WorldWideScience

Sample records for pulsatory nonthermal emission

  1. Nonthermal emission from clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushnir, Doron; Waxman, Eli

    2009-01-01

    We show that the spectral and radial distribution of the nonthermal emission of massive, M ∼> 10 14.5 M ☉ , galaxy clusters may be approximately described by simple analytic expressions, which depend on the cluster thermal X-ray properties and on two model parameter, β core and η e . β core is the ratio of the cosmic-ray (CR) energy density (within a logarithmic CR energy interval) and the thermal energy density at the cluster core, and η e(p) is the fraction of the thermal energy generated in strong collisionless shocks, which is deposited in CR electrons (protons). Using a simple analytic model for the evolution of intra-cluster medium CRs, which are produced by accretion shocks, we find that β core ≅ η p /200, nearly independent of cluster mass and with a scatter Δln β core ≅ 1 between clusters of given mass. We show that the hard X-ray (HXR) and γ-ray luminosities produced by inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons by electrons accelerated in accretion shocks (primary electrons) exceed the luminosities produced by secondary particles (generated in hadronic interactions within the cluster) by factors ≅ 500(η e /η p )(T/10 keV) −1/2 and ≅ 150(η e /η p )(T/10 keV) −1/2 respectively, where T is the cluster temperature. Secondary particle emission may dominate at the radio and very high energy (∼> 1 TeV) γ-ray bands. Our model predicts, in contrast with some earlier work, that the HXR and γ-ray emission from clusters of galaxies are extended, since the emission is dominated at these energies by primary (rather than by secondary) electrons. Our predictions are consistent with the observed nonthermal emission of the Coma cluster for η p ∼ η e ∼ 0.1. The implications of our predictions to future HXR observations (e.g. by NuStar, Simbol-X) and to (space/ground based) γ-ray observations (e.g. by Fermi, HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) are discussed. In particular, we identify the clusters which are the best candidates for detection in

  2. Nonthermal emission from clusters of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushnir, Doron; Waxman, Eli, E-mail: doron.kushnir@weizmann.ac.il, E-mail: eli.waxman@weizmann.ac.il [Physics Faculty, Weizmann Institute of Science, PO Box 26, Rehovot (Israel)

    2009-08-01

    We show that the spectral and radial distribution of the nonthermal emission of massive, M ∼> 10{sup 14.5}M{sub ☉}, galaxy clusters may be approximately described by simple analytic expressions, which depend on the cluster thermal X-ray properties and on two model parameter, β{sub core} and η{sub e}. β{sub core} is the ratio of the cosmic-ray (CR) energy density (within a logarithmic CR energy interval) and the thermal energy density at the cluster core, and η{sub e(p)} is the fraction of the thermal energy generated in strong collisionless shocks, which is deposited in CR electrons (protons). Using a simple analytic model for the evolution of intra-cluster medium CRs, which are produced by accretion shocks, we find that β{sub core} ≅ η{sub p}/200, nearly independent of cluster mass and with a scatter Δln β{sub core} ≅ 1 between clusters of given mass. We show that the hard X-ray (HXR) and γ-ray luminosities produced by inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons by electrons accelerated in accretion shocks (primary electrons) exceed the luminosities produced by secondary particles (generated in hadronic interactions within the cluster) by factors ≅ 500(η{sub e}/η{sub p})(T/10 keV){sup −1/2} and ≅ 150(η{sub e}/η{sub p})(T/10 keV){sup −1/2} respectively, where T is the cluster temperature. Secondary particle emission may dominate at the radio and very high energy (∼> 1 TeV) γ-ray bands. Our model predicts, in contrast with some earlier work, that the HXR and γ-ray emission from clusters of galaxies are extended, since the emission is dominated at these energies by primary (rather than by secondary) electrons. Our predictions are consistent with the observed nonthermal emission of the Coma cluster for η{sub p} ∼ η{sub e} ∼ 0.1. The implications of our predictions to future HXR observations (e.g. by NuStar, Simbol-X) and to (space/ground based) γ-ray observations (e.g. by Fermi, HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) are discussed. In particular

  3. Nonthermal emission from clusters of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Doron; Waxman, Eli

    2009-08-01

    We show that the spectral and radial distribution of the nonthermal emission of massive, M gtrsim 1014.5Msun, galaxy clusters may be approximately described by simple analytic expressions, which depend on the cluster thermal X-ray properties and on two model parameter, βcore and ηe. βcore is the ratio of the cosmic-ray (CR) energy density (within a logarithmic CR energy interval) and the thermal energy density at the cluster core, and ηe(p) is the fraction of the thermal energy generated in strong collisionless shocks, which is deposited in CR electrons (protons). Using a simple analytic model for the evolution of intra-cluster medium CRs, which are produced by accretion shocks, we find that βcore simeq ηp/200, nearly independent of cluster mass and with a scatter Δln βcore simeq 1 between clusters of given mass. We show that the hard X-ray (HXR) and γ-ray luminosities produced by inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons by electrons accelerated in accretion shocks (primary electrons) exceed the luminosities produced by secondary particles (generated in hadronic interactions within the cluster) by factors simeq 500(ηe/ηp)(T/10 keV)-1/2 and simeq 150(ηe/ηp)(T/10 keV)-1/2 respectively, where T is the cluster temperature. Secondary particle emission may dominate at the radio and very high energy (gtrsim 1 TeV) γ-ray bands. Our model predicts, in contrast with some earlier work, that the HXR and γ-ray emission from clusters of galaxies are extended, since the emission is dominated at these energies by primary (rather than by secondary) electrons. Our predictions are consistent with the observed nonthermal emission of the Coma cluster for ηp ~ ηe ~ 0.1. The implications of our predictions to future HXR observations (e.g. by NuStar, Simbol-X) and to (space/ground based) γ-ray observations (e.g. by Fermi, HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) are discussed. In particular, we identify the clusters which are the best candidates for detection in γ-rays. Finally, we show

  4. Hard x ray imaging and the relative contribution of thermal and nonthermal emission in flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    The question of whether the impulsive 25 to 100 keV x ray emission from solar flares is thermal or nonthermal has been a long-standing controversy. Both thermal and nonthermal (beam) models have been developed and applied to the hard x ray data. It now seems likely that both thermal and nonthermal emission have been observed at hard x ray energies. The Hinotori classification scheme, for example, is an attempt to associate the thermal-nonthermal characteristics of flare hard x ray emission with other flare properties. From a theoretical point of view, it is difficult to generate energetic, nonthermal electrons without dumping an equal or greater amount of energy into plasma heating. On the other hand, any impulsive heating process will invariably generate at least some nonthermal particles. Hence, strictly speaking, although thermal or nonthermal emission may dominate the hard x ray emission in a given energy range for a given flare, there is no such thing as a purely thermal or nonthermal flare mechanism

  5. Modelling of non-thermal electron cyclotron emission during ECRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribaldos, V.; Krivenski, V.

    1990-01-01

    The existence of suprathermal electrons during Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating experiments in tokamaks is today a well established fact. At low densities the creation of large non-thermal electron tails affects the temperature profile measurements obtained by 2 nd harmonic, X-mode, low-field side, electron cyclotron emission. At higher densities suprathermal electrons can be detected by high-field side emission. In electron cyclotron current drive experiments a high energy suprathermal tail, asymmetric in v, is observed. Non-Maxwellian electron distribution functions are also typically observed during lower-hybrid current drive experiments. Fast electrons have been observed during ionic heating by neutral beams as well. Two distinct approaches are currently used in the interpretation of the experimental results: simple analytical models which reproduce some of the expected non-Maxwellian characteristics of the electron distribution function are employed to get a qualitative picture of the phenomena; sophisticated numerical Fokker-Planck calculations give the electron distribution function from which the emission spectra are computed. No algorithm is known to solve the inverse problem, i.e. to compute the electron distribution function from the emitted spectra. The proposed methods all relay on the basic assumption that the electron distribution function has a given functional dependence on a limited number of free parameters, which are then 'measured' by best fitting the experimental results. Here we discuss the legitimacy of this procedure. (author) 7 refs., 5 figs

  6. Quantifying unsteadiness and dynamics of pulsatory volcanic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, L.; Pioli, L.; Bonadonna, C.; Connor, C. B.; Andronico, D.; Harris, A. J. L.; Ripepe, M.

    2016-06-01

    Pulsatory eruptions are marked by a sequence of explosions which can be separated by time intervals ranging from a few seconds to several hours. The quantification of the periodicities associated with these eruptions is essential not only for the comprehension of the mechanisms controlling explosivity, but also for classification purposes. We focus on the dynamics of pulsatory activity and quantify unsteadiness based on the distribution of the repose time intervals between single explosive events in relation to magma properties and eruptive styles. A broad range of pulsatory eruption styles are considered, including Strombolian, violent Strombolian and Vulcanian explosions. We find a general relationship between the median of the observed repose times in eruptive sequences and the viscosity of magma given by η ≈ 100 ṡtmedian. This relationship applies to the complete range of magma viscosities considered in our study (102 to 109 Pa s) regardless of the eruption length, eruptive style and associated plume heights, suggesting that viscosity is the main magma property controlling eruption periodicity. Furthermore, the analysis of the explosive sequences in terms of failure time through statistical survival analysis provides further information: dynamics of pulsatory activity can be successfully described in terms of frequency and regularity of the explosions, quantified based on the log-logistic distribution. A linear relationship is identified between the log-logistic parameters, μ and s. This relationship is useful for quantifying differences among eruptive styles from very frequent and regular mafic events (Strombolian activity) to more sporadic and irregular Vulcanian explosions in silicic systems. The time scale controlled by the parameter μ, as a function of the median of the distribution, can be therefore correlated with the viscosity of magmas; while the complexity of the erupting system, including magma rise rate, degassing and fragmentation efficiency

  7. On the Absence of Non-thermal X-Ray Emission around Runaway O Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toalá, J. A. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica (ASIAA), Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Oskinova, L. M. [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Ignace, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Theoretical models predict that the compressed interstellar medium around runaway O stars can produce high-energy non-thermal diffuse emission, in particular, non-thermal X-ray and γ -ray emission. So far, detection of non-thermal X-ray emission was claimed for only one runaway star, AE Aur. We present a search for non-thermal diffuse X-ray emission from bow shocks using archived XMM-Newton observations for a clean sample of six well-determined runaway O stars. We find that none of these objects present diffuse X-ray emission associated with their bow shocks, similarly to previous X-ray studies toward ζ Oph and BD+43°3654. We carefully investigated multi-wavelength observations of AE Aur and could not confirm previous findings of non-thermal X-rays. We conclude that so far there is no clear evidence of non-thermal extended emission in bow shocks around runaway O stars.

  8. Thermal and Nonthermal Emissions of a Composite Flare Derived from NoRH and SDO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongwoo; White, Stephen M.; Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Masuda, Satoshi; Chae, Jongchul

    2017-12-01

    Differential emission measure (DEM) derived from the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory is used in the analysis of a solar flare observed by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). The target was a composite event consisting of an impulsive flare, SOL2015-06-21T01:42 (GOES class M2.0), and a gradual flare, SOL2015-06-21T02:36 (M2.6), for which separation of thermal plasma heating from nonthermal particle acceleration was of major interest. We have calculated the thermal free-free intensity maps with the AIA-derived DEM and compared them against the observed NoRH maps to attribute the difference to the nonthermal component. In this way, we were able to locate three distinct sources: the major source with thermal and nonthermal components mixed, a nonthermal source devoid of thermal particles, and a thermal source lacking microwave emission. Both the first and the second nonthermal sources produced impulsively rising 17 GHz intensities and moved away from the local magnetic polarization inversion lines in correlation with the flare radiation. In contrast, the thermal sources stay in fixed locations and show temporal variations of the temperature and emission measure uncorrelated with the flare radiation. We interpret these distinct properties as indicating that nonthermal sources are powered by magnetic reconnection and thermal sources passively receive energy from the nonthermal donor. The finding of these distinct properties between thermal and nonthermal sources demonstrates the microwave and EUV emission measure combined diagnostics.

  9. A SUZAKU SEARCH FOR NONTHERMAL EMISSION AT HARD X-RAY ENERGIES IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wik, Daniel R.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Matsushita, Kyoko; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Clarke, Tracy E.

    2009-01-01

    The brightest cluster radio halo known resides in the Coma cluster of galaxies. The relativistic electrons producing this diffuse synchrotron emission should also produce inverse Compton emission that becomes competitive with thermal emission from the intracluster medium (ICM) at hard X-ray energies. Thus far, claimed detections of this emission in Coma are controversial. We present a Suzaku HXD-PIN observation of the Coma cluster in order to nail down its nonthermal hard X-ray content. The contribution of thermal emission to the HXD-PIN spectrum is constrained by simultaneously fitting thermal and nonthermal models to it and a spatially equivalent spectrum derived from an XMM-Newton mosaic of the Coma field. We fail to find statistically significant evidence for nonthermal emission in the spectra which are better described by only a single- or multitemperature model for the ICM. Including systematic uncertainties, we derive a 90% upper limit on the flux of nonthermal emission of 6.0 x 10 -12 erg s -1 cm -2 (20-80 keV, for Γ = 2.0), which implies a lower limit on the cluster-averaged magnetic field of B>0.15 μG. Our flux upper limit is 2.5 times lower than the detected nonthermal flux from RXTE and BeppoSAX. However, if the nonthermal hard X-ray emission in Coma is more spatially extended than the observed radio halo, the Suzaku HXD-PIN may miss some fraction of the emission. A detailed investigation indicates that ∼50%-67% of the emission might go undetected, which could make our limit consistent with that of Rephaeli and Gruber and Fusco-Femiano et al. The thermal interpretation of the hard Coma spectrum is consistent with recent analyses of INTEGRAL and Swift data.

  10. Energetic electron propagation in the decay phase of non-thermal flare emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua [Key Laboratory of Solar Activities, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Tsap, Yuri T., E-mail: huangj@nao.cas.cn [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory of Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, 98409 Crimea, Nauchny (Ukraine)

    2014-06-01

    On the basis of the trap-plus-precipitation model, the peculiarities of non-thermal emission in the decay phase of solar flares have been considered. The calculation formulas for the escape rate of trapped electrons into the loss cone in terms of time profiles of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emission have been obtained. It has been found that the evolution of the spectral indices of non-thermal emission depend on the regimes of the pitch angle diffusion of trapped particles into the loss cone. The properties of non-thermal electrons related to the HXR and MW emission of the solar flare on 2004 November 3 are studied with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, RHESSI, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations. The spectral indices of non-thermal electrons related to MW and HXR emission remained constant or decreased, while the MW escape rate as distinguished from that of the HXRs increased. This may be associated with different diffusion regimes of trapped electrons into the loss cone. New arguments in favor of an important role of the superstrong diffusion for high-energy electrons in flare coronal loops have been obtained.

  11. The Swift BAT Perspective on Non-Thermal Emission in HIFLUGCS Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wik, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    The search for diffuse non-thermal, inverse Compton (IC) emission from galaxy clusters at hard X-ray energies has been underway for many years, with most detections being either of low significance or controversial. Until recently, comprehensive surveys of hard X-ray emission from clusters were not possible; instead, individually proposed-for. long observations would be collated from the archive. With the advent of the Swift BAT all sky survey, any c1u,;ter's emission above 14 keV can be probed with nearly uniform sensitivity. which is comparable to that of RXTE, Beppo-SAX, and Suzaku with the 58-month version of the survey. In this work. we search for non-thermal excess emission above the exponentially decreasing, high energy thermal emission in the flux-limited HIFLUGCS sample. The BAT emission from many of the detected clusters is marginally extended; we are able to extract the total flux for these clusters using fiducial models for their spatial extent. To account for thermal emission at BAT energies, XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are extracted from coincident spatial regions so that both the thermal and non-thermal spectral components can be determined simultaneou,;ly in joint fits. We find marginally significant IC components in 6 clusters, though after closer inspection and consideration of systematic errors we are unable to claim a clear detection in any of them. The spectra of all clusters are also summed to enhance a cumulative non-thermal signal not quite detectable in individual clusters. After constructing a model based on single temperature

  12. Non-thermal Hard X-Ray Emission from Coma and Several Abell Clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, C

    2004-01-01

    We report results of hard X-Ray observations of the clusters Coma, Abell 496, Abell754, Abell 1060, Abell 1367, Abell2256 and Abell3558 using RXTE data from the NASA HEASARC public archive. Specifically we searched for clusters with hard x-ray emission that can be fitted by a power law because this would indicate that the cluster is a source of non-thermal emission. We are assuming the emission mechanism proposed by Vahk Petrosian where the inter cluster space contains clouds of relativistic electrons that by themselves create a magnetic field and emit radio synchrotron radiation. These relativistic electrons Inverse-Compton scatter Microwave Background photons up to hard x-ray energies. The clusters that were found to be sources of non-thermal hard x-rays are Coma, Abell496, Abell754 and Abell 1060

  13. Effect of secondary electron emission on Jean's instability in a complex plasma in the presence of nonthermal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Susmita; Maity, Saumyen; Banerjee, Soumyajyoti

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the role of secondary electron emission on Jean's instability in a complex plasma in the presence of nonthermal ions. The equilibrium dust surface potential has been considered negative and hence primary and secondary electron temperatures are equal. Such plasma consists of three components: Boltzman distributed electrons, nonthermal ions and negatively charged inertial dust grains. From the linear dispersion relation, we have calculated the real frequency and growth rate of Jean's instability. Numerically, we have shown that for strong ion nonthermality Jean's mode is unstable. Growth of the instability reduces and the real part of the wave frequency increases with increasing secondary electron emission from dust grains. Hence, strong secondary electron emission suppresses Jean's instability in a complex plasma even when ion nonthermality is strong and equilibrium dust charge is negative.

  14. Geometry of the non-thermal emission in SN 1006. Azimuthal variations of cosmic-ray acceleration

    OpenAIRE

    Rothenflug, R.; Ballet, J.; Dubner, Gloria Mabel; Giacani, Elsa Beatriz; Decourchelle, A.; Ferrando, P.

    2017-01-01

    SN 1006 is the prototype of shell supernova remnants, in which non-thermal synchrotron emission dominates the X-ray spectrum. The non-thermal emission is due to the cosmic-ray electrons accelerated behind the blast wave. The X-ray synchrotron emission is due to the highest energy electrons, and is thus a tracer of the maximum energy electrons may reach behind a shock. We have put together all XMM-Newton observations to build a full map of SN 1006. The very low brightness a...

  15. The EVE plus RHESSI DEM for Solar Flares, and Implications for Residual Non-Thermal X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTiernan, James; Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry

    2016-05-01

    Solar flare spectra are typically dominated by thermal emission in the soft X-ray energy range. The low energy extent of non-thermal emission can only be loosely quantified using currently available X-ray data. To address this issue, we combine observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) with X-ray data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to calculate the Differential Emission Measure (DEM) for solar flares. This improvement over the isothermal approximation helps to resolve the ambiguity in the range where the thermal and non-thermal components may have similar photon fluxes. This "crossover" range can extend up to 30 keV.Previous work (Caspi et.al. 2014ApJ...788L..31C) concentrated on obtaining DEM models that fit both instruments' observations well. For this current project we are interested in breaks and cutoffs in the "residual" non-thermal spectrum; i.e., the RHESSI spectrum that is left over after the DEM has accounted for the bulk of the soft X-ray emission. As in our earlier work, thermal emission is modeled using a DEM that is parametrized as multiple gaussians in temperature. Non-thermal emission is modeled as a photon spectrum obtained using a thin-target emission model ('thin2' from the SolarSoft Xray IDL package). Spectra for both instruments are fit simultaneously in a self-consistent manner.For this study, we have examined the DEM and non-thermal resuidual emission for a sample of relatively large (GOES M class and above) solar flares observed from 2011 to 2014. The results for the DEM and non-thermal parameters found using the combined EVE-RHESSI data are compared with those found using only RHESSI data.

  16. Local Group dSph radio survey with ATCA - II. Non-thermal diffuse emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regis, Marco; Richter, Laura; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Profumo, Stefano; de Blok, W. J. G.; Massardi, Marcella

    2015-04-01

    Our closest neighbours, the Local Group dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, are extremely quiescent and dim objects, where thermal and non-thermal diffuse emissions lack, so far, of detection. In order to possibly study the dSph interstellar medium, deep observations are required. They could reveal non-thermal emissions associated with the very low level of star formation, or to particle dark matter annihilating or decaying in the dSph halo. In this work, we employ radio observations of six dSphs, conducted with the Australia Telescope Compact Array in the frequency band 1.1-3.1 GHz, to test the presence of a diffuse component over typical scales of few arcmin and at an rms sensitivity below 0.05 mJy beam-1. We observed the dSph fields with both a compact array and long baselines. Short spacings led to a synthesized beam of about 1 arcmin and were used for the extended emission search. The high-resolution data mapped background sources, which in turn were subtracted in the short-baseline maps, to reduce their confusion limit. We found no significant detection of a diffuse radio continuum component. After a detailed discussion on the modelling of the cosmic ray (CR) electron distribution and on the dSph magnetic properties, we present bounds on several physical quantities related to the dSphs, such that the total radio flux, the angular shape of the radio emissivity, the equipartition magnetic field, and the injection and equilibrium distributions of CR electrons. Finally, we discuss the connection to far-infrared and X-ray observations.

  17. A Non-thermal Pulsed X-Ray Emission of AR Scorpii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, J.; Hu, C.-P.; Lin, L. C. C.; Tam, P. H. T.; Pal, P. S.; Hui, C. Y.; Kong, A. K. H.; Cheng, K. S.

    2018-02-01

    We report the analysis result of UV/X-ray emission from AR Scorpii, which is an intermediate polar (IP) composed of a magnetic white dwarf and an M-type star, with the XMM-Newton data. The X-ray/UV emission clearly shows a large variation over the orbit, and their intensity maximum (or minimum) is located at the superior conjunction (or inferior conjunction) of the M star orbit. The hardness ratio of the X-ray emission shows a small variation over the orbital phase and shows no indication of the absorption by an accretion column. These properties are naturally explained by the emission from the M star surface rather than that from the accretion column on the white dwarf’s (WD) star, which is similar to usual IPs. Additionally, the observed X-ray emission also modulates with the WD’s spin with a pulse fraction of ∼14%. The peak position is aligned in the optical/UV/X-ray band. This supports the hypothesis that the electrons in AR Scorpii are accelerated to a relativistic speed and emit non-thermal photons via the synchrotron radiation. In the X-ray bands, evidence of the power-law spectrum is found in the pulsed component, although the observed emission is dominated by the optically thin thermal plasma emissions with several different temperatures. It is considered that the magnetic dissipation/reconnection process on the M star surface heats up the plasma to a temperature of several keV and also accelerates the electrons to the relativistic speed. The relativistic electrons are trapped in the WD’s closed magnetic field lines by the magnetic mirror effect. In this model, the observed pulsed component is explained by the emissions from the first magnetic mirror point.

  18. Simulating three-dimensional nonthermal high-energy photon emission in colliding-wind binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitberger, K.; Kissmann, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O., E-mail: klaus.reitberger@uibk.ac.at [Institut für Astro- und Teilchenphysik and Institut für Theoretische Physik, Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2014-07-01

    Massive stars in binary systems have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy γ rays. The emission is principally thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide and accelerate relativistic particles which subsequently emit γ rays. On the basis of a three-dimensional distribution function of high-energy particles in the wind collision region—as obtained by a numerical hydrodynamics and particle transport model—we present the computation of the three-dimensional nonthermal photon emission for a given line of sight. Anisotropic inverse Compton emission is modeled using the target radiation field of both stars. Photons from relativistic bremsstrahlung and neutral pion decay are computed on the basis of local wind plasma densities. We also consider photon-photon opacity effects due to the dense radiation fields of the stars. Results are shown for different stellar separations of a given binary system comprising of a B star and a Wolf-Rayet star. The influence of orbital orientation with respect to the line of sight is also studied by using different orbital viewing angles. For the chosen electron-proton injection ratio of 10{sup –2}, we present the ensuing photon emission in terms of two-dimensional projections maps, spectral energy distributions, and integrated photon flux values in various energy bands. Here, we find a transition from hadron-dominated to lepton-dominated high-energy emission with increasing stellar separations. In addition, we confirm findings from previous analytic modeling that the spectral energy distribution varies significantly with orbital orientation.

  19. NON-THERMAL EMISSION FROM CATACLYSMIC VARIABLES: IMPLICATIONS ON ASTROPARTICLE PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtech Šimon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We review the lines of evidence that some cataclysmic variables (CVs are the sources of non-thermal radiation. It was really observed in some dwarf novae in outburst, a novalike CV in the high state, an intermediate polar, polars, and classical novae (CNe during outburst. The detection of this radiation suggests the presence of highly energetic particles in these CVs. The conditions for the observability of this emission depend on the state of activity, and the system parameters. We review the processes and conditions that lead to the production of this radiation in various spectral bands, from gamma-rays including TeV emission to radio. Synchrotron and cyclotron emissions suggest the presence of strong magnetic fields in CV. In some CVs, e.g. during some dwarf nova outbursts, the magnetic field generated in the accretion disk leads to the synchrotron jets radiating in radio. The propeller effect or a shock in the case of the magnetized white dwarf (WD can lead to a strong acceleration of the particles that produce gamma-ray emission via pi0 decay; even Cherenkov radiation is possible. In addition, a gamma-ray production via pi0 decay was observed in the ejecta of an outburst of a symbiotic CN. Nuclear reactions during thermonuclear runaway in the outer layer of the WD undergoing CN outburst lead to the production of radioactive isotopes; their decay is the source of gamma-ray emission. The production of accelerated particles in CVs often has episodic character with a very small duty cycle; this makes their detection and establishing the relation of the behavior in various bands difficult.

  20. Non-thermal emission from young supernova remnants: Implications on cosmic ray acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya-Arguedas, Miguel A.

