operation or measurement of output

  11. Effect of laser pulse energies in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in double-pulse configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedetti, P.A.; Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.; Pardini, L.; Salvetti, A.; Tognoni, E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of laser pulse energy on double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal is studied. In particular, the energy of the first pulse has been changed, while the second pulse energy is held fixed. A systematic study of the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal dependence on the interpulse delay is performed, and the results are compared with the ones obtained with a single laser pulse of energy corresponding to the sum of the two pulses. At the same time, the crater formed at the target surface is studied by video-confocal microscopy, and the variation in crater dimensions is correlated to the enhancement of the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal. The results obtained are consistent with the interpretation of the double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal enhancement in terms of the changes in ambient gas pressure produced by the shock wave induced by the first laser pulse

  12. Dose reduction in pulsed fluoroscopy by modifying the high-voltage pulse shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabau, M.N.; Phelps, G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the dose reduction results in pulsed fluoroscopy by modifying the high-voltage pulse shape (HVPS). Since the HVPS in regular pulsed fluoroscopy has a long tail, the radiation pulse shape (RPS) is similar. Using specially designed circuitry in the high-voltage generator to produce a rectangular HVPS, and consequently a rectangular RPS, it was possible to obtain a reduction of up to 25% of patient exposure. This dose reduction obtained by cutting the long tail of RPS does not damage the image quality

  13. Apparatus for generating nonlinear pulse patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.M.I.

    Apparatus for generating a plurality of nonlinear pulse patterns from a single linear pulse pattern. A first counter counts the pulses of the linear pulse pattern and a second counter counts the pulses of the nonlinear pulse pattern. A comparator compares the counts of both counters, and in response to an equal count, a gate is enabled to gate a pulse of the linear pattern as a pulse of the nonlinear pattern, the latter also resetting the first counter. Presettable dividers divide the pulses of each pattern before they are counted by the respective counters. Apparatus for generating a logarithmic pulse pattern from a linear pulse pattern to any log base is described. In one embodiment, a shift register is used in place of the second counter to be clocked by each pulse of the logarithmic pattern to generate the pattern. In another embodiment, a memory stores the logarithmic pattern and is addressed by the second counter which is clocked by the pulses of the logarithmic pulse pattern.

  14. Pulsed neutron generator for mass flow measurement using the pulsed neutron activation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochau, G.E.; Hornsby, D.R.; Mareda, J.F.; Riggan, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    A high-output, transportable neutron generator has been developed to measure mass flow velocities in reactor safety tests using the Pulsed Neutron Activation (PNA) Technique. The PNA generator produces >10 10 14 MeV D-T neutrons in a 1.2 millisecond pulse. The Millisecond Pulse (MSP) Neutron Tube, developed for this application, has an expected operational life of 1000 pulses, and it limits the generator pulse repetition rate to 12 pulses/minute. A semiconductor neutron detector is included in the generator package to monitor the neutron output. The control unit, which can be operated manually or remotely, also contains a digital display with a BCD output for the neutron monitor information. The digital logic of the unit controls the safety interlocks and rejects transient signals which could accidently fire the generator

  15. PulseNet International: Vision for the implementation of whole genome sequencing (WGS) for global food-borne disease surveillance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadon, Celine; Van Walle, Ivo; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Campos, Josefina; Chinen, Isabel; Concepcion-Acevedo, Jeniffer; Gilpin, Brent; Smith, Anthony M; Man Kam, Kai; Perez, Enrique; Trees, Eija; Kubota, Kristy; Takkinen, Johanna; Nielsen, Eva Møller; Carleton, Heather

    2017-01-01

    PulseNet International is a global network dedicated to laboratory-based surveillance for food-borne diseases. The network comprises the national and regional laboratory networks of Africa, Asia Pacific, Canada, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, the Middle East, and the United States. The

  16. High current transistor pulse generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1991-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current trapezoidally shaped pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in the capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of Darlington transistors. A combination of diodes and Darlington transistors is used to obtain trapezoidal or triangular shaped current pulses into an inductive load and to recover the remaining energy in the same capacitor bank without reversing capacitor voltage. The transistors work in the switch mode, and the power losses are low. The rack mounted pulse generators presently used at SLAC contain a 660 microfarad storage capacitor bank and can deliver 400 amps at 800 volts into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The pulse generators are used in several different power systems, including pulse to pulse bipolar power supplies and in application with current pulses distributed into different inductive loads. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled by the central computer system through a specially developed multichannel controller. Several years of operation with the pulse generators have proven their consistent performance and reliability. 8 figs

  17. Pulse power modulators - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatramani, N.

    2006-01-01

    Pulse power modulators are electronic devices to provide, high voltage, high current, power bursts. Ideally, a modulator, with the means to shape and control the pulses, acts as a switch between a high voltage power supply and its load. This article gives an overview of the pulse power modulators: starting with the basics of pulse and modulation, it covers modulation topologies, different types of modulators, major subsystems and pulse measurement techniques. The various applications of pulse power modulators and the recent trends have been included at the end. (author)

  18. ANALYTICAL SYNTHESIS OF FORCED PULSE ELECTRONIC DRIVE CONTROL OF A TRACKING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Abufanas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of analytical synthesis of a control signal by a linear dynamical system is considered. As an optimization criterion, it is proposed to consider the transition time of the system from the initial state to a given final state. This type of control is called forced, providing the maximum system speed. The principle of solving this problem is considered on the basis of application of uncertain Lagrange multipliers and the Pontryagin maximum principle. Expressions are obtained for the matrix of transitions of the system and the control signal in a vector form.As an example, the electric drive described by the widespread second-order mathematical model is considered to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed method. Qualitative illustrations of the operability of the proposed approach, obtained by modeling in the Mathcad environment, and quantitative characteristics of the change in the input and output signals of the hypothetical control system are presented. It is shown that the use of forced control does not lead to the output of variables characterizing the state of the system, beyond the limits of admissible values.The use of forced control makes it possible to synthesize the control law in the form of a sequence of rectangular pulses of constant amplitude determined by the power source, variable duty cycle and polarity. This approach can be used for the control of DC-type DC motors used in various tracking systems used on unmanned aerial vehicles. Key words: forced control, target function, electric drive, pulse train. The use of forced control makes it possible to synthesize the control law in the form of a sequence of rectangular pulses of constant amplitude determined by the power source, variable duty cycle and polarity. This approach can be used for the control of DC-type DC motors used in various tracking systems used on unmanned aerial vehicles.

  19. Ultrashort laser pulses and electromagnetic pulse generation in air and on dielectric surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprangle, P.; Penano, J.R.; Hafizi, B.; Kapetanakos, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Intense, ultrashort laser pulses propagating in the atmosphere have been observed to emit sub-THz electromagnetic pulses (EMPS). The purpose of this paper is to analyze EMP generation from the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with air and with dielectric surfaces and to determine the efficiency of conversion of laser energy to EMP energy. In our self-consistent model the laser pulse partially ionizes the medium, forms a plasma filament, and through the ponderomotive forces associated with the laser pulse, drives plasma currents which are the source of the EMP. The propagating laser pulse evolves under the influence of diffraction, Kerr focusing, plasma defocusing, and energy depletion due to electron collisions and ionization. Collective effects and recombination processes are also included in the model. The duration of the EMP in air, at a fixed point, is found to be a few hundred femtoseconds, i.e., on the order of the laser pulse duration plus the electron collision time. For steady state laser pulse propagation the flux of EMP energy is nonradiative and axially directed. Radiative EMP energy is present only for nonsteady state or transient laser pulse propagation. The analysis also considers the generation of EMP on the surface of a dielectric on which an ultrashort laser pulse is incident. For typical laser parameters, the power and energy conversion efficiency from laser radiation to EMP radiation in both air and from dielectric surfaces is found to be extremely small, -8 . Results of full-scale, self-consistent, numerical simulations of atmospheric and dielectric surface EMP generation are presented. A recent experiment on atmospheric EMP generation is also simulated

  20. A method to reduce the suppression of relevant pulses in pulse weight discriminators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, P.

    1975-01-01

    The pulse height analyzer is used, for instance, with proportional counters. Pulses are broken down into amplitude ranges in accordance with their maximum amplitudes. In pulse height analyzers with real time analog-digital conversion only one deadtime is needed for the respective range selected. For this purpose, all discriminator thresholds of the amplitude stores connected parallel are actuated as an input pulse arrives. The leading edges of the discriminator signals set the amplitude range flip-flop. Only the flip-flop circuit of the maximum amplitude range reached remains set whilst all the others are erased. The trailing edge of the discriminator signals actuates the evaluation of the information stored by the flip-flop circuit selected. It triggers a pulse extender and resets the flip-flop selected. Therefore, only the amplitude range selected needs a deadtime. The pulse extender in addition reduces the processing time of the analyzer by the output pulse length. The characteristic used for the trailing edge is the backward count of the real time analog-digital converter. (DG/RF) [de

  1. Pulsed corona generation using a diode-based pulsed power generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemen, A. J. M.; Grekhov, I. V.; van Heesch, E. J. M.; Yan, K.; Nair, S. A.; Korotkov, S. V.

    2003-10-01

    Pulsed plasma techniques serve a wide range of unconventional processes, such as gas and water processing, hydrogen production, and nanotechnology. Extending research on promising applications, such as pulsed corona processing, depends to a great extent on the availability of reliable, efficient and repetitive high-voltage pulsed power technology. Heavy-duty opening switches are the most critical components in high-voltage pulsed power systems with inductive energy storage. At the Ioffe Institute, an unconventional switching mechanism has been found, based on the fast recovery process in a diode. This article discusses the application of such a "drift-step-recovery-diode" for pulsed corona plasma generation. The principle of the diode-based nanosecond high-voltage generator will be discussed. The generator will be coupled to a corona reactor via a transmission-line transformer. The advantages of this concept, such as easy voltage transformation, load matching, switch protection and easy coupling with a dc bias voltage, will be discussed. The developed circuit is tested at both a resistive load and various corona reactors. Methods to optimize the energy transfer to a corona reactor have been evaluated. The impedance matching between the pulse generator and corona reactor can be significantly improved by using a dc bias voltage. At good matching, the corona energy increases and less energy reflects back to the generator. Matching can also be slightly improved by increasing the temperature in the corona reactor. More effective is to reduce the reactor pressure.

  2. Laser ablation comparison by picosecond pulses train and nanosecond pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V. N.; Filippov, M. N.; Bunkin, A. F.; Pershin, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    A comparison of laser ablation by a train of picosecond pulses and nanosecond pulses revealed a difference in laser craters, ablation thresholds, plasma sizes and spectral line intensities. Laser ablation with a train of picosecond pulses resulted in improved crater quality while ablated mass decreased up to 30%. A reduction in laser plasma dimensions for picosecond train ablation was observed while the intensity of atomic/ionic lines in the plasma spectra was greater by a factor of 2-4 indicating an improved excitation and atomization in the plasma.

  3. Granule size control and targeting in pulsed spray fluid bed granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Henrik; Liu, Anchang; Räikkönen, Heikki; Hatara, Juha; Antikainen, Osmo; Airaksinen, Sari; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Lou, Honxiang; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2009-07-30

    The primary aim of the study was to investigate the effects of pulsed liquid feed on granule size. The secondary aim was to increase knowledge of this technique in granule size targeting. Pulsed liquid feed refers to the pump changing between on- and off-positions in sequences, called duty cycles. One duty cycle consists of one on- and off-period. The study was performed with a laboratory-scale top-spray fluid bed granulator with duty cycle length and atomization pressure as studied variables. The liquid feed rate, amount and inlet air temperature were constant. The granules were small, indicating that the powder has only undergone ordered mixing, nucleation and early growth. The effect of atomizing pressure on granule size depends on inlet air relative humidity, with premature binder evaporation as a reason. The duty cycle length was of critical importance to the end product attributes, by defining the extent of intermittent drying and rewetting. By varying only the duty cycle length, it was possible to control granule nucleation and growth, with a wider granule size target range in increased relative humidity. The present study confirms that pulsed liquid feed in fluid bed granulation is a useful tool in end product particle size targeting.

  4. Particle acceleration by electromagnetic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, H.M.

    1982-01-01

    Particle interaction with plane electromagnetic pulses is studied. It is shown that particle acceleration by a wavy pulse, depending on the shape of the pulse, may not be small. Further, a diffusive-type particle acceleration by multiple weak pulses is described and discussed. (author)

  5. Hybrid Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sawyer; Trujillo, Skyler; Fort Lewis College Laser Group Team

    This work concerns the novel design of an inexpensive pulsed Nd:YAG laser, consisting of a hybrid Kerr Mode Lock (KLM) and Q-switch pulse. The two pulse generation systems work independently, non simultaneously of each other, thus generating the ability for the user to easily switch between ultra-short pulse widths or large energy density pulses. Traditionally, SF57 glass has been used as the Kerr medium. In this work, novel Kerr mode-locking mediums are being investigated including: tellurite compound glass (TeO2), carbon disulfide (CS2), and chalcogenide glass. These materials have a nonlinear index of refraction orders of magnitude,(n2), larger than SF57 glass. The Q-switched pulse will utilize a Pockels cell. As the two pulse generation systems cannot be operated simultaneously, the Pockels cell and Kerr medium are attached to kinematic mounts, allowing for quick interchange between systems. Pulse widths and repetition rates will vary between the two systems. A goal of 100 picosecond pulse widths are desired for the mode-locked system. A goal of 10 nanosecond pulse widths are desired for the Q-switch system, with a desired repetition rate of 50 Hz. As designed, the laser will be useful in imaging applications.

