WorldWideScience

Sample records for pulse rise time

  1. A compact, low jitter, nanosecond rise time, high voltage pulse generator with variable amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jiubing; Wang, Xin; Tang, Dan; Lv, Huayi; Li, Chengxin; Shao, Yanhua; Qin, Lan

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a compact, low jitter, nanosecond rise time, command triggered, high peak power, gas-switch pulse generator system is developed for high energy physics experiment. The main components of the system are a high voltage capacitor, the spark gap switch and R = 50 Ω load resistance built into a structure to obtain a fast high power pulse. The pulse drive unit, comprised of a vacuum planar triode and a stack of avalanche transistors, is command triggered by a single or multiple TTL (transistor-transistor logic) level pulses generated by a trigger pulse control unit implemented using the 555 timer circuit. The control unit also accepts user input TTL trigger signal. The vacuum planar triode in the pulse driving unit that close the first stage switches is applied to drive the spark gap reducing jitter. By adjusting the charge voltage of a high voltage capacitor charging power supply, the pulse amplitude varies from 5 kV to 10 kV, with a rise time of gas-switch and available capacitor recovery time.

  2. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TROYER, G.L.

    2000-08-25

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% {at} 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse rise time versus photo peak position and resolution. These data were collected to investigate the effect of pulse rise time compensation on resolution and efficiency.

  3. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Troyer, G L

    2000-01-01

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% (at) 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse r...

  4. A 200 kV fast rise time, low jitter, trigger system with magnetic pulse sharpener

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaitly, N.C.; Coleman, M.D.; Ramrus, A. [Maxwell Labs., Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Earley, L.M.; Downing, J.N.; Reisch, H.H.; Caudill, L.D.; Eversol, S.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-09-01

    The DARHT Facility is being designed at Los Alamos national Laboratory to produce high resolution flash radiographs of hydrodynamic experiments. Two linear induction accelerators (LIA), each in the range of 16 to 20 MeV, will be used to produce intense bremsstrahlung X-ray pulses of short duration (60 ns flat top). Each LIA will produce a 3 kA, high brightness, electron beam using a 4 MeV injector and a series of 250 kV induction cells. Technology demonstration of key accelerator subsystems is under progress at the DARHT Integrated Test Stand (ITS). The eight inductions cells present in the ITS are driven by a Maxwell prototype Induction Cell Pulsed Power supply (ICPPS) which provides 250 kV, 70 ns pulses via four Blumieins. Each Blumiein drives two cells and is triggered using independently controlled trigger units. This turnkey DARHT Trigger System, consisting of four separate trigger units, provides 200 kV trigger pulses with low jitter and fast rise time to each of the four Blumiein coaxial spark gaps. Details of the trigger system design and results obtained during extensive testing at Maxwell are described.

  5. A 200 kV fast rise time, low jitter, trigger system with magnetic pulse sharpener

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaitly, N.C.; Coleman, M.D.; Ramrus, A. (Maxwell Labs., Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)); Earley, L.M.; Downing, J.N.; Reisch, H.H.; Caudill, L.D.; Eversol, S.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The DARHT Facility is being designed at Los Alamos national Laboratory to produce high resolution flash radiographs of hydrodynamic experiments. Two linear induction accelerators (LIA), each in the range of 16 to 20 MeV, will be used to produce intense bremsstrahlung X-ray pulses of short duration (60 ns flat top). Each LIA will produce a 3 kA, high brightness, electron beam using a 4 MeV injector and a series of 250 kV induction cells. Technology demonstration of key accelerator subsystems is under progress at the DARHT Integrated Test Stand (ITS). The eight inductions cells present in the ITS are driven by a Maxwell prototype Induction Cell Pulsed Power supply (ICPPS) which provides 250 kV, 70 ns pulses via four Blumieins. Each Blumiein drives two cells and is triggered using independently controlled trigger units. This turnkey DARHT Trigger System, consisting of four separate trigger units, provides 200 kV trigger pulses with low jitter and fast rise time to each of the four Blumiein coaxial spark gaps. Details of the trigger system design and results obtained during extensive testing at Maxwell are described.

  6. A 200 kV fast rise time, low jitter, trigger system with magnetic pulse sharpener

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaitly, N.C.; Ramrus, A. [Maxwell Labs., Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Coleman, M.D. [Directed Technologies, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Earley, L.M.; Downing, J.N.; Reisch, H.H.; Caudill, L.D.; Eversol, S.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The DARHT Facility is being designed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to produce high resolution flash radiographs of hydrodynamic experiments. Two linear induction accelerators (LIA), each in the range of 16 to 20 MeV, will be used to produce intense bremsstrahlung X-ray pulses of short duration (60 ns flat top). Each LIA will produce a 3 kA, high brightness, electron beam using a 4 MeV injector and a series of 250 kV induction cells. Technology demonstration of key accelerator subsystems is under progress at the DARHT Integrated Test Stand (ITS). The eight inductions cells present in the ITS are driven by a Maxwell prototype Induction Cell Pulsed Power Supply (ICPPS) which provides 250 kV, 70ns pulses via four Blumleins. Each Blumlein drives two cells and is triggered using independently controlled trigger units. This turnkey DARHT Trigger System, consisting of four separate trigger units, provides 200 kV trigger pulses with low jitter and fast rise time to each of the four Blumlein coaxial spark gaps. Details of the trigger system design and results obtained during extensive testing at Maxwell are described.

  7. CHARACTERISTICS OF A FAST RISE TIME POWER SUPPLY FOR A PULSED PLASMA REACTOR FOR CHEMICAL VAPOR DESTRUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotating spark gap devices for switching high-voltage direct current (dc) into a corona plasma reactor can achieve pulse rise times in the range of tens of nanoseconds. The fast rise times lead to vigorous plasma generation without sparking at instantaneous applied voltages highe...

  8. Transistorized Marx bank pulse circuit provides voltage multiplication with nanosecond rise-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, E. A.; Lewis, R. N.

    1968-01-01

    Base-triggered avalanche transistor circuit used in a Marx bank pulser configuration provides voltage multiplication with nanosecond rise-time. The avalanche-mode transistors replace conventional spark gaps in the Marx bank. The delay time from an input signal to the output signal to the output is typically 6 nanoseconds.

  9. Influence of Voltage Rise Time for Oxidation Treatment of NO in Simulated Exhausted Gas by Polarity-Reversed Pulse Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinmoto, Kazuya; Kadowaki, Kazunori; Nishimoto, Sakae; Kitani, Isamu

    This paper describes experimental study on NO removal from a simulated exhausted-gas using repetitive surface discharge on a glass barrier subjected to polarity-reversed voltage pulses. The very fast polarity-reversal with a rise time of 20ns is caused by direct grounding of a charged coaxial cable of 10m in length. Influence of voltage rise time on energy efficiency for NO removal is studied. Results of NO removal using a barrier-type plasma reactor with screw-plane electrode system indicates that the energy efficiency for the very fast polarity reversal caused by direct grounding becomes higher than that for the slower polarity reversal caused by grounding through an inductor at the cable end. The energy efficiency for the direct grounding is about 80g/kWh for 50% NO removal ratio and is about 60g/kWh for 100% NO removal ratio. Very intense discharge light is observed at the initial time of 10ns for the fast polarity reversal, whereas the intensity in the initial discharge light for the slower polarity reversal is relatively small. To confirm the effectiveness of the polarity-reversed pulse application, comparison of the energy efficiency between the polarity-reversed voltage pulse and ac 60Hz voltage will be presented.

  10. Anode initiated impulse breakdown in water: the dependence on pulse rise time for nanosecond and sub-nanosecond pulses and initiation mechanism based on electrostriction

    CERN Document Server

    Seepersad, Yohan; Dobrynin, Danil

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the voltage rise time on nanosecond and sub-nanosecond impulse breakdown of distilled water is studied. The dependence of anode initiated streamer inception on this parameter is shown to be more intricate than previously reported, particularly as it relates to mechanisms directly in the liquid phase. Dynamics of the emission phase for sub-nanosecond pulses with 600ps rise time are presented to enable comparison with previous work on nanosecond initiation features. Schlieren imaging is also used to show the development of optical density perturbations and rarefactions as a result of electrostriction in the liquid which were previously found for nanosecond pulses as well. The mechanism of nanopore generation in the liquid due to fast impulses proposed by Shneider, Pekker and Fridman is used to explain the results.

  11. High-voltage isolation transformer for sub-nanosecond rise time pulses constructed with annular parallel-strip transmission lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Akira

    2011-07-01

    A novel annular parallel-strip transmission line was devised to construct high-voltage high-speed pulse isolation transformers. The transmission lines can easily realize stable high-voltage operation and good impedance matching between primary and secondary circuits. The time constant for the step response of the transformer was calculated by introducing a simple low-frequency equivalent circuit model. Results show that the relation between the time constant and low-cut-off frequency of the transformer conforms to the theory of the general first-order linear time-invariant system. Results also show that the test transformer composed of the new transmission lines can transmit about 600 ps rise time pulses across the dc potential difference of more than 150 kV with insertion loss of -2.5 dB. The measured effective time constant of 12 ns agreed exactly with the theoretically predicted value. For practical applications involving the delivery of synchronized trigger signals to a dc high-voltage electron gun station, the transformer described in this paper exhibited advantages over methods using fiber optic cables for the signal transfer system. This transformer has no jitter or breakdown problems that invariably occur in active circuit components.

  12. Improvement in limit of detection in particle induced X-ray emission by means of rise time and pulse shape discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Tibor; Lakatos, Tamás; Nejedly, Zdenek; Campbell, John L.

    2002-04-01

    A digital signal processor, based upon high-rate sampling of the preamplifier output, and equipped with rise time and pulse shape discrimination, has been tested in three situations. This processor provided significant improvement of particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray fluorescence detection limits over the state of the art analog processors, depending on the energy and intensity distribution of the X-ray spectra. Additionally it had a superior performance when measurements were performed in an environment of large electronic noise and in large nuclear background environment. It has also improved the reduction of several artifacts in X-ray spectra.

  13. Improvement in limit of detection in particle induced X-ray emission by means of rise time and pulse shape discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, Tibor E-mail: tibpapp@netscape.nettibpapp@yahoo.ca; Lakatos, Tamas; Nejedly, Zdenek; Campbell, John L

    2002-04-01

    A digital signal processor, based upon high-rate sampling of the preamplifier output, and equipped with rise time and pulse shape discrimination, has been tested in three situations. This processor provided significant improvement of particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray fluorescence detection limits over the state of the art analog processors, depending on the energy and intensity distribution of the X-ray spectra. Additionally it had a superior performance when measurements were performed in an environment of large electronic noise and in large nuclear background environment. It has also improved the reduction of several artifacts in X-ray spectra.

  14. Excitation of a single atom with exponentially rising light pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Aljunid, Syed Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the interaction between a single atom and optical pulses in a coherent state with a controlled temporal envelope. In a comparison between a rising exponential and a square envelope, we show that the rising exponential envelope leads to a higher excitation probability for fixed low average photon numbers, in accordance to a time-reversed Weisskopf-Wigner model. We characterize the atomic transition dynamics for a wide range of the average photon numbers, and are able to saturate the optical transition of a single atom with ~50 photons in a pulse by a strong focusing technique. For photon numbers of ~1000 in a 15ns long pulse, we clearly observe Rabi oscillations.

  15. Simulation and measurement of pulse height and rise-time for electron signals in CZT detectors:. influence of material and electronics parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathy, F.; Bonnefoy, J. P.; Gliere, A.; Mestais, C.; Verger, L.

    2001-02-01

    A model for simulation of amplitude vs. rise-time biparametric spectra as a function of CZT materials properties was developed. This model takes into account the physical properties of the CZT detectors, the electric field profile and the physics of γ- ray interaction with CZT. The model has been refined to include the filtering effects of the front-end electronics and applied again to biparametric spectra. The electronic filtering is represented by a combination of linear band pass filters. The rise-time measurement circuit induces a non-linearity that is taken into account. A comparison between the electronics simulations and calibration measurements on the actual circuits is presented. In addition, physical and electrical properties of several CZT samples have been characterized and these properties have been incorporated in the model so that actual and simulated biparametric spectra can be compared. Finally, the model is applied to show the influence of the main physical parameters (mobility and lifetime) and of the applied electric field on the biparametric spectra.

  16. Pulse Portraiture: Pulsar timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennucci, Timothy T.; Demorest, Paul B.; Ransom, Scott M.

    2016-06-01

    Pulse Portraiture is a wideband pulsar timing code written in python. It uses an extension of the FFTFIT algorithm (Taylor 1992) to simultaneously measure a phase (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM). The code includes a Gaussian-component-based portrait modeling routine. The code uses the python interface to the pulsar data analysis package PSRCHIVE (ascl:1105.014) and also requires the non-linear least-squares minimization package lmfit (ascl:1606.014).

  17. Preparation of an Exponentially Rising Optical Pulse for Efficient Excitation of Single Atoms in Free Space

    CERN Document Server

    Dao, Hoang Lan; Maslennikov, Gleb; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We report on a simple method to prepare optical pulses with exponentially rising envelope on the time scale of a few ns. The scheme is based on the exponential transfer function of a fast transistor, which generates an exponentially rising envelope that is transferred first on a radio frequency carrier, and then on a coherent cw laser beam with an electro-optical phase modulator (EOM). The temporally shaped sideband is then extracted with an optical resonator and can be used to efficiently excite a single Rb-87 atom.

  18. Chinas Rise: A Time for Choosing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    industrialization and empowerment through technology, the productive balances will shift. As productive balances shift, all other forms of power...population has a liability function. China’s rapid rise and empowerment of individuals with higher education and standards of living have forced the...all of these decisions are fraught with risk and none are palatable. The United States has consciously chosen schizophrenia in relation to China’s

  19. Rise time and recovery of GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zutavern, F.J.; Loubriel, G.M.; O' Malley, M.W.; McLaughlin, D.L.; Helgeson, W.D.

    1990-01-01

    Fast rise time applications have encouraged us to look at the rise time dependences of lock-on switching. Our tests have shown rise time and delay effects which decrease dramatically with increasing electric field across the switch and/or optical energy used in activating lock-on. Interest in high repetition rate photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS), which require very little trigger energy (our 1.5-cm long switches have been triggered with as little as 20 {mu}J), has also led us to investigate recovery from lock-on. Several circuits have been used to induce fast recovery, the fastest being 30 ns. The most reliable circuit produced a 4-pulse burst of +/{minus} 10-kV pulses at 7 MHz with 100-{mu}J trigger energy per pulse. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Important Property of GRB Pulse: Power-Law Indices of Time Properties on Energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhao-Yang Peng

    2014-09-01

    The dependence of pulse temporal properties (pulse width, pulse rise width and pulse decay width) on energy is power-law function. Some correlated relationships between the power-law indices of the pulse time properties on energy and the spectral lags, relative spectral lags, spectral parameters of band function, and photon flux using a well-separated long-duration -ray burst (GRB) pulse sample is demonstrated here. We argue that the curvature effect can explain the correlated properties.

  1. Optical visualization and electrical characterization of fast-rising pulsed dielectric barrier discharge for airflow control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benard, Nicolas; Zouzou, Nourredine; Claverie, Alain; Sotton, Julien; Moreau, Eric

    2012-02-01

    Flow control consists of manipulating flows in an effective and robust manner to improve the global performances of transport systems or industrial processes. Plasma technologies, and particularly surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), can be a good candidate for such purpose. The present experimental study focuses on optical and electrical characterization of plasma sheet formed by applying a pulse of voltage with rising and falling periods of 50 ns for a typical surface DBD geometry. Positive and negative polarities are compared in terms of current behavior, deposited energy, fast-imaging of the plasma propagation, and resulting modifications of the surrounding medium by using shadowgraphy acquisitions. Positive and negative pulses of voltage produce streamers and corona type plasma, respectively. Both of them result in the production of a localized pressure wave propagating in the air with a speed maintained at 343 m/s (measurements at room temperature of 20 °C). This suggests that the produced pressure wave can be considered as a propagating sound wave. The intensity of the pressure wave is directly connected to the dissipated energy at the dielectric wall with a linear increase with the applied voltage amplitude and a strong dependence toward the rising time. At constant voltage amplitude, the pressure wave is reinforced by using a positive pulse. The present investigation also reveals that rising and decaying periods of a single pulse of voltage result in two distinct pressure waves. As a result, superposition or successive pressure wave can be produced by adjusting the width of the pulse.

  2. Progress in time transfer by laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Yang, Fu-Min

    2004-03-01

    Time transfer by laser pulses is based on the propagation of light pulses between satellite and ground clocks or between remote clocks on earth. It will realize the synchronization of these clocks with high accuracy and stability. Several experiments of the time transfer by laser pulses had been successfully carried out in some countries. These experiments validate the feasibility of the synchronization of clocks by laser pulses. The paper describes the results of these experiments. The time comparison by laser pulses between atomic clocks on aircraft and ground ones in the United States, and the LASSO and T2L2 projects in France are introduced in detail.

  3. Accurate measurement of the rise and decay times of fast scintillators with solid state photon counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, S.; Steenbergen, J. H. L.; van Dam, H. T.; Schaart, D. R.

    2012-09-01

    In this work we present a measurement setup for the determination of scintillation pulse shapes of fast scintillators. It is based on a time-correlated single photon counting approach that utilizes the correlation between 511 keV annihilation photons to produce start and stop signals in two separate crystals. The measurement is potentially cost-effective and simple to set up while maintaining an excellent system timing resolution of 125 ps. As a proof-of-concept the scintillation photon arrival time histograms were recorded for two well-known, fast scintillators: LYSO:Ce and LaBr3:5%Ce. The scintillation pulse shapes were modeled as a linear combination of exponentially distributed charge transfer and photon emission processes. Correcting for the system timing resolution, the exponential time constants were extracted from the recorded histograms. A decay time of 43 ns and a rise time of 72 ps were determined for LYSO:Ce thus demonstrating the capability of the system to accurately measure very fast rise times. In the case of LaBr3:5%Ce two processes were observed to contribute to the rising edge of the scintillation pulse. The faster component (270 ps) contributes with 72% to the rising edge of the scintillation pulse while the second, slower component (2.0 ns) contributes with 27%. The decay of the LaBr3:5%Ce scintillation pulse was measured to be 15.4 ns with a small contribution (2%) of a component with a larger time constant (130 ns).

  4. RISE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortenzi, M.; Petrini, F.; Bontempi, F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper originates from a European research proposal entitled RISE (Resilient Infrastructures and Structures against Emergencies). In RISE the assessment of the resilience of an urban development is carried out within an effective theoretical framework in which the large scale urban built infr...

  5. RISE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortenzi, M.; Petrini, F.; Bontempi, F.;

    2013-01-01

    This paper originates from a European research proposal entitled RISE (Resilient Infrastructures and Structures against Emergencies). In RISE the assessment of the resilience of an urban development is carried out within an effective theoretical framework in which the large scale urban built infr...

  6. A model with nonzero rise time for AE signals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M A Majeed; C R L Murthy

    2001-10-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signals are conventionally modelled as damped or decaying sinusoidal functions. A major drawback of this model is its negligible or zero rise time. This paper proposes an alternative model, which provides for the rising part of the signal without sacrificing the analytical tractability and simplicity of the conventional model. Signals obtained from the proposed model through computer programs are illustrated for demonstrating their parity with actual AE signals. Analytic expressions for the time-domain parameters, viz., peak amplitude and rise time used in conventional AE signal analysis, are also derived. The model is believed to be also of use in modelling the output signal of any transducer that has finite rise time and fall time.

  7. Flip-Flop Sensor Controlled by Slow-Rise Control Pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kollar

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we deal with dynamic properties of the flip-flopsensor. Special attention will be paid to the condition of control byslow-rise segment of the control pulse and the derivation of theequivalent voltage. The results of the theoretical considerations areverified by simulations using SPICE, VERILOG, and a laboratoryexperiment.

  8. Improving Pulsar Timing Precision with Single Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The measurement error of pulse times of arrival (TOAs) in the high S/N limit is dominated by the quasi-random variation of a pulsar's emission profile from rotation to rotation. Like measurement noise, this noise is only reduced as the square root of observing time, posing a major challenge to future pulsar timing campaigns with large aperture telescopes, e.g. the Five-hundred-metre Aperture Spherical Telescope and the Square Kilometre Array. We propose a new method of pulsar timing that attempts to approximate the pulse-to-pulse variability with a small family of 'basis' pulses. If pulsar data are integrated over many rotations, this basis can be used to measure sub-pulse structure. Or, if high-time resolution data are available, the basis can be used to 'tag' single pulses and produce an optimal timing template. With realistic simulations, we show that these applications can dramatically reduce the effect of pulse-to-pulse variability on TOAs. Using high-time resolution data taken from the bright PSR J0835-...

  9. Discriminating cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time using a GEM detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui-Yin; Zhao, Sheng-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Qi, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Ke-Yan; Hu, Bi-Tao; Zhang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Gas electron multiplier (GEM) detectors have been used in cosmic muon scattering tomography and neutron imaging over the last decade. In this work, a triple GEM device with an effective readout area of 10 cm × 10 cm is developed, and a method of discriminating between cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time is tested. The energy resolution of the GEM detector is tested by 55Fe ray source to prove the GEM detector has a good performance. Analysis of the complete signal-cycles allows us to get the rise time and pulse heights. The experiment result indicates that cosmic muons and X-rays can be discriminated with an appropriate rise time threshold. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11275235, 11405077, 11575073)

  10. SPS Injection and Beam Quality for LHC Heavy Ions With 150 ns Kicker Rise Time

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, Brennan; Ducimetière, Laurent; Kotzian, Gerd; Uythoven, Jan; Velotti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    As part of the LHC Injectors Upgrade project for LHC heavy ions, the SPS injection kicker system rise time needs reduction below its present 225 ns. One technically challenging option under consideration is the addition of fast Pulse Forming Lines in parallel to the existing Pulse Forming Networks for the 12 kicker magnets MKP-S, targeting a system field rise time of 100 ns. An alternative option is to optimise the system to approach the existing individual magnet field rise time (2-98%) of 150 ns. This would still significantly increase the number of colliding bunches in LHC while minimising the cost and effort of the system upgrade. The observed characteristics of the present system are described, compared to the expected system rise time, together with results of simulations and measurements with 175 and 150 ns injection batch spacing. The expected beam quality at injection into LHC is quantified, with the emittance growth and simulated tail population taking into account expected jitter and synchronisatio...

  11. Standardization of Rocket Engine Pulse Time Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Max E.; Lumpkin, Forrest E.; Rauer, Scott J.

    2001-01-01

    Plumes of bipropellant thrusters are a source of contamination. Small bipropellant thrusters are often used for spacecraft attitude control and orbit correction. Such thrusters typically operate in a pulse mode, at various pulse lengths. Quantifying their contamination effects onto spacecraft external surfaces is especially important for long-term complex-geometry vehicles, e.g. International Space Station. Plume contamination tests indicated the presence of liquid phase contaminant in the form of droplets. Their origin is attributed to incomplete combustion. Most of liquid-phase contaminant is generated during the startup and shutdown (unsteady) periods of thruster pulse. These periods are relatively short (typically 10-50 ms), and the amount of contaminant is determined by the thruster design (propellant valve response, combustion chamber size, thruster mass flow rate, film cooling percentage, dribble volume, etc.) and combustion process organization. Steady-state period of pulse is characterized by much lower contamination rates, but may be lengthy enough to significantly conh'ibute to the overall contamination effect. Because there was no standard methodology for thruster pulse time division, plume contamination tests were conducted at various pulse durations, and their results do not allow quantifying contaminant amounts from each portion of the pulse. At present, the ISS plume contamination model uses an assumption that all thrusters operate in a pulse mode with the pulse length being 100 ms. This assumption may lead to a large difference between the actual amounts of contaminant produced by the thruster and the model predictions. This paper suggests a way to standardize thruster startup and shutdown period definitions, and shows the usefulness of this approach to better quantify thruster plume contamination. Use of the suggested thruster pulse time-division technique will ensure methodological consistency of future thruster plume contamination test programs

  12. Neural processing of amplitude and formant rise time in dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Varghese; Kalashnikova, Marina; Burnham, Denis

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate how children with dyslexia weight amplitude rise time (ART) and formant rise time (FRT) cues in phonetic discrimination. Passive mismatch responses (MMR) were recorded for a/ba/-/wa/contrast in a multiple deviant odd-ball paradigm to identify the neural response to cue weighting in 17 children with dyslexia and 17 age-matched control children. The deviant stimuli had either partial or full ART or FRT cues. The results showed that ART did not generate an MMR in either group, whereas both partial and full FRT cues generated MMR in control children while only full FRT cues generated MMR in children with dyslexia. These findings suggest that children, both controls and those with dyslexia, discriminate speech based on FRT cues and not ART cues. However, control children have greater sensitivity to FRT cues in speech compared to children with dyslexia. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Neural processing of amplitude and formant rise time in dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varghese Peter

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate how children with dyslexia weight amplitude rise time (ART and formant rise time (FRT cues in phonetic discrimination. Passive mismatch responses (MMR were recorded for a/ba/-/wa/contrast in a multiple deviant odd-ball paradigm to identify the neural response to cue weighting in 17 children with dyslexia and 17 age-matched control children. The deviant stimuli had either partial or full ART or FRT cues. The results showed that ART did not generate an MMR in either group, whereas both partial and full FRT cues generated MMR in control children while only full FRT cues generated MMR in children with dyslexia. These findings suggest that children, both controls and those with dyslexia, discriminate speech based on FRT cues and not ART cues. However, control children have greater sensitivity to FRT cues in speech compared to children with dyslexia.

  14. The Rise-Time of Type II Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Gaitan, Santiago; Molina, J; Galbany, L; Bufano, F; Anderson, J P; Gutierrez, C; Forster, F; Pignata, G; Bersten, M; Howell, D A; Sullivan, M; Carlberg, R; de Jaeger, T; Hamuy, M; Baklanov, P V; Blinnikov, S I

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the early-time light-curves of a large sample of 223 type II supernovae (SNe) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Supernova Legacy Survey. Having a cadence of a few days and sufficient non-detections prior to explosion, we constrain rise-times, i.e. the durations from estimated first to maximum light, as a function of effective wavelength. At restframe g-band (4722A), we find a distribution of fast rise-times with median of (7.5+/-0.3) days. Comparing these durations with analytical shock models of Rabinak and Waxman (2013); Nakar and Sari (2010) and hydrodynamical models of Tominaga et al. (2009), which are mostly sensitive to progenitor radius at these epochs, we find a median characteristic radius of less than 400 solar radii. The inferred radii are on average much smaller than the radii obtained for observed red supergiants (RSG). Investigating the post-maximum slopes as a function of effective wavelength in the light of theoretical models, we find that massive hydrogen envelopes are ...

  15. Time shift of pulses due to dispersion slope and nonlinearity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcuse, D.; Menyuk, C.R.; Holzloehner, R.

    1999-12-01

    The authors show that the time delay of optical pulses traveling in long fibers is influenced by the dispersion slope and the fiber nonlinearity. Consequently, one or more new pulses that are inserted by add-drop operations into a pulse train that has already traveled a long distance may shift relative to the old pulses. This time shift delays the initial pulses more than the newly inserted ones, so that the newly inserted pulses can leave their time frames, leading to errors.

  16. Doctorate time rising sharply: How long should it take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen, William

    The period 1967-1987 saw a 20% increase in the time it takes to complete the doctorate. That figure is based on data provided by the National Research Council from 11 scientific and engineering fields, including the Earth, atmospheric and marine sciences.The median time spent earning the degree rose from 5.4 years in 1967 to 6.1 years in 1977 to 6.9 years in 1987—an increase of 1.5 years in a single generation. Completion time still seems to be rising! All graduating doctoral students in 1987 had a median age of 33.6 years; chemistry students were youngest at 29, and education students were the oldsters at 39.8 years.

  17. Rise-Time Distortion of Signal without Carrying Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhman, N. S.

    2016-08-01

    The article deals with one-dimensional problem of rise-time distortion signal without carrying signal, that appears in the starting point intermittently, that is signal distortion at front edge or one of its derivative. The authors show that front edge of signal isn't distorted in case of propagation in unrestricted (including absorbing) area (amplitude of starting signal step or of one of its derivatives doesn't change) and move with the accuracy of vacuum light speed. The paper proves that it is the time interval shortage that causes signal loss with the route extension, but not the reduction of its starting amplitude, during which front edge of signal retains its starting value. The research presents new values for this time interval.

  18. Shaping and timing gradient pulses to reduce MRI acoustic noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segbers, Marcel; Rizzo Sierra, Carlos V; Duifhuis, Hendrikus; Hoogduin, Johannes M

    2010-08-01

    A method to reduce the acoustic noise generated by gradient systems in MRI has been recently proposed; such a method is based on the linear response theory. Since the physical cause of MRI acoustic noise is the time derivative of the gradient current, a common trapezoid current shape produces an acoustic gradient coil response mainly during the rising and falling edge. In the falling edge, the coil acoustic response presents a 180 degrees phase difference compared to the rising edge. Therefore, by varying the width of the trapezoid and keeping the ramps constant, it is possible to suppress one selected frequency and its higher harmonics. This value is matched to one of the prominent resonance frequencies of the gradient coil system. The idea of cancelling a single frequency is extended to a second frequency, using two successive trapezoid-shaped pulses presented at a selected interval. Overall sound pressure level reduction of 6 and 10 dB is found for the two trapezoid shapes and a single pulse shape, respectively. The acoustically optimized pulse shape proposed is additionally tested in a simulated echo planar imaging readout train, obtaining a sound pressure level reduction of 12 dB for the best case.

  19. Study on SO2 Removal Efficiency by Nanosecond Rising Edge Pulse DBD Under Different Environmental Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-hua; SU Biao; LIU Ding-xin; WANG Jun-hua; RONG Ming-zhe

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,an experimental study on SO2 removal by nanosecond rising edge pulse dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma,generated by multi-needle-to-plane electrodes,is carried out.The mechanism of the effect of various factors,such as gap size between dielectric barrier and discharge needles,environmental humidity,and inlet speed of gas flow upon the removal efficiency of air purification is analyzed.The studies show that SO2 removal efficiency improves with the increase in the gap size between dielectric barrier and discharge needles in the case of a fixed space between two electrodes,and also improves with the increase in the environmental humidity.For a mixed gas with a fixed concentration,there is an optimal inlet speed of gas flow,which leads to the best removal efficiency.

  20. Femtosecond Timing Distribution Using Optical Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, A; Winter, A

    2005-01-01

    Fourth-generation light sources, such as the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) require timing signals distributed over distances of several kilometers with a stability in the order of femtoseconds. A promising approach is the use of a mode-locked laser that generates sub-picosecond pulses which are distributed in timing stabilized optical fiber links. A good candidate for a laser master oscillator (LMO) is a mode-locked Erbium-doped fiber laser, featuring extremely low phase noise far from the carrier. Results on the development of the LMO locked to an external reference microwave oscillator to suppress low frequency jitter, the distribution via timing stabilized optical fiber links and the reconversion of the optical pulses to a low phase noise microwave RF signals with overall femtosecond stability are presented.

  1. Design and implementation of an FPGA-based timing pulse programmer for pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Savory, Joshua J; Warncke, Kurt

    2013-08-01

    The design, construction and implementation of a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) -based pulse programmer for pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments is described. The FPGA pulse programmer offers advantages in design flexibility and cost over previous pulse programmers, that are based on commercial digital delay generators, logic pattern generators, and application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) designs. The FPGA pulse progammer features a novel transition-based algorithm and command protocol, that is optimized for the timing structure required for most pulsed magnetic resonance experiments. The algorithm was implemented by using a Spartan-6 FPGA (Xilinx), which provides an easily accessible and cost effective solution for FPGA interfacing. An auxiliary board was designed for the FPGA-instrument interface, which buffers the FPGA outputs for increased power consumption and capacitive load requirements. Device specifications include: Nanosecond pulse formation (transition edge rise/fall times, ≤3 ns), low jitter (≤150 ps), large number of channels (16 implemented; 48 available), and long pulse duration (no limit). The hardware and software for the device were designed for facile reconfiguration to match user experimental requirements and constraints. Operation of the device is demonstrated and benchmarked by applications to 1-D electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) and 2-D hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) experiments. The FPGA approach is transferrable to applications in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR; magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), and to pulse perturbation and detection bandwidths in spectroscopies up through the optical range.

  2. Dynamic parabolic pulse generation using temporal shaping of wavelength to time mapped pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dat; Piracha, Mohammad Umar; Mandridis, Dimitrios; Delfyett, Peter J

    2011-06-20

    Self-phase modulation in fiber amplifiers can significantly degrade the quality of compressed pulses in chirped pulse amplification systems. Parabolic pulses with linear frequency chirp are suitable for suppressing nonlinearities, and to achieve high peak power pulses after compression. In this paper, we present an active time domain technique to generate parabolic pulses for chirped pulse amplification applications. Pulses from a mode-locked laser are temporally stretched and launched into an amplitude modulator, where the drive voltage is designed using the spectral shape of the input pulse and the transfer function of the modulator, resulting in the generation of parabolic pulses. Experimental results of pulse shaping with a pulse train from a mode-locked laser are presented, with a residual error of less than 5%. Moreover, an extinction ratio of 27 dB is achieved, which is ideal for chirped pulse amplification applications.

  3. Rise time of proton cut-off energy in 2D and 3D PIC simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, J.; Gizzi, L. A.; Londrillo, P.; Mirzanejad, S.; Rovelli, T.; Sinigardi, S.; Turchetti, G.

    2017-04-01

    The Target Normal Sheath Acceleration regime for proton acceleration by laser pulses is experimentally consolidated and fairly well understood. However, uncertainties remain in the analysis of particle-in-cell simulation results. The energy spectrum is exponential with a cut-off, but the maximum energy depends on the simulation time, following different laws in two and three dimensional (2D, 3D) PIC simulations so that the determination of an asymptotic value has some arbitrariness. We propose two empirical laws for the rise time of the cut-off energy in 2D and 3D PIC simulations, suggested by a model in which the proton acceleration is due to a surface charge distribution on the target rear side. The kinetic energy of the protons that we obtain follows two distinct laws, which appear to be nicely satisfied by PIC simulations, for a model target given by a uniform foil plus a contaminant layer that is hydrogen-rich. The laws depend on two parameters: the scaling time, at which the energy starts to rise, and the asymptotic cut-off energy. The values of the cut-off energy, obtained by fitting 2D and 3D simulations for the same target and laser pulse configuration, are comparable. This suggests that parametric scans can be performed with 2D simulations since 3D ones are computationally very expensive, delegating their role only to a correspondence check. In this paper, the simulations are carried out with the PIC code ALaDyn by changing the target thickness L and the incidence angle α, with a fixed a0 = 3. A monotonic dependence, on L for normal incidence and on α for fixed L, is found, as in the experimental results for high temporal contrast pulses.

  4. Reconsidering Melt-water Pulses 1A and 1B:Global Impacts of Rapid Sea-level Rise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Paul Liu; John D.Milliman

    2004-01-01

    Re-evaluation of the post-glacial sea level derived from the Barbados coral-reef borings suggests slightly revised depth ranges and timing of melt-water pulses MWP-1A(96-76 m, 14.3-14.0 ka cal BP)and 1B(58-45 m, 11.5-11.2 ka cal BP), respectively. Ages of non-reef sea-level indicators from the Sunda Shelf, the East China Sea and Yellow Sea for these two intervals are unreliable because of the well-documented radiocarbon(14C)plateau, but their vertical clustering corresponds closely with MWP-1A and 1B depth ranges. Close correlation of the revised sea-level curve with Greenland ice-core data suggests that the 14C plateau may be related to oceanographic-atmospheric changes due to rapid sea-level rise, fresh-water input, and impaired ocean circulation. MWP-1A appears to have occurred at the end of Blling Warm Transition, suggesting that the rapid sea-level rise may have resulted from lateral heat transport from low to high-latitude regions and subsequent abrupt ice-sheet collapses in both North America-Europe and Antarctica. An around 70 mm a-1 transgression during MWP-1A may have increased freshwater discharge to the North Atlantic by as much as an order of magnitude, thereby disturbing thermohaline circulation and initiating the Older Dryas global cooling.

  5. Data processing in pulse transit time measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingmeng Zhang; Ye Li

    2008-01-01

    Pulse transit time(PTT) is used as a noninvasive and cuff-hss parameter to estimate blood pressure.In this paper,we develop an algorithm to obtain PTT rapidly,which is appropriate for micro-processor and could achieve good accuracy in PTT,even in noisy measurements.,The algorithm is based on finite impulse response(FIR) filter to reduce the noise and an adaptive threshold to detect the significant points of ECG and PPG.Evaluation of this method is based on the signals from our PTT-based blood pressure devices.It is shown that the method works well for PPT calculation.

  6. Self-modulation instability of ultra-relativistic particle bunches with finite rise times

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, J; Fang, Y; Mori, W B; Muggli, P; Silva, L O

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of the self-modulation instability using bunches with finite rise times. Using particle-in-cell simulations we show that unlike long bunches with sharp rise times, there are large variations of the wake amplitudes and wake phase velocity when bunches with finite rise times are used. These results show that use of bunches with sharp rise times is important to seed the self-modulation instability and to ensure stable acceleration regimes.

  7. Rise time of proton cut-off energy in 2D and 3D PIC simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Babaei, Javad; Londrillo, Pasquale; Mirzanejad, Saeed; Rovelli, Tiziano; Sinigardi, Stefano; Turchetti, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) regime for proton acceleration by laser pulses is experimentally consolidated and fairly well understood. However, uncertainties remain in the analysis of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results. The energy spectrum is exponential with a cut-off, but the maximum energy depends on the simulation time, following different laws in two and three dimensional (2D, 3D) PIC simulations, so that the determination of an asymptotic value has some arbitrariness. We propose two empirical laws for rise time of the cut-off energy in 2D and 3D PIC simulations, suggested by a model in which the proton acceleration is due to a surface charge distribution on the target rear side. The kinetic energy of the protons that we obtain follows two distinct laws, which appear to be nicely satisfied by PIC simulations. The laws depend on two parameters: the scaling time, at which the energy starts to rise, and the asymptotic cut-off energy. The values of the cut-off energy, obtained by fitti...

  8. On using peak amplitude and rise time for AE source characterization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M A Majeed; C R L Murthy

    2002-06-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) signals, which are electrical version of acoustic emissions, are usually analysed using a set of signal parameters. The major objective of signal analysis is to study the characteristics of the sources of emissions. Peak amplitude $(P_a)$ and rise time $(R_t)$ are two such parameters used for source characterization. In this paper, we theoretically investigate the efficiency of $P_a$ and $R_t$ to classify and characterize AE sources by modelling the input stress pulse and transducer. Analytical expressions obtained for $P_a$ and $R_t$ clearly indicate their use and efficiency for source characterization. It is believed that these results may be of use to investigators in areas like control systems and signal processing also.

  9. 2.5MV快沿电磁脉冲模拟器脉冲源故障状态模拟分析%Simulation Analysis for Fault States of 2.5 MV Electro-Magnetic Pulse Driver with Fast Rise Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾伟; 陈维青; 谢霖森; 张国伟; 李俊娜; 邱孟通

    2012-01-01

    利用电路模拟软件与实测波形,建立了2.5 MV快沿电磁脉冲(EMP)模拟脉冲源等效电路模型.通过在电路模型中模拟绝缘薄弱环节,如Marx输出端、中储电容、中储开关与峰化电容间支撑绝缘子、峰化电容等位置,设置等效滑闪电路的方法,对模拟器脉冲源可能出现的绝缘故障进行了模拟分析.将模拟器调试阶段出现的故障波形与模拟结果进行比对,二者符合良好.试验结果证明,根据模拟故障波形并结合试验中出现的巨大声响、电源跳闸等物理现象及后续输出电压降低等情况,可以实现模拟器滑闪故障的准确定位,从而保证故障的及时发现与快速排除,提高装置运行可靠性.%A circuit model of an electro-magnetic pulse (EMP) simulator driver with 2.5 MV rated voltage and fast rise time is established by the circuit simulation software and the measured output waveforms of the generator. An equivalent flash circuit is set up for the weaker insulation positions in the simulator, such as the output terminal of Marx, intermediate transfer switch, peaking capacitor, and intermediate capacitor. The modified model is used to analyze fault states of the driver, and the simulation results coincide well with the experimental data in debugging stage. The fault simulation and analysis combined with the physical phenomena - violent noise or breakdown of power supply appearing in the experiments and the subsequent output voltage reduction, can accurately locate the flash faults of the EMP simulator.

  10. Optimal Linear Filters. 2. Pulse Time Measurements in the Presence of Noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nygaard, K.

    1966-09-15

    The problem of calculating the maximum available timing information contained in nuclear pulses in the presence of noise is solved theoretically. Practical experiments show that the theoretical values can be obtained by very simple, but untraditional, means. An output pulse from a practical filter connected to a charge sensitive amplifier with a Ge(Li) detector showed a rise time of 30 ns and a noise level of less than 5 keV. The time jitter measured was inversely proportional to the pulse height and less than 30 ns for 10 keV pulses. With the timing filter shown solid state detectors can be classified somewhere between Nal scintillators and organic scintillators with respect to time resolution.

  11. Induction time effects in pulse combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, J B; Marcus, D L; Pember, R B

    1999-04-09

    Combustion systems that take advantage of a periodic combustion process have many advantages over conventional systems. Their rate of heat transfer is greatly enhanced and their pollutant emissions are lower. They draw in their own supply of fuel and air and they are self-venting. They have few moving parts. The most common type of pulse combustor is based on a Helmholtz resonator - a burning cycle drives a resonant pressure wave, which in turn enhances the rate of combustion, resulting in a self-sustaining, large-scale oscillation. Although the basic physical mechanisms controlling such a process were explained by Rayleigh over a century ago, a full understanding of the operation of a pulse combustor still does not exist. The dominant processes in such a system--combustion, turbulent fluid dynamics, acoustics--are highly coupled and interact nonlinearly, which has reduced the design process to a costly and inefficient trial-and-error procedure. Several recent numerical and experimental studies, however, have been focused towards a better understanding of the basic underlying physics. Barr et al. [l] have elucidated the relative roles of the time scales governing the energy release, the turbulent mixing, and the acoustics. Keller et al. [5] have demonstrated the importance of the phase relation between the resonant pressure field in the tailpipe and the periodic energy release. Marcus et al. [6] have developed the capability for a fully three-dimensional simulation of the reacting flow in a pulse combustor. This paper is an application of that methodology to a detailed investigation of the frequency response of the model to changes in the chemical kinetics. The methodology consists of a fully conservative second-order Godunov algorithm for the inviscid, reacting gas dynamics equations coupled to an adaptive mesh refinement procedure[2]. The axisymmetric and three-dimensional simulations allow us to explore in detail the interaction between the transient fluid

  12. Pulse transit time differential measurement by fiber Bragg grating pulse recorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh, Sharath; Padma, Srivani; Ambastha, Shikha; Kalegowda, Anand; Asokan, Sundarrajan

    2015-05-01

    The present study reports a noninvasive technique for the measurement of the pulse transit time differential (PTTD) from the pulse pressure waveforms obtained at the carotid artery and radial artery using fiber Bragg grating pulse recorders (FBGPR). PTTD is defined as the time difference between the arrivals of a pulse pressure waveform at the carotid and radial arterial sites. The PTTD is investigated as an indicator of variation in the systolic blood pressure. The results are validated against blood pressure variation obtained from a Mindray Patient Monitor. Furthermore, the pulse wave velocity computed from the obtained PTTD is compared with the pulse wave velocity obtained from the color Doppler ultrasound system and is found to be in good agreement. The major advantage of the PTTD measurement via FBGPRs is that the data acquisition system employed can simultaneously acquire pulse pressure waveforms from both FBGPRs placed at carotid and radial arterial sites with a single time scale, which eliminates time synchronization complexity.

  13. Research on fast rise time EMP radiating-wave simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lisi; Liu, Haitao; Wang, Yun

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an antenna of High altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) radiating-wave simulator which expands the testing zone larger than the traditional transmission line simulator. The numerical results show that traverse electramagnetic (TEM) antenna can be used to radiate HEMP simulation radiating wave, but in low frequency band the emissive capability is poor. The experiment proves the numerical model is valid. The results of this paper show that TEM antenna can be used to HEMP radiating-wave simulator, and can prove the low frequency radiation capability through resistance loaded method.

  14. Dephasing time of a positron accelerated by a laser pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜春光; 李师群

    2002-01-01

    The dephasing time of a positron in the total field associated with a laser pulse in a plasma is studied numerically.It is shown that the dynamics of the positron is quite different from that of an electron due to the electrostatic potential in the body of the pulse. The dephasing time of the positron increases with the pulse length and decreases with the pulse intensity nonlinearly. In the long pulse case (L> λp) the dephasing time is proportional to the pulse length. These results provide a scientific basis for experiments to observe the positron acceleration scheme, and may be important to the physics of laser-particle interactions in multi-component plasmas.

  15. Modeling of space-time focusing of localized nondiffracting pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Besieris, Ioannis M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we develop a method capable of modeling the space-time focusing of nondiffracting pulses. These pulses can possess arbitrary peak velocities and, in addition to being resistant to diffraction, can have their peak intensities and focusing positions chosen a priori. More specifically, we can choose multiple locations (spatial ranges) of space and time focalization; also, the pulse intensities can be chosen in advance. The pulsed wave solutions presented here can have very interesting applications in many different fields, such as free-space optical communications, remote sensing, medical apparatus, etc.

  16. Modeling of Space-Time Focusing of Localized Nondiffracting Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Zamboni-Rached, Michel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we develop a method capable of modeling the space-time focusing of nondiffracting pulses. The new pulses can possess arbitrary peak velocities and, in addition to being resistant to diffraction, can have their peak intensities and focusing positions chosen a priori. More specifically, we can choose multiple locations (spatial ranges) of space/time focalization; also, the pulse intensities can be chosen in advance. The pulsed wave solutions presented here can have very interesting applications in many different fields, such as free-space optical communications, remote sensing, medical apparatus, etc.

  17. Determination of tissue thermal conductivity by measuring and modeling temperature rise induced in tissue by pulsed focused ultrasound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Kujawska

    Full Text Available A tissue thermal conductivity (Ks is an important parameter which knowledge is essential whenever thermal fields induced in selected organs are predicted. The main objective of this study was to develop an alternative ultrasonic method for determining Ks of tissues in vitro suitable for living tissues. First, the method involves measuring of temperature-time T(t rises induced in a tested tissue sample by a pulsed focused ultrasound with measured acoustic properties using thermocouples located on the acoustic beam axis. Measurements were performed for 20-cycle tone bursts with a 2 MHz frequency, 0.2 duty-cycle and 3 different initial pressures corresponding to average acoustic powers equal to 0.7 W, 1.4 W and 2.1 W generated from a circular focused transducer with a diameter of 15 mm and f-number of 1.7 in a two-layer system of media: water/beef liver. Measurement results allowed to determine position of maximum heating located inside the beef liver. It was found that this position is at the same axial distance from the source as the maximum peak-peak pressure calculated for each nonlinear beam produced in the two-layer system of media. Then, the method involves modeling of T(t at the point of maximum heating and fitting it to the experimental data by adjusting Ks. The averaged value of Ks determined by the proposed method was found to be 0.5±0.02 W/(m·°C being in good agreement with values determined by other methods. The proposed method is suitable for determining Ks of some animal tissues in vivo (for example a rat liver.

  18. Development of a High-Speed Digitizer to Time Resolve Nanosecond Fluorescence Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Moreno-García

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of a high-speed digitizer system to measure time-domain voltage pulses in nanoseconds range is presented in this work. The digitizer design includes a high performance digital signal processor, a high-bandwidth analog-to-digital converter of flash-type, a set of delay lines, and a computer to achieve the time-domain measurements. A program running on the processor applies a time-equivalent sampling technique to acquire the input pulse. The processor communicates with the computer via a serial port RS-232 to receive commands and to transmit data. A control program written in LabVIEW 7.1 starts an acquisition routine in the processor. The program reads data from processor point by point in each occurrence of the signal, and plots each point to recover the time-resolved input pulse after n occurrences. The developed prototype is applied to measure fluorescence pulses from a homemade spectrometer. For this application, the LabVIEW program was improved to control the spectrometer, and to register and plot time-resolved fluorescence pulses produced by a substance. The developed digitizer has 750 MHz of analog input bandwidth, and it is able to resolve 2 ns rise-time pulses with 150 ps of resolution and a temporal error of 2.6 percent.

  19. Nonlinear pulse propagation: a time-transformation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuzhe; Agrawal, Govind P; Maywar, Drew N

    2012-04-01

    We present a time-transformation approach for studying the propagation of optical pulses inside a nonlinear medium. Unlike the conventional way of solving for the slowly varying amplitude of an optical pulse, our new approach maps directly the input electric field to the output one, without making the slowly varying envelope approximation. Conceptually, the time-transformation approach shows that the effect of propagation through a nonlinear medium is to change the relative spacing and duration of various temporal slices of the pulse. These temporal changes manifest as self-phase modulation in the spectral domain and self-steepening in the temporal domain. Our approach agrees with the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation for 100 fs pulses and the finite-difference time-domain solution of Maxwell's equations for two-cycle pulses, while producing results 20 and 50 times faster, respectively.

  20. Estimating changes in Stroke Volume by non-invasive pulse-oximetry Pulse Transit Time Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Bokkel-Andela, J.; Poterman, Marieke; Scheeren, Thomas; Kalmar, A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Goal of Study:  Pulse wave transit time (PTT), the interval between the R-wave peak on an electrocardiogram (ECG) and arrival of the pulse waves in the periphery (e.g. the finger), is reported to be a reliable estimate for stroke volume[1,2]. In this study, the PTT based on ECG and th

  1. Coefficient of restitution dependence of intruder rise time in two-dimensional Brazil-nut effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesuma, T.; Aji, D. P. Purwa; Viridi, S.; Suprijadi

    2016-04-01

    Brazil-Nut Effect (BNE) is a granular material phenomenon, where larger grains (usually known as intruder) rise to the top when the granular system vibrated. We observe a single intruder rise time of BNE phenomenon in a two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation of hard spheres collision scheme. Some experiments have shown that some granular properties, such as size and density ratio, play an important role to determine the rise time. However, other property, such as coefficients of restitution, is considered not to have a measurable impact. We explore the intruder inelasticity dependence of the rise time by varying its coefficient of restitution. We found that the intruder rise time tends to be flat for relatively high coefficient of restitution and increases exponentially below a certain deflecting point for low coefficient of restitution. This holds for specific mass ratio.

  2. Photonic integrated circuit as a picosecond pulse timing discriminator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Arthur James; Zhuang, Leimeng

    2016-04-18

    We report the first experimental demonstration of a compact on-chip optical pulse timing discriminator that is able to provide an output voltage proportional to the relative timing of two 60-ps input pulses on separate paths. The output voltage is intrinsically low-pass-filtered, so the discriminator forms an interface between high-speed optics and low-speed electronics. Potential applications include timing synchronization of multiple pulse trains as a precursor for optical time-division multiplexing, and compact rangefinders with millimeter dimensions.

  3. Abrupt Bølling warming and ice saddle collapse contributions to the Meltwater Pulse 1a rapid sea level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, Lauren J.; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Valdes, Paul J.; Ivanovic, Ruza

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the source(s) of Meltwater Pulse 1a, the largest rapid sea level rise caused by ice melt (14-18 m in less than 340 years, 14,600 years ago), is important for understanding mechanisms of rapid ice melt and the links with abrupt climate change. Here we quantify how much and by what mechanisms the North American ice sheet could have contributed to Meltwater Pulse 1a, by driving an ice sheet model with two transient climate simulations of the last 21,000 years. Ice sheet perturbed physics ensembles were run to account for model uncertainties, constraining ice extent and volume with reconstructions of 21,000 years ago to present. We determine that the North American ice sheet produced 3-4 m global mean sea level rise in 340 years due to the abrupt Bølling warming, but this response is amplified to 5-6 m when it triggers the ice sheet saddle collapse.

  4. Measurement of complex supercontinuum light pulses using time domain ptychography

    CERN Document Server

    Heidt, Alexander M; Brügmann, Michael; Rohwer, Erich G; Feurer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that time-domain ptychography, a recently introduced ultrafast pulse reconstruction modality, has properties ideally suited for the temporal characterization of complex light pulses with large time-bandwidth products as it achieves temporal resolution on the scale of a single optical cycle using long probe pulses, low sampling rates, and an extremely fast and robust algorithm. In comparison to existing techniques, ptychography minimizes the data to be recorded and processed, and drastically reduces the computational time of the reconstruction. Experimentally we measure the temporal waveform of an octave-spanning, 3.5~ps long supercontinuum pulse generated in photonic crystal fiber, resolving features as short as 5.7~fs with sub-fs resolution and 30~dB dynamic range using 100~fs probe pulses and similarly large delay steps.

  5. Time-lens based optical packet pulse compression and retiming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laguardia Areal, Janaina; Hu, Hao; Palushani, Evarist

    2010-01-01

    compression, as well. The overall design is: (1) Pulses are converted from NRZ to RZ; (2) pulses are synchronized, retimed and further compressed at the specially designed time-lens; and (3) with adequate optical delays, frames from different input interfaces are added, with a simple optical coupler...

  6. Modeling of time evolution of power and temperature in single-pulse and multi-pulses diode-pumped alkali vapor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Binglin; Huang, Jinghua; Xu, Xingqi; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2017-06-12

    A physical model combining rate, power propagation, and transient heat conduction equations for diode-pumped alkali vapor lasers (DPAL) is applied to a pulsed Rb-CH4 DPAL, which agrees well with the time evolution of laser power and temperature measured by K absorption spectroscopy. The output feature and temperature rise of a multi-pulse DPAL are also calculated in the time domain, showing that if we energize the pump light when the temperature rise decays to 1/2, rather than 1/e of its maximum, we can increase the duty cycle and obtain more output energy. The repetition rate of >100Hz is high enough to achieve QCW (quasi-continuous-wave) laser pulses.

  7. Thermal Processes Using Attosecond Laser Pulses When Time Matters

    CERN Document Server

    Kozłowski, Mirosław

    2006-01-01

    This book contains a study of the thermal processes initiated by attosecond laser pulses. Considering the existence of the experimental evidence for the trains of the attosecond laser pulses, we developed the theoretical framework for attophysics, i.e. physics of phenomena with time duration in the attosecond domain. This time domain is concerned with phenomena whose duration is much shorter than the relaxation time for atomic, molecular and nanoparticles scales.

  8. Time-resolved optical transmission of pulsed laser-irradiated silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.C.; Lo, H.W.; Aydinli, A.; Compaan, A.

    1980-10-20

    The time-resolved optical transmission of silicon has been observed at lambda = 1.15 microns during irradiation by an 8 nsec pulsed laser at 485 nm with several energy densities in the range of .25 to 1.2 J/sq cm. The transmission exhibits a sudden brief drop consistent with the rise and fall of the reflectivity enhancement. However, the transmission does not exhibit the strong absorption expected of molten silicon with a skin depth of approx. 100A.

  9. Characteristics of temperature rise in variable inductor employing magnetorheological fluid driven by a high-frequency pulsed voltage source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho-Young; Kang, In Man; Shon, Chae-Hwa; Lee, Se-Hee

    2015-05-01

    A variable inductor with magnetorheological (MR) fluid has been successfully applied to power electronics applications; however, its thermal characteristics have not been investigated. To evaluate the performance of the variable inductor with respect to temperature, we measured the characteristics of temperature rise and developed a numerical analysis technique. The characteristics of temperature rise were determined experimentally and verified numerically by adopting a multiphysics analysis technique. In order to accurately estimate the temperature distribution in a variable inductor with an MR fluid-gap, the thermal solver should import the heat source from the electromagnetic solver to solve the eddy current problem. To improve accuracy, the B-H curves of the MR fluid under operating temperature were obtained using the magnetic property measurement system. In addition, the Steinmetz equation was applied to evaluate the core loss in a ferrite core. The predicted temperature rise for a variable inductor showed good agreement with the experimental data and the developed numerical technique can be employed to design a variable inductor with a high-frequency pulsed voltage source.

  10. Characteristics of temperature rise in variable inductor employing magnetorheological fluid driven by a high-frequency pulsed voltage source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho-Young; Kang, In Man, E-mail: imkang@ee.knu.ac.kr [School of Electronics Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shon, Chae-Hwa [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon 642-120 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se-Hee, E-mail: shlees@knu.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-07

    A variable inductor with magnetorheological (MR) fluid has been successfully applied to power electronics applications; however, its thermal characteristics have not been investigated. To evaluate the performance of the variable inductor with respect to temperature, we measured the characteristics of temperature rise and developed a numerical analysis technique. The characteristics of temperature rise were determined experimentally and verified numerically by adopting a multiphysics analysis technique. In order to accurately estimate the temperature distribution in a variable inductor with an MR fluid-gap, the thermal solver should import the heat source from the electromagnetic solver to solve the eddy current problem. To improve accuracy, the B–H curves of the MR fluid under operating temperature were obtained using the magnetic property measurement system. In addition, the Steinmetz equation was applied to evaluate the core loss in a ferrite core. The predicted temperature rise for a variable inductor showed good agreement with the experimental data and the developed numerical technique can be employed to design a variable inductor with a high-frequency pulsed voltage source.

  11. Timing control of an intense picosecond pulse laser to the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Hara, Toru; Kitamura, Hideo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2000-03-01

    We have developed a control system to synchronize intense picosecond laser pulses to the hard x-ray synchrotron radiation (SR) pulses of SPring-8. A regeneratively amplified mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser is synchronized to 40 ps SR pulses by locking the laser to the radio frequency of the ring. The synchronization of the pulses is monitored by detecting both beams simultaneously on a gold photocathode of a streak camera. This method enabled us to make a precise measurement of the time interval between the beams, even if the trigger of the streak camera drifts. Synchronization between the laser and the SR pulses has been achieved with a precision of ±2 ps for some hours. The stable timing control ensures the possibility of making two-photon excitation and pump-probe experiments with time resolution of a few tens of ps (limited by the pulse duration of the SR). We have used this system to show that closing undulator gaps in the storage ring shifts the arrival time of the SR pulses, in accord with expectations for the increased power loss.

  12. Spatio-temporal evolution of the optical field on a hohlraum wall at the rising edge of a flat-topped pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoyang; Jiao; Yanli; Zhang; Junyong; Zhang; Jianqiang; Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Considering the time delay in different hohlraum wall positions caused by oblique incidence,the spatio-temporal optical field distribution characteristics of a hohlraum wall,especially during the rising edge of a flat-topped pulse,is simulated by a fast Fourier transform method together with chromatography.Results demonstrate that beam propagation along the hohlraum wall is a push-broom process with complex dynamic spatial–temporal evolution.In the first few picoseconds,the optical intensity of the front position increases rapidly,while that of the rear position is relatively weak.The ratio R of the optical intensity during the rising edge is smaller than that of the steady state.R gradually increases and finally tends to the value of the steady state with time.Calculation also shows that,with shorter total width of the rising edge,R of the optical field decreases and the difference compared to the steady state becomes larger.The evolution is more severe with smaller angle of inclination.

  13. Effects of Resistivity and Viscosity on m =0 Rise and Fall Time in the RFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futch, A. M.; Craig, D.; Hesse, R.; Jacobson, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    In the reversed field pinch (RFP), poloidal mode number m =0 fluctuations are driven in a sawtooth cycle via nonlinear coupling with unstable m =1 tearing modes. We explore how the rise and fall time of these m =0 fluctuations depends on resistivity and viscosity in visco-resistive MHD simulations using the DEBS code. Both the Lundquist number (S) and magnetic Prandtl number (Pr) affect the rise/fall time. Analysis of MST experimental data also shows that both the rise and fall times of the m =0 amplitude vary with S. The variation observed in experiment is consistent with simulation results for rise time, but shows some differences for fall time. Rise time is insensitive to the resistivity profile but depends slightly on the viscosity profile. Fall time is strongly correlated with the duration of the crash which depends on both resistivity and viscosity profiles. These results suggest that the rise and fall time of the m =0 modes at the sawtooth crash is not strongly influenced by the local resistivity near the resonant surface but instead is primarily determined by the overall dynamics of the entire sawtooth cycle. The role of viscosity is less clear though the edge viscosity affects the m =0 evolution more than the core. This work has been supported by the U.S.D.O.E.

