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Sample records for pulse rate calculator

  1. Pulse superimposition calculational methodology for estimating the subcriticality level of nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Y.; Rabiti, C.; Aliberti, G.; Kondev, F.; Smith, D.; Zhong, Z.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.; Serafimovich, I.

    2009-01-01

    One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the subcriticality level of a nuclear fuel assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology simulating the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the experimental and analytical reaction rates and the obtained subcriticality levels. In this methodology, the reaction rate is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the delayed fission neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction rate is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is then superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The analytical results of this new calculation methodology have shown an excellent agreement with the experimental data available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. This methodology can be used to calculate Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor.

  2. Pulse superimposition calculational methodology for estimating the subcriticality level of nuclear fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: atalamo@anl.gov; Gohar, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rabiti, C. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2528, Idaho Falls, ID 83403 (United States); Aliberti, G.; Kondev, F.; Smith, D.; Zhong, Z. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.; Serafimovich, I. [Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research-Sosny, National Academy of Sciences (Belarus)

    2009-07-21

    One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the subcriticality level of a nuclear fuel assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology simulating the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the experimental and analytical reaction rates and the obtained subcriticality levels. In this methodology, the reaction rate is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the delayed fission neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction rate is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is then superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The analytical results of this new calculation methodology have shown an excellent agreement with the experimental data available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. This methodology can be used to calculate Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor.

  3. Radiological dose rate calculations for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khater, H.Y.; Santoro, R.T.

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional biological dose rates were calculated at different locations outside the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) design. An 18 degree sector of the reactor was modeled in r-θ geometry. The calculations were performed for three different pulsing scenarios. This included a single pulse of 1000 s duration, 10 pulses of 1000 s duration with a 50% duty factor, and 9470 pulses of 1000 s duration with a 50% duty factor for a total fluence of 0.3 MW.a/m 2 . The dose rates were calculated as a function of toroidal angle at locations in the space between the toroidal field (TF) coils and cryostat, and in the space between the cryostat and the biological shield. The two-dimensional results clearly showed the toroidal effect, which is dominated by contribution from the activation of the cryostat and the biological shield. After one pulse, full access to the machine is possible within a few hours following shutdown. After 10 pulses, full access is also possible within the first day following shutdown. At the end of the Basic Performance Phase (BPP), full access is possible at any of the locations considered after one week following shutdown. 5 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Biological effect of Pulsed Dose Rate brachytherapy with stepping sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limbergen, Erik F.M. van; Fowler, Jack F.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the possible increase of radiation effect in tissues irradiated by pulsed brachytherapy (PDR), for local tissue dose-rates between those 'averaged over the whole pulse' and the instantaneous high dose rates close to the dwell positions. An earlier publication (Fowler and Mount 1992) had shown that, for dose rates (averaged for the duration of the pulse) up to 3 Gy/h, little change of isoeffect doses from continuous low dose rate (CLDR) are expected, unless larger doses per fraction than 1 Gy are used, and especially if components of very rapid repair are present with half-times of less than about 0.5 hours. However, local and transient dose rates close to stepping sources can be up to several Gy per minute. Methods: Calculations were done assuming the linear quadratic formula for radiation damage, in which only the dose-squared term is subject to repair, at a constant exponential rate. The formula developed by Dale for fractionated low-dose-rate radiotherapy was used. A constant overall time of 140 hours and constant total dose of 70 Gy were assumed throughout, the continuous low dose-rate of 0.5 Gy/h (CLDR) providing the unitary standard effects for each PDR condition. Effects of dose-rates ranging from 4 Gy/h to 120 Gy/h (HDR at 2 Gy/min) were studied, and T (1(2)) from 4 minutes to 1.5 hours. Results: Curves are presented relating the ratio of increased biological effect (proportional to log cell kill) calculated for PDR relative to CLDR. Ratios as high as 1.5 can be found for large doses per pulse (> 1 Gy) at high instantaneous dose-rates if T (1(2)) in tissues is as short as a few minutes. The major influences on effect are dose per pulse, half-time of repair in the tissue, and - when T (1(2)) is short - the instantaneous dose-rate. Maximum ratios of PDR/CLDR effect occur when the dose-rate is such that pulse duration is approximately equal to T (1(2)) of repair. Results are presented for late-responding tissues, the differences from CLDR

  5. Calculation code PULCO for Purex process in pulsed column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonda, Kozo; Matsuda, Teruo

    1982-03-01

    The calculation code PULCO, which can simulate the Purex process using a pulsed column as an extractor, has been developed. The PULCO is based on the fundamental concept of mass transfer that the mass transfer within a pulsed column occurs through the interface of liquid drops and continuous phase fluid, and is the calculation code different from conventional ones, by which various phenomena such as the generation of liquid drops, their rising and falling, and the unification of liquid drops actually occurring in a pulsed column are exactly reflected and can be correctly simulated. In the PULCO, the actually measured values of the fundamental quantities representing the extraction behavior of liquid drops in a pulsed column are incorporated, such as the mass transfer coefficient of each component, the diameter and velocity of liquid drops in a pulsed column, the holdup of dispersed phase, and axial turbulent flow diffusion coefficient. The verification of the results calculated with the PULCO was carried out by installing a pulsed column of 50 mm inside diameter and 2 m length with 40 plate stage in a glove box for unirradiated uranium-plutonium mixed system. The results of the calculation and test were in good agreement, and the validity of the PULCO was confirmed. (Kako, I.)

  6. Frequency-chirp rates of harmonics driven by a few-cycle pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, M.; Mauritsson, J.; Gaarde, M.B.

    2005-01-01

    We present numerical calculations of the time-frequency characteristics of cutoff harmonics generated by few-cycle laser pulses. We find that for driving pulses as short as three optical cycles, the adiabatic prediction for the harmonic chirp rate is very accurate. This negative chirp is so large that the resulting bandwidth causes substantial overlap between neighboring harmonics, and the harmonic phase therefore appears to not vary in time or frequency. By adding a compensating positive chirp to the driving pulse, which reduces the harmonic bandwidth and allows for the appearance of the negative chirp, we can measure the harmonic chirp rates. We also find that the positive chirp on the driving pulse causes the harmonics to shift down in frequency. We show that this counterintuitive result is caused by the change in the strong field continuum dynamics introduced by the variation of the driving frequency with time

  7. PULSTRI-1 computer program for mixed core pulse calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravnik, M.; Mele, I.; Dimic, V.

    1990-01-01

    PUISTRI-1 is a computer code designed for calculations of the pulse parameters of TRIGA Mark II reactor with mixed core. The code is provided with data for four types of fuel elements: standard 8.5 and 12 w/o, LEU and FLIP. The pulse parameters, such as maximum power, prompt pulse energy and average fuel temperatures are calculated in adiabatic point kinetics, approximation, modified by taking into account temperature dependence of fuel temperature reactivity coefficient and thermal capacity factor averaged over all elements in the core. Maximal fuel temperature at power peaking location is calculated from total released energy using total power peaking factor and heat capacity of the element at the location of the power peaking. Results of the code were compared to data found in references (mainly General Atomics safety analysis reports) showing good agreement for all main pulse parameters. The most important parameters, average and maximal fuel temperature, are found to be systematically slightly overpredicted (20 C and 50 C, respectively). Other parameters (energy, peak power, width) agree within ± 10 % to the reference values. The code is written in FORTRAN for IBM PC computer. The input is user friendly. running time of IBM PC AT is a few seconds. It is designed for practical applications in pulse experiments as an analytical tool for predicting pulse parameters. (orig.)

  8. System for increasing laser pulse rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A technique of static elements is disclosed for combining a plurality of laser beams having time sequenced, pulsed radiation to achieve an augmented pulse rate. The technique may also be applied in a system for combining both time sequenced pulses and frequency distinct pulses for use in a system for isotope enrichment. (author)

  9. Modeling study on the effects of pulse rise rate in atmospheric pulsed discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan-Tao; Wang, Yan-Hui

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we present a modeling study on the discharge characteristics driven by short pulsed voltages, focusing on the effects of pulse rise rate based on the fluid description of atmospheric plasmas. The numerical results show that the breakdown voltage of short pulsed discharge is almost linearly dependent on the pulse rise rate, which is also confirmed by the derived equations from the fluid model. In other words, if the pulse rise rate is fixed as a constant, the simulation results clearly suggest that the breakdown voltage is almost unchanged, although the amplitude of pulsed voltage increases significantly. The spatial distribution of the electric field and electron density are given to reveal the underpinning physics. Additionally, the computational data and the analytical expression also indicate that an increased repetition frequency can effectively decrease the breakdown voltage and current density, which is consistent with the experimental observation.

  10. Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility (SPRF) calculator-assisted pulse analysis and display system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, B.F.; Berry, D.T.

    1980-02-01

    Two solid-metal fast burst type reactors (SPR II and SPR III) are operated at the Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility. Since startup of the reactors, oscilloscope traces have been used to record (by camera) the pulse (power) shape while log N systems have measured initial reactor period. Virtually no other pulse information is available. A decision was made to build a system that could collect the basic input data available from the reactor - fission chambers, photodiodes, and thermocouples - condition the signals and output the various parameters such as power, energy, temperature, period and lifetime on hard copy that would provide a record for operations personnel as well as the experimenter. Because the reactors operate in short time frames - pulse operation - it is convenient to utilize the classical Nordheim-Fuchs approximation of the diffusion equation to describe reactor behavior. This report describes the work performed to date in developing the calculator system and analytical models for computing the desired parameters

  11. Volunteer Work, Religious Commitment, and Resting Pulse Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Neal; Ironson, Gail; Hill, Peter C

    2017-04-01

    Research indicates that greater involvement in volunteer activities is associated with better health. We aim to contribute to this literature in two ways. First, rather than rely on self-reports of health, measured resting pulse rates serve as the dependent variable. Second, an effort is made to see if religious commitment moderates the relationship between volunteering and resting pulse rates. Data that come from a recent nationwide survey (N = 2265) suggest that volunteer work is associated with lower resting pulse rates. The results also reveal that the relationship between engaging in volunteer work and resting pulse rates improves among study participants who are more deeply committed to religion.

  12. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruma,; Yoshihara, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R.; Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H.; Akiyama, M.; Lukeš, P.

    2014-01-01

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H 2 O 2 and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  13. Sternal Pulse Rate Variability Compared with Heart Rate Variability on Healthy Subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chreiteh, Shadi; Belhage, Bo; Hoppe, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    differing more than 50 ms (pNN50) were calculated from the R peak-to-R peak (R-R) and pulse-to-pulse (P-P) intervals. In the frequency domain the low and high frequency ratio of the power spectral density (LF/HF) was also computed. The Pearson correlation coefficient showed significant correlation for all...

  14. Determination of pseudo multi-pulse production rate in GM counters by correlation analysis between signal pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Kengo; Ueda, Taizou

    1996-01-01

    A technique, based on the correlation analysis of signal pulses in time sequence, is proposed to determine the production rate of the pseudo multi-pulse in Geiger-Mueller (GM) counter. With a multi-channel scaler initiated by a signal pulse, subsequent pulses are recorded in sequence. The production of the multi-pulse increases the counting probability immediately after the initiation. By examining the deviation of the measured probability from the ideal counting probability, the production rate and the average lag time to produce the multi-pulse can be determined. By the use of the present technique, the production rate and the average lag time were obtained for the various GM tubes. These results indicate that the consumption of the quench gas results in a significant increase in the production rate but little variation in the lag time, and that the lag time strongly depends on the tube diameter. (author)

  15. Dose rate effect on micronuclei induction in human blood lymphocytes exposed to single pulse and multiple pulses of electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Santhosh; Bhat, N N; Joseph, Praveen; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Sreedevi, B; Narayana, Y

    2011-05-01

    The effects of single pulses and multiple pulses of 7 MV electrons on micronuclei (MN) induction in cytokinesis-blocked human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were investigated over a wide range of dose rates per pulse (instantaneous dose rate). PBLs were exposed to graded doses of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 Gy of single electron pulses of varying pulse widths at different dose rates per pulse, ranging from 1 × 10(6) Gy s(-1) to 3.2 × 10(8) Gy s(-1). Different dose rates per pulse were achieved by changing the dose per electron pulse by adjusting the beam current and pulse width. MN yields per unit absorbed dose after irradiation with single electron pulses were compared with those of multiple pulses of electrons. A significant decrease in the MN yield with increasing dose rates per pulse was observed, when dose was delivered by a single electron pulse. However, no reduction in the MN yield was observed when dose was delivered by multiple pulses of electrons. The decrease in the yield at high dose rates per pulse suggests possible radical recombination, which leads to decreased biological damage. Cellular response to the presence of very large numbers of chromosomal breaks may also alter the damage.

  16. Pulsed dose rate and fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy: choice of brachytherapy schedules to replace low dose rate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Andries G.; Aardweg, Gerard J.M.J. van den; Levendag, Peter C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a new type of afterloading brachytherapy (BT) in which a continuous low dose rate (LDR) treatment is simulated by a series of 'pulses,' i.e., fractions of short duration (less than 0.5 h) with intervals between fractions of 1 to a few hours. At the Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, the term 'PDR brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with a large number of fractions (at least four per day), while the term 'fractionated high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with just one or two brachytherapy fractions per day. Both treatments can be applied as alternatives for LDR BT. This article deals with the choice between PDR and fractionated HDR schedules and proposes possible fractionation schedules. Methods and Materials: To calculate HDR and PDR fractionation schedules with the intention of being equivalent to LDR BT, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been used in an incomplete repair formulation as given by Brenner and Hall, and by Thames. In contrast to earlier applications of this model, both the total physical dose and the overall time were not kept identical for LDR and HDR/PDR schedules. A range of possible PDR treatment schedules is presented, both for booster applications (in combination with external radiotherapy (ERT) and for BT applications as a single treatment. Because the knowledge of both α/β values and the half time for repair of sublethal damage (T (1(2)) ), which are required for these calculations, is quite limited, calculations regarding the equivalence of LDR and PDR treatments have been performed for a wide range of values of α/β and T (1(2)) . The results are presented graphically as PDR/LDR dose ratios and as ratios of the PDR/LDR tumor control probabilities. Results: If the condition that total physical dose and overall time of a PDR treatment must be exactly identical to the values for the corresponding LDR treatment regimen is not applied, there appears

  17. Radiobiological response to ultra-short pulsed megavoltage electron beams of ultra-high pulse dose rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyreuther, Elke; Karsch, Leonhard; Laschinsky, Lydia; Leßmann, Elisabeth; Naumburger, Doreen; Oppelt, Melanie; Richter, Christian; Schürer, Michael; Woithe, Julia; Pawelke, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    In line with the long-term aim of establishing the laser-based particle acceleration for future medical application, the radiobiological consequences of the typical ultra-short pulses and ultra-high pulse dose rate can be investigated with electron delivery. The radiation source ELBE (Electron Linac for beams with high Brilliance and low Emittance) was used to mimic the quasi-continuous electron beam of a clinical linear accelerator (LINAC) for comparison with electron pulses at the ultra-high pulse dose rate of 10(10) Gy min(-1) either at the low frequency of a laser accelerator or at 13 MHz avoiding effects of prolonged dose delivery. The impact of pulse structure was analyzed by clonogenic survival assay and by the number of residual DNA double-strand breaks remaining 24 h after irradiation of two human squamous cell carcinoma lines of differing radiosensitivity. The radiation response of both cell lines was found to be independent from electron pulse structure for the two endpoints under investigation. The results reveal, that ultra-high pulse dose rates of 10(10) Gy min(-1) and the low repetition rate of laser accelerated electrons have no statistically significant influence (within the 95% confidence intervals) on the radiobiological effectiveness of megavoltage electrons.

  18. Robust motion artefact resistant circuit for calculation of Mean Arterial Pressure from pulse transit time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Tinish; Gupta, Ankesh; Singh, Salam ThoiThoi; Roy, Sitikantha; Prasad, Anamika

    2017-07-01

    Cuff-less and non-invasive methods of Blood Pressure (BP) monitoring have faced a lot of challenges like stability, noise, motion artefact and requirement for calibration. These factors are the major reasons why such devices do not get approval from the medical community easily. One such method is calculating Blood Pressure indirectly from pulse transit time (PTT) obtained from electrocardiogram (ECG) and Photoplethysmogram (PPG). In this paper we have proposed two novel analog signal conditioning circuits for ECG and PPG that increase stability, remove motion artefacts, remove the sinusoidal wavering of the ECG baseline due to respiration and provide consistent digital pulses corresponding to blood pulses/heart-beat. We have combined these two systems to obtain the PTT and then correlated it with the Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP). The aim was to perform major part of the processing in analog domain to decrease processing load over microcontroller so as to reduce cost and make it simple and robust. We have found from our experiments that the proposed circuits can calculate the Heart Rate (HR) with a maximum error of ~3.0% and MAP with a maximum error of ~2.4% at rest and ~4.6% in motion.

  19. High-repetition-rate short-pulse gas discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulip, J; Seguin, H; Mace, P N

    1979-09-01

    A high-average-power short-pulse gas discharge is described. This consists of a volume-preionized transverse discharge of the type used in gas lasers driven by a Blumlein energy storage circuit. The Blumlein circuit is fabricated from coaxial cable, is pulse-charged from a high-repetition-rate Marx-bank generator, and is switched by a high-repetition-rate segmented rail gap. The operation of this discharge under conditions typical of rare-gas halide lasers is described. A maximum of 900 pps was obtained, giving a power flow into the discharge of 30 kW.

  20. Radiobiological influence of megavoltage electron pulses of ultra-high pulse dose rate on normal tissue cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschinsky, Lydia; Karsch, Leonhard; Leßmann, Elisabeth; Oppelt, Melanie; Pawelke, Jörg; Richter, Christian; Schürer, Michael; Beyreuther, Elke

    2016-08-01

    Regarding the long-term goal to develop and establish laser-based particle accelerators for a future radiotherapeutic treatment of cancer, the radiobiological consequences of the characteristic short intense particle pulses with ultra-high peak dose rate, but low repetition rate of laser-driven beams have to be investigated. This work presents in vitro experiments performed at the radiation source ELBE (Electron Linac for beams with high Brilliance and low Emittance). This accelerator delivered 20-MeV electron pulses with ultra-high pulse dose rate of 10(10) Gy/min either at the low pulse frequency analogue to previous cell experiments with laser-driven electrons or at high frequency for minimizing the prolonged dose delivery and to perform comparison irradiation with a quasi-continuous electron beam analogue to a clinically used linear accelerator. The influence of the different electron beam pulse structures on the radiobiological response of the normal tissue cell line 184A1 and two primary fibroblasts was investigated regarding clonogenic survival and the number of DNA double-strand breaks that remain 24 h after irradiation. Thereby, no considerable differences in radiation response were revealed both for biological endpoints and for all probed cell cultures. These results provide evidence that the radiobiological effectiveness of the pulsed electron beams is not affected by the ultra-high pulse dose rates alone.

  1. Radiobiological influence of megavoltage electron pulses of ultra-high pulse dose rate on normal tissue cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laschinsky, Lydia; Karsch, Leonhard; Schuerer, Michael; Lessmann, Elisabeth; Beyreuther, Elke; Oppelt, Melanie; Pawelke, Joerg; Richter, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Regarding the long-term goal to develop and establish laser-based particle accelerators for a future radiotherapeutic treatment of cancer, the radiobiological consequences of the characteristic short intense particle pulses with ultra-high peak dose rate, but low repetition rate of laser-driven beams have to be investigated. This work presents in vitro experiments performed at the radiation source ELBE (Electron Linac for beams with high Brilliance and low Emittance). This accelerator delivered 20-MeV electron pulses with ultra-high pulse dose rate of 10"1"0 Gy/min either at the low pulse frequency analogue to previous cell experiments with laser-driven electrons or at high frequency for minimizing the prolonged dose delivery and to perform comparison irradiation with a quasi-continuous electron beam analogue to a clinically used linear accelerator. The influence of the different electron beam pulse structures on the radiobiological response of the normal tissue cell line 184A1 and two primary fibroblasts was investigated regarding clonogenic survival and the number of DNA double-strand breaks that remain 24 h after irradiation. Thereby, no considerable differences in radiation response were revealed both for biological endpoints and for all probed cell cultures. These results provide evidence that the radiobiological effectiveness of the pulsed electron beams is not affected by the ultra-high pulse dose rates alone. (orig.)

  2. Derivation of pulse height to exposure rate conversion functions for aerial radiological surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artuso, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described for deriving conversion functions that can be used to convert pulse height spectra taken at altitude to the exposure rate at the 1-m level. An integral equation is set up which involves the integration of a calculated pulse height spectrum multiplied by an unknown conversion function and then set equal to the exposure rate at ground level. This equation is then solved for the conversion function by assuming as a solution a three-term polynomial. Conversion functions have been derived for various source distributions, including surface, uniform, and exponentially distributed sources. These conversion functions are independent of source energy, which means that a conversion can be made without any knowledge of the isotopic content of the source. In the case of a uniform distribution, these conversion functions provide conversions that agree to within 10% with ground truth measurements

  3. Balanced cross-rate model for saturated molecular fluorescence in flames using a nanosecond pulse length laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucht, R.P.; Sweeney, D.W.; Laurendeau, N.M.

    1980-01-01

    The balanced cross-rate model is proposed to analyze laser-induced molecular fluorescence signals when the laser pulse length is of the order of nanoseconds. Nanosecond pulse length lasers. specifically Q-switched Nd:YAG-pumped dye lasers, are attractive for saturated molecular fluorescence spectroscopy because of their high peak power and because of their short pulse length minimizes the risk of laser-induced chemistry. In the balanced cross-rate model, single upper and lower rotational levels are assumed to be directly coupled by the laser radiation. Because the laser-induced processes which couple these levels are so fast at saturation intensities, a steady state is established between the two levels within picoseconds. Provided that the total population of the two laser-coupled rotational levels is constant during the laser pulse, the total molecular population can be calculated from the observed upper rotational level population using a two-level saturation model and Boltzmann statistics. Numerical simulation of the laser excitation dynamics of OH in an atmospheric pressure H 2 /O 2 /N 2 flame indicates that the balanced cross-rate model will give accurate results provided that the rotational relaxation rates in the upper and lower sets of rotational levels are approximately equal

  4. System for evaluation of the true average input-pulse rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichenlaub, D.P.; Garrett, P.

    1977-01-01

    The description is given of a digital radiation monitoring system making use of current digital circuit and microprocessor for rapidly processing the pulse data coming from remote radiation controllers. This system analyses the pulse rates in order to determine if a new datum is statistically the same as that previously received. Hence it determines the best possible average time for itself. So long as the true average pulse rate stays constant, the time required to establish an average can increase until the statistical error is under the desired level, i.e. 1%. When the digital processing of the pulse data indicates a change in the true average pulse rate, the time required to establish an average can be reduced so as to improve the response time of the system at the statistical error. This concept includes a fixed compromise between the statistical error and the response time [fr

  5. MICROCALORIMETER SPECTROSCOPY AT HIGH PULSE RATES: A MULTI-PULSE FITTING TECHNIQUE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J. W.; Alpert, B. K.; Doriese, W. B.; Joe, Y. I.; O’Neil, G. C.; Swetz, D. S.; Ullom, J. N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway MS 686.02, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Fischer, D. A.; Jaye, C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Brookhaven National Lab, Brookhaven, NY (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Transition Edge Sensor microcalorimeters can measure X-ray and gamma-ray energies with very high energy resolution and high photon-collection efficiency. For this technology to reach its full potential in future X-ray observatories, each sensor must be able to measure hundreds or even thousands of photon energies per second. Current “optimal filtering” approaches to achieve the best possible energy resolution work only for photons that are well isolated in time, a requirement which is in direct conflict with the need for high-rate measurements. We describe a new analysis procedure to allow fitting for the pulse height of all photons even in the presence of heavy pulse pile-up. In the limit of isolated pulses, the technique reduces to standard optimal filtering with long records. We employ reasonable approximations to the noise covariance function in order to render this procedure computationally viable even for very long data records. The technique is employed to analyze X-ray emission spectra at 600 eV and 6 keV at rates up to 250 counts s{sup −1} in microcalorimeters having exponential signal decay times of approximately 1.2 ms.

  6. Calculation of the pulsed Feynman- and Rossi-alpha formulae with delayed neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Y.; Pazsit, I.; Wright, J.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamane, Y.

    2005-01-01

    In previous works, the authors have developed an effective solution technique for calculating the pulsed Feynman- and Rossi-alpha formulae. Through derivation of these formulae, it was shown that the technique can easily handle various pulse shapes of the pulsed neutron source. Furthermore, it was also shown that both the deterministic (i.e., synchronizing with the pulsing of neutron source) and stochastic (non-synchronizing) Feynman-alpha formulae can be obtained with this solution technique. However, for mathematical simplicity and the sake of insight, the formal derivation was performed in a model without delayed neutrons. In this paper, to demonstrate the robustness of the technique, the pulsed Feynman- and Rossi-alpha formulae were re-derived by taking one group of delayed neutrons into account. The results show that the advantages of this technique are retained even by inclusion of the delayed neutrons. Compact explicit formulae are derived for the Feynman- and Rossi-alpha methods for various pulse shapes and pulsing methods

  7. Reliability and validity of a smartphone pulse rate application for the assessment of resting and elevated pulse rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Katy; Graff, Megan; Hedt, Corbin; Simmons, James

    2016-08-01

    Purpose/hypothesis: This study was designed to investigate the test-retest reliability, concurrent validity, and the standard error of measurement (SEm) of a pulse rate assessment application (Azumio®'s Instant Heart Rate) on both Android® and iOS® (iphone operating system) smartphones as compared to a FT7 Polar® Heart Rate monitor. Number of subjects: 111. Resting (sitting) pulse rate was assessed twice and then the participants were asked to complete a 1-min standing step test and then immediately re-assessed. The smartphone assessors were blinded to their measurements. Test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC 2,1] and 95% confidence interval) for the three tools at rest (time 1/time 2): iOS® (0.76 [0.67-0.83]); Polar® (0.84 [0.78-0.89]); and Android® (0.82 [0.75-0.88]). Concurrent validity at rest time 2 (ICC 2,1) with the Polar® device: IOS® (0.92 [0.88-0.94]) and Android® (0.95 [0.92-0.96]). Concurrent validity post-exercise (time 3) (ICC) with the Polar® device: iOS® (0.90 [0.86-0.93]) and Android® (0.94 [0.91-0.96]). The SEm values for the three devices at rest: iOS® (5.77 beats per minute [BPM]), Polar® (4.56 BPM) and Android® (4.96 BPM). The Android®, iOS®, and Polar® devices showed acceptable test-retest reliability at rest and post-exercise. Both the smartphone platforms demonstrated concurrent validity with the Polar® at rest and post-exercise. The Azumio® Instant Heart Rate application when used by either platform appears to be a reliable and valid tool to assess pulse rate in healthy individuals.

  8. Robust efficient estimation of heart rate pulse from video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuchang; Sun, Lingyun; Rohde, Gustavo Kunde

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple but robust algorithm for estimating the heart rate pulse from video sequences containing human skin in real time. Based on a model of light interaction with human skin, we define the change of blood concentration due to arterial pulsation as a pixel quotient in log space, and successfully use the derived signal for computing the pulse heart rate. Various experiments with different cameras, different illumination condition, and different skin locations were conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm. Examples computed with normal illumination show the algorithm is comparable with pulse oximeter devices both in accuracy and sensitivity. PMID:24761294

  9. Pulse repetition rate multiplication by Talbot effect in a coaxial fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Nikhil; Saxena, Geetika Jain; Anand, Jyoti; Sharma, Enakshi K.

    2018-03-01

    We use a coaxial fiber, which is a cylindrical coupled waveguide structure consisting of two concentric cores, the inner rod and an outer ring core as a first order dispersive media to achieve temporal Talbot effect for pulse repetition rate multiplication (PRRM) in high bit rate optical fiber communication. It is observed that for an input Gaussian pulse train with pulse width, 2τ0=1ps at a repetition rate of 40 Gbps (repetition period, T=25ps), an output repetition rate of 640 Gbps can be achieved without significant distortion at a length of 40.92 m.

  10. Calculation code of mass and heat transfer in a pulsed column for Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Takeshi; Takahashi, Keiki

    1993-01-01

    A calculation code for extraction behavior analysis in a pulsed column employed at an extraction process of a reprocessing plant was developed. This code was also combined with our previously developed calculation code for axial temperature profiles in a pulsed column. The one-dimensional dispersion model was employed for both of the extraction behavior analysis and the axial temperature profile analysis. The reported values of the fluid characteristics coefficient, the transfer coefficient and the diffusivities in the pulsed column were used. The calculated concentration profiles of HNO 3 , U and Pu for the steady state have a good agreement with the reported experimental results. The concentration and temperature profiles were calculated under the operation conditions which induce the abnormal U extraction behavior, i.e. U extraction zone is moved to the bottom of the column. Thought there is slight difference between calculated and experimental value, it is appeared that our developed code can be applied to the simulation under the normal operation condition and the relatively slowly transient condition. Pu accumulation phenomena was analyzed with this code and the accumulation tendency is similar to the reported analysis results. (author)

  11. A copper bromide vapour laser with a high pulse repetition rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiyanov, D V; Evtushenko, Gennadii S; Sukhanov, V B; Fedorov, V F

    2002-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of a copper bromide vapour laser with a discharge-channel diameter above 2.5 cm and a high pump-pulse repetition rate are presented. A TGU1-1000/25 high-power tacitron used as a switch made it possible to obtain for the first time a fairly high output radiation power for pump-pulse repetition rates exceeding 200 kHz. At a maximum pump-pulse repetition rate of 250 kHz achieved in a laser tube 2.6 cm in diameter and 76 cm long, the output power was 1.5 W. The output powers of 3 and 10.5 W were reached for pump-pulse repetition rates of 200 and 100 kHz, respectively. These characteristics were obtained without circulating a buffer gas and (or) low-concentration active impurities through the active volume. (active media. lasers)

  12. Mechanism and kinetics in reactions of caffeic acid with radicals by pulse radiolysis and calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xifeng; Cai, Zhongli; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of caffeic acid with e aq - , (CH 3 ) 2 (OH) CCH 2 · , CO 2 ·- , H · , ·OH and N 3 · radicals were studied by γ-, pulse radiolysis and molecular orbital calculation. UV-visible spectra of electron/·OH adducts, semi-quinone radicals of caffeic ions, and the stable products from the reactions were derived. The rate constants were determined. The attacked sites and the most favorable structures of the transient radicals were predicted. Reaction mechanisms were proposed. (author)

  13. Study on the Depth, Rate, Shape, and Strength of Pulse with Cardiovascular Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Yeon Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulse diagnosis is important in oriental medicine. The purpose of this study is explaining the mechanisms of pulse with a cardiovascular simulator. The simulator is comprised of the pulse generating part, the vessel part, and the measurement part. The pulse generating part was composed of motor, slider-crank mechanism, and piston pump. The vessel part, which was composed with the aorta and a radial artery, was fabricated with silicon to implement pulse wave propagation. The pulse parameters, such as the depth, rate, shape, and strength, were simulated. With changing the mean pressure, the floating pulse and the sunken pulse were generated. The change of heart rate generated the slow pulse and the rapid pulse. The control of the superposition time of the reflected wave generated the string-like pulse and the slippery pulse. With changing the pulse pressure, the vacuous pulse and the replete pulse were generated. The generated pulses showed good agreements with the typical pulses.

  14. Using Pulse Rate in Estimating Workload Evaluating a Load Mobilizing Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Alberto Castillo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The pulse rate is a direct indicator of the state of the cardiovascular system, in ad-dition to being an indirect indicator of the energy expended in performing a task. The pulse of a person is the number of pulses recorded in a peripheral artery per unit time; the pulse appears as a pressure wave moving along the blood vessels, which are flexible, “in large arterial branches, speed of 7-10 m/s in the small arteries, 15 to 35 m/s”. Materials and methods: The aim of this study was to assess heart rate, using the technique of recording the frequency of the pulse, oxy-gen consumption and observation of work activity in the estimation of the workload in a load handling task for three situations: lift/transfer/deposit; before, during and after the task the pulse rate is recorded for 24 young volunteers (10 women and 14 men under laboratory conditions. We performed a gesture analysis of work activity and lifting and handling strategies. Results: We observed an increase between initial and final fp in both groups and for the two tasks, a dif¬ference is also recorded in the increase in heart rate of 17.5 for charging 75 % of the participants experienced an increase in fp above 100 lat./min. Par 25 kg, registered values indicate greater than 114 lat./min and 17.5 kg than 128 lat./min values. Discussion: The pulse rate method is recommended for its simplicity of use for operational staff, supervisors and managers and indus¬trial engineers not trained in the physiology method can also be used by industrial hygienists.

  15. Comparative investigation of three dose rate meters for their viability in pulsed radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotz, M; Karsch, L; Pawelke, J

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed radiation fields, characterized by microsecond pulse duration and correspondingly high pulse dose rates, are increasingly used in therapeutic, diagnostic and research applications. Yet, dose rate meters which are used to monitor radiation protection areas or to inspect radiation shielding are mostly designed, characterized and tested for continuous fields and show severe deficiencies in highly pulsed fields. Despite general awareness of the problem, knowledge of the specific limitations of individual instruments is very limited, complicating reliable measurements. We present here the results of testing three commercial dose rate meters, the RamION ionization chamber, the LB 1236-H proportional counter and the 6150AD-b scintillation counter, for their response in pulsed radiation fields of varied pulse dose and duration. Of these three the RamION proved reliable, operating in a pulsed radiation field within its specifications, while the other two instruments were only able to measure very limited pulse doses and pulse dose rates reliably. (paper)

  16. Calculation of secondary capacitance of compact Tesla pulse transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Binxiong; Liu Jinliang

    2013-01-01

    An analytic expression of the secondary capacitance of a compact Tesla pulse transformer is derived. Calculated result by the expression shows that two parts contribute to the secondary capacitance, namely the capacitance between inner and outer magnetic cores and the attached capacitance caused by the secondary winding. The attached capacitance equals to the capacitance of a coaxial line which is as long as the secondary coil, and whose outer and inner diameters are as large as the inner diameter of the outer magnetic and the outer diameter of the inner magnetic core respectively. A circuital model for analyzing compact Tesla transformer is built, and numeric calculation shows that the expression of the secondary capacitance is correct. Besides, a small compact Tesla transformer is developed, and related test is carried out. Test result confirms the calculated results by the expression derived. (authors)

  17. Applications: REP-rate pulse power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Research on the following topics is discussed: (1) REP-rate pulse power technology, (2) RTF-I, 300-J, 100-pps test facility experiments, (3) transformer development, (4) reactor system studies, (5) general conceptual design, (6) economic considerations, (7) specific reactor designs, (8) low-current density diode physics studies, and (9) plasma injected, microsecond, E-beam diodes

  18. Fission yield covariance generation and uncertainty propagation through fission pulse decay heat calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorito, L.; Diez, C.J.; Cabellos, O.; Stankovskiy, A.; Van den Eynde, G.; Labeau, P.E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fission yield data and uncertainty comparison between major nuclear data libraries. • Fission yield covariance generation through Bayesian technique. • Study of the effect of fission yield correlations on decay heat calculations. • Covariance information contribute to reduce fission pulse decay heat uncertainty. - Abstract: Fission product yields are fundamental parameters in burnup/activation calculations and the impact of their uncertainties was widely studied in the past. Evaluations of these uncertainties were released, still without covariance data. Therefore, the nuclear community expressed the need of full fission yield covariance matrices to be able to produce inventory calculation results that take into account the complete uncertainty data. State-of-the-art fission yield data and methodologies for fission yield covariance generation were researched in this work. Covariance matrices were generated and compared to the original data stored in the library. Then, we focused on the effect of fission yield covariance information on fission pulse decay heat results for thermal fission of 235 U. Calculations were carried out using different libraries and codes (ACAB and ALEPH-2) after introducing the new covariance values. Results were compared with those obtained with the uncertainty data currently provided by the libraries. The uncertainty quantification was performed first with Monte Carlo sampling and then compared with linear perturbation. Indeed, correlations between fission yields strongly affect the uncertainty of decay heat. Eventually, a sensitivity analysis of fission product yields to fission pulse decay heat was performed in order to provide a full set of the most sensitive nuclides for such a calculation

  19. A Pulse Rate Estimation Algorithm Using PPG and Smartphone Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Sarah Ali; Zhang, Yuan; Feng, Zhiquan; Kos, Anton

    2016-05-01

    The ubiquitous use and advancement in built-in smartphone sensors and the development in big data processing have been beneficial in several fields including healthcare. Among the basic vitals monitoring, pulse rate monitoring is the most important healthcare necessity. A multimedia video stream data acquired by built-in smartphone camera can be used to estimate it. In this paper, an algorithm that uses only smartphone camera as a sensor to estimate pulse rate using PhotoPlethysmograph (PPG) signals is proposed. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm are compared with the actual pulse rate and the maximum error found is 3 beats per minute. The standard deviation in percentage error and percentage accuracy is found to be 0.68 % whereas the average percentage error and percentage accuracy is found to be 1.98 % and 98.02 % respectively.

  20. A program to calculate pulse transmission responses through transversely isotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Zou, Changchun; Chen, Xiwei

    2018-05-01

    We provide a program (AOTI2D) to model responses of ultrasonic pulse transmission measurements through arbitrarily oriented transversely isotropic rocks. The program is built with the distributed point source method that treats the transducers as a series of point sources. The response of each point source is calculated according to the ray-tracing theory of elastic plane waves. The program could offer basic wave parameters including phase and group velocities, polarization, anisotropic reflection coefficients and directivity patterns, and model the wave fields, static wave beam, and the observed signals for pulse transmission measurements considering the material's elastic stiffnesses and orientations, sample dimensions, and the size and positions of the transmitters and the receivers. The program could be applied to exhibit the ultrasonic beam behaviors in anisotropic media, such as the skew and diffraction of ultrasonic beams, and analyze its effect on pulse transmission measurements. The program would be a useful tool to help design the experimental configuration and interpret the results of ultrasonic pulse transmission measurements through either isotropic or transversely isotropic rock samples.

  1. [Calculation and analysis of arc temperature field of pulsed TIG welding based on Fowler-Milne method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao; Hua, Xue-Ming; Wu, Yi-Xiong; Li, Fang

    2012-09-01

    Pulsed TIG welding is widely used in industry due to its superior properties, and the measurement of arc temperature is important to analysis of welding process. The relationship between particle densities of Ar and temperature was calculated based on the theory of spectrum, the relationship between emission coefficient of spectra line at 794.8 nm and temperature was calculated, arc image of spectra line at 794.8 nm was captured by high speed camera, and both the Abel inversion and Fowler-Milne method were used to calculate the temperature distribution of pulsed TIG welding.

  2. Biological effect of pulsed dose rate brachytherapy with stepping sources if short half-times of repair are present in tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, Jack F.; Limbergen, Erik F.M. van

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the possible increase of radiation effect in tissues irradiated by pulsed brachytherapy (PDR) for local tissue dose rates between those 'averaged over the whole pulse' and the instantaneous high dose rates close to the dwell positions. Increased effect is more likely for tissues with short half-times of repair of the order of a few minutes, similar to pulse durations. Methods and Materials: Calculations were done assuming the linear quadratic formula for radiation damage, in which only the dose-squared term is subject to exponential repair. The situation with two components of T (1(2)) is addressed. A constant overall time of 140 h and a constant total dose of 70 Gy were assumed throughout, the continuous low dose rate of 0.5 Gy/h (CLDR) providing the unitary standard effects for each PDR condition. Effects of dose rates ranging from 4 Gy/h to 120 Gy/h (HDR at 2 Gy/min) were studied, covering the gap in an earlier publication. Four schedules were examined: doses per pulse of 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 Gy given at repetition frequencies of 1, 2, 3, and 4 h, respectively, each with a range of assumed half-times of repair of 4 min to 1.5 h. Results are presented for late-responding tissues, the differences from CLDR being two or three times greater than for early-responding tissues and most tumors. Results: Curves are presented relating the ratio of increased biological effect (proportional to log cell kill) calculated for PDR relative to CLDR. Ratios as high as 1.5 can be found for large doses per pulse (2 Gy) if the half-time of repair in tissues is as short as a few minutes. The major influences on effect are dose per pulse, half-time of repair in tissue, and--when T (1(2)) is short--the instantaneous dose rate. Maximum ratios of PDR/CLDR occur when the dose rate is such that pulse duration is approximately equal to T (1(2)) . As dose rate in the pulse is increased, a plateau of effect is reached, for most T (1(2)) s, above 10 to 20 Gy/h, which is

  3. Mechanism and kinetics in reactions of caffeic acid with radicals by pulse radiolysis and calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xifeng; Cai, Zhongli; Katsumura, Yosuke [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab

    2000-03-01

    The interaction of caffeic acid with e{sub aq}{sup -}, (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH) CCH{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}, CO{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -}, H{sup {center_dot}}, {center_dot}OH and N{sub 3}{sup {center_dot}} radicals were studied by {gamma}-, pulse radiolysis and molecular orbital calculation. UV-visible spectra of electron/{center_dot}OH adducts, semi-quinone radicals of caffeic ions, and the stable products from the reactions were derived. The rate constants were determined. The attacked sites and the most favorable structures of the transient radicals were predicted. Reaction mechanisms were proposed. (author)

  4. Measuring Pulse Rate Variability using Long-Range, Non-Contact Imaging Photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-20

    contains color . 14. ABSTRACT Camera-based measurement of the blood volume pulse via non-contact, imaging photoplethysmography is a very popular approach...ECG) for each window were calculated in beats per minute (bpm). The periodogram method with a Hamming window was used to estimate mean pulse...11 Hz. Independent component analysis (ICA) was then used to decompose the normalized, bandpass-filtered, color -channel signals into independent

  5. Analytical modeling of pulse-pileup distortion using the true pulse shape; applications to Fermi-GBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplin, Vandiver; Bhat, Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Pulse-pileup affects most photon counting systems and occurs when photon detections occur faster than the detector's shaping and recovery time. At high input rates, shaped pulses interfere and the source spectrum, as well as intensity information, get distorted. For instruments using bipolar pulse shaping there are two aspects to consider: ‘peak’ and ‘tail’ pileup effects, which raise and lower the measured energy, respectively. Peak effects have been extensively modeled in the past. Tail effects have garnered less attention due to increased complexity. We leverage previous work to derive an accurate, semi-analytical prediction for peak and tail pileup including high order effects. We use the pulse shape of the detectors of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor. The measured spectrum is calculated by expressing exposure time with a state-space expansion of overlapping pileup states and is valid up to very high rates. The model correctly predicts deadtime and pileup losses, and energy-dependent losses due to tail subtraction (sub-threshold) effects. We discuss total losses in terms of the true rate of photon detections versus the recorded count rate. -- Highlights: • A derivation of pulse-pileup spectral and intensity distortion is presented. • Applies to bipolar shaping instruments in general, but is calculated for Fermi-GBM. • Exposure time is partitioned with pulse widths as states of a Poisson process. • Each state has an associated energy distribution function for peak and tail pileup. • The total spectrum is the union of pulse states and their associated spectra

  6. Studies on the Pulse Rate, Pedometer Count and Satisfactoin Degree at Various Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    小原, 史朗

    2004-01-01

    This investigation examined whether free exercise of students became good stimulation of breathing circulation function from relation of pulse rate and pedometer count. And, I examined it on satisfaction degree after exercise. Object person was 432 man students (total of 1391) and 94 woman students (total of 472). As for relation of pulse rate and pedometer count, statistical meaning was recognized by man and women. The exercise that a pulse rate and pedometer count were high together seemed ...

  7. Temporal dynamics of high repetition rate pulsed single longitudinal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ing (GIG) cavity, single-mode dye laser pumped by high repetition rate ... in a high loss cavity, a detailed theoretical study and optimization of cavity ..... rate for high conversion efficiency and longer pulse width of the single-mode dye laser.

  8. High-power pre-chirp managed amplification of femtosecond pulses at high repetition rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Wenxue; Zhao, Jian; Bai, Dongbi; Luo, Daping; Zeng, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond pulses at 250 MHz repetition rate from a mode-locked fiber laser are amplified to high power in a pre-chirp managed amplifier. The experimental strategy offers a potential towards high-power ultrashort laser pulses at high repetition rates. By investigating the laser pulse evolution in the amplification processes, we show that self-similar evolution, finite gain bandwidth and mode instabilities determine pulse characteristics in different regimes. Further average power scaling is limited by the mode instabilities. Nevertheless, this laser system enables us to achieve sub-50 fs pulses with an average power of 93 W. (letter)

  9. Increasing the bit rate in OCDMA systems using pulse position modulation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, Vahid R; Saghari, Poorya; Haghi, Mahta; Ebrahimi, Paniz; Willner, Alan E

    2007-09-17

    We have experimentally demonstrated two novel pulse position modulation techniques, namely Double Pulse Position Modulation (2-PPM) and Differential Pulse Position Modulation (DPPM) in Time-Wavelength OCDMA systems that will operate at a higher bit rate compared to traditional OOK-OCDMA systems with the same bandwidth. With 2-PPM technique, the number of active users will be more than DPPM while their bit rate is almost the same. Both techniques provide variable quality of service in OCDMA networks.

  10. Numerical calculation of spin echo amplitude in pulsed NMR: effects of quadrupole interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobral, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The spin echo obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance, in systems which atomic nuclei interact with magnetic fields and electric field gradients, present oscillations in function of the time interval between two excitations pulses. Using the density matrix formalism, the amplitudes of these echo is calculated, analytically. In this work, echo amplitudes obtained under different excitation conditions for nuclei of different nuclear spin values are calculated. The numerical results are compared with disposable analytical solutions. Applications of this method to the case of electric field gradient without axial symmetry were studied. Within the used approximation limits, an expression for attnuation of oscillatory behaviour of echo amplitude in function of the time interval between experimentally observed pulses was obtained. (M.C.K.) [pt

  11. The impact of pulsed irradiation upon neutron activation calculations for inertial and magnetic fusion energy power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latkowski, J.F.; Sanz, J.; Vujic, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) and magnetic fusion energy (MFE) power plants will probably operate in a pulsed mode. The two different schemes, however, will have quite different time periods. Typical repetition rates for IFE power plants will be 1-5 Hz. MFE power plants will ramp up in current for about 1 hour, shut down for several minutes, and repeat the process. Traditionally, activation calculations for IFE and MFE power plants have assumed continuous operation and used either the ''steady state'' (SS) or ''equivalent steady state'' (ESS) approximations. It has been suggested recently that the SS and ESS methods may not yield accurate results for all radionuclides of interest. The present work expands that of Sisolak, et al. by applying their formulae to conditions which might be experienced in typical IFE and MFE power plants. In addition, complicated, multi-step reaction/decay chains are analyzed using an upgraded version of the ACAB radionuclide generation/depletion code. Our results indicate that the SS method is suitable for application to MFE power plant conditions. We also find that the ESS method generates acceptable results for radionuclides with half-lives more than a factor of three greater than the time between pulses. For components that are subject to 0.05 Hz (or more frequent) irradiation (such as coolant), use of the ESS method is recommended. For components or materials that are subject to less frequent irradiation (such as high-Z target materials), pulsed irradiation calculations should be used

  12. Calculational models for the treatment of pulsed/intermittent activation within fusion energy devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangler, S.E.; Sisolak, J.E.; Henderson, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    Two calculationally efficient methods have been developed to compute the induced radioactivity due to pulsed/intermittent irradiation histories as encountered in both magnetic and inertial fusion energy devices. The numerical algorithms are based on the linear chain method (Bateman Equations) and employ series reduction and matrix algebra. The first method models the case in which the irradiated materials are present throughout a series of irradiation pulses. The second method treats the case where a fixed amount of radioactive and transmuted material is created during each pulse. Analytical solutions are given for each method for a three nuclide linear chain. Numerical results and comparisons are presented for a select number of linear chains. (orig.)

  13. Radiobiological modelling of dose-gradient effects in low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armpilia, C; Dale, R G; Sandilos, P; Vlachos, L

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a generalization of a previously published methodology which quantified the radiobiological consequences of dose-gradient effects in brachytherapy applications. The methodology uses the linear-quadratic (LQ) formulation to identify an equivalent biologically effective dose (BED eq ) which, if applied uniformly to a specified tissue volume, would produce the same net cell survival as that achieved by a given non-uniform brachytherapy application. Multiplying factors (MFs), which enable the equivalent BED for an enclosed volume to be estimated from the BED calculated at the dose reference surface, have been calculated and tabulated for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. The main types of brachytherapy (high dose rate (HDR), low dose rate (LDR) and pulsed (PB)) have been examined for a range of radiobiological parameters/dimensions. Equivalent BEDs are consistently higher than the BEDs calculated at the reference surface by an amount which depends on the treatment prescription (magnitude of the prescribed dose) at the reference point. MFs are closely related to the numerical BED values, irrespective of how the original BED was attained (e.g., via HDR, LDR or PB). Thus, an average MF can be used for a given prescribed BED as it will be largely independent of the assumed radiobiological parameters (radiosensitivity and α/β) and standardized look-up tables may be applicable to all types of brachytherapy treatment. This analysis opens the way to more systematic approaches for correlating physical and biological effects in several types of brachytherapy and for the improved quantitative assessment and ranking of clinical treatments which involve a brachytherapy component

  14. Calculation of anti-seismic design for Xi'an pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuian

    2002-01-01

    The author describes the reactor safety rule, safety regulation and design code that must be observed to anti-seismic design in Xi'an pulsed reactor. It includes the classification of reactor installation, determination of seismic loads, calculate contents, program, method, results and synthetically evaluation. According to the different anti-seismic structure character of reactor installation, an appropriate method was selected to calculate the seismic response. The results were evaluated synthetically using the design code and design requirement. The evaluate results showed that the anti-seismic design function of reactor installation of Xi'an pules reactor is well, and the structure integrality and normal property of reactor installation can be protect under the designed classification of the earthquake

  15. Tank Z-361 dose rate calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    Neutron and gamma ray dose rates were calculated above and around the 6-inch riser of tank Z-361 located at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Dose rates were also determined off of one side of the tank. The largest dose rate 0.029 mrem/h was a gamma ray dose and occurred 76.2 cm (30 in.) directly above the open riser. All other dose rates were negligible. The ANSI/ANS 1991 flux to dose conversion factor for neutrons and photons were used in this analysis. Dose rates are reported in units of mrem/h with the calculated uncertainty shown within the parentheses

  16. Measurement and control of the frequency chirp rate of high-order harmonic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauritsson, J.; Johnsson, P.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Varju, K.; L'Huillier, A.; Kornelis, W.; Biegert, J.; Keller, U.; Gaarde, M.B.; Schafer, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    We measure the chirp rate of harmonics 13 to 23 in argon by cross correlation with a 12 femtosecond probe pulse. Under low ionization conditions, we directly measure the negative chirp due to the atomic dipole phase, and show that an additional chirp on the pump pulse is transferred to the qth harmonic as q times the fundamental chirp. Our results are in accord with simulations using the experimentally measured 815 nm pump and probe pulses. The ability to measure and manipulate the harmonic chirp rate is essential for the characterization and optimization of attosecond pulse trains

  17. The effect of the pulse repetition rate on the fast ionization wave discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bang-Dou; Carbone, Emile; Takashima, Keisuke; Zhu, Xi-Ming; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2018-06-01

    The effect of the pulse repetition rate (PRR) on the generation of high energy electrons in a fast ionization wave (FIW) discharge is investigated by both experiment and modelling. The FIW discharge is driven by nanosecond high voltage pulses and is generated in helium with a pressure of 30 mbar. The axial electric field (E z ), as the driven force of high energy electron generation, is strongly influenced by PRR. Both the measurement and the model show that, during the breakdown, the peak value of E z decreases with the PRR, while after the breakdown, the value of E z increases with the PRR. The electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is calculated with a model similar to Boeuf and Pitchford (1995 Phys. Rev. E 51 1376). It is found that, with a low value of PRR, the EEDF during the breakdown is strongly non-Maxwellian with an elevated high energy tail, while the EEDF after the breakdown is also non-Maxwellian but with a much depleted population of high energy electrons. However, with a high value of PRR, the EEDF is Maxwellian-like without much temporal variation both during and after the breakdown. With the calculated EEDF, the temporal evolution of the population of helium excited species given by the model is in good agreement with the measured optical emission, which also depends critically on the shape of the EEDF.

  18. Reduction of the beam pulse repetition rate of the Hamburg Isochronous Cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, H; Langkau, R; Schirm, N [Hamburg Univ. (F.R. Germany). 1. Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik

    1976-04-01

    A system for the reduction of the beam pulse repetition rate of the energy-variable Hamburg Isochronous Cyclotron comprising beam pulse supression in the cyclotron center and in the external beam is described.

  19. Fluctuation of blood pressure and pulse rate during colostomy irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadahiro, S; Noto, T; Tajima, T; Mitomi, T; Miyazaki, T; Numata, M

    1995-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of colostomy irrigation on the vital signs of patients with left colostomy. Twenty-two consecutive patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection for cancer of the lower rectum and had left lower quadrant end colostomy were included in this study. Subjective symptoms, blood pressure, and pulse rate during the first irrigation were investigated. Fluctuation of blood pressure during instillation was 8.0/8.5 mmHg (average) and 25.0/17.9 mmHg during evacuation. Fluctuation of pulse rate was 5.5 per minute (average) during instillation and 11.5 per minute during evacuation. The number of subjects who showed more than 20% fluctuation of systolic pressure was 12 (54.5 percent) and that of diastolic pressure was 14 (63.6 percent). One of 22 patients complained of illness during irrigation. Although colostomy irrigation showed no significant effects on vital signs in the majority of patients, it caused a significant reduction in both blood pressure and pulse rate in a small number of patients. Careful attention should be paid to vital signs considering the possibility of such effects, especially on the initial irrigation.

  20. Calculation of femtosecond pulse laser induced damage threshold for broadband antireflective microstructure arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xufeng; Shao, Jianda; Zhang, Junchao; Jin, Yunxia; He, Hongbo; Fan, Zhengxiu

    2009-12-21

    In order to more exactly predict femtosecond pulse laser induced damage threshold, an accurate theoretical model taking into account photoionization, avalanche ionization and decay of electrons is proposed by comparing respectively several combined ionization models with the published experimental measurements. In addition, the transmittance property and the near-field distribution of the 'moth eye' broadband antireflective microstructure directly patterned into the substrate material as a function of the surface structure period and groove depth are performed by a rigorous Fourier model method. It is found that the near-field distribution is strongly dependent on the periodicity of surface structure for TE polarization, but for TM wave it is insensitive to the period. What's more, the femtosecond pulse laser damage threshold of the surface microstructure on the pulse duration taking into account the local maximum electric field enhancement was calculated using the proposed relatively accurate theoretical ionization model. For the longer incident wavelength of 1064 nm, the weak linear damage threshold on the pulse duration is shown, but there is a surprising oscillation peak of breakdown threshold as a function of the pulse duration for the shorter incident wavelength of 532 nm.

  1. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy (PDR): an analysis of the technique at 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thienpont, M [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Van Eijkeren, M; Van Hecke, H; Boterberg, T; De Neve, W

    1995-12-01

    A total of 154 applications was analysed using a pulsed dose brachytherapy technique for 138 patients over a 2 year period with emphasis on technical aspects influencing the overall treatment time. Vaginal ovoids were used in 59 cases, plastic tubes in 52, a Fletcher-type in 18, vaginal cylinders in 14 and a perineal template in 11 cases. Pulses were given at hourly intervals with a median dose rate of 0.6 Gy per pulse (range 0.4 to 3 Gy). The number of pulses per application varied from 3 to 134 (median 32). The number of dwell positions varied from 1 to 542 over 1 to 18 catheters. Patient related problems were few. The room was entered almost every 77 minutes. We noted 561 status codes in 147 applications. Of the 25 different codes, the most frequent one was due to the door left open when a pulse had to be given (35%) or due to constriction of the plastic catheters at the transfer tube junction (26%). However, the median total treatment time was increased by only 5 minutes. With pulsed dose rate brachytherapy at hourly pulses we can treat our patients within the planned time despite frequent room entrance and occurrence of an appreciable number of status codes. This technique seems to fulfill its promise to replace low dose rate brachytherapy.

  2. Calculating graduation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starck, Patricia L; Love, Karen; McPherson, Robert

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the focus has been on increasing the number of registered nurse (RN) graduates. Numerous states have initiated programs to increase the number and quality of students entering nursing programs, and to expand the capacity of their programs to enroll additional qualified students. However, little attention has been focused on an equally, if not more, effective method for increasing the number of RNs produced-increasing the graduation rate of students enrolling. This article describes a project that undertook the task of compiling graduation data for 15 entry-level programs, standardizing terms and calculations for compiling the data, and producing a regional report on graduation rates of RN students overall and by type of program. Methodology is outlined in this article. This effort produced results that were surprising to program deans and directors and is expected to produce greater collaborative efforts to improve these rates both locally and statewide.

  3. Development of a Pulse Oximeter Using MSP430 Microcontroller

    OpenAIRE

    Gayathri.R; Hepsiba.D

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,we propose and demonstrate the design of a Pulse Oximeter using MSP430FG439 Microcontroller.The Oxygen Saturation and Heart Rate are the two important key parameters for health monitoring of a patients.The proposed system consists of spo₂ Sensor,MSP430FG439 Pulse Oximeter board With LCD Display,PC.The oxygen saturation is calculated by measuring the ratio between the intensities of two different lights.The heart rate is calculated by measuring the elapsed time between the peaks ...