  6. Modeling study on the effects of pulse rise rate in atmospheric pulsed discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan-Tao; Wang, Yan-Hui

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we present a modeling study on the discharge characteristics driven by short pulsed voltages, focusing on the effects of pulse rise rate based on the fluid description of atmospheric plasmas. The numerical results show that the breakdown voltage of short pulsed discharge is almost linearly dependent on the pulse rise rate, which is also confirmed by the derived equations from the fluid model. In other words, if the pulse rise rate is fixed as a constant, the simulation results clearly suggest that the breakdown voltage is almost unchanged, although the amplitude of pulsed voltage increases significantly. The spatial distribution of the electric field and electron density are given to reveal the underpinning physics. Additionally, the computational data and the analytical expression also indicate that an increased repetition frequency can effectively decrease the breakdown voltage and current density, which is consistent with the experimental observation.

  7. Intense isolated attosecond pulse generation from relativistic laser plasmas using few-cycle laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Guangjin; Dallari, William; Borot, Antonin; Tsakiris, George D.; Veisz, Laszlo; Krausz, Ferenc; Yu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We have performed a systematic study through particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the generation of attosecond pulse from relativistic laser plasmas when laser pulse duration approaches the few-cycle regime. A significant enhancement of attosecond pulse energy has been found to depend on laser pulse duration, carrier envelope phase, and plasma scale length. Based on the results obtained in this work, the potential of attaining isolated attosecond pulses with ∼100 μJ energy for photons >16 eV using state-of-the-art laser technology appears to be within reach

  8. Electronic system for recording proportional counter rare pulses with the pulse shape analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, I.R.; Gavrin, V.N.; Zakharov, Yu.I.; Tikhonov, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The anutomated system for recording proportional counter rare pulses is described. The proportional counters are aimed at identification of 37 Ar and H7 1 Gr decays in chemical radiation detectors of solar neutrino. Pulse shape recording by means of a storage oscilloscope and a TV display is performed in the system considered besides two-parametric selection of events (measurement of pulse amplitude in a slow channel and the amplitude of pulse differentiated with time constant of about 10 ns in a parallel fast channel). Pulse discrimination by a front rise rate provides background decrease in the 55 Fe range (5.9 keV) by 6 times; the visual analysis of pulse shapes recorded allows to decrease the background additionally by 25-30%. The background counting rate in the 55 Fe range being equal to 1 pulse per 1.5 days, is obtained when using the installation described above, as well as the passive Pb shield 5 cm thick, and the active shield based on the anticoincidence NaI(Tl) detector with the cathode 5.6 mm in-diameter made of Fe fabircated by zone melting. The installation described allows to reach the background level of 0.6 pulse/day (the total coefficient of background attenuation is 400). Further background decrease is supposed to be provided by installation allocation in the low-noise underground laboratory of the Baksan Neutrino Observatory

  9. Pulsed corona generation using a diode-based pulsed power generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pemen, A.J.M.; Grekhov, I.V.; Heesch, van E.J.M.; Yan, K.; Nair, S.A.; Korotkov, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    Pulsed plasma techniques serve a wide range of unconventional processes, such as gas and water processing, hydrogen production, and nanotechnology. Extending research on promising applications, such as pulsed corona processing, depends to a great extent on the availability of reliable, efficient and

  10. Surface texturing of Si3N4–SiC ceramic tool components by pulsed laser machining

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tshabalala, LC

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available texturing of Si(sub3)N(sub4)–SiC composites in the fabrication of machining tool inserts for various tribological applications. The samples were machined at varied laser energy (0.1–0.6 mJ) and lateral pulse overlap (50–88%) in order to generate a sequence...

  11. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Diels, Jean-Claude

    2006-01-01

    Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena, 2e serves as an introduction to the phenomena of ultra short laser pulses and describes how this technology can be used to examine problems in areas such as electromagnetism, optics, and quantum mechanics. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena combines theoretical backgrounds and experimental techniques and will serve as a manual on designing and constructing femtosecond (""faster than electronics"") systems or experiments from scratch. Beyond the simple optical system, the various sources of ultrashort pulses are presented, again with emphasis on the basic

  12. Multimode pulse counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natanzon, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    A pulse counter with code conversion is described. The counter is based on the integrated circuits of direct-counting devices of medium integration. The counter ensures various modes of pulse counting depending on the logical control signals: reversible, two-channel summing, one-channel summing binary, summing with ''storage'' signal code fixation without interrupting pulse counting. Arrangement of the suggested structure as a microcircuit of medium integration might contribute to reduction in the counter type nomenclature in digital families of widely used integrated circuits

  13. Powerful nanosecond pulse train generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isakov, I.F.; Logachev, E.I.; Opekunov, M.S.; Pechenkin, S.A.; Remnev, G.E.; Usov, Yu.P.

    1987-01-01

    A generator permitting to shape on the load pulsed with the repetition frequency of 10 3 -10 6 Hz and more is described. The amplitude of shaped voltage pulses is up to 150 kV at pulse duration equal to 50 ns. The generator comprises connected in-series with the load two shaping and two transmission lines realized on the base of the KVI-300 low-ohmic cable. The shaping lines are supplied from two independently connected pulse voltage generators for obtaining time interval between pulses > 10 -6 s; they may be also supplied from one generator for obtaining time interval -6 s. At the expense of reducing losses in the discharge circuit the amplitude of the second pulse grows with increase of time interval between pulses up to 300 ns, further on the curve flat-topping exists. The described generator is used in high-current accelerators, in which the primary negative pulse results in generation of explosive-emission plasma, and the second positive pulse provides ion beam shaping including ions of heavy metal used for production of a potential electrode. The generator multipulse mode is used for successive ion acceleration in the transport system

  14. Biossegurança e desastres: conceitos, prevenção, saúde pública e manejo de cadáveres Biosecurity and disaster: concepts, prevention, public health and management of corpses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Abdalla de Oliveira Cardoso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo discute a complexidade dos desastres, realçando situações de risco e a essencialidade do suporte da Biossegurança, uma vez que, em episódios com vítimas fatais, os procedimentos formulados por este campo devem ser adotados no manejo de cadáveres, sobretudo quando da ocorrência de soterramento com busca de corpos. Contextualiza a magnitude dos desastres caracterizados pelas chuvas e suas consequências (deslizamentos, soterramento, enfatizando o fenômeno do aquecimento global e as mudanças climáticas e seus impactos sobre as comunidades, em especial as mais pobres, valorizando a análise do conceito de vulnerabilidade a partir do cenário da urbanização, da degradação do meio ambiente causada pelo manejo inadequado dos recursos naturais, da contaminação ambiental, das políticas públicas ineficientes, sublinhando o baixo investimento em infraestrutura. Sublinha o conceito de desastre como fenômeno imprevisível, súbito e violento, que causa grande número de mortos e destruição. Enfatiza as problemáticas sociais, sanitárias, jurídicas e operacionais quando do registro de um número elevado mortes ocorridas ao mesmo tempo ou em curto espaço de tempo. Traz para a análise a contribuição da Biossegurança como orientadora dos planos de emergência voltados para os desastres, realçando o risco biológico e as medidas necessárias para o manejo de cadáveres.The paper discusses the complexity of disasters, enhancing risk situations and the importance of support from Biosecurity, as in episodes with fatalities, procedures formulated by this field should be adopted in the handling of corpses, particularly when occurring with search of buried bodies. It contextualizes the magnitude of the disaster characterized by rain and its aftermath (landslides, burying, emphasizing the phenomenon of global warming and climate change and its impacts on communities, especially the poorest, valuing the concept analysis of

  15. Control of π-Electron Rotations in Chiral Aromatic Molecules Using Intense Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Manabu; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi

    Our recent theoretical studies on laser-induced π-electron rotations in chiral aromatic molecules are reviewed. π electrons of a chiral aromatic molecule can be rotated along its aromatic ring by a nonhelical, linearly polarized laser pulse. An ansa aromatic molecule with a six-membered ring, 2,5-dichloro[n](3,6) pyrazinophane, which belongs to a planar-chiral molecule group, and its simplified molecule 2,5-dichloropyrazine are taken as model molecules. Electron wavepacket simulations in the frozen-molecular-vibration approximation show that the initial direction of π-electron rotation depends on the polarization direction of a linearly polarized laser pulse applied. Consecutive unidirectional rotation can be achieved by applying a sequence of linearly polarized pump and dump pulses to prevent reverse rotation. Optimal control simulations of π-electron rotation show that another controlling factor for unidirectional rotation is the relative optical phase between the different frequency components of an incident pulse in addition to photon polarization direction. Effects of nonadiabatic coupling between π-electron rotation and molecular vibrations are also presented, where the constraints of the frozen approximation are removed. The angular momentum gradually decays mainly owing to nonadiabatic coupling, while the vibrational amplitudes greatly depend on their rotation direction. This suggests that the direction of π-electron rotation on an attosecond timescale can be identified by detecting femtosecond molecular vibrations.

  16. RIIM two-pulse injector experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Smith, D.L.; Jones, E.E.; Hasti, D.E.; Jojola, J.M.; Lehmann, M.

    1987-01-01

    The RADLAC-II foilless diode injector was operated under double pulse conditions utilizing the RIIM accelerator as the test bed. The original RIIM accelerator pulse-power network was modified to provide for the generation, transmission, and delivery to the foilless diode of two distinct voltage pulses with variable interpulse separation from 0 to 2 ms. Two pulse-power assemblies were investigated and will be presented in connection with the diode performance. In both cases, the generated plasma and an excessive neutral gas release, following the first pulse, prevented the diode from producing a second beam pulse for interpulse separations larger than ∼1 μs. 4 refs

  17. Coiled transmission line pulse generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kenneth Fox

    2010-11-09

    Methods and apparatus are provided for fabricating and constructing solid dielectric "Coiled Transmission Line" pulse generators in radial or axial coiled geometries. The pour and cure fabrication process enables a wide variety of geometries and form factors. The volume between the conductors is filled with liquid blends of monomers, polymers, oligomers, and/or cross-linkers and dielectric powders; and then cured to form high field strength and high dielectric constant solid dielectric transmission lines that intrinsically produce ideal rectangular high voltage pulses when charged and switched into matched impedance loads. Voltage levels may be increased by Marx and/or Blumlein principles incorporating spark gap or, preferentially, solid state switches (such as optically triggered thyristors) which produce reliable, high repetition rate operation. Moreover, these Marxed pulse generators can be DC charged and do not require additional pulse forming circuitry, pulse forming lines, transformers, or an a high voltage spark gap output switch. The apparatus accommodates a wide range of voltages, impedances, pulse durations, pulse repetition rates, and duty cycles. The resulting mobile or flight platform friendly cylindrical geometric configuration is much more compact, light-weight, and robust than conventional linear geometries, or pulse generators constructed from conventional components. Installing additional circuitry may accommodate optional pulse shape improvements. The Coiled Transmission Lines can also be connected in parallel to decrease the impedance, or in series to increase the pulse length.

  18. A 70 kV solid-state high voltage pulse generator based on saturable pulse transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xuliang; Liu, Jinliang

    2014-02-01

    High voltage pulse generators are widely applied in many fields. In recent years, solid-state and operating at repetitive mode are the most important developing trends of high voltage pulse generators. A solid-state high voltage pulse generator based on saturable pulse transformer is proposed in this paper. The proposed generator is consisted of three parts. They are charging system, triggering system, and the major loop. Saturable pulse transformer is the key component of the whole generator, which acts as a step-up transformer and main switch during working process of this generator. The circuit and working principles of the proposed pulse generator are introduced first in this paper, and the saturable pulse transformer used in this generator is introduced in detail. Circuit of the major loop is simulated to verify the design of the system. Demonstration experiments are carried out, and the results show that when the primary energy storage capacitor is charged to a high voltage, such as 2.5 kV, a voltage with amplitude of 86 kV can be achieved on the secondary winding. The magnetic core of saturable pulse transformer is saturated deeply and the saturable inductance of the secondary windings is very small. The switch function of the saturable pulse transformer can be realized ideally. Therefore, a 71 kV output voltage pulse is formed on the load. Moreover, the magnetic core of the saturable pulse transformer can be reset automatically.