    For a long time, supernova remnants have been thought to constitute the main source of galactic cosmic rays. Plausible mechanisms have been proposed through which these objects would be able to transfer some of their energy to charged particles. Detailed studies of SNRs, particularly allowed by the spectral and spatial resolution obtained with telescopes such as the Chandra X-Ray Observatory , have permitted us to understand some of the properties of high-energy particles within these objects and their interactions with their environment. In the first part of this work, the basic concepts of particle acceleration in SNRs are outlined, and the main observational tools available today for studying high-energy phenomena in astrophysics are mentioned briefly. In the second part, a study of non-thermal emission from the young SNR Cassiopeia A is presented. Through the use of a very deep one million-second Chandra observation of this remnant, the spectral evolution across non-thermal filaments near the forward shock was studied. A consistent hardening of the spectrum towards the exterior of the remnant was found and explained via a model developed that takes into account particle diffusion, plasma advection and radiation losses. The role of particle diffusion was studied and its effect on the photon spectral index quantified. In the model, the diffusion is included as a fraction of Bohm-type diffusion, which is consistent with the data. The model also allowed an estimation of the electron distribution, the magnetic field and its orientation, as well as the level of magnetic turbulence. In the third part, a multi-wavelength study of two young SNRs is presented. Multi-wavelength modeling of spectral energy distributions (SED) may hold the key to disentangle the nature and content of cosmic rays within these objects. The first model shown presents state of the art measurements gathered for Cassiopeia A, and the modeling is based partly on the results presented in the second

  1. THE NON-THERMAL, TIME-VARIABLE RADIO EMISSION FROM Cyg OB2 no. 5: A WIND-COLLISION REGION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Leon, Gisela N.; Loinard, Laurent; RodrIguez, Luis F.; Dzib, Sergio A.; Mioduszewski, Amy J.

    2011-01-01

    The radio emission from the well-studied massive stellar system Cyg OB2 no. 5 is known to fluctuate with a period of 6.7 years between a low-flux state, when the emission is entirely of free-free origin, and a high-flux state, when an additional non-thermal component (of hitherto unknown nature) appears. In this paper, we demonstrate that the radio flux of that non-thermal component is steady on timescales of hours and that its morphology is arc-like. This shows that the non-thermal emission results from the collision between the strong wind driven by the known contact binary in the system and that of an unseen companion on a somewhat eccentric orbit with a 6.7 year period and a 5-10 mas semimajor axis. Together with the previously reported wind-collision region located about 0.''8 to the northeast of the contact binary, so far Cyg OB2 no. 5 appears to be the only multiple system known to harbor two radio-imaged wind-collision regions.

  2. Non-thermal emission in the core of Perseus: results from a long XMM-Newton observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molendi, S.; Gastaldello, F.

    2009-01-01

    We employ a long XMM-Newton observation of the core of the Perseus cluster to validate claims of a non-thermal component discovered with Chandra. From a meticulous analysis of our dataset, which includes a detailed treatment of systematic errors, we find the 2-10 keV surface brightness of the non-thermal component to be less than about 5 × 10-16 erg~cm-2 s-1 arcsec-2. The most likely explanation for the discrepancy between the XMM-Newton and Chandra estimates is a problem in the effective area calibration of the latter. Our EPIC-based magnetic field lower limits do not disagree with Faraday rotation measure estimates on a few cool cores and with a minimum energy estimate on Perseus. In the not too distant future Simbol-X may allow detection of non-thermal components with intensities more than 10 times lower than those that can be measured with EPIC; nonetheless even the exquisite sensitivity within reach for Simbol-X might be insufficient to detect the IC emission from Perseus.

  3. A SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF THE THERMAL AND NONTHERMAL EMISSION IN THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT RCW 86 WITH SUZAKU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubone, Yoshio; Sawada, Makoto; Bamba, Aya; Katsuda, Satoru; Vink, Jacco

    2017-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration by the shockwaves in supernova remnants (SNRs) is widely accepted as the dominant source for Galactic cosmic rays. However, it is unknown what determines the maximum energy of accelerated particles. The surrounding environment could be one of the key parameters. The SNR RCW 86 shows both thermal and nonthermal X-ray emission with different spatial morphologies. These emission originate from the shock-heated plasma and accelerated electrons respectively, and their intensities reflect their density distributions. Thus, the remnant provides a suitable laboratory to test possible association between the acceleration efficiency and the environment. In this paper, we present results of spatially resolved spectroscopy of the entire remnant with Suzaku . The spacially resolved spectra are well reproduced with a combination of a power-law for synchrotron emission and a two-component optically thin thermal plasma, corresponding to the shocked interstellar medium (ISM) with kT of 0.3–0.6 keV and Fe-dominated ejecta. It is discovered that the photon index of the nonthermal component becomes smaller when decreasing the emission measure of the shocked ISM, where the shock speed has remained high. This result implies that the maximum energy of accelerated electrons in RCW 86 is higher in the low-density and higher shock speed regions.

  4. Continuous reduction of cyclic adsorbed and desorbed NO{sub x} in diesel emission using nonthermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwahara, Takuya [Department of Products Engineering and Environmental Management, Nippon Institute of Technology, 4-1 Gakuendai, Miyashiro-machi, Minamisaitama, Saitama 345-8501 (Japan); Nakaguchi, Harunobu; Kuroki, Tomoyuki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Okubo, Masaaki, E-mail: mokubo@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • High-efficiency continuous diesel NO{sub x} reduction method is proposed. • Characteristics of diesel NO{sub x} adsorption and desorption on adsorbent is provided. • Efficiency of NO{sub x} reduction with nonthermal plasma is evaluated. • Efficiency of NO{sub x} reduction with exhaust gas component recirculation is evaluated. • High NO{sub x} removal efficiency equal to only 1.0% penalty of engine power is achieved. - Abstract: Considering the recent stringent regulations governing diesel NO{sub x} emission, an aftertreatment system for the reduction of NO{sub x} in the exhaust gas has been proposed and studied. The proposed system is a hybrid method combining nonthermal plasma and NO{sub x} adsorbent. The system does not require precious metal catalysts or harmful chemicals such as urea and ammonia. In the present system, NO{sub x} in diesel emission is treated by adsorption and desorption by adsorbent as well as nonthermal plasma reduction. In addition, the remaining NO{sub x} in the adsorbent is desorbed again in the supplied air by residual heat. The desorbed NO{sub x} in air recirculates into the intake of the engine, and this process, i.e., exhaust gas components’ recirculation (EGCR) achieves NO{sub x} reduction. Alternate utilization of two adsorption chambers in the system can achieve high-efficiency NO{sub x} removal continuously. An experiment with a stationary diesel engine for electric power generation demonstrates an energy efficiency of 154 g(NO{sub 2})/kWh for NO{sub x} removal and continuous NO{sub x} reduction of 70.3%. Considering the regulation against diesel emission in Japan, i.e., the new regulation to be imposed on vehicles of 3.5–7.5 ton since 2016, the present aftertreatment system fulfills the requirement with only 1.0% of engine power.

  5. Probing the non-thermal emission in Abell 2146 and the Perseus cluster with the JVLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron-Marsolais, Marie-Lou; Hlavacek-Larrondo, Julie; van Weeren, Reinout; Clarke, Tracy; Intema, Huib; Russell, Helen; Edge, Alastair; Fabian, Andy; Olamaie, Malak; Rumsey, Clare; King, Lindsay; McNamara, Brian; Fecteau-Beaucage, David; Hogan, Michael; Mezcua, Mar; Taylor, Gregory; Blundell, Katherine; Sanders, Jeremy

    2018-01-01

    Jets created from accretion onto supermassive black holes release relativistic particles on large distances. These strongly affect the intracluster medium when located in the center of a brightest cluster galaxy. The hierarchical merging of subclusters and groups, from which cluster originate, also generates perturbations into the intracluster medium through shocks and turbulence, constituting a potential source of reacceleration for these particles. I will present deep multi-configuration low radio frequency observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array of two unique clusters, probing the non-thermal emission from the old particle population of the AGN outflows.Recently awarded of 550 hours of Chandra observations, Abell 2146 is one of the rare clusters undergoing a spectacular merger in the plane of the sky. Our recent deep multi-configuration JVLA 1.4 GHz observations have revealed the presence of a structure extending to 850 kpc in size, consisting of one component associated with the upstream shock and classified as a radio relic, and one associated with the subcluster core, consistent with a radio halo bounded by the bow shock. Theses structures have some of the lowest radio powers detected thus far in any cluster. The flux measurements of the halo, its morphology and measurements of the dynamical state of the cluster suggest that the halo was recently created (~ 0.3 Gyr after core passage). This makes A2146 extremely interesting to study, allowing us to probe the complete evolutionary stages of halos.I will also present results on 230-470 MHz JVLA observations of the Perseus cluster. Our observations of this nearby relaxed cool core cluster have revealed a multitude of new structures associated with the mini-halo, extending to hundreds of kpc in size. Its irregular morphology seems to be have been influenced both by the AGN activity and by the sloshing motion of the cluster’ gas. In addition, it has a filamentary structure similar to that seen in

  6. Abatement of global warming gas emissions from semiconductor manufacturing processes by non-thermal plasma-catalyst systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J-S.; Urashima, K. [McMaster Univ., McIARS and Dept. Eng. Phys., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Emission of various hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and greenhouse gases including perfluoro-compounds (PFCs) from semiconductor industries may cause significant impact on human health and the global environment, has attracted much public attention. In this paper, an application of nonthermal plasma-adsorbent system for a removal of PFCs emission from semiconductor process flue gases is experimentally investigated. The non-thermal plasma reactor used is the ferro-electric packed-bed type barrier discharge plasma and adsorbent reactor used is Zeolite bed reactor. The results show that for a simulated semiconductor process flue gas with C{sub 2}F{sub 6} (2000ppm)/ CF{sub 4}(1000ppm)/ N{sub 2}O(1000ppm)/ N{sub 2}/ Air mixture, 54% of C{sub 2}F{sub 6} and 32% of CF{sub 4} were decomposed by the plasma reactor and 100% of C{sub 2}F{sub 6} and 98% of CF{sub 4} were removed by plasma reactor/Zeolite adsorbent hybrid system. For a simulated semiconductor process flue gas with NF{sub 3} (2000ppm)/ SiF{sub 4}(1000ppm)/ N{sub 2}O(200ppm)/ N{sub 2}/ Air mixture, 92% of NF{sub 3} and 32% of SiF{sub 4} were decomposed by the plasma reactor and total (100%) removal of the pollutant gases was achieved by plasma reactor/Zeolite adsorbent hybrid system. (author)

  7. Abatement of global warming gas emissions from semiconductor manufacturing processes by non-thermal plasma-catalyst systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J-S.; Urashima, K.

    2009-01-01

    Emission of various hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and greenhouse gases including perfluoro-compounds (PFCs) from semiconductor industries may cause significant impact on human health and the global environment, has attracted much public attention. In this paper, an application of nonthermal plasma-adsorbent system for a removal of PFCs emission from semiconductor process flue gases is experimentally investigated. The non-thermal plasma reactor used is the ferro-electric packed-bed type barrier discharge plasma and adsorbent reactor used is Zeolite bed reactor. The results show that for a simulated semiconductor process flue gas with C 2 F 6 (2000ppm)/ CF 4 (1000ppm)/ N 2 O(1000ppm)/ N 2 / Air mixture, 54% of C 2 F 6 and 32% of CF 4 were decomposed by the plasma reactor and 100% of C 2 F 6 and 98% of CF 4 were removed by plasma reactor/Zeolite adsorbent hybrid system. For a simulated semiconductor process flue gas with NF 3 (2000ppm)/ SiF 4 (1000ppm)/ N 2 O(200ppm)/ N 2 / Air mixture, 92% of NF 3 and 32% of SiF 4 were decomposed by the plasma reactor and total (100%) removal of the pollutant gases was achieved by plasma reactor/Zeolite adsorbent hybrid system. (author)

  8. Nonthermal x-ray emission from a tungsten z-pinch at 5 MA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    The generation of intense bursts of warm x rays with power in the 1-TW regime are of interest for the study of in-depth nuclear radiation effects. Results from high-atomic-number single-wire experiments carried out at 0.8 MA on Gamble II in the 1970s showed 0.25% efficient production of nonthermal, bremsstrahlung-like lines and continuum in the 5- to 100-keV regime. This high efficiency in combination with suggested Z 2 and I 2 scaling of the nonthermal radiation motivated the present experiment to measure and model the radiation from the z pinch formed from compact high-Z wire arrays at high current. In the experiment, tungsten wire arrays of length 20 mm on a mounting radius of 2 mm were imploded over the mass range 1 to 16 mg on the Saturn accelerator operating with a peak discharge current of 5 MA. As in the Gamble-II experiments, bright spots were observed to form at ∼1-mm intervals along the z axis at the time of a first implosion and to be the source of the hard radiation measured. Maximum radiation occurred for masses less than or approximately equal to 4 mg. The experiment was simulated using the LASNEX and TIP numerical codes with a nonthermal model. The timing of the multiple implosions, owing to compression and expansion of the resulting plasma are observed to be in agreement with predictions from both codes and analytic modeling

  9. Amended Results for Hard X-Ray Emission by Non-thermal Thick Target Recombination in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reep, J. W.; Brown, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    Brown & Mallik and the corresponding corrigendum Brown et al. presented expressions for non-thermal recombination (NTR) in the collisionally thin- and thick-target regimes, claiming that the process could account for a substantial part of the hard X-ray continuum in solar flares usually attributed entirely to thermal and non-thermal bremsstrahlung (NTB). However, we have found the thick-target expression to become unphysical for low cut-offs in the injected electron energy spectrum. We trace this to an error in the derivation, derive a corrected version that is real-valued and continuous for all photon energies and cut-offs, and show that, for thick targets, Brown et al. overestimated NTR emission at small photon energies. The regime of small cut-offs and large spectral indices involve large (reducing) correction factors but in some other thick-target parameter regimes NTR/NTB can still be of the order of unity. We comment on the importance of these results to flare and microflare modeling and spectral fitting. An empirical fit to our results shows that the peak NTR contribution comprises over half of the hard X-ray signal if δ ≳ 6{≤ft(\\tfrac{{E}0c}{4{keV}}\\right)}0.4.

  10. Cosmic Rays and Non-thermal Emission Induced by Accretion of Cool Gas onto the Galactic Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Susumu; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Arakawa, Masanori; Renaud, Matthieu; Wada, Keiichi

    2017-11-01

    On both observational and theoretical grounds, the disk of our Galaxy should be accreting cool gas with temperature ≲ {10}5 K via the halo at a rate ˜1 {{M}⊙ {yr}}-1. At least some of this accretion is mediated by high-velocity clouds (HVCs), observed to be traveling in the halo with velocities of a few 100 km s-1 and occasionally impacting the disk at such velocities, especially in the outer regions of the Galaxy. We address the possibility of particle acceleration in shocks triggered by such HVC accretion events, and the detectability of consequent non-thermal emission in the radio to gamma-ray bands and high-energy neutrinos. For plausible shock velocities ˜ 300 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and magnetic field strengths ˜ 0.3{--}10 μ {{G}}, electrons and protons may be accelerated up to ˜1-10 TeV and ˜ 30{--}{10}3 TeV, respectively, in sufficiently strong adiabatic shocks during their lifetime of ˜ {10}6 {{yr}}. The resultant pion decay and inverse Compton gamma-rays may be the origin of some unidentified Galactic GeV-TeV sources, particularly the “dark” source HESS J1503-582 that is spatially coincident with the anomalous H I structure known as “forbidden-velocity wings.” Correlation of their locations with star-forming regions may be weak, absent, or even opposite. Non-thermal radio and X-ray emission from primary and/or secondary electrons may be detectable with deeper observations. The contribution of HVC accretion to Galactic cosmic rays is subdominant, but could be non-negligible in the outer Galaxy. As the thermal emission induced by HVC accretion is likely difficult to detect, observations of such phenomena may offer a unique perspective on probing gas accretion onto the Milky Way and other galaxies.

  11. The Multi-Instrument (EVE-RHESSI) DEM for Solar Flares, and Implications for Residual Non-Thermal Soft X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTiernan, James M.; Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry

    2015-04-01

    In the soft X-ray energy range, solar flare spectra are typically dominated by thermal emission. The low energy extent of non-thermal emission can only be loosely quantified using currently available X-ray data. To address this issue, we combine observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) with X-ray data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The improvement over the isothermal approximation is intended to resolve the ambiguity in the range where the thermal and non-thermal components may have similar photon fluxes. This "crossover" range can extend up to 30 keV for medium to large solar flares.Previous work (Caspi et.al. 2014ApJ...788L..31C) has concentrated on obtaining DEM models that fit both instruments' observations well. Now we are interested in any breaks and cutoffs in the "residual" non-thermal spectrum; i.e., the RHESSI spectrum that is left over after the DEM has accounted for the bulk of the soft X-ray emission. Thermal emission is again modeled using a DEM that is parametrized as multiple gaussians in temperature; the non-thermal emission is modeled as a photon spectrum obtained using a thin-target emission model ('thin2' from the SolarSoft Xray IDL package). Spectra for both instruments are fit simultaneously in a self-consistent manner. The results for non-thermal parameters then are compared with those found using RHESSI data alone, with isothermal and double-thermal models.

  12. The role of Dark Matter sub-halos in the non-thermal emission of galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchegiani, Paolo; Colafrancesco, Sergio, E-mail: Paolo.Marchegiani@wits.ac.za, E-mail: Sergio.Colafrancesco@wits.ac.za [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, WITS-2050, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2016-11-01

    Annihilation of Dark Matter (DM) particles has been recognized as one of the possible mechanisms for the production of non-thermal particles and radiation in galaxy clusters. Previous studies have shown that, while DM models can reproduce the spectral properties of the radio halo in the Coma cluster, they fail in reproducing the shape of the radio halo surface brightness because they produce a shape that is too concentrated towards the center of the cluster with respect to the observed one. However, in previous studies the DM distribution was modeled as a single spherically symmetric halo, while the DM distribution in Coma is found to have a complex and elongated shape. In this work we calculate a range of non-thermal emissions in the Coma cluster by using the observed distribution of DM sub-halos. We find that, by including the observed sub-halos in the DM model, we obtain a radio surface brightness with a shape similar to the observed one, and that the sub-halos boost the radio emission by a factor between 5 and 20%, thus allowing to reduce the gap between the annihilation cross section required to reproduce the radio halo flux and the upper limits derived from other observations, and that this gap can be explained by realistic values of the boosting factor due to smaller substructures. Models with neutralino mass of 9 GeV and composition τ{sup +} τ{sup −}, and mass of 43 GeV and composition b b-bar can fit the radio halo spectrum using the observed properties of the magnetic field in Coma, and do not predict a gamma-ray emission in excess compared to the recent Fermi-LAT upper limits. These findings make these DM models viable candidate to explain the origin of radio halos in galaxy clusters, avoiding the problems connected to the excessive gamma-ray emission expected from proton acceleration in most of the currently proposed models, where the acceleration of particles is directly or indirectly connected to events related to clusters merging. Therefore, DM

  13. Thermal and non-thermal emission from NGC 1275(3C84)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gear, W.K.; Robson, E.I.; Gee, G.; Nolt, I.G.

    1985-01-01

    Millimetre, submillimetre, far- and near-infrared observations of the unusual galaxy NGC 1275 are presented. After subtraction of the near-infrared stellar contamination of the surrounding galaxy the non-stellar emission at these wavelengths is investigated. It is concluded that the millimetre-wave and near-infrared emission is synchrotron radiation from a very compact component. It is shown that the emission at wavelengths from 10-400 μm is dominated by thermal emission with a spectrum very similar to NGC 1068. It is shown that the material for star formation in NGC 1275 is almost certainly being provided by accretion in a cooling flow from the Perseus intracluster gas with only approx. 2 per cent of the accreting mass forming OBA stars. (author)

  14. Detection of non-thermal X-ray emission in the lobes and jets of Cygnus A

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, M. N.; Wise, M. W.; Huppenkothen, D.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Snios, B.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D. M.; Duffy, R. T.; McNamara, B. R.

    2018-06-01

    We present a spectral analysis of the lobes and X-ray jets of Cygnus A, using more than 2 Ms of Chandra observations. The X-ray jets are misaligned with the radio jets and significantly wider. We detect non-thermal emission components in both lobes and jets. For the eastern lobe and jet, we find 1 keV flux densities of 71_{-10}^{+10} nJy and 24_{-4}^{+4} nJy, and photon indices of 1.72_{-0.03}^{+0.03} and 1.64_{-0.04}^{+0.04} respectively. For the western lobe and jet, we find flux densities of 50_{-13}^{+12} nJy and 13_{-5}^{+5} nJy, and photon indices of 1.97_{-0.10}^{+0.23} and 1.86_{-0.12}^{+0.18} respectively. Using these results, we modeled the electron energy distributions of the lobes as broken power laws with age breaks. We find that a significant population of non-radiating particles is required to account for the total pressure of the eastern lobe. In the western lobe, no such population is required and the low energy cutoff to the electron distribution there needs to be raised to obtain pressures consistent with observations. This discrepancy is a consequence of the differing X-ray photon indices, which may indicate that the turnover in the inverse-Compton spectrum of the western lobe is at lower energies than in the eastern lobe. We modeled the emission from both jets as inverse-Compton emission. There is a narrow region of parameter space for which the X-ray jet can be a relic of an earlier active phase, although lack of knowledge about the jet's electron distribution and particle content makes the modelling uncertain.

  15. Young supernova remnants and INTEGRAL: "4"4Ti lines and non-thermal emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, M.

    2006-10-01

    This thesis deals with the search for and the study of young galactic supernova remnants using the observations performed by IBIS/ISGRI, one of the two main coded-mask instruments onboard the european gamma-ray satellite INTEGRAL. This research is based on i) the study of gamma-ray lines coming from the radioactive decay of "4"4Ti, a short-lived nucleus (τ∼ 86 y) exclusively produced during the first stages of stellar explosions, and ii) the study of the nonthermal continuum mechanisms which take place inside the young supernova remnants. I separate the manuscript in four main parts. The first one presents an overview of supernovae from an observational and theoretical point of view. The second part describes the INTEGRAL satellite with its instruments, the techniques used for analyzing the data collected by IBIS/ISGRI, and my personal investigations concerning different developments such as: the spectral calibration of the IBIS/ISGRI instrument, the correction of noisy pixels on the camera, the creation of background maps, and the development of an alternative pipeline useful for dealing with a large amount of data. I also present a method for imaging extended sources with a coded-mask instrument such as IBIS/ISGRI, and its first application on the Coma Cluster. The results obtained on historical supernova remnants like Cas A, Tycho, RXJ0852-4622 (Vela Junior) are presented in the third part. The first chapter of the last part is devoted to the study of the detectability of supernovae in the optical domain with a model of the interstellar extinction. The second chapter reports on the search for missing and hidden young supernova remnants in the Milky Way with the IBIS/ISGRI galactic plane survey through the "4"4Sc gamma-ray lines as well as with a multi-wavelength approach, from the radio domain (VLA) to the new observational window at TeV energies (HESS). I also discuss the constraints on the supernova rate and the "4"4Ti production in core-collapse supernovae

  16. Discovery of Hard Nonthermal Pulsed X-Ray Emission from the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, L.; Hermsen, W.; Méndez, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    We report the discovery of nonthermal pulsed X-ray/soft gamma-ray emission up to ~150 keV from the anomalous 11.8 s X-ray pulsar AXP 1E 1841-045 located near the center of supernova remnant Kes 73 using Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Proportional Counter Array and High Energy X-Ray Timing

  17. HIGH-ENERGY NON-THERMAL AND THERMAL EMISSION FROM GRB 141207A DETECTED BY FERMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimoto, Makoto [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Ohkubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 169-8555 (Japan); Asano, Katsuaki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8582 (Japan); Ohno, Masanori [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima, 739-8526 (Japan); Veres, Péter [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Axelsson, Magnus [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Bissaldi, Elisabetta [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Tachibana, Yutaro; Kawai, Nobuyuki, E-mail: m.arimoto@aoni.waseda.jp [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo, 152-8551 (Japan)

    2016-12-20

    A bright long gamma-ray burst GRB 141207A was observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and detected by both instruments onboard. The observations show that the spectrum in the prompt phase is not well described by the canonical empirical Band function alone, and that an additional power-law component is needed. In the early phase of the prompt emission, a modified blackbody with a hard low-energy photon index ( α  = +0.2 to +0.4) is detected, which suggests a photospheric origin. In a finely time-resolved analysis, the spectra are also well fitted by the modified blackbody combined with a power-law function. We discuss the physical parameters of the photosphere such as the bulk Lorentz factor of the relativistic flow and the radius. We also discuss the physical origin of the extra power-law component observed during the prompt phase in the context of different models such as leptonic and hadronic scenarios in the internal shock regime and synchrotron emission in the external forward shock. In the afterglow phase, the temporal and spectral behaviors of the temporally extended high-energy emission and the fading X-ray emission detected by the X-Ray Telescope on-board Swift are consistent with synchrotron emission in a radiative external forward shock.

  18. First hard X-ray detection of the non-thermal emission around the Arches cluster: morphology and spectral studies with NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krivonos, Roman A.; Tomsick, John A.; Bauer, Franz E.

    2014-01-01

    The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended non-thermal X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe Ku line emission at 6.4 keV from material that is n......The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended non-thermal X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe Ku line emission at 6.4 keV from material...... and spectrum. The spatial distribution of the hard X-ray emission is found to be consistent with the broad region around the cluster where the 6.4 keV line is observed. The interpretation of the hard X-ray emission within the context of the X-ray reflection model puts a strong constraint on the luminosity...... of the possible illuminating hard X-ray source. The properties of the observed emission are also in broad agreement with the low-energy cosmic-ray proton excitation scenario....

  19. Thermal and nonthermal electron cyclotron emission by high-temperature tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airoldi, A.; Ramponi, G.

    1997-01-01

    An analysis of the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) spectra emitted by a high-temperature tokamak plasma in the frequency range of the second and third harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency is made, both in purely Maxwellian and in non-Maxwellian cases (i.e., in the presence of a current-carrying superthermal tail). The work is motivated mainly by the experimental observations made in the supershot plasmas of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), where a systematic disagreement is found between the T e measurements by second-harmonic ECE and Thomson scattering. We show that, by properly taking into account the overlap of superthermals-emitted third harmonic with second-harmonic bulk emission, the radiation temperature observed about the central frequency of the second harmonic may be enhanced up to 30%endash 40% compared to the corresponding thermal value. Moreover we show that, for parameters relevant to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) with T e (0)>7 keV, the overlap between the second and the downshifted third harmonic seriously affects the central plasma region, so that the X-mode emission at the second harmonic becomes unsuitable for local T e measurements. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  20. Performance evaluation of non-thermal plasma on particulate matter, ozone and CO2 correlation for diesel exhaust emission reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babaie, Meisam; Davari, Pooya; Talebizadeh, Poyan

    2015-01-01

    This study is seeking to investigate the effect of non-thermal plasma technology in the abatement of particulate matter (PM) from the actual diesel exhaust. Ozone (O3) strongly promotes PM oxidation, the main product of which is carbon dioxide (CO2). PM oxidation into the less harmful product (CO2...