  4. Investigation of component failure rates for pulsed versus steady state tokamak operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1992-07-01

    This report presents component failure rate data sources applicable to magnetic fusion systems, and defines multiplicative factors to adjust these data for specific use on magnetic fusion experiment designs. The multipliers address both long pulse and steady state tokamak operation. Thermal fatigue and radiation damage are among the leading reasons for large multiplier values in pulsed operation applications. Field failure rate values for graphite protective tiles are presented, and beryllium tile failure rates in laboratory testing are also given. All of these data can be used for reliability studies, safety analyses, design tradeoff studies, and risk assessments

  5. Transition to Pulse-Like Rupture, With and Without Inclusion of Evolving Temperature and Pore Pressure, When Accounting for Extreme Weakening at High Slip Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, H.; Dunham, E. M.; Rice, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    We have conducted rupture propagation simulations incorporating the combined effects of thermal pressurization of pore fluid by distributed heating within a finite width shear zone, and flash heating of microscopic contacts. These are probably the primary weakening mechanisms at high coseismic slip rates. For flash heating, we use a rate- and state-dependent friction law in the slip law formulation, accounting for extreme velocity weakening above a weakening slip rate Vw ~ 0.1 m/s that depends on the background temperature, and a very short state evolution distance, L, of ~ 10 μm, which is comparable to the asperity length. We have also conducted a series of calculations with neglecting evolving change in macroscopic temperature, T, and pore pressure, p, and compared the results. Slip rate, V, at a point on a fault increases when a rupture front approaches, and decreases behind it. In the pulse-like solutions, V decreases below Vw, and the point is eventually locked. On the other hand, in the crack-like solutions, V increases again only if we allow evolving change in T and p. In the cases when we neglect changes in T and p, V continues to decrease behind the rupture front as long as we simulate. Here, a question emerges; is the solution crack-like because of the short calculation time? Zheng and Rice [1998] proposed an intuitive criterion between crack-like and pulse-like solutions as follows: If and only if the background shear stress, τb, is larger than a critical value, τpulse, there are roots of τss(V) = τb - μ V/2 cs, where τss is steady-state strength, μ is shear modulus and cs is shear speed. If TZR = - (μ/2cs)/(dτss/dV) at the largest root is near unity, the solution is pulse-like. Our calculations without T and p changes show that the pulse-like solution regime extends above τpulse, at least up to the point where TZR = 0.176, if a rupture is initiated by a perturbation in shear stress in a certain manner. The transition time to pulse

  6. Pulsed laser deposition of SrRuO3 thin-films: The role of the pulse repetition rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Schraknepper

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available SrRuO3 thin-films were deposited with different pulse repetition rates, fdep, epitaxially on vicinal SrTiO3 substrates by means of pulsed laser deposition. The measurement of several physical properties (e.g., composition by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the out-of-plane lattice parameter, the electric conductivity, and the Curie temperature consistently reveals that an increase in laser repetition rate results in an increase in ruthenium deficiency in the films. By the same token, it is shown that when using low repetition rates, approaching a nearly stoichiometric cation ratio in SrRuO3 becomes feasible. Based on these results, we propose a mechanism to explain the widely observed Ru deficiency of SrRuO3 thin-films. Our findings demand these theoretical considerations to be based on kinetic rather than widely employed thermodynamic arguments.

  7. Calculating the Rate of Senescence From Mortality Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, Jacob J E; Rozing, Maarten P; Kramer, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    , they do not fit mortality rates at young and old ages. Therefore, we developed a method to calculate senescence rates from the acceleration of mortality directly without modeling the mortality rates. We applied the different methods to age group-specific mortality data from the European Renal Association......, the rate of senescence can be calculated directly from non-modeled mortality rates, overcoming the disadvantages of an indirect estimation based on modeled mortality rates....

  8. A simple sub-nanosecond ultraviolet light pulse generator with high repetition rate and peak power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, P H; Trong, V D; Renucci, P; Marie, X

    2013-08-01

    We present a simple ultraviolet sub-nanosecond pulse generator using commercial ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with peak emission wavelengths of 290 nm, 318 nm, 338 nm, and 405 nm. The generator is based on step recovery diode, short-circuited transmission line, and current-shaping circuit. The narrowest pulses achieved have 630 ps full width at half maximum at repetition rate of 80 MHz. Optical pulse power in the range of several hundreds of microwatts depends on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage dependences of the output optical pulse width and peak power are analysed and discussed. Compared to commercial UV sub-nanosecond generators, the proposed generator can produce much higher pulse repetition rate and peak power.

  9. Reaction rate calculations via transmission coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feit, M.D.; Alder, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    The transmission coefficient of a wavepacket traversing a potential barrier can be determined by steady state calculations carried out in imaginary time instead of by real time dynamical calculations. The general argument is verified for the Eckart barrier potential by a comparison of transmission coefficients calculated from real and imaginary time solutions of the Schroedinger equation. The correspondence demonstrated here allows a formulation for the reaction rate that avoids difficulties due to both rare events and explicitly time dependent calculations. 5 refs., 2 figs

  10. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA- booster subcritical assembly Part II: pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, M.Y.A.; Rabiti, C.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology for characterizing the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly using the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the analytical and experimental time dependent reaction rates and the reactivity measurements. In this methodology, the reaction rate, detector response, is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the fission delayed neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The new calculation methodology has shown an excellent agreement with the experimental results available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. The facility has been driven by a Deuterium-Deuterium or Deuterium-Tritium pulsed neutron source and the (n,p) reaction rate has been experimentally measured by a 3 He detector. The MCNP calculation has utilized the weight window and delayed neutron biasing variance reduction techniques since the detector volume is small compared to the assembly volume. Finally, this methodology was used to calculate the IAEA benchmark of the YALINA-Booster experiment

  11. A novel method of calculating the energy deposition curve of nanosecond pulsed surface dielectric barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Kun; Wang, Xinying; Lu, Jiayu; Cui, Quansheng; Pang, Lei; Di, Dongxu; Zhang, Qiaogen

    2015-01-01

    To obtain the energy deposition curve is very important in the fields to which nanosecond pulse dielectric barrier discharges (NPDBDs) are applied. It helps the understanding of the discharge physics and fast gas heating. In this paper, an equivalent circuit model, composed of three capacitances, is introduced and a method of calculating the energy deposition curve is proposed for a nanosecond pulse surface dielectric barrier discharge (NPSDBD) plasma actuator. The capacitance C d and the energy deposition curve E R are determined by mathematically proving that the mapping from C d to E R is bijective and numerically searching one C d that satisfies the requirement for E R to be a monotonically non-decreasing function. It is found that the value of capacitance C d varies with the amplitude of applied pulse voltage due to the change of discharge area and is dependent on the polarity of applied voltage. The bijectiveness of the mapping from C d to E R in nanosecond pulse volumetric dielectric barrier discharge (NPVDBD) is demonstrated and the feasibility of the application of the new method to NPVDBD is validated. This preliminarily shows a high possibility of developing a unified approach to calculate the energy deposition curve in NPDBD. (paper)

  12. Validation of the Nonin 8600V Pulse Oximeter for heart rate and oxygen saturation measurements in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Susan L; An, Dowon; Glenny, Robb W

    2004-05-01

    This report validates the use and limitations of the Nonin Pulse Oximeter for measuring heart rate and oxygen saturation in rats. Eight anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were intubated and catheterized. Oxygen saturation was directly measured from arterial blood by using a Radiometer OSM3 Hemoximeter adjusted for rat blood as well as indirectly by using the Nonin Pulse Oximeter. Oxygen saturation was changed by varying the level of inhaled oxygen. Heart rate was measured in two ways: 1) by using the signal from the Nonin Pulse Oximeter and 2) by counting the pressure pulses from the transduced blood pressure. There was excellent agreement between heart rate values measured by the Nonin Pulse Oximeter and that measured by counting the pulses from the arterial blood pressure recording. The Nonin Pulse Oximeter underestimated oxygen saturations by about 3% to 5% compared to the Hemoximeter. Overall, the pulse oximeter reflected important trends in oxygen saturations, making it a useful tool for laboratory animal medicine.

  13. Pen harvester for powering a pulse rate sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedekar, Vishwas; Oliver, Josiah; Priya, Shashank

    2009-01-01

    Rapid developments in the area of micro-sensors for various applications such as structural health monitoring, bio-chemical sensors and pressure sensors have increased the demand for portable, low cost, high efficiency energy harvesting devices. In this paper, we describe the scheme for powering a pulse rate sensor with a vibration energy harvester integrated inside a pen commonly carried by humans in the pocket close to the heart. Electromagnetic energy harvesting was selected in order to achieve high power at lower frequencies. The prototype pen harvester was found to generate 3 mW at 5 Hz and 1 mW at 3.5 Hz operating under displacement amplitude of 16 mm (corresponding to an acceleration of approximately 1.14 g rms at 5 Hz and 0.56 g rms at 3.5 Hz, respectively). A comprehensive mathematical modelling and simulations were performed in order to optimize the performance of the vibration energy harvester. The integrated pen harvester prototype was found to generate continuous power of 0.46-0.66 mW under normal human actions such as jogging and jumping which is enough for a small scale pulse rate sensor.

  14. Dose rate calculations for a reconnaissance vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindrod, L.; Mackey, J.; Salmon, M.; Smith, C.; Wall, S.

    2005-01-01

    A Chemical Nuclear Reconnaissance System (CNRS) has been developed by the British Ministry of Defence to make chemical and radiation measurements on contaminated terrain using appropriate sensors and recording equipment installed in a land rover. A research programme is under way to develop and validate a predictive capability to calculate the build-up of contamination on the vehicle, radiation detector performance and dose rates to the occupants of the vehicle. This paper describes the geometric model of the vehicle and the methodology used for calculations of detector response. Calculated dose rates obtained using the MCBEND Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code in adjoint mode are presented. These address the transient response of the detectors as the vehicle passes through a contaminated area. Calculated dose rates were found to agree with the measured data to be within the experimental uncertainties, thus giving confidence in the shielding model of the vehicle and its application to other scenarios. (authors)

  15. Assessing the reliability of calculated catalytic ammonia synthesis rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medford, Andrew James; Wellendorff, Jess; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a general method for estimating the uncertainty in calculated materials properties based on density functional theory calculations. We illustrate the approach for a calculation of the catalytic rate of ammonia synthesis over a range of transition-metal catalysts. The correlation...... between errors in density functional theory calculations is shown to play an important role in reducing the predicted error on calculated rates. Uncertainties depend strongly on reaction conditions and catalyst material, and the relative rates between different catalysts are considerably better described...

  16. Soft error rate analysis methodology of multi-Pulse-single-event transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Bin; Huo Mingxue; Xiao Liyi

    2012-01-01

    As transistor feature size scales down, soft errors in combinational logic because of high-energy particle radiation is gaining more and more concerns. In this paper, a combinational logic soft error analysis methodology considering multi-pulse-single-event transients (MPSETs) and re-convergence with multi transient pulses is proposed. In the proposed approach, the voltage pulse produced at the standard cell output is approximated by a triangle waveform, and characterized by three parameters: pulse width, the transition time of the first edge, and the transition time of the second edge. As for the pulse with the amplitude being smaller than the supply voltage, the edge extension technique is proposed. Moreover, an efficient electrical masking model comprehensively considering transition time, delay, width and amplitude is proposed, and an approach using the transition times of two edges and pulse width to compute the amplitude of pulse is proposed. Finally, our proposed firstly-independently-propagating-secondly-mutually-interacting (FIP-SMI) is used to deal with more practical re-convergence gate with multi transient pulses. As for MPSETs, a random generation model of MPSETs is exploratively proposed. Compared to the estimates obtained using circuit level simulations by HSpice, our proposed soft error rate analysis algorithm has 10% errors in SER estimation with speed up of 300 when the single-pulse-single-event transient (SPSET) is considered. We have also demonstrated the runtime and SER decrease with the increment of P0 using designs from the ISCAS-85 benchmarks. (authors)

  17. Updates to In-Line Calculation of Photolysis Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    How photolysis rates are calculated affects ozone and aerosol concentrations predicted by the CMAQ model and the model?s run-time. The standard configuration of CMAQ uses the inline option that calculates photolysis rates by solving the radiative transfer equation for the needed ...

  18. 49 CFR 1141.1 - Procedures to calculate interest rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the portion of the year covered by the interest rate. A simple multiplication of the nominal rate by... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures to calculate interest rates. 1141.1... TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE PROCEDURES TO CALCULATE INTEREST RATES...

  19. A 7.8 kV nanosecond pulse generator with a 500 Hz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M.; Liao, H.; Liu, M.; Zhu, G.; Yang, Z.; Shi, P.; Lu, Q.; Sun, X.

    2018-04-01

    Pseudospark switches are widely used in pulsed power applications. In this paper, we present the design and performance of a 500 Hz repetition rate high-voltage pulse generator to drive TDI-series pseudospark switches. A high-voltage pulse is produced by discharging an 8 μF capacitor through a primary windings of a setup isolation transformer using a single metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) as a control switch. In addition, a self-break spark gap is used to steepen the pulse front. The pulse generator can deliver a high-voltage pulse with a peak trigger voltage of 7.8 kV, a peak trigger current of 63 A, a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ~30 ns, and a rise time of 5 ns to the trigger pin of the pseudospark switch. During burst mode operation, the generator achieved up to a 500 Hz repetition rate. Meanwhile, we also provide an AC heater power circuit for heating a H2 reservoir. This pulse generator can be used in circuits with TDI-series pseudospark switches with either a grounded cathode or with a cathode electrically floating operation. The details of the circuits and their implementation are described in the paper.

  20. The rating reliability calculator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon David J

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rating scales form an important means of gathering evaluation data. Since important decisions are often based on these evaluations, determining the reliability of rating data can be critical. Most commonly used methods of estimating reliability require a complete set of ratings i.e. every subject being rated must be rated by each judge. Over fifty years ago Ebel described an algorithm for estimating the reliability of ratings based on incomplete data. While his article has been widely cited over the years, software based on the algorithm is not readily available. This paper describes an easy-to-use Web-based utility for estimating the reliability of ratings based on incomplete data using Ebel's algorithm. Methods The program is available public use on our server and the source code is freely available under GNU General Public License. The utility is written in PHP, a common open source imbedded scripting language. The rating data can be entered in a convenient format on the user's personal computer that the program will upload to the server for calculating the reliability and other statistics describing the ratings. Results When the program is run it displays the reliability, number of subject rated, harmonic mean number of judges rating each subject, the mean and standard deviation of the averaged ratings per subject. The program also displays the mean, standard deviation and number of ratings for each subject rated. Additionally the program will estimate the reliability of an average of a number of ratings for each subject via the Spearman-Brown prophecy formula. Conclusion This simple web-based program provides a convenient means of estimating the reliability of rating data without the need to conduct special studies in order to provide complete rating data. I would welcome other researchers revising and enhancing the program.

  1. Evaluation of safety ratings of roads based on frontal crashes with known crash pulse and injury outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigson, H

    2009-06-01

    The objective in this study, using data from crashed cars fitted with on-board crash pulse recorders, was to present differences in average crash severity, distribution of crash severity, and injury outcomes, based on an independent safety rating of roads, also taking road type and speed limit into consideration. Furthermore, the objective was to evaluate differences in injury risk, based on the distribution of crash severity. The investigation included both frontal two-vehicle crashes and single-vehicle crashes with known injury outcome. In total, 209 real-world crashes involving cars fitted with crash pulse recorders were included. For all crashes, average mean acceleration and change of velocity of the vehicle acceleration pulse were measured and calculated. All crash spots were classified according to an independent road safety rating program (European Road Assessment Programme Road Protection Score), where the safety quality of roads is rated in relation to posted speed limits. The crash severity and injury outcome in crashes that occurred on roads with good safety ratings were compared with crashes on roads with poor safety ratings. The data were also divided into subcategories according to posted speed limit and road type, to evaluate whether there was a difference in crash severity and injury outcome within the categories. In total, crash severity was statistically significantly lower in crashes occurring on roads with good safety ratings than in crashes occurring on roads with poor safety ratings. It was found that crash severity and injury risk were lower on roads with good safety ratings with a speed limit of above 90 km/h compared with roads with poor safety ratings, irrespective of speed limit. On the other hand, crash severity was higher on roads with good safety ratings with speed limit of 70 km/h than on roads with poor safety ratings with the same speed limit. Though it was found that a higher speed limit resulted in higher crash severity on roads

  2. Chemical exchange effects during refocusing pulses in constant-time CPMG relaxation dispersion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myint, Wazo; Ishima, Rieko

    2009-01-01

    In the analysis of the constant-time Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CT-CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiment, chemical exchange parameters, such as rate of exchange and population of the exchanging species, are typically optimized using equations that predict experimental relaxation rates recorded as a function of effective field strength. In this process, the effect of chemical exchange during the CPMG pulses is typically assumed to be the same as during the free-precession. This approximation may introduce systematic errors into the analysis of data because the number of CPMG pulses is incremented during the constant-time relaxation period, and the total pulse duration therefore varies as a function of the effective field strength. In order to estimate the size of such errors, we simulate the time-dependence of magnetization during the entire constant time period, explicitly taking into account the effect of the CPMG pulses on the spin relaxation rate. We show that in general the difference in the relaxation dispersion profile calculated using a practical pulse width from that calculated using an extremely short pulse width is small, but under certain circumstances can exceed 1 s -1 . The difference increases significantly when CPMG pulses are miscalibrated

  3. A Technique for Temperature and Ultimate Load Calculations of Thin Targets in a Pulsed Electron Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen-Walther; Lundsager, Per

    1979-01-01

    A technique is presented for the calculation of transient temperature distributions and ultimate load of rotationally symmetric thin membranes with uniform lateral load and exposed to a pulsed electron beam from a linear accelerator. Heat transfer by conduction is considered the only transfer...... mechanism. The ultimate load is calculated on the basis of large plastic strain analysis. Analysis of one aluminum and one titanium membrane is shown....

  4. Fair and Reasonable Rate Calculation Data -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This dataset provides guidelines for calculating the fair and reasonable rates for U.S. flag vessels carrying preference cargoes subject to regulations contained at...

  5. Bit rate and pulse width dependence of four-wave mixing of short optical pulses in semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diez, S.; Mecozzi, A.; Mørk, Jesper

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the saturation properties of four-wave mixing of short optical pulses in a semiconductor optical amplifier. By varying the gain of the optical amplifier, we find a strong dependence of both conversion efficiency and signal-to-background ratio on pulse width and bit rate....... In particular, the signal-to-background ratio can be optimized for a specific amplifier gain. This behavior, which is coherently described in experiment and theory, is attributed to the dynamics of the amplified spontaneous emission, which is the main source of noise in a semiconductor optical amplifier....

  6. An optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for seeding high repetition rate free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Höppner, H; Hage, A; Tanikawa, T; Schulz, M; Faatz, B; Riedel, R; Prandolini, M J; Teubner, U; Tavella, F

    2015-01-01

    High repetition rate free-electron lasers (FEL), producing highly intense extreme ultraviolet and x-ray pulses, require new high power tunable femtosecond lasers for FEL seeding and FEL pump-probe experiments. A tunable, 112 W (burst mode) optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) is demonstrated with center frequencies ranging from 720–900 nm, pulse energies up to 1.12 mJ and a pulse duration of 30 fs at a repetition rate of 100 kHz. Since the power scalability of this OPCPA is limited by the OPCPA-pump amplifier, we also demonstrate a 6.7–13.7 kW (burst mode) thin-disk OPCPA-pump amplifier, increasing the possible OPCPA output power to many hundreds of watts. Furthermore, third and fourth harmonic generation experiments are performed and the results are used to simulate a seeded FEL with high-gain harmonic generation. (paper)

  7. High-energy, high-repetition-rate picosecond pulses from a quasi-CW diode-pumped Nd:YAG system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noom, Daniel W E; Witte, Stefan; Morgenweg, Jonas; Altmann, Robert K; Eikema, Kjeld S E

    2013-08-15

    We report on a high-power quasi-CW pumped Nd:YAG laser system, producing 130 mJ, 64 ps pulses at 1064 nm wavelength with a repetition rate of 300 Hz. Pulses from a Nd:YVO(4) oscillator are first amplified by a regenerative amplifier to the millijoule level and then further amplified in quasi-CW diode-pumped Nd:YAG modules. Pulsed diode pumping enables a high gain at repetition rates of several hundred hertz, while keeping thermal effects manageable. Birefringence compensation and multiple thermal-lensing-compensated relay-imaging stages are used to maintain a top-hat beam profile. After frequency doubling, 75 mJ pulses are obtained at 532 nm. The intensity stability is better than 1.1%, which makes this laser an attractive pump source for a high-repetition-rate optical parametric amplification system.

  8. Spall damage of a mild carbon steel: Effects of peak stress, strain rate and pulse duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.; Li, B.; Huang, J.Y.; Ma, H.H.; Zhu, M.H.; Zhu, J.; Luo, S.N.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate spall damage of a mild carbon steel under high strain-rate loading, regarding the effects of peak stress, strain rate, and pulse duration on spall strength and damage, as well as related microstructure features, using gas gun plate impact, laser velocimetry, and electron backscatter diffraction analysis. Our experiments demonstrate strong dependences of spall strength on peak stress and strain rate, and its weak dependence on pulse duration. We establish numerical relations between damage and peak stress or pulse duration. Brittle and ductile spall fracture modes are observed at different loading conditions. Damage nucleates at grain boundaries and triple junctions, either as transgranular cleavage cracks or voids.

  9. Spall damage of a mild carbon steel: Effects of peak stress, strain rate and pulse duration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Li, B.; Huang, J.Y. [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Ma, H.H. [CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Zhu, M.H. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Zhu, J., E-mail: zhujun01@163.com [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Luo, S.N., E-mail: sluo@pims.ac.cn [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)

    2016-04-13

    We investigate spall damage of a mild carbon steel under high strain-rate loading, regarding the effects of peak stress, strain rate, and pulse duration on spall strength and damage, as well as related microstructure features, using gas gun plate impact, laser velocimetry, and electron backscatter diffraction analysis. Our experiments demonstrate strong dependences of spall strength on peak stress and strain rate, and its weak dependence on pulse duration. We establish numerical relations between damage and peak stress or pulse duration. Brittle and ductile spall fracture modes are observed at different loading conditions. Damage nucleates at grain boundaries and triple junctions, either as transgranular cleavage cracks or voids.

  10. Absorption of subcutaneously infused insulin: influence of the basal rate pulse interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, P; Birch, K; Jensen, B M; Kühl, C; Brange, J

    1985-01-01

    Eight insulin-dependent diabetic patients were given two constant infusions (each 1 IU/h) of 125I-labeled insulin into the abdominal subcutaneous tissue for about 12 h. Insulin was infused in pulses into one side of the abdomen in 6-min intervals (by means of an Auto-Syringe pump) and in the other side of the abdomen, insulin was infused in 1-h intervals (by means of a Medix pump). The size of the subcutaneous depots was continuously measured by counting the radioactivity at the infusion sites. After starting the infusions, the two depots were built up to steady-state levels at the same time and of the same size (approximately 3 IU) and with similar absorption rates. Thus, during basal rate insulin infusion, identical insulin absorption kinetics was achieved, irrespective of a 10-fold difference in the pulse rate.

  11. Pulse and integral optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Similarities and dissimilarities to thermoluminescence (TL) dose dependence and dose-rate effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, R.; Leung, P.L.

    2000-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (Tl) are two possible methods to monitor the absorbed radiation in solid samples, and therefore are utilized for dosimetry. For this application, two properties are desirable, namely, linear dose dependence of the measured quantity and dose-rate independence. For Tl, different kinds of super linear dose dependence have been reported in the literature in different materials, and in some cases, dose-rate dependence has also been found. These have been explained as being the result of competition. In OSL, some recent works reported on super linear dose dependence in annealed samples. In the present work, we explain the possible occurrence of these phenomena in OSL by solving numerically the relevant rate equations governing the process during irradiation, relaxation and read-out (heating or light stimulation). The results show that for short pulse OSL, quadratic dose dependence can be expected when only one trapping state and one kind of recombination center are involved and when the excitation starts with empty traps and centers. With the short pulse OSL, the calculation also reveals a possible dose-rate effect. Under the same circumstances, the area under the OSL curve depends linearly on the dose. The dependence of the whole area under the OSL curve on the dose is shown to be super linear when a disconnected trapping state or radiationless center take part in the process. Also, dose-rate effect can be expected in these cases, although no experimental effect of this sort has been reported so far. In pulse OSL, the analogy is made between the measured intensity and the initial rise range of non-first order Tl, whereas for the total area OSL, there is a nearly full analogy with the dose behavior of the Tl maximum. (Author)

  12. Study on Frequency Dependency of ON-Resistance and Pulse-Loss Calculation of MOSFETs for Switch Mode Power Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Hideho; Sato, Ryohei; Iwata, Yoshiharu

    Global efforts toward energy conservation, increasing data centers, and the increasing use of IT equipments are leading to a demand in reduced power consumption of equipments, and power efficiency improvement of power supply units is becoming a necessity. MOSFETs are widely used for their low ON-resistances. Power efficiency is designed using time-domain circuit simulators, except for transformer copper-loss, which has frequency dependency which is calculated separately using methods based on skin and proximity effects. As semiconductor technology reduces the ON-resistance of MOSFETs, frequency dependency due to the skin effect or proximity effect is anticipated. In this study, ON-resistance of MOSFETs are measured and frequency dependency is confirmed. Power loss against rectangular current pulse is calculated. The calculation method for transformer copper-loss is expanded to MOSFETs. A frequency function for the resistance model is newly developed and parametric calculation is enabled. Acceleration of calculation is enabled by eliminating summation terms. Using this method, it is shown that the frequency dependent component of the measured MOSFETs increases the dissipation from 11% to 32% at a switching frequency of 100kHz. From above, this paper points out the importance of the frequency dependency of MOSFETs' ON-resistance, provides means of calculating its pulse losses, and improves loss calculation accuracy of SMPSs.

  13. Radiobiological responses for two cell lines following continuous low dose-rate (CLDR) and pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanisch, Per Henrik; Furre, Torbjoern; Olsen, Dag Rune; Pettersen, Erik O.

    2007-01-01

    The iso-effective irradiation of continuous low-dose-rate (CLDR) irradiation was compared with that of various schedules of pulsed dose rate (PDR) irradiation for cells of two established human lines, T-47D and NHIK 3025. Complete single-dose response curves were obtained for determination of parameters α and β by fitting of the linear quadratic formula. Sublethal damage repair constants μ and T 1/2 were determined by split-dose recovery experiments. On basis of the acquired parameters of each cell type the relative effectiveness of the two regimens of irradiation (CLDR and PDR) was calculated by use of Fowler's radiobiological model for iso-effect irradiation for repeated fractions of dose delivered at medium dose rates. For both cell types the predicted and observed relative effectiveness was compared at low and high iso-effect levels. The results indicate that the effect of PDR irradiation predicted by Fowler's model is equal to that of CLDR irradiation for both small and large doses with T-47D cells. With NHIK 3025 cells PDR irradiation induces a larger effect than predicted by the model for small doses, while it induces the predicted effect for high doses. The underlying cause of this difference is unclear, but cell-cycle parameters, like G2-accumulation is tested and found to be the same for the two cell lines

  14. Accumulation effects in modulation spectroscopy with high-repetition-rate pulses: Recursive solution of optical Bloch equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, Vladimir Al.; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2017-10-01

    Application of the phase-modulated pulsed light for advance spectroscopic measurements is the area of growing interest. The phase modulation of the light causes modulation of the signal. Separation of the spectral components of the modulations allows to distinguish the contributions of various interaction pathways. The lasers with high repetition rate used in such experiments can lead to appearance of the accumulation effects, which become especially pronounced in systems with long-living excited states. Recently it was shown that such accumulation effects can be used to evaluate parameters of the dynamical processes in the material. In this work we demonstrate that the accumulation effects are also important in the quantum characteristics measurements provided by modulation spectroscopy. In particular, we consider a model of quantum two-level system driven by a train of phase-modulated light pulses, organized in analogy with the two-dimensional spectroscopy experiments. We evaluate the harmonics' amplitudes in the fluorescent signal and calculate corrections appearing from the accumulation effects. We show that the corrections can be significant and have to be taken into account at analysis of experimental data.

  15. Use of a prototype pulse oximeter for time series analysis of heart rate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Erika; López, Jehú; Hautefeuille, Mathieu; Velázquez, Víctor; Del Moral, Jésica

    2015-05-01

    This work presents the development of a low cost pulse oximeter prototype consisting of pulsed red and infrared commercial LEDs and a broad spectral photodetector used to register time series of heart rate and oxygen saturation of blood. This platform, besides providing these values, like any other pulse oximeter, processes the signals to compute a power spectrum analysis of the patient heart rate variability in real time and, additionally, the device allows access to all raw and analyzed data if databases construction is required or another kind of further analysis is desired. Since the prototype is capable of acquiring data for long periods of time, it is suitable for collecting data in real life activities, enabling the development of future wearable applications.

  16. Impact ionisation rate calculations in wide band gap semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, D.

    1998-09-01

    Calculations of band-to-band impact ionisation rates performed in the semi-classical Fermi's Golden Rule approximation are presented here for the semiconductors GaAs, In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As and Si 0.5 Ge 0.5 at 300K. The crystal band structure is calculated using the empirical pseudopotential method. To increase the speed with which band structure data at arbitrary k-vectors can be obtained, an interpolation scheme has been developed. Energies are quadratically interpolated on adapted meshes designed to ensure accuracy is uniform throughout the Brillouin zone, and pseudowavefunctions are quadratically interpolated on a regular mesh. Matrix elements are calculated from the pseudowavefunctions, and include the terms commonly neglected in calculations for narrow band gap materials and an isotropic approximation to the full wavevector and frequency dependent dielectric function. The numerical integration of the rate over all distinct energy and wavevector conserving transitions is performed using two different algorithms. Results from each are compared and found to be in good agreement, indicating that the algorithms are reliable. The rates for electrons and holes in each material are calculated as functions of the k-vector of the impacting carriers, and found to be highly anisotropic. Average rates for impacting carriers at a given energy are calculated and fitted to Keldysh-type expressions with higher than quadratic dependence of the rate on energy above threshold being obtained in all cases. The average rates calculated here are compared to results obtained by other workers, with reasonable agreement being obtained for GaAs, and poorer agreement obtained for InGaAs and SiGe. Possible reasons for the disagreement are investigated. The impact ionisation thresholds are examined and k-space and energy distributions of generated carriers are determined. The role of threshold anisotropy, variation in the matrix elements and the shape of the bands in determining

  17. Organization of pulse-height analysis programs for high event rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, C E [Argonne National Lab., Ill. (USA)

    1976-09-01

    The ability of a pulse-height analysis program to handle high event rates can be enhanced by organizing it so as to minimize the time spent in interrupt housekeeping. Specifically, the routine that services the data-ready interrupt from the ADC should test whether another event is ready before performing the interrupt return.

  18. Research on the Transient Characteristics of Microgrid with Pulsed Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianke Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike traditional load, pulsed load typically features small average power and large peak power. In this paper, the mathematic models of microgrid consisting of synchronous generator and pulsed load are established. Average Magnitude Difference Compensate Function (AMDCF is proposed to calculate the frequency of synchronous generator, and, based on AMDCF, relative deviation rate (RDR which characterizes the impact of pulsed load on the AC side of grid is firstly defined and this paper describes calculation process in detail. Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT is used as DC switch to control the on/off state of resistive load for simulating pulsed load, the period and duty-cycle of the pulsed load are simulated by setting the gate signal of IGBT, and the peak power of the pulsed load is simulated by setting the resistance. The system dynamic characteristics under pulsed load are analyzed in detail, and the influence of duty-cycle, period, peak power, and filter capacitance of the pulsed load on system dynamic indicators is studied and validated experimentally.

  19. Fluorescence decay data analysis correcting for detector pulse pile-up at very high count rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patting, Matthias; Reisch, Paja; Sackrow, Marcus; Dowler, Rhys; Koenig, Marcelle; Wahl, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Using time-correlated single photon counting for the purpose of fluorescence lifetime measurements is usually limited in speed due to pile-up. With modern instrumentation, this limitation can be lifted significantly, but some artifacts due to frequent merging of closely spaced detector pulses (detector pulse pile-up) remain an issue to be addressed. We propose a data analysis method correcting for this type of artifact and the resulting systematic errors. It physically models the photon losses due to detector pulse pile-up and incorporates the loss in the decay fit model employed to obtain fluorescence lifetimes and relative amplitudes of the decay components. Comparison of results with and without this correction shows a significant reduction of systematic errors at count rates approaching the excitation rate. This allows quantitatively accurate fluorescence lifetime imaging at very high frame rates.

  20. Thirty-six pulse rectifier scheme based on zigzag auto-connected transformer

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Qiang Chen; Chun-Ling Hao; Hao Qiu; Min Li

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a low kilo-volt-ampere rating zigzag connected autotransformer based 36-pulse rectifier system supplying vector controlled induction motor drives (VCIMD) is designed, modeled and simulated. Detailed design procedure and magnetic rating calculation of the proposed autotransformer and interphase reactor is studied. Moreover, the design process of the autotransformer is modified to make it suitable for retrofit applications. Simulation results confirm that the proposed 36-pulse re...

  1. Development of electronic tattoo for pulse rate monitoring: Materials perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Shilpa Vikas; Sonavane, S. S.

    2018-05-01

    In India, there is a growing concern of the heart diseases and deaths due to heart failure. The severity of the problem can be minimised by efficient heart rate monitoring which can be used to provide before time caution to cater heart attack. Wearable sensor can be designed to sense the pulse. The sensor can be either placed near to heart or on the wrist to sense pulses and send pulse signals to the doctors. Such sensor should adhere to the skin for sufficiently long period without causing etching to the patient. It should also be bendable and stretchable like skin. This paper is a part of the research work carried out to develop patch type sensor, which is termed as Electronic Tattoo (ET). In pursuit for development of ET, we came across various designs and candidate materials which can be used for the ET. Thus, in this paper, we describe the process of selecting best suited method and material for the ET. It may also be noted that the sensor development is governed by the prevailing IEEE 802.15.6 standard.

  2. The calculation of dose rates from rectangular sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    A common problem in radiation protection is the calculation of dose rates from extended sources and irregular shapes. Dose rates are proportional to the solid angle subtended by the source at the point of measurement. Simple methods of calculating solid angles would assist in estimating dose rates from large area sources and therefore improve predictive dose estimates when planning work near such sources. The estimation of dose rates is of particular interest to producers of radioactive ores but other users of bulk radioactive materials may have similar interest. The use of spherical trigonometry can assist in determination of solid angles and a simple equation is derived here for the determination of the dose at any distance from a rectangular surface. The solid angle subtended by complex shapes can be determined by modelling the area as a patchwork of rectangular areas and summing the solid angles from each rectangle. The dose rates from bags of thorium bearing ores is of particular interest in Western Australia and measured dose rates from bags and containers of monazite are compared with theoretical estimates based on calculations of solid angle. The agreement is fair but more detailed measurements would be needed to confirm the agreement with theory. (author)

  3. Pulse shaping for all-optical signal processing of ultra-high bit rate serial data signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palushani, Evarist

    The following thesis concerns pulse shaping and optical waveform manipulation for all-optical signal processing of ultra-high bit rate serial data signals, including generation of optical pulses in the femtosecond regime, serial-to-parallel conversion and terabaud coherent optical time division...

  4. High-q microring resonator with narrow free spectral range for pulse repetition rate multiplication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Ji, Hua; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a silicon-on-insulator microring resonator with a free-spectral-range of 0.32 nm, an extinction ratio of 27 dB, and a quality factor of ~140900 at 1550 nm that is used for pulse repetition-rate multiplication from 10 to 40 GHz.......We demonstrate a silicon-on-insulator microring resonator with a free-spectral-range of 0.32 nm, an extinction ratio of 27 dB, and a quality factor of ~140900 at 1550 nm that is used for pulse repetition-rate multiplication from 10 to 40 GHz....

  5. A pulsed load model and its impact on a synchronous-rectifier system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Pengfei; Xu, Ye; Li, Jianke; Wang, Jinquan; Zhang, Haitao; Yan, Jun; Wang, Chunming; Chen, Jingjing

    2017-02-01

    The pulsed load has become a developing trend of power loading. Unlike traditional loads, pulsed loads with current abrupt and repeated charges will result in unstable Microgrid operations because of their small capacity and inertia. In this paper, an Average Magnitude Sum Function (AMSF) is proposed to calculate the frequency of the grid, and based on AMSF, the Relative Deviation Rate (RDR) that characterises the impact of pulsed load on the AC side of the grid is defined and its calculation process is described in detail. In addition, the system dynamic characteristics under a pulsed load are analysed using an Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) to control the on/off state of the resistive load for simulating a pulsed load. Finally, the transient characteristics of a synchronous-rectifier system with a pulsed load are studied and validated experimentally.

  6. Stochastic analysis of a pulse-type prey-predator model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Zhu, W. Q.

    2008-04-01

    A stochastic Lotka-Volterra model, a so-called pulse-type model, for the interaction between two species and their random natural environment is investigated. The effect of a random environment is modeled as random pulse trains in the birth rate of the prey and the death rate of the predator. The generalized cell mapping method is applied to calculate the probability distributions of the species populations at a state of statistical quasistationarity. The time evolution of the population densities is studied, and the probability of the near extinction time, from an initial state to a critical state, is obtained. The effects on the ecosystem behaviors of the prey self-competition term and of the pulse mean arrival rate are also discussed. Our results indicate that the proposed pulse-type model shows obviously distinguishable characteristics from a Gaussian-type model, and may confer a significant advantage for modeling the prey-predator system under discrete environmental fluctuations.

  7. Estimation of subcriticality of TCA using 'indirect estimation method for calculation error'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Arakawa, Takuya; Sakurai, Kiyoshi

    1996-01-01

    To estimate the subcriticality of neutron multiplication factor in a fissile system, 'Indirect Estimation Method for Calculation Error' is proposed. This method obtains the calculational error of neutron multiplication factor by correlating measured values with the corresponding calculated ones. This method was applied to the source multiplication and to the pulse neutron experiments conducted at TCA, and the calculation error of MCNP 4A was estimated. In the source multiplication method, the deviation of measured neutron count rate distributions from the calculated ones estimates the accuracy of calculated k eff . In the pulse neutron method, the calculation errors of prompt neutron decay constants give the accuracy of the calculated k eff . (author)

  8. Treatment Planning for Pulsed Reduced Dose-Rate Radiotherapy in Helical Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Yi; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Howard, Steven P.; Welsh, James

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Pulsed reduced dose-rate radiotherapy (PRDR) is a valuable method of reirradiation because of its potential to reduce late normal tissue toxicity while still yielding significant tumoricidal effect. A typical method using a conventional linear accelerator (linac) is to deliver a series of 20-cGy pulses separated by 3-min intervals to give an effective dose-rate of just under 7 cGy/min. Such a strategy is fraught with difficulties when attempted on a helical tomotherapy unit. We investigated various means to overcome this limitation. Methods and Materials: Phantom and patient cases were studied. Plans were generated with varying combinations of field width (FW), pitch, and modulation factor (MF) to administer 200 cGy per fraction to the planning target in eight subfractions, thereby mimicking the technique used on conventional linacs. Plans were compared using dose-volume histograms, homogeneity indices, conformation numbers, and treatment time. Plan delivery quality assurance was performed to assess deliverability. Results: It was observed that for helical tomotherapy, intrinsic limitations in leaf open time in the multileaf collimator deteriorate plan quality and deliverability substantially when attempting to deliver very low doses such as 20-40 cGy. The various permutations evaluated revealed that the combination of small FW (1.0 cm), small MF (1.3-1.5), and large pitch (∼0.86), along with the half-gantry-angle-blocked scheme, can generate clinically acceptable plans with acceptable delivery accuracy (±3%). Conclusion: Pulsed reduced dose-rate radiotherapy can be accurately delivered using helical tomotherapy for tumor reirradiation when the appropriate combination of FW, MF, and pitch is used.

  9. APUAMA: a software tool for reaction rate calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euclides, Henrique O; P Barreto, Patricia R

    2017-06-01

    APUAMA is a free software designed to determine the reaction rate and thermodynamic properties of chemical species of a reagent system. With data from electronic structure calculations, the APUAMA determine the rate constant with tunneling correction, such as Wigner, Eckart and small curvature, and also, include the rovibrational level of diatomic molecules. The results are presented in the form of Arrhenius-Kooij form, for the reaction rate, and the thermodynamic properties are written down in the polynomial form. The word APUAMA means "fast" in Tupi-Guarani Brazilian language, then the code calculates the reaction rate on a simple and intuitive graphic interface, the form fast and practical. As program output, there are several ASCII files with tabulated information for rate constant, rovibrational levels, energy barriers and enthalpy of reaction, Arrhenius-Kooij coefficient, and also, the option to the User save all graphics in BMP format.

  10. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy – is it the right way?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skowronek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed dose rate (PDR-BT treatment is a brachytherapy modality that combines physical advantages of high-doserate (HDR-BT technology (isodose optimization, radiation safety with the radiobiological advantages of low-dose-rate (LDR-BT brachytherapy. Pulsed brachytherapy consists of using stronger radiation source than for LDR-BT and producing series of short exposures of 10 to 30 minutes in every hour to approximately the same total dose in the sameoverall time as with the LDR-BT. Modern afterloading equipment offers certain advantages over interstitial or intracavitaryinsertion of separate needles, tubes, seeds or wires. Isodose volumes in tissues can be created flexibly by a combinationof careful placement of the catheter and the adjustment of the dwell times of the computerized stepping source.Automatic removal of the radiation sources into a shielded safe eliminates radiation exposures to staff and visitors.Radiation exposure is also eliminated to the staff who formerly loaded and unloaded multiplicity of radioactive sources into the catheters, ovoids, tubes etc. This review based on summarized clinical investigations, analyses the feasibility and the background to introduce this brachytherapy technique and chosen clinical applications of PDR-BT.

  11. The effect of pulse pile-up on discrimination between neutrons and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittlestone, S.

    1980-01-01

    Pulse pile-up lengthens the rise-time of pulses. With an organic scintillator such as NE 213, pile-up can cause a short rise-time pulse originating from gamma rays to be interpreted by a rise-time analyser as a neutron. The degradation of pulse shape analyser performance at high count rates is shown to be directly related to pulse pile-up. Using this relationship, the contribution of piled-up gamma rays and neutrons to count rate related errors is calculated for a time-dependent fast neutron energy spectrum measurement. Errors of a few per cent occur even when the probability of a count per burst is as low as 0.01. (orig.)

  12. Pulse frequency in pulsed brachytherapy based on tissue repair kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sminia, Peter; Schneider, Christoph J.; Koedooder, Kees; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Blank, Leo E.C.M.; Gonzalez Gonzalez, Dionisio

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Investigation of normal tissue sparing in pulsed brachytherapy (PB) relative to continuous low-dose rate irradiation (CLDR) by adjusting pulse frequency based on tissue repair characteristics. Method: Using the linear quadratic model, the relative effectiveness (RE) of a 20 Gy boost was calculated for tissue with an α/β ratio ranging from 2 to 10 Gy and a half-time of sublethal damage repair between 0.1 and 3 h. The boost dose was considered to be delivered either in a number of pulses varying from 2 to 25, or continuously at a dose rate of 0.50, 0.80, or 1.20 Gy/h. Results: The RE of 20 Gy was found to be identical for PB in 25 pulses of 0.80 Gy each h and CLDR delivered at 0.80 Gy/h for any α/β value and for a repair half-time > 0.75 h. When normal tissue repair half-times are assumed to be longer than tumor repair half-times, normal tissue sparing can be obtained, within the restriction of a fixed overall treatment time, with higher dose per pulse and longer period time (time elapsed between start of pulse n and start of pulse n + 1). An optimum relative normal tissue sparing larger than 10% was found with 4 pulses of 5 Gy every 8 h. Hence, a therapeutic gain might be obtained when changing from CLDR to PB by adjusting the physical dose in such a way that the biological dose on the tumor is maintained. The normal tissue-sparing phenomenon can be explained by an increase in RE with longer period time for tissue with high α/β ratio and fast or intermediate repair half-time, and the RE for tissue with low α/β ratio and long repair half-time remains almost constant. Conclusion: Within the benchmark of the LQ model, advantage in normal tissue-sparing is expected when matching the pulse frequency to the repair kinetics of the normal tissue exposed. A period time longer than 1 h may lead to a reduction of late normal tissue complications. This theoretical advantage emphasizes the need for better knowledge of human tissue-repair kinetics

  13. A new model for volume recombination in plane-parallel chambers in pulsed fields of high dose-per-pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotz, M; Karsch, L; Pawelke, J

    2017-11-01

    In order to describe the volume recombination in a pulsed radiation field of high dose-per-pulse this study presents a numerical solution of a 1D transport model of the liberated charges in a plane-parallel ionization chamber. In addition, measurements were performed on an Advanced Markus ionization chamber in a pulsed electron beam to obtain suitable data to test the calculation. The experiment used radiation pulses of 4 μs duration and variable dose-per-pulse values up to about 1 Gy, as well as pulses of variable duration up to 308 [Formula: see text] at constant dose-per-pulse values between 85 mGy and 400 mGy. Those experimental data were compared to the developed numerical model and existing descriptions of volume recombination. At low collection voltages the observed dose-per-pulse dependence of volume recombination can be approximated by the existing theory using effective parameters. However, at high collection voltages large discrepancies are observed. The developed numerical model shows much better agreement with the observations and is able to replicate the observed behavior over the entire range of dose-per-pulse values and collection voltages. Using the developed numerical model, the differences between observation and existing theory are shown to be the result of a large fraction of the charge being collected as free electrons and the resultant distortion of the electric field inside the chamber. Furthermore, the numerical solution is able to calculate recombination losses for arbitrary pulse durations in good agreement with the experimental data, an aspect not covered by current theory. Overall, the presented numerical solution of the charge transport model should provide a more flexible tool to describe volume recombination for high dose-per-pulse values as well as for arbitrary pulse durations and repetition rates.

  14. Blood pressure and pulse rate of apparently healthy adults on land ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood pressure and pulse rate of apparently healthy adults on land and in water: A comparative study. AI Bello, BOA Adegoke, OA Abass, O Addo. Abstract. Objective: The study compared cardiovascular parameters of apparently healthy adults in erect standing posture on land and whilst immersed in water at rest. Methods: ...

  15. Time-dependent H-like and He-like Al lines produced by ultra-short pulse laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Takako; Kato, Masatoshi [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Shepherd, R; Young, B; More, R; Osterheld, Al

    1998-03-01

    We have performed numerical modeling of time-resolved x-ray spectra from thin foil targets heated by the LLNL Ultra-short pulse (USP) laser. The targets were aluminum foils of thickness ranging from 250 A to 1250 A, heated with 120 fsec pulses of 400 nm light from the USP laser. The laser energy was approximately 0.2 Joules, focused to a 3 micron spot size for a peak intensity near 2 x 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Ly{alpha} and He{alpha} lines were recorded using a 900 fsec x-ray streak camera. We calculate the effective ionization, recombination and emission rate coefficients including density effects for H-like and He-like aluminum ions using a collisional radiative model. We calculate time-dependent ion abundances using these effective ionization and recombination rate coefficients. The time-dependent electron temperature and density used in the calculation are based on an analytical model for the hydrodynamic expansion of the target foils. During the laser pulse the target is ionized. After the laser heating stops, the plasma begins to recombine. Using the calculated time dependent ion abundances and the effective emission rate coefficients, we calculate the time dependent Ly{alpha} and He{alpha} lines. The calculations reproduce the main qualitative features of the experimental spectra. (author)

  16. Single pulse two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (SP-FLIM) with MHz pixel rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Matthias; Karpf, Sebastian; Weng, Daniel; Hakert, Hubertus; Pfeiffer, Tom; Kolb, Jan Philip; Huber, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a chemically specific 3-D sensing modality providing valuable information about the microstructure, composition and function of a sample. However, a more widespread application of this technique is hindered by the need for a sophisticated ultra-short pulse laser source and by speed limitations of current FLIM detection systems. To overcome these limitations, we combined a robust sub-nanosecond fiber laser as the excitation source with high analog bandwidth detection. Due to the long pulse length in our configuration, more fluorescence photons are generated per pulse, which allows us to derive the lifetime with a single excitation pulse only. In this paper, we show high quality FLIM images acquired at a pixel rate of 1 MHz. This approach is a promising candidate for an easy-to-use and benchtop FLIM system to make this technique available to a wider research community.

  17. Research on the optoacoustic communication system for speech transmission by variable laser-pulse repetition rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongyan; Qiu, Hongbing; He, Ning; Liao, Xin

    2018-06-01

    For the optoacoustic communication from in-air platforms to submerged apparatus, a method based on speech recognition and variable laser-pulse repetition rates is proposed, which realizes character encoding and transmission for speech. Firstly, the theories and spectrum characteristics of the laser-generated underwater sound are analyzed; and moreover character conversion and encoding for speech as well as the pattern of codes for laser modulation is studied; lastly experiments to verify the system design are carried out. Results show that the optoacoustic system, where laser modulation is controlled by speech-to-character baseband codes, is beneficial to improve flexibility in receiving location for underwater targets as well as real-time performance in information transmission. In the overwater transmitter, a pulse laser is controlled to radiate by speech signals with several repetition rates randomly selected in the range of one to fifty Hz, and then in the underwater receiver laser pulse repetition rate and data can be acquired by the preamble and information codes of the corresponding laser-generated sound. When the energy of the laser pulse is appropriate, real-time transmission for speaker-independent speech can be realized in that way, which solves the problem of underwater bandwidth resource and provides a technical approach for the air-sea communication.

  18. Research of narrow pulse width, high repetition rate, high output power fiber lasers for deep space exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yan-feng; Li, Hong-zuo; Wang, Yan; Hao, Zi-qiang; Xiao, Dong-Ya

    2013-08-01

    As human beings expand the research in unknown areas constantly, the deep space exploration has become a hot research topic all over the world. According to the long distance and large amount of information transmission characteristics of deep space exploration, the space laser communication is the preferred mode because it has the advantages of concentrated energy, good security, and large information capacity and interference immunity. In a variety of laser source, fibre-optical pulse laser has become an important communication source in deep space laser communication system because of its small size, light weight and large power. For fiber lasers, to solve the contradiction between the high repetition rate and the peak value power is an important scientific problem. General Q technology is difficult to obtain a shorter pulse widths, This paper presents a DFB semiconductor laser integrated with Electro-absorption modulator to realize the narrow pulse width, high repetition rate of the seed source, and then using a two-cascaded high gain fiber amplifier as amplification mean, to realize the fibre-optical pulse laser with pulse width 3ns, pulse frequency 200kHz and peak power 1kW. According to the space laser atmospheric transmission window, the wavelength selects for 1.06um. It is adopted that full fibre technology to make seed source and amplification, pumping source and amplification of free-space coupled into fiber-coupled way. It can overcome that fibre lasers are vulnerable to changes in external conditions such as vibration, temperature drift and other factors affect, improving long-term stability. The fiber lasers can be modulated by PPM mode, to realize high rate modulation, because of its peak power, high transmission rate, narrow pulse width, high frequency stability, all technical indexes meet the requirements of the exploration of deep space communication technology.

  19. High repetition rate tunable femtosecond pulses and broadband amplification from fiber laser pumped parametric amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, T V; Schmidt, O; Bruchmann, C; Limpert, J; Aguergaray, C; Cormier, E; Tünnermann, A

    2006-05-29

    We report on the generation of high energy femtosecond pulses at 1 MHz repetition rate from a fiber laser pumped optical parametric amplifier (OPA). Nonlinear bandwidth enhancement in fibers provides the intrinsically synchronized signal for the parametric amplifier. We demonstrate large tunability extending from 700 nm to 1500 nm of femtosecond pulses with pulse energies as high as 1.2 muJ when the OPA is seeded by a supercontinuum generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Broadband amplification over more than 85 nm is achieved at a fixed wavelength. Subsequent compression in a prism sequence resulted in 46 fs pulses. With an average power of 0.5 W these pulses have a peak-power above 10 MW. In particular, the average power and pulse energy scalability of both involved concepts, the fiber laser and the parametric amplifier, will enable easy up-scaling to higher powers.

  20. Insulin appearance of subcutaneously infused insulin: influence of the basal rate pulse interval of the infusion pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, K; Hildebrandt, P; Jensen, B M; Kühl, C; Brange, J

    1985-05-01

    To compare the metabolic control and the pharmacokinetics of infused insulin using an insulin pump (Auto-Syringe AS 6C) which provides the basal rate in pulses every 2-10 min with a pump (Medix Syringe Driver 209) providing the basal rate in pulses every 15-60 min, 6 C-peptide negative diabetic patients received, in random order, identical, but individual, insulin treatment during one 4-day period using the Auto-Syringe pump and another 4-day period using the Medix pump. On the fourth day of each period, blood glucose and plasma-free insulin were estimated every 30 min for 7 hr and every 5 min for the next hour. Plasma-free insulin was significantly higher on 3 time points out of the 26 possible when using the Medix pump, but this was not reflected in the blood glucose concentrations which were similar in the 2 periods. The results indicate that, from a metabolic and pharmacokinetic point of view, insulin pumps working with larger intervals between the basal rate pulses are just as good as the more technically advanced and hence often more expensive pumps which provide the basal rate in more and smaller pulses.

  1. FABGEN, a transient power-generation and isotope birth rate calculator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roland, H.C.

    1975-04-01

    A description is given of the FABGEN program, a fast-running program for calculating fuel element power-generation rates and selected fission product birth rates in a known neutron flux as functions of time. A first forward difference calculation is used, and the time step is one day. Provisions are made for including various fuel element lengths, variation of thermal flux with time, and use of different fertile isotopes. Five different fission products may be specified for birth-rate calculations. A daily summary may be output, or totals by days may be accumulated for final output. (U.S.)

  2. Complex pulsing schemes for high frame rate imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misaridis, Thanassis; Fink, Mathias; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    up to a pulse train. The acoustically generated high time-bandwidth (TB) product waveforms can be compressed by using a filter bank of matched filters one for every beam direction. Matched filtering compresses the pulse train to a single pulse at the scatterer position plus a number of spike axial...... with linear frequency modulation along the transducer elements, that cover the 70% fractional bandwidth of the 7 MHz transducer. The resulted images (after beamforming and matched filtering) show an axial resolution at the same order as in conventional pulse excitation and axial sidelobes down to -45 d...

  3. The slope of the oxygen pulse curve does not depend on the maximal heart rate in elite soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Rodrigues Perim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: It is unknown whether an extremely high heart rate can affect oxygen pulse profile during progressive maximal exercise in healthy subjects. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to compare relative oxygen pulse (adjusted for body weight curves in athletes at their maximal heart rate during treadmill cardiopulmonary exercise testing. METHODS: A total of 180 elite soccer players were categorized in quartiles according to their maximum heart rate values (n = 45. Oxygen consumption, maximum heart rate and relative oxygen pulse curves in the extreme quartiles, Q1 and Q4, were compared at intervals corresponding to 10% of the total duration of a cardiopulmonary exercise testing. RESULTS: Oxygen consumption was similar among all subjects during cardiopulmonary exercise testing; however subjects in Q1 started to exhibit lower maximum heart rate values when 20% of the test was complete. Conversely, the relative oxygen pulse was higher in this group when cardiopulmonary exercise testing was 40% complete (p<.01. Although the slopes of the lines were similar (p = .25, the regression intercepts differed (p<.01 between Q1 and Q4. During the last two minutes of testing, a flat or decreasing oxygen pulse was identified in 20% of the soccer players, and this trend was similar between subjects in Q1 and Q4. CONCLUSION: Relative oxygen pulse curve slopes, which serve as an indirect and non-invasive surrogate for stroke volume, suggest that the stroke volume is similar in young and aerobically fit subjects regardless of the maximum heart rate reached.

  4. Managing Clutter in a High Pulse Rate Echolocation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Isbell

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of echolocation for navigating in dense, cluttered environments is a challenge due to the need for rapid sampling of nearby objects in the face of delayed echoes from distant objects. In the wild, echolocating bats frequently encounter this situation when leaving the roost or while hunting. If long-delay echoes from a distant object are received after the next pulse is sent out, these “aliased” echoes appear as close-range phantom objects. Little is known about how bats cope with these situations. In this work, we demonstrate a novel strategy to manage aliasing in cases where a single target is actively being tracked at close range. This paper presents three reactive strategies for a high pulse-rate sonar system to combat aliased echoes: (1 changing the interpulse interval to move the aliased echoes away in time from the tracked target, (2 changing positions to create a geometry without aliasing, and (3 a phase-based, transmission beam-shaping strategy to illuminate the target and not the aliasing object.

  5. Application of the Monte Carlo method in calculation of energy-time distribution from a pulsed photon source in homogeneous air environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, R.D.; Vojvodic, V.I.; Orlic, M.P.

    1981-01-01

    The stochastic nature of photon interactions with matter and the characteristics of photon transport through real materials, are very well suited for applications of the Monte Carlo method in calculations of the energy-space distribution of photons. Starting from general principles of the Monte Carlo method, physical-mathematical model of photon transport from a pulsed source is given for the homogeneous air environment. Based on that model, a computer program is written which is applied in calculations of scattered photons delay spectra and changes of the photon energy spectrum. Obtained results provide the estimation of the timespace function of the electromagnetic field generated by photon from a pulsed source. (author)

  6. Effects of pulse ON and OFF time and electrode types on the material removal rate and tool wear rate of the Ti-6Al-4V Alloy using EDM machining with reverse polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, L.; Geeta Krishna, P.; Venugopal, L.; Prasad, N. E. C.

    2018-03-01

    Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) is an unconventional metal removal process that is extensively used for removing the difficult-to-machine metal such as Ti alloys, super alloys and metal matrix composites. This paper investigates the effects of pulse (ON/OFF) time on EDM machining characteristics of Ti-6Al-4V alloy using copper and graphite as electrodes in reverse polarity condition. Full factorial design method was used to design the experiments. Two variables (Pulse On and OFF) with three levels are considered. The output variables are the tool wear rate and the material removal rate. The important findings from the present work are: (1) the material removal rate (MRR) increases gradually with an increase of the Pulse ON time whereas the change is insignificant with an increase of the Pulse OFF time, (2) Between copper and graphite electrodes, the copper electrode is proved to be good in terms of MRR, (3) a combination of high pulse ON time and OFF time is desirable for high MRR rate in the Cu electrode whereas for the graphite electrode, a combination of high pulse ON time and low pulse OFF time is desirable for high MRR rate, (4) the tool wear rate (TWR) reduces with the Pulse On or OFF time, the rate of TWR is uniform for the graphite electrode in contrast to abrupt decrease from 25 to 50 μs (pulse ON time) in the copper electrode, (5) In order to keep the TWR as minimum possible, it is desirable to have a combination of high pulse ON time and OFF time for both the copper and the graphite electrode.

  7. Discrimination of nuclear-explosion and lightning electromagnetic pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Shufeng; Li Ximei; Han Shaoqing; Niu Chao; Feng Jun; Liu Daizhi

    2012-01-01

    The discrimination of nuclear-explosion and lightning electromagnetic pulses was studied using empirical mode decomposition and the fractal analytical method. The box dimensions of nuclear-explosion and lightning electromagnetic pulses' original signals were calculated, and the box dimensions of the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) of nuclear-explosion and lightning electromagnetic pulses' original signals after empirical mode decomposition were also obtained. The discrimination of nuclear explosion and lightning was studied using the nearest neighbor classification. The experimental results show that, the discrimination rate of the box dimension based on the first and second IMF after the original signal empirical mode decomposition is higher than that based on the third and forth IMF; the discrimination rate of the box dimension based on the original signal is higher than that based on any IMF; and the discrimination rate based on two-dimensional and three-dimensional characters is higher and more stable than that based on one-dimensional character, besides, the discrimination rate based on three-dimensional character is over 90%. (authors)

  8. Characterization of a high repetition-rate laser-driven short-pulsed neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, J.; Nees, J. A.; Hammig, M. D.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate a repetitive, high flux, short-pulsed laser-driven neutron source using a heavy-water jet target. We measure neutron generation at 1/2 kHz repetition rate using several-mJ pulse energies, yielding a time-averaged neutron flux of 2 × 105 neutrons s‑1 (into 4π steradians). Deuteron spectra are also measured in order to understand source characteristics. Analyses of time-of-flight neutron spectra indicate that two separate populations of neutrons, ‘prompt’ and ‘delayed’, are generated at different locations. Gamma-ray emission from neutron capture 1H(n,γ) is also measured to confirm the neutron flux.