  19. Time-stretch microscopy based on time-wavelength sequence reconstruction from wideband incoherent source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chi; Xu, Yiqing; Wei, Xiaoming; Tsia, Kevin K.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Time-stretch microscopy has emerged as an ultrafast optical imaging concept offering the unprecedented combination of the imaging speed and sensitivity. However, dedicated wideband and coherence optical pulse source with high shot-to-shot stability has been mandated for time-wavelength mapping—the enabling process for ultrahigh speed wavelength-encoded image retrieval. From the practical point of view, exploiting methods to relax the stringent requirements (e.g., temporal stability and coherence) for the source of time-stretch microscopy is thus of great value. In this paper, we demonstrated time-stretch microscopy by reconstructing the time-wavelength mapping sequence from a wideband incoherent source. Utilizing the time-lens focusing mechanism mediated by a narrow-band pulse source, this approach allows generation of a wideband incoherent source, with the spectral efficiency enhanced by a factor of 18. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, time-stretch imaging with the scan rate as high as MHz and diffraction-limited resolution is achieved based on the wideband incoherent source. We note that the concept of time-wavelength sequence reconstruction from wideband incoherent source can also be generalized to any high-speed optical real-time measurements, where wavelength is acted as the information carrier

  20. High efficiency, monolithic fiber chirped pulse amplification system for high energy femtosecond pulse generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiang; Kim, Kyungbum; Mielke, Michael; Jennings, Stephen; Masor, Gordon; Stohl, Dave; Chavez-Pirson, Arturo; Nguyen, Dan T; Rhonehouse, Dan; Zong, Jie; Churin, Dmitriy; Peyghambarian, N

    2013-10-21

    A novel monolithic fiber-optic chirped pulse amplification (CPA) system for high energy, femtosecond pulse generation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. By employing a high gain amplifier comprising merely 20 cm of high efficiency media (HEM) gain fiber, an optimal balance of output pulse energy, optical efficiency, and B-integral is achieved. The HEM amplifier is fabricated from erbium-doped phosphate glass fiber and yields gain of 1.443 dB/cm with slope efficiency >45%. We experimentally demonstrate near diffraction-limited beam quality and near transform-limited femtosecond pulse quality at 1.55 µm wavelength. With pulse energy >100 µJ and pulse duration of 636 fs (FWHM), the peak power is estimated to be ~160 MW. NAVAIR Public Release Distribution Statement A-"Approved for Public release; distribution is unlimited".

  1. Magnetic Alignment of Pulsed Solenoids Using the Pulsed Wire Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbelaez, D.; Madur, A.; Lipton, T.M.; Waldron, W.L.; Kwan, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    A unique application of the pulsed-wire measurement method has been implemented for alignment of 2.5 T pulsed solenoid magnets. The magnetic axis measurement has been shown to have a resolution of better than 25 (micro)m. The accuracy of the technique allows for the identification of inherent field errors due to, for example, the winding layer transitions and the current leads. The alignment system is developed for the induction accelerator NDCX-II under construction at LBNL, an upgraded Neutralized Drift Compression experiment for research on warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion. Precise alignment is essential for NDCX-II, since the ion beam has a large energy spread associated with the rapid pulse compression such that misalignments lead to corkscrew deformation of the beam and reduced intensity at focus. The ability to align the magnetic axis of the pulsed solenoids to within 100 pm of the induction cell axis has been demonstrated.

  2. Neural mechanisms of sequence generation in songbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Bruce

    Animal models in research are useful for studying more complex behavior. For example, motor sequence generation of actions requiring good muscle coordination such as writing with a pen, playing an instrument, or speaking, may involve the interaction of many areas in the brain, each a complex system in itself; thus it can be difficult to determine causal relationships between neural behavior and the behavior being studied. Birdsong, however, provides an excellent model behavior for motor sequence learning, memory, and generation. The song consists of learned sequences of notes that are spectrographically stereotyped over multiple renditions of the song, similar to syllables in human speech. The main areas of the songbird brain involve in singing are known, however, the mechanisms by which these systems store and produce song are not well understood. We used a custom built, head-mounted, miniature motorized microdrive to chronically record the neural firing patterns of identified neurons in HVC, a pre-motor cortical nucleus which has been shown to be important in song timing. These were done in Bengalese finch which generate a song made up of stereotyped notes but variable note sequences. We observed song related bursting in neurons projecting to Area X, a homologue to basal ganglia, and tonic firing in HVC interneurons. Interneuron had firing rate patterns that were consistent over multiple renditions of the same note sequence. We also designed and built a light-weight, low-powered wireless programmable neural stimulator using Bluetooth Low Energy Protocol. It was able to generate perturbations in the song when current pulses were administered to RA, which projects to the brainstem nucleus responsible for syringeal muscle control.

  3. Few-cycle isolated attosecond pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansone, G.; Benedetti, E.; Calegari, F.; Stagira, S.; Vozzi, C.; Silvestri De, S.; Nisoli, M.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. In the last few years the field of attosecond science has shown impressive and rapid progress, mainly due to the introduction of novel experimental methods for the characterization of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses and attosecond electron wave packets. This development has been also triggered by significant improvements in the control of the electric field of the driving infrared pulses. Particularly interesting for the applications is the generation of isolated attosecond XUV pulses using few-cycle driving pulses. In this case significant progresses have been achieved thanks to the stabilization of the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of amplified light pulses. In this work we demonstrate that the polarization gating (PG) method with few-cycle phase-stabilized driving pulses allows one to generate few-cycle isolated attosecond pulses tunable on a very broad spectral region. The PG method is based on temporal modulation of the ellipticity of a light pulse, which confines the XUV emission in the temporal gate where the polarization is close to linear. The time-dependent polarization of phase-stabilized sub-6-fs pulses, generated by the hollow fiber technique, has been obtained using two birefringent plates. It is possible to create a linear polarization gate, whose position is imposed by the intensity profile of the pulse whilst the emission time is linked to the CEP of the electric field. The pulses have been analyzed by using a flat-field spectrometer. Continuous XUV spectra, corresponding to the production of isolated attosecond pulses, have been generated for particular CEP values. Upon changing the rotation of the first plate it was possible to tune the XUV emission in a broad spectra range. We have then achieved a complete temporal characterization of the generated isolated attosecond pulses using frequency-resolved optical gating for complete reconstruction of attosecond bursts (FROG CRAB). The measured parabolic phase

  4. Foundations of pulsed power technology

    CERN Document Server

    Lehr, Janet

    2018-01-01

    Pulsed power technologies could be an answer to many cutting-edge applications. The challenge is in how to develop this high-power/high-energy technology to fit current market demands of low-energy consuming applications. This book provides a comprehensive look at pulsed power technology and shows how it can be improved upon for the world of today and tomorrow. Foundations of Pulsed Power Technology focuses on the design and construction of the building blocks as well as their optimum assembly for synergetic high performance of the overall pulsed power system. Filled with numerous design examples throughout, the book offers chapter coverage on various subjects such as: Marx generators and Marx-like circuits; pulse transformers; pulse-forming lines; closing switches; opening switches; multi-gigawatt to multi-terawatt systems; energy storage in capacitor banks; electrical breakdown in gases; electrical breakdown in solids, liquids and vacuum; pulsed voltage and current measurements; electromagnetic interferen...

  5. Hole transfer in DNA studied by pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majima, T.; Kawai, K.; Takada, T.

    2003-01-01

    Attention has been paid to charge transfer in DNA with respect to oxidation damage of DNA and nano bio-devices such as DNA molecular wire. We report hole transfer in DNA during pulse radiolysis of molecule-conjugated DNA (M-DNA). Direct measurement of the charge transfer in DNA has never been reported due to the low extinction coefficient of nucleobase radical ions and to difficult definition of nucleobases. We have used M-DNA in which M radical cation has enough extinction coefficient and distinct absorption. Radical cation was generated in M-DNA during pulse radiolysis in water, and hole transfer through DNA was monitored by time-resolved transient absorption spectra of the radical cations. Hole was generated in Py-DNA by pulse radiolysis in water. Hole transfer to Py through DNA was monitored by transient absorption of Py'+ at 465 nm. The hole hopping rate (k) from G-region to Py was determined to be 104 s-1 which decreased with intervening A-T base-pairs between Py and G-region. We suppose that G(-H+)-radical and C(+H+) basepair can alive in DNA more than 100 us and that this long lifetime is responsible to the long-distance hole transfer. The dependence of k against the distance between the G-region and Py led to the slope of 0.3 Angstroms-1 which is due to multi-step k with the smaller distance dependence. On the other hand, beta = 0.6 Angstroms-1 was found for the single-step k in DNA. On the basis of pulse radiolytic studied on various molecule-conjugated DNA, we found that hole transfer between two chromophores (A and B)-conjugated DNA increased with decreasing the distance between A and B and was accelerated slightly with increasing the number of Gs of the bridge between A and B, and that k was modulated by the bridged base sequences. We also found that weak distance dependent hole transfer in DNA by adenine hopping mechanism

  6. The influence of body temperature on image contrast in post mortem MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruder, Thomas D.; Hatch, Gary M.; Siegenthaler, Lea; Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Mathier, Sandra; Thali, Michael J.; Weber, Oliver M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the temperature dependency of tissue contrast on post mortem magnetic resonance (PMMR) images both objectively and subjectively; and to visually demonstrate the changes of image contrast at various temperatures. Materials and methods: The study was approved by the responsible justice department and the ethics committee. The contrast of water, fat, and muscle was measured using regions of interest (ROI) in the orbit of 41 human corpses to assess how body temperature (range 2.1–39.8 °C) relates to image contrast of T1-weighted (T1W) and T2-weighted (T2W) sequences on PMMR. Regressions were calculated using the method of least squares. Three readers judged visible changes of image contrast subjectively by consensus. Results: There was a positive relationship between temperature and contrast on T1-weighted (T1W) images and between temperature and the contrast of fat/muscle on T2-weighted (T2W) images. There was a negative relationship between temperature and the contrast of water/fat and water/muscle on T2W images. Subjectively, the influence of temperature became visible below 20 °C on T2W images, and below 10 °C on T1W images. Conclusion: Image contrast on PMMR depends on the temperature of a corpse. Radiologists involved in post mortem imaging must be aware of temperature-related changes in MR image contrast. To preserve technical quality, scanning corpses below 10 °C should be avoided.

  7. An 8-GW long-pulse generator based on Tesla transformer and pulse forming network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiancang; Zhang, Xibo; Li, Rui; Zhao, Liang; Sun, Xu; Wang, Limin; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Wang, Ying; Peng, Jianchang; Song, Xiaoxin

    2014-06-01

    A long-pulse generator TPG700L based on a Tesla transformer and a series pulse forming network (PFN) is constructed to generate intense electron beams for the purpose of high power microwave (HPM) generation. The TPG700L mainly consists of a 12-stage PFN, a built-in Tesla transformer in a pulse forming line, a three-electrode gas switch, a transmission line with a trigger, and a load. The Tesla transformer and the compact PFN are the key technologies for the development of the TPG700L. This generator can output electrical pulses with a width as long as 200 ns at a level of 8 GW and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. When used to drive a relative backward wave oscillator for HPM generation, the electrical pulse width is about 100 ns on a voltage level of 520 kV. Factors affecting the pulse waveform of the TPG700L are also discussed. At present, the TPG700L performs well for long-pulse HPM generation in our laboratory.

  8. An 8-GW long-pulse generator based on Tesla transformer and pulse forming network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Jiancang; Zhang, Xibo; Li, Rui; Zhao, Liang, E-mail: zhaoliang0526@163.com; Sun, Xu; Wang, Limin; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Wang, Ying; Peng, Jianchang; Song, Xiaoxin [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710024 (China)

    2014-06-15

    A long-pulse generator TPG700L based on a Tesla transformer and a series pulse forming network (PFN) is constructed to generate intense electron beams for the purpose of high power microwave (HPM) generation. The TPG700L mainly consists of a 12-stage PFN, a built-in Tesla transformer in a pulse forming line, a three-electrode gas switch, a transmission line with a trigger, and a load. The Tesla transformer and the compact PFN are the key technologies for the development of the TPG700L. This generator can output electrical pulses with a width as long as 200 ns at a level of 8 GW and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. When used to drive a relative backward wave oscillator for HPM generation, the electrical pulse width is about 100 ns on a voltage level of 520 kV. Factors affecting the pulse waveform of the TPG700L are also discussed. At present, the TPG700L performs well for long-pulse HPM generation in our laboratory.

  9. Pulse pile-up IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, D.H.

    1991-05-01

    The study of pulse pile-up is extended from the case of unipolar pulses, for which ruin theory is an excellent approximation, to the case of bipolar pulses for which ruin theory is not applicable to the effect of the back-kicks in reducing the pile-up: an appropriate solution is presented. (Author) 3 refs., 11 figs

  10. Application of nonlinear pulse shaping of femtosecond pulse generation in a fiber amplifier at 500 MHz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Luo, Daping; Wang, Chao; Zhu, Zhiwei; Li, Wenxue

    2018-03-01

    We numerically and experimentally demonstrate that a nonlinear pulse shaping technique based on pre-chirping management in a short gain fiber can be exploited to improve the quality of a compressed pulse. With prior tuning of the pulse chirp, the amplified pulse express different nonlinear propagating processes. A spectrum with s flat top and more smooth wings, showing a similariton feature, generates with the optimal initial pulse chirp, and the shortest pulses with minimal pulse pedestals are obtained. Experimental results show the ability of nonlinear pulse shaping to enhance the quality of compressed pulses, as theoretically expected.