  1. Treatment Efficiency by means of a Nonthermal Plasma Combined with Heterogeneous Catalysis of Odoriferous Volatile Organic Compounds Emissions from the Thermal Drying of Landfill Leachates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Almarcha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work was to assess the odoriferous volatile organic compounds depuration efficiency of an experimental nonthermal plasma coupled to a catalytic system used for odor abatement of real emissions from a leachate thermal drying plant installed in an urban solid waste landfill. VOC screening was performed by means of HRGC-MS analysis of samples taken at the inlet and at the outlet of the nonthermal plasma system. Odor concentration by means of dynamic olfactometry, total organic carbon, mercaptans, NH3, and H2S were also determined in order to assess the performance of the system throughout several days. Three plasma frequencies (100, 150, and 200 Hz and two catalyst temperatures (150°C and 50°C were also tested. Under conditions of maximum capacity of the treatment system, the results show VOC depuration efficiencies around 69%, with average depuration efficiencies between 44 and 95% depending on the chemical family of the substance. Compounds belonging to the following families have been detected in the samples: organic acids, alcohols, ketones, aldehydes, pyrazines, and reduced sulphur compounds, among others. Average total organic carbon removal efficiency was 88%, while NH3 and H2S removal efficiencies were 88% and 87%, respectively, and odor concentration abatement was 78%.

  2. Forecasting pulsatory motion for non-invasive cardiac radiosurgery: an analysis of algorithms from respiratory motion prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Floris; Bruder, Ralf; Schlaefer, Alexander; Schweikard, Achim

    2011-01-01

    Recently, radiosurgical treatment of cardiac arrhythmia, especially atrial fibrillation, has been proposed. Using the CyberKnife, focussed radiation will be used to create ablation lines on the beating heart to block unwanted electrical activity. Since this procedure requires high accuracy, the inevitable latency of the system (i.e., the robotic manipulator following the motion of the heart) has to be compensated for. We examine the applicability of prediction algorithms developed for respiratory motion prediction to the prediction of pulsatory motion. We evaluated the MULIN, nLMS, wLMS, SVRpred and EKF algorithms. The test data used has been recorded using external infrared position sensors, 3D ultrasound and the NavX catheter systems. With this data, we have shown that the error from latency can be reduced by at least 10 and as much as 75% (44% average), depending on the type of signal. It has also been shown that, although the SVRpred algorithm was successful in most cases, it was outperformed by the simple nLMS algorithm, the EKF or the wLMS algorithm in a number of cases. We have shown that prediction of cardiac motion is possible and that the algorithms known from respiratory motion prediction are applicable. Since pulsation is more regular than respiration, more research will have to be done to improve frequency-tracking algorithms, like the EKF method, which performed better than expected from their behaviour on respiratory motion traces.

  3. HYDRO2GEN: Non-thermal hydrogen Balmer and Paschen emission in solar flares generated by electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druett, M. K.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2018-03-01

    Aim. Sharp rises of hard X-ray (HXR) emission accompanied by Hα line profiles with strong red-shifts up to 4 Å from the central wavelength, often observed at the onset of flares with the Specola Solare Ticinese Telescope (STT) and the Swedish Solar Telescope (SST), are not fully explained by existing radiative models. Moreover, observations of white light (WL) and Balmer continuum emission with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRISH) reveal strong co-temporal enhancements and are often nearly co-spatial with HXR emission. These effects indicate a fast effective source of excitation and ionisation of hydrogen atoms in flaring atmospheres associated with HXR emission. In this paper, we investigate electron beams as the agents accounting for the observed hydrogen line and continuum emission. Methods: Flaring atmospheres are considered to be produced by a 1D hydrodynamic response to the injection of an electron beam defining their kinetic temperatures, densities, and macro velocities. We simulated a radiative response in these atmospheres using a fully non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) approach for a 5-level plus continuum hydrogen atom model, considering its excitation and ionisation by spontaneous, external, and internal diffusive radiation and by inelastic collisions with thermal and beam electrons. Simultaneous steady-state and integral radiative transfer equations in all optically thick transitions (Lyman and Balmer series) were solved iteratively for all the transitions to define their source functions with the relative accuracy of 10-5. The solutions of the radiative transfer equations were found using the L2 approximation. Resulting intensities of hydrogen line and continuum emission were also calculated for Balmer and Paschen series. Results: We find that inelastic collisions with beam electrons strongly increase excitation and ionisation of hydrogen atoms from the chromosphere to photosphere. This leads to an increase in Lyman continuum

  4. Discovery of megaparsec-scale, low surface brightness nonthermal emission in merging galaxy clusters using the green bank telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnsworth, Damon; Rudnick, Lawrence [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Brown, Shea [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, 203 Van Allen Hall, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Brunetti, Gianfranco [INAF/Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-12-20

    We present results from a study of 12 X-ray bright clusters at 1.4 GHz with the 100 m Green Bank Telescope. After subtraction of point sources using existing interferometer data, we reach a median (best) 1σ rms sensitivity level of 0.01 (0.006) μJy arcsec{sup –2}, and find a significant excess of diffuse, low surface brightness emission in 11 of 12 Abell clusters observed. We also present initial results at 1.4 GHz of A2319 from the Very Large Array. In particular, we find: (1) four new detections of diffuse structures tentatively classified as two halos (A2065, A2069) and two relics (A2067, A2073); (2) the first detection of the radio halo in A2061 at 1.4 GHz, which qualifies this as a possible ultra-steep spectrum halo source with a synchrotron spectral index of α ∼ 1.8 between 327 MHz and 1.4 GHz; (3) a ∼2 Mpc radio halo in the sloshing, minor-merger cluster A2142; (4) a >2× increase of the giant radio halo extent and luminosity in the merging cluster A2319; (5) a ∼7× increase to the integrated radio flux and >4× increase to the observed extent of the peripheral radio relic in A1367 to ∼600 kpc, which we also observe to be polarized on a similar scale; (6) significant excess emission of ambiguous nature in three clusters with embedded tailed radio galaxies (A119, A400, A3744). Our radio halo detections agree with the well-known X-ray/radio luminosity correlation, but they are larger and fainter than current radio power correlation studies would predict. The corresponding volume-averaged synchrotron emissivities are 1-2 orders of magnitude below the characteristic value found in previous studies. Some of the halo-like detections may be some type of previously unseen, low surface brightness radio halo or blend of unresolved shock structures and sub-Mpc-scale turbulent regions associated with their respective cluster merging activity. Four of the five tentative halos contain one or more X-ray cold fronts, suggesting a possible connection between gas

  5. A LINGERING NON-THERMAL COMPONENT IN THE GAMMA-RAY BURST PROMPT EMISSION: PREDICTING GeV EMISSION FROM THE MeV SPECTRUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basak, Rupal; Rao, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    The high-energy GeV emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by Fermi/LAT has a significantly different morphology compared to the lower energy MeV emission detected by Fermi/GBM. Though the late-time GeV emission is believed to be synchrotron radiation produced via an external shock, this emission as early as the prompt phase is puzzling. A meaningful connection between these two emissions can be drawn only by an accurate description of the prompt MeV spectrum. We perform a time-resolved spectroscopy of the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) data of long GRBs with significant GeV emission, using a model consisting of two blackbodies and a power law. We examine in detail the evolution of the spectral components and find that GRBs with high GeV emission (GRB 090902B and GRB 090926A) have a delayed onset of the power-law component in the GBM spectrum, which lingers at the later part of the prompt emission. This behavior mimics the flux evolution in the Large Area Telescope (LAT). In contrast, bright GBM GRBs with an order of magnitude lower GeV emission (GRB 100724B and GRB 091003) show a coupled variability of the total and the power-law flux. Further, by analyzing the data for a set of 17 GRBs, we find a strong correlation between the power-law fluence in the MeV and the LAT fluence (Pearson correlation: r = 0.88 and Spearman correlation: ρ = 0.81). We demonstrate that this correlation is not influenced by the correlation between the total and the power-law fluences at a confidence level of 2.3σ. We speculate the possible radiation mechanisms responsible for the correlation

  6. Search for Nonthermal X-Rays from Supernova Remnant Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petre, R.; Keohane, J.; Hwang, U.; Allen, G.; Gotthelf, E.

    The demonstration by ASCA that the nonthermal X-ray emission from the rim of SN1006 is synchrotron emission from TeV electrons, produced in the same environment responsible for cosmic ray protons and nuclei (Koyama et al. 1995, Nature 378, 255), has stimulated a search for nonthermal X-rays from other remnants. Nonthermal emission has subsequently been found to arise in the shells of at least two other remnants, Cas A and IC 443. In Cas A, a hard tail is detected using ASCA, XTE, and OSSE to energies exceeding 100 keV; the shape of the spectrum rules out all mechanisms except synchrotron radiation. In IC 443, the previously known hard emission has been shown using ASCA to be isolated to a small region along the rim of the remnant, where the shock is interacting most strongly with a molecular cloud. Nonthermal X-ray emission is thought to arise here by enhanced cosmic ray production associated with the shock/cloud interaction (Keohane et al. 1997, ApJ in press). We describe the properties of the nonthermal emission in SN1006, Cas A, and IC 443, and discuss the status of our search for nonthermal emission associated with the shocks of other Galactic and LMC SNR's.

  7. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may he elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should ma be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well.

  8. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, D.J.; Chung, D.J.; Kolb, E.W.; Kolb, E.W.; Riotto, A.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may be elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should not be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  9. Nonthermal Supermassive Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Daniel J. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Riotto, Antonio

    1998-01-01

    We discuss several cosmological production mechanisms for nonthermal supermassive dark matter and argue that dark matter may be elementary particles of mass much greater than the weak scale. Searches for dark matter should not be limited to weakly interacting particles with mass of the order of the weak scale, but should extend into the supermassive range as well.

  10. Numerical modeling of nitrogen oxide emission and experimental verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szecowka Lech

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of nitrogen reduction in combustion process with application of primary method are presented in paper. The reduction of NOx emission, by the recirculation of combustion gasses, staging of fuel and of air was investigated, and than the reduction of NOx emission by simultaneous usage of the mentioned above primary method with pulsatory disturbances.The investigations contain numerical modeling of NOx reduction and experimental verification of obtained numerical calculation results.

  11. Nonthermal plasma technology for organic destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, W.O.; Birmingham, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating the use of nonthermal, electrically driven plasmas for destroying organic contaminants near ambient temperatures and pressures. Three different plasma systems have been developed to treat organics in air, water, and soil. These systems are the gas-phase corona reactor (GPCR) for treating air, the liquid phase corona reactor for treating water, and the in-situ corona for treating soils. This paper focuses on the GPCR as an alternative to other air purification technologies for treating off-gasses from remedial action efforts and industrial emissions

  12. Moderate pressure plasma source of nonthermal electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, S.; Raitses, Y.

    2018-06-01

    Plasma sources of electrons offer control of gas and surface chemistry without the need for complex vacuum systems. The plasma electron source presented here is based on a cold cathode glow discharge (GD) operating in a dc steady state mode in a moderate pressure range of 2–10 torr. Ion-induced secondary electron emission is the source of electrons accelerated to high energies in the cathode sheath potential. The source geometry is a key to the availability and the extraction of the nonthermal portion of the electron population. The source consists of a flat and a cylindrical electrode, 1 mm apart. Our estimates show that the length of the cathode sheath in the plasma source is commensurate (~0.5–1 mm) with the inter-electrode distance so the GD operates in an obstructed regime without a positive column. Estimations of the electron energy relaxation confirm the non-local nature of this GD, hence the nonthermal portion of the electron population is available for extraction outside of the source. The use of a cylindrical anode presents a simple and promising method of extracting the high energy portion of the electron population. Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy confirm the presence of electrons with energies ~15 eV outside of the source. These electrons become available for surface modification and radical production outside of the source. The extraction of the electrons of specific energies by varying the anode geometry opens exciting opportunities for future exploration.

  13. Nonthermal Radiation from Supernova Remnant Shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyesung Kang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of high energy cosmic rays (CRs are thought to be produced by diffusive shock acceleration (DSA at supernova remnants (SNRs within the Galaxy. Fortunately, nonthermal emissions from CR protons and electrons can provide direct observational evidence for such a model and place strong constraints on the complex nonlinear plasma processes in DSA theory. In this study we calculate the energy spectra of CR protons and electrons in Type Ia SNRs, using time-dependent DSA simulations that incorporate phenomenological models for some wave-particle interactions. We demonstrate that the timedependent evolution of the self-amplified magnetic fields, Alfvénic drift, and escape of the highest energy particles affect the energy spectra of accelerated protons and electrons, and so resulting nonthermal radiation spectrum. Especially, the spectral cutoffs in X-ray and γ-ray emission spectra are regulated by the evolution of the highest energy particles, which are injected at the early phase of SNRs. Thus detailed understandings of nonlinear wave-particle interactions and time-dependent DSA simulations of SNRs are crucial in testing the SNR hypothesis for the origin of Galactic cosmic rays.

  14. Non-thermally activated chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiller, W.

    1987-01-01

    The subject is covered under the following headings: state-of-the art of non-thermally activated chemical processes; basic phenomena in non-thermal chemistry including mechanochemistry, photochemistry, laser chemistry, electrochemistry, photo-electro chemistry, high-field chemistry, magneto chemistry, plasma chemistry, radiation chemistry, hot-atom chemistry, and positronium and muonium chemistry; elementary processes in non-thermal chemistry including nuclear chemistry, interactions of electromagnetic radiations, electrons and heavy particles with matter, ionic elementary processes, elementary processes with excited species, radicalic elementary processes, and energy-induced elementary processes on surfaces and interfaces; and comparative considerations. An appendix with historical data and a subject index is given. 44 figs., 41 tabs., and 544 refs

  15. Jean’s instability in a complex plasma in presence of secondary electrons and nonthermal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Susmita; Maity Saumyen

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the effect of secondary electron emission and nonthermality of ion velocity distribution simultaneously on Jean’s instability in a complex plasma in presence of negatively charged dust grains. Primary and secondary electron temperatures are assumed to be equal. Thus plasma under consideration consists of Boltzmann distributed electrons, nonthermal ions and negatively charged dust grains. The dust grain component is modeled by continuity and momentum equations. From the linear dispersion relation we have calculated the real frequency and growth rate of the Jean’s mode. Numerically it is found that for lower values of the nonthermal parameter Jean’s instability is higher for higher secondary electron emission whereas the effect of secondary electron emission on Jean’s instability becomes insignificant for higher values of the nonthermal parameter. (author)

  16. Integrated nonthermal treatment system study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagi, C.; Bahar, D.; Teheranian, B.; Vetromile, J. [Morrison Knudsen Corp. (United States); Quapp, W.J. [Nuclear Metals (United States); Bechtold, T.; Brown, B.; Schwinkendorf, W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swartz, G. [Swartz and Associates (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of nonthermal treatment technologies. The study consisted of a systematic assessment of five nonthermal treatment alternatives. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The alternatives considered were innovative nonthermal treatments for organic liquids and sludges, process residue, soil and debris. Vacuum desorption or various washing approaches are considered for treatment of soil, residue and debris. Organic destruction methods include mediated electrochemical oxidation, catalytic wet oxidation, and acid digestion. Other methods studied included stabilization technologies and mercury separation of treatment residues. This study is a companion to the integrated thermal treatment study which examined 19 alternatives for thermal treatment of MLLW waste. The quantities and physical and chemical compositions of the input waste are based on the inventory database developed by the US Department of Energy. The Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) systems were evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 pounds per hour) as the Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems (ITTS). 48 refs., 68 figs., 37 tabs.

  17. Integrated nonthermal treatment system study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biagi, C.; Bahar, D.; Teheranian, B.; Vetromile, J.; Quapp, W.J.; Bechtold, T.; Brown, B.; Schwinkendorf, W.; Swartz, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study of nonthermal treatment technologies. The study consisted of a systematic assessment of five nonthermal treatment alternatives. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The alternatives considered were innovative nonthermal treatments for organic liquids and sludges, process residue, soil and debris. Vacuum desorption or various washing approaches are considered for treatment of soil, residue and debris. Organic destruction methods include mediated electrochemical oxidation, catalytic wet oxidation, and acid digestion. Other methods studied included stabilization technologies and mercury separation of treatment residues. This study is a companion to the integrated thermal treatment study which examined 19 alternatives for thermal treatment of MLLW waste. The quantities and physical and chemical compositions of the input waste are based on the inventory database developed by the US Department of Energy. The Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) systems were evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 pounds per hour) as the Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems (ITTS). 48 refs., 68 figs., 37 tabs

  18. Nonthermal Radiation Processes in Interplanetary Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, A. C. L.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. En la interacci6n de haces de electrones energeticos con plasmas interplanetarios, se excitan ondas intensas de Langmuir debido a inestabilidad del haz de plasma. Las ondas Langmuir a su vez interaccio nan con fluctuaciones de densidad de baja frecuencia para producir radiaciones. Si la longitud de las ondas de Langmujr exceden las condicio nes del umbral, se puede efectuar la conversi5n de modo no lineal a on- das electromagneticas a traves de inestabilidades parametricas. As se puede excitar en un plasma inestabilidades parametricas electromagneticas impulsadas por ondas intensas de Langmuir: (1) inestabilidades de decaimiento/fusi5n electromagnetica impulsadas por una bomba de Lang- muir que viaja; (2) inestabilidades dobles electromagneticas de decai- miento/fusi5n impulsadas por dos bombas de Langrnuir directamente opues- tas; y (3) inestabilidades de dos corrientes oscilatorias electromagne- ticas impulsadas por dos bombas de Langmuir de corrientes contrarias. Se concluye que las inestabilidades parametricas electromagneticas in- ducidas por las ondas de Langmuir son las fuentes posibles de radiacio- nes no termicas en plasmas interplanetarios. ABSTRACT: Nonthermal radio emissions near the local electron plasma frequency have been detected in various regions of interplanetary plasmas: solar wind, upstream of planetary bow shock, and heliopause. Energetic electron beams accelerated by solar flares, planetary bow shocks, and the terminal shock of heliosphere provide the energy source for these radio emissions. Thus, it is expected that similar nonthermal radiation processes may be responsible for the generation of these radio emissions. As energetic electron beams interact with interplanetary plasmas, intense Langmuir waves are excited due to a beam-plasma instability. The Langmuir waves then interact with low-frequency density fluctuations to produce radiations near the local electron plasma frequency. If Langmuir waves are of sufficiently large

  19. Nonthermal plasma technology for organic destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, W.O.; Birmingham, J.G.

    1995-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating the use of nonthermal, electrically driven plasmas for destroying organic contaminants near ambient temperatures and pressures. Three different plasma systems have been developed to treat organics in air, water, and soil. These systems are the Gas-Phase Corona Reactor (GPCR)III for treating air, the Liquid-Phase Corona Reactor for treating water, and In Situ Corona for treating soils. This presentation focuses on recent technical developments, commercial status, and project costs of OPCR as a cost-effective alternative to other air-purification technologies that are now in use to treat off-gases from site-remediation efforts as well as industrial emissions

  20. Nonthermal Particles and Radiation Produced by Cluster Merger Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-10

    NONTHERMAL PARTICLES AND RADIATION PRODUCED BY CLUSTER MERGER SHOCKS Robert C. Berrington and Charles D. Dermer Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7653...of the merging cluster and is assumed to be constant as the shock propagates outward from the cluster center. In this paper , we model the cluster ...emission in the60–250 eV band for a number of clus- ters. These clusters include Virgo , Coma, Fornax, A2199, A1795, and A4059 (Lieu et al. 1996a, 1996b

  1. Combining nonthermal technologies to control foodborne microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Alexander I V; Griffiths, Mansel W; Mittal, Gauri S; Deeth, Hilton C

    2003-12-31

    Novel nonthermal processes, such as high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), pulsed electric fields (PEFs), ionizing radiation and ultrasonication, are able to inactivate microorganisms at ambient or sublethal temperatures. Many of these processes require very high treatment intensities, however, to achieve adequate microbial destruction in low-acid foods. Combining nonthermal processes with conventional preservation methods enhances their antimicrobial effect so that lower process intensities can be used. Combining two or more nonthermal processes can also enhance microbial inactivation and allow the use of lower individual treatment intensities. For conventional preservation treatments, optimal microbial control is achieved through the hurdle concept, with synergistic effects resulting from different components of the microbial cell being targeted simultaneously. The mechanisms of inactivation by nonthermal processes are still unclear; thus, the bases of synergistic combinations remain speculative. This paper reviews literature on the antimicrobial efficiencies of nonthermal processes combined with conventional and novel nonthermal technologies. Where possible, the proposed mechanisms of synergy is mentioned.

  2. Thermal-nonthermal relationships in active galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waard, G.J. de.

    1986-01-01

    This dissertation reports on optical and radio observations of active galactic nuclei, selected on the basis of the presence of dominant narrow (narrow line radio galaxies, Seyfert II galaxies, QSOs) and/or broad (broad line radio galaxies, Seyfert I galaxies, QSOs) optical emission lines in their spectra. Special attention is drawn to possible relationships and physical links between the two regimes responsible for the optical (thermal) and radio (non-thermal) emission. Several projects, each studying such relationships on different angular (and thus linear) scales and at different observational frequencies were conceived with a variety of detection devices. (Auth.)

  3. A dc non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma microjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, WeiDong; Lopez, Jose L.

    2012-06-01

    A direct current (dc), non-thermal, atmospheric-pressure plasma microjet is generated with helium/oxygen gas mixture as working gas. The electrical property is characterized as a function of the oxygen concentration and show distinctive regions of operation. Side-on images of the jet were taken to analyze the mode of operation as well as the jet length. A self-pulsed mode is observed before the transition of the discharge to normal glow mode. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed from both end-on and side-on along the jet to analyze the reactive species generated in the plasma. Line emissions from atomic oxygen (at 777.4 nm) and helium (at 706.5 nm) were studied with respect to the oxygen volume percentage in the working gas, flow rate and discharge current. Optical emission intensities of Cu and OH are found to depend heavily on the oxygen concentration in the working gas. Ozone concentration measured in a semi-confined zone in front of the plasma jet is found to be from tens to ˜120 ppm. The results presented here demonstrate potential pathways for the adjustment and tuning of various plasma parameters such as reactive species selectivity and quantities or even ultraviolet emission intensities manipulation in an atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma source. The possibilities of fine tuning these plasma species allows for enhanced applications in health and medical related areas.

  4. A dc non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma microjet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Weidong; Lopez, Jose L

    2012-01-01

    A direct current (dc), non-thermal, atmospheric-pressure plasma microjet is generated with helium/oxygen gas mixture as working gas. The electrical property is characterized as a function of the oxygen concentration and show distinctive regions of operation. Side-on images of the jet were taken to analyze the mode of operation as well as the jet length. A self-pulsed mode is observed before the transition of the discharge to normal glow mode. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed from both end-on and side-on along the jet to analyze the reactive species generated in the plasma. Line emissions from atomic oxygen (at 777.4 nm) and helium (at 706.5 nm) were studied with respect to the oxygen volume percentage in the working gas, flow rate and discharge current. Optical emission intensities of Cu and OH are found to depend heavily on the oxygen concentration in the working gas. Ozone concentration measured in a semi-confined zone in front of the plasma jet is found to be from tens to ∼120 ppm. The results presented here demonstrate potential pathways for the adjustment and tuning of various plasma parameters such as reactive species selectivity and quantities or even ultraviolet emission intensities manipulation in an atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma source. The possibilities of fine tuning these plasma species allows for enhanced applications in health and medical related areas. (paper)

  5. Non-thermal AGN models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Band, D.L.

    1986-12-01

    The infrared, optical and x-ray continua from radio quiet active galactic nuclei (AGN) are explained by a compact non-thermal source surrounding a thermal ultraviolet emitter, presumably the accretion disk around a supermassive black hole. The ultraviolet source is observed as the ''big blue bump.'' The flat (..cap alpha.. approx. = .7) hard x-ray spectrum results from the scattering of thermal ultraviolet photons by the flat, low energy end of an electron distribution ''broken'' by Compton losses; the infrared through soft x-ray continuum is the synchrotron radiation of the steep, high energy end of the electron distribution. Quantitative fits to specific AGN result in models which satisfy the variability constraints but require electron (re)acceleration throughout the source. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Effect of Weakly Nonthermal Ion Velocity Distribution on Jeans Instability in a Complex Plasma in Presence of Secondary Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.; Maity, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the effect of weak nonthermality of ion velocity distribution on Jean’s instability in a complex plasma in presence of secondary electrons and negatively charged dust grains. The primary and secondary electron temperatures are assumed equal. Thus plasma under consideration consists of three components: Boltzman distributed electrons, non-thermal ions and negatively charged inertial dust grains. From the linear dispersion relation we have calculated the real frequency and growth rate of the Jean’s mode. Numerically we have found that secondary electron emission destabilizes Jean’s mode when ion nonthermality is weak. (author)

  7. Naima: a Python package for inference of particle distribution properties from nonthermal spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabalza, V.

    2015-07-01

    The ultimate goal of the observation of nonthermal emission from astrophysical sources is to understand the underlying particle acceleration and evolution processes, and few tools are publicly available to infer the particle distribution properties from the observed photon spectra from X-ray to VHE gamma rays. Here I present naima, an open source Python package that provides models for nonthermal radiative emission from homogeneous distribution of relativistic electrons and protons. Contributions from synchrotron, inverse Compton, nonthermal bremsstrahlung, and neutral-pion decay can be computed for a series of functional shapes of the particle energy distributions, with the possibility of using user-defined particle distribution functions. In addition, naima provides a set of functions that allow to use these models to fit observed nonthermal spectra through an MCMC procedure, obtaining probability distribution functions for the particle distribution parameters. Here I present the models and methods available in naima and an example of their application to the understanding of a galactic nonthermal source. naima's documentation, including how to install the package, is available at http://naima.readthedocs.org.

  8. Nonthermal plasmas around black holes, relevant collective modes, new configurations, and magnetic field amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppi, B., E-mail: coppi@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

    2017-03-15

    The radiation emission from Shining Black Holes is most frequently observed to have nonthermal features. It is therefore appropriate to consider relevant collective processes in plasmas surrounding black holes that contain high energy particles with nonthermal distributions in momentum space. A fluid description with significant temperature anisotropies is the simplest relevant approach. These anisotropies are shown to have a critical influence on: (a) the existence and characteristics of stationary plasma and field ring configurations, (b) the excitation of “thermo-gravitational modes” driven by temperature anisotropies and gradients that involve gravity and rotation, (c) the generation of magnetic fields over macroscopic scale distances, and (d) the transport of angular momentum.