  14. Influence of the Gilbert damping constant on the flux rise time of write head fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertl, Othmar [Institute of Applied and Technical Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10/138, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Schrefl, Thomas [Institute of Applied and Technical Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10/138, A-1040 Vienna (Austria) and Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: thomas.schrefl@tuwien.ac.at; Suess, Dieter [Institute of Applied and Technical Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10/138, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Schabes, Manfred E. [Hitachi Global Storage Technologies, Hitachi San Jose Research Center, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2005-04-15

    Magnetic recording at fast data rates requires write heads with rapid rise times of the magnetic flux during the write process. We present three-dimensional (3D) micromagnetic finite element calculations of an entire ring head including 3D coil geometry during the writing of magnetic bits in granular media. The simulations demonstrate how input current profiles translate into magnetization processes in the head and which in turn generate the write head field. The flux rise time significantly depends on the Gilbert damping constant of the head material. Low damping causes incoherent magnetization processes, leading to long rise times and low head fields. High damping leads to coherent reversal of the magnetization in the head. As a consequence, the gap region can be quickly saturated which causes high head fields with short rise times.

  15. The role of interplanetary shock orientation on SC/SI rise time and geoeffectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumaran, R.; Veenadhari, B.; Ebihara, Y.; Kumar, Sandeep; Prasad, D. S. V. V. D.

    2017-03-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks interact with the Earth's magnetosphere, resulting in compression of the magnetosphere which in turn increases the Earth's magnetic field termed as Sudden commencement/Sudden impulse (SC/SI). Apart from IP shock speed and solar wind dynamic pressure, IP shock orientation angle also plays a major role in deciding the SC rise time. In the present study, the IP shock orientation angle and SC/SI rise time for 179 IP shocks are estimated which occurred during solar cycle 23. More than 50% of the Shock orientations are in the range of 140°-160°. The SC/SI rise time decreases with the increase in the orientation angle and IP shock speed. In this work, the type of IP shocks i.e., Radio loud (RL) and Radio quiet (RQ) are examined in connection with SC/SI rise time. The RL associated IP shock speeds show a better correlation than RQ shocks with SC/SI rise time irrespective of the orientation angle. Magnetic Cloud (MC) associated shocks dominate in producing less rise time when compared to Ejecta (EJ) shocks. Magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are used for three different IP shock orientation categories to see the importance of orientation angle in determining the geoeffectiveness. Simulations results reveal that shocks hitting parallel to the magnetosphere are more geoeffective as compared to oblique shocks by means of change in magnetic field, pressure and Field Aligned Current (FAC).

  16. Extreme Value Statistical Characterization of Time Domain Pulse-to-Pulse Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)712364; Arpaia, Pasquale; Martino, Michele

    2015-01-01

    An analytical method, based on Extreme Value Theory (EV T), for predicting the worst case repeatability of time domain pulse-to-pulse measurements, modeled as independent and identically distributed random variables, is proposed. The method allows the use of the noise level of a measurement system for predicting the upcoming peak values over a given number of independent observations. The proposed analytical model is compared against simulated distributions generated in Matlab, highlighting satisfying match for any sample size.The simulations are based on a case study on the characterization of a pulsed power supply for the klystron modulators of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) under study at CERN.

  17. Controllable generation of partially coherent light pulses with direct space-to-time pulse shaper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Company, Víctor; Mínguez-Vega, Gladys; Lancis, Jesús; Friberg, Ari T

    2007-06-15

    We demonstrate the possibility of creating user-defined partially coherent light pulses by means of a slight modification of the direct space-to-time pulse shaper. Specifically, we generate a mutual coherence function that corresponds to the independent-elementary-pulse representation model. The theoretical limits in the parameter of global coherence and the efficiency of the system are studied. Our result opens the door to a new way of quantum control in laser-assisted chemical reactions, namely, control by partial coherence.

  18. Relationship of Morning Cortisol to Circadian Phase and Rising Time in Young Adults with Delayed Sleep Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Rea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at further elucidating the relationship between circadian phase, rising time, and the morning cortisol awakening response (CAR. The results presented here are a secondary analysis of experimental data obtained from a study of advanced sleep-wake schedules and light exposures on circadian phase advances measured by dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO. The present results demonstrate that morning CAR is strongly related to rising time and more weakly related to DLMO phase.

  19. Subpicosecond luminescence rise time in magnesium codoped GAGG:Ce scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulaitis, G.; Vaitkevičius, A.; Nargelas, S.; Augulis, R.; Gulbinas, V.; Bohacek, P.; Nikl, M.; Borisevich, A.; Fedorov, A.; Korjik, M.; Auffray, E.

    2017-10-01

    The influence of co-doping of Gd3Al2GA3O12:Ce (GAGG:Ce) scintillator with magnesium on the rise time of luminescence response was studied in two GAGG:Ce crystals grown in nominally identical conditions except of Mg co-doping in one of them. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy and free carrier absorption techniques were exploited. It is evidenced that the Mg co-doping decreases the rise time down to sub-picosecond domain. Meanwhile, the light yield decreases by ∼20%. Thus, the feasibility of exploitation of the fast rise edge in luminescence response for ultrafast timing in scintillation detectors is demonstrated. The role of Mg impurities in facilitating the excitation transfer to radiative recombination centers is discussed.

  20. Rise Time. Operational Control Tests for Wastewater Treatment Facilities. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie, John W.

    The rise time test (along with the settleometer procedure) is used to monitor sludge behavior in the secondary clarifier of an activated sludge system. The test monitors the effect of the nitrification/denitrification process and aids the operator in determining optimum clarifier sludge detention time and, to some extent, optimum degree of…

  1. The Rise-Time of Normal and Subluminous Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Gaitan, S; Bianco, F B; Howell, D A; Sullivan, M; Perrett, K; Carlberg, R; Astier, P; Balam, D; Balland, C; Basa, S; Fouchez, D; Fourmanoit, N; Graham, M L; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Lidman, C; Pain, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the average stretch-corrected rise-time of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Supernova Legacy Survey. We use the aggregate lightcurves of spectroscopic and photometrically identified SNe Ia to fit the rising part of the lightcurve with a simple quadratic model. We obtain a lightcurve shape corrected, i .e. stretch-corrected, fiducial rise-time of 17.02^{+0.18}_{-0.28} (stat) days. The measured rise-time differs from an earlier finding by the SNLS (Conley et al. 2006) due to the use of different SN Ia templates. We compare it to nearby samples using the same methods and find no evolution in the early part of the lightcurve of SNe Ia up to z=1. We search for variations among different populations, particularly subluminous objects, by dividing the sample in stretch. Bright and slow decliners (s>1.0) have consistent stretch-corrected rise-times compared to fainter and faster decliners (0.8

  2. Rise-Time of FRET-Acceptor Fluorescence Tracks Protein Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H.; van Mierlo, Carlo P. M.; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.; Borst, Jan Willem

    2014-01-01

    Uniform labeling of proteins with fluorescent donor and acceptor dyes with an equimolar ratio is paramount for accurate determination of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiencies. In practice, however, the labeled protein population contains donor-labeled molecules that have no corresponding acceptor. These FRET-inactive donors contaminate the donor fluorescence signal, which leads to underestimation of FRET efficiencies in conventional fluorescence intensity and lifetime-based FRET experiments. Such contamination is avoided if FRET efficiencies are extracted from the rise time of acceptor fluorescence upon donor excitation. The reciprocal value of the rise time of acceptor fluorescence is equal to the decay rate of the FRET-active donor fluorescence. Here, we have determined rise times of sensitized acceptor fluorescence to study the folding of double-labeled apoflavodoxin molecules and show that this approach tracks the characteristics of apoflavodoxinʼs complex folding pathway. PMID:25535076

  3. Pulsed photo-excitation timed with pulsed rf can reveal the radical-pair magnetoreceptor

    CERN Document Server

    Kominis, I K

    2014-01-01

    The radical-pair mechanism is understood to underlie the magnetic navigation capability of birds and possibly other species. Experiments with birds have provided indirect and in cases conflicting evidence on the actual existence of this mechanism. We here propose a new experiment that can unambiguously identify the presence of the radical-pair magnetoreceptor in birds and unravel some of its basic properties. The proposed experiment is based on modulated light excitation with a pulsed laser, combined with delayed radio-frequency magnetic field pulses. We predict a resonance effect in the birds' magnetic orientation versus the rf-pulse delay time. The resonance's position reflects the singlet-triplet mixing time of the magnetoreceptor.

  4. Real-time energy measurement of high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses using pulse integration and FPGA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qi-Jie; Yang, Dong-Xu; Wang, Jian; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Chen, Teng-Yun

    2016-11-01

    Real-time energy measurement using pulse integration method for high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses based on FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) and high-speed pipeline ADC (Analog-to-Digital Convertor) is introduced in this paper. There are two parts contained in this method: pulse integration and real-time data processing. The pulse integration circuit will convert the pulse to the step type signals which are linear to the laser pulse energy. Through the real-time data processing part, the amplitude of the step signals will be obtained by ADC sampling and conducting calculation in real time in FPGA. The test result shows that the method with good linearity (4.770%) and without pulse measurement missing is suitable for ultrashort laser pulses with high repetition rate up to 100 MHz.

  5. Real-time energy measurement of high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses using pulse integration and FPGA processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qi-jie; Yang, Dong-xu; Wang, Jian; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Hong-fei; Chen, Teng-yun

    2016-11-01

    Real-time energy measurement using pulse integration method for high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses based on FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) and high-speed pipeline ADC (Analog-to-Digital Convertor) is introduced in this paper. There are two parts contained in this method: pulse integration and real-time data processing. The pulse integration circuit will convert the pulse to the step type signals which are linear to the laser pulse energy. Through the real-time data processing part, the amplitude of the step signals will be obtained by ADC sampling and conducting calculation in real time in FPGA. The test result shows that the method with good linearity (4.770%) and without pulse measurement missing is suitable for ultrashort laser pulses with high repetition rate up to 100 MHz.

  6. Synthesis of fractal light pulses by quasi-direct space-to-time pulse shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Alonso, Benjamín; Mínguez-Vega, Gladys; Sola, Iñigo Juan; Lancis, Jesús; Monsoriu, Juan A

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrated a simple diffractive method to map the self-similar structure shown in squared radial coordinate of any set of circularly symmetric fractal plates into self-similar light pulses in the corresponding temporal domain. The space-to-time mapping of the plates was carried out by means of a kinoform diffractive lens under femtosecond illumination. The spatio-temporal characteristics of the fractal pulses obtained in this way were measured by means of a spectral interferometry technique assisted by a fiber optics coupler (STARFISH). Our proposal allows synthesizing suited sequences of focused fractal femtosecond pulses potentially useful for several current applications, such as femtosecond material processing, atomic, and molecular control of chemical processes or generation of nonlinear effects.

  7. Rise Time Perception in Children with Reading and Combined Reading and Language Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Rachel L.; Manis, Franklin R.

    2013-01-01

    Using a non-speech-specific measure of prosody, rise time perception, Goswami and her colleagues have found that individuals with dyslexia perform significantly worse than nonimpaired readers. Studies have also found that children and adults with specific language impairment were impaired on these tasks. Despite the high comorbidity of these…

  8. The Time-Frequency Characteristics of Pulse Propagation Through Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, propagated δ pulses through different distance of Plasma are calculated, and their time-frequency characteristics are studied using CWD (Choi-William distrilution). It is found that several horizontal spectra appear at early arrival time like discrete spectruml at last time a hyperbolic curve lies in the time-frequency spectrum which corresponds to the frequency-group delay curve of plasma. To understand the time-frequency, the property of a signal is helpful for obtaining the plasma parameters.

  9. Eldecalcitol improves chair-rising time in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with bisphosphonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwamoto J

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Jun Iwamoto,1 Yoshihiro Sato21Institute for Integrated Sports Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Neurology, Mitate Hospital, Fukuoka, JapanAbstract: An open-label randomized controlled trial was conducted to clarify the effect of eldecalcitol (ED on body balance and muscle power in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with bisphosphonates. A total of 106 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis (mean age 70.8 years were randomly divided into two groups (n=53 in each group: a bisphosphonate group (control group and a bisphosphonate plus ED group (ED group. Biochemical markers, unipedal standing time (body balance, and five-repetition chair-rising time (muscle power were evaluated. The duration of the study was 6 months. Ninety-six women who completed the trial were included in the subsequent analyses. At baseline, the age, body mass index, bone mass indices, bone turnover markers, unipedal standing time, and chair-rising time did not differ significantly between the two groups. During the 6-month treatment period, bone turnover markers decreased significantly from the baseline values similarly in the two groups. Although no significant improvement in the unipedal standing time was seen in the ED group, compared with the control group, the chair-rising time decreased significantly in the ED group compared with the control group. The present study showed that ED improved the chair-rising time in terms of muscle power in postmenopausal osteoporotic women treated with bisphosphonates.Keywords: osteoporosis, fall, vitamin D, muscle power, body balance

  10. Scintillation time dependence and pulse shape discrimination in liquid argon

    CERN Document Server

    Lippincott, W H; Gastler, D; Hime, A; Kearns, E; McKinsey, D N; Nikkel, J A; Stonehill, L C

    2008-01-01

    Using a single-phase liquid argon detector with a signal yield of 4.85 photoelectrons per keV of electronic-equivalent recoil energy (keVee), we measure the scintillation time dependence of both electronic and nuclear recoils in liquid argon down to 5 keVee. We develop two methods of pulse shape discrimination to distinguish between electronic and nuclear recoils. Using one of these methods, we measure a background and statistics-limited level of electronic recoil contamination to be $7.6\\times10^{-7}$ between 60 and 128 keV of nuclear recoil energy (keVr) for a nuclear recoil acceptance of 50% with no nuclear recoil-like events above 72 keVr. Finally, we develop a maximum likelihood method of pulse shape discrimination using the measured scintillation time dependence and predict the sensitivity to WIMP-nucleon scattering in three configurations of a liquid argon dark matter detector.

  11. Recovery Time Measurements of Silicon Photomultipliers Using a Pulsed Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, L; Curceanu, C; Marton, J; Vidal, A Romero; Scordo, A; Suzuki, K; Doce, O Vazquez

    2015-01-01

    We performed an experimental study to determine the pixel recovery time of various Multi Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) in order to characterize their rate capability and double-hit resolution. The recovery time constant and its dependence on the operating voltage has been evaluated by measuring the photosensor response to two consecutive laser pulses with varying relative time differences of a few ns (2-3 ns) up to some 100 ns using a waveform analysis technique. A Monte Carlo simulation tool is being developed to model the MPPC recovery process and interpret experimental data. In this context, the influence of after-pulsing, cross-talk and dark-noise on the recovery process can be studied.

  12. Note: A method for correction of finite pulse time effects in flash diffusivity measurements of thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Yang, Liping; Zhong, Qiu; Xu, Zijun; Luo, Caiyun

    2016-08-01

    A data correction method that can reduce finite pulse time effects in the flash method is presented in this article. Based on the physical model of the classical flash method, the present method uses the cutoff time moment of laser heating as zero point. This article investigated the case of constant heat flux heating by using the theoretical method and obtained a new calculation formula. The formula was tested in the case where half temperature rise time is less than the pulse time (i.e., τ0/t0.5 > 1), and the result was satisfactory. Theoretically, this method can correct the effect of any finite pulse time and significantly expand the scope of application of the flash method.

  13. Real-time evolvable pulse shaper for radiation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanchares, Juan, E-mail: julandan@dacya.ucm.es [Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/Prof. José García Santesmases s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garnica, Oscar, E-mail: ogarnica@dacya.ucm.es [Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/Prof. José García Santesmases s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Risco-Martín, José L., E-mail: jlrisco@dacya.ucm.es [Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/Prof. José García Santesmases s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ignacio Hidalgo, J., E-mail: hidalgo@dacya.ucm.es [Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), C/Prof. José García Santesmases s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Regadío, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.regadio@insa.es [Área de Tecnologías Electrónicas, Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA), 28850 Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-11-01

    In the last two decades, recursive algorithms for real-time digital pulse shaping in pulse height measurements have been developed and published in number of articles and textbooks. All these algorithms try to synthesize in real time optimum or near optimum shapes in the presence of noise. Even though some of these shapers can be considered effective designs, some side effects like aging cannot be ignored. We may observe that after sensors degradation, the signal obtained is not valid. In this regard, we present in this paper a novel technique that, based on evolvable hardware concepts, is able to evolve the degenerated shaper into a new design with better performance than the original one under the new sensor features.

  14. Rising methane: post-2007 growth, geographic loci, timings and isotopic shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Euan G.; Manning, Martin R.; Dlugokencky, Ed; Lowry, David; Fisher, Rebecca E.; Brownlow, Rebecca

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric methane is rising rapidly again, after a period of stability [1]. NOAA report a global growth rate from 2007-2013 of 5.7±1.2 ppb yr-1, followed by extreme growth of 12.6±0.5 ppb in 2014 and 10.0±0.7 ppb in 2015. Growth has been accompanied by a shift in δ13C(CH4) (a measure of the 13C/12C isotope ratio in methane) to significantly more negative values since 2007. This isotopic shift has been observed in independently calibrated NOAA, Royal Holloway and NIWA-New Zealand measurements: thus the negative trend is real, global, and not a calibration artifact. Fossil fuel methane emissions, which are mostly more positive than atmospheric values, are not driving the rise in methane. Instead, the geographic loci of post-2007 growth, and the timings of the methane rise and isotopic shift suggest growth was dominated by significant increases in biogenic methane emissions, particularly in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere: for example in years with heavy rainfall under the Inter-Tropical Convergence, from wetlands and increased agricultural sources such as ruminants and rice paddies. Changes in the removal rate of methane by the OH radical or other sinks may also have occurred but do not appear fully to explain short term variations in methane isotopes. All these drivers of rising methane - wetlands, ruminants, changing sinks - may reflect underlying decade-long trends in tropical climate: methane may thus be an important climate-change signal. 1. Nisbet, E.G. et al. (2016) Rising atmospheric methane: 2007-2014 growth and isotopic shift, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 30, doi:10.1002/ 2016GB005406.

  15. A real-time n/γ digital pulse shape discriminator based on FPGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiping; Xu, Xiufeng; Cao, Hongrui; Yuan, Guoliang; Yang, Qingwei; Yin, Zejie

    2013-02-01

    A FPGA-based real-time digital pulse shape discriminator has been employed to distinguish between neutrons (n) and gammas (γ) in the Neutron Flux Monitor (NFM) for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The discriminator takes advantages of the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) parallel and pipeline process capabilities to carry out the real-time sifting of neutrons in n/γ mixed radiation fields, and uses the rise time and amplitude inspection techniques simultaneously as the discrimination algorithm to observe good n/γ separation. Some experimental results have been presented which show that this discriminator can realize the anticipated goals of NFM perfectly with its excellent discrimination quality and zero dead time.

  16. A Real-time Single Pulse Detection Algorithm for GPUs

    CERN Document Server

    Adámek, Karel

    2016-01-01

    The detection of non-repeating events in the radio spectrum has become an important area of study in radio astronomy over the last decade due to the discovery of fast radio bursts (FRBs). We have implemented a single pulse detection algorithm, for NVIDIA GPUs, which use boxcar filters of varying widths. Our code performs the calculation of standard deviation, matched filtering by using boxcar filters and thresholding based on the signal-to-noise ratio. We present our parallel implementation of our single pulse detection algorithm. Our GPU algorithm is approximately 17x faster than our current CPU OpenMP code (NVIDIA Titan XP vs Intel E5-2650v3). This code is part of the AstroAccelerate project which is a many-core accelerated time-domain signal processing code for radio astronomy. This work allows our AstroAccelerate code to perform a single pulse search on SKA-like data 4.3x faster than real-time.

  17. Red and blue pulse timing control for pulse width modulation light dimming of light emitting diodes for plant cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Aoi; Taniguchi, Yoshio

    2011-09-02

    A pulse width modulation (PWM) light dimming system containing red and blue light emitting diodes was designed and constructed. Cultivation of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana under various light dimming wave patterns was compared. Control of the pulse timing (phase of wave pattern) between red and blue light in PWM light dimming was examined. Different plant growth was obtained by changing the phase of red and blue pulses. Pulse timing control of PWM light dimming for plant cultivation has the potential to act as a method for probing photosynthesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Time domain simulations of preliminary breakdown pulses in natural lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, B E; Liang, C; Bitzer, P; Christian, H

    2015-01-01

    Lightning discharge is a complicated process with relevant physical scales spanning many orders of magnitude. In an effort to understand the electrodynamics of lightning and connect physical properties of the channel to observed behavior, we construct a simulation of charge and current flow on a narrow conducting channel embedded in three-dimensional space with the time domain electric field integral equation, the method of moments, and the thin-wire approximation. The method includes approximate treatment of resistance evolution due to lightning channel heating and the corona sheath of charge surrounding the lightning channel. Focusing our attention on preliminary breakdown in natural lightning by simulating stepwise channel extension with a simplified geometry, our simulation reproduces the broad features observed in data collected with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array. Some deviations in pulse shape details are evident, suggesting future work focusing on the detailed properties of the stepping mechanism. Key Points Preliminary breakdown pulses can be reproduced by simulated channel extension Channel heating and corona sheath formation are crucial to proper pulse shape Extension processes and channel orientation significantly affect observations PMID:26664815

  19. Time domain simulations of preliminary breakdown pulses in natural lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, B E; Liang, C; Bitzer, P; Christian, H

    2015-06-16

    Lightning discharge is a complicated process with relevant physical scales spanning many orders of magnitude. In an effort to understand the electrodynamics of lightning and connect physical properties of the channel to observed behavior, we construct a simulation of charge and current flow on a narrow conducting channel embedded in three-dimensional space with the time domain electric field integral equation, the method of moments, and the thin-wire approximation. The method includes approximate treatment of resistance evolution due to lightning channel heating and the corona sheath of charge surrounding the lightning channel. Focusing our attention on preliminary breakdown in natural lightning by simulating stepwise channel extension with a simplified geometry, our simulation reproduces the broad features observed in data collected with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array. Some deviations in pulse shape details are evident, suggesting future work focusing on the detailed properties of the stepping mechanism. Preliminary breakdown pulses can be reproduced by simulated channel extension Channel heating and corona sheath formation are crucial to proper pulse shape Extension processes and channel orientation significantly affect observations.

  20. Global Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Level Rise Estimation with Optimal Historical Time Lag Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa M. Aral

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of global temperatures and sea level rise (SLR is important for sustainable development planning of coastal regions of the world and the health and safety of communities living in these regions. In this study, climate change effects on sea level rise is investigated using a dynamic system model (DSM with time lag on historical input data. A time-invariant (TI-DSM and time-variant dynamic system model (TV-DSM with time lag is developed to predict global temperatures and SLR in the 21st century. The proposed model is an extension of the DSM developed by the authors. The proposed model includes the effect of temperature and sea level states of several previous years on the current temperature and sea level over stationary and also moving scale time periods. The optimal time lag period used in the model is determined by minimizing a synthetic performance index comprised of the root mean square error and coefficient of determination which is a measure for the reliability of the predictions. Historical records of global temperature and sea level from 1880 to 2001 are used to calibrate the model. The optimal time lag is determined to be eight years, based on the performance measures. The calibrated model was then used to predict the global temperature and sea levels in the 21st century using a fixed time lag period and moving scale time lag periods. To evaluate the adverse effect of greenhouse gas emissions on SLR, the proposed model was also uncoupled to project the SLR based on global temperatures that are obtained from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC emission scenarios. The projected SLR estimates for the 21st century are presented comparatively with the predictions made in previous studies.

  1. Pulse wave transit time for monitoring respiration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, A; Ahlstrom, C; Lanne, T; Ask, P

    2006-06-01

    In this study, we investigate the beat-to-beat respiratory fluctuations in pulse wave transit time (PTT) and its subcomponents, the cardiac pre-ejection period (PEP) and the vessel transit time (VTT) in ten healthy subjects. The three transit times were found to fluctuate in pace with respiration. When applying a simple breath detecting algorithm, 88% of the breaths seen in a respiration air-flow reference could be detected correctly in PTT. Corresponding numbers for PEP and VTT were 76 and 81%, respectively. The performance during hypo- and hypertension was investigated by invoking blood pressure changes. In these situations, the error rates in breath detection were significantly higher. PTT can be derived from signals already present in most standard monitoring set-ups. The transit time technology thus has prospects to become an interesting alternative for respiration rate monitoring.

  2. Time-resolved temperature and O atom measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in combustible mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanier, Suzanne; Bowman, Sherrie; Burnette, David; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents results of time-resolved rotational temperature measurements, by pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and absolute O atom number density measurements, by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence. The experiments were conducted in nanosecond pulse discharges in H2-O2-Ar and C2H4-O2-Ar mixtures, initially at room temperature, operated at a high pulse repetition rate of 40 kHz, in a plane-to-plane double dielectric barrier geometry at a pressure of 40 Torr. Intensified charge-coupled device images show that O2-Ar and H2-O2-Ar plasmas remain diffuse and volume-filling during the entire burst. Images taken in C2H4-O2-Ar plasma demonstrate significant discharge filamentation and constriction along the center plane and in the corners of the test section. The experimental results demonstrate high accuracy of pure rotational psec CARS for thermometry measurements at low partial pressures of oxygen in nonequilibrium plasmas. The results are compared with kinetic modeling calculations, using two different H2-O2 chemistry and C2H4-O2 chemistry mechanisms. In H2-O2-Ar mixtures, the kinetic modeling predictions are in fairly good agreement with the data, predicting temperature rise and O atom accumulation in long discharge bursts, up to 450 pulses. The results show that adding hydrogen to the mixture results in an additional temperature rise, due to its partial oxidation by radicals generated in the plasma, essentially without chain branching. In C2H4-O2-Ar mixtures, the model consistently underpredicts both temperature and O atom number density. The most likely reason for the difference between the experimental data and model predictions is discharge filamentation developing when ethylene is added to the O2-Ar mixture, at fairly low temperatures.

  3. Evolution of the solar radius during the solar cycle 24 rise time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, Mustapha

    2015-08-01

    One of the real motivations to observe the solar radius is the suspicion that it might be variable. Possible temporal variations of the solar radius are important as an indicator of internal energy storage and as a mechanism for changes in the total solar irradiance. Measurements of the solar radius are of great interest within the scope of the debate on the role of the Sun in climate change. Solar energy input dominates the surface processes (climate, ocean circulation, wind, etc.) of the Earth. Thus, it appears important to know on what time scales the solar radius and other fundamental solar parameters, like the total solar irradiance, vary in order to better understand and assess the origin and mechanisms of the terrestrial climate changes. The current solar cycle is probably going to be the weakest in 100 years, which is an unprecedented opportunity for studying the variability of the solar radius during this period. This paper presents more than four years of solar radius measurements obtained with a satellite and a ground-based observatory during the solar cycle 24 rise time. Our measurements show the benefit of simultaneous measurements obtained from ground and space observatories. Space observations are a priori most favourable, however, space entails also technical challenges, a harsh environment, and a finite mission lifetime. The evolution of the solar radius during the rising phase of the solar cycle 24 show small variations that are out of phase with solar activity.

  4. Individual differences in processing pitch contour and rise time in adults: A behavioral and electrophysiological study of Cantonese tone merging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jinghua; Law, Sam-Po

    2016-06-01

    One way to understand the relationship between speech perception and production is to examine cases where the two dissociate. This study investigates the hypothesis that perceptual acuity reflected in event-related potentials (ERPs) to rise time of sound amplitude envelope and pitch contour [reflected in the mismatch negativity (MMN)] may associate with individual differences in production among speakers with otherwise comparable perceptual abilities. To test this hypothesis, advantage was taken of an on-going sound change-tone merging in Cantonese, and compared the ERPs between two groups of typically developed native speakers who could discriminate the high rising and low rising tones with equivalent accuracy but differed in the distinctiveness of their production of these tones. Using a passive oddball paradigm, early positive-going EEG components to rise time and MMN to pitch contour were elicited during perception of the two tones. Significant group differences were found in neural responses to rise time rather than pitch contour. More importantly, individual differences in efficiency of tone discrimination in response latency and magnitude of neural responses to rise time were correlated with acoustic measures of F0 offset and rise time differences in productions of the two rising tones.

  5. Changes across time in the temporal responses of auditory nerve fibers stimulated by electric pulse trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Charles A; Hu, Ning; Zhang, Fawen; Robinson, Barbara K; Abbas, Paul J

    2008-03-01

    Most auditory prostheses use modulated electric pulse trains to excite the auditory nerve. There are, however, scant data regarding the effects of pulse trains on auditory nerve fiber (ANF) responses across the duration of such stimuli. We examined how temporal ANF properties changed with level and pulse rate across 300-ms pulse trains. Four measures were examined: (1) first-spike latency, (2) interspike interval (ISI), (3) vector strength (VS), and (4) Fano factor (FF, an index of the temporal variability of responsiveness). Data were obtained using 250-, 1,000-, and 5,000-pulse/s stimuli. First-spike latency decreased with increasing spike rate, with relatively small decrements observed for 5,000-pulse/s trains, presumably reflecting integration. ISIs to low-rate (250 pulse/s) trains were strongly locked to the stimuli, whereas ISIs evoked with 5,000-pulse/s trains were dominated by refractory and adaptation effects. Across time, VS decreased for low-rate trains but not for 5,000-pulse/s stimuli. At relatively high spike rates (>200 spike/s), VS values for 5,000-pulse/s trains were lower than those obtained with 250-pulse/s stimuli (even after accounting for the smaller periods of the 5,000-pulse/s stimuli), indicating a desynchronizing effect of high-rate stimuli. FF measures also indicated a desynchronizing effect of high-rate trains. Across a wide range of response rates, FF underwent relatively fast increases (i.e., within 100 ms) for 5,000-pulse/s stimuli. With a few exceptions, ISI, VS, and FF measures approached asymptotic values within the 300-ms duration of the low- and high-rate trains. These findings may have implications for designs of cochlear implant stimulus protocols, understanding electrically evoked compound action potentials, and interpretation of neural measures obtained at central nuclei, which depend on understanding the output of the auditory nerve.

  6. Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the person's heart is pumping. Pulse ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  7. Slope Transit Time (STT): A Pulse Transit Time Proxy requiring Only a Single Signal Fiducial Point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Paul S

    2016-11-01

    A novel pulse transit time proxy measurement, slope transit time (STT), is proposed in this letter. STT is based on geometrical considerations of the arriving photoplethysmographic cardiac waveform and its computation requires only the measurement of a single point on each cardiac beat arriving at the peripheral site. This novel transit time is explained conceptually and its implementation illustrated through its application to signals from respiratory effort, Müller maneuver, and obstructive sleep apnea trials.

  8. Time domain simulations of preliminary breakdown pulses in natural lightning

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, B E; Bitzer, P; Christian, H

    2016-01-01

    Lightning discharge is a complicated process with relevant physical scales spanning many orders of magnitude. In an effort to understand the electrodynamics of lightning and connect physical properties of the channel to observed behavior, we construct a simulation of charge and current flow on a narrow conducting channel embedded in three-dimensional space with the time domain electric field integral equation, the method of moments, and the thin-wire approximation. The method includes approximate treatment of resistance evolution due to lightning channel heating and the corona sheath of charge surrounding the lightning channel. Focusing our attention on preliminary breakdown in natural lightning by simulating stepwise channel extension with a simplified geometry, our simulation reproduces the broad features observed in data collected with the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array. Some deviations in pulse shape details are evident, suggesting future work focusing on the detailed properties of the stepping mecha...

  9. Toward a Smartphone Application for Estimation of Pulse Transit Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulse transit time (PTT is an important physiological parameter that directly correlates with the elasticity and compliance of vascular walls and variations in blood pressure. This paper presents a PTT estimation method based on photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGi. The method utilizes two opposing cameras for simultaneous acquisition of PPGi waveform signals from the index fingertip and the forehead temple. An algorithm for the detection of maxima and minima in PPGi signals was developed, which includes technology for interpolation of the real positions of these points. We compared our PTT measurements with those obtained from the current methodological standards. Statistical results indicate that the PTT measured by our proposed method exhibits a good correlation with the established method. The proposed method is especially suitable for implementation in dual-camera-smartphones, which could facilitate PTT measurement among populations affected by cardiac complications.

  10. Weighing Scale-Based Pulse Transit Time is a Superior Marker of Blood Pressure than Conventional Pulse Arrival Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephanie L.-O.; Carek, Andrew M.; Kim, Chang-Sei; Ashouri, Hazar; Inan, Omer T.; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-12-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is being widely pursued for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) monitoring. Most efforts have employed the time delay between ECG and finger photoplethysmography (PPG) waveforms as a convenient surrogate of PTT. However, these conventional pulse arrival time (PAT) measurements include the pre-ejection period (PEP) and the time delay through small, muscular arteries and may thus be an unreliable marker of BP. We assessed a bathroom weighing scale-like system for convenient measurement of ballistocardiography and foot PPG waveforms – and thus PTT through larger, more elastic arteries – in terms of its ability to improve tracking of BP in individual subjects. We measured “scale PTT”, conventional PAT, and cuff BP in humans during interventions that increased BP but changed PEP and smooth muscle contraction differently. Scale PTT tracked the diastolic BP changes well, with correlation coefficient of ‑0.80 ± 0.02 (mean ± SE) and root-mean-squared-error of 7.6 ± 0.5 mmHg after a best-case calibration. Conventional PAT was significantly inferior in tracking these changes, with correlation coefficient of ‑0.60 ± 0.04 and root-mean-squared-error of 14.6 ± 1.5 mmHg (p < 0.05). Scale PTT also tracked the systolic BP changes better than conventional PAT but not to an acceptable level. With further development, scale PTT may permit reliable, convenient measurement of BP.

  11. HERA Transverse Polarimeter absolute scale and error by rise-time calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Karibian, V

    2003-01-01

    We give the results of an analysis of some 18 rise-time calibrations which are based on data collected in 1996/97. Such measurements are used to determine the absolute polarization scale of the transverse electron beam polarimeter (TPOL) at HERA. The results of the 1996/97 calibrations are found to be in good agreement with earlier calibrations of the TPOL performed in 1994 with errors of 1.2% and 1.1%. Based on these calibrations and a comparison with measurements from the longitudinal polarimeter (LPOL) at HERA carried out over a two-months period in 2000, we obtain a mean LPOL/TPOL ratio of 1.018. Both polarimeters are found to agree with each other within their overall errors of about 2% each.

  12. Propagation of time-truncated Airy-type pulses in media with quadratic and cubic dispersion

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, José Angel Borda; Shaarawi, Amr; Besieris, Ioannis M

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe analytically the propagation of Airy-type pulses truncated by a finite-time aperture when second and third order dispersion effects are considered. The mathematical method presented here, based on the superposition of exponentially truncated Airy pulses, is very effective, allowing us to avoid the use of time-consuming numerical simulations. We analyze the behavior of the time truncated Ideal-Airy pulse and also the interesting case of a time truncated Airy pulse with a "defect" in its initial profile, which reveals the self-healing property of this kind of pulse solution.

  13. Device for Writing the Time Tail from Spallation Neutron Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langan, P. (Paul); Schoenborn, Benno P.; Langan, P. (Paul); Schoenborn, Benno P.; Daemen, L. L. (Luc L.)

    2001-01-01

    Recent work at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), has shown that there are large gains in neutron beam intensity to be made by using coupled moderators at spallation neutron sources. Most of these gains result from broadening the pulse-width in time. However the accompanying longer exponential tail at large emission times can be a problem in that it introduces relatively large beam-related backgrounds at high resolutions. We have designed a device that can reshape the moderated neutron beam by cutting the time-tail so that a sharp time resolution can be re-established without a significant loss in intensity. In this work the basic principles behind the tail-cutter and some initial results of Monte Carlo simulations are described. Unwanted neutrons in the long time-tail are diffracted out of the transmitted neutron beam by a nested stack of aperiodic multi-layers, rocking at the same frequency as the source. Nested aperiodic multi-layers have recently been used at X-ray sources and as band-pass filters in quasi-Laue neutron experiments at reactor neutron sources. Optical devices that rock in synchronization with a pulsed neutron beam are relatively new but are already under construction at LANSCE. The tail-cutter described here is a novel concept that uses existing multi-layer technology in a new way for spallation neutrons. Coupled moderators in combination with beam shaping devices offer the means of increasing flux whilst maintaining a sharp time distribution. A prototype device is being constructed for the protein crystallography station at LANSCE. The protein crystallography station incorporates a water moderator that has been judiciously coupled in order to increase the flux over neutron energies that are important to structural biology (3-80meV). This development in moderator design is particularly important because protein crystallography is flux limited and because conventional ambient water and cold hydrogen moderators do not provide relatively

  14. Measuring pulse times of arrival from broadband pulsar observations

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, K; Cognard, I; Stappers, B W; Verbiest, J P W; Lee, K J; Champion, D J; Kramer, M; Freire, P C C; Karuppusamy, R

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, instrumentation enabling pulsar observations with unprecedentedly high fractional bandwidth has been under development which can be used to substantially improve the precision of pulsar timing experiments. The traditional template-matching method used to calculate pulse times-of-arrival (ToAs), may not function effectively on these broadband data due to a variety of effects such as diffractive scintillation in the interstellar medium, profile variation as a function of frequency, dispersion measure (DM) evolution and so forth. In this paper, we describe the channelised Discrete Fourier Transform method that can greatly mitigate the influence of the aforementioned effects when measuring ToAs from broadband timing data. The method is tested on simulated data, and its potential in improving timing precision is shown. We further apply the method to PSR J1909$-$3744 data collected at the Nan\\c{c}ay Radio Telescope with the Nan\\c{c}ay Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument. We demonstrate a removal ...

  15. Assessing the Impacts of Sea Level Rise on Salinity Intrusion and Transport Time Scales in a Tidal Estuary, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cheng Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change has resulted in a gradual sea level rise. Sea level rise can cause saline water to migrate upstream in estuaries and rivers, thereby threatening freshwater habitat and drinking-water supplies. In the present study, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was established to simulate salinity distributions and transport time scales in the Wu River estuary of central Taiwan. The model was calibrated and verified using tidal amplitudes and phases, time-series water surface elevation and salinity distributions in 2011. The results show that the model simulation and measured data are in good agreement. The validated model was then applied to calculate the salinity distribution, flushing time and residence time in response to a sea level rise of 38.27 cm. We found that the flushing time for high flow under the present condition was lower compared to the sea level rise scenario and that the flushing time for low flow under the present condition was higher compared to the sea level rise scenario. The residence time for the present condition and the sea level rise scenario was between 10.51 and 34.23 h and between 17.11 and 38.92 h, respectively. The simulated results reveal that the residence time of the Wu River estuary will increase when the sea level rises. The distance of salinity intrusion in the Wu River estuary will increase and move further upstream when the sea level rises, resulting in the limited availability of water of suitable quality for municipal and industrial uses.

  16. Dependence of a railgun operation on a current rise time; Railgun dosa no kudo denryu tachiagari izonsei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsuki, S.; Sueda, T.; Akiyama, H. [Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-08-20

    Railguns are facilities to accelerate projectiles up to several km/s by the electromagnetic force due to a driving current. A variety of current waveforms are used for railguns developed in the world. This paper describes the dependence of a railgun operation on a rising rate of the driving current. The use of the exploding wire as an opening switch enables to change the rise time of the driving current. A secondary arc is likely to appear and the erosion on a rail surface is more severe when the current with a short rise time is used. According to the non-dimensional railgun plasma simulation, the current with a short rise time heats up the plasma so fast that plenty of particles ablated from the bore surface, which seem to be the cause of the secondary arc, increase rapidly in the early phase of acceleration. 18 refs., 14 figs.

  17. Reaction time to changes in the tempo of acoustic pulse trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. P.; Warm, J. S.; Westendorf, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the ability of human observers to detect accelerations and decelerations in the rate of presentation of pulsed stimuli, i.e., changes in the tempo of acoustic pulse trains. Response times to accelerations in tempo were faster than to decelerations. Overall speed of response was inversely related to the pulse repetition rate.

  18. Synchronization of time-delay coupled pulse oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinshov, V.V., E-mail: vklin@mail.r [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov Str., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Nekorkin, V.I. [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov Str., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2011-01-15

    Research highlights: Oscillators can be synchronized via coupling with arbitrary large delay. Imposing of coupling delay may either result in delay-induced synchronization or delay-induced desynchronization. In-phase and antiphase synchronization zones alternate in parameter space. Two types of transitions between the in-phase and antiphase synchronization, i.e. phase-flip bifurcation and soft switching. - Abstract: We present a detailed study of the dynamics of pulse oscillators with time-delayed coupling. We get the return maps, obtain strict solutions and analyze their stability. For the case of two oscillators, a periodical structure of synchronization regions is found in parameter space, and the regions corresponding to in-phase and antiphase regimes alternate with growth of time delay. Two types of switching between in-phase and antiphase regimes are studied. We also show that for different parameters coupling delay may have synchronizing or desynchronizing effect. Another novel result is that phase locked regimes exist for arbitrary large values. The specificity of system dynamics with large delay is studied.

  19. Pulse processing routines for neutron time-of-flight data

    CERN Document Server

    Žugec, P; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Vlachoudis, V; Sabate-Gilarte, M; Stamatopoulos, A; Wright, T; Lerendegui-Marco, J; Mingrone, F; Ryan, J A; Warren, S G; Tsinganis, A; Barbagallo, M

    2016-01-01

    A pulse shape analysis framework is described, which was developed for n_TOF-Phase3, the third phase in the operation of the n_TOF facility at CERN. The most notable feature of this new framework is the adoption of generic pulse shape analysis routines, characterized by a minimal number of explicit assumptions about the nature of pulses. The aim of these routines is to be applicable to a wide variety of detectors, thus facilitating the introduction of the new detectors or types of detectors into the analysis framework. The operational details of the routines are suited to the specific requirements of particular detectors by adjusting the set of external input parameters. Pulse recognition, baseline calculation and the pulse shape fitting procedure are described. Special emphasis is put on their computational efficiency, since the most basic implementations of these conceptually simple methods are often computationally inefficient.

  20. All-digital pulse-expansion-based CMOS digital-to-time converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Chu, Che-Hsun

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a new all-digital CMOS digital-to-time converter (DTC) based on pulse expansion. Pulse expansion is achieved using an all-digital pulse-mixing scheme that can effectively improve the timing resolution and enable the DTC to be concise. Without requiring the Vernier principle or a costly digital-to-analog converter, the DTC comprises a pulse generator for generating a pulse, a pulse-expanding circuit (PEC) for programming timing generation, and a time subtractor for removing the time width of the pulse. The PEC comprises only a delay chain composed of proposed pulse-expanding units and a multiplexer. For accuracy enhancement, a pulse neutralization technique is presented to eliminate undesirable pulse variation. A 4-bit converter was fabricated in a 0.35-μ m Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company CMOS process and had a small area of nearly 0.045 mm2. Six chips were tested, all of which exhibited an improved resolution (approximately 16 ps) and low integral nonlinearity (less than ±0.4 least significant bit). The power consumption was 0.2 mW when the sample rate was 1M samples/s and the voltage supply was 3.3 V. The proposed DTC not only has favorable cost and power but also achieves an acceptable resolution without requiring an advanced CMOS process. This study is the first to use pulse expansion in digital-to-time conversion.

  1. Time resolved measurements of the CF{sub 2} rotational temperature in pulsed fluorocarbon rf plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, O; Stepanov, S; Pfafferott, M; Meichsner, J [Institute of Physics, University of Greifswald, Domstrasse 10a, D-17498, Greifswald (Germany)

    2006-11-01

    Knowledge of the absolute densities of small radicals like CF, CF{sub 2} and CF{sub 3} in fluorocarbon plasmas is essential for a fundamental understanding of plasma chemical processes and plasma surface interaction. Infrared absorption spectroscopy by means of tunable diode lasers (IR-TDLAS) was established and widely used for density measurements in the last decade. The often unknown parameter in the calculation of absolute radical densities from a measured absorption of a single line is the rotational temperature. In particular, a strong dependence of the line strength on rotational temperature has a significant influence on density calculation. In this paper we report on measurements of the CF{sub 2} rotational temperature in capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2} plasmas (CCP) with rf (13.56 MHz) powers up to 200 W. Rotational temperatures in continuous and pulsed modes of the discharge were found to be between 300 and 450 K. Furthermore, first measurements of the time dependence of the rotational temperature in pulsed rf plasma are presented. The rotational temperature rises in the plasma phase within 0.1 s and goes down again to the temperature of the background gas in the plasma pause within 0.5 s. It is also shown that accurate density measurements of the radicals by means of single line absorption need correct information about the rotational temperature and careful selection of a suitable absorption line.

  2. Timed Rise from Floor as a Predictor of Disease Progression in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Elena S.; Coratti, Giorgia; Sormani, Maria Pia; Messina, Sonia; Pane, Marika; D'Amico, Adele; Colia, Giulia; Fanelli, Lavinia; Berardinelli, Angela; Gardani, Alice; Lanzillotta, Valentina; D’Ambrosio, Paola; Petillo, Roberta; Cavallaro, Filippo; Frosini, Silvia; Bello, Luca; Bonfiglio, Serena; De Sanctis, Roberto; Rolle, Enrica; Forcina, Nicola; Magri, Francesca; Vita, Gianluca; Palermo, Concetta; Donati, Maria Alice; Procopio, Elena; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Baranello, Giovanni; Mongini, Tiziana; Pini, Antonella; Battini, Roberta; Pegoraro, Elena; Torrente, Yvan; Previtali, Stefano C.; Bruno, Claudio; Politano, Luisa; Comi, Giacomo P.; D’Angelo, Maria Grazia; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of timed items, and more specifically, of the time to rise from the floor, has been reported as an early prognostic factor for disease progression and loss of ambulation. The aim of our study was to investigate the possible effect of the time to rise from the floor test on the changes observed on the 6MWT over 12 months in a cohort of ambulant Duchenne boys. Subjects and methods A total of 487 12-month data points were collected from 215 ambulant Duchenne boys. The age ranged between 5.0 and 20.0 years (mean 8.48 ±2.48 DS). Results The results of the time to rise from the floor at baseline ranged from 1.2 to 29.4 seconds in the boys who could perform the test. 49 patients were unable to perform the test at baseline and 87 at 12 month The 6MWT values ranged from 82 to 567 meters at baseline. 3 patients lost the ability to perform the 6mwt at 12 months. The correlation between time to rise from the floor and 6MWT at baseline was high (r = 0.6, p<0.01). Conclusions Both time to rise from the floor and baseline 6MWT were relevant for predicting 6MWT changes in the group above the age of 7 years, with no interaction between the two measures, as the impact of time to rise from the floor on 6MWT change was similar in the patients below and above 350 m. Our results suggest that, time to rise from the floor can be considered an additional important prognostic factor of 12 month changes on the 6MWT and, more generally, of disease progression. PMID:26982196

  3. Timed Rise from Floor as a Predictor of Disease Progression in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: An Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena S Mazzone

    Full Text Available The role of timed items, and more specifically, of the time to rise from the floor, has been reported as an early prognostic factor for disease progression and loss of ambulation. The aim of our study was to investigate the possible effect of the time to rise from the floor test on the changes observed on the 6MWT over 12 months in a cohort of ambulant Duchenne boys.A total of 487 12-month data points were collected from 215 ambulant Duchenne boys. The age ranged between 5.0 and 20.0 years (mean 8.48 ±2.48 DS.The results of the time to rise from the floor at baseline ranged from 1.2 to 29.4 seconds in the boys who could perform the test. 49 patients were unable to perform the test at baseline and 87 at 12 month The 6MWT values ranged from 82 to 567 meters at baseline. 3 patients lost the ability to perform the 6mwt at 12 months. The correlation between time to rise from the floor and 6MWT at baseline was high (r = 0.6, p<0.01.Both time to rise from the floor and baseline 6MWT were relevant for predicting 6MWT changes in the group above the age of 7 years, with no interaction between the two measures, as the impact of time to rise from the floor on 6MWT change was similar in the patients below and above 350 m. Our results suggest that, time to rise from the floor can be considered an additional important prognostic factor of 12 month changes on the 6MWT and, more generally, of disease progression.

  4. Calibration of ionization energy loss at relativistic rise with STAR Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Yichun; Bichsel, Hans; Dong, Xin; Fachini, Patricia; Fisyak, Yuri; Kocolosky, Adam; Mohanty, Bedanga; Netrakanti, Pawan; Ruan, Lijuan; Suarez, Maria Cristina; Tang, Zebo; van Buren, Gene; Xu, Zhangbu

    2008-01-01

    We derive a method to improve particle identification (PID) at high transverse momentum ($p_T$) using the relativistic rise of the ionization energy loss ($rdE/dx$) when charged particles traverse the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) at STAR. Electrons triggered and identified by the Barrel Electro-Magnetic Calorimeter (BEMC), pure protons and pions from $\\Lambda\\to p+\\pi^{-}$ ($\\bar{\\Lambda}\\to \\bar{p}+\\pi^{+}$), and $K^{0}_{S}\\to\\pi^{+}+\\pi^{-}$ decays are used to obtain the $dE/dx$ value and its width at given $\\beta\\gamma=p/m$. We found that the deviation of the $dE/dx$ from the Bichsel function can be up to $0.4\\sigma$ ($\\sim3%$) in p+p collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV taken and subsequently calibrated in year 2005. The deviation is approximately a function of $\\beta\\gamma$ independent of particle species and can be described with a function of $f(x) = A+\\frac{B}{C+x^{2}}$. The deviations obtained with this method are used to re-calibrate the data sample from p+p collision for physics analysis of ident...

  5. Time resolved ESR spectroscopy. ESR pulse radiolysis equipment with microsecond time resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckert, D.; Mehler, K. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Leipzig. Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung)

    1983-01-01

    Time resolved ESR experiments allow the study of the chemical kinetics as well as spin dynamics of free radicals in the liquid phase. Starting from the physical and chemical requirements the experimental parameters of a universal time resolved ESR spectrometer are derived. The main components of the ESR pulse radiolysis equipment are described and their technical parameters are discussed. By two experimental examples it is shown that at a time resolution of 0.3 ..mu..s a sensitivity of c/sub min/ = 10/sup -6/ mol dm/sup -3/ for simple radical spectra can be achieved.

  6. Time-evolution of Peak Energy and Luminosity Relation within Pulses for GRB 061007: Probing Fireball Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ohno, Masanori; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Tashiro, Makoto; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Yujin E

    2008-01-01

    We perform a time-resolved spectral analysis of bright, long Gamma-ray burst GRB 061007 using Suzaku/WAM and Swift/BAT. Thanks to the large effective area of the WAM, we can investigate the time evolution of the spectral peak energy, Et_peak and the luminosity Lt_iso with 1-sec time resolution, and we find that luminosity Lt_iso with 1-sec time resolution, and we find that the time-resolved pulses also satisfy the Epeak-Liso relation, which was found for the time-averaged spectra of other bursts, suggesting the same physical conditions in each pulse. Furthermore, the initial rising phase of each pulse could be an outlier of this relation with higher Et_peak value by about factor 2. This difference could suggest that the fireball radius expands by a factor of 2-4 and/or bulk Lorentz factor of the fireball is decelerated by a factor of 4 during the initial phase, providing a new probe of the fireball dynamics in real time.

  7. Pulsed Green Laser for Time Resolved Raman Spectroscopy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort will demonstrate the feasibility of developing a fully packaged, efficient, short pulse, high repetition rate frequency doubled micro-chip...

  8. Diversity of Decline-Rate-Corrected Type 1a Supernova Rise times:One Mode or Two?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strovink, Mark

    2007-05-01

    B-band light-curve rise times for eight unusually well-observed nearby Type Ia supernova (SNe) are fitted by a newly developed template-building algorithm, using light-curve functions that are smooth, flexible, and free of potential bias from externally derived templates and other prior assumptions. From the available literature, photometric BVRI data collected over many months, including the earliest points, are reconciled, combined, and fitted to a unique time of explosion for each SN. On average, after they are corrected for light-curve decline rate, three SNe rise in 18.81 {+-} 0.36 days, while five SNe rise in 16.64 {+-} 0.21 days. If all eight SNe are sampled from a single parent population (a hypothesis not favored by statistical tests), the rms intrinsic scatter of the decline-rate-corrected SN rise time is 0.96{sub -0.25}{sup +0.52} days--a first measurement of this dispersion. The corresponding global mean rise time is 17.44 {+-} 0.39 days, where the uncertainty is dominated by intrinsic variance. This value is {approx}2 days shorter than two published averages that nominally are twice as precise, though also based on small samples. When comparing high-z to low-z SN luminosities for determining cosmological parameters, bias can be introduced by use of a light-curve template with an unrealistic rise time. If the period over which light curves are sampled depends on z in a manner typical of current search and measurement strategies, a two-day discrepancy in template rise time can bias the luminosity comparison by {approx}0.03 magnitudes.

  9. Effect of inter-pulse delay time on production and size properties of colloidal nanoparticles prepared by collinear double-pulse laser ablation in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, Behzad; Mahdieh, Mohammah Hossein

    2016-08-01

    The influence of inter-pulse delay times (0-20 ns) between two collinear sequential nanosecond pulses on the production and size properties (mean size and size distribution) of colloidal nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser ablation of a silver target in a distilled water medium has been studied. Various laser fluences at different inter-pulse delay times between two collinear pulses were used. Furthermore, for a better understanding of the effect of the double-pulse and single-pulse mode, experiments were performed. The characterization of the synthesized colloidal nanoparticles was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Our results showed that 5 ns time-delayed double-pulse laser ablation results in the production of nanoparticles with the highest concentration among the other time-delayed ablation experiments and even more than single-pulse-mode experiments. It also found that using a double-pulse approach with inter-pulse delay times in the range of 0-20 ns leads to the production of nanoparticles with smaller mean sizes and narrower size distributions in comparison to single-pulse-mode laser ablation. The effect of time overlapping between two pulses in the case of double-pulse ablation was analyzed.

  10. Left ventricular ejection time, not heart rate, is an independent correlate of aortic pulse wave velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Paolo; Palombo, Carlo; Salvi, Giovanni Matteo; Labat, Carlos; Parati, Gianfranco; Benetos, Athanase

    2013-12-01

    Several studies showed a positive association between heart rate and pulse wave velocity, a sensitive marker of arterial stiffness. However, no study involving a large population has specifically addressed the dependence of pulse wave velocity on different components of the cardiac cycle. The aim of this study was to explore in subjects of different age the link between pulse wave velocity with heart period (the reciprocal of heart rate) and the temporal components of the cardiac cycle such as left ventricular ejection time and diastolic time. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was assessed in 3,020 untreated subjects (1,107 men). Heart period, left ventricular ejection time, diastolic time, and early-systolic dP/dt were determined by carotid pulse wave analysis with high-fidelity applanation tonometry. An inverse association was found between pulse wave velocity and left ventricular ejection time at all ages (pulse wave velocity and heart period was also found, with the exception of the youngest subjects (P = 0.20). A significant positive correlation was also found between pulse wave velocity and dP/dt (P pulse wave velocity at all ages, whereas the contribution of heart period no longer became significant. Our data demonstrate that pulse wave velocity is more closely related to left ventricular systolic function than to heart period. This may have methodological and pathophysiological implications.

  11. Early-phase photometry and spectroscopy of transitional Type Ia SN 2012ht: Direct constraint on the rise time

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanaka, Masayuki; Kawabata, Miho; Tanaka, Masaomi; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Ueno, Issei; Masumoto, Kazunari; Kawabata, Koji S; Itoh, Ryosuke; Moritani, Yuki; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Arai, Akira; Honda, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Koichi; Kabashima, Fumio; Matsumoto, Katsura; Nogami, Daisaku; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2014-01-01

    We report photometric and spectroscopic observations of the nearby Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) 2012ht from $-15.8$ days to $+49.1$ days after $B$-band maximum. The decline rate of the light curve is $\\Delta m_{15}$($B$)$=1.39~\\pm~0.05$ mag, which is intermediate between normal and subluminous SNe Ia, and similar to that of the `transitional' Type Ia SN 2004eo. The spectral line profiles also closely resemble those of SN 2004eo. We were able to observe SN 2012ht at very early phase, when it was still rising and was about three magnitudes fainter than at the peak. The rise time to the $B$-band maximum is estimated to be $17.6 \\pm 0.5$ days and the time of the explosion is MJD $56277.98 \\pm 0.13$. SN 2012ht is the first transitional SN Ia whose rise time is directly measured without using light curve templates, and the fifth SN Ia overall. This rise time is consistent with those of the other four SNe within the measurement error, even including the extremely early detection of SN 2013dy. The rising part of the lig...

  12. An in-ear pulse wave velocity measurement system using heart sounds as time reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusche R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulse wave measurements provide vital information in medical diagnosis. For this reason, a measurement system is developed for determining the transient time of the pulse wave between the heart and the ear. To detect pressure variations in the sealed ear canal, caused by the arriving pulse wave, an in-ear sensor is developed which uses heart sounds as time reference. Furthermore, for extracting the heart sounds from the pressure measurements and calculating the pulse wave transient time, a MATLAB-based algorithm is described. An embedded microcontroller based measurement board is presented, which realizes an interface between the sensor and the computer for signal processing.

  13. Direct space-time observation of pulse tunneling in an electromagnetic band gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Serge; Haché, Alain; Winful, Herbert G.

    2007-08-01

    We present space-time-resolved measurements of electromagnetic pulses tunneling through a coaxial electromagnetic band gap structure. The results show that during the tunneling process the field distribution inside the barrier is an exponentially decaying standing wave whose amplitude increases and decreases as it slowly follows the temporal evolution of the input pulse. At no time is a pulse maximum found inside the barrier, and hence the transmitted peak is not the incident peak that has propagated to the exit. The results support the quasistatic interpretation of tunneling dynamics and confirm that the group delay is not the traversal time of the input pulse peak.

  14. Dynamical Solution of the SGEMP Electron Boundary Layer for Linearly Rising and Constant X-Ray Time Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    The time dependent solution is presented for the dynamical behavior of the one dimensional electron boundary layer formed when X-rays knock photoelectrons out of a material surface. The X-ray flux is taken to be either linearly rising in time or constant in time . Two electron energy spectra are considered-exponential and linear-times-exponential. The electrons are assumed to have a cos theta

  15. Sub-nanosecond time resolved light emission study for diffuse discharges in air under steep high voltage pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardiveau, P.; Magne, L.; Marode, E.; Ouaras, K.; Jeanney, P.; Bournonville, B.

    2016-10-01

    Pin-to-plane discharges in centimetre air gaps and standard conditions of pressure and temperature are generated under very high positive nanosecond scale voltage pulses. The experimental study is based on recordings of sub-nanosecond time resolved and Abel-processed light emission profiles and their complete correlation to electrical current waveforms. The effects of the voltage pulse features (amplitude between 20 and 90 kV, rise time between 2 and 5.2 ns, and time rate between 4 and 40 kV · ns‑1) and the electrode configuration (gap distance between 10 and 30 mm, pin radius between 10 and 200 µm, copper, molybdenum or tungsten pin material) are described. A three time period development can be found: a glow-like structure with monotonic light profiles during the first 1.5 ns whose size depends on time voltage rate, a shell-like structure with bimodal profiles whose duration and extension in space depends on rise time, and either diffuse or multi-channel regime for the connection to the cathode plane according to gap distance. The transition of the light from monotonic to bimodal patterns reveals the relative effects and dynamics of streamer space charge and external laplacian field. A classical 2D-fluid model for streamer propagation has been used and adapted for very high and steep voltage pulses. It shows the formation of a strong space charge (streamer) very close to the pin, but also a continuity of emission between the pin and the streamer, and electric fields higher than the critical ionization field (28 kV · cm‑1 in air) almost in the whole gap and very early in the discharge propagation.