  11. Nanosecond bipolar pulse generators for bioelectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shu; Zhou, Chunrong; Yang, Enbo; Rajulapati, Sambasiva R

    2018-04-26

    Biological effects caused by a nanosecond pulse, such as cell membrane permeabilization, peripheral nerve excitation and cell blebbing, can be reduced or cancelled by applying another pulse of reversed polarity. Depending on the degree of cancellation, the pulse interval of these two pulses can be as long as dozens of microseconds. The cancellation effect diminishes as the pulse duration increases. To study the cancellation effect and potentially utilize it in electrotherapy, nanosecond bipolar pulse generators must be made available. An overview of the generators is given in this paper. A pulse forming line (PFL) that is matched at one end and shorted at the other end allows a bipolar pulse to be produced, but no delay can be inserted between the phases. Another generator employs a combination of a resistor, an inductor and a capacitor to form an RLC resonant circuit so that a bipolar pulse with a decaying magnitude can be generated. A third generator is a converter, which converts an existing unipolar pulse to a bipolar pulse. This is done by inserting an inductor in a transmission line. The first phase of the bipolar pulse is provided by the unipolar pulse's rising phase. The second phase is formed during the fall time of the unipolar pulse, when the inductor, which was previously charged during the flat part of the unipolar pulse, discharges its current to the load. The fourth type of generator uses multiple MOSFET switches stacked to turn on a pre-charged, bipolar RC network. This approach is the most flexible in that it can generate multiphasic pulses that have different amplitudes, delays, and durations. However, it may not be suitable for producing short nanosecond pulses (<100 ns), whereas the PFL approach and the RLC approach with gas switches are used for this range. Thus, each generator has its own advantages and applicable range. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pulse electromagnetic fields enhance extracellular electron transfer in magnetic bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huihui; Liu, Bingfeng; Wang, Qisong; Sun, Jianmin; Xie, Guojun; Ren, Nanqi; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Xing, Defeng

    2017-01-01

    Microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) is essential in driving the microbial interspecies interaction and redox reactions in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). Magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) and magnetic fields (MFs) were recently reported to promote microbial EET, but the mechanisms of MFs stimulation of EET and current generation in BESs are not known. This study investigates the behavior of current generation and EET in a state-of-the-art pulse electromagnetic field (PEMF)-assisted magnetic BES (PEMF-MBES), which was equipped with magnetic carbon particle (Fe 3 O 4 @N-mC)-coated electrodes. Illumina Miseq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was also conducted to reveal the changes of microbial communities and interactions on the anode in response to magnetic field. PEMF had significant influences on current generation. When reactors were operated in microbial fuel cell (MFC) mode with pulse electromagnetic field (PEMF-MMFCs), power densities increased by 25.3-36.0% compared with no PEMF control MFCs (PEMF-OFF-MMFCs). More interestingly, when PEMF was removed, the power density dropped by 25.7%, while when PEMF was reintroduced, the value was restored to the previous level. Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicon and principal component analysis (PCA) based on operational taxonomic units (OTUs) indicate that PEMFs led to the shifts in microbial community and changes in species evenness that decreased biofilm microbial diversity. Geobacter spp. were found dominant in all anode biofilms, but the relative abundance in PEMF-MMFCs (86.1-90.0%) was higher than in PEMF-OFF-MMFCs (82.5-82.7%), indicating that the magnetic field enriched Geobacter on the anode. The current generation of Geobacter -inoculated microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) presented the same change regularity, the accordingly increase or decrease corresponding with switch of PEMF, which confirmed the reversible stimulation of PEMFs on microbial electron transfer. The pulse electromagnetic

  13. Industrial Applications of Pulsed Power Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Koichi; Katsuki, Sunao

    Recent progress of the industrial applications of pulsed power is reviewed in this paper. Repetitively operated pulsed power generators with a moderate peak power have been developed for industrial applications. These generators are reliable and low maintenance. Development of the pulsed power generators helps promote industrial applications of pulsed power for such things as food processing, medical treatment, water treatment, exhaust gas treatment, ozone generation, engine ignition, ion implantation and others. Here, industrial applications of pulsed power are classified by application for biological effects, for pulsed streamer discharges in gases, for pulsed discharges in liquid or liquid-mixture, and for bright radiation sources.

  14. Linear induction accelerators made from pulse-line cavities with external pulse injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, I.

    1979-01-01

    Two types of linear induction accelerator have been reported previously. In one, unidirectional voltage pulses are generated outside the accelerator and injected into the accelerator cavity modules, which contain ferromagnetic material to reduce energy losses in the form of currents induced, in parallel with the beam, in the cavity structure. In the other type, the accelerator cavity modules are themselves pulse-forming lines with energy storage and switches; parallel current losses are made zero by the use of circuits that generate bidirectional acceleration waveforms with a zero voltage-time integral. In a third type of design described here, the cavities are externally driven, and 100% efficient coupling of energy to the beam is obtained by designing the external pulse generators to produce bidirectional voltage waveforms with zero voltage-time integral. A design for such a pulse generator is described that is itself one hundred percent efficient and which is well suited to existing pulse power techniques. Two accelerator cavity designs are described that can couple the pulse from such a generator to the beam; one of these designs provides voltage doubling. Comparison is made between the accelerating gradients that can be obtained with this and the preceding types of induction accelerator

  15. Laser-plasma acceleration with multi-color pulse stacks: Designer electron beams for advanced radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmykov, Serge; Shadwick, Bradley; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Davoine, Xavier

    2015-11-01

    Photon engineering offers new avenues to coherently control electron beam phase space on a femtosecond time scale. It enables generation of high-quality beams at a kHz-scale repetition rate. Reducing the peak pulse power (and thus the average laser power) is the key to effectively exercise such control. A stepwise negative chirp, synthesized by incoherently stacking collinear sub-Joule pulses from conventional CPA, affords a micron-scale bandwidth. It is sufficient to prevent rapid compression of the pulse into an optical shock, while delaying electron dephasing. This extends electron energy far beyond the limits suggested by accepted scalings (beyond 1 GeV in a 3 mm plasma), without compromising beam quality. In addition, acceleration with a stacked pulse in a channel favorably modifies electron beam on a femtosecond time scale, controllably producing synchronized sequences of 100 kA-scale, quasi-monoenergetic bunches. These comb-like, designer GeV electron beams are ideal drivers of polychromatic, tunable inverse Thomson γ-ray sources. The work of SYK and BAS is supported by the US DOE Grant DE-SC0008382 and NSF Grant PHY-1104683. Inverse Thomson scattering simulations were completed utilizing the Holland Computing Center of the University of Nebraska.

  16. Optimal filter bandwidth for pulse oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuban, Norbert; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2012-10-01

    Pulse oximeters contain one or more signal filtering stages between the photodiode and microcontroller. These filters are responsible for removing the noise while retaining the useful frequency components of the signal, thus improving the signal-to-noise ratio. The corner frequencies of these filters affect not only the noise level, but also the shape of the pulse signal. Narrow filter bandwidth effectively suppresses the noise; however, at the same time, it distorts the useful signal components by decreasing the harmonic content. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the filter bandwidth on the accuracy of pulse oximeters. We used a pulse oximeter tester device to produce stable, repetitive pulse waves with digitally adjustable R ratio and heart rate. We built a pulse oximeter and attached it to the tester device. The pulse oximeter digitized the current of its photodiode directly, without any analog signal conditioning. We varied the corner frequency of the low-pass filter in the pulse oximeter in the range of 0.66-15 Hz by software. For the tester device, the R ratio was set to R = 1.00, and the R ratio deviation measured by the pulse oximeter was monitored as a function of the corner frequency of the low-pass filter. The results revealed that lowering the corner frequency of the low-pass filter did not decrease the accuracy of the oxygen level measurements. The lowest possible value of the corner frequency of the low-pass filter is the fundamental frequency of the pulse signal. We concluded that the harmonics of the pulse signal do not contribute to the accuracy of pulse oximetry. The results achieved by the pulse oximeter tester were verified by human experiments, performed on five healthy subjects. The results of the human measurements confirmed that filtering out the harmonics of the pulse signal does not degrade the accuracy of pulse oximetry.

  17. SLAC pulsed X-ray facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipe, N. E.; McCall, R. C.; Baker, E. D.

    1986-05-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) operates a high energy (up to 33 GeV) linear accelerator delivering pulses up to a few microseconds wide. The pulsed nature of the electron beam creates problems in the detection and measurement of radiation both from the accelerator beam and the klystrons that provide the RF power for the accelerator. Hence, a pulsed X-ray facility has been built at SLAC mainly for the purpose of testing the response of different radiation detection instruments to pulsed radiation fields. The X-ray tube consists of an electron gun with a control grid. This provides a stream of pulsed electrons that can be accelerated towards a confined target-window. The window is made up of aluminum 0.051 cm (20 mils) thick, plated on the vacuum side with a layer of gold 0.0006 cm (1/4 mil) thick. The frequency of electron pulses can be varied by an internal pulser from 60 to 360 pulses per second with pulse widths of 360 ns to 5 ms. The pulse amplitude can be varied over a wide range of currents. An external pulser can be used to obtain other frequencies or special pulse shapes. The voltage across the gun can be varied from 0 to 100 kV. The major part of the X-ray tube is enclosed in a large walk-in-cabinet made of 1.9 cm (3/4 in) plywood and lined with 0.32 cm (1/8 in) lead to make a very versatile facility.

  18. SLAC pulsed x-ray facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipe, N.E.; McCall, R.C.; Baker, E.D.

    1986-05-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) operates a high energy (up to 33 GeV) linear accelerator delivering pulses up to a few microseconds wide. The pulsed nature of the electron beam creates problems in the detection and measurement of radiation both from the accelerator beam and the klystrons that provide the rf power for the accelerator. Hence, a pulsed x-ray facility has been built at SLAC mainly for the purpose of testing the response of different radiation detection instruments to pulsed radiation fields. The x-ray tube consists of an electron gun with a control grid. This provides a stream of pulsed electrons that can be accelerated towards a confined target-window. The window is made up of aluminium 0.051 cm (20 mils) thick, plated on the vacuum side with a layer of gold 0.0006 cm (1/4 mil) thick. The frequency of electron pulses can be varied by an internal pulser from 60 to 360 pulses per second with pulse widths of 360 ns to 5 μs. The pulse amplitude can be varied over a wide range of currents. An external pulser can be used to obtain other frequencies or special pulse shapes. The voltage across the gun can be varied from 0 to 100 kV. The major part of the x-ray tube is enclosed in a large walk-in-cabinet made of 1.9 cm (3/4 in) plywood and lined with 0.32 cm (1/8 in) lead to make a very versatile facility. 3 refs., 5 figs

  19. Effects of laser wavelengths and pulse energy ratio on the emission enhancement in dual pulse LIBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Rizwan; Iqbal, Javed; Baig, M Aslam

    2015-01-01

    We present new studies on the effects of laser wavelengths, pulse energy ratio and interpulse delay between two laser pulses in the collinear dual pulse configuration of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) on an iron sample in air using the fundamental (1064 nm) and the second harmonics (532 nm) of Nd:YAG lasers. In the dual pulse LIBS, an optimum value of interpulse delay with an appropriate combination of laser wavelengths, and laser pulse energy ratio, yields a 30 times signal intensity enhancement in the neutral iron lines as compared with single pulse LIBS. A comparison in the spatial variations of electron temperature along the axis of the plume expansion in single and double pulse LIBS has also been studied. (letter)

  20. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Alan Hap [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90° Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated ~ 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 Å) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has been demonstrated as a

  1. Ultrashort X-ray pulse science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, A.H.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1998-01-01

    A variety of phenomena involves atomic motion on the femtosecond time-scale. These phenomena have been studied using ultrashort optical pulses, which indirectly probe atomic positions through changes in optical properties. Because x-rays can more directly probe atomic positions, ultrashort x-ray pulses are better suited for the study of ultrafast structural dynamics. One approach towards generating ultrashort x-ray pulses is by 90 o Thomson scattering between terawatt laser pulses and relativistic electrons. Using this technique, the author generated ∼ 300 fs, 30 keV (0.4 (angstrom)) x-ray pulses. These x-ray pulses are absolutely synchronized with ultrashort laser pulses, allowing femtosecond optical pump/x-ray probe experiments to be performed. Using the right-angle Thomson scattering x-ray source, the author performed time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies of laser-perturbated InSb. These experiments revealed a delayed onset of lattice expansion. This delay is due to the energy relaxation from a dense electron-hole plasma to the lattice. The dense electron-hole plasma first undergoes Auger recombination, which reduces the carrier concentration while maintaining energy content. Longitudinal-optic (LO) phonon emission then couples energy to the lattice. LO phonon decay into acoustic phonons, and acoustic phonon propagation then causes the growth of a thermally expanded layer. Source characterization is instrumental in utilizing ultrashort x-ray pulses in time-resolved x-ray spectroscopies. By measurement of the electron beam diameter at the generation point, the pulse duration of the Thomson scattered x-rays is determined. Analysis of the Thomson scattered x-ray beam properties also provides a novel means of electron bunch characterization. Although the pulse duration is inferred for the Thomson scattering x-ray source, direct measurement is required for other x-ray pulse sources. A method based on the laser-assisted photoelectric effect (LAPE) has been

  2. MR contrast of ferritin and hemosiderin in the brain: comparison among gradient-echo, conventional spin-echo and fast spin-echo sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haque, Tabassum Laz; Miki, Yukio; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Akira; Konishi, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Konishi, Junji

    2003-12-01

    Objective: To compare the magnetic resonance image contrasts due to ferritin and hemosiderin in the brain tissue among different pulse sequences. Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with cavernous hemangioma in the brain prospectively underwent MR imaging with T2*-weighted gradient-echo (GRE), T2-weighted conventional spin-echo (SE) and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences. The relative contrast ratios (CRs) of the hypointense part of cavernous hemangioma, globus pallidus and putamen to the deep frontal white matter were measured on each pulse sequence and statistically analyzed using analysis of variance followed by paired t-test. Results: In the hypointense part of cavernous hemangioma, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2*-weighted GRE than on T2-weighted SE images (P=0.0001), and on T2-weighted SE than on T2-weighted FSE images (P=0.0001). In the globus pallidus, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.002), and on T2*-weighted GRE than on T2-weighted FSE images (P=0.0002). In the putamen, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.001), and there was no significant difference between CRs on T2-weighted FSE and T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.90). Conclusion: Hemosiderin showed best image contrast on T2*-weighted GRE images but ferritin showed more prominent image contrast on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images, which may help to determine an appropriate pulse sequence in neurological diseases associated with excessive ferritin accumulation.