  9. Advanced oxidation technology for H2S odor gas using non-thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, ZHU; Ruonan, WANG; Wenjing, BIAN; Yang, CHEN; Weidong, JING

    2018-05-01

    Non-thermal plasma technology is a new type of odor treatment processing. We deal with H2S from waste gas emission using non-thermal plasma generated by dielectric barrier discharge. On the basis of two criteria, removal efficiency and absolute removal amount, we deeply investigate the changes in electrical parameters and process parameters, and the reaction process of the influence of ozone on H2S gas removal. The experimental results show that H2S removal efficiency is proportional to the voltage, frequency, power, residence time and energy efficiency, while it is inversely proportional to the initial concentration of H2S gas, and ozone concentration. This study lays the foundations of non-thermal plasma technology for further commercial application.

  10. Enhanced integrated nonthermal treatment system study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biagi, C.; Schwinkendorf, B.; Teheranian, B.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of the Enhanced Nonthermal Treatment Systems (ENTS) study is to evaluate alternative configurations of one of the five systems evaluated in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) study. Five alternative configurations are evaluated. Each is designed to enhance the final waste form performance by replacing grout with improved stabilization technologies, or to improve system performance by improving the destruction efficiency for organic contaminants. AU enhanced systems are alternative configurations of System NT-5, which has the following characteristics: Nonthermal System NT-5: (1) catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) to treat organic material including organic liquids, sludges, and soft (or combustible) debris, (2) thermal desorption of inorganic sludge and process residue, (3) washing of soil and inorganic debris with treatment by CWO of removed organic material, (4) metal decontamination by abrasive blasting, (5) stabilization of treated sludge, soil, debris, and untreated debris with entrained contamination in grout, and (6) stabilization of inorganic sludge, salts and secondary waste in polymer. System NT-5 was chosen because it was designed to treat combustible debris thereby minimizing the final waste form volume, and because it uses grout for primary stabilization. The enhanced nonthermal systems were studied to determine the cost and performance impact of replacing grout (a commonly used stabilization agent in the DOE complex) with improved waste stabilization methods such as vitrification and polymer

  11. IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY ON PREFLARE CORONAL NONTHERMAL SOURCES ASSOCIATED WITH THE 2002 JULY 23 FLARE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, Ayumi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Shimojo, Masumi; Yokoyama, Takaaki; Masuda, Satoshi; Krucker, Saem

    2009-01-01

    We present a detailed examination on the coronal nonthermal emissions during the preflare phase of the X4.8 flare that occurred on 2002 July 23. The microwave (17 GHz and 34 GHz) data obtained with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, at Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory and the hard X-ray (HXR) data taken with RHESSI obviously showed nonthermal sources that are located above the flare loops during the preflare phase. We performed imaging spectroscopic analyses on the nonthermal emission sources both in microwaves and in HXRs, and confirmed that electrons are accelerated from several tens of keV to more than 1 MeV even in this phase. If we assume the thin-target model for the HXR emission source, the derived electron spectral indices (∼4.7) is the same value as that from microwaves (∼4.7) within the observational uncertainties, which implies that the distribution of the accelerated electrons follows a single power law. The number density of the microwave-emitting electrons is, however, larger than that of the HXR-emitting electrons, unless we assume low-ambient plasma density of about 1.0 x 10 9 cm -3 for the HXR-emitting region. If we adopt the thick-target model for the HXR emission source, on the other hand, the electron spectral index (∼6.7) is much different, while the gap of the number density of the accelerated electrons is somewhat reduced.

  12. Sneutrino hybrid inflation and nonthermal leptogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antusch, Stefan; Baumann, Jochen P.; Domcke, Valerie F.; Kostka, Philipp M.

    2010-01-01

    In sneutrino hybrid inflation the superpartner of one of the right-handed neutrinos involved in the seesaw mechanism plays the role of the inflaton field. It obtains its large mass after the ''waterfall'' phase transition which ends hybrid inflation. After this phase transition the oscillations of the sneutrino inflaton field may dominate the universe and efficiently produce the baryon asymmetry of the universe via nonthermal leptogenesis. We investigate the conditions under which inflation, with primordial perturbations in accordance with the latest WMAP results, as well as successful nonthermal leptogenesis can be realized simultaneously within the sneutrino hybrid inflation scenario. We point out which requirements successful inflation and leptogenesis impose on the seesaw parameters, i.e. on the Yukawa couplings and the mass of the right-handed (s)neutrino, and derive the predictions for the CMB observables in terms of the right-handed (s)neutrino mass and the other relevant model parameters

  13. Sneutrino hybrid inflation and nonthermal leptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antusch, Stefan; Baumann, Jochen P.; Domcke, Valerie F.; Kostka, Philipp M., E-mail: antusch@mppmu.mpg.de, E-mail: jbaumann@mppmu.mpg.de, E-mail: domcke@mppmu.mpg.de, E-mail: kostka@mppmu.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany)

    2010-10-01

    In sneutrino hybrid inflation the superpartner of one of the right-handed neutrinos involved in the seesaw mechanism plays the role of the inflaton field. It obtains its large mass after the ''waterfall'' phase transition which ends hybrid inflation. After this phase transition the oscillations of the sneutrino inflaton field may dominate the universe and efficiently produce the baryon asymmetry of the universe via nonthermal leptogenesis. We investigate the conditions under which inflation, with primordial perturbations in accordance with the latest WMAP results, as well as successful nonthermal leptogenesis can be realized simultaneously within the sneutrino hybrid inflation scenario. We point out which requirements successful inflation and leptogenesis impose on the seesaw parameters, i.e. on the Yukawa couplings and the mass of the right-handed (s)neutrino, and derive the predictions for the CMB observables in terms of the right-handed (s)neutrino mass and the other relevant model parameters.

  14. Bacterial decontamination using ambient pressure nonthermal discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birmingham, J.G.; Hammerstrom, D.J.

    2000-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure nonthermal plasmas can efficiently deactivate bacteria in gases, liquids, and on surfaces, as well as can decompose hazardous chemicals. This paper focuses on the changes to bacterial spores and toxic biochemical compounds, such as mycotoxins, after their treatment in ambient pressure discharges. The ability of nonthermal plasmas to decompose toxic chemicals and deactivate hazardous biological materials has been applied to sterilizing medical instruments, ozonating water, and purifying air. In addition, the fast lysis of bacterial spores and other cells has led us to include plasma devices within pathogen detection instruments, where nucleic acids must be accessed. Decontaminating chemical and biological warfare materials from large, high value targets such as building surfaces, after a terrorist attack, are especially challenging. A large area plasma decontamination technology is described.

  15. Non-thermal Plasma and Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2015-09-01

    Thermal plasmas and lasers have been used in medicine to cut and ablate tissues and for coagulation. Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP; non-thermal plasma) is a recently developed, non-thermal technique with possible biomedical applications. Although NEAPP reportedly generates reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, electrons, positive ions, and ultraviolet radiation, few research projects have been conducted to merge this technique with conventional free radical biology. Recently, Prof. Masaru Hori's group (Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University) developed a NEAPP device with high electron density. Here electron spin resonance revealed hydroxyl radicals as a major product. To merge non-thermal plasma biology with the preexisting free radical biology, we evaluated lipid peroxidation and DNA modifications in various in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Conjugated dienes increased after exposure to linoleic and alfa-linolenic acids. An increase in 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances was also increased after exposure to phosphatidylcholine, liposomes or liver homogenate. Direct exposure to rat liver in medium produced immunohistochemical evidence of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal- and acrolein-modified proteins. Exposure to plasmid DNA induced dose-dependent single/double strand breaks and increased the amounts of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. These results indicate that oxidative biomolecular damage by NEAPP is dose-dependent and thus can be controlled in a site-specific manner. Simultaneous oxidative and UV-specific DNA damage may be useful in cancer treatment. Other recent advancements in the related studies of non-thermal plasma in Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine will also be discussed.

  16. Nonthermal gravitino production in tribrid inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antusch, Stefan; Dutta, Koushik

    2015-10-01

    We investigate nonthermal gravitino production after tribrid inflation in supergravity, which is a variant of supersymmetric hybrid inflation where three fields are involved in the inflationary model and where the inflaton field resides in the matter sector of the theory. In contrast to conventional supersymmetric hybrid inflation, where nonthermal gravitino production imposes severe constraints on the inflationary model, we find that the "nonthermal gravitino problem" is generically absent in models of tribrid inflation, mainly due to two effects: (i) With the inflaton in tribrid inflation (after inflation) being lighter than the waterfall field, the latter has a second decay channel with a much larger rate than for the decay into gravitinos. This reduces the branching ratio for the decay of the waterfall field into gravitinos. (ii) The inflaton generically decays later than the waterfall field, and it does not produce gravitinos when it decays. This leads to a dilution of the gravitino population from the decays of the waterfall field. The combination of both effects generically leads to a strongly reduced gravitino production in tribrid inflation.

  17. Hadronic model for the non-thermal radiation from the binary system AR Scorpii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarek, W.

    2018-05-01

    AR Scorpii is a close binary system containing a rotation powered white dwarf and a low-mass M type companion star. This system shows non-thermal emission extending up to the X-ray energy range. We consider hybrid (lepto-hadronic) and pure hadronic models for the high energy non-thermal processes in this binary system. Relativistic electrons and hadrons are assumed to be accelerated in a strongly magnetised, turbulent region formed in collision of a rotating white dwarf magnetosphere and a magnetosphere/dense atmosphere of the M-dwarf star. We propose that the non-thermal X-ray emission is produced either by the primary electrons or the secondary e± pairs from decay of charged pions created in collisions of hadrons with the companion star atmosphere. We show that the accompanying γ-ray emission from decay of neutral pions, which are produced by these same protons, is expected to be on the detectability level of the present and/or the future satellite and Cherenkov telescopes. The γ-ray observations of the binary system AR Sco should allow us to constrain the efficiency of hadron and electron acceleration and also the details of the radiation processes.

  18. Onset of turbulence induced by electron nonthermality in a complex plasma in presence of positively charged dust grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Sarkar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper onset of turbulence has been detected from the study of non linear dust acoustic wave propagation in a complex plasma considering electrons nonthermal and equilibrium dust charge positive. Dust grains are charged by secondary electron emission process. Our analysis shows that increase in electron nonthermality makes the grain charging process faster by reducing the magnitude of the nonadiabaticity induced pseudo viscosity. Consequently nature of dust charge variation changes from nonadiabatic to adiabatic one. For further increase of electron nonthermality, this pseudo viscosity becomes negative and hence generates a turbulent grain charging behaviour. This turbulent grain charging phenomenon is exclusively the outcome of this nonlinear study which was not found in linear analysis.

  19. Nonthermal Quantum Channels as a Thermodynamical Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navascués, Miguel; García-Pintos, Luis Pedro

    2015-07-01

    Quantum thermodynamics can be understood as a resource theory, whereby thermal states are free and the only allowed operations are unitary transformations commuting with the total Hamiltonian of the system. Previous literature on the subject has just focused on transformations between different state resources, overlooking the fact that quantum operations which do not commute with the total energy also constitute a potentially valuable resource. In this Letter, given a number of nonthermal quantum channels, we study the problem of how to integrate them in a thermal engine so as to distill a maximum amount of work. We find that, in the limit of asymptotically many uses of each channel, the distillable work is an additive function of the considered channels, computable for both finite dimensional quantum operations and bosonic channels. We apply our results to bound the amount of distillable work due to the natural nonthermal processes postulated in the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber (GRW) collapse model. We find that, although GRW theory predicts the possibility of extracting work from the vacuum at no cost, the power which a collapse engine could, in principle, generate is extremely low.

  20. Phenomena of non-thermal electrons from the X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on J-TEXT tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, W. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Chen, Z.Y., E-mail: zychen@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Jin, W. [Center of Interface Dynamics for Sustainability, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu 610200, Sichuan (China); Huang, D.W. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Lee, S.G.; Shi, Y.J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Tong, R.H.; Wang, S.Y.; Wei, Y.N.; Ma, T.K.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Some lines from X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) can be enhanced by non-thermal electrons, such as q, r satellite lines and z lines. • Analyze the non-thermal phenomena can reduce the error of electron temperature deduced from the intensity ratio of different lines of the He-like argon spectra from XICS. • XICS can be a tool to measure the non-thermal phenomena from these enhanced lines. - Abstract: A high spectra resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been implemented on J-TEXT Tokamak for the measurements of K{sub α} spectra of helium-like argon and its satellite lines. The wavelength range of K{sub α} spectra of helium-like argon is from 3.9494 Å to 3.9944 Å that includes the resonance line w, intercombination lines x and y, forbidden line z and numerous satellite lines, referenced using standard Gabriel notation. In low-density discharge, the intensity of q, r satellite lines and z lines can be significantly enhanced by non-thermal electrons. Non-thermal electrons are produced due to the low plasma density. The high hard X-ray flux from NaI detector and significant downshift electron cyclotron emissions from energetic runaway electrons also indicated that there is a large population of runaway electrons in the low-density discharge. The non-thermal part of electrons can affect the excitation/transition equilibrium or ionization/recombination equilibrium. The q line is mainly produced by inner-shell excitation of lithium-like argon, and the r line is partially produced by inner-shell excitation of lithium-like argon and dielectronic recombination of helium-like argon.

  1. Phenomena of non-thermal electrons from the X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on J-TEXT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z.Y.; Jin, W.; Huang, D.W.; Lee, S.G.; Shi, Y.J.; Tong, R.H.; Wang, S.Y.; Wei, Y.N.; Ma, T.K.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Some lines from X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) can be enhanced by non-thermal electrons, such as q, r satellite lines and z lines. • Analyze the non-thermal phenomena can reduce the error of electron temperature deduced from the intensity ratio of different lines of the He-like argon spectra from XICS. • XICS can be a tool to measure the non-thermal phenomena from these enhanced lines. - Abstract: A high spectra resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been implemented on J-TEXT Tokamak for the measurements of K_α spectra of helium-like argon and its satellite lines. The wavelength range of K_α spectra of helium-like argon is from 3.9494 Å to 3.9944 Å that includes the resonance line w, intercombination lines x and y, forbidden line z and numerous satellite lines, referenced using standard Gabriel notation. In low-density discharge, the intensity of q, r satellite lines and z lines can be significantly enhanced by non-thermal electrons. Non-thermal electrons are produced due to the low plasma density. The high hard X-ray flux from NaI detector and significant downshift electron cyclotron emissions from energetic runaway electrons also indicated that there is a large population of runaway electrons in the low-density discharge. The non-thermal part of electrons can affect the excitation/transition equilibrium or ionization/recombination equilibrium. The q line is mainly produced by inner-shell excitation of lithium-like argon, and the r line is partially produced by inner-shell excitation of lithium-like argon and dielectronic recombination of helium-like argon.

  2. Studying the non-thermal plasma jet characteristics and application on bacterial decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-rawaf, Ali F.; Fuliful, Fadhil Khaddam; Khalaf, Mohammed K.; Oudah, Husham. K.

    2018-04-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet represents an excellent approach for the decontamination of bacteria. In this paper, we want to improve and characterize a non-thermal plasma jet to employ it in processes of sterilization. The electrical characteristics was studied to describe the discharge of the plasma jet and the development of plasma plume has been characterized as a function of helium flow rate. Optical emission spectroscopy was employed to detect the active species inside the plasma plume. The inactivation efficiency of non-thermal plasma jet was evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria by measuring the diameter of inhibition zone and the number of surviving cells. The results presented that the plasma plume temperature was lower than 34° C at a flow rate of 4 slm, which will not cause damage to living tissues. The diameter of inhibition zone is directly extended with increased exposure time. We confirmed that the inactivation mechanism was unaffected by UV irradiation. In addition, we concluded that the major reasons for the inactivation process of bacteria is because of the action of the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which formed from ambient air, while the charged particles played a minor role in the inactivation process.

  3. Cyclotron radiation from thermal and non-thermal electrons in the WEGA-stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piekaar, H.W.; Rutgers, W.R.

    1980-11-01

    Electron cyclotron radiation measurements on the WEGA-stellarator are reported. Emission spectra around 2ωsub(ce) and 3ωsub(ce) were measured with a far-infra-red spectrometer and InSb detectors. When the plasma loop voltage is high, runaway electrons give rise to intense broad-band emission. Runaway particles can be removed by increasing the plasma density. For low loop voltage discharges the electron temperature profile was deduced from thermal emission around 2ωsub(ce). In spite of the low E-field, runaway particles are still created and pitch-angle scattered because ωsub(pe)/ωsub(ce) approximately 1. From non-thermal emission below 2ωsub(ce) and 3ωsub(ce) the energy and number of particles could be calculated, and was found to be in agreement with existing theories

  4. Relationship between the intensity of nonthermal radiation and widths of Balmer lines in the spectra of quasar-like nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komberg, B.V.; Shefer, E.Yu.

    1983-01-01

    The data summarized by Steiner (1981) were used to derive the relationship between the intensity of nonthermal X-ray and radio emission and fullwidths of Balmer emission lines. It is shown that the existence of such dependences does not contradict the assumption on partition equidistribution of nonthermal radiation and motion of gas clouds energy in the region of formation of wide lines. Emphasis is given to similar dependence drived by Vayana (1981) for X-ray radiation from hot coronas of fast-rotating single stars, and a suggestion is made about radiation anisotropy from active nuclei (similar to that observed in the SS 433 system). The latter may imply the double nature of active nuclei

  5. Nonthermal and screening effects on photoionizations in Lorentzian plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dong-Soo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2009-01-01

    The nonthermal and plasma screening effects on the x-ray photoionization process are investigated in astrophysical Lorentzian plasmas. The screened atomic wave function and energy eigenvalue of the target ion in Lorentzian plasmas are obtained by the Rayleigh-Ritz variational method. The x-ray retardation and screened Coulomb corrections are considered to obtain a photoionization cross section as a function of the spectral index and plasma parameters. It is shown that the nonthermal character of the Lorentzian plasma suppresses the photoionization cross section. Hence, the photoionization cross sections in nonthermal plasmas are found to be always smaller than those in thermal plasmas. It is also shown that the plasma screening effect is more significant for small spectral indices. In addition, the nonthermal effect on the photoionization cross section is found to be decreased with an increase in the Debye length.

  6. Non-Thermal Sanitation By Atmospheric Pressure Plasma, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a non-thermal technology based on atmospheric-pressure (AP) cold plasma to sanitize foods, food packaging materials, and other hardware...

  7. On the Non-Thermal Energy Content of Cosmic Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Vazza

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: the budget of non-thermal energy in galaxy clusters is not well constrained, owing to the observational and theoretical difficulties in studying these diluted plasmas on large scales; (2 Method: we use recent cosmological simulations with complex physics in order to connect the emergence of non-thermal energy to the underlying evolution of gas and dark matter; (3 Results: the impact of non-thermal energy (e.g., cosmic rays, magnetic fields and turbulent motions is found to increase in the outer region of galaxy clusters. Within numerical and theoretical uncertainties, turbulent motions dominate the budget of non-thermal energy in most of the cosmic volume; (4 Conclusion: assessing the distribution non-thermal energy in galaxy clusters is crucial to perform high-precision cosmology in the future. Constraining the level of non-thermal energy in cluster outskirts will improve our understanding of the acceleration of relativistic particles and of the origin of extragalactic magnetic fields.

  8. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood.

  9. Evolution of streamer groups in nonthermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, M., E-mail: mokubo@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Nonthermal plasmas (NTPs) induced by atmospheric nanosecond pulsed corona discharge have been studied for controlling pollution from combustors, such as boilers, incinerators, and diesel engines. In high-speed short-width high-voltage pulsed corona discharge-induced plasmas, primary streamer evolution is followed by secondary streamer evolution. Though this phenomenon is known experimentally, the details of the structures of the streamers and their evolution mechanisms have not been fully clarified. In this letter, we perform quasi two-dimensional numerical analysis of nonequilibrium NTP induced by a nanosecond positive pulsed corona discharge. The continuum fluid equations for two-temperature nonequilibrium NTP are used as governing equations. In this study, 197 gas phase reactions for 25 chemical species and 21 surface reactions on the inner glass wall surface are considered in an air plasma under atmospheric pressure. The simulated behavior of the streamer groups agrees with experimental observations. Soon after the voltage increases on the reactor, primary streamers are formed, which may transit the complete gap, disappearing near the peak voltage. Next, second streamers appear, disappearing at the end of the applied voltage pulse. The streamer wavelength and the distance between the streamers in the axial direction are determined. Moreover, ozone generation is shown to be more significant in the secondary streamer. This simulation will allow better predictions for nanosecond positive pulsed plasma systems.

  10. Evolution of streamer groups in nonthermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, M.

    2015-12-01

    Nonthermal plasmas (NTPs) induced by atmospheric nanosecond pulsed corona discharge have been studied for controlling pollution from combustors, such as boilers, incinerators, and diesel engines. In high-speed short-width high-voltage pulsed corona discharge-induced plasmas, primary streamer evolution is followed by secondary streamer evolution. Though this phenomenon is known experimentally, the details of the structures of the streamers and their evolution mechanisms have not been fully clarified. In this letter, we perform quasi two-dimensional numerical analysis of nonequilibrium NTP induced by a nanosecond positive pulsed corona discharge. The continuum fluid equations for two-temperature nonequilibrium NTP are used as governing equations. In this study, 197 gas phase reactions for 25 chemical species and 21 surface reactions on the inner glass wall surface are considered in an air plasma under atmospheric pressure. The simulated behavior of the streamer groups agrees with experimental observations. Soon after the voltage increases on the reactor, primary streamers are formed, which may transit the complete gap, disappearing near the peak voltage. Next, second streamers appear, disappearing at the end of the applied voltage pulse. The streamer wavelength and the distance between the streamers in the axial direction are determined. Moreover, ozone generation is shown to be more significant in the secondary streamer. This simulation will allow better predictions for nanosecond positive pulsed plasma systems.

  11. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyong-Tai [Department of Life Science, Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja Dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyoo-Cheon, E-mail: ktk@postech.ac.kr [Department of Oral Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan 626-810 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-12

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood. (topical review)

  12. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood. (topical review)

  13. Non-thermal particle acceleration in collisionless relativistic electron-proton reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, G. R.; Uzdensky, D. A.; Begelman, M. C.; Cerutti, B.; Nalewajko, K.

    2018-02-01

    Magnetic reconnection in relativistic collisionless plasmas can accelerate particles and power high-energy emission in various astrophysical systems. Whereas most previous studies focused on relativistic reconnection in pair plasmas, less attention has been paid to electron-ion plasma reconnection, expected in black hole accretion flows and relativistic jets. We report a comprehensive particle-in-cell numerical investigation of reconnection in an electron-ion plasma, spanning a wide range of ambient ion magnetizations σi, from the semirelativistic regime (ultrarelativistic electrons but non-relativistic ions, 10-3 ≪ σi ≪ 1) to the fully relativistic regime (both species are ultrarelativistic, σi ≫ 1). We investigate how the reconnection rate, electron and ion plasma flows, electric and magnetic field structures, electron/ion energy partitioning, and non-thermal particle acceleration depend on σi. Our key findings are: (1) the reconnection rate is about 0.1 of the Alfvénic rate across all regimes; (2) electrons can form concentrated moderately relativistic outflows even in the semirelativistic, small-σi regime; (3) while the released magnetic energy is partitioned equally between electrons and ions in the ultrarelativistic limit, the electron energy fraction declines gradually with decreased σi and asymptotes to about 0.25 in the semirelativistic regime; and (4) reconnection leads to efficient non-thermal electron acceleration with a σi-dependent power-law index, p(σ _i)˜eq const+0.7σ _i^{-1/2}. These findings are important for understanding black hole systems and lend support to semirelativistic reconnection models for powering non-thermal emission in blazar jets, offering a natural explanation for the spectral indices observed in these systems.

  14. Nonthermal effects of therapeutic ultrasound: the frequency resonance hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Lennart D

    2002-07-01

    To present the frequency resonance hypothesis, a possible mechanical mechanism by which treatment with non-thermal levels of ultrasound stimulates therapeutic effects. The review encompasses a 4-decade history but focuses on recent reports describing the effects of nonthermal therapeutic levels of ultrasound at the cellular and molecular levels. A search of MEDLINE from 1965 through 2000 using the terms ultrasound and therapeutic ultrasound. The literature provides a number of examples in which exposure of cells to therapeutic ultrasound under nonthermal conditions modified cellular functions. Nonthermal levels of ultrasound are reported to modulate membrane properties, alter cellular proliferation, and produce increases in proteins associated with inflammation and injury repair. Combined, these data suggest that nonthermal effects of therapeutic ultrasound can modify the inflammatory response. The concept of the absorption of ultrasonic energy by enzymatic proteins leading to changes in the enzymes activity is not novel. However, recent reports demonstrating that ultrasound affects enzyme activity and possibly gene regulation provide sufficient data to present a probable molecular mechanism of ultrasound's nonthermal therapeutic action. The frequency resonance hypothesis describes 2 possible biological mechanisms that may alter protein function as a result of the absorption of ultrasonic energy. First, absorption of mechanical energy by a protein may produce a transient conformational shift (modifying the 3-dimensional structure) and alter the protein's functional activity. Second, the resonance or shearing properties of the wave (or both) may dissociate a multimolecular complex, thereby disrupting the complex's function. This review focuses on recent studies that have reported cellular and molecular effects of therapeutic ultrasound and presents a mechanical mechanism that may lead to a better understanding of how the nonthermal effects of ultrasound may be

  15. Analysis of non-thermal velocities in the solar corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Contesse

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe new ground-based spectroscopic observations made using a 40-cm aperture coronagraph over a whole range of radial distances (up to heights of 12' above the limb and along four different heliocentric directions N, E, S and W. The analysis is limited to the study of the brightest forbidden emission line of Fe XIV at 530.3nm, in order to reach the best possible signal-to-noise ratio. To make the results statistically more significant, the extracted parameters are averaged over the whole length of the slit, and measurements are repeated fives times at each position; the corresponding dispersions in the results obtained along the slit are given. Central line profile intensities and full line widths (FWHM are plotted and compared to measurements published by other authors closer to the limb. We found widths and turbulent (non-thermal velocities of significantly higher values above the polar regions, especially when a coronal hole is present along the line of sight. We do not see a definitely decreasing behaviour of widths and turbulent velocities in equatorial directions for larger radial distances, as reported in the literature, although lower values are measured compared to the values in polar regions. The variation in the high corona is rather flat and a correlation diagram indicates that it is different for different regions and different radial distances. This seems to be the first analysis of the profiles of this coronal line, up to large heights above the limb for both equatorial and polar regions.

  16. Non-thermal escape of molecular hydrogen from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacesa, M.; Zhang, P.; Kharchenko, V.