  16. Time for pulse traversal through slabs of dispersive and negative ($\\epsilon$, $\\mu$) materials

    CERN Document Server

    Nanda, Lipsa

    2007-01-01

    The traversal times for an electromagnetic pulse traversing a slab of dispersive and dissipative material with negative dielectric permittivity ($\\epsilon$) and magnetic permeability ($\\mu$) have been calculated by using the average flow of electromagnetic energy in the medium. The effects of bandwidth of the pulse and dissipation in the medium have been investigated. While both large bandwidth and large dissipation have similar effects in smoothening out the resonant features that appear due to Fabry-P\\'{e}rot resonances, large dissipation can result in very small or even negative traversal times near the resonant frequencies. We have also investigated the traversal times and Wigner delay times for obliquely incident pulses and evanescent pulses. The coupling to slab plasmon polariton modes in frequency ranges with negative $\\epsilon$ or $\\mu$ is shown to result in large traversal times at the resonant conditions. We also find that the group velocity mainly contributes to the delay times for pulse propagatin...

  17. Generation of a single attosecond pulse from an overdense plasma surface driven by a laser pulse with time-dependent polarization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Mu-Hua; Zhang Qiu-Ju

    2011-01-01

    The influence of time-dependent polarization on attosecond pulse generation from an overdense plasma surface driven by laser pulse is discussed analytically and numerically.The results show that the frequency of controlling pulse controls the number and interval of the generated attosecond pulse,that the generation moment of the attosecond pulse is dominated by the phase difference between the controlling and driving pulses,and that the amplitude of the controlling pulse affects the intensity of the attosecond pulse.Using the method of time-dependent polarization,a "single" ultra-strong attosecond pulse with duration τ≈8.6 as and intensity I≈3.08×1020 W·cm-2 can be generated.

  18. EARLY-PHASE PHOTOMETRY AND SPECTROSCOPY OF TRANSITIONAL TYPE Ia SN 2012ht: DIRECT CONSTRAINT ON THE RISE TIME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, Masayuki; Nogami, Daisaku [Kwasan Observatory, Kyoto University, 17-1 Kitakazan-ohmine-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Maeda, Keiichi [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kawabata, Miho; Masumoto, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Katsura [Astronomical Institute, Osaka Kyoiku University, Asahigaoka, Kashiwara, Osaka 582-8582 (Japan); Tanaka, Masaomi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Takaki, Katsutoshi; Ueno, Issei; Itoh, Ryosuke [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kawabata, Koji S.; Moritani, Yuki; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Michitoshi [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Arai, Akira; Honda, Satoshi [Center for Astronomy, University of Hyogo, 407-2 Nishigaichi, Sayo-cho, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Koichi [Kurume, Fukuoka-ken (Japan); Kabashima, Fujio, E-mail: yamanaka@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Miyaki-cho, Saga-ken (Japan)

    2014-02-20

    We report photometric and spectroscopic observations of the nearby Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) 2012ht from –15.8 days to +49.1 days after B-band maximum. The decline rate of the light curve is Δm {sub 15}(B) = 1.39 ± 0.05 mag, which is intermediate between normal and subluminous SNe Ia, and similar to that of the ''transitional'' Type Ia SN 2004eo. The spectral line profiles also closely resemble those of SN 2004eo. We were able to observe SN 2012ht at a very early phase, when it was still rising and was about three magnitudes fainter than at the peak. The rise time to the B-band maximum is estimated to be 17.6 ± 0.5 days and the time of the explosion is MJD 56277.98 ± 0.13. SN 2012ht is the first transitional SN Ia whose rise time is directly measured without using light curve templates, and the fifth SN Ia overall. This rise time is consistent with those of the other four SNe within the measurement error, even including the extremely early detection of SN 2013dy. The rising part of the light curve can be fitted by a quadratic function, and shows no sign of a shock-heating component due to the interaction of the ejecta with a companion star. The rise time is significantly longer than that inferred for subluminous SNe such as SN 1991bg, which suggests that a progenitor and/or explosion mechanism of transitional SNe Ia are more similar to normal SNe Ia rather than to subluminous SNe Ia.

  19. Time evolution of the diffraction pattern of an ultrashort laser pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrancois, M; Pereira, S

    2003-05-19

    An analytical expression for the time evolution of the diffraction pattern of an ultrashort laser pulse passing through a circular aperture is obtained in the Fresnel regime. The diffraction is not constant in time as the pulse travels through the aperture. This may have implications in experiments involving fast dynamics. Examples of the evolution of the diffraction pattern are given.

  20. Time-resolved pulse propagation in a strongly scattering material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Patrick M.; Imhof, Arnout; Bret, B.P.J.; Gomez Rivas, J.; Gomez Rivas, Jaime; Lagendijk, Aart

    2003-01-01

    Light transport in macroporous gallium phosphide, perhaps the strongest nonabsorbing scatterer of visible light, is studied using phase-sensitive femtosecond pulse interferometry. Phase statistics are measured at optical wavelengths in both reflection and transmission and compared with theory. The d

  1. Time-lens based optical packet pulse compression and retiming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laguardia Areal, Janaina; Hu, Hao; Palushani, Evarist;

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new optical circuit that performs both pulse compression and frame synchronization and retiming. Our design aims at directly multiplexing several 10G Ethernet data packets (frames) to a high-speed OTDM link. This scheme is optically transparent and does not require clock...

  2. High-performance TDM demultiplexing of coherent Nyquist pulses using time-domain orthogonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harako, Koudai; Otuya, David Odeke; Kasai, Keisuke; Hirooka, Toshihiko; Nakazawa, Masataka

    2014-12-01

    We propose a simple and high-performance scheme for demultiplexing coherent Nyquist TDM signals by photo-mixing on a photo-detector with Nyquist LO pulses. This scheme takes advantage of the time-domain orthogonality of Nyquist pulses, which enables high-SNR demultiplexing and homodyne detection simultaneously in spite of a strong overlap with adjacent pulses in the time domain. The feasibility of this scheme is demonstrated through a demultiplexing experiment employing 80 Gbaud, 64 QAM Nyquist pulse OTDM signals. This scheme exhibits excellent demultiplexing performance with a much simpler configuration than a conventional ultrafast all-optical sampling scheme.

  3. Time Delay of a Chirped Light Pulse After Transmitting a Fabry-Pérot Interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏光琼; 吴正茂; 陈建国

    2002-01-01

    We have theoretically investigated the time delay of a chirped light pulse, defined as the temporal difference of for an interferometer of known parameters, the chirp of the light pulse makes the time delay become intensively smaller. The mismatch between the central frequency of the light pulse and the resonance frequency of the interferometer also has an influence on the time delay. Under some circumstances, this mismatch will induce a time delay smaller than t0 that is defined as the one-way traverse time of the light inside the interferometer.

  4. Time-dependent Bragg diffraction and short-pulse reflection by one-dimensional photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    André, Jean-michel

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependence of the Bragg diffraction by one-dimensional photonic crystals and its influence on the short pulse reflection are studied in the framework of the coupled- wave theory. The indicial response of the photonic crystal is calculated and it appears that it presents a time-delay effect with a transient time conditioned by the extinction length. A numerical simulation is presented for a Bragg mirror in the x-ray domain and a pulse envelope modelled by a sine-squared shape. The potential consequences of the time-delay effect in time-dependent optics of short-pulses are emphasized.

  5. Interaction-powered supernovae: Rise-time vs. peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Ofek, E O; Tal, D; Sullivan, M; Gal-Yam, A; Kulkarni, S R; Nugent, P E; Ben-Ami, S; Bersier, D; Cao, Y; Cenko, S B; De Cia, A; Filippenko, A V; Fransson, C; Kasliwal, M M; Laher, R; Surace, J; Quimby, R; Yaron, O

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limit...

  6. Learning Novel Phonological Representations in Developmental Dyslexia: Associations with Basic Auditory Processing of Rise Time and Phonological Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Jennifer M.; Goswami, Usha

    2010-01-01

    Across languages, children with developmental dyslexia are known to have impaired lexical phonological representations. Here, we explore associations between learning new phonological representations, phonological awareness, and sensitivity to amplitude envelope onsets (rise time). We show that individual differences in learning novel phonological…

  7. Ultra-Short Pulse Tracking by Using Wavelength Dispersion for a Short-Time Optical Buffer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsuyoshi; Konishi; Hideaki; Furukawa; Kousuke; Asano; Kazuyoshi; Itoh

    2003-01-01

    To synchronize a control signal with a packet signal in response to changing timing jitter, we investigate ultra-short pulse tracking by using wavelength dispersion for a short-time optical buffer in an optical router.

  8. Active cancellation - A means to zero dead-time pulse EPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, John M.; Barnes, Ryan P.; Keller, Timothy J.; Kaufmann, Thomas; Han, Songi

    2015-12-01

    The necessary resonator employed in pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) rings after the excitation pulse and creates a finite detector dead-time that ultimately prevents the detection of signal from fast relaxing spin systems, hindering the application of pulse EPR to room temperature measurements of interesting chemical or biological systems. We employ a recently available high bandwidth arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to produce a cancellation pulse that precisely destructively interferes with the resonant cavity ring-down. We find that we can faithfully detect EPR signal at all times immediately after, as well as during, the excitation pulse. This is a proof of concept study showcasing the capability of AWG pulses to precisely cancel out the resonator ring-down, and allow for the detection of EPR signal during the pulse itself, as well as the dead-time of the resonator. However, the applicability of this approach to conventional EPR experiments is not immediate, as it hinges on either (1) the availability of low-noise microwave sources and amplifiers to produce the necessary power for pulse EPR experiment or (2) the availability of very high conversion factor micro coil resonators that allow for pulse EPR experiments at modest microwave power.

  9. Self-referenced characterization of space-time couplings in near single-cycle laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Witting, T; Barilot, T; Greening, D; Matia-Hernando, P; Walke, D; Marangos, J P; Tisch, J W G

    2016-01-01

    We report on the characterization of space-time couplings in high energy sub-2-cycle 770nm laser pulses using a self-referencing single-shot method. Using spatially-encoded arrangement filter-based spectral phase interferometry for direct electric fi?eld reconstruction (SEA-F-SPIDER) we characterize few-cycle pulses with a wave-front rotation of 2.8x?10^11 rev/sec (1.38 mrad per half-cycle) and pulses with pulse front tilts ranging from to -0.33 fs/um to -3.03 fs/um.

  10. Laser ranging by time-of-flight measurement of femtosecond light pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Jin

    2014-04-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) measurement of femtosecond light pulses was investigated for laser ranging of long distances with sub-micrometer precision in the air. The bandwidth limitation of the photo-detection electronics used in timing femtosecond pulses was overcome by adopting a type-II nonlinear second-harmonic crystal that permits producing the balanced optical cross-correlation signal between two overlapped light pulses. This method offered a sub-femtosecond timing resolution in determining the temporal offset between two pulses through lock-in control of the pulse repetition rate with reference to the atomic clock. The exceptional ranging capability was verified by measuring various distances from 1.5 m to 700 m. This method is found suited for terrestrial land surveying and space missions of formation-flying satellites.

  11. High precision laser ranging by time-of-flight measurement of femtosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohyung; Lee, Keunwoo; Lee, Sanghyun; Kim, Seung-Woo; Kim, Young-Jin

    2012-06-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) measurement of femtosecond light pulses was investigated for laser ranging of long distances with sub-micrometer precision in the air. The bandwidth limitation of the photo-detection electronics used in timing femtosecond pulses was overcome by adopting a type-II nonlinear second-harmonic crystal that permits the production of a balanced optical cross-correlation signal between two overlapping light pulses. This method offered a sub-femtosecond timing resolution in determining the temporal offset between two pulses through lock-in control of the pulse repetition rate with reference to the atomic clock. The exceptional ranging capability was verified by measuring various distances of 1.5, 60 and 700 m. This method is found well suited for future space missions based on formation-flying satellites as well as large-scale industrial applications for land surveying, aircraft manufacturing and shipbuilding.

  12. Uppermost Pleistocene drowned coralgal bank detailed bathymetry along the South Texas shelf edge: record of episodic rapid sea-level rise during last deglaciation between Meltwater Pulses IA and IB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, P.; Droxler, A. W.; Nittrouer, J. A.; Tunnell, W.; Shirley, T. C.

    2013-12-01

    . relative to the terrace edges of some banks margin most likely correspond to spurs and grooves, common to modern coralgal reef high energy margins. Because the depths to crest of nine out of these ten drowned coralgal banks lie between 58-61 m, a 2-3 m narrow depth range, their demise had to be synchronous and most likely occurred at the end of the Younger Dryas/Meltwater Pulse IB. Quantitave analyses of the high resolution bathymetric data sets clearly display four distinct terraces at 62-63, 66-67, 70-71 and 73-74 m, each one defined by a 2-4 m steep step. The surface area of these terraces shrunk through time, representing the typical back-stepping morphologies of coralgal reefs struggling to keep up with episodes of rapid sea-level rise between Melt Water Pulses 1A and 1B. These unique observations help understanding that the main ice sheets melted not gradually between the two main melt water pulses but most likely by successive small collapses. Future drilling will help constrain the amplitude and timing of these small scale melt water pulses.

  13. MR pulse sequences for selective relaxation time measurements: a phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Jensen, M

    1990-01-01

    a Siemens Magnetom wholebody magnetic resonance scanner operating at 1.5 Tesla was used. For comparison six imaging pulse sequences for relaxation time measurements were tested on the same phantom. The spectroscopic pulse sequences all had an accuracy better than 10% of the reference values....

  14. Delay time dependence of thermal effect of combined pulse laser machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Boshi; Jin, Guangyong; Ma, Yao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    The research focused on the effect of delay time in combined pulse laser machining on the material temperature field. Aiming at the parameter optimization of pulse laser machining aluminum alloy, the combined pulse laser model based on heat conduction equation was introduced. And the finite element analysis software, COMSOL Multiphysics, was also utilized in the research. Without considering the phase transition process of aluminum alloy, the results of the numerical simulation was shown in this paper. By the simulation study of aluminum alloy's irradiation with combined pulse, the effect of the change in delay time of combined pulse on the temperature field of the aluminum alloy and simultaneously the quantized results under the specific laser spot conditions were obtained. Based on the results, several conclusions could be reached, the delay time could affect the rule of temperature changing with time. The reasonable delay time controlling would help improving the efficiency. In addition, when the condition of the laser pulse energy density is constant, the optimal delay time depends on pulse sequence.

  15. A Fault Feature Extraction Method for Rolling Bearing Based on Pulse Adaptive Time-Frequency Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinbao Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shock pulse method is a widely used technique for condition monitoring of rolling bearing. However, it may cause erroneous diagnosis in the presence of strong background noise or other shock sources. Aiming at overcoming the shortcoming, a pulse adaptive time-frequency transform method is proposed to extract the fault features of the damaged rolling bearing. The method arranges the rolling bearing shock pulses extracted by shock pulse method in the order of time and takes the reciprocal of the time interval between the pulse at any moment and the other pulse as all instantaneous frequency components in the moment. And then it visually displays the changing rule of each instantaneous frequency after plane transformation of the instantaneous frequency components, realizes the time-frequency transform of shock pulse sequence through time-frequency domain amplitude relevancy processing, and highlights the fault feature frequencies by effective instantaneous frequency extraction, so as to extract the fault features of the damaged rolling bearing. The results of simulation and application show that the proposed method can suppress the noises well, highlight the fault feature frequencies, and avoid erroneous diagnosis, so it is an effective fault feature extraction method for the rolling bearing with high time-frequency resolution.

  16. Combined single-pulse holography and time-resolved laser schlieren for flow visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burner, A. W.; Goad, W. K.

    1981-01-01

    A pulsed ruby laser and continuous-wave argon ion laser were used in a combined setup at the Langley Expansion Tube for single pulse holography and time resolved laser schlieren with a common optical axis. The systems can be operated simultaneously for a single run. For a single frame, the pulsed holographic setup offers the options of shadowgraph, Schlieren, and interferometry from the reconstructed hologram as well as the advantage of post-run sensitivity adjustments. For flow establishment studies the time resolved laser Schlieren provides visualization of the flow field every 12.5 microns for up to 80 frames with an exposure time per frame of 5.4 microns.

  17. All optical implementation of a time-domain ptychographic pulse reconstruction set-up

    CERN Document Server

    Spangenberg, Dirk-Mathys; Rohwer, Erich; Feurer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    An all optical implementation of pulse reconstruction using time-domain ptychography is demonstrated showing excellent results. Setup and reconstruction are easy to implement and a number of drawbacks found in other second order techniques are removed, such as the beam splitter modifying the pulse under consideration, the time ambiguity, or the strict correspondence between time delay increment and temporal resolution. Ptychography generally performs superior to algorithms based on general projections, requires considerable less computational effort and is much less susceptible to noise.

  18. Rise time reduction of thermal actuators operated in air and water through optimized pre-shaped open-loop driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, T.; Doll, J. C.; Loizeau, F.; Hosseini, N.; Peng, A. W.; Fantner, G. E.; Ricci, A. J.; Pruitt, B. L.

    2017-04-01

    Electrothermal actuators have many advantages compared to other actuators used in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). They are simple to design, easy to fabricate and provide large displacements at low voltages. Low voltages enable less stringent passivation requirements for operation in liquid. Despite these advantages, thermal actuation is typically limited to a few kHz bandwidth when using step inputs due to its intrinsic thermal time constant. However, the use of pre-shaped input signals offers a route for reducing the rise time of these actuators by orders of magnitude. We started with an electrothermally actuated cantilever having an initial 10-90% rise time of 85 μs in air and 234 μs in water for a standard open-loop step input. We experimentally characterized the linearity and frequency response of the cantilever when operated in air and water, allowing us to obtain transfer functions for the two cases. We used these transfer functions, along with functions describing desired reduced rise-time system responses, to numerically simulate the required input signals. Using these pre-shaped input signals, we improved the open-loop 10-90% rise time from 85 μs to 3 μs in air and from 234 μs to 5 μs in water, an improvement by a factor of 28 and 47, respectively. Using this simple control strategy for MEMS electrothermal actuators makes them an attractive alternative to other high speed micromechanical actuators such as piezoelectric stacks or electrostatic comb structures which are more complex to design, fabricate, or operate.

  19. Interaction-powered supernovae: rise-time versus peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Tal, David; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; De Cia, Annalisa; Yaron, Ofer [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Cao, Yi [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Nugent, Peter E. [Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bersier, David [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Fransson, Claes [Department of Astronomy, The Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kasliwal, Mansi M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason [Spitzer Science Center, MS 314-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Quimby, Robert [Kavli IPMU (WPI), The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-06-20

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock-breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a specific relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limits on the shock-breakout velocity. The lower limits on the shock velocity we find are consistent with what is expected for SNe (i.e., ∼10{sup 4} km s{sup –1}). This supports the suggestion that the early-time light curves of SNe IIn are caused by shock breakout in a dense CSM. We note that such a correlation can arise from other physical mechanisms. Performing such a test on other classes of SNe (e.g., superluminous SNe) can be used to rule out the interaction model for a class of events.

  20. The Rise of Euroscepticism in Times of Crisis. Evidence from the 2008–2013 Eurobarometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Bârgăoanu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The financial and economic turmoil within the European Union has significantly impacted upon the way in which the European citizens assess the advantages of EU membership and the future of the integration process. Intensely preoccupied with the economic problems, the EU leadership has lost sight of the constant decrease of public support and the increasing lack of citizens’ confidence in the Union. This paper seeks to show the dynamics of public opinion between 2008 and 2013 with a special focus on the rise of Euroscepticism, using secondary data analysis of standard Eurobarometers. Our longitudinal analysis reveals the dynamics of EU-related attitudes and perceptions before, during, and after most of events that are usually labeled under the rather generic term “crisis”.

  1. Detection of Underwater Carrier-Free Pulse based on Time-Frequency Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlu Ni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carrier-free short pulse widely employed in UWB radar is brought into high-resolution sonar system, which has unique advantages: attaining more target information, restraining fluctuation of reverberation envelop efficiently in short-range detection and achieving accurate estimation. In essence such pulse is transiently short in time domain and wide in frequency domain, and as such it is difficult to separate signal to noise based on Fourier Transform spectrum. So as to seek for detection methods of short pulse, minor differences of energy distribution of time-frequency characteristics are presented on three time-frequency methods such as Short Time Fourier Transform, Wavelet Transform and Hilbert-Huang Transform. With these results, a tri-channel detector is established for such underwater short pulse in noise environment, which is generally suitable not only for detection module of underwater sonar system but also that of radar system.

  2. Enhancement of Time-Reversal Subwavelength Wireless Transmission Using Pulse Shaping

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Shuai; Zou, Lianfeng; Wang, Bingzhong; Caloz, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    A novel time-reversal subwavelength transmission technique, based on pulse shaping circuits (PSCs), is proposed. Compared to previously reported approaches, this technique removes the need for complex or electrically large electromagnetic structures by generating channel diversity via pulse shaping instead of angular spectrum transformation. Moreover, the pulse shaping circuits (PSCs) are based on Radio Analog Signal Processing (R-ASP), and therefore do not suffer from the well-known issues of digital signal processing in ultrafast regimes. The proposed PSC time-reversal systems is mathematically shown to offer high channel discrimination under appropriate PSC design conditions, and is experimentally demonstrated for the case of two receivers.

  3. Time-resolved detection of relative intensity squeezed nanosecond pulses in a 87Rb vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Agha, Imad H; Messin, Gaetan; Grangier, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    We present experimental studies on the generation and detection of pulsed, relative-intensity squeezed light in a warm rubidium vapor. The noise correlations between a pulsed probe beam and its conjugate -generated through nearly-degenerate four-wave mixing in a double-lambda system- are studied via time-resolved balanced detection. We observe -0.96 dB of time-resolved relative intensity squeezing with 50 nanosecond pulses at 1 MHz repetition rate. (-1.34 dB corrected for loss).

  4. Time-resolved detection of relative intensity squeezed nanosecond pulses in a Rb87 vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Agha, Imad H; Glorieux, Quentin; Coudreau, Thomas; Grangier, Philippe; Messin, Gaetan

    2011-01-01

    We present theoretical and experimental results on the generation and detection of pulsed, relative-intensity squeezed light in a hot Rb87 vapor. The intensity noise correlations between a pulsed probe beam and its conjugate, generated through nearly-degenerate four-wave mixing in a double-lambda system, are studied numerically and measured experimentally via time-resolved balanced detection. We predict and observe about -1 dB of time-resolved relative intensity squeezing with 50 nanosecond pulses at 1 MHz repetition rate. (-1.34 dB corrected for loss).

  5. Visualization and analysis of modulated pulses in magnetic resonance by joint time-frequency representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köcher, S S; Heydenreich, T; Glaser, S J

    2014-10-17

    We study the utility of joint time-frequency representations for the analysis of shaped or composite pulses for magnetic resonance. Such spectrograms are commonly used for the visualization of shaped laser pulses in optical spectroscopy. This intuitive representation provides additional insight compared to conventional approaches, which exclusively show either temporal or spectral information. We focus on the short-time Fourier transform, which provides not only amplitude but also phase information. The approach is illustrated for broadband inversion pulses, multiple quantum excitation and broadband heteronuclear decoupling. The physical interpretation and validity of the approach is discussed.

  6. Influence of voltage rise time on phase locking by priming effect in weakly resonant relativistic backward wave oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dewen; Deng, Yuqun; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Wu, Ping; Chen, Changhua

    2017-05-01

    Phase locking is the key point of coherent power combination, which is very important for the development of high power microwave sources. In this paper, theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations investigate the influence of the diode voltage rise time on phase locking by the priming effect in a weakly resonant relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO). When the diode voltage rise time becomes long and the final output frequency remains unchanged, the initial operation frequency may fluctuate around a value which is not equal to the final output frequency. Moreover, this state may last for several nanoseconds and then jumps to the final output frequency, which is very important for phase locking. Besides, it is suggested that, due to the weak resonance of the RF cavity without the electron beam, the microwave signal with frequency which is much lower than the final output frequency is usually excited at the beginning of the starting process. Finally, it is found that, when the injected frequency approaches the frequency of the initial microwave signal, the phase locking by the priming effect in the RBWO with long voltage rise time is noticeably improved, and the starting process becomes more rapid as well. The simulation results agree well with theoretical analysis.

  7. Influence of Surface Resistivity and Temperature on Variation with Time of Current Pulses in Air at Optimum Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.G. Pimpale

    1977-04-01

    Full Text Available The variation of discharge current pulses with the surface nature of electrodes has been investigated by producing discharge in the intense ionizing zone of two ozonizers (A&B containing pure, dry air at a pressure of 4 & 10mm of mercury respectively. The course of reaction in the tube A showed that the periodic rise and fall of discharge counts through a series of recurrences whose amplitude varied randomly. During this reaction, steady potential, temperature of the electrolytic bath, counting time and pulse height were kept fixed. The phenomenon obtained for both the tubes is produced within a critical range of conditions. The results have been interpreted on the basis of activated adsorption at a temperature of 90 degree and 100 degree Centigrade and discussed on the theoretical grounds of change of surface resistivity upon the glass walls. Use of different coatings on annular surface in the same system with appropriate levels of electrolytic solution for a definite value of height-pulses and temperature, etc. shows significant variations in the discharge counts.

  8. Time-resolved measurement of single pulse femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kafka, K. R. P.; D. R. Austin; Li, H.; Yi, A; Cheng, J.; Chowdhury, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved diffraction microscopy technique has been used to observe the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) from the interaction of a single femtosecond laser pulse (pump) with a nano-scale groove mechanically formed on a single-crystal Cu substrate. The interaction dynamics (0-1200 ps) was captured by diffracting a time-delayed, frequency-doubled pulse from nascent LIPSS formation induced by the pump with an infinity-conjugate microscopy setup. The LIPSS ripple...

  9. Correlations between pulsed X-ray flux and radio arrival time in the Vela pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Lommen, A N; Gwinn, C; Arzoumanian, Z; Harding, A; Strickman, M S; Dodson, R; McCulloch, P; Moffett, D

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of simultaneous observations of the Vela pulsar in X-rays and radio from the RXTE satellite and the Mount Pleasant Radio Observatory in Tasmania. We sought correlations between the Vela's X-ray and radio flux densities and radio arrival times on a pulse by pulse basis. We found significantly higher flux density in Vela's main X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrived early. This excess flux shifts to the 'trough' following the 2nd X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrive later. We suggest that the mechanism producing the radio pulses is intimately connected to the mechanism producing X-rays. Current models using resonant absorption in the outer magnetosphere as a cause of the radio emission, and less directly of the X-ray emission, are explored as a possible explanation for the correlation.

  10. Time and Frequency Localized Pulse Shape for Resolution Enhancement in STFT-BOTDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linqing Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-Time Fourier Transform-Brillouin Optical Time-Domain Reflectometry (STFT-BOTDR implements STFT over the full frequency spectrum to measure the distributed temperature and strain along the optic fiber, providing new research advances in dynamic distributed sensing. The spatial and frequency resolution of the dynamic sensing are limited by the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR and the Time-Frequency (T-F localization of the input pulse shape. T-F localization is fundamentally important for the communication system, which suppresses interchannel interference (ICI and intersymbol interference (ISI to improve the transmission quality in multicarrier modulation (MCM. This paper demonstrates that the T-F localized input pulse shape can enhance the SNR and the spatial and frequency resolution in STFT-BOTDR. Simulation and experiments of T-F localized different pulses shapes are conducted to compare the limitation of the system resolution. The result indicates that rectangular pulse should be selected to optimize the spatial resolution and Lorentzian pulse could be chosen to optimize the frequency resolution, while Gaussian shape pulse can be used in general applications for its balanced performance in both spatial and frequency resolution. Meanwhile, T-F localization is proved to be useful in the pulse shape selection for system resolution optimization.

  11. Phase retrieval and time-frequency methods in the measurement of ultrashort laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLong, K.W.; Fittinghoff, D.N.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    Recently several techniques have become available to measure the time- (or frequency-) dependent intensity and phase of ultrashort laser pulses. One of these, Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG), is rigorous and has achieved single-laser-shot operation. FROG combines the concepts of time-frequency analysis in the form of spectrogram generation (in order to create a two-dimensional problem), and uses a phase-retrieval-based algorithm to invert the experimental data to yield the intensity and phase of the laboratory laser pulse. In FROG it is easy to generate a spectrogram of the unknown signal, and inversion of the spectrogram to recover the signal is the main goal. Because the temporal width of a femtosecond laser pulse is much shorter than anything achievable by electronics, FROG uses the pulse to measure itself. In FROG, the laser pulse is split into two replicas of itself by a partially reflecting beamsplitter, and the two replicas interact with each other in a medium with an instantaneous nonlinear-optical response. This interaction generates a signal field that is then frequency-resolved using a spectrometer. The spectrum of the signal field is measured for all relevant values of the temporal delay between the two pulses. Here, the authors employ FROG and FROG related techniques to measure the time-dependent intensity and phase of an ultrashort laser pulse.

  12. Time-of-flight measurement with femtosecond pulses for high precision ranging lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Kim, Y.-J.; Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Kim, S.-W.

    2010-10-01

    The time-of-flight of light pulses has long been used as a direct measure of distance, but the state-of-the-art measurement precision using conventional light pulses or microwaves reaches only several hundreds of micromeres. This is due to the bandwidth limit of the photodetectors available today, which is in the picosecond range at best. Here, we improve the time-of-flight precision to the nanometer regime by timing femtosecond pulses through phase-locking control of the pulse repetition rate using the optical cross-correlation technique that exploits a second-harmonic birefringence crystal and a balance photodetector. The enhanced capability is maintained at long range without periodic ambiguity, being well suited to terrestrial lidar applications such as geodetic surveying, range finders and absolute altimeters. This method could also be applied to future space missions of formation-flying satellites for synthetic aperture imaging and remote experiments related to the general relativity theory.

  13. Pulse on Pulse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik; Carlson, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Pulse on Pulse” investigates the relation between signifying processes and non-signifying material dynamism in the installation Pulse Room (2006-) by Mexican Canadian artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer. In Pulse Room the sense of pulse is ambiguous. Biorhythms are transmitted from the pulsing energy...... and pulsating ‘room’. Hence, the visitors in Pulse Room are invited into a complex scenario that continuously oscillates between various aspects of signification (the light bulbs representing individual lives; the pulse itself as the symbolic ‘rhythm of life’) and instants of pure material processuality...... a multilayered sense of time and space that is central to the sensory experience of Pulse Room as a whole. Pulse Room is, at the very same time, an anthropomorfized archive of a past intimacy and an all-encompassing immersive environment modulating continuously in real space-time....

  14. A Real-Time Terahertz Time-Domain Polarization Analyzer with 80-MHz Repetition-Rate Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Tachizaki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a real-time terahertz time-domain polarization analyzer by using 80-MHz repetition-rate femtosecond laser pulses. Our technique is based on the spinning electro-optic sensor method, which we recently proposed and demonstrated by using a regenerative amplifier laser system; here we improve the detection scheme in order to be able to use it with a femtosecond laser oscillator with laser pulses of a much higher repetition rate. This improvement brings great advantages for realizing broadband, compact and stable real-time terahertz time-domain polarization measurement systems for scientific and industrial applications.

  15. A real-time terahertz time-domain polarization analyzer with 80-MHz repetition-rate femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shinichi; Yasumatsu, Naoya; Oguchi, Kenichi; Takeda, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Tachizaki, Takehiro

    2013-03-11

    We have developed a real-time terahertz time-domain polarization analyzer by using 80-MHz repetition-rate femtosecond laser pulses. Our technique is based on the spinning electro-optic sensor method, which we recently proposed and demonstrated by using a regenerative amplifier laser system; here we improve the detection scheme in order to be able to use it with a femtosecond laser oscillator with laser pulses of a much higher repetition rate. This improvement brings great advantages for realizing broadband, compact and stable real-time terahertz time-domain polarization measurement systems for scientific and industrial applications.

  16. Time-optimal excitation of maximum quantum coherence: Physical limits and pulse sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köcher, S. S.; Heydenreich, T.; Zhang, Y.; Reddy, G. N. M.; Caldarelli, S.; Yuan, H.; Glaser, S. J.

    2016-04-01

    Here we study the optimum efficiency of the excitation of maximum quantum (MaxQ) coherence using analytical and numerical methods based on optimal control theory. The theoretical limit of the achievable MaxQ amplitude and the minimum time to achieve this limit are explored for a set of model systems consisting of up to five coupled spins. In addition to arbitrary pulse shapes, two simple pulse sequence families of practical interest are considered in the optimizations. Compared to conventional approaches, substantial gains were found both in terms of the achieved MaxQ amplitude and in pulse sequence durations. For a model system, theoretically predicted gains of a factor of three compared to the conventional pulse sequence were experimentally demonstrated. Motivated by the numerical results, also two novel analytical transfer schemes were found: Compared to conventional approaches based on non-selective pulses and delays, double-quantum coherence in two-spin systems can be created twice as fast using isotropic mixing and hard spin-selective pulses. Also it is proved that in a chain of three weakly coupled spins with the same coupling constants, triple-quantum coherence can be created in a time-optimal fashion using so-called geodesic pulses.

  17. Gender Differences in Time Use among Adolescents in Developing Countries: Implications of Rising School Enrollment Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Cynthia B.; Grant, Monica; Ritchie, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    This comparative analysis of gender differences in time use among adolescents uses surveys from five developing countries and is motivated by an interest in gender role socialization and gendered patterns of behavior during adolescence. Exploring differences in work (both noneconomic household work and labor market work) and leisure time among…

  18. Protecting and accelerating adiabatic passage with time-delayed pulse sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Sampedro, Pablo; Sola, Ignacio R

    2016-01-01

    Using numerical simulations of two-photon electronic absorption with femtosecond pulses in Na$_2$ we show that: i) it is possible to avoid the characteristic saturation or dumped Rabi oscillations in the yield of absorption by time-delaying the laser pulses; ii) it is possible to accelerate the onset of adiabatic passage by using the vibrational coherence starting in a wave packet; and iii) it is possible to prepare the initial wave packet in order to achieve full state-selective transitions with broadband pulses. The findings can be used, for instance, to achieve ultrafast adiabatic passage by light-induced potentials and understand its intrinsic robustness.

  19. TIME INTERVAL APPROACH TO THE PULSED NEUTRON LOGGING METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵经武; 苏为宁

    1994-01-01

    The time interval of neibouring neutrons emitted from a steady state neutron source can be treated as that from a time-dependent neutron source,In the rock space.the neutron flux is given by the neutron diffusion equation and is composed of an infinite number of “modes”,EaCh“mode”,is composed of two die-away curves.The delay action has been discussed and used to measure the time interval with only one detector in the experiment,Nuclear reactions with the time distribution due to different types of radiations observed in the neutron well-logging methods are presented with a view to getting the rock nuclear parameters from the time interval technique.

  20. Time-resolved homodyne characterization of individual quadrature-entangled pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Wenger, J; Tualle-Brouri, R; Grangier, P; Wenger, Jerome; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Grangier, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    We describe a simple and efficient setup to generate and characterize femtosecond quadrature-entangled pulses. Quantum correlations equivalent to about 2.5 dB squeezing are efficiently and easily reached using the non-degenerate parametric amplification of femtosecond pulses through a single-pass in a thin (0.1 mm) potassium niobate crystal. The entangled pulses are then individually sampled to characterize the non-separability and the entropy of formation of the states. The complete experiment is analysed in the time-domain, from the pulsed source of quadrature entanglement to the time-resolved homodyne detection. This particularity allows for applications in quantum communication protocols using continuous-variable entanglement.

  1. AN INVESTIGATION ON PHOTODIODE SWITCHING TIMES FOR PULSED HIGH RADIANT POWERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem ÖZÜTÜRK

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In many applications the light impinging on photodiode surface is pulsed. The change in parameter values in the equivalent circuit of photodiode is important if the amplitude of light pulses are large. In this situation, the change of parameter values with the amplitude of light pulse is nonlinear. Because of this, the nonlinear model of photodiode has been used in this search. By the reasons of photoconductive operation mode is a fast operation, the photoconductive circuit has been examined. In this study, according to the nonlinear behavior of photodiode at pulsed high radiant powers the changes of switching times have been investigated by using SPICE program and the changing of switching times with increasing radiant power has been showed.

  2. Quasi-real-time photon pulse duration measurement by analysis of FEL radiation spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, Robin, E-mail: robin.engel@uni-oldenburg.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Institut für Laser und Optik, Hochschule Emden/Leer, University of Applied Sciences, Constantiaplatz 4, D-26723 Emden (Germany); Düsterer, Stefan; Brenner, Günter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Teubner, Ulrich [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Institut für Laser und Optik, Hochschule Emden/Leer, University of Applied Sciences, Constantiaplatz 4, D-26723 Emden (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    Considering the second-order spectral correlation function of SASE-FEL radiation allows a real-time observation of the photon pulse duration during spectra acquisition. For photon diagnostics at free-electron lasers (FELs), the determination of the photon pulse duration is an important challenge and a complex task. This is especially true for SASE FELs with strongly fluctuating pulse parameters. However, most techniques require an extensive experimental setup, data acquisition and evaluation time, limiting the usability in all-day operation. In contrast, the presented work uses an existing approach based on the analysis of statistical properties of measured SASE FEL spectra and implements it as a software tool, integrated in FLASH’s data acquisition system. This allows the calculation of the average pulse durations from a set of measured spectral distributions with only seconds of delay, whenever high-resolution spectra are recorded.

  3. Generation of time-dependent ultra-short optical pulse trains in the presence of self-steepening effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Xian-Qiong; Xiang An-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Starting from the extended nonlinear Schrodinger equation in which the self-steepening effect is included, the evolution and the splitting processes of continuous optical wave whose amplitude is perturbed into time related ultra-short optical pulse trains in an optical fibre are numerically simulated by adopting the split-step Fourier algorithm. The results show that the self-steepening effect can cause the characteristic of the pulse trains to vary with time, which is different from the self-steepening-free case where the generated pulse trains consist of single pulses which are identical in width, intensity, and interval, namely when pulses move a certain distance, they turn into the pulse trains within a certain time range. Moreover, each single pulse may split into several sub-pulses. And as timc gocs on, the number of the sub-pulses will decrease gradually and the pulse width and the pulse intcnsity will change too. With the increase of the self-steepening parameter, the distance needed to generate time-dependent pulse trains will shorten. In addition, for a large self-steepening parameter and at the distance where more sub-pulses appear, the corresponding frequency spectra of pulse trains are also wider.

  4. Timing of meltwater pulse 1a and climate responses to meltwater injections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanford, Jennifer D.; Rohling, Eelco J.; Hunter, Sally E.

    2006-01-01

    The temporal relationship between meltwater pulse 1a (mwp-1a) and the climate history of the last deglaciation remains a subject of debate. By combining the Greenland Ice Core Project d18O ice core record on the new Greenland ice core chronology 2005 timescale with the U/Th-dated Barbados coral...... record, we conclusively derive that mwp-1a did not coincide with the sharp Bølling warming but instead with the abrupt cooling of the Older Dryas. To evaluate whether there is a relationship between meltwater injections, North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation, and climate change, we present a high...... rises, and yet these periods were characterized by intense NADW slowdowns/shutdowns. Clearly, deepwater formation and climate are not simply controlled by the magnitude or rate of meltwater addition. Instead, our results emphasize that the location of meltwater pulses may be more important, with NADW...

  5. Time-domain radio pulses from particle showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Muniz, Jaime [Depto. de Fisica de Particulas and Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Romero-Wolf, Andres, E-mail: rw.andres@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Zas, Enrique [Depto. de Fisica de Particulas and Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2012-01-11

    The time-domain properties of the far-field coherent radio emission from electromagnetic showers are studied in depth. A purely time-domain technique for mapping the electromagnetic fields of charged tracks is developed. The method is applied to the ZHS shower code to produce electric fields. It is demonstrated that the technique is equivalent to the frequency domain methods used in the ZHS code and produces consistent results. In addition, a model for mapping the longitudinal charge profile of a shower to a time-domain electromagnetic field is developed. It is shown that the model is in good agreement to the results of shower simulation.

  6. Time resolved measurement of film growth during reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) of titanium nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Mitschker, Felix; Benedikt, Jan; Maszl, Christian; von Keudell, Achim

    2013-01-01

    The growth rate during reactive high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) of titanium nitride is measured with a temporal resolution of up to 25 us using a rotating shutter concept. According to that concept a 200 um slit is rotated in front of the substrate synchronous with the HIPIMS pulses. Thereby, the growth flux is laterally distributed over the substrate. By measuring the resulting deposition profile with profilometry and with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the temporal variation of the titanium and nitrogen growth flux per pulse is deduced. The analysis reveals that film growth occurs mainly during a HIPIMS pulse, with the growth rate following the HIPIMS phases ignition, current rise, gas rarefaction, plateau and afterglow. The growth fluxes of titanium and nitrogen follow slightly different behaviors with titanium dominating at the beginning of the HIPIMS pulse and nitrogen at the end of the pulse. This is explained by the gas rarefaction effect resulting in a dense initial metal plasma and...

  7. Experimental demonstration of sub-Fourier structures in time--frequency measurement of light pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Praxmeyer, L; Radzewicz, C; Wodkiewicz, K; Praxmeyer, Ludmila; Wasylczyk, Piotr; Radzewicz, Czeslaw; Wodkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    We present experimental data of the frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) measurements of light pulses revealing interference features corresponding to sub-Planck structures in phase space. For superpositions of pulses a small, sub-Fourier shift in the carrier frequency leads to a state orthogonal to the initial one, although in the representation of standard time--frequency distributions these states seem to have a non-vanishing overlap.

  8. Single photon detection based devices and techniques for pulsed time-of-flight applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hallman, L. (Lauri)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this thesis, a new type of laser diode transmitter using enhanced gain-switching suitable for use with a single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detector was developed and tested in the pulsed time-of-flight laser range finding (lidar) application. Several laser diode versions were tested and the driving electronics were developed. The driving electronics improvements enabled a pulsing frequency of up to 1 MHz, while the maximum laser output power was about 5–40 W depending on...

  9. High speed simultaneous measurement of pulse area and time-of-flight for photomultiplier signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartouni, E.P.; Jensen, D.A.; Klima, B.; Kreisler, M.N.; Lee, S.; Markianos, K.; Nordberg, M.; Rabin, M.S.Z.; Uribe, J.; Wesson, D. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)); Church, M.; Gara, A.; Gottschalk, E.; Hylton, R.; Knapp, B.C.; Sippach, W.; Stern, B.; Wiencke, L. (Columbia Univ., Nevis Lab., Irvington-on-Hudson, NY (United States)); Christian, D.; Etchegoyen, M.C.B.; Gutierrez, G.; Holmes, S.; Strait, J.; Wehmann, A. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States)); Avilez, C.; Correa, W.; Felix, J.; Flores, H.; Moreno, G.; Romero, M.; Sosa, M. (Inst. de Fisica, Univ. Guanajuato, Leon (Mexico)); Forbush, M.; Huson, F.R.; White, J.T.; Wightman, J.A. (Dept. of Physics, Texas A and M Univ., TX (United States))

    1992-06-15

    A modular system to provide high speed simultaneous measurements of pulse area and time-of-flight for photomultiplier signals is described. By requiring a minimum pulse size and a time-of-flight signal within a gate before recording either measurement, the system achieves several advantages over other techniques. In particular, since no time is wasted reading channels without useful information, read out speed is enhanced. The system permits accurate measurements at rates exceeding 10 MHz per channel and can be read out without excessive dead time at rates up to approximately 100 kHz. Data storage problems are also reduced. Both pulse area and time-of-flight are measured using 128 bins (7 bits). Costs are less than 40 US Dollar per channel. Other advantages and design features are discussed. (orig.).

  10. Generation of low-timing-jitter femtosecond pulse trains with 2 GHz repetition rate via external repetition rate multiplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Sickler, Jason W; Fendel, Peter; Ippen, Erich P; Kärtner, Franz X; Wilken, Tobias; Holzwarth, Ronald; Hänsch, Theodor W

    2008-05-01

    Generation of low-timing-jitter 150 fs pulse trains at 1560 nm with 2 GHz repetition rate is demonstrated by locking a 200 MHz fundamental polarization additive-pulse mode-locked erbium fiber laser to high-finesse external Fabry-Perot cavities. The timing jitter and relative intensity noise of the repetition-rate multiplied pulse train are investigated.

  11. Time resolved studies of H{sub 2}{sup +} dissociation with phase-stabilized laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Bettina

    2010-06-23

    In the course of this thesis, experimental studies on the dissociation of H{sub 2}{sup +}(H{sub 2}{sup +}{yields}p+H) in ultrashort laser pulses with a stabilized carrier-envelope phase (CEP) were carried out. In single-pulse measurements, the ability to control the emission direction of low energetic protons, i.e. the localization of the bound electron at one of the nuclei after dissociation, by the CEP was demonstrated. The coincident detection of the emitted protons and electrons and the measurement of their three-dimensional momentum vectors with a reaction microscope allowed to clarify the localization mechanism. Further control was achieved by a pump-control scheme with two timedelayed CEP-stabilized laser pulses. Here the neutral H{sub 2} molecule was ionized in the first pulse and dissociation was induced by the second pulse. Electron localization was shown to depend on the properties of the bound nuclear wave packet in H{sub 2}{sup +} at the time the control pulse is applied, demonstrating the ability to use the shape and dynamics of the nuclear wave packet as control parameters. Wave packet simulations were performed reproducing qualitatively the experimental results of the single and the two-pulse measurements. For both control schemes, intuitive models are presented, which qualitatively explain the main features of the obtained results. (orig.)

  12. Shaping and timing gradient pulses to reduce MRI acoustic noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segbers, Marcel; Sierra, Carlos V. Rizzo; Duifhuis, Hendrikus; Hoogduin, Johannes M.

    A method to reduce the acoustic noise generated by gradient systems in MRI has been recently proposed; such a method is based on the linear response theory. Since the physical cause of MRI acoustic noise is the time derivative of the gradient current, a common trapezoid current shape produces an

  13. Shaping and Timing Gradient Pulses to Reduce MRI Acoustic Noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segbers, Marcel; Sierra, Carlos V. Rizzo; Duifhuis, Hendrikus; Hoogduin, Johannes M.

    2010-01-01

    A method to reduce the acoustic noise generated by gradient systems in MRI has been recently proposed; such a method is based on the linear response theory. Since the physical cause of MRI acoustic noise is the time derivative of the gradient current, a common trapezoid current shape produces an aco

  14. The rise of global warming skepticism: exploring affective image associations in the United States over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas; Leiserowitz, Anthony

    2012-06-01

    This article explores how affective image associations to global warming have changed over time. Four nationally representative surveys of the American public were conducted between 2002 and 2010 to assess public global warming risk perceptions, policy preferences, and behavior. Affective images (positive or negative feelings and cognitive representations) were collected and content analyzed. The results demonstrate a large increase in "naysayer" associations, indicating extreme skepticism about the issue of climate change. Multiple regression analyses found that holistic affect and "naysayer" associations were more significant predictors of global warming risk perceptions than cultural worldviews or sociodemographic variables, including political party and ideology. The results demonstrate the important role affective imagery plays in judgment and decision-making processes, how these variables change over time, and how global warming is currently perceived by the American public. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  15. A comparison of n-γ discrimination by the rise-time and zero-crossing methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The n-γ discrimination performance of two experimental arrangements based on the rise-time method and the zero-crossing method was compared for a 50.8 mm-diametered and 50.8 mm-high BC501A liquid scintillator coupled to a 50.8 mm-diametered 9807B photomultiplier in this work. The low energy limitation of the detected neutron with different detector high voltages and the figure of merit of the n-γ discrimination in four neutron energy regions (1–2 MeV, 0.75–1 MeV, 0.5–0.75 MeV and below 0.5 MeV) were studied by using the Am-Be neutron source. Under a time statistical model of the photoelectron emission process in scintillation counters, the intrinsic capability of the n-γ discrimination performance under the optimal condition was evaluated. The experimental results of the zero-crossing method demonstrate a better n-γ. discrimination performance than those of the rise-time method, which is consistent with the calculated results.

  16. Timing Solution and Single-pulse Properties for Eight Rotating Radio Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, B.-Y.; Boyles, J.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Palliyaguru, N.

    2017-05-01

    Rotating radio transients (RRATs), loosely defined as objects that are discovered through only their single pulses, are sporadic pulsars that have a wide range of emission properties. For many of them, we must measure their periods and determine timing solutions relying on the timing of their individual pulses, while some of the less sporadic RRATs can be timed by using folding techniques as we do for other pulsars. Here, based on Parkes and Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations, we introduce our results on eight RRATs including their timing-derived rotation parameters, positions, and dispersion measures (DMs), along with a comparison of the spin-down properties of RRATs and normal pulsars. Using data for 24 RRATs, we find that their period derivatives are generally larger than those of normal pulsars, independent of any intrinsic correlation with period, indicating that RRATs’ highly sporadic emission may be associated with intrinsically larger magnetic fields. We carry out Lomb-Scargle tests to search for periodicities in RRATs’ pulse detection times with long timescales. Periodicities are detected for all targets, with significant candidates of roughly 3.4 hr for PSR J1623-0841 and 0.7 hr for PSR J1839-0141. We also analyze their single-pulse amplitude distributions, finding that log-normal distributions provide the best fits, as is the case for most pulsars. However, several RRATs exhibit power-law tails, as seen for pulsars emitting giant pulses. This, along with consideration of the selection effects against the detection of weak pulses, imply that RRAT pulses generally represent the tail of a normal intensity distribution.

  17. Pulse saturation recovery, pulse ELDOR, and free induction decay electron paramagnetic resonance detection using time-locked subsampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froncisz, W.; Camenisch, Theodore G.; Ratke, Joseph J.; Hyde, James S.

    2001-03-01

    Time locked subsampling (TLSS) in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) involves the steps of (i) translation of the signal from a microwave carrier to an intermediate frequency (IF) carrier where the (IF) offset between the signal oscillator and local oscillator frequencies is synthesized, (ii) sampling the IF carrier four times in an odd number of cycles, say 4 in 3, where the analog-to-digital (A/D) converter is driven by a frequency synthesizer that has the same clock input as the IF synthesizer, (iii) signal averaging as required for adequate signal to noise, (iv) separating the even and odd digitized words into two separate signal channels, which correspond to signals in phase and in quadrature with respect to the IF carrier, i.e., I and Q, and (v) detecting the envelope of I and also of Q by changing the signs of alternate words in each of the two channels. TLSS detection has been demonstrated in three forms of pulse EPR spectroscopy at X band: saturation recovery, pulse electron-electron double resonance, and free induction decay. The IF was 187.5 MHz, the A/D converter frequency was 250 MHz, the overall bandwidth was 125 MHz, and the bandwidths for the separate I and Q channels were each 62.5 MHz. Experiments were conducted on nitroxide radical spin labels. The work was directed towards development of methodology to monitor bimolecular collisions of oxygen with spin labels in a context of site-directed spin labeling.

  18. Enhancement of Time Reversal Sub-wavelength Wireless Transmission Using Pulse Shaping Technique (submit/1139227)

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Shuai; Zang, Rui; Zou, Lianfeng; Wang, Bing-Zhong; Caloz, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    A novel time-reversal subwavelength transmission technique, based on pulse shaping circuits (PSCs), is proposed. This technique removes the need for complex or electrically large electromagnetic structures by generating channel diversity via pulse shaping instead of angular spectrum transformation. It is shown that, compared to our previous time-reversal system based on chirped delay lines, the PSC approach offers greater flexibility and larger possible numbers of channels, i.e. ultimately higher transmission throughput. The PSC based time-reversal system is also demonstrated experimentally.

  19. Optical Nyquist pulse generation using a time lens with spectral slicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Huo, Li; Xing, Yanfei; Jiang, Xiangyu; Lou, Caiyun

    2015-02-23

    Optical Nyquist pulse generation based on a time lens with subsequent optical filtering is proposed. A nearly chirp-free 10-GHz 8.1-ps Nyquist pulse generator is experimentally demonstrated. By inserting group velocity dispersion (GVD) between cascaded phase and amplitude modulators, 11 tones ultraflat optical frequency comb (OFC) of 10-GHz frequency spacing within 0.9 dB power variation is obtained. The quasi-rectangular shape spectrum is then filtered out with a tunable rectangular-shaped optical band-pass filter (OBPF) and the quasi-linear chirp is compensated by a segment of standard single mode fiber (SSMF). By changing the wavelength of the continuous wave (CW) light, nearly chirp-free Nyquist pulses over C band are obtained. Furthermore, simultaneous dual-wavelength pulse generation is also demonstrated.

  20. Measuring the pulse of GRB 090618: A Simultaneous Spectral and Timing Analysis of the Prompt Emission

    CERN Document Server

    RupalBasak,

    2011-01-01

    We develop a new method for simultaneous timing and spectral studies of Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) prompt emission and apply it to make a pulse-wise description of the prompt emission of GRB 090618, the brightest GRB detected in the Fermi era. We exploit the large area (and sensitivity) of Swift/BAT and the wide band width of Fermi/GBM to derive the parameters for a complete spectral and timing description of the individual pulses of this GRB, based on the various empirical relations suggested in the literature. We demonstrate that this empirical model correctly describes the other observed properties of the burst like the variation of the lag with energy and the pulse width with energy. The measurements also show an indication of an increase in pulse width as a function of energy at low energies for some of the pulses, which is naturally explained as an off-shoot of some particular combination of the model parameters. We argue that these model parameters, particularly the peak energy at the beginning of the pulse...

  1. A Fast Pulsed Neutron Source for Time-of-Flight Detection of Nuclear Materials and Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Bures, Brian; James, Colt; Madden, Robert; Hennig, Wolfgang; Breus, Dimitry; Asztalos, Stephen; Sabourov, Konstantin; Lane, Stephen

    2011-12-01

    AASC has built a fast pulsed neutron source based on the Dense Plasma Focus (DPF). The more current version stores only 100 J but fires at ˜10-50 Hz and emits ˜106n/pulse at a peak current of 100 kA. Both sources emit 2.45±0.1 MeV (DD) neutron pulses of ˜25-40 ns width. Such fast, quasi-monoenergetic pulses allow time-of-flight detection of characteristic emissions from nuclear materials or high explosives. A test is described in which iron targets were placed at different distances from the point neutron source. Detectors such as Stilbene and LaBr3 were used to capture inelastically induced, 847 keV gammas from the iron target. Shielding of the source and detectors eliminated most (but not all) of the source neutrons from the detectors. Gated detection, pulse shape analysis and time-of-flight discrimination enable separation of gamma and neutron signatures and localization of the target. A Monte Carlo simulation allows evaluation of the potential of such a fast pulsed source for a field-portable detection system. The high rep-rate source occupies two 200 liter drums and uses a cooled DPF Head that is <500 cm3 in volume.

  2. A Fast Pulsed Neutron Source for Time-of-Flight Detection of Nuclear Materials and Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Bures, Brian; James, Colt; Madden, Robert [Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation, 3077 Teagarden Street, San Leandro, CA 94577 (United States); Hennig, Wolfgang; Breus, Dimitry; Asztalos, Stephen; Sabourov, Konstantin [XIA LLC, 31057 Genstar Road, Hayward, CA 94544 (United States); Lane, Stephen [NSF Center for Biophotonics and School of Medicine, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA, 95817 (United States)

    2011-12-13

    AASC has built a fast pulsed neutron source based on the Dense Plasma Focus (DPF). The more current version stores only 100 J but fires at {approx}10-50 Hz and emits {approx}10{sup 6}n/pulse at a peak current of 100 kA. Both sources emit 2.45{+-}0.1 MeV(DD) neutron pulses of {approx}25-40 ns width. Such fast, quasi-monoenergetic pulses allow time-of-flight detection of characteristic emissions from nuclear materials or high explosives. A test is described in which iron targets were placed at different distances from the point neutron source. Detectors such as Stilbene and LaBr3 were used to capture inelastically induced, 847 keV gammas from the iron target. Shielding of the source and detectors eliminated most (but not all) of the source neutrons from the detectors. Gated detection, pulse shape analysis and time-of-flight discrimination enable separation of gamma and neutron signatures and localization of the target. A Monte Carlo simulation allows evaluation of the potential of such a fast pulsed source for a field-portable detection system. The high rep-rate source occupies two 200 liter drums and uses a cooled DPF Head that is <500 cm{sup 3} in volume.

  3. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei, E-mail: wei.kong@oregonstate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sub 4}{sup +}, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl{sub 4} doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He){sub n}C{sup +}, (He){sub n}Cl{sup +}, and (He){sub n}CCl{sup +}. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  4. Self-Powered Real-Time Arterial Pulse Monitoring Using Ultrathin Epidermal Piezoelectric Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dae Yong; Joe, Daniel J; Kim, Dong Hyun; Park, Hyewon; Han, Jae Hyun; Jeong, Chang Kyu; Park, Hyelim; Park, Jung Gyu; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Keon Jae

    2017-10-01

    Continuous monitoring of an arterial pulse using a pressure sensor attached on the epidermis is an important technology for detecting the early onset of cardiovascular disease and assessing personal health status. Conventional pulse sensors have the capability of detecting human biosignals, but have significant drawbacks of power consumption issues that limit sustainable operation of wearable medical devices. Here, a self-powered piezoelectric pulse sensor is demonstrated to enable in vivo measurement of radial/carotid pulse signals in near-surface arteries. The inorganic piezoelectric sensor on an ultrathin plastic achieves conformal contact with the complex texture of the rugged skin, which allows to respond to the tiny pulse changes arising on the surface of epidermis. Experimental studies provide characteristics of the sensor with a sensitivity (≈0.018 kPa(-1) ), response time (≈60 ms), and good mechanical stability. Wireless transmission of detected arterial pressure signals to a smart phone demonstrates the possibility of self-powered and real-time pulse monitoring system. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2(+) and He4(+), which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)(n)C(+), (He)(n)Cl(+), and (He)(n)CCl(+). Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  6. TIME EVOLUTION OF PLASMA PARAMETERS DURING THE RISE OF A SOLAR PROMINENCE INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orozco Suárez, D.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Díaz, A. J., E-mail: dorozco@iac.es [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2014-04-10

    We present high-spatial resolution spectropolarimetric observations of a quiescent hedgerow prominence taken in the He I 1083.0 nm triplet. The observation consisted of a time series in sit-and-stare mode of ∼36 minutes duration. The spectrograph's slit crossed the prominence body and we recorded the time evolution of individual vertical threads. Eventually, we observed the development of a dark Rayleigh-Taylor plume that propagated upward with a velocity, projected onto the plane of the sky, of 17 km s{sup –1}. Interestingly, the plume apex collided with the prominence threads pushing them aside. We inferred Doppler shifts, Doppler widths, and magnetic field strength variations by interpreting the He I Stokes profiles with the HAZEL code. The Doppler shifts show that clusters of threads move coherently while individual threads have oscillatory patterns. Regarding the plume we found strong redshifts (∼9-12 km s{sup –1}) and large Doppler widths (∼10 km s{sup –1}) at the plume apex when it passed through the prominence body and before it disintegrated. We associate the redshifts with perspective effects while the Doppler widths are more likely due to an increase in the local temperature. No local variations of the magnetic field strength associated with the passage of the plume were found; this leads us to conclude that the plumes are no more magnetized than the surroundings. Finally, we found that some of the threads' oscillations are locally damped, what allowed us to apply prominence seismology techniques to infer additional prominence physical parameters.

  7. Time-resolved, local temperature measurements during pulsed laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappes, Ralf S; Li Chen; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Gutmann, Jochen S, E-mail: kappes@mpip-mainz.mpg.d [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    To analyse processes during laser heating, one needs to be able to measure temperatures of about 1000 K within one microsecond and with micrometre resolution. To achieve this accuracy, we set up a high-performance optical detection system with a microsecond gated camera in combination with selected interference filters to detect the thermal emission spectrum in the visible range. By fitting the emission spectrum to Planck's law, we are able to collect an area temperature profile for time intervals as short as one microsecond. Thus we can show that a polymer film, which is doped with an organic dye for energy conversion, can reach temperatures of at least 900 K, which is high above its 'normal' decomposition temperature. It is, furthermore, possible to relate the temperature to the effect of the laser beam on the polymer film.