  3. MR contrast of ferritin and hemosiderin in the brain: comparison among gradient-echo, conventional spin-echo and fast spin-echo sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, Tabassum Laz; Miki, Yukio; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Akira; Konishi, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Konishi, Junji

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare the magnetic resonance image contrasts due to ferritin and hemosiderin in the brain tissue among different pulse sequences. Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with cavernous hemangioma in the brain prospectively underwent MR imaging with T2*-weighted gradient-echo (GRE), T2-weighted conventional spin-echo (SE) and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences. The relative contrast ratios (CRs) of the hypointense part of cavernous hemangioma, globus pallidus and putamen to the deep frontal white matter were measured on each pulse sequence and statistically analyzed using analysis of variance followed by paired t-test. Results: In the hypointense part of cavernous hemangioma, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2*-weighted GRE than on T2-weighted SE images (P=0.0001), and on T2-weighted SE than on T2-weighted FSE images (P=0.0001). In the globus pallidus, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.002), and on T2*-weighted GRE than on T2-weighted FSE images (P=0.0002). In the putamen, relative CRs were significantly lower on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.001), and there was no significant difference between CRs on T2-weighted FSE and T2*-weighted GRE images (P=0.90). Conclusion: Hemosiderin showed best image contrast on T2*-weighted GRE images but ferritin showed more prominent image contrast on T2-weighted SE than on T2*-weighted GRE images, which may help to determine an appropriate pulse sequence in neurological diseases associated with excessive ferritin accumulation

  4. Demonstration and Optimization of BNFL's Pulsed Jet Mixing and RFD Sampling Systems Using NCAW Simulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bontha, J.R.; Golcar, G.R.; Hannigan, N.

    2000-01-01

    The BNFL Inc. flowsheet for the pretreatment and vitrification of the Hanford High Level Tank waste includes the use of several hundred Reverse Flow Diverters (RFDs) for sampling and transferring the radioactive slurries and Pulsed Jet mixers to homogenize or suspend the tank contents. The Pulsed Jet mixing and the RFD sampling devices represent very simple and efficient methods to mix and sample slurries, respectively, using compressed air to achieve the desired operation. The equipment has no moving parts, which makes them very suitable for mixing and sampling highly radioactive wastes. However, the effectiveness of the mixing and sampling systems are yet to be demonstrated when dealing with Hanford slurries, which exhibit a wide range of physical and theological properties. This report describes the results of the testing of BNFL's Pulsed Jet mixing and RFD sampling systems in a 13-ft ID and 15-ft height dish-bottomed tank at Battelle's 336 building high-bay facility using AZ-101/102 simulants containing up to 36-wt% insoluble solids. The specific objectives of the work were to: Demonstrate the effectiveness of the Pulsed Jet mixing system to thoroughly homogenize Hanford-type slurries over a range of solids loading; Minimize/optimize air usage by changing sequencing of the Pulsed Jet mixers or by altering cycle times; and Demonstrate that the RFD sampler can obtain representative samples of the slurry up to the maximum RPP-WTP baseline concentration of 25-wt%

  5. Pulse-width discriminators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budyashov, Yu.G.; Grebenyuk, V.M.; Zinov, V.G.

    1978-01-01

    A pulse duration discriminator is described which is intended for processing signals from multilayer scintillators. The basic elements of the scintillator are: an input gate, a current generator, an integrating capacitor, a Schmidt trigger and an anticoincidence circuit. The basic circuit of the discriminator and its time diagrams explaining its operating are given. The discriminator is based on microcircuits. Pulse duration discrimination threshold changes continuously from 20 to 100 ns, while its amplitude threshold changes within 20 to 100 mV. The temperature instability of discrimination thresholds (both in pulse width and in amplitude) is better than 0.1 per cent/deg C

  6. A compact high-voltage pulse generator based on pulse transformer with closed magnetic core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Jinliang; Cheng, Xinbing; Bai, Guoqiang; Zhang, Hongbo; Feng, Jiahuai; Liang, Bo

    2010-03-01

    A compact high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator, based on a pulse transformer with a closed magnetic core, is presented in this paper. The pulse generator consists of a miniaturized pulse transformer, a curled parallel strip pulse forming line (PFL), a spark gap, and a matched load. The innovative design is characterized by the compact structure of the transformer and the curled strip PFL. A new structure of transformer windings was designed to keep good insulation and decrease distributed capacitance between turns of windings. A three-copper-strip structure was adopted to avoid asymmetric coupling of the curled strip PFL. When the 31 microF primary capacitor is charged to 2 kV, the pulse transformer can charge the PFL to 165 kV, and the 3.5 ohm matched load can deliver a high-voltage pulse with a duration of 9 ns, amplitude of 84 kV, and rise time of 5.1 ns. When the load is changed to 50 ohms, the output peak voltage of the generator can be 165 kV, the full width at half maximum is 68 ns, and the rise time is 6.5 ns.

  7. Enhancement of beam pulse controllability for a single-pulse formation system of a cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The single-pulse formation technique using a beam chopping system consisting of two types of high-voltage beam kickers was improved to enhance the quality and intensity of the single-pulse beam with a pulse interval over 1 μs at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency cyclotron facility. A contamination rate of neighboring beam bunches in the single-pulse beam was reduced to less than 0.1%. Long-term purification of the single pulse beam was guaranteed by the well-controlled magnetic field stabilization system for the cyclotron magnet. Reduction of the multi-turn extraction number for suppressing the neighboring beam bunch contamination was achieved by restriction of a beam phase width and precise optimization of a particle acceleration phase. In addition, the single-pulse beam intensity was increased by a factor of two or more by a combination of two types of beam bunchers using sinusoidal and saw-tooth voltage waveforms. Provision of the high quality intense single-pulse beam contributed to improve the accuracy of experiments for investigation of scintillation light time-profile and for neutron energy measurement by a time-of-flight method

  8. Hyper dispersion pulse compressor for chirped pulse amplification systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2011-11-29

    A grating pulse compressor configuration is introduced for increasing the optical dispersion for a given footprint and to make practical the application for chirped pulse amplification (CPA) to quasi-narrow bandwidth materials, such as Nd:YAG. The grating configurations often use cascaded pairs of gratings to increase angular dispersion an order of magnitude or more. Increased angular dispersion allows for decreased grating separation and a smaller compressor footprint.

  9. NMR imaging of solids with multiple-pulse line narrowing and radiofrequency gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    The usual methods of magnetic resonance imaging fail in rigid solids due to the line-shape contributions of dipolar coupling, chemical shift dispersion and anisotropy, and bulk magnetic susceptibility. This dissertation presents a new method of solid-stage imaging by nuclear magnetic resonance which averages away these contributions with multiple-pulse line-narrowing and encodes spatial information with pulsed radiofrequency field gradients. This method is closely related to simultaneously developed methods utilizing pulsed DC gradients, and offers similar improvements in sensitivity and resolution. The advantage of rf gradients is that they can be rapidly switched without inducing eddy currents in the probe or the magnet. In addition, the phases and amplitudes of the rf gradients can be switched by equipment which is already part of an NMR spectrometer capable of solid-state spectroscopy. The line-narrowing and gradient pulses originate in separate rf circuits tuned to the same frequency. Interactions between the circuits have been minimized by a method of active Q-switching which employs PIN diodes in the matching networks of these circuits. Both one- and two-dimensional images are presented. The latter are obtained by a novel method in which the two dimensions of imaging transverse to the static magnetic field are encoded by two orthogonal components of a single rf gradient. A π/2 phase shift of the rf phase relative to that of the line-narrowing pulses selects one component or the other. This arrangement allows the solid-state analogs of versatile imaging sequences based on Fourier imaging and eliminates the need for sample rotation and back-projection methods. Coherent averaging theory is used to analyze this imaging technique and exact numerical simulations on several coupled spins are discussed. These lend insight to the residual linewidth and its dependence on pixel position as well as to the range of applicability of this technique

  10. Technical specifications manual for the MARK-1 pulsed ionizing radiation detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, R.S.; Harker, Y.D.; Jones, J.L.; Hoggan, J.M.

    1993-03-01

    The MARK-1 detection system was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation. The completely portable system was designed for the detection and analysis of intense photon emissions from pulsed ionizing radiation sources. This manual presents the technical design specifications for the MARK-1 detection system and was written primarily to assist the support or service technician in the service, calibration, and repair of the system. The manual presents the general detection system theory, the MARK-1 component design specifications, the acquisition and control software, the data processing sequence, and the system calibration procedure. A second manual entitled: Volume 2: Operations Manual for the MARK-1 Pulsed Ionizing Radiation Detection System (USDOE Report WINCO-1108, September 1992) provides a general operational description of the MARK-1 detection system. The Operations Manual was written primarily to assist the field operator in system operations and analysis of the data

  11. Scattering of a pulse by a cavity in an elastic half-space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scandrett, C.L.; Kriegsmann, G.A.; Achienbach, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    The finite difference technique is employed to study plane strain scattering of pulses from finite anomalies embedded in an isotropic, homogeneous, elastic half-space. In particular, the scatterer is taken to by a cylindrical cavity. A new transmission boundary condition is developed which transmits energy conveyed by Rayleigh surface waves. This condition is successfully employed in reducing the domain of numerical calculations from a semi-infinite to a finite region. A test of the numerical scheme is given by considering a time harmonic pulse of infinite extent. The numerical technique is marched out in time until transients have radiated away and a steady state solution has been reached which is found to be in good agreement with results produced by a series type solution. Time domain solutions are given in terms of time histories of displacements at the half-space free surface; and by sequences of snapshots, taken of the entire numerical domain, which illustrate the scattering dynamics

  12. Pulse duration discriminator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosakovskij, L.F.

    1980-01-01

    Basic circuits of a discriminator for discrimination of pulses with the duration greater than the preset one, and of a multifunctional discriminator allowing to discriminate pulses with the duration greater (tsub(p)>tsub(s)) and lesser (tsub(p) tsub(s) and with the duration tsub(p) [ru

  13. Effect of rising time of rectangular pulse on inactivation of staphylococcus aureus by pulsed electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruobing; Liang, Dapeng; Zheng, Nanchen; Xiao, Jianfu; Mo, Mengbin; Li, Jing

    2013-03-01

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) is a novel non-thermal food processing technology that involves the electric discharge of high voltage short pulses through the food product. In PEF study, rectangular pulses are most commonly used for inactivating microorganisms. However, little information is available on the inactivation effect of rising time of rectangular pulse. In this paper, inactivation effects, electric field strength, treatment time and conductivity on staphylococcus aureus inactivation were investigated when the pulse rising time is reduced from 2.5 μs to 200 ns. Experimental results showed that inactivation effect of PEF increased with electric field strength, solution conductivity and treatment time. Rising time of the rectangular pulse had a significant effect on the inactivation of staphylococcus aureus. Rectangular pulses with a rising time of 200 ns had a better inactivation effect than that with 2 μs. In addition, temperature increase of the solution treated by pulses with 200 ns rising time was lower than that with 2 μs. In order to obtain a given inactivation effect, treatment time required for the rectangular pulse with 200 ns rise time was shorter than that with 2 μs.

  14. Effect of rising time of rectangular pulse on inactivation of staphylococcus aureus by pulsed electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ruobing; Liang, Dapeng; Xiao, Jianfu; Mo, Mengbin; Li, Jing; Zheng, Nanchen

    2013-01-01

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) is a novel non-thermal food processing technology that involves the electric discharge of high voltage short pulses through the food product. In PEF study, rectangular pulses are most commonly used for inactivating microorganisms. However, little information is available on the inactivation effect of rising time of rectangular pulse. In this paper, inactivation effects, electric field strength, treatment time and conductivity on staphylococcus aureus inactivation were investigated when the pulse rising time is reduced from 2.5 μs to 200 ns. Experimental results showed that inactivation effect of PEF increased with electric field strength, solution conductivity and treatment time. Rising time of the rectangular pulse had a significant effect on the inactivation of staphylococcus aureus. Rectangular pulses with a rising time of 200 ns had a better inactivation effect than that with 2 μs. In addition, temperature increase of the solution treated by pulses with 200 ns rising time was lower than that with 2 μs. In order to obtain a given inactivation effect, treatment time required for the rectangular pulse with 200 ns rise time was shorter than that with 2 μs.

  15. Pile-up and defective pulse rejection by pulse shape discrimination in surface barrier detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeland, K.A.; Kristiansson, P.