  9. High-average-power 2 μm few-cycle optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier at 100 kHz repetition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Yariv; Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Demmler, Stefan; Tschernajew, Maxim; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Sources of long wavelengths few-cycle high repetition rate pulses are becoming increasingly important for a plethora of applications, e.g., in high-field physics. Here, we report on the realization of a tunable optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier at 100 kHz repetition rate. At a central wavelength of 2 μm, the system delivered 33 fs pulses and a 6 W average power corresponding to 60 μJ pulse energy with gigawatt-level peak powers. Idler absorption and its crystal heating is experimentally investigated for a BBO. Strategies for further power scaling to several tens of watts of average power are discussed.

  10. Simulation calculation for the energy deposition profile and the transmission fraction of intense pulsed electron beam at various incident angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hailiang; Qiu Aici; Zhang Jiasheng; Huang Jianjun; Sun Jianfeng

    2002-01-01

    The incident angles have a heavy effect on the intense pulsed electron beam energy deposition profile, energy deposition fraction and beam current transmission fraction in material. The author presents electron beam energy deposition profile and energy deposition fraction versus electron energy (0.5-2.0 MeV), at various incident angles for three aluminum targets of various thickness via theoretical calculation. The intense pulsed electron beam current transmission fractions versus electron energy (0.4-1.4 MeV) at various incident angles for three thickness of carbon targets were also theoretically calculated. The calculation results indicate that the deposition energy in unit mass of material surface layer increase with the rise of electron beam incident angle, and electron beam with low incident angle (closer to normal incident angle) penetrates deeper into the target material. The electron beams deposit more energy in unit mass of material surface layer at 60 degree-70 degree incident angle

  11. Retrospective Dosimetric Comparison of Low-Dose-Rate and Pulsed-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy Using a Tandem and Mini-Ovoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourtada, Firas; Gifford, Kent A.; Berner, Paula A.; Horton, John L.; Price, Michael J.; Lawyer, Ann A.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dose distribution of Iridium-192 ( 192 Ir) pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy to that of Cesium-137 ( 137 Cs) low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy around mini-ovoids and an intrauterine tandem. Ten patient treatment plans were selected from our clinical database, all of which used mini-ovoids and an intrauterine tandem. A commercial treatment planning system using AAPM TG43 formalism was used to calculate the dose in water for both the 137 Cs and 192 Ir sources. For equivalent system loadings, we compared the dose distributions in relevant clinical planes, points A and B, and to the ICRU bladder and rectal reference points. The mean PDR doses to points A and B were 3% ± 1% and 6% ± 1% higher than the LDR doses, respectively. For the rectum point, the PDR dose was 4% ± 3% lower than the LDR dose, mainly because of the 192 Ir PDR source anisotropy. For the bladder point, the PDR dose was 1% ± 4% higher than the LDR dose. We conclude that the PDR and LDR dose distributions are equivalent for intracavitary brachytherapy with a tandem and mini-ovoids. These findings will aid in the transfer from the current practice of LDR intracavitary brachytherapy to PDR for the treatment of gynecologic cancers

  12. Empirical rate equation model and rate calculations of hydrogen generation for Hanford tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HU, T.A.

    1999-01-01

    Empirical rate equations are derived to estimate hydrogen generation based on chemical reactions, radiolysis of water and organic compounds, and corrosion processes. A comparison of the generation rates observed in the field with the rates calculated for twenty eight tanks shows agreement within a factor of two to three

  13. Calculation methods for dissolution rate of multicomponent alloys during electrochemical machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikusar, A.I.; Petrenko, V.I.; Dikusar, G.K.; Ehngel'gardt, G.R.; Michukova, N.Yu.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of theoretical calculation of metal dissolution rate during electrochemical mashining is considered. Two calculation techniques are compared at the example of two-component W-Re, Ni-W, Mo-Re alloys, namely: ''charge superposition'' and ''weight percents''. It is concluded that the technique of ''charge superposition'' is the only grounded calculation technique of specific rates of dissolution for alloys [ru

  14. Exact comparison of dose rate measurements and calculation of TN12/2 packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniuchi, H.; Matsuda, F.

    1998-01-01

    Both of dose rate measurements of TN 12/2 package and calculations by Monte Carlo code MORSE in SCALE code system and MCNP were performed to evaluate the difference between the measurement and the calculation and finding out the cause of the difference. The calculated gamma-ray dose rates agreed well with measured ones, but calculated neutron dose rates overestimated more than a factor of 1.7. When considering the cause of the difference and applying the modification into the neutron calculation, the calculated neutron dose rates become to agree well, and the factor decreased to around 1.3. (authors)

  15. Regulation and drive system for high rep-rate magnetic-pulse compressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birx, D.L.; Cook, E.G.; Hawkins, S.; Meyers, A.; Reginato, L.L.; Schmidt, J.A.; Smith, M.W.

    1982-01-01

    The essentially unlimited rep-rate capability of non-linear magnetic systems has imposed strict requirements on the drive system which initiates the pulse compression. An order of magnitude increase in the rep-rates achieved by the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) gas blown system is not difficult to achieve in the magnetic compressor. The added requirement of having a high degree of regulation at the higher rep-rates places strict requirements on the triggerable switch for charging and de-Queing. A novel feedback technique which applies the proper bias to a magnetic core by comparing a reference voltage to the charging voltage eases considerably the regulation required to achieve low jitter in magnetic compression. The performance of the high rep-rate charging and regulation systems will be described in the following pages

  16. Thirty-six pulse rectifier scheme based on zigzag auto-connected transformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Qiang Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a low kilo-volt-ampere rating zigzag connected autotransformer based 36-pulse rectifier system supplying vector controlled induction motor drives (VCIMD is designed, modeled and simulated. Detailed design procedure and magnetic rating calculation of the proposed autotransformer and interphase reactor is studied. Moreover, the design process of the autotransformer is modified to make it suitable for retrofit applications. Simulation results confirm that the proposed 36-pulse rectifier system is able to suppress less than 35th harmonics in the utility line current. The influence of load variation and load character is also studied to demonstrate the performance and effectiveness of the proposed 36-pulse rectifiers. A set of power quality indices at AC mains and DC link are presented to compare the performance of 6-, 24- and 36-pulse AC-DC converters.

  17. Photoionization cross sections and Auger rates calculated by many-body perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, H.P.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for applying the many body perturbation theory to atomic calculations are discussed with particular emphasis on calculation of photoionization cross sections and Auger rates. Topics covered include: Rayleigh--Schroedinger theory; many body perturbation theory; calculations of photoionization cross sections; and Auger rates

  18. Efficient calculation of atomic rate coefficients in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanyan, Valentin; Tallents, Greg J.

    2017-03-01

    Modelling electron statistics in a cold, dense plasma by the Fermi-Dirac distribution leads to complications in the calculations of atomic rate coefficients. The Pauli exclusion principle slows down the rate of collisions as electrons must find unoccupied quantum states and adds a further computational cost. Methods to calculate these coefficients by direct numerical integration with a high degree of parallelism are presented. This degree of optimization allows the effects of degeneracy to be incorporated into a time-dependent collisional-radiative model. Example results from such a model are presented.

  19. Effects of pulse-to-pulse residual species on discharges in repetitively pulsed discharges through packed bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszelnicki, Juliusz; Engeling, Kenneth W.; Foster, John E.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in packed bed reactors (PBRs) are being investigated for conversion of toxic and waste gases, and CO2 removal. These discharges are repetitively pulsed having varying flow rates and internal geometries, which results in species from the prior pulse still being in the discharge zone at the time the following discharge pulse occurs. A non-negligible residual plasma density remains, which effectively acts as preionization. This residual charge changes the discharge properties of subsequent pulses, and may impact important PBR properties such as chemical selectivity. Similarly, the residual neutral reactive species produced during earlier pulses will impact the reaction rates on subsequent pulses. We report on results of a computational investigation of a 2D PBR using the plasma hydrodynamics simulator nonPDPSIM. Results will be discussed for air flowing though an array of dielectric rods at atmospheric pressure. The effects of inter-pulse residual species on PBR discharges will be quantified. Means of controlling the presence of residual species in the reactor through gas flow rate, pulse repetition, pulse width and geometry will be described. Comparisons will be made to experiments. Work supported by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  20. The effect of pulse pile-up on threshold crossing rates in a system with a known impulse response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, A.V.; Davidchack, R.L.; Armstrong, T.P.

    1998-01-01

    The problem of counting rates in a counting detection system is viewed as a stochastic problem of mean threshold crossing rates for a dynamic system driven by a stationary random force. We present a general formula for calculating the rates of such a system at an arbitrary threshold for all values of event occurrence rates, given that the amplitude distribution of the incoming events and the impulse response of the detection system are known. From a single general formula we derive asymptotic expressions for counting rates at both limits of high and low incoming rates. We give a simple expression for the saturation counting rate of a detection system and show that for a high-order pile-up the average intensity and variation of the incoming signal can be determined by measuring the counting rates at two thresholds. For low incoming rates, we show how the unknown incoming distribution can be computed from the measured pulse-height spectrum. Based on the asymptotic results, we demonstrate how to construct an approximation to the impulse response function of the detection system, which facilitates numerical evaluation of the general formula. In each case, we present a comparison with numerical experiments. Throughout the paper, we illustrate how well-known experimental facts can be deduced from a single general formula. (orig.)

  1. Relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation calculation of total muon capture rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marketin, T.; Paar, N.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.

    2009-01-01

    The relativistic proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-RQRPA) is applied in the calculation of total muon capture rates on a large set of nuclei from 12 C to 244 Pu, for which experimental values are available. The microscopic theoretical framework is based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model for the nuclear ground state, and transitions to excited states are calculated using the pn-RQRPA. The calculation is fully consistent, i.e., the same interactions are used both in the RHB equations that determine the quasiparticle basis, and in the matrix equations of the pn-RQRPA. The calculated capture rates are sensitive to the in-medium quenching of the axial-vector coupling constant. By reducing this constant from its free-nucleon value g A =1.262 by 10% for all multipole transitions, the calculation reproduces the experimental muon capture rates to better than 10% accuracy.

  2. Closed cycle high-repetition-rate pulsed HF laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael R.; Morris, A. V.; Gorton, Eric K.

    1997-04-01

    The design and performance of a closed cycle high repetition rate HF laser is described. A short pulse, glow discharge is formed in a 10 SF6:1 H2 gas mixture at a total pressure of approximately 110 torr within a 15 by 0.5 by 0.5 cm3 volume. Transverse, recirculated gas flow adequate to enable repetitive operation up to 3 kHz is imposed by a centrifugal fan. The fan also forces the gas through a scrubber cell to eliminate ground state HF from the gas stream. An automated gas make-up system replenishes spent gas removed by the scrubber. Typical mean laser output powers up to 3 W can be maintained for extended periods of operation.

  3. Application of nonlinear pulse shaping of femtosecond pulse generation in a fiber amplifier at 500 MHz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Luo, Daping; Wang, Chao; Zhu, Zhiwei; Li, Wenxue

    2018-03-01

    We numerically and experimentally demonstrate that a nonlinear pulse shaping technique based on pre-chirping management in a short gain fiber can be exploited to improve the quality of a compressed pulse. With prior tuning of the pulse chirp, the amplified pulse express different nonlinear propagating processes. A spectrum with s flat top and more smooth wings, showing a similariton feature, generates with the optimal initial pulse chirp, and the shortest pulses with minimal pulse pedestals are obtained. Experimental results show the ability of nonlinear pulse shaping to enhance the quality of compressed pulses, as theoretically expected.

  4. Generation of plasma X-ray sources via high repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguckis, Artūras; Plukis, Artūras; Reklaitis, Jonas; Remeikis, Vidmantas; Giniūnas, Linas; Vengris, Mikas

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we present the development and characterization of Cu plasma X-ray source driven by 20 W average power high repetition rate femtosecond laser in ambient atmosphere environment. The peak Cu- Kα photon flux of 2.3 × 109 photons/s into full solid angle is demonstrated (with a process conversion efficiency of 10-7), using pulses with peak intensity of 4.65 × 1014 W/cm2. Such Cu- Kα flux is significantly larger than others found in comparable experiments, performed in air environment. The effects of resonance plasma absorption process, when optimized, are shown to increase measured flux by the factor of 2-3. The relationship between X-ray photon flux and plasma-driving pulse repetition rate is quasi-linear, suggesting that fluxes could further be increased to 1010 photons/s using even higher average powers of driving radiation. These results suggest that to fully utilize the potential of high repetition rate laser sources, novel target material delivery systems (for example, jet-based ones) are required. On the other hand, this study demonstrates that high energy lasers currently used for plasma X-ray sources can be conveniently and efficiently replaced by high average power and repetition rate laser radiation, as a way to increase the brightness of the generated X-rays.

  5. Treatment of Refractory Idiopathic Supraorbital Neuralgia Using Percutaneous Pulsed Radiofrequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fang; Lu, Jingjing; Ji, Nan

    2018-02-26

    No ideal therapeutic method currently exists for refractory idiopathic supraorbital neuralgia patients who do not respond to conservative therapy, including medications and nerve blocks. Pulsed radiofrequency is a neuromodulation technique that does not produce sequelae of nerve damage after treatment. However, the efficacy of percutaneous pulsed radiofrequency for the treatment of refractory idiopathic supraorbital neuralgia is still not clear. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the supraorbital nerve for refractory supraorbital neuralgia patients. We prospectively investigated the long-term effects of ultrasound-guided percutaneous pulsed radiofrequency in the treatment of 22 refractory idiopathic supraorbital neuralgia patients. A reduction in the verbal pain numeric rating scale score of more than 50% was used as the standard of effectiveness. The effectiveness rates at different time points within 2 years were calculated. After a single pulsed radiofrequency treatment, the effectiveness rate at 1 and 3 months was 77%, and the rates at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years were 73%, 64%, and 50%, respectively. Except for a small portion of patients (23%) who experienced mild upper eyelid ecchymosis that gradually disappeared after approximately 2 weeks, no obvious complications were observed. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrate that for patients with refractory idiopathic supraorbital neuralgia, percutaneous pulsed radiofrequency may be an effective and safe treatment choice. © 2018 World Institute of Pain.

  6. Investigation on repetition rate and pulse duration influences on ablation efficiency of metals using a high average power Yb-doped ultrafast laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez J.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast lasers provide an outstanding processing quality but their main drawback is the low removal rate per pulse compared to longer pulses. This limitation could be overcome by increasing both average power and repetition rate. In this paper, we report on the influence of high repetition rate and pulse duration on both ablation efficiency and processing quality on metals. All trials have been performed with a single tunable ultrafast laser (350 fs to 10ps.

  7. 500 MW peak power degenerated optical parametric amplifier delivering 52 fs pulses at 97 kHz repetition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothhardt, J; Hädrich, S; Röser, F; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2008-06-09

    We present a high peak power degenerated parametric amplifier operating at 1030 nm and 97 kHz repetition rate. Pulses of a state-of-the art fiber chirped-pulse amplification (FCPA) system with 840 fs pulse duration and 410 microJ pulse energy are used as pump and seed source for a two stage optical parametric amplifier. Additional spectral broadening of the seed signal in a photonic crystal fiber creates enough bandwidth for ultrashort pulse generation. Subsequent amplification of the broadband seed signal in two 1 mm BBO crystals results in 41 microJ output pulse energy. Compression in a SF 11 prism compressor yields 37 microJ pulses as short as 52 fs. Thus, pulse shortening of more than one order of magnitude is achieved. Further scaling in terms of average power and pulse energy seems possible and will be discussed, since both concepts involved, the fiber laser and the parametric amplifier have the reputation to be immune against thermo-optical effects.

  8. Influence of duration and rate of pulse rise of the applied voltage on ozone concentration in the barrier glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnyj, V.V.; Klosovski, A.V.; Knysh, A.S.; Shvets, O.M.; Taran, V.S.; Tereshin, V.I.

    2005-01-01

    The barrier glow discharge between two planar electrodes, covered with dielectric, is studied under high-voltage pulsed power supply. Wide applications of such type of discharges, in particular, for ozone production, stimulated a number of investigations in this direction. In this work we investigated the dependence of ozone concentration on the duration and the rate of pulse rise of the applied voltage. The thyristor converter circuit with the shortening of input pulses on the base of the saturable throttle was used for the realization of this task. The output pulses with amplitude up to 15 kV, repetition frequency of 1 kHz, pulse duration of 0.3 μs (or 7 μs) and the rate of pulse rise of 0.1 μs were generated with this scheme. Measurements of the ozone concentration produced in the air mixture have shown that its value increased by factor two with variation of the rate of pulse rise from 0.5 μs to 0.1 μs (for pulse duration of 7 μs). The dependence of the ozone concentration on the variation of air mixture pressure in the discharge gap of reactor was investigated also. It was shown proportional increase of the output concentration of ozone with increasing the pressure value. Spectroscopic measurements carried out in the ultraviolet spectrum made it possible to analyze changing the concentration of ozone and nitric components. (author)

  9. High power pulsed magnetron sputtering: A method to increase deposition rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, Priya; McLain, Jake; Ruzic, David N; Shchelkanov, Ivan A.

    2015-01-01

    High power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) is a state-of-the-art physical vapor deposition technique with several industrial applications. One of the main disadvantages of this process is its low deposition rate. In this work, the authors report a new magnetic field configuration, which produces deposition rates twice that of conventional magnetron's dipole magnetic field configuration. Three different magnet pack configurations are discussed in this paper, and an optimized magnet pack configuration for HPPMS that leads to a higher deposition rate and nearly full-face target erosion is presented. The discussed magnetic field produced by a specially designed magnet assembly is of the same size as the conventional magnet assembly and requires no external fields. Comparison of deposition rates with different power supplies and the electron trapping efficiency in complex magnetic field arrangements are discussed

  10. High voltage nanosecond generator with pulse repetition rate of 1,000 p.p.s.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubanov, V P; Korovin, S D; Stepchenko, A S [High Current Electronics Institute, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    A compact high voltage nanosecond generator is described with a pulse repetition rate up to 1000 p.p.s. The generator includes a 30-Ohm coaxial forming line charged by a built-in Tesla transformer with a high coupling coefficient, and a high voltage (N{sub 2}) gas gap switch with gas blowing between the electrodes. The maximum forming line charge voltage is 450 kV, the pulse duration is about 4 ns, and its amplitude for a matched load is up to 200 kV. (author). 3 figs., 9 refs.

  11. Accurate quantum calculations of the reaction rates for H/D+ CH4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrevelt, R. van; Nyman, G.; Manthe, U.

    2007-01-01

    In previous work [T. Wu, H. J. Werner, and U. Manthe, Science 306, 2227 (2004)], accurate quantum reaction rate calculations of the rate constant for the H+CH4 -> CH3+H-2 reaction have been presented. Both the electronic structure calculations and the nuclear dynamics calculations are converged with

  12. Effect of the Bit Rate on the Pulses of the Laser Diodes | Ayadi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The qualities required for Laser Diodes are their spatial and temporal coherence, and their performance in terms modulation. This paper presents the effect data rate of optical pulses delivered by diode laser using software COMSIS. Two types of modulation have been considered: direct modulation and external modulation.

  13. The calculation of coolant leak rate through the cracks using RELAP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krungeleviciute, V.; Kaliatka, A.

    2001-01-01

    For reason to choose method of leak detection first of all it is necessary to perform evaluating thermal-hydraulic calculations. These calculations allow to determine flow rate of discharged coolant. For coolant leak rate calculations through possible cracks in Ignalina NPP pipes SQUIRT and RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic codes were used. SQUIRT is well known as computer program that predicts the leakage for cracked pipes in NPP. As this code calculates only water (at subcooled or saturated conditions) leak rate, RELAP5 code model, that calculates water and steam leak rate, was created. For model validation comparison of SQUIRT, RELAP5 and experimental results was performed. Analysis shows RELAP5 code model suitability for calculations of leak through through-wall cracks in pipes. (author)

  14. Relationship between Resting Heart Rate, Blood Pressure and Pulse Pressure in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofaro, Diego Giulliano Destro; Casonatto, Juliano; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Cucato, Gabriel Grizzo; Dias, Raphael Mendes Ritti

    2017-05-01

    High resting heart rate is considered an important factor for increasing mortality chance in adults. However, it remains unclear whether the observed associations would remain after adjustment for confounders in adolescents. To analyze the relationship between resting heart rate, blood pressure and pulse pressure in adolescents of both sexes. A cross-sectional study with 1231 adolescents (716 girls and 515 boys) aged 14-17 years. Heart rate, blood pressure and pulse pressure were evaluated using an oscillometric blood pressure device, validated for this population. Weight and height were measured with an electronic scale and a stadiometer, respectively, and waist circumference with a non-elastic tape. Multivariate analysis using linear regression investigated the relationship between resting heart rate and blood pressure and pulse pressure in boys and girls, controlling for general and abdominal obesity. Higher resting heart rate values were observed in girls (80.1 ± 11.0 beats/min) compared to boys (75.9 ± 12.7 beats/min) (p ≤ 0.001). Resting heart rate was associated with systolic blood pressure in boys (Beta = 0.15 [0.04; 0.26]) and girls (Beta = 0.24 [0.16; 0.33]), with diastolic blood pressure in boys (Beta = 0.50 [0.37; 0.64]) and girls (Beta = 0.41 [0.30; 0.53]), and with pulse pressure in boys (Beta = -0.16 [-0.27; -0.04]). This study demonstrated a relationship between elevated resting heart rate and increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure in both sexes and pulse pressure in boys even after controlling for potential confounders, such as general and abdominal obesity. A frequência cardíaca de repouso é considerada um importante fator de aumento de mortalidade em adultos. Entretanto, ainda é incerto se as associações observadas permanecem após ajuste para fatores de confusão em adolescentes. Analisar a relação entre frequência cardíaca de repouso, pressão arterial e pressão de pulso em adolescentes dos dois sexos. Estudo transversal

  15. Dynamic behavior of superconducting flux qubit excited by a series of electromagnetic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyko, A.S.; Omelyanchouk, A.N.; Shevchenko, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    We study theoretically the behavior of the superconducting flux qubit subjected to a series of electromagnetic pulses. The possibility of controlling system state via changing the parameters of the pulse is studied. We calculated the phase shift in a tank circuit weakly coupled to the qubit which can be measured by the impedance measurement technique. For the flux qubit we consider the possibility of estimating the relaxation rate from the impedance measurements by varying the delay time between the pulses

  16. Extracting breathing rate information from a wearable reflectance pulse oximeter sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, W S; Mendelson, Y

    2004-01-01

    The integration of multiple vital physiological measurements could help combat medics and field commanders to better predict a soldier's health condition and enhance their ability to perform remote triage procedures. In this paper we demonstrate the feasibility of extracting accurate breathing rate information from a photoplethysmographic signal that was recorded by a reflectance pulse oximeter sensor mounted on the forehead and subsequently processed by a simple time domain filtering and frequency domain Fourier analysis.

  17. Influence of gamma irradiation, cold storage and pulsing on post harvest life and respiration rate of 'golden gate' cut roses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palanikumar, S.; Vinod Kumar; Bhattacharjee, S.K.; Pal, Madan

    2003-01-01

    Gamma irradiation at 0.025 kGy increased the respiration rate of 'Golden Gate' cut roses. The irradiation followed by cold storage (at 4 deg C) brought down the respiration rate after storage duration of 3 days. The respiration rate was found maximum in the sucrose (3% ) pulsed flowers immediately after pulsing. However, the rate of respiration is decreased in all the treatments. The irradiated flowers recorded lowest amount of respiration at senescence and the vase life was maximum in these flowers. (author)

  18. A Simulation of the Effects of Varying Repetition Rate and Pulse Width of Nanosecond Discharges on Premixed Lean Methane-Air Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Soo Bak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional kinetic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of repetition rate and pulse width of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on stabilizing premixed lean methane-air combustion. The repetition rate and pulse width are varied from 10 kHz to 50 kHz and from 9 ns to 2 ns while the total power is kept constant. The lower repetition rates provide larger amounts of radicals such as O, H, and OH. However, the effect on stabilization is found to be the same for all of the tested repetition rates. The shorter pulse width is found to favor the production of species in higher electronic states, but the varying effects on stabilization are also found to be small. Our results indicate that the total deposited power is the critical element that determines the extent of stabilization over this range of discharge properties studied.

  19. Phase-stable, multi-µJ femtosecond pulses from a repetition-rate tunable Ti:Sa-oscillator-seeded Yb-fiber amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saule, T.; Holzberger, S.; De Vries, O.; Plötner, M.; Limpert, J.; Tünnermann, A.; Pupeza, I.

    2017-01-01

    We present a high-power, MHz-repetition-rate, phase-stable femtosecond laser system based on a phase-stabilized Ti:Sa oscillator and a multi-stage Yb-fiber chirped-pulse power amplifier. A 10-nm band around 1030 nm is split from the 7-fs oscillator output and serves as the seed for subsequent amplification by 54 dB to 80 W of average power. The µJ-level output is spectrally broadened in a solid-core fiber and compressed to 30 fs with chirped mirrors. A pulse picker prior to power amplification allows for decreasing the repetition rate from 74 MHz by a factor of up to 4 without affecting the pulse parameters. To compensate for phase jitter added by the amplifier to the feed-forward phase-stabilized seeding pulses, a self-referencing feed-back loop is implemented at the system output. An integrated out-of-loop phase noise of less than 100 mrad was measured in the band from 0.4 Hz to 400 kHz, which to the best of our knowledge corresponds to the highest phase stability ever demonstrated for high-power, multi-MHz-repetition-rate ultrafast lasers. This system will enable experiments in attosecond physics at unprecedented repetition rates, it offers ideal prerequisites for the generation and field-resolved electro-optical sampling of high-power, broadband infrared pulses, and it is suitable for phase-stable white light generation.

  20. Implementation of Online Promethee Method for Poor Family Change Rate Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukito Aji Dhady

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This research has been done online calculation of the rate of poor family change rate by using Preference Ranking Method of Organization Of Enrichment Evaluation (PROMETHEE .This system is very useful to monitor poverty in a region as well as for administrative services related to poverty rate. The system consists of computer clients and servers connected via the internet network. Poor family residence data obtained from the government. In addition, survey data are inputted through the client computer in each administrative village and also 23 criteria of input in accordance with the established government. The PROMETHEE method is used to evaluate the value of poverty and its weight is used to determine poverty status. PROMETHEE output can also be used to rank the poverty of the registered population of the server based on the netflow value. The poverty rate is calculated based on the current poverty rate compared to the previous poverty rate. The rate results can be viewed online and real time on the server through numbers and graphs. From the test results can be seen that the system can classify poverty status, calculate the poverty rate change rate and can determine the value and poverty ranking of each population.

  1. Implementation of Online Promethee Method for Poor Family Change Rate Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aji, Dhady Lukito; Suryono; Widodo, Catur Edi

    2018-02-01

    This research has been done online calculation of the rate of poor family change rate by using Preference Ranking Method of Organization Of Enrichment Evaluation (PROMETHEE) .This system is very useful to monitor poverty in a region as well as for administrative services related to poverty rate. The system consists of computer clients and servers connected via the internet network. Poor family residence data obtained from the government. In addition, survey data are inputted through the client computer in each administrative village and also 23 criteria of input in accordance with the established government. The PROMETHEE method is used to evaluate the value of poverty and its weight is used to determine poverty status. PROMETHEE output can also be used to rank the poverty of the registered population of the server based on the netflow value. The poverty rate is calculated based on the current poverty rate compared to the previous poverty rate. The rate results can be viewed online and real time on the server through numbers and graphs. From the test results can be seen that the system can classify poverty status, calculate the poverty rate change rate and can determine the value and poverty ranking of each population.

  2. Gigahertz repetition rate, sub-femtosecond timing jitter optical pulse train directly generated from a mode-locked Yb:KYW laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Heewon; Kim, Hyoji; Shin, Junho; Kim, Chur; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Guang-Hoon; Rotermund, Fabian; Kim, Jungwon

    2014-01-01

    We show that a 1.13 GHz repetition rate optical pulse train with 0.70 fs high-frequency timing jitter (integration bandwidth of 17.5 kHz-10 MHz, where the measurement instrument-limited noise floor contributes 0.41 fs in 10 MHz bandwidth) can be directly generated from a free-running, single-mode diode-pumped Yb:KYW laser mode-locked by single-wall carbon nanotube-coated mirrors. To our knowledge, this is the lowest-timing-jitter optical pulse train with gigahertz repetition rate ever measured. If this pulse train is used for direct sampling of 565 MHz signals (Nyquist frequency of the pulse train), the jitter level demonstrated would correspond to the projected effective-number-of-bit of 17.8, which is much higher than the thermal noise limit of 50 Ω load resistance (~14 bits).

  3. Effect of pulsed corona discharge voltage and feed gas flow rate on dissolved ozone concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasetyaningrum, A.; Ratnawati,; Jos, B.

    2015-01-01

    Ozonization is one of the methods extensively used for water purification and degradation of organic materials. Ozone (O 3 ) is recognized as a powerful oxidizing agent. Due to its strong oxidability and better environmental friendless, ozone increasing being used in domestic and industrial applications. Current technology in ozone production utilizes several techniques (corona discharge, ultra violet radiation and electrolysis). This experiment aimed to evaluating effect of voltage and gas flow rate on ozone production with corona discharge. The system consists of two net-type stainless steel electrode placed in a dielectric barrier. Three pulsed voltage (20, 30, 40 KV) and flow rate (5, 10, 15 L/min) were prepare for operation variable at high frequency (3.7 kHz) with AC pulsed power supply. The dissolved ozone concentration depends on the applied high-voltage level, gas flow rate and the discharge exposure duration. The ozone concentration increases with decreasing gas flow rate. Dissolved ozone concentrations greater than 200 ppm can be obtained with a minimum voltage 40 kV

  4. Effect of pulsed corona discharge voltage and feed gas flow rate on dissolved ozone concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyaningrum, A.; Ratnawati, Jos, B.

    2015-12-01

    Ozonization is one of the methods extensively used for water purification and degradation of organic materials. Ozone (O3) is recognized as a powerful oxidizing agent. Due to its strong oxidability and better environmental friendless, ozone increasing being used in domestic and industrial applications. Current technology in ozone production utilizes several techniques (corona discharge, ultra violet radiation and electrolysis). This experiment aimed to evaluating effect of voltage and gas flow rate on ozone production with corona discharge. The system consists of two net-type stainless steel electrode placed in a dielectric barrier. Three pulsed voltage (20, 30, 40 KV) and flow rate (5, 10, 15 L/min) were prepare for operation variable at high frequency (3.7 kHz) with AC pulsed power supply. The dissolved ozone concentration depends on the applied high-voltage level, gas flow rate and the discharge exposure duration. The ozone concentration increases with decreasing gas flow rate. Dissolved ozone concentrations greater than 200 ppm can be obtained with a minimum voltage 40 kV.

  5. Effect of pulsed corona discharge voltage and feed gas flow rate on dissolved ozone concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasetyaningrum, A., E-mail: ajiprasetyaningrum@gmail.com; Ratnawati,; Jos, B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Diponegoro University Jl. Prof. H. Soedarto Tembalang, Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia, 50276 (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Ozonization is one of the methods extensively used for water purification and degradation of organic materials. Ozone (O{sub 3}) is recognized as a powerful oxidizing agent. Due to its strong oxidability and better environmental friendless, ozone increasing being used in domestic and industrial applications. Current technology in ozone production utilizes several techniques (corona discharge, ultra violet radiation and electrolysis). This experiment aimed to evaluating effect of voltage and gas flow rate on ozone production with corona discharge. The system consists of two net-type stainless steel electrode placed in a dielectric barrier. Three pulsed voltage (20, 30, 40 KV) and flow rate (5, 10, 15 L/min) were prepare for operation variable at high frequency (3.7 kHz) with AC pulsed power supply. The dissolved ozone concentration depends on the applied high-voltage level, gas flow rate and the discharge exposure duration. The ozone concentration increases with decreasing gas flow rate. Dissolved ozone concentrations greater than 200 ppm can be obtained with a minimum voltage 40 kV.

  6. Probing background ionization: positive streamers with varying pulse repetition rate and with a radioactive admixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijdam, S; Van Veldhuizen, E M; Ebert, U; Wormeester, G

    2011-01-01

    Positive streamers need a source of free electrons ahead of them to propagate. A streamer can supply these electrons by itself through photo-ionization, or the electrons can be present due to external background ionization. Here we investigate the effects of background ionization on streamer propagation and morphology by changing the gas composition and the repetition rate of the voltage pulses, and by adding a small amount of radioactive 85 Kr. We find that the general morphology of a positive streamer discharge in high-purity nitrogen depends on background ionization: at lower background ionization levels the streamers branch more and have a more feather-like appearance. This is observed both when varying the repetition rate and when adding 85 Kr, though side branches are longer with the radioactive admixture. But velocities and minimal diameters of streamers are virtually independent of the background ionization level. In air, the inception cloud breaks up into streamers at a smaller radius when the repetition rate and therefore the background ionization level is higher. When measuring the effects of the pulse repetition rate and of the radioactive admixture on the discharge morphology, we found that our estimates of background ionization levels are consistent with these observations; this gives confidence in the estimates. Streamer channels generally do not follow the paths of previous discharge channels for repetition rates of up to 10 Hz. We estimate the effect of recombination and diffusion of ions and free electrons from the previous discharge and conclude that the old trail has largely disappeared at the moment of the next voltage pulse; therefore the next streamers indeed cannot follow the old trail.

  7. Pulse induction heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, A S; Kachanov, B Y; Kogan, B V

    1993-12-31

    Induction heating and three types of pulse processes were studied. It was found that in pulse processes the frequency and pulse duration of heat treatments do not remain constant. High frequency pulse heat treatments can be used on sprayed coatings; such treatments will result in stronger surfaces with no cracks. For induction hardening, the rate of specific power was 1 to 1.5 kW/sq.cm, for forging it was 0.2 to 0.3 kW/sq.cm and for melting it was 0.05 to 0.1 kW/sq.cm. The application of pulse heating will result in higher rates of specific power.

  8. Pulse formation of gas-filled counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwatani, Kazuo; Teshima, Kazunori; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hasai, Hiromi

    1991-01-01

    The pulse formation of gas-filled counter has been calculated by simple models for the proportional and self-quenching streamer (SQS) modes. Calculated pulse shapes of counter output have accurately reproduced the observed ones for both modes. As a result, it is shown that the special density distribution of ion pairs in a streamer can be estimated with the rising part of observed pulse shape, using the model. (author)

  9. RCS Leak Rate Calculation with High Order Least Squares Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hun; Kang, Young Kyu; Kim, Yang Ki

    2010-01-01

    As a part of action items for Application of Leak before Break(LBB), RCS Leak Rate Calculation Program is upgraded in Kori unit 3 and 4. For real time monitoring of operators, periodic calculation is needed and corresponding noise reduction scheme is used. This kind of study was issued in Korea, so there have upgraded and used real time RCS Leak Rate Calculation Program in UCN unit 3 and 4 and YGN unit 1 and 2. For reduction of the noise in signals, Linear Regression Method was used in those programs. Linear Regression Method is powerful method for noise reduction. But the system is not static with some alternative flow paths and this makes mixed trend patterns of input signal values. In this condition, the trend of signal and average of Linear Regression are not entirely same pattern. In this study, high order Least squares Method is used to follow the trend of signal and the order of calculation is rearranged. The result of calculation makes reasonable trend and the procedure is physically consistence

  10. Semiclassical calculation of ionisation rate for Rydberg helium atoms in an electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang De-Hua

    2011-01-01

    The ionisation of Rydberg helium atoms in an electric field above the classical ionisation threshold has been examined using the semiclassical method, with particular emphasis on discussing the influence of the core scattering on the escape dynamics of electrons. The results show that the Rydberg helium atoms ionise by emitting a train of electron pulses. Unlike the case of the ionisation of Rydberg hydrogen atom in parallel electric and magnetic fields, where the pulses of the electron are caused by the external magnetic field, the pulse trains for Rydberg helium atoms are created through core scattering. Each peak in the ionisation rate corresponds to the contribution of one core-scattered combination trajectory. This fact further illustrates that the ionic core scattering leads to the chaotic property of the Rydberg helium atom in external fields. Our studies provide a simple explanation for the escape dynamics in the ionisation of nonhydrogenic atoms in external fields. (atomic and molecular physics)

  11. Aging, resting pulse rate, and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stessman, Jochanan; Jacobs, Jeremy M; Stessman-Lande, Irit; Gilon, Dan; Leibowitz, David

    2013-01-01

    To examine the relationship between resting pulse rate (RPR) and longevity in individuals aged 70 to 90. The Jerusalem Longitudinal Cohort Study (1990-2010) is a prospective longitudinal study of a representative cohort born in 1920-21. Home-based comprehensive assessment in 1990, 1998, and 2005. Individuals aged 70 (n = 453), 78 (n = 856), and 85 (n = 1,044), with follow-up to age 90. Comprehensive assessment included average RPR, beta-blocker usage, and physical activity level. Mortality data were collected from the Ministry of Interior from 1990 to 2010. Cox proportional hazards ratios (HRs) were determined for RPR (continuous variable), adjusting for sex, education, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, hypertension, kidney disease, anemia, physical activity, body mass index, self-rated health, dementia, beta-blocker use, and an interaction term for RPR by beta-blocker use. Mean RPR was 75.1 ± 9.9 at 70, 74.5 ± 10.9 at 78, and 68.5 ± 10.5 at 85 in women and 74.3 ± 10.7 at 70, 73.1 ± 11.2 at 78, and 65.2 ± 10.5 at 85 in men, with a significant decline from 78 to 85 for both sexes. In participants not taking beta-blockers followed up from 70 to 77, 78 to 84, and 85 to 90, mean RPR was lower in survivors than nonsurvivors for women (75.8 ± 9.2 vs 83.5 ± 10.9, P longevity. It may serve as a simple prognostic marker in the oldest old. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  12. An extended diffusive model for calculating thermal diffusivity from single monopole tokamak heat pulse propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinak, M.

    1990-02-01

    The problem of deducing χ e from measurements of the propagation of a monopole heatpulse is considered. An extended diffusive model, which takes into account perturbed sources and sinks is extended to the case of a monopole heat input. χ e is expressed as a function of two observables, the heat pulse velocity and the radial damping rate. Two simple expressions valid for two different ranges of the radius of the poloidal waist of the beam power profile are given. The expressions are valid in the heat pulse measurement region, extending radially 0.05a beyond the beam power waist to near 0.6a. The inferred χ e is a local value, not an average value of the radial χ e profile. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  13. Neutron detection system for extremely low count rate. Calculation, construction and employment in search for 'cold fusion'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, R.E.; Patino, N.E.; Florido, P.C.; Gomez, S.E.; Granada, J.R.; Gillette, V.H.

    1993-01-01

    A 22% efficiency thermal neutron detection system was designed for the investigation of neutron emission from pulsed D 2 O electrolysis. Reasons are discussed for the choice of 10 atm 3 He proportional counters. Optimization calculations carried out through standard reactor code system (AMPX-II) are presented along with construction details and characteristics of the associated electronics. Experimental verification of calculated efficiency and examples of measurements performed with the detector are included. (orig.)

  14. Relativistic QRPA calculation of β-decay rates of r-process nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marketin, T.; Paar, N.; Niksic, T.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid neutron-capture process (r-process) is responsible for the creation of many nuclei heavier than iron. To describe the r-process, precise data is needed on a large number of neutron-rich nuclei, most of which are not experimentally reachable. One crucial parameter in modeling the nucleosynthesis are the half-lives of the nuclei through which the r-process runs. Therefore, it is of great importance to develop a reliable predictive model which can be applied to the decay of exotic nuclei. A fully self-consistent calculation of β-decay rates is presented, based on a microscopic theoretical framework. Nuclear ground state is determined using the Relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model with density-dependent meson-nucleon coupling constants. Momentum dependent terms are also included to improve the density of single-particle states around the Fermi level via an increase of the effective nucleon mass [1]. Transition rates are calculated within the proton-neutron relativistic quasiparticle RPA using the same interaction that was used in the RHB equations. In this way no additional parameters are introduced in the RPA calculation. Weak interaction rates are calculated using the current-current formalism previously employed in the study of other astrophysically significant weak processes [2,3], which systematically includes the contributions of forbidden transitions. This theoretical framework will be utilized to study the contributions of forbidden transitions to the total decay rate in several mass regions. We will compare the calculated half-lives for several isotopic chains with previous calculations and experimental data and discuss possible improvements to the model.(author)

  15. Calculation of gamma ray exposure rates from uranium ore bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.E.; Wilson, O.J.

    1980-02-01

    The planning of operations associated with uranium mines often requires that estimates be made of the exposure rates from various ore bodies. A straight-forward method of calculating the exposure rate from an arbitrarily shaped body is presented. Parameters for the calculation are evaluated under the assumption of secular equilibrium of uranium with its daughters and that the uranium is uniformly distributed throughout an average soil mixture. The spectral distribution of the emitted gamma rays and the effect of air attenuation are discussed. Worked examples are given of typical situations encountered in uranium mines

  16. Effect of pulse repetition rate and number of pulses in the analysis of polypropylene and high density polyethylene by nanosecond infrared laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leme, Flavio O. [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica ' Henrique Bergamin Filho' , Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Godoi, Quienly [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica ' Henrique Bergamin Filho' , Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Rod. Washington Luis, km 235, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Kiyataka, Paulo H.M. [Centro de Tecnologia de Embalagens, Instituto de Tecnologia de Alimentos, Av. Brasil 2880, 13070-178 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Santos, Dario [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Rua Prof. Artur Riedel 275, 09972-270 Diadema, SP (Brazil); Agnelli, Jose A.M. [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Rod. Washington Luis, km 235, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); and others

    2012-02-01

    Pulse repetition rates and the number of laser pulses are among the most important parameters that do affect the analysis of solid materials by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, and the knowledge of their effects is of fundamental importance for suggesting analytical strategies when dealing with laser ablation processes of polymers. In this contribution, the influence of these parameters in the ablated mass and in the features of craters was evaluated in polypropylene and high density polyethylene plates containing pigment-based PbCrO{sub 4}. Surface characterization and craters profile were carried out by perfilometry and scanning electron microscopy. Area, volume and profile of craters were obtained using Taylor Map software. A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy system consisted of a Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 5 ns) and an Echelle spectrometer equipped with ICCD detector were used. The evaluated operating conditions consisted of 10, 25 and 50 laser pulses at 1, 5 and 10 Hz, 250 mJ/pulse (85 J cm{sup -2}), 2 {mu}s delay time and 6 {mu}s integration time gate. Differences in the topographical features among craters of both polymers were observed. The decrease in the repetition rate resulted in irregular craters and formation of edges, especially in polypropylene sample. The differences in the topographical features and ablated masses were attributed to the influence of the degree of crystallinity, crystalline melting temperature and glass transition temperature in the ablation process of the high density polyethylene and polypropylene. It was also observed that the intensities of chromium and lead emission signals obtained at 10 Hz were two times higher than at 5 Hz by keeping the number of laser pulses constant.

  17. Audit Calculations of LBLOCA for Ulchin Unit 1 and 2 Power Up rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Donggu; Huh, Byunggil; Yoo, Seunghunl; Yang, Chaeyong; Seul, Kwangwon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The KINS-Realistic Evaluation Model (KINS-REM) was developed for the independent audit calculation in 1991, and the code accuracy and statistical method have been improved. To support the licensing review and to confirm the validity of licensee's calculation, regulatory auditing calculations have been also conducted. Currently, the modification of Ulchin 1 and 2 operating license for 4.5% power up rate is under review. In this study, the regulatory audit calculation for LBLOCA of Ulchin Unit 1 and 2 with 4.5% power up rate was performed by applying KINS-REM. In this study, the regulatory audit calculation for LBLOCA of Ulchin Unit 1 and 2 with 4.5% power up rate was performed by applying KINS-REM. It is confirmed that the analysis results of LBLOCA for Ulchin 1 and 2 power up rate meets the PCT acceptance criteria.

  18. The performance of passive flow monitors and phosphate accumulating passive samplers when exposed to pulses in external water flow rate and/or external phosphate concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, Dominique; Hawker, Darryl; Shaw, Melanie; Mueller, Jochen F.

    2011-01-01

    Passive samplers are typically calibrated under constant flow and concentration conditions. This study assessed whether concentration and/or flow pulses could be integrated using a phosphate passive sampler (P-sampler). Assessment involved three 21-day experiments featuring a pulse in flow rate, a pulse of filterable reactive phosphate (FRP) concentration and a simultaneous concentration and flow pulse. FRP concentrations were also determined by parallel grab sampling and the P-sampler calibrated with passive flow monitors (PFMs) and direct measurement of flow rates. The mass lost from the PFM over the deployment periods predicted water velocity to within 5.1, 0.48 and 7.1% when exposed to a flow rate pulse (7.5-50 cm s -1 ), concentration pulse (5-100 μg P L -1 ), or both simultaneously. For the P-sampler, good agreement was observed between the grab and passive measurements of FRP concentration when exposed to a pulse in flow (6% overestimation) or concentration (2% underestimation). - Highlights: → We assess the performance of the passive flow monitor and a phosphate passive sampler when exposed to changing environmental conditions. → The PFM responded quickly and accurately to a pulse in flow rate but showed little response to an external FRP pulse. → The ability of the sampler to provide an integrated measure of the average phosphate concentrations has been demonstrated. → The results presented demonstrate under which conditions the greatest accuracy is achieved when employing passive samplers. - The performance of an integrative phosphate passive sampler has been assessed when exposed to pulses in flow rate and concentration, both individually and simultaneously.

  19. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  20. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G. [and others

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations.

  1. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations

  2. Low-timing-jitter, stretched-pulse passively mode-locked fiber laser with tunable repetition rate and high operation stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yuanshan; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guofu; Zhao, Wei; Bai, Jing

    2010-01-01

    We design a low-timing-jitter, repetition-rate-tunable, stretched-pulse passively mode-locked fiber laser by using a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror (NALM), a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), and a tunable optical delay line in the laser configuration. Low-timing-jitter optical pulses are stably produced when a SESAM and a 0.16 m dispersion compensation fiber are employed in the laser cavity. By inserting a tunable optical delay line between NALM and SESAM, the variable repetition-rate operation of a self-starting, passively mode-locked fiber laser is successfully demonstrated over a range from 49.65 to 50.47 MHz. The experimental results show that the newly designed fiber laser can maintain the mode locking at the pumping power of 160 mW to stably generate periodic optical pulses with width less than 170 fs and timing jitter lower than 75 fs in the 1.55 µm wavelength region, when the fundamental repetition rate of the laser is continuously tuned between 49.65 and 50.47 MHz. Moreover, this fiber laser has a feature of turn-key operation with high repeatability of its fundamental repetition rate in practice

  3. High dose-per-pulse electron beam dosimetry: Usability and dose-rate independence of EBT3 Gafchromic films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, Maud; Petersson, Kristoffer; Buchillier, Thierry; Germond, Jean-François; Durán, Maria Teresa; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Bourhis, Jean; Bochud, François O; Bailat, Claude

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of Gafchromic EBT3 films for reference dose measurements in the beam of a prototype high dose-per-pulse linear accelerator (linac), capable of delivering electron beams with a mean dose-rate (Ḋ m ) ranging from 0.07 to 3000 Gy/s and a dose-rate in pulse (Ḋ p ) of up to 8 × 10 6 Gy/s. To do this, we evaluated the overall uncertainties in EBT3 film dosimetry as well as the energy and dose-rate dependence of their response. Our dosimetric system was composed of EBT3 Gafchromic films in combination with a flatbed scanner and was calibrated against an ionization chamber traceable to primary standard. All sources of uncertainties in EBT3 dosimetry were carefully analyzed using irradiations at a clinical radiotherapy linac. Energy dependence was investigated with the same machine by acquiring and comparing calibration curves for three different beam energies (4, 8 and 12 MeV), for doses between 0.25 and 30 Gy. Ḋ m dependence was studied at the clinical linac by changing the pulse repetition frequency (f) of the beam in order to vary Ḋ m between 0.55 and 4.40 Gy/min, while Ḋ p dependence was probed at the prototype machine for Ḋ p ranging from 7 × 10 3 to 8 × 10 6 Gy/s. Ḋ p dependence was first determined by studying the correlation between the dose measured by films and the charge of electrons measured at the exit of the machine by an induction torus. Furthermore, we compared doses from the films to independently calibrated thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLD) that have been reported as being dose-rate independent up to such high dose-rates. We report that uncertainty below 4% (k = 2) can be achieved in the dose range between 3 and 17 Gy. Results also demonstrated that EBT3 films did not display any detectable energy dependence for electron beam energies between 4 and 12 MeV. No Ḋ m dependence was found either. In addition, we obtained excellent consistency between films and TLDs over the entire Ḋ p

  4. Dose Rate Calculations for Rotary Mode Core Sampling Exhauster

    CERN Document Server

    Foust, D J

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the calculated estimated dose rates for three external locations on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) exhauster HEPA filter housing, per the request of Characterization Field Engineering.

  5. Dose Rate Calculations for Rotary Mode Core Sampling Exhauster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FOUST, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the calculated estimated dose rates for three external locations on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) exhauster HEPA filter housing, per the request of Characterization Field Engineering

  6. Ponderomotive Generation and Detection of Attosecond Free-Electron Pulse Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozák, M.; Schönenberger, N.; Hommelhoff, P.

    2018-03-01

    Atomic motion dynamics during structural changes or chemical reactions have been visualized by pico- and femtosecond pulsed electron beams via ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy. Imaging the even faster dynamics of electrons in atoms, molecules, and solids requires electron pulses with subfemtosecond durations. We demonstrate here the all-optical generation of trains of attosecond free-electron pulses. The concept is based on the periodic energy modulation of a pulsed electron beam via an inelastic interaction, with the ponderomotive potential of an optical traveling wave generated by two femtosecond laser pulses at different frequencies in vacuum. The subsequent dispersive propagation leads to a compression of the electrons and the formation of ultrashort pulses. The longitudinal phase space evolution of the electrons after compression is mapped by a second phase-locked interaction. The comparison of measured and calculated spectrograms reveals the attosecond temporal structure of the compressed electron pulse trains with individual pulse durations of less than 300 as. This technique can be utilized for tailoring and initial characterization of suboptical-cycle free-electron pulses at high repetition rates for stroboscopic time-resolved experiments with subfemtosecond time resolution.

  7. Low-threshold, nanosecond, high-repetition-rate vortex pulses with controllable helicity generated in Cr,Nd:YAG self-Q-switched microchip laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hong-Sen; Chen, Zhen; Li, Hong-Bin; Dong, Jun

    2018-05-01

    A high repetition rate, nanosecond, pulsed optical vortex beam has been generated in a Cr,Nd:YAG self-Q-switched microchip laser pumped by the annular-beam formed with a hollow focus lens. The lasing threshold for vortex pulses is 0.9 W. A pulse width of 6.5 ns and a repetition rate of over 330 kHz have been achieved. The average output power of 1 W and the slope efficiency of 46.6% have been obtained. The helicity of the optical vortices has been controlled by adjusting the tilted angle between Cr,Nd:YAG crystal and output coupler. The work provides a new method for developing pulsed optical vortices for potential applications on quantum communication and optical trapping.

  8. Non-invasive mapping of calculation function by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Stefanie; Tanigawa, Noriko; Sollmann, Nico; Hauck, Theresa; Ille, Sebastian; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-11-01

    Concerning calculation function, studies have already reported on localizing computational function in patients and volunteers by functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation. However, the development of accurate repetitive navigated TMS (rTMS) with a considerably higher spatial resolution opens a new field in cognitive neuroscience. This study was therefore designed to evaluate the feasibility of rTMS for locating cortical calculation function in healthy volunteers, and to establish this technique for future scientific applications as well as preoperative mapping in brain tumor patients. Twenty healthy subjects underwent rTMS calculation mapping using 5 Hz/10 pulses. Fifty-two previously determined cortical spots of the whole hemispheres were stimulated on both sides. The subjects were instructed to perform the calculation task composed of 80 simple arithmetic operations while rTMS pulses were applied. The highest error rate (80 %) for all errors of all subjects was observed in the right ventral precentral gyrus. Concerning division task, a 45 % error rate was achieved in the left middle frontal gyrus. The subtraction task showed its highest error rate (40 %) in the right angular gyrus (anG). In the addition task a 35 % error rate was observed in the left anterior superior temporal gyrus. Lastly, the multiplication task induced a maximum error rate of 30 % in the left anG. rTMS seems feasible as a way to locate cortical calculation function. Besides language function, the cortical localizations are well in accordance with the current literature for other modalities or lesion studies.

  9. Rate maximum calculation of Dpa in CNA-II pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascitti, J. A

    2012-01-01

    The maximum dpa rate was calculated for the reactor in the following state: fresh fuel, no Xenon, a Boron concentration of 15.3 ppm, critical state, its control rods in the criticality position, hot, at full power (2160 MW). It was determined that the maximum dpa rate under such conditions is 3.54(2)x10 12 s -1 and it is located in the positions corresponding to θ=210 o in the azimuthal direction, and z=20 cm and -60 cm respectively in the axial direction, considering the calculation mesh centered at half height of the fuel element (FE) active length. The dpa rate spectrum was determined as well as the contribution to it for 4 energy groups: a thermal group, two epithermal groups and a fast one. The maximum dpa rate considering the photo-neutrons production from (γ, n) reaction in the heavy water of coolant and moderator was 3.93(4)x10 12 s -1 that is 11% greater than the obtained without photo-neutrons. This verified significant difference between both cases, suggest that photo-neutrons in large heavy water reactors such as CNA-II should not be ignored. The maximum DPA rate in the first mm of the reactor pressure vessel was calculated too and it was obtained a value of 4.22(6)x10 12 s -1 . It should be added that the calculation was carried out with the reactor complete accurate model, with no approximations in spatial or energy variables. Each value has, between parentheses, a percentage relative error representing the statistical uncertainty due to the probabilistic Monte Carlo method used to estimate it. More representative values may be obtained with this method if equilibrium burn-up distribution is used (author)

  10. Calculation of the gamma-dose rate from a continuously emitted plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebschmann, W.; Papadopoulos, D.

    1975-06-01

    A computer model is presented which calculates the long term gamma dose rate caused by the radioactive off-gas continuously emitted from a stack. The statistical distribution of the wind direction and velocity and of the stability categories is taken into account. The emitted activity, distributed in the atmosphere according to this statistics, is assumed to be concentrated at the mesh points of a three-dimensional grid. The grid spacing and the integration limits determine the accuracy as well as the computer time needed. When calculating the dose rate in a given wind direction, the contribution of the activity emitted into the neighbouring sectors is evaluated. This influence is demonstrated in the results, which are calculated with a error below 3% and compared to the dose rate distribution curves of the submersion model and the model developed by K.J. Vogt. (orig.) [de

  11. Performance of n-γ pulse-shape discrimination with simple pile-up rejection at high γ-ray count rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Kawabata, M.; Kasagi, J.; Harada, H.

    1999-01-01

    The performance of n-γ pulse-shape discrimination for a liquid scintillation detector has been investigated for γ-ray count rates up to 50 kcps. A method in which the ratio of the total to partial charge in the anode pulse is directly measured has shown much improved quality of the pulse-shape discrimination when pile-up events are rejected; it can discriminate neutron events of 50 cps from γ-ray events of 29 kcps. The method with simple pile-up rejection has the advantage that only general purpose electronics are required

  12. Scientific periodical publications rating's calculation and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. E. Nikitin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the constructing problem of the food industry journals aggregate ratings. The streamlines of the seventeen magazines on four bibliometric indexes (SCIENCE INDEX, five-year impact factor RISC given the translated version without self-citations, h-index over 10 years and Herfindahl index, which are used in the scientific electronic library elibrary.ru was used as initial data. The statement of the problem refers to multi-criteria decision-making problems. Ranking the journals in these indexes are different from each other because bibliometric indicators account different aspects of the journals. The classical approach to thisproblems solution is based on generalized criterion building in the form of an additive convolution. However, this approach requires adherence to a number of regular conditions that may not always be performed when the practical problems solution. The reductionspossibility of the considered formulation in the form of multi-criteria decision-making tasks to the problem of collective choice. The aggregated ratings of the reporting journals are calculated by using the three social choice rules – Board procedure, Copeland procedures and Kemeny median heuristic procedures. On the basis of Spearman's rank correlation determined the quantitative evaluation of the degree of intimacy built in magazines. In particular, calculated on the basis of procedure, Board and Kemeny median aggregate ratings reporting in the logs coincided. The results showed that the constructed ordering of journals on the basis of social choice rules are in good agreement with the scientific electronic library (eLIBRARY bibliometric indicators.

  13. Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy as salvage treatment of locally advanced or recurrent gynecologic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P T; Roed, H; Engelholm, S A

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a new treatment option permitting dose distribution optimization in interstitial implants. It possesses the advantage of equipment simplification and radiation protection to the staff, compared to the manually afterloading technique. This study pre...

  14. Detection of pulsed fast neutrons by a proportional counter boron-convered and enveloped in paraffin moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalez, O.L.; Yanagihara, L.S.; Veissid, V.L.C.P.; Herdade, S.B.

    1983-01-01

    The response to pulsed fast neutrons by a parafin moderated boron-lined proportional counter is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The neutrons pulses are generated by 60 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator. The calculation of the counting loss based on the detector dead time and on the exponential decresse of the thermal neutron population in the moderator is presented in detail. An analytical relation between the true counting rate and the reduced one, indicated by the detector, is found. In this formula three parameters appear: the decay constant of the thermal neutron population, the detector dead time and the pulse frequency of the neutron source. The decay constant is calculated by diffusion theory. The experimental results for six values of moderator thickness (between 2.5 to 12.5 cm) agree with our theoretical calculation within 20 per cent. (Author) [pt

  15. Biased Brownian dynamics for rate constant calculation.

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, G; Skeel, R D; Subramaniam, S

    2000-01-01

    An enhanced sampling method-biased Brownian dynamics-is developed for the calculation of diffusion-limited biomolecular association reaction rates with high energy or entropy barriers. Biased Brownian dynamics introduces a biasing force in addition to the electrostatic force between the reactants, and it associates a probability weight with each trajectory. A simulation loses weight when movement is along the biasing force and gains weight when movement is against the biasing force. The sampl...