  8. Electrophysiological aspects of the middle ear muscle reflex in the rat: latency, rise time and effect on sound transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berge, H; Kingma, H; Kluge, C; Marres, E H

    1990-10-01

    The latency, the rise time and the influence of the acoustic reflex on sound transmission were investigated in the adult rat during ketamin anesthesia. This was done by recordings of the cochlear microphonics (CM) and electromyographic (EMG) recordings of the reflex responses of the tensor tympani muscle. The acoustic reflex was elicited by contralateral acoustic stimuli of which the intensity and frequency was varied. Ipsilaterally, the effect on sound transmission was determined by estimating the change in amplitude of the CM's of ipsilateral administered subliminal stimuli. It was shown that both the tensor tympani muscle and the stapedius muscle contribute in the reflex. The latency as well as the rise time of the reflex determined by CM recordings showed to be short (minimal values: 12 and 7 ms respectively). The mean latency of the tensor tympani muscle reflex, measured by EMG, was about 7 ms. The attenuation of 0.25-8 kHz tone bursts upto 115 dB SPL is limited to a mean maximum of 15 dB SPL. The maximal attenuation was shown to occur at 1 kHz. Frequencies above 2 kHz appeared to be the best elicitor of the middle ear muscle reflex.

  9. The Effect of Driver Rise-Time on Pinch Current and its Impact on Plasma Focus Performance and Neutron Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Jason; Schmidt, Andrea; Link, Anthony; Welch, Dale

    2016-10-01

    Experiments have suggested that dense plasma focus (DPF) neutron yield increases with faster drivers [Decker NIMP 1986]. Using the particle-in-cell code LSP [Schmidt PRL 2012], we reproduce this trend in a kJ DPF [Ellsworth 2014], and demonstrate how driver rise time is coupled to neutron output. We implement a 2-D model of the plasma focus including self-consistent circuit-driven boundary conditions. Driver capacitance and voltage are varied to modify the current rise time, and anode length is adjusted so that run-in coincides with the peak current. We observe during run down that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities of the sheath shed blobs of plasma that remain in the inter-electrode gap during run in. This trailing plasma later acts as a low-inductance restrike path that shunts current from the pinch during maximum compression. While the MHD growth rate increases slightly with driver speed, the shorter anode of the fast driver allows fewer e-foldings and hence reduces the trailing mass between electrodes. As a result, the fast driver postpones parasitic restrikes and maintains peak current through the pinch during maximum compression. The fast driver pinch therefore achieves best simultaneity between its ion beam and peak target density, which maximizes neutron production. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Use of a prototype pulse oximeter for time series analysis of heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Erika; López, Jehú; Hautefeuille, Mathieu; Velázquez, Víctor; Del Moral, Jésica

    2015-05-01

    This work presents the development of a low cost pulse oximeter prototype consisting of pulsed red and infrared commercial LEDs and a broad spectral photodetector used to register time series of heart rate and oxygen saturation of blood. This platform, besides providing these values, like any other pulse oximeter, processes the signals to compute a power spectrum analysis of the patient heart rate variability in real time and, additionally, the device allows access to all raw and analyzed data if databases construction is required or another kind of further analysis is desired. Since the prototype is capable of acquiring data for long periods of time, it is suitable for collecting data in real life activities, enabling the development of future wearable applications.

  11. Pulsed single-photon spectrograph by frequency-to-time mapping using chirped fiber Bragg gratings

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Alex O C; Karpinski, Michal; Smith, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    A fiber-integrated spectrograph for single-photon pulses based upon frequency-to-time mapping, implemented by chromatic group delay dispersion (GDD), and precise temporally-resolved single photon counting is presented. A chirped fiber Bragg grating provides low-loss GDD mapping the frequency distribution of an input pulse onto the temporal envelope of the output pulse. Time-resolved detection with fast single-photon-counting modules enables the monitoring of the 825 nm to 835 nm wavelength range with nearly uniform efficiency with 55 pm resolution (24 GHz at 830 nm). To demonstrate the versatility of this technique spectral interference of heralded single photons and the joint spectral intensity distribution of a photon-pair source are measured. This approach to single-photon-level spectral measurements provides a route to realize applications of time-frequency quantum optics at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, where multiple spectral channels must be simultaneously monitored.

  12. Intense two-cycle laser pulses induce time-dependent bond hardening in a polyatomic molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dota, K; Garg, M; Tiwari, A K; Dharmadhikari, J A; Dharmadhikari, A K; Mathur, D

    2012-02-17

    A time-dependent bond-hardening process is discovered in a polyatomic molecule (tetramethyl silane, TMS) using few-cycle pulses of intense 800 nm light. In conventional mass spectrometry, symmetrical molecules such as TMS do not exhibit a prominent molecular ion (TMS(+)) as unimolecular dissociation into [Si(CH(3))(3)](+) proceeds very fast. Under a strong field and few-cycle conditions, this dissociation channel is defeated by time-dependent bond hardening: a field-induced potential well is created in the TMS(+) potential energy curve that effectively traps a wave packet. The time dependence of this bond-hardening process is verified using longer-duration (≥100 fs) pulses; the relatively slower falloff of optical field in such pulses allows the initially trapped wave packet to leak out, thereby rendering TMS(+) unstable once again.

  13. Time-resolved measurement of single pulse femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kafka, K R P; Li, H; Yi, A; Cheng, J; Chowdhury, E A

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved diffraction microscopy technique has been used to observe the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) from the interaction of a single femtosecond laser pulse (pump) with a nano-scale groove mechanically formed on a single-crystal Cu substrate. The interaction dynamics (0-1200 ps) was captured by diffracting a time-delayed, frequency-doubled pulse from nascent LIPSS formation induced by the pump with an infinity-conjugate microscopy setup. The LIPSS ripples are observed to form sequentially outward from the groove edge, with the first one forming after 50 ps. A 1-D analytical model of electron heating and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation induced by the interaction of incoming laser pulse with the groove edge qualitatively explains the time-evloution of LIPSS formation.

  14. Spectral enhancement of single attosecond pulses by time-delayed control field

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Wei-Chun

    2012-01-01

    An optical coherent control scheme has been proposed where an extreme ultraviolet single attosecond pulse (SAP) propagates through a dense helium gas dressed by a time-delayed femtosecond laser pulse. The laser pulse couples the 2s2p(^1P) and 2s^2(^1S) autoionizing states when the SAP excites the 2s2p state. After going through the gas, the spectral and temporal profiles of the SAP are strongly distorted. A narrowed but enhanced spike in the spectrum shows up for specific intensities and time delays of the laser, which exemplifies the control of a broadband photon wave packet by an ultrashort dressing field for the first time. We analyze the photon and electron dynamics and conclude on the dressing condition that maximizes this enhancement. The result demonstrates new possibilities of attosecond optical control.

  15. The effect of rf pulse pattern on bremsstrahlung and ion current time evolution of an ECRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropponen, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Toivanen, V.; Peura, P.; Jones, P.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae FI-40014 (Finland); Noland, J.; Leitner, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Time-resolved helium ion production and bremsstrahlung emission from JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS is presented with different radio frequency pulse lengths. rf on times are varied from 5 to 50 ms and rf off times from 10 to 1000 ms between different measurement sets. It is observed that the plasma breakdown occurs a few milliseconds after launching the rf power into the plasma chamber, and in the beginning of the rf pulses a preglow transient is seen. During this transient the ion beam currents are increased by several factors compared to a steady state situation. By adjusting the rf pulse separation the maximum ion beam currents can be maintained during the so-called preglow regime while the amount of bremsstrahlung radiation is significantly decreased.

  16. New theoretical approaches to atomic and molecular dynamics triggered by ultrashort light pulses on the atto- to picosecond time scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabst, Stefan Ulf

    2013-04-15

    The concept of atoms as the building blocks of matter has existed for over 3000 years. A revolution in the understanding and the description of atoms and molecules has occurred in the last century with the birth of quantum mechanics. After the electronic structure was understood, interest in studying the dynamics of electrons, atoms, and molecules increased. However, time-resolved investigations of these ultrafast processes were not possible until recently. The typical time scale of atomic and molecular processes is in the picosecond to attosecond realm. Tremendous technological progress in recent years makes it possible to generate light pulses on these time scales. With such ultrashort pulses, atomic and molecular dynamics can be triggered, watched, and controlled. Simultaneously, the need rises for theoretical models describing the underlying mechanisms. This doctoral thesis focuses on the development of theoretical models which can be used to study the dynamical behavior of electrons, atoms, and molecules in the presence of ultrashort light pulses. Several examples are discussed illustrating how light pulses can trigger and control electronic, atomic, and molecular motions. In the first part of this work, I focus on the rotational motion of asymmetric molecules, which happens on picosecond and femtosecond time scales. Here, the aim is to align all three axes of the molecule as well as possible. To investigate theoretically alignment dynamics, I developed a program that can describe alignment motion ranging from the impulsive to the adiabatic regime. The asymmetric molecule SO{sub 2} is taken as an example to discuss strategies of optimizing 3D alignment without the presence of an external field (i.e., field-free alignment). Field-free alignment is particularly advantageous because subsequent experiments on the aligned molecule are not perturbed by the aligning light pulse. Wellaligned molecules in the gas phase are suitable for diffraction experiments. From the

  17. Design of one-dimensional optical pulse-shaping filters by time-domain topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Lirong; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2009-01-01

    Time-domain topology optimization is used here to design optical pulse-shaping filters in Si/SiO2 thin-film systems. A novel envelope objective function as well as explicit penalization are used to adapt the optimization method to this unique class of design problems.......Time-domain topology optimization is used here to design optical pulse-shaping filters in Si/SiO2 thin-film systems. A novel envelope objective function as well as explicit penalization are used to adapt the optimization method to this unique class of design problems....

  18. Effect of heat-induced pain stimuli on pulse transit time and pulse wave amplitude in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, Marit H N; Loeve, Arjo J; Kortekaas, Minke C; Niehof, Sjoerd P; Mik, Egbert G; Stolker, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Pain is commonly assessed subjectively by interpretations of patient behaviour and/or reports from patients. When this is impossible the availability of a quantitative objective pain assessment tool based on objective physiological parameters would greatly benefit clinical practice and research beside the standard self-report tests. Vasoconstriction is one of the physiological responses to pain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether pulse transit time (PTT) and pulse wave amplitude (PWA) decrease in response to this vasoconstriction when caused by heat-induced pain. The PTT and PWA were measured in healthy volunteers, on both index fingers using photoplethysmography and electrocardiography. Each subject received 3 heat-induced pain stimuli using a Temperature-Sensory Analyzer thermode block to apply a controlled, increasing temperature from 32.0 °C to 50.0 °C to the skin. After reaching 50.0 °C, the thermode was immediately cooled down to 32.0 °C. The study population was divided into 2 groups with a time-interval between the stimuli 20s or 60s. The results showed a significant (p  <  0.05) decrease of both PTT and PWA on the stimulated and contralateral side. Moreover, there was no significant difference between the stimulated and contralateral side. The time-interval of 20s was too short to allow PTT and PWA to return to baseline values and should exceed 40s in future studies. Heat-induced pain causes a decrease of PTT and PWA. Consequently, it is expected that, in the future, PTT and PWA may be applied as objective indicators of pain, either beside the standard self-report test, or when self-report testing is impossible.

  19. Pulse Phase-coherent Timing and Spectroscopy of CXOU J164710.2-45521 Outbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Castillo, Guillermo A Rodríguez; Esposito, Paolo; Pons, José A; Rea, Nanda; Turolla, Roberto; Viganò, Daniele; Zane, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    We present a long-term phase-coherent timing analysis and pulse-phase resolved spectroscopy for the two outbursts observed from the transient anomalous X-ray pulsar CXOU J164710.2-45521. For the first outburst we used 11 Chandra and XMM-Newton observations between September 2006 to August 2009, the longest baseline yet for this source. We obtain a coherent timing solution with $P=10.61065583(4)$ s, $\\dot{P} = 9.72(1) \\times 10^{-13}\\;$s s$^{-1}$ and $\\ddot{P} = -1.05(5)\\times10^{-20}\\; $s s$^{-2}$. Under the standard assumptions this implies a surface dipolar magnetic field of $\\sim 10^{14}$ G, confirming this source as a standard-$B$ magnetar. We also study the evolution of the pulse profile (shape, intensity and pulsed fraction) as a function of time and energy. Using the phase-coherent timing solution we perform a phase-resolved spectroscopy analysis, following the spectral evolution of pulse-phase features, which hints at the physical processes taking place on the star. The results are discussed from the ...

  20. A pulse-front-tilt–compensated streaked optical spectrometer with high throughput and picosecond time resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, J., E-mail: jkat@lle.rochester.edu; Boni, R.; Rivlis, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Muir, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A high-throughput, broadband optical spectrometer coupled to the Rochester optical streak system equipped with a Photonis P820 streak tube was designed to record time-resolved spectra with 1-ps time resolution. Spectral resolution of 0.8 nm is achieved over a wavelength coverage range of 480 to 580 nm, using a 300-groove/mm diffraction grating in conjunction with a pair of 225-mm-focal-length doublets operating at an f/2.9 aperture. Overall pulse-front tilt across the beam diameter generated by the diffraction grating is reduced by preferentially delaying discrete segments of the collimated input beam using a 34-element reflective echelon optic. The introduced delay temporally aligns the beam segments and the net pulse-front tilt is limited to the accumulation across an individual sub-element. The resulting spectrometer design balances resolving power and pulse-front tilt while maintaining high throughput.

  1. A pulse-front-tilt-compensated streaked optical spectrometer with high throughput and picosecond time resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, J.; Boni, R.; Rivlis, R.; Muir, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    A high-throughput, broadband optical spectrometer coupled to the Rochester optical streak system equipped with a Photonis P820 streak tube was designed to record time-resolved spectra with 1-ps time resolution. Spectral resolution of 0.8 nm is achieved over a wavelength coverage range of 480 to 580 nm, using a 300-groove/mm diffraction grating in conjunction with a pair of 225-mm-focal-length doublets operating at an f/2.9 aperture. Overall pulse-front tilt across the beam diameter generated by the diffraction grating is reduced by preferentially delaying discrete segments of the collimated input beam using a 34-element reflective echelon optic. The introduced delay temporally aligns the beam segments and the net pulse-front tilt is limited to the accumulation across an individual sub-element. The resulting spectrometer design balances resolving power and pulse-front tilt while maintaining high throughput.

  2. Evolution of optical force on two-level atom by ultrashort time-domain dark hollow Gaussian pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaochao; Wang, Zhaoying; Lin, Qiang

    2017-09-01

    Based on the analytical expression of the ultrashort time-domain dark hollow Gaussian (TDHG) pulse, the optical force on two-level atoms induced by a TDHG pulse is calculated in this paper. The phenomena of focusing or defocusing of the light force is numerical analyzed for different detuning, various duration time, and different order of the ultrashort pulse. The transverse optical force can change from a focusing force to a defocusing force depending on the spatial-temporal coupling effect as the TDHG pulses propagating in free space. Our results also show that the initial phase of the TDHG pulse can significantly changes the envelope of the optical force.

  3. Optimization of the ionization time of an atom with tailored laser pulses: a theoretical study

    CERN Document Server

    Kammerlander, David; Marques, Miguel A L

    2016-01-01

    How fast can a laser pulse ionize an atom? We address this question by considering pulses that carry a fixed time-integrated energy per-area, and finding those that achieve the double requirement of maximizing the ionization that they induce, while having the shortest duration. We formulate this double-objective quantum optimal control problem by making use of the Pareto approach to multi-objetive optimization, and the differential evolution genetic algorithm. The goal is to find out how much a precise time-profiling of ultra-fast, large-bandwidth pulses may speed up the ionization process with respect to simple-shape pulses. We work on a simple one-dimensional model of hydrogen-like atoms (the P\\"oschl-Teller potential), that allows to tune the number of bound states that play a role in the ionization dynamics. We show how the detailed shape of the pulse accelerates the ionization process, and how the presence or absence of bound states influences the velocity of the process.

  4. A transit timing analysis of nine RISE light curves of the exoplanet system TrES-3

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, N P; Skillen, I; Simpson, E K; Barros, S; Joshi, Y C; Todd, I; Benn, C; Christian, D; Hrudková, M; Keenan, F P; Steele, I A

    2009-01-01

    We present nine newly observed transits of TrES-3, taken as part of a transit timing program using the RISE instrument on the Liverpool Telescope. A Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo analysis was used to determine the planet-star radius ratio and inclination of the system, which were found to be Rp/Rstar=0.1664^{+0.0011}_{-0.0018} and i = 81.73^{+0.13}_{-0.04} respectively, consistent with previous results. The central transit times and uncertainties were also calculated, using a residual-permutation algorithm as an independent check on the errors. A re-analysis of eight previously published TrES-3 light curves was conducted to determine the transit times and uncertainties using consistent techniques. Whilst the transit times were not found to be in agreement with a linear ephemeris, giving chi^2 = 35.07 for 15 degrees of freedom, we interpret this to be the result of systematics in the light curves rather than a real transit timing variation. This is because the light curves that show the largest deviation from a con...

  5. Multi-pulse time delay integration method for flexible 3D super-resolution range-gated imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinwei, Wang; Youfu, Li; Yan, Zhou

    2015-03-23

    Constructing flexible regular-shaped range-intensity profiles by the convolution of illuminator laser pulse and sensor gate pulse is crucial for 3D super-resolution range-gated imaging. However, ns-scale rectangular-shaped laser pulse with tunable pulse width is difficult to be obtained, especially for pulsed solid-stated lasers. In this paper we propose a multi-pulse time delay integration (MPTDI) method to reshape range-intensity profiles (RIP) free from the above limitation of pulsed lasers. An equivalent laser pulse temporal shaping model is established to evaluate and optimize the MPTDI method. By using MPTDI, the RIP shape and depth of viewing can both be flexibly changed as desired. Here typical triangular and trapezoidal RIPs are established for 3D imaging under triangular and trapezoidal range-intensity correlation algorithms. In addition, a prototype experiment is demonstrated to prove the feasibility of MPTDI.

  6. Compensation for the distortion in satellite laser range predictions due to varying pulse travel times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunonen, Matti

    1993-01-01

    A method for compensating for the effect of the varying travel time of a transmitted laser pulse to a satellite is described. The 'observed minus predicted' range differences then appear to be linear, which makes data screening or use in range gating more effective.

  7. Pulse-wave timing between the cervical carotid and intracranial arteries by means of wavelet transform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Journee, HL; de Jonge, AB; Hamoen, DJ; Smit, A; van Bruggen, AC; Mooij, JJA; Boom, H; Robinson, C; Rutten, W; Neuman, M; Wijkstra, H

    1997-01-01

    Wavelet Transform (WT) is applied in a method for timing the blood pulse wave between the internal carotid artery: and one of the intracranial arteries. The required accuracy is a few milliseconds. In contrast to the Fourier Transform (FT), WT is an appropriate technique for the detection of

  8. Pulsed field probe of real time magnetization dynamics in magnetic nanoparticle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulkes, T.; Syed, M.; Taplin, T.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are extensively used in biotechnology. These applications rely on magnetic properties that are a keen function of MNP size, distribution, and shape. Various magneto-optical techniques, including Faraday Rotation (FR), Cotton-Mouton Effect, etc., have been employed to characterize magnetic properties of MNPs. Generally, these measurements employ AC or DC fields. In this work, we describe the results from a FR setup that uses pulsed magnetic fields and an analysis technique that makes use of the entire pulse shape to investigate size distribution and shape anisotropy. The setup employs a light source, polarizing components, and a detector that are used to measure the rotation of light from a sample that is subjected to a pulsed magnetic field. This magnetic field "snapshot" is recorded alongside the intensity pulse of the sample's response. This side by side comparison yields useful information about the real time magnetization dynamics of the system being probed. The setup is highly flexible with variable control of pulse length and peak magnitude. Examining the raw data for the response of bare Fe3O4 and hybrid Au and Fe3O4 nanorods reveals interesting information about Brownian relaxation and the hydrodynamic size of these nanorods. This analysis exploits the self-referencing nature of this measurement to highlight the impact of an applied field on creating a field induced transparency for a longitudinal measurement. Possible sources for this behavior include shape anisotropy and field assisted aggregate formation.

  9. Time-resolved studies of the interactions between pulsed lasers and aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, Cindy L; Qian, Jun; Miller, Roger E

    2002-09-20

    Studies of the interaction between a pulsed CO2 laser and micrometer-sized aqueous and organic particles by use of light-scattering methods and step-scan Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy are reported. Visible two-color extinction experiments indicate primary particle shattering, accompanied by a high fraction of vaporization, followed by secondary particle evaporation. The extent of the latter depends on the pulse intensity and particle composition. Angle-resolved light-scattering investigations provide insight into the aerosol size distribution and temperature following the pulsed heating event. The time dependence of the vapor plume, monitored with step-scan FTIR spectroscopy, confirms that a large fraction of the initial particle is quickly evaporated during the shattering event, followed by secondary fragment evaporation and thermal expansion.

  10. Extracting a common pulse like signal from Time Serie using a non linear Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazeaux, J.; Batista, D.; Ammann, C.; Naveau, P.; Jégat, C.; Gao, C.

    2009-04-01

    To understand the nature and cause of natural climate variability, it is important to attribute past climate variations to particular forcing factors. In this work, our main focus is to introduce an automatic assimilation procedure to estimate the magnitude of strong but short-lived perturbations, such as large explosive volcanic eruptions, using climate/proxies time series. The extraction and decomposition procedure is run on real multivariate time series of sulfate from ice cores drilled at different sites in Greenland. The sulfate ejected by volcanoes is transported through the stratosphere towards the poles and deposited via sedimentation near the pole. Sulfate in Greenland is then a marker of huge volcanic eruptions which occur all over the world. Such pulse-like processes are highly non linear, as much in time as for their intensity. If they are not detected, such pulse-like signals of extreme and rare events can perturb an objective calculation of the trend. This work is then as much an estimation procedure for such signals, as a first step to estimate a posteriori trend in the time series. Our extraction algorithm handles multivariate time series with a common but unknown forcing. This statistical procedure is based on a multivariate multi-state space model and a non linear Kalman Filter. The non linearity is solved using the calculation of a twice conditional expectation and variance. It can provide an accurate estimate of the timing and duration of individual pulse-like events from a set of different series covering the same temporal space. It not only allows for a more objective estimation of its associated peak amplitude and the subsequent time evolution of the signal, but at the same time it provides a measure of confidence through the posterior probability for each pulse-like event. The flexibility, robustness and limitations of our approach are discussed by applying our method to simulated time series and to the Monte-Carlo method to test the

  11. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grills, David C., E-mail: dcgrills@bnl.gov; Farrington, Jaime A.; Layne, Bobby H.; Preses, Jack M.; Wishart, James F. [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, P.O. Box 5000, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Bernstein, Herbert J. [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Dowling College, 1300 William Floyd Parkway, Shirley, New York 11967 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330 to 1051 cm{sup −1}. The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ∼40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ∼100 μOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. This new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  12. Development of nanosecond time-resolved infrared detection at the LEAF pulse radiolysis facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grills, David C; Farrington, Jaime A; Layne, Bobby H; Preses, Jack M; Bernstein, Herbert J; Wishart, James F

    2015-04-01

    When coupled with transient absorption spectroscopy, pulse radiolysis, which utilizes high-energy electron pulses from an accelerator, is a powerful tool for investigating the kinetics and thermodynamics of a wide range of radiation-induced redox and electron transfer processes. The majority of these investigations detect transient species in the UV, visible, or near-IR spectral regions. Unfortunately, the often-broad and featureless absorption bands in these regions can make the definitive identification of intermediates difficult. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy would offer much improved structural characterization, but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis. In this paper, we describe in detail the development of a unique nanosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection capability for condensed-phase pulse radiolysis on a new beam line at the LEAF facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The system makes use of a suite of high-power, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade lasers as the IR probe source, with coverage from 2330 to 1051 cm(-1). The response time of the TRIR detection setup is ∼40 ns, with a typical sensitivity of ∼100 μOD after 4-8 signal averages using a dual-beam probe/reference normalization detection scheme. This new detection method has enabled mechanistic investigations of a range of radiation-induced chemical processes, some of which are highlighted here.

  13. Pulsed energy-time entangled twin-photon source for quantum communication

    CERN Document Server

    Brendel, J; Tittel, W; Zbinden, H

    1999-01-01

    A pulsed source of energy-time entangled photon pairs pumped by a standard laser diode is proposed and demonstrated. The basic states can be distinguished by their time of arrival. This greatly simplifies the realization of 2-photon quantum cryptography, Bell state analyzers, quantum teleportation, dense coding, entanglement swapping, GHZ-states sources, etc. Moreover the entanglement is well protected during photon propagation in telecom optical fibers, opening the door to few-photon applications of quantum communication over long distances.

  14. Measurement of the Pulse Radiation of an IRA in Time Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadtler, Thiemo; Ter Haseborg, Jan Luiken; Sabath, Frank

    For radiation of UWB pulses special Impulse Radiating Antennas (IRA) have been designed and are continuously improved. The measurement of its near field can help optimizing this antenna type. This paper presents a time domain scanner which is able to determine the transient near field. The so called double probe near field scanner can be employed to measure the two dimensional field distribution in time domain.

  15. Synchronized and timing-stabilized pulse generation from a gain-switched laser diode for stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Kyoya; Fang, Yi-Cheng; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Ozeki, Yasuyuki

    2016-03-01

    We present a picosecond laser source based on a gain-switched laser diode (GS-LD) that can be applied to stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. A 1.06-μm GS-LD was used to generate 14-ps pulses at a repetition rate of 38 MHz. The GS-LD was driven by 200-ps electrical pulses, which were triggered through a toggle flip-flop (T-FF). As a result, the GS-LD pulses were subharmonically synchronized to Ti:sapphire laser (TSL) pulses at a repetition rate of 76 MHz. We investigated the timing jitter of GS-LD pulses and found it to be less than 2.5 ps. We also show that the trigger delay can be less sensitive to the optical power of TSL pulses by controlling the threshold voltage of the T-FF. As a result, GS-LD pulses sufficiently overlapped with TSL pulses even when we scanned the wavelength of the TSL pulses. We demonstrate the SRS imaging of HeLa cells with GS-LD pulses and TSL pulses, proving that GS-LD is readily applicable to SRS microscopy as a compact and stable pulse source.

  16. Pulse on Pulse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ulrik; Carlson, Merete

    2012-01-01

    and pulsating ‘room’. Hence, the visitors in Pulse Room are invited into a complex scenario that continuously oscillates between various aspects of signification (the light bulbs representing individual lives; the pulse itself as the symbolic ‘rhythm of life’) and instants of pure material processuality......“Pulse on Pulse” investigates the relation between signifying processes and non-signifying material dynamism in the installation Pulse Room (2006-) by Mexican Canadian artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer. In Pulse Room the sense of pulse is ambiguous. Biorhythms are transmitted from the pulsing energy...... of the visitor’s beating heart to the blink of a fragile light bulb, thereby transforming each light bulb into a register of individual life. But at the same time the blinking light bulbs together produce a chaotically flickering light environment composed by various layers of repetitive rhythms, a vibrant...

  17. Time-resolved electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roettgen, A.; Shkurenkov, I.; Simeni Simeni, M.; Petrishchev, V.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2016-10-01

    Thomson scattering is used to study temporal evolution of electron density and electron temperature in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium sustained in two different configurations, (i) diffuse filament discharge between two spherical electrodes, and (ii) surface discharge over plane quartz surface. In the diffuse filament discharge, the experimental results are compared with the predictions of a 2D plasma fluid model. Electron densities are put on an absolute scale using pure rotational Raman spectra in nitrogen, taken without the plasma, for calibration. In the diffuse filament discharge, electron density and electron temperature increase rapidly after breakdown, peaking at n e  ≈  3.5 · 1015 cm-3 and T e  ≈  4.0 eV. After the primary discharge pulse, both electron density and electron temperature decrease (to n e ~ 1014 cm-3 over ~1 µs and to T e ~ 0.5 eV over ~200 ns), with a brief transient rise produced by the secondary discharge pulse. At the present conditions, the dominant recombination mechanism is dissociative recombination of electrons with molecular ions, \\text{He}2+ . In the afterglow, the electron temperature does not relax to gas temperature, due to superelastic collisions. Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) inferred from the Thomson scattering spectra are nearly Maxwellian, which is expected at high ionization fractions, when the shape of EEDF is controlled primarily by electron-electron collisions. The kinetic model predictions agree well with the temporal trends detected in the experiment, although peak electron temperature and electron density are overpredicted. Heavy species temperature predicted during the discharge and the early afterglow remains low and does not exceed T  =  400 K, due to relatively slow quenching of metastable He* atoms in two-body and three-body processes. In the surface discharge, peak electron density and electron temperature are n e  ≈  3 · 1014 cm3 and T e

  18. Time domain measuring system of molecular fluorescence with real-time monitor and control of pulsed dye laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Kato, H.; Konishi, N.; Kasuya, T.

    1982-04-01

    A computer controlled system is presented for a high-precision, time-domain measurement of molecular fluorescence induced by a pulsed dye laser field. In this system three intelligent functions are assembled by the system controller: they are an automatic wavelength control of pulsed dye laser to 0.45 GHz resolution, a digital wavelength meter of 10-7 precision, and a high-speed waveform digitizer with 10 ps inherent resolution. Then the system achieves a unique capability such as to record real-time data of fluorescence decay in the nanosecond regime under an on-line monitor and control of the laser wavelength to milliangstrom precision. The basic constitution and practical performance of the system are described with particular emphasis on its high precision and multi-task capability.

  19. DynPeak: An Algorithm for Pulse Detection and Frequency Analysis in Hormonal Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Alexandre; Zhang, Qinghua; Médigue, Claire; Fabre, Stéphane; Clément, Frédérique

    2012-01-01

    The endocrine control of the reproductive function is often studied from the analysis of luteinizing hormone (LH) pulsatile secretion by the pituitary gland. Whereas measurements in the cavernous sinus cumulate anatomical and technical difficulties, LH levels can be easily assessed from jugular blood. However, plasma levels result from a convolution process due to clearance effects when LH enters the general circulation. Simultaneous measurements comparing LH levels in the cavernous sinus and jugular blood have revealed clear differences in the pulse shape, the amplitude and the baseline. Besides, experimental sampling occurs at a relatively low frequency (typically every 10 min) with respect to LH highest frequency release (one pulse per hour) and the resulting LH measurements are noised by both experimental and assay errors. As a result, the pattern of plasma LH may be not so clearly pulsatile. Yet, reliable information on the InterPulse Intervals (IPI) is a prerequisite to study precisely the steroid feedback exerted on the pituitary level. Hence, there is a real need for robust IPI detection algorithms. In this article, we present an algorithm for the monitoring of LH pulse frequency, basing ourselves both on the available endocrinological knowledge on LH pulse (shape and duration with respect to the frequency regime) and synthetic LH data generated by a simple model. We make use of synthetic data to make clear some basic notions underlying our algorithmic choices. We focus on explaining how the process of sampling affects drastically the original pattern of secretion, and especially the amplitude of the detectable pulses. We then describe the algorithm in details and perform it on different sets of both synthetic and experimental LH time series. We further comment on how to diagnose possible outliers from the series of IPIs which is the main output of the algorithm. PMID:22802933

  20. Note: All-digital pulse-shrinking time-to-digital converter with improved dynamic range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Hwang, Chorng-Sii; Lin, Yi; Chen, Guan-Hong

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an all-digital pulse-shrinking time-to-digital converter (TDC) using the offset error cancellation circuitry to widen its dynamic range and to improve its accuracy. Although the TDC based on a pulse-shrinking mechanism can achieve a sub-gate resolution without circuit complexity, it possesses an undesired offset error that results in a nonzero lower bound appeared in its dynamic range and then affects its accuracy. The proposed cancellation circuitry for eliminating the offset error consists of a time adder with a delay line and a time subtractor with an identical delay line. The experimental TDC is implemented on Xilinx field programmable gate arrays and it also functions successfully in improving its dynamic range.

  1. Note: All-digital pulse-shrinking time-to-digital converter with improved dynamic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Hwang, Chorng-Sii; Lin, Yi; Chen, Guan-Hong

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an all-digital pulse-shrinking time-to-digital converter (TDC) using the offset error cancellation circuitry to widen its dynamic range and to improve its accuracy. Although the TDC based on a pulse-shrinking mechanism can achieve a sub-gate resolution without circuit complexity, it possesses an undesired offset error that results in a nonzero lower bound appeared in its dynamic range and then affects its accuracy. The proposed cancellation circuitry for eliminating the offset error consists of a time adder with a delay line and a time subtractor with an identical delay line. The experimental TDC is implemented on Xilinx field programmable gate arrays and it also functions successfully in improving its dynamic range.

  2. Climate impacts on rising atmospheric CO2 from long-term time-series of CO2 and O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, R. F.; Rafelski, L. E.; Piper, S. C.

    2009-04-01

    The long-term time series of atmospheric CO2 and O2 concentrations from the Scripps Institution of oceanography now span 51 and 19 years, respectively. These time series will be presented together with the ice-core CO2 records and discussed in terms of the processes controlling the atmospheric CO2 rise, particularly the sensitivity of the natural sinks for CO2 in the land and ocean to climate changes. The CO2 record provides constraints on the sensitivity of the land sinks to climate. The CO2 rise can be expressed as an anomaly relative to the trend expected from fossil-fuel burning, land use emissions, and uptake by the land biosphere and oceans, with the latter two processes depicted by simple reservoir models (land sink driven by CO2 fertilization). Despite uncertainties, the anomaly computed this way shows an evident link with global land temperature, with both the anomaly and temperature trend showing breaks in slope around 1940 and 1980. Climate effects on the land biosphere may thus explain two otherwise puzzling features in the CO2 record: the plateau in growth in the 1940s and the persistent high growth after 1980. The implied effect of warming on CO2 suggested by this decadal variability is too small to be a significant climate feedback, however. Additional constraints on the climate sensitivity of ocean sinks can be obtained by combining the CO2 and O2 records. The ocean CO2 sink that would have been obtained in the absence of climate change is quite well constrained based on ocean observations of chlorofluorocarbons. This sink can be compared to the sink computed from the global O2 budget, assuming the oceans have not been a long-term source or sink for O2. The comparison reveals a significant discrepancy, which suggests that climate changes are impacting some combination of the long-term O2 and CO2 fluxes. The climate effect is qualitatively consistent with ocean models, which predict that warming will reduce oceanic uptake of CO2 and induce oceanic

  3. Experimental Study of SO2 Removal by Pulsed DBD Along with the Application of Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG Ming-zhe; LIU Ding-xin; WANG Xiao-hua; WANG Jun-hua

    2007-01-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) for SO2 removal from indoor air is investigated.In order to improve the removal efficiency,two novel methods are combined in this paper,namely by applying a pulsed driving voltage with nanosecond rising time and applying a magnetic field.For SO2 removal efficiency,different matches of electric field and magnetic field are discussed.And nanosecond rising edge pulsed power supply and microsecond rising edge pulsed power supply are compared.It can be concluded that a pulsed DBD with nanosecond rising edge should be adopted,and electrical field and magnetic field should be applied in an appropriate match.

  4. Measuring the dynamics of second-order photon correlation functions inside a pulse with picosecond time resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assmann, Marc; Veit, Franziska; Tempel, Jean-Sebastian;

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed discussion of a recently demonstrated experimental technique capable of measuring the orrelation function of a pulsed light source with picosecond time resolution. The measurement involves a streak camera in single photon counting mode, which is modified such that a signal...... at a fixed repetition rate, and well defined energy, can be monitored after each pulsed laser excitation. The technique provides further insight into the quantum optical properties of pulsed light emission from semiconductor nanostructures, and the dynamics inside a pulse, on the subnanosecond time scale....

  5. Laser-induced reversion of δ′ precipitates in an Al-Li alloy: Study on temperature rise in pulsed laser atom probe

    KAUST Repository

    Khushaim, Muna Saeed Amin

    2016-06-14

    The influence of tuning the laser pulse energy during the analyses on the resulting microstructure in a specimen utilizing an ultra-fast laser assisted atom probe was demonstrated by a case study of a binary Al-Li alloy. The decomposition parameters, such as the size, number density, volume fraction, and composition of δ\\' precipitates, were carefully monitored after each analysis. A simple model was employed to estimate the corresponding specimen temperature for each value of the laser energy. The results indicated that the corresponding temperatures for the laser pulse energy in the range of 10 to 80 pJ are located inside the miscibility gap of the binary Al-Li phase diagram and fall into the metastable equilibrium field. In addition, the corresponding temperature for a laser pulse energy of 100 pJ was in fairly good agreement with reported range of δ\\' solvus temperature, suggesting a result of reversion upon heating due to laser pulsing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Laser-induced reversion of δ' precipitates in an Al-Li alloy: Study on temperature rise in pulsed laser atom probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushaim, Muna; Gemma, Ryota; Al-Kassab, Talaat

    2016-08-01

    The influence of tuning the laser pulse energy during the analyses on the resulting microstructure in a specimen utilizing an ultra-fast laser assisted atom probe was demonstrated by a case study of a binary Al-Li alloy. The decomposition parameters, such as the size, number density, volume fraction, and composition of δ' precipitates, were carefully monitored after each analysis. A simple model was employed to estimate the corresponding specimen temperature for each value of the laser energy. The results indicated that the corresponding temperatures for the laser pulse energy in the range of 10 to 80 pJ are located inside the miscibility gap of the binary Al-Li phase diagram and fall into the metastable equilibrium field. In addition, the corresponding temperature for a laser pulse energy of 100 pJ was in fairly good agreement with reported range of  δ' solvus temperature, suggesting a result of reversion upon heating due to laser pulsing. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:727-737, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Electron thermalization and attachment in pulse-irradiated oxygen studied by time-resolved microwave conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warman, John M.; Cooper, Ronald

    The microwave conductivity of oxygen gas following nanosecond pulsed irradiation has been studied for pressures from 5 to 50 torr. The conductivity is found to decrease by a factor of approx. 20 in the early stages ( tN < 2 x 10 11 s cm -3) following the pulse. This is attributed to a decrease in the electron collision frequency as the initial excess energy of the electrons becomes degraded. A further decrease found at longer times is due to the three-body attachment of electrons to O 2 with a rate constant of 2.4 x 10 -30 cm 6s -1. Above a pressure of approx. 30 torr significant attachment begins to occur while electrons are still superthermal. The time at which the microwave signal is within 10% of the value corresponding to thermal energies is given by τ thP ≈ 15 μs.torr.

  8. Quantitative interpretation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy with all Gaussian pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Ariunbold, Gombojav O

    2016-01-01

    Coherent Raman scattering spectroscopy is studied purposely, with the Gaussian ultrashort pulses as a hands-on elucidatory extraction tool of the clean coherent Raman resonant spectra from the overall measured data contaminated with the non-resonant four wave mixing background. The integral formulae for both the coherent anti-Stokes and Stokes Raman scattering are given in the semiclassical picture, and the closed-form solutions in terms of a complex error function are obtained. An analytic form of maximum enhancement of pure coherent Raman spectra at threshold time delay depending on bandwidth of probe pulse is also obtained. The observed experimental data for pyridine in liquid-phase are quantitatively elucidated and the inferred time-resolved coherent Raman resonant results are reconstructed with a new insight.

  9. analysis of large electromagnetic pulse simulators using the electric field integral equation method in time domain

    CERN Document Server

    Jamali, J; Moini, R; Sadeghi, H

    2002-01-01

    A time-domain approach is presented to calculate electromagnetic fields inside a large Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) simulator. This type of EMP simulator is used for studying the effect of electromagnetic pulses on electrical apparatus in various structures such as vehicles, a reoplanes, etc. The simulator consists of three planar transmission lines. To solve the problem, we first model the metallic structure of the simulator as a grid of conducting wires. The numerical solution of the governing electric field integral equation is then obtained using the method of moments in time domain. To demonstrate the accuracy of the model, we consider a typical EMP simulator. The comparison of our results with those obtained experimentally in the literature validates the model introduced in this paper.

  10. Pulse wave transit time measured by imaging photoplethysmography in upper extremities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volynsky, M. A.; Mamontov, O. V.; Sidorov, I. S.; Kamshilin, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    We describe highly reliable measurement method of the pulse wave transit time (PWTT) to human limbs by using simultaneous recordings of imaging photoplethysmography and electrocardiography. High accuracy of measurements was achieved by access to a larger number of statistically independent data obtained simultaneously in different points. The method is characterized by higher diagnostic reliability because of automatic selection of the regions less affected by environmental noise. The technique was tested in the group of 12 young healthy subjects aged from 21 to 33 years. Even though PWTT in right and left hands was comparable after averaging over the whole group of subjects, significant difference in the time delay of pulse wave between the hands was found in several individuals. The technique can be used for early-stage diagnostics of various vascular diseases.

  11. Femtosecond time-resolved impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy using sub-7-fs pulses: Apparatus and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramochi, Hikaru; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei

    2016-04-01

    We describe details of the setup for time-resolved impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy (TR-ISRS). In this method, snapshot molecular vibrational spectra of the photoreaction transients are captured via time-domain Raman probing using ultrashort pulses. Our instrument features transform-limited sub-7-fs pulses to impulsively excite and probe coherent nuclear wavepacket motions, allowing us to observe vibrational fingerprints of transient species from the terahertz to 3000-cm-1 region with high sensitivity. Key optical components for the best spectroscopic performance are discussed. The TR-ISRS measurements for the excited states of diphenylacetylene in cyclohexane are demonstrated, highlighting the capability of our setup to track femtosecond dynamics of all the Raman-active fundamental molecular vibrations.

  12. Luminescence rise time in self-activated PbWO4 and Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 scintillation crystals

    CERN Document Server

    E. Auffray; A. Borisevich; V. Gulbinas; A. Fedorov; M. Korjik; M.T. Lucchini; V. Mechinsky; S. Nargelas; E. Songaila; G. Tamulaitis; A. Vaitkevičius; S. Zazubovich

    2016-01-01

    The time resolution of scintillation detectors of ionizing radiation is one of the key parameters sought for in the current and future high-energy physics experiments. This study is encouraged by the necessity to find novel detection methods enabling a sub-10-ps time resolution in scintillation detectors and is focused on the exploitation of fast luminescence rise front. Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques have been used to study two promising scintillators: self-activated lead tungstate (PWO, PbWO4) and Ce-doped gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (GAGG, Gd3Al2Ga3O12). A sub-picosecond PL rise time is observed in PWO, while longer processes in the PL response in GAGG:Ce are detected and studied. The mechanisms responsible for the PL rise time in self-activated and doped scintillators are under discussion.

  13. A Compact Nanosecond-Pulse Shaping System Based on Pulse Stacking in Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Zhan; LIN Hong-Huan; WANG Jian-Jun; ZHAO Hong-Ming; LI Ming-Zhong; QIAN Lie-Jia; ZHU He-Yuan; FAN Dian-Yuan

    2006-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate a compact pulse shaping system based on temporal stacking of pulses in fibres, by which synchronized pulses of ultrashort and nanosecond lasers can be obtained. The system may generate shape-controllable pulses with a fast rise time and high-resolution within a time window of ~2.2 ns by adjusting variable optical attenuators in the 32 fibre channels independently. With the help of optical amplifiers, the system delivers mJ-level pulses with a signal-to-noise ratio of~35 dB.

  14. Time response of Cd0.9Zn0.1Te crystals under transient and pulsed irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. C. Zhao

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A CdZnTe detector based on high-quality Cd0.9Zn0.1Te crystals was developed and tested as a monitor in high-intensity radiation fields. The current–voltage measurements were performed using thermally evaporated Au contacts deposited on the crystals, which revealed resistivity of 1010 Ω·cm. Typical leakage current for the planar devices was ∼3 nA for a field strength of 1000 V·cm–1. The test results show that the CdZnTe detector has a fast time response, with a rise time of approximately 2 ns, when exposed to transient and pulsed irradiation of X-rays or electron beams. The decay of current curves is observed and discussed according to charge carrier trapping effects and space-charge accumulation mechanisms. It is suggested that the current decreases quickly with strengthening of the electric field, possibly because of charge de-trapping.

  15. Analysis on the arcelin expression in bruchid pest resistant wild pulses using real time RT-qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivelkumar, Shanmugavel; Veeramani, Velayutham; Hilda, Karuppiah; Arumugam, Munusamy; Janarthanan, Sundaram

    2014-12-01

    Arcelin, the antimetabolic protein from wild pulses is a known natural insecticidal molecule. Wild pulses with high arcelin content could serve as potential source to. increase the levels of insect resistance in cultivated pulse crops. In this study, arcelin (Arl) gene expression was screened in seven stored product insect pest resistant wild pulse varieties using real time RT-qPCR. Arcelin gene specific real time PCR primers were synthesized from arcelin mRNA sequence of the wild pulse variety, Lablab purpureus. The results revealed different levels of arcelin gene expression in the tested varieties. Canavalia virosa registered significantly high content indicating its suitability for utilization of arcelin gene in developing stored product insect pest resistance with other cultivated pulses.

  16. Envelope time reversal of optical pulses following frequency conversion with accelerating quasi-phase-matching

    CERN Document Server

    Yachini, Michal; Bahabad, Alon

    2016-01-01

    It is shown theoretically that the use of accelerating spatiotemporal quasi-phase-matching (QPM) modulation patterns in media with parametric optical interactions makes it possible to generate a time-reversed replica of the pump pulse envelope in a frequency converted signal. The conversion is dependent on the group-velocity mismatch between the fundamental and up-converted harmonics, and controlled by the acceleration rate (chirp) of the QPM phase pattern. Analytical results are corroborated by numerical simulations.

  17. Application of ultrashort laser pulses for timing characterization of silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, E. V.; Buzhan, P. Zh; Stifutkin, A. A.; Ilyin, A. L.; Mavritskii, O. B.; Egorov, A. N.; Nastulyavichius, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The application of femtosecond laser irradiation for the investigation of Geiger discharge process in silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is discussed. It is shown experimentally that sub-picosecond pulses of laser beam focused to micron spot sizes allow studying the dynamics of Geiger discharge process in single cell of silicon photomultiplier. These studies are aimed at identifying the factors limiting the timing resolution of this class of devices.

  18. Time-dependent density functional theory for strong-field ionization by circularly polarized pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirilă, Ciprian C.; Lein, Manfred

    2017-03-01

    By applying time-dependent density functional theory to a two-dimensional multielectron atom subject to strong circularly polarized light pulses, we confirm that the ionization of p orbitals with defined angular momentum depends on the sense of rotation of the applied field. A simple ad-hoc modification of the adiabatic local-density exchange-correlation functional is proposed to remedy its unphysical behavior under orbital depletion.

  19. Rising Star

    OpenAIRE

    Worley, Christiana

    2012-01-01

    Rising Star is a novel about appearances. Thailand Allen is a girl who thinks she understands what she sees. But when what she sees are cracks in her perfect world, maturation and new sight are not far off. Before growth can occur, Thailand must undergo a painful process of learning that carries with it embarrassment, sorrow, anger and confusion. Thailand lives with her mother in a small Texas town called Rising Star. Rising Star is like every other small town with its community gather...

  20. Motion artefact reduction of the photoplethysmographic signal in pulse transit time measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, J Y A; Wilson, S J; Williams, G R; Harris, M; Cooper, D M

    2004-12-01

    Motion artefact is a common occurrence that contaminates photoplethysmographic (PPG) measurements. To extract timing information from signals during artefact is challenging. PPG signal is very sensitive to artefacts and can be used in applications like, pulse transit time (PTT) as part of the polysomnographic studies. A correlation cancellation or signal processing approach is implemented with the adaptive cancelling filter concept and a triaxial accelerometry. PPG signals obtained from a Masimo (Reference) pulse oximeter is used as reference to compare with the reconstructed PPG signals. Different hands are used for each PPG source, one stationary while the other involves typical movements during sleep. A second Masimo pulse oximeter is used to register intensity of timing errors on commercial PPG signals. 108 PTT measurements are recorded in three different movements with PTT estimates from unprocessed PPG signals showing 35.51+/-27.42%, Masimo 50.02+/-29.40% and reconstructed 4.32+/-3.59% difference against those from the Reference PPG. The triaxial accelerometry can be used to detect the presence of artefact on PPG signals. This is useful in PTT measurements when signal contaminated with artefacts are required for further analysis, especially after and during arousals in sleep. The suggested filtering model can then reconstruct these corrupted PPG signals.

  1. Intense 2-cycle laser pulses induce time-dependent bond-hardening in a polyatomic molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Dota, K; Tiwari, A K; Dharmadhikari, J A; Dharmadhikari, A K; Mathur, D

    2012-01-01

    A time-dependent bond-hardening process is discovered in a polyatomic molecule (tetramethyl silane, TMS) using few-cycle pulses of intense 800 nm light. In conventional mass spectrometry, symmetrical molecules like TMS do not exhibit a prominent molecular ion (TMS$^+$) as unimolecular dissociation into [Si(CH$_3$)$_3]^+$ proceeds very fast. Under strong field and few-cycle conditions, this dissociation channel is defeated by time-dependent bond-hardening: a field-induced potential well is created in the TMS$^+$ potential energy curve that effectively traps a wavepacket. The time-dependence of this bond hardening process is verified using longer-duration ($\\geq$ 100 fs) pulses; the relatively "slower" fall-off of optical field in such pulses allows the initially trapped wavepacket to leak out, thereby rendering TMS$^+$ unstable once again. Our results are significant as they demonstrate (i) optical generation of polyatomic ions that are normally inaccessible and (ii) optical control of dynamics in strong field...

  2. Time resolved dosimetry of human brain exposed to low frequency pulsed magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffi, Alessandra; Camera, Francesca; Lucano, Elena; Apollonio, Francesca; Liberti, Micaela

    2016-06-01

    An accurate dosimetry is a key issue to understanding brain stimulation and related interaction mechanisms with neuronal tissues at the basis of the increasing amount of literature revealing the effects on human brain induced by low-level, low frequency pulsed magnetic fields (PMFs). Most literature on brain dosimetry estimates the maximum E field value reached inside the tissue without considering its time pattern or tissue dispersivity. Nevertheless a time-resolved dosimetry, accounting for dispersive tissues behavior, becomes necessary considering that the threshold for an effect onset may vary depending on the pulse waveform and that tissues may filter the applied stimulatory fields altering the predicted stimulatory waveform’s size and shape. In this paper a time-resolved dosimetry has been applied on a realistic brain model exposed to the signal presented in Capone et al (2009 J. Neural Transm. 116 257-65), accounting for the broadband dispersivity of brain tissues up to several kHz, to accurately reconstruct electric field and current density waveforms inside different brain tissues. The results obtained by exposing the Duke’s brain model to this PMF signal show that the E peak in the brain is considerably underestimated if a simple monochromatic dosimetry is carried out at the pulse repetition frequency of 75 Hz.

  3. Time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy of pulsed plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adámek, P; Olejníček, J; Čada, M; Kment, Š; Hubička, Z

    2013-07-15

    A method for time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) has been developed. In this Letter, we describe in detail a developed electronic module that controls the time resolution of the LAS system. The transistor-transistor logic signal triggering the plasma pulse is used for generation of two signals: the first one triggers fine tuning of the laser wavelength and the second one controls time-defined signal sampling from the absorption detector. The described method and electronic system enable investigation of the temporal evolution of the density and temperature of selected particles in technological plasma systems. The high-power impulse magnetron sputtering system with a period of 10 ms and a duty cycle of 1% has been used to verify this method. The temporal evolution of argon metastable density was measured in the active part of the pulse and in the afterglow. The resulting density of Ar* displays a double-peak structure with a first peak in the plasma "ON" phase and a second peak in the afterglow approximately 1 ms after the end of the pulse.

  4. Smartphone-based Continuous Blood Pressure Measurement Using Pulse Transit Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamhosseini, Hamid; Meintjes, Andries; Baig, Mirza; Linden, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability of low cost and easy to use personalized medical monitoring devices has opened the door for new and innovative methods of health monitoring to emerge. Cuff-less and continuous methods of measuring blood pressure are particularly attractive as blood pressure is one of the most important measurements of long term cardiovascular health. Current methods of noninvasive blood pressure measurement are based on inflation and deflation of a cuff with some effects on arteries where blood pressure is being measured. This inflation can also cause patient discomfort and alter the measurement results. In this work, a mobile application was developed to collate the PhotoPlethysmoGramm (PPG) waveform provided by a pulse oximeter and the electrocardiogram (ECG) for calculating the pulse transit time. This information is then indirectly related to the user's systolic blood pressure. The developed application successfully connects to the PPG and ECG monitoring devices using Bluetooth wireless connection and stores the data onto an online server. The pulse transit time is estimated in real time and the user's systolic blood pressure can be estimated after the system has been calibrated. The synchronization between the two devices was found to pose a challenge to this method of continuous blood pressure monitoring. However, the implemented continuous blood pressure monitoring system effectively serves as a proof of concept. This combined with the massive benefits that an accurate and robust continuous blood pressure monitoring system would provide indicates that it is certainly worthwhile to further develop this system.

  5. Comparison of noninvasive pulse transit time estimates as markers of blood pressure using invasive pulse transit time measurements as a reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingwu; Olivier, N Bari; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-05-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) measured as the time delay between invasive proximal and distal blood pressure (BP) or flow waveforms (invasive PTT [I-PTT]) tightly correlates with BP PTT estimated as the time delay between noninvasive proximal and distal arterial waveforms could therefore permit cuff-less BP monitoring. A popular noninvasive PTT estimate for this application is the time delay between ECG and photoplethysmography (PPG) waveforms (pulse arrival time [PAT]). Another estimate is the time delay between proximal and distal PPG waveforms (PPG-PTT). PAT and PPG-PTT were assessed as markers of BP over a wide physiologic range using I-PTT as a reference. Waveforms for determining I-PTT, PAT, and PPG-PTT through central arteries were measured from swine during baseline conditions and infusions of various hemodynamic drugs. Diastolic, mean, and systolic BP varied widely in each subject (group average (mean ± SE) standard deviation between 25 ± 2 and 36 ± 2 mmHg). I-PTT correlated well with all BP levels (group average R(2) values between 0.86 ± 0.03 and 0.91 ± 0.03). PPG-PTT also correlated well with all BP levels (group average R(2) values between 0.81 ± 0.03 and 0.85 ± 0.02), and its R(2) values were not significantly different from those of I-PTT PAT correlated best with systolic BP (group average R(2) value of 0.70 ± 0.04), but its R(2) values for all BP levels were significantly lower than those of I-PTT (P < 0.005) and PPG-PTT (P < 0.02). The pre-ejection period component of PAT was responsible for its inferior correlation with BP In sum, PPG-PTT was not different from I-PTT and superior to the popular PAT as a marker of BP.

  6. A conversion formula for comparing pulse oximeter desaturation rates obtained with different averaging times.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Vagedes

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The number of desaturations determined in recordings of pulse oximeter saturation (SpO2 primarily depends on the time over which values are averaged. As the averaging time in pulse oximeters is not standardized, it varies considerably between centers. To make SpO2 data comparable, it is thus desirable to have a formula that allows conversion between desaturation rates obtained using different averaging times for various desaturation levels and minimal durations. METHODS: Oxygen saturation was measured for 170 hours in 12 preterm infants with a mean number of 65 desaturations <90% per hour of arbitrary duration by using a pulse oximeter in a 2-4 s averaging mode. Using 7 different averaging times between 3 and 16 seconds, the raw red-to-infrared data were reprocessed to determine the number of desaturations (D. The whole procedure was carried out for 7 different minimal desaturation durations (≥ 1, ≥ 5, ≥ 10, ≥ 15, ≥ 20, ≥ 25, ≥ 30 s below SpO2 threshold values of 80%, 85% or 90% to finally reach a conversion formula. The formula was validated by splitting the infants into two groups of six children each and using one group each as a training set and the other one as a test set. RESULTS: Based on the linear relationship found between the logarithm of the desaturation rate and the logarithm of the averaging time, the conversion formula is: D2 = D1 (T2/T1(c, where D2 is the desaturation rate for the desired averaging time T2, and D1 is the desaturation rate for the original averaging time T1, with the exponent c depending on the desaturation threshold and the minimal desaturation duration. The median error when applying this formula was 2.6%. CONCLUSION: This formula enables the conversion of desaturation rates between different averaging times for various desaturation thresholds and minimal desaturation durations.

  7. Raman amplification of Stokes pulse in ultra-small silicon on-insulator optical waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The stimulated Raman amplification of picosecond Stokes pulse is numerically investigated in ultra-small silicon-oninsulator optical waveguide. Numerical results show that we obtain the gain of up to 30-dB for weak Stokes pulse in the copropagation configuration for 10 mm Jength waveguide using high intensity pump optical pulse. The peak gain, pulse width, rise time, and fall time of Stokes pulse will experience the variation course of decaying then increasing with increasing waveguide length. The time delay of output Stokes pulse is controlled by adjusting the initial time delay of both pump and Stokes pulses.

  8. Pulse intensity modulation and the timing stability of millisecond pulsars: A case study of PSR J1713+0747

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, Ryan M

    2012-01-01

    Most millisecond pulsars, like essentially all other radio pulsars, show timing errors well in excess of what is expected from additive radiometer noise alone. We show that changes in amplitude, shape and pulse phase for the millisecond pulsar J1713+0747 cause this excess error. These changes appear to be uncorrelated from one pulse period to the next. The resulting time of arrival variations are correlated across a wide frequency range and are observed with different backend processors on different days, confirming that they are intrinsic in origin and not an instrumental effect or caused by strongly frequency dependent interstellar scattering. Centroids of single pulses show an rms phase variation \\approx 40 microsec, which dominates the timing error and is the same phase jitter phenomenon long known in slower spinning, canonical pulsars. We show that the amplitude modulations of single pulses are modestly correlated with their arrival time fluctuations. We also demonstrate that single-pulse variations are ...

  9. Soliton-like pulse timing jitter in dispersion-managed systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qi-Liang; Li Qing-Shan; Lin Li-Bin

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the timing jitter in dispersion-managed soliton-like systems with the Gaussian pulse is studied by using two methods. Firstly, the derivation of the dynamic equations for the evolution of soliton-like parameters and the timing jitter expressions for the dispersion-managed soliton-like systems are carried out by the perturbed variational method. By analysing and simulating these timing jitter expressions, one can find that the timing jitter is induced by the amplified spontaneous emission noise and the frequency shift, etc. Nonlinear gain can suppress the timing jitter.The chirp sign and the filters action have also effects on the total timing jitter. Secondly, the timing jitter is calculated and analysed by using the moment method. The results of the two methods prove to be consistent with each other.

  10. Time-over-threshold for pulse shape discrimination in a time-of-flight phoswich PET detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chen-Ming; Cates, Joshua W.; Levin, Craig S.

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that a PET detector capable of measuring both photon time-of-flight (TOF) and depth-of-interaction (DOI) improves the image quality and accuracy. Phoswich designs have been realized in PET detectors to measure DOI for more than a decade. However, PET detectors based on phoswich designs put great demand on the readout circuits, which have to differentiate the pulse shape produced by different crystal layers. A simple pulse shape discrimination approach is required to realize the phoswich designs in a clinical PET scanner, which consists of thousands of scintillation crystal elements. In this work, we studied time-over-threshold (ToT) as a pulse shape parameter for DOI. The energy, timing and DOI performance were evaluated for a phoswich detector design comprising 3~\\text{mm}× 3~\\text{mm}× 10 mm LYSO:Ce crystal optically coupled to 3~\\text{mm}× 3~\\text{mm}× 10 mm calcium co-doped LSO:Ce,Ca(0.4%) crystal read out by a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). A DOI accuracy of 97.2% has been achieved for photopeak events using the proposed time-over-threshold (ToT) processing. The energy resolution without correction for SiPM non-linearity was 9.7+/- 0.2 % and 11.3+/- 0.2 % FWHM at 511 keV for LYSO and LSO crystal layers, respectively. The coincidence time resolution for photopeak events ranges from 164.6 ps to 183.1 ps FWHM, depending on the layer combinations. The coincidence time resolution for inter-crystal scatter events ranges from 214.6 ps to 418.3 ps FWHM, depending on the energy windows applied. These results show great promises of using ToT for pulse shape discrimination in a TOF phoswich detector since a ToT measurement can be easily implemented in readout electronics.