    1994-01-01

    A technique to reject pile-up pulses and defective tail pulses from surface barrier detectors by the use of pulse shape discrimination is demonstrated. The electronic implementation of the pulse shape discrimination is based upon the zero crossing technique and for data reduction multiparameter techniques are used. The characteristic τ value for pile-up rejection is shown to be less than 56 ns. Its effect on detection limits from tail reduction in Particle Elastic Scattering Analysis (PESA) and pile-up peak suppression is discussed. ((orig.))

  16. CAMAC differential pulse discriminator-counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tselikov, N.V.

    1987-01-01

    Differential pulse discriminator-counter for Moessbauer spectrometer is described. Input pulse setting into the channel is performed according to the following algorithm: the pulse is transmitted to the channel depending on the fact whether the preceding pulse has got to the discrimination window or not. The circuit does not contain delay lines, taking into account the delay of a signal from the upper level discriminator in relation to the lower level discriminator signal, which is connected with input pulse rise finite time, which in turn allows one to reduce the discriminator dead time up to the operation time of threshold circuits. The pulse counting rate is 150 MHz, input signal amplitude is ±3 V, dead time is 6 ns, delay time from input to output is 14 ns. The unit is made in CAMAC system

  17. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, George J [Livermore, CA; Nelson, Scott D [Patterson, CA; Poole, Brian R [Tracy, CA

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  18. Assessment and mitigation of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) impacts at short-pulse laser facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C G Jr; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

    2010-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

  19. Time-resolved measurements with intense ultrashort laser pulses: a 'molecular movie' in real time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudenko, A; Ergler, Th; Feuerstein, B; Zrost, K; Schroeter, C D; Moshammer, R; Ullrich, J

    2007-01-01

    We report on the high-resolution multidimensional real-time mapping of H 2 + and D 2 + nuclear wave packets performed employing time-resolved three-dimensional Coulomb explosion imaging with intense laser pulses. Exploiting a combination of a 'reaction microscope' spectrometer and a pump-probe setup with two intense 6-7 fs laser pulses, we simultaneously visualize both vibrational and rotational motion of the molecule, and obtain a sequence of snapshots of the squared ro-vibrational wave function with time-step resolution of ∼ 0.3 fs, allowing us to reconstruct a real-time movie of the ultrafast molecular motion. We observe fast dephasing, or 'collapse' of the vibrational wave packet and its subsequent revival, as well as signatures of rotational excitation. For D 2 + we resolve also the fractional revivals resulting from the interference between the counter-propagating parts of the wave packet

  20. Dose rate effect on micronuclei induction in human blood lymphocytes exposed to single pulse and multiple pulses of electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Santhosh; Bhat, N N; Joseph, Praveen; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Sreedevi, B; Narayana, Y

    2011-05-01

    The effects of single pulses and multiple pulses of 7 MV electrons on micronuclei (MN) induction in cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were investigated over a wide range of dose rates per pulse (instantaneous dose rate). PBLs were exposed to graded doses of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 Gy of single electron pulses of varying pulse widths at different dose rates per pulse, ranging from 1 × 10(6) Gy s(-1) to 3.2 × 10(8) Gy s(-1). Different dose rates per pulse were achieved by changing the dose per electron pulse by adjusting the beam current and pulse width. MN yields per unit absorbed dose after irradiation with single electron pulses were compared with those of multiple pulses of electrons. A significant decrease in the MN yield with increasing dose rates per pulse was observed, when dose was delivered by a single electron pulse. However, no reduction in the MN yield was observed when dose was delivered by multiple pulses of electrons. The decrease in the yield at high dose rates per pulse suggests possible radical recombination, which leads to decreased biological damage. Cellular response to the presence of very large numbers of chromosomal breaks may also alter the damage.

  1. Rapid thermal pulse annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.G.; Koehn, B.W.; Chaplin, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    Characteristics of recovery processes have been investigated for cases of heating a sample to successively higher temperatures by means of isochronal annealing or by using a rapid pulse annealing. A recovery spectra shows the same features independent of which annealing procedure is used. In order to determine which technique provides the best resolution, a study was made of how two independent first-order processes are separated for different heating rates and time increments of the annealing pulses. It is shown that the pulse anneal method offers definite advantages over isochronal annealing when annealing for short time increments. Experimental data by means of the pulse anneal techniques are given for the various substages of stage I of aluminium. (author)

  2. Linear transformer driver for pulse generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Alexander A; Mazarakis, Michael G; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A; Volkov, Sergey N; Kondratiev, Sergey S; Alexeenko, Vitaly M; Bayol, Frederic; Demol, Gauthier; Stygar, William A

    2015-04-07

    A linear transformer driver includes at least one ferrite ring positioned to accept a load. The linear transformer driver also includes a first power delivery module that includes a first charge storage devices and a first switch. The first power delivery module sends a first energy in the form of a first pulse to the load. The linear transformer driver also includes a second power delivery module including a second charge storage device and a second switch. The second power delivery module sends a second energy in the form of a second pulse to the load. The second pulse has a frequency that is approximately three times the frequency of the first pulse. The at least one ferrite ring is positioned to force the first pulse and the second pulse to the load by temporarily isolating the first pulse and the second pulse from an electrical ground.

  3. Performance comparison of dynamical decoupling sequences for a qubit in a rapidly fluctuating spin bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Gonzalo A.; Suter, Dieter; Ajoy, Ashok; Peng Xinhua

    2010-01-01

    Avoiding the loss of coherence of quantum mechanical states is an important prerequisite for quantum information processing. Dynamical decoupling (DD) is one of the most effective experimental methods for maintaining coherence, especially when one can access only the qubit system and not its environment (bath). It involves the application of pulses to the system whose net effect is a reversal of the system-environment interaction. In any real system, however, the environment is not static, and therefore the reversal of the system-environment interaction becomes imperfect if the spacing between refocusing pulses becomes comparable to or longer than the correlation time of the environment. The efficiency of the refocusing improves therefore if the spacing between the pulses is reduced. Here, we quantify the efficiency of different DD sequences in preserving different quantum states. We use 13 C nuclear spins as qubits and an environment of 1 H nuclear spins as the environment, which couples to the qubit via magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. Strong dipole-dipole couplings between the proton spins result in a rapidly fluctuating environment with a correlation time of the order of 100 μs. Our experimental results show that short delays between the pulses yield better performance if they are compared with the bath correlation time. However, as the pulse spacing becomes shorter than the bath correlation time, an optimum is reached. For even shorter delays, the pulse imperfections dominate over the decoherence losses and cause the quantum state to decay.

  4. Harmonic generation with a dual frequency pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keravnou, Christina P; Averkiou, Michalakis A

    2014-05-01

    Nonlinear imaging was implemented in commercial ultrasound systems over the last 15 years offering major advantages in many clinical applications. In this work, pulsing schemes coupled with a dual frequency pulse are presented. The pulsing schemes considered were pulse inversion, power modulation, and power modulated pulse inversion. The pulse contains a fundamental frequency f and a specified amount of its second harmonic 2f. The advantages and limitations of this method were evaluated with both acoustic measurements of harmonic generation and theoretical simulations based on the KZK equation. The use of two frequencies in a pulse results in the generation of the sum and difference frequency components in addition to the other harmonic components. While with single frequency pulses, only power modulation and power modulated pulse inversion contained odd harmonic components, with the dual frequency pulse, pulse inversion now also contains odd harmonic components.

  5. New neutron imaging using pulsed sources. Characteristics of a pulsed neutron source and principle of pulsed neutron imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Neutron beam is one of important tools to obtain the transmission image of an object. Until now, steady state neutron sources such as reactors are mainly used for this imaging purpose. Recently, it has been demonstrated that pulsed neutron imaging based on accelerator neutron sources can provide a real-space distribution of physical information of materials such as crystallographic structure, element, temperature, hydrogen bound state, magnetic field and so on, by analyzing wavelength dependent transmission spectrum, which information cannot be observed or difficult to obtain with a traditional imaging method using steady state neutrons. Here, characteristics of the pulsed neutron source and principle of the pulsed neutron imaging are explained as a basic concept of the new method. (author)

  6. Development of ultra-short high voltage pulse technology using magnetic pulse compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Byung Heon; Kim, S. G.; Nam, S. M.; Lee, B. C.; Lee, S. M.; Jeong, Y. U.; Cho, S. O.; Jin, J. T.; Choi, H. L

    1998-01-01

    The control circuit for high voltage switches, the saturable inductor for magnetic assist, and the magnetic pulse compression circuit were designed, constructed, and tested. The core materials of saturable inductors in magnetic pulse compression circuit were amorphous metal and ferrite and total compression stages were 3. By the test, in high repetition rate, high pulse compression were certified. As a result of this test, it became possible to increase life-time of thyratrons and to replace thyratrons by solid-state semiconductor switches. (author). 16 refs., 16 tabs.

  7. Development of ultra-short high voltage pulse technology using magnetic pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Byung Heon; Kim, S. G.; Nam, S. M.; Lee, B. C.; Lee, S. M.; Jeong, Y. U.; Cho, S. O.; Jin, J. T.; Choi, H. L.

    1998-01-01

    The control circuit for high voltage switches, the saturable inductor for magnetic assist, and the magnetic pulse compression circuit were designed, constructed, and tested. The core materials of saturable inductors in magnetic pulse compression circuit were amorphous metal and ferrite and total compression stages were 3. By the test, in high repetition rate, high pulse compression were certified. As a result of this test, it became possible to increase life-time of thyratrons and to replace thyratrons by solid-state semiconductor switches. (author). 16 refs., 16 tabs

  8. <3> OMEGA pulse-forming network

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    Adjustement of the 3 W pulse-forming network of the SPS beam dumping system. When charged at 60 kV, this PFN gives 10 kA, 25 ms current pulses, with oscillations, superimposed on the pulse flat top, of an amplitude of +/- 1 Ka.

  9. Ultrafast T2-weighted single shot spin-echo sequences: applications on abdominal and pelvic pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.; Martin, C.; Falco, J.; Esteban, L.

    1999-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences that obtain all the data using a sole excitation pulse of 90 degree centigrade, filling the K space in a single repetition time (TR) is known as snap shot or single shot (SS). The SS sequence based on the rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (SS-RARE) method, designed by Hening (1) and a variation of it with a half-Fourier reconstruction (SS-HF-RARE (HASTEL)) (2, 3) are capable of obtaining high contrast images in T2, in very short times, that oscillate between one to several seconds. The clinical application of these sequences to abdominal and pelvic pathologies is increasing, providing and improvement in the contrast resolution, but also in the spatial resolution, with a high relation signal/noise ratio, high contrast and absence of movement artifacts. (Author)

  10. Phase-coded multi-pulse technique for ultrasonic high-order harmonic imaging of biological tissues in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Qingyu; Zhang Dong; Gong Xiufen; Ma Yong

    2007-01-01

    Second or higher order harmonic imaging shows significant improvement in image clarity but is degraded by low signal-noise ratio (SNR) compared with fundamental imaging. This paper presents a phase-coded multi-pulse technique to provide the enhancement of SNR for the desired high-order harmonic ultrasonic imaging. In this technique, with N phase-coded pulses excitation, the received Nth harmonic signal is enhanced by 20 log 10 N dB compared with that in the single-pulse mode, whereas the fundamental and other order harmonic components are efficiently suppressed to reduce image confusion. The principle of this technique is theoretically discussed based on the theory of the finite amplitude sound waves, and examined by measurements of the axial and lateral beam profiles as well as the phase shift of the harmonics. In the experimental imaging for two biological tissue specimens, a plane piston source at 2 MHz is used to transmit a sequence of multiple pulses with equidistant phase shift. The second to fifth harmonic images are obtained using this technique with N = 2 to 5, and compared with the images obtained at the fundamental frequency. Results demonstrate that this technique of relying on higher order harmonics seems to provide a better resolution and contrast of ultrasonic images

  11. Software emulator of nuclear pulse generation with different pulse shapes and pile-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechousek, Jiri, E-mail: jiri.pechousek@upol.cz [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17. listopadu 1192/12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Konecny, Daniel [Department of Optics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17. listopadu 1192/12, 77 146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Novak, Petr; Kouril, Lukas; Kohout, Pavel [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17. listopadu 1192/12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Celiktas, Cuneyt [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ege University, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Vujtek, Milan [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, 17. listopadu 1192/12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2016-08-21

    The optimal detection of output signals from nuclear counting devices represents one of the key physical factors that govern accuracy and experimental reproducibility. In this context, the fine calibration of the detector under diverse experimental scenarios, although time costly, is necessary. However this process can be rendered easier with the use of systems that work in lieu of emulators. In this report we describe an innovative programmable pulse generator device capable to emulate the scintillation detector signals, in a way to mimic the detector performances under a variety of experimental conditions. The emulator generates a defined number of pulses, with a given shape and amplitude in the form of a sampled detector signal. The emulator output is then used off-line by a spectrometric system in order to set up its optimal performance. Three types of pulse shapes are produced by our device, with the possibility to add noise and pulse pile-up effects into the signal. The efficiency of the pulse detection, pile-up rejection and/or correction, together with the dead-time of the system, are therein analyzed through the use of some specific algorithms for pulse processing, and the results obtained validate the beneficial use of emulators for the accurate calibration process of spectrometric systems.

  12. Prospects of biomolecule sequencing with the techniques of translocation through nanopores: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosik, V. L.; Rudakova, E. B.