    2012-05-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of non-thermal escape of molecular hydrogen from Mars induced by collisions with hot atomic oxygen from the Martian corona. To accurately describe the energy transfer in O + H2(v, j) collisions, we performed extensive quantum-mechanical calculations of state-to-state elastic, inelastic, and reactive cross sections. The escape flux of H2 molecules was evaluated using a simplified 1D column model of the Martian atmosphere with realistic densities of atmospheric gases and hot oxygen production rates for low solar activity conditions. An average intensity of the non-thermal escape flux of H2 of 1.9 × 105 cm-2s-1 was obtained considering energetic O atoms produced in dissociative recombinations of O2+ ions. Predicted ro-vibrational distribution of the escaping H2 was found to contain a significant fraction of higher rotational states. While the non-thermal escape rate was found to be lower than Jeans rate for H2 molecules, the non-thermal escape rates of HD and D2 are significantly higher than their respective Jeans rates. The accurate evaluation of the collisional escape flux of H2 and its isotopes is important for understanding non-thermal escape of molecules from Mars, as well as for the formation of hot H2 Martian corona. The described molecular ejection mechanism is general and expected to contribute to atmospheric escape of H2 and other light molecules from planets, satellites, and exoplanetary bodies.

  17. Time-resolved investigations of the non-thermal ablation process of graphite induced by femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalupka, C., E-mail: christian.kalupka@llt.rwth-aachen.de; Finger, J. [Chair for Laser Technology LLT, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen 52074 (Germany); Reininghaus, M. [Chair for Laser Technology LLT, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen 52074 (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT, Steinbachstraße 15, Aachen 52074 (Germany)

    2016-04-21

    We report on the in-situ analysis of the ablation dynamics of the, so-called, laser induced non-thermal ablation process of graphite. A highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is excited by femtosecond laser pulses with fluences below the classic thermal ablation threshold. The ablation dynamics are investigated by axial pump-probe reflection measurements, transversal pump-probe shadowgraphy, and time-resolved transversal emission photography. The combination of the applied analysis methods allows for a continuous and detailed time-resolved observation of the non-thermal ablation dynamics from several picoseconds up to 180 ns. Formation of large, μm-sized particles takes place within the first 3.5 ns after irradiation. The following propagation of ablation products and the shock wave front are tracked by transversal shadowgraphy up to 16 ns. The comparison of ablation dynamics of different fluences by emission photography reveals thermal ablation products even for non-thermal fluences.

  18. Non-thermal distribution of O(1D) atoms in the night-time thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Jeng-Hwa

    1988-01-01

    The 6300 A O(1D-3P) emission has been used for many years to remotely monitor the thermospheric temperature from the Doppler width of its line profile. The O(1D) atoms in the nighttime thermosphere are initially produced by the dissociative recombination of O2(+) ions with kinetic energy much greater than the thermal energy of the ambient neutrals. The validity of the technique to monitor neutral ambient temperature by measuring O(1D) 6300 A emission depends on the degree of thermalization of the O(1D) atoms. The object of this study is to calculate the velocity distribution of the O(1D) atoms and to examine the effect of nonthermal distribution on the nighttime thermospheric neutral temperature determined.

  19. Measurement of the non-thermal properties in a low-pressure spraying plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yong Ho; Chung, Kyu Sun

    2002-01-01

    The non-thermal properties of a low-pressure spraying plasma have been characterized by using optical emission spectroscopy and single probes installed in a fast scanning probe system. A two-temperature model of the electrons is introduced to explain their non-isothermal properties, which are measured using single probes. The excitation temperatures of the atomic and the ionic lines are calculated from measurements of the emission intensities of Ar (I) and Ar (II), and those temperatures can be explained by using a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) or a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) model. In order to deduce more reasonable values (excitation temperatures), we introduce a multi-thermodynamic equilibrium (MTE) model, which gives different temperatures, depending upon the atomic excitation states

  20. Nonthermal Particle Acceleration in 3D Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection in Pair Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Gregory R.; Uzdensky, Dmitri A., E-mail: Greg.Werner@colorado.edu [Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, Physics Department, University of Colorado, 390 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2017-07-10

    As a fundamental process converting magnetic to plasma energy in high-energy astrophysical plasmas, relativistic magnetic reconnection is a leading explanation for the acceleration of particles to the ultrarelativistic energies that are necessary to power nonthermal emission (especially X-rays and gamma-rays) in pulsar magnetospheres and pulsar wind nebulae, coronae and jets of accreting black holes, and gamma-ray bursts. An important objective of plasma astrophysics is therefore the characterization of nonthermal particle acceleration (NTPA) effected by reconnection. Reconnection-powered NTPA has been demonstrated over a wide range of physical conditions using large 2D kinetic simulations. However, its robustness in realistic 3D reconnection—in particular, whether the 3D relativistic drift-kink instability (RDKI) disrupts NTPA—has not been systematically investigated, although pioneering 3D simulations have observed NTPA in isolated cases. Here, we present the first comprehensive study of NTPA in 3D relativistic reconnection in collisionless electron–positron plasmas, characterizing NTPA as the strength of 3D effects is varied systematically via the length in the third dimension and the strength of the guide magnetic field. We find that, while the RDKI prominently perturbs 3D reconnecting current sheets, it does not suppress particle acceleration, even for zero guide field; fully 3D reconnection robustly and efficiently produces nonthermal power-law particle spectra closely resembling those obtained in 2D. This finding provides strong support for reconnection as the key mechanism powering high-energy flares in various astrophysical systems. We also show that strong guide fields significantly inhibit NTPA, slowing reconnection and limiting the energy available for plasma energization, yielding steeper and shorter power-law spectra.

  1. Monitoring non-thermal plasma processes for nanoparticle synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangolini, Lorenzo

    2017-09-01

    Process characterization tools have played a crucial role in the investigation of dusty plasmas. The presence of dust in certain non-thermal plasma processes was first detected by laser light scattering measurements. Techniques like laser induced particle explosive evaporation and ion mass spectrometry have provided the experimental evidence necessary for the development of the theory of particle nucleation in silane-containing non-thermal plasmas. This review provides first a summary of these early efforts, and then discusses recent investigations using in situ characterization techniques to understand the interaction between nanoparticles and plasmas. The advancement of such monitoring techniques is necessary to fully develop the potential of non-thermal plasmas as unique materials synthesis and processing platforms. At the same time, the strong coupling between materials and plasma properties suggest that it is also necessary to advance techniques for the measurement of plasma properties while in presence of dust. Recent progress in this area will be discussed.

  2. X-Ray Emission Properties of Supernova Remnants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.; Alsabti, A.W.; Murdin, P.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray emission from supernova remnants can be broadly divided into thermal X-ray emission from the shock-heated plasmas and in nonthermal (synchrotron) emission caused by very high-energy (10–100 TeV) electrons moving in the magnetic fields of the hot plasmas. The thermal X-ray emission of young

  3. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Mosher, D.; De Groot, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays in 5-MA Saturn discharges is reported. The timing of multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra (1 to 10 keV) agree with 2D radiation-hydrocode simulations. Nonthermal x-ray emission (10 to 100 keV) correlates with pinch spots distributed along the z-axis. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum, yield, and pinch-spot emission with those of 0.8-MA, single-exploded-wire discharges on Gamble-II suggest a common nonthermal-production mechanism. Nonthermal x-ray yields are lower than expected from current scaling of Gamble II results, suggesting that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single-wire geometries for nonthermal x-ray production. The instabilities, azimuthal asymmetries, and inferred multiple implosions that accompany the implosion geometry lead to larger, more irregular pinch spots, a likely reason for reduced nonthermal efficiency. A model for nonthermal-electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas combined with 1D hydrocode simulations of Saturn compact loads predicts weak nonthermal x-ray emission. (author). 3 figs., 10 refs

  4. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Mosher, D.; De Groot, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays in 5-MA Saturn discharges is reported. The timing of multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra (1 to 10 keV) agree with 2D radiation-hydrocode simulations. Nonthermal x-ray emission (10 to 100 keV) correlates with pinch spots distributed along the z-axis. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum, yield, and pinch-spot emission with those of 0.8-MA, single- exploded-wire discharges on Gamble-II suggest a common nonthermal- production mechanism. Nonthermal x-ray yields are lower than expected from current scaling of Gamble II results, suggesting that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single-wire geometries for nonthermal x-ray production. The instabilities, azimuthal asymmetries, and inferred multiple implosions that accompany the implosion geometry lead to larger, more irregular pinch spots, a likely reason for reduced nonthermal efficiency. A model for nonthermal-electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly- collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas combined with 1D hydrocode simulations of Saturn compact loads predicts weak nonthermal x-ray emission

  5. ON THE ROLE AND ORIGIN OF NONTHERMAL ELECTRONS IN HOT ACCRETION FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedźwiecki, Andrzej; Stȩpnik, Agnieszka [Department of Astrophysics, University of Łódź, Pomorska 149/153, 90-236 Łódź (Poland); Xie, Fu-Guo, E-mail: niedzwiecki@uni.lodz.pl, E-mail: agajer@o2.pl, E-mail: fgxie@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2015-02-01

    We study the X-ray spectra of tenuous, two-temperature accretion flows using a model involving an exact, Monte Carlo computation of the global Comptonization effect as well as a general relativistic description of both the flow structure and radiative processes. In our previous work, we found that in flows surrounding supermassive black holes, thermal synchrotron radiation is not capable of providing a sufficient seed photon flux to explain the X-ray spectral indices as well as the cut-off energies measured in several best-studied active galactic nuclei (AGNs). In this work, we complete the model by including seed photons provided by nonthermal synchrotron radiation and we find that it allows us to reconcile the hot flow model with the AGN data. We take into account two possible sources of nonthermal electrons. First, we consider e {sup ±} produced by charged-pion decay, which should always be present in the innermost part of a two-temperature flow due to proton-proton interactions. We find that for a weak heating of thermal electrons (small δ) the synchrotron emission of pion-decay e {sup ±} is much stronger than the thermal synchrotron emission in the considered range of bolometric luminosities, L ∼ (10{sup –4}-10{sup –2}) L {sub Edd}. The small-δ model including hadronic effects, in general, agrees with the AGN data, except for the case of a slowly rotating black hole and a thermal distribution of protons. For large δ, the pion-decay e {sup ±} have a negligible effect and, in this model, we consider nonthermal electrons produced by direct acceleration. We find an approximate agreement with the AGN data for the fraction of the heating power of electrons, which is used for the nonthermal acceleration η ∼ 0.1. However, for constant η and δ, the model predicts a positive correlation of the X-ray spectral index with the Eddington ratio, and hence a fine tuning of η and/or δ with the accretion rate is required to explain the negative correlation

  6. IRIS , Hinode , SDO , and RHESSI Observations of a White Light Flare Produced Directly by Non-thermal Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung-Sun [Hinode Science Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Imada, Shinsuke [Institute for Space–Earth Environmental Research (ISEE), Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Watanabe, Kyoko [National Defense Academy of Japan, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu, Yokosuka 239-8686 (Japan); Bamba, Yumi [Hinode team, ISAS/JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Brooks, David H., E-mail: ksun.lee@nao.ac.jp [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2017-02-20

    An X1.6 flare occurred in active region AR 12192 on 2014 October 22 at 14:02 UT and was observed by Hinode , IRIS , SDO , and RHESSI . We analyze a bright kernel that produces a white light (WL) flare with continuum enhancement and a hard X-ray (HXR) peak. Taking advantage of the spectroscopic observations of IRIS and Hinode /EIS, we measure the temporal variation of the plasma properties in the bright kernel in the chromosphere and corona. We find that explosive evaporation was observed when the WL emission occurred, even though the intensity enhancement in hotter lines is quite weak. The temporal correlation of the WL emission, HXR peak, and evaporation flows indicates that the WL emission was produced by accelerated electrons. To understand the WL emission process, we calculated the energy flux deposited by non-thermal electrons (observed by RHESSI ) and compared it to the dissipated energy estimated from a chromospheric line (Mg ii triplet) observed by IRIS . The deposited energy flux from the non-thermal electrons is about (3–7.7) × 10{sup 10} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} for a given low-energy cutoff of 30–40 keV, assuming the thick-target model. The energy flux estimated from the changes in temperature in the chromosphere measured using the Mg ii subordinate line is about (4.6–6.7) × 10{sup 9} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}: ∼6%–22% of the deposited energy. This comparison of estimated energy fluxes implies that the continuum enhancement was directly produced by the non-thermal electrons.

  7. Cold plasma as a nonthermal food processing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of meats, seafood, poultry, eggs, and fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables is an ongoing concern. Although well-established in non-food applications for surface treatment and modification, cold plasma is a relatively new food safety intervention. As a nonthermal food processing te...

  8. Applying chemical engineering concepts to non-thermal plasma reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro AFFONSO, NOBREGA; Alain, GAUNAND; Vandad, ROHANI; François, CAUNEAU; Laurent, FULCHERI

    2018-06-01

    Process scale-up remains a considerable challenge for environmental applications of non-thermal plasmas. Undersanding the impact of reactor hydrodynamics in the performance of the process is a key step to overcome this challenge. In this work, we apply chemical engineering concepts to analyse the impact that different non-thermal plasma reactor configurations and regimes, such as laminar or plug flow, may have on the reactor performance. We do this in the particular context of the removal of pollutants by non-thermal plasmas, for which a simplified model is available. We generalise this model to different reactor configurations and, under certain hypotheses, we show that a reactor in the laminar regime may have a behaviour significantly different from one in the plug flow regime, often assumed in the non-thermal plasma literature. On the other hand, we show that a packed-bed reactor behaves very similarly to one in the plug flow regime. Beyond those results, the reader will find in this work a quick introduction to chemical reaction engineering concepts.

  9. Nonthermal effects in thermal treatment applications of nonionizing irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Sharon

    2005-04-01

    Several non-thermal factors influence the primary and secondary effects of interstitial thermal treatments using various types of non-ionizing irradiation. Recognition and understanding of the influences of these various factors are important in choice of energy source, the configuration of the application instrument and the design of treatments.

  10. Thermal and nonthermal particle production without event horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, N.

    1979-01-01

    Usually, particle production in accelerated frames is discussed in connection with the presence of event horizons and with a planckian spectrum. Accelerated frames without event horizons, where particle production takes place with thermal as well as nonthermal distributions, are constructed. (Auth.)

  11. Ultrafast Non-Thermal Electron Dynamics in Single Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novoselov K.S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the ultrafast dynamics of non-thermal electron relaxation in graphene upon impulsive excitation. The 10-fs resolution two color pump-probe allows us to unveil the non-equilibrium electron gas decay at early times.

  12. Interpretation of the microwave non-thermal radiation of the Moon during impact events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Grimalsky

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of recent observations of the non-thermal electromagnetic (EM emission at wavelengths of 2.5cm, 13cm, and 21cm are summarized. After strong impacts of meteorites or spacecrafts (Lunar Prospector with the Moon's surface, the radio emissions in various frequency ranges were recorded. The most distinctive phenomenon is the appearance of quasi-periodic oscillations with amplitudes of 3–10K during several hours. The mechanism concerning the EM emission from a propagating crack within a piezoactive dielectric medium is considered. The impact may cause the global acoustic oscillations of the Moon. These oscillations lead to the crackening of the Moon's surface. The propagation of a crack within a piezoactive medium is accompanied by the excitation of an alternative current source. It is revealed that the source of the EM emission is the effective transient magnetization that appears in the case of a moving crack in piezoelectrics. The moving crack creates additional non-stationary local mechanical stresses around the apex of the crack, which generate the non-stationary electromagnetic field. For the cracks with a length of 0.1–1µm, the maximum of the EM emission may be in the 1–10GHz range.

  13. Multiple-wavelength analysis of energy release during a solar flare - Thermal and nonthermal electron populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Robert F.; Lang, Kenneth R.; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Kerdraon, Alain; Trottet, Gerard

    1990-01-01

    Collaborative solar investigations by Tufts University and the Observatoire de Paris have resulted in simultaneous radio observations with the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Nancay Radioheliograph (NR), comparisons of this radio data with X-ray observations, and theoretical interpretations of the dominant radiation mechanisms during a weak impulsive solar flare observed on May 28, 1988. The VLA has mapped the flaring structures at time intervals of 3.3 s, showing that the preflash and flash-phase components of the impulsive emission originate in spatially separated sources. The 20.7 cm preflash source is ascribed to thermal gyroresonance emission from coronal loops with typical magnetic field strengths of up to 270 G; this emission is associated with heating and exhibits no detectable hard X-ray radiation above 30 keV. The flash-phase 20.7 cm source and the hard X-ray emission are attributed to nonthermal electrons in the coronal and chromospheric portions of a magnetic loop. The combination of imaging observations at 20.7 and 91.6 cm excludes emission from a confined hot plasma during the flash phase.

  14. Ignition phase and steady-state structures of a non-thermal air plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Lu Xin Pei

    2003-01-01

    An AC-driven, non-thermal, atmospheric pressure air plasma is generated within the gap separating a disc-shaped metal electrode and a water electrode. The ignition phase and the steady-state are studied by a high-speed CCD camera. It is found that the plasma always initiates at the surface of the water electrode. The plasma exhibits different structures depending on the polarity of the water electrode: when the water electrode plays the role of cathode, a relatively wide but visibly dim plasma column is generated. At the maximum driving voltage, the gas temperature is between 800 and 900 K, and the peak current is 67 mA; when the water electrode is anode, the plasma column narrows but increases its light emission. The gas temperature in this case is measured to be in the 1400-1500 K range, and the peak current is 81 mA.

  15. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

  16. Optimization of nonthermal fusion power consistent with energy channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, P.B.; Herrmann, M.C.; Fisch, N.J.

    1995-02-01

    If the energy of charged fusion products can be diverted directly to fuel ions, non-Maxwellian fuel ion distributions and temperature differences between species will result. To determine the importance of these nonthermal effects, the fusion power density is optimized at constant-β for nonthermal distributions that are self-consistently maintained by channeling of energy from charged fusion products. For D-T and D- 3 He reactors, with 75% of charged fusion product power diverted to fuel ions, temperature differences between electrons and ions increase the reactivity by 40-70%, while non- Maxwellian fuel ion distributions and temperature differences between ionic species increase the reactivity by an additional 3-15%

  17. Some non-thermal microbial inactivation methods in dairy products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yangilar, F.; Kabil, E.

    2013-01-01

    During the production of dairy products, some thermal processes such as pasteurization and sterilization are used commonly to inactive microorganisms. But as a result of thermal processes, loss of nutrient and aroma, non-enzymatic browning and organoleptic differentiation especially in dairy products are seen. Because of this, alternative methods are needed to provide microbial inactivation and as major problems are caused by high temperatures, non-thermal processes are focused on. For this purpose, some methods such as high pressure (HP), pulsed light (PL), ultraviolet radiation (UV), supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) or pulsed electric field (PEF) are used in food. These methods products are processed in ambient temperature and so not only mentioned losses are minimized but also freshness and naturality of products can be preserved. In this work, we will try to be given information about methods of non-thermal microbial inactivation of dairy products. (author) [tr

  18. Process modeling for the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, B.W.

    1997-04-01

    This report describes the process modeling done in support of the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System (INTS) study. This study was performed to supplement the Integrated Thermal Treatment System (ITTS) study and comprises five conceptual treatment systems that treat DOE contract-handled mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) at temperatures of less than 350{degrees}F. ASPEN PLUS, a chemical process simulator, was used to model the systems. Nonthermal treatment systems were developed as part of the INTS study and include sufficient processing steps to treat the entire inventory of MLLW. The final result of the modeling is a process flowsheet with a detailed mass and energy balance. In contrast to the ITTS study, which modeled only the main treatment system, the INTS study modeled each of the various processing steps with ASPEN PLUS, release 9.1-1. Trace constituents, such as radionuclides and minor pollutant species, were not included in the calculations.

  19. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering

  20. Non-thermal leptogenesis after Majoron hilltop inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antusch, Stefan; Marschall, Kenneth

    2018-05-01

    We analyse non-thermal leptogenesis after models of Majoron hilltop inflation, where the scalar field that provides masses for the right-handed neutrinos and sneutrinos via its vacuum expectation value acts as the inflaton. We discuss different realisations of Majoron inflation models with different hilltop shapes and couplings to the right-handed (s)neutrinos. To study the non-thermally produced baryon asymmetry in these models, we numerically solve the relevant Boltzmann equations. In contrast to previous studies, we include the effects from resonant sneutrino particle production during preheating. We find that these effects can result in an enhancement of the produced baryon asymmetry by more than an order of magnitude. This can significantly change the favoured parameter regions of these models.

  1. Possibilities of implementing nonthermal processing methods in the dairy industry

    OpenAIRE

    Irena Jeličić

    2010-01-01

    In the past two decades a lot of research in the field of food science has focused on new, non-thermal processing methods. This article describes the most intensively investigated new processing methodsfor implementation in the dairy industry, like microfiltration, high hydrostatic pressure, ultrasound and pulsed electric fields. For each method an overview is given for the principle of microbial inactivation, the obtained results regarding reduction of microorganisms as well as the positive ...

  2. Non-thermal pressure in the outskirts of Abell 2142

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco-Femiano, Roberto; Lapi, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    Clumping and turbulence are expected to affect the matter accreted on to the outskirts of galaxy clusters. To determine their impact on the thermodynamic properties of Abell 2142, we perform an analysis of the X-ray temperature data from XMM-Newton via our SuperModel, a state-of-the-art tool for investigating the astrophysics of the intracluster medium already tested on many individual clusters (since Cavaliere, Lapi & Fusco-Femiano 2009). Using the gas density profile corrected for clumpiness derived by Tchernin et al. (2016), we find evidence for the presence of a non-thermal pressure component required to sustain gravity in the cluster outskirts of Abell 2142, that amounts to about 30 per cent of the total pressure at the virial radius. The presence of the non-thermal component implies the gas fraction to be consistent with the universal value at the virial radius and the electron thermal pressure profile to be in good agreement with that inferred from the SZ data. Our results indicate that the presence of gas clumping and of a non-thermal pressure component are both necessary to recover the observed physical properties in the cluster outskirts. Moreover, we stress that an alternative method often exploited in the literature (included Abell 2142) to determine the temperature profile kBT = Pe/ne basing on a combination of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) pressure Pe and of the X-ray electron density ne does not allow us to highlight the presence of non-thermal pressure support in the cluster outskirts.

  3. Nonthermal fixed points and the functional renormalization group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berges, Juergen; Hoffmeister, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    Nonthermal fixed points represent basic properties of quantum field theories, in addition to vacuum or thermal equilibrium fixed points. The functional renormalization group on a closed real-time path provides a common framework for their description. For the example of an O(N) symmetric scalar theory it reveals a hierarchy of fixed point solutions, with increasing complexity from vacuum and thermal equilibrium to nonequilibrium

  4. Constraining Non-thermal and Thermal properties of Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupal eDev

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe the evolution of Dark Matter (DM abundance from the very onset of its creation from inflaton decay under the assumption of an instantaneous reheating. Based on the initial conditions such as the inflaton mass and its decay branching ratio to the DM species, the reheating temperature, and the mass and interaction rate of the DM with the thermal bath, the DM particles can either thermalize (fully/partially with the primordial bath or remain non-thermal throughout their evolution history. In the thermal case, the final abundance is set by the standard freeze-out mechanism for large annihilation rates, irrespective of the initial conditions. For smaller annihilation rates, it can be set by the freeze-in mechanism which also does not depend on the initial abundance, provided it is small to begin with. For even smaller interaction rates, the DM decouples while being non-thermal, and the relic abundance will be essentially set by the initial conditions. We put model-independent constraints on the DM mass and annihilation rate from over-abundance by exactly solving the relevant Boltzmann equations, and identify the thermal freeze-out, freeze-in and non-thermal regions of the allowed parameter space. We highlight a generic fact that inflaton decay to DM inevitably leads to an overclosure of the Universe for a large range of DM parameter space, and thus poses a stringent constraint that must be taken into account while constructing models of DM. For the thermal DM region, we also show the complementary constraints from indirect DM search experiments, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Cosmic Microwave Background, Planck measurements, and theoretical limits due to the unitarity of S-matrix. For the non-thermal DM scenario, we show the allowed parameter space in terms of the inflaton and DM masses for a given reheating temperature, and compute the comoving free-streaming length to identify the hot, warm and cold DM regimes.

  5. Evolutionary pulsational mode dynamics in nonthermal turbulent viscous astrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Pralay Kumar; Dutta, Pranamika

    2017-11-01

    The pulsational mode of gravitational collapse in a partially ionized self-gravitating inhomogeneous viscous nonthermal nonextensive astrofluid in the presence of turbulence pressure is illustratively analyzed. The constitutive thermal species, lighter electrons and ions, are thermostatistically treated with the nonthermal κ-distribution laws. The inertial species, such as identical heavier neutral and charged dust microspheres, are modelled in the turbulent fluid framework. All the possible linear processes responsible for dust-dust collisions are accounted. The Larson logatropic equations of state relating the dust thermal (linear) and turbulence (nonlinear) pressures with dust densities are included. A regular linear normal perturbation analysis (local) over the complex astrocloud ensues in a generalized quartic dispersion relation with unique nature of plasma-dependent multi-parametric coefficients. A numerical standpoint is provided to showcase the basic mode features in a judicious astronomical paradigm. It is shown that both the kinematic viscosity of the dust fluids and nonthermality parameter (kappa, the power-law tail index) of the thermal species act as stabilizing (damping) agent against the gravity; and so forth. The underlying evolutionary microphysics is explored. The significance of redistributing astrofluid material via waveinduced accretion in dynamic nonhomologic structureless cloud collapse leading to hierarchical astrostructure formation is actualized.

  6. Toward a Philosophy and Theory of Volumetric Nonthermal Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, Sudhir K

    2016-06-01

    Nonthermal processes for food preservation have been under intensive investigation for about the past quarter century, with varying degrees of success. We focus this discussion on two volumetrically acting nonthermal processes, high pressure processing (HPP) and pulsed electric fields (PEF), with emphasis on scientific understanding of each, and the research questions that need to be addressed for each to be more successful in the future. We discuss the character or "philosophy" of food preservation, with a question about the nature of the kill step(s), and the sensing challenges that need to be addressed. For HPP, key questions and needs center around whether its nonthermal effectiveness can be increased by increased pressures or pulsing, the theoretical treatment of rates of reaction as influenced by pressure, the assumption of uniform pressure distribution, and the need for (and difficulties involved in) in-situ measurement. For PEF, the questions include the rationale for pulsing, difficulties involved in continuous flow treatment chambers, the difference between electroporation theory and experimental observations, and the difficulties involved in in-situ measurement and monitoring of electric field distribution. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  7. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1--issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2--issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study--drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

  8. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrani, H.A.; Schmidt, L.J.; Erickson, T.A.; Sondreal, E.A.; Erjavec, J.; Steadman, E.N.; Fabrycky, W.J.; Wilson, J.S.; Musich, M.A.