  11. A comparison of the failure times of pulse oximeters during blood pressure cuff-induced hypoperfusion in volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagishi, Toshiya; Kanaya, Noriaki; Nakayama, Masayasu; Kurosawa, Saori; Namiki, Akiyoshi

    2004-09-01

    Important information may not be obtained if the pulse oximetry signal is lost during inflation of a cuff for blood pressure measurement, particularly in patients with hemodynamic instability. In the present study, we compared the failure times of pulse oximeters during cuff-induced hypoperfusion in volunteers. A pulse oximeter sensor was attached to the index finger, and a blood pressure cuff was attached to the same arm of each volunteer. MasimoSET Radical (Masimo), Nellcor N-395 (N-395), Nellcor N-20PA, and Nellcor D-25 were tested. To evaluate the failure time of each pulse oximeter, time to peak of cuff pressure, time to loss of signal, time to recovery of signal, and failure interval were measured. All measurements were performed three times for each pulse oximeter and were averaged. There were no differences in hemodynamic measurements among the groups. Time to loss of signal was longer in Masimo than the other pulse oximeters. Masimo and N-395 showed significantly shorter times to recovery of signal than those of the other two pulse oximeters. Failure interval was in the order of Masimo Masimo did not lose a signal as rapidly as the other oximeters studied. Masimo was similar in performance to the N-395 at providing useful data sooner than conventional technology after a loss of the signal. These observations suggest that data will be more available with fewer false-positive alarms when using the Masimo oximeter followed by the N-395 when compared with conventional oximeters.

  12. FPGA-Based Pulse Pile-Up Correction With Energy and Timing Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselman, M D; Pasko, J; Hauck, S; Lewellen, T K; Miyaoka, R S

    2012-10-01

    Modern field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are capable of performing complex discrete signal processing algorithms with clock rates well above 100 MHz. This, combined with FPGA's low expense, ease of use, and selected dedicated hardware make them an ideal technology for a data acquisition system for a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. The University of Washington is producing a high-resolution, small-animal PET scanner that utilizes FPGAs as the core of the front-end electronics. For this scanner, functions that are typically performed in dedicated circuits, or offline, are being migrated to the FPGA. This will not only simplify the electronics, but the features of modern FPGAs can be utilized to add significant signal processing power to produce higher quality images. In this paper we report on an all-digital pulse pile-up correction algorithm that has been developed for the FPGA. The pile-up mitigation algorithm will allow the scanner to run at higher count rates without incurring large data losses due to the overlapping of scintillation signals. This correction technique utilizes a reference pulse to extract timing and energy information for most pile-up events. Using pulses acquired from a Zecotech Photonics MAPD-N with an LFS-3 scintillator, we show that good timing and energy information can be achieved in the presence of pile-up utilizing a moderate amount of FPGA resources.

  13. Time Resolved Measurement of Electron Cloud Densities from Dispersion of Transverse Electric Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnad, Kiran G

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of electron cloud densities in particle accelerators using microwaves has proven to be an effective, non-invasive and inexpensive method. So far the experimental schemes have used continuous waves. This has either been in the form of travelling waves that are propagated, or standing waves that are trapped, in both cases within a segment of the accelerator chamber. The variation in the wave dispersion relation caused by the periodic creation and decay of the electron cloud leads to a phase modulation in the former case, and a frequency modulation in the latter. In general, these methods enable the measurement of a time averaged electron cloud density. In this paper we propose a time resolved measurement by using pulses propagated over a finite length of the accelerator chamber. The pulses are launched periodically, once after a bunch train has passed and then again half a revolution period later. This results in pulses alternating between a dispersion that is either affected by a cloud or not. ...

  14. Time-resolved microplasma excitation temperature in a pulsed microwave discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Jeffrey; Monfared, Shabnam; Hoskinson, Alan

    2013-09-01

    Microwave-driven microplasmas are usually operated in a steady-state mode such that the electron temperature is constant in time. Transient measurements of excitation temperature and helium emission lines, however, suggest that short microwave pulses can be used to raise the electron energy by 20-30% for approximately 100 ns. Time-resolved optical emission spectrometry reveals an initial burst of light emission from the igniting microplasma. This emission overshoot is also correlated with a measured increase in excitation temperature. Excimer emission lags atomic emission, however, and does not overshoot. A simple model demonstrates that an increase in electron temperature is responsible for the overshoot of atomic optical emission at the beginning of each microwave pulse. The formation of dimers and subsequent excimer emission requires slower three-body collisions with the excited rare gas atom; this is why excimer emission does not overshoot the steady state value. Similar experimental and modeling results are observed in argon gas. The overshoot in electron temperature may be used to manipulate the collisional production of species in microplasmas using short, low-duty cycle microwave pulses. This material is based upon work supported by the USAF and Physical Sciences Inc., under contract No. FA8650-C-12-C-2312. Additional support was provided by the DARPA MPD program under award FA9550-12-1-0006.

  15. Time-resolved microplasma electron dynamics in a pulsed microwave discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfared, S. K.; Hoskinson, A. R.; Hopwood, J.

    2013-10-01

    Microwave-driven microplasmas are typically operated in a steady-state mode in which the electron temperature is constant in time. Transient measurements of excitation temperature and helium emission lines, however, suggest that short microwave pulses can be used to increase the electron energy by 20-30%. Time-resolved optical emission spectrometry reveals an initial burst of light emission from the igniting microplasma. This emission overshoot is also correlated with a measured increase in excitation temperature. Excimer emission lags atomic emission, however, and does not overshoot. A simple model shows that an increase in electron temperature is responsible for the overshoot of atomic optical emission at the beginning of each microwave pulse. The formation of dimers and subsequent excimer emission requires slower three-body collisions with the excited rare gas atoms, which is why excimer emission does not overshoot the steady-state values. Similar results are observed in argon gas. The overshoot in electron temperature may be used to manipulate the collisional production of species in microplasmas using short, low-duty cycle microwave pulses.

  16. Incoherent frequency-to-time mapping: application to incoherent pulse shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Company, Victor; Lancis, Jesús; Andrés, Pedro

    2007-03-01

    After temporal amplitude modulation of a spectrally incoherent optical source the averaged intensity profile at the so-called temporal far-zone regime coalesces with a magnified replica of the spectral density function of the source. This has provided the basis for the generalization of the frequency-to-time mapping technique in the partially coherent case. Based on this fact, temporal intensity waveform generation is demonstrated by spectral filtering the incoherent source before the temporal modulation stage. We refer to this technique as full incoherent pulse shaping. Although only the average intensity of the output signal is properly shaped, intensity fluctuations between the different realizations of the output shaped waveform are shown to be small in the practical situation. Finally, we provide some computer simulations concerning arbitrary picosecond pulse generation from an amplified spontaneous emission source.

  17. The High Time Resolution Universe Survey - III. Single-pulse searches and preliminary analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Burke-Spolaor, S; Johnston, S; Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; D'Amico, N; Jameson, A; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Milia, S; Possenti, A; Stappers, B; van Straten, W

    2011-01-01

    We present the search methods and initial results for transient radio signals in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) Survey. The HTRU survey's single-pulse search, the software designed to perform the search, and a determination of the HTRU survey's sensitivity to single pulses are described. Initial processing of a small fraction of the survey has produced 11 discoveries, all of which are sparsely-emitting neutron stars, as well as provided confirmation of two previously unconfirmed neutron stars. Most of the newly discovered objects lie in regions surveyed previously, indicating both the improved sensitivity of the HTRU survey observing system and the dynamic nature of the radio sky. The cycles of active and null states in nulling pulsars, rotating radio transients (RRATs), and long-term intermittent pulsars are explored in the context of determining the relationship between these populations, and of the sensitivity of a search to the various radio-intermittent neutron star populations. This analysis s...

  18. Advanced nitrogen removal by pulsed sequencing batch reactors (SBR) with real-time control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Qing; PENG Yongzhen; YANG Anming; GUO Jianhua; LI Jianfeng

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of pH and oxidation reduction potential (ORP) as on-line control parameters to advance nitrogen removal in pulsed sequencing batch reactors (SBR)was evaluated.The pulsed SBR,a novel operational mode of SBR,was utilized to treat real municipal wastewater accompanied with adding ethanol as external carbon source.It was observed that the bending-point (apex and knee) of pH and ORP profiles can be used to control denitrification process at a low influent C/N ratio while dpH/dt can be used to control the nitrification and denitrification process at a high influent C/N ratio.The experimental results demonstrated that the effluent total nitrogen can be reduced to lower than 2 mg/L,and the average total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency was higher than 98% by using real-time controll strategy.

  19. Time-Frequency (Wigner Analysis of Linear and Nonlinear Pulse Propagation in Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Azaña

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Time-frequency analysis, and, in particular, Wigner analysis, is applied to the study of picosecond pulse propagation through optical fibers in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. The effects of first- and second-order group velocity dispersion (GVD and self-phase modulation (SPM are first analyzed separately. The phenomena resulting from the interplay between GVD and SPM in fibers (e.g., soliton formation or optical wave breaking are also investigated in detail. Wigner analysis is demonstrated to be an extremely powerful tool for investigating pulse propagation dynamics in nonlinear dispersive systems (e.g., optical fibers, providing a clearer and deeper insight into the physical phenomena that determine the behavior of these systems.

  20. Time-resolved measurement of atomic emission enhancement by fs-ns dual-pulsed laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Li-Xin; Zhang Yong-Sheng; Zheng Guo-Xin; Liu Jing-Ru; Cheng Jian-Ping; Lü Min

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved measurement of atomic emission enhancement is performed by using a 500-fs KrF laser pulse incident upon a high density supersonic O2 gas jet, synchronized with an orthogonal ns frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser pulse. The ultra-short pulse serves as an igniter of the gas jet, and the subsequent ns-laser pulse significantly enhances the atomic emission. Analysis shows that the contributions to the enhancement effect are made mainly by the bremsstrahlung radiation and cascade ionization.

  1. A comparative study of Type II-P and II-L supernova rise times as exemplified by the case of LSQ13cuw

    CERN Document Server

    Gall, E E E; Kotak, R; Jerkstrand, A; Leibundgut, B; Rabinowitz, D; Sollerman, J; Sullivan, M; Smartt, S J; Anderson, J P; Benetti, S; Baltay, C; Feindt, U; Fraser, M; González-Gaitán, S; Inserra, C; Maguire, K; McKinnon, R; Valenti, S; Young, D

    2015-01-01

    We report on our findings based on the analysis of observations of the Type II-L supernova LSQ13cuw within the framework of currently-accepted physical predictions of core-collapse supernova explosions. LSQ13cuw was discovered within a day of explosion, which is hitherto unprecedented for Type II-L supernovae. This motivated a comparative study of Type II-P and II-L supernovae with relatively well-constrained explosion epochs and rise times to maximium (optical) light. From our sample of 19 such events, we find evidence of a positive correlation between the duration of the rise and the peak brightness. On average, SNe II-L tend to have brighter peak magnitudes and longer rise times than SNe II-P. However, this difference is clearest only at the extreme ends of the rise-time versus peak brightness relation. Using two different analytical models, we performed a parameter study to investigate the physical parameters that control the rise-time behaviour. In general, the models qualitatively reproduce aspects of t...

  2. Limitations in timing precision due to single-pulse shape variability in millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, R M; Dai, S; Bailes, M; Hobbs, G; Manchester, R N; van Straten, W; Raithel, C A; Ravi, V; Toomey, L; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Coles, W A; Keith, M J; Kerr, M; Levin, Y; Sarkissian, J M; Wang, J -B; Wen, L; Zhu, X -J

    2014-01-01

    High-sensitivity radio-frequency observations of millisecond pulsars usually show stochastic, broadband, pulse-shape variations intrinsic to the pulsar emission process. These variations induce jitter noise in pulsar timing observations; understanding the properties of this noise is of particular importance for the effort to detect gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays. We assess the short-term profile and timing stability of 22 millisecond pulsars that are part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array sample by examining intra-observation arrival time variability and single-pulse phenomenology. In 7 of the 22 pulsars, in the band centred at approximately 1400MHz, we find that the brightest observations are limited by intrinsic jitter. We find consistent results, either detections or upper limits, for jitter noise in other frequency bands. PSR J1909-3744 shows the lowest levels of jitter noise, which we estimate to contribute $\\sim$10 ns root mean square error to the arrival times for hour-duration observati...

  3. Minimization of the external heating power by long fusion power rise-up time for self-ignition access in the helical reactor FFHR2m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitarai, O.; Sagara, A.; Chikaraishi, H.; Imagawa, S.; Watanabe, K.; Shishkin, A. A.; Motojima, O.

    2007-11-01

    Minimization of the external heating power to access self-ignition is advantageous to increase the reactor design flexibility and to reduce the capital and operating costs of the plasma heating device in a helical reactor. In this work we have discovered that a larger density limit leads to a smaller value of the required confinement enhancement factor, a lower density limit margin reduces the external heating power and over 300 s of the fusion power rise-up time makes it possible to reach a minimized heating power. While the fusion power rise-up time in a tokamak is limited by the OH transformer flux or the current drive capability, any fusion power rise-up time can be employed in a helical reactor for reducing the thermal stresses of the blanket and shields, because the confinement field is generated by the external helical coils.

  4. Landau-Zener-Stückelberg Interferometry in Quantum Dots with Fast Rise Times: Evidence for Coherent Phonon Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkusinski, M.; Studenikin, S. A.; Aers, G.; Granger, G.; Kam, A.; Sachrajda, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    Manipulating qubits via electrical pulses in a piezoelectric material such as GaAs can be expected to generate incidental acoustic phonons. In this Letter we determine theoretically and experimentally the consequences of these phonons for semiconductor spin qubits using Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry. Theoretical calculations predict that phonons in the presence of the spin-orbit interaction produce both phonon-Rabi fringes and accelerated evolution at the singlet-triplet anticrossing. Observed features confirm the influence of these mechanisms. Additionally, evidence is found that the pulsed gates themselves act as phonon cavities increasing the influence of phonons under specific resonant conditions.

  5. From RISING to the DESPEC fast-timing project within NUSTAR at FAIR: Sub-nanosecond nuclear timing spectroscopy with LaBr{sub 3} scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regan, P.H., E-mail: p.regan@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    This paper summarises a presentation given at the IRRMA8 conference in June 2011 which reviewed briefly the topic of current research studies in the evolution of nuclear structure with changing proton and neutron numbers. A short review of relevant contemporary spectroscopic studies of the structure of nuclei with highly exotic N/Z ratios using projectile fragmentation and fission reactions is given, together with an overview of some of the physics research aims to be attacked using the proposed Decay Spectroscopy (DESPEC) LaBr{sub 3} Fast-Timing gamma-ray array for the NUSTAR project at the upcoming Facility for Anti-Proton and Ion Research (FAIR). Examples of recent results using both 'isomer' and {beta}{sup -}-delayed gamma-ray decay measurements with the Stopped RISING hyper-pure germanium array at GSI are summarised and used to highlight some of the fundamental physics studies which are expected to become available in this area of research in the coming decade. Examples of the performance of cerium-doped LaBr{sub 3} detectors from 'in-beam' test experiments are presented together with initial plans for the geometry of the planned multi-detector LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) array for DESPEC. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The paper presents an overview of nuclear excitation systematics in even-even nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The paper gives a description of the Stopped RISING gamma-ray spectrometer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper gives some of the recent scientific results in nuclear spectroscopy of exotic nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The paper shows the use of halide scintillation detectors for gamma-ray decay studies of nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper shows the use of LaBr{sub 3} detectors to nuclear excited state lifetimes in the ns regime.

  6. A low timing jitter picosecond microchip laser pumped by pulsed LD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sha; Wang, Yan-biao; Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shou-huan

    2016-07-01

    SESAM passively Q-switched microchip laser is a very promising instrument to replace mode locked lasers to obtain picosecond pulses. The biggest drawback of a passively Q-switched microchip laser is its un-avoided large timing jitter, especially when the pump intensity is low, i.e. at low laser repetition rate range. In order to obtain a low timing jitter passively Q-switched picosecond microchip laser in the whole laser repetition rate range, a 1000 kHz pulsed narrow bandwidth Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) stablized laser diode was used as the pump source. By tuning the pump intensity, we could control the output laser frequency. In this way, we achieved a very low timing jitter passively Q-switched picosecond laser at 2.13 mW, 111.1 kHz. The relative timing jitter was only 0.0315%, which was around 100 times smaller compared with a cw LD pumped microchip working at hundred kilohertz repetition rate frequency range.

  7. Real-time single-shot measurement and correction of pulse phase and amplitude for ultrafast lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestov, Dmitry; Ryabtsev, Anton; Rasskazov, Gennady; Lozovoy, Vadim V.; Dantus, Marcos

    2014-05-01

    The transition of femtosecond lasers from the laboratory to commercial applications requires real-time automated pulse compression, ensuring optimum performance without assistance. Single-shot phase measurements together with closed-loop optimization based on real-time multiphoton intrapulse interference phase scan are demonstrated. On-the-fly correction of amplitude, as well as second- and third-order phase distortions based on the real-time measurements, is accomplished by a pulse shaper.

  8. Noise-Tolerant Streaming Real-Time Data Acquisition Fabric for Pulsed Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Siskind, E J

    2002-01-01

    A noise-tolerant data communications fabric has been developed to meet the real-time data acquisition and control requirements of fast feedback loops, machine protection systems, pulse-to-pulse sequencing, and machine-experiment communications at next-generation pulsed accelerators such as the Next Linear Collider ("NLC"). The fabric is constructed from "platform" or "system-on-a-chip" field programmable gate arrays ("FPGAs") containing embedded processors, block memory, and multi-gigabit serial transceivers interconnected via an array of point-to-point fiber-optic physical links for standard networks such as gigabit Ethernet. The FPGA-based link hardware segments messages of varying priorities into a continuous sequence of fixed-length data cells, interrupting the cell stream of lower priority messages with those comprising higher priority traffic. A high level of noise-tolerance is provided by dedicating almost half the contents of each cell to Reed-Solomon forward error correcting code ("ECC") data. Furthe...

  9. Propagation of an electromagnetic pulse through a waveguide with a barrier A time domain solution within classical electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Emig, T

    1996-01-01

    An electromagnetic truncated Gaussian pulse propagates through a waveguide with piecewise different dielectric constants. The waveguide contains a barrier, namely a region of a lower dielectric constant compared to the neighboring regions. This set-up yields a purely imaginary wave vector in the region of the barrier ('electromagnetic tunneling'). We exactly calculate the time-dependent Green's function for a slightly simplified dispersion relation. In order to observe the plain tunneling effect we neglect the distortions caused by the wave guide in obtaining the transmitted pulse. The wave front of the pulse travels with the vacuum speed of light. Nevertheless, behind the barrier, the maximum of the transmitted pulse turns up at an earlier time than in the case without an barrier. This effect will be explained in terms of the energy flow across the barrier. The solutions obtained reproduce the shape of the pulses measured in the tunneling experiments of Enders and Nimtz [J. Phys. (France) I2, 1693 (1992); Ph...

  10. Pulsed second order field NMR for real time PGSE and single-shot surface to volume ratio measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, W C; Obruchkov, S; Galvosas, P; Hunter, M W

    2014-10-01

    Pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance provides a powerful tool for the measurement of particle diffusion and mobility. When these particles are contained in a porous medium, the diffusive process is influenced by the pore boundaries, and their effect on diffusion measurements provides information about the pore space. The acquisition of the apparent diffusion coefficient and its dependence on time, in the short time limit, reveals the surface to volume ratio of the porous medium, and in the long time limit, its tortuosity. With conventional pulsed field gradient techniques, processes where pore boundaries are evolving on the sub-second time scale cannot be resolved. Using pulsed second order magnetic fields in conjunction with one-dimensional imaging and the pulse sequence Difftrain, this paper presents a proof of concept for the first ever real time single-shot surface to volume NMR measurement.

  11. Pulsed second order field NMR for real time PGSE and single-shot surface to volume ratio measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittler, W. C.; Obruchkov, S.; Galvosas, P.; Hunter, M. W.

    2014-10-01

    Pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance provides a powerful tool for the measurement of particle diffusion and mobility. When these particles are contained in a porous medium, the diffusive process is influenced by the pore boundaries, and their effect on diffusion measurements provides information about the pore space. The acquisition of the apparent diffusion coefficient and its dependence on time, in the short time limit, reveals the surface to volume ratio of the porous medium, and in the long time limit, its tortuosity. With conventional pulsed field gradient techniques, processes where pore boundaries are evolving on the sub-second time scale cannot be resolved. Using pulsed second order magnetic fields in conjunction with one-dimensional imaging and the pulse sequence Difftrain, this paper presents a proof of concept for the first ever real time single-shot surface to volume NMR measurement.

  12. Performance of dynamical decoupling in bosonic environments and under pulse-timing fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, W. S.; Kapale, K. T.; Paternostro, M.; Semião, F. L.

    2016-12-01

    We study the suppression of qubit dephasing through Uhrig dynamical decoupling (UDD) in nontrivial environments modeled within the spin-boson formalism. In particular, we address the case of (i) a qubit coupled to a bosonic bath with power-law spectral density, and (ii) a qubit coupled to a single harmonic oscillator that dissipates energy into a bosonic bath, which embodies an example of a structured bath for the qubit. We then model the influence of random time jitter in the UDD protocol by sorting pulse-application times from Gaussian distributions centered at appropriate values dictated by the optimal protocol. In case (i) we find that, when few pulses are applied and a sharp cutoff is considered, longer coherence times and robust UDD performances (against random timing errors) are achieved for a super-Ohmic bath. On the other hand, when an exponential cutoff is considered, a super-Ohmic bath is undesirable. In case (ii) the best scenario is obtained for an overdamped harmonic motion. Our study provides relevant information for the implementation of optimized schemes for the protection of quantum states from decoherence.

  13. Use of optical fibers in the pulsed time-of-flight laser rangefinding technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissilae, Seppo M.; Kostamovaara, Juha T.; Myllylae, Risto A.

    1990-08-01

    The problems associated with the fibres used in pulsed time-of-flight rangefinders were studied, and particularly errors due to the transit time disturbances of step and graded index fibres as a function of fibre length, input numerical aperture and temperature. The cladding modes and leaky modes ofa fibre can affect the transit time oflight pulses under suitable conditions, so that fibres become sensitive to environmental effects. The effect of temperature is smaller and more linear for acryl-coated fibres than for nylon-coated ones. The main reason for the non-linear effect of temperature on a nylon fibre is the non-linear Young's modulus of nylon as a function of temperature. The increasing transit time of hard clad silica (HCS) fibres at lower temperatures (below +20°C), contrary to glass fibres, can be explained by the different thermal coefficient of the core and cladding, leading to increased non-homogenities on the core-cladding interface.

  14. Downhole pulse radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsi-Tien

    1987-09-28

    A borehole logging tool generates a fast rise-time, short duration, high peak-power radar pulse having broad energy distribution between 30 MHz and 300 MHz through a directional transmitting and receiving antennas having barium titanate in the electromagnetically active region to reduce the wavelength to within an order of magnitude of the diameter of the antenna. Radar returns from geological discontinuities are sampled for transmission uphole. 7 figs.

  15. Time scaling with efficient time-propagation techniques for atoms and molecules in pulsed radiation fields

    CERN Document Server

    Hamido, Aliou; Madroñero, Javier; Mota-Furtado, Francisca; O'Mahony, Patrick; Frapiccini, Ana Laura; Piraux, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    We present an ab initio approach to solve the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation to treat electron and photon impact multiple ionization of atoms or molecules. It combines the already known time scaled coordinate method with a new high order time propagator based on a predictor-corrector scheme. In order to exploit in an optimal way the main advantage of the time scaled coordinate method namely that the scaled wave packet stays confined and evolves smoothly towards a stationary state the modulus square of which being directly proportional to the electron energy spectra in each ionization channel, we show that the scaled bound states should be subtracted from the total scaled wave packet. In addition, our detailed investigations suggest that multi-resolution techniques like for instance, wavelets are the most appropriate ones to represent spatially the scaled wave packet. The approach is illustrated in the case of the interaction of an one-dimensional model atom as well as atomic hydrogen with a strong osci...

  16. Numerical simulation of the early-time high altitude electromagnetic pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟萃; 陈雨生; 刘顺坤; 谢秦川; 陈向跃; 龚建成

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the finite difference method is used to develop the Fortran software MCHII. The physical process in which the electromagnetic signal is generated by the interaction of nuclear-explosion-induced Compton currents with the geomagnetic field is numerically simulated. The electromagnetic pulse waveforms below the burst point are investigated.The effects of the height of burst, yield and the time-dependence of ?-rays are calculated by using the MCHII code.The results agree well with those obtained by using the code CHAP.

  17. Real time evolvable hardware for optimal reconfiguration of cusp-like pulse shapers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanchares, Juan, E-mail: julandan@dacya.ucm.es; Garnica, Oscar, E-mail: ogarnica@dacya.ucm.es; Risco-Martín, José L., E-mail: jlrisco@dacya.ucm.es; Hidalgo, J. Ignacio, E-mail: hidalgo@dacya.ucm.es; Colmenar, J. Manuel, E-mail: jmcolmenar@ajz.ucm.es; Cuesta-Infante, Alfredo, E-mail: acuestai@pdi.ucm.es

    2014-11-01

    The design of a cusp-like digital pulse shaper for particle energy measurements requires the definition of four parameters whose values are defined based on the nature of the shaper input signal (timing, noise, …) provided by a sensor. However, after high doses of radiation, sensors degenerate and their output signals do not meet the original characteristics, which may lead to erroneous measurements of the particle energies. We present in this paper an evolvable cusp-like digital shaper, which is able to auto-recalibrate the original hardware implementation into a new design that match the original specifications under the new sensor features.

  18. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Arimoto, Y; Igarashi, Y; Iwashita, Y; Ino, T; Katayama, R; Kitahara, R; Kitaguchi, M; Matsumura, H; Mishima, K; Oide, H; Otono, H; Sakakibara, R; Shima, T; Shimizu, H M; Sugino, T; Sumi, N; Sumino, H; Taketani, K; Tanaka, G; Tanaka, M; Tauchi, K; Toyoda, A; Yamada, T; Yamashita, S; Yokoyama, H; Yoshioka, T

    2015-01-01

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with $^6$Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  19. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimoto, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Ibaraki (Japan); Higashi, N. [Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Igarashi, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Ibaraki (Japan); Iwashita, Y. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Ino, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Ibaraki (Japan); Katayama, R. [Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Kitaguchi, M. [Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute, Nagoya University, Aichi (Japan); Kitahara, R. [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Matsumura, H.; Mishima, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Ibaraki (Japan); Nagakura, N.; Oide, H. [Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Otono, H., E-mail: otono@phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Research Centre for Advanced Particle Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Sakakibara, R. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Aichi (Japan); Shima, T. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Shimizu, H.M.; Sugino, T. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Aichi (Japan); Sumi, N. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Sumino, H. [Department of Basic Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Taketani, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Ibaraki (Japan); and others

    2015-11-01

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with {sup 6}Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  20. Time-resolved pulsed stimulated infrared thermography applied to carbon-epoxy non destructive evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapez, J.-C.; Boscher, D.; Delpech, Ph.; Deom, A.; Gardette, G.; Balageas, D.

    Since several years, time-resolved pulsed stimulated infrared thermography (SIRT) has been developed at ONERA with the aim of combining fast screening and quantitative characterization. The analysis of pixel by pixel thermograms leads to depth-location and thermal resistance images of delaminations. In this paper we present recent enhancements of the portable SIRT system and refinement of the data reduction procedure which demonstrate the possibility of detecting and evaluating delaminations in C-epoxy at depths higher than 3 mm. A 2-D inversion procedure is proposed to better characterize defects of reduced lateral extend as compared to the former 1-D method.

  1. Temperature field at time of pulse current discharge in metal structure with elliptical embedding crack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yu-ming; TIAN Zhen-guo; ZHENG Li-juan; LI Wei

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical analysis is made on the temperature field at the time of pulse current discharge in a metal structure with an elliptical embedding crack. In finding the temperature field, analogy between the current flow through an elliptical embedding crack and the fluid flow through a barrier is made based on the similarity principle. Boundary conditions derived from this theory are introduced so that the distribution of current density and the temperature field expressions can be obtained. The study provides a theoretic basis to the applications of stopping spatial crack with electromagnetic heating.

  2. An Improved Clutter Suppression Method for Weather Radars Using Multiple Pulse Repetition Time Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjie Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the implementation of an improved clutter suppression method for the multiple pulse repetition time (PRT technique based on simulated radar data. The suppression method is constructed using maximum likelihood methodology in time domain and is called parametric time domain method (PTDM. The procedure relies on the assumption that precipitation and clutter signal spectra follow a Gaussian functional form. The multiple interleaved pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs that are used in this work are set to four PRFs (952, 833, 667, and 513 Hz. Based on radar simulation, it is shown that the new method can provide accurate retrieval of Doppler velocity even in the case of strong clutter contamination. The obtained velocity is nearly unbiased for all the range of Nyquist velocity interval. Also, the performance of the method is illustrated on simulated radar data for plan position indicator (PPI scan. Compared with staggered 2-PRT transmission schemes with PTDM, the proposed method presents better estimation accuracy under certain clutter situations.

  3. Variability in time delay between two models of pulse oximeters for deriving the photoplethysmographic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Jong Yong A; Wilson, Stephen J; Dakin, Carolyn; Williams, Gordon; Harris, Margaret-Anne; Cooper, David

    2005-08-01

    Pulse oximetry is commonly used as an arterial blood oxygen saturation (SaO2) measure. However, its other serial output, the photoplethysmography (PPG) signal, is not as well studied. Raw PPG signals can be used to estimate cardiovascular measures like pulse transit time (PTT) and possibly heart rate (HR). These timing-related measurements are heavily dependent on the minimal variability in phase delay of the PPG signals. Masimo SET Rad-9 and Novametrix Oxypleth oximeters were investigated for their PPG phase characteristics on nine healthy adults. To facilitate comparison, PPG signals were acquired from fingers on the same hand in a random fashion. Results showed that mean PTT variations acquired from the Masimo oximeter (37.89 ms) were much greater than the Novametrix (5.66 ms). Documented evidence suggests that 1 ms variation in PTT is equivalent to 1 mmHg change in blood pressure. Moreover, the PTT trend derived from the Masimo oximeter can be mistaken as obstructive sleep apnoeas based on the known criteria. HR comparison was evaluated against estimates attained from an electrocardiogram (ECG). Novametrix differed from ECG by 0.71+/-0.58% (pMasimo differed by 4.51+/-3.66% (p>0.05). Modern oximeters can be attractive for their improved SaO2 measurement. However, using raw PPG signals obtained directly from these oximeters for timing-related measurements warrants further investigations.

  4. Laser-induced reversion of $\\delta^{'}$ precipitates in an Al-Li alloy: Study on temperature rise in pulsed laser atom probe

    CERN Document Server

    Khushaim, Muna; Al-Kassab, Talaat

    2015-01-01

    The influence of tuning the laser energy during the analyses on the resulting microstructure in a specimen utilizing an ultra-fast laser assisted atom probe was demonstrated by a case study of a binary Al-Li alloy. The decomposition parameters, such as the size, number density, volume fraction and composition of $\\delta^{'}$ precipitates, were carefully monitored after each analysis. A simple model was employed to estimate the corresponding specimen temperature for each value of the laser energy. The results indicated that the corresponding temperatures for the laser energy in the range of 10 to 80 pJ are located inside the miscibility gap of the binary Al-Li phase diagram and fall into the metastable equilibrium field. In addition, the corresponding temperature for a laser energy of 100 pJ was in fairly good agreement with reported range of $\\delta^{'}$ solvus temperature, suggesting a result of reversion upon heating due to laser pulsing.

  5. Time transfer between the Goddard Optical Research Facility and the U.S. Naval Observatory using 100 picosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, C. O.; Rayner, J. D.; Steggerda, C. A.; Mullendore, J. V.; Small, L.; Wagner, S.

    1983-01-01

    A horizontal two-way time comparison link in air between the University of Maryland laser ranging and time transfer equipment at the Goddard Optical Research Facility (GORF) 1.2 m telescope and the Time Services Division of the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) was established. Flat mirrors of 25 cm and 30 cm diameter respectively were placed on top of the Washington Cathedral and on a water tower at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center. Two optical corner reflectors at the USNO reflect the laser pulses back to the GORF. Light pulses of 100 ps duration and an energy of several hundred microjoules are sent at the rate of 10 pulses per second. The detection at the USNO is by means of an RCA C30902E avalanche photodiode and the timing is accomplished by an HP 5370A computing counter and an HP 1000 computer with respect to a 10 pps pulse train from the Master Clock.

  6. Pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy: A comparison of experimental measurement and simulation prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Marie-Luise; Almualimi, Majdi A; Langton, Christian M

    2016-01-01

    Considering ultrasound propagation through complex composite media as an array of parallel sonic rays, a comparison of computer-simulated prediction with experimental data has previously been reported for transmission mode (where one transducer serves as transmitter, the other as receiver) in a series of 10 acrylic step-wedge samples, immersed in water, exhibiting varying degrees of transit time inhomogeneity. In this study, the same samples were used but in pulse-echo mode, where the same ultrasound transducer served as both transmitter and receiver, detecting both 'primary' (internal sample interface) and 'secondary' (external sample interface) echoes. A transit time spectrum was derived, describing the proportion of sonic rays with a particular transit time. A computer simulation was performed to predict the transit time and amplitude of various echoes created, and compared with experimental data. Applying an amplitude-tolerance analysis, 91.7% ± 3.7% of the simulated data were within ±1 standard deviation of the experimentally measured amplitude-time data. Correlation of predicted and experimental transit time spectra provided coefficients of determination (R(2)%) ranging from 100.0% to 96.8% for the various samples tested. The results acquired from this study provide good evidence for the concept of parallel sonic rays. Furthermore, deconvolution of experimental input and output signals has been shown to provide an effective method to identify echoes otherwise lost due to phase cancellation. Potential applications of pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy include improvement of ultrasound image fidelity by improving spatial resolution and reducing phase interference artefacts.

  7. Time-resolved detection of relative-intensity squeezed nanosecond pulses in an {sup 87}Rb vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agha, Imad H; Giarmatzi, Christina; Grangier, Philippe; Messin, Gaetan [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Universite Paris-Sud, Campus Polytechnique, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Glorieux, Quentin; Coudreau, Thomas, E-mail: agha@enst.fr [Laboratoire Materiaux et Phenomenes Quantiques, UMR 7162, Universite Paris-Diderot CNRS, 10, rue A Domon et L Duquet, 75013 Paris (France)

    2011-04-15

    We present theoretical and experimental results on the generation and detection of pulsed, relative-intensity squeezed light in a hot {sup 87}Rb vapor. The intensity noise correlations between a pulsed probe beam and its conjugate, generated through nearly degenerate four-wave mixing in a double-lambda system, are studied numerically and measured experimentally via time-resolved balanced detection. We predict and observe approximately - 1 dB of time-resolved relative-intensity squeezing with 50 ns pulses at 1 MHz repetition rate. (- 1.34 dB corrected for loss).

  8. Time-resolved thermal lens spectroscopy with a single-pulsed laser excitation beam: an analytical model for dual-beam mode-mismatched experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Rezaei, Hamidreza; Ghalambor-Dezfouli, Abdolmohammad

    2017-02-01

    Pulsed laser beam excitations are more commonly used in thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS) than continuous-wave (CW) ones, because CW excitations limit the measurement to linear absorption processes [J. Opt. A5, 256 (2003)]. In this work, we present a new and full analytical model for a single-pulsed laser excitation dual-beam mode-mismatched TLS for low absorption solid-state and liquid samples. Our model has been based on a new solution of time-dependent heat equation for a finite-radius cylindrical sample exposed to a single-pulsed excitation laser beam. For low absorbent samples, unlike previous models, all aberration terms associated in the thermal lens were taken into account in Fresnel integration. Besides, the model provides a full analytical mathematical expression for the temperature rise, normalized signal intensity, and Z-scan photothermal lens signal. The model was confirmed with experimental data of distilled deionized water with excellent agreement. Therefore, the model allows us to extract thermo-optical properties of samples in an analytical and more accurate way.

  9. Time-Dependent Measure of a Nano-Scale Force-Pulse Driven by the Axonemal Dynein Motors in Individual Live Sperm Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, M J; Rudd, R E; McElfresh, M W; Balhorn, R

    2009-04-23

    Nano-scale mechanical forces generated by motor proteins are crucial to normal cellular and organismal functioning. The ability to measure and exploit such forces would be important to developing motile biomimetic nanodevices powered by biological motors for Nanomedicine. Axonemal dynein motors positioned inside the sperm flagellum drive microtubule sliding giving rise to rhythmic beating of the flagellum. This force-generating action makes it possible for the sperm cell to move through viscous media. Here we report new nano-scale information on how the propulsive force is generated by the sperm flagellum and how this force varies over time. Single cell recordings reveal discrete {approx}50 ms pulses oscillating with amplitude 9.8 {+-} 2.6 nN independent of pulse frequency (3.5-19.5 Hz). The average work carried out by each cell is 4.6 x 10{sup -16} J per pulse, equivalent to the hydrolysis of {approx}5,500 ATP molecules. The mechanochemical coupling at each active dynein head is {approx}2.2 pN/ATP, and {approx}3.9 pN per dynein arm, in agreement with previously published values obtained using different methods.

  10. Blood Pressure Estimation Using Pulse Transit Time From Bioimpedance and Continuous Wave Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxi, Dilpreet; Redout, Jean-Michel; Yuce, Mehmet Rasit

    2017-04-01

    We have developed and tested a new architecture for pulse transit time (PTT) estimation at the central arteries using electrical bioimpedance, electrocardiogram, and continuous wave radar to estimate cuffless blood pressure. A transmitter and receiver antenna are placed at the sternum to acquire the arterial pulsation at the aortic arch. A four-electrode arrangement across the shoulders acquires arterial pulse across the carotid and subclavian arteries from bioimpedance as well as a bipolar lead I electrocardiogram. The PTT and pulse arrival times (PATs) are measured on six healthy male subjects during exercise on a bicycle ergometer. Using linear regression, the estimated PAT and PTT values are calibrated to the systolic and mean as well as diastolic blood pressure from an oscillometric device. For all subjects, the Pearson correlation coefficients for PAT-SBP and PTT-SBP are -0.66 (p = 0.001) and -0.48 (p = 0.0029), respectively. Correlation coefficients for individual subjects ranged from -0.54 to -0.9 and -0.37 to -0.95, respectively. The proposed system architecture is promising in estimating cuffless arterial blood pressure at the central, proximal arteries, which obey the Moens-Korteweg equation more closely when compared to peripheral arteries. An important advantage of PTT from the carotid and subclavian arteries is that the PTT over the central elastic arteries is measured instead of the peripheral arteries, which potentially reduces the changes in PTT due to vasomotion. Furthermore, the sensors can be completely hidden under a patients clothes, making them more acceptable by the patient for ambulatory monitoring.

  11. Periodic modulation in pulse arrival times from young pulsars: a renewed case for neutron star precession

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, Matthew; Johnston, Simon; Shannon, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    In a search for periodic variation in the arrival times of pulses from 151 young, energetic pulsars, we have identified seven cases of modulation consistent with one or two harmonics of a single fundamental with time-scale 0.5-1.5 yr. We use simulations to show that these modulations are statistically significant and of high quality (sinusoidal) even when contaminated by the strong stochastic timing noise common to young pulsars. Although planetary companions could induce such modulation, the large implied masses and 2:1 mean motion resonances challenge such an explanation. Instead, the modulation is likely to be intrinsic to the pulsar, arising from quasi-periodic switching between stable magnetospheric states, and we propose that precession of the neutron star may regulate this switching.

  12. An Investigation of Pulse Transit Time as a Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurement Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, B M; O' Flynn, B; Mathewson, A, E-mail: brian.mccarthy@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, UCC, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

    2011-08-17

    The objective of this paper is to examine the Pulse Transit Method (PTT) as a non-invasive means to track Blood Pressure over a short period of time. PTT was measured as the time it takes for an ECG R-wave to propagate to the finger, where it is detected by a photoplethysmograph sensor. The PTT method is ideal for continuous 24-hour Blood Pressure Measurement (BPM) since it is both cuff-less and non-invasive and therefore comfortable and unobtrusive for the patient. Other techniques, such as the oscillometric method, have shown to be accurate and reliable but require a cuff for operation, making them unsuitable for long term monitoring. Although a relatively new technique, the PTT method has shown to be able to accurately track blood pressure changes over short periods of time, after which re-calibration is necessary. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of the method.

  13. Scalable time reversal of Raman echo quantum memory and quantum waveform conversion of light pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseev, E S

    2013-01-01

    We have found the new hidden symmetry of time reversal light-atom interaction in the photon echo quantum memory with Raman atomic transition. The time-reversed quantum memory provides generalized condition for ideal compression/decompression of time duration and wavelength conversion of the input light pulse. Based on a general analytical approach to this scheme, we have studied the optimal conditions of the light field compression/decompression in resonant atomic systems characterized by realistic spectral properties. The demonstrated effective quantum conversion of the light waveform and wavelength are also discussed for various possible realizations of the quantum memory scheme. The performed study promises new capabilities for fundamental study of the light-atom interaction and for deterministic quantum manipulation of the light field interested for quantum communication and quantum computing.

  14. Integrated multi-channel receiver for a pulsed time-of-flight laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Liu, Ruqing; Zhu, Jingguo

    2015-04-01

    An integrated multi-channel receiver for a pulsed time-of-flight (TOF) laser rangefinder has been designed in this paper. The receiver chip as an important component of the laser radar device has been implemented in a 0.18um CMOS process. It consists of sixteen channels and every channel includes preamplifier, amplifier stages, high-pass filter and a timing discriminator which contains a timing comparator and a noise comparator. Each signal paths is independent of other channels. Based on the simulations, the bandwidth and transimpedance of the amplifier channel are 652MHz, 99dBΩ. Under the simulation condition of TT corner and 27°C, the propagation delay of the discriminator is 2.15ns and the propagation delay dispersion is 223ps. The power consumption during continuous measurement is 810mW, and the operating temperature range of the device is -10~60°C.

  15. Shock-Timing Experiment Using a Two-Step Radiation Pulse with a Polystyrene Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Feng; PENG Xiao-Shi; JIAO Chun-Ye; LIU Shen-Ye; JIANG Xiao-Hua; DING Yong-Kun

    2011-01-01

    @@ A shock-timing experiment plays an important role in inertial confinement fusion studies, and the timing of multiple shock waves is crucial to the performance of inertial confinement fusion ignition targets.We present an experimental observation of a shock wave driven by a two-step radiation pulse in a polystyrene target.The experiment is carried out at Shen Guang 11 Yuan Xing (SGNYX) laser facility in China, and the generation and coalescence of the two shock waves, originating from each of the two radiation steps, is clearly seen with two velocity interferometers.This two-shock-wave coalescence is also simulated by the radioactive hydrodynamic code of a multi-1D program.The experimental measurements are compared with the simulations and quite good agreements are found, with relatively small discrepancies in shock timing.

  16. Single-Shot Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy in Pulsed High Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Noe, G Timothy; Katsutani, Fumiya; Allred, James J; Horowitz, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Qi; Sekiguch, Fumiya; Woods, Gary L; Sullivan, David M; Hoffmann, Matthias C; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a single-shot terahertz time-domain spectrometer to perform optical pump/terahertz probe experiments in pulsed, high magnetic fields up to 30 T. The single-shot detection scheme for measuring a terahertz waveform incorporates a reflective echelon to create time-delayed beamlets across the intensity profile of the gate beam before it spatially and temporally overlaps with the terahertz radiation in a ZnTe detection crystal. After imaging the gate beam onto a camera, the terahertz time-domain waveform can be retrieved by analyzing the resulting image. Here, we have measured cyclotron resonance absorption of optically excited carriers in the terahertz frequency range in bulk, intrinsic silicon at high magnetic fields.

  17. Electron thermalization and attachment in pulse-irradiated oxygen studied by time-resolved microwave conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warman, J.M. (Technische Univ., Delft (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Chemistry); Cooper, Ronald (Melbourne Univ., Parkville (Australia). Dept. of Physical Chemistry)

    1990-01-01

    The microwave conductivity of oxygen gas following nanosecond pulsed irradiation has been studied for pressures from 5 to 50 torr. The conductivity is found to decrease by a factor of approx. 20 in the early stages (tN < 2 x 10{sup 11} s cm{sup -3}) following the pulse. This is attributed to a decrease in the electron collision frequency as the initial excess energy of the electrons becomes degraded. A further decrease found at longer times is due to the three-body attachment of electrons to O{sub 2} with a rate constant of 2.4 x 10{sup -30} cm{sup 6}s{sup -1}. Above a pressure of approx. 30 torr significant attachment begins to occur while electrons are still superthermal. The time at which the microwave signal is within 10% of the value corresponding to thermal energies is given by {tau}{sub th}P approx = 15 {mu}s.torr. (author).

  18. Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Model with Time-Evolution of Energy and State Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Sankaran, Kamesh

    2012-01-01

    A model for pulsed inductive plasma acceleration is presented that consists of a set of circuit equations coupled to both a one-dimensional equation of motion and an equation governing the partitioning of energy. The latter two equations are obtained for the plasma current sheet by treating it as a single element of finite volume and integrating the governing equations over that volume. The integrated terms are replaced where necessary by physically-equivalent quantities that are calculated through the solution of other parts of the governing equation set. The model improves upon previous one-dimensional performance models by permitting the time-evolution of the energy and state properties of the plasma, the latter allowing for the tailoring of the model to different gases that may be chosen as propellants. The time evolution of the various energy modes in the system and the associated plasma properties, calculated for argon propellant, are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the model. The model produces a result where efficiency is maximized at a given value of the electrodynamic scaling term known as the dynamic impedance parameter. Qualitatively and quantitatively, the model compares favorably with performance measured for two separate inductive pulsed plasma thrusters, with disagreements attributable to simplifying assumptions employed in the generation of the model solution.

  19. Strong-field Breit-Wheeler pair production in two consecutive laser pulses with variable time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Martin J. A.; Müller, Carsten

    2017-03-01

    Photoproduction of electron-positron pairs by the strong-field Breit-Wheeler process in an intense laser field is studied. The laser field is assumed to consist of two consecutive short pulses, with a variable time delay in between. By numerical calculations within the framework of scalar quantum electrodynamics, we demonstrate that the time delay exerts a strong impact on the pair-creation probability. For the case when both pulses are identical, the effect is traced back to the relative quantum phase of the interfering S-matrix amplitudes and explained within a simplified analytical model. Conversely, when the two laser pulses differ from each other, the pair-creation probability depends not only on the time delay but, in general, also on the temporal order of the pulses.

  20. Thermalization time of thin metal film heated by short pulse laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Hong-Yu; Zhang Yuan-Chong; Song Ya-Qin; Chen Dian-Yun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the hyperbolic two-step heat conduction model, using the Laplace transform and numerical inverse transform method (Riemann-sum approximation method), the thermal behaviour of thin metal films has been studied during femtosecond pulse laser heating. Also the thermalization time, which is the time for the electron gas and solid lattice to reach thermal balance, has been studied in detail. The values of thermalization time for silver (Ag), gold (Au),copper (Cu) and lead (Pb) are obtained. The effects of material parameters of the thin metal film on the thermalization time are considered for the four kinds of metals by changing one of the parameters and regarding the other parameters as constant. For a typical metal material, the order of the thermalization time is of the order of hundreds of picoseconds.The thermalization time decays exponentially with the increase of phonon-electron coupling factor or electron gas thermal conductivity, and it increases linearly with the increase of the ratio of lattice heat capacity to electron gas heat capacity. However, the relaxation time of the electron gas has very little effect on the thermalization time.

  1. Thermalization time of thin metal film heated by short pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong-Yu; Zhang, Yuan-Chong; Song, Ya-Qin; Chen, Dian-Yun

    2004-10-01

    Based on the hyperbolic two-step heat conduction model, using the Laplace transform and numerical inverse transform method (Riemann-sum approximation method), the thermal behaviour of thin metal films has been studied during femtosecond pulse laser heating. Also the thermalization time, which is the time for the electron gas and solid lattice to reach thermal balance, has been studied in detail. The values of thermalization time for silver (Ag), gold (Au), copper (Cu) and lead (Pb) are obtained. The effects of material parameters of the thin metal film on the thermalization time are considered for the four kinds of metals by changing one of the parameters and regarding the other parameters as constant. For a typical metal material, the order of the thermalization time is of the order of hundreds of picoseconds. The thermalization time decays exponentially with the increase of phonon-electron coupling factor or electron gas thermal conductivity and it increases linearly with the increase of the ratio of lattice heat capacity to electron gas heat capacity. However, the relaxation time of the electron gas has very little effect on the thermalization time.

  2. Development of high-voltage pulse-slicer unit with variable pulse duration for pulse radiolysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, J.; Sharma, M. L.; Navathe, C. P.; Toley, M. A.; Shinde, S. J.; Nadkarni, S. A.; Sarkar, S. K.

    2012-02-01

    A high-voltage pulse-slicer unit with variable pulse duration has been developed and integrated with a 7 MeV linear electron accelerator (LINAC) for pulse radiolysis investigation. The pulse-slicer unit provides switching voltage from 1 kV to 10 kV with rise time better than 5 ns. Two MOSFET based 10 kV switches were configured in differential mode to get variable duration pulses. The high-voltage pulse has been applied to the deflecting plates of the LINAC for slicing of electron beam of 2 μs duration. The duration of the electron beam has been varied from 30 ns to 2 μs with the optimized pulse amplitude of 7 kV to get corresponding radiation doses from 6 Gy to 167 Gy.

  3. Frequency-time coherence for all-optical sampling without optical pulse source

    CERN Document Server

    Preussler, Stefan; Schneider, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Sampling is the first step to convert an analogue optical signal into a digital electrical signal. The latter can be further processed and analysed by well-known electrical signal processing methods. Optical pulse sources like mode-locked lasers are commonly incorporated for all-optical sampling, but have several drawbacks. A novel approach for a simple all-optical sampling is to utilise the frequency-time coherence of each signal. The method is based on only using two coupled modulators driven with an electrical sine wave, allowing simple integration in appropriate platforms, such as Silicon Photonics. The presented method grants all-optical sampling with electrically tunable bandwidth, repetition rate and time shift.

  4. Stokes phenomenon and schwinger vacuum pair production in time-dependent laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumlu, Cesim K; Dunne, Gerald V

    2010-06-25

    Particle production due to external fields (electric, chromoelectric, or gravitational) requires evolving an initial state through an interaction with a time-dependent background, with the rate being computed from a Bogoliubov transformation between the in and out vacua. When the background fields have temporal profiles with substructure, a semiclassical analysis of this problem confronts the full subtlety of the Stokes phenomenon: WKB solutions are only local, while the production rate requires global information. We give a simple quantitative explanation of the recently computed [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 150404 (2009)10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.150404] oscillatory momentum spectrum of e^{+}e^{-} pairs produced from vacuum subjected to a time-dependent electric field with subcycle laser pulse structure. This approach also explains naturally why for spinor and scalar QED these oscillations are out of phase.

  5. Time-Frequency Analysis of Electromagnetic Pulse Response from a Spherical Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈东; 金亚秋

    2003-01-01

    Transient backscattering from a spherical target under incidence of an electromagnetic short pulse is studied. The target can be a perfectly conducting sphere, a dielectric sphere or a dielectric spherical shell. To understand the scattering mechanism from transient impulse echoes for target detection, both the short-time Fourier transform(STFT) and the wavelet transform (WT) are applied to retrieval of scattering information from the backscattering data. Analysis in both the time and frequency domains demonstrates that the WT is more feasible than the STFT to clarifying scattering process of the scatterer because of its excellent multi-resolution characteristic. This technique shall be helpful for scattering analysis and detection of more complex single or multi-targets.

  6. Frequency-time coherence for all-optical sampling without optical pulse source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preußler, Stefan; Raoof Mehrpoor, Gilda; Schneider, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Sampling is the first step to convert an analogue optical signal into a digital electrical signal. The latter can be further processed and analysed by well-known electrical signal processing methods. Optical pulse sources like mode-locked lasers are commonly incorporated for all-optical sampling, but have several drawbacks. A novel approach for a simple all-optical sampling is to utilise the frequency-time coherence of each signal. The method is based on only using two coupled modulators driven with an electrical sine wave. Since no optical source is required, a simple integration in appropriate platforms, such as Silicon Photonics might be possible. The presented method grants all-optical sampling with electrically tunable bandwidth, repetition rate and time shift.

  7. Pulse profile stability of the Crab pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Chetana

    2011-01-01

    We present an X-ray timing analysis of the Crab pulsar, PSR B0531+21, using the archival RXTE data. We have investigated the stability of the Crab pulse profile, in soft (2-20 keV) and hard (30-100 keV) X-ray energies, over the last decade of RXTE operation. The analysis includes measurement of the separation between the two pulse peaks; and intensity and the widths of the two peaks. We did not find any significant time dependency in the pulse shape. The two peaks are stable in phase, intensity and widths, for the last ten years. The first pulse is relatively stronger at soft X-rays. The first pulse peak is narrower than the second peak, in both, soft- and hard X-ray energies. Both the peaks show a slow rise and a steeper fall. The ratio of the pulsed photons in the two peaks is also constant in time.

  8. Pulse transit time shows vascular changes caused by propofol in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joo-Eun; Song, In-Kyung; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Hur, Min; Kim, Jin-Tae; Kim, Hee-Soo

    2015-08-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is the time that it takes for the arterial pulse pressure wave to travel from the aortic valve to the periphery. It is a simple noninvasive technique for evaluating vascular changes. This study investigated the vascular changes by propofol during the induction of anesthesia in pediatric patients with the measuring of PTT. Without premedication, 2 mg/kg of propofol was administered intravenously with monitoring of electrocardiogram (ECG) and photoplethysmograph (PPG) in 20 pediatric patients aged 3-7 years. The ECG and PPG data were obtained for 1 min before propofol injection (baseline PTT) and 2 min after administration of propofol in the operating room. The PTT was defined as the time interval from the R-wave on the ECG to the maximum upslope of the corresponding PPG. The PTT was calculated off-line after collecting the data. The mean baseline PTT was 166.2 ± 25.9 ms and maximum PTT after propofol injection was 315.9 ± 64.9 ms (the interval between injection and the peak was 17.3 ± 7.6 s). The PTT after the peak changed variously; most of the patients showed no plateau; the PTT decreased progressively after the peak. The PTT after propofol administration prolonged in short time and rapidly recovered toward to the baseline values in pediatric patients. In conclusion, the baseline PTT in children is shorter comparing with adults and the vasodilatory effect of propofol on the vessels as described by the PTT was rapid and the recovery was faster, although the response to propofol was more varied than in adults.

  9. Sea ice phenology and timing of primary production pulses in the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Rubao; Jin, Meibing; Varpe, Øystein

    2013-03-01

    Arctic organisms are adapted to the strong seasonality of environmental forcing. A small timing mismatch between biological processes and the environment could potentially have significant consequences for the entire food web. Climate warming causes shrinking ice coverage and earlier ice retreat in the Arctic, which is likely to change the timing of primary production. In this study, we test predictions on the interactions among sea ice phenology and production timing of ice algae and pelagic phytoplankton. We do so using the following (1) a synthesis of available satellite observation data; and (2) the application of a coupled ice-ocean ecosystem model. The data and model results suggest that, over a large portion of the Arctic marginal seas, the timing variability in ice retreat at a specific location has a strong impact on the timing variability in pelagic phytoplankton peaks, but weak or no impact on the timing of ice-algae peaks in those regions. The model predicts latitudinal and regional differences in the timing of ice algae biomass peak (varying from April to May) and the time lags between ice algae and pelagic phytoplankton peaks (varying from 45 to 90 days). The correlation between the time lag and ice retreat is significant in areas where ice retreat has no significant impact on ice-algae peak timing, suggesting that changes in pelagic phytoplankton peak timing control the variability in time lags. Phenological variability in primary production is likely to have consequences for higher trophic levels, particularly for the zooplankton grazers, whose main food source is composed of the dually pulsed algae production of the Arctic.

  10. Characterisation of historic plastics using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and pulsed imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorelli, Gianluca; Trafela, Tanja; Taday, Phillip F; Portieri, Alessia; Lowe, David; Fukunaga, Kaori; Strlič, Matija

    2012-05-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy and 3D THz pulsed imaging have been explored with regard to polymer materials, both commodity and historic polymers. A systematic spectroscopic study of a wide range of different polymer materials showed significant differences in their spectra. Polyolefins and polystyrenes generally exhibit lower absorption than other examined polymers, various cellulose derivates, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(methyl methacrylate), polyamide, hard rubber and phenol formaldehyde resin, the last of these exhibiting the most intense absorption over the entire range, 0.15-4.2 THz. It was also examined how the presence of plasticisers in poly(vinyl chloride), the presence of fillers in polypropylene, and the degree of branching in polyethylene and polystyrene affect the spectra; inorganic fillers in polypropylene affected the absorption most. With 3D THz pulsed imaging, features in polymer objects were explored, appearing either as integral parts of the material (coatings and pores in foams) or as a consequence of physical deterioration (cracks, delamination). All of these features of various complexities can be successfully imaged in 3D. Terahertz technology is thus shown to have significant potential for both chemical and structural characterisation of polymers, which will be of interest to heritage science, but also to the polymer industry and development of analytical technologies in general.

  11. Fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse shape discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, A.A., E-mail: a.a.ivanova@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Zubarev, P.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Ivanenko, S.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Khilchenko, A.D. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kotelnikov, A.I. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Polosatkin, S.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Puryga, E.A.; Shvyrev, V.G. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sulyaev, Yu.S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-11

    Investigation of subthermonuclear plasma confinement and heating in magnetic fusion devices such as GOL–3 and GDT at the Budker Institute (Novosibirsk, Russia) requires sophisticated equipment for neutron-, gamma- diagnostics and upgrading data acquisition systems with online data processing. Measurement of fast neutron flux with stilbene scintillation detectors raised the problem of discrimination of the neutrons (n) from background cosmic particles (muons) and neutron-induced gamma rays (γ). This paper describes a fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse-shape discrimination (DPSD) algorithm FPGA-implemented for the GOL–3 and GDT devices. This analyzer was tested and calibrated with the help of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 252}Cf radiation sources. The Figures of Merit (FOM) calculated for different energy cuts are presented. - Highlights: • Electronic equipment for measurement of fast neutron flux with stilbene scintillator is presented. • FPGA-implemented digital pulse-shape discrimination algorithm by charge comparison method is shown. • Calibration of analyzer was carried out with {sup 137}Cs and {sup 252}Cf. • Figures of Merit (FOM) values for energy cuts from 1/8 Cs to 2 Cs are from 1.264 to 2.34 respectively.

  12. Miniaturized pulsed laser source for time-domain diffuse optics routes to wearable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sieno, Laura; Nissinen, Jan; Hallman, Lauri; Martinenghi, Edoardo; Contini, Davide; Pifferi, Antonio; Kostamovaara, Juha; Mora, Alberto Dalla

    2017-08-01

    We validate a miniaturized pulsed laser source for use in time-domain (TD) diffuse optics, following rigorous and shared protocols for performance assessment of this class of devices. This compact source (12×6 mm2) has been previously developed for range finding applications and is able to provide short, high energy (˜100 ps, ˜0.5 nJ) optical pulses at up to 1 MHz repetition rate. Here, we start with a basic level laser characterization with an analysis of suitability of this laser for the diffuse optics application. Then, we present a TD optical system using this source and its performances in both recovering optical properties of tissue-mimicking homogeneous phantoms and in detecting localized absorption perturbations. Finally, as a proof of concept of in vivo application, we demonstrate that the system is able to detect hemodynamic changes occurring in the arm of healthy volunteers during a venous occlusion. Squeezing the laser source in a small footprint removes a key technological bottleneck that has hampered so far the realization of a miniaturized TD diffuse optics system, able to compete with already assessed continuous-wave devices in terms of size and cost, but with wider performance potentialities, as demonstrated by research over the last two decades.

  13. Comparison of WDM/Pulse-Position-Modulation (WDM/PPM) with Code/Pulse-Position-Swapping (C/PPS) Based on Wavelength/Time Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez, A J; Hernandez, V J; Gagliardi, R M; Bennett, C V

    2009-06-19

    Pulse position modulation (PPM) signaling is favored in intensity modulated/direct detection (IM/DD) systems that have average power limitations. Combining PPM with WDM over a fiber link (WDM/PPM) enables multiple accessing and increases the link's throughput. Electronic bandwidth and synchronization advantages are further gained by mapping the time slots of PPM onto a code space, or code/pulse-position-swapping (C/PPS). The property of multiple bits per symbol typical of PPM can be combined with multiple accessing by using wavelength/time [W/T] codes in C/PPS. This paper compares the performance of WDM/PPM and C/PPS for equal wavelengths and bandwidth.