    2013-01-01

    The interest in the functional properties of biomolecules in native solutions (in particular, their interaction with membranes) constantly increases with accumulation of data on the macromolecular structure, obtained by X-ray diffraction (with synchrotron radiation sources), nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry; this interest is closely related to the development of new technologies of sequencing (i.e., determining the sequence of nucleotides in DNA biomolecule). One of the most promising “physical” approaches to sequencing is the application of methods based on the use of nanochannels or nanopores, through which biomolecules pass in ionic solutions under an electric field applied. A nanopore provides spatial localization of molecules and makes it possible to detect a signal (electric, fluorescent, etc.) from an individual nucleotide. In view of the development of new high-intensity pulsed X-ray sources, the popularity of fluorescence analysis constantly increases. The existing methods for simulating the motion of biomolecules and interpreting their structure, sequencing techniques, and the prospects of further development of investigations in this field are discussed

  13. Supercoherent phenomena in pulsed power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Rourke, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter proposes the formulation of programs of basic physics research to transform Pulsed Power Technology (PPT) to Pulsed Power Science and Technology (PPS and T) by formulating the laws of the quantized microscopic electromagnetic field; applying the microscopic electromagnetic field theory to the generation, propagation and deposition of pulses in nonlinear networks; learning more about the basic super coherent ''micro-structure'' in space and time of the many-photon states of pulsed laser beams; learning more about the basic super coherent ''micro-structure'' in space and time of the many-electronstates of pulsed electron and ion laser beams; and learning everything about the ''micro-picture'' of so-called ''dielectric breakdown'' and the associated absolute time delays. Promotes the idea that laser, electron and ion beams are similar kinds of pulses in the microscopic electromagnetic field. Presents expression for the microscopic electromagnetic field in order to show the role of supercoherence in PPS and T

  14. Pulse plating

    CERN Document Server

    Hansal, Wolfgang E G; Green, Todd; Leisner, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The electrodeposition of metals using pulsed current has achieved practical importance in recent years. Although it has long been known that changes in potential, with or without polarity reversal, can significantly affect the deposition process, the practical application of this has been slow to be adopted. This can largely be explained in terms of the complex relationship between the current regime and its effect on the electrodeposition process. In order to harness these effects, an understanding of the anodic and cathodic electrochemical processes is necessary, together with the effects of polarity reversal and the rate of such reversals. In this new monograph, the basics of metal electrodeposition from solution are laid out in great detail in seven distinct chapters. With this knowledge, the reader is able to predict how a given pulse train profile can be adopted to achieve a desired outcome. Equally important is the choice of a suitable rectifier and the ancillary control circuits to enable pulse platin...

  15. Core genome conservation of Staphylococcus haemolyticus limits sequence based population structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Jorunn Pauline; Klingenberg, Claus; Hanssen, Anne-Merethe; Fredheim, Elizabeth Aarag; Francois, Patrice; Schrenzel, Jacques; Flægstad, Trond; Sollid, Johanna Ericson

    2012-06-01

    The notoriously multi-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus is an emerging pathogen causing serious infections in immunocompromised patients. Defining the population structure is important to detect outbreaks and spread of antimicrobial resistant clones. Currently, the standard typing technique is pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). In this study we describe novel molecular typing schemes for S. haemolyticus using multi locus sequence typing (MLST) and multi locus variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) analysis. Seven housekeeping genes (MLST) and five VNTR loci (MLVF) were selected for the novel typing schemes. A panel of 45 human and veterinary S. haemolyticus isolates was investigated. The collection had diverse PFGE patterns (38 PFGE types) and was sampled over a 20 year-period from eight countries. MLST resolved 17 sequence types (Simpsons index of diversity [SID]=0.877) and MLVF resolved 14 repeat types (SID=0.831). We found a low sequence diversity. Phylogenetic analysis clustered the isolates in three (MLST) and one (MLVF) clonal complexes, respectively. Taken together, neither the MLST nor the MLVF scheme was suitable to resolve the population structure of this S. haemolyticus collection. Future MLVF and MLST schemes will benefit from addition of more variable core genome sequences identified by comparing different fully sequenced S. haemolyticus genomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Laser-pulsed relativistic electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, N.K.

    1986-01-01

    A relativistic (β ≅ 0.8) electron gun with good emittance and subnanosecond pulse duration which can be synchronized to picosecond laser pulses is being developed at NRC for use in studies of particle acceleration by lasers. Bursts of electron pulses exceeding 280 keV in energy have been extracted into air form a laser-driven vacuum photodiode. Trains of 5 ps pulses of ultraviolet UV light illuminate a magnesium cathode. Photoelectrons emitted from the cathode are accelerated in a graded electrostatic potential set up by a 360 kV Marx-generator. The UV pulses are obtained by doubling the frequency of a 606 nm dye laser modelocked at 160 MHz. Electron energies were measured by residual range in an echelon of Al foils. Total charge per burst was measured by picoammeter. Time structure of the bursts has been examined with plastic scintillator and a fast photomultiplier. Tests on a low voltage photodiode achieved a current density of 180 A/cm/sup 2/ from an Mg cathode, with quantum efficiency of 2.4 x 10/sup -6/ electron per UV photon. The brevity and intensity of the laser pulses cause the electric charge collected per pulse to increase linearly with bias voltage rather than according to the Langmuir-Child law. Gun emittance is about 150 mm-msr and beam brightness is about 1A/cm/sup 2/-sr. Estimated duration of individual electron pulses of a burst is about 400 ps with instantaneous current of about 0.1 mA. Energy spread within one pulse is expected to be about 15%. This gun has the potential to be a useful source of relativistic electrons for laser acceleration studies

  17. Pulsed irradiation of enriched UO{sub 2} in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, T R; Lucoff, D M; Reil, K O; Croucher, D W [Sandia Laboratories (United States)

    1974-07-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) to determine the energy deposition and behavior of enriched UO{sub 2} under pulse conditions. In the experiment single unirradiated pellets with enrichments up to 25 percent were pulse heated to melt temperatures. Temperature and fission product inventory measurements were made and compared with neutron transport calculations. (author)

  18. Pulsed neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bespalov, D.F.; Bykovskii, Yu.A.; Vergun, I.I.; Kozlovskii, K.I.; Kozyrev, Yu.P.; Leonov, R.K.; Simagin, B.I.; Tsybin, A.S.; Shikanov, A.Ie.

    1986-03-01

    The paper describes a new device for generating pulsed neutron fields, utilized in nuclear geophysics for carrying out pulsed neutron logging and activation analysis under field conditions. The invention employs a sealed-off neutron tube with a laser ion source which increases neutron yield to the level of 10 neutrons per second or higher. 2 refs., 1 fig

  19. Generation of spin waves by a train of fs-laser pulses: a novel approach for tuning magnon wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savochkin, I V; Jäckl, M; Belotelov, V I; Akimov, I A; Kozhaev, M A; Sylgacheva, D A; Chernov, A I; Shaposhnikov, A N; Prokopov, A R; Berzhansky, V N; Yakovlev, D R; Zvezdin, A K; Bayer, M

    2017-07-18

    Currently spin waves are considered for computation and data processing as an alternative to charge currents. Generation of spin waves by ultrashort laser pulses provides several important advances with respect to conventional approaches using microwaves. In particular, focused laser spot works as a point source for spin waves and allows for directional control of spin waves and switching between their different types. For further progress in this direction it is important to manipulate with the spectrum of the optically generated spin waves. Here we tackle this problem by launching spin waves by a sequence of femtosecond laser pulses with pulse interval much shorter than the relaxation time of the magnetization oscillations. This leads to the cumulative phenomenon and allows us to generate magnons in a specific narrow range of wavenumbers. The wavelength of spin waves can be tuned from 15 μm to hundreds of microns by sweeping the external magnetic field by only 10 Oe or by slight variation of the pulse repetition rate. Our findings expand the capabilities of the optical spin pump-probe technique and provide a new method for the spin wave generation and control.

  20. SVX Sequencer Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utes, M.

    1997-01-01

    The SVX Sequencer boards are 9U by 280mm circuit boards that reside in slots 2 through 21 of each of eight Eurocard crates in the D0 Detector Platform. The basic purpose is to control the SVX chips for data acquisition and when a trigger occurs, to gather the SVX data and relay the data to the VRB boards in the Movable Counting House. Functions and features are as follows: (1) Initialization of eight SVX chip strings using the MIL-STD-1553 data bus; (2) Real time manipulation of the SVX control lines to effect data acquisition, digitization, and readout based on the NRZ/Clock signals from the Controller; (3) Conversion of 8-bit electrical SVX readout data to an optical signal operating at 1.062 Gbit/sec, sent to the VRB. Eight HDIs will be serviced per board; (4) Built-in logic analyzer which can record the most important control and data lines during a data acquisition cycle and put this recorded information onto the 1553 bus; (5) Identification header and end of data trailer tacked onto data stream; (6) 1553 register which can read the current values of the control and data lines; (7) 1553 register which can test the optical link; (8) 1553 registers for crossing pulse width, calibration pulse voltage, and calibration pipeline select; (9) 1553 register for reading the optical drivers status link; (10) 1553 register for power control of SVX chips and ignoring bad SVX strings; (11) Front panel displays and LEDs show the board status at a glance; (12) In-system programmable EPLDs are programmed via 1553 or Altera's 'Bitblaster'; (13) Automatic readout abort after 45us; (14) Supplies BUSY signal back to Trigger Framework; (15) Supports a heartbeat system to prevent excessive SVX current draw; and (16) Supports a SVX power trip feature if heartbeat failure occurs.

  1. Coaxial pulse matching transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledenev, V.V.; Khimenko, L.T.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a coaxial pulse matching transformer with comparatively simple design, increased mechanical strength, and low stray inductance. The transformer design makes it easy to change the turns ratio. The circuit of the device and an expression for the current multiplication factor are presented; experiments confirm the efficiency of the transformer. Apparatus with a coaxial transformer for producing high-power pulsed magnetic fields is designed (current pulses of 1-10 MA into a load and a natural frequency of 100 kHz)

  2. Low power arcjet thruster pulse ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Charles J.; Gruber, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of the pulse ignition characteristics of a 1 kW class arcjet using an inductive energy storage pulse generator with a pulse width modulated power converter identified several thruster and pulse generator parameters that influence breakdown voltage including pulse generator rate of voltage rise. This work was conducted with an arcjet tested on hydrogen-nitrogen gas mixtures to simulate fully decomposed hydrazine. Over all ranges of thruster and pulser parameters investigated, the mean breakdown voltages varied from 1.4 to 2.7 kV. Ignition tests at elevated thruster temperatures under certain conditions revealed occasional breakdowns to thruster voltages higher than the power converter output voltage. These post breakdown discharges sometimes failed to transition to the lower voltage arc discharge mode and the thruster would not ignite. Under the same conditions, a transition to the arc mode would occur for a subsequent pulse and the thruster would ignite. An automated 11 600 cycle starting and transition to steady state test demonstrated ignition on the first pulse and required application of a second pulse only two times to initiate breakdown.

  3. Device for flattening statistically distributed pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'kanaev, G.I.; Iskenderov, V.G.; Rudnev, O.V.; Teller, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    The description is given of a device that converts the series of statistically distributed pulses into a pseudo-uniform one. The inlet pulses switch over the first counter, and the second one is switched over by the clock pulses each time the uniformity of the counters' states is violated. This violation is recorded by the logic circuit which passes to the output the clock pulses in the amount equal to that of the pulses that reached the device inlet. Losses at the correlation between the light velocity and the sampling rate up to 0.3 do not exceed 0.7 per cent for the memory of pulse counters 3, and 0.035 per cent for memory 7

  4. Bacterial identification and subtyping using DNA microarray and DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaldi, Sufian F; Mossoba, Magdi M; Allard, Marc M; Lienau, E Kurt; Brown, Eric D

    2012-01-01

    The era of fast and accurate discovery of biological sequence motifs in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells is here. The co-evolution of direct genome sequencing and DNA microarray strategies not only will identify, isotype, and serotype pathogenic bacteria, but also it will aid in the discovery of new gene functions by detecting gene expressions in different diseases and environmental conditions. Microarray bacterial identification has made great advances in working with pure and mixed bacterial samples. The technological advances have moved beyond bacterial gene expression to include bacterial identification and isotyping. Application of new tools such as mid-infrared chemical imaging improves detection of hybridization in DNA microarrays. The research in this field is promising and future work will reveal the potential of infrared technology in bacterial identification. On the other hand, DNA sequencing by using 454 pyrosequencing is so cost effective that the promise of $1,000 per bacterial genome sequence is becoming a reality. Pyrosequencing technology is a simple to use technique that can produce accurate and quantitative analysis of DNA sequences with a great speed. The deposition of massive amounts of bacterial genomic information in databanks is creating fingerprint phylogenetic analysis that will ultimately replace several technologies such as Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis. In this chapter, we will review (1) the use of DNA microarray using fluorescence and infrared imaging detection for identification of pathogenic bacteria, and (2) use of pyrosequencing in DNA cluster analysis to fingerprint bacterial phylogenetic trees.