  16. Design and Construction of a Microcontroller-Based Ventilator Synchronized with Pulse Oximeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gölcük, Adem; Işık, Hakan; Güler, İnan

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to introduce a novel device with which mechanical ventilator and pulse oximeter work in synchronization. Serial communication technique was used to enable communication between the pulse oximeter and the ventilator. The SpO2 value and the pulse rate read on the pulse oximeter were transmitted to the mechanical ventilator through transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) lines. The fuzzy-logic-based software developed for the mechanical ventilator interprets these values and calculates the percentage of oxygen (FiO2) and Positive End-Expiratory Pressure (PEEP) to be delivered to the patient. The fuzzy-logic-based software was developed to check the changing medical states of patients and to produce new results (FiO2 ve PEEP) according to each new state. FiO2 and PEEP values delivered from the ventilator to the patient can be calculated in this way without requiring any arterial blood gas analysis. Our experiments and the feedbacks from physicians show that this device makes it possible to obtain more successful results when compared to the current practices.

  17. Influence of the laser pulse repetition rate and scanning speed on the morphology of Ag nanostructures fabricated by pulsed laser ablation of solid target in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolov, A. S.; Balchev, I. I.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Kostadinov, I. K.; Karashanova, D. B.; Atanasova, G. B.

    2017-11-01

    Nanostructures of noble metal were produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquid. A solid Ag target was immersed in double distilled water and a CuBr laser in a master oscillator—power amplifier configuration oscillating at 511 nm and emitting pulses with duration of 30 ns at a repetition rate of up to 20 kHz was employed to produce different colloids. The impact was studied of the laser pulse repetition rate and the beam scanning speed on the morphology of the nanostructures formed. Further, the optical extinction spectra of the colloids in the UV/VIS range were measured and used to make an indirect assessment of the changes in the shape and size distribution of the nanostructures. The transmission values in the near UV range were used to estimate the efficiency of the ablation process under the different experimental conditions implemented. A visualization of the nanostructures was made possible by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structure and phase composition of the nanoparticles were studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), while the alteration of the target surface caused by the impact of the high-repetition-rate laser illumination was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The optimal conditions were determined yielding the highest efficiency in terms of amount of ablated material.

  18. HLW disposal by fission reactors; calculation of trans-mutation rate and recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulyanto

    1997-01-01

    Transmutation of MA (Minor actinide) and LLFPS (long-lived fission products) into stable nuclide or short-lived isotopes by fission reactors seem to become an alternative technology for HLW disposal. in this study, transmutation rate and recycle calculation were developed in order to evaluate transmutation characteristics of MA and LLFPs in the fission reactors. inventory of MA and LLFPs in the transmutation reactors were determined by solving of criticality equation with 1-D cylindrical geometry of multigroup diffusion equations at the beginning of cycle (BOC). transmutation rate and burn-up was determined by solving of depletion equation. inventory of MA and LLFPs was calculated for 40 years recycle. From this study, it was concluded that characteristics of MA and LLFPs in the transmutation reactors can be evaluated by recycle calculation. by calculation of transmutation rate, performance of fission reactor for transmutation of MA or LLFPs can be discussed

  19. Measuring and calculational complex on the base of multi-detector system and the kinetics parametrs by the method of neutron pulsed source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veselova, G.P.; Grachev, A.V.; Ivanova, N.K.

    1985-01-01

    Description of hardware of a measuring and calculation complex (MCC) designed for measuring neutron-physical characteristics of a reactor by the neutron pulsed method simultaneously from 8 detectors and the MERA-60 computer software used by MCC for measuring dependences of neutron generation and life time on the reactivity change is presented. The complex serviceability is tested at one of the PEI physical stands. MCC operation during a year has demonstrated its high reliability and a possibility of being used both for pulsed and other methods for investigating physical stands without introduction of supplementary equipment

  20. Model of pulse extraction from a copper laser amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boley, C.D.; Warner, B.E.

    1997-03-01

    A computational model of pulse propagation through a copper laser amplifier has been developed. The model contains a system of 1-D (in the axial direction), time-dependent equations for the laser intensity and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), coupled to rate equations for the atomic levels. Detailed calculations are presented for a high-power amplifier at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The extracted power agrees with experiment near saturation. At lower input power the calculation overestimates experiment, probably because of increased ASE effects. 6 refs., 6 figs

  1. Coil protection calculator for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsala, R.J.; Woolley, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    A new coil protection calculator (CPC) is presented in this paper. It is now being developed for TFTR's magnetic field coils will replace the existing coil fault detector. The existing fault detector sacrifices TFTR operating capability for simplicity. The new CPC will permit operation up to the actual coil limits by accurately and continuously computing coil parameters in real-time. The improvement will allow TFTR to operate with higher plasma currents and will permit the optimization of pulse repetition rates

  2. Pulsed irradiation of enriched UO{sub 2} in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, T R; Lucoff, D M; Reil, K O; Croucher, D W [Sandia Laboratories (United States)

    1974-07-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) to determine the energy deposition and behavior of enriched UO{sub 2} under pulse conditions. In the experiment single unirradiated pellets with enrichments up to 25 percent were pulse heated to melt temperatures. Temperature and fission product inventory measurements were made and compared with neutron transport calculations. (author)

  3. Why shorter half-times of repair lead to greater damage in pulsed brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    Pulsed brachytherapy consists of replacing continuous irradiation at low dose-rate with a series of medium dose-rate fractions in the same overall time and to the same total dose. For example, pulses of 1 Gy given every 2 hr or 2 Gy given every 4 hr would deliver the same 70 Gy in 140 hr as continuous irradiation at 0.5 Gy/hr. If higher dose-rates are used, even with gaps between the pulses, the biological effects are always greater. Provided that dose rates in the pulse do not exceed 3 Gy/hr, and provided that pulses are given as often as every 2 hr, the inevitable increases of biological effect are no larger than a few percent (of biologically effective dose or extrapolated response dose). However, these increases are more likely to exceed 10% (and thus become clinically significant) if the half-time of repair of sublethal damage is short (less than 1 hr) rather than long. This somewhat unexpected finding is explained in detail here. The rise and fall of Biologically Effective Dose (and hence of Relative Effectiveness, for a constant dose in each pulse) is calculated during and after single pulses, assuming a range of values of T 1/2 , the half-time of sublethal damage repair. The area under each curve is proportional to Biologically Effective Dose and therefore to log cell kill. Pulses at 3 Gy/hr do yield greater biological effect (dose x integrated Relative Effectiveness) than lower dose-rate pulses or continuous irradiation at 0.5 Gy/hr. The contrast is greater for the short T 1/2 of 0.5 hr than for the longer T 1/2 of 1.5 hr. More biological damage will be done (compared with traditional low dose rate brachytherapy) in tissues with short T 1/2 (0.1-1 hr) than in tissues with longer T 1/2 values. 8 refs., 3 figs

  4. Relativistic QRPA Calculation of β-Decay Rates of r-process Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marketin, T.; Paar, N.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.

    2009-01-01

    A systematic, fully self-consistent calculation of β-decay rates is presented, based on a microscopic theoretical framework. Analysis is performed on a large number of nuclei from the valley of β stability towards the neutron drip-line. Nuclear ground state is determined using the Relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model with density-dependent meson-nucleon coupling constants. Transition rates are calculated within the proton-neutron relativistic quasiparticle RPA (pn-RQRPA) using the same interaction that was used in the RHB equations.

  5. Calculating stocking rates for game ranches: substitution ratios for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calculating stocking rates for game ranches: substitution ratios for use in the Mopani ... Reports on a study conducted to quantify the overlap in ungulate resource-use on a game ranch, and to demonstrate how ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  6. Comparison of leak opening and leak rate calculations to HDR experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebner, H.; Hoefler, A.; Hunger, H.

    1993-01-01

    During the last years a number of calculations of leak opening and leak rate for through cracks in piping components have been performed. Analyses are pre- or mostly post-calculations to experiments performed at the HDR facility under PWR operating conditions. Piping components under consideration were small diameter straight pipes with circumferential cracks, pipe bends with longitudinal or circumferential cracks and pipe branches with weldment cracks. The components were loaded by internal pressure and opening as well as closing bending moment. The finite element method and two-phase flow leak rate programs were used for the calculations. Results of the analyses are presented as J-integral values, crack opening displacements and areas and leak rates as well as comparisons to the experimental results

  7. 2 ~ 5 times tunable repetition-rate multiplication of a 10 GHz pulse source using a linearly tunable, chirped fiber Bragg grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Han; Chang, You; Han, Young-Geun; Kim, Sang; Lee, Sang

    2004-08-23

    We experimentally demonstrate a simple scheme for the tunable pulse repetition-rate multiplication based on the fractional Talbot effect in a linearly tunable, chirped fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The key component in this scheme is our linearly tunable, chirped FBG with no center wavelength shift, which was fabricated with the S-bending method using a uniform FBG. By simply tuning the group velocity dispersion of the chirped FBG, we readily multiply an original 8.5 ps, 10 GHz soliton pulse train by a factor of 2 ~ 5 to obtain high quality pulses at repetition-rates of 20 ~ 50 GHz without significantly changing the system configuration.

  8. Neutron induced current pulses in fission chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboas, A.L.; Buck, W.L.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanism of neutron induced current pulse generation in fission chambers is discussed. By application of the calculated detector transfer function to proposed detector current pulse shapes, and by comparison with actually observed detector output voltage pulses, a credible, semi-empirical, trapezoidal pulse shape of chamber current is obtained

  9. Ionization of a multilevel atom by ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, A. V.; Stremoukhov, S. Yu.; Shutova, O. A.

    2010-01-01

    Specific features of ionization of single atoms by laser fields of a near-atomic strength are investigated. Calculations are performed for silver atoms interacting with femtosecond laser pulses with wavelengths λ = 800 nm (Ti:Sapphire) and λ = 1.064 μm (Nd:YAG). The dependences of the probability of ionization and of the form of the photoelectron energy spectra on the field of laser pulses for various values of their duration are considered. It is shown that the behavior of the probability of ionization in the range of subatomic laser pulse fields is in good agreement with the Keldysh formula. However, when the field strength attains values close to the atomic field strength, the discrepancies in these dependences manifested in a decrease in the ionization rate (ionization stabilization effect) or in its increase (accelerated ionization) are observed. These discrepancies are associated with the dependence of the population dynamics of excited discrete energy levels of the atom on the laser pulse field amplitude.

  10. Physical activity and resting pulse rate in older adults: findings from a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Elevated resting pulse rate (RPR) is a well-recognized risk factor for adverse outcomes. Epidemiological evidence supports the beneficial effects of regular exercise for lowering RPR, but studies are mainly confined to persons younger than 65 years. We set out to evaluate the utility of ...

  11. Frequency-locked pulse sequencer for high-frame-rate monochromatic tissue motion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Reza Zahiri; Baghani, Ali; Salcudean, Septimiu E; Rohling, Robert

    2011-04-01

    To overcome the inherent low frame rate of conventional ultrasound, we have previously presented a system that can be implemented on conventional ultrasound scanners for high-frame-rate imaging of monochromatic tissue motion. The system employs a sector subdivision technique in the sequencer to increase the acquisition rate. To eliminate the delays introduced during data acquisition, a motion phase correction algorithm has also been introduced to create in-phase displacement images. Previous experimental results from tissue- mimicking phantoms showed that the system can achieve effective frame rates of up to a few kilohertz on conventional ultrasound systems. In this short communication, we present a new pulse sequencing strategy that facilitates high-frame-rate imaging of monochromatic motion such that the acquired echo signals are inherently in-phase. The sequencer uses the knowledge of the excitation frequency to synchronize the acquisition of the entire imaging plane to that of an external exciter. This sequencing approach eliminates any need for synchronization or phase correction and has applications in tissue elastography, which we demonstrate with tissue-mimicking phantoms. © 2011 IEEE

  12. Theory of Pulse Train Amplification Without Patterning Effects in Quantum Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander V.; Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    A theory for pulse amplification and saturation in quantum dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is developed. In particular, the maximum bit rate at which a data stream of pulses can be amplified without significant patterning effects is investigated. Simple expressions are derived th...... energies of 0.2–0.4 pJ. The superiority of QD SOAs is based on: 1) the faster achievement of the regime of maximum gain in QD SOAs compared to QW and bulk SOAs and 2) the lower effective cross section of photon-carrier interaction in QDs....... that clearly show the dependence of the maximum bit rate on material and device parameters. A comparative analysis of QD, quantum well (QW), and bulk SOAs shows that QD SOAs may have superior properties; calculations predict patterning-free amplification up to bit rates of 150–200 Gb/s with pulse output...

  13. Calculation of radiation dose rate arisen from radionuclide contained in building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Tien Thinh; Nguyen Hao Quang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents some results that we used MCNP5 program to calculate radiation dose rate arisen from radionuclide in building materials. Since then, the limits of radionuclide content in building materials are discussed. The calculation results by MCNP are compared with those calculated by analytical method. (author)

  14. Dual-Pulse Pulse Position Modulation (DPPM) for Deep-Space Optical Communications: Performance and Practicality Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Hylton, Alan; Budinger, James; Nappier, Jennifer; Downey, Joseph; Raible, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Due to its simplicity and robustness against wavefront distortion, pulse position modulation (PPM) with photon counting detector has been seriously considered for long-haul optical wireless systems. This paper evaluates the dual-pulse case and compares it with the conventional single-pulse case. Analytical expressions for symbol error rate and bit error rate are first derived and numerically evaluated, for the strong, negative-exponential turbulent atmosphere; and bandwidth efficiency and throughput are subsequently assessed. It is shown that, under a set of practical constraints including pulse width and pulse repetition frequency (PRF), dual-pulse PPM enables a better channel utilization and hence a higher throughput than it single-pulse counterpart. This result is new and different from the previous idealistic studies that showed multi-pulse PPM provided no essential information-theoretic gains than single-pulse PPM.

  15. Evaluation of dose equivalent rate distribution in JCO critical accident by radiation transport calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    In the prevention of nuclear disaster, there needs the information on the dose equivalent rate distribution inside and outside the site, and energy spectra. The three dimensional radiation transport calculation code is a useful tool for the site specific detailed analysis with the consideration of facility structures. It is important in the prediction of individual doses in the future countermeasure that the reliability of the evaluation methods of dose equivalent rate distribution and energy spectra by using of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation code, and the factors which influence the dose equivalent rate distribution outside the site are confirmed. The reliability of radiation transport calculation code and the influence factors of dose equivalent rate distribution were examined through the analyses of critical accident at JCO's uranium processing plant occurred on September 30, 1999. The radiation transport calculations including the burn-up calculations were done by using of the structural info...

  16. High dose-rate irradiation of materials with pulsed ion beams at NDCX-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Peter; Treffert, F.; Ji, Q.; Ludewigt, B.; Persaud, A.; Kong, X.; de Leon, S. J.; Dowling, E.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Stepanov, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.

    2017-10-01

    Charged particle radiation effects in materials is important for the design of fusion plasma facing components. Also, radiation effects in semiconductor devices are of interest for many applications such as detectors and space electronics. We present results from radiation effects studies with intense pulses of helium ions that impinged on thin samples at the induction linac at Berkeley Lab (Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II). Intense bunches of 1.2 MeV He+ ions with peak currents of 2 A, 1-mm beam spot radius and 2-30 ns FWHM duration create controlled high instantaneous dose rates enabling the exploration of collective damage effects. We use in-situ diagnostics to monitor transient effects due to rapid heating and the ionization and damage cascade dynamics. For tin, single pulses deposit sufficient energy in the foil to drive phase transitions. A new Thomson parabola to measures ion energy loss and charge state distributions following transmission of a few micron thick samples. In silicon, ion pulses induce free electron densities of order 1021 cm-3. Supported by the Office of Science of the US DOE under contracts DE-AC0205CH11231, DE-AC52-07NA27344 and DE-AC02-09CH11466 and by the China Scholarship Council.

  17. Quantitation of chemical exchange rates using pulsed-field-gradient diffusion measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrec, Michael; Prestegard, James H.

    1997-01-01

    A new approach to the quantitation of chemical exchange rates is presented, and its utility is illustrated with application to the exchange of protein amide protons with bulk water. The approach consists of a selective-inversion exchange HMQC experiment in which a short spin echo diffusion filter has been inserted into the exchange period. In this way, the kinetics of exchange are encoded directly in an apparent diffusion coefficient which is a function of the position of the diffusion filter in the pulse sequence. A detailed theoretical analysis of this experiment indicates that, in addition to the measurement of simple exchange rates, the experiment is capable of measuring the effect of mediated exchange, e.g. the transfer of magnetization from bulk water to an amide site mediated by an internal bound water molecule or a labile protein side-chain proton in fast exchange with bulk water. Experimental results for rapid water/amide exchange in acyl carrier protein are shown to be quantitatively consistent with the exchange rates measured using a selective-inversion exchange experiment

  18. Pulse shaping for high data rate ultra-wideband wireless transmission under the Russian spectral emission mask

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rommel, Simon; Grakhova, Elizaveta P.; Jurado-Navas, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses impulse-radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) transmission under the Russian spectral emission mask for unlicensed UWB radio communications. Four pulse shapes are proposed and their bit error rate (BER) performance is both estimated analytically and evaluated experimentally. Well......-known shapes such as the Gaussian, root-raised cosine, hyperbolic secant, and the frequency B-spline wavelet are used to form linear combinations of component pulses, shaped to make efficient use of the spectral emission mask. Analytical BER values are derived using a Nakagami-m model, and good agreement......-UWB transmission under the strict regulations of the Russian spectral emission mask....

  19. Modeling for Dose Rate Calculation of the External Exposure to Gamma Emitters in Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allam, K. A.; El-Mongy, S. A.; El-Tahawy, M. S.; Mohsen, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Based on the model proposed and developed in Ph.D thesis of the first author of this work, the dose rate conversion factors (absorbed dose rate in air per specific activity of soil in nGy.hr - 1 per Bq.kg - 1) are calculated 1 m above the ground for photon emitters of natural radionuclides uniformly distributed in the soil. This new and simple dose rate calculation software was used for calculation of the dose rate in air 1 m above the ground. Then the results were compared with those obtained by five different groups. Although the developed model is extremely simple, the obtained results of calculations, based on this model, show excellent agreement with those obtained by the above-mentioned models specially that one adopted by UNSCEAR. (authors)

  20. Pulse-duration discrimination for increasing counting characteristic plateau and for improving counting rate stability of a scintillation counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'min, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    For greater stability of scintillation counters operation, discussed is the possibility for increasing the plateau and reducing its slope. Presented is the circuit for discrimination of the signal pulses from input pulses of a photomultiplier. The counting characteristics have been measured with the scintillation detectors being irradiated by different gamma sources ( 60 Co, 137 Cs, 241 Am) and without the source when the scintillation detector is shielded by a tungsten cylinder with a wall thickness of 23 mm. The comparison has revealed that discrimination in duration increase the plateau and reduces its slope. Proceeding from comparison of the noise characteristics, the relationship is found between the noise pulse number and gamma radiation energy. For better stability of the counting rate it is suggested to introduce into the scintillation counter the circuit for duration discrimination of the output pulses of a photomultiplier

  1. A New Method to Calculate Internal Rate of Return

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    azadeh zandi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A number of methods have been developed to choose the best capital investment projects such as net present value, internal rate of return and etc. Internal rate of return method is probably the most popular method among managers and investors. But despite the popularity there are serious drawbacks and limitations in this method. After decades of efforts made by economists and experts to improve the method and its shortcomings, Magni in 2010 has revealed a new approach that can solves the most of internal rate of return method problems. This paper present a new method which is originated from Magni’s approach but has much more simple calculations and can resolve all the drawbacks of internal rate of return method.

  2. Semiclassical Calculation of Reaction Rate Constants for Homolytical Dissociations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    2002-01-01

    There is growing interest in extending organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) to III-V materials that exhibit large thermal decomposition at their optimum growth temperature, such as indium nitride. The group III nitrides are candidate materials for light-emitting diodes and semiconductor lasers operating into the blue and ultraviolet regions. To overcome decomposition of the deposited compound, the reaction must be conducted at high pressures, which causes problems of uniformity. Microgravity may provide the venue for maintaining conditions of laminar flow under high pressure. Since the selection of optimized parameters becomes crucial when performing experiments in microgravity, efforts are presently geared to the development of computational OMCVD models that will couple the reactor fluid dynamics with its chemical kinetics. In the present study, we developed a method to calculate reaction rate constants for the homolytic dissociation of III-V compounds for modeling OMCVD. The method is validated by comparing calculations with experimental reaction rate constants.

  3. Role of N2 molecules in pulse discharge production of I atoms for a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochetov, I V; Napartovich, A P; Vagin, N P; Yuryshev, N N

    2011-01-01

    A pulsed electric discharge is the most effective means to turn chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) operation into the pulse mode by fast production of iodine atoms. Experimental studies and numerical simulations are performed on a pulsed COIL initiated by an electric discharge in a mixture CF 3 I : N 2 : O 2 ( 3 X) : O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) flowing out of a chemical singlet oxygen generator. A transverse pulsed discharge is realized at various iodide pressures. The model comprises a system of kinetic equations for neutral and charged species, the electric circuit equation, the gas thermal balance equation and the photon balance equation. Reaction rate coefficients for processes involving electrons are repeatedly re-calculated by the electron Boltzmann equation solver when the plasma parameters are changed. The processes accounted for in the Boltzmann equation include direct and stepwise excitation and ionization of atoms and molecules, dissociation of molecules, electron attachment processes, electron-ion recombination, electron-electron collisions and second-kind collisions. The last processes are particularly important because of a high singlet oxygen concentration in gas flow from the singlet oxygen chemical generator. A conclusion is drawn about satisfactory agreement between the theory and the experiment.

  4. Calculation method for gamma dose rates from Gaussian puffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S; Deme, S; Lang, E

    1995-06-01

    The Lagrangian puff models are widely used for calculation of the dispersion of releases to the atmosphere. Basic output from such models is concentration of material in the air and on the ground. The most simple method for calculation of the gamma dose from the concentration of airborne activity is based on the semi-infinite cloud model. This method is however only applicable for puffs with large dispersion parameters, i.e. for receptors far away from the release point. The exact calculation of the cloud dose using volume integral requires large computer time usually exceeding what is available for real time calculations. The volume integral for gamma doses could be approximated by using the semi-infinite cloud model combined with correction factors. This type of calculation procedure is very fast, but usually the accuracy is poor because only a few of the relevant parameters are considered. A multi-parameter method for calculation of gamma doses is described here. This method uses precalculated values of the gamma dose rates as a function of E{sub {gamma}}, {sigma}{sub y}, the asymmetry factor - {sigma}{sub y}/{sigma}{sub z}, the height of puff center - H and the distance from puff center R{sub xy}. To accelerate the calculations the release energy, for each significant radionuclide in each energy group, has been calculated and tabulated. Based on the precalculated values and suitable interpolation procedure the calculation of gamma doses needs only short computing time and it is almost independent of the number of radionuclides considered. (au) 2 tabs., 15 ills., 12 refs.

  5. Calculation method for gamma dose rates from Gaussian puffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Deme, S.; Lang, E.

    1995-06-01

    The Lagrangian puff models are widely used for calculation of the dispersion of releases to the atmosphere. Basic output from such models is concentration of material in the air and on the ground. The most simple method for calculation of the gamma dose from the concentration of airborne activity is based on the semi-infinite cloud model. This method is however only applicable for puffs with large dispersion parameters, i.e. for receptors far away from the release point. The exact calculation of the cloud dose using volume integral requires large computer time usually exceeding what is available for real time calculations. The volume integral for gamma doses could be approximated by using the semi-infinite cloud model combined with correction factors. This type of calculation procedure is very fast, but usually the accuracy is poor because only a few of the relevant parameters are considered. A multi-parameter method for calculation of gamma doses is described here. This method uses precalculated values of the gamma dose rates as a function of E γ , σ y , the asymmetry factor - σ y /σ z , the height of puff center - H and the distance from puff center R xy . To accelerate the calculations the release energy, for each significant radionuclide in each energy group, has been calculated and tabulated. Based on the precalculated values and suitable interpolation procedure the calculation of gamma doses needs only short computing time and it is almost independent of the number of radionuclides considered. (au) 2 tabs., 15 ills., 12 refs

  6. Pulse testing in the presence of wellbore storage and skin effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogbe, D.O.; Brigham, W.E.

    1984-08-01

    A pulse test is conducted by creating a series of short-time pressure transients in an active (pulsing) well and recording the observed pressure response at an observation (responding) well. Using the pressure response and flow rate data, the transmissivity and storativity of the tested formation can be determined. Like any other pressure transient data, the pulse-test response is significantly influenced by wellbore storage and skin effects. The purpose of this research is to examine the influence of wellbore storage and skin effects on interference testing in general and on pulse-testing in particular, and to present the type curves and procedures for designing and analyzing pulse-test data when wellbore storage and skin effects are active at either the responding well or the pulsing well. A mathematical model for interference testing was developed by solving the diffusivity equation for radial flow of a single-phase, slightly compressible fluid in an infinitely large, homogeneous reservoir. When wellbore storage and skin effects are present in a pulse test, the observed response amplitude is attenuated and the time lag is inflated. Consequently, neglecting wellbore storage and skin effects in a pulse test causes the calculated storativity to be over-estimated and the transmissivity to be under-estimated. The error can be as high as 30%. New correlations and procedures are developed for correcting the pulse response amplitude and time lag for wellbore storage effects. Using these correlations, it is possible to correct the wellbore storage-dominated response amplitude and time lag to within 3% of their expected values without wellbore storage, and in turn to calculate the corresponding transmissivity and storativity. Worked examples are presented to illustrate how to use the new correction techniques. 45 references.

  7. Benchmark calculations of thermal reaction rates. I - Quantal scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, David C.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The thermal rate coefficient for the prototype reaction H + H2 yields H2 + H with zero total angular momentum is calculated by summing, averaging, and numerically integrating state-to-state reaction probabilities calculated by time-independent quantum-mechanical scattering theory. The results are very carefully converged with respect to all numerical parameters in order to provide high-precision benchmark results for confirming the accuracy of new methods and testing their efficiency.

  8. Increasing sync rate of pulse-coupled oscillators via phase response function design: theory and application to wireless networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yongqiang; Nunez, Felipe; Doyle III, Francis J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the synchronization rate of weakly connected pulse-coupled oscillators (PCOs). We prove that besides coupling strength, the phase response function is also a determinant of synchronization rate. Inspired by the result, we propose to increase the synchronization rate of PCOs by designing the phase response function. This has important significance in PCO-based clock synchronization of wireless networks. By designing the phase response function, synchronization rate is incr...

  9. Effects of bee venom acupuncture on heart rate variability, pulse wave, and cerebral blood flow for types of Sasang Constitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang-min

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available 1. Objectives: To evaluate effects of bee venom acupuncture on cardiovascular system and differences according to each constitution. 2. Methods: Heart rate variability, pulse wave and the velocity of cerebral blood flow were measured before bee venom acupuncture(BVA, right after and after 30 minuets, had been applied to 20 subjects. 3. Results: 1. BVA did not have effects on measurement variables of heart rate variability. 2. BVA had effects on pulse wave, showing total time, radial augmentation index up and height of percussion wave, time to percussion wave, sum of pulse pressure down. 3. BVA did not have effects on the cerebral blood flow velocity when considering not Sasang Constitution 4. Considering Sasang Constitution, BVA demonstrates different responses in time to preincisura wave, mean blood flow velocity, peak systolic velocity and end diastolic velocity. 4.Conclusion: From those results, the following conclusions are obtained. Cause BVA alters pulse wave and makes differences in the cerebral blood flow velocity according to Sasang Constitution. Various methods of BVA treatment are needed considering Sasang Constitution.

  10. Calculated fraction of an incident current pulse that will be accelerated by an electron linear accelerator and comparisons with experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Alsmiller, F.S.; Lewis, T.A.

    1986-05-01

    In a series of previous papers, calculated results obtained using a one-dimensional ballistic model were presented to aid in the design of a prebuncher for the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. As part of this work, a model was developed to provide limits on the fraction of an incident current pulse that would be accelerated by the existing accelerator. In this paper experimental data on this fraction are presented and the validity of the model developed previously is tested by comparing calculated and experimental data. Part of the experimental data is used to fix the physical parameters in the model and then good agreement between the calculated results and the rest of the experimental data is obtained

  11. Method for pulse to pulse dose reproducibility applied to electron linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ighigeanu, D.; Martin, D.; Oproiu, C.; Cirstea, E.; Craciun, G.

    2002-01-01

    An original method for obtaining programmed beam single shots and pulse trains with programmed pulse number, pulse repetition frequency, pulse duration and pulse dose is presented. It is particularly useful for automatic control of absorbed dose rate level, irradiation process control as well as in pulse radiolysis studies, single pulse dose measurement or for research experiments where pulse-to-pulse dose reproducibility is required. This method is applied to the electron linear accelerators, ALIN-10 of 6.23 MeV and 82 W and ALID-7, of 5.5 MeV and 670 W, built in NILPRP. In order to implement this method, the accelerator triggering system (ATS) consists of two branches: the gun branch and the magnetron branch. ATS, which synchronizes all the system units, delivers trigger pulses at a programmed repetition rate (up to 250 pulses/s) to the gun (80 kV, 10 A and 4 ms) and magnetron (45 kV, 100 A, and 4 ms).The accelerated electron beam existence is determined by the electron gun and magnetron pulses overlapping. The method consists in controlling the overlapping of pulses in order to deliver the beam in the desired sequence. This control is implemented by a discrete pulse position modulation of gun and/or magnetron pulses. The instabilities of the gun and magnetron transient regimes are avoided by operating the accelerator with no accelerated beam for a certain time. At the operator 'beam start' command, the ATS controls electron gun and magnetron pulses overlapping and the linac beam is generated. The pulse-to-pulse absorbed dose variation is thus considerably reduced. Programmed absorbed dose, irradiation time, beam pulse number or other external events may interrupt the coincidence between the gun and magnetron pulses. Slow absorbed dose variation is compensated by the control of the pulse duration and repetition frequency. Two methods are reported in the electron linear accelerators' development for obtaining the pulse to pulse dose reproducibility: the method

  12. Ultrashort x-ray pulse generation by nonlinear Thomson scattering of a relativistic electron with an intense circularly polarized laser pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Liu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear Thomson scattering of a relativistic electron with an intense laser pulse is calculated numerically. The results show that an ultrashort x-ray pulse can be generated by an electron with an initial energy of 5 MeV propagating across a circularly polarized laser pulse with a duration of 8 femtosecond and an intensity of about 1.1×10^{21}  W/cm^{2}, when the detection direction is perpendicular to the propagation directions of both the electron and the laser beam. The optimal values of the carrier-envelop phase and the intensity of the laser pulse for the generation of a single ultrashort x-ray pulse are obtained and verified by our calculations of the radiation characteristics.

  13. Calculation of dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    Methods are presented for the calculation of dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon and electron radiation from radioactive decay. A dose-rate conversion factor is defined as the dose-equivalent rate per unit radionuclide concentration. Exposure modes considered are immersion in contaminated air, immersion in contaminated water, and irradiation from a contaminated ground surface. For each radiation type and exposure mode, dose-rate conversion factors are derived for tissue-equivalent material at the body surface of an exposed individual. In addition, photon dose-rate conversion factors are estimated for 22 body organs. The calculations are based on the assumption that the exposure medium is infinite in extent and that the radionuclide concentration is uniform. The dose-rate conversion factors for immersion in contaminated air and water then follow from the requirement that all of the energy emitted in the radioactive decay is absorbed in the infinite medium. Dose-rate conversion factors for ground-surface exposure are calculated at a reference location above a smooth, infinite plane using the point-kernel integration method and known specific absorbed fractions for photons and electrons in air

  14. Effects of high repetition rate and beam size on hard tissue damage due to subpicosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Beop-Min; Feit, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Joslin, Elizabeth J.; Eichler, Juergen; Stoller, Patrick C.; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    2000-01-01

    We report the effects of the repetition rate and the beam size on the threshold for ultrashort laser pulse induced damage in dentin. The observed results are explained as cumulative thermal effects. Our model is consistent with the experimental results and explains the dependence of the threshold on repetition rate, beam size, and exposure time. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  15. Can accelerometry data improve estimates of heart rate variability from wrist pulse PPG sensors?*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Maciej; Li, Xuan; Khaghani-Far, Iman; Gordon, Christine M.; Pavel, Misha; Jimison Member, Holly B.

    2018-01-01

    A key prerequisite for precision medicine is the ability to assess metrics of human behavior objectively, unobtrusively and continuously. This capability serves as a framework for the optimization of tailored, just-in-time precision health interventions. Mobile unobtrusive physiological sensors, an important prerequisite for realizing this vision, show promise in implementing this quality of physiological data collection. However, first we must trust the collected data. In this paper, we present a novel approach to improving heart rate estimates from wrist pulse photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors. We also discuss the impact of sensor movement on the veracity of collected heart rate data. PMID:29060185

  16. Can accelerometry data improve estimates of heart rate variability from wrist pulse PPG sensors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Maciej; Xuan Li; Khaghani-Far, Iman; Gordon, Christine M; Pavel, Misha; Jimison, Holly B

    2017-07-01

    A key prerequisite for precision medicine is the ability to assess metrics of human behavior objectively, unobtrusively and continuously. This capability serves as a framework for the optimization of tailored, just-in-time precision health interventions. Mobile unobtrusive physiological sensors, an important prerequisite for realizing this vision, show promise in implementing this quality of physiological data collection. However, first we must trust the collected data. In this paper, we present a novel approach to improving heart rate estimates from wrist pulse photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors. We also discuss the impact of sensor movement on the veracity of collected heart rate data.

  17. Preparation of a program for the independent verification of the brachytherapy planning systems calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V Carmona, V.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Lliso, F.; Richart Sancho, J.; Ballester, F.; Pujades-Claumarchirant, M.C.; Munoz, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this work a program is presented that independently checks for each patient the treatment planning system calculations in low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed dose rate brachytherapy. The treatment planning system output text files are automatically loaded in this program in order to get the source coordinates, the desired calculation point coordinates and the dwell times when it is the case. The source strength and the reference dates are introduced by the user. The program allows implementing the recommendations about independent verification of the clinical brachytherapy dosimetry in a simple and accurate way, in few minutes. (Author).

  18. Calculation method for gamma-dose rates from spherical puffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Deme, S.; Lang, E.

    1993-05-01

    The Lagrangian puff-models are widely used for calculation of the dispersion of atmospheric releases. Basic output from such models are concentrations of material in the air and on the ground. The most simple method for calculation of the gamma dose from the concentration of airborne activity is based on semi-infinite cloud model. This method is however only applicable for points far away from the release point. The exact calculation of the cloud dose using the volume integral requires significant computer time. The volume integral for the gamma dose could be approximated by using the semi-infinite cloud model combined with correction factors. This type of calculation procedure is very fast, but usually the accuracy is poor due to the fact that the same correction factors are used for all isotopes. The authors describe a more elaborate correction method. This method uses precalculated values of the gamma-dose rate as a function of the puff dispersion parameter (δ p ) and the distance from the puff centre for four energy groups. The release of energy for each radionuclide in each energy group has been calculated and tabulated. Based on these tables and a suitable interpolation procedure the calculation of gamma doses takes very short time and is almost independent of the number of radionuclides. (au) (7 tabs., 7 ills., 12 refs.)

  19. Error statistics during the propagation of short optical pulses in a high-speed fibreoptic communication line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, E G

    2008-01-01

    Simple analytic expressions are derived to approximate the bit error rate for data transmission through fibreoptic communication lines. The propagation of optical pulses is directly numerically simulated. Analytic estimates are in good agreement with numerical calculations. (fibreoptic communication)

  20. From regional pulse vaccination to global disease eradication: insights from a mathematical model of poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Cameron J; Smith, Robert J; Bourouiba, Lydia

    2015-07-01

    Mass-vaccination campaigns are an important strategy in the global fight against poliomyelitis and measles. The large-scale logistics required for these mass immunisation campaigns magnifies the need for research into the effectiveness and optimal deployment of pulse vaccination. In order to better understand this control strategy, we propose a mathematical model accounting for the disease dynamics in connected regions, incorporating seasonality, environmental reservoirs and independent periodic pulse vaccination schedules in each region. The effective reproduction number, Re, is defined and proved to be a global threshold for persistence of the disease. Analytical and numerical calculations show the importance of synchronising the pulse vaccinations in connected regions and the timing of the pulses with respect to the pathogen circulation seasonality. Our results indicate that it may be crucial for mass-vaccination programs, such as national immunisation days, to be synchronised across different regions. In addition, simulations show that a migration imbalance can increase Re and alter how pulse vaccination should be optimally distributed among the patches, similar to results found with constant-rate vaccination. Furthermore, contrary to the case of constant-rate vaccination, the fraction of environmental transmission affects the value of Re when pulse vaccination is present.

  1. Pulse radiolysis of alkanes in the gas-phase, ion-molecule reactions and neutralization mechanisms of hydrocarbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ausloos, P.

    1975-01-01

    A discussion is presented of the fate of unreactive hydrocarbon ions in various selected gaseous systems. It is shown that experiments performed with the high radiation dose rates obtained in pulse radiolysis experiments have several advantages over conventional low dose rate experiments for the elucidation of the mechanism of homogeneous neutralization of unreactive hydrocarbon ions. This is so because the charged species has a much shorter lifetime with respect to neutralization under high dose rate (pulse radiolysis) conditions, so that the reaction of the ions with minor impurities or accumulated products is much less probable than in low dose rate experiments. It is further shown through a few examples, that quantitative information about the rate contants of neutralization events and ion-molecule reactions can be obtained when the dose rate is high enough for neutralization and chemical reaction to be in competition. Once reliable rate constants for neutralization and ion-molecule reactions are derived, one can obtain a quantitative evaluation of the products which will by formed in the pulse radiolysis of a hydrocarbon gas mixture from a computer calculation. (author)

  2. Method and system of simulating nuclear power plant count rate for training purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alliston, W.H.; Koenig, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    A method and system are described for the real-time simulation of the dynamic operation of a nuclear power plant in which nuclear flux rate counters are provided for monitoring the rate of nuclear fission of the reactor. The system utilizes apparatus that includes digital computer means for calculating data relating to the rate of nuclear fission of a simulated reactor model, which rate is controlled in accordance with the operation of control panel devices. A digital number from the computer corresponding to the flux rate controls an oscillator driven counter means to produce a pulse after a predetermined count. This pulse controls an oscillator driven polynomial counter to count a random number that controls a third counter in accordance with pulse from the first counter to produce a random fission count for operating the meters. (U.S.)

  3. Optimization of pulsed DC PACVD parameters: Toward reducing wear rate of the DLC films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahimi, Mansoureh; Mahboubi, Farzad; Naimi-Jamal, M. Reza

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of pulsed DC PACVD deposition temperature, duty cycle, hydrogen flow and argon/CH4 flow ratio on the wear rate and durability of DLC films was studied. • Results show that wear rate of the DLC films, reduced from 14×E-4 mm3/Nm to 1×E-6 mm3/Nm with increasing the duty cycle from 50% to 80%. • In low duty cycle (around 50%), wear rate increases with increasing in Argon/CH4 flow ratio. • Oxidation, fatigue, abrasion and graphitization are main wear mechanisms in the DLC film. - Abstract: The effect of pulsed direct current (DC) plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) parameters such as temperature, duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH_4 flow ratio on the wear behavior and wear durability of the diamond-like carbon (DLC) films was studied by using response surface methodology (RSM). DLC films were deposited on nitrocarburized AISI 4140 steel. Wear rate and wear durability of the DLC films were examined with the pin-on-disk method. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques were used for studying wear mechanisms, chemical structure, and hardness of the DLC films. RSM results show that duty cycle is one of the important parameters that affect the wear rate of the DLC samples. The wear rate of the samples deposited with a duty cycle of >75% decreases with an increase in the argon/CH4 ratio. In contrast, for a duty cycle of <65%, the wear rate increases with an increase in the argon/CH_4 ratio. The wear durability of the DLC samples increases with an increase in the duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH_4 flow ratio at the deposition temperature between 85 °C and 110 °C. Oxidation, fatigue, abrasive wear, and graphitization are the wear mechanisms observed on the wear scar of the DLC samples deposited with the optimum deposition conditions.

  4. Optimization of pulsed DC PACVD parameters: Toward reducing wear rate of the DLC films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi, Mansoureh [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 1875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahboubi, Farzad, E-mail: mahboubi@aut.ac.ir [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 1875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naimi-Jamal, M. Reza [Research Laboratory of Green Organic Synthesis and Polymers, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16846, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Effect of pulsed DC PACVD deposition temperature, duty cycle, hydrogen flow and argon/CH4 flow ratio on the wear rate and durability of DLC films was studied. • Results show that wear rate of the DLC films, reduced from 14×E-4 mm3/Nm to 1×E-6 mm3/Nm with increasing the duty cycle from 50% to 80%. • In low duty cycle (around 50%), wear rate increases with increasing in Argon/CH4 flow ratio. • Oxidation, fatigue, abrasion and graphitization are main wear mechanisms in the DLC film. - Abstract: The effect of pulsed direct current (DC) plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) parameters such as temperature, duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH{sub 4} flow ratio on the wear behavior and wear durability of the diamond-like carbon (DLC) films was studied by using response surface methodology (RSM). DLC films were deposited on nitrocarburized AISI 4140 steel. Wear rate and wear durability of the DLC films were examined with the pin-on-disk method. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques were used for studying wear mechanisms, chemical structure, and hardness of the DLC films. RSM results show that duty cycle is one of the important parameters that affect the wear rate of the DLC samples. The wear rate of the samples deposited with a duty cycle of >75% decreases with an increase in the argon/CH4 ratio. In contrast, for a duty cycle of <65%, the wear rate increases with an increase in the argon/CH{sub 4} ratio. The wear durability of the DLC samples increases with an increase in the duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH{sub 4} flow ratio at the deposition temperature between 85 °C and 110 °C. Oxidation, fatigue, abrasive wear, and graphitization are the wear mechanisms observed on the wear scar of the DLC samples deposited with the optimum deposition conditions.

  5. Investigation on the generation characteristic of pressure pulse wave signal during the measurement-while-drilling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changqing, Zhao; Kai, Liu; Tong, Zhao; Takei, Masahiro; Weian, Ren

    2014-04-01

    The mud-pulse logging instrument is an advanced measurement-while-drilling (MWD) tool and widely used by the industry in the world. In order to improve the signal transmission rate, ensure the accurate transmission of information and address the issue of the weak signal on the ground of oil and gas wells, the signal generator should send out the strong mud-pulse signals with the maximum amplitude. With the rotary valve pulse generator as the study object, the three-dimensional Reynolds NS equations and standard k - ɛ turbulent model were used as a mathematical model. The speed and pressure coupling calculation was done by simple algorithms to get the amplitudes of different rates of flow and axial clearances. Tests were done to verify the characteristics of the pressure signals. The pressure signal was captured by the standpiece pressure monitoring system. The study showed that the axial clearances grew bigger as the pressure wave amplitude value decreased and caused the weakening of the pulse signal. As the rate of flow got larger, the pressure wave amplitude would increase and the signal would be enhanced.

  6. Shielding calculations for the TFTR neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Lillie, R.A.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.

    1979-07-01

    Two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations have been performed to determine the location and thickness of concrete shielding around the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) neutral beam injectors. Two sets of calculations were performed: one to determine the dose equivalent rate on the roof and walls of the test cell building when no injectors are present, and one to determine the contribution to the dose equivalent rate at these locations from radiation streaming through the injection duct. Shielding the side and rear of the neutral beam injector with 0.305 and 0.61 m of concrete, respectively, and lining the inside of the test cell wall with an additional layer of concrete having a thickness of 0.305 m and a height above the axis of deuteron injection of 3.10 m are sufficient to maintain the biological dose equivalent rate outside the test cell to approx. 1 mrem/DT pulse

  7. HARMONIC ANALYSIS OF SVPWM INVERTER USING MULTIPLE-PULSES METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet YUMURTACI

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Space Vector Modulation (SVM technique is a popular and an important PWM technique for three phases voltage source inverter in the control of Induction Motor. In this study harmonic analysis of Space Vector PWM (SVPWM is investigated using multiple-pulses method. Multiple-Pulses method calculates the Fourier coefficients of individual positive and negative pulses of the output PWM waveform and adds them together using the principle of superposition to calculate the Fourier coefficients of the all PWM output signal. Harmonic magnitudes can be calculated directly by this method without linearization, using look-up tables or Bessel functions. In this study, the results obtained in the application of SVPWM for values of variable parameters are compared with the results obtained with the multiple-pulses method.

  8. Reference values and associated factors for Japanese newborns' blood pressure and pulse rate: the babies' and their parents' longitudinal observation in Suzuki Memorial Hospital on intrauterine period (BOSHI) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Michihiro; Inoue, Ryusuke; Tada, Hideko; Hosaka, Miki; Metoki, Hirohito; Asayama, Kei; Murakami, Takahisa; Mano, Nariyasu; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Yagihashi, Katsuyo; Hoshi, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Masakuni; Imai, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Currently, normative means and ranges of blood pressure (BP) and pulse rates in Japanese newborns are not available. The objective of the present study was to estimate BP, pulse rate, and their distribution among Japanese newborns. Using oscillometric devices, arm or calf BP and pulse rate levels were obtained from 3148 infants born between 2007 and 2014, consecutively at Suzuki Memorial Hospital, Iwanuma, Japan. Of those, data from 2628 full-term, singleton newborns with BP measured on day 3 after birth were analyzed. Arm SBP/DBP and pulse rate in the reference group (n = 2628) were 70.5 ± 7.4/44.3 ± 6.7 mmHg and 117.3 ± 16.6 bpm, respectively. The 5-95th percentiles were 58-83 mmHg for SBP, 35-57 mmHg for DBP, and 91-145 bpm for pulse rate. Similar values were obtained from calf measurements. In multiple regression analysis, birth weight and spontaneous cephalic delivery were positively and light/deep sleep was inversely associated with higher arm SBP/DBP (P ≤ 0.04), whereas sex, Apgar score, gestational age, and mother's age did not significantly affect BP levels (P ≥ 0.06). Male sex, gestational age, spontaneous cephalic delivery, and light/deep sleep were inversely associated with higher pulse rate (P ≤ 0.02). The present study is the first to show the distributions of Asian newborns' BP levels and pulse rate. The assessment of newborns' BP levels and pulse rate should consider birth weight, gestational age after birth, and actual condition at BP measurement.

  9. Pulse height model for deuterated scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Haitang; Enqvist, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An analytical model of light pulse height distribution for finite deuterated scintillation detectors is created using the impulse approximation. Particularly, the energy distribution of a scattered neutron is calculated based on an existing collision probability scheme for general cylindrical shaped detectors considering double differential cross-sections. The light pulse height distribution is analytically and numerically calculated by convoluting collision sequences with the light output function for an EJ-315 detector from our measurements completed at Ohio University. The model provides a good description of collision histories capturing transferred neutron energy in deuterium-based scintillation materials. The resulting light pulse height distribution details pulse compositions and their corresponding contributions. It shows that probabilities of neutron collision with carbon and deuterium nuclei are comparable, however the light pulse amplitude due to collisions with carbon nuclei is small and mainly located at the lower region of the light pulse distribution axis. The model can explore those neutron interaction events that generate pulses near or below a threshold that would be imposed in measurements. A comparison is made between the light pulse height distributions given by the analytical model and measurements. It reveals a significant probability of a neutron generating a small light pulse due to collisions with carbon nuclei when compared to larger light pulse generated by collisions involving deuterium nuclei. This model is beneficial to understand responses of scintillation materials and pulse compositions, as well as nuclei information extraction from recorded pulses.

  10. Verbal attribute magnitude estimates of pulse trains acros selectrode places and stimulation rates in cochlear implant listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamping, Wiebke; Santurette, Sébastien; Marozeau, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    For cochlear implant users, temporal and place cue are assumed to varyalong two orthogonal perceptual dimensions linked to pitch height and timbre.Here, the effect of electrode place, pulse rate, and amplitude modulationfrequency on those perceptual dimensions was investigated. Combinations...

  11. Application of HDF5 in long-pulse quasi-steady state data acquisition at high sampling rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Wang, F.; Li, S.; Xiao, B.J.; Yang, F.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The new data-acquisition system supports long-pulse EAST data acquisition. • The new data-acquisition system is capable for most of the high frequency signals of EAST experiments. • The system's total throughput is about 500 MB/s. • The system uses HDF5 to store data. - Abstract: A new high sampling rate quasi-steady state data-acquisition system has been designed for the microwave reflectometry diagnostic of EAST experiments. In order to meet the requirements of long-pulse discharge and high sampling rate, it is designed based on PXI Express technology. A high-performance digitizer National Instruments PXIe-5122 with two synchronous analog input channels in which the maximum sampling rate is 100 MHz has been adopted. Two PXIe-5122 boards at 60 MSPS and one PXIe-6368 board at 2 MSPS are used in the system and the total throughput is about 500 MB/s. To guarantee the large amounts of data being saved continuously in the long-pulse discharge, an external hard-disk data stream enclosure NI HDD-8265 in which the capacity of sustained speed of reading and writing is 700 MB/s. And in RAID-5 mode its storage capacity is 80% of the total. The obtained raw data firstly stream continuously into NI HDD-8265 during the discharge. Then it will be transferred to the data server automatically and converted into HDF5 file format. HDF5 is an open source file format for data storage and management which has been widely used in various fields, and suitable for long term case. The details of the system are described in the paper

  12. Optimizing the Thermoacoustic Pulse Tube Refrigerator Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Blagin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with research and optimization of the thermoacoustic pulse tube refrigerator to reach a cryogenic temperature level. The refrigerator is considered as a thermoacoustic converter based on the modified Stirling cycle with helium working fluid. A sound pressure generator runs as a compressor. Plant model comprises an inner heat exchanger, a regenerative heat exchanger, a pulse tube, hot and cold heat exchangers at its ends, an inertial tube with the throttle, and a reservoir. A model to calculate the pulse tube thermoacoustic refrigerator using the DeltaEC software package has been developed to be a basis for calculation techniques of the pulse tube refrigerator. Momentum, continuity, and energy equations for helium refrigerant are solved according to calculation algorithm taking into account the porosity of regenerator and heat exchangers. Optimization of the main geometric parameters resulted in decreasing temperature of cold heat exchanger by 41,7 K. After optimization this value became equal to 115,01 K. The following parameters have been optimized: diameters of the feeding and pulse tube and heat exchangers, regenerator, lengths of the regenerator and pulse and inertial tubes, as well as initial pressure. Besides, global minimum of temperatures has been searched at a point of local minima corresponding to the optimal values of abovementioned parameters. A global-local minima difference is 0,1%. Optimized geometric and working parameters of the thermoacoustic pulse tube refrigerator are presented.

  13. A calculation of the surface recombination rate constant for hydrogen isotopes on metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskes, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    The surface recombination rate constant for hydrogen isotopes on a metal has been calculated using a simple model whose parameters may be determined by direct experimental measurements. Using the experimental values for hydrogen diffusivity, solubility, and sticking coefficient at zero surface coverage a reasonable prediction of the surface recombination constant may be made. The calculated recombination constant is in excellent agreement with experiment for bcc iron. A heuristic argument is developed which, along with the rate constant calculation, shows that surface recombination is important in those metals in which hydrogen has an exothermic heat of solution. (orig.)

  14. Calculation of nuclear-spin-relaxation rate for spin-polarized atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, R.M.C.; Eijnde, J.P.H.W.V.; Verhaar, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    Approximations introduced in previous calculations of spin relaxation for spin-polarized atomic hydrogen are investigated by carrying out a more exact coupled-channel calculation. With the exception of the high-temperature approximation, the approximations turn out to be justified up to the 10 -3 level of accuracy. It is shown that at the lowest temperatures for which experimental data are available, the high-temperature limit underestimates relaxation rates by a factor of up to 2. For a comparison with experimental data it is also of interest to pay attention to the expression for the atomic hydrogen relaxation rates in terms of transition amplitudes for two-particle collisions. Discrepancies by a factor of 2 among previous derivations of relaxation rates are pointed out. To shed light on these discrepancies we present two alternative derivations in which special attention is paid to identical-particle aspects. Comparing with experiment, we find our theoretical volume relaxation rate to be in better agreement with measured values than that obtained by other groups. The theoretical surface relaxation rate, however, still shows a discrepancy with experiment by a factor of order 50

  15. Hybrid Simulation of Duty Cycle Influences on Pulse Modulated RF SiH4/Ar Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xifeng; Song, Yuanhong; Zhao, Shuxia; Dai, Zhongling; Wang, Younian

    2016-04-01

    A one-dimensional fluid/Monte-Carlo (MC) hybrid model is developed to describe capacitively coupled SiH4/Ar discharge, in which the lower electrode is applied by a RF source and pulse modulated by a square-wave, to investigate the modulation effects of the pulse duty cycle on the discharge mechanism. An electron Monte Carlo simulation is used to calculate the electron energy distribution as a function of position and time phase. Rate coefficients in chemical reactions can then be obtained and transferred to the fluid model for the calculation of electron temperature and densities of different species, such as electrons, ions, and radicals. The simulation results show that, the electron energy distribution f(ɛ) is modulated evidently within a pulse cycle, with its tail extending to higher energies during the power-on period, while shrinking back promptly in the afterglow period. Thus, the rate coefficients could be controlled during the discharge, resulting in modulation of the species composition on the substrate compared with continuous excitation. Meanwhile, more negative ions, like SiH-3 and SiH-2, may escape to the electrodes owing to the collapse of ambipolar electric fields, which is beneficial to films deposition. Pulse modulation is thus expected to provide additional methods to customize the plasma densities and components. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11275038)

  16. Pulse Rate and Transit Time Analysis to Predict Hypotension Events After Spinal Anesthesia During Programmed Cesarean Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolea, Juan; Lázaro, Jesús; Gil, Eduardo; Rovira, Eva; Remartínez, José M; Laguna, Pablo; Pueyo, Esther; Navarro, Augusto; Bailón, Raquel

    2017-09-01

    Prophylactic treatment has been proved to reduce hypotension incidence after spinal anesthesia during cesarean labor. However, the use of pharmacological prophylaxis could carry out undesirable side-effects on mother and fetus. Thus, the prediction of hypotension becomes an important challenge. Hypotension events are hypothesized to be related to a malfunctioning of autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation of blood pressure. In this work, ANS responses to positional changes of 51 pregnant women programmed for a cesarean labor were explored for hypotension prediction. Lateral and supine decubitus, and sitting position were considered while electrocardiographic and pulse photoplethysmographic signals were recorded. Features based on heart rate variability, pulse rate variability (PRV) and pulse transit time (PTT) analysis were used in a logistic regression classifier. The results showed that PRV irregularity changes, assessed by approximate entropy, from supine to lateral decubitus, and standard deviation of PTT in supine decubitus were found as the combination of features that achieved the best classification results sensitivity of 76%, specificity of 70% and accuracy of 72%, being normotensive the positive class. Peripheral regulation and blood pressure changes, measured by PRV and PTT analysis, could help to predict hypotension events reducing prophylactic side-effects in the low-risk population.

  17. Transport calculations of. gamma. -ray flux density and dose rate about implantable californium-252 sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A; Lin, B I [Cincinnati Univ., Ohio (USA). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Windham, J P; Kereiakes, J G

    1976-07-01

    ..gamma.. flux density and dose rate distributions have been calculated about implantable californium-252 sources for an infinite tissue medium. Point source flux densities as a function of energy and position were obtained from a discrete-ordinates calculation, and the flux densities were multiplied by their corresponding kerma factors and added to obtain point source dose rates. The point dose rates were integrated over the line source to obtain line dose rates. Container attenuation was accounted for by evaluating the point dose rate as a function of platinum thickness. Both primary and secondary flux densities and dose rates are presented. The agreement with an independent Monte Carlo calculation was excellent. The data presented should be useful for the design of new source configurations.

  18. Calculation of radiation dose rates from a spent nuclear fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Yuan, Y.C.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation doses from a spent nuclear fuel cask are usually from various phases of operations during handling, shipping, and storage of the casks. Assessment of such doses requires knowledge of external radiation dose rates at various locations surrounding a cask. Under current practices, dose rates from gamma photons are usually estimated by means of point- or line-source approaches incorporating the conventional buildup factors. Although such simplified approaches may at times be easy to use, their accuracy has not been verified. For example, those simplified methods have not taken into account influencing factors such as the geometry of the cask and the presence of the ground surface, and the effects of these factors on the calculated dose rates are largely unknown. Moreover, similar empirical equations for buildup factors currently do not exist for neutrons. The objective of this study is to use a more accurate approach in calculating radiation dose rates for both neutrons and gamma photons from a spent fuel cask. The calculation utilizes the more sophisticated transport method and takes into account the geometry of the cask and the presence of the ground surface. The results of a detailed study of dose rates in the near field (within 20 meters) are presented and, for easy application, the cask centerline dose rates are fitted into empirical equations at cask centerline distances up to 2000 meters from the surface of the cask

  19. From laboratory experiments to a geological disposal vault: calculation of used nuclear fuel dissolution rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunder, S.; Shoesmith, D.W.; Kolar, M.; Leneveu, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    Calculation of used nuclear fuel dissolution rates in a geological disposal vault requires a knowledge of the redox conditions in the vault. For redox conditions less oxidizing than those causing UO 2 oxidation to the U 3 O 7 , stage, a thermodynamically-based model is appropriate. For more oxidizing redox conditions a kinetic or an electrochemical model is needed to calculate these rates. The redox conditions in a disposal vault will be affected by the radiolysis of groundwater by the ionizing radiation associated with the fuel. Therefore, we have calculated the alpha-, beta- and gamma-dose rates in water in contact with the reference used fuel in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP) as a function of cooling time. Also, we have determined dissolution rates of UO 2 fuel as a function of alpha and gamma dose rates from our electrochemical measurements. These room-temperature rates are used to calculate the dissolution rates of used fuel at 100 o C, the highest temperature expected in a container in the CNFWMP, as a function of time since emplacement. It is shown that beta radiolysis of water will be the main cause of oxidation of used CANDU fuel in a failed container. The use of a kinetic or an electrochemical corrosion model, to calculate fuel dissolution rates, is required for a period of ∼1000 a following emplacement of copper containers in the geologic disposal vault envisaged in the CNFWMP. Beyond this time period a thermodynamically-based model adequately predicts the fuel dissolution rates. The results presented in this paper can be adopted to calculate used fuel dissolution rates for other used UO 2 fuels in other waste management programs. (author)

  20. Configuration interaction calculations and excitation rates of X-ray and EUV transitions in sulfurlike manganese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Maaref, A.A., E-mail: ahmed.maaref@azhar.edu.eg; Saddeek, Y.B.; Abou halaka, M.M.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Fine-structure calculations of sulfurlike Mn have been performed using configuration interaction technique, CI. • The relativistic effects, Breit-Pauli Hameltonian, have been correlated to the CI calculations. • Excitation rates by electron impact of the Mn X ion have been evaluated up to ionization potential. - Abstract: Fine-structure calculations of energies and transition parameters have been performed using the configuration interaction technique (CI) as implemented in CIV3 code for sulfurlike manganese, Mn X. The calculations are executed in an intermediate coupling scheme using the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. As well as, energy levels and oscillator strengths are calculated using LANL code, where the calculations by LANL have been used to estimate the accuracy of the present CI calculations. The calculated energy levels, oscillator strengths, and lifetimes are in reasonable agreement with the published experimental and theoretical values. Electron impact excitation rates of the transitions emit soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths have been evaluated. The level population densities are calculated using the collisional radiative model (CRM), as well. The collisional excitation rates and collision strengths have been calculated in the electron temperature range ≤ the ionization potential, ∼1–250 eV.