  14. The Information Coding in the Time Structure of the Object of a Laser Pulse in an Optical Echo Processor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Nefediev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The encoding of information in time intervals of an echelon of laser pulses of an object pulse in the optical echo processor is considered. The measures of information are introduced to describe the transformation of classical information in quantum information. It is shown that in the description of information transformation into quantum information, the most appropriate measure is a measure of quantum information based on the algorithmic information theory.

  15. Simulation and real-time analysis of pulse shapes from segmented HPGe-detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlarb, Michael Christian

    2009-11-17

    The capabilities of future HPGe arrays consisting of highly segmented detectors, like AGATA will depend heavily on the performance of {gamma}-ray tracking. The most crucial component in the whole concept is the pulse shape analysis (PSA). The working principle of PSA is to compare the experimental signal shape with signals available from a basis set with known interaction locations. The efficiency of the tracking algorithm hinges on the ability of the PSA to reconstruct the interaction locations accurately, especially for multiple {gamma}-interactions. Given the size of the arrays the PSA algorithm must be run in a real-time environment. A prerequisite to a successful PSA is an accurate knowledge of the detectors response. Making a full coincidence scan of a single AGATA detector, however takes between two and three months, which is too long to produce an experimental signal basis for all detector elements. A straight forward possibility is to use a precise simulation of the detector and to provide a basis of simulated signals. For this purpose the Java Agata Signal Simulation (JASS) was developed in the course of this thesis. The geometry of the detector is given with numerical precision and models describing the anisotropic mobilities of the charge carriers in germanium were taken from the literature. The pulse shapes of the transient and net-charge signals are calculated using weighting potentials on a finite grid. Special care was taken that the interpolation routine not only reproduces the weighting potentials precisely in the highly varying areas of the segment boundaries but also that its performance is independent of the location within the detector. Finally data from a coincidence scan and a pencil beam experiment were used to verify JASS. The experimental signals are reproduced accurately by the simulation. Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) reconstructs the positions of the individual interactions and the corresponding energy deposits within the detector. This

  16. Two analytical solutions for a model of pulsed arterial spin labeling with randomized blood arrival times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabe, J.; Lewis, D. P.

    2004-03-01

    A fairly general theoretical model for pulsed arterial spin labeling perfusion methods has been available for some time but analytical solutions were derived for only a small number of arterial blood input functions. These mostly assumed a sudden and simultaneous arrival of the tagged blood into the imaged region. More general cases had to be handled numerically. We present analytical solutions for two more realistic arterial input functions. They both allow the arrival times of the molecules of tagged arterial blood to be statistically distributed. We consider cases of (1) a uniform distribution on a finite time interval and (2) a normal distribution characterized by its mean and standard deviation. These models are physiologically meaningful because the statistical nature of the arrival times reflects the distribution of velocities and path lengths that the blood water molecules undertake from the tagging region to the imaged region. The model parameters can be estimated from the measured dependency of the perfusion signal on the tag inversion time.

  17. A New Wavelet Denoising Method for Experimental Time-Domain Signals: Pulsed Dipolar Electron Spin Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Madhur; Georgieva, Elka R; Freed, Jack H

    2017-03-30

    We adapt a new wavelet-transform-based method of denoising experimental signals to pulse-dipolar electron-spin resonance spectroscopy (PDS). We show that signal averaging times of the time-domain signals can be reduced by as much as 2 orders of magnitude, while retaining the fidelity of the underlying signals, in comparison with noiseless reference signals. We have achieved excellent signal recovery when the initial noisy signal has an SNR ≳ 3. This approach is robust and is expected to be applicable to other time-domain spectroscopies. In PDS, these time-domain signals representing the dipolar interaction between two electron spin labels are converted into their distance distribution functions P(r), usually by regularization methods such as Tikhonov regularization. The significant improvements achieved by using denoised signals for this regularization are described. We show that they yield P(r)'s with more accurate detail and yield clearer separations of respective distances, which is especially important when the P(r)'s are complex. Also, longer distance P(r)'s, requiring longer dipolar evolution times, become accessible after denoising. In comparison to standard wavelet denoising approaches, it is clearly shown that the new method (WavPDS) is superior.

  18. Pulsed illumination, closed circuit television system for real-time viewing of unsteady (> 1 micros) events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marden, W W; Steinberger, R L; Bracco, F V

    1978-10-01

    A pulsed illumination closed circuit television system is described whereby fast (times cycles. The reported applications include the recording of steady and transient propane torch flames, of the transient fuel injection process in a motored internal combustion engine, and of the propagation of a flame under firing conditions in the engine. In the shadowgraph and Schlieren modes the method is particularly suited for application to periodic combustion events such as those occurring in internal combustion engines. The method then presents the following advantages over high-speed filming (> 3000 pictures/s); real-time observation and recording of chamber events at any crankangle; real-time observation and recording of the effects of changes in the engine variables (speed, load, spark timing, injection pressure and duration, chamber swirl, etc.) on the combustion events; real-time observation and recording of ensemble averages and cycle-to-cycle variations. The technique also eliminates the delays and unknowns of film processing. Finally, the cost of this system is similar to that of a high-speed camera.

  19. Ciguatera incidence in the US Virgin Islands has not increased over a 30-year time period despite rising seawater temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, Elizabeth G; Grattan, Lynn M; Cook, Robert L; Smith, Tyler B; Anderson, Donald M; Morris, J Glenn

    2013-05-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning is the most common marine food poisoning worldwide. It has been hypothesized that increasing seawater temperature will result in increasing ciguatera incidence. In St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, we performed an island-wide telephone survey (N = 807) and a medical record review of diagnosed ciguatera cases at the emergency department of the sole hospital and compared these data with comparable data sources collected in 1980. Annual incidence from both recent data sources remained high (12 per 1,000 among adults in the telephone survey). However, the combined data sources suggest that incidence has declined by 20% or more or remained stable over 30 years, whereas seawater temperatures were increasing. Illness was associated with lower education levels, higher levels of fish consumption, and having previous episodes of ciguatera; population shifts from 1980 to 2010 in these factors could explain an incidence decline of approximately 3 per 1,000, obscuring effects from rising seawater temperature.

  20. Variability, polarimetry, and timing properties of single pulses from PSR J1713+0747 using the Large European Array for Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.; Bassa, C. G.; Janssen, G. H.; Karuppusamy, R.; McKee, J.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Perrodin, D.; Purver, M.; Sanidas, S.; Smits, R.; Stappers, B. W.; Weltevrede, P.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-12-01

    Single pulses preserve information about the pulsar radio emission and propagation in the pulsar magnetosphere, and understanding the behaviour of their variability is essential for estimating the fundamental limit on the achievable pulsar timing precision. Here we report the findings of our analysis of single pulses from PSR J1713+0747 with data collected by the Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP). We present statistical studies of the pulse properties that include distributions of their energy, phase and width. Two modes of systematic sub-pulse drifting have been detected, with a periodicity of seven and three pulse periods. The two modes appear at different ranges of pulse longitude but overlap under the main peak of the integrated profile. No evidence for pulse micro-structure is seen with a time resolution down to 140 ns. In addition, we show that the fractional polarization of single pulses increases with their pulse peak flux density. By mapping the probability density of linear polarization position angle with pulse longitude, we reveal the existence of two orthogonal polarization modes. Finally, we find that the resulting phase jitter of integrated profiles caused by single pulse variability can be described by a Gaussian probability distribution only when at least 100 pulses are used for integration. Pulses of different flux densities and widths contribute approximately equally to the phase jitter, and no improvement on timing precision is achieved by using a sub-set of pulses with a specific range of flux density or width.

  1. Flow Separation Control on Airfoil With Pulsed Nanosecond Discharge Actuator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correale, G.; Popov, I.B.; Ratikin, A.E.; Starikovskii, A.Y.; Hulshoff, S.J.; Veldhuis, L.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study of flow separation control with a nanosecond pulse plasma actuator was performed in wind-tunnel experiments. The discharge used had a pulse width of 12 ns and rising time of 3 ns with voltage up to 12 kV. Repetition frequency was adjustable up to 10 kHz. The first series of exp

  2. Cuff-less blood pressure measurement using pulse arrival time and a Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Xianxiang; Fang, Zhen; Xue, Yongjiao; Zhan, Qingyuan; Yang, Ting; Xia, Shanhong

    2017-02-01

    The present study designs an algorithm to increase the accuracy of continuous blood pressure (BP) estimation. Pulse arrival time (PAT) has been widely used for continuous BP estimation. However, because of motion artifact and physiological activities, PAT-based methods are often troubled with low BP estimation accuracy. This paper used a signal quality modified Kalman filter to track blood pressure changes. A Kalman filter guarantees that BP estimation value is optimal in the sense of minimizing the mean square error. We propose a joint signal quality indice to adjust the measurement noise covariance, pushing the Kalman filter to weigh more heavily on measurements from cleaner data. Twenty 2 h physiological data segments selected from the MIMIC II database were used to evaluate the performance. Compared with straightforward use of the PAT-based linear regression model, the proposed model achieved higher measurement accuracy. Due to low computation complexity, the proposed algorithm can be easily transplanted into wearable sensor devices.

  3. Toward Ubiquitous Blood Pressure Monitoring via Pulse Transit Time: Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Inan, Omer T; Mestha, Lalit K; Kim, Chang-Sei; Töreyin, Hakan; Kyal, Survi

    2015-08-01

    Ubiquitous blood pressure (BP) monitoring is needed to improve hypertension detection and control and is becoming feasible due to recent technological advances such as in wearable sensing. Pulse transit time (PTT) represents a well-known potential approach for ubiquitous BP monitoring. The goal of this review is to facilitate the achievement of reliable ubiquitous BP monitoring via PTT. We explain the conventional BP measurement methods and their limitations; present models to summarize the theory of the PTT-BP relationship; outline the approach while pinpointing the key challenges; overview the previous work toward putting the theory to practice; make suggestions for best practice and future research; and discuss realistic expectations for the approach.

  4. Fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse shape discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, A. A.; Zubarev, P. V.; Ivanenko, S. V.; Khilchenko, A. D.; Kotelnikov, A. I.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Puryga, E. A.; Shvyrev, V. G.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of subthermonuclear plasma confinement and heating in magnetic fusion devices such as GOL-3 and GDT at the Budker Institute (Novosibirsk, Russia) requires sophisticated equipment for neutron-, gamma- diagnostics and upgrading data acquisition systems with online data processing. Measurement of fast neutron flux with stilbene scintillation detectors raised the problem of discrimination of the neutrons (n) from background cosmic particles (muons) and neutron-induced gamma rays (γ). This paper describes a fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse-shape discrimination (DPSD) algorithm FPGA-implemented for the GOL-3 and GDT devices. This analyzer was tested and calibrated with the help of 137Cs and 252Cf radiation sources. The Figures of Merit (FOM) calculated for different energy cuts are presented.

  5. Effect of intervention initiation timing of pulsed electromagnetic field on ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Liao, Yuan; Zeng, Yahua; Xie, Haitao; Fu, Chengxiao; Li, Neng

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effect of timing of initiation of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy on bone mass, microarchitecture, and biomechanical properties, and to investigate receptor activator of NF-kB (RANK) expression in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Sixty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two equal batches of three groups each (10 rats in each group). The first batch comprised of sham-operated (Sham-0 group), ovariectomized (OVX-0 group), and ovariectomized plus treated with PEMF starting from the day of OVX (Early PEMF group). The second batch comprised of sham-operated (Sham-12 group), ovariectomized (OVX-12 group), and ovariectomized plus treated with PEMF starting 12 weeks after OVX (Late PEMF group). Rats (whole body) in the early and late PEMF groups were exposed to PEMF (3.8 mT peak, 8 Hz pulse burst repetition rate). After 12 weeks of PEMF therapy, Early PEMF prevented OVX-induced deterioration in bone mineral density (BMD) and mechanical properties in lumbar vertebral body and femur, and deterioration in bone microarchitecture in lumbar vertebral body and proximal tibia. Late PEMF intervention only inhibited deterioration of BMD, bone microarchitecture, and mechanical properties in lumbar vertebral body. Both early and late PEMF therapy suppressed RANK protein expression in OVX rats without a concomitant effect on RANK mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that timing of initiation of PEMF therapy plays an important role in achieving optimal beneficial effects. The specific PEMF parameters may exert these favorable biological responses, at least partially, via inhibition of protein expression of RANK. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:456-465, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Constant time tensor correlation experiments by non-gamma-encoded recoupling pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Yun; Tsai, Tim W T; Chan, Jerry C C

    2012-10-28

    Constant-time tensor correlation under magic-angle spinning conditions is an important technique in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the measurements of backbone or side-chain torsion angles of polypeptides and proteins. We introduce a general method for the design of constant-time tensor correlation experiments under magic-angle spinning. Our method requires that the amplitude of the average Hamiltonian must depend on all the three Euler angles bringing the principal axis system to the rotor-fixed frame, which is commonly referred to as non-gamma encoding. We abbreviate this novel approach as COrrelation of Non-Gamma-Encoded Experiment (CONGEE), which exploits the orientation-dependence of non-gamma-encoded sequences with respect to the magic-angle rotation axis. By manipulating the relative orientation of the average Hamiltonians created by two non-gamma-encoded sequences, one can obtain a modulation of the detected signal, from which the structural information can be extracted when the tensor orientations relative to the molecular frame are known. CONGEE has a prominent feature that the number of rf pulses and the total pulse sequence duration can be maintained to be constant so that for torsion angle determination the effects of systematic errors owing to the experimental imperfections and/or T(2) effects could be minimized. As a proof of concept, we illustrate the utility of CONGEE in the correlation between the C' chemical shift tensor and the C(α)-H(α) dipolar tensor for the backbone psi angle determination. In addition to a detailed theoretical analysis, numerical simulations and experiments measured for [U-(13)C, (15)N]-L-alanine and N-acetyl-[U-(13)C, (15)N]-D,L-valine are used to validate our approach at a spinning frequency of 20 kHz.

  7. Excitation of spin echo by pulses with linear frequency modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruzdin, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    The excitation of a spin echo by two pulses with linear frequency modulation, upon which the pulse parameters ensure maximal compression of the response in time, is considered. The frequency of the excitation pulses was changed by a step law, approximating its linear rise. The transfer matrix of the state of the spin system for pulses with linear frequency modulation is found by solving the Bloch equations. The shape of the envelope of the spin echo in thin magnetic cobalt films, as well as the dependence of the echo amplitude on the parameters of the excitation pulses, is determined. The amplitudes of the excitation pulses, which ensure the excitation of the echo maximal amplitude for various values of the frequency deviation, are found. It is shown that the use of pulses with linear frequency modulation makes it possible to obtain the same echo amplitude as with the use of simple excitation pulses for a substantially smaller amplitude and power of excitation pulses.

  8. Effects of Reducing River Flow on Pulse Residence Time in Little Manatee River, USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Wenrui; LIU Xiaohai

    2009-01-01

    Residence time is an important indicator for river environmental management. In this paper, a 3D hydrody-namic model has been successfully applied to Little Manatee River to characterize the mixing and transport process and residence time. The model employs horizontal curvilinear orthogonal grids to represent the complex river system that consists of branches and bayous. The model has been satisfactorily calibrated and verified by using two continuous data sets. The data sets consist of hourly observations of all forcing boundaries, including freshwater inputs, tides, winds, salin-ity and temperatures at bay boundary, and air temperatures for model simulations. The data sets also consist of hourly observations of water levels, salinity, and temperature at several river stations. The calibrated and verified hydrodynamic model was used to predict residence time in the Little Manatee River. Under the minimum flow of 0.312 m3/s, the pulse residence time (PRT) is 108 days. Model simulations were also conducted for 17 flow scenarios. Empirical regression equations have been satisfactorily derived to correlate PRT to freshwater inflow. Correlation coefficient R2 is 0.982 for PRT.

  9. Factors that affect pulse wave time transmission in the monitoring of cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Jong Yong A; Wilson, Stephen J; Wang, Ping

    2008-04-01

    Vascular transit time (VTT) can be defined as the first heart sound of the phonocardiography (PCG) signal to its arrival at the photoplethysmography (PPG). Studies have shown that monitoring VTT can be useful as an early prognosis of cardiac diseases. However, there is limited study conducted to understand the physiologic factors that affect VTT at the upper limb. In this study, the effect associated with difference in subject height, weight, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, systolic and diastolic blood pressure was assessed. A study population of 31 healthy Chinese young adults (21 male; age range 20-33 yr) were recruited. PCG and PPG were recorded non-invasively from the fourth costal cartilage at the midclavicular line and right index finger, respectively. A single sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) goodness-of-fit hypothesis test, a univariate linear regression analysis, and a multiple linear regression modelling were performed on the VTT measurements and the associated physiologic parameters. The results from the K-S test showed that the physiologic parameters and VTT measurements had a normal cumulative distribution function. Furthermore, all physiologic parameters were significantly and independently related to VTT (P VTT regression model was also derived (r (2) = 0.79). The findings herein suggest that the observed physiologic parameters have significant contributions to the nominal VTT value of a subject. Unlike pulse transit time, the VTT technique has the added advantage that the left ventricular isometric contraction time is not included in the timing derivation.

  10. Digital pulse-timing technique for the neutron detector array NEDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modamio, V., E-mail: victor.modamio@lnl.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Valiente-Dobón, J.J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Jaworski, G. [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Hüyük, T. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Triossi, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Egea, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Department of Electronic Engineering, Universitat de València, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Di Nitto, A. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Söderström, P.-A. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, 351-0198 Saitama (Japan); Agramunt Ros, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València, E-46980 Valencia (Spain); Angelis, G. de [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); France, G. de [GANIL, CEA/DSAM and CNRS/IN2P3, F-14076 Caen (France); Erduran, M.N. [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, 34303 Istanbul (Turkey); and others

    2015-03-01

    A new digital pulse-timing algorithm, to be used with the future neutron detector array NEDA, has been developed and tested. The time resolution of four 5 in. diameter photomultiplier tubes (XP4512, R4144, R11833-100, and ET9390-kb), coupled to a cylindrical 5 in. by 5 in. BC501A liquid scintillator detector was measured by employing digital sampling electronics and a constant fraction discriminator (CFD) algorithm. The zero crossing of the CFD algorithm was obtained with a cubic spline interpolation, which was continuous up to the second derivative. The performance of the algorithm was studied at sampling rates of 500 MS/s and 200 MS/s. The time resolution obtained with the digital electronics was compared to the values acquired with a standard analog CFD. The result of this comparison shows that the time resolution from the analog and the digital measurements at 500 MS/s and at 200 MS/s are within 15% for all the tested photomultiplier tubes.

  11. Improvements in time resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in a compact pico-second pulse radiolysis system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Hiroyuki [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 17 Kikuicho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0044 (Japan)], E-mail: physik-albert@suou.waseda.jp; Kawaguchi, Masaaki; Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Komiya, Keita; Nomoto, Tomoaki; Kamiya, Yoshio; Hama, Yoshimasa; Washio, Masakazu [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 17 Kikuicho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0044 (Japan); Ushida, Kiminori [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kashiwagi, Shigeru [The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Kuroda, Ryunosuke [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, AIST Tsukuba Central 2, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2007-12-15

    A compact pico-second pulse radiolysis system has been developing at Waseda University for studying primary processes in radiation chemistry. The system is composed of a photo-injector system and a pico-second all-solid-state laser system. An infrared (IR) and an ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses are obtained from mode-locked Nd:YLF laser system and used for generation of the white light continuum as a probe light and the irradiation to the Cu cathode of a photo-cathode RF-gun, respectively. To improve signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and time resolution of this pulse radiolysis system, we optimized both probe light and pump electron beam. As a result, our pico-second pulse radiolysis system has been enough to study the primary processes of radiation chemistry. The experimental results and the improvements of our system are described in this paper.

  12. Real-time digital signal processor implementation of self-calibrating pulse-shape discriminator for high purity germanium

    CERN Document Server

    Suarez, R; Aalseth, C E; Hossbach, T W; Miley, H S

    2007-01-01

    Pulse-shape analysis of the ionization signals from germanium gamma-ray spectrometers is a method for obtaining information that can characterize an event beyond just the total energy deposited in the crystal. However, as typically employed, this method is data-intensive requiring the digitization, transfer, and recording of electronic signals from the spectrometer. A hardware realization of a real-time digital signal processor for implementing a parametric pulse shape is presented. Specifically, a previously developed method for distinguishing between single-site and multi-site gamma-ray interactions is demonstrated in an on-line digital signal processor, compared with the original off-line pulse-shape analysis routine, and shown to have no significant difference. Reduction of the amount of the recorded information per event is shown to translate into higher duty-cycle data acquisition rates while retaining the benefits of additional event characterization from pulse-shape analysis.

  13. Assessment of Temperature Rise and Time of Alveolar Ridge Splitting by Means of Er:YAG Laser, Piezosurgery, and Surgical Saw: An Ex Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Matys

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common adverse effect after bone cutting is a thermal damage. The aim of our study was to evaluate the bone temperature rise during an alveolar ridge splitting, rating the time needed to perform this procedure and the time to raise the temperature of a bone by 10°C, as well as to evaluate the bone carbonization occurrence. The research included 60 mandibles (n=60 of adult pigs, divided into 4 groups (n=15. Two vertical and one horizontal cut have been done in an alveolar ridge using Er:YAG laser with set power of 200 mJ (G1, 400 mJ (G2, piezosurgery unit (G3, and a saw (G4. The temperature was measured by K-type thermocouple. The highest temperature gradient was noted for piezosurgery on the buccal and lingual side of mandible. The temperature rises on the bone surface along with the increase of laser power. The lower time needed to perform ridge splitting was measured for a saw, piezosurgery, and Er:YAG laser with power of 400 mJ and 200 mJ, respectively. The temperature rise measured on the bone over 10°C and bone carbonization occurrence was not reported in all study groups. Piezosurgery, Er:YAG laser (200 mJ and 400 mJ, and surgical saw are useful and safe tools in ridge splitting surgery.

  14. Assessment of Temperature Rise and Time of Alveolar Ridge Splitting by Means of Er:YAG Laser, Piezosurgery, and Surgical Saw: An Ex Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, Jacek; Flieger, Rafał; Dominiak, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    The most common adverse effect after bone cutting is a thermal damage. The aim of our study was to evaluate the bone temperature rise during an alveolar ridge splitting, rating the time needed to perform this procedure and the time to raise the temperature of a bone by 10°C, as well as to evaluate the bone carbonization occurrence. The research included 60 mandibles (n = 60) of adult pigs, divided into 4 groups (n = 15). Two vertical and one horizontal cut have been done in an alveolar ridge using Er:YAG laser with set power of 200 mJ (G1), 400 mJ (G2), piezosurgery unit (G3), and a saw (G4). The temperature was measured by K-type thermocouple. The highest temperature gradient was noted for piezosurgery on the buccal and lingual side of mandible. The temperature rises on the bone surface along with the increase of laser power. The lower time needed to perform ridge splitting was measured for a saw, piezosurgery, and Er:YAG laser with power of 400 mJ and 200 mJ, respectively. The temperature rise measured on the bone over 10°C and bone carbonization occurrence was not reported in all study groups. Piezosurgery, Er:YAG laser (200 mJ and 400 mJ), and surgical saw are useful and safe tools in ridge splitting surgery.

  15. Two-electron time-delay interference in atomic double ionization by attosecond pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rescigno, Thomas N

    2009-10-04

    A two-color two-photon atomic double ionization experiment using subfemtosecond UV pulses can be designed such that the sequential two-color process dominates and one electron is ejected by each pulse. Nonetheless, ab initio calculations show that, for sufficiently short pulses, a prominent interference pattern in the joint energy distribution of the sequentially ejected electrons can be observed that is due to their indistinguishability and the exchange symmetry of the wave function.

  16. Two pulse-coupled non-identical, frequency-different BZ oscillators with time delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrova, Anastasia I; Vanag, Vladimir K

    2014-04-14

    Two non-identical, frequency-different pulse-coupled oscillators with time delay have been systematically studied using four-variable model of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction at mutual inhibitory, mutual excitatory, and mixed excitatory-inhibitory types of coupling. Different resonances like 1 : 2, 2 : 3, 1 : 3, etc., as well as complex rhythms and abrupt changes between them occur depending on the coupling strengths, time delay, and frequency ratio. Analogously to in-phase and anti-phase oscillations for 1 : 1 resonance, a similar phase locking exists for 1 : 2 resonance in the case of inhibitory coupling. For excitatory coupling, a bursting regime is found. The number of spikes in a single burst can be tuned by both the frequency ratio and time delay. For excitatory-inhibitory coupling, a region where one oscillator is suppressed (OS zone) has been found. Boundary of the OS zone depends on the frequency ratio. For weakly coupled oscillators, Farey sequence has been found for excitatory-inhibitory and mutual excitatory coupling.

  17. Time-Domain Modeling of Electromagnetic Pulses Returned from Targets in Dispersive and Dissipative Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunaurd, G. C.; Strifors, H. C.; Sullivan, A.

    2008-06-01

    Using a Method-of-Moments (MoM) code, we earlier simulated ultra-wideband (UWB) returned echoes from two targets, one penetrable and one impenetrable, buried in a soil with known electric properties. The simple shape of mines, coupled with their predictable deployment in the ground, has also provided a fundamental understanding of the underlying backscatter phenomenology. In particular, the backscattered waveform from a mine can be decomposed into a collection of closely spaced copies of an elemental wave object with different amplitudes and time delays. This wave object is here defined as the derivative of the waveform incident on the target. The spacing of the copies or replicas of the wave object could be determined by the round trip time delay between scattering centers. This methodology was previously applied to impenetrable targets and is now applied also to a penetrable target. The previously computed returns from each target for a given incident pulse are modeled by a few copies of the elemental wave object with the time delay and amplitude of each copy taken as unknown parameters. These parameters are then determined by minimizing in the least square sense the difference between the MoM computed signal and the model signal using the differential evolution method (DEM). The methodology is extended by way of our previously developed target translated method (TTM) to approximate the computation of the backscattered model signal when the target is buried at a different depth in the soil with a different moisture content.

  18. The Pulsed-Field Multiport Antenna System Reciprocity Relation and Its Applications: A Time-Domain Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hoop, A.T.; Lager, I.E.; Tomassetti, V.

    2009-01-01

    A novel time-domain approach to the derivation of the pulsed electromagnetic field multiport antenna system reciprocity theorem is presented. The theorem interrelates the field and system properties in two states: the transmitting state and the receiving state. General time-domain Thevenin (voltage-

  19. Dependence of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy results on pulse energies and timing parameters using soil simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurek, Lauren; Najarian, Maya L; Cremers, David A; Chinni, Rosemarie C

    2013-09-23

    The dependence of some LIBS detection capabilities on lower pulse energies (<100 mJ) and timing parameters were examined using synthetic silicate samples. These samples were used as simulants for soil and contained minor and trace elements commonly found in soil at a wide range of concentrations. For this study, over 100 calibration curves were prepared using different pulse energies and timing parameters; detection limits and sensitivities were determined from the calibration curves. Plasma temperatures were also measured using Boltzmann plots for the various energies and the timing parameters tested. The electron density of the plasma was calculated using the full-width half maximum (FWHM) of the hydrogen line at 656.5 nm over the energies tested. Overall, the results indicate that the use of lower pulse energies and non-gated detection do not seriously compromise the analytical results. These results are very relevant to the design of field- and person-portable LIBS instruments.

  20. A high-resolution time-of-flight energy analyzer for femtosecond electron pulses at 30 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliserin, Alexander; Walbran, Matthew; Baum, Peter

    2016-03-01

    We report a time-of-flight spectrometer for electron pulses at up to 30 keV, which is a suitable energy for atomic-resolution femtosecond investigations via time-resolved electron diffraction, microscopy, and energy loss spectroscopy. For realistic femtosecond beams without apertures, the instrument's energy resolution is ˜0.5 eV (full width at half maximum) or 2 × 10-5 at a throughput of 50%-90%. We demonstrate the analyzer's versatility by three first applications, namely, femtosecond electron pulse metrology via optical streaking, in situ drift correction in laser-microwave synchronization for electron pulse compression, and time-resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy of aluminum, showing the instrument's capability of tracking plasmonic loss peak positions with few-meV accuracy.

  1. Timing of morphological and ecological innovations in the cyanobacteria--a key to understanding the rise in atmospheric oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, C E; Sánchez-Baracaldo, P

    2010-01-01

    When cyanobacteria originated and diversified, and what their ancient traits were, remain critical unresolved problems. Here, we used a phylogenomic approach to construct a well-resolved 'core' cyanobacterial tree. The branching positions of four lineages (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Synechococcus elongatus, Synechococcus PCC 7335 and Acaryochloris marina) were problematic, probably due to long branch attraction artifacts. A consensus genomic tree was used to study trait evolution using ancestral state reconstruction (ASR). The early cyanobacteria were probably unicellular, freshwater, had small cell diameters, and lacked the traits to form thick microbial mats. Relaxed molecular clock analyses suggested that early cyanobacterial lineages were restricted to freshwater ecosystems until at least 2.4 Ga, before diversifying into coastal brackish and marine environments. The resultant increases in niche space and nutrient availability, and consequent sedimentation of organic carbon into the deep oceans, would have generated large pulses of oxygen into the biosphere, possibly explaining why oxygen rose so rapidly. Rapid atmospheric oxidation could have destroyed the methane-driven greenhouse with simultaneous drawdown in pCO(2), precipitating 'Snowball Earth' conditions. The traits associated with the formation of thick, laminated microbial mats (large cell diameters, filamentous growth, sheaths, motility and nitrogen fixation) were not seen until after diversification of the LPP, SPM and PNT clades, after 2.32 Ga. The appearance of these traits overlaps with a global carbon isotopic excursion between 2.2 and 2.1 Ga. Thus, a massive re-ordering of biogeochemical cycles caused by the appearance of complex laminated microbial communities in marine environments may have caused this excursion. Finally, we show that ASR may provide an explanation for why cyanobacterial microfossils have not been observed until after 2.0 Ga, and make suggestions for how future

  2. Measurement of vascular water transport in human subjects using time-resolved pulsed arterial spin labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibic, Adnan; Knutsson, Linda; Schmidt, Anders; Henningsson, Erik; Månsson, Sven; Abul-Kasim, Kasim; Åkeson, Jonas; Gunther, Matthias; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Wirestam, Ronnie

    2015-08-01

    Most approaches to arterial spin labelling (ASL) data analysis aim to provide a quantitative measure of the cerebral blood flow (CBF). This study, however, focuses on the measurement of the transfer time of blood water through the capillaries to the parenchyma (referred to as the capillary transfer time, CTT) as an alternative parameter to characterise the haemodynamics of the system. The method employed is based on a non-compartmental model, and no measurements need to be added to a common time-resolved ASL experiment. Brownian motion of labelled spins in a potential was described by a one-dimensional general Langevin equation as the starting point, and as a Fokker-Planck differential equation for the averaged distribution of labelled spins at the end point, which takes into account the effects of flow and dispersion of labelled water by the pseudorandom nature of the microvasculature and the transcapillary permeability. Multi-inversion time (multi-TI) ASL data were acquired in 14 healthy subjects on two occasions in a test-retest design, using a pulsed ASL sequence and three-dimensional gradient and spin echo (3D-GRASE) readout. Based on an error analysis to predict the size of a region of interest (ROI) required to obtain reasonably precise parameter estimates, data were analysed in two relatively large ROIs, i.e. the occipital lobe (OC) and the insular cortex (IC). The average values of CTT in OC were 260 ± 60 ms in the first experiment and 270 ± 60 ms in the second experiment. The corresponding IC values were 460 ± 130 ms and 420 ± 139 ms, respectively. Information related to the water transfer time may be important for diagnostics and follow-up of cerebral conditions or diseases characterised by a disrupted blood-brain barrier or disturbed capillary blood flow.

  3. Fast analysis of complex metallic alloys by double-pulse time-integrated Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorrentino, F., E-mail: marwan@df.unipi.i [Marwan Technology s.r.l., Spin-off University of Pisa Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Carelli, G.; Francesconi, F.; Francesconi, M.; Marsili, P. [Marwan Technology s.r.l., Spin-off University of Pisa Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.; Tognoni, E. [Applied Laser Spectroscopy Laboratory, IPCF/CNR - Via G.Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    Results are reported on the application of double-pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for fast analysis of complex metallic alloys. The approach followed for the determination of the composition of the alloys is based on the time-integrated acquisition of LIBS spectra emitted by plasmas induced by collinear double-pulse laser excitation. The spectra are analysed using the Partial Least Squares method, which allows the determination of sample composition even in the presence of strong spectral interferences. The results shown indicate the possibility of measuring the composition of complex metallic alloys in very short times and using relatively cheap LIBS instrumentation.

  4. Improved pulse transit time estimation by system identification analysis of proximal and distal arterial waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Da; Ryan, Kathy L; Rickards, Caroline A; Zhang, Guanqun; Convertino, Victor A; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the system identification approach for potentially improved estimation of pulse transit time (PTT), a popular arterial stiffness marker. In this approach, proximal and distal arterial waveforms are measured and respectively regarded as the input and output of a system. Next, the system impulse response is identified from all samples of the measured input and output. Finally, the time delay of the impulse response is detected as the PTT estimate. Unlike conventional foot-to-foot detection techniques, this approach is designed to provide an artifact robust estimate of the true PTT in the absence of wave reflection. The approach is also applicable to arbitrary types of arterial waveforms. We specifically applied a parametric system identification technique to noninvasive impedance cardiography (ICG) and peripheral arterial blood pressure waveforms from 15 humans subjected to lower-body negative pressure. We assessed the technique through the correlation coefficient (r) between its 1/PTT estimates and measured diastolic pressure (DP) per subject and the root mean squared error (RMSE) of the DP predicted from these estimates and measured DP. The technique achieved average r and RMSE values of 0.81 ± 0.16 and 4.3 ± 1.3 mmHg. For comparison, the corresponding values were 0.59 ± 0.37 (P system identification approach can indeed improve PTT estimation.

  5. Pulse transit time variability analysis in an animal model of endotoxic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Collin H H; Chan, Gregory S H; Middleton, Paul M; Cave, Grant; Harvey, Martyn; Javed, Faizan; Savkin, Andrey V; Lovell, Nigel H

    2010-01-01

    The use of non-invasively measured pulse transit time (PTT) to monitor the cardiovascular systems in critically ill patients, like sepsis, can be of significant clinical value. In this study, the potential of PTT and its variability in cardiovascular system monitoring in a mechanically ventilated and anesthetized rabbit model of endotoxic shock was assessed. Eight adult New Zealand white rabbits, which were treated with endotoxin bolus infusion, were studied. Measurements of PTT, pre-ejection period (PEP), and vascular transit time (VTT) were obtained in pre- and post-intervention stages (before and 90 minutes after the administration of endotoxin). The decrease in mean PTT (p VTT (p VTT (R(2) ≥ 0.84 with positive slope). Computation of coherence and phase shift in the ventilating frequency band (HF: 0.50 - 0.75 Hz) showed that the respiratory variation in PTT was synchronized with both PEP and VTT (coherence > 0.84 with phase shift less than one cardiac beat). These results highlighted the potential value of PTT and its respiratory variation in characterizing the pathophysioloigcal hemodynamic change in endotoxic shock.

  6. Fast neutron tomography with real-time pulse-shape discrimination in organic scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Malcolm J.; Agar, Stewart; Aspinall, Michael D.; Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Colley, Edmund; Colling, Miriam; Dykes, Joseph; Kardasopoulos, Phoevos; Mitton, Katie

    2016-10-01

    A fast neutron tomography system based on the use of real-time pulse-shape discrimination in 7 organic liquid scintillation detectors is described. The system has been tested with a californium-252 source of dose rate 163 μSv/h at 1 m and neutron emission rate of 1.5×107 per second into 4π and a maximum acquisition time of 2 h, to characterize two 100×100×100 mm3 concrete samples. The first of these was a solid sample and the second has a vertical, cylindrical void. The experimental data, supported by simulations with both Monte Carlo methods and MATLAB®, indicate that the presence of the internal cylindrical void, corners and inhomogeneities in the samples can be discerned. The potential for fast neutron assay of this type with the capability to probe hydrogenous features in large low-Z samples is discussed. Neutron tomography of bulk porous samples is achieved that combines effective penetration not possible with thermal neutrons in the absence of beam hardening.

  7. Holographic and time-resolving ability of pulse-pair two-dimensional velocity interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erskine, David J., E-mail: erskine1@llnl.gov; Smith, R. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Bolme, C. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Ali, S. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Previous velocity interferometers used at research laboratories for shock physics experiments measured target motion at a point or many points on a line on the target. Recently, a two-dimensional (2d) version (2d-velocity interferometer system for any reflector) has been demonstrated using a pair of ultrashort (3 ps) pulses for illumination, separated by 268 ps. We have discovered new abilities for this instrument, by treating the complex output image as a hologram. For data taken in an out of focus configuration, we can Fourier process to bring narrow features such as cracks into sharp focus, which are otherwise completely blurred. This solves a practical problem when using high numerical aperture optics having narrow depth of field to observe moving surface features such as cracks. Furthermore, theory predicts that the target appearance (position and reflectivity) at two separate moments in time are recorded by the main and conjugate images of the same hologram, and are partially separable during analysis for narrow features. Hence, for the cracks we bring into refocus, we can make a two-frame movie with a subnanosecond frame period. Longer and shorter frame periods are possible with different interferometer delays. Since the megapixel optical detectors we use have superior spatial resolution over electronic beam based framing cameras, this technology could be of great use in studying microscopic three-dimensional-behavior of targets at ultrafast times scales. Demonstrations on shocked silicon are shown.

  8. Estimation of Arterial Stiffness by Time-Frequency Analysis of Pulse Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masashi; Yamamoto, Yuya; Shibayama, Yuka; Matsukawa, Mami; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Furuya, Mio; Asada, Takaaki

    2011-07-01

    Evaluation of a pulse wave is effective for the early diagnosis of arteriosclerosis because the pulse wave contains the reflected wave that is the age- and stiffness-dependent component. In this study, we attempted to extract the parameter reflecting the component by pulse wave analysis using continuous wavelet transform. The Morlet wavelet was used as the mother wavelet. We then investigated the relationship between the parameter and the reflected wave that was extracted from the pulse wave by our previously reported separation technique. Consequently, the result of wavelet transform of the differentiated pulse waveform changed markedly owing to age and had medium correlation with the peak of the reflected wave (R=0.68).

  9. A Time-Domain Reflectometry Method with Variable Needle Pulse Width for Measuring the Dielectric Properties of Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Wilczek

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Time-domain reflectometry (TDR methods used for measuring the dielectric properties of materials mostly utilize step or needle electrical pulses of constant amplitudes and shapes. Our novel approach enables determining the dielectric relaxation time of a sample using the analysis of the amplitudes of reflected pulses of two widths, in addition to bulk dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity commonly obtained by the TDR technique. The method was developed for various values of electrical conductivity and relaxation time using numerical simulations of a five-rod probe placed in a material with complex dielectric permittivity described by the Debye model with an added electrical conductivity term. The characterization of amplitudes of two pulses of selected widths was done with regard to the dielectric parameters of simulated materials. The required probe parameters were obtained solely from numerical simulations. Verification was performed for the probe placed in aqueous KCl solutions with 14 different electrical conductivity values. The determined relaxation time remained roughly constant and independent of electrical conductivity. The obtained electrical conductivity agreed with the reference values. Our results indicate that the relaxation time, dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity of the tested solutions can be simultaneously determined using a simple analysis of the amplitude and reflection time of two needle pulses of different widths.

  10. Optimized pulses for Raman excitation through the continuum: verification using multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock

    CERN Document Server

    Greenman, Loren; Haxton, Daniel J; McCurdy, C William

    2016-01-01

    We have verified a mechanism for Raman excitation of atoms through continuum levels previously obtained by quantum optimal control using the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method. This mechanism, which was obtained at the time-dependent configuration interaction singles (TDCIS) level of theory, involves sequentially exciting an atom from the ground state to an intermediate core-hole state using a long pump pulse, and then transferring this population to the target Raman state with a shorter Stokes pulse. This process represents the first step in a multidimensional x-ray spectroscopy scheme that will provide a local probe of valence electronic correlations. Although at the optimal pulse intensities at the TDCIS level of theory the MCTDHF method predicts multiple ionization of the atom, at slightly lower intensities (reduced by a factor of about 4) the TDCIS mechanism is shown to hold qualitatively. Quantitatively, the MCTDHF populations are reduced from the TDCIS calculations by a f...

  11. Low Timing Jitter and Tunable Dual- Wavelength Picosecond Pulse Genera from a Fabry-Pérot Laser Diode with External Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yi-Biao; WANG Yun-Cai; ZHANG Ming-Jiang; LIANG Wei

    2007-01-01

    A novel scheme to generate tunable dual-wavelength optical pulses with low timing jitter at arbitrary repetition rates is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The pulses are generated from a gain-switched Fabry-Perot laser diode with two external cw beams for injection seeding simultaneously. The cw light is generated by two independent distributed feedback laser diodes, and their wavelengths can be tuned independently by two temperature controllers. The dual-wavelength pulses with the pulse width of 57 ps, the timing jitter of 340 fs, are obtained. The sidemode-suppression ratio of the output pulses is better than 23 dB over a 10-nm wavelength tuning range.

  12. Real time kinetic flow cytometry measurements of cellular parameter changes evoked by nanosecond pulsed electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbán, Csaba; Pérez-García, Esther; Bajnok, Anna; McBean, Gethin; Toldi, Gergely; Blanco-Fernandez, Alfonso

    2016-05-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) is a novel method to increase cell proliferation rate. The phenomenon is based on the microporation of cellular organelles and membranes. However, we have limited information on the effects of nsPEF on cell physiology. Several studies have attempted to describe the effects of this process, however no real time measurements have been conducted to date. In this study we designed a model system which allows the measurement of cellular processes before, during and after nsPEF treatment in real time. The system employs a Vabrema Mitoplicator(TM) nsPEF field generating instrument connected to a BD Accuri C6 cytometer with a silicon tube led through a peristaltic pump. This model system was applied to observe the effects of nsPEF in mammalian C6 glioblastoma (C6 glioma) and HEK-293 cell lines. Viability (using DRAQ7 dye), intracellular calcium levels (using Fluo-4 dye) and scatter characteristics were measured in a kinetic manner. Data were analyzed using the FACSKin software. The viability and morphology of the investigated cells was not altered upon nsPEF treatment. The response of HEK-293 cells to ionomycin as positive control was significantly lower in the nsPEF treated samples compared to non-treated cells. This difference was not observed in C6 cells. FSC and SSC values were not altered significantly by the nsPEF treatment. Our results indicate that this model system is capable of reliably investigating the effects of nsPEF on cellular processes in real time. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  13. Timing of breast cancer surgery in relation to the menstrual cycle the rise and fall of a hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroman, N.

    2008-01-01

    It has been claimed that the timing of surgery in relation to the menstrual cycle can significantly influence the prognosis among premenopausal women with primary breast cancer. The literature on the subject is reviewed. The results are heterogeneous, and the quality of the studies is in general...

  14. Time correlated measurements using plastic scintillators with neutron-photon pulse shape discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Norman E., IV

    nuclear and radiological material. Moreover, the production of 3He isotope as a byproduct of security programs was drastically decreased. This isotope shortage coupled with the disadvantages of relying on a detector that requires neutron moderation before the detection of fission neutrons, poses a significant challenge in supporting the existing detection systems and the development of future technologies. To address this problem, a reliable and accurate alternative technology to detect neutrons emitted in fissions must be developed. One such alternative technology that shows promise in this application is the use of scintillators based on solid state materials (plastics) which are sensitive to fast neutrons. However, plastic scintillators are also sensitive to photons. Hence, it is necessary to separate the neutron signals from the photon signals, using the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) analysis. The PSD is based on the comparison of the pulse shapes of digitized signal waveforms. This approach allows for the measurement of fast neutrons without the necessity of their moderation. Because the fission spectrum neutrons are mainly fast, methods employing fast neutron detection are applicable for the assay of fissile materials. In addition, the average time of scintillation of the plastic medium is much shorter than those of the gaseous counters, thus allowing scintillation detectors to be used in high count rate environments. Furthermore, the temporal information of the fast neutron detection using multiple sensors enables the time correlation analysis of the fission neutron multiplicity. The study of time correlation measurements of fast neutrons using the array of plastic scintillators is the basis of this work. The array of four plastic scintillator detectors equipped with the digital data acquisition and analysis system was developed. The digital PSD analysis of detector signals "on-the-fly" was implemented for the array. The time coincidence measurement technique

  15. Mechanism of Electron Excitation and Emission from a Nanoribbon under Pulsed Laser Irradiation: Time-Dependent First-Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi, Shota; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2017-03-01

    A time-dependent density functional theory simulation demonstrated the sequential dynamics of electron excitation and emission from a silicene nanoribbon under a femtosecond laser pulse. The mechanism for the multiphoton absorption processes that are responsible for the kinetic-energy spectra of emitted electrons was elucidated using Kohn-Sham potentials and the decomposition scheme.

  16. Time dependence of X-ray polarizability of a crystal induced by an intense femtosecond X-ray pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Leonov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The time evolution of the electron density and the resulting time dependence of Fourier components of the X-ray polarizability of a crystal irradiated by highly intense femtosecond pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL is investigated theoretically on the basis of rate equations for bound electrons and the Boltzmann equation for the kinetics of the unbound electron gas. The photoionization, Auger process, electron-impact ionization, electron–electron scattering and three-body recombination have been implemented in the system of rate equations. An algorithm for the numerical solution of the rate equations was simplified by incorporating analytical expressions for the cross sections of all the electron configurations in ions within the framework of the effective charge model. Using this approach, the time dependence of the inner shell populations during the time of XFEL pulse propagation through the crystal was evaluated for photon energies between 4 and 12 keV and a pulse width of 40 fs considering a flux of 1012 photons pulse−1 (focusing on a spot size of ∼1 µm. This flux corresponds to a fluence ranging between 0.8 and 2.4 mJ µm−2. The time evolution of the X-ray polarizability caused by the change of the atomic scattering factor during the pulse propagation is numerically analyzed for the case of a silicon crystal. The time-integrated polarizability drops dramatically if the fluence of the X-ray pulse exceeds 1.6 mJ µm−2.

  17. Studies of high power density, pico-second rise-time light-activated semiconductor switch. Final report, 1 September 1987-31 December 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, P.L.

    1988-12-31

    The carrier dynamics of the diode which is related to its electrical power switching behaviors is investigated in this program. A model is developed where the carrier transport and Maxwell equations are incorporated and self-consistent electrical-field profiles, current density and carrier are obtained in the PIN diode. Both low- and high-level optical excitations as well as low and high applied bias situations can be described by this model. The transient behavior of the diode switch at different optical energy levels is now well understood, while conventional theory for photodiodes at low-level excitation and at low bias cannot be applied to cases for high-level excitation and high bias. As a circuit element, the rise time of the switch under these circumstances depends on the time the internal field is cancelled out by mobile carriers generated. The predicted input-energy dependence and the transmission line impedance dependence of the rise time compare well with experimental results. The model also suggests the experimental configuration for obtaining power in the GW range. Finally, a preliminary investigation is made on the effects of avalanche multiplication on the performance of the diode switch.

  18. Pulse radiolysis of alkanes: A time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkrob, I.A.; Trifunac, A.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Division

    1994-02-14

    Time-resolved spin-echo-detected electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was applied to examine short-lived alkyl radicals formed in pulse radiolysis of liquid alkanes. It was found that the ratio of yields of penultimate and interior radicals in n-alkanes at the instant of their generation is temperature-independent and is ca. 1.25 times greater than the statistical quantity. This higher-than-statistical production of penultimate radicals indicates that the fast ion molecule reactions involving radical cations are a significant route of radical generation. The analysis of spin-echo kinetics in n-alkanes suggests that the alkyl radicals are emissively polarized in spur reactions. this initial polarization rapidly increases with shortening of the aliphatic chain. Another finding is that a long-chain structure of these radicals results in much higher rate of Heisenberg spin exchange relative to the recombination rate. The relative yields of hydrogen abstraction and fragmentation for various branched alkanes are estimated. It is concluded that the fragmentation occurs prior to the formation of radicals in an excited precursor species. Effects of phenolic and alkene additives in radiolysis of n-alkanes are examined. It is demonstrated that phenoxy radicals are produced in dissociative capture of electrons and alkane holes. Another route is a reaction of phenols with free hydrogen atoms. A rapid transfer of singlet correlation from the geminate radical ion pairs is responsible for unusual polarization patterns in the phenoxy and cyclohexadienyl radicals. The significance of these results in the context of cross-linking in polyethylene and higher paraffins is discussed. 56 refs.

  19. Development of subpicosecond pulse radiolysis system

    CERN Document Server

    Kozawa, T; Miki, M; Yamamoto, T; Suemine, S; Yoshida, Y; Tagawa, S

    2000-01-01

    The highest time resolution of the pulse radiolysis had remained about 30 ps since the late 1960s. To make clear the primary processes in the radiation chemistry and physics within 30 ps, we developed a stroboscopic pulse radiolysis system for the absorption spectroscopy with the time resolution of 2.0 ps (10-90% rise time). The time resolution of 2.0 ps was estimated from the time-dependent behavior of the hydrated electrons. The system consists of a subpicosecond electron linac as an irradiation source, a femtosecond laser as an analyzing light and a jitter compensation system.

  20. Pulsed feedback defers cellular differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe H Levine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental signals induce diverse cellular differentiation programs. In certain systems, cells defer differentiation for extended time periods after the signal appears, proliferating through multiple rounds of cell division before committing to a new fate. How can cells set a deferral time much longer than the cell cycle? Here we study Bacillus subtilis cells that respond to sudden nutrient limitation with multiple rounds of growth and division before differentiating into spores. A well-characterized genetic circuit controls the concentration and phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A, which rises to a critical concentration to initiate sporulation. However, it remains unclear how this circuit enables cells to defer sporulation for multiple cell cycles. Using quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of Spo0A dynamics in individual cells, we observed pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation at a characteristic cell cycle phase. Pulse amplitudes grew systematically and cell-autonomously over multiple cell cycles leading up to sporulation. This pulse growth required a key positive feedback loop involving the sporulation kinases, without which the deferral of sporulation became ultrasensitive to kinase expression. Thus, deferral is controlled by a pulsed positive feedback loop in which kinase expression is activated by pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation. This pulsed positive feedback architecture provides a more robust mechanism for setting deferral times than constitutive kinase expression. Finally, using mathematical modeling, we show how pulsing and time delays together enable "polyphasic" positive feedback, in which different parts of a feedback loop are active at different times. Polyphasic feedback can enable more accurate tuning of long deferral times. Together, these results suggest that Bacillus subtilis uses a pulsed positive feedback loop to implement a "timer" that operates over timescales much longer than a cell cycle.

  1. Long-Term Time Variability in the X-Ray Pulse Shape of the Crab Nebula Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.

    2000-01-01

    This is the final performance report for our grant 'Long-Term Time Variability in the X-Ray Pulse Shape of the Crab Nebula Pulsar.' In the first year of this grant, we received the 50,000-second ROSAT (German acronym for X-ray satellite) High Resolution Images (HRI) observation of the Crab Nebula pulsar. We used the data to create a 65-ms-resolution pulse profile and compared it to a similar pulse profile obtained in 1991. No statistically significant differences were found. These results were presented at the January 1998 meeting of the American Astronomical Society. Since then, we have performed more sensitive analyses to search for potential changes in the pulse profile shape between the two data sets. Again, no significant variability was found. In order to augment this long (six-year) baseline data set, we have analyzed archival observations of the Crab Nebula pulsar with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). While these observations have shorter time baselines than the ROSAT data set, their higher signal-to-noise offers similar sensitivity to long-term variability. Again, no significant variations have been found, confirming our ROSAT results. This work was done in collaboration with Prof. Stephen Eikenberry, Cornell University. These analyses will be included in Cornell University graduate student Dae-Sik Moon's doctoral thesis.

  2. EFFECT OF DIGITAL BLOCK ON SPAO2, LAG TIME AND HEIGHT OF PLETHYSMOGRAPHIC WAYE OF PULSE OXIMETER BY SIMULATED SHOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K TAVAKKOL

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pulse oximetry is impaired by hypotention and peripheral vasoconstriction. Digital block may cause to increase tissue perfusion and improve the parameters of pulse oximetry. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of digital block on SPa02, lag time and height of plethysmographic wave of pulse oximeter by simulated shock in upper extrimity. Methods. In an experimental study, 34 Paitents under general anesthesia and elective surgery were selected. Lag time and height of pletysmographic wave and SPa02 had been measured in two fingers shocked by cooling, elevation of hand and inflation of cuff; then, compared to opposite middle finger as control. shocked Middle finger were blocked by lidocaine 2% and these parameters were measured in the 15th and 20th minutes after digital block. Data analysis was performed by SPSS using ANOVA. Results. Mean height of plethysmographic wave in blocked finger was signihcontly taller than shocked and control fingers in the 15th minute (respectively, 16.9±6, 10.8 ± 4. 3,10.7 ± 4.3, P < 0.05 and the 20th minute afters digital block (21.1 ± 5.8, 11.8 ± 4.3, 11.2 ± 3.9, P < 0.05. There were not significalt differences between three fingers in lag time and SPa02. Discussion. This study documents effect of digital block, undergoing shock condition in improving the parameters of pulse oximetry.

  3. Timing, polarimetry and physics of the bright, nearby millisecond pulsar PSR J0437-4715 - a single-pulse perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Osłowski, S; Bailes, M; Jameson, A; Hobbs, G

    2014-01-01

    Single pulses from radio pulsars contain a wealth of information about emission and propagation in the magnetosphere and insight into their timing properties. It was recently demonstrated that single-pulse emission is responsible for limiting the timing stability of the brightest of millisecond pulsars. We report on an analysis of more than a million single-pulses from PSR J0437-4715 and present various statistical properties such as the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) distribution, timing and polarimetry of average profiles integrated from subpulses with chosen S/N cut-offs, modulation properties of the emission, phase-resolved statistics of the S/N, and two dimensional spherical histograms of the polarization vector orientation. The last of these indicates the presence of orthogonally polarised modes (OPMs). Combined with the dependence of the polarisation fraction on the S/N and polarimetry of the brightest pulses, the existence of OPMs constrains pulsar emission mechanisms and models for the plasma physics in...

  4. [The reasons and background for the rise of college education of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) in modern times].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-jie; Huang, Ying; Li, Jie

    2009-09-01

    With western learning spreading throughout the orient, the survival and development of TCM was restrained to a large degree due to the medical administrative policy, educational system and diffusion of western medicine at different social levels. Facing this adversity, the TCM sector complied with the changing times and survived through persistent efforts as well as wide and solid popular foundations, striving actively for the legitimacy status of TCM education and establishing several TCM colleges. During the course of running the colleges, the TCM sector was brave in changing ideas and giving and accepting new knowledge, it explored a comprehensive educational syllabus, which not only promoted the development of TCM education in the Republican period of China, but also laid a foundation for TCM education in the new period.

  5. One nanosecond pulsed electron gun systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koontz, R.F.

    1979-02-01

    At SLAC there has been a continuous need for the injection of very short bunches of electrons into the accelerator. Several time-of-flight experiments have used bursts of short pulses during a normal 1.6 micro-second rf acceleration period. Single bunch beam loading experiments made use of a short pulse injection system which included high power transverse beam chopping equipment. Until the equipment described in this paper came on line, the basic grid-controlled gun pulse was limited to a rise time of 7 nanoseconds and a pulse width of 10 nanoseconds. The system described here has a grid-controlled rise time of less than 500 pico-seconds, and a minimum pulse width of less than 1 nanosecond. Pulse burst repetition rate has been demonstrated above 20 MHz during a 1.6 microsecond rf accelerating period. The order-of-magnitude increase in gun grid switching speed comes from a new gun design which minimizes lead inductance and stray capacitance, and also increases gun grid transconductance. These gun improvements coupled with a newly designed fast pulser mounted directly within the gun envelope make possible subnanosecond pulsing of the gun.

  6. Study on time-based variation of blood circulation index, pulse wave energy, and RAI of healthy adult men after different eating times

    OpenAIRE

    Gyeong-Cheol Kim; Ki-Young Ji; Yi-Soon Kim; Yi-Sub Kwak

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of different eating times on blood circulation index, pulse wave energy (E), and radial augmentation index (RAI) of healthy adult men. Methods: Blood circulation index, E, and RAI were measured using a three-dimensional (3-D) pulse imaging system (3-D MAC) at before, right after, 30 minutes after, 1 hour after, and 2 hours after eating. Results: In the blood circulation index, heart rate (HR), estimated cardiac output (ECO)...

  7. Microfossil measures of rapid sea-level rise: Timing of response of two microfossil groups to a sudden tidal-flooding experiment in Cascadia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, B.P.; Milker, Yvonne; Dura, T.; Wang, Kelin; Bridgeland, W.T.; Brophy, Laura S.; Ewald, M.; Khan, Nicole; Engelhart, S.E.; Nelson, Alan R.; Witter, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    Comparisons of pre-earthquake and post-earthquake microfossils in tidal sequences are accurate means to measure coastal subsidence during past subduction earthquakes, but the amount of subsidence is uncertain, because the response times of fossil taxa to coseismic relative sea-level (RSL) rise are unknown. We measured the response of diatoms and foraminifera to restoration of a salt marsh in southern Oregon, USA. Tidal flooding following dike removal caused an RSL rise of ∼1 m, as might occur by coseismic subsidence during momentum magnitude (Mw) 8.1–8.8 earthquakes on this section of the Cascadia subduction zone. Less than two weeks after dike removal, diatoms colonized low marsh and tidal flats in large numbers, showing that they can record seismically induced subsidence soon after earthquakes. In contrast, low-marsh foraminifera took at least 11 months to appear in sizeable numbers. Where subsidence measured with diatoms and foraminifera differs, their different response times may provide an estimate of postseismic vertical deformation in the months following past megathrust earthquakes.

  8. Controlled supercontinuum generation for optimal pulse compression : a time-warp analysis of nonlinear propagation of ultra-broad-band pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanner, M; Pshenichnikov, M; Olvo, [No Value; Ivanov, M

    2003-01-01

    We describe the virtues of the pump-probe approach for controlled supercontinuum generation in nonlinear media, using the example of pulse compression by cross-phase modulation in dielectrics. Optimization of a strong (pump) pulse and a weak (probe) pulse at the input into the medium opens the route

  9. Effect of the stimulus frequency and pulse number of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the inter-reversal time of perceptual reversal on the right superior parietal lobule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojima, Kazuhisa; Ge, Sheng; Katayama, Yoshinori; Ueno, Shoogo; Iramina, Keiji

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the stimulus frequency and pulses number of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the inter-reversal time (IRT) of perceptual reversal on the right superior parietal lobule (SPL). The spinning wheel illusion was used as the ambiguous figures stimulation in this study. To investigate the rTMS effect over the right SPL during perceptual reversal, 0.25 Hz 60 pulse, 1 Hz 60 pulse, 0.5 Hz 120 pulse, 1 Hz 120 pulse, and 1 Hz 240 pulse biphasic rTMS at 90% of resting motor threshold was applied over the right SPL and the right posterior temporal lobe (PTL), respectively. As a control, a no TMS was also conducted. It was found that rTMS on 0.25 Hz 60 pulse and 1 Hz 60 pulse applied over the right SPL caused shorter IRT. In contrast, it was found that rTMS on 1 Hz 240-pulse applied over the right SPL caused longer IRT. On the other hand, there is no significant difference between IRTs when the rTMS on 0.5 Hz 120 pulse and 1 Hz 120 pulse were applied over the right SPL. Therefore, the applying of rTMS over the right SPL suggests that the IRT of perceptual reversal is effected by the rTMS conditions such as the stimulus frequency and the number of pulses.