  5. Simulation of neutrons and gamma pulse signal and research on the pulse shape discrimination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Guangxia; He Bin; Xu Peng; Qiu Xiaolin; Ma Wenyan; Li Sufen

    2012-01-01

    In neutrons detection, it is important to discriminate the neutron signals from the gamma-ray background. In this article, simulation of neutrons and gamma pulse signals is developed based on the LabVIEW platform. Two digital algorithms of the charge comparison method and the pulse duration time method are realized using 10000 simulation signals. Experimental results show that neutron and gamma pulse signals can be discriminated by the two methods, and the pulse duration time method is better than the charge comparison method. (authors)

  6. IAE pulsed electrostatic accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, V.P.; Ganzhelyuk, M.L.; Kozlov, L.D.; Koltypin, E.A.; Molchanov, Yu.D.; Otroshchenko, G.A.; Yan'kov, G.B.

    1976-01-01

    The modernized pulse electrostatic accelerator using the klystron ion grouping and the beam interruption system prior to acceleration is described. The accelerator is modernized in order to improve parameters of a current pulse and to decrease the background in the measurement room. The ion beam of needed dimensions is obtained with the help of a high-frequency source and a beam grouping and deflection system. The general view of the beam grouping and deflection system is shown. The ion beam forming process is considered in detail. The modernized electrostatic accelerator permits to obtain a pulse current with a pulse length of 1.5 ns and an amplitude of 1.5 - 2 μA. With the repetition frequency of 2 MHz, the average target current is about 6 μA

  7. Synchronization and sequencing of data acquisition and control electronics at the European X-ray free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gessler, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    The 3.5 km long European X-Ray Free Electron Laser, currently under construction in northern Germany, will deliver bursts of up to 2700 short X-ray pulses every 100 ms, providing wavelengths between 0.05 and 6 nm, and a repetition rate of 4.5 MHz to several experiment stations. It allows in-depth research in various scientific fields. In order to set-up the beam, position samples and capture the measured variables, information from the accelerator, diagnostic devices and detectors have to be digitized, converted, processed, transferred, concentrated, distributed, reorganized, controlled and saved. All these steps have to be accurately synchronized and sequenced relative to the actual electron bunch or photon pulse in order to guarantee correct data acquisition timings and unique identification of each bunch passing the beamlines. This document provides a complete description of the planning, design, realization and evaluation of the European XFEL Timing System, which implements the synchronization and sequencing of the data acquisition and control electronics for the European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Facility.

  8. Square pulse linear transformer driver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The linear transformer driver (LTD technological approach can result in relatively compact devices that can deliver fast, high current, and high-voltage pulses straight out of the LTD cavity without any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The usual LTD architecture [A. A. Kim, M. G. Mazarakis, V. A. Sinebryukhov, B. M. Kovalchuk, V. A. Vizir, S. N Volkov, F. Bayol, A. N. Bastrikov, V. G. Durakov, S. V. Frolov, V. M. Alexeenko, D. H. McDaniel, W. E. Fowler, K. LeCheen, C. Olson, W. A. Stygar, K. W. Struve, J. Porter, and R. M. Gilgenbach, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 050402 (2009PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.050402; M. G. Mazarakis, W. E. Fowler, A. A. Kim, V. A. Sinebryukhov, S. T. Rogowski, R. A. Sharpe, D. H. McDaniel, C. L. Olson, J. L. Porter, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, and J. R. Woodworth, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 050401 (2009PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.050401] provides sine shaped output pulses that may not be well suited for some applications like z-pinch drivers, flash radiography, high power microwaves, etc. A more suitable power pulse would have a flat or trapezoidal (rising or falling top. In this paper, we present the design and first test results of an LTD cavity that generates such a type of output pulse by including within its circular array a number of third harmonic bricks in addition to the main bricks. A voltage adder made out of a square pulse cavity linear array will produce the same shape output pulses provided that the timing of each cavity is synchronized with the propagation of the electromagnetic pulse.

  9. Measurement of a 3D Ultrasonic Wavefield Using Pulsed Laser Holographic Microscopy for Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In ultrasonic array imaging, 3D ultrasonic wavefields are normally recorded by an ultrasonic piezo array transducer. Its performance is limited by the configuration and size of the array transducer. In this paper, a method based on digital holographic interferometry is proposed to record the 3D ultrasonic wavefields instead of the array transducer, and the measurement system consisting of a pulsed laser, ultrasonic excitation, and synchronization and control circuit is designed. A consecutive sequence of holograms of ultrasonic wavefields are recorded by the system. The interferograms are calculated from the recorded holograms at different time sequence. The amplitudes and phases of the transient ultrasonic wavefields are recovered from the interferograms by phase unwrapping. The consecutive sequence of transient ultrasonic wavefields are stacked together to generate 3D ultrasonic wavefields. Simulation and experiments are carried out to verify the proposed technique, and preliminary results are presented.

  10. Electromagnetic pulses, localized and causal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2018-01-01

    We show that pulse solutions of the wave equation can be expressed as time Fourier superpositions of scalar monochromatic beam wave functions (solutions of the Helmholtz equation). This formulation is shown to be equivalent to Bateman's integral expression for solutions of the wave equation, for axially symmetric solutions. A closed-form one-parameter solution of the wave equation, containing no backward-propagating parts, is constructed from a beam which is the tight-focus limit of two families of beams. Application is made to transverse electric and transverse magnetic pulses, with evaluation of the energy, momentum and angular momentum for a pulse based on the general localized and causal form. Such pulses can be represented as superpositions of photons. Explicit total energy and total momentum values are given for the one-parameter closed-form pulse.

  11. Twenty-channel high-voltage pulse generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anan'in, P.S.; Kashirin, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    A 20-channel high-voltage pulse generator operating with a mismatched load is described. The generator contains shaping lines 20 m long made of coaxial cable, a trigatron-type discharged, and isolating plates. The channel characteristic impedance is 50 Ohm. The maximum pulse amplitude is up to 15 kV on a high-resistance load and 7.5 kV on a matched one. The pulse duration is 100 ns at a pulse rise time of 12 ns, the delay introduced by the generator is 200 +-2.5 ns. Provision is made in the control circuit for compensation of the shaped pulse and separation of a pulse reflected from the load. The reflected pulse shape and amplitude characterize load parameters. Generator tests proved its high operational reliability (after 10 5 operations no significant changes in generator performances have been observed). The generator is intended for filmless data output from spark chambers

  12. The Pulse Line Ion Accelerator Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Richard J.

    2006-02-15

    The Pulse Line Ion Accelerator concept was motivated by the desire for an inexpensive way to accelerate intense short pulse heavy ion beams to regimes of interest for studies of High Energy Density Physics and Warm Dense Matter. A pulse power driver applied at one end of a helical pulse line creates a traveling wave pulse that accelerates and axially confines the heavy ion beam pulse. Acceleration scenarios with constant parameter helical lines are described which result in output energies of a single stage much larger than the several hundred kilovolt peak voltages on the line, with a goal of 3-5 MeV/meter acceleration gradients. The concept might be described crudely as an ''air core'' induction linac where the PFN is integrated into the beam line so the accelerating voltage pulse can move along with the ions to get voltage multiplication.

  13. ENDOR with band-selective shaped inversion pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Claudia E.; Stoll, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Electron Nuclear DOuble Resonance (ENDOR) is based on the measurement of nuclear transition frequencies through detection of changes in the polarization of electron transitions. In Davies ENDOR, the initial polarization is generated by a selective microwave inversion pulse. The rectangular inversion pulses typically used are characterized by a relatively low selectivity, with full inversion achieved only for a limited number of spin packets with small resonance offsets. With the introduction of pulse shaping to EPR, the rectangular inversion pulses can be replaced with shaped pulses with increased selectivity. Band-selective inversion pulses are characterized by almost rectangular inversion profiles, leading to full inversion for spin packets with resonance offsets within the pulse excitation bandwidth and leaving spin packets outside the excitation bandwidth largely unaffected. Here, we explore the consequences of using different band-selective amplitude-modulated pulses designed for NMR as the inversion pulse in ENDOR. We find an increased sensitivity for small hyperfine couplings compared to rectangular pulses of the same bandwidth. In echo-detected Davies-type ENDOR, finite Fourier series inversion pulses combine the advantages of increased absolute ENDOR sensitivity of short rectangular inversion pulses and increased sensitivity for small hyperfine couplings of long rectangular inversion pulses. The use of pulses with an almost rectangular frequency-domain profile also allows for increased control of the hyperfine contrast selectivity. At X-band, acquisition of echo transients as a function of radiofrequency and appropriate selection of integration windows during data processing allows efficient separation of contributions from weakly and strongly coupled nuclei in overlapping ENDOR spectra within a single experiment.

  14. Vibration measurements by pulsed digital holographic endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedin, Staffan; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Perez-Lopez, Carlos; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando

    2005-02-01

    Digital holographic interferometry in combination with a flexible fiber endoscope allows high precision measurements of deformations on hidden objects surfaces, inside cavities and objects with small access apertures. A digital holographic endoscopy system is described with a frequency-doubled, twin oscillator Q-switched pulsed Nd:YAG laser as light source. A sequence of digital hologram pairs are recorded with a maximum repetition rate of 260 ms. Each digital hologram is captured at separate video frames of a CCD-camera. The time separation between the laser pulses from each cavity can be set in the range from 50 to 500 μs. The digital holograms are transferred to a PC via a frame grabber and evaluated quantitatively by the Fourier transform method. The resulting phase fringe pattern has the information needed to evaluate quantitatively the amount of the deformation. Experimental results of vibration measurements of hidden mechanical and biological object surfaces are presented. The quality of the results obtained by mechanical object surfaces is usually higher than for biological surfaces. This can be explained easily by the fact that a biological surface is much more complex than a mechanical surface in the sense that some parts of the surface may reflect the light well whereas other parts may absorb the light. Also, biological surfaces are translucent, which means that part of the light may enter inside the sample where it may be absorbed or reflected.

  15. The Toulouse pulsed magnet facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The 'Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Pulses' (LNCMP) is an international user facility providing access to pulsed magnetic fields up to and beyond 60 T. The laboratory disposes of 10 magnet stations equipped with long-pulse magnets operating in the 35-60 T range and a short-pulse system reaching magnetic fields in excess of 70 T. The experimental infrastructure includes various high and low-temperature systems ranging from ordinary flow-type cryostats to dilution refrigerators reaching 50 mK, as well as different types of high-pressure cells. Experimental techniques include magnetization, transport, luminescence, IR-spectroscopy and polarimetry. The LNCMP pursues an extensive in-house research program focussing on all technological and scientific aspects of pulsed magnetic fields. Recent technical developments include the implementation of 60 T rapid-cooling coils, an 80 T prototype, a pulsed dipole magnet for optical investigations of dilute matter and a transportable horizontal access magnet for small angle x-ray scattering experiments. Scientific activities cover a variety of domains, including correlated electron systems, magnetism, semiconductors and nanoscience

  16. A 16.3 pJ/pulse low-complexity and energy-efficient transmitter with adjustable pulse parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jun; Zhao Yi; Shao Ke; Chen Hu; Xia Lingli; Hong Zhiliang

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel, fully integrated transmitter for 3-5 GHz pulsed UWB. The BPSK modulation transmitter has been implemented in SMIC CMOS 0.13 μm technology with a 1.2-V supply voltage and a die size of 0.8 x 0.95 mm 2 . This transmitter is based on the impulse response filter method, which uses a tunable R paralleled with a LC frequency selection network to realize continuously adjustable pulse parameters, including bandwidth, width and amplitude. Due to the extremely low duty of the pulsed UWB, a proposed output buffer is employed to save power consumption significantly. Finally, measurement results show that the transmitter consumes only 16.3 pJ/pulse to achieve a pulse repetition rate of 100 Mb/s. Generated pulses strictly comply with the FCC spectral mask. The continuously variable pulse width is from 900 to 1.5 ns and the amplitude with the minimum 178 mVpp and the maximum 432 mVpp can be achieved. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  17. Herophilus on pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonasin, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The first detailed study of the pulse (sphygmology is associated in antiquity with Herophilus (the end of the 4th century BCE, an Alexandrian physician, renowned for his anatomical discoveries. The scholars also attribute to him a discovery of a portable and adjustable water-clock, used for measuring ‘natural’ and ‘unnatural’ pulse and, accordingly, temperature of the patient. In the article we translate the principal ancient evidences and comment upon them. We study both the practical aspects of ancient sphygmology and the theoretical speculations associated with it. Ancient theory of proportion and musical harmony allowed to build a classification of the pulses, but the medical experience did not fit well in the Procrustean bed of this rather simple theory.

  18. Radiobiological response to ultra-short pulsed megavoltage electron beams of ultra-high pulse dose rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyreuther, Elke; Karsch, Leonhard; Laschinsky, Lydia; Leßmann, Elisabeth; Naumburger, Doreen; Oppelt, Melanie; Richter, Christian; Schürer, Michael; Woithe, Julia; Pawelke, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    In line with the long-term aim of establishing the laser-based particle acceleration for future medical application, the radiobiological consequences of the typical ultra-short pulses and ultra-high pulse dose rate can be investigated with electron delivery. The radiation source ELBE (Electron Linac for beams with high Brilliance and low Emittance) was used to mimic the quasi-continuous electron beam of a clinical linear accelerator (LINAC) for comparison with electron pulses at the ultra-high pulse dose rate of 10(10) Gy min(-1) either at the low frequency of a laser accelerator or at 13 MHz avoiding effects of prolonged dose delivery. The i