    1996-07-01

    This report analyzes three systems engineering (SE) studies performed on integrated thermal treatment systems (ITTSs) and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTSs) for the remediation of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stored throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), and Virginia Tech (VT). The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1--issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2--issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study--drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions taken in the studies might bias the resulting economic evaluations of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to produce sound SE applications.

  9. Landau damping of dust acoustic solitary waves in nonthermal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Yashika; Saini, N. S.; Eliasson, B.

    2018-01-01

    Dust acoustic (DA) solitary and shock structures have been investigated under the influence of Landau damping in a dusty plasma containing two temperature nonthermal ions. Motivated by the observations of Geotail spacecraft that reported two-temperature ion population in the Earth's magnetosphere, we have investigated the effect of resonant wave-particle interactions on DA nonlinear structures. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation with an additional Landau damping term is derived and its analytical solution is presented. The solution has the form of a soliton whose amplitude decreases with time. Further, we have illustrated the influence of Landau damping and nonthermality of the ions on DA shock structures by a numerical solution of the Landau damping modified KdV equation. The study of the time evolution of shock waves suggests that an initial shock-like pulse forms an oscillatory shock at later times due to the balance of nonlinearity, dispersion, and dissipation due to Landau damping. The findings of the present investigation may be useful in understanding the properties of nonlinear structures in the presence of Landau damping in dusty plasmas containing two temperature ions obeying nonthermal distribution such as in the Earth's magnetotail.

  10. Light higgsino dark matter from non-thermal cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aparicio, Luis [ICTP,Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); Cicoli, Michele [ICTP,Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna,via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bologna,via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Dutta, Bhaskar [Department of Physics and Astronomy,Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy,TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); Muia, Francesco [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna,via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bologna,via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Quevedo, Fernando [ICTP,Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences,Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-08

    We study the scenario of higgsino dark matter in the context of a non-standard cosmology with a period of matter domination prior to Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Matter domination changes the dark matter relic abundance if it ends via reheating to a temperature below the higgsino thermal freeze-out temperature. We perform a model independent analysis of the higgsino dark matter production in such scenario. We show that light higgsino-type dark matter is possible for reheating temperatures close to 1 GeV. We study the impact of dark matter indirect detection and collider physics in this context. We show that Fermi-LAT data rule out non-thermal higgsinos with masses below 300 GeV. Future indirect dark matter searches from Fermi-LAT and CTA will be able to cover essentially the full parameter space. Contrary to the thermal case, collider signals from a 100 TeV collider could fully test the non-thermal higgsino scenario. In the second part of the paper we discuss the motivation of such non-thermal cosmology from the perspective of string theory with late-time decaying moduli for both KKLT and LVS moduli stabilisation mechanisms. We finally describe the impact of embedding higgsino dark matter in these scenarios.

  11. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunov, O.; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy

  12. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1--issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2--issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study--drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering

  13. On the Origins of Mars' Exospheric Nonthermal Oxygen Component as Observed by MAVEN and Modeled by HELIOSARES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, F.; Chaufray, J. Y.; Modolo, R.; Leclercq, L.; Curry, S.; Luhmann, J.; Lillis, R.; Hara, T.; McFadden, J.; Halekas, J.; Schneider, N.; Deighan, J.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Benna, M.; Johnson, R. E.; Gonzalez-Galindo, F.; Forget, F.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Eparvier, F. G.; Jakosky, B.

    2017-12-01

    The first measurements of the emission brightness of the oxygen atomic exosphere by Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission have clearly shown that it is composed of a thermal component produced by the extension of the upper atmosphere and of a nonthermal component. Modeling these measurements allows us to constrain the origins of the exospheric O and, as a consequence, to estimate Mars' present oxygen escape rate. We here propose an analysis of three periods of MAVEN observations based on a set of three coupled models: a hybrid magnetospheric model (LATmos HYbrid Simulation (LatHyS)), an Exospheric General Model (EGM), and the Global Martian Circulation model of the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD-GCM), which provide a description of Mars' environment from the surface up to the solar wind. The simulated magnetosphere by LatHyS is in good agreement with MAVEN Plasma and Field Package instruments data. The LMD-GCM modeled upper atmospheric profiles for the main neutral and ion species are compared to Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer/MAVEN data showing that the LMD-GCM can provide a satisfactory global view of Mars' upper atmosphere. Finally, we were able to reconstruct the expected emission brightness intensity from the oxygen exosphere using EGM. The good agreement with the averaged measured profiles by Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph during these three periods suggests that Mars' exospheric nonthermal component can be fully explained by the reactions of dissociative recombination of the O2+ ion in Mars' ionosphere, limiting significantly our ability to extract information from MAVEN observations of the O exosphere on other nonthermal processes, such as sputtering.

  14. Probing light nonthermal dark matter at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Gao, Yu; Kamon, Teruki

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates the collider phenomenology of a minimal nonthermal dark matter model with a 1-GeV dark matter candidate, which naturally explains baryogenesis. Since the light dark matter is not parity protected, it can be singly produced at the LHC. This leads to large missing energy associated with an energetic jet whose transverse momentum distribution is featured by a Jacobian-like shape. The monojet, dijet, paired dijet, and two jets + missing energy channels are studied. Currently existing data at the Tevatron and LHC offer significant bounds on our model.

  15. Nonthermal Effects of Photon Illumination on Surface Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditchfield, R.; Llera-Rodriguez, D.; Seebauer, E.G.

    1998-01-01

    Nonthermal influences of photon illumination on surface diffusion at high temperatures have been measured experimentally for the first time. Activation energies and preexponential factors for diffusion of germanium and indium on silicon change substantially in response to illumination by photons having energies greater than the substrate band gap. Results depend on doping type. Ionization of surface vacancies by photogenerated charge carriers seems to play a key role. The results have significant implications for aspects of microelectronics fabrication governed by surface mobility. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  16. Smooth hybrid inflation and non-thermal Type II leptogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sil, Arunansu

    2013-01-01

    We consider a smooth hybrid inflation scenario based on a supersymmetricSU(2) L ⊗ SU(2) R ⊗ U(1) B-L model. The Higgs triplets involved in the model play a key role in inflation as well as in explaining the observed baryon asymmetry of the universe. We show that the baryon asymmetry can originate via non-thermal triplet leptogenesis from the decay of SU(2) B-L triplets, whose tiny vacuum expectation values also provide masses for the light neutrinos. (author)

  17. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: scanning electron microscopy observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Churpita, Olexandr; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Deyneka, I.G.; Meshkovskii, I.K.; Jäger, Aleš; Syková, Eva; Kubinová, Šárka; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 5 (2015), "053703-1"-"053703-5" ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA MŠk LO1309 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100101219; SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : non-thermal plasma * plasma medicine * bacteria * cells Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.142, year: 2015

  18. The origin of stellar winds: Subatmospheric nonthermal storage modes versus radiation pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, C.J.; Thomas, R.N.

    1977-01-01

    Most current models of matter-flux in hot stars place its origin in radiation pressure, and then model the flow explicitly to produce no chromosphere-corona. Our model of the stellar atmosphere as a transition zone between stellar interior and interstellar medium places the origin of matter-flux, chromosphere-corona, and spectral ''emission classes'' in subatmospheric nonthermal kinetic energy storage, equally for all stars, hot or cold. Current observations of both hot and cold stars suggest chromospheres to be a universal phenomenon, correlated with matter-fluxes, and enhanced in ''emission-class'' stars. To clarify the difference between the two kinds of models above, we reformulate the wind-tunnel analogy to stellar winds, suggesting that stars satisfy and ''imperfect,'' such model;i.e., transsonic shocks occur before the throat, corresponding to an imposed outward velocity in the storage section, or subatmosphere. We then investigate the stability of an arbitrary stellar atmosphere, hot or cold, to suggest a cause for such an outward subatmospheric velocity

  19. Experimental studies of thermal and non-thermal electron cyclotron phenomena in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, F.S.

    1984-12-01

    A direct measurement of wave absorption in the ISX-B tokamak at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency is reported. Measurements of the absorption of a wave polarized in the extraordinary mode and propagating perpendicular to the toroidal magnetic field are in agreement with the absorption predicted by the linearized Vlasov equation for a thermal plasma. Agreement is found both for an analytic approximation to the wave absorption and for a numerical simulation of ray propagation in toroidal geometry. Observations are also reported on a non-linear, three-wave interaction process occurring during high power electron cyclotron resonance heating in the Versator II tokamak. The measured spectra and the threshold power are consistent with a model in which the incident power in the extraordinary mode of polarization decays at the upper hybrid resonance layer into a lower hybrid wave and an electron Bernstein wave. Finally, measurements of non-thermal emission at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency and below the electron plasma frequency are reported from low density, non-Maxwellian plasma in the Versator II tokamak. The emission spectra are in agreement with a model in which waves are driven unstable at the anomalous Doppler resonance, while only weakly damped at the Cerenkov resonance

  20. Description of recommended non-thermal mixed waste treatment technologies: Version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This document contains description of the technologies selected for inclusions in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) Study. The purpose of these descriptions is to provide a more complete description of the INTS technologies. It supplements the summary descriptions of candidate nonthermal technologies that were considered for the INTS

  1. Description of recommended non-thermal mixed waste treatment technologies: Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document contains description of the technologies selected for inclusions in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) Study. The purpose of these descriptions is to provide a more complete description of the INTS technologies. It supplements the summary descriptions of candidate nonthermal technologies that were considered for the INTS.

  2. Simulations of planar non-thermal plasma assisted ignition at atmospheric pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, Tiernan A.; Han, Jie; Belhi, Memdouh; Arias, Paul G.; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Im, Hong G.; Chen, Jyh Yuan

    2016-01-01

    neutrals and ions to the non-thermal electrons. A two-temperature plasma mechanism describing gas phase combustion, excitation of neutral species, and high-energy electron kinetics is employed to account for non-thermal effects. Charged species transported

  3. Application of non-thermal plasmas to pollution control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Bardsley, J.N.; Vitello, P.A.; Wallman, P.H.

    1993-06-01

    Non-thermal plasma techniques can be used to destroy many types of hazardous molecules. They are particularly efficient when the toxic materials are present in very small concentrations. This paper discusses three particular applications of non-thermal plasmas: (1) decomposition of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), (2) removal of trichloroethylene (TCE), and (3) removal of nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Emphasis is placed on the energy cost for implementing the decomposition or removal of these pollutants. Some of the factors affecting the energy cost are discussed. The authors discuss in detail their work at LLNL on pulsed plasma processing for the treatment of NO x in diesel engine exhaust. The results suggest that their plasma reactor can remove up to 70% of NO with relatively high initial concentrations (up to 500 ppM) at a power consumption cost of 2.5% for an engine with an output of 14 kW and an exhaust gas flow rate of 1,200 liters per minute

  4. Application of non-thermal plasmas to pollution control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Bardsley, J.N.; Vitello, P.A.; Wallman, P.H.

    1993-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma techniques can be used to destroy many types of hazardous molecules. They are particularly efficient when the toxic materials are present in very small concentrations. This paper discusses three particular applications of non-thermal plasmas: (1) decomposition of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), (2) removal of trichloroethylene (TCE), and (3) removal of nitric oxides (NO x ) Emphasis is placed on the energy cost for implementing the decomposition or removal of these pollutants. Some of the factors affecting the energy cost are discussed. We discuss in detail our work at LLNL on pulsed plasma processing for the treatment of NO x in diesel engine exhaust. Our results suggest that our plasma reactor can remove up to 70% of NO x with relatively high initial concentrations (up to 500 ppM) at a power consumption cost of 2.5% for an engine with an output of 14 kill and an exhaust gas flow rate of 1200 liters per minute

  5. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  6. THE LOCATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY IN THE EARLY PHASES OF LARGE FLARES—REVEALING PRE-ERUPTION FLUX ROPES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harra, Louise K.; Matthews, Sarah; Culhane, J. L.; Cheung, Mark C. M.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Hara, Hirohisa

    2013-01-01

    Non-thermal velocity measurements of the solar atmosphere, particularly from UV and X-ray emission lines have demonstrated over the decades that this parameter is important in understanding the triggering of solar flares. Enhancements have often been observed before intensity enhancements are seen. However, until the launch of Hinode, it has been difficult to determine the spatial location of the enhancements to better understand the source region. The Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer has the spectral and spatial resolution to allow us to probe the early stages of flares in detail. We analyze four events, all of which are GOES M- or X-classification flares, and all are located toward the limb for ease of flare geometry interpretation. Three of the flares were eruptive and one was confined. In all events, pre-flare enhancement in non-thermal velocity at the base of the active region and its surroundings has been found. These enhancements seem to be consistent with the footpoints of the dimming regions, and hence may be highlighting the activation of a coronal flux rope for the three eruptive events. In addition, pre-flare enhancements in non-thermal velocity were found above the looptops for the three eruptive events

  7. Nonthermal plasma--A tool for decontamination and disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Vladimir; Pazlarova, Jarmila; Souskova, Hana; Khun, Josef; Julak, Jaroslav

    2015-11-01

    By definition, the nonthermal plasma (NTP) is partially ionized gas where the energy is stored mostly in the free electrons and the overall temperature remains low. NTP is widely used for many years in various applications such as low-temperature plasma chemistry, removal of gaseous pollutants, in gas-discharge lamps or surface modification. However, during the last ten years, NTP usage expanded to new biological areas of application like plasma microorganisms' inactivation, ready-to-eat food preparation, biofilm degradation or in healthcare, where it seems to be important for the treatment of cancer cells and in the initiation of apoptosis, prion inactivation, prevention of nosocomial infections or in the therapy of infected wounds. These areas are presented and documented in this paper as a review of representative publications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Paracetamol degradation in aqueous solution by non-thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloul, Yasmine; Aubry, Olivier; Rabat, Hervé; Colas, Cyril; Maunit, Benoît; Hong, Dunpin

    2017-08-01

    This study deals with paracetamol degradation in water using a non-thermal plasma (NTP) created by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The effects of the NTP operating conditions on the degradation were studied, showing that the treatment efficiency of the process was highly dependent on the electrical parameters and working gas composition in the reactor containing the aqueous solution. A conversion rate higher than 99% was reached with an energy yield of 12 g/kWh. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) measurements showed that the main species produced in water during the process were nitrogen compounds, carboxylic acids and aromatic compounds. Contribution to the topical issue "The 15th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi and Tomáš Hoder

  9. Nonthermal production of dark matter from primordial black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh; Dent, James; Osinski, Jacek

    2018-03-01

    We present a scenario for nonthermal production of dark matter from evaporation of primordial black holes. A period of very early matter domination leads to formation of black holes with a maximum mass of ≃2 ×108 g , whose subsequent evaporation prior to big bang nucleosynthesis can produce all of the dark matter in the Universe. We show that the correct relic abundance can be obtained in this way for thermally underproduced dark matter in the 100 GeV-10 TeV mass range. To achieve this, the scalar power spectrum at small scales relevant for black hole formation should be enhanced by a factor of O (105) relative to the scales accessible by the cosmic microwave background experiments.

  10. Semiconductor surface diffusion: Nonthermal effects of photon illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditchfield, R.; Llera-Rodriguez, D.; Seebauer, E. G.

    2000-01-01

    Nonthermal influences of photon illumination on surface diffusion at high temperatures have been measured experimentally. Activation energies and pre-exponential factors for diffusion of germanium, indium, and antimony on silicon change by up to 0.3 eV and two orders of magnitude, respectively, in response to illumination by photons having energies greater than the substrate band gap. The parameters decrease for n-type material and increase for p-type material. Aided by results from photoreflectance spectroscopy, we suggest that motion of the surface quasi-Fermi-level for minority carriers accounts for much of the effect by changing the charge states of surface vacancies. An additional adatom-vacancy complexation mechanism appears to operate on p-type substrates. The results have significant implications for aspects of microelectronics fabrication by rapid thermal processing that are governed by surface mobility. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  11. Pre-treating water with non-thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young I.; Fridman, Alexander; Rabinovich, Alexander; Cho, Daniel J.

    2017-07-04

    The present invention consists of a method of pre-treatment of adulterated water for distillation, including adulterated water produced during hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") of shale rock during natural gas drilling. In particular, the invention is directed to a method of treating adulterated water, said adulterated water having an initial level of bicarbonate ion in a range of about 250 ppm to about 5000 ppm and an initial level of calcium ion in a range of about 500 ppm to about 50,000 ppm, said method comprising contacting the adulterated water with a non-thermal arc discharge plasma to produce plasma treated water having a level of bicarbonate ion of less than about 100 ppm. Optionally, the plasma treated water may be further distilled.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Non-Thermal Food Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, C.; Krauss, J.; Ertunc, Ö.; Delgado, a.

    2010-09-01

    Food preservation is an important process step in food technology regarding product safety and product quality. Novel preservation techniques are currently developed, that aim at improved sensory and nutritional value but comparable safety than in conventional thermal preservation techniques. These novel non-thermal food preservation techniques are based for example on high pressures up to one GPa or pulsed electric fields. in literature studies the high potential of high pressures (HP) and of pulsed electric fields (PEF) is shown due to their high retention of valuable food components as vitamins and flavour and selective inactivation of spoiling enzymes and microorganisms. for the design of preservation processes based on the non-thermal techniques it is crucial to predict the effect of high pressure and pulsed electric fields on the food components and on the spoiling enzymes and microorganisms locally and time-dependent in the treated product. Homogenous process conditions (especially of temperature fields in HP and PEF processing and of electric fields in PEF) are aimed at to avoid the need of over-processing and the connected quality loss and to minimize safety risks due to under-processing. the present contribution presents numerical simulations of thermofluiddynamical phenomena inside of high pressure autoclaves and pulsed electric field treatment chambers. in PEF processing additionally the electric fields are considered. Implementing kinetics of occurring (bio-) chemical reactions in the numerical simulations of the temperature, flow and electric fields enables the evaluation of the process homogeneity and efficiency connected to different process parameters of the preservation techniques. Suggestions to achieve safe and high quality products are concluded out of the numerical results.

  13. Explosive Chromospheric Evaporation Driven by Nonthermal Electrons around One Footpoint of a Solar Flare Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, Q. M., E-mail: lidong@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2017-05-20

    We explore the temporal relationship between microwave/hard X-ray (HXR) emission and Doppler velocity during the impulsive phase of a solar flare on 2014 October 27 (SOL2014-10-27) that displays a pulse on the light curves in the microwave (34 GHz) and HXR (25–50 keV) bands before the flare maximum. Imaging observation shows that this pulse mainly comes from one footpoint of a solar flare loop. The slit of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) stays at this footpoint during this solar flare. The Doppler velocities of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å and Si iv 1402.77 Å are extracted from the Gaussian fitting method. We find that the hot line of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å (log T ∼ 7.05) in the corona exhibits blueshift, while the cool line of Si iv 1402.77 Å (log T ∼ 4.8) in the transition region exhibits redshift, indicating explosive chromospheric evaporation. Evaporative upflows along the flare loop are also observed in the AIA 131 Å image. To our knowledge, this is the first report of chromospheric evaporation evidence from both spectral and imaging observations in the same flare. Both microwave and HXR pulses are well correlated with the Doppler velocities, suggesting that the chromospheric evaporation is driven by nonthermal electrons around this footpoint of a solar flare loop.

  14. Treatment of oral cancer cells with nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkovich, James; Han, Xu; Coffey, Benjamin; Klas, Matej; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2012-10-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are specialized types of plasma that are proposed as a new agent to induce death in cancer cells. The experimental phase of this study will test the application of such plasma to SCC-25 oral cancer cells to determine if it is possible to induce apoptosis or necrosis. Different sources are used on the cells to find a configuration which kills cancer cells but has no effect on normal cells. The sources have been developed based on the dielectric barrier discharge between two external electrodes surrounding a dielectric tube; such a configuration has been shown to induce breaks in DNA strands. Each configuration is characterized using an optical emission spectrophotometer and iCCD camera to determine the optimal conditions for inducing cell death. The cells are incubated after irradiation with plasma, and cell death is determined using microscopy imaging to identify antibody interaction within the cells. These studies are important for better understanding of plasma species interactions with cancer cells and mechanisms of DNA damage and at latter stage they will be useful for the development of advanced cancer therapy.

  15. FLARE STARS—A FAVORABLE OBJECT FOR STUDYING MECHANISMS OF NONTHERMAL ASTROPHYSICAL PHENOMENA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oks, E. [Physics Department, 206 Allison Lab., Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Gershberg, R. E. [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, Nauchny, Bakhchisaray region, Crimea, 298409 (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-01

    We present a spectroscopic method for diagnosing a low-frequency electrostatic plasma turbulence (LEPT) in plasmas of flare stars. This method had been previously developed by one of us and successfully applied to diagnosing the LEPT in solar flares. In distinction to our previous applications of the method, here we use the latest advances in the theory of the Stark broadening of hydrogen spectral lines. By analyzing observed emission Balmer lines, we show that it is very likely that the LEPT was developed in several flares of AD Leo, as well as in one flare of EV Lac. We found the LEPT (though of different field strengths) both in the explosive/impulsive phase and at the phase of the maximum, as well as at the gradual phase of the stellar flares. While for solar flares our method allows diagnosing the LEPT only in the most powerful flares, for the flare stars it seems that the method allows revealing the LEPT practically in every flare. It should be important to obtain new and better spectrograms of stellar flares, allowing their analysis by the method outlined in the present paper. This can be the most favorable way to the detailed understanding of the nature of nonthermal astrophysical phenomena.

  16. Spontaneous non-thermal leptogenesis in high-scale inflation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, M.; Takahashi, F.; Yanagida, T.T.; Tokyo Univ.

    2006-11-01

    We argue that a non-thermal leptogenesis occurs spontaneously, without direct couplings of the inflation with right-handed neutrinos, in a wide class of high-scale inflation models such as the chaotic and hybrid inflation. It is only a finite vacuum expectation value of the inflaton, of more precisely, a linear term in the Kaehler potential, that is a prerequisite for the spontaneous non-thermal leptogenesis. To exemplify how it works, we show that a chaotic inflation model in supergravity naturally produces a right amount of baryon asymmetry via the spontaneous non-thermal leptogenesis. We also discuss the gravitino production from the inflation. (orig.)

  17. Effect of non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatment on gingival wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas have been applied in the biomedical field for the improvement of various cellular activities. In dentistry, the healing of gingival soft tissue plays an important role in health and aesthetic outcomes. While the biomedical application of plasma has been thoroughly studied in dentistry, a detailed investigation of plasma-mediated human gingival fibroblast (HGF) migration for wound healing and its underlying biological mechanism is still pending. Therefore, the aim of this study is to apply a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAAPPJ) to HGF to measure the migration and to reveal the underlying biological mechanisms involved in the migration. After the characterization of NTAAPPJ by optical emission spectroscopy, the adherent HGF was treated with NTAAPPJ or air with a different flow rate. Cell viability, lipid peroxidation, migration, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the expression of migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK3) were investigated. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. NTAAPPJ and air treatment with a flow rate of 250–1000 standard cubic centimetres per minute (sccm) for up to 30 s did not induce significant decreases in cell viability or membrane damage. A significant increase in the migration of mitomycin C-treated HGF was observed after 30 s of NTAAPPJ treatment compared to 30 s air-only treatment, which was induced by high levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). An increase in migration-related gene expression and EGFR activation was observed following NTAAPPJ treatment in an air flow rate-dependent manner. This is the first report that NTAAPPJ treatment induces an increase in HGF migration without changing cell viability or causing membrane damage. HGF migration was related to an increase in intracellular ROS, changes in the expression of three of the migration-related genes (EGFR, PAK1, and MAPK1), and EGFR activation. Therefore

  18. Non-thermal Processes in Colliding-wind Massive Binaries: the Contribution of Simbol-X to a Multiwavelength Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Becker, Michaël; Blomme, Ronny; Micela, Giusi; Pittard, Julian M.; Rauw, Gregor; Romero, Gustavo E.; Sana, Hugues; Stevens, Ian R.

    2009-05-01

    Several colliding-wind massive binaries are known to be non-thermal emitters in the radio domain. This constitutes strong evidence for the fact that an efficient particle acceleration process is at work in these objects. The acceleration mechanism is most probably the Diffusive Shock Acceleration (DSA) process in the presence of strong hydrodynamic shocks due to the colliding-winds. In order to investigate the physics of this particle acceleration, we initiated a multiwavelength campaign covering a large part of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this context, the detailed study of the hard X-ray emission from these sources in the SIMBOL-X bandpass constitutes a crucial element in order to probe this still poorly known topic of astrophysics. It should be noted that colliding-wind massive binaries should be considered as very valuable targets for the investigation of particle acceleration in a similar way as supernova remnants, but in a different region of the parameter space.

  19. Thermodynamics, transport phenomena, and electrochemistry of external field-assisted nonthermal food technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, N N; Martynenko, Alex; Chemat, Farid; Paniwnyk, Larysa; Barba, Francisco J; Jambrak, Anet Režek

    2018-07-24

    Interest in the development and adoption of nonthermal technologies is burgeoning within the food and bioprocess industry, the associated research community, and among the consumers. This is evident from not only the success of some innovative nonthermal technologies at industrial scale, but also from the increasing number of publications dealing with these topics, a growing demand for foods processed by nonthermal technologies and use of natural ingredients. A notable feature of the nonthermal technologies such as cold plasma, electrohydrodynamic processing, pulsed electric fields, and ultrasound is the involvement of external fields, either electric or sound. Therefore, it merits to study the fundamentals of these technologies and the associated phenomenon with a unified approach. In this review, we revisit the fundamental physical and chemical phenomena governing the selected technologies, highlight similarities, and contrasts, describe few successful applications, and finally, identify the gaps in research.

  20. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established

  1. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mizuno, Masaaki [Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Toyokuni, Shinya [Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Maruyama, Shoichi [Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroko [Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuo [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 501-1196 Gifu (Japan); Kato, Masashi [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kikkawa, Fumitaka [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  2. A new non-thermal galactic radio source with a possible binary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuerst, E.; Reich, W.; Reich, P.; Sofue, Y.; Handa, T.

    1985-01-01

    A galactic object [G18.95-1.1], detected recently in a galactic plane survey, may belong to a new class of non-thermal radio sources that originate in accreting binary systems. The data on integrated flux density spectral index and the polarization, proves the non-thermal nature of the source. The morphology defies any classification as a supernova remnant. The authors suggest that the object is a binary system containing a compact component. (U.K.)