  10. Unilateral brief-pulse electroconvulsive therapy and cognition: Effects of electrode placement, stimulus dosage and time.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Semkovska, Maria

    2010-11-23

    To clarify advantages of unilateral electrode placement as an optimisation technique for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for depression, aims were to meta-analyse unilateral ECT effects on cognitive performance relative to: (1) bitemporal electrode placement, (2) electrical dosage, and (3) time interval between final treatment and cognitive reassessment. Relevant electronic databases were systematically searched through May 2009, using the terms: "electroconvulsive therapy" and ["cogniti∗", "neuropsycholog∗", "memory", "attention", "executive", "spatial", or "intellectual"]. Inclusion criteria were: independent study of depressed patients receiving unilateral or bitemporal brief-pulse ECT; within-subjects design; use of objective cognitive assessments; available mean electrical dosage for unilateral samples. Standardized pre-post ECT weighted effect sizes were computed and pooled within 16 cognitive domains by a mixed-effects model. Thirty-nine studies (1415 patients) were meta-analysed. Up to three days after final treatment, unilateral ECT was associated with significantly smaller decreases in global cognition, delayed verbal memory retrieval, and autobiographical memory, compared to bitemporal ECT. Significant publication bias was found for autobiographical memory, favouring reporting of larger percentage loss. Higher unilateral ECT electrical dosage predicted larger decreases in verbal learning, delayed verbal memory retrieval, visual recognition, and semantic memory retrieval. When retested more than three days after completing ECT, no significant differences remained between the two electrode placements; for unilateral ECT, electrical dosage no longer predicted cognitive performance whereas increasing interval between final treatment and retesting predicted growing improvement in some variables. This interval is a more useful long-term predictor of cognitive function than electrode placement or electrical dosage following unilateral ECT.

  11. Study on self-frequency-shift of femtosecond pulse in nonlinear dispersion medium using time-resolved cross-phase modulation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵应桥; 朱鹤元; 刘建华; 孙迭篪; 李富铭

    1997-01-01

    A time-resolved cross-phase modulation method combined with a modified nonlinear Schrodinger equation is used to study the effects of nonlinear response time on the propagation of ultrashort pulses in nonlinear dispersion media. Evolution of cross-phase modulation spectrum with the different time delay between the probe pulse and pump pulse is simulated using split-step Fourier method. It is shown that both normal self-frequency-shift-red-shift and abnormal self-frequency-shift-blue-shift can occur in the frequency domain for the probe pulse, and a satisfactory theoretical interpretation is given.

  12. Current pulse shaping of the load current on PTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghe Xia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The typical rise time of PTS machine is ∼110 ns with about 10 MA peak current under short pulse mode when all 24 modules discharge simultaneously. By distributing the trigger times of 12 laser beams logically and adjusting the statues of the pulse output switches, longer rise-time pulse can be obtained on the PTS facility. Based on the required pulse shape, whole circuit simulations will be used to calculate the trigger times of each laser triggering gas switch and the status of the pulse output switches. The rise time of the current is determined by the time difference between the first and last trigged laser triggering gas switches. In order to trigger the laser triggering gas switch, sufficient laser power is needed to be sent into the gap of the gas switches. The gas pressure and voltage difference on the two electrodes of the gas switches also affect the triggering of the gas switches, and the voltage added on the gas switch is determined by its transition time. Traditionally the trigger time difference should be less than the transition time of the two neighboring modules. A new simulation model of PTS shows one can break this transition time limits. Series of current pulse shaping experiments have been investigated on the PTS (Primary Test Stand. As results, more than 5 MA peak current were successfully achieved on the load with a rise time of 600 ns. This study and experiments of the pulse shaping on PTS demonstrate the adaptable ability of the PTS for offering different waveform of mega ampere current pulse for different research purpose.

  13. Adding high time resolution to charge-state-specific ion energy measurements for pulsed copper vacuum arc plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Koichi; Zhou, Xue; Anders, André

    2015-01-01

    Charge-state-resolved ion energy-time-distributions of pulsed Cu arc plasma were obtained by using direct (time dependent) acquisition of the ion detection signal from a commercial ion mass-per-charge and energy-per-charge analyzer. We find a shift of energies of Cu2+, Cu3+ and Cu4+ ions to lower values during the first few hundred microseconds after arc ignition, which is evidence for particle collisions in the plasma. The generation of Cu1+ ions in the later part of the pulse, measured by the increase of Cu1+ signal intensity and an associated slight reduction of the mean charge state point to charge exchange reactions between ions and neutrals. At the very beginning of the pulse, when the plasma expands into vacuum and the plasma potential strongly fluctuates, ions with much higher energy (over 200 eV) were observed. Early in the pulse, the ion energies observed are approximately proportional to the ion charge state, and we conclude that the acceleration mechanism is primarily based on acceleration in an e...

  14. The High Time Resolution Universe Survey - V: Single-pulse energetics and modulation properties of 315 pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Burke-Spolaor, S; Bailes, M; Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Champion, D J; D'Amico, N; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Possenti, S Milia A; Stappers, B; van Straten, W

    2012-01-01

    We report on the pulse-to-pulse energy distributions and phase-resolved modulation properties for catalogued pulsars in the southern High Time Resolution Universe intermediate-latitude survey. We selected the 315 pulsars detected in a single-pulse search of this survey, allowing a large sample unbiased regarding any rotational parameters of neutron stars. We found that the energy distribution of many pulsars is well-described by a log-normal distribution, with few deviating from a small range in log-normal scale and location parameters. Some pulsars exhibited multiple energy states corresponding to mode changes, and implying that some observed "nulling" may actually be a mode-change effect. PSRJ1900-2600 was found to emit weakly in its previously-identified "null" state. We found evidence for another state-change effect in two pulsars, which show bimodality in their nulling time scales; that is, they switch between a continuous-emission state and a single-pulse-emitting state. Large modulation occurs in many ...

  15. Optical time of flight studies of lithium plasma in double pulse laser ablation: Evidence of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivakumaran, V.; Joshi, H. C.; Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai, E-mail: ajai@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2014-06-15

    The early stage of formation of lithium plasma in a collinear—double pulse laser ablation mode has been studied using optical time of flight (OTOF) spectroscopy as a function of inter-pulse delay time, the distance from the target surface and the fluence of the ablation lasers. The experimental TOF measurements were carried out for lithium neutral (670.8 nm and 610.3 nm), and ionic (548.4 nm and 478.8 nm) lines. These experimental observations have been compared with that for single pulse laser ablation mode. It is found that depending on the fluence and laser pulse shape of the first pre-ablation laser and the second main ablation laser, the plasma plume formation and its characteristic features can be described in terms of plume-plume or laser-plume interaction processes. Moreover, the enhancement in the intensity of Li neutral and ionic lines is observed when the laser-plume interaction is the dominant process. Here, we see the evidence of the role of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption process in the initial stage of formation of lithium plasma in this case.

  16. DynPeak : An algorithm for pulse detection and frequency analysis in hormonal time series

    CERN Document Server

    Vidal, Alexandre; Médigue, Claire; Fabre, Stéphane; Clément, Frédérique

    2011-01-01

    The endocrine control of the reproductive function is often studied from the analysis of luteinizing hormone (LH) pulsatile secretion by the pituitary gland. Whereas measurements in the cavernous sinus cumulate anatomical and technical difficulties, LH levels can be easily assessed from jugular blood. However, plasma levels result from a convolution process due to clearance effects when LH enters the general circulation. Simultaneous measurements comparing LH levels in the cavernous sinus and jugular blood have revealed clear differences in the pulse shape, the amplitude and the baseline. Besides, experimental sampling occurs at a relatively low frequency (typically every 10 min) with respect to LH highest frequency release (one pulse per hour) and the resulting LH measurements are noised by both experimental and assay errors. As a result, the pattern of plasma LH may be not so clearly pulsatile. Yet, reliable information on the InterPulse Intervals (IPI) is a prerequisite to study precisely the steroid feedb...

  17. Very short NMR relaxation times of anions in ionic liquids: new pulse sequence to eliminate the acoustic ringing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimavicius, Vytautas; Gdaniec, Zofia; Balevicius, Vytautas

    2014-11-11

    NMR relaxation processes of anions were studied in two neat imidazolium-based room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) 1-decyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromide- and chloride. The spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxations of 81Br and 35Cl nuclei were found to be extremely fast due to very strong quadrupolar interactions. The determined relaxation rates are comparable with those observed in the solids or in some critical organic solute/water/salt systems. In order to eliminate the acoustic ringing of the probe-head during relaxation times measurements the novel pulse sequence has been devised. It is based on the conventional inversion recovery pulse sequence, however, instead of the last 90° pulse the subsequence of three 90° pulses applied along axes to fulfill the phase cycling condition is used. Using this pulse sequence it was possible to measure T1 for both studied nuclei. The viscosity measurements have been carried out and the rotational correlation times were calculated. The effective 35Cl quadrupolar coupling constant was found to be almost one order lower than that for 81Br, i.e. 1.8 MHz and 16.0 MHz, respectively. Taking into account the facts that the ratio of (Q(35Cl)/Q(81Br))2≈0.1 and EFG tensors on the anions are quite similar, analogous structural organizations are expected for both RTILs. The observed T1/T2 (1.27-1.44) ratios were found to be not sufficiently high to confirm the presence of long-living (on the time scale of ≥10(-8) s) mesoscopic structures or heterogeneities in the studied neat ionic liquids.

  18. Time domain dielectric spectroscopy of nanosecond pulsed electric field induced changes in dielectric properties of pig whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jie; Kolb, Juergen F

    2015-06-01

    The dielectric spectra of fresh pig whole blood in the β-dispersion range after exposure to 300-nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) with amplitude higher than the supra-electroporation threshold for erythrocytes were recorded by time domain reflectometry dielectric spectroscopy. The implications of the dielectric parameters on the dynamics of post-pulse pore development were discussed in light of the Cole-Cole relaxation model. The temporal development of the Cole-Cole parameters indicates that nsPEFs induced significant poration and swelling of erythrocytes within the first 5 min. The results also show that the majority of erythrocytes could not fully recover from supra-electroporation up to 30 min. The findings of this study suggest that time domain dielectric spectroscopy is a promising label-free and real-time physiological measuring technique for nsPEF-blood related biomedical applications, capable of following the conformational and morphological changes of cells.

  19. Using Adaptive Discrete-Time Gas Supply Control for Long Pulse Arc Discharge of Ion Source on NBI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Peng; HU Chundong; SONG Shihua; LIU Sheng; LIU Zhimin

    2008-01-01

    A control model of gas supply system is introduced for ion source and an adaptive discrete-time control algorithm to regulate the hydrogen injection.A real-time feedback control system (RFCS) is designed to control the gas supply for ion source based on the control model and the discrete-time control algorithm.The experimental results have proved that RFCS could regulate the gas supply smoothly,suppress the arc's abrupt over-current at the end of the ion source discharging,prolong the discharge pulse and stabilize the ion concentration.With RFCS,the ion source for neutral beam injection has reached its longest pulse with a length of 4.5 seconds in a stable status.

  20. Indirect versus direct photoionization with ultrashort pulses: interferences and time-resolved bond-length changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, S.; Engel, V.

    2004-02-01

    The photoionization of NaI molecules with femtosecond laser pulses leads to photoelectron distributions which vary with the delay between a pump- and a probe-pulse. If the vibrational wave packet as prepared in the pump-transition is located in a region where the bonding character is ionic, the photoelectron, due to its localization on the iodine atom, may be ejected directly or be scattered from the Na + ion. This leads to structures in the photoelectron spectrum which, in turn, reflect temporal bond-length changes.

  1. Time-dependent H-like and He-like Al lines produced by ultra-short pulse laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Takako; Kato, Masatoshi [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Shepherd, R.; Young, B.; More, R.; Osterheld, Al

    1998-03-01

    We have performed numerical modeling of time-resolved x-ray spectra from thin foil targets heated by the LLNL Ultra-short pulse (USP) laser. The targets were aluminum foils of thickness ranging from 250 A to 1250 A, heated with 120 fsec pulses of 400 nm light from the USP laser. The laser energy was approximately 0.2 Joules, focused to a 3 micron spot size for a peak intensity near 2 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Ly{alpha} and He{alpha} lines were recorded using a 900 fsec x-ray streak camera. We calculate the effective ionization, recombination and emission rate coefficients including density effects for H-like and He-like aluminum ions using a collisional radiative model. We calculate time-dependent ion abundances using these effective ionization and recombination rate coefficients. The time-dependent electron temperature and density used in the calculation are based on an analytical model for the hydrodynamic expansion of the target foils. During the laser pulse the target is ionized. After the laser heating stops, the plasma begins to recombine. Using the calculated time dependent ion abundances and the effective emission rate coefficients, we calculate the time dependent Ly{alpha} and He{alpha} lines. The calculations reproduce the main qualitative features of the experimental spectra. (author)

  2. Time-resolved electron temperature and electron density measurements in a nanosecond pulse filament discharge in H2-He and O2-He mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roettgen, A.; Shkurenkov, I.; Simeni Simeni, M.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2016-10-01

    Time evolution of electron density and electron temperature in a nanosecond pulse, diffuse filament electric discharge in H2-He and O2-He mixtures at a pressure of 100 Torr is studied by Thomson/pure rotational Raman scattering and kinetic modeling. The discharge is sustained between two spherical electrodes separated by a 1 cm gap and powered by high voltage pulses ~150 ns duration. Discharge energy coupled to the plasma filament 2-3 mm in diameter is 4-5 mJ/pulse, with specific energy loading of up to ~0.3 eV/molecule. At all experimental conditions, a rapid initial rise of electron temperature and electron density during the discharge pulse is observed, followed by the decay in the afterglow, over ~100 ns-1 µs. Electron density in the afterglow decays more rapidly as H2 or O2 fraction in the mixture is increased. In He/H2 mixtures, this is likely due to more rapid recombination of electrons in collisions with \\text{H}2+ and \\text{H}3+ ions, compared to recombination with \\text{He}2+ ions. In O2/He mixtures, electron density decay in the afterglow is affected by recombination with \\text{O}2+ and \\text{O}4+ ions, while the effect of three-body attachment is relatively minor. Peak electron number densities and electron temperatures are n e  =  (1.7-3.1) · 1014 cm-3 and T e  =  2.9-5.5 eV, depending on gas mixture composition. Electron temperature in the afterglow decays to approximately T e  ≈  0.3 eV, considerably higher compared to the gas temperature of T  =  300-380 K, inferred from O2 pure rotational Raman scattering spectra, due to superelastic collisions. The experimental results in helium and O2-He mixtures are compared with kinetic modeling predictions, showing good agreement.

  3. The importance of land hydrology changes in sea level rise on decadal time scales: results from 2002-2014 using GRACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reager, John; Gardner, Alex; Famiglietti, James; Wiese, David; Eicker, Annette; Lo, Min-Hui

    2016-04-01

    Climate-driven changes in land hydrology and their contributions to sea level rise have been absent from IPCC sea level budgets owing to challenges in observing global land water storage. In a review of recent and ongoing work, we show that recent advances in the measurement of time variable gravity from space using Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission observations, combined with reconciled global glacier loss estimates, enable a disaggregation of continental water mass trends and a quantification of this climate-driven term. We find that between 2002 and 2014, can additional 3200 +/- 900 Gt of water was stored on land in snow, soils and groundwater, likely due to climate variability. This gain partially offset water losses from ice sheets, glaciers, and groundwater pumping, slowing the rate of sea level rise by 0.71 +/- 0.20 mm yr-1, and consistent with observations of slowing over the recent decade. We also discuss possible causes and contributors to these trends and their implications for decadal variability. These findings highlight the importance of climate-driven changes in hydrology when assigning attribution to decadal changes in sea level.

  4. Tracking fs light pulses in space and time through advanced photonic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, L.; Gersen, H.; Balistreri, M.L.M.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; van Hulst, N.F.

    2003-01-01

    The propagation of short light pulses through advanced photonic structures like photonic crystals is influenced by the interplay of various physical mechanisms, for instance by the strong material dispersion and the low group velocity. To study the complex interplay between different mechanisms as

  5. Measurement of intrinsic rise times for various L(Y)SO and LuAG scintillators with a general study of prompt photons to achieve 10 ps in TOF-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundacker, Stefan; Auffray, Etiennette; Pauwels, Kristof; Lecoq, Paul

    2016-04-07

    The coincidence time resolution (CTR) of scintillator based detectors commonly used in positron emission tomography is well known to be dependent on the scintillation decay time (τd) and the number of photons detected (n'), i.e. CTR proportional variant √τd/n'. However, it is still an open question to what extent the scintillation rise time (τr) and other fast or prompt photons, e.g. Cherenkov photons, at the beginning of the scintillation process influence the CTR. This paper presents measurements of the scintillation emission rate for different LSO type crystals, i.e. LSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce, LSO:Ce codoped Ca and LGSO:Ce. For the various LSO-type samples measured we find an average value of 70 ps for the scintillation rise time, although some crystals like LSO:Ce codoped Ca seem to have a much faster rise time in the order of 20 ps. Additional measurements for LuAG:Ce and LuAG:Pr show a rise time of 535 ps and 251 ps, respectively. For these crystals, prompt photons (Cherenkov) can be observed at the beginning of the scintillation event. Furthermore a significantly lower rise time value is observed when codoping with calcium. To quantitatively investigate the influence of the rise time to the time resolution we measured the CTR with the same L(Y)SO samples and compared the values to Monte Carlo simulations. Using the measured relative light yields, rise- and decay times of the scintillators we are able to quantitatively understand the measured CTRs in our simulations. Although the rise time is important to fully explain the CTR variation for the different samples tested we determined its influence on the CTR to be in the order of a few percent only. This result is surprising because, if only photonstatistics of the scintillation process is considered, the CTR would be proportional to the square root of the rise time. The unexpected small rise time influence on the CTR can be explained by the convolution of the scintillation rate with the single photon time

  6. Measurement of intrinsic rise times for various L(Y)SO and LuAG scintillators with a general study of prompt photons to achieve 10 ps in TOF-PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundacker, Stefan; Auffray, Etiennette; Pauwels, Kristof; Lecoq, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The coincidence time resolution (CTR) of scintillator based detectors commonly used in positron emission tomography is well known to be dependent on the scintillation decay time ({τd} ) and the number of photons detected ({{n}\\prime} ), i.e. CTR\\propto \\sqrt{{τd}/{{n}\\prime}} . However, it is still an open question to what extent the scintillation rise time ({τr} ) and other fast or prompt photons, e.g. Cherenkov photons, at the beginning of the scintillation process influence the CTR. This paper presents measurements of the scintillation emission rate for different LSO type crystals, i.e. LSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce, LSO:Ce codoped Ca and LGSO:Ce. For the various LSO-type samples measured we find an average value of 70 ps for the scintillation rise time, although some crystals like LSO:Ce codoped Ca seem to have a much faster rise time in the order of 20 ps. Additional measurements for LuAG:Ce and LuAG:Pr show a rise time of 535 ps and 251 ps, respectively. For these crystals, prompt photons (Cherenkov) can be observed at the beginning of the scintillation event. Furthermore a significantly lower rise time value is observed when codoping with calcium. To quantitatively investigate the influence of the rise time to the time resolution we measured the CTR with the same L(Y)SO samples and compared the values to Monte Carlo simulations. Using the measured relative light yields, rise- and decay times of the scintillators we are able to quantitatively understand the measured CTRs in our simulations. Although the rise time is important to fully explain the CTR variation for the different samples tested we determined its influence on the CTR to be in the order of a few percent only. This result is surprising because, if only photonstatistics of the scintillation process is considered, the CTR would be proportional to the square root of the rise time. The unexpected small rise time influence on the CTR can be explained by the convolution of the scintillation rate with the

  7. Pulse-Width Jitter Measurement for Laser Diode Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jun-Hua; WANG Yun-Cai

    2006-01-01

    @@ Theoretical analysis and experimental measurement of pulse-width jitter of diode laser pulses are presented. The expression of pulse power spectra with all amplitude jitter, timing jitter and pulse-width jitter is deduced.

  8. Two-dimensional time-dependent modelling of fume formation in a pulsed gas metal arc welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boselli, M.; Colombo, V.; Ghedini, E.; Gherardi, M.; Sanibondi, P.

    2013-06-01

    Fume formation in a pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process is investigated by coupling a time-dependent axi-symmetric two-dimensional model, which takes into account both droplet detachment and production of metal vapour, with a model for fume formation and transport based on the method of moments for the solution of the aerosol general dynamic equation. We report simulative results of a pulsed process (peak current = 350 A, background current 30 A, period = 9 ms) for a 1 mm diameter iron wire, with Ar shielding gas. Results showed that metal vapour production occurs mainly at the wire tip, whereas fume formation is concentrated in the fringes of the arc in the spatial region close to the workpiece, where metal vapours are transported by convection. The proposed modelling approach allows time-dependent tracking of fumes also in plasma processes where temperature-time variations occur faster than nanoparticle transport from the nucleation region to the surrounding atmosphere, as is the case for most pulsed GMAW processes.

  9. Time-resolved OES of nanosecond pulsed discharges in N$_{2}$ and N$_{2}$/H$_{2}$O mixtures]{Time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy of nanosecond pulsed discharges in atmospheric pressure N$_{2}$ and N$_{2}$/H$_{2}$O mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, R M; van Veldhuizen, E M; Bruggeman, P J

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, nanosecond pulsed discharges in N$_{2}$ and N$_{2}$/0.9% H$_{2}$O at atmospheric pressure (at 300 K) are studied with time-resolved imaging, optical emission spectroscopy and Rayleigh scattering. A 170 ns high voltage pulse is applied across two pin-shaped electrodes at a frequency of 1 kHz. The discharge consists of three phases: an ignition phase, a spark phase and a recombination phase. During the ignition phase the emission is mainly caused by molecular nitrogen (N$_{2}$(C-B)). In the spark and recombination phase mainly atomic nitrogen emission is observed. The emission when H$_{2}$O is added is very similar, except the small contribution of H$_{\\alpha}$ and the intensity of the molecular N$_{2}$(C-B) emission is less.

  10. Semi-Active Pulse-Switching Vibration Suppression Using Sliding Time Window

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mohammadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of pulse-switching vibration control technique is investigated using a new method for switching sequence, in order to enhance the vibration damping. The control law in this method which was developed in the field of piezoelectric damping is based on triggering the inverting switch on each extremum of the produced voltage (or displacement; however, its efficiency in the case of random excitation is arguable because of the local extremum detection process. The new proposed method for switching sequence is only based on the fact that the triggering voltage level was determined using windowed statistical examination of the deflection signal. Results for a cantilever beam excited by different excitation forces, such as stationary and nonstationary random samples, and pulse forces are presented. A significant decrease in vibration energy and also the robustness of this method are demonstrated.

  11. Design of FIR digital filters for pulse shaping and channel equalization using time-domain optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, R. C.; Vaughn, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    Three algorithms are developed for designing finite impulse response digital filters to be used for pulse shaping and channel equalization. The first is the Minimax algorithm which uses linear programming to design a frequency-sampling filter with a pulse shape that approximates the specification in a minimax sense. Design examples are included which accurately approximate a specified impulse response with a maximum error of 0.03 using only six resonators. The second algorithm is an extension of the Minimax algorithm to design preset equalizers for channels with known impulse responses. Both transversal and frequency-sampling equalizer structures are designed to produce a minimax approximation of a specified channel output waveform. Examples of these designs are compared as to the accuracy of the approximation, the resultant intersymbol interference (ISI), and the required transmitted energy. While the transversal designs are slightly more accurate, the frequency-sampling designs using six resonators have smaller ISI and energy values.

  12. Target Recognition Using Late-Time Returns from Ultra-Wideband, Short-Pulse Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    WIDEBAND, SHORT-PULSE RADAR DISSERTATION Kenneth J. Pascoe, B.S.E.E., M.S. Major, USAF Approved: Dr. Michael J. Havrilla Dissertation Advisor Date Dr...Acknowledgments Thanks to all the people who helped to make this research happen. Thanks to my committee: Dr. Michael Havrilla , the late Major Bill Wood...Singularity Expansion Method 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Michael J. Havrilla , Ph.D. (ENG) a. REPORT U b

  13. Numeric modeling of synchronous laser pulsing and voltage pulsing field evaporation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, L; Houard, J; Blum, I; Delaroche, F; Vurpillot, F

    2016-01-01

    We have recently proposed an atom probe design based on a femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe setup. This setup unlocks the limitation of voltage pulsed mode atom probe thanks to the occurrence of local photoconductive switching effect . In this paper, we have used a numerical model to simulate the field evaporation process triggered by the synchronous two pulses. The model takes into account the local photoconductive effect and the temperature rise caused by the laser application and the voltage pulse distortion due to the RC effect.

  14. Effect of anomalous pulse timing on call discrimination by females of the gray treefrog (Hyla versicolor): behavioral correlates of neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joshua J; Huth, Kenneth; Hunce, Raymond; Lentine, Brandon

    2010-06-15

    Research has demonstrated that certain midbrain neurons of anurans 'count' interpulse intervals (IPIs). Some neurons fire after exposure to fewer intervals than do others. Counting can be reset to zero if an IPI falls outside the cell's tolerance range. We tested female gray treefrogs for behavioral correlates of these neural response patterns using phonotaxis tests in order to gain a better understanding of the mechanistic bases of female responses to calls. For example, previous work demonstrated females often prefer longer to shorter pulsed advertisement calls, even when the former occur at lower rates. Call attractiveness can also be reduced when pulse duration and timing have been manipulated experimentally or disrupted by acoustic interference. In this study, female responses were consistent with neural data, emphasizing the importance of IPIs. Females discriminated in favor of calls with normal interpulse timing relative to those in which a single IPI was too long or too short. Our data suggest that neural resetting of interval counting by inappropriate intervals may more strongly influence females than reduced firing in response to such intervals on an individual basis. Data also suggest a transition point between 125 ms and 175 ms at which an interval between pulse strings is treated as an interval between calls.

  15. Development of an active detector for the characterization of the late-time radiation environment from a reactor pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luker, S.M. [Applied Nuclear Technologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Mail Stop 1146, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1146 (United States); Griffin, P.J. [Nuclear Facility Operations, Sandia National Laboratories, Mail Stop 0614, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1146 (United States); Kolb, N.R. [Applied Nuclear Technologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Mail Stop 0982, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0982 (United States); Naranjo, G.N. [Advanced Nuclear Concepts, Sandia National Laboratories, Mail Stop 1143, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1143 (United States); Suo-Anttila, A.J. [Computational Engineering Analysis LLC, Albuquerque, NM 87111 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: This paper discusses the use of a commercially available {sup 235}U fission chamber, with a matching compensating ion chamber, originally sold as a single-ended detector with the signal conducted over the shield of a coaxial cable. The authors designed an aluminum housing that isolates the two detectors and converts the signals to full differential mode as a noise-reduction technique. The signals are processed using the switched resistor technique to extend the signal range to longer times from the peak of the pulse [Luker, S. M., Griffin, P. J., King, D. B., and Suo-Anttila, A. J., 'Improved Diagnostics for Analysis of a Reactor Pulse Radiation Environment,' 13. International Symposium on Reactor Dosimetry, Akersloot, Netherlands, May 25, 2008, pp. 4-6.]. The newly configured fission chamber assembly has been used at the annular core research reactor at Sandia National Laboratories to provide a high-fidelity characterization of the neutron time profile from a pulsed operation. (authors)

  16. Validation of New and Existing Decision Rules for the Estimation of Beat-to-Beat Pulse Transit Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulse transit time (PTT is a pivotal marker of vascular stiffness. Because the actual PTT duration in vivo is unknown and the complicated variation in waveform may occur, the robust determination of characteristic point is still a very difficult task in the PTT estimation. Our objective is to devise a method for real-time estimation of PTT duration in pulse wave. It has an ability to reduce the interference caused by both high- and low-frequency noise. The reproducibility and performance of these methods are assessed on both artificial and clinical pulse data. Artificial data are generated to investigate the reproducibility with various signal-to-noise ratios. For all artificial data, the mean biases obtained from all methods are less than 1 ms; collectively, this newly proposed method has minimum standard deviation (SD, <1 ms. A set of data from 33 participants together with the synchronously recorded continuous blood pressure data are used to investigate the correlation coefficient (CC. The statistical analysis shows that our method has maximum values of mean CC (0.5231, sum of CCs (17.26, and median CC (0.5695 and has the minimum SD of CCs (0.1943. Overall, the test results in this study indicate that the newly developed method has advantages over traditional decision rules for the PTT measurement.

  17. Effect of double false pulses in calibrated neutron coincidence collar during measuring time-correlated neutrons from PuBe neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Tam Cong, E-mail: tam.nguyen.cong@energia.mta.hu; Huszti, Jozsef; Nguyen, Quan Van

    2015-09-01

    Effect of double false pulses of preamplifiers in neutron coincidence collar was investigated to explain non-parallel shape of calibrated D/S–M{sub Pu} curves of two commercial neutron coincidence collars, JCC-31 and JCC-13. Two curves, which were constructed from D/S ratio (doubles and singles count rate), and Pu content M{sub Pu}, of the same set of secondary standard PuBe neutron sources, should be parallel. Non-parallelism rises doubt about usability of the method based on this curve for determination of Pu content in PuBe neutron sources. We have shown in three steps that the problem originates from double false pulses of preamplifiers in JCC-13. First we used a pulse train diagram for analyzing the non-parallel shape, second we used Rossi-Alpha distribution measured by pulse train recorder developed in our institute and finally, we investigated the effect of inserted noise pulses. This implies a new type of QA test option in traditional multiplicity shift registers for excluding presence of double false pulses.

  18. Time resolved study of the emission enhancement mechanisms in orthogonal double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanginés, R., E-mail: roberto.sangines@ccadet.unam.mx; Sobral, H.

    2013-10-01

    The evolution of laser induced ablation plume on aluminum targets has been investigated in orthogonal pre-ablation double pulse scheme at atmospheric pressure from the earliest stages of plasma evolution. Time-resolved emission spectra from neutrals, singly- and doubly-ionized species obtained with the double pulse experiment have been compared with those from the single pulse configuration. Signal-to-noise enhancement reaches values of up to 15 depending on the analyzed species; and the lower the charge state the later its maximum signal-to-noise ratio is reached. Ablation plume dynamics was monitored from 10 ns after the plasma onset via shadowgraphy and fast-photography with narrow interference filters to follow the evolution of individual species. Results show that ionic species from the target are located at the plasma core while nitrogen from the background air is found at the plume peripheral. Initially both configurations exhibit similar ablation plume sizes and their expansions were successfully fitted with the strong explosion model for the first 500 ns. At later times a good agreement was obtained by using the drag model, which predicts that the plume expansion eventually stops due to interaction with the background gas particles. The emission enhancement measured in the double pulse scheme is discussed in terms of the models describing the plume dynamics. - Highlights: • Production of 2 + ions at the earliest stages of plasma evolution • The higher the charge state the inner the location within the ablation plume. • The expansion rate of the second (ablation) plume was measured. • Shock and drag models successfully fit the ablation shock front expansion.

  19. Real-time diagnostics of a jet engine exhaust using an intra-pulse quantum cascade laser spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, Geoffrey; Hay, Kenneth G.; Langford, Nigel; Johnson, Mark P.; Black, John D.

    2011-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that an intra-pulse scanned quantum cascade laser spectrometer may be used to obtain real-time diagnostics of the amounts of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water, in the exhaust of an aero gas turbine (turbojet) engine operated in a sea level test cell. Measurements have been made of the rapid changes in composition following ignition, the composition under steady state operating conditions, and the composition changes across the exhaust plume. The minimum detection limit for CO in a double pass through a typical gas turbine plume of 50 cm in diameter, with 0.4 seconds integration time, is approximately 2 ppm.

  20. Attosecond timing jitter pulse trains from semiconductor saturable absorber mode-locked Cr:LiSAF lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Sennaroğlu, Alphan; Li, Duo; Demirbaş, Ümit; Benedick, Andrew; Fujimoto, James G.; Kaertner, Franz X.

    2012-01-01

    The timing jitter of optical pulse trains from diode-pumped, semiconductor saturable absorber mode-locked femtosecond Cr:LiSAF lasers is characterized by a single-crystal balanced optical cross-correlator with an equivalent sensitivity in phase noise of -235 dBc/Hz. The RMS timing jitter is 30 attoseconds integrated from 10 kHz to 50 MHz, the Nyquist frequency of the 100 MHz repetition rate oscillator. The AM-to-PM conversion induced excess phase noise is calculated and compared with experime...

  1. Influence of Pressboard Aging on PD Pulse Parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun-hao; WANG Song; JIN Wei; LI Yan-ming

    2011-01-01

    Combination of pressboard and mineral oil continues to be the choice of materials used as the insulation die- lectric media in large transformers. The purpose of the reported study is to investigate the influence of pressboard ag- ing on PD (partial discharge) pulse parameters. Ultra wide band (UWB) time-resolved PD pulse measurements were carried out on gas void inside pressboard. The rise rime, full time and width time of PD pulse in different aging degree pressboard are obtained. The result is helpful to better understanding the influence of the aging of pressboard on PD measurement and insulation diagnostics in power transformers.

  2. Variability, polarimetry, and timing properties of single pulses from PSR J1713+0747 using the Large European Array for Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, K; Janssen, G H; Karuppusamy, R; McKee, J; Kramer, M; Lee, K J; Perrodin, D; Purver, M; Sanidas, S; Smits, R; Stappers, B W; Weltevrede, P; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Single pulses preserve information about the pulsar radio emission and propagation in the pulsar magnetosphere, and understanding the behaviour of their variability is essential for estimating the fundamental limit on the achievable pulsar timing precision. Here we report the findings of our analysis of single pulses from PSR J1713+0747 with data collected by the Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP). We present statistical studies of the pulse properties that include distributions of their energy, phase and width. Two modes of systematic sub-pulse drifting have been detected, with a periodicity of 7 and 3 pulse periods. The two modes appear at different ranges of pulse longitude but overlap under the main peak of the integrated profile. No evidence for pulse micro-structure is seen with a time resolution down to 140 ns. In addition, we show that the fractional polarisation of single pulses increases with their pulse peak flux density. By mapping the probability density of linear polarisation position angle...

  3. Generation of high-quality parabolic pulses with optimized duration and energy by use of dispersive frequency-to-time mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jeonghyun; Azaña, José

    2015-10-19

    We propose and demonstrate a novel linear-optics method for high-fidelity parabolic pulse generation with durations ranging from the picosecond to the sub-nanosecond range. This method is based on dispersion-induced frequency-to-time mapping combined with spectral shaping in order to overcome constraints of previous linear shaping approaches. Temporal waveform distortions associated with the need to satisfy a far-field condition are eliminated by use of a virtual time-lens process, which is directly implemented in the linear spectral shaping stage. Using this approach, the generated parabolic pulses are able to maintain most energy spectrum available from the input pulse frequency bandwidth, regardless of the target pulse duration, which is not anymore limited by the finest spectral resolution of the optical pulse spectrum shaper. High-quality parabolic pulses, with durations from 25ps to 400ps and output powers exceeding 4dBm before amplification, have been experimentally synthesized from a picosecond mode-locked optical source using a commercial optical pulse shaper with a frequency resolution >10GHz. In particular, we report the synthesis of full-duty cycle parabolic pulses that match up almost exactly with an ideal fitting over the entire pulse period.

  4. A compact high-voltage pulse generator based on pulse transformer with closed magnetic core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Jinliang; Cheng, Xinbing; Bai, Guoqiang; Zhang, Hongbo; Feng, Jiahuai; Liang, Bo

    2010-03-01

    A compact high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator, based on a pulse transformer with a closed magnetic core, is presented in this paper. The pulse generator consists of a miniaturized pulse transformer, a curled parallel strip pulse forming line (PFL), a spark gap, and a matched load. The innovative design is characterized by the compact structure of the transformer and the curled strip PFL. A new structure of transformer windings was designed to keep good insulation and decrease distributed capacitance between turns of windings. A three-copper-strip structure was adopted to avoid asymmetric coupling of the curled strip PFL. When the 31 microF primary capacitor is charged to 2 kV, the pulse transformer can charge the PFL to 165 kV, and the 3.5 ohm matched load can deliver a high-voltage pulse with a duration of 9 ns, amplitude of 84 kV, and rise time of 5.1 ns. When the load is changed to 50 ohms, the output peak voltage of the generator can be 165 kV, the full width at half maximum is 68 ns, and the rise time is 6.5 ns.

  5. Time-resolved diffraction profiles and structural dynamics of Ni film under short laser pulse irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zhibin; Zhigilei, Leonid V [University of Virginia, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 116 Engineer' s Way, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4745 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    The evolution of the diffraction profiles during the fast thermoelastic deformation and structural transformations induced in a thin Ni film by short pulse laser irradiation is investigated in molecular dynamics simulations. Fast disappearance of the diffraction peaks characteristic for the initial crystal structure is related to the homogeneous nucleation and growth of liquid regions inside the overheated crystal. Transient thermoelastic deformation of the film prior to melting is reflected in shifts and splittings of the diffraction peaks, providing an opportunity for experimental probing of the ultrafast deformations.

  6. Operational Characteristics of an SCR-Based Pulse Generating Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    the inductive loading of the probe connected to the oscilloscope during pulsing. The fast rise time (  < 1 µs), coupled with the surge in current...16] V. A. K. Temple and F. W. Holroyd. (1983, July). Optimizing carrier lifetime profile for improved trade-off between turn-off time and

  7. Anomalous time delays of an optical pulse interacting with a micro-resonator: a quantum weak-measurement approach

    CERN Document Server

    Asano, M; Bliokh, Y P; Kofman, A G; Zhao, G; Ikuta, R; Yamamoto, T; Kivshar, Y S; Yang, L; Imoto, N; Ozdemir, S K; Nori, F

    2016-01-01

    We study inelastic resonant scattering of a Gaussian pulse with the parameters close to a zero of the complex scattering coefficient. We demonstrate, both theoretically and experimentally, that such near-zero scattering can result in anomalously-large time delays and frequency shifts of the scattered pulse. Furthermore, we reveal a close analogy of these anomalous shifts with the spatial and angular Goos-Hanchen optical beam shifts, which are amplified via quantum weak measurements. However, in contrast to other beam-shift and weak-measurement systems, we deal with a one-dimensional scalar wave without any intrinsic degrees of freedom. It is the non-Hermitian nature of the system that produces its rich and non-trivial behaviour. Our results are generic for any scattering problem, either quantum or classical. As an example, we consider the transmission of an optical pulse through a nano-fiber with a side-coupled toroidal micro-resonator. The zero of the transmission coefficient corresponds to the critical coup...

  8. Contemporary sea level rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazenave, Anny; Llovel, William

    2010-01-01

    Measuring sea level change and understanding its causes has considerably improved in the recent years, essentially because new in situ and remote sensing observations have become available. Here we report on most recent results on contemporary sea level rise. We first present sea level observations from tide gauges over the twentieth century and from satellite altimetry since the early 1990s. We next discuss the most recent progress made in quantifying the processes causing sea level change on timescales ranging from years to decades, i.e., thermal expansion of the oceans, land ice mass loss, and land water-storage change. We show that for the 1993-2007 time span, the sum of climate-related contributions (2.85 +/- 0.35 mm year(-1)) is only slightly less than altimetry-based sea level rise (3.3 +/- 0.4 mm year(-1)): approximately 30% of the observed rate of rise is due to ocean thermal expansion and approximately 55% results from land ice melt. Recent acceleration in glacier melting and ice mass loss from the ice sheets increases the latter contribution up to 80% for the past five years. We also review the main causes of regional variability in sea level trends: The dominant contribution results from nonuniform changes in ocean thermal expansion.

  9. Neural Networks-Based Real-Time Determination of the Laser Beam Spatial Profile and Vibrational-to-Translational Relaxation Time Within Pulsed Photoacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukić, M.; Ćojbašić, Ž.; Rabasović, M. D.; Markushev, D. D.; Todorović, D. M.

    2013-09-01

    This paper concerns with the possibilities of computational intelligence application for simultaneous determination of the laser beam spatial profile and vibrational-to-translational relaxation time of the polyatomic molecules in gases by pulsed photoacoustics. Results regarding the application of neural computing through the use of feed-forward multilayer perception networks are presented. Feed-forward multilayer perception networks are trained in an offline batch training regime to estimate simultaneously, and in real-time, the laser beam spatial profile (profile shape class) and the vibrational-to-translational relaxation time from given (theoretical) photoacoustic signals. The proposed method significantly shortens the time required for the simultaneous determination of the laser beam spatial profile and relaxation time and has the advantage of accurately calculating the aforementioned quantities.

  10. Neural Code-Neural Self-information Theory on How Cell-Assembly Code Rises from Spike Time and Neuronal Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Tsien, Joe Z

    2017-01-01

    A major stumbling block to cracking the real-time neural code is neuronal variability - neurons discharge spikes with enormous variability not only across trials within the same experiments but also in resting states. Such variability is widely regarded as a noise which is often deliberately averaged out during data analyses. In contrast to such a dogma, we put forth the Neural Self-Information Theory that neural coding is operated based on the self-information principle under which variability in the time durations of inter-spike-intervals (ISI), or neuronal silence durations, is self-tagged with discrete information. As the self-information processor, each ISI carries a certain amount of information based on its variability-probability distribution; higher-probability ISIs which reflect the balanced excitation-inhibition ground state convey minimal information, whereas lower-probability ISIs which signify rare-occurrence surprisals in the form of extremely transient or prolonged silence carry most information. These variable silence durations are naturally coupled with intracellular biochemical cascades, energy equilibrium and dynamic regulation of protein and gene expression levels. As such, this silence variability-based self-information code is completely intrinsic to the neurons themselves, with no need for outside observers to set any reference point as typically used in the rate code, population code and temporal code models. Moreover, temporally coordinated ISI surprisals across cell population can inherently give rise to robust real-time cell-assembly codes which can be readily sensed by the downstream neural clique assemblies. One immediate utility of this self-information code is a general decoding strategy to uncover a variety of cell-assembly patterns underlying external and internal categorical or continuous variables in an unbiased manner.

  11. Microstructure and magnetic properties of NiZn nanowires with controlled Zn ion concentration and off-time between pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazani, A., E-mail: rmzn@kashanu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, University of Kashan, P.O. Box 87147.71147, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Almasi-Kashi, M. [Department of Physics, University of Kashan, P.O. Box 87147.71147, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salati, A. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Zn content is almost independent of off-time but magnetic properties vary with it. • Wide FORC distribution of alloy nanowires implies Zn substitution in Ni lattice. • A weakly interacting single domain was found for the low Zn content NiZn nanowires. • Annealed samples with higher Zn content showed a multi-domain treatment. - Abstract: Varying the off-time between pulses in electrolyte with different compositions, Ni{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x} (0.73 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.91) nanowire arrays were ac pulse electrodeposited into the porous alumina templates prepared by common two-step anodization technique. The effect of post annealing also was investigated. The influence of deposition parameters on alloy contents was investigated by studying the microstructures and magnetic properties of as-prepared and annealed nanowires. Although Zn content was almost constant with increase in off-time between pulses it remarkably varied the magnetic properties of the samples. X-ray diffractometry of NiZn nanowires showed a face center cubic structure of Ni with a full with half maximum wider than usual Ni nanowires which was shifted towards the low angle confirming Zn substitution in the Ni lattice. Low Zn containing alloy nanowires showed relatively weak interacting single domain system while a pseudo-single domain system was seen for the annealed sample indicating larger magnetic domains with more interaction. Annealed samples with higher Zn content on the other hand showed a multi-domain treatment.

  12. Effects of cardiac timing and peripheral resistance on measurement of pulse wave velocity for assessment of arterial stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hanguang; Butlin, Mark; Tan, Isabella; Avolio, Alberto

    2017-07-20

    To investigate the effects of heart rate (HR), left ventricular ejection time (LVET) and wave reflection on arterial stiffness as assessed by pulse wave velocity (PWV), a pulse wave propagation simulation system (PWPSim) based on the transmission line model of the arterial tree was developed and was applied to investigate pulse wave propagation. HR, LVET, arterial elastic modulus and peripheral resistance were increased from 60 to 100 beats per minute (bpm), 0.1 to 0.45 seconds, 0.5 to 1.5 times and 0.5 to 1.5 times of the normal value, respectively. Carotid-femoral PWV (cfPWV) and brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) were calculated by intersecting tangent method (cfPWVtan and baPWVtan), maximum slope (cfPWVmax and baPWVmax), and using the Moens-Korteweg equation ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]). Results showed cfPWV and baPWV increased significantly with arterial elastic modulus but did not increase with HR when using a constant elastic modulus. However there were significant LVET dependencies of cfPWVtan and baPWVtan (0.17 ± 0.13 and 0.17 ± 0.08 m/s per 50 ms), and low peripheral resistance dependencies of cfPWVtan, cfPWVmax, baPWVtan and baPWVmax (0.04 ± 0.01, 0.06 ± 0.04, 0.06 ± 0.03 and 0.09 ± 0.07 m/s per 10% peripheral resistance), respectively. This study demonstrated that LVET dominates the effect on calculated PWV compared to HR and peripheral resistance when arterial elastic modulus is constant.

  13. Optimal battery charging, Part I: Minimizing time-to-charge, energy loss, and temperature rise for OCV-resistance battery model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, A.; Han, X.; Avvari, G. V.; Raghunathan, N.; Balasingam, B.; Pattipati, K. R.; Bar-Shalom, Y.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a closed-form solution to the problem of optimally charging a Li-ion battery. A combination of three cost functions is considered as the objective function: time-to-charge (TTC), energy losses (EL), and a temperature rise index (TRI). First, we consider the cost function of the optimization problem as a weighted sum of TTC and EL. We show that the optimal charging strategy in this case is the well-known Constant Current-Constant Voltage (CC-CV) policy with the value of the current in the CC stage being a function of the ratio of weighting on TTC and EL and of the resistance of the battery. Then, we extend the cost function to a weighted sum of TTC, EL and TRI and derive an analytical solution for the problem. It is shown that the analytical solution can be approximated by a CC-CV with the value of current in the CC stage being a function of ratio of weighting on TTC and EL, resistance of the battery and the effective thermal resistance.

  14. Time-of-flight diffractometer with multiple pulse overlap - an example for the application of modern tools for instrument design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhr, U.; Bauer, G.S.; Wagner, W. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    A Time-of-Flight Diffractometer with high pulse rates, allowing multiple frame overlap, is a completely novel design of an instrument dedicated for high resolution strain-field mapping. We elaborated a detailed concept of this instrument applying analytical calculations and Monte Carlo computer simulations. Having established the instrument concept, the computer simulations will now be extended to optimize the total performance of the instrument. To illustrate the necessity and possibilities of applying modem tools for instrument design, we describe, as an example, the different steps towards the development of the detailed design of this instrument, which we intend to build at the Swiss spallation. source SINQ in the near future.

  15. Multi-stage pulse tube cryocooler with acoustic impedance constructed to reduce transient cool down time and thermal loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedeon, David R. (Inventor); Wilson, Kyle B. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The cool down time for a multi-stage, pulse tube cryocooler is reduced by configuring at least a portion of the acoustic impedance of a selected stage, higher than the first stage, so that it surrounds the cold head of the selected stage. The surrounding acoustic impedance of the selected stage is mounted in thermally conductive connection to the warm region of the selected stage for cooling the acoustic impedance and is fabricated of a high thermal diffusivity, low thermal radiation emissivity material, preferably aluminum.

  16. Ab initio time-dependent method to study the hydrogen molecule exposed to intense ultrashort laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz-Vicario, J.L. [Departamento de Quimica, C-IX, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049-Madrid (Spain); Sede de Investigacion Universitaria (SIU). Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia)], E-mail: joseluis.sanzvicario@uam.es; Palacios, A. [Departamento de Quimica, C-IX, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049-Madrid (Spain); Cardona, J.C. [Sede de Investigacion Universitaria (SIU). Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia); Bachau, H. [Centre des Lasers Intenses et Applications, UMR 5107 du CNRS-Universite bordeaux I-CEA, Universite Bordeaux I, 33405 Talence Cedex (France); Martin, F. [Departamento de Quimica, C-IX, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049-Madrid (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    An ab initio non-perturbative time dependent method to describe ionization of molecular systems by ultrashort (femtosecond) laser pulses has been developed. The method allows one to describe competing processes such as non dissociative ionization, dissociative ionization and dissociation into neutrals, including the possibility of autoionization. In this work we assess the validity of the method by applying it to different physical situations and by comparing with results previously obtained within stationary perturbation theory. In particular, it is shown that inclusion of the nuclear motion is essential to describe H{sub 2} resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and interferences mediated by H{sub 2} autoionizing states.

  17. Short-pulsed diode lasers as an excitation source for time-resolved fluorescence applications and confocal laser scanning microscopy in PDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Matthias; Meier, Thomas H.; El-Tayeb, Tarek A. A.; Kemkemer, Ralf; Steiner, Rudolf W.; Rueck, Angelika C.

    2001-11-01

    This article describes a setup for subcellular time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime measurements using a confocal laser scanning microscope in combination with a short pulsed diode laser for fluorescence excitation and specimen illumination. The diode laser emits pulses at 398 nm wavelength with 70 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) duration. The diode laser can be run at a pulse repetition rate of 40 MHz down to single shot mode. For time resolved spectroscopy a spectrometer setup consisting of an Czerny Turner spectrometer and a MCP-gated and -intensified CCD camera was used. Subcellular fluorescence lifetime measurements were achieved using a time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) module instead of the spectrometer setup. The capability of the short pulsed diode laser for fluorescence imaging, fluorescence lifetime measurements and time-resolved spectroscopy in combination with laser scanning microscopy is demonstrated by fluorescence analysis of several photosensitizers on a single cell level.

  18. A stochastical event-based continuous time step rainfall generator based on Poisson rectangular pulse and microcanonical random cascade models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohle, Ina; Niebisch, Michael; Zha, Tingting; Schümberg, Sabine; Müller, Hannes; Maurer, Thomas; Hinz, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall variability within a storm is of major importance for fast hydrological processes, e.g. surface runoff, erosion and solute dissipation from surface soils. To investigate and simulate the impacts of within-storm variabilities on these processes, long time series of rainfall with high resolution are required. Yet, observed precipitation records of hourly or higher resolution are in most cases available only for a small number of stations and only for a few years. To obtain long time series of alternating rainfall events and interstorm periods while conserving the statistics of observed rainfall events, the Poisson model can be used. Multiplicative microcanonical random cascades have been widely applied to disaggregate rainfall time series from coarse to fine temporal resolution. We present a new coupling approach of the Poisson rectangular pulse model and the multiplicative microcanonical random cascade model that preserves the characteristics of rainfall events as well as inter-storm periods. In the first step, a Poisson rectangular pulse model is applied to generate discrete rainfall events (duration and mean intensity) and inter-storm periods (duration). The rainfall events are subsequently disaggregated to high-resolution time series (user-specified, e.g. 10 min resolution) by a multiplicative microcanonical random cascade model. One of the challenges of coupling these models is to parameterize the cascade model for the event durations generated by the Poisson model. In fact, the cascade model is best suited to downscale rainfall data with constant time step such as daily precipitation data. Without starting from a fixed time step duration (e.g. daily), the disaggregation of events requires some modifications of the multiplicative microcanonical random cascade model proposed by Olsson (1998): Firstly, the parameterization of the cascade model for events of different durations requires continuous functions for the probabilities of the multiplicative

  19. Photoacoustic tomography from weak and noisy signals by using a pulse decomposition algorithm in the time-domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liangbing; Tao, Chao; Liu, XiaoJun; Deng, Mingxi; Wang, Senhua; Liu, Jun

    2015-10-19

    Photoacoustic tomography is a promising and rapidly developed methodology of biomedical imaging. It confronts an increasing urgent problem to reconstruct the image from weak and noisy photoacoustic signals, owing to its high benefit in extending the imaging depth and decreasing the dose of laser exposure. Based on the time-domain characteristics of photoacoustic signals, a pulse decomposition algorithm is proposed to reconstruct a photoacoustic image from signals with low signal-to-noise ratio. In this method, a photoacoustic signal is decomposed as the weighted summation of a set of pulses in the time-domain. Images are reconstructed from the weight factors, which are directly related to the optical absorption coefficient. Both simulation and experiment are conducted to test the performance of the method. Numerical simulations show that when the signal-to-noise ratio is -4 dB, the proposed method decreases the reconstruction error to about 17%, in comparison with the conventional back-projection method. Moreover, it can produce acceptable images even when the signal-to-noise ratio is decreased to -10 dB. Experiments show that, when the laser influence level is low, the proposed method achieves a relatively clean image of a hair phantom with some well preserved pattern details. The proposed method demonstrates imaging potential of photoacoustic tomography in expanding applications.

  20. Coherent femtosecond low-energy single-electron pulses for time-resolved diffraction and imaging: A numerical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paarmann, A.; Mueller, M.; Ernstorfer, R. [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Gulde, M.; Schaefer, S.; Schweda, S.; Maiti, M.; Ropers, C. [Courant Research Center Physics and Material Physics Institute, University of Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Xu, C. [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, 390, Qinghe Road, Jiading, Shanghai 201800 (China); Hohage, T. [Institute of Numerical and Applied Mathematics, University of Goettingen, Lotzestr. 16-18, 37083 Goettingen (Germany); Schenk, F. [Courant Research Center Physics and Material Physics Institute, University of Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Institute of Numerical and Applied Mathematics, University of Goettingen, Lotzestr. 16-18, 37083 Goettingen (Germany)

    2012-12-01

    We numerically investigate the properties of coherent femtosecond single electron wave packets photoemitted from nanotips in view of their application in ultrafast electron diffraction and non-destructive imaging with low-energy electrons. For two different geometries, we analyze the temporal and spatial broadening during propagation from the needle emitter to an anode, identifying the experimental parameters and challenges for realizing femtosecond time resolution. The simple tip-anode geometry is most versatile and allows for electron pulses of several ten of femtosecond duration using a very compact experimental design, however, providing very limited control over the electron beam collimation. A more sophisticated geometry comprising a suppressor-extractor electrostatic unit and a lens, similar to typical field emission electron microscope optics, is also investigated, allowing full control over the beam parameters. Using such a design, we find {approx}230 fs pulses feasible in a focused electron beam. The main limitation to achieve sub-hundred femtosecond time resolution is the typical size of such a device, and we suggest the implementation of more compact electron optics for optimal performance.

  1. Ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy of PYP by a sub-8 fs pulse laser at 400 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Yabushita, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Seiji; Chosrowjan, Haik; Imamoto, Yasushi; Sueda, Keiichi; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2013-05-01

    Impulsive excitation of molecular vibration is known to induce wave packets in both the ground state and excited state. Here, the ultrafast dynamics of PYP was studied by pump-probe spectroscopy using a sub-8 fs pulse laser at 400 nm. The broadband spectrum of the UV pulse allowed us to detect the pump-probe signal covering 360-440 nm. The dependence of the vibrational phase of the vibrational mode around 1155 cm(-1) on the probe photon energy was observed for the first time to our knowledge. The vibrational mode coupled to the electronic transition observed in the probe spectral ranges of 2.95-3.05 and 3.15-3.35 eV was attributed to the wave packets in the ground state and the excited state, respectively. The frequencies in the ground state and excited state were determined to be 1155 ± 1 and 1149 ± 1 cm(-1), respectively. The frequency difference is due to change after photoexcitation. This means a reduction of the bond strength associated with π-π* excitation, which is related to the molecular structure change associated with the primary isomerization process in the photocycle in PYP. Real-time vibrational modes at low frequency around 138, 179, 203, 260, and 317 cm(-1) were also observed and compared with the Raman spectrum for the assignment of the vibrational wave packet.

  2. A New Possibility for Production of Sub-picosecond X-ray Pulses using a Time Dependent Radio Frequency Orbit Deflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zholents, A. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-01

    It is shown that two radio frequency deflecting cavities with slightly different frequencies can be used to produce time-dependent orbit deflection to a few special electron bunches while keeping the majority of the electron bunches unaffected. These special bunches produce an x-ray pulse in which transverse position or angle, or both, are correlated with time. The x-ray pulses are then shortened, either with an asymmetrically cut crystal that acts as a pulse compressor, or with an angular aperture such as a narrow slit positioned downstream. The implementation of this technique creates a highly flexible environment for synchrotrons in which users of most beamlines will be able to easily select between the x-rays originated by the standard electron bunches and the short x-ray pulses originated by the special electron bunches carrying a time-dependent transverse correlation.

  3. Pulsed plasma electron sourcesa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasik, Ya. E.; Yarmolich, D.; Gleizer, J. Z.; Vekselman, V.; Hadas, Y.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Felsteiner, J.

    2009-05-01

    There is a continuous interest in research of electron sources which can be used for generation of uniform electron beams produced at E ≤105 V/cm and duration ≤10-5 s. In this review, several types of plasma electron sources will be considered, namely, passive (metal ceramic, velvet and carbon fiber with and without CsI coating, and multicapillary and multislot cathodes) and active (ferroelectric and hollow anodes) plasma sources. The operation of passive sources is governed by the formation of flashover plasma whose parameters depend on the amplitude and rise time of the accelerating electric field. In the case of ferroelectric and hollow-anode plasma sources the plasma parameters are controlled by the driving pulse and discharge current, respectively. Using different time- and space-resolved electrical, optical, spectroscopical, Thomson scattering and x-ray diagnostics, the parameters of the plasma and generated electron beam were characterized.

  4. An Advantage of the Equivalent Velocity Spectroscopy for Femtsecond Pulse Radiolysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kondoh, Takafumi; Tagawa, Seiichi; Tomosada, Hiroshi; Yang Jin Feng; Yoshida, Yoichi

    2005-01-01

    For studies of electron beam induced ultra-fast reaction process, femtosecond(fs) pulse radiolysis is under construction. To realize fs time resolution, fs electron and analyzing light pulses and their jitter compensation system are needed. About a 100fs electron pulse was generated by a photocathode RF gun linac and a magnetic pulse compressor. Synchronized Ti: Sapphire laser have a puleswidth about 160fs. And, it is significant to avoid degradation of time resolution caused by velocity difference between electron and analyzing light in a sample. In the 'Equivalent velocity spectroscopy' method, incident analyzing light is slant toward electron beam with an angle associated with refractive index of sample. Then, to overlap light wave front and electron pulse shape, electron pulse shape is slanted toward the direction of travel. As a result of the equivalent velocity spectroscopy for hydrated electrons, using slanted electron pulse shape, optical absorption rise time was about 1.4ps faster than normal electro...

  5. Pulse laser photolysis of aqueous ozone in the microsecond range studied by time-resolved far-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takeyoshi; Morisawa, Yusuke; Higashi, Noboru; Ikehata, Akifumi; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2013-05-01

    Chemical dynamics of an ozone (O3) pulse-photolytic reaction in aqueous solutions were studied with pump-probe transient far-ultraviolet (FUV) absorption spectroscopy. With a nanosecond pulse laser of 266 nm as pump light, transient spectra of O3 aqueous solutions (78-480 μM, pH 2.5-11.3) were acquired in the time range from -50 to 50 μs in the wavelength region from 190 to 225 nm. The measured transient spectra were linearly decomposed into the molar absorption coefficients and the concentration-time profiles of constituted chemical components with a multivariate curve resolution method. From the dependences of the time-averaged concentrations for 20 μs of the constituted chemicals on the initial concentration of O3, it was found that the transient spectra involve the decomposition of O3 and the formation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and a third component that is assigned to hydroxyl radical (OH) or perhydroxyl radical (HO2). Furthermore, the pH dependence of the time-averaged concentration of the third components indicates that HO2 is more probable than OH as the third component. The time-averaged concentration ratio of each chemical component to the initial O3 concentration depends on the pH conditions from -0.95 to -0.60 for O3, 0.98 to 1.2 for H2O2, 0.002 to 0.29 for OH, and 0.012 to 0.069 for HO2.