  1. High rate deposition of thin film cadmium sulphide by pulsed direct current magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisco, F., E-mail: F.Lisco@lboro.ac.uk [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Kaminski, P.M.; Abbas, A.; Bowers, J.W.; Claudio, G. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Losurdo, M. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR, via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Walls, J.M. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium Sulphide (CdS) is an important n-type semiconductor widely used as a window layer in thin film photovoltaics Copper Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Gallium (di)Selenide, Copper Zinc Tin Sulphide and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe). Cadmium Sulphide has been deposited using a number of techniques but these techniques can be slow (chemical bath deposition and Radio Frequency sputtering) or the uniformity and the control of thickness can be relatively difficult (close space sublimation). In this paper we report on the development of a process using pulsed Direct Current magnetron sputtering which allows nanometre control of thin film thickness using time only. The CdS thin films deposited in this process are highly uniform and smooth. They exhibit the preferred hexagonal structure at room temperature deposition and they have excellent optical properties. Importantly, the process is highly stable despite the use of a semi-insulating magnetron target. Moreover, the process is very fast. The deposition rate using 1.5 kW of power to a 6-inch circular magnetron was measured to be greater than 8 nm/s. This makes the process suitable for industrial deployment. - Highlights: • Pulsed DC magnetron sputtering of CdS • High deposition rate deposition • Uniform, pinhole free films.

  2. High rate deposition of thin film cadmium sulphide by pulsed direct current magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisco, F.; Kaminski, P.M.; Abbas, A.; Bowers, J.W.; Claudio, G.; Losurdo, M.; Walls, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium Sulphide (CdS) is an important n-type semiconductor widely used as a window layer in thin film photovoltaics Copper Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Gallium (di)Selenide, Copper Zinc Tin Sulphide and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe). Cadmium Sulphide has been deposited using a number of techniques but these techniques can be slow (chemical bath deposition and Radio Frequency sputtering) or the uniformity and the control of thickness can be relatively difficult (close space sublimation). In this paper we report on the development of a process using pulsed Direct Current magnetron sputtering which allows nanometre control of thin film thickness using time only. The CdS thin films deposited in this process are highly uniform and smooth. They exhibit the preferred hexagonal structure at room temperature deposition and they have excellent optical properties. Importantly, the process is highly stable despite the use of a semi-insulating magnetron target. Moreover, the process is very fast. The deposition rate using 1.5 kW of power to a 6-inch circular magnetron was measured to be greater than 8 nm/s. This makes the process suitable for industrial deployment. - Highlights: • Pulsed DC magnetron sputtering of CdS • High deposition rate deposition • Uniform, pinhole free films

  3. Improving Pulse Rate Measurements during Random Motion Using a Wearable Multichannel Reflectance Photoplethysmograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Warren

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Photoplethysmographic (PPG waveforms are used to acquire pulse rate (PR measurements from pulsatile arterial blood volume. PPG waveforms are highly susceptible to motion artifacts (MA, limiting the implementation of PR measurements in mobile physiological monitoring devices. Previous studies have shown that multichannel photoplethysmograms can successfully acquire diverse signal information during simple, repetitive motion, leading to differences in motion tolerance across channels. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a custom-built multichannel forehead-mounted photoplethysmographic sensor under a variety of intense motion artifacts. We introduce an advanced multichannel template-matching algorithm that chooses the channel with the least motion artifact to calculate PR for each time instant. We show that for a wide variety of random motion, channels respond differently to motion artifacts, and the multichannel estimate outperforms single-channel estimates in terms of motion tolerance, signal quality, and PR errors. We have acquired 31 data sets consisting of PPG waveforms corrupted by random motion and show that the accuracy of PR measurements achieved was increased by up to 2.7 bpm when the multichannel-switching algorithm was compared to individual channels. The percentage of PR measurements with error ≤ 5 bpm during motion increased by 18.9% when the multichannel switching algorithm was compared to the mean PR from all channels. Moreover, our algorithm enables automatic selection of the best signal fidelity channel at each time point among the multichannel PPG data.

  4. Relativistic electronic structure calculations on endohedral Gd rate at C60, La rate at C60, Gd rate at C74, and La rate at C74

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, X.

    2000-01-01

    Relativistic discrete-variational local density functional calculations on endohedral Gd rate at C 60 , La rate at C 60 ,Gd rate at C 74 , and La rate at C 74 are performed. All the C 60 - and C 74 -derived levels are lowered upon endohedral Gd and La doping. Both the Gd (4f 7 5d 1 6s 2 ) and La (5d 1 6s 2 ) atoms only donate their two 6s valence electrons to the cages, leaving behind their 5d electrons when they are placed at the cage centers. Compared with large-band-gap C 60 , small-band-gap C 74 and Gd (La)-metallofullerenes have strong both electron-donating and electron-accepting characters, and the calculated ionization potentials and electron affinities for them agree well with the available experimental data. (orig.)

  5. 40 CFR 75.83 - Calculation of Hg mass emissions and heat input rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculation of Hg mass emissions and... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING Hg Mass Emission Provisions § 75.83 Calculation of Hg mass emissions and heat input rate. The owner or operator shall calculate Hg mass emissions...

  6. Calculation of neutron and gamma-ray flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.G.; Lee, S.Y.; Yook, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for neutrons and gamma rays based on the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) N666. These data are used to calculate the dose rate distribution of neutron and gamma ray in radiation fields. Neutron flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors for energies from 2.5 x 10 -8 to 20 MeV are presented; the corresponding energy range for gamma rays is 0.01 to 15 MeV. Flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors were calculated, under the assumption that radiation energy distribution has nonlinearity in the phantom, have different meaning from those values obtained by monoenergetic radiation. Especially, these values were determined with the cross section library. The flux-to-dose-rate conversion factors obtained in this work were in a good agreement to the values presented by ANSI. Those data will be useful for the radiation shielding analysis and the radiation dosimetry in the case of continuous energy distributions. (author)

  7. Heat pulses in dilute 3He-4He mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husson, L.P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The propagation of heat pulses in dilute 3 He- 4 He mixtures under pressure along a tube, which is long compared to its diameter, is discussed. At high temperatures, where the excitations are in local equilibrium with one another, the propagation of heat pulses in the liquid is determined by the phenomenon of second sound, which is essentially a density wave in the excitation gas. The velocity and attenuation of second sound can be determined from the shape of the transmitted pulse. Measurements on the scattering and absorption of phonons are presented, together with a detailed description of the experimental technique and the electronic equipment. Measurements on the velocity and absorption of second sound are presented. From the results for the velocity of second sound in pure 4 He, values of the phonon and roton parameters are deduced. The velocity data in the mixtures have been used to calculate values of the effective mass of 3 He in superfluid 4 He. The results of these calculations have been compared with values of the effective mass obtained by other authors. The coefficient of second-sound absorption in pure 4 He is computed from theory, making use of the phonon and roton parameters calculated from the second-sound velocity data in pure 4 He. The experimental results on the scattering and absorption of phonons have been analysed. The empirical expressions for the scattering and absorption rates obtained from the diffusive phonon signals were compared with the results of the Baym-Ebner theory, and have also been used to calculate the coefficient of thermal conductivity in dilute 3 He- 4 He mixtures. (Auth.)

  8. A rating system for post pulse data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buceti, G.; Centioli, Cristina; Iannone, F.; Panella, M.; Rizzo, A.; Vitale, V.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of an automatic data validation system in a fusion experiment is to account--after every shot--for any occurrence of faulty sensors and unreliable measurements, thus preventing the proliferation of poor pulse data. In the past years a prototype has been successfully developed at Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) on a small set of density measurements. The results have shown that the model can be further extended to plant and diagnostic data, and that the same system can be used to assign to raw data a quality factor, to be stored in the archive and to be used in the post-shot elaboration phase as a selection criterion. In this way, a data validation system can also provide data analysts with an useful tool to be used as a key--together with other significant parameters, like plasma current, or magnetic field--to search the archive for quality data. This paper will describe how, using soft computing techniques, both these functions have been implemented on FTU, providing the users with a simple interface for fault detection developed in an open source environment (PHP-MySQL), to be finalised into the realisation of an overall rating system for FTU data

  9. A rating system for post pulse data validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buceti, G.; Centioli, Cristina E-mail: centioli@frascati.enea.it; Iannone, F.; Panella, M.; Rizzo, A.; Vitale, V

    2003-09-01

    The aim of an automatic data validation system in a fusion experiment is to account--after every shot--for any occurrence of faulty sensors and unreliable measurements, thus preventing the proliferation of poor pulse data. In the past years a prototype has been successfully developed at Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) on a small set of density measurements. The results have shown that the model can be further extended to plant and diagnostic data, and that the same system can be used to assign to raw data a quality factor, to be stored in the archive and to be used in the post-shot elaboration phase as a selection criterion. In this way, a data validation system can also provide data analysts with an useful tool to be used as a key--together with other significant parameters, like plasma current, or magnetic field--to search the archive for quality data. This paper will describe how, using soft computing techniques, both these functions have been implemented on FTU, providing the users with a simple interface for fault detection developed in an open source environment (PHP-MySQL), to be finalised into the realisation of an overall rating system for FTU data.

  10. 31 CFR 356.21 - How are awards at the high yield or discount rate calculated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... discount rate calculated? 356.21 Section 356.21 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... high yield or discount rate calculated? (a) Awards to submitters. We generally prorate bids at the highest accepted yield or discount rate under § 356.20(a)(2) of this part. For example, if 80.15% is the...

  11. Cavitation enhances coagulated size during pulsed high-intensity focussed ultrasound ablation in an isolated liver perfusion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu-Yan; Liu, Shan; Chen, Zong-Gui; Zou, Jian-Zhong; Wu, Feng

    2016-11-24

    To investigate whether cavitation enhances the degree of coagulation during pulsed high-intensity focussed ultrasound (HIFU) in an isolated liver perfusion system. Isolated liver was treated by pulsed HIFU or continuous-wave HIFU with different portal vein flow rates. The cavitation emission during exposure was recorded, and real-time ultrasound images were used to observe changes in the grey scale. The coagulation size was measured and calculated. HIFU treatment led to complete coagulation necrosis and total cell destruction in the target regions. Compared to exposure at a duty cycle (DC) of 100%, the mean volumes of lesions induced by 6 s exposure at DCs of 50% and 10% were significantly larger (P cavitation activity for the pulsed-HIFU (P > .05). For continuous-wave HIFU exposure, there was a significant decrease in the necrosis volume and cavitation activity for exposure times of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 s with increasing portal perfusion rates. Perfusion flow rates negatively influence cavitation activity and coagulation volume. Ablation is significantly enhanced during pulsed HIFU exposure compared with continuous-wave HIFU.

  12. Theoretical and Experimental Investigations of Coincidences in Poisson Distributed Pulse Trains and Spectral Distortion Caused by Pulse Pileup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Quentin

    1990-01-01

    Part one of this two-part study is concerned with the multiple coincidences in pulse trains from X-ray and gamma radiation detectors which are the cause of pulse pileup. A sequence of pulses with inter-arrival times less than tau, the resolving time of the pulse-height analysis system used to acquire spectra, is called a multiple pulse string. Such strings can be classified on the basis of the number of pulses they contain, or the number of resolving times they cover. The occurrence rates of such strings are derived from theoretical considerations. Logic circuits were devised to make experimental measurements of multiple pulse string occurrence rates in the output from a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector over a wide range of count rates. Markov process theory was used to predict state transition rates in the logic circuits, enabling the experimental data to be checked rigorously for conformity with those predicted for a Poisson distribution. No fundamental discrepancies were observed. Part two of the study is concerned with a theoretical analysis of pulse pileup and the development of a discrete correction algorithm, based on the use of a function to simulate the coincidence spectrum produced by partial sums of pulses. Monte Carlo simulations, incorporating criteria for pulse pileup inherent in the operation of modern ADC's, were used to generate pileup spectra due to coincidences between two pulses, (1st order pileup) and three pulses (2nd order pileup), for different semi-Gaussian pulse shapes. Coincidences between pulses in a single channel produced a basic probability density function spectrum which can be regarded as an impulse response for a particular pulse shape. The use of a flat spectrum (identical count rates in all channels) in the simulations, and in a parallel theoretical analysis, showed the 1st order pileup distorted the spectrum to a linear ramp with a pileup tail. The correction algorithm was successfully applied to correct entire spectra for 1st and

  13. Hybrid Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sawyer; Trujillo, Skyler; Fort Lewis College Laser Group Team

    This work concerns the novel design of an inexpensive pulsed Nd:YAG laser, consisting of a hybrid Kerr Mode Lock (KLM) and Q-switch pulse. The two pulse generation systems work independently, non simultaneously of each other, thus generating the ability for the user to easily switch between ultra-short pulse widths or large energy density pulses. Traditionally, SF57 glass has been used as the Kerr medium. In this work, novel Kerr mode-locking mediums are being investigated including: tellurite compound glass (TeO2), carbon disulfide (CS2), and chalcogenide glass. These materials have a nonlinear index of refraction orders of magnitude,(n2), larger than SF57 glass. The Q-switched pulse will utilize a Pockels cell. As the two pulse generation systems cannot be operated simultaneously, the Pockels cell and Kerr medium are attached to kinematic mounts, allowing for quick interchange between systems. Pulse widths and repetition rates will vary between the two systems. A goal of 100 picosecond pulse widths are desired for the mode-locked system. A goal of 10 nanosecond pulse widths are desired for the Q-switch system, with a desired repetition rate of 50 Hz. As designed, the laser will be useful in imaging applications.

  14. Failure rate modeling using fault tree analysis and Bayesian network: DEMO pulsed operation turbine study case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dongiovanni, Danilo Nicola; Iesmantas, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • RAMI (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Inspectability) assessment of secondary heat transfer loop for a DEMO nuclear fusion plant. • Definition of a fault tree for a nuclear steam turbine operated in pulsed mode. • Turbine failure rate models update by mean of a Bayesian network reflecting the fault tree analysis in the considered scenario. • Sensitivity analysis on system availability performance. - Abstract: Availability will play an important role in the Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO) success from an economic and safety perspective. Availability performance is commonly assessed by Reliability Availability Maintainability Inspectability (RAMI) analysis, strongly relying on the accurate definition of system components failure modes (FM) and failure rates (FR). Little component experience is available in fusion application, therefore requiring the adaptation of literature FR to fusion plant operating conditions, which may differ in several aspects. As a possible solution to this problem, a new methodology to extrapolate/estimate components failure rate under different operating conditions is presented. The DEMO Balance of Plant nuclear steam turbine component operated in pulse mode is considered as study case. The methodology moves from the definition of a fault tree taking into account failure modes possibly enhanced by pulsed operation. The fault tree is then translated into a Bayesian network. A statistical model for the turbine system failure rate in terms of subcomponents’ FR is hence obtained, allowing for sensitivity analyses on the structured mixture of literature and unknown FR data for which plausible value intervals are investigated to assess their impact on the whole turbine system FR. Finally, the impact of resulting turbine system FR on plant availability is assessed exploiting a Reliability Block Diagram (RBD) model for a typical secondary cooling system implementing a Rankine cycle. Mean inherent availability

  15. Failure rate modeling using fault tree analysis and Bayesian network: DEMO pulsed operation turbine study case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongiovanni, Danilo Nicola, E-mail: danilo.dongiovanni@enea.it [ENEA, Nuclear Fusion and Safety Technologies Department, via Enrico Fermi 45, Frascati 00040 (Italy); Iesmantas, Tomas [LEI, Breslaujos str. 3 Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • RAMI (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Inspectability) assessment of secondary heat transfer loop for a DEMO nuclear fusion plant. • Definition of a fault tree for a nuclear steam turbine operated in pulsed mode. • Turbine failure rate models update by mean of a Bayesian network reflecting the fault tree analysis in the considered scenario. • Sensitivity analysis on system availability performance. - Abstract: Availability will play an important role in the Demonstration Power Plant (DEMO) success from an economic and safety perspective. Availability performance is commonly assessed by Reliability Availability Maintainability Inspectability (RAMI) analysis, strongly relying on the accurate definition of system components failure modes (FM) and failure rates (FR). Little component experience is available in fusion application, therefore requiring the adaptation of literature FR to fusion plant operating conditions, which may differ in several aspects. As a possible solution to this problem, a new methodology to extrapolate/estimate components failure rate under different operating conditions is presented. The DEMO Balance of Plant nuclear steam turbine component operated in pulse mode is considered as study case. The methodology moves from the definition of a fault tree taking into account failure modes possibly enhanced by pulsed operation. The fault tree is then translated into a Bayesian network. A statistical model for the turbine system failure rate in terms of subcomponents’ FR is hence obtained, allowing for sensitivity analyses on the structured mixture of literature and unknown FR data for which plausible value intervals are investigated to assess their impact on the whole turbine system FR. Finally, the impact of resulting turbine system FR on plant availability is assessed exploiting a Reliability Block Diagram (RBD) model for a typical secondary cooling system implementing a Rankine cycle. Mean inherent availability

  16. Calculation of hydrogen outgassing rate of LHD by recombination limited model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaishi, K.; Nakasuga, M.

    2002-04-01

    To simulate hydrogen outgassing in the plasma vacuum vessel of LHD, the recombination limited model is presented, where the time evolution of hydrogen concentration in the wall of the plasma vacuum vessel is described by a one-dimensional diffusion equation. The hydrogen outgassing rates when the plasma vacuum vessel is pumped down at room temperature and baked at 100 degC are calculated as a function of pumping time. The calculation shows that the hydrogen outgassing rate of the plasma vacuum vessel can be reduced at least by one order of magnitude due to pumping and baking. This prediction is consistent with the recent result of outgassing reduction observed in the pumping-down and baking of the plasma vacuum vessel in LHD. (author)

  17. Parameters of a trigatron-driven low-pulse-repetition-rate TEA CO2 laser preionised by a surface corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aram, M; Shabanzadeh, M; Mansori, F; Behjat, A

    2007-01-01

    The design of a TEA CO 2 laser with UV preionisation by a surface corona discharge is described and the dependences of its average output energy on the gas-flow rate, discharge voltage and pulse repetition rate are presented. The scheme of the electric circuit and the geometry of the pre-ionisation system are considered. The electric circuit is designed to produce only impulse voltage difference between the laser electrodes. The triggering system of the trigatron is used to prevent the appearance of the arc. The dependences of the current, voltage and average output energy on the gas-mixture composition and applied voltages at a low pulse repetition rate are presented. The central output wavelength of the laser was measured with an IR spectrometer. Lasing at two adjacent vibrational-rotational transitions of the CO 2 molecule was observed, which demonstrates the possibility of simultaneous lasing at several lines. (lasers)

  18. Efficient modeling for pulsed activation in inertial fusion energy reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz, J.; Yuste, P.; Reyes, S.; Latkowski, J.F.

    2000-01-01

    First structural wall material (FSW) materials in inertial fusion energy (IFE) power reactors will be irradiated under typical repetition rates of 1-10 Hz, for an operation time as long as the total reactor lifetime. The main objective of the present work is to determine whether a continuous-pulsed (CP) approach can be an efficient method in modeling the pulsed activation process for operating conditions of FSW materials. The accuracy and practicability of this method was investigated both analytically and (for reaction/decay chains of two and three nuclides) by computational simulation. It was found that CP modeling is an accurate and practical method for calculating the neutron-activation of FSW materials. Its use is recommended instead of the equivalent steady-state method or the exact pulsed modeling. Moreover, the applicability of this method to components of an IFE power plant subject to repetition rates lower than those of the FSW is still being studied. The analytical investigation was performed for 0.05 Hz, which could be typical for the coolant. Conclusions seem to be similar to those obtained for the FSW. However, further future work is needed for a final answer

  19. Control of giant pulse duration in neodymium mini lasers with controllable cavity length and pulsed pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenberg, Vladimir A.; Cervantes, Miguel A.; Terpugov, Vladimir S.

    2006-01-01

    In a solid-state laser incident on aLiNdP4O12 crystal, pumped by a short light pulse, giant pulse oscillation without the use of resonator Q switching is realized. Tuning of the oscillation pulse duration from 2 up to 20 ns is achieved by changing the cavity length from 24 to 3 mm, respectively. Our analysis of this mode of laser radiation is made on the basis of the rate equations. The factors influencing oscillation pulse duration a reinvestigated. It is shown that in a limiting case the minimal value of the pulse duration is limited by only the rate of excitation transfer from the pumping band to the metastable level

  20. Approaches to proton single-event rate calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, E.L.

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses the fundamentals of proton-induced single-event upsets and of the various methods that have been developed to calculate upset rates. Two types of approaches are used based on nuclear-reaction analysis. Several aspects can be analyzed using analytic methods, but a complete description is not available. The paper presents an analytic description for the component due to elastic-scattering recoils. There have been a number of studies made using Monte Carlo methods. These can completely describe the reaction processes, including the effect of nuclear reactions occurring outside the device-sensitive volume. They have not included the elastic-scattering processes. The article describes the semiempirical approaches that are most widely used. The quality of previous upset predictions relative to space observations is discussed and leads to comments about the desired quality of future predictions. Brief sections treat the possible testing limitation due to total ionizing dose effects, the relationship of proton and heavy-ion upsets, upsets due to direct proton ionization, and relative proton and cosmic-ray upset rates

  1. 39 CFR 3010.23 - Calculation of percentage change in rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... DOMINANT PRODUCTS Rules for Applying the Price Cap § 3010.23 Calculation of percentage change in rates. (a... Postal Service billing determinants. The Postal Service shall make reasonable adjustments to the billing determinants to account for the effects of classification changes such as the introduction, deletion, or...

  2. Reirradiation of Large-Volume Recurrent Glioma With Pulsed Reduced-Dose-Rate Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adkison, Jarrod B.; Tome, Wolfgang; Seo, Songwon; Richards, Gregory M.; Robins, H. Ian; Rassmussen, Karl; Welsh, James S.; Mahler, Peter A.; Howard, Steven P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Pulsed reduced-dose-rate radiotherapy (PRDR) is a reirradiation technique that reduces the effective dose rate and increases the treatment time, allowing sublethal damage repair during irradiation. Patients and Methods: A total of 103 patients with recurrent glioma underwent reirradiation using PRDR (86 considered to have Grade 4 at PRDR). PRDR was delivered using a series of 0.2-Gy pulses at 3-min intervals, creating an apparent dose rate of 0.0667 Gy/min to a median dose of 50 Gy (range, 20-60) delivered in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions. The mean treatment volume was 403.5 ± 189.4 cm 3 according to T 2 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging and a 2-cm margin. Results: For the initial or upgraded Grade 4 cohort (n = 86), the median interval from the first irradiation to PRDR was 14 months. Patients undergoing PRDR within 14 months of the first irradiation (n = 43) had a median survival of 21 weeks. Those treated ≥14 months after radiotherapy had a median survival of 28 weeks (n = 43; p = 0.004 and HR = 1.82 with a 95% CI ranging from 1.25 to 3.10). These data compared favorably to historical data sets, because only 16% of the patients were treated at first relapse (with 46% treated at the second relapse, 32% at the third or fourth relapse, and 4% at the fourth or fifth relapse). The median survival since diagnosis and retreatment was 6.3 years and 11.4 months for low-grade, 4.1 years and 5.6 months for Grade 3, and 1.6 years and 5.1 months for Grade 4 tumors, respectively, according to the initial histologic findings. Multivariate analysis revealed age at the initial diagnosis, initial low-grade disease, and Karnofsky performance score of ≥80 to be significant predictors of survival after initiation of PRDR. Conclusion: PRDR allowed for safe retreatment of larger volumes to high doses with palliative benefit.

  3. Power scaling of supercontinuum seeded megahertz-repetition rate optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, R; Stephanides, A; Prandolini, M J; Gronloh, B; Jungbluth, B; Mans, T; Tavella, F

    2014-03-15

    Optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifiers with high average power are possible with novel high-power Yb:YAG amplifiers with kW-level output powers. We demonstrate a compact wavelength-tunable sub-30-fs amplifier with 11.4 W average power with 20.7% pump-to-signal conversion efficiency. For parametric amplification, a beta-barium borate crystal is pumped by a 140 W, 1 ps Yb:YAG InnoSlab amplifier at 3.25 MHz repetition rate. The broadband seed is generated via supercontinuum generation in a YAG crystal.

  4. Distorted wave approach to calculate Auger transition rates of ions in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutscher, Stefan A. E-mail: sad@utk.edu; Diez Muino, R.; Arnau, A.; Salin, A.; Zaremba, E

    2001-08-01

    We evaluate the role of target distortion in the determination of Auger transition rates for multicharged ions in metals. The required two electron matrix elements are calculated using numerical solutions of the Kohn-Sham equations for both the bound and continuum states. Comparisons with calculations performed using plane waves and hydrogenic orbitals are presented.

  5. Medicine and ionizing rays: a help sheet in analysing risks in pulsed rate curietherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauron, C.

    2009-01-01

    This document proposes a synthesis of useful knowledge for radioprotection in the case of pulsed rate curietherapy. Several aspects are considered: the concerned personnel, the course of treatment procedures, the hazards, the identification of the risk associated with ionizing radiation, the risk assessment and the determination of exposure levels, the strategy to control the risks (reduction of risks, technical measures concerning the installation or the personnel, teaching and information, prevention and medical monitoring), and risk control assessment

  6. Fieldable computer system for determining gamma-ray pulse-height distributions, flux spectra, and dose rates from Little Boy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, C.E.; Lucas, M.C.; Tisinger, E.W.; Hamm, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Our system consists of a LeCroy 3500 data acquisition system with a built-in CAMAC crate and eight bismuth-germanate detectors 7.62 cm in diameter and 7.62 cm long. Gamma-ray pulse-height distributions are acquired simultaneously for up to eight positions. The system was very carefully calibrated and characterized from 0.1 to 8.3 MeV using gamma-ray spectra from a variety of radioactive sources. By fitting the pulse-height distributions from the sources with a function containing 17 parameters, we determined theoretical repsonse functions. We use these response functions to unfold the distributions to obtain flux spectra. A flux-to-dose-rate conversion curve based on the work of Dimbylow and Francis is then used to obtain dose rates. Direct use of measured spectra and flux-to-dose-rate curves to obtain dose rates avoids the errors that can arise from spectrum dependence in simple gamma-ray dosimeter instruments. We present some gamma-ray doses for the Little Boy assembly operated at low power. These results can be used to determine the exposures of the Hiroshima survivors and thus aid in the establishment of radation exposure limits for the nuclear industry

  7. Dose rates from a C-14 source using extrapolation chamber and MC calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, J.

    1996-05-01

    The extrapolation chamber technique and the Monte Carlo (MC) calculation technique based on the EGS4 system have been studied for application for determination of dose rates in a low-energy β radiation field e.g., that from a 14 C source. The extrapolation chamber measurement method is the basic method for determination of dose rates in β radiation fields. Applying a number of correction factors and the stopping power ratio, tissue to air, the measured dose rate in an air volume surrounded by tissue equivalent material is converted into dose to tissue. Various details of the extrapolation chamber measurement method and evaluation procedure have been studied and further developed, and a complete procedure for the experimental determination of dose rates from a 14 C source is presented. A number of correction factors and other parameters used in the evaluation procedure for the measured data have been obtained by MC calculations. The whole extrapolation chamber measurement procedure was simulated using the MC method. The measured dose rates showed an increasing deviation from the MC calculated dose rates as the absorber thickness increased. This indicates that the EGS4 code may have some limitations for transport of very low-energy electrons. i.e., electrons with estimated energies less than 10 - 20 keV. MC calculations of dose to tissue were performed using two models: a cylindrical tissue phantom and a computer model of the extrapolation chamber. The dose to tissue in the extrapolation chamber model showed an additional buildup dose compared to the dose in the tissue model. (au) 10 tabs., 11 ills., 18 refs

  8. THIDA: code system for calculation of the exposure dose rate around a fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Hiromasa; Igarashi, Masahito.

    1978-12-01

    A code system THIDA has been developed for calculation of the exposure dose rates around a fusion device. It consists of the following: one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinate transport codes; induced activity calculation code; activation chain, activation cross section, radionuclide gamma-ray energy/intensity and gamma-ray group constant files; and gamma ray flux to exposure dose rate conversion coefficients. (author)

  9. Electronic system for recording proportional counter rare pulses with the pulse shape analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanov, I.R.; Gavrin, V.N.; Zakharov, Yu.I.; Tikhonov, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The anutomated system for recording proportional counter rare pulses is described. The proportional counters are aimed at identification of 37 Ar and H7 1 Gr decays in chemical radiation detectors of solar neutrino. Pulse shape recording by means of a storage oscilloscope and a TV display is performed in the system considered besides two-parametric selection of events (measurement of pulse amplitude in a slow channel and the amplitude of pulse differentiated with time constant of about 10 ns in a parallel fast channel). Pulse discrimination by a front rise rate provides background decrease in the 55 Fe range (5.9 keV) by 6 times; the visual analysis of pulse shapes recorded allows to decrease the background additionally by 25-30%. The background counting rate in the 55 Fe range being equal to 1 pulse per 1.5 days, is obtained when using the installation described above, as well as the passive Pb shield 5 cm thick, and the active shield based on the anticoincidence NaI(Tl) detector with the cathode 5.6 mm in-diameter made of Fe fabircated by zone melting. The installation described allows to reach the background level of 0.6 pulse/day (the total coefficient of background attenuation is 400). Further background decrease is supposed to be provided by installation allocation in the low-noise underground laboratory of the Baksan Neutrino Observatory

  10. CW seeded optical parametric amplifier providing wavelength and pulse duration tunable nearly transform limited pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hädrich, S; Gottschall, T; Rothhardt, J; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2010-02-01

    An optical parametric amplifier that delivers nearly transform limited pulses is presented. The center wavelength of these pulses can be tuned between 993 nm and 1070 nm and, at the same time, the pulse duration is varied between 206 fs and 650 fs. At the shortest pulse duration the pulse energy was increased up to 7.2 microJ at 50 kHz repetition rate. Variation of the wavelength is achieved by applying a tunable cw seed while the pulse duration can be varied via altering the pump pulse duration. This scheme offers superior flexibility and scaling possibilities.

  11. Study on pulsed-discharge devices with high current rising rate for point spot short-wavelength source in dense plasma observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachinami, Fumitaka; Anzai, Nobuyuki; Sasaki, Toru; Kikuchi, Takashi; Harada, Nob.

    2014-01-01

    A pulsed-power generator with high current rise based on a pulse-forming-network was studied toward generating intense point-spot X-ray source. To obtain the high rate of current rise, we have designed the compact discharge device with low circuit inductance. The results indicate that the inductance of the compact discharge device was dominated by a gap switch inductance. To reduce the gap switch inductance and operation voltage, the feasible gap switch inductance in the vacuum chamber has been estimated by the circuit simulation. The gap switch inductance can be reduced by the lower pressure operation. It means that the designed discharge device achieves the rate of current rise of 10 12 A/s

  12. Coiled transmission line pulse generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kenneth Fox

    2010-11-09

    Methods and apparatus are provided for fabricating and constructing solid dielectric "Coiled Transmission Line" pulse generators in radial or axial coiled geometries. The pour and cure fabrication process enables a wide variety of geometries and form factors. The volume between the conductors is filled with liquid blends of monomers, polymers, oligomers, and/or cross-linkers and dielectric powders; and then cured to form high field strength and high dielectric constant solid dielectric transmission lines that intrinsically produce ideal rectangular high voltage pulses when charged and switched into matched impedance loads. Voltage levels may be increased by Marx and/or Blumlein principles incorporating spark gap or, preferentially, solid state switches (such as optically triggered thyristors) which produce reliable, high repetition rate operation. Moreover, these Marxed pulse generators can be DC charged and do not require additional pulse forming circuitry, pulse forming lines, transformers, or an a high voltage spark gap output switch. The apparatus accommodates a wide range of voltages, impedances, pulse durations, pulse repetition rates, and duty cycles. The resulting mobile or flight platform friendly cylindrical geometric configuration is much more compact, light-weight, and robust than conventional linear geometries, or pulse generators constructed from conventional components. Installing additional circuitry may accommodate optional pulse shape improvements. The Coiled Transmission Lines can also be connected in parallel to decrease the impedance, or in series to increase the pulse length.

  13. Effects of pulse frequency of input power on the physical and chemical properties of pulsed streamer discharge plasmas in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruma; Lukes, P.; Aoki, N.; Spetlikova, E.; Hosseini, S. H. R.; Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H.

    2013-03-01

    A repetitive pulsed-power modulator, which employs a magnetic pulse compression circuit with a high-speed thyristor switch, was used to study the effects of the pulse repetition rate of input power on the physical and chemical properties of pulsed discharges in water. Positive high-voltage pulses of 20 kV with repetition rates of up to 1 kHz were used to generate a discharge in water using the point-to-plane electrode geometry. By varying the pulse repetition rate, two distinct modes of the discharge plasma were formed in water. The first mode was characterized by the formation of a corona-like discharge propagating through water in the form of streamer channels. The second mode was formed typically above 500 Hz, when the formation of streamer channels in water was suppressed and all plasmas occurred inside a spheroidal aggregate of very fine gas bubbles surrounding the tip of the high-voltage electrode. The production of hydrogen peroxide, degradation of organic dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and inactivation of bacteria Escherichia coli by the discharge in water were studied under different discharge plasma modes in dependence on the pulse repetition rate of input power. The efficiency of both chemical and biocidal processes induced by the plasma in water decreased significantly with pulse repetition rates above 500 Hz.

  14. Effects of pulse frequency of input power on the physical and chemical properties of pulsed streamer discharge plasmas in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruma; Aoki, N; Hosseini, S H R; Sakugawa, T; Akiyama, H; Lukes, P; Spetlikova, E

    2013-01-01

    A repetitive pulsed-power modulator, which employs a magnetic pulse compression circuit with a high-speed thyristor switch, was used to study the effects of the pulse repetition rate of input power on the physical and chemical properties of pulsed discharges in water. Positive high-voltage pulses of 20 kV with repetition rates of up to 1 kHz were used to generate a discharge in water using the point-to-plane electrode geometry. By varying the pulse repetition rate, two distinct modes of the discharge plasma were formed in water. The first mode was characterized by the formation of a corona-like discharge propagating through water in the form of streamer channels. The second mode was formed typically above 500 Hz, when the formation of streamer channels in water was suppressed and all plasmas occurred inside a spheroidal aggregate of very fine gas bubbles surrounding the tip of the high-voltage electrode. The production of hydrogen peroxide, degradation of organic dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) and inactivation of bacteria Escherichia coli by the discharge in water were studied under different discharge plasma modes in dependence on the pulse repetition rate of input power. The efficiency of both chemical and biocidal processes induced by the plasma in water decreased significantly with pulse repetition rates above 500 Hz. (paper)

  15. X particle effect for 6Li reaction rates calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocak, G.; Balantekin, A. B.

    2009-01-01

    The inferred primordial 6 L i-7 L i abundances are different from standard big bang nucleosynthesis results, 6 L i is 1000 times larger and 7 L i is 3 times smaller than the big bang prediction. In big bang nucleosynthesis, negatively charged massive X particles a possible solution to explain this primordial Li abundances problem [1]. In this study, we consider only X particle effect for nuclear reactions to obtain S-factor and reaction rates for Li. All S-factors calculated within the Optical Model framework for d(α,γ)6 L i system. We showed that the enhancement effect of massive negatively charged X particle for 6 L i system reaction rate.(author)

  16. The correlation schemes in calculations of the rate constants of some radiation chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorets, P.A.; Shostenko, A.G.; Kim, V.

    1983-01-01

    The various correlation relationships of the evaluation of the rate constants of radiation chemical reactions of addition, abstraction and isomerization were considered. It was shown that neglection of the influence of solvent can result in errors in calculations of rate constants equalling two orders in magnitude. Several examples of isokinetic relationship are given. The methods of calculation of transmission coefficient of reaction addition have been discussed. (author)

  17. Calculation of expected rates of fisheries‐induced evolution in data‐poor situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste

    2010-01-01

    A central part of an impact assessment of the evolutionary effects of fishing is a calculation of the expected rates of fishing induced by current fishing practice and an evaluation of how alternative fishing patterns may reduce evolutionary impacts of fishing. Here a general size-based framework...... for modeling the demography of fish based on size-based prescriptions of natural mortality, growth, and fishing is presented. Life history theory is used to reduce the necessary parameter set by utilizing relations between parameters making the framework particularly well suited for data-poor situations where...... only the size at maturation or the asymptotic size is known. The framework is applied to perform the modeling part of an evolutionary impact assessment using basic quantitative genetics to calculated expected rates of evolution on size at maturation, growth rate, and investment in gonads. A sensitivity...

  18. Advanced local dose rate calculations with the Monte Carlo code MCNP for plutonium nitrate storage containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quade, U.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron- und Gamma dose rate calculations were performed for the storage containers filled with plutonium nitrate of the MOX fabrication facility of Siemens. For the particle transport calculations the Monte Carlo Code MCNP 4.2 was used. The calculated results were compared with experimental dose rate measurements. It can be stated that the choice of the code system was appropriate since all aspects of the many facettes of the problem were well reproduced in the calculations. The position dependency as well as the influence of the shieldings, the reflections and the mutual influences of the sources were well described by the calculations for the gamma and for the neutron dose rates. However, good agreement with the experimental results on the gamma dose rates could only be reached when the lead shielding of the detector was integrated into the geometry modelling of the calculations. For some few cases of thick shieldings and soft gamma ray sources the statistics of the calculational results were not sufficient. In such cases more elaborate variance reduction methods must be applied in future calculations. Thus the MCNP code in connection with NGSRC has been proven as an effective tool for the solution of this type of problems. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Scattering of Femtosecond Laser Pulses on the Negative Hydrogen Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astapenko, V. A.; Moroz, N. N.

    2018-05-01

    Elastic scattering of ultrashort laser pulses (USLPs) on the negative hydrogen ion is considered. Results of calculations of the USLP scattering probability are presented and analyzed for pulses of two types: the corrected Gaussian pulse and wavelet pulse without carrier frequency depending on the problem parameters.

  20. A Simple Exact Error Rate Analysis for DS-CDMA with Arbitrary Pulse Shape in Flat Nakagami Fading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Azizur; Sasaki, Shigenobu; Kikuchi, Hisakazu; Harada, Hiroshi; Kato, Shuzo

    A simple exact error rate analysis is presented for random binary direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA) considering a general pulse shape and flat Nakagami fading channel. First of all, a simple model is developed for the multiple access interference (MAI). Based on this, a simple exact expression of the characteristic function (CF) of MAI is developed in a straight forward manner. Finally, an exact expression of error rate is obtained following the CF method of error rate analysis. The exact error rate so obtained can be much easily evaluated as compared to the only reliable approximate error rate expression currently available, which is based on the Improved Gaussian Approximation (IGA).

  1. The Effects of TM on Concurrent Heart Rate, Peripheral Blood Pulse Volume, and the Alpha Wave Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Jerome S.

    Through observation of 26 subjects over a 3 month period, this research project measured the effects of transcendental meditation (TM) on concurrent heart rate, peripheral blood pulse volume, and the alpha wave frequency. The subjects were assigned randomly to three groups. One group practiced TM as prescribed by the International Meditation…

  2. Calculation of pressure fields from arbitrarily shaped, apodized, and excited ultrasound transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Svendsen, Niels Bruun

    1992-01-01

    A method for simulation of pulsed pressure fields from arbitrarily shaped, apodized and excited ultrasound transducers is suggested. It relies on the Tupholme-Stepanishen method for calculating pulsed pressure fields, and can also handle the continuous wave and pulse-echo case. The field...... is calculated by dividing the surface into small rectangles and then Summing their response. A fast calculation is obtained by using the far-field approximation. Examples of the accuracy of the approach and actual calculation times are given...

  3. Experimental research of double-pulse linear induction electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Shuqing; Cheng Cheng; Zheng Shuxin; Tang Chuanxiang; Lin Yuzheng; Jing Xiaobing; Mu Fan; Pan Haifeng

    2009-01-01

    The Mini-LIA is a double-pulse linear induction electron accelerator with megahertz repetition rates, which consists of a double-pulse power system, a thermal cathode electron gun, two induction cells, beam transportation systems and diagnosis systems, etc. Experiments of the Mini-LIA have been conducted. The double-pulse high voltage was obtained with several hundred nanosecond pulse intervals (i. e. megahertz repetition rate) and each pulse had an 80 kV amplitude with a FWHM of 80 ns. In the gap of the induction cell, the double-pulse accelerating electric field was measured via E-field probes, and the double-pulse electron beam with a current about 1.1 A has been obtained at the Mini-LIA exit. These experimental results show that the double-pulse high voltage with megahertz repetition rates can be generated by an insulation and junction system. And they also indicate that the induction cell with metglas as the ferromagnetic material and the LaB 6 thermal cathode electron gun suit the double-pulse operation with megahertz repetition rates. (authors)

  4. Quality control in pulsed dose rate brachytherapy; Controle de qualite en curietherapie de debit de dose pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metayer, Y.; Brunaud, C.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Unite de Radiophysique, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Meyer, P. [Centre Paul-Strauss, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    2009-07-15

    A prospective multicenter study (P.D.R.) was leaded on pulsed dose rate brachytherapy over 2 years (2005/2006) in 20 French centres, as part of a programme entitled (Support for the innovative and expensive techniques) S.t.i.c.-P.D.R. and supported by the French ministry of health. Eight hundred and fifty patients were treated for cervix carcinoma with 2D classic or 3D innovative brachytherapy (425 in each arm). The main objectives of this study were to assess the cost of P.D.R. brachytherapy with dose optimization compared to traditional treatments, and to evaluate the complications and local control. A joint programme of quality control was established by the physicists of the different centres, concerning the software treatment planning, the source replacement, the projector and the technical parameters of the course of patient treatment. This technical note lists these controls, and their frequency. (authors)

  5. Dynamic pulse buckling of cylindrical shells under axial impact: A benchmark study of 2D and 3D finite element calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several 2D and 3D finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the work is to investigate the performance of various analysis codes and element types on a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry. During the pulse buckling tests, a buckle formed at each end of the cylinder, and one of the two buckles became unstable and collapsed. Numerical simulations of the test were performed using PRONTO, a Sandia developed transient dynamics analysis code, and ABAQUS/Explicit with both shell and continuum elements. The calculations are compared to the tests with respect to deformed shape and impact load history

  6. Tunable dispersion compensator based on uniform fiber Bragg grating and its application to tunable pulse repetition-rate multiplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Geun; Lee, Sang

    2005-11-14

    A new technique to control the chromatic dispersion of a uniform fiber Bragg grating based on the symmetrical bending is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The specially designed two translation stages with gears and a sawtooth wheel can simultaneously induce the tension and compression strain corresponding to the bending direction. The tension and compression strain can effectively control the chirp ratio along the fiber grating attached on a flexible cantilever beam and consequently the dispersion value without the center wavelength shift. We successfully achieve the wide tuning range of chromatic dispersion without the center wavelength shift, which is less than 0.02 nm. We also reduce the group delay ripple as low as ~+/-5 ps. And we also demonstrate the application of the proposed tunable dispersion compensation technique to the tunable pulse repetition-rate multiplication and obtain high-quality pulses at repetition rates of 20 ~ 40 GHz.

  7. Kinetic model of vibrational relaxation in a humid-air pulsed corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komuro, Atsushi; Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2010-01-01

    The effect of humidity on the vibrational relaxation of O 2 (v) and N 2 (v) in a humid-air pulsed corona discharge is studied using a kinetic model. We previously showed that humidity markedly increases the vibration-to-translation (V-T) rate of molecules in a humid-air pulsed corona discharge by measuring O 2 (v) density (Ono et al 2010 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 19 015009). In this paper, we numerically calculate the vibrational kinetics of O 2 , N 2 and H 2 O to study the reason behind the acceleration of V-T in the presence of humidity. The calculation closely reproduces the measured acceleration of V-T due to humidity, and shows that the increase in the V-T rate is caused by the fast vibration-to-vibration (V-V) processes of O 2 -H 2 O and N 2 -H 2 O and the subsequent rapid V-T process of H 2 O-H 2 O. In addition, it is shown that O atom density is also important in the vibrational kinetics owing to the rapid V-T process of O 2 -O.

  8. Glass dissolution rate measurement and calculation revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Maxime, E-mail: maxime.fournier@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Ull, Aurélien; Nicoleau, Elodie [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Inagaki, Yaohiro [Department of Applied Quantum Physics & Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, 819-0395 (Japan); Odorico, Michaël [ICSM-UMR5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Site de Marcoule, BP17171, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207, Bagnols sur Cèze (France)

    2016-08-01

    Aqueous dissolution rate measurements of nuclear glasses are a key step in the long-term behavior study of such waste forms. These rates are routinely normalized to the glass surface area in contact with solution, and experiments are very often carried out using crushed materials. Various methods have been implemented to determine the surface area of such glass powders, leading to differing values, with the notion of the reactive surface area of crushed glass remaining vague. In this study, around forty initial dissolution rate measurements were conducted following static and flow rate (SPFT, MCFT) measurement protocols at 90 °C, pH 10. The international reference glass (ISG), in the forms of powders with different particle sizes and polished monoliths, and soda-lime glass beads were examined. Although crushed glass grains clearly cannot be assimilated with spheres, it is when using the samples geometric surface (S{sub geo}) that the rates measured on powders are closest to those found for monoliths. Overestimation of the reactive surface when using the BET model (S{sub BET}) may be due to small physical features at the atomic scale—contributing to BET surface area but not to AFM surface area. Such features are very small compared with the thickness of water ingress in glass (a few hundred nanometers) and should not be considered in rate calculations. With a S{sub BET}/S{sub geo} ratio of 2.5 ± 0.2 for ISG powders, it is shown here that rates measured on powders and normalized to S{sub geo} should be divided by 1.3 and rates normalized to S{sub BET} should be multiplied by 1.9 in order to be compared with rates measured on a monolith. The use of glass beads indicates that the geometric surface gives a good estimation of glass reactive surface if sample geometry can be precisely described. Although data clearly shows the repeatability of measurements, results must be given with a high uncertainty of approximately ±25%. - Highlights: • Initial dissolution

  9. Preliminary calculations on the cooling rate of the Renca batholit, Sierra de San Luis, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez de Luchi, M.G.; Ostera, H.A.; Linares, E; Rosello, E.A

    2001-01-01

    Cooling rates can be used to constrain the unroofing history of plutonic-metamorphic system. Geocronological cooling rates (Spear and Parrish, 1996) can be unravelled using age calculations on minerals that were open systems and subsequently passed through their closure temperatures (Dodson, 1973) during cooling. Several age determinations on different minerals are needed in order to accurately constrain the cooling path of a pluton (Hodges 1991, Spear and Parrish, 1996 and references therein). Isotopic open-system behaviour in minerals can be modelled as volume diffusion process (Hodges, 1991 and references therein), which depends on the cooling rate of the whole system. We present the first results on the calculation of the cooling rate of the Renca batholith on the basis of the combination of both thermometric calculations and available crystallization and cooling ages (au)

  10. LASERS: Parameters of a trigatron-driven low-pulse-repetition-rate TEA CO2 laser preionised by a surface corona discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aram, M.; Behjat, A.; Shabanzadeh, M.; Mansori, F.

    2007-01-01

    The design of a TEA CO2 laser with UV preionisation by a surface corona discharge is described and the dependences of its average output energy on the gas-flow rate, discharge voltage and pulse repetition rate are presented. The scheme of the electric circuit and the geometry of the pre-ionisation system are considered. The electric circuit is designed to produce only impulse voltage difference between the laser electrodes. The triggering system of the trigatron is used to prevent the appearance of the arc. The dependences of the current, voltage and average output energy on the gas-mixture composition and applied voltages at a low pulse repetition rate are presented. The central output wavelength of the laser was measured with an IR spectrometer. Lasing at two adjacent vibrational-rotational transitions of the CO2 molecule was observed, which demonstrates the possibility of simultaneous lasing at several lines.

  11. Simulation analysis of impulse characteristics of space debris irradiated by multi-pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhengguo; Jin, Xing; Chang, Hao; You, Xiangyu

    2018-02-01

    Cleaning space debris with laser is a hot topic in the field of space security research. Impulse characteristics are the basis of cleaning space debris with laser. In order to study the impulse characteristics of rotating irregular space debris irradiated by multi-pulse laser, the impulse calculation method of rotating space debris irradiated by multi-pulse laser is established based on the area matrix method. The calculation method of impulse and impulsive moment under multi-pulse irradiation is given. The calculation process of total impulse under multi-pulse irradiation is analyzed. With a typical non-planar space debris (cube) as example, the impulse characteristics of space debris irradiated by multi-pulse laser are simulated and analyzed. The effects of initial angular velocity, spot size and pulse frequency on impulse characteristics are investigated.

  12. Constrained independent component analysis approach to nonobtrusive pulse rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouri, Gill R.; Kyal, Survi; Dianat, Sohail; Mestha, Lalit K.

    2012-07-01

    Nonobtrusive pulse rate measurement using a webcam is considered. We demonstrate how state-of-the-art algorithms based on independent component analysis suffer from a sorting problem which hinders their performance, and propose a novel algorithm based on constrained independent component analysis to improve performance. We present how the proposed algorithm extracts a photoplethysmography signal and resolves the sorting problem. In addition, we perform a comparative study between the proposed algorithm and state-of-the-art algorithms over 45 video streams using a finger probe oxymeter for reference measurements. The proposed algorithm provides improved accuracy: the root mean square error is decreased from 20.6 and 9.5 beats per minute (bpm) for existing algorithms to 3.5 bpm for the proposed algorithm. An error of 3.5 bpm is within the inaccuracy expected from the reference measurements. This implies that the proposed algorithm provided performance of equal accuracy to the finger probe oximeter.

  13. Random noise effects in pulse-mode digital multilayer neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y C; Shanblatt, M A

    1995-01-01

    A pulse-mode digital multilayer neural network (DMNN) based on stochastic computing techniques is implemented with simple logic gates as basic computing elements. The pulse-mode signal representation and the use of simple logic gates for neural operations lead to a massively parallel yet compact and flexible network architecture, well suited for VLSI implementation. Algebraic neural operations are replaced by stochastic processes using pseudorandom pulse sequences. The distributions of the results from the stochastic processes are approximated using the hypergeometric distribution. Synaptic weights and neuron states are represented as probabilities and estimated as average pulse occurrence rates in corresponding pulse sequences. A statistical model of the noise (error) is developed to estimate the relative accuracy associated with stochastic computing in terms of mean and variance. Computational differences are then explained by comparison to deterministic neural computations. DMNN feedforward architectures are modeled in VHDL using character recognition problems as testbeds. Computational accuracy is analyzed, and the results of the statistical model are compared with the actual simulation results. Experiments show that the calculations performed in the DMNN are more accurate than those anticipated when Bernoulli sequences are assumed, as is common in the literature. Furthermore, the statistical model successfully predicts the accuracy of the operations performed in the DMNN.

  14. Fast Computation of Pulse Height Spectra Using SGRD Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humbert Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available SGRD (Spectroscopy, Gamma rays, Rapid, Deterministic code is used for fast calculation of the gamma ray spectrum produced by a spherical shielded source and measured by a detector. The photon source lines originate from the radioactive decay of the unstable isotopes. The emission rate and spectrum of these primary sources are calculated using the DARWIN code. The leakage spectrum is separated in two parts, the uncollided component is transported by ray-tracing and the scattered component is calculated using a multigroup discrete ordinates method. The pulsed height spectrum is then simulated by folding the leakage spectrum with the detector response functions which are pre-calculated using MCNP5 code for each considered detector type. An application to the simulation of the gamma spectrum produced by a natural uranium ball coated with plexiglass and measured using a NaI detector is presented.

  15. CALCULATION OF SHOCK-WAVE PULSE EFFECT ON OUTSTRETCHED SPINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Esman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined effects of a shock-wave pulse method and mechanotherapy on a spine is considered as an alternative to conservative and operative methods.Methodology for spinal disease treatment while applying a shock-wave therapy is characterized by the following specific features. Firstly, it is necessary to limit a penetration depth of shock pulses in a biological object in order to exclude damage to a spinal cord. Secondly, it is necessary to limit an energy flux density:Imax≤ 0,280 J∕m2and  pressure in focus:PFmax≤ 0,040 MPа,in order to exclude traumatizing of spinal tissue and only stimulate blood  circulation and metabolic processes in them.Where an acceptable value of the force acting on the inter-vertebral disc while a shock wave is passing is determined by the following formula: F max = PFmaxS = PFmax πr02 = 0,040 ∙106 ∙3,14 ∙(8∙10-32 = 9 N, where r0 – a focal spot radius, mm.Mechanotherapy is applied in combination with the shock-wave therapy and it presupposes the following: an outstretching force acts created in a longitudinal direction of the spine and it is directed across a vertebral column, whose value usually ranges from 50 to 500 N.   

  16. Modeling of intense pulsed ion beam heated masked targets for extreme materials characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, John J.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Intense, pulsed ion beams locally heat materials and deliver dense electronic excitations that can induce material modifications and phase transitions. Material properties can potentially be stabilized by rapid quenching. Pulsed ion beams with pulse lengths of order ns have recently become available for materials processing. Here, we optimize mask geometries for local modification of materials by intense ion pulses. The goal is to rapidly excite targets volumetrically to the point where a phase transition or local lattice reconstruction is induced followed by rapid cooling that stabilizes desired material's properties fast enough before the target is altered or damaged by, e.g., hydrodynamic expansion. By using a mask, the longitudinal dimension can be large compared to the transverse dimension, allowing the possibility of rapid transverse cooling. We performed HYDRA simulations that calculate peak temperatures for a series of excitation conditions and cooling rates of silicon targets with micro-structured masks and compare these to a simple analytical model. The model gives scaling laws that can guide the design of targets over a wide range of pulsed ion beam parameters.

  17. Resolving an ostensible inconsistency in calculating the evaporation rate of sessile drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chini, S F; Amirfazli, A

    2017-05-01

    This paper resolves an ostensible inconsistency in the literature in calculating the evaporation rate for sessile drops in a quiescent environment. The earlier models in the literature have shown that adapting the evaporation flux model for a suspended spherical drop to calculate the evaporation rate of a sessile drop needs a correction factor; the correction factor was shown to be a function of the drop contact angle, i.e. f(θ). However, there seemed to be a problem as none of the earlier models explicitly or implicitly mentioned the evaporation flux variations along the surface of a sessile drop. The more recent evaporation models include this variation using an electrostatic analogy, i.e. the Laplace equation (steady-state continuity) in a domain with a known boundary condition value, or known as the Dirichlet problem for Laplace's equation. The challenge is that the calculated evaporation rates using the earlier models seemed to differ from that of the recent models (note both types of models were validated in the literature by experiments). We have reinvestigated the recent models and found that the mathematical simplifications in solving the Dirichlet problem in toroidal coordinates have created the inconsistency. We also proposed a closed form approximation for f(θ) which is valid in a wide range, i.e. 8°≤θ≤131°. Using the proposed model in this study, theoretically, it was shown that the evaporation rate in the CWA (constant wetted area) mode is faster than the evaporation rate in the CCA (constant contact angle) mode for a sessile drop. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Radial Pressure Pulse and Heart Rate Variability in Heat- and Cold-Stressed Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Ming Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explore the effects of heat and cold stress on the radial pressure pulse (RPP and heart rate variability (HRV. The subjects immersed their left hand into 45°C and 7°C water for 2 minutes. Sixty healthy subjects (age 25±4 yr; 29 men and 31 women were enrolled in this study. All subjects underwent the supine temperature measurements of the bilateral forearms, brachial arterial blood pressure, HRV and RPP with a pulse analyzer in normothermic conditions, and thermal stresses. The power spectral low-frequency (LF and high-frequency (HF components of HRV decreased in the heat test and increased in the cold test. The heat stress significantly reduced radial augmentation index (AIr (P<.05, but the cold stress significantly increased AIr (P<.01. The spectral energy of RPP did not show any statistical difference in 0∼10 Hz region under both conditions, but in the region of 10∼50 Hz, there was a significant increase (P<.01 in the heat test and a significant decrease in the cold test (P<.01. The changes in AIr induced by heat and cold stress were significantly negatively correlated with the spectral energy in the region of 10∼50 Hz (SE10−50 Hz but not in the region of 0∼10 Hz (SE0−10 Hz. The results demonstrated that the SE10−50 Hz, which only possessed a small percentage in total pulse energy, presented more physiological characteristics than the SE0−10 Hz under the thermal stresses.