  3. Nonlinear localized dust acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonthermal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Amour, Rabia

    2007-01-01

    A numerical investigation is presented to show the existence, formation, and possible realization of large-amplitude dust acoustic (DA) solitary waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonthermal ions. These nonlinear localized structures are self-consistent solutions of the collisionless Vlasov equation with a population of fast particles. The spatial patterns of the variable charge DA solitary wave are significantly modified by the nonthermal effects. The results complement and provide new insights into previously published results on this problem

  4. Optimization of Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment in an In Vivo Model Organism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Lee

    Full Text Available Non-thermal plasma is increasingly being recognized for a wide range of medical and biological applications. However, the effect of non-thermal plasma on physiological functions is not well characterized in in vivo model systems. Here we use a genetically amenable, widely used model system, Drosophila melanogaster, to develop an in vivo system, and investigate the role of non-thermal plasma in blood cell differentiation. Although the blood system in Drosophila is primitive, it is an efficient system with three types of hemocytes, functioning during different developmental stages and environmental stimuli. Blood cell differentiation in Drosophila plays an essential role in tissue modeling during embryogenesis, morphogenesis and also in innate immunity. In this study, we optimized distance and frequency for a direct non-thermal plasma application, and standardized doses to treat larvae and adult flies so that there is no effect on the viability, fertility or locomotion of the organism. We discovered that at optimal distance, time and frequency, application of plasma induced blood cell differentiation in the Drosophila larval lymph gland. We articulate that the augmented differentiation could be due to an increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS upon non-thermal plasma application. Our studies open avenues to use Drosophila as a model system in plasma medicine to study various genetic disorders and biological processes where non-thermal plasma has a possible therapeutic application.

  5. High power RF heating and nonthermal distributions in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeters, A.G.

    1994-12-13

    This thesis discusses the nonthermal effects in the electron population of a tokamak, that are generated by the inductive electric field and electron cyclotron resonant heating. The kinetic description of the plasma is given by a Boltzmann equation for the electron velocity distribution, in which the many small angle scattering Coulomb collisions that occur in the plasma are modelled by a Fokker-Planck collision term. These collisions drive the distribution towards the Maxwellian distribution of thermodynamic equilibrium. The energy absorption from the electron cyclotron waves and the acceleration by the toroidal electric field lead to deviations from the Maxwellian destribution. The interaction of the electron cyclotron waves with the plasma is treated within quasilinear theory. Resonant interaction occurs when the wave frequency matches one of the harmonics of the gyration frequency of the electrons in the static magnetic field. The waves generate a diffusion of resonant electrons in velocity space. The inductive electric field accelerates the electrons in the direction prallel to the magnetic field and leads to a convection in velocity space. The equilibrium that is reached between the driving forces of the electric field and the electron cyclotron waves and the restoring force of the collisions is studied in this thesis. The specific geometry of the tokamak is incorporated in the model through an average of the kinetic equation over the electron orbits. (orig./WL).

  6. High power RF heating and nonthermal distributions in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, A.G.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis discusses the nonthermal effects in the electron population of a tokamak, that are generated by the inductive electric field and electron cyclotron resonant heating. The kinetic description of the plasma is given by a Boltzmann equation for the electron velocity distribution, in which the many small angle scattering Coulomb collisions that occur in the plasma are modelled by a Fokker-Planck collision term. These collisions drive the distribution towards the Maxwellian distribution of thermodynamic equilibrium. The energy absorption from the electron cyclotron waves and the acceleration by the toroidal electric field lead to deviations from the Maxwellian destribution. The interaction of the electron cyclotron waves with the plasma is treated within quasilinear theory. Resonant interaction occurs when the wave frequency matches one of the harmonics of the gyration frequency of the electrons in the static magnetic field. The waves generate a diffusion of resonant electrons in velocity space. The inductive electric field accelerates the electrons in the direction prallel to the magnetic field and leads to a convection in velocity space. The equilibrium that is reached between the driving forces of the electric field and the electron cyclotron waves and the restoring force of the collisions is studied in this thesis. The specific geometry of the tokamak is incorporated in the model through an average of the kinetic equation over the electron orbits. (orig./WL)

  7. Light-induced nonthermal population of optical phonons in nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, Bruno P.; Leitão, Joaquim P.; Correia, Maria R.; Soares, Maria R.; Wiggers, Hartmut; Cantarero, Andrés; Pereira, Rui N.

    2017-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is widely used to study bulk and nanomaterials, where information is frequently obtained from spectral line positions and intensities. In this study, we monitored the Raman spectrum of ensembles of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) as a function of optical excitation intensity (optical excitation experiments). We observe that in NCs the red-shift of the Raman peak position with increasing light power density is much steeper than that recorded for the corresponding bulk material. The increase in optical excitation intensity results also in an increasingly higher temperature of the NCs as obtained with Raman thermometry through the commonly used Stokes/anti-Stokes intensity ratio. More significantly, the obtained dependence of the Raman peak position on temperature in optical excitation experiments is markedly different from that observed when the same NCs are excited only thermally (thermal excitation experiments). This difference is not observed for the control bulk material. The inefficient diffusion of photogenerated charges in nanoparticulate systems, due to their inherently low electrical conductivity, results in a higher steady-state density of photoexcited charges and, consequently, also in a stronger excitation of optical phonons that cannot decay quickly enough into acoustic phonons. This results in a nonthermal population of optical phonons and thus the Raman spectrum deviates from that expected for the temperature of the system. Our study has major consequences to the general application of Raman spectroscopy to nanomaterials.

  8. Nonthermal Argon Plasma Generator and Some Potential Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunoiu M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory - made nonthermal plasma generator is presented. It has a diameter of 0.020 m and length of 0.155 m and contains two electrodes. The first electrode is a 2% Th-W alloy, 0.002 m in diameter bar, centred inside the generator’s body by means of a four channel teflon piece; the other three channels, 0.003 m in diameter, are used for Ar supply. The second electrode is a nozzle of 0.002 m - 0.008 m diameter and 0.005m length. A ~500 kV/m electric field is generated between the two electrodes by a high frequency source (13.56 MHz ±5%, equipped with a OT-1000 (Tungsram power triode. For Ar flows ranging from 0.00008 m3/s to 0.00056 m3/s, a plasma jet of length not exceeding 0.015 m and temperature below 315 K is obtained. Anthurium andraeanumis sample , blood matrix, human hair and textile fibers may be introduced in the plasma jet. For time periods of 30 s and 60 s, various effects like, cell detexturization, fast blood coagulation or textile fiber or hair cleaning and smoothing are obtained. These effects are presented and discussed in the paper.

  9. Time Variations of Observed H α Line Profiles and Precipitation Depths of Nonthermal Electrons in a Solar Flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falewicz, Robert; Radziszewski, Krzysztof; Rudawy, Paweł; Berlicki, Arkadiusz, E-mail: falewicz@astro.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: radziszewski@astro.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: berlicki@astro.uni.wroc.pl [Astronomical Institute, University of Wrocław, 51-622 Wrocław, ul. Kopernika 11 (Poland)

    2017-10-01

    We compare time variations of the H α and X-ray emissions observed during the pre-impulsive and impulsive phases of the C1.1-class solar flare on 2013 June 21 with those of plasma parameters and synthesized X-ray emission from a 1D hydrodynamic numerical model of the flare. The numerical model was calculated assuming that the external energy is delivered to the flaring loop by nonthermal electrons (NTEs). The H α spectra and images were obtained using the Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass spectrograph with a time resolution of 50 ms. The X-ray fluxes and spectra were recorded by RHESSI . Pre-flare geometric and thermodynamic parameters of the model and the delivered energy were estimated using RHESSI data. The time variations of the X-ray light curves in various energy bands and those of the H α intensities and line profiles were well correlated. The timescales of the observed variations agree with the calculated variations of the plasma parameters in the flaring loop footpoints, reflecting the time variations of the vertical extent of the energy deposition layer. Our result shows that the fast time variations of the H α emission of the flaring kernels can be explained by momentary changes of the deposited energy flux and the variations of the penetration depths of the NTEs.

  10. Induction of Immunogenic Cell Death with Non-Thermal Plasma for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Abraham G.

    treatment, ROS immediately increased. When chemical attenuators of ROS were used, intracellular ROS was abrogated and emission of ICD markers were attenuated. This strongly suggests that plasma-induced ICD is associated with increased intracellular ROS. The gold-standard approach to evaluating whether a stimulus can elicit genuine ICD relies on a vaccination assay. CT26 colorectal cancer cells were treated at ICD-inducing regimes of plasma and injected into syngeneic Balb/c mice. One week later, mice were challenged with live CT26 cancer cells. Tumor progression was moderated in animals immunized with plasma-treated CT26 cells. Altogether, these provide strong evidence that plasma regimes can be adapted for a new application: ICD induction. Next, a study was conducted to test the potential of plasma to induce ICD in tumors in animals. Plasma treatment of subcutaneous tumors in mice elicited the emission of ecto-CRT and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), another marker of ICD, in the tumor and also recruited CD11c+ and CD45+ immune cells locally. This was followed by development of cancer-specific splenic T cells, indicating that a systemic anti-tumor response was elicited from localized plasma treatment of the tumor. Overall, this work demonstrates the development of non-thermal plasma as a novel method of inducing immunogenic cell death for cancer immunotherapy. The obtained results further our understanding of plasma-cellular interaction mechanisms and highlight the potential for clinical translation.

  11. Photobiomodulation with non-thermal lasers: Mechanisms of action and therapeutic uses in dermatology and aesthetic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Mark; Andriessen, Anneke; Berman, Brian; Katz, Bruce E; Gilbert, Dore; Goldberg, David J; Gold, Michael H; Kirsner, Robert S; Lorenc, Paul Z

    2017-08-01

    Non-thermal laser therapy in dermatology, is a growing field in medical technology by which therapeutic effects are achieved by exposing tissues to specific wavelengths of light. The purpose of this review was to gain a better understanding of the science behind non-thermal laser and the evidence supporting its use in dermatology. A group of dermatologists and surgeons recently convened to review the evidence supporting the use of non-thermal laser for body sculpting, improving the appearance of cellulite, and treating onychomycosis. The use of non-thermal laser for body sculpting is supported by three randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled studies (N = 161), one prospective open-label study (N = 54), and two retrospective studies (N = 775). Non-thermal laser application for improving the appearance of cellulite is supported by one randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study (N = 38). The use of non-thermal laser for the treatment of onychomycosis is supported by an analysis of three non-randomized, open-label studies demonstrating clinical improvement of nails (N = 292). Non-thermal laser is steadily moving into mainstream medical practice, such as dermatology. Although present studies have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of non-thermal laser for body sculpting, cellulite reduction and onychomycosis treatment, studies demonstrating the efficacy of non-thermal laser as a stand-alone procedure are still inadequate.

  12. Non-thermal plasma-activated water inactivation of food-borne pathogen on fresh produce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ruonan; Wang, Guomin; Tian, Ying; Wang, Kaile; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a new approach to treat S. aureus inoculated on strawberries by PAW. • PAW could inactivate S. aureus on strawberries via the Log Reduction results, further confirmed by CLSM and SEM. • The short-lived ROS in PAW are considered the most important agents in inactivation process. • No significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. - Abstract: Non-thermal plasma has been widely considered to be an effective method for decontamination of foods. Recently, numerous studies report that plasma-activated water (PAW) also has outstanding antibacterial ability. This study presents the first report on the potential of PAW for the inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) inoculated on strawberries. PAW treatments achieved a reduction of S. aureus ranging from 1.6 to 2.3 log at day-0 storage, while 1.7 to 3.4 log at day-4 storage. The inactivation efficiency depended on the plasma-activated time for PAW generation and PAW-treated time of strawberries inoculated with S. aureus. LIVE/DEAD staining and scanning electron microscopy results confirm that PAW could damage the bacterial cell wall. Moreover, optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrate the inactivation is mainly attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. In addition, no significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. Thus, PAW can be a promising alternative to traditional sanitizers applied in the fresh produce industry.

  13. Non-thermal plasma-activated water inactivation of food-borne pathogen on fresh produce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruonan; Wang, Guomin; Tian, Ying; Wang, Kaile [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Jue, E-mail: zhangjue@pku.edu.cn [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Fang, Jing [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • We propose a new approach to treat S. aureus inoculated on strawberries by PAW. • PAW could inactivate S. aureus on strawberries via the Log Reduction results, further confirmed by CLSM and SEM. • The short-lived ROS in PAW are considered the most important agents in inactivation process. • No significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. - Abstract: Non-thermal plasma has been widely considered to be an effective method for decontamination of foods. Recently, numerous studies report that plasma-activated water (PAW) also has outstanding antibacterial ability. This study presents the first report on the potential of PAW for the inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) inoculated on strawberries. PAW treatments achieved a reduction of S. aureus ranging from 1.6 to 2.3 log at day-0 storage, while 1.7 to 3.4 log at day-4 storage. The inactivation efficiency depended on the plasma-activated time for PAW generation and PAW-treated time of strawberries inoculated with S. aureus. LIVE/DEAD staining and scanning electron microscopy results confirm that PAW could damage the bacterial cell wall. Moreover, optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrate the inactivation is mainly attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. In addition, no significant change was found in color, firmness and pH of the PAW treated strawberries. Thus, PAW can be a promising alternative to traditional sanitizers applied in the fresh produce industry.

  14. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-03-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, E c , below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below E c . These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production

  15. Possibilities of implementing nonthermal processing methods in the dairy industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Jeličić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades a lot of research in the field of food science has focused on new, non-thermal processing methods. This article describes the most intensively investigated new processing methodsfor implementation in the dairy industry, like microfiltration, high hydrostatic pressure, ultrasound and pulsed electric fields. For each method an overview is given for the principle of microbial inactivation, the obtained results regarding reduction of microorganisms as well as the positive and undesirable effects on milk composition and characteristics. Most promising methods for further implementation in the dairy industry appeared to be combination of moderate temperatures with high hydrostatic pressure, respectively, pulsed electric fields and microfiltration, since those treatments did not result in any undesirable changes in sensory properties of milk. Additionally, milk treatment with these methodsresulted in a better milk fat homogenization, faster rennet coagulation, shorter duration of milk fermentations, etc. Very good results regarding microbial inactivation were obtained by treating milkwith combination of moderate temperatures and high intensity ultrasound which is also called a process of thermosonification. However, thermosonification treatments often result in undesirablechanges in milk sensory properties, which is most probably due to ultrasonic induced milk fat oxidation. This article also shortly describes the use of natural compounds with antimicrobial effects such as bacteriocins, lactoperoxidase system and lysozime. However their implementation is limited for reasons like high costs, interaction with other food ingredients, poor solubility, narrow activity spectrum, spontaneous loss of bacteriocinogenicity, etc. In addition, principles of antimicrobial effect of microwaves and ultraviolet irradiation are described. However their implementation in the dairy industry failed mostly due to technical and commercial reasons.

  16. A Nonthermal Radio Filament Connected to the Galactic Black Hole?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Mark R.; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Goss, W. M.

    2017-12-01

    Using the Very Large Array, we have investigated a nonthermal radio filament (NTF) recently found very near the Galactic black hole and its radio counterpart, Sgr A*. While this NTF—the Sgr A West Filament (SgrAWF)—shares many characteristics with the population of NTFs occupying the central few hundred parsecs of the Galaxy, the SgrAWF has the distinction of having an orientation and sky location that suggest an intimate physical connection to Sgr A*. We present 3.3 and 5.5 cm images constructed using an innovative methodology that yields a very high dynamic range, providing an unprecedentedly clear picture of the SgrAWF. While the physical association of the SgrAWF with Sgr A* is not unambiguous, the images decidedly evoke this interesting possibility. Assuming that the SgrAWF bears a physical relationship to Sgr A*, we examine the potential implications. One is that Sgr A* is a source of relativistic particles constrained to diffuse along ordered local field lines. The relativistic particles could also be fed into the local field by a collimated outflow from Sgr A*, perhaps driven by the Poynting flux accompanying the black hole spin in the presence of a magnetic field threading the event horizon. Second, we consider the possibility that the SgrAWF is the manifestation of a low-mass-density cosmic string that has become anchored to the black hole. The simplest form of these hypotheses would predict that the filament be bi-directional, whereas the SgrAWF is only seen on one side of Sgr A*, perhaps because of the dynamics of the local medium.

  17. Particle acceleration and nonthermal radiation in supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirakashvili, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Cosmic ray acceleration and magnetic amplification in shell-type supernova remnants is shortly reviewed. The results on the modeling of broadband electromagnetic emission from supernova remnants are presented and compared with observations.

  18. Non-thermal recombination - a neglected source of flare hard X-rays and fast electron diagnostics (Corrigendum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. C.; Mallik, P. C. V.; Badnell, N. R.

    2010-06-01

    Brown and Mallik (BM) recently claimed that non-thermal recombination (NTR) can be a dominant source of flare hard X-rays (HXRs) from hot coronal and chromospheric sources. However, major discrepancies between the thermal continua predicted by BM and by the Chianti database as well as RHESSI flare data, led us to discover substantial errors in the heuristic expression used by BM to extend the Kramers expressions beyond the hydrogenic case. Here we present the relevant corrected expressions and show the key modified results. We conclude that, in most cases, NTR emission was overestimated by a factor of 1-8 by BM but is typically still large enough (as much as 20-30% of the total emission) to be very important for electron spectral inference and detection of electron spectral features such as low energy cut-offs since the recombination spectra contain sharp edges. For extreme temperature regimes and/or if the Fe abundance were as high as some values claimed, NTR could even be the dominant source of flare HXRs, reducing the electron number and energy budget, problems such as in the extreme coronal HXR source cases reported by e.g. Krucker et al.

  19. RADYN Simulations of Non-thermal and Thermal Models of Ellerman Bombs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jie; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Carlsson, Mats, E-mail: dmd@nju.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2017-08-20

    Ellerman bombs (EBs) are brightenings in the H α line wings that are believed to be caused by magnetic reconnection in the lower atmosphere. To study the response and evolution of the chromospheric line profiles, we perform radiative hydrodynamic simulations of EBs using both non-thermal and thermal models. Overall, these models can generate line profiles that are similar to observations. However, in non-thermal models we find dimming in the H α line wings and continuum when the heating begins, while for the thermal models dimming occurs only in the H α line core, and with a longer lifetime. This difference in line profiles can be used to determine whether an EB is dominated by non-thermal heating or thermal heating. In our simulations, if a higher heating rate is applied, then the H α line will be unrealistically strong and there are still no clear UV burst signatures.

  20. Formation of negative hydrogen ion: polarization electron capture and nonthermal shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Dae-Han; Jung, Young-Dae

    2012-09-07

    The influence of the nonthermal shielding on the formation of the negative hydrogen ion (H(-)) by the polarization electron capture are investigated in partially ionized generalized Lorentzian plasmas. The Bohr-Lindhard method has been applied to obtain the negative hydrogen formation radius and cross section as functions of the collision energy, de Broglie wave length, Debye length, impact parameter, and spectral index of the plasma. The result shows that the nonthermal character of the plasma enhances the formation radius of the negative hydrogen, especially, for small Debye radii. It is found that the nonthermal effect increases the formation cross section of the negative hydrogen. It is also found that the maximum position of the formation cross section approaches to the collision center with an increase of the spectral index. In addition, it is found that the formation cross section significantly decreases with an increase of the Debye length, especially, for small spectral indices.

  1. Formation of negative hydrogen ion: Polarization electron capture and nonthermal shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, Dae-Han; Jung, Young-Dae

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the nonthermal shielding on the formation of the negative hydrogen ion (H − ) by the polarization electron capture are investigated in partially ionized generalized Lorentzian plasmas. The Bohr-Lindhard method has been applied to obtain the negative hydrogen formation radius and cross section as functions of the collision energy, de Broglie wave length, Debye length, impact parameter, and spectral index of the plasma. The result shows that the nonthermal character of the plasma enhances the formation radius of the negative hydrogen, especially, for small Debye radii. It is found that the nonthermal effect increases the formation cross section of the negative hydrogen. It is also found that the maximum position of the formation cross section approaches to the collision center with an increase of the spectral index. In addition, it is found that the formation cross section significantly decreases with an increase of the Debye length, especially, for small spectral indices.

  2. Ion Streaming Instabilities in Pair Ion Plasma and Localized Structure with Non-Thermal Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir Khattak, M.; Mushtaq, A.; Qamar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Pair ion plasma with a fraction of non-thermal electrons is considered. We investigate the effects of the streaming motion of ions on linear and nonlinear properties of unmagnetized, collisionless plasma by using the fluid model. A dispersion relation is derived, and the growth rate of streaming instabilities with effect of streaming motion of ions and non-thermal electrons is calculated. A qausi-potential approach is adopted to study the characteristics of ion acoustic solitons. An energy integral equation involving Sagdeev potential is derived during this process. The presence of the streaming term in the energy integral equation affects the structure of the solitary waves significantly along with non-thermal electrons. Possible application of the work to the space and laboratory plasmas are highlighted.

  3. Ion streaming instabilities in pair ion plasma and localized structure with non-thermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khattak, M. Nasir; Qamar, A., E-mail: mnnasirphysics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Peshawar (Pakistan); Mushtaq, A. [Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University Mardan, National Center for Physics, Mardan (Pakistan)

    2015-12-15

    Pair ion plasma with a fraction of non-thermal electrons is considered. We investigate the effects of the streaming motion of ions on linear and nonlinear properties of unmagnetized, collisionless plasma by using the fluid model. A dispersion relation is derived, and the growth rate of streaming instabilities with effect of streaming motion of ions and non-thermal electrons is calculated. A quasi-potential approach is adopted to study the characteristics of ion acoustic solitons. An energy integral equation involving Sagdeev potential is derived during this process. The presence of the streaming term in the energy integral equation affects the structure of the solitary waves significantly along with non-thermal electrons. Possible application of the work to the space and laboratory plasmas are highlighted. (author)

  4. RADYN Simulations of Non-thermal and Thermal Models of Ellerman Bombs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jie; Carlsson, Mats; Ding, M. D.

    2017-08-01

    Ellerman bombs (EBs) are brightenings in the Hα line wings that are believed to be caused by magnetic reconnection in the lower atmosphere. To study the response and evolution of the chromospheric line profiles, we perform radiative hydrodynamic simulations of EBs using both non-thermal and thermal models. Overall, these models can generate line profiles that are similar to observations. However, in non-thermal models we find dimming in the Hα line wings and continuum when the heating begins, while for the thermal models dimming occurs only in the Hα line core, and with a longer lifetime. This difference in line profiles can be used to determine whether an EB is dominated by non-thermal heating or thermal heating. In our simulations, if a higher heating rate is applied, then the Hα line will be unrealistically strong and there are still no clear UV burst signatures.

  5. Signatures of Hot Molecular Hydrogen Absorption from Protoplanetary Disks. I. Non-thermal Populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoadley, Keri; France, Kevin; Arulanantham, Nicole; Loyd, R. O. Parke; Kruczek, Nicholas, E-mail: keri.hoadley@colorado.edu [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), University of Colorado Space Science Building (SPSC), 3665 Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The environment around protoplanetary disks (PPDs) regulates processes that drive the chemical and structural evolution of circumstellar material. We perform a detailed empirical survey of warm molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) absorption observed against H i-Ly α (Ly α : λ 1215.67) emission profiles for 22 PPDs, using archival Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet (UV) spectra to identify H{sub 2} absorption signatures and quantify the column densities of H{sub 2} ground states in each sightline. We compare thermal equilibrium models of H{sub 2} to the observed H{sub 2} rovibrational level distributions. We find that, for the majority of targets, there is a clear deviation in high-energy states ( T {sub exc} ≳ 20,000 K) away from thermal equilibrium populations ( T (H{sub 2}) ≳ 3500 K). We create a metric to estimate the total column density of non-thermal H{sub 2} ( N (H{sub 2}){sub nLTE}) and find that the total column densities of thermal ( N (H{sub 2})) and N (H{sub 2}){sub nLTE} correlate for transition disks and targets with detectable C iv-pumped H{sub 2} fluorescence. We compare N (H{sub 2}) and N (H{sub 2}){sub nLTE} to circumstellar observables and find that N (H{sub 2}){sub nLTE} correlates with X-ray and far-UV luminosities, but no correlations are observed with the luminosities of discrete emission features (e.g., Ly α , C iv). Additionally, N (H{sub 2}) and N (H{sub 2}){sub nLTE} are too low to account for the H{sub 2} fluorescence observed in PPDs, so we speculate that this H{sub 2} may instead be associated with a diffuse, hot, atomic halo surrounding the planet-forming disk. We create a simple photon-pumping model for each target to test this hypothesis and find that Ly α efficiently pumps H{sub 2} levels with T {sub exc} ≥ 10,000 K out of thermal equilibrium.

  6. A Suzaku Search for Nonthermal Emission at Hard X-Ray Energies in the Coma Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    8.45 ± 0.07 0.217 ± 0.002 2.0 (2+12−2 ) × 10−4 1676.18/1688 2Te 8.0 0.17 10.1 0.05 1672.34/1687 Tmap · · · · · · . . . · · · 1684.35/1690 Notes. a See...the temperature map. The thermal model (“ Tmap ,” green) is nearly coincident with the data, though falling below it at higher energies. The other two...PIN spatial sensi- tivity and combined them. This resulting model was compared with the PIN spectrum (Table 2, row labeled “ Tmap ”). Note that only the

  7. Hard X-ray Emission from Galaxy Clusters Observed with INTEGRAL and Prospects for Simbol-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, D.; Paltani, S.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.

    2009-05-01

    Some galaxy clusters are known to contain a large population of relativistic electrons, which produce radio emission through synchrotron radiation. Therefore, it is expected that inverse-Compton scattering of the relativistic electrons with the CMB produce non-thermal emission which should be observable in the hard X-ray domain. Here we focus on the recent results by INTEGRAL, which shed a new light on the non-thermal emission thanks to its angular resolution and sensitivity in the hard X-ray range. We also present the exciting prospects in this field for Simbol-X, which will allow us to detect the non-thermal emission in a number of clusters and map the magnetic field throughout the intra-cluster medium.

  8. Effects of nonthermal preservation technologies on antioxidant activity of fruits and vegetables: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhaohui; Li, Jiaomei; Yu, Wancong; Lu, Xiaotong; Kou, Xiaohong

    2015-10-05

    Consumer demand for safe and nutritious fruits and vegetables has given rise to the development of a number of nonthermal food preservation techniques. Recent studies have highlighted that antioxidant activity of fruits and vegetables plays an important role in human health. In this paper, the influences of nonthermal preservation technologies, including pulsed electric field, radiation processing, dense phase carbon dioxide, ozone processing, and edible coatings, on the antioxidant capacity and related compounds in fruits and vegetables are reviewed. The proposed mechanisms and future trends are also discussed to accelerate the further commercialization and exploration of these novel technologies, which will, in turn, help to promote human health. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Instability of nonplanar modulated dust acoustic wave packets in a strongly coupled nonthermal dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Labany, S. K., E-mail: skellabany@hotmail.com; Zedan, N. A., E-mail: nesreenplasma@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta, P.O. 34517 (Egypt); El-Taibany, W. F., E-mail: eltaibany@hotmail.com, E-mail: eltaibany@du.edu.eg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, New Damietta, P.O. 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science for Girls in Abha, King Khalid University, P.O. 960 Abha (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-07-15

    Cylindrical and spherical amplitude modulations of dust acoustic (DA) solitary wave envelopes in a strongly coupled dusty plasma containing nonthermal distributed ions are studied. Employing a reductive perturbation technique, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation including the geometrical effect is derived. The influences of nonthermal ions, polarization force, and the geometries on the modulational instability conditions are analyzed and the possible rogue wave structures are discussed in detail. It is found that the spherical DA waves are more structurally stable to perturbations than the cylindrical ones. Possible applications of these theoretical findings are briefly discussed.