  6. [A Time-Spatial Resolvable High Speed Spectrograph and Its Application on Spectrum Measurement of a Nanosecond Pulsed Underwater Spark Discharge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhi-wen; Yan, Xian-feng; Li, Shu-han; Wen, Xiao-qiong; Liu, Jin-yuan

    2015-10-01

    Recently, the diagnosis of the characteristic of pulsed underwater electrical discharges plasma have received significant attention. The measurement of a time-spatial resolved spectrum emitted from a single discharge pulse is important for understanding the time-spatial evolution characteristics of plasma generated by a pulsed high-voltage discharge in water. In this paper, a high speed time-spatial resolvable spectrograph for measuring the emission spectrum of a single electrical discharge pulse was reported. The high speed time-spatial resolvable spectrograph has been constructed by combining an ultrahigh-speed frame camera system with monochromator. Software for the spectral analyzing was also developed. The performance of the spectrograph was tested by using a 632.8 nm He-Ne laser beam at a 1 200 g x mm(-1) grating. The pixel resolution for 632.8 nm spectra is 0.013 nm. The instrument broadening for 632.8 nm spectra is (0.150 ± 0.009)nm when the exposure.time of the camera is 20 ns and the width of entrance slit is 0.2 mm, and increases with increasing the slit width. The change of exposure time of the camera has no influence on the instrument broadening, ensuring the spectrograph in a steady performance while adjusting the exposure time of the camera. With the spectrograph, time-spatial resolved spectra emitted from a single discharge pulse of an underwater nanoseconds spark discharge were obtained. It provides good data for investigating the time-spatial evolution characteristics of the discharge plasma during a single discharge pulse. The spectrograph developed in this work provides a technical approach for studying the time-spatial evolution characteristic of, plasma generated by a single electrical discharge pulse.

  7. The Investigation of Properties of Copper Vapor Pulsed Power Active Medium in Time and Development of Operational Control Methods of Output Radiation Parameters on Their Basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Lyabin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The given paper focuses on the investigation in time of the properties of a pulsed CVL AM using CVLS of the type DO – SFC –PA and mistiming method in wide limits (± 1000 ns of a DO light radiation pulse relatively to PA light pulse from the moment of maximal amplification.It was stated that CVL AM in relation to its own radiation has got four characteristic time zones following each other and repeating from pulse to pulse: weak absorption 30-50 ns in length (appears at the initial stage of pulse pump current development, amplification 20-40 ns in length (appears at the sharp leading edge of the current pulse, complete absorption over 1000 ns in length (appears at the pulse current cut and follows the pulse and maximal transparency over 1000 ns in length (before the new current pulse.These AM properties have become the basis for developing methods and electron devices of operational control of power and radiation pulse repetition frequency (PRF, including packet and pulse-to-pulse modulation according to preset algorithm in industrial CVLs and CVLSs of new generation. Based on such class of CVLs and CVLSs a set of up-to-date automated laser technological installations (ALTI “Karavella” with computerized control: “Karavella-1”, “Karavella-1M”, “Karavella-2”, “Karavella-2M” were created for precision microprocessing of materials for electron engineering products (EEP 0.02 – 2 mm thick.The capability of ALTI “Karavella” to operate in the modes of high speed control over the laser radiation parameters allows to increase significantly the operational control over technological processes of manufacturing precision parts, to increase the productivity of material microprocessing, to make cuts and holes with minimal roughness and zone of thermal influence.The main conclusions made in the given paper on the results of experimental investigations of CVL AM time properties are also true for lasers on self-contained transitions

  8. Pulsed-source time-resolved phosphorimetry: comparison of a commercial gated photomultiplier with a specially wired ungated photomultiplier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persvik, Øyvind; Melø, Thor Bernt; Naqvi, K Razi

    2013-06-01

    A common problem encountered in recording delayed light emission is that the signal of interest is preceded by a much more intense signal arising from prompt fluorescence. When a photomultiplier tube (PMT) is used as the photosensor in a pulsed-source phosphorimeter, two options are open to an experimenter who finds mechanical shutters inconvenient or impracticable and photon counting inappropriate: apply an electronic gate that suppresses the PMT gain for a brief period, or use a wiring scheme that enables the PMT to quickly regain normal operation after an intense burst of prompt emission. The performance of a squirrel-cage PMT that operates in the latter mode is compared with a new gateable PMT (Hamamatsu H11526 series) with a minimum gate time of 100 ns. The two detectors are found to provide practically the same temporal record of the delayed emission, but the ungated PMT is slightly superior in terms of recovery time and signal-to-noise ratio.

  9. Time-Domain Quaternary-Weighted Pulse Width Modulation Driving Method for Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Sang; Kuk, Seung-Hee; Han, Min-Koo

    2008-03-01

    We proposed a new digital driving method and its pixel structure for active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays employing time-domain quaternary-weighted pulse width modulation. In the new digital driving method, the luminance of AMOLED displays is accurately determined by averaging photon flux to the desired level over a frame period. The proposed pixel was verified by spice simulation and the output linearity between the grayscale and the OLED current was successfully achieved. In the proposed digital driving pixel, the timing margin was increased and the effect on luminance of AMOLED displays by the troublesome variation of the thin-film transistors (TFTs) was suppressed without additional compensation schemes.

  10. Timing of Newborn Pulse Oximetry Screenings for Critical Congenital Heart Defects Before Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Lynn; Speroni, Karen Gabel; Jones, Ruth Ann; MacDougall, Eileen P; Daniel, Marlon G

    2016-01-01

    To determine if there would be positive results from a second pulse oximetry screening (POS) completed for newborns at discharge at 28 to 48 hours of age in addition to the newborn POS completed at 24 to 25 hours of age. Prospective descriptive research study. Rural, mid-Atlantic, 13-bed, level I hospital. Newborns (N = 1,002) at 35 weeks' gestation or older discharged from the newborn nursery. Registered nurses (RNs) performed POS at 24 to 25 hours of age (POS 1) and at discharge but less than 48 hours of age (POS 2). Data related to critical congenital heart defects were collected. There were no positive POS results (O2 saturation ≤ 90%) at POS 1 or POS 2, and no additional diagnostic tests were ordered as a result of POS. Although one full-term newborn had negative results at POS 1 and POS 2, the RN identified a murmur, and a subsequent echocardiogram was used to detect tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia. The RNs detected concerning conditions in 14 newborns that resulted in 28 additional tests, including echocardiograms (9), chest x-ray imaging (8), laboratory testing (7), electrocardiograms (3), and ultrasound imaging (1). The POS-positive result rate was 0 for newborns at POS 1 and POS 2. Therefore, our study findings supported Maryland's mandate of one POS completed within 24 to 48 hours of birth. Nurses must continue to be vigilant about assessing newborns, including screening for critical congenital heart defects and congenital heart defects. Copyright © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Time-domain study of acoustic pulse propagation in an ocean waveguide using a new normal mode model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorovskaia, Natalia Anatol'evna

    1997-11-01

    This study is focused on issues of numerical modeling of sound propagation in diverse ocean waveguides. A new normal mode acoustical model (Shallow Water Acoustic Mode Propagation-SWAMP) has been developed. The algorithm for obtaining the vertical modal solution is based on a warping matrix transformation of the solution of an isovelocity (reference) waveguide to one of arbitrary velocity profile. An efficient mode coupling scheme with an adaptive step-size in range has been implemented for range-dependent environments. The new algorithm allows fairly arbitrary ocean layering and readily works at high frequency. An important advantage of the new procedure is that vertical modal eigenfunctions can easily be transformed to a spherical representation suitable for coupling in object scattering problems. Benchmarking results of the new code against established acoustic models based on parabolic equation and existing normal mode approaches show good agreement for range-independent and up-slope and down-slope bathymetries and a very competitive calculation speed. Broad-band pulse propagation in deep and shallow water with double (surface and bottom) ducts has been modeled using the new normal mode model for a variety of ocean waveguide parameters and different frequency bands. The surface duct generates a series of the surface-duct-trapped- modes, which form amplitude-modulated precursors in the far field pulse response. It has been found that the arrival times of the precursors could not be explained by the conventional concept of group velocity so that a more general principle based on the rate of energy transfer has been used. The Airy function solution was found to explain the amplitude modulation of the precursors. It has been learned from the numerical simulation that for a range-independent environment the time separation between precursors is fixed and any variations from this have been a result of range-dependence and mode coupling in the model. The time

  12. Effects of in-pulse transverse relaxation in 3D ultrashort echo time sequences: analytical derivation, comparison to numerical simulation and experimental application at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Fabian; Steidle, Günter; Martirosian, Petros; Claussen, Claus D; Schick, Fritz

    2010-09-01

    The introduction of ultrashort-echo-time-(UTE)-sequences to clinical whole-body MR scanners has opened up the field of MR characterization of materials or tissues with extremely fast signal decay. If the transverse relaxation time is in the range of the RF-pulse duration, approximation of the RF-pulse by an instantaneous rotation applied at the middle of the RF-pulse and immediately followed by free relaxation will lead to a distinctly underestimated echo signal. Thus, the regular Ernst equation is not adequate to correctly describe steady state signal under those conditions. The paper presents an analytically derived modified Ernst equation, which correctly describes in-pulse relaxation of transverse magnetization under typical conditions: The equation is valid for rectangular excitation pulses, usually applied in 3D UTE sequences. Longitudinal relaxation time of the specimen must be clearly longer than RF-pulse duration, which is fulfilled for tendons and bony structures as well as many solid materials. Under these conditions, the proposed modified Ernst equation enables adequate and relatively simple calculation of the magnetization of materials or tissues. Analytically derived data are compared to numerical results obtained by using an established Runge-Kutta-algorithm based on the Bloch equations. Validity of the new approach was also tested by systematical measurements of a solid polymeric material on a 3T whole-body MR scanner. Thus, the presented modified Ernst equation provides a suitable basis for T1 measurements, even in tissues with T2 values as short as the RF-pulse duration: independent of RF-pulse duration, the 'variable flip angle method' led to consistent results of longitudinal relaxation time T1, if the T2 relaxation time of the material of interest is known as well.

  13. Transient features in nanosecond pulsed electric fields differentially modulate mitochondria and viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Beebe

    Full Text Available It is hypothesized that high frequency components of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs, determined by transient pulse features, are important for maximizing electric field interactions with intracellular structures. For monopolar square wave pulses, these transient features are determined by the rapid rise and fall of the pulsed electric fields. To determine effects on mitochondria membranes and plasma membranes, N1-S1 hepatocellular carcinoma cells were exposed to single 600 ns pulses with varying electric fields (0-80 kV/cm and short (15 ns or long (150 ns rise and fall times. Plasma membrane effects were evaluated using Fluo-4 to determine calcium influx, the only measurable source of increases in intracellular calcium. Mitochondria membrane effects were evaluated using tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE to determine mitochondria membrane potentials (ΔΨm. Single pulses with short rise and fall times caused electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death. Pulses with long rise and fall times exhibited electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, but diminished effects on dissipation of ΔΨm and viability. Results indicate that high frequency components have significant differential impact on mitochondria membranes, which determines cell death, but lesser variances on plasma membranes, which allows calcium influxes, a primary determinant for dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death.

  14. Transient features in nanosecond pulsed electric fields differentially modulate mitochondria and viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Stephen J; Chen, Yeong-Jer; Sain, Nova M; Schoenbach, Karl H; Xiao, Shu

    2012-01-01

    It is hypothesized that high frequency components of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs), determined by transient pulse features, are important for maximizing electric field interactions with intracellular structures. For monopolar square wave pulses, these transient features are determined by the rapid rise and fall of the pulsed electric fields. To determine effects on mitochondria membranes and plasma membranes, N1-S1 hepatocellular carcinoma cells were exposed to single 600 ns pulses with varying electric fields (0-80 kV/cm) and short (15 ns) or long (150 ns) rise and fall times. Plasma membrane effects were evaluated using Fluo-4 to determine calcium influx, the only measurable source of increases in intracellular calcium. Mitochondria membrane effects were evaluated using tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) to determine mitochondria membrane potentials (ΔΨm). Single pulses with short rise and fall times caused electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death. Pulses with long rise and fall times exhibited electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, but diminished effects on dissipation of ΔΨm and viability. Results indicate that high frequency components have significant differential impact on mitochondria membranes, which determines cell death, but lesser variances on plasma membranes, which allows calcium influxes, a primary determinant for dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death.

  15. Real-time Dynamics of Surface Photoreactions Probed with Ultrashort XUV Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinlong; Zhao, Peng; Corder, Christopher; Polanco, Austin; Reber, Melanie; Chen, Yuning; Muraca, Amanda; Kershis, Matthew; White, Michael; Allison, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) and time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) are well-established technique, broadly applicable for studying electronic and nuclear dynamics in real time. However, conventional HHG is typically limited to low repetition rates (titania surfaces which contain noble metal nanoparticles. AFOSR. Stony Brook University.

  16. Evidence for influence of the Galápagos hotspot on the East Pacific Rise MORB composition during times of superfast spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldmacher, J.; Höfig, T.; Hauff, S. F.; Hoernle, K.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.

    2011-12-01

    ODP/IODP Hole 1256D on the Cocos Plate is located on oceanic crust that formed 15 m.y. ago at the East Pacific Rise (EPR) during a period of superfast spreading (~11-20 Ma). This site is considered to be a reference site for crust formed during fast (>8 cm/y) and particularly superfast (>20 cm/y) spreading rates. The question exists whether its formation was geochemically influenced by the Galápagos hotspot. Today, the effect of the Galápagos hotspot on mid ocean ridge geochemistry can only be seen along the Cocos-Nasca Spreading Center (located immediately north of the hotspot). It has been speculated that Galápagos plume material might have reached the EPR during times of superfast spreading due to processes such as increased "ridge suction" (Niu & Hékinian, 2004). To test this idea, MORB samples from several DSDP, ODP and IODP drill sites that formed along the EPR between 3°S and 7°N and between 9 and 21 Ma have been studied to delineate any effect of the Galápagos hotspot on their geochemistry. N-MORB from sites formed during times of superfast spreading show slighty, but systematically, lower incompatible element ratios (e.g. La/Yb 0.66, Ce/Lu >0.8). In addition, the melts formed during superfast spreading show generally higher Eu/Hf and Eu/Eu* ratios which is interpreted to indicate a recycled gabbroic component in their source. Despite their more depleted incompatible trace element patterns, Pb (double-spike) and Nd isotope ratios of the superfast spreading MORB are enriched (higher 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb and lower 143Nd/144Nd) compared to the samples from MORB created during normal spreading. The combined trace element and isotope data suggest that EPR MORB created during superfast spreading was formed by greater degrees of melting of a possibly trace element depleted, but isotopically enriched source component. It is suggested that the source of these melts may represent Galápagos plume material that has experienced trace element depletion during

  17. Properties of cryocooler-cooled superconductive pulse coil (1); Chokureishiki chodendo parusu koiru no tokusei hyoka (1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hae, T.; Kajikawa, K.; Iwakuma, M.; Funaki, K. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Hayashi, H.; Tsutsumi, K. [Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc., Fukuoka (Japan); Tomioka, A.; Konno, M.; Nose, S. [Fuji Electric Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-11-10

    We manufactured the pulse coil of refrigerating machine direct cooling system using oxide superconducting wire rod, and they succeeded in triangular wave continuous running of 1T and 1Hz. It aimed at future further scale-up using this pulse coil this time, and the relationship between heat quantity and coil temperature rise in the operation was evaluated. (NEDO)

  18. Gigahertz repetition rate, sub-femtosecond timing jitter optical pulse train directly generated from a mode-locked Yb:KYW laser

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Heewon; Shin, Junho; Kim, Chur; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Guang-Hoon; Rotermund, Fabian; Kim, Jungwon

    2014-01-01

    We show that a 1.13-GHz repetition rate optical pulse train with 0.70 fs high-frequency timing jitter (integration bandwidth of 17.5 kHz - 10 MHz, where the measurement instrument-limited noise floor contributes 0.41 fs in 10 MHz bandwidth) can be directly generated from a free-running, single-mode diode-pumped Yb:KYW laser mode-locked by single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-coated mirrors. To our knowledge, this is the lowest timing jitter optical pulse train with the GHz repetition rate ever measured. If this pulse train is used for direct sampling of 565-MHz signals (Nyquist frequency of the pulse train), the demonstrated jitter level corresponds to the projected effective-number-of-bit (ENOB) of 17.8, which is much higher than the thermal noise limit of 50-ohm load resistance (~14 bits).

  19. Template Reproduction of GRB Pulse Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkila, Jon E.; Preece, R. D.; Loredo, T. J.; Wolpert, R. L.; Broadbent, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    A study of well-isolated pulses in gamma ray burst light curves indicates that simple models having smooth and monotonic pulse rises and decays are inadequate. Departures from the Norris et al. (2005) pulse shape are in the form of a wave-like pre-peak residual that is mirrored and stretched following the peak. Pulse shape departures are present in GRB pulses of all durations, but placement of the departures relative to pulse peaks correlates with asymmetry. This establishes an additional link between temporal structure and spectral evolution, as pulse asymmetry is related to initial hardness while pulse duration indicates the rate of hard-to-soft pulse evolution.

  20. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  1. Investigation of the time characteristics of a pulsed flow of large rare gas clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李邵辉; 刘丙辰; 倪国权; 徐至展

    2003-01-01

    The time characteristics of a flow of large rare gas atomic clusters formed by supersonic expansion of a gas into vacuum through conic nozzles are studied using the time resolving Rayleigh scattering method. The results show a two-region structure of the time resolved spectrum of the scattered light from the clusters. The average cluster size in the second region is much, even orders of magnitude, larger than that in the first one. Three designs of the valve-nozzle assembly have been used to investigate the origin of this finding. Finally, the potential application of the observation is proposed.

  2. Time Resolved Studies of ZnO(Eu) Nanostructure Luminescence Using Short Synchrotron Radiation Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heigl, F.; Jurgensen, A.; Zhou, X.-T.; Murphy, M.; Ko, J.Y.P.; Lam, S.; Sham, T.K.; Regier, T.; Blyth, R.I.R.; Coulthard, I.; Zuin, L.; Hu, Y.-F.; Armelao, L.; Gordon, R.A.; Brewe, D. (CLS); (Padova); (APS); (UWO); (Simon); (CSRF)

    2008-10-06

    X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) is a well established technique to study nano structured light emitting materials. XEOL bares the essential features necessary for the study of advanced nano structured materials like element specifity, good quantum efficiency, and easy approach for time resolution. Being sensitive to the geometry of the material on a nano-scale, luminescence gives insight into the phenomenologic correlation of structural, optical, and electronic properties. Besides structural aspects we study the time behavior of nanostructured ZnO (Eu) in a pump-probe like experiment, using the time structure of synchrotron radiation.

  3. Impact of time-domain IP pulse length on measured data and inverted models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, P. I.; Fiandaca, G.; Dahlin, T.;

    2015-01-01

    The duration of time domain (TD) induced polarization (IP) current injections has significant impact on the acquired IP data as well as on the inversion models, if the standard evaluation procedure is followed. However, it is still possible to retrieve similar inversion models if the waveform...... of the injected current and the IP response waveform are included in the inversion. The on-time also generally affects the signal-tonoise ratio (SNR) where an increased on-time gives higher SNR for the IP data....

  4. submitter Measurement of intrinsic rise times for various L(Y)SO and LuAG scintillators with a general study of prompt photons to achieve 10 ps in TOF-PET

    CERN Document Server

    Gundacker, Stefan; Pauwels, Kristof; Lecoq, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The coincidence time resolution (CTR) of scintillator based detectors commonly used in positron emission tomography is well known to be dependent on the scintillation decay time (${{\\tau}_{d}}$ ) and the number of photons detected (${{n}^{\\prime}}$ ), i.e. $CTR\\propto \\sqrt{{{\\tau}_{d}}/{{n}^{\\prime}}}$ . However, it is still an open question to what extent the scintillation rise time (${{\\tau}_{r}}$ ) and other fast or prompt photons, e.g. Cherenkov photons, at the beginning of the scintillation process influence the CTR. This paper presents measurements of the scintillation emission rate for different LSO type crystals, i.e. LSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce, LSO:Ce codoped Ca and LGSO:Ce. For the various LSO-type samples measured we find an average value of 70 ps for the scintillation rise time, although some crystals like LSO:Ce codoped Ca seem to have a much faster rise time in the order of 20 ps. Additional measurements for LuAG:Ce and LuAG:Pr show a rise time of 535 ps and 251 ps, respectively. For these crystals, promp...

  5. Establishment of control equations and adjoint equations using block-pulse functions for optimal control of linear systems with time delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兴涛

    2002-01-01

    Control equation and adjoint equation are established by using block-pulse functions, which trans-forms the linear time-varying systems with time delays into a system of algebraic equations and the optimal con-trol problems are transformed into an optimization problem of multivariate functions thereby achieving the opti-mal control of linear systems with time delays.

  6. Comparison of pulse and SFCW GPR in time, frequency and wavelet domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pue, Jan; Van De Vijver, Ellen; Cornelis, Wim; Van Meirvenne, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) systems operating in the time- or frequency domain are two fundamentally different concepts, pursuing the same objective: non-invasive characterization of the subsurface. The aim of this study is to compare the performance of these two GPR systems in the time, frequency and wavelet domain. The time domain GPR investigated is the Utilityscan DF. This is a ground coupled GPR with a digital dual-frequency antenna (300 and 800 MHz). The Geoscope GS3F and VX1213 antenna array from 3DRadar is the frequency domain GPR used in this comparison. It is an air coupled stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) GPR with a frequency bandwidth from 200 MHz to 3000 MHz. Using data from several test sites of various soil types, the data is evaluated in the time domain, the frequency domain and the wavelet domain. Each of these domains contains specific information regarding the data quality. Presenting the data in the time domain, allows visualizing the subsurface reflections. This makes it visible how strong the data is affected by internal interference, ringing and other noise. To compensate for the attenuation of the signal in time, automatic gain control is applied. The maximum of this gain function indicates the time where the signal is attenuated completely and noise becomes more dominant, corresponding with the maximal penetration depth of the different GPR systems. In the frequency domain, the data allows to investigate which frequencies contain most valuable information and which ones are affected by noise. Finally, by performing a wavelet transformation the data is transformed to the time-frequency domain. Due to frequency dependent attenuation of electromagnetic signals in the soil, low frequencies will be more dominant in deeper layers, and high frequencies will not be present anymore. This is determining for the range resolution of the data throughout the traveltime of the signal. This work is a contribution to COST Action TU1208 "Civil

  7. 实时脉冲光声法用于分子弛豫时间的测定%Real-time pulsed photoacoustics-molecular relaxation time measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Markushev Dragan; Rabasovic Mihailo; Lukic Mladena; Cojbasic Zarko; Todorovic Dragan

    2013-01-01

    脉冲光声光谱法一个重要的应用是确定气体分子的振动—平动弛豫时间τV-T.因激光光束的空间分布R(r)对光声测量有显著影响,我们发展了同时测定R(r)和τV-T的方法.本方法基于光声脉冲的实时信号和一种用于光声成像的数学运算法则.本文讨论了智能计算用于多原子气体分子的R(r)和τV-T同时和实时测定的可能性.进一步利用前馈多层神经网络的离线批训练法,结合一个理论光声信号对R(r)和τV-T进行了同时和实时分析.本方法可明显缩短确定上述参数所需时间.%Determination of the vibrational-to-translational relaxation time rv-T in gases is one of the applications of pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy.Because the spatial profile of the laser beam R (r)can significantly influence the accuracy of the photoacoustic measurements,we developed the method for simultaneous determination of the R(r)and τv T.It is based on the temporal shape of the photoacoustic pulse and utilizes a mathematical algorithm developed for photoacoustic tomography.The possibilities of computational intelligence application for simultaneous and real-time determination of R(r)and rv-T values of polyatomic molecules in gases by pulsed photoacoustic are also discussed.Feed forward multilayer perception networks are trained in an offline batch training regime to estimate simultaneously,and in real-time,R(r) (profile shape class) and τv T from a given (theoretical) photoacoustic signals.Proposed method significantly shortens the time required for the simultaneous determination of the afore mentioned quantities.

  8. The development of the SNO+ experiment: Scintillator timing, pulse shape discrimination, and sterile neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Erin

    The SNO+ experiment is a multi-purpose neutrino detector which is under construction in the SNOLAB facility in Sudbury, Ontario. SNO+ will search for neutrinoless double beta decay, and will measure low energy solar neutrinos. This thesis will describe three main development activities for the SNO+ experiment: the measurement of the timing parameters for the liquid scintillator cocktail, using those timing parameters to estimate the ability of SNO+ to discriminate alpha and beta events in the detector, and a sensitivity study that examines how solar neutrino data can constrain a light sterile neutrino model. Characterizing the timing parameters of the emission light due to charged-particle excitation in the scintillator is necessary for proper reconstruction of events in the detector. Using data obtained from a bench-top setup, the timing profile was modelled as three exponential components with distinct timing coefficients. Also investigated was the feasibility of using the timing profiles as a means to separate alpha and beta excitation events in the scintillator. The bench-top study suggested that using the peak-to-total method of analyzing the timing profiles could remove >99.9% of alpha events while retaining >99.9% of beta events. The timing parameters measured in the test set-up were then implemented in a Monte Carlo code which simulated the SNO+ detector conditions. The simulation results suggested that detector effects reduce the effectiveness of discriminating between alpha and beta events using the peak-to-total method. Using a more optimal method of analyzing the timing profile differences, specifically using a Gatti filter, improved the discrimination capability back to the levels determined in the bench-top setup. One of the physics goals of SNO+ is the first precision measurement of the pep solar neutrino ux at the level of about 5 % uncertainty. A study was performed to investigate how current solar neutrino data constrains the allowed parameters of

  9. Timing properties and pulse shape discrimination of LAB-based liquid scintillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Bo; XIAO Hua-Lin; CAO Jun; LI Jin; RUAN Xi-Chao; HENG Yue-Kun

    2011-01-01

    Linear Alkyl Benzene (LAB) is a promising liquid scintillator solvent in neutrino experiments because it has many appealing properties.The timing properties of LAB-based liquid scintillator have been studied through ultraviolet and ionization excitation in this study.The decay time of LAB,PPO and bis-MSB is found to be 48.6 ns,1.55 ns and 1.5 ns,respectively.A model can describe the absorption and re-emission process between PPO and bis-MSB perfectly.The energy transfer time between LAB and PPO with different concentrations can be obtained via another model.We also show that the LAB-based liquid scintillator has good (n,γ) and (α,γ) discrimination power.

  10. Design of time-pulse coded optoelectronic neuronal elements for nonlinear transformation and integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilenko, Vladimir G.; Nikolsky, Alexander I.; Lazarev, Alexander A.; Lazareva, Maria V.

    2008-03-01

    In the paper the actuality of neurophysiologically motivated neuron arrays with flexibly programmable functions and operations with possibility to select required accuracy and type of nonlinear transformation and learning are shown. We consider neurons design and simulation results of multichannel spatio-time algebraic accumulation - integration of optical signals. Advantages for nonlinear transformation and summation - integration are shown. The offered circuits are simple and can have intellectual properties such as learning and adaptation. The integrator-neuron is based on CMOS current mirrors and comparators. The performance: consumable power - 100...500 μW, signal period- 0.1...1ms, input optical signals power - 0.2...20 μW time delays - less 1μs, the number of optical signals - 2...10, integration time - 10...100 of signal periods, accuracy or integration error - about 1%. Various modifications of the neuron-integrators with improved performance and for different applications are considered in the paper.

  11. Paleoposition of the northern margin of Armorica in Late Devonian times: Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic results from the Frankenstein Intrusive Complex (Mid-German Crystalline Rise)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwing, Alexander; Bachtadse, Valerian

    2000-09-01

    A detailed rockmagnetic and paleomagnetic study of the Frankenstein Intrusive Complex (FIC, 363±7 Ma in age), southwestern Germany, has been carried out in order to test whether the paleomagnetic declinations within the internal parts of the European Variscides follow a common trend controlled by the structural grain of the orogen or whether the distribution of declinations follows a random pattern. In addition, new paleomagnetic data will contribute to further refine the drift history of the Armorican Terrane Assemblage during late Paleozoic times. The unmetamorphosed Frankenstein Igneous Complex forms part of the Mid-German Crystalline Rise within the Armorican Terrane Assemblage, amalgamated to Avalonia and Baltica during the Variscan orogeny, Stepwise thermal and alternating field (AF) demagnetization experiments identify four components (A, B, Cn, and Cr) of magnetization. Component A is a recent viscous overprint that parallels the present-day geomagnetic field. The high unblocking temperatures of A in some samples can be explained by the presence of multidomain magnetite. Component B is carried by hematite and is considered to be a late Carboniferous remagnetization. Components Cr and Cn, found in 110 samples from 20 sites, are antiparallel and pass a class C reversal test. Their primary origin is further supported by a contact test. Cr and Cn have maximum unblocking temperatures of up to 580°C and occasionally above over 600°C, indicating magnetite and hematite to carry the characteristic remanent magnetization. Ore microscopy revealed that primary hematite lamellae in ilmenite carry Cr and Cn and that a secondary generation of hematite is the carrier of B. The overall site mean direction of Cr and Cn (20 sites) based on endpoints and remagnetization circle analysis of 198°/40° (declination/inclination) with a 95% confidence limit (α95) of 4.9° and a precision parameter (k) of 45.0 defines a paleopole at 15°S, 9°W. When comparing to the apparent

  12. Time-resolved soft X-ray core-level photoemission spectroscopy at 880 °C using the pulsed laser and synchrotron radiation and the pulse heating current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abukawa, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yukawa, R.; Kanzaki, S.; Mukojima, K.; Matsuda, I.

    2017-02-01

    We developed a time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy system for tracking the temporal variation in an electronic state of a heated sample. Our pump-probe method used laser and synchrotron radiation pulses on a silicon surface that was heated by a synchronized pulse current that did not interfere with the measurements. The transient surface photovoltage effect on the Si 2p core spectra was measured from room temperature to 880 °C and was found to be consistent with the thermal carrier distributions in silicon crystals at the corresponding temperatures. This versatile technique may have applications studying molecular dynamics on high temperature surfaces such as in catalytic reactions.

  13. Positioning for People Behind Barriers in Real time with UWB Pulse Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipilov Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper features the technology for identifying the location of real people behind the barriers in real time using the UWB sensing. The opportunity to obtain the radar images of moving and not moving people was presented in this paper. The oscillation rate of a human chest can be defined by the continuous recording the not moving person. The point of this technique is in calculation of the differential signal in successive periods of time. The range of application to be extended considering the particular conditions. The research results can be used in intelligence service as well as for searching people trapped under the rubble.

  14. Time-based distribution of Staphylococcus saprophyticus pulsed field gel-electrophoresis clusters in community-acquired urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Santos de Sousa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of urinary tract infections (UTI by Staphylococcus saprophyticus has not been fully characterised and strain typing methods have not been validated for this agent. To evaluate whether epidemiological relationships exist between clusters of pulsed field gel-electrophoresis (PFGE genotypes of S. saprophyticus from community-acquired UTI, a cross-sectional surveillance study was conducted in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In total, 32 (16% female patients attending two walk-in clinics were culture-positive for S. saprophyticus. Five PFGE clusters were defined and evaluated against epidemiological data. The PFGE clusters were grouped in time, suggesting the existence of community point sources of S. saprophyticus. From these point sources, S. saprophyticus strains may spread among individuals.

  15. USE OF PULSE TRANSIT TIME AS A MEASURE OF AUTONOMIC AROUSALS IN PATIENTS WITH OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Xiao; Xu Zhong; Rong Huang

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of pulse transit time ( PIT) arousals as an index of sleep fragmentation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS).Methods Individuals referred for evaluation of possible OSAHS underwent overnight polysomnography (PSG). Three conventional indices of sleep fragmentation [ electroencephalography (EEG) arousals, apnea/hypopnea index (AMI), oxygen desaturation index (ODI) ], PTT arousals, and Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) were compared.Results PTT arousals were positively correlated with EEG arousals (r = 0.746, P<0. 001), AHI (r = 0.786, P< 0. 001) , and ODI (r = 0. 665, P<0. 001), respectively. But, both PTT arousals and EEG arousals had no correlation with ESS O= 0.432, P=0.201; r= 0.196, P=0.59l, respectively).Conclusion PTT arousals are correlated well with other standard measures estimating severity of OSAHS and potentially a non-invasive marker with which to measure the sleep fragmentation in patients with OSAHS.

  16. A 3D time reversal cavity for the focusing of high-intensity ultrasound pulses over a large volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, J.; Arnal, B.; Tanter, M.; Pernot, M.

    2017-02-01

    Shock wave ultrasound therapy techniques, increasingly used for non-invasive surgery, require extremely high pressure amplitudes in precise focal spots, and large high-power transducers arranged on a spherical shell are usually used to achieve that. This solution allows limited steering of the beam around the geometrical focus of the device at the cost of a large number of transducer elements, and the treatment of large and moving organs like the heart is challenging or impossible. This paper validates numerically and experimentally the possibility of using a time reversal cavity (TRC) for the same purpose. A 128-element, 1 MHz power transducer combined with different multiple scattering media in a TRC was used. We were able to focus high-power ultrasound pulses over a large volume in a controlled manner, with a limited number of transducer elements. We reached sufficiently high pressure amplitudes to erode an Ultracal® target over a 10 cm2 area.

  17. Time-based distribution of Staphylococcus saprophyticus pulsed field gel-electrophoresis clusters in community-acquired urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Viviane Santos de; Rabello, Renata Fernandes; Dias, Rubens Clayton da Silva; Martins, Ianick Souto; Santos, Luisa Barbosa Gomes da Silva dos; Alves, Elisabeth Mendes; Riley, Lee Woodford; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2013-02-01

    The epidemiology of urinary tract infections (UTI) by Staphylococcus saprophyticus has not been fully characterised and strain typing methods have not been validated for this agent. To evaluate whether epidemiological relationships exist between clusters of pulsed field gel-electrophoresis (PFGE) genotypes of S. saprophyticus from community-acquired UTI, a cross-sectional surveillance study was conducted in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In total, 32 (16%) female patients attending two walk-in clinics were culture-positive for S. saprophyticus. Five PFGE clusters were defined and evaluated against epidemiological data. The PFGE clusters were grouped in time, suggesting the existence of community point sources of S. saprophyticus. From these point sources, S. saprophyticus strains may spread among individuals.

  18. High sensitivity photonic time-stretch electro-optic sampling of terahertz pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Szwaj, Christophe; Parquier, Marc Le; Roy, Pascale; Manceron, Laurent; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Tordeux, Marie-Agnès; Bielawski, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Single-shot recording of terahertz electric signals has recently become possible at high repetition rates, by using the photonic time-stretch electro-optic sampling (EOS) technique. However the moderate sensitivity of time-stretch EOS is still a strong limit for a range of applications. Here we present a variant enabling to increase the sensitivity of photonic time-stretch for free-propagating THz signals. A key point is to integrate the idea presented in Ref. [Ahmed et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013114 (2014)], for upgrading classical time-stretch systems. The method is tested using the high repetition rate terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation source (CSR) of the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation facility. The signal-to-noise ratio of our terahertz digitizer could thus be straightforwardly improved by a factor $\\approx 6.5$, leading to a noise-equivalent input electric field below $1.25$~V/cm inside the electro-optic crystal, over the 0-300~GHz band (i.e, 2.3~$\\mu$V/cm/$\\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$). The sensitivity is...

  19. Two-Step Time of Arrival Estimation for Pulse-Based Ultra-Wideband Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vincent Poor

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In cooperative localization systems, wireless nodes need to exchange accurate position-related information such as time-of-arrival (TOA and angle-of-arrival (AOA, in order to obtain accurate location information. One alternative for providing accurate position-related information is to use ultra-wideband (UWB signals. The high time resolution of UWB signals presents a potential for very accurate positioning based on TOA estimation. However, it is challenging to realize very accurate positioning systems in practical scenarios, due to both complexity/cost constraints and adverse channel conditions such as multipath propagation. In this paper, a two-step TOA estimation algorithm is proposed for UWB systems in order to provide accurate TOA estimation under practical constraints. In order to speed up the estimation process, the first step estimates a coarse TOA of the received signal based on received signal energy. Then, in the second step, the arrival time of the first signal path is estimated by considering a hypothesis testing approach. The proposed scheme uses low-rate correlation outputs and is able to perform accurate TOA estimation in reasonable time intervals. The simulation results are presented to analyze the performance of the estimator.

  20. Pulse profile stability of the Crab pulsar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chetana Jain; Biswajit Paul

    2011-01-01

    We present an X-ray timing analysis of the Crab pulsar,PSR B0531+21,using archival RXTE data.We have investigated the stability of the Crab pulse profile,in soft (2-20keV) and hard (30-100keV) X-ray energies,over the last decade of RXTE operation.The analysis includes measurement of the separation between the two pulse peaks and the intensity and widths of the two peaks.We did not find any significant time dependency in the pulse shape.The two peaks have been stable in phase,intensity and width for the last ten years.The first pulse is relatively stronger at soft X-rays.The first pulse peak is narrower than the second peak in both soft and hard X-ray energies.Both the peaks show a slow rise and a steeper fall.The ratio of the pulsed photons in the two peaks is also constant in time.

  1. Capacitor discharge pulse analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Michael Sean; Griffiths, Stewart K.; Tanner, Danelle Mary

    2013-08-01

    Capacitors used in firing sets and other high discharge current applications are discharge tested to verify performance of the capacitor against the application requirements. Parameters such as capacitance, inductance, rise time, pulse width, peak current and current reversal must be verified to ensure that the capacitor will meet the application needs. This report summarizes an analysis performed on the discharge current data to extract these parameters by fitting a second-order system model to the discharge data and using this fit to determine the resulting performance metrics. Details of the theory and implementation are presented. Using the best-fit second-order system model to extract these metrics results in less sensitivity to noise in the measured data and allows for direct extraction of the total series resistance, inductance, and capacitance.

  2. Time-resolved microspectrofluorometry and fluorescence lifetime imaging of photosensitizers using picosecond pulsed diode lasers in laser scanning microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Matthias; Meier, Thomas; Steiner, Rudolf; Dolp, Frank; Erdmann, Rainer; Ortmann, Uwe; Rück, Angelika

    2003-01-01

    This work describes the time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of two different photosensitizers in single cells, in detail mTHPC and 5-ALA induced PPIX, which are currently clinically used in photodynamic therapy. The fluorescence lifetime of the drugs was determined in the cells from time-gated spectra as well as single photon counting, using a picosecond pulsed diode laser for fluorescence excitation. The diode laser, which emits pulses at 398 nm with 70 ps full width at half maximum duration, was coupled to a confocal laser scanning microscope. For time-resolved spectroscopy a setup consisting of a Czerny Turner spectrometer and a MCP-gated and -intensified CCD camera was used. Time-gated spectra within the cells were acquired by placing the laser beam in "spot scan" mode. In addition, a time-correlated single photon counting module was used to determine the fluorescence lifetime from single spots and to record lifetime images. The fluorescence lifetime of mTHPC decreased from 7.5 to 5.5 ns during incubation from 1 to 6 h. This decrease was probably attributed to enhanced formation of aggregates during incubation. Fluorescence lifetime imaging showed that longer lifetimes were correlated with accumulation in the cytoplasm in the neighborhood of the cell nucleus, whereas shorter lifetimes were found in the outer cytoplasm. For cells that were incubated with 5-ALA, a fluorescence lifetime of 7.4 ns was found for PPIX; a shorter lifetime at 3.6 ns was probably attributed to photoproducts and aggregates of PPIX. In contrast from fluorescence intensity images alone, different fluorescence species could not be distinguished. However, in the lifetime image a structured fluorescence distribution in the cytoplasm was correlated with the longer lifetime and probably coincides with mitochondria. In conclusion, picosecond diode lasers coupled to a laser scanning microscope equipped with appropriate detection units allows time-resolved spectroscopy and lifetime imaging

  3. FY05 LDRD Final ReportTime-Resolved Dynamic Studies using Short Pulse X-Ray Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A; Dunn, J; van Buuren, T; Budil, K; Sadigh, B; Gilmer, G; Falcone, R; Lee, R; Ng, A

    2006-02-10

    Established techniques must be extended down to the ps and sub-ps time domain to directly probe product states of materials under extreme conditions. We used short pulse ({le} 1 ps) x-ray radiation to track changes in the physical properties in tandem with measurements of the atomic and electronic structure of materials undergoing fast laser excitation and shock-related phenomena. The sources included those already available at LLNL, including the picosecond X-ray laser as well as the ALS Femtosecond Phenomena beamline and the SSRL based sub-picosecond photon source (SPPS). These allow the temporal resolution to be improved by 2 orders of magnitude over the current state-of-the-art, which is {approx} 100 ps. Thus, we observed the manifestations of dynamical processes with unprecedented time resolution. Time-resolved x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and x-ray scattering were used to study phase changes in materials with sub-picosecond time resolution. These experiments coupled to multiscale modeling allow us to explore the physics of materials in high laser fields and extreme non-equilibrium states of matter. The ability to characterize the physical and electronic structure of materials under extreme conditions together with state-of-the-art models and computational facilities will catapult LLNL's core competencies into the scientific world arena as well as support its missions of national security and stockpile stewardship.

  4. Time-resolved measurement of single pulse femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structure formation induced by a pre-fabricated surface groove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, K R P; Austin, D R; Li, H; Yi, A Y; Cheng, J; Chowdhury, E A

    2015-07-27

    Time-resolved diffraction microscopy technique has been used to observe the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) from the interaction of a single femtosecond laser pulse (pump) with a nano-scale groove mechanically formed on a single-crystal Cu substrate. The interaction dynamics (0-1200 ps) was captured by diffracting a time-delayed, frequency-doubled pulse (probe) from nascent LIPSS formation induced by the pump with an infinity-conjugate microscopy setup. The LIPSS ripples are observed to form asynchronously, with the first one forming after 50 ps and others forming sequentially outward from the groove edge at larger time delays. A 1-D analytical model of electron heating including both the laser pulse and surface plasmon polariton excitation at the groove edge predicts ripple period, melt spot diameter, and qualitatively explains the asynchronous time-evolution of LIPSS formation.

  5. 640 Gb/s timing jitter-tolerant data processing using a long-period fiber-grating-based flat-top pulse shaper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Slavik, R.; Galili, Michael

    2008-01-01

    We report on the use of a novel all-fiber flat-top pulse shaping technique for improving performance and timing jitter tolerance of a switch made for 640–10 Gb/s signal demultiplexing. The jitter tolerance is increased to almost 30% of the one-bit time window, and an increase of the receiver sens...... sensitivity by 13 dB compared to a nonflat-top pulse is reported.......We report on the use of a novel all-fiber flat-top pulse shaping technique for improving performance and timing jitter tolerance of a switch made for 640–10 Gb/s signal demultiplexing. The jitter tolerance is increased to almost 30% of the one-bit time window, and an increase of the receiver...

  6. A contradictory phenomenon of deshelving pulses in a dilute medium used for lengthened photon storage time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Byoung S

    2010-08-16

    Lengthening of photon storage time has been an important issue in quantum memories for long distance quantum communications utilizing quantum repeaters. Atom population transfer into an auxiliary spin state has been adapted to increase photon storage time of photon echoes. In this population transfer process phase shift to the collective atoms is inevitable, where the phase recovery condition must be multiple of 2pi to satisfy rephasing mechanism. Recent adaptation of the population transfer method to atomic frequency comb (AFC) echoes [Afzelius et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 040503 (2010)], where the population transfer method is originated in a controlled reversible inhomogeneous broadening technique [Moiseev and Kroll, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 173601 (2001)], however, shows contradictory phenomenon violating the phase recovery condition. This contradiction in AFC is reviewed as a general case of optical locking applied to a dilute medium for an optical depth-dependent coherence leakage resulting in partial retrieval efficiency.

  7. A comparison of systolic time intervals measured by impedance cardiography and carotid pulse tracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Bonde, J; Rehling, Michael;

    1990-01-01

    .001) and found that left ventricular ejection times were longer when determined by the carotid technique (p less than 0.01). We found a significant correlation between drug-induced changes in STI-variables measured by the two methods (p less than 0.001). Both methods had a high degree of reproducibility......The purpose of this study was to compare the systolic time intervals (STI) obtained by impedance cardiography and by the conventional carotid technique. This comparison was done with respect to: 1) correlations between variables obtained by the two methods, 2) ability to reflect drug......-induced changes, 3) reliability in terms of reproducibility and 4) heart rate dependency of the variables measured. The study included 25 unmedicated patients with ischaemic heart disease and 36 healthy subjects. We obtained significant correlations between STI-variables measured by the two methods (p less than 0...

  8. Time-resolved measurement of emission profiles in pulsed radiofrequency glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy: Investigation of the pre-peak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberts, D. [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Horvath, P. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland); Nelis, Th. [LAPLACE, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 rte de Narbonne, Bat3R2, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); CU Jean Francois Champollion, Place de Verdun 81012 Albi Cedex 9 (France); Pereiro, R. [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Bordel, N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Michler, J. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland); Sanz-Medel, A., E-mail: asm@uniovi.e [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Radiofrequency glow discharge coupled to optical emission spectroscopy has been used in pulsed mode in order to perform a detailed study of the measured temporal emission profiles for a wide range of copper transitions. Special attention has been paid to the early emission peak (or so-called pre-peak), observed at the beginning of the emission pulse profile. The effects of the important pulse parameters such as frequency, duty cycle, pulse width and power-off time, have been studied upon the Cu pulse emission profiles. The influence of discharge parameters, such as pressure and power, was studied as well. Results have shown that the intensity observed in the pre-peak can be 10 times as large as the plateau value for resonant lines and up to 5 times in case of transitions to the metastable levels. Increasing pressure or power increased the pre-peak intensity while its appearance in time changed. The pre-peak decreased when the discharge off-time was shorter than 100 {mu}s. According to such results, the presence of the pre-peak could be probably due to the lack of self-absorption during the first 50 {mu}s, and not to the ignition of the plasma. Under the selected operation conditions, the use of the pre-peak emission as analytical signals increases the linearity of calibration curves for resonant lines subjected to self-absorption at high concentrations.

  9. Millisecond time scale atmospheric light pulses associated with solar and magnetospheric activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogelman, H.

    1973-01-01

    By using a wide-angle photomultiplier system a class of millisecond time scale diffuse atmospheric light emission of terrestrial origin has been discovered. These fast atmospheric pulsation events also show damped oscillations around 10-kHz frequency, which distinguishes them from ordinary lightning-type events. Evidence is presented for the enhancement in the rate of these events induced by solar flare activity.

  10. High sensitivity photonic time-stretch electro-optic sampling of terahertz pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwaj, C.; Evain, C.; Le Parquier, M.; Roy, P.; Manceron, L.; Brubach, J.-B.; Tordeux, M.-A.; Bielawski, S.

    2016-10-01

    Single-shot recording of terahertz electric signals has recently become possible at high repetition rates, by using the photonic time-stretch electro-optic sampling (EOS) technique. However the moderate sensitivity of time-stretch EOS is still a strong limit for a range of applications. Here we present a variant enabling to increase the sensitivity of photonic time-stretch for free-propagating THz signals. The ellipticity of the laser probe is enhanced by adding a set of Brewster plates, as proposed by Ahmed et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013114 (2014)] in a different context. The method is tested using the high repetition rate terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation source of the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation facility. The signal-to-noise ratio of our terahertz digitizer could thus be straightforwardly improved by a factor ≈6.5, leading to a noise-equivalent input electric field below 1.25 V/cm inside the electro-optic crystal, over the 0-300 GHz band (i.e., 2.3 μ V / cm / √{ Hz } ). The sensitivity is scalable with respect to the available laser power, potentially enabling further sensitivity improvements when needed.

  11. Usefulness of maximal oxygen pulse in timing of pulmonary valve replacement in patients with isolated pulmonary regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Antoine; Richard, Ruddy; Pontnau, Florence; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Dufour, Marc; Grenier, Olivier; Mousseaux, Elie; Ladouceur, Magalie; Iserin, Laurence; Bonnet, Damien

    2016-10-01

    Patients with pulmonary regurgitation after tetralogy of Fallot repair have impaired aerobic capacity; one of the reasons is the decreasing global ventricular performance at exercise, reflected by decreasing peak oxygen pulse. The aims of our study were to evaluate the impact of pulmonary valve replacement on peak oxygen pulse in a population with pure pulmonary regurgitation and with different degrees of right ventricular dilatation and to determine the predictors of peak oxygen pulse after pulmonary valve replacement. The mean and median age at pulmonary valve replacement was 27 years. Mean pre-procedural right ventricular end-diastolic volume was 182 ml/m2. Out of 24 patients, 15 had abnormal peak oxygen pulse before pulmonary valve replacement. We did not observe a significant increase in peak oxygen pulse after pulmonary valve replacement (p=0.76). Among cardiopulmonary test/MRI/historical pre-procedural parameters, peak oxygen pulse appeared to be the best predictor of peak oxygen pulse after pulmonary valve replacement (positive and negative predictive values, respectively, 0.94 and 1). After pulmonary valve replacement, peak oxygen pulse was well correlated with left ventricular stroke and end-diastolic volumes (r=0.67 and 0.68, respectively). Our study confirms the absence of an effect of pulmonary valve replacement on peak oxygen pulse whatever the initial right ventricular volume, reflecting possible irreversible right and/or left ventricle lesions. Pre-procedural peak oxygen pulse seemed to well predict post-procedural peak oxygen pulse. These results encourage discussions on pulmonary valve replacement in patients showing any decrease in peak oxygen pulse during their follow-up.

  12. Square pulse linear transformer driver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The linear transformer driver (LTD technological approach can result in relatively compact devices that can deliver fast, high current, and high-voltage pulses straight out of the LTD cavity without any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The usual LTD architecture [A. A. Kim, M. G. Mazarakis, V. A. Sinebryukhov, B. M. Kovalchuk, V. A. Vizir, S. N Volkov, F. Bayol, A. N. Bastrikov, V. G. Durakov, S. V. Frolov, V. M. Alexeenko, D. H. McDaniel, W. E. Fowler, K. LeCheen, C. Olson, W. A. Stygar, K. W. Struve, J. Porter, and R. M. Gilgenbach, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 050402 (2009PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.050402; M. G. Mazarakis, W. E. Fowler, A. A. Kim, V. A. Sinebryukhov, S. T. Rogowski, R. A. Sharpe, D. H. McDaniel, C. L. Olson, J. L. Porter, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, and J. R. Woodworth, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 050401 (2009PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.050401] provides sine shaped output pulses that may not be well suited for some applications like z-pinch drivers, flash radiography, high power microwaves, etc. A more suitable power pulse would have a flat or trapezoidal (rising or falling top. In this paper, we present the design and first test results of an LTD cavity that generates such a type of output pulse by including within its circular array a number of third harmonic bricks in addition to the main bricks. A voltage adder made out of a square pulse cavity linear array will produce the same shape output pulses provided that the timing of each cavity is synchronized with the propagation of the electromagnetic pulse.

  13. Hyaline articular cartilage: relaxation times, pulse-sequence parameters and MR appearance at 1.5 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalkias, S.M. [Dept. of Radiology, A.H.E.P.A. General Hospital of the Aristotelian Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece); Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste (Italy); Pozzi-Mucelli, M. [Orthopaedic Clinic, Univ. of Trieste (Italy); Frezza, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste (Italy); Longo, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Trieste (Italy)

    1994-08-01

    In order to optimize the parameters for the best visualization of the internal architecture of the hyaline articular cartilage a study both ex vivo and in vivo was performed. Accurate T1 and T2 relaxation times of articular cartilage were obtained with a particular mixed sequence and then used for the creation of isocontrast intensity graphs. These graphs subsequently allowed in all pulse sequences (spin echo, SE and gradient echo, GRE) the best combination of repetition time (TR), echo time (TE) and flip angle (FA) for optimization of signal differences between MR cartilage zones. For SE sequences maximum contrast between cartilage zones can be obtained by using a long TR (> 1,500 ms) with a short TE (< 30 ms), whereas for GRE sequences maximum contrast is obtained with the shortest TE (< 15 ms) combined with a relatively long TR (> 400 ms) and an FA greater than 40 . A trilaminar appearance was demonstrated with a superficial and deep hypointense zone in all sequences and an intermediate zone that was moderately hyperintense on SE T1-weighted images, slightly more hyperintense on proton density Rho and SE T2-weighted images and even more hyperintense on GRE images. (orig.)

  14. Space and time structure of helium pulsed surface-wave discharges at intermediate pressures (5-50 Torr)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Ahmad; Valade, Fabrice; Margot, Joëlle; Vidal, François; Matte, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the ignition and development of a plasma created by pulsed surface wave discharges (PSWDs) was experimentally investigated using time-resolved imaging techniques and optical spectroscopy in helium at intermediate gas pressures between 5 and 50 Torr. We found that the ionization front moves at a few km s-1 during the ignition phase and decreases to hundreds of m s-1 after only some tens of µs. Once the plasma has reached a sufficient length, a standing wave pattern is observed in the light emission of the discharge. We attribute its formation to the reflection of the surface wave on the ionization front, which results in a pattern of nodes and antinodes. We have also determined the time and space evolution of the gas temperature. It is shown that the gas temperature increases from the room temperature value to a plateau at several hundreds of degrees over a short time (typically 100 µs). These results supports those obtained by light emission imaging and also show that the standing wave pattern does not affect the gas temperature.

  15. High-precision Distribution of Highly-stable Optical Pulse Trains with Sub-10-fs Timing Jitter

    CERN Document Server

    Ning, B; Hou, D; Wu, J T; Li, Z B; Zhao, J Y

    2014-01-01

    High-precision optical pulse trains distribution via fibre links has made huge impacts in many fields. In most published works, the accuracies are still fundamentally limited by some unavoidable noises, such as thermal and shot noise from conventional photodiodes, thermal noise from mixers. Here, we demonstrate a new high-precision timing distribution system by using highly-precision phase detector to overcome the limitations. Instead of using photodiodes and microwave mixers, we use several fibre Sagnac-loop-based optical-microwave phase detectors to realize optical-electrical conversion and phase measurements, for suppressing the noises and achieving ultra-high accuracy. A 10-km fibre link distribution experiment shows our system provides a residual instability at the level of 4.6*10-15@1-s and 6.1*10-18@10000-s, with an integrated timing jitter as low as 3.8 fs in a bandwidth of 1 Hz to 100 KHz. This low instability and timing jitter makes it possible that our system can be used in the optical clock distri...

  16. Development and testing of neutron pulse time stamping data acquisition system for neutron noise experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajeev [Reactor Physics Design Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India); Yakub Ali, M [Radio Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India); Degweker, S.B. [Theoretical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India); Vishwasrao, S.C. [Product Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India); Jadhav, R.T. [Radio Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2015-01-11

    Statistical correlation techniques find applications in the analysis of zero power reactor noise and in passive neutron assay (PNA). A large number of apparently different techniques have been in use in these application areas and traditionally the electronics modules used for data acquisition and analysis is specific to the method used. In this paper we describe a data acquisition scheme developed by us, which is independent of the specific analysis method and can therefore be used for all of them. This is a neutron time stamping data acquisition system based on a timer card and an interface software to acquire and store the data in the required format. The system has been successfully tested with two statistically different types of neutron sources, namely a random Poisson source (Pu–Be) and a correlated source (a nuclear reactor)

  17. In Vitro Comparison of Holmium Lasers: Evidence for Shorter Fragmentation Time and Decreased Retropulsion Using a Modern Variable-pulse Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, John Roger; Penniston, Kristina L; Nakada, Stephen Y

    2017-06-21

    To compare the performance of variable- and fixed-pulse lasers on stone phantoms in vitro. Seven-millimeter stone phantoms were made to simulate calcium oxalate monohydrate stones using BegoStone plus. The in vitro setting was created with a clear polyvinyl chloride tube. For each trial, a stone phantom was placed at the open end of the tubing. The Cook Rhapsody H-30 variable-pulse laser was tested on both long- and short-pulse settings and was compared to the Dornier H-20 fixed-pulse laser; 5 trials were conducted for each trial arm. Fragmentation was accomplished with the use of a flexible ureteroscope and a 273-micron holmium laser fiber using settings of 1 J × 12 Hz. The treatment time (in minute) for complete fragmentation was recorded as was the total retropulsion distance (in centimeter) during treatment. Laser fibers were standardized for all repetitions. The treatment time was significantly shorter with the H-30 vs the H-20 laser (14.3 ± 2.5 vs 33.1 ± 8.9 minutes, P = .008). There was no difference between the treatment times using the long vs short pulse widths of the H-30 laser (14.4 ± 3.4 vs 14.3 ± 1.7 minutes, P = .93). Retropulsion differed by laser type and pulse width, H-30 long pulse (15.8 ± 5.7 cm), H-30 short pulse (54.8 ± 7.1 cm), and H-20 (33.2 ± 12.5 cm) (P laser fragmented stone phantoms in half the time of the H-20 laser regardless of the pulse width. Retropulsion effects differed between the lasers, with the H-30 causing the least retropulsion. Longer pulse widths result in less stone retropulsion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Short-pulsed laser transport in absorbing and scattering media: time-based versus frequency-based approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francoeur, Mathieu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Rousse, Daniel R [Department of Mathematics, Computer Sciences, and Engineering, Universite du Quebec a Rimouski, Levis, PQ G6V 8R9 (Canada)

    2007-09-21

    Optical tomography (OT) is a promising non-intrusive characterization technique of absorbing and scattering media that uses transmitted and/or reflected signals of samples irradiated with visible or near-infrared light. The quality of OT techniques is directly related to the accuracy of their forward models due to the use of inversion algorithms. In this paper, forward models for transient OT approaches are investigated. The system under study involves a one-dimensional absorbing and scattering medium illuminated by a short laser pulse; this problem is solved using a discrete ordinates-finite volume (DO-FV) method in both time and frequency domain. Previous works have shown that time-domain approaches coupled with first order spatial interpolation schemes cannot represent the physics of the problem adequately as transmitted fluxes emerge before the minimal physical time required to leave the medium. In this work, the Van Leer and Superbee flux limiters, combined with the second order Lax-Wendroff scheme, are used in an attempt to prevent this. Results show that despite significant improvement, flux limiters fail to completely eliminate the physically unrealistic behaviour. On the other hand, results for transmittance obtained from the frequency-based method are accurate, without physically unrealistic behaviours at early time periods. The frequency-dependent approach is however computationally expensive, since it requires approximately five times more computational time than its temporal counterpart when used as a forward model for transient OT. On the other hand, the great advantages of the frequency-based approach is that limited windows of temporal signals can be calculated efficiently (in transient OT), and it can also be used as a forward model for steady-state, frequency-based and transient OT techniques.

  19. Timing A Pulsed Thin Film Pyroelectric Generator For Maximum Power Denisty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. N.; Hanrahan, B. M.; Neville, C. J.; Jankowski, N. R.

    2016-11-01

    Pyroelectric thermal-to-electric energy conversion is accomplished by a cyclic process of thermally-inducing polarization changes in the material under an applied electric field. The pyroelectric MEMS device investigated consisted of a thin film PZT capacitor with platinum bottom and iridium oxide top electrodes. Electric fields between 1-20 kV/cm with a 30% duty cycle and frequencies from 0.1 - 100 Hz were tested with a modulated continuous wave IR laser with a duty cycle of 20% creating temperature swings from 0.15 - 26 °C on the pyroelectric receiver. The net output power of the device was highly sensitive to the phase delay between the laser power and the applied electric field. A thermal model was developed to predict and explain the power loss associated with finite charge and discharge times. Excellent agreement was achieved between the theoretical model and the experiment results for the measured power density versus phase delay. Limitations on the charging and discharging rates result in reduced power and lower efficiency due to a reduced net work per cycle.

  20. MOSFET-based high voltage double square-wave pulse generator with an inductive adder configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Zhang, Qiaogen, E-mail: hvzhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Long, Jinghua [College of Physics, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Lei, Yunfei; Liu, Jinyuan [Institute of Optoelectronics, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a fast MOSFET-based solid-state pulse generator for high voltage double square-wave pulses. The generator consists mainly of an inductive adder system stacked of 20 solid-state modules. Each of the modules has 18 power MOSFETs in parallel, which are triggered by individual drive circuits; these drive circuits themselves are synchronously triggered by a signal from avalanche transistors. Our experiments demonstrate that the output pulses with amplitude of 8.1 kV and peak current of about 405 A are available at a load impedance of 20 Ω. The pulse has a double square-wave form with a rise and fall time of 40 ns and 26 ns, respectively and bottom flatness better than 12%. The interval time of the double square-wave pulses can be adjustable by varying the interval time of the trigger pulses.