  19. Radial Pressure Pulse and Heart Rate Variability in Heat- and Cold-Stressed Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chin-Ming; Chang, Hsien-Cheh; Kao, Shung-Te; Li, Tsai-Chung; Wei, Ching-Chuan; Chen, Chiachung; Liao, Yin-Tzu; Chen, Fun-Jou

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of heat and cold stress on the radial pressure pulse (RPP) and heart rate variability (HRV). The subjects immersed their left hand into 45°C and 7°C water for 2 minutes. Sixty healthy subjects (age 25 ± 4 yr; 29 men and 31 women) were enrolled in this study. All subjects underwent the supine temperature measurements of the bilateral forearms, brachial arterial blood pressure, HRV and RPP with a pulse analyzer in normothermic conditions, and thermal stresses. The power spectral low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components of HRV decreased in the heat test and increased in the cold test. The heat stress significantly reduced radial augmentation index (AIr) (P < .05), but the cold stress significantly increased AIr (P < .01). The spectral energy of RPP did not show any statistical difference in 0 ~ 10 Hz region under both conditions, but in the region of 10 ~ 50 Hz, there was a significant increase (P < .01) in the heat test and a significant decrease in the cold test (P < .01). The changes in AIr induced by heat and cold stress were significantly negatively correlated with the spectral energy in the region of 10 ~ 50 Hz (SE10−50 Hz) but not in the region of 0 ~ 10 Hz (SE0−10 Hz). The results demonstrated that the SE10−50 Hz, which only possessed a small percentage in total pulse energy, presented more physiological characteristics than the SE0−10 Hz under the thermal stresses. PMID:21113292

  20. Self-resonant wakefield excitation by intense laser pulse in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, N.E.; Pogosova, A.A.; Gorbunov, L.M.; Ramazashvili, R.R.; Kirsanov, V.I.

    1993-01-01

    It is demonstrated by theoretical analysis and numerical calculations that in an underdense plasma the process of three-dimensional evolution of the short and strong laser pulse (with duration equal to several plasma periods) leads to compression and self-modulation of the pulse, so that during a fairly long period of time beats of pulse amplitude generates resonantly a strong and stable plasma wakefield. The intensity of the wake-field is so high that it can provide a new promising outlook for the plasma based accelerator concept. Linear analysis of dispersion relation predicts that taking into account transverse component of wavenumber considerably increases the growth rate of resonance instability of the pulse. The numerical simulations demonstrate that considered self-focusing and resonant-modulation instability are essentially three dimensional processes. Laser field evolution in each transverse cross section of the pulse is synchronized by the regular structure of plasma wave that is excited by the pulse. The considered effect of resonant modulation has a threshold. For the pulses with the intensity below the threshold the refraction dominates and no modulation appears. The studied phenomenon can be referred to as the Self-Resonant Wakefield (SRWF) excitation that is driven by self-focusing and self-modulation of laser pulse with quite a moderate initial duration. In fact, this method of excitation differs from both suggested in Ref.1 (PBWA) and in Refs.2,3 (LWFA), being even more than the combination of these concepts. Unlike the first scheme it does not require initially the two-frequency laser pulse, since the modulation here appears in the most natural way due to evolution of the pulse. In contrast with the LWFA, the considered SRWF generation scheme gives the possibility to raise the intensity of wake-excitation due to pulse self-focusing ( initial stage) and self modulation (second stage)

  1. Temperature field analysis of single layer TiO2 film components induced by long-pulse and short-pulse lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bin; Zhang Hongchao; Qin Yuan; Wang Xi; Ni Xiaowu; Shen Zhonghua; Lu Jian

    2011-01-01

    To study the differences between the damaging of thin film components induced by long-pulse and short-pulse lasers, a model of single layer TiO 2 film components with platinum high-absorptance inclusions was established. The temperature rises of TiO 2 films with inclusions of different sizes and different depths induced by a 1 ms long-pulse and a 10 ns short-pulse lasers were analyzed based on temperature field theory. The results show that there is a radius range of inclusions that corresponds to high temperature rises. Short-pulse lasers are more sensitive to high-absorptance inclusions and long-pulse lasers are more easily damage the substrate. The first-damage decision method is drawn from calculations.

  2. Generation of ozone by Ns-width pulsed power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, Naoyuki; Wakimoto, Masaya; Shinke, Yosuke; Nagata, Masayoshi; Namihira, Takao; Akiyama, Hidenori

    2002-01-01

    The demand of ozone will be increasing for wholesome and environment-conscious sterilizations. The generation of ozone using the pulsed power discharge will apply electron accelerations around the head of streamer discharge principally. The breakdown in reactor often limits the efficient generation. Therefore, the pulse shape should be controlled for dimension of the reactor. It is clear that a pulse shortening is one of effective approaches. Pulsed power voltage with ns-width applies for ozone generation. The effects, on concentration and efficiency of generation, of pulse shape, repetition rate of pulse, flow rate of oxygen gas, and dimension and configuration of reactor, are discussed. The dimension and configuration of the reactor are optimized for the pulse width

  3. Development of integrated photoplethysmographic recording circuit for trans-nail pulse-wave monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhengyang; Takezawa, Yoshiki; Shimokawa, Kenji; Kino, Hisashi; Fukushima, Takafumi; Kiyoyama, Koji; Tanaka, Tetsu

    2018-04-01

    Health monitoring and self-management have become increasingly more important because of health awareness improvement, the aging of population, and other reasons. In general, pulse waves are among the most useful physiological signals that can be used to calculate several parameters such as heart rate and blood pressure for health monitoring and self-management. To realize an automatic and real-time pulse-wave monitoring system that can be used in daily life, we have proposed a trans-nail pulse-wave monitoring system that was placed on the fingernail to detect photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals as pulse waves. In this study, we designed a PPG recording circuit that was composed of a 600 × 600 µm2 photodiode (PD), an LED driver with pulse wave modulation (PWM) and a low-frequency ring oscillator (RING), and a PPG signal readout circuit. The proposed circuit had a very small area of 2.2 × 1.1 mm2 designed with 0.18 µm CMOS technology. The proposed circuit was used to detect pulse waves on the human fingernail in both the reflection and transmission modes. Electrical characteristics of the prototype system were evaluated precisely and PPG waveforms were obtained successfully.

  4. Shell model calculations for levels and transition rates in 204Pb and 206Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.; McEllistrem, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    Level energies and decay rates of both negative and positive parity levels of 206,204 Pb have been calculated through mixed-configuration shell model calculations using the modified surface delta interaction (MSDI), the Schiffer-True central interaction, and another two-body interaction. These calculations were all carried out with a full six-orbit neutron hole space. The predicted low-lying levels with the MSDI are in excellent agreement with experiments, accounting for the energies, spins, and parities of essentially all levels below 3 MeV excitation energy except known particle-hole collective excitations in both nuclei. Almost all calculated E2 and M1 transition rates are consistent with measured branching ratios for γ-ray decay of excited levels. The comparison of the observed and calculated levels demonstrates the important role played by the neutron-hole i 13/2 configuration in the levels of 204 Pb and 206 Pb, and interprets an apparent discrepancy over the character and energy spacings of 0 + levels in 204 Pb

  5. Theoretical models for electron conduction in polymer systems—I. Macroscopic calculations of d.c. transient conductivity after pulse irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartczak, Witold M.; Kroh, Jerzy

    The simulation of the transient d.c. conductivity in a quasi one-dimensional system of charges produced by a pulse of ionizing radiation in a solid sample has been performed. The simulation is based on the macroscopic conductivity equations and can provide physical insight into d.c. conductivity measurements, particularly for the case of transient currents in samples with internal space charge. We consider the system of mobile (negative) and immobile (positive) charges produced by a pulse of ionizing radiation in the sample under a fixed external voltage V0. The presence of space charge results in an electric field which is a function of both the spatial and the time variable: E( z, t). Given the space charge density, the electric field can be calculated from the Poisson equation. However, for an arbitrary space charge distribution, the corresponding equations can only be solved numerically. The two non-trivial cases for which approximate analytical solutions can be provided are: (i) The density of the current carriers n( z, t) is negligible in comparison with the density of immobile space charge N( z). A general analytical solution has been found for this case using Green's functions. The solutions for two cases, viz. the homogeneous distribution of space charge N( z) = N, and the non-homogeneous exponential distribution N( z) = A exp(- Bz), have been separately discussed. (ii) The space charge created in the pulse without any space charge present prior to the irradiation.

  6. Electron-ion collision rates in atomic clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, M; Hilse, P; Schlanges, M; Bornath, Th; Krainov, V P

    2010-01-01

    In atomic clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses, plasmas with high density and high temperature are created. The heating is mainly caused by inverse bremsstrahlung, i.e. determined by electron-ion collisions. In the description of the scattering of electrons on noble gas ions in such plasmas, it is important to account for the inner structure of the ions and the screening by the surrounding plasma medium which can be accomplished by using suitable model potentials. In the wide parameter range met in experiments, the Born approximation is not applicable. Instead, the electron-ion collision frequency is calculated on the basis of classical momentum transport cross sections. Results are presented for xenon, krypton and argon ions in different charge states. A comparison of these results to those for the scattering on Coulomb particles with the same charge shows an enhancement of the collision frequency. The Born approximation, however, leads to an overestimation.

  7. Examination of the semi-automatic calculation technique of vegetation cover rate by digital camera images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemine, S.; Rikimaru, A.; Takahashi, K.

    The rice is one of the staple foods in the world High quality rice production requires periodically collecting rice growth data to control the growth of rice The height of plant the number of stem the color of leaf is well known parameters to indicate rice growth Rice growth diagnosis method based on these parameters is used operationally in Japan although collecting these parameters by field survey needs a lot of labor and time Recently a laborsaving method for rice growth diagnosis is proposed which is based on vegetation cover rate of rice Vegetation cover rate of rice is calculated based on discriminating rice plant areas in a digital camera image which is photographed in nadir direction Discrimination of rice plant areas in the image was done by the automatic binarization processing However in the case of vegetation cover rate calculation method depending on the automatic binarization process there is a possibility to decrease vegetation cover rate against growth of rice In this paper a calculation method of vegetation cover rate was proposed which based on the automatic binarization process and referred to the growth hysteresis information For several images obtained by field survey during rice growing season vegetation cover rate was calculated by the conventional automatic binarization processing and the proposed method respectively And vegetation cover rate of both methods was compared with reference value obtained by visual interpretation As a result of comparison the accuracy of discriminating rice plant areas was increased by the proposed

  8. STEADY STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION AND LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HU TA

    2009-10-26

    Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The hydrogen generation rate was calculated for 177 tanks using the rate equation model. Flammability calculations based on hydrogen, ammonia, and methane were performed for 177 tanks for various scenarios.

  9. Brachytherapy. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy - Radiation protection: medical sheet ED 4250

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celier, D.; Aubert, B.; Vidal, J.P.; Biau, A.; Lahaye, T.; Gauron, C.; Barret, C.; Boisserie, G.; Branchet, E.; Gambini, D.; Gondran, C.; Le Guen, B.; Guerin, C.; Nguyen, S.; Pierrat, N.; Sarrazin, T.; Donnarieix, D.

    2009-06-01

    After having indicated the required authorization to implement brachytherapy techniques, this document presents the various aspects and measures related to radiation protection when performing pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. It presents the concerned personnel, describes the operational process, indicates the associated hazards and the risk related to ionizing radiation, and describes how the risk is to be assessed and how exposure levels are to be determined (elements of risk assessment, delimitation of controlled and monitored areas, personnel classification, and choice of the dose monitoring method). It describes the various components of a risk management strategy (risk reduction, technical measures regarding the installation and the personnel, training and information, prevention and medical monitoring). It briefly presents how risk management is to be assessed, and mentions other related risks (biological risk, handling and posture, handling of heavy loads, mental workload, chemical risk)

  10. A comparison of measured and calculated values of air kerma rates from 137Cs in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Ramzaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, a study was conducted to determine the air gamma dose rate from 137Cs deposited in soil. The gamma dose rate measurements and soil sampling were performed at 30 reference plots from the south-west districts of the Bryansk region (Russia that had been heavily contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl accident. The 137Cs inventory in the top 20 cm of soil ranged from 260 kBq m–2 to 2800 kBq m–2. Vertical distributions of 137Cs in soil cores (6 samples per a plot were determined after their sectioning into ten horizontal layers of 2 cm thickness. The vertical distributions of 137Cs in soil were employed to calculate air kerma rates, K, using two independent methods proposed by Saito and Jacob [Radiat. Prot. Dosimetry, 1995, Vol. 58, P. 29–45] and Golikov et al. [Contaminated Forests– Recent Developments in Risk Identification and Future Perspective. Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999. – P. 333–341]. A very good coincidence between the methods was observed (Spearman’s rank coefficient of correlation = 0.952; P<0.01; on average, a difference between the kerma rates calculated with two methods did not exceed 3%. The calculated air kerma rates agreed with the measured dose rates in air very well (Spearman’s coefficient of correlation = 0.952; P<0.01. For large grassland plots (n=19, the measured dose rates were on average 6% less than the calculated kerma rates. The tested methods for calculating the air dose rate from 137Cs in soil can be recommended for practical studies in radiology and radioecology. 

  11. Pulsed neutron generator for mass flow measurement using the pulsed neutron activation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochau, G.E.; Hornsby, D.R.; Mareda, J.F.; Riggan, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    A high-output, transportable neutron generator has been developed to measure mass flow velocities in reactor safety tests using the Pulsed Neutron Activation (PNA) Technique. The PNA generator produces >10 10 14 MeV D-T neutrons in a 1.2 millisecond pulse. The Millisecond Pulse (MSP) Neutron Tube, developed for this application, has an expected operational life of 1000 pulses, and it limits the generator pulse repetition rate to 12 pulses/minute. A semiconductor neutron detector is included in the generator package to monitor the neutron output. The control unit, which can be operated manually or remotely, also contains a digital display with a BCD output for the neutron monitor information. The digital logic of the unit controls the safety interlocks and rejects transient signals which could accidently fire the generator

  12. Actual laser removal of black soiling crust from siliceous sandstone by high pulse repetition rate equipment: effects on surface morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iglesias-Campos, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research project studies the role of pulse repetition rate in laser removal of black soiling crust from siliceous sandstone, and specifically, how laser fluence correlates with high pulse repetition rates in cleaning practice. The aim is to define practical cleaning processes and determine simple techniques for evaluation based on end-users’ perspective (restorers. Spot and surface tests were made using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser system with a wide range of pulse repetition rates (5–200 Hz, systematically analysed and compared by macrophotography, portable microscope, stereomicroscope with 3D visualizing and area roughness measurements, SEM imaging and spectrophotometry. The results allow the conclusion that for operation under high pulse repetition rates the average of total energy applied per spot on a treated surface should be attendant upon fluence values in order to provide a systematic and accurate description of an actual laser cleaning intervention.En este trabajo se estudia el papel de la frecuencia de repetición en la limpieza láser de costras de contaminación sobre una arenisca silícea, y concretamente, como se relaciona fluencia y frecuencias elevadas en una limpieza real. Se pretende definir un procedimiento práctico de limpieza y determinar técnicas sencillas de evaluación desde el punto de vista de los usuarios finales (restauradores. Para el estudio se realizaron diferentes ensayos en spot y en superficie mediante un equipo Q-switched Nd:YAG con un amplio rango de frecuencias (5–200 Hz, que se analizaron y compararon sistemáticamente mediante macrofotografía, microscopio portátil, estereomicroscopio con visualización 3D y mediciones de rugosidad en área, imágenes SEM y espectrofotometría. Los resultados permiten proponer que, al trabajar con altas frecuencias, la media de la energía total depositada por spot en la superficie debería acompañar los valores de fluencia para describir y comprender mejor una

  13. Linear constraint relations in biochemical reaction systems: I. Classification of the calculability and the balanceability of conversion rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, R T; Heijnen, J J; Hellinga, C; Romein, B; Luyben, K C

    1994-01-05

    Measurements provide the basis for process monitoring and control as well as for model development and validation. Systematic approaches to increase the accuracy and credibility of the empirical data set are therefore of great value. In (bio)chemical conversions, linear conservation relations such as the balance equations for charge, enthalpy, and/or chemical elements, can be employed to relate conversion rates. In a pactical situation, some of these rates will be measured (in effect, be calculated directly from primary measurements of, e.g., concentrations and flow rates), as others can or cannot be calculated from the measured ones. When certain measured rates can also be calculated from other measured rates, the set of equations, the accuracy and credibility of the measured rates can indeed be improved by, respectively, balancing and gross error diagnosis. The balanced conversion rates are more accurate, and form a consistent set of data, which is more suitable for further application (e.g., to calculate nonmeasured rates) than the raw measurements. Such an approach has drawn attention in previous studies. The current study deals mainly with the problem of mathematically classifying the conversion rates into balanceable and calculable rates, given the subset of measured rates. The significance of this problem is illustrated with some examples. It is shown that a simple matrix equation can be derived that contains the vector of measured conversion rates and the redundancy matrix R. Matrix R plays a predominant role in the classification problem. In supplementary articles, significance of the redundancy matrix R for an improved gross error diagnosis approach will be shown. In addition, efficient equations have been derived to calculate the balanceable and/or calculable rates. The method is completely based on matrix algebra (principally different from the graph-theoretical approach), and it is easily implemented into a computer program. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons

  14. Experiments and calculations to leak openings and leak rates on typical piping components and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefler, A.; Grebner, H.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of leak opening and leak rate for through cracks in piping components have been performed. The analyses are pre- or mostly post-calculations to experiments performed at the HDR facility under PWR operating conditions. Piping components under consideration are small diameter straight pipes with circumferential cracks, pipe bends with longitudinal or circumferential cracks and pipe branches with weldment cracks. The component are loaded by internal pressure and opening as well as closing bending moment. The finite element method and two-phase flow leak rate programs are used for the calculations. Results of the analyses are presented as J-integral values, crack opening displacements and areas and leak rates as well as comparisons to the experimental results. 6 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Numerical modeling of Harmonic Imaging and Pulse Inversion fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Victor F.; Duncan, Tracy M.; Duck, Francis

    2003-10-01

    Tissue Harmonic Imaging (THI) and Pulse Inversion (PI) Harmonic Imaging exploit the harmonics generated as a result of nonlinear propagation through tissue to improve the performance of imaging systems. A 3D finite difference model, that solves the KZK equation in the frequency domain, is used to investigate the finite amplitude fields produced by rectangular transducers driven with short pulses and their inverses, in water and homogeneous tissue. This enables the characteristic of the fields and the effective PI field to be calculated. The suppression of the fundamental field in PI is monitored, and the suppression of side lobes and a reduction in the effective beamwidth for each field are calculated. In addition, the differences between the pulse and inverse pulse spectra resulting from the use of very short pulses are noted, and the differences in the location of the fundamental and second harmonic spectral peaks observed.

  16. Kinetic studies on a repetitively pulsed fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.

    1982-01-01

    Neutronic analysis of an earlier proposed periodically pulsed fast reactor at Kalpakkam (KPFR) has been carried out numerically under equilibrium and transient conditions using the one-point model of reactor kinetics and the experimentally measured total worth of reactivity modulator, the parabolic coefficient of reactivity of the movable reflector and the mean prompt neutron lifetime. Results of steady-state calculations - treated on the basis of delayed neutron precursor and energy balances during a period of operation - have been compared with the analytical formulae of Larrimore for a parabolic reactivity input. Empirical relations for half-width of the fast neutron pulse, the peak pulse power and the power at first crossing of prompt criticality have been obtained and shown to be accurate enough for predicting steady-state power pulse characteristics of a periodically pulsed fast reactor. The concept of a subprompt-critical reactor has been used to calculate the fictitious delayed neutron fraction, β of the KPFR through a numerical experiment. Relative pulse height stability and pulse shape sensitivity to changes of maximum reactivity is discussed. With the aid of new safety concepts, the Power Amplification Factor (PAF) and the Pulse Growth Factor (Rsub(p)), the dynamics KPFR under accidental conditions has been studied for step and ramp reactivity perturbations. All the analysis has been done without taking account of reactivity feedback. (orig.)

  17. Calculation of heat rating and burn-up for test fuel pins irradiated in DR 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagger, C.; Carlsen, H.; Hansen, K.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the DR 3 reactor and HP1 rig design is given followed by a detailed description of the calculation procedure for obtaining linear heat rating and burn-up values of fuel pins irradiated in HP1 rigs. The calculations are carried out rather detailed, especially regarding features like end pellet contribution to power as a function of burn-up, gamma heat contributions, and evaluation of local values of heat rating and burn-up. Included in the report is also a description of the fast flux- and cladding temperature calculation techniques currently used. A good agreement between measured and calculated local burn-up values is found. This gives confidence to the detailed treatment of the data. (author)

  18. Large-scale calculations of the beta-decay rates and r-process nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borzov, I N; Goriely, S [Inst. d` Astronomie et d` Astrophysique, Univ. Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Bruxelles (Belgium); Pearson, J M [Inst. d` Astronomie et d` Astrophysique, Univ. Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Bruxelles (Belgium); [Lab. de Physique Nucleaire, Univ. de Montreal, Montreal (Canada)

    1998-06-01

    An approximation to a self-consistent model of the ground state and {beta}-decay properties of neutron-rich nuclei is outlined. The structure of the {beta}-strength functions in stable and short-lived nuclei is discussed. The results of large-scale calculations of the {beta}-decay rates for spherical and slightly deformed nuclides of relevance to the r-process are analysed and compared with the results of existing global calculations and recent experimental data. (orig.)

  19. Performance scaling via passive pulse shaping in cavity-enhanced optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Aleem M; Moses, Jeffrey; Hong, Kyung-Han; Lai, Chien-Jen; Kärtner, Franz X

    2010-06-15

    We show that an enhancement cavity seeded at the full repetition rate of the pump laser can automatically reshape small-signal gain across the interacting pulses in an optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for close-to-optimal operation, significantly increasing both the gain bandwidth and the conversion efficiency, in addition to boosting gain for high-repetition-rate amplification. Applied to a degenerate amplifier, the technique can provide an octave-spanning gain bandwidth.

  20. Calculation of critical level value for radioactivity detection in gamma spectrometric analysis on the base of semiconductor detectors under the Chernobyl' conditions in 1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazunov, V.O.; Rusyaev, R.V.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of determination of radioactivity critical level in a sample by means of gamma spectrometer with semiconductor detector is studied theoretically. The formula for critical level, which shows that it is necessary to know the background pulse counting rate in order to determine the minimum gamma photon pulse counting rates, is derived. Calculations of critical level for the Chernobyl' conditions in time period from October 1986 till July 1987 are made. 8 refs.; 7 figs.; 17 tabs

  1. Increasing sync rate of pulse-coupled oscillators via phase response function design: theory and application to wireless networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongqiang; Núñez, Felipe; Doyle, Francis J

    2012-07-25

    This paper addresses the synchronization rate of weakly connected pulse-coupled oscillators (PCOs). We prove that besides coupling strength, the phase response function is also a determinant of synchronization rate. Inspired by the result, we propose to increase the synchronization rate of PCOs by designing the phase response function. This has important significance in PCO-based clock synchronization of wireless networks. By designing the phase response function, synchronization rate is increased even under a fixed transmission power. Given that energy consumption in synchronization is determined by the product of synchronization time and transformation power, the new strategy reduces energy consumption in clock synchronization. QualNet experiments confirm the theoretical results.

  2. Calculation of the soft error rate of submicron CMOS logic circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhnke, T.; Klar, H.

    1995-01-01

    A method to calculate the soft error rate (SER) of CMOS logic circuits with dynamic pipeline registers is described. This method takes into account charge collection by drift and diffusion. The method is verified by comparison of calculated SER's to measurement results. Using this method, the SER of a highly pipelined multiplier is calculated as a function of supply voltage for a 0.6 microm, 0.3 microm, and 0.12 microm technology, respectively. It has been found that the SER of such highly pipelined submicron CMOS circuits may become too high so that countermeasures have to be taken. Since the SER greatly increases with decreasing supply voltage, low-power/low-voltage circuits may show more than eight times the SER for half the normal supply voltage as compared to conventional designs

  3. Development of ultra-short high voltage pulse technology using magnetic pulse compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Byung Heon; Kim, S. G.; Nam, S. M.; Lee, B. C.; Lee, S. M.; Jeong, Y. U.; Cho, S. O.; Jin, J. T.; Choi, H. L

    1998-01-01

    The control circuit for high voltage switches, the saturable inductor for magnetic assist, and the magnetic pulse compression circuit were designed, constructed, and tested. The core materials of saturable inductors in magnetic pulse compression circuit were amorphous metal and ferrite and total compression stages were 3. By the test, in high repetition rate, high pulse compression were certified. As a result of this test, it became possible to increase life-time of thyratrons and to replace thyratrons by solid-state semiconductor switches. (author). 16 refs., 16 tabs.

  4. Development of ultra-short high voltage pulse technology using magnetic pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Byung Heon; Kim, S. G.; Nam, S. M.; Lee, B. C.; Lee, S. M.; Jeong, Y. U.; Cho, S. O.; Jin, J. T.; Choi, H. L.

    1998-01-01

    The control circuit for high voltage switches, the saturable inductor for magnetic assist, and the magnetic pulse compression circuit were designed, constructed, and tested. The core materials of saturable inductors in magnetic pulse compression circuit were amorphous metal and ferrite and total compression stages were 3. By the test, in high repetition rate, high pulse compression were certified. As a result of this test, it became possible to increase life-time of thyratrons and to replace thyratrons by solid-state semiconductor switches. (author). 16 refs., 16 tabs

  5. Comparison of measured and calculated reaction rate distributions in an scwr-like test lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raetz, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.raetz@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Jordan, Kelly A., E-mail: kelly.jordan@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Murphy, Michael F., E-mail: mike.murphy@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Perret, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.perret@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Chawla, Rakesh, E-mail: rakesh.chawla@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne, EPFL (Switzerland)

    2011-04-15

    High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements were performed on 61 rods of an SCWR-like fuel lattice, after irradiation in the central test zone of the PROTEUS zero-power research reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. The derived reaction rates are the capture rate in {sup 238}U (C{sub 8}) and the total fission rate (F{sub tot}), and also the reaction rate ratio C{sub 8}/F{sub tot}. Each of these has been mapped rod-wise on the lattice and compared to calculated results from whole-reactor Monte Carlo simulations with MCNPX. Ratios of calculated to experimental values (C/E's) have been assessed for the C{sub 8}, F{sub tot} and C{sub 8}/F{sub tot} distributions across the lattice. These C/E's show excellent agreement between the calculations and the measurements. For the {sup 238}U capture rate distribution, the 1{sigma} level in the comparisons corresponds to an uncertainty of {+-}0.8%, while for the total fission rate the corresponding value is {+-}0.4%. The uncertainty for C{sub 8}/F{sub tot}, assessed as a reaction rate ratio characterizing each individual rod position in the test lattice, is significantly higher at {+-}2.2%. To determine the reproducibility of these results, the measurements were performed twice, once in 2006 and again in 2009. The agreement between these two measurement sets is within the respective statistical uncertainties.

  6. Temperature field analysis of single layer TiO2 film components induced by long-pulse and short-pulse lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Zhang, Hongchao; Qin, Yuan; Wang, Xi; Ni, Xiaowu; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian

    2011-07-10

    To study the differences between the damaging of thin film components induced by long-pulse and short-pulse lasers, a model of single layer TiO(2) film components with platinum high-absorptance inclusions was established. The temperature rises of TiO(2) films with inclusions of different sizes and different depths induced by a 1 ms long-pulse and a 10 ns short-pulse lasers were analyzed based on temperature field theory. The results show that there is a radius range of inclusions that corresponds to high temperature rises. Short-pulse lasers are more sensitive to high-absorptance inclusions and long-pulse lasers are more easily damage the substrate. The first-damage decision method is drawn from calculations. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  7. Locating the rate-limiting step for the interaction of hydrogen with Mg(0001) using density-functional theory calculations and rate theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Tejs

    2004-01-01

    The dissociation of molecular hydrogen on a Mgs0001d surface and the subsequent diffusion of atomic hydrogen into the magnesium substrate is investigated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and rate theory. The minimum energy path and corresponding transition states are located usi...... to be rate-limiting for the ab- and desorption of hydrogen, respectively. Zero-point energy contributions are found to be substantial for the diffusion of atomic hydrogen, but classical rates are still found to be within an order of magnitude at room temperature.......The dissociation of molecular hydrogen on a Mgs0001d surface and the subsequent diffusion of atomic hydrogen into the magnesium substrate is investigated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and rate theory. The minimum energy path and corresponding transition states are located using...

  8. MO-D-213-07: RadShield: Semi- Automated Calculation of Air Kerma Rate and Barrier Thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLorenzo, M; Wu, D; Rutel, I; Yang, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop the first Java-based semi-automated calculation program intended to aid professional radiation shielding design. Air-kerma rate and barrier thickness calculations are performed by implementing NCRP Report 147 formalism into a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The ultimate aim of this newly created software package is to reduce errors and improve radiographic and fluoroscopic room designs over manual approaches. Methods: Floor plans are first imported as images into the RadShield software program. These plans serve as templates for drawing barriers, occupied regions and x-ray tube locations. We have implemented sub-GUIs that allow the specification in regions and equipment for occupancy factors, design goals, number of patients, primary beam directions, source-to-patient distances and workload distributions. Once the user enters the above parameters, the program automatically calculates air-kerma rate at sampled points beyond all barriers. For each sample point, a corresponding minimum barrier thickness is calculated to meet the design goal. RadShield allows control over preshielding, sample point location and material types. Results: A functional GUI package was developed and tested. Examination of sample walls and source distributions yields a maximum percent difference of less than 0.1% between hand-calculated air-kerma rates and RadShield. Conclusion: The initial results demonstrated that RadShield calculates air-kerma rates and required barrier thicknesses with reliable accuracy and can be used to make radiation shielding design more efficient and accurate. This newly developed approach differs from conventional calculation methods in that it finds air-kerma rates and thickness requirements for many points outside the barriers, stores the information and selects the largest value needed to comply with NCRP Report 147 design goals. Floor plans, parameters, designs and reports can be saved and accessed later for modification and recalculation

  9. MO-D-213-07: RadShield: Semi- Automated Calculation of Air Kerma Rate and Barrier Thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLorenzo, M [Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Wu, D [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Ok (United States); Rutel, I [University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Yang, K [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop the first Java-based semi-automated calculation program intended to aid professional radiation shielding design. Air-kerma rate and barrier thickness calculations are performed by implementing NCRP Report 147 formalism into a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The ultimate aim of this newly created software package is to reduce errors and improve radiographic and fluoroscopic room designs over manual approaches. Methods: Floor plans are first imported as images into the RadShield software program. These plans serve as templates for drawing barriers, occupied regions and x-ray tube locations. We have implemented sub-GUIs that allow the specification in regions and equipment for occupancy factors, design goals, number of patients, primary beam directions, source-to-patient distances and workload distributions. Once the user enters the above parameters, the program automatically calculates air-kerma rate at sampled points beyond all barriers. For each sample point, a corresponding minimum barrier thickness is calculated to meet the design goal. RadShield allows control over preshielding, sample point location and material types. Results: A functional GUI package was developed and tested. Examination of sample walls and source distributions yields a maximum percent difference of less than 0.1% between hand-calculated air-kerma rates and RadShield. Conclusion: The initial results demonstrated that RadShield calculates air-kerma rates and required barrier thicknesses with reliable accuracy and can be used to make radiation shielding design more efficient and accurate. This newly developed approach differs from conventional calculation methods in that it finds air-kerma rates and thickness requirements for many points outside the barriers, stores the information and selects the largest value needed to comply with NCRP Report 147 design goals. Floor plans, parameters, designs and reports can be saved and accessed later for modification and recalculation

  10. Nonlinear Pulse Shaping in Fibres for Pulse Generation and Optical Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Boscolo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of new all-optical technologies for data processing and signal manipulation is a field of growing importance with a strong potential for numerous applications in diverse areas of modern science. Nonlinear phenomena occurring in optical fibres have many attractive features and great, but not yet fully explored, potential in signal processing. Here, we review recent progress on the use of fibre nonlinearities for the generation and shaping of optical pulses and on the applications of advanced pulse shapes in all-optical signal processing. Amongst other topics, we will discuss ultrahigh repetition rate pulse sources, the generation of parabolic shaped pulses in active and passive fibres, the generation of pulses with triangular temporal profiles, and coherent supercontinuum sources. The signal processing applications will span optical regeneration, linear distortion compensation, optical decision at the receiver in optical communication systems, spectral and temporal signal doubling, and frequency conversion.

  11. Comparison of high-voltage ac and pulsed operation of a surface dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, James M.; Trump, Darryl D.; Bletzinger, Peter; Ganguly, Biswa N.

    2006-10-01

    A surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in atmospheric pressure air was excited either by low frequency (0.3-2 kHz) high-voltage ac or by short, high-voltage pulses at repetition rates from 50 to 600 pulses s-1. The short-pulse excited discharge was more diffuse and did not have the pronounced bright multiple cathode spots observed in the ac excited discharge. The discharge voltage, current and average power deposited into the discharge were calculated for both types of excitation. As a measure of plasma-chemical efficiency, the ozone number density was measured by UV absorption as a function of average deposited power. The density of ozone produced by ac excitation did not increase so rapidly as that produced by short-pulse excitation as a function of average power, with a maximum measured density of ~3 × 1015 cm-3 at 25 W. The maximum ozone production achieved by short-pulse excitation was ~8.5 × 1015 cm-3 at 20 W, which was four times greater than that achieved by ac excitation at the same power level.

  12. Calculation of the effective environmental dose rate for ESR and luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    The determination of the age of a sample using luminescence and ESR dating techniques requires knowledge of the sample's average effective environmental dose rate due to natural radiation sources (alpha, beta, gamma, and cosmic), and age estimates can never be more accurate than the estimate of this dose rate. The estimation process is often complicated by spatial and temporal inhomogeneities in the distribution of natural radiation sources. This paper discusses applications of radiation physics in modelling the effects of these inhomogeneities to ensure accurate estimation of the average dose rate for the sample. For natural alpha, beta, and gamma sources, 'dose point kernels' are employed in calculations using an assumed model for the spatial and temporal dependence of source concentrations. These three types of radiation have rather different penetration properties, with their typical effective ranges being multiples of 10 micrometre, 1 mm, and 100 mm respectively. For each type of radiation, applications are discussed where spatial inhomogeneity in the distribution of sources around and in a sample has a serious effect on the average dose rate to the sample. In some cases, (e.g. gamma dose estimation in 'lumpy' environments) lack of detailed knowledge precludes accurate modelling of the site for a particular sample, but useful statistical information can still be obtained. Temporal variation of radioactive source concentrations is usually coupled with spatial effects and can arise from processes such as parent-daughter disequilibrium, uptake or leaching of sources, or variation in burial depth or water saturation. Again, calculations based non a known or assumed history can be employed to obtain a time-averaged dose rate for a sample. The accuracy with which these calculations can reflect the true environmental dose rate is limited principally by the reliability of the model assumed, which in turn depends on the state of knowledge of the site and its history

  13. Fast differential pulse discriminator-counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelevoj, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    The flowsheet of a differential pulse discriminator counter is described; the result of discrimination here is independent from the shape of the input pulse. Rate of the analysis of input pulses with minimum amplitude up to 0.3 mV coming out from the photomultiplier makes up 220 MHz. The flowsheet of the discriminator used in the system of photon counting for atmosphere probing is presented

  14. High-energy high-rate pulsed-power processing of materials by powder consolidation and by railgun deposition. Technical report (Final), 10 April 1985-10 February 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persad, C.; Marcus, H.L.; Weldon, W.F.

    1987-03-31

    This exploratory research program was initiated to investigate the potential of using pulse power sources for powder consolidation, deposition and other high-energy high-rate processing. The characteristics of the high-energy-high-rate (1MJ/s) powder consolidation using megampere current pulses from a homopolar generator, were defined. Molybdenum Alloy TZM, a nickel-based metallic glass, copper/graphite composites, and P/M aluminum alloy X7091 were investigated. The powder-consolidation process produced high densification rates. Density values of 80% to 99% could be obtained with subsecond high-temperature exposure. Specific energy input and applied pressure were controlling process parameters. Time temperature transformation (TTT) concepts underpin a fundamental understanding of pulsed power processing. Inherent control of energy input, and time-to-peak processing temperature developed to be held to short times. Deposition experiments were conducted using an exploding-foil device (EFD) providing an armature feed to railgun mounted in a vacuum chamber. The material to be deposited - in plasma, gas, liquid, or solid state - was accelerated electromagnetically in the railgun and deposited on a substrate. Deposits of a wide variety of single- and multi-specie materials were produced on several types of substrates. In a series of ancillary experiments, pulsed-skin-effect heating and self quenching of metallic conductors was discovered to be a new means of surface modification by high-energy high-rate-processing.

  15. Optimal pulse fishing policy in stage-structured models with birth pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shujing; Chen Lansun; Sun Lihua

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose exploited models with stage structure for the dynamics in a fish population for which periodic birth pulse and pulse fishing occur at different fixed time. Using the stroboscopic map, we obtain an exact cycle of system, and obtain the threshold conditions for its stability. Bifurcation diagrams are constructed with the birth rate (or pulse fishing time or harvesting effort) as the bifurcation parameter, and these are observed to display complex dynamic behaviors, including chaotic bands with period windows, period-doubling, multi-period-halving and incomplete period-doubling bifurcation, pitch-fork and tangent bifurcation, non-unique dynamics (meaning that several attractors or attractor and chaos coexist) and attractor crisis. This suggests that birth pulse and pulse fishing provide a natural period or cyclicity that make the dynamical behaviors more complex. Moreover, we show that the pulse fishing has a strong impact on the persistence of the fish population, on the volume of mature fish stock and on the maximum annual-sustainable yield. An interesting result is obtained that, after the birth pulse, the population can sustain much higher harvesting effort if the mature fish is removed as early as possible

  16. Generation of frequency-chirped optical pulses with felix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knippels, G.M.H.; Meer, A.F.G. van der; Mols, R.F.X.A.M. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Frequency-chirped optical pulses have been produced in the picosecond regime by varying the energy of the electron beam on a microsecond time scale. These pulses were then compressed close to their bandwidth limit by an external pulse compressor. The amount of chirp can be controlled by varying the sweep rate on the electron beam energy and by cavity desynchronisation. To examine the generated chirp we used the following diagnostics: a pulse compressor, a crossed beam autocorrelator, a multichannel electron spectrometer and multichannel optical spectrometer. The compressor is build entirely using reflective optics to permit broad band operation. The autocorrelator is currently operating from 6 {mu}m to 30 {mu}m with one single crystal. It has been used to measure pulses as short as 500 fs. All diagnostics are evacuated to prevent pulse shape distortion or pulse lengthening caused by absorption in ambient water vapour. Pulse length measurements and optical spectra will be presented for different electron beam sweep rates, showing the presence of a frequency chirp. Results on the compression of the optical pulses to their bandwidth limit are given for different electron sweep rates. More experimental results showing the dependence of the amount of chirp on cavity desynchronisation will be presented.

  17. Fabrication of Multi-Harmonic Buncher for Pulsed Proton Beam Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. S.; Kwon, H. J.; Cho, Y. S. [Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Fast neutrons with a broad spectrum can be generated by irradiating the proton beams on target materials. To measure the neutron energy by time of flight (TOF) method, the short pulse width of the proton beam is preferred because the neutron energy uncertainty is proportional to the pulse width. In addition, the pulse repetition rate should be low enough to extend the lower limit of the available neutron energy. Pulsed proton beam generation system is designed based on an electrostatic deflector and slit system as shown in Fig. 1. In a simple deflector with slit system, most of the proton beam is blocked by slit, especially when the beam pulse width is short. The ideal field pattern inside the buncher cavity is saw-tooth wave. To make the field pattern similar to the saw-tooth waveform, we adopted a multi-harmonic buncher (MHB). The design for the multi-harmonic buncher including 3D electromagnetic calculation has been performed. Based on the design, a multi-harmonic buncher cavity was fabricated. It consists of two resonators, two drift tubes and a vacuum chamber. The resonator is a quarter-wave coaxial resonator type. The drift tube is connected to the resonator by using a coaxial vacuum feedthrough. Design summary and detailed fabrication method of the multi-harmonic buncher is presented in this paper. A multi-harmonic buncher for a proton beam chopper system to generate a short pulse neutron beam was designed, fabricated and assembled.

  18. Pulsed growth of fungal hyphal tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Franco, R; Bartnicki-Garcia, S; Bracker, C E

    1994-12-06

    Somatic fungal hyphae are generally assumed to elongate at steady linear rates when grown under constant environmental conditions with ample nutrients. However, patterns of pulsed hyphal elongation were detected during apparent steady growth of hyphal tips in fungi from several major taxonomic groups (Oomycetes, Pythium aphanidermatum and Saprolegnia ferax; Zygomycetes, Gilbertella persicaria; Deuteromycetes, Trichoderma viride; Ascomycetes, Neurospora crassa and Fusarium culmorum; Basidiomycetes, Rhizoctonia solani). Growing hyphal tips were recorded with video-enhanced phase-contrast microscopy at high magnification, and digital images were measured at very short time intervals (1-5 s). In all fungi tested, the hyphal elongation rate was never perfectly steady but fluctuated continuously with alternating periods of fast and slow growth at more or less regular intervals. Pulsed growth was observed in fungi differing in cell diameter, overall growth rate, taxonomic position, and presence and pattern of Spitzenkörper organization, suggesting that this is a general phenomenon. Frequency and amplitude of the pulses varied among the test organisms. T. viride and N. crassa showed the most frequent pulses (average of 13-14 per min), and F. culmorum the least frequent (2.7 per min). Average pulse amplitude varied from 0.012 microns/s for F. culmorum to 0.068 microns/s for G. persicaria. In F. culmorum and T. viride, the fast phase of the growth pulses was correlated with the merger of satellite Spitzenkörper with the main Spitzenkörper. These findings are consistent with a causal relationship between fluctuations in the overall rate of secretory vesicle delivery/discharge at the hyphal apex and the fluctuations in hyphal elongation rate.

  19. Simulation study of a pulsed neutron focusing using a pulsed electromagnetic lens coupled with a permanent magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwashita, H.; Iwasa, H.; Hiraga, F.; Kamiyama, T.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Suzuki, J.; Shinohara, T.; Oku, T.; Shimizu, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    A pulsed sextupole electromagnetic lens with suitably controlled time-dependent magnetic field can in principle focus pulsed neutrons at the same focal point over a wide range of wavelength as the lens removes aberrations. However, in fact, it is difficult to focus neutrons over a wide range of wavelength because attenuation of a practical pulsed sextupole electromagnet is faster than an ideal case. We have devised a method of canceling the difference between the practical pulsed sextupole magnetic field and the ideal magnetic field with the use of a permanent sextupole magnet. We performed simulation calculations to investigate the feasibility of this method, and it was shown that focusing wavelength range spread compared with the case using a pulsed magnetic lens only. This result indicates the usefulness of the method.

  20. Pulse Propagation on close conductors

    CERN Document Server

    Dieckmann, A

    2001-01-01

    The propagation and reflection of arbitrarily shaped pulses on non-dispersive parallel conductors of finite length with user defined cross section is simulated employing the discretized telegraph equation. The geometry of the system of conductors and the presence of dielectric material determine the capacities and inductances that enter the calculation. The values of these parameters are found using an iterative Laplace equation solving procedure and confirmed for certain calculable geometries including the line charge inside a box. The evolving pulses and the resulting crosstalk can be plotted at any instant and - in the Mathematica notebook version of this report - be looked at in an animation. As an example a differential pair of microstrips as used in the ATLAS vertex detector is analysed.

  1. Efficiency Enhancement in DC Pulsed Gas Discharge Memory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yukio

    1983-01-01

    Much improvement in the luminous efficiency of a dc pulsed gas discharge memory panel for color TV display was achieved by shortening the sustaining pulse duration. High energy electrons can thus be produced in the pulsed discharge with fast rise times. Calculated optimum value of E/P in a Xe gas discharge is 7-8 V/cm\\cdotTorr.

  2. Results of Propellant Mixing Variable Study Using Precise Pressure-Based Burn Rate Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanski, Philip L.

    2014-01-01

    A designed experiment was conducted in which three mix processing variables (pre-curative addition mix temperature, pre-curative addition mixing time, and mixer speed) were varied to estimate their effects on within-mix propellant burn rate variability. The chosen discriminator for the experiment was the 2-inch diameter by 4-inch long (2x4) Center-Perforated (CP) ballistic evaluation motor. Motor nozzle throat diameters were sized to produce a common targeted chamber pressure. Initial data analysis did not show a statistically significant effect. Because propellant burn rate must be directly related to chamber pressure, a method was developed that showed statistically significant effects on chamber pressure (either maximum or average) by adjustments to the process settings. Burn rates were calculated from chamber pressures and these were then normalized to a common pressure for comparative purposes. The pressure-based method of burn rate determination showed significant reduction in error when compared to results obtained from the Brooks' modification of the propellant web-bisector burn rate determination method. Analysis of effects using burn rates calculated by the pressure-based method showed a significant correlation of within-mix burn rate dispersion to mixing duration and the quadratic of mixing duration. The findings were confirmed in a series of mixes that examined the effects of mixing time on burn rate variation, which yielded the same results.

  3. Modelling of Ne-like copper X-ray laser driven by 1.2 ps short pulse and 280 ps background pulse configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, A.; Kenar, N.; Goktas, H.; Tallents, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Detailed simulations of Ne-like Cu x-ray laser are undertaken using the EHYBRID code. The atomic physics data are obtained using the Cowan code. The optimization calculations are performed in terms of the intensity of background and the time separation between the background and the short pulse. The optimum value is obtained for the conditions of a Nd:glass laser with 1.2 ps pulse at 4.4 x 10 15 W cm -2 irradiance pumping a plasma pre-formed by a 280 ps duration pulse at 5.4 x 10 12 W cm -2 with peak-to-peak pulse separation set at 300 ps. X-ray resonance lines between 6 A and 15 A emitted from copper plasmas have been simulated. Free-free and free-bound emission from the Si-, Al-, Mg-, Na-, Ne- and F-like ions is calculated in the simulation. (author)

  4. Condensation and dissociation rates for gas phase metal clusters from molecular dynamics trajectory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Goudeli, Eirini; Hogan, Christopher J.

    2018-04-01

    In gas phase synthesis systems, clusters form and grow via condensation, in which a monomer binds to an existing cluster. While a hard-sphere equation is frequently used to predict the condensation rate coefficient, this equation neglects the influences of potential interactions and cluster internal energy on the condensation process. Here, we present a collision rate theory-molecular dynamics simulation approach to calculate condensation probabilities and condensation rate coefficients. We use this approach to examine atomic condensation onto 6-56-atom Au and Mg clusters. The probability of condensation depends upon the initial relative velocity (v) between atom and cluster and the initial impact parameter (b). In all cases, there is a well-defined region of b-v space where condensation is highly probable, and outside of which the condensation probability drops to zero. For Au clusters with more than 10 atoms, we find that at gas temperatures in the 300-1200 K range, the condensation rate coefficient exceeds the hard-sphere rate coefficient by a factor of 1.5-2.0. Conversely, for Au clusters with 10 or fewer atoms and for 14- and 28-atom Mg clusters, as cluster equilibration temperature increases, the condensation rate coefficient drops to values below the hard-sphere rate coefficient. Calculations also yield the self-dissociation rate coefficient, which is found to vary considerably with gas temperature. Finally, calculations results reveal that grazing (high b) atom-cluster collisions at elevated velocity (>1000 m s-1) can result in the colliding atom rebounding (bounce) from the cluster surface or binding while another atom dissociates (replacement). The presented method can be applied in developing rate equations to predict material formation and growth rates in vapor phase systems.

  5. Steady-State Flammable Gas Release Rate Calculation And Lower Flammability Level Evaluation For Hanford Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, T.A.

    2007-01-01

    Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The methodology of flammability analysis for Hanford tank waste is developed. The hydrogen generation rate model was applied to calculate the gas generation rate for 177 tanks. Flammability concentrations and the time to reach 25% and 100% of the lower flammability limit, and the minimum ventilation rate to keep from 100 of the LFL are calculated for 177 tanks at various scenarios.

  6. Standard practice for calculation of corrosion rates and related information from electrochemical measurements

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1989-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the providing of guidance in converting the results of electrochemical measurements to rates of uniform corrosion. Calculation methods for converting corrosion current density values to either mass loss rates or average penetration rates are given for most engineering alloys. In addition, some guidelines for converting polarization resistance values to corrosion rates are provided. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

  7. Calculation of nuclide inventory, decay power, activity and dose rates for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haakansson, Rune

    2000-03-01

    The nuclide inventory was calculated for a BWR and a PWR fuel element, with burnups of 38 and 55 MWd/kg uranium for the BWR fuel, and 42 and 60 MWd/kg uranium for the PWR fuel. The calculations were performed for decay times of up to 300,000 years. Gamma and neutron dose rates have been calculated at a distance of 1 m from a bare fuel element and outside the spent fuel canister. The calculations were performed using the CASMO-4 code

  8. Assessments of fluid friction factors for use in leak rate calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chivers, T.C. [Berkeley Technology Centre, Glos (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    Leak before Break procedures require estimates of leakage, and these in turn need fluid friction to be assessed. In this paper available data on flow rates through idealized and real crack geometries are reviewed in terms of a single friction factor k It is shown that for {lambda} < 1 flow rates can be bounded using correlations in terms of surface R{sub a} values. For {lambda} > 1 the database is less precise, but {lambda} {approx} 4 is an upper bound, hence in this region flow calculations can be assessed using 1 < {lambda} < 4.

  9. A pulse shape discriminator with high precision of neutron and gamma ray selection at high counting rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialkowski, J.; Moszynski, M.; Wolski, D.

    1989-01-01

    A pulse shape discriminator based on the zero-crossing principle is described. Due to dc negative feedback loops stabilizing the shaping amplifier and the zero-crossing discriminator, the working of the circuit is not affected by the high counting rate and the temperature variations. The pileup rejection circuit built into the discriminator improves the quality of the n-γ separation at high counting rates. A full γ-ray rejection is obtained for a recoil energy of electrons down to 25 keV. At high counting rates the remaining γ-ray contribution is evidently due to the pileup effect which is equal to about 2% at 4x10 5 counts/s. (orig.)

  10. SU-E-T-34: An in Vivo Study On Pulsed Low Dose-Rate Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, L; Ma, C; Chen, X; Zhang, P; Zhang, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Re-irradiation with conventional radiotherapy techniques (CRT) may pose significant risks due to high accumulative radiation doses. Pulsed low dose-rate radiotherapy (PLDR) has been used in clinical trials for recurrent cancer treatment. In our previous studies, PLDR irradiation showed significantly lower toxicity than CRT, resulting in much longer survival of mice after PLDR total body irradiation (TBI) than conventional TBI. The purpose of this study was to investigate tumor control efficacy of PLDR treatment for prostate cancer with an animal model of prostate cancer LNCaP. Methods: We used an orthotopic murine model of LNCaP cell line for this study. LNCaP cells were implanted into immune-suppressed male nude mice via surgery. We monitored the tumor growth with MRI. The tumor-bearing mice were allocated into a PLDR(n=9), CRT(n=7), and control group(n=7) randomly. The mice in the PLDR and CRT groups were irradiated with 2Gy dose for one time. For the CRT treatment, the mice received 2Gy at a dose-rate of 300 MU/minute. For the PLDR treatment, the 2Gy dose was further divided into ten pulses of 0.2Gy at the same dose-rate with an interval of 3 minutes between the pulses. Results: Sizable tumor growth delays were observed for the PLDR and CRT groups through weekly MRI scans. The mean values of the normalized tumor volumes (± standard deviation of the mean) were 1.53±0.07, 1.53±0.14, and 1.81±0.09 at one week after treatment, 2.28±0.13, 2.19±0.16, and 3.04±0.25 at two weeks after treatment, and 3.31±0.23, 3.14±0.24 and 4.62±0.49 at three weeks after treatment, for the PLDR, CRT, and control groups, respectively. Conclusion: The PLDR and CRT treatments showed comparable tumor control rates in this study. Our in vivo results indicate that PLDR may be a viable option for treating recurrent prostate cancer due to its equivalent tumor control but low normal tissue toxocities

  11. Calculations radiobiological using the quadratic lineal model in the use of the medium dose rate absorbed in brachytherapy. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Calculations with the quadratic lineal model for medium rate using the equation dose-effect. Several calculations for system of low dose rate brachytherapy plus teletherapy, calculations for brachytherapy with medium dose rate together with teletherapy, dose for fraction and the one numbers of fractions in medium rate

  12. A relation between calculated human body exergy consumption rate and subjectively assessed thermal sensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Kolarik, Jakub; Iwamatsu, Toshiya

    2011-01-01

    occupants, it is reasonable to consider both the exergy flows in building and those within the human body. Until now, no data have been available on the relation between human-body exergy consumption rates and subjectively assessed thermal sensation. The objective of the present work was to relate thermal...... sensation data, from earlier thermal comfort studies, to calculated human-body exergy consumption rates. The results show that the minimum human body exergy consumption rate is associated with thermal sensation votes close to thermal neutrality, tending to the slightly cool side of thermal sensation....... Generally, the relationship between air temperature and the exergy consumption rate, as a first approximation, shows an increasing trend. Taking account of both convective and radiative heat exchange between the human body and the surrounding environment by using the calculated operative temperature, exergy...

  13. Pulsed neutron sources at KAON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, I.M.; Egelstaff, P.A.; Craddock, M.K.

    1991-01-01

    The proposed KAON Factory facility at TRIUMF consists of a number of synchrotrons and storage rings which offer proton beams of energies between 0.45 and 30 GeV with varying pulse amplitudes, widths and repetition rates. Various possibilities for feeding these beams to a pulsed neutron facility and their potential for future development are examined. The incremental cost of such a pulsed neutron facility is estimated approximately. (author)

  14. Ionization of molecular hydrogen in ultrashort intense laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanne, Yulian V.

    2010-03-18

    A novel ab initio numerical approach is developed and applied that solves the time-dependent Schroedinger equation describing two-electron diatomic molecules (e.g. molecular hydrogen) exposed to an intense ultrashort laser pulse. The method is based on the fixed-nuclei and the non-relativistic dipole approximations and aims to accurately describe both correlated electrons in full dimensionality. The method is applicable for a wide range of the laser pulse parameters and is able to describe both few-photon and many-photon single ionization processes, also in a non-perturbative regime. A key advantage of the method is its ability to treat the strong-field response of the molecules with arbitrary orientation of the molecular axis with respect to the linear-polarized laser field. Thus, this work reports on the first successful orientation-dependent analysis of the multiphoton ionization of H{sub 2} performed by means of a full-dimensional numerical treatment. Besides the investigation of few-photon regime, an extensive numerical study of the ionization by ultrashort frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser pulses (400 nm) is presented. Performing a series of calculations for different internuclear separations, the total ionization yields of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} in their ground vibrational states are obtained for both parallel and perpendicular orientations. A series of calculations for 800 nm laser pulses are used to test a popular simple interference model. Besides the discussion of the ab initio numerical method, this work considers different aspects related to the application of the strong-field approximation (SFA) for investigation of a strong-field response of an atomic and molecular system. Thus, a deep analysis of the gauge problem of SFA is performed and the quasistatic limit of the velocity-gauge SFA ionization rates is derived. The applications of the length-gauge SFA are examined and a recently proposed generalized Keldysh theory is criticized. (orig.)

  15. Ionization of molecular hydrogen in ultrashort intense laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanne, Yulian V.

    2010-01-01

    A novel ab initio numerical approach is developed and applied that solves the time-dependent Schroedinger equation describing two-electron diatomic molecules (e.g. molecular hydrogen) exposed to an intense ultrashort laser pulse. The method is based on the fixed-nuclei and the non-relativistic dipole approximations and aims to accurately describe both correlated electrons in full dimensionality. The method is applicable for a wide range of the laser pulse parameters and is able to describe both few-photon and many-photon single ionization processes, also in a non-perturbative regime. A key advantage of the method is its ability to treat the strong-field response of the molecules with arbitrary orientation of the molecular axis with respect to the linear-polarized laser field. Thus, this work reports on the first successful orientation-dependent analysis of the multiphoton ionization of H 2 performed by means of a full-dimensional numerical treatment. Besides the investigation of few-photon regime, an extensive numerical study of the ionization by ultrashort frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser pulses (400 nm) is presented. Performing a series of calculations for different internuclear separations, the total ionization yields of H 2 and D 2 in their ground vibrational states are obtained for both parallel and perpendicular orientations. A series of calculations for 800 nm laser pulses are used to test a popular simple interference model. Besides the discussion of the ab initio numerical method, this work considers different aspects related to the application of the strong-field approximation (SFA) for investigation of a strong-field response of an atomic and molecular system. Thus, a deep analysis of the gauge problem of SFA is performed and the quasistatic limit of the velocity-gauge SFA ionization rates is derived. The applications of the length-gauge SFA are examined and a recently proposed generalized Keldysh theory is criticized. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of polymer-coated CsI:Tl as an alpha/beta pulse shape discriminating flow-cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branton, S.D.; Fjeld, R.A.; DeVol, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    A pulse shape discriminating flow-cell radiation detection system constructed with polymer coated CsI:Tl was evaluated for simultaneous gross alpha/gross beta quantification. The CsI:TI scintillator was crushed and sieved to 63-90 μm particle size and microencapsulated with Parylene C to reduce its rate of dissolution. Averaged over the first hour of use, the pulse shape discrimination figure-of-merit was 1.4 and the detection efficiencies were 64.9 ± 5.7 %, 52.5 ± 4.5 % and 4.5 ± 0.2 % for 233 U, 90 Sr/ 90 Y and 14 C , respectively. The typical background count rate in the alpha and beta pulse shape window was 0.17 and 0.004 cps, respectively. The resultant minimum detectable activity for a 30 second count time was calculated to be 0.19 ± 0.01 Bq, 0.9 ± 0.1 Bq and 11.4 ± 0.6 Bq for 233 U, 90 Sr/ 90 Y and 14 C, respectively. Although the 3 μm thick microencapsulation reduced CsI:Tl dissolution, the detection efficiency declined by a factor of two after 4.8 hours while the pulse shape resolution degraded slightly

  17. Calculation of the ingestion critical dose rate for the Goiania radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passos, E.M. dos; Martin Alves, A.S. De

    1994-01-01

    The calculation results of the critical distance for the ingestion dose rate due to a hypothetical Cs-137 release from the Abadia de Goias repository are shown. The work is based on the pathway repository-aquifer-well food chain. The calculations were based upon analytical models for the migration of radioisotopes through the aquifer and for its transfer from well water to food. (author)

  18. Divided Saddle Theory: A New Idea for Rate Constant Calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daru, János; Stirling, András

    2014-03-11

    We present a theory of rare events and derive an algorithm to obtain rates from postprocessing the numerical data of a free energy calculation and the corresponding committor analysis. The formalism is based on the division of the saddle region of the free energy profile of the rare event into two adjacent segments called saddle domains. The method is built on sampling the dynamics within these regions: auxiliary rate constants are defined for the saddle domains and the absolute forward and backward rates are obtained by proper reweighting. We call our approach divided saddle theory (DST). An important advantage of our approach is that it requires only standard computational techniques which are available in most molecular dynamics codes. We demonstrate the potential of DST numerically on two examples: rearrangement of alanine-dipeptide (CH3CO-Ala-NHCH3) conformers and the intramolecular Cope reaction of the fluxional barbaralane molecule.