  10. Fundamental limitations of non-thermal plasma processing for internal combustion engine NOx control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the physics and chemistry of non-thermal plasma processing for post-combustion NO x control in internal combustion engines. A comparison of electron beam and electrical discharge processing is made regarding their power consumption, radical production, NO x removal mechanisms, and by product formation. Can non-thermal deNO x operate efficiently without additives or catalysts? How much electrical power does it cost to operate? What are the by-products of the process? This paper addresses these fundamental issues based on an analysis of the electron-molecule processes and chemical kinetics

  11. Independent peer review panel report on the integrated nonthermal treatment systems study and the comparison of integrated thermal and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for mixed low level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Office of Science and Technology (OST) has conducted studies of integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTS) for treating contact handled, alpha and non-alpha mixed low level radioactive waste (MLLW). The MLLW in the DOE complex consists of a wide variety of organic and inorganic solids and liquids contaminated with radioactive substances. Treatment systems are needed to destroy organic material and stabilize residues prior to land disposal. In May 1996 the Deputy Assistant Secretary for OST appointed an Independent Peer Review Panel to: (1) review and comment on the INTS Study; (2) make recommendations on the most promising thermal and nonthermal treatment systems; (3) make recommendations on research and development necessary to prove the performance of nonthermal and thermal technologies; and (4) review and comment on the preliminary draft of the ITTS/INTS Comparison Report. This report presents the primary conclusions and recommendations based on the review of the INTS study and the comparison report. System selection, overviews, comparisons, cost estimations and sensitivity analyses, and recommended R and D engineering needs are then described and discussed.

  12. Independent peer review panel report on the integrated nonthermal treatment systems study and the comparison of integrated thermal and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for mixed low level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Office of Science and Technology (OST) has conducted studies of integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTS) for treating contact handled, alpha and non-alpha mixed low level radioactive waste (MLLW). The MLLW in the DOE complex consists of a wide variety of organic and inorganic solids and liquids contaminated with radioactive substances. Treatment systems are needed to destroy organic material and stabilize residues prior to land disposal. In May 1996 the Deputy Assistant Secretary for OST appointed an Independent Peer Review Panel to: (1) review and comment on the INTS Study; (2) make recommendations on the most promising thermal and nonthermal treatment systems; (3) make recommendations on research and development necessary to prove the performance of nonthermal and thermal technologies; and (4) review and comment on the preliminary draft of the ITTS/INTS Comparison Report. This report presents the primary conclusions and recommendations based on the review of the INTS study and the comparison report. System selection, overviews, comparisons, cost estimations and sensitivity analyses, and recommended R and D engineering needs are then described and discussed

  13. Experimental studies on removal of airborne haloanisoles by non-thermal plasma air purifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Hallam, David; Bermúdez, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to test the performance of non-thermal plasma air purifiers on its removal effectiveness of two haloanisoles – 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) and 2,4,6-Tribromoanisole (TBA). TCA and TBA are the two major compounds found in wine cellars that can contaminate wine to ...

  14. Non-thermal Plasma Activates Human Keratinocytes by Stimulation of Antioxidant and Phase II Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anke; Dietrich, Stephan; Steuer, Anna; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; von Woedtke, Thomas; Masur, Kai; Wende, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma provides a novel therapeutic opportunity to control redox-based processes, e.g. wound healing, cancer, and inflammatory diseases. By spatial and time-resolved delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, it allows stimulation or inhibition of cellular processes in biological systems. Our data show that both gene and protein expression is highly affected by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2) and phase II enzyme pathway components were found to act as key controllers orchestrating the cellular response in keratinocytes. Additionally, glutathione metabolism, which is a marker for NRF2-related signaling events, was affected. Among the most robustly increased genes and proteins, heme oxygenase 1, NADPH-quinone oxidoreductase 1, and growth factors were found. The roles of NRF2 targets, investigated by siRNA silencing, revealed that NRF2 acts as an important switch for sensing oxidative stress events. Moreover, the influence of non-thermal plasma on the NRF2 pathway prepares cells against exogenic noxae and increases their resilience against oxidative species. Via paracrine mechanisms, distant cells benefit from cell-cell communication. The finding that non-thermal plasma triggers hormesis-like processes in keratinocytes facilitates the understanding of plasma-tissue interaction and its clinical application. PMID:25589789

  15. Analysis of the step responses of laminar premixed flames to forcing by non-thermal plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna; Moeck, Jonas P.; Roberts, William L.; Chung, Suk-Ho; Cha, Min

    2016-01-01

    The step responses of lean methane-air flames to non-thermal plasma forcing is reported. The experimental setup consists of an axisymmetric burner, with a nozzle made of a quartz tube. The equivalence ratio is 0.95, allowing stabilization

  16. The interplay between biological and physical scenarios of bacterial death induced by non-thermal plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, O.; Zablotskyy, V.; Churpita, O.; Jäger, A.; Polívka, L.; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, A.; Kubinová, Šárka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 82, mar. (2016), s. 71-83 ISSN 0142-9612 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : non-thermal plasma * bacteria * cytotoxicity Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines Impact factor: 8.402, year: 2016

  17. Relaxation of nonthermal hh and lh excitons in ZnSe quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalt, H.; Hoffmann, J.; Umlauff, M.

    1998-01-01

    The strong exciton-LO phonon coupling in ZnSe QWs gives a direct access to the relaxation dynamics of nonthermal, free heavy-hole and light-hole excitons. Narrow hot-exciton distributions can be generated by LO-phonon assisted exciton formation. The thermalization of these excitons is monitored b...

  18. Chemically different non-thermal plasmas target distinct cell death pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, O.; Zablotskyy, V.; Chrupina, O.; Lunova, M.; Jirsa, M.; Dejneka, A.; Kubinová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, apr (2017), s. 600 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : chemically different * non-thermal plasmas * target distinct cell death pathways Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  19. Nonthermal food processing alternatives and their effects on taste and flavor compounds of beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Rivas, Enrique; Salmerón-Ochoa, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Food drinks are normally processed to increase their shelf-life and facilitate distribution before consumption. Thermal pasteurization is quite efficient in preventing microbial spoilage of many types of beverages, but the applied heat may also cause undesirable biochemical and nutritious changes that may affect sensory attributes of the final product. Alternative methods of pasteurization that do not include direct heat have been investigated in order to obtain products safe for consumption, but with sensory attributes maintained as unchanged as possible. Food scientists interested in nonthermal food preservation technologies have claimed that such methods of preserving foods are equally efficient in microbial inactivation as compared with conventional thermal means of food processing. Researchers in the nonthermal food preservation area also affirm that alternative preservation technologies will not affect, as much as thermal processes, nutritional and sensory attributes of processed foods. This article reviews research in nonthermal food preservation, focusing on effects of processing of food drinks such as fruit juices and dairy products. Analytical techniques used to identify volatile flavor-aroma compounds will be reviewed and comparative effects for both thermal and nonthermal preservation technologies will be discussed.

  20. Knowledge and Attitudes of Produce and Seafood Processors and Food Safety Educators Regarding Nonthermal Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivarnik, Lori F.; Richard, Nicole L.; Gable, Robert K.; Worobo, Randy W.

    2016-01-01

    A needs assessment survey was designed and administered to measure knowledge of and attitudes toward food safety impacts of nonthermal processing technologies of shellfish and produce industry personnel and extension educators. An online survey was sent via e-mail notification with the survey link through professional listserves. The survey…

  1. Towards the understanding of non-thermal airplasma action: effects on bacteria and fibroblasts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Jäger, Aleš; Polívka, Leoš; Syková, Eva; Terebova, N.; Kulikov, A.; Kubinová, Šárka; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 30 (2016), 25286-25292 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : non-thermal plasma * bactericidal effects * medical applications Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  2. Nonthermal effect of microwave irradiation on nitrite uptake in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrajas, C.; Cotrino, J.

    1989-01-01

    When cells of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were subjected to microwave irradiation at 2.45 GHz, nitrite uptake kinetics still obeyed the Michaelis-Menten equation, the Km of the process remaining constant, whereas V max increased, which indicates an enhanced nonthermal permeability in irradiated cells. (author)

  3. The Atmospheric Response to High Nonthermal Electron Beam Fluxes in Solar Flares. I. Modeling the Brightest NUV Footpoints in the X1 Solar Flare of 2014 March 29

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Adam F. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, 2000 Colorado Ave, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Allred, Joel C.; Daw, Adrian [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cauzzi, Gianna [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Carlsson, Mats, E-mail: Adam.Kowalski@lasp.colorado.edu [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2017-02-10

    The 2014 March 29 X1 solar flare (SOL20140329T17:48) produced bright continuum emission in the far- and near-ultraviolet (NUV) and highly asymmetric chromospheric emission lines, providing long-sought constraints on the heating mechanisms of the lower atmosphere in solar flares. We analyze the continuum and emission line data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the brightest flaring magnetic footpoints in this flare. We compare the NUV spectra of the brightest pixels to new radiative-hydrodynamic predictions calculated with the RADYN code using constraints on a nonthermal electron beam inferred from the collisional thick-target modeling of hard X-ray data from Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager . We show that the atmospheric response to a high beam flux density satisfactorily achieves the observed continuum brightness in the NUV. The NUV continuum emission in this flare is consistent with hydrogen (Balmer) recombination radiation that originates from low optical depth in a dense chromospheric condensation and from the stationary beam-heated layers just below the condensation. A model producing two flaring regions (a condensation and stationary layers) in the lower atmosphere is also consistent with the asymmetric Fe ii chromospheric emission line profiles observed in the impulsive phase.

  4. Effects of non-thermal plasmas and electric field on hydrocarbon/air flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Biswa

    2009-10-01

    Need to improve fuel efficiency, and reduce emission from hydrocarbon combustor in automotive and gas turbine engines have reinvigorated interest in reducing combustion instability of a lean flame. The heat generation rate in a binary reaction is HQ =N^2 c1c2 Q exp(-E/RT), where N is the density, c1 and c2 are mol fractions of the reactants, Q is the reaction heat release, E is the activation energy, R is the gas constant and T is the average temperature. For hydrocarbon-air reactions, the typical value of E/R ˜20, so most heat release reactions are confined to a thin reaction sheet at T >=1400 K. The lean flame burning condition is susceptible to combustion instability due to a critical balance between heat generation and heat loss rates, especially at high gas flow rate. Radical injection can increase flame speed by reducing the hydrocarbon oxidation reaction activation barrier and it can improve flame stability. Advances in nonequilibrium plasma generation at high pressure have prompted its application for energy efficient radical production to enhance hydrocarbon-air combustion. Dielectric barrier discharges and short pulse excited corona discharges have been used to enhance combustion stability. Direct electron impact dissociation of hydrocarbon and O2 produces radicals with lower fuel oxidation reaction activation barriers, initiating heat release reaction CnHm+O CnHm-1+ OH (and other similar sets of reactions with partially dissociated fuel) below the typical cross-over temperature. Also, N2 (A) produced in air discharge at a moderate E/n can dissociate O2 leading to oxidation of fuel at lower gas temperature. Low activation energy reactions are also possible by dissociation of hydrocarbon CnHm+e -> CnHm-2+H2+e, where a chain propagation reaction H2+ O OH+H can be initiated at lower gas temperature than possible under thermal equilibrium kinetics. Most of heat release comes from the reaction CO+OH-> CO2 +H, nonthermal OH production seem to improve

  5. Calculation of momentum distribution function of a non-thermal fermionic dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Anirban; Gupta, Aritra, E-mail: anirbanbiswas@hri.res.in, E-mail: aritra@hri.res.in [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India)

    2017-03-01

    The most widely studied scenario in dark matter phenomenology is the thermal WIMP scenario. Inspite of numerous efforts to detect WIMP, till now we have no direct evidence for it. A possible explanation for this non-observation of dark matter could be because of its very feeble interaction strength and hence, failing to thermalise with the rest of the cosmic soup. In other words, the dark matter might be of non-thermal origin where the relic density is obtained by the so-called freeze-in mechanism. Furthermore, if this non-thermal dark matter is itself produced substantially from the decay of another non-thermal mother particle, then their distribution functions may differ in both size and shape from the usual equilibrium distribution function. In this work, we have studied such a non-thermal (fermionic) dark matter scenario in the light of a new type of U(1){sub B−L} model. The U(1){sub B−L} model is interesting, since, besides being anomaly free, it can give rise to neutrino mass by Type II see-saw mechanism. Moreover, as we will show, it can accommodate a non-thermal fermionic dark matter as well. Starting from the collision terms, we have calculated the momentum distribution function for the dark matter by solving a coupled system of Boltzmann equations. We then used it to calculate the final relic abundance, as well as other relevant physical quantities. We have also compared our result with that obtained from solving the usual Boltzmann (or rate) equations directly in terms of comoving number density, Y . Our findings suggest that the latter approximation is valid only in cases where the system under study is close to equilibrium, and hence should be used with caution.

  6. Shock tube experiments on nitromethane and Promotion of chemical reactions by non-thermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seljeskog, Morten

    2002-06-01

    This dissertation was undertaken to study two different subjects both related to molecular decomposition by applying a shock tube and non-thermal plasma to decompose selected hydrocarbons. The first approach to molecular decomposition concerned thermal decomposition and oxidation of highly diluted nitromethane (NM) in a shock tube. Reflected shock tube experiments on NM decomposition, using mixtures of 0.2 to 1.5 vol% NM in nitrogen or argon were performed over the temperature range 850-1550 K and pressure range 190-900 kPa, with 46 experiments diluted in nitrogen and 44 diluted in argon. By residual error analysis of the measured decomposition profiles it was found that NM decomposition (CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2} + M {yields} CH{sub 3} + NO{sub 2} + M, where M = N{sub 2} /Ar) corresponds well to a law of first order. Arrhenius expressions corresponding to NM diluted either in N{sub 2} or in Ar were found as k{sub N2} = 10{sup 17.011} * exp(- 182.6 kJ/mole / R*T) and k{sub Ar} = 10{sup 17.574}*exp(-207 kJ/mole / R*T ) , respectively. A new reaction mechanism was then proposed, based on new experimental data for NM decomposition both in Ar and N{sub 2} and on three previously developed mechanisms. The new mechanism predicts well the decomposition of NM diluted in both N{sub 2} and Ar within the pressure and temperature range covered by the experiments. In parallel to, and following the decomposition experiments, oxidative experiments on the ignition delay times of NM/O{sub 2}/Ar mixtures were investigated over high temperature and low to high pressure ranges. These experiments were carried out with eight different mixtures of gaseous NM and oxygen diluted in argon, with pressures ranging between 44.3-600 kPa, and temperatures ranging between 842-1378 K. The oxidation experiments were divided into different categories according to the type of decomposition signals achieved. For signals with and without emission, the apparent quasi

  7. Thermal radio emission from the winds of single stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of thermal emission at radio wavelengths provides a powerful diagnostic of the rate of mass loss and temperature of the winds of early-type stars. Some winds are also strong sources of nonthermal emission. Case studies of known thermal and nonthermal sources provide empirical criteria for classifying the observed radio radiation. Mass loss rates are derived for 37 OB and Wolf-Rayet stars considered definite or probable thermal wind sources by these criteria. The rate of mass loss is strongly linked to stellar luminosity in OB stars and probably linked to stellar mass in Wolf-Rayet stars, with no measurable correlation with any other stellar property. A few late-type giants and supergiants also have detectable thermal emission, which arises from extended, accelerating, partially-ionized chromospheres. (orig.)

  8. Position- and time-resolved Stark broadening diagnostics of a non-thermal laser-induced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hao; Truscott, Benjamin S; Ashfold, Michael N R

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the Stark-broadened line shapes of silicon ions in a laser-induced plasma using a model constructed, without assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), using a Druyvesteyn electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The method is applied to temporally and spatially resolved measurements of Si 2+ and Si 3+ emissions from a transient plasma expanding into vacuum, produced by 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a Si (1 0 0) target. The best-fitting simulated line shapes and the corresponding electron number densities and temperatures (or equivalently, Druyvesteyn average energies) are compared with those returned assuming LTE (i.e. for a Maxwellian EEDF). Non-thermal behavior is found to dominate at all but the very earliest stages of expansion close to the target surface, consistent with McWhirter’s criterion for the establishment of LTE. The Druyvesteyn EEDF always yields an equivalent or better model of the experimental measurements, and the observed increasingly strong departure from the Maxwellian case with time and distance from the ablation event highlights the essential invalidity of the LTE assumption for moderate-power, nanosecond laser-induced plasma expanding in vacuo. (paper)

  9. An investigation of the treatment of particulate matter from gasoline engine exhaust using non-thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Dan; Gao Dengshan; Yu Gang; Shen Xianglin; Gu Fan

    2005-01-01

    A plasma reactor with catalysts was used to treat exhaust gas from a gasoline engine in order to decrease particulate matter (PM) emissions. The effect of non-thermal plasma (NTP) of the dielectric discharges on the removal of PM from the exhaust gas was investigated experimentally. The removal efficiency of PM was based on the concentration difference in PM for particle diameters ranging from 0.3 to 5.0 μm as measured by a particle counter. Several factors affecting PM conversion, including the density of plasma energy, reaction temperature, flow rate of exhaust gas, were investigated in the experiment. The results indicate that PM removal efficiency ranged approximately from 25 to 57% and increased with increasing energy input in the reactor, reaction temperature and residence time of the exhaust gas in the reactor. Enhanced removal of the PM was achieved by filling the discharge gap of the reactor with Cu-ZSM-5 catalyst pellets. In addition, the removal of unburned hydrocarbons was studied. Finally, available approaches for PM conversion were analyzed involving the interactions between discharge and catalytic reactions

  10. Proceedings of the 1998 diesel engine emissions reduction workshop [DEER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This workshop was held July 6--9, 1998 in Castine, Maine. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on reduction of diesel engine emissions. Attention was focused on the following: agency/organization concerns on engine emissions; diesel engine issues and challenges; health risks from diesel engines emissions; fuels and lubrication technologies; non-thermal plasma and urea after-treatment technologies; and diesel engine technologies for emission reduction 1 and 2.

  11. Investigation of non-thermal plasma effects on lung cancer cells within 3D collagen matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Surya B.; Thapa Gupta, Tripti; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Eisenmann, Kathryn M.; Ayan, Halim

    2017-08-01

    Recent breakthroughs in plasma medicine have identified a potential application for the non-thermal plasma in cancer therapy. Most studies on the effects of non-thermal plasma on cancer cells have used traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture. However, very few studies are conducted employing non-thermal plasma in animal models. Two dimensional models do not fully mimic the three-dimensional (3D) tumor microenvironment and animal models are expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, we used 3D collagen matrices that closely resemble the native geometry of cancer tissues and provide more physiologically relevant results than 2D models, while providing a more cost effective and efficient precursor to animal studies. We previously demonstrated a role for non-thermal plasma application in promoting apoptotic cell death and reducing the viability of A549 lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells cultured upon 2D matrices. In this study, we wished to determine the efficacy of non-thermal plasma application in driving apoptotic cell death of A549 lung cancer cells encapsulated within a 3D collagen matrix. The percentage of apoptosis increased as treatment time increased and was time dependent. In addition, the anti-viability effect of plasma was demonstrated. Twenty-four hours post-plasma treatment, 38% and 99% of cell death occurred with shortest (15 s) and longest treatment time (120 s) respectively at the plasma-treated region. We found that plasma has a greater effect on the viability of A549 lung cancer cells on the superficial surface of 3D matrices and has diminishing effects as it penetrates the 3D matrix. We also identified the nitrogen and oxygen species generated by plasma and characterized their penetration in vertical and lateral directions within the 3D matrix from the center of the plasma-treated region. Therefore, the utility of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma in driving apoptosis and reducing the viability of lung cancer cells

  12. Investigation of non-thermal plasma effects on lung cancer cells within 3D collagen matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karki, Surya B; Gupta, Tripti Thapa; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Ayan, Halim; Eisenmann, Kathryn M

    2017-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in plasma medicine have identified a potential application for the non-thermal plasma in cancer therapy. Most studies on the effects of non-thermal plasma on cancer cells have used traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture. However, very few studies are conducted employing non-thermal plasma in animal models. Two dimensional models do not fully mimic the three-dimensional (3D) tumor microenvironment and animal models are expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, we used 3D collagen matrices that closely resemble the native geometry of cancer tissues and provide more physiologically relevant results than 2D models, while providing a more cost effective and efficient precursor to animal studies. We previously demonstrated a role for non-thermal plasma application in promoting apoptotic cell death and reducing the viability of A549 lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells cultured upon 2D matrices. In this study, we wished to determine the efficacy of non-thermal plasma application in driving apoptotic cell death of A549 lung cancer cells encapsulated within a 3D collagen matrix. The percentage of apoptosis increased as treatment time increased and was time dependent. In addition, the anti-viability effect of plasma was demonstrated. Twenty-four hours post-plasma treatment, 38% and 99% of cell death occurred with shortest (15 s) and longest treatment time (120 s) respectively at the plasma-treated region. We found that plasma has a greater effect on the viability of A549 lung cancer cells on the superficial surface of 3D matrices and has diminishing effects as it penetrates the 3D matrix. We also identified the nitrogen and oxygen species generated by plasma and characterized their penetration in vertical and lateral directions within the 3D matrix from the center of the plasma-treated region. Therefore, the utility of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma in driving apoptosis and reducing the viability of lung cancer cells

  13. Star Formation Under the Outflow: The Discovery of a Non-thermal Jet from OMC-2 FIR 3 and Its Relationship to the Deeply Embedded FIR 4 Protostar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, Mayra; Díaz-Rodríguez, Ana K.; Anglada, Guillem; Gómez, José F. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC) Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n E-18008 Granada (Spain); Megeath, S. Thomas [Ritter Astrophysical Research Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy University of Toledo 2801 West Bancroft Street Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Rodríguez, Luis F.; Loinard, Laurent; Carrasco-González, Carlos [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM Apartado Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Tobin, John J. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Stutz, Amelia M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Concepción Concepción (Chile); Furlan, Elise [IPAC, Mail Code 314-6, Caltech 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Fischer, William J. [Space Telescope Science Institute 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Manoj, P. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); González-García, Beatriz; Vavrek, Roland [European Space Astronomy Center, ESA P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Stanke, Thomas [European Southern Observatory Garching bei München (Germany); Watson, Dan M., E-mail: osorio@iaa.es [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester Rochester, NY 14627 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We carried out multiwavelength (0.7–5 cm), multi-epoch (1994–2015) Very Large Array (VLA) observations toward the region enclosing the bright far-IR sources FIR 3 (HOPS 370) and FIR 4 (HOPS 108) in OMC-2. We report the detection of 10 radio sources, 7 of them identified as young stellar objects. We image a well-collimated radio jet with a thermal free–free core (VLA 11) associated with the Class I intermediate-mass protostar HOPS 370. The jet features several knots (VLA 12N, 12C, 12S) of non-thermal radio emission (likely synchrotron from shock-accelerated relativistic electrons) at distances of ∼7500–12,500 au from the protostar, in a region where other shock tracers have been previously identified. These knots are moving away from the HOPS 370 protostar at ∼100 km s{sup −1}. The Class 0 protostar HOPS 108, which itself is detected as an independent, kinematically decoupled radio source, falls in the path of these non-thermal radio knots. These results favor the previously proposed scenario in which the formation of HOPS 108 is triggered by the impact of the HOPS 370 outflow with a dense clump. However, HOPS 108 has a large proper motion velocity of ∼30 km s{sup −1}, similar to that of other runaway stars in Orion, whose origin would be puzzling within this scenario. Alternatively, an apparent proper motion could result because of changes in the position of the centroid of the source due to blending with nearby extended emission, variations in the source shape, and/or opacity effects.

  14. Star Formation Under the Outflow: The Discovery of a Non-thermal Jet from OMC-2 FIR 3 and Its Relationship to the Deeply Embedded FIR 4 Protostar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, Mayra; Díaz-Rodríguez, Ana K.; Anglada, Guillem; Gómez, José F.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Loinard, Laurent; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Tobin, John J.; Stutz, Amelia M.; Furlan, Elise; Fischer, William J.; Manoj, P.; González-García, Beatriz; Vavrek, Roland; Stanke, Thomas; Watson, Dan M.

    2017-01-01

    We carried out multiwavelength (0.7–5 cm), multi-epoch (1994–2015) Very Large Array (VLA) observations toward the region enclosing the bright far-IR sources FIR 3 (HOPS 370) and FIR 4 (HOPS 108) in OMC-2. We report the detection of 10 radio sources, 7 of them identified as young stellar objects. We image a well-collimated radio jet with a thermal free–free core (VLA 11) associated with the Class I intermediate-mass protostar HOPS 370. The jet features several knots (VLA 12N, 12C, 12S) of non-thermal radio emission (likely synchrotron from shock-accelerated relativistic electrons) at distances of ∼7500–12,500 au from the protostar, in a region where other shock tracers have been previously identified. These knots are moving away from the HOPS 370 protostar at ∼100 km s −1 . The Class 0 protostar HOPS 108, which itself is detected as an independent, kinematically decoupled radio source, falls in the path of these non-thermal radio knots. These results favor the previously proposed scenario in which the formation of HOPS 108 is triggered by the impact of the HOPS 370 outflow with a dense clump. However, HOPS 108 has a large proper motion velocity of ∼30 km s −1 , similar to that of other runaway stars in Orion, whose origin would be puzzling within this scenario. Alternatively, an apparent proper motion could result because of changes in the position of the centroid of the source due to blending with nearby extended emission, variations in the source shape, and/or opacity effects.

  15. Some perspectives in nuclear astrophysics on non-thermal phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatischeff, V.

    2012-01-01

    In this HDR (Accreditation to Supervise Researches) report, the author presents and comments his research activities on nuclear phenomena in stellar eruptions (solar eruptions, lithium nucleosynthesis