  19. Suppression of acoustic streaming in tapered pulse tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, J.R.; Swift, G.W.

    1998-01-01

    In a pulse tube cryocooler, the gas in the pulse tube can be thought of as an insulating piston, transmitting pressure and velocity from the cold heat exchanger to the hot end of the pulse tube. Unfortunately, convective heat transfer can carry heat from the hot end to the cold end and reduce the net cooling power. Here, the authors discuss one driver of such convection: steady acoustic streaming as generated by interactions between the boundary and the oscillating pressure, velocity, and temperature. Using a perturbation method, they have derived an analytical expression for the streaming in a tapered pulse tube with axially varying mean temperature in the acoustic boundary layer limit. The calculations showed that the streaming depends strongly on the taper angle, the ratio of velocity and pressure amplitudes, and the phase between the velocity and pressure, but it depends only weakly on the mean temperature profile and is independent of the overall oscillatory amplitude. With the appropriate tapering of the tube, streaming can be eliminated for a particular operating condition. Experimentally, the authors have demonstrated that an orifice pulse tube cryocooler with the calculated zero-streaming taper has more cooling power than one with either a cylindrical tube or a tapered pulse tube with twice the optimum taper angle

  20. Optimizing Discount Rates: Expressing Preferences for Sustainable Outcomes in Present Value Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Axelrod, David

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes how the discount rate used in present value calculations expresses the preference for sustainability in decision making, and its implication for sustainable economic growth. In essence, the lower the discount rate, the greater the regard for the future, and the more likely we choose behaviors that lead to long-term sustainability. The theoretical framework combines behavioral economics and holonomics, which involve limitations of regard for the future due to constraints o...

  1. Rapid thermal pulse annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.G.; Koehn, B.W.; Chaplin, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    Characteristics of recovery processes have been investigated for cases of heating a sample to successively higher temperatures by means of isochronal annealing or by using a rapid pulse annealing. A recovery spectra shows the same features independent of which annealing procedure is used. In order to determine which technique provides the best resolution, a study was made of how two independent first-order processes are separated for different heating rates and time increments of the annealing pulses. It is shown that the pulse anneal method offers definite advantages over isochronal annealing when annealing for short time increments. Experimental data by means of the pulse anneal techniques are given for the various substages of stage I of aluminium. (author)

  2. Energy-dependent losses in pulsed-feedback preamplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landis, D.A.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.S.

    1978-11-01

    Energy dependent counting losses occur in most pulsed-feedback preamplifiers due to the loss of those pulses which activate the recharge system. A pulsed-feedback system that overcomes this inefficiency is described. Pulsed-light feedback as used with germanium gamma-ray spectrometers is discussed as used at high energies and high rates where those losses become significant. Experimental results are presented

  3. NAC-1 cask dose rate calculations for LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARLSON, A.B.

    1999-01-01

    A Nuclear Assurance Corporation nuclear fuel transport cask, NAC-1, is being considered as a transport and storage option for spent nuclear fuel located in the B-Cell of the 324 Building. The loaded casks will be shipped to the 200 East Area Interim Storage Area for dry interim storage. Several calculations were performed to assess the photon and neutron dose rates. This report describes the analytical methods, models, and results of this investigation

  4. Rate constant for reaction of hydroxyl radicals with bicarbonate ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buxton, G.V.; Elliot, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    The rate constant for reaction of hydroxyl radicals with the bicarbonate ion has been determined to be 8.5 x 10 6 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . This value was calculated from: the measured rate of formation of the CO 3 - radical in pulsed electron irradiation of bicarbonate solutions over the pH range 7.0 to 9.4; the pK for the equilibrium HCO 3 - = CO 3 2- + H + ; and the rate constant for hydroxyl radicals reacting with the carbonate ion. (author)

  5. Performance of a tapered pulse tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, G.; Allen, M.; Woolan, J.J.

    1998-02-01

    In a well instrumented pulse tube refrigerator having 1,500 W of cooling power at 125 K, the authors have measured the figure of merit of a tapered pulse tube at several operating points. At operating points near the operating point for which the taper was designed, the figure of merit is 0.96. This is close to the theoretical optimum figure of merit 0.97 calculated for this pulse tube considering only two loss mechanisms: heat conduction in the metal pulse tube wall and ordinary thermoacoustic heat transport in the gas within a few thermal penetration depths of the wall. At operating points farther from the design operating point, the measured figure of merit is much lower, as streaming driven convection adds a third loss mechanism

  6. Some considerations of ''cold fusion'' including the calculation of fusion rates in molecules of hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, S.C.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1989-11-01

    We calculate the fusion reaction rates in molecules of hydrogen isotopes. The rates are calculated analytically (for the first time) as an asymptotic expansion in the ratio of the electron mass to the reduced mass of the nucleii. The fusion rates of the P-D, D-D, and D-T reactions are given for a variable electron mass by a simple analytic formula. However, we do not know any mechanism by which a sufficiently localized electron in solid can have an 'effective mass' large enough to explain the result of Fleischman and Pons (FP). This calculation indicates that P-D rates should exceed D-D rates for D-D fusion rates less than approximately 10 -23 per molecule per second. The D-D fusion rate is enhanced by a factor of 10 5 at 10,000 degree K if the excited vibrational states are populated with a Boltzmann distribution and the rotational excitations suppressed. The suggestion that experimental results could be explained by bombardment of cold deuterons by kilovolt deuterons is shown to be an unlikely from an energetic point of view. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  7. Turnover rates in microorganisms by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and pulse-chase analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopka, Sylwia A.; Mansour, Tarek R.; Shrestha, Bindesh [Department of Chemistry, W.M. Keck Institute for Proteomics Technology and Applications, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Maréchal, Éric; Falconet, Denis [Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire et Végétale, UMR 5168, CEA-CNRS-INRA-Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble (France); Vertes, Akos, E-mail: vertes@gwu.edu [Department of Chemistry, W.M. Keck Institute for Proteomics Technology and Applications, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Biochemical processes rely on elaborate networks containing thousands of compounds participating in thousands of reaction. Rapid turnover of diverse metabolites and lipids in an organism is an essential part of homeostasis. It affects energy production and storage, two important processes utilized in bioengineering. Conventional approaches to simultaneously quantify a large number of turnover rates in biological systems are currently not feasible. Here we show that pulse-chase analysis followed by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) enable the simultaneous and rapid determination of metabolic turnover rates. The incorporation of ion mobility separation (IMS) allowed an additional dimension of analysis, i.e., the detection and identification of isotopologs based on their collision cross sections. We demonstrated these capabilities by determining metabolite, lipid, and peptide turnover in the photosynthetic green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, in the presence of {sup 15}N-labeled ammonium chloride as the main nitrogen source. Following the reversal of isotope patterns in the chase phase by LAESI-IMS-MS revealed the turnover rates and half-lives for biochemical species with a wide range of natural concentrations, e.g., chlorophyll metabolites, lipids, and peptides. For example, the half-lives of lyso-DGTS(16:0) and DGTS(18:3/16:0), t{sub 1/2} = 43.6 ± 4.5 h and 47.6 ± 2.2 h, respectively, provided insight into lipid synthesis and degradation in this organism. Within the same experiment, half-lives for chlorophyll a, t{sub 1/2} = 24.1 ± 2.2 h, and a 2.8 kDa peptide, t{sub 1/2} = 10.4 ± 3.6 h, were also determined. - Highlights: • High-throughput pulse-chase analysis using direct sampling of biological cells. • Ion mobility separation for the elucidation of isotopologs. • Identification of isotopologs in difference heat plots of DT vs. m/z. • Simultaneous determination of turnover rates for lipids and

  8. Parametric study on femtosecond laser pulse ablation of Au films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Xiaochang; Wang Chingyue; Yang Li; Li Jianping; Chai Lu; Jia Wei; Zhang Ruobing; Zhang Zhigang

    2006-01-01

    Ablation process of 1 kHz rate femtosecond lasers (pulse duration 148 fs, wavelength 775 nm) with Au films on silica substrates has been systemically studied. The single-pulse threshold can be obtained directly. For the multiple pulses the ablation threshold varies with the number of pulses applied to the surface due to the incubation effect. From the plot of accumulated laser fluence N x φ th (N) and the number of laser pulses N, incubation coefficient of Au film can be obtained (s = 0.765). As the pulse energy is increased, the single pulse ablation rate is increasing following two ablation logarithmic regimes, which can be explained by previous research

  9. Method for estimating off-axis pulse tube losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, T.; Mulcahey, T. I.; Taylor, R. P.; Spoor, P. S.; Conrad, T. J.; Ghiaasiaan, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Some Stirling-type pulse tube cryocoolers (PTCs) exhibit sensitivity to gravitational orientation and often exhibit significant cooling performance losses unless situated with the cold end pointing downward. Prior investigations have indicated that some coolers exhibit sensitivity while others do not; however, a reliable method of predicting the level of sensitivity during the design process has not been developed. In this study, we present a relationship that estimates an upper limit to gravitationally induced losses as a function of the dimensionless pulse tube convection number (NPTC) that can be used to ensure that a PTC would remain functional at adverse static tilt conditions. The empirical relationship is based on experimental data as well as experimentally validated 3-D computational fluid dynamics simulations that examine the effects of frequency, mass flow rate, pressure ratio, mass-pressure phase difference, hot and cold end temperatures, and static tilt angle. The validation of the computational model is based on experimental data collected from six commercial pulse tube cryocoolers. The simulation results are obtained from component-level models of the pulse tube and heat exchangers. Parameter ranges covered in component level simulations are 0-180° for tilt angle, 4-8 for length to diameter ratios, 4-80 K cold tip temperatures, -30° to +30° for mass flow to pressure phase angles, and 25-60 Hz operating frequencies. Simulation results and experimental data are aggregated to yield the relationship between inclined PTC performance and pulse tube convection numbers. The results indicate that the pulse tube convection number can be used as an order of magnitude indicator of the orientation sensitivity, but CFD simulations should be used to calculate the change in energy flow more accurately.

  10. Preliminary calculations of release rates from spent fuel in a tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apted, M.J.; O'Connell, W.J.; Lee, K.H.; MacIntyre, A.T.; Ueng, T.S.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1991-01-01

    Time-dependent release rates of Tc-99, I-129, Cs-135, and Np-237 have been calculated for wet-drip and moist-continuous release modes from the engineered barrier system of a potential nuclear waste repository in unsaturated tuff, representative of a possible repository at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. We describe the modes of water contact and of release of dissolved radionuclides to the surrounding intact rock, and the corresponding calculational models. We list the parameter values adopted, and then present numerical results, conclusions, and recommendations. 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Panthere V2: Multipurpose Simulation Software for 3D Dose Rate Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penessot, Gaël; Bavoil, Éléonore; Wertz, Laurent; Malouch, Fadhel; Visonneau, Thierry; Dubost, Julien

    2017-09-01

    PANTHERE is a multipurpose radiation protection software developed by EDF to calculate gamma dose rates in complex 3D environments. PANTHERE takes a key role in the EDF ALARA process, enabling to predict dose rates and to organize and optimize operations in high radiation environments. PANTHERE is also used for nuclear waste characterization, transport of nuclear materials, etc. It is used in most of the EDF engineering units and their design service providers and industrial partners.

  12. A fatigue monitoring system based on time-domain and frequency-domain analysis of pulse data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiaai

    2018-04-01

    Fatigue is almost a problem that everyone would face, and a psychosis that everyone hates. If we can test people's fatigue condition and remind them of the tiredness, dangers in life, for instance, traffic accidents and sudden death will be effectively reduced, people's fatigued operations will be avoided. And people can be assisted to have access to their own and others' physical condition in time to alternate work with rest. The article develops a wearable bracelet based on FFT Pulse Frequency Spectrum Analysis and IBI's standard deviation and range calculation, according to people's heart rate (BPM) and inter-beat interval (IBI) while being tired and conscious. The hardware part is based on Arduino, pulse rate sensor, and Bluetooth module, and the software part is relied on network micro database and APP. By doing sample experiment to get more accurate standard value to judge tiredness, we prove that we can judge people's fatigue condition based on heart rate (BPM) and inter-beat interval (IBI).

  13. Pulsed TRIGA reactor as substitute for long pulse spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittemore, W.L.

    1999-01-01

    TRIGA reactor cores have been used to demonstrate various pulsing applications. The TRIGA reactor fuel (U-ZrH x ) is very robust especially in pulsing applications. The features required to produce 50 pulses per second have been successfully demonstrated individually, including pulse tests with small diameter fuel rods. A partially optimized core has been evaluated for pulses at 50 Hz with peak pulsed power up to 100 MW and an average power up to 10 MW. Depending on the design, the full width at half power of the individual pulses can range between 2000 μsec to 3000 μsec. Until recently, the relatively long pulses (2000 μsec to 3000 μsec) from a pulsed thermal reactor or a long pulse spallation source (LPSS) have been considered unsuitable for time-of-flight measurements of neutron scattering. More recently considerable attention has been devoted to evaluating the performance of long pulse (1000 to 4000 μs) spallation sources for the same type of neutron measurements originally performed only with short pulses from spallation sources (SPSS). Adequate information is available to permit meaningful comparisons between CW, SPSS, and LPSS neutron sources. Except where extremely high resolution is required (fraction of a percent), which does require short pulses, it is demonstrated that the LPSS source with a 1000 msec or longer pulse length and a repetition rate of 50 to 60 Hz gives results comparable to those from the 60 MW ILL (CW) source. For many of these applications the shorter pulse is not necessarily a disadvantage, but it is not an advantage over the long pulse system. In one study, the conclusion is that a 5 MW 2000 μsec LPSS source improves the capability for structural biology studies of macromolecules by at least a factor of 5 over that achievable with a high flux reactor. Recent studies have identified the advantages and usefulness of long pulse neutron sources. It is evident that the multiple pulse TRIGA reactor can produce pulses comparable to

  14. Controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulator with enhanced circuit topology and pulse shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; DʼOstilio, Kevin; Rothwell, John C.; Murphy, David L.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. This work aims at flexible and practical pulse parameter control in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which is currently very limited in commercial devices. Approach. We present a third generation controllable pulse parameter device (cTMS3) that uses a novel circuit topology with two energy-storage capacitors. It incorporates several implementation and functionality advantages over conventional TMS devices and other devices with advanced pulse shape control. cTMS3 generates lower internal voltage differences and is implemented with transistors with a lower voltage rating than prior cTMS devices. Main results. cTMS3 provides more flexible pulse shaping since the circuit topology allows four coil-voltage levels during a pulse, including approximately zero voltage. The near-zero coil voltage enables snubbing of the ringing at the end of the pulse without the need for a separate active snubber circuit. cTMS3 can generate powerful rapid pulse sequences (\\lt 10 ms inter pulse interval) by increasing the width of each subsequent pulse and utilizing the large capacitor energy storage, allowing the implementation of paradigms such as paired-pulse and quadripulse TMS with a single pulse generation circuit. cTMS3 can also generate theta (50 Hz) burst stimulation with predominantly unidirectional electric field pulses. The cTMS3 device functionality and output strength are illustrated with electrical output measurements as well as a study of the effect of pulse width and polarity on the active motor threshold in ten healthy volunteers. Significance. The cTMS3 features could extend the utility of TMS as a research, diagnostic, and therapeutic tool.

  15. Eddy currents in pulsed field measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuepferling, M.; Groessinger, R.; Wimmer, A.; Taraba, M.; Scholz, W.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: One problem of pulsed field magnetometry is an error in magnetization, which appears in measurements of conducting samples. This error is due to eddy currents induced by a time varying field. To allow predictions how eddy currents exert influence on the hysteresis loop, systematic experimental and theoretical studies of pulsed field measurements of metallic samples were performed. The theoretical studies include analytical calculations as well as numerical ones using a 2D finite element software. In the measurements three physical parameters have been varied: i) the conductivity of the sample by using two different materials, in this case technical Cu and Al ii) size and shape of the sample by using cylinders, spheres and cuboids iii) the pulse duration of the external field by changing the capacitor battery from 8mF ( =9.1ms) to 24mF ( =15.7ms). The time dependence of the external field corresponds with a pulsed damped harmonic oscillation with a maximum value of 5.2T. The samples were studied in the as cast state (after machining) as well as after heat treatment. Theoretical calculations showed not only good agreement with the absolute values of the measured eddy current m agnetization , they also gave an explanation of the shape of the eddy current hysteresis and the dependence of the eddy current 'magnetization' on parameters as pulse duration of the external field and conductivity of the sample. (author)

  16. Periodic nanostructures fabricated on GaAs surface by UV pulsed laser interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei; Huo, Dayun; Guo, Xiaoxiang; Rong, Chen; Shi, Zhenwu, E-mail: zwshi@suda.edu.cn; Peng, Changsi, E-mail: changsipeng@suda.edu.cn

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Periodic nanostructures were fabricated on GaAs wafers by four-beam laser interference patterning which have potential applications in many fields. • Significant different results were obtained on epi-ready and homo-epitaxial GaAs substrate surfaces. • Two-pulse patterning was carried out on homo-epitaxial GaAs substrate, a noticeable morphology transformation induced by the second pulse was observed. • Temperature distribution on sample surface as a function of time and position was calculated by solving the heat diffusion equations. The calculation agrees well with the experiment results. - Abstract: In this paper, periodic nanostructures were fabricated on GaAs wafers by four-beam UV pulsed laser interference patterning. Significant different results were observed on epi-ready and homo-epitaxial GaAs substrate surfaces, which suggests GaAs oxide layer has an important effect on pulsed laser irradiation process. In the case of two-pulse patterning, a noticeable morphology transformation induced by the second pulse was observed on homo-epitaxial GaAs substrate. Based on photo-thermal mode, temperature distribution on sample surface as a function of time and position was calculated by solving the heat diffusion equations.

  17. Custom pulse generator for RPC testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, A.; Castro, E.; Diaz, J.; Fonte, P.; Garzon, J.A.; Montes, N.; Zapata, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a pulse generator able to generate pulses statistically similar to the ones produced by RPC cells. The device generates up to four arrays of fast and narrow random-like pulses. Polarity, maximum amplitudes, widths and pulse rate in each channel may be modified independently in order to simulate different RPC setups and environments. This portable and cost-effective pulse generator is a versatile instrument for testing FE-Electronics and different real detector features related with the signal propagation inside the detector. It has been developed in the framework of the ESTRELA project of the HADES experiment at GSI.

  18. Numerical simulation of nanosecond-pulse electrical discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggie, J.; Adamovich, I.; Bisek, N.; Nishihara, M.

    2013-02-01

    experimental measurements (50 K and 500 K, respectively), and the approach appears promising for future multi-dimensional calculations. The effectiveness of flow control actuators based on nanosecond-pulse, dielectric barrier discharges is seen to depend crucially on the rapid thermalization of input energy, in particular the rate of quenching of excited electronic states and the rate of electron-ion recombination.

  19. Repetitive pulse accelerator technology for light ion inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttram, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    Successful ignition of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) pellet is calculated to require that several megajoules of energy be deposited in the pellet's centimeter-sized shell within 10 ns. This implies a driver power of several hundreds of terawatts and power density around 100 TW/cm 2 . The Sandia ICF approach is to deposit the energy with beams of 30 MV lithium ions. The first accelerator capable of producing these beams (PBFA II, 100 TW) will be used to study beam formation and target physics on a single pulse basis. To utilize this technology for power production, repetitive pulsing at rates that may be as high as 10 Hz will be required. This paper will overview the technologies being studied for a repetitively pulsed ICF accelerator. As presently conceived, power is supplied by rotating machinery providing 16 MJ in 1 ms. The generator output is transformed to 3 MV, then switched into a pulse compression system using laser triggered spark gaps. These must be synchronized to about 1 ns. Pulse compression is performed with saturable inductor switches, the output being 40 ns, 1.5 MV pulses. These are transformed to 30 MV in a self-magnetically insulated cavity adder structure. Space charge limited ion beams are drawn from anode plasmas with electron counter streaming being magnetically inhibited. The ions are ballistically focused into the entrances of guiding discharge channels for transport to the pellet. The status of component development from the prime power to the ion source will be reviewed

  20. S-process studies using single and pulsed neutron exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, H.

    The formation of heavy elements by slow neutron capture (s-process) is investigated. A pulsed neutron irradiation leading to an exponential exposure distribution is dominant for nuclei from A = 90 to 200. For the isotopes from iron to zirconium an additional 'weak' s-process component must be superimposed. Calculations using a single or another pulsed neutron exposure for this component have been carried out in order to reproduce the abundance pattern of the s-only and s-process dominant isotopes. For the adjustment of these calculations to the empirical values, the inclusion of new capture cross section data on Se76 and Y89 and the consideration of the branchings at Ni63, Se79, and Kr85 was important. The combination of an s-process with a single and a pulsed neutron exposure yielded a better representation of empirical abundances than a two component pulsed s-process.

  1. S-process studies using single and pulsed neutron exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, H.

    1986-01-01

    The formation of heavy elements by slow neutron capture (s-process) is investigated. A pulsed neutron irradiation leading to an exponential exposure distribution is dominant for nuclei from A=90 to 200. For the isotopes from iron to zirconium an additional ''weak'' s-process component must be superimposed. Calculations using a single or another pulsed neutron exposure for this component have been carried out in order to reproduce the abundance pattern of the s-only and s-process dominant isotopes. For the adjustment of these calculations to the empirical values, including new capture cross section data on Se76 and Y89 and the consideration of the branchings at Ni63, Se79, and Kr85 was important. The combination of a s-process with a single and a pulsed neutron exposure yielded a better representation of empirical abundances than a two component pulsed s-process

  2. Benchmark calculations for evaluation methods of gas volumetric leakage rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, R.; Aritomi, M.; Matsuzaki, M.

    1998-01-01

    A containment function of radioactive materials transport casks is essential for safe transportation to prevent the radioactive materials from being released into environment. Regulations such as IAEA standard determined the limit of radioactivity to be released. Since is not practical for the leakage tests to measure directly the radioactivity release from a package, as gas volumetric leakages rates are proposed in ANSI N14.5 and ISO standards. In our previous works, gas volumetric leakage rates for several kinds of gas from various leaks were measured and two evaluation methods, 'a simple evaluation method' and 'a strict evaluation method', were proposed based on the results. The simple evaluation method considers the friction loss of laminar flow with expansion effect. The strict evaluating method considers an exit loss in addition to the friction loss. In this study, four worked examples were completed for on assumed large spent fuel transport cask (Type B Package) with wet or dry capacity and at three transport conditions; normal transport with intact fuels or failed fuels, and an accident in transport. The standard leakage rates and criteria for two kinds of leak test were calculated for each example by each evaluation method. The following observations are made based upon the calculations and evaluations: the choked flow model of ANSI method greatly overestimates the criteria for tests ; the laminar flow models of both ANSI and ISO methods slightly overestimate the criteria for tests; the above two results are within the design margin for ordinary transport condition and all methods are useful for the evaluation; for severe condition such as failed fuel transportation, it should pay attention to apply a choked flow model of ANSI method. (authors)

  3. One-run Monte Carlo calculation of effective delayed neutron fraction and area-ratio reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhaopeng Zhong; Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry, E-mail: zzhong@anl.gov, E-mail: alby@anl.gov, E-mail: gohar@anl.gov [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The Monte Carlo code MCNPX has been utilized to calculate the effective delayed neutron fraction and reactivity by using the area-ratio method. The effective delayed neutron fraction β{sub eff} has been calculated with the fission probability method proposed by Meulekamp and van der Marck. MCNPX was used to calculate separately the fission probability of the delayed and the prompt neutrons by using the TALLYX user subroutine of MCNPX. In this way, β{sub eff} was obtained from the one criticality (k-code) calculation without performing an adjoint calculation. The traditional k-ratio method requires two criticality calculations to calculate β{sub eff}, while this approach utilizes only one MCNPX criticality calculation. Therefore, the approach described here is referred to as a one-run method. In subcritical systems driven by a pulsed neutron source, the area-ratio method is used to calculate reactivity (in dollar units) as the ratio between the prompt and delayed areas. These areas represent the integral of the reaction rates induced from the prompt and delayed neutrons during the pulse period. Traditionally, application of the area-ratio method requires two separate fixed source MCNPX simulations: one with delayed neutrons and the other without. The number of source particles in these two simulations must be extremely high in order to obtain accurate results with low statistical errors because the values of the total and prompt areas are very close. Consequently, this approach is time consuming and suffers from the statistical errors of the two simulations. The present paper introduces a more efficient method for estimating the reactivity calculated with the area method by taking advantage of the TALLYX user subroutine of MCNPX. This subroutine has been developed for separately scoring the reaction rates caused by the delayed and the prompt neutrons during a single simulation. Therefore the method is referred to as a one run calculation. These methodologies have

  4. One-run Monte Carlo calculation of effective delayed neutron fraction and area-ratio reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhaopeng Zhong; Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2011-01-01

    The Monte Carlo code MCNPX has been utilized to calculate the effective delayed neutron fraction and reactivity by using the area-ratio method. The effective delayed neutron fraction β_e_f_f has been calculated with the fission probability method proposed by Meulekamp and van der Marck. MCNPX was used to calculate separately the fission probability of the delayed and the prompt neutrons by using the TALLYX user subroutine of MCNPX. In this way, β_e_f_f was obtained from the one criticality (k-code) calculation without performing an adjoint calculation. The traditional k-ratio method requires two criticality calculations to calculate β_e_f_f, while this approach utilizes only one MCNPX criticality calculation. Therefore, the approach described here is referred to as a one-run method. In subcritical systems driven by a pulsed neutron source, the area-ratio method is used to calculate reactivity (in dollar units) as the ratio between the prompt and delayed areas. These areas represent the integral of the reaction rates induced from the prompt and delayed neutrons during the pulse period. Traditionally, application of the area-ratio method requires two separate fixed source MCNPX simulations: one with delayed neutrons and the other without. The number of source particles in these two simulations must be extremely high in order to obtain accurate results with low statistical errors because the values of the total and prompt areas are very close. Consequently, this approach is time consuming and suffers from the statistical errors of the two simulations. The present paper introduces a more efficient method for estimating the reactivity calculated with the area method by taking advantage of the TALLYX user subroutine of MCNPX. This subroutine has been developed for separately scoring the reaction rates caused by the delayed and the prompt neutrons during a single simulation. Therefore the method is referred to as a one run calculation. These methodologies have been

  5. Device for flattening statistically distributed pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'kanaev, G.I.; Iskenderov, V.G.; Rudnev, O.V.; Teller, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    The description is given of a device that converts the series of statistically distributed pulses into a pseudo-uniform one. The inlet pulses switch over the first counter, and the second one is switched over by the clock pulses each time the uniformity of the counters' states is violated. This violation is recorded by the logic circuit which passes to the output the clock pulses in the amount equal to that of the pulses that reached the device inlet. Losses at the correlation between the light velocity and the sampling rate up to 0.3 do not exceed 0.7 per cent for the memory of pulse counters 3, and 0.035 per cent for memory 7

  6. LIDAR pulse coding for high resolution range imaging at improved refresh rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gunzung; Park, Yongwan

    2016-10-17

    In this study, a light detection and ranging system (LIDAR) was designed that codes pixel location information in its laser pulses using the direct- sequence optical code division multiple access (DS-OCDMA) method in conjunction with a scanning-based microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirror. This LIDAR can constantly measure the distance without idle listening time for the return of reflected waves because its laser pulses include pixel location information encoded by applying the DS-OCDMA. Therefore, this emits in each bearing direction without waiting for the reflected wave to return. The MEMS mirror is used to deflect and steer the coded laser pulses in the desired bearing direction. The receiver digitizes the received reflected pulses using a low-temperature-grown (LTG) indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) based photoconductive antenna (PCA) and the time-to-digital converter (TDC) and demodulates them using the DS-OCDMA. When all of the reflected waves corresponding to the pixels forming a range image are received, the proposed LIDAR generates a point cloud based on the time-of-flight (ToF) of each reflected wave. The results of simulations performed on the proposed LIDAR are compared with simulations of existing LIDARs.

  7. Molecular dynamics study of lubricant depletion by pulsed laser heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Young Woo; Rosenkranz, Andreas; Talke, Frank E.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to numerically investigate the effect of pulsed laser heating on lubricant depletion. The maximum temperature, the lubricant depletion width, the number of evaporated lubricant beads and the number of fragmented lubricant chains were studied as a function of laser peak power, pulse duration and repetition rate. A continuous-wave laser and a square pulse laser were simulated and compared to a Gaussian pulse laser. With increasing repetition rate, pulsed laser heating was found to approach continuous-wave laser heating.

  8. Scattering of an ultrashort electromagnetic pulse in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astapenko, V. A.

    2011-01-01

    An analytic approach is developed to describing how ultrashort electromagnetic pulses with a duration of one period or less at the carrier frequency are scattered in a plasma. Formulas are derived to calculate and analyze the angular and spectral probabilities of radiation scattering via two possible mechanisms-Compton and transition radiation channels-throughout the entire pulse. Numerical simulations were carried out for a Gaussian pulse. The effect of the phase of the carrier frequency relative to the pulse envelope on the scattering parameters is investigated.

  9. Experimental study and modelisation of a pulse tube refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravex, A.; Rolland, P.; Liang, J.

    1992-01-01

    A test bench for pulse tube refrigerator characterization has been built. In various configurations (basic pulse tube, orifice pulse tube and double inlet pulse tube), the ultimate temperature and the cooling power have been measured as a function of pressure wave amplitude and frequency for various geometries. A lowest temperature of 28 K has been achieved in a single staged double inlet configuration. A modelisation taking into account wall heat pumping, enthalpy flow and regenerator inefficiency is under development. Preliminary calculation results are compared with experimental data

  10. CAMAC differential pulse discriminator-counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tselikov, N.V.

    1987-01-01

    Differential pulse discriminator-counter for Moessbauer spectrometer is described. Input pulse setting into the channel is performed according to the following algorithm: the pulse is transmitted to the channel depending on the fact whether the preceding pulse has got to the discrimination window or not. The circuit does not contain delay lines, taking into account the delay of a signal from the upper level discriminator in relation to the lower level discriminator signal, which is connected with input pulse rise finite time, which in turn allows one to reduce the discriminator dead time up to the operation time of threshold circuits. The pulse counting rate is 150 MHz, input signal amplitude is ±3 V, dead time is 6 ns, delay time from input to output is 14 ns. The unit is made in CAMAC system

  11. Pulse shaping and energy storage capabilities of angularly multiplexed KrF laser fusion drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmberg, R. H.; Giuliani, J. L.; Schmitt, A. J.

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes a rep-rated multibeam KrF laser driver design for the 500kJ Inertial Fusion test Facility (FTF) recently proposed by NRL, then models its optical pulse shaping capabilities using the ORESTES laser kinetics code. It describes a stable and reliable iteration technique for calculating the required precompensated input pulse shape that will achieve the desired output shape, even when the amplifiers are heavily saturated. It also describes how this precompensation technique could be experimentally implemented in real time on a reprated laser system. The simulations show that this multibeam system can achieve a high fidelity pulse shaping capability, even for a high gain shock ignition pulse whose final spike requires output intensities much higher than the ˜4MW/cm2 saturation levels associated with quasi-cw operation; i.e., they show that KrF can act as a storage medium even for pulsewidths of ˜1ns. For the chosen pulse, which gives a predicted fusion energy gain of ˜120, the simulations predict the FTF can deliver a total on-target energy of 428kJ, a peak spike power of 385TW, and amplified spontaneous emission prepulse contrast ratios IASE/Ilaser.

  12. Comparison of high-voltage ac and pulsed operation of a surface dielectric barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, James M [Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc., 2766 Indian Ripple Road, Dayton, Ohio 45440-3638 (United States); Trump, Darryl D [Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc., 2766 Indian Ripple Road, Dayton, Ohio 45440-3638 (United States); Bletzinger, Peter [Innovative Scientific Solutions, Inc., 2766 Indian Ripple Road, Dayton, Ohio 45440-3638 (United States); Ganguly, Biswa N [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433-7919 (United States)

    2006-10-21

    A surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in atmospheric pressure air was excited either by low frequency (0.3-2 kHz) high-voltage ac or by short, high-voltage pulses at repetition rates from 50 to 600 pulses s{sup -1}. The short-pulse excited discharge was more diffuse and did not have the pronounced bright multiple cathode spots observed in the ac excited discharge. The discharge voltage, current and average power deposited into the discharge were calculated for both types of excitation. As a measure of plasma-chemical efficiency, the ozone number density was measured by UV absorption as a function of average deposited power. The density of ozone produced by ac excitation did not increase so rapidly as that produced by short-pulse excitation as a function of average power, with a maximum measured density of {approx}3 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} at 25 W. The maximum ozone production achieved by short-pulse excitation was {approx}8.5 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} at 20 W, which was four times greater than that achieved by ac excitation at the same power level.

  13. Comparison of high-voltage ac and pulsed operation of a surface dielectric barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, James M; Trump, Darryl D; Bletzinger, Peter; Ganguly, Biswa N

    2006-01-01

    A surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in atmospheric pressure air was excited either by low frequency (0.3-2 kHz) high-voltage ac or by short, high-voltage pulses at repetition rates from 50 to 600 pulses s -1 . The short-pulse excited discharge was more diffuse and did not have the pronounced bright multiple cathode spots observed in the ac excited discharge. The discharge voltage, current and average power deposited into the discharge were calculated for both types of excitation. As a measure of plasma-chemical efficiency, the ozone number density was measured by UV absorption as a function of average deposited power. The density of ozone produced by ac excitation did not increase so rapidly as that produced by short-pulse excitation as a function of average power, with a maximum measured density of ∼3 x 10 15 cm -3 at 25 W. The maximum ozone production achieved by short-pulse excitation was ∼8.5 x 10 15 cm -3 at 20 W, which was four times greater than that achieved by ac excitation at the same power level

  14. Testing of super conducting low-beta 704 Mhz cavities at 50 Hz pulse repetition rate in view of SPL- first results

    CERN Document Server

    Höfle, W; Lollierou, J; Valuch, D; Chel, S; Devanz, G; Desmons, M; Piquet, O; Paparella, R; Pierini, P

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the preparatory phase for the luminosity upgrade of the LHC (SLHC-PP ) it is foreseen to characterize two superconducting RF cavities and demonstrate compliance of the required SPL field stability in amplitude and phase using a prototype LLRF system. We report on the preparation for testing of two superconducting low-beta cavities at 50 Hz pulse repetition rate including the setting-up of the low level RF control system to evaluate the performance of the piezo-tuning system and cavity field stability in amplitude and phase. Results from tests with 50 Hz pulse repetition rate are presented. Simulations of the RF system will be used to predict the necessary specifications for power and bandwidth to control the cavity field and derive specifications for the RF system and its control. Exemplary results of the simulation are presented.

  15. Mechanical study of 20 MJ superconducting pulse coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Yasuhide; Shimamoto, Susumu

    1985-09-01

    This paper describes calculation methods and computer codes of stress distribution in a circular-shaped superconducting pulsed coils. The stress problems of a large sized superconducting coil, for example, are discussed for 20 MJ pool-cooled pulse coil. Young's modulus of a stranded flat cable, low rigidity, is measured and evaluated. (author)

  16. Preliminary Calculation for Plasma Chamber Design of Pulsed Electron Source Based on Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widdi Usada

    2009-01-01

    This paper described the characteristics of pulsed electron sources with anode-cathode distance of 5 cm, electrode diameter of 10 cm, driven by capacitor energy of 25 J. The preliminary results showed that if the system is operated with diode resistance is 1.6 Ω, plasma resistance is 0.14 Ω, and β is 0.94, the achieved of plasma voltage is 640 V, its current is 4.395 kA with its pulse width of 0.8 μsecond. According to breakdown voltage based on Paschen empirical formula, with this achieved voltage, this system could be operated for operation pressure of 1 torr. (author)

  17. Error rate of automated calculation for wound surface area using a digital photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S; Park, J; Lee, H; Lee, J B; Lee, B U; Oh, B H

    2018-02-01

    Although measuring would size using digital photography is a quick and simple method to evaluate the skin wound, the possible compatibility of it has not been fully validated. To investigate the error rate of our newly developed wound surface area calculation using digital photography. Using a smartphone and a digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera, four photographs of various sized wounds (diameter: 0.5-3.5 cm) were taken from the facial skin model in company with color patches. The quantitative values of wound areas were automatically calculated. The relative error (RE) of this method with regard to wound sizes and types of camera was analyzed. RE of individual calculated area was from 0.0329% (DSLR, diameter 1.0 cm) to 23.7166% (smartphone, diameter 2.0 cm). In spite of the correction of lens curvature, smartphone has significantly higher error rate than DSLR camera (3.9431±2.9772 vs 8.1303±4.8236). However, in cases of wound diameter below than 3 cm, REs of average values of four photographs were below than 5%. In addition, there was no difference in the average value of wound area taken by smartphone and DSLR camera in those cases. For the follow-up of small skin defect (diameter: <3 cm), our newly developed automated wound area calculation method is able to be applied to the plenty of photographs, and the average values of them are a relatively useful index of wound healing with acceptable error rate. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Modeling of Pulsed Direct-Current Glow Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Mu; Zheng Yaru; Fan Yujia; Zhang Nan; Liu Chengsen; Wang Dezhen

    2010-01-01

    A self-consistent model was adopted to study the time evolution of low-voltage pulsed DC glow discharge. The distributions of electric field, ion density and electron density in nitrogen were investigated in our simulation, and the temporal shape of the discharge current was also obtained. Our results show that the dynamic behaviors of the discharge depends strongly on the applied pulse voltage, and the use of higher pulse voltages results in a significantly increase of discharge current and a decrease of discharge delay time. The current-voltage characteristic calculated by adjusting secondary electron emission coefficient for different applied pulse voltage under the gas pressure of 1 Torr is found in a reasonable agreement with the experimental results.

  19. Attosecond pulse generation in noble gases in the presence of extreme high intensity THz pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogh, E.; Varju, K.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The shortest - attosecond - light pulses available today are produced by high harmonic generation (HHG) of near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses in noble gas jets, providing a broad spectral plateau of XUV radiation ending in a cutoff. The minimum pulse duration is determined by the achievable bandwidth (i.e. the position of the cutoff), and the chirp of the produced pulses. The extension of the cutoff by increasing the laser intensity is limited by the depletion and phase matching problems of the medium. An alternative method demonstrated to produce higher harmonic orders is by using longer pump pulse wavelength, with the disadvantage of decreased efficiency. Recently it was shown that application of a quasi-DC high strength electric field results in an increase of more than a factor of two in the order of efficiently generated high harmonics. However, the possibility to implement the method proposed in [3] of using a CO 2 laser to create a quasi-DC field for assisting HHG of the NIR laser is questionable, because it's technically very challenging to synchronize pulses from different laser sources. Alternatively, synchronous production of THz pulses with the NIR laser pulse offers a more promising route. The first numerical test of this idea has been reported in [4]. In this contribution we further investigate the method for realistic THz field strengths and short driving pulses, exploring the effect of longer pump laser wavelength on the process. We assume the presence of high intensity THz pulses for supplying the high-strength quasi-DC electric field. The spectrum as well as the chirp of the produced radiation is calculated. We use the non-adiabatic saddle point method to determine the generated radiation described in [6]. We simulate harmonic generation in noble gas atoms, with few cycle NIR pulses of peak intensity at and above 2 x 10 14 W/cm 2 (388 MV/cm) and wavelengths 800 nm and 1560 nm. The THz field strength is varied

  20. Photoplethysmography pulse rate variability as a surrogate measurement of heart rate variability during non-stationary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, E; Orini, M; Bailón, R; Laguna, P; Vergara, J M; Mainardi, L

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we assessed the possibility of using the pulse rate variability (PRV) extracted from the photoplethysmography signal as an alternative measurement of the HRV signal in non-stationary conditions. The study is based on analysis of the changes observed during a tilt table test in the heart rate modulation of 17 young subjects. First, the classical indices of HRV analysis were compared to the indices from PRV in intervals where stationarity was assumed. Second, the time-varying spectral properties of both signals were compared by time-frequency (TF) and TF coherence analysis. Third, the effect of replacing PRV with HRV in the assessment of the changes of the autonomic modulation of the heart rate was considered. Time-invariant HRV and PRV indices showed no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) and high correlation (>0.97). Time-frequency analysis revealed that the TF spectra of both signals were highly correlated (0.99 ± 0.01); the difference between the instantaneous power, in the LF and HF bands, obtained from HRV and PRV was small (<10 −3 s −2 ) and their temporal patterns were highly correlated (0.98 ± 0.04 and 0.95 ± 0.06 in the LF and HF bands, respectively) and TF coherence in the LF and HF bands was high (0.97 ± 0.04 and 0.89 ± 0.08, respectively). Finally, the instantaneous power in the LF band was observed to significantly increase during head-up tilt by both HRV and PRV analysis. These results suggest that although some differences in the time-varying spectral indices extracted from HRV and PRV exist, mainly in the HF band associated with respiration, PRV could be used as a surrogate of HRV during non-stationary conditions, at least during the tilt table test

  1. Pulsed-linac synchronization using an embedded micro-controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, S.R.; Alexander, S.B.; West, R.J.; Simpson, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    A Master Timing Generator (MTG) was developed using a single Motorola MC68332 embedded micro-controller. The MTG produces electrical synchronization pulses that coordinate the action of all pulsed subsystems and the acquisition of pulsed data. Pulse width and delay-offset of each of the 13 output channels can be changed on-line. The MTG is interfaced with a GE Series-Six Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), which coordinates overall control of the IMPELA linac. Serial communications are used between the PLC and the MTG. The PLC needs only to transmit data to define the pulse repetition rate, the beam pulse width, and the subsystems that should be active. The MTG determines the widths and relative delays required to achieve the requested beam pulse-width. Changes in width and repetition rate are effected using a smooth ramp to avoid power-demand transients. All MTG timing requirements are met with the current implementation, having the following characteristics: 1 Hz ≤ repetition rate ≤ 500 Hz with ±1% resolution, 12 μs ≤ width ≤ 1000 μs in 1 μs steps, and a delay-offset range of 4.5 ms in 1 μs steps. (Author) (4 figs., 5 refs.)

  2. Control Loop for a Pulse Generator of a Fast Septum Magnet using DSP and Fuzzy Logic

    CERN Document Server

    Aldaz-Carroll, E; Dieperink, J H; Schröder, G; Vossenberg, Eugène B

    1997-01-01

    A prototype of a fast pulsed eddy current septum magnet for one of thebeam extraction's from the SPS towards LHC is under development. The precision of the magnetic field must be better than ±1.0 10-4 during a flat top of 30 µs. The current pulse is generated by discharging the capacitors of a LC circuit that resonates on the 1st and on the 3rd harmonic of a sine wave with a repetition rate of 15 s. The parameters of the circuit and the voltage on the capacitors must be carefully adjusted to meet the specifications. Drifts during operation must be corrected between two pulses by mechanically adjusting the inductance of the coil in the generator as well as the primary capacitor voltage. This adjustment process is automated by acquiring the current pulse waveform with sufficient time and amplitude resolution, calculating the corrections needed and applying these corrections to the hardware for the next pulse. A very cost-effective and practical solution for this adjustment process is the integration of off-th...

  3. Groups of bats improve sonar efficiency through mutual suppression of pulse emissions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna eJarvis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available How bats adapt their sonar behavior to accommodate the noisiness of a crowded day roost is a mystery. Some bats change their pulse acoustics to enhance the distinction between theirs and another bat’s echoes, but additional mechanisms are needed to explain the bat sonar system’s exceptional resilience to jamming by conspecifics. Variable pulse repetition rate strategies offer one potential solution to this dynamic problem, but precisely how changes in pulse rate could improve sonar performance in social settings is unclear. Here we show that bats decrease their emission rates as population density increases, following a pattern that reflects a cumulative mutual suppression of each other’s pulse emissions. Playback of artificially-generated echolocation pulses similarly slowed emission rates, demonstrating that suppression was mediated by hearing the pulses of other bats. Slower emission rates did not support an antiphonal emission strategy but did reduce the relative proportion of emitted pulses that overlapped with another bat’s emissions, reducing the relative rate of mutual interference. The prevalence of acoustic interferences occurring amongst bats was empirically determined to be a linear function of population density and mean emission rates. Consequently as group size increased, small reductions in emission rates spread across the group partially mitigated the increase in interference rate. Drawing on lessons learned from communications networking theory we show how modest decreases in pulse emission rates can significantly increase the net information throughput of the shared acoustic space, thereby improving sonar efficiency for all individuals in a group. We propose that an automated acoustic suppression of pulse emissions triggered by bats hearing each other's emissions dynamically optimizes sonar efficiency for the entire group.

  4. Fractional Calculus Based FDTD Modeling of Layered Biological Media Exposure to Wideband Electromagnetic Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mescia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic fields are involved in several therapeutic and diagnostic applications such as hyperthermia and electroporation. For these applications, pulsed electric fields (PEFs and transient phenomena are playing a key role for understanding the biological response due to the exposure to non-ionizing wideband pulses. To this end, the PEF propagation in the six-layered planar structure modeling the human head has been studied. The electromagnetic field and the specific absorption rate (SAR have been calculated through an accurate finite-difference time-domain (FDTD dispersive modeling based on the fractional derivative operator. The temperature rise inside the tissues due to the electromagnetic field exposure has been evaluated using both the non-thermoregulated and thermoregulated Gagge’s two-node models. Moreover, additional parametric studies have been carried out with the aim to investigate the thermal response by changing the amplitude and duration of the electric pulses.

  5. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krastelev, E. G., E-mail: ekrastelev@yandex.ru; Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80–90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  6. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krastelev, E. G.; Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-01-01

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80–90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz

  7. Performance of a nonlinear receiver for the ultrashort-pulse optical CDMA system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bin; Lehnert, James S.

    2005-09-01

    At the receiver of an ultrashort-pulse optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) system, a nonlinear thresholder is needed to discriminate between the correctly decoded short pulse and the interference that appears to be a pseudorandom signal. It has been demonstrated that the self phase modulation (SPM) effect can be used to realize this nonlinear thresholder. The performance of a system that exploits this phenomenon is analyzed in this paper. If the spreading code is random, the electrical field of the interfering signal from the multiple users can be shown to be a complex Gaussian random process. The broadened power spectral density (PSD) function caused by the SPM effect can be calculated. When "1" is transmitted, the correctly decoded signal from the desired user, which is a deterministic waveform, is added to the Gaussian random process. Beating between the two signals causes random fluctuations in the power. Since the strength of the SPM effect is proportional to the variation rate of power, the broadened signal spectrum will appear random. The Monte Carlo method is used to obtain the properties of the decision statistic. Finally, the bit-error rate (BER) is calculated, and the simulation results are presented. The result reveals that the performance of the SPM-based nonlinear receiver can outperform the ideal linear receiver in some circumstances.

  8. Rate constant for the H˙ + H2O → ˙OH + H2 reaction at elevated temperatures measured by pulse radiolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroya, Y; Yamashita, S; Lertnaisat, P; Sanguanmith, S; Meesungnoen, J; Jay-Gerin, J-P; Katsumura, Y

    2017-11-22

    Maintaining the structural integrity of materials in nuclear power plants is an essential issue associated with safe operation. Hydrogen (H 2 ) addition or injection to coolants is a powerful technique that has been widely applied such that the reducing conditions in the coolant water avoid corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Because the radiation-induced reaction of ˙OH + H 2 → H˙ + H 2 O plays a crucial role in these systems, the rate constant has been measured at operation temperatures of the reactors (285-300 °C) by pulse radiolysis, generating sufficient data for analysis. The reverse reaction H˙ + H 2 O → ˙OH + H 2 is negligibly slow at ambient temperature; however, it accelerates considerably quickly at elevated temperatures. Although the reverse reaction reduces the effectiveness of H 2 addition, reliable rate constants have not yet been measured. In this study, the rate constants have been determined in a temperature range of 250-350 °C by pulse radiolysis in an aqueous I - solution.

  9. Investigation of the Effect of Finite Pulse Errors on BABA Pulse Sequence Using Floquet-Magnus Expansion Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene S; Reid, Alicia E

    This paper presents the study of finite pulse widths for the BABA pulse sequence using the Floquet-Magnus expansion (FME) approach. In the FME scheme, the first order F 1 is identical to its counterparts in average Hamiltonian theory (AHT) and Floquet theory (FT). However, the timing part in the FME approach is introduced via the Λ 1 ( t ) function not present in other schemes. This function provides an easy way for evaluating the spin evolution during "the time in between" through the Magnus expansion of the operator connected to the timing part of the evolution. The evaluation of Λ 1 ( t ) is useful especially for the analysis of the non-stroboscopic evolution. Here, the importance of the boundary conditions, which provides a natural choice of Λ 1 (0) is ignored. This work uses the Λ 1 ( t ) function to compare the efficiency of the BABA pulse sequence with δ - pulses and the BABA pulse sequence with finite pulses. Calculations of Λ 1 ( t ) and F 1 are presented.

  10. High power all-solid-state fourth harmonic generation of 266 nm at the pulse repetition rate of 100 kHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Q; Yan, X P; Fu, X; Gong, M; Wang, D S

    2009-01-01

    14.8 W UV laser at 266 nm was reported with the extra cavity frequency quartered configuration. The fundamental frequency IR source is a high-power high-beam-quality acoustic-optic Q-switched Nd:YVO 4 master-oscillator-power-amplifier laser. The type-I phase-matched LBO and type-I phase-matched BBO crystals were used as the extra-cavity frequency doubled and quartered crystal respectively. 14.8 W UV laser of 266 nm was obtained at the pulse repetition rate of 100 kHz with the conversion efficiency of 18.3% from green to UV, and the pulse duration of the UV laser was 10 ns corresponding to the pulse peak power of 14.8 kW. At 150 kHz, 11.5 W power output was obtained. The highest peak power of 21 kW was also achieved at 80 kHz with the average output power of 14.5 W

  11. An 8-GW long-pulse generator based on Tesla transformer and pulse forming network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiancang; Zhang, Xibo; Li, Rui; Zhao, Liang; Sun, Xu; Wang, Limin; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Wang, Ying; Peng, Jianchang; Song, Xiaoxin

    2014-06-01

    A long-pulse generator TPG700L based on a Tesla transformer and a series pulse forming network (PFN) is constructed to generate intense electron beams for the purpose of high power microwave (HPM) generation. The TPG700L mainly consists of a 12-stage PFN, a built-in Tesla transformer in a pulse forming line, a three-electrode gas switch, a transmission line with a trigger, and a load. The Tesla transformer and the compact PFN are the key technologies for the development of the TPG700L. This generator can output electrical pulses with a width as long as 200 ns at a level of 8 GW and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. When used to drive a relative backward wave oscillator for HPM generation, the electrical pulse width is about 100 ns on a voltage level of 520 kV. Factors affecting the pulse waveform of the TPG700L are also discussed. At present, the TPG700L performs well for long-pulse HPM generation in our laboratory.

  12. An 8-GW long-pulse generator based on Tesla transformer and pulse forming network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Jiancang; Zhang, Xibo; Li, Rui; Zhao, Liang, E-mail: zhaoliang0526@163.com; Sun, Xu; Wang, Limin; Zeng, Bo; Cheng, Jie; Wang, Ying; Peng, Jianchang; Song, Xiaoxin [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710024 (China)

    2014-06-15

    A long-pulse generator TPG700L based on a Tesla transformer and a series pulse forming network (PFN) is constructed to generate intense electron beams for the purpose of high power microwave (HPM) generation. The TPG700L mainly consists of a 12-stage PFN, a built-in Tesla transformer in a pulse forming line, a three-electrode gas switch, a transmission line with a trigger, and a load. The Tesla transformer and the compact PFN are the key technologies for the development of the TPG700L. This generator can output electrical pulses with a width as long as 200 ns at a level of 8 GW and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. When used to drive a relative backward wave oscillator for HPM generation, the electrical pulse width is about 100 ns on a voltage level of 520 kV. Factors affecting the pulse waveform of the TPG700L are also discussed. At present, the TPG700L performs well for long-pulse HPM generation in our laboratory.

  13. Time-dependence and averaging techniques in atomic photoionization calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheibner, K.F.

    1984-01-01

    Two distinct problems in the development and application of averaging techniques to photoionization calculations are considered. The first part of the thesis is concerned with the specific problem of near-resonant three-photon ionization in hydrogen, a process for which no cross section exists. Effects of the inclusion of the laser pulse characteristics (both temporal and spatial) on the dynamics of the ionization probability and of the metastable state probability are examined. It is found, for example, that the ionization probability can decrease with increasing field intensity. The temporal profile of the laser pulse is found to affect the dynamics very little, whereas the spatial character of the pulse can affect the results drastically. In the second part of the thesis techniques are developed for calculating averaged cross sections directly without first calculating a detailed cross section. Techniques are developed whereby the detailed cross section never has to be calculated as an intermediate step, but rather, the averaged cross section is calculated directly. A variation of the moment technique and a new method based on the stabilization technique are applied successfully to atomic hydrogen and helium

  14. Ozone Production Using Pulsed Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Oxygen

    OpenAIRE

    Samaranayake, W. J. M.; Miyahara, Y.; Namihira, T.; Katsuki, S.; Hackam, R.; Akiyama, H.; ナミヒラ, タカオ; カツキ, スナオ; アキヤマ, ヒデノリ; 浪平, 隆男; 勝木, 淳; 秋山, 秀典

    2000-01-01

    The production of ozone was investigated using a dielectric barrier discharge in oxygen, and employing short-duration pulsed power. The dependence of the ozone concentration (parts per million, ppm) and ozone production yield (g(O3)/kWh) on the peak pulsed voltage (17.5 to 57.9 kV) and the pulse repetition rate (25 to 400 pulses/s, pps) were investigated. In the present study, the following parameters were kept constant: a pressure of 1.01×105 Pa, a temperature of 26±4°C a gas flow rate of 3....

  15. Monte Carlo calculation of dose rate conversion factors for external exposure to photon emitters in soil

    CERN Document Server

    Clouvas, A; Antonopoulos-Domis, M; Silva, J

    2000-01-01

    The dose rate conversion factors D/sub CF/ (absorbed dose rate in air per unit activity per unit of soil mass, nGy h/sup -1/ per Bq kg/sup -1/) are calculated 1 m above ground for photon emitters of natural radionuclides uniformly distributed in the soil. Three Monte Carlo codes are used: 1) The MCNP code of Los Alamos; 2) The GEANT code of CERN; and 3) a Monte Carlo code developed in the Nuclear Technology Laboratory of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. The accuracy of the Monte Carlo results is tested by the comparison of the unscattered flux obtained by the three Monte Carlo codes with an independent straightforward calculation. All codes and particularly the MCNP calculate accurately the absorbed dose rate in air due to the unscattered radiation. For the total radiation (unscattered plus scattered) the D/sub CF/ values calculated from the three codes are in very good agreement between them. The comparison between these results and the results deduced previously by other authors indicates a good ag...

  16. High current pulsed positron microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, R.H.; Stoeffl, W.; Kumar, A.; Sterne, P.A.; Cowan, T.E.; Hartley, J.

    1997-01-01

    We are developing a low energy, microscopically focused, pulsed positron beam for defect analysis by positron lifetime spectroscopy to provide a new defect analysis capability at the 10 10 e + s -l beam at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron linac. When completed, the pulsed positron microprobe will enable defect specific, 3-dimensional maps of defect concentrations with sub-micron resolution of defect location. By coupling these data with first principles calculations of defect specific positron lifetimes and positron implantation profiles we will both map the identity and concentration of defect distributions

  17. Phase selection during pulsed laser annealing of manganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Peercy, P.S.; Perepezko, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Pulsed (25 ns) laser-induced heating of the α phase of Mn is found to be sufficiently rapid to bypass solid-state transformation to the high-temperature β, γ, and delta allotropes and thus produce melts that are calculated to be undercooled by approx. 120 K with respect to the equilibrium melting temperature of the delta phase. Nucleation of the γ phase in this highly undercooled melt is observed for sufficiently long melt durations. The experiments thus demonstrate that pulsed laser-induced melting of metals with allotropes permits the study of nucleation and growth in highly undercooled melts with calculable temperatures

  18. Electron emitter pulsed-type cylindrical IEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Gu, Y.; Stubbers, R.; Zich, R.; Anderl, R.; Hartwell, J.

    1997-01-01

    A cylindrical version of the single grid Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device (termed the C-device) has been developed for use as a 2.5-MeV D-D fusion neutron source for neutron activation analysis. The C-device employs a hollow-tube type cathode with similar anodes backed up by ''reflector'' dishes. The resulting discharge differs from a conventional hollow cathode discharge, by creating an explicit ion beam which is ''pinched'' in the cathode region. Resulting fusion reactions generate ∼10 6 neutron/s. A pulsed version is under development for applications requiring higher fluxes. Several pulsing techniques are under study, including an electron emitter (e-emitter) assisted discharge in a thorated tungsten wire emitter located behind a slotted area in the reflector dishes. Pulsing is initiated after establishing a low power steady-state discharge by pulsing the e-emitter current using a capacitor switch type circuit. The resulting electron jet, coupled with the discharge by the biased slot array, creates a strong pulse in the pinched ion beam. The pulse length/repetition rate are controlled by the e-emitter pulse circuit. Typical parameters in present studies are ∼30micros, 10Hz and 1-amp ion current. Corresponding neutron measurements are an In-foil type activation counter for time averaged rates. Results for a wide variety of operating conditions are presented

  19. Conceptual design of a novel instrument for producing intense pulses of 10 ps X-rays for ultra-fast fluorescence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, G.J.

    1996-05-01

    A novel bench-top device for producing intense, fast pulses of x-rays has been designed with 10 ps fwhm (full-width at half-maximum) x-ray pulse width, 120 keV maximum energy, 100 kHz repetition rate, and 1 A peak current onto the x-ray anode. The device includes three sections: (1) an electron gun that generates 5 ns wide pulses of 120 keV electrons at 100 kHz; (2) solenoidal magnetic lenses and deflection plates that focus the electrons onto an aperture plate and sweep the pulsed beam past the aperture, respectively; and (3) a tungsten anode onto which the post-aperture electrons are focused, producing pulses of x-rays. At a sweeping rate of 10{sup 13} V/s, the electron pulses and resulting x-ray pulses are reduced to about 10 ps. The design process used EGUN (an electron optics and gun design program) electron trajectory simulations, including calculation of important space charge effects. When built, this instrument will be used to excite new, fast, bright scintillator samples in crystal or powdered form, allowing fluorescent lifetimes and spectra to be measured with a microchannel PMT. The very narrow 10 ps x-ray pulse width is necessary for accurate measurements of the risetimes of very fast scintillators (e.g., BaF{sub 2}). In addition, the large x-ray flux (1 A peak current) is advantageous when using a reflection grating monochromator to measure decay times at different wavelengths.

  20. Conceptual design of a novel instrument for producing intense pulses of 10 ps X-rays for ultra-fast fluorescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, G.J.

    1996-05-01

    A novel bench-top device for producing intense, fast pulses of x-rays has been designed with 10 ps fwhm (full-width at half-maximum) x-ray pulse width, 120 keV maximum energy, 100 kHz repetition rate, and 1 A peak current onto the x-ray anode. The device includes three sections: (1) an electron gun that generates 5 ns wide pulses of 120 keV electrons at 100 kHz; (2) solenoidal magnetic lenses and deflection plates that focus the electrons onto an aperture plate and sweep the pulsed beam past the aperture, respectively; and (3) a tungsten anode onto which the post-aperture electrons are focused, producing pulses of x-rays. At a sweeping rate of 10 13 V/s, the electron pulses and resulting x-ray pulses are reduced to about 10 ps. The design process used EGUN (an electron optics and gun design program) electron trajectory simulations, including calculation of important space charge effects. When built, this instrument will be used to excite new, fast, bright scintillator samples in crystal or powdered form, allowing fluorescent lifetimes and spectra to be measured with a microchannel PMT. The very narrow 10 ps x-ray pulse width is necessary for accurate measurements of the risetimes of very fast scintillators (e.g., BaF 2 ). In addition, the large x-ray flux (1 A peak current) is advantageous when using a reflection grating monochromator to measure decay times at different wavelengths

  1. Results of a bench mark test on the crack opening and leak rate calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebner, H.

    1995-01-01

    Results of a bench mark test on the standard problem calculation of crack opening and leak rate in piping components are presented. The bench mark test is based on two experiments performed in phase III of the German HDR safety program. The pipe sections considered in these experiments were a straight pipe with an 80 mm diameter containing a circumferential wall penetrating crack and a pipe branch DN 100/DN 25 with a crack in the weldment between the nozzle and the main pipe. Both test pieces were made of austenitic steel and were loaded by internal pressure and bending moment. For the evaluation of the crack opening either analytical methods or estimation schemes or the finite element method were used, while leak rates were calculated by means of two-phase flow methods. The compilation of the results shows very large scatter bands in general, with deviations between calculated and measured values of up to some one hundred percent. Reasons for this behaviour are uncertainties in the measured data and their evaluation as well as the different methods of calculation and their uncertainties. (author)

  2. Erbium:ytterbium fiber-laser system delivering watt-level femtosecond pulses using divided pulse amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herda, Robert; Zach, Armin

    2015-03-01

    We present an Erbium:Ytterbium codoped fiber-amplifer system based on Divided-Pulses-Amplification (DPA) for ultrashort pulses. The output from a saturable-absorber mode-locked polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber oscillator is amplified in a PM normal-dispersion Erbium-doped fiber. After this stage the pulses are positively chirped and have a duration of 2.0 ps at an average power of 93 mW. A stack of 5 birefringent Yttrium-Vanadate crystals divides these pulses 32 times. We amplify these pulses using a double-clad Erbium:Ytterbium codoped fiber pumped through a multimode fiber combiner. The pulses double pass the amplifier and recombine in the crystals using non-reciprocal polarization 90° rotation by a Faraday rotating mirror. Pulses with a duration of 144 fs are obtained after separation from the input beam using a polarizing beam splitter cube. These pulses have an average power of 1.85 W at a repetition rate of 80 MHz. The generation of femtosecond pulses directly from the amplifier was enabled by a positively chirped seed pulse, normally dispersive Yttrium-Vanadate crystals, and anomalously dispersive amplifier fibers. Efficient frequency doubling to 780 nm with an average power of 725 mW and a pulse duration of 156 fs is demonstrated. In summary we show a DPA setup that enables the generation of femtosecond pulses at watt-level at 1560 nm without the need for further external dechirping and demonstrate a good pulse quality by efficient frequency doubling. Due to the use of PM fiber components and a Faraday rotator the setup is environmentally stable.

  3. Coil protection calculator for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsala, R.J.; Lawson, J.E.; Persing, R.G.; Senko, T.R.; Woolley, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    A new coil protection system (CPS) is being developed to replace the existing TFTR magnetic coil fault detector. The existing fault detector sacrifices TFTR operating capability for simplicity. The new CPS, when installed in October of 1988, will permit operation up to the actual coil stress limits parameters in real-time. The computation will be done in a microprocessor based Coil Protection Calculator (CPC) currently under construction at PPL. THe new CPC will allow TFTR to operate with higher plasma currents and will permit the optimization of pulse repetition rates. The CPC will provide real-time estimates of critical coil and bus temperatures and stresses based on real-time redundant measurements of coil currents, coil cooling water inlet temperature, and plasma current. The critical parameter calculations are compared to prespecified limits. If these limits are reached or exceeded, protection action will be initiated to a hard wired control system (HCS), which will shut down the power supplies. The CPC consists of a redundant VME based microprocessor system which will sample all input data and compute all stress quantities every ten milliseconds. Thermal calculations will be approximated every 10ms with an exact solution occurring every second. The CPC features continuous cross-checking of redundant input signal, automatic detection of internal failure modes, monitoring and recording of calculated results, and a quick, functional verification of performance via an internal test system. (author)

  4. Direct quantum mechanical calculation of the F + H{sub 2} {yields} HF + H thermal rate constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moix, Marc [Computer Simulation and Modeling (COSMO) Lab, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Josep Samitier 5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Quimica Teorica i Computacional de la UB (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona (Spain); Huarte-Larranaga, Fermin [Computer Simulation and Modeling (COSMO) Lab, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, Josep Samitier 5, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Quimica Teorica i Computacional de la UB (IQTCUB), Universitat de Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: fhuarte@pcb.ub.es

    2008-07-03

    Accurate full-dimensional quantum mechanical thermal rate constant values have been calculated for the F+H{sub 2}{yields}HF+H reaction on the Stark-Werner ab initio potential energy surface. These calculations are based on a flux correlation functions and employ a rigorous statistical sampling scheme to account for the overall rotation and the MCTDH scheme for the wave packet propagation. Our results shed some light on discrepancies on the thermal rate found for previous flux correlation based calculations with respect to accurate reactive scattering results. The resonance pattern of the all-J cumulative reaction probability is analyzed in terms of the partial wave contributions.

  5. MCNPCX calculations of dose rates and spectra in experimental channels of the CTEx irradiating facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Renato G.; Rebello, Wilson F.; Vellozo, Sergio O.; Junior, Luis M.; Vital, Helio C.; Rusin, Tiago; Silva, Ademir X.

    2013-01-01

    MCNPX simulations have been performed in order to calculate dose rates as well as spectra along the four experimental channels of the gamma irradiating facility at the Technology Center of the Brazilian Army (CTEx). Safety, operational and research requirements have led to the need to determine both the magnitude and spectra of the leaking gamma fluxes. The CTEx experimental facility is cavity type with a moveable set of 28 horizontally positioned rods, filled with Cesium-137 chloride and doubly encased in stainless steel that yields an approximately plane 42 kCi-source that provides a maximum dose rate of about 1.5 kG/h into two irradiating chambers. The channels are intended for irradiation tests outside facility. They would allow larger samples to be exposed to lower gamma dose rates under controlled conditions. Dose rates have been calculated for several positions inside the channels as well as at their exits. In addition, for purposes related to the safety of operators and personnel, the angles submitted by the exiting beams have also been evaluated as they spread when leaving the channels. All calculations have been performed by using a computational model of the CTEx facility that allows its characteristics and operation to be accurately simulated by using the Monte Carlo Method. Virtual dosimeters filled with Fricke (ferrous sulfate) were modeled and positioned throughout 2 vertical channels (top and bottom) and 2 horizontal ones (front and back) in order to map dose rates and gamma spectrum distributions. The calculations revealed exiting collimated beams in the order of tenths of Grays per minute as compared to the maximum 25 Gy / min dose rate in the irradiator chamber. In addition, the beams leaving the two vertical channels were found to exhibit a widespread cone-shaped distribution with aperture angle ranging around 85 deg. The data calculated in this work are intended for use in the design of optimized experiments (better positioning of samples and

  6. Gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission line generator of high voltage pulses modulated at 4 GHz frequency with 1000 Hz pulse repetition rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulmasculov, M R; Sharypov, K A; Shunailov, S A; Shpak, V G; Yalandin, M I; Pedos, M S; Rukin, S N

    2017-01-01

    Results of testing of a generator based on a solid-state drive and the parallel gyromagnetic nonlinear transmission lines with external bias are presented. Stable rf-modulated high-voltage nanosecond pulses were shaped in each of the four channels in 1 s packets with 1000 Hz repetition frequencies. Pulse amplitude reaches -175 kV, at a modulation depth of rf-oscillations to 50 % and the effective frequency ∼4 GHz. (paper)

  7. A 70 MHz pulsing beam system for protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Shizhong; Zhang Tianjue; Wu Longcheng; Lv Yinlong; Song Guofang; Guan Fengping; Jia Xianlu

    2008-01-01

    A test beam line for pulsed beam generation for 10 MeV central region model (CRM) of a compact cyclotron is under construction as China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). A 70 MHz continuous H - beam with the energy of dozens of keV or a hundred keV will be pulsed to pulse length of less than 10 ns with the repetition rate of 1-8 MHz. A 70.487 MHz buncher will be used to compress the DC beam into the RF phase acceptance of ±30° of the CRM cyclotron. The 2.2 MHz sine waveform will be used for the chopper. A pulse with the repetition rate to 4.4 MHz and pulse length less than 10 ns is expected after CRM cyclotron. (authors)

  8. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  9. External dose-rate conversion factors for calculation of dose to the public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    This report presents a tabulation of dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides in the environment. This report was prepared in conjunction with criteria for limiting dose equivalents to members of the public from operations of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The dose-rate conversion factors are provided for use by the DOE and its contractors in performing calculations of external dose equivalents to members of the public. The dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons presented in this report are based on a methodology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. However, some adjustments of the previously documented methodology have been made in obtaining the dose-rate conversion factors in this report. 42 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  10. Metal processing with ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Paul S.; Felt, M. D.; Komashko, Aleksey M.; Perry, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Stuart, Brent C.

    2000-08-01

    Femtosecond laser ablation has been shown to produce well-defined cuts and holes in metals with minimal heat effect to the remaining material. Ultrashort laser pulse processing shows promise as an important technique for materials processing. We will discuss the physical effects associated with processing based experimental and modeling results. Intense ultra-short laser pulse (USLP) generates high pressures and temperatures in a subsurface layer during the pulse, which can strongly modify the absorption. We carried out simulations of USLP absorption versus material and pulse parameters. The ablation rate as function of the laser parameters has been estimated. Since every laser pulse removes only a small amount of material, a practical laser processing system must have high repetition rate. We will demonstrate that planar ablation is unstable and the initially smooth crater bottom develops a corrugated pattern after many tens of shots. The corrugation growth rate, angle of incidence and the polarization of laser electric field dependence will be discussed. In the nonlinear stage, the formation of coherent structures with scales much larger than the laser wavelength was observed. Also, there appears to be a threshold fluence above which a narrow, nearly perfectly circular channel forms after a few hundred shots. Subsequent shots deepen this channel without significantly increasing its diameter. The role of light absorption in the hole walls will be discussed.

  11. Development of a pulse magnet of a superconducting storage ring and degradation of the pulse magnetic field by the vacuum chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukishima, Chihiro; Nakata, Shuhei

    1993-01-01

    A pulse magnet and its modulator are developed for a superconducting storage ring commissioning at Mitsubishi Electric Corp. The magnet is a window flame type one and uses a ceramic chamber with thin metallic coating for the vacuum shielding. The modulator generates a pulse current of 5.5 kA and the magnetic field is up to 1,300 G. The rise time of the field should be less than 300 ns in order to obtain enough injection efficiency to the storage ring. The shielding effects of the pulse magnetic field by the vacuum chamber are estimated using a three dimensional transient analysis program. The program solves the magnetic charge on the yoke surface of the magnet using the boundary element method and the eddy currents on the vacuum chamber using the network circuits method. The degradation of the magnetic field is measured by the search coil for different coating thickness to check the calculations results, and the results show good agreement with the calculation results. The calculation and the measurement results show the thickness should be less than 10 nm when the pulse width of the field is 600 ns. The dependence of the ununiformity of the coating thickness on the shielding effects is also estimated and the requirements for the uniformity are not so strict when the thickness is less than 10 nm. (author)

  12. The theory of temporal compression of intense pulses in a metal vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M.J.; Crane, J.K.

    1990-11-16

    We examine compression of near-resonant pulses in metal vapor in the nonlinear regime. Our calculations examine nonlinear effects on compression of optimally-chirped pulses of various fluences. In addition, we compare model predictions with experimental results for compression of 4 nsec Nd:YAG pumped dye pulses.

  13. Influence of Individual Differences on the Calculation Method for FBG-Type Blood Pressure Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shouhei; Ishizawa, Hiroaki; Fujimoto, Keisaku; Chino, Shun; Kobayashi, Yuka

    2016-12-28

    In this paper, we propose a blood pressure calculation and associated measurement method that by using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. There are several points at which the pulse can be measured on the surface of the human body, and when a FBG sensor located at any of these points, the pulse wave signal can be measured. The measured waveform is similar to the acceleration pulse wave. The pulse wave signal changes depending on several factors, including whether or not the individual is healthy and/or elderly. The measured pulse wave signal can be used to calculate the blood pressure using a calibration curve, which is constructed by a partial least squares (PLS) regression analysis using a reference blood pressure and the pulse wave signal. In this paper, we focus on the influence of individual differences from calculated blood pressure based on each calibration curve. In our study, the calculated blood pressure from both the individual and overall calibration curves were compared, and our results show that the calculated blood pressure based on the overall calibration curve had a lower measurement accuracy than that based on an individual calibration curve. We also found that the influence of the individual differences on the calculated blood pressure when using the FBG sensor method were very low. Therefore, the FBG sensor method that we developed for measuring the blood pressure was found to be suitable for use by many people.

  14. Investigations on the pulse operation of YAYOI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-04-01

    This report is composed of ten independent documents concerning the pulse operation of YAYOI, which were prepared in the period between July, 1976, and March, 1977. The titles of the documents included in this report are: (1) the operational sequence of the linac neutron generating facility, (2) safety systems of linac pulse operation and the treatment and preservation of neutron generating targets, (3) nuclear calculation concerning linac pulse operation, (4) simulated natural uranium core, (5) linac neutron target system, (6) computer processing accompanying linac pulse operation, (7) fundamental concept of electron beam generation within the reactor room, (8) reactor room shielding requirements for the linac neutron source, (9) TOF measuring room, and (10) utilization of low energy neutrons from P-YAYOI operation. (Aoki, K.)

  15. Propagating Characteristics of Pulsed Laser in Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the performance of laser ranging system under the rain weather condition, we need to know the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain. In this paper, the absorption and attenuation coefficients were calculated based on the scattering theories in discrete stochastic media, and the propagating characteristics of laser pulse in rain were simulated and analyzed using Monte-Carlo method. Some simulation results were verified by experiments, and the simulation results are well matched with the experimental data, with the maximal deviation not less than 7.5%. The results indicated that the propagating laser beam would be attenuated and distorted due to the scattering and absorption of raindrops, and the energy attenuation and pulse shape distortion strongly depended on the laser pulse widths.

  16. Pulsed activation analyses of the ITER blanket design options considered in the blanket trade-off study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Henderson, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    Pulsed activation calculations have been performed on two blanket options considered as part of the ITER home team blanket trade-off study. The objective was to compare the activity, afterheat and waste disposal rating (WDR) results of a composite blanket-shield design for the continuous operation approximation to a pulsed operation case to determine whether the differences are at most the duty factor as predicted by the two nuclide chain model. Up to a cooling period of 100 years, the pulsed activity and afterheat values were below the continuous oepration results and well within (except for one afterheat value) the maximum deviation predicted by the two nuclide chain model. No differences in the WDR values were noted as they are, to a large extent, based on long-lived nuclides which are insensitive to short-term changes in the operation history. (orig.)

  17. Influence of short heat pulses on the helium boiling heat transfer rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, V.K.; Deev, V.I.; Savin, A.N.; Kutsenko, K.V.

    1987-01-01

    Investigation results on heat transfer in the process of helium boiling on a heated wall under conditions of pulsed heat effect are described. Results of the given study point to one of possible ways of heat exchange intensification in boiling helium by supplying short heat pulse to the heater. Even short-time noncontrolled or incidental increase in the heater capacity during experiment with boiling helium can result in a considerable disagreement of experimental data on heat transfer

  18. TH-C-19A-03: Characterization of the Dose Per Pulse Dependence of Various Detectors Used in Quality Assurance of FFF Treatment Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karan, T [Stronach Regional Cancer Center, Newmarket, ON (Canada); Viel, F; Atwal, P; Gete, E; Camborde, M; Horwood, R; Strgar, V; Duzenli, C [British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present the dose per pulse dependence of various QA devices under Flattening Filter Free (FFF) conditions. Methods: Air and liquid filled ion chamber arrays, diode arrays, radiochromic film and optically stimulated luminescence detectors were investigated. All detectors were irradiated under similar conditions of varying dose per pulse on a TrueBeam linac. Dose per pulse was controlled by varying SSD from 70 to 160 cm providing a range from ~0.5 to ~3 mGy per pulse. MU rates of up to 2400 MU/min for 10X FFF and 1400 MU/min for the 6X FFF beam were used. Beam pulses were counted using the Profiler™ diode array and pulse timing was confirmed by examining linac node files. Delivered doses were calculated with the Eclipse™ treatment planning system. Results: The detectors show a range of behaviors depending on the detector type, as expected. Diode arrays show up to 4% change in sensitivity (sensitivity increases with increasing dose per pulse) over the range tested. Air and liquid ion chambers arrays show a change in sensitivity of up to 3% (air) and 6% (liquid) (sensitivity decreases with increasing dose per pulse) while film and OSLD do not demonstrate a dependence on dose per pulse. Conclusion: Dependence of detector response on dose per pulse varies considerably depending on detector design. Interplay between dose per pulse and MU rate also exists for some detectors. Due diligence is required to characterize detector response prior to implementation of a QA protocol for FFF treatment delivery. During VMAT delivery, the MU rate may also vary dramatically within a treatment fraction. We intend to further investigate the implications of this for VMAT FFF patient specific quality assurance. T Karan and F Viel have received partial funding through the Varian Research program.

  19. TH-C-19A-03: Characterization of the Dose Per Pulse Dependence of Various Detectors Used in Quality Assurance of FFF Treatment Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karan, T; Viel, F; Atwal, P; Gete, E; Camborde, M; Horwood, R; Strgar, V; Duzenli, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present the dose per pulse dependence of various QA devices under Flattening Filter Free (FFF) conditions. Methods: Air and liquid filled ion chamber arrays, diode arrays, radiochromic film and optically stimulated luminescence detectors were investigated. All detectors were irradiated under similar conditions of varying dose per pulse on a TrueBeam linac. Dose per pulse was controlled by varying SSD from 70 to 160 cm providing a range from ~0.5 to ~3 mGy per pulse. MU rates of up to 2400 MU/min for 10X FFF and 1400 MU/min for the 6X FFF beam were used. Beam pulses were counted using the Profiler™ diode array and pulse timing was confirmed by examining linac node files. Delivered doses were calculated with the Eclipse™ treatment planning system. Results: The detectors show a range of behaviors depending on the detector type, as expected. Diode arrays show up to 4% change in sensitivity (sensitivity increases with increasing dose per pulse) over the range tested. Air and liquid ion chambers arrays show a change in sensitivity of up to 3% (air) and 6% (liquid) (sensitivity decreases with increasing dose per pulse) while film and OSLD do not demonstrate a dependence on dose per pulse. Conclusion: Dependence of detector response on dose per pulse varies considerably depending on detector design. Interplay between dose per pulse and MU rate also exists for some detectors. Due diligence is required to characterize detector response prior to implementation of a QA protocol for FFF treatment delivery. During VMAT delivery, the MU rate may also vary dramatically within a treatment fraction. We intend to further investigate the implications of this for VMAT FFF patient specific quality assurance. T Karan and F Viel have received partial funding through the Varian Research program

  20. A Monte Carlo program to calculate the exposure rate from airborne radioactive gases inside a nuclear reactor containment building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbini, S; Tamasanis, D; Sykes, J; Porter, S W

    1986-12-01

    A program was developed to calculate the exposure rate resulting from airborne gases inside a reactor containment building. The calculations were performed at the location of a wall-mounted area radiation monitor. The program uses Monte Carlo techniques and accounts for both the direct and scattered components of the radiation field at the detector. The scattered component was found to contribute about 30% of the total exposure rate at 50 keV and dropped to about 7% at 2000 keV. The results of the calculations were normalized to unit activity per unit volume of air in the containment. This allows the exposure rate readings of the area monitor to be used to estimate the airborne activity in containment in the early phases of an accident. Such estimates, coupled with containment leak rates, provide a method to obtain a release rate for use in offsite dose projection calculations.

  1. Device for measuring the dose rate of pulsed neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klett, A.

    2009-01-01

    The author presents a new apparatus, developed in collaboration by Berthold Technologies and the German company DESY, allowing neutron pulsed fields to be measured. It is based on the activation by high energy neutrons of carbon 12 present in the sensor materials, and on the decay of short life radionuclides produced by this activation. The detection principle and system are briefly presented

  2. Investigation of an angular spectrum approach for pulsed ultrasound fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yigang; Jensen, Henrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2013-01-01

    An Angular Spectrum Approach (ASA)is formulated and employed to simulate linear pulsed ultra sound fields for high bandwidth signals. Ageometrically focused piston transducer is used as the acoustic source. Signals are cross-correlated to findthe true sound speed during the measurement to make...... the simulated and measured pulses in phase for comparisons. The calculated sound speed in the measurement is varied between 1487.45 m/s and 1487.75 m/s by using different initial values in the ASA simulation. Results from the pulsed ASA simulation susing both Field II simulated and hydrophone measured acoustic....... Optim al parameters for the ASA are found in the simulation .The RMS error of the ASA simulation is reduced from 10.9% to 2.4% for the optimal parameters when comparing to Field II simulation s. The comparison between the ASA calculated and measured pulses are illustrated and the corresponding RMS error...

  3. Small-angle scattering at a pulsed neutron source: comparison with a steady-state reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borso, C S; Carpenter, J M; Williamson, F S; Holmblad, G L; Mueller, M H; Faber, J Jr; Epperson, J E; Danyluk, S S [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)

    1982-08-01

    A time-of-flight small-angle diffractometer employing seven tapered collimator elements and a two-dimensional gas proportional counter was successfully utilized to collect small-angle scattering data from a solution sample of the lipid salt cetylpyridinium chloride, C/sub 21/H/sub 38/N/sup +/.Cl/sup -/, at the Argonne National Laboratory prototype pulsed spallation neutron source, ZING-P'. Comparison of the small-angle scattering observed from the same compound at the University of Missouri Research Reactor corroborated the ZING-P' results. The results are used to compare the neutron flux available from the ZING-P' source relative to the well characterized University of Missouri source. Calculations based on experimentally determined parameters indicated the time-averaged rate of detected neutrons at the ZING-P' pulsed spallation source to have been at least 33% higher than the steady-state count rate from the same sample. Differences between time-of-flight techniques and conventional steady-state techniques are discussed.

  4. Reexamining the Dissolution of Spent Fuel: A Comparison of Different Methods for Calculating Rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, Brady D.; Stout, Ray B.

    2004-01-01

    Dissolution rates for spent fuel have typically been reported in terms of a rate normalized to the surface area of the specimen. Recent evidence has shown that neither the geometric surface area nor that measured with BET accurately predicts the effective surface area of spent fuel. Dissolution rates calculated from results obtained by flowthrough tests were reexamined comparing the cumulative releases and surface area normalized rates. While initial surface area is important for comparison of different rates, it appears that normalizing to the surface area introduces unnecessary uncertainty compared to using cumulative or fractional release rates. Discrepancies in past data analyses are mitigated using this alternative method

  5. Expanded calculation of weak-interaction-mediated neutrino cooling rates due to 56Ni in stellar matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2010-01-01

    An accurate estimate of the neutrino cooling rates is required in order to study the various stages of stellar evolution of massive stars. Neutrino losses from proto-neutron stars play a crucial role in deciding whether these stars would be crushed into black holes or explode as supernovae. Both pure leptonic and weak-interaction processes contribute to the neutrino energy losses in stellar matter. At low temperatures and densities, the characteristics of the early phase of presupernova evolution, cooling through neutrinos produced via the weak interaction, are important. Proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory has recently been used with success for the calculation of stellar weak-interaction rates of fp-shell nuclide. The lepton-to-baryon ratio (Y e ) during early phases of stellar evolution of massive stars changes substantially, mainly due to electron captures on 56 Ni. The stellar matter is transparent to the neutrinos produced during the presupernova evolution of massive stars. These neutrinos escape the site and assist the stellar core in maintaining a lower entropy. Here, an expanded calculation of weak-interaction-mediated neutrino and antineutrino cooling rates due to 56 Ni in stellar matter using the pn-QRPA theory is presented. This detailed scale is appropriate for interpolation purposes and is of greater utility for simulation codes. The calculated rates are compared with earlier calculations. During the relevant temperature and density regions of stellar matter the reported rates show few differences compared with the shell model rates and might contribute in fine-tuning of the lepton-to-baryon ratio during the presupernova phases of stellar evolution of massive stars.

  6. Pulse plating

    CERN Document Server

    Hansal, Wolfgang E G; Green, Todd; Leisner, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The electrodeposition of metals using pulsed current has achieved practical importance in recent years. Although it has long been known that changes in potential, with or without polarity reversal, can significantly affect the deposition process, the practical application of this has been slow to be adopted. This can largely be explained in terms of the complex relationship between the current regime and its effect on the electrodeposition process. In order to harness these effects, an understanding of the anodic and cathodic electrochemical processes is necessary, together with the effects of polarity reversal and the rate of such reversals. In this new monograph, the basics of metal electrodeposition from solution are laid out in great detail in seven distinct chapters. With this knowledge, the reader is able to predict how a given pulse train profile can be adopted to achieve a desired outcome. Equally important is the choice of a suitable rectifier and the ancillary control circuits to enable pulse platin...

  7. Large area crystallization of amorphous Si with overlapping high repetition rate laser pulses

    KAUST Repository

    Ryu, Sang-Gil

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a pulsed laser crystallization technique, enabling large area crystallization of amorphous Si to produce grains having well-defined size and orientation. The method is developed by first determining the parameters influencing crystallization induced by single laser pulses of circular cross-sectional profile. In a second step, crystallization by overlapping round spots is examined. The experiments reveal three zones characterized by distinctly different crystallized morphologies following the laser irradiation. One of these zones corresponds to the regime of lateral crystal growth, wherein grains are driven towards the center of the spot by the radial temperature gradient. These findings are then applied to processing via line beam profiles that facilitate large area crystallization upon rapid translation of the specimen. Crystallization of extended areas hinges on the determination of the crystal growth length for a single spot. The pitch between successive pulses is then set on the basis of this information. It is shown that the pulse energy has only a weak effect on the crystal growth length. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Pulsed high-power beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reginato, L.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The marriage of induction linac technology with nonlinear magnetic modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It is now possible to produce short-pulse electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients approaching 1-MeV/m, and with power efficiencies exceeding 50%. This paper reports on a 70-MeV, 3-kA induction accelerator (ETA II) constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that incorporates the pulse technology concepts that have evolved over the past several years. The ETA II is a linear induction accelerator and provides a test facility for demonstration of the high-average-power components and high-brightness sources used in such accelerators. The pulse drive of the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak-power capability, repetition rates exceeding 1 kHz, and excellent reliability

  9. Optimisation studies for a moderator on a pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picton, D.J.; Ross, D.K.; Taylor, A.D.

    1982-01-01

    Having reviewed general aspects of moderator design for pulsed neutron sources, calculations are presented on a number of aspects of moderator optimization. Results of time-independent calculations on metal hydride moderators and a detailed method of evaluating moderated pulse intensities and time distributions, are given. Using computer codes, neutron cross-sections have been calculated from vibrational frequency distributions and time-dependent moderator calculations performed by Monte Carlo methods. The choice of an ambient moderator material and the optimum configuration of heterogeneous poisoning are examined and evaluations of liquid-nitrogen-cooled moderators are presented. Conclusions are drawn concerning the relative merits of cooled and poisoned moderators and an evaluation presented of solid methane at 20 K as a moderator for the production of cold neutrons. (U.K.)

  10. Preliminary core design calculations for the ACPR Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickard, P.S.

    1976-01-01

    The goal of the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) Upgrade design studies is to define a core configuration that provides a significant increase in pulse fluence and fission energy deposition. The reactor modification should provide as flat an energy deposition profile for experiments as feasible. The fuels examined in this study were UO 2 -BeO (5-15 w/o UO 2 ), UC-ZrC-C (200-500 mg U/cc) and U-ZrH 1.5 . The basic core concept examined was a two region core, - a high heat capacity inner core region surrounded by an outer U-ZrH 1.5 region. Survey core calculations utilizing 1D transport calculations and cross sections libraries derived from the ORNL-AMPX code examined relative fuel loadings, fuel temperatures, reactivity requirements and pulse performance improvement. Reference designs for all candidate fuels were defined utilizing 2D transport and Monte Carlo calculations. The performance implications of alternative core designs were also examined for the UO 2 -BeO and UC-ZrC-C fuel candidates. (author)

  11. Pulsed neutron determination of anisotropic diffusion constants in multi-layered slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Ram, K.

    1978-01-01

    Anisotropic neutron diffusion parameters for graphite and plexiglas slab assemblies were calculated using one-dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN, and also Case's eigenfunction expansion technique as suggested by Leonard. These calculated values were checked with the pulsed neutron experimental results as well as simple diffusion theory calculations of Spinrad. Relatively little experimental work has been done with heterogeneous assemblies which do not contain voids. The present comparison shows that the experimental results agree well with transport theory calculations. It appears from the results and inter-comparison of this work in simple geometries, that the pulsed neutron method can yield accurate experimental anisotropic diffusion constants, and can therefore be applied to more complicated geometries which may be difficult to calculate. (author)

  12. Enhancement of beam pulse controllability for a single-pulse formation system of a cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The single-pulse formation technique using a beam chopping system consisting of two types of high-voltage beam kickers was improved to enhance the quality and intensity of the single-pulse beam with a pulse interval over 1 μs at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency cyclotron facility. A contamination rate of neighboring beam bunches in the single-pulse beam was reduced to less than 0.1%. Long-term purification of the single pulse beam was guaranteed by the well-controlled magnetic field stabilization system for the cyclotron magnet. Reduction of the multi-turn extraction number for suppressing the neighboring beam bunch contamination was achieved by restriction of a beam phase width and precise optimization of a particle acceleration phase. In addition, the single-pulse beam intensity was increased by a factor of two or more by a combination of two types of beam bunchers using sinusoidal and saw-tooth voltage waveforms. Provision of the high quality intense single-pulse beam contributed to improve the accuracy of experiments for investigation of scintillation light time-profile and for neutron energy measurement by a time-of-flight method

  13. Optimization of pulsed DC PACVD parameters: Toward reducing wear rate of the DLC films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Mansoureh; Mahboubi, Farzad; Naimi-Jamal, M. Reza

    2016-12-01

    The effect of pulsed direct current (DC) plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) parameters such as temperature, duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH4 flow ratio on the wear behavior and wear durability of the diamond-like carbon (DLC) films was studied by using response surface methodology (RSM). DLC films were deposited on nitrocarburized AISI 4140 steel. Wear rate and wear durability of the DLC films were examined with the pin-on-disk method. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques were used for studying wear mechanisms, chemical structure, and hardness of the DLC films. RSM results show that duty cycle is one of the important parameters that affect the wear rate of the DLC samples. The wear rate of the samples deposited with a duty cycle of >75% decreases with an increase in the argon/CH4 ratio. In contrast, for a duty cycle of <65%, the wear rate increases with an increase in the argon/CH4 ratio. The wear durability of the DLC samples increases with an increase in the duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH4 flow ratio at the deposition temperature between 85 °C and 110 °C. Oxidation, fatigue, abrasive wear, and graphitization are the wear mechanisms observed on the wear scar of the DLC samples deposited with the optimum deposition conditions.

  14. Regression analysis and transfer function in estimating the parameters of central pulse waves from brachial pulse wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai Rui; Li Si-Man; Xu Li-Sheng; Yao Yang; Hao Li-Ling

    2017-07-01

    This study mainly analyzed the parameters such as ascending branch slope (A_slope), dicrotic notch height (Hn), diastolic area (Ad) and systolic area (As) diastolic blood pressure (DBP), systolic blood pressure (SBP), pulse pressure (PP), subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR), waveform parameter (k), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and peripheral resistance (RS) of central pulse wave invasively and non-invasively measured. These parameters extracted from the central pulse wave invasively measured were compared with the parameters measured from the brachial pulse waves by a regression model and a transfer function model. The accuracy of the parameters which were estimated by the regression model and the transfer function model was compared too. Our findings showed that in addition to the k value, the above parameters of the central pulse wave and the brachial pulse wave invasively measured had positive correlation. Both the regression model parameters including A_slope, DBP, SEVR and the transfer function model parameters had good consistency with the parameters invasively measured, and they had the same effect of consistency. The regression equations of the three parameters were expressed by Y'=a+bx. The SBP, PP, SV, CO of central pulse wave could be calculated through the regression model, but their accuracies were worse than that of transfer function model.

  15. Ozone generation in a kHz-pulsed He-O2 capillary dielectric barrier discharge operated in ambient air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Brian L.; Ganguly, Biswa N.

    2013-12-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species using nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet devices has been a subject of recent interest due to their ability to generate localized concentrations from a compact source. To date, such studies with plasma jet devices have primarily utilized radio-frequency excitation. In this work, we characterize ozone generation in a kHz-pulsed capillary dielectric barrier discharge configuration comprised of an active discharge plasma jet operating in ambient air that is externally grounded. The plasma jet flow gas was composed of helium with an admixture of up to 5% oxygen. A unipolar voltage pulse train with a 20 ns pulse risetime was used to drive the discharge at repetition rates between 2-25 kHz. Using UVLED absorption spectroscopy centered at 255 nm near the Hartley-band absorption peak, ozone was detected over 1 cm from the capillary axis. We observed roughly linear scaling of ozone production with increasing pulse repetition rate up to a "turnover frequency," beyond which ozone production steadily dropped and discharge current and 777 nm O(5P→5S°) emission sharply increased. The turnover in ozone production occurred at higher pulse frequencies with increasing flow rate and decreasing applied voltage with a common energy density of 55 mJ/cm3 supplied to the discharge. The limiting energy density and peak ozone production both increased with increasing O2 admixture. The power dissipated in the discharge was obtained from circuit current and voltage measurements using a modified parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge circuit model and the volume-averaged ozone concentration was derived from a 2D ozone absorption measurement. From these measurements, the volume-averaged efficiency of ozone production was calculated to be 23 g/kWh at conditions for peak ozone production of 41 mg/h at 11 kV applied voltage, 3% O2, 2 l/min flow rate, and 13 kHz pulse repetition rate, with 1.79 W dissipated in the discharge.

  16. Investigation of the effect of finite pulse errors on the BABA pulse sequence using the Floquet-Magnus expansion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene S.; Reid, Alicia E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study of finite pulse widths for the BABA pulse sequence using the Floquet-Magnus expansion (FME) approach. In the FME scheme, the first order ? is identical to its counterparts in average Hamiltonian theory (AHT) and Floquet theory (FT). However, the timing part in the FME approach is introduced via the ? function not present in other schemes. This function provides an easy way for evaluating the spin evolution during the time in between' through the Magnus expansion of the operator connected to the timing part of the evolution. The evaluation of ? is particularly useful for the analysis of the non-stroboscopic evolution. Here, the importance of the boundary conditions, which provide a natural choice of ? , is ignored. This work uses the ? function to compare the efficiency of the BABA pulse sequence with ? and the BABA pulse sequence with finite pulses. Calculations of ? and ? are presented.

  17. 20 CFR 10.216 - How is the pay rate for COP calculated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for COP purposes is equal to the employee's regular “weekly” pay (the average of the weekly pay over... occurred during the 45-day period are to be reflected in the weekly pay determination. (b) The weekly pay... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is the pay rate for COP calculated? 10...

  18. Intraband effects on ultrafast pulse propagation in semiconductor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High bit-rate (>10 Gb/s) signals are composed of very short pulses and propagation of such pulses through a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) requires consideration of intraband phenomena. Due to the intraband effects, the propagating pulse sees a fast recovering nonlinear gain which introduces less distortion in the ...

  19. A relation between calculated human body exergy consumption rate and subjectively assessed thermal sensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simone, Angela; Kolarik, Jakub; Olesen, Bjarne W. [ICIEE/BYG, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Iwamatsu, Toshiya [Faculty of Urban Environmental Science, Tokyo Metropolitan University (Japan); Asada, Hideo [Architech Consulting Co., Tokyo (Japan); Dovjak, Mateja [Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Schellen, Lisje [Eindhoven University of Technology, Faculty of Architecture Building and Planning (Netherlands); Shukuya, Masanori [Laboratory of Building Environment, Tokyo City University, Yokohama (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Application of the exergy concept to research on the built environment is a relatively new approach. It helps to optimize climate conditioning systems so that they meet the requirements of sustainable building design. As the building should provide a healthy and comfortable environment for its occupants, it is reasonable to consider both the exergy flows in building and those within the human body. Until now, no data have been available on the relation between human-body exergy consumption rates and subjectively assessed thermal sensation. The objective of the present work was to relate thermal sensation data, from earlier thermal comfort studies, to calculated human-body exergy consumption rates. The results show that the minimum human body exergy consumption rate is associated with thermal sensation votes close to thermal neutrality, tending to the slightly cool side of thermal sensation. Generally, the relationship between air temperature and the exergy consumption rate, as a first approximation, shows an increasing trend. Taking account of both convective and radiative heat exchange between the human body and the surrounding environment by using the calculated operative temperature, exergy consumption rates increase as the operative temperature increases above 24 C or decreases below 22 C. With the data available so far, a second-order polynomial relationship between thermal sensation and the exergy consumption rate was established. (author)

  20. Reaction time to changes in the tempo of acoustic pulse trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. P.; Warm, J. S.; Westendorf, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the ability of human observers to detect accelerations and decelerations in the rate of presentation of pulsed stimuli, i.e., changes in the tempo of acoustic pulse trains. Response times to accelerations in tempo were faster than to decelerations. Overall speed of response was inversely related to the pulse repetition rate.

  1. Practical pulse engineering: Gradient ascent without matrix exponentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhole, Gaurav; Jones, Jonathan A.

    2018-06-01

    Since 2005, there has been a huge growth in the use of engineered control pulses to perform desired quantum operations in systems such as nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processors. These approaches, which build on the original gradient ascent pulse engineering algorithm, remain computationally intensive because of the need to calculate matrix exponentials for each time step in the control pulse. In this study, we discuss how the propagators for each time step can be approximated using the Trotter-Suzuki formula, and a further speedup achieved by avoiding unnecessary operations. The resulting procedure can provide substantial speed gain with negligible costs in the propagator error, providing a more practical approach to pulse engineering.

  2. All solid state pulsed power system for water discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Sakugawa, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Kunihiro; Kiyan, Tsuyoshi; Namihira, Takao; Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori; サクガワ, タカシ; ヤマグチ, タカヒロ; ヤマモト, クニヒロ; キヤン, ツヨシ; ナミヒラ, タカオ; カツキ, スナオ; アキヤマ, ヒデノリ; 佐久川, 貴志

    2005-01-01

    Pulsed power has been used to produce non-thermal plasmas in gases that generate a high electric field at the tip of streamer discharges, where high energy electrons, free radicals, and ozone are produced. Recently, all solid state pulsed power generators, which are operated with high repetition rate, long lifetime and high reliability, have been developed for industrial applications, such as high repetition rate pulsed gas lasers, high energy density plasma (EUV sources) and water discharges...

  3. A modified Gaussian integration method for thermal reaction rate calculation in U- and Pu-isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosevski, T.; Fredin, B.

    1966-01-01

    An advanced multi-group cell calculations a lot of data information is very often necessary, and hence the data administration will be elaborate, and the spectrum calculation will be time consuming. We think it is possible to reduce the necessary data information by using an effective reaction rate integration method well suited for U- and Pu-absorptions (author)

  4. A long-pulse repetitive operation magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Yu-Wei; Zhong, Hui-Huang; Zhang, Jian-De; Shu, Ting; Liu, Jin Liang

    2014-01-01

    The improved magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) is a gigawatt-class L-band high power microwave tube. It has allowed us to generate 3.1 GW pulse of 40 ns duration in the single-pulse operation and 500 MW pulse of 25 ns duration in the repetition rate operation. However, because of the severe impedance mismatch, the power conversion efficiency is only about 4% in the repetition rate operation. In order to eliminate the impedance mismatch and obtain repetitive long-pulse high-power microwave (HPM), a series of experiments are carried out and the recent progress is presented in this paper. In the single-pulse operation, when the diode voltage is 466 kV and current is 41.6 kA, the radiated microwave power is above 2.2 GW, the pulse duration is above 102 ns, the microwave frequency is about 1.74 GHz, and the power conversion efficiency is about 11.5%. In the repetition rate operation, under the condition of the diode voltage about 400 kV, beam current about 38 kA, the radiated microwave power is about 1.0 GW, the pulse duration is about 85 ns. Moreover, the radiated microwave power and the pulse duration decline little by little when the shot numbers increase gradually. The experimental results show that the impedance matching is a vital factor for HPM systems and one of the major technical challenges is to improve the cathode for the repetition rate operation MILO

  5. A long-pulse repetitive operation magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yu-Wei; Zhong, Hui-Huang; Zhang, Jian-De; Shu, Ting; Liu, Jin Liang [College of Optoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2014-05-15

    The improved magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) is a gigawatt-class L-band high power microwave tube. It has allowed us to generate 3.1 GW pulse of 40 ns duration in the single-pulse operation and 500 MW pulse of 25 ns duration in the repetition rate operation. However, because of the severe impedance mismatch, the power conversion efficiency is only about 4% in the repetition rate operation. In order to eliminate the impedance mismatch and obtain repetitive long-pulse high-power microwave (HPM), a series of experiments are carried out and the recent progress is presented in this paper. In the single-pulse operation, when the diode voltage is 466 kV and current is 41.6 kA, the radiated microwave power is above 2.2 GW, the pulse duration is above 102 ns, the microwave frequency is about 1.74 GHz, and the power conversion efficiency is about 11.5%. In the repetition rate operation, under the condition of the diode voltage about 400 kV, beam current about 38 kA, the radiated microwave power is about 1.0 GW, the pulse duration is about 85 ns. Moreover, the radiated microwave power and the pulse duration decline little by little when the shot numbers increase gradually. The experimental results show that the impedance matching is a vital factor for HPM systems and one of the major technical challenges is to improve the cathode for the repetition rate operation MILO.

  6. A long-pulse repetitive operation magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yu-Wei; Zhong, Hui-Huang; Zhang, Jian-De; Shu, Ting; Liu, Jin Liang

    2014-05-01

    The improved magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) is a gigawatt-class L-band high power microwave tube. It has allowed us to generate 3.1 GW pulse of 40 ns duration in the single-pulse operation and 500 MW pulse of 25 ns duration in the repetition rate operation. However, because of the severe impedance mismatch, the power conversion efficiency is only about 4% in the repetition rate operation. In order to eliminate the impedance mismatch and obtain repetitive long-pulse high-power microwave (HPM), a series of experiments are carried out and the recent progress is presented in this paper. In the single-pulse operation, when the diode voltage is 466 kV and current is 41.6 kA, the radiated microwave power is above 2.2 GW, the pulse duration is above 102 ns, the microwave frequency is about 1.74 GHz, and the power conversion efficiency is about 11.5%. In the repetition rate operation, under the condition of the diode voltage about 400 kV, beam current about 38 kA, the radiated microwave power is about 1.0 GW, the pulse duration is about 85 ns. Moreover, the radiated microwave power and the pulse duration decline little by little when the shot numbers increase gradually. The experimental results show that the impedance matching is a vital factor for HPM systems and one of the major technical challenges is to improve the cathode for the repetition rate operation MILO.

  7. Strong-field ionization with twisted laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paufler, Willi; Böning, Birger; Fritzsche, Stephan

    2018-04-01

    We apply quantum trajectory Monte Carlo computations in order to model strong-field ionization of atoms by twisted Bessel pulses and calculate photoelectron momentum distributions (PEMD). Since Bessel beams can be considered as an infinite superposition of circularly polarized plane waves with the same helicity, whose wave vectors lie on a cone, we compared the PEMD of such Bessel pulses to those of a circularly polarized pulse. We focus on the momentum distributions in propagation direction of the pulse and show how these momentum distributions are affected by experimental accessible parameters, such as the opening angle of the beam or the impact parameter of the atom with regard to the beam axis. In particular, we show that we can find higher momenta of the photoelectrons, if the opening angle is increased.

  8. Wideband simulation of earthquake ground motion by a spectrum-matching, multiple-pulse technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, A.; Pavlov, V.

    2006-04-01

    To simulate earthquake ground motion, we combine a multiple-point stochastic earthquake fault model and a suite of Green functions. Conceptually, our source model generalizes the classic one of Haskell (1966). At any time instant, slip occurs over a narrow strip that sweeps the fault area at a (spatially variable) velocity. This behavior defines seismic signals at lower frequencies (LF), and describes directivity effects. High-frequency (HF) behavior of source signal is defined by local slip history, assumed to be a short segment of pulsed noise. For calculations, this model is discretized as a grid of point subsources. Subsource moment rate time histories, in their LF part, are smooth pulses whose duration equals to the rise time. In their HF part, they are segments of non-Gaussian noise of similar duration. The spectral content of subsource time histories is adjusted so that the summary far-field signal follows certain predetermined spectral scaling law. The results of simulation depend on random seeds, and on particular values of such parameters as: stress drop; average and dispersion parameter for rupture velocity; rupture nucleation point; slip zone width/rise time, wavenumber-spectrum parameter defining final slip function; the degrees of non-Gaussianity for random slip rate in time, and for random final slip in space, and more. To calculate ground motion at a site, Green functions are calculated for each subsource-site pair, then convolved with subsource time functions and at last summed over subsources. The original Green function calculator for layered weakly inelastic medium is of discrete wavenumber kind, with no intrinsic limitations with respect to layer thickness or bandwidth. The simulation package can generate example motions, or used to study uncertainties of the predicted motion. As a test, realistic analogues of recorded motions in the epicentral zone of the 1994 Northridge, California earthquake were synthesized, and related uncertainties were

  9. A 0.76-pJ/Pulse 0.1-1 Gpps Microwatt IR-UWB CMOS Pulse Generator with Adaptive PSD Control Using A Limited Monocycle Precharge Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Ming; Yin, Ying-Zheng; Jiang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents an ultra-wideband pulse generator topology featuring adaptive control of power spectral density for a broad range of applications with different data rate requirements. The adaptivity is accomplished by employing a limited monocycle precharge approach to control the energy use...... for validation. The measured results show that the pulse generator can be used for a wide pulse repetition rate range from 100 Mpps to 1 Gpps. In addition, the pulse generator consumes 0.76 pJ/pulse at 1 Gpps, equivalent to 760 μW and has a compact size of 0.09 mm2....

  10. CAMAC-compatible differential pulse discriminator-counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tselikov, I.V.

    1988-01-01

    A differential pulse discriminator-counter for a Moessbauer spectrometer is described. Input pulses are collected according to the following algorithm; a pulse is admitted into the channel depending on whether or not the preceding pulse fell into the discrimination window. The circuit does not contain delay lines to allow for the delay lines to allow for the delay of the signal from the upper-level discriminator with respect to the signal from the lower-level discriminator due to the finite rise time of the input pulses, which makes it possible to reduce the dead time of the discriminator to the actuation time of the threshold circuits. The pulse count rate is 150 MHz, the input amplitude is +/-3 V, the dead time is 6 nsec, and the delay from input to output is 14 nsec. The unit is CAMAC-compatible

  11. Electromagnetic Calculation and Plasma Leakage Rate Analysis of the Magnetically Confined Plasma Rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Zhipeng; Wang Liangbin; Li Jiangang; Chen Zhiyou; Zhang Yong; Wang Futang

    2008-01-01

    An electromagnetic calculation and the parameters of the magnet system of the magnetically confined plasma rocket were established. By using ANSYS code, it was found that the leakage rate depends on the current intensity of the magnet and the change of the magnet position.

  12. Local eddy current measurements in pulsed fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espina-Hernandez, J.H. [SEPI-Electronica, ESIME-IPN, UPALM Edif. ' Z' . Zacatenco, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico)], E-mail: jhespina@gmail.com; Groessinger, R. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Hallen, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico)

    2008-07-15

    This work presents new eddy current measurements in pulsed fields. A commercial point pick-up coil is used to detect the induction signal along the radius of Cu and Al samples with cylindrical shape and diameters between 5 and 35 mm. Local eddy current measurements were performed on the surface of conducting materials due to the small dimensions of the coil. A simple electrical circuit, used as a model, is proposed to describe the local eddy current effect in pulsed fields. The proposed model allows to calculate the phase shift angle between the signal proportional to eddy currents and the applied external field in a pulsed field magnetometer.

  13. The characterisation of polymers using pulsed NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlesby, A.

    1983-01-01

    Broad line pulsed NMR is applied to obtain information on radiation-induced polymer changes and other aspects of polymer science based on the interpretation of spin-spin relaxation curves. Calculations are made to determine the molecular weight, the crosslink density of simple, low molecular weight, flexible polymers. For higher molecular weight polymers, a conclusion can be drawn on the concentrations of entangled and crosslinked units by means of pulsed NMR. Some typical applications of the technique are illustrated by the examples of polyethylenes, rubbers, filled polymeric systems and aqueous polyethylene oxide solutions. The morphology of polymers can be followed by pulsed NMR. (V.N.)

  14. CALCULATION-EXPERIMENTAL METHOD OF RESEARCH IN A METALLIC CONDUCTOR WITH THE PULSE CURRENT OF ELECTRONIC WAVEPACKAGES AND DE BROGLIE ELECTRONIC HALF-WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Baranov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of calculation-experimental method for a discovery and study of electronic wavepackages (EWP and of de Broglie electronic half-waves in a metallic conductor with the pulse axial-flow current of high density. Methodology. Theoretical bases of the electrical engineering, bases of quantum physics, electrophysics bases of technique of high voltage and large pulsecurrents, and also bases of technique of measuring of permanent and variable electric value. Results. On the basis of generalization of results of research of features of the longitudinal wave periodic distributing of negatively charged transmitters of electric current of conductivity in the thin round continuous zincked steel wire offered and approved in the conditions of high-voltage laboratory method for a discovery and direct determination in him of geometrical parameters of «hot» and «cold» longitudinal areas quantized periodic longitudinal EWP and accordingly the mediated determination of values of the quantized lengths formative their de Broglie electronic half-waves. It is shown that results of close quantum mechanical calculations of EWP and quantized lengths λenz/2 of longitudinal de Broglie half-waves for the probed wire long l0 well comport with the results of the executed high temperature experiments on the powerful high-voltage generator of homopolar large pulse current of millisecond duration. Originality. First calculation-experimental a way the important for the theory of electricity fact of existence is set in a round metallic explorer with the impulsive axial-flow current of the quantized coherent de Broglie electronic half-waves, amplitudes of which at the quantum number of n=1,3,9 correspond the middles of «hot» longitudinal areas of EWP. Calculation quantum mechanical correlation of type of λenz/2=l0/n got experimental confirmation, in obedience to which on length of l0 conductor the integer of quantized electronic half-waves is always laid

  15. Effects of sample size on estimates of population growth rates calculated with matrix models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian J Fiske

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Matrix models are widely used to study the dynamics and demography of populations. An important but overlooked issue is how the number of individuals sampled influences estimates of the population growth rate (lambda calculated with matrix models. Even unbiased estimates of vital rates do not ensure unbiased estimates of lambda-Jensen's Inequality implies that even when the estimates of the vital rates are accurate, small sample sizes lead to biased estimates of lambda due to increased sampling variance. We investigated if sampling variability and the distribution of sampling effort among size classes lead to biases in estimates of lambda. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using data from a long-term field study of plant demography, we simulated the effects of sampling variance by drawing vital rates and calculating lambda for increasingly larger populations drawn from a total population of 3842 plants. We then compared these estimates of lambda with those based on the entire population and calculated the resulting bias. Finally, we conducted a review of the literature to determine the sample sizes typically used when parameterizing matrix models used to study plant demography. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found significant bias at small sample sizes when survival was low (survival = 0.5, and that sampling with a more-realistic inverse J-shaped population structure exacerbated this bias. However our simulations also demonstrate that these biases rapidly become negligible with increasing sample sizes or as survival increases. For many of the sample sizes used in demographic studies, matrix models are probably robust to the biases resulting from sampling variance of vital rates. However, this conclusion may depend on the structure of populations or the distribution of sampling effort in ways that are unexplored. We suggest more intensive sampling of populations when individual survival is low and greater sampling of stages with high

  16. Effects of sample size on estimates of population growth rates calculated with matrix models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Ian J; Bruna, Emilio M; Bolker, Benjamin M

    2008-08-28

    Matrix models are widely used to study the dynamics and demography of populations. An important but overlooked issue is how the number of individuals sampled influences estimates of the population growth rate (lambda) calculated with matrix models. Even unbiased estimates of vital rates do not ensure unbiased estimates of lambda-Jensen's Inequality implies that even when the estimates of the vital rates are accurate, small sample sizes lead to biased estimates of lambda due to increased sampling variance. We investigated if sampling variability and the distribution of sampling effort among size classes lead to biases in estimates of lambda. Using data from a long-term field study of plant demography, we simulated the effects of sampling variance by drawing vital rates and calculating lambda for increasingly larger populations drawn from a total population of 3842 plants. We then compared these estimates of lambda with those based on the entire population and calculated the resulting bias. Finally, we conducted a review of the literature to determine the sample sizes typically used when parameterizing matrix models used to study plant demography. We found significant bias at small sample sizes when survival was low (survival = 0.5), and that sampling with a more-realistic inverse J-shaped population structure exacerbated this bias. However our simulations also demonstrate that these biases rapidly become negligible with increasing sample sizes or as survival increases. For many of the sample sizes used in demographic studies, matrix models are probably robust to the biases resulting from sampling variance of vital rates. However, this conclusion may depend on the structure of populations or the distribution of sampling effort in ways that are unexplored. We suggest more intensive sampling of populations when individual survival is low and greater sampling of stages with high elasticities.

  17. Small groups, large profits: Calculating interest rates in community-managed microfinance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ole Dahl

    2012-01-01

    Savings groups are a widely used strategy for women’s economic resilience – over 80% of members worldwide are women, and in the case described here, 72.5%. In these savings groups it is common to see the interest rate on savings reported as "20-30% annually". Using panel data from 204 groups...... in Malawi, I show that the right figure is likely to be at least twice this figure. For these groups, the annual return is 62%. The difference comes from sector-wide application of a non-standard interest rate calculations and unrealistic assumptions about the savings profile in the groups. As a result......, it is impossible to compare returns in savings groups with returns elsewhere. Moreover, the interest on savings is incomparable to the interest rate on loans. I argue for the use of a standardized comparable metric and suggest easy ways to implement it. Developments of new tools and standard along these lines...

  18. A comparative study of different methods for calculating electronic transition rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananenka, Alexei A.; Sun, Xiang; Schubert, Alexander; Dunietz, Barry D.; Geva, Eitan

    2018-03-01

    We present a comprehensive comparison of the following mixed quantum-classical methods for calculating electronic transition rates: (1) nonequilibrium Fermi's golden rule, (2) mixed quantum-classical Liouville method, (3) mean-field (Ehrenfest) mixed quantum-classical method, and (4) fewest switches surface-hopping method (in diabatic and adiabatic representations). The comparison is performed on the Garg-Onuchic-Ambegaokar benchmark charge-transfer model, over a broad range of temperatures and electronic coupling strengths, with different nonequilibrium initial states, in the normal and inverted regimes. Under weak to moderate electronic coupling, the nonequilibrium Fermi's golden rule rates are found to be in good agreement with the rates obtained via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville method that coincides with the fully quantum-mechanically exact results for the model system under study. Our results suggest that the nonequilibrium Fermi's golden rule can serve as an inexpensive yet accurate alternative to Ehrenfest and the fewest switches surface-hopping methods.

  19. Pulsed power supply for injection bump magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praeg, W.F.

    1977-01-01

    A very precise and relatively inexpensive charging circuit for an energy storage capacitor bank feeds an efficient thyristor-controlled pulse-forming discharge circuit. These circuits, which generate magnet pulses of 300 joules at a rate of 30 per second, are analyzed

  20. Effects of dispersion on electromagnetic parameters of tape-helix Blumlein pulse forming line of accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Liu, J.L.; Feng, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the tape-helix model is introduced in the field of intense electron beam accelerator to analyze the dispersion effects on the electromagnetic parameters of helical Blumlein pulse forming line (PFL). Work band and dispersion relation of the PFL are analyzed, and the normalized coefficients of spatial harmonics are calculated. Dispersion effects on the important electromagnetic parameters of PFL, such as phase velocity, slow-wave coefficient, electric length and pulse duration, are analyzed as the central topic. In the PFL, electromagnetic waves with different frequencies in the work band of PFL have almost the same phase velocity. When de-ionized water, transformer oil and air are used as the PFL filling dielectric, respectively, the pulse duration of the helical Blumlein PFL is calculated as 479.6 ns, 81.1 ns and 53.1 ns in order. Electromagnetic wave simulation and experiments are carried out to demonstrate the theoretical calculations of the electric length and pulse duration which directly describe the phase velocity and dispersion of the PFL. Simulation results prove the theoretical analysis and calculation on pulse duration. Experiment is carried out based on the tape-helix Blumlein PFL and magnetic switch system. Experimental results show that the pulse durations are tested as 460 ns, 79 ns and 49 ns in order when de-ionized water, transformer oil and air are used respectively. Experimental results basically demonstrate the theoretical calculations and the analyses of dispersion. (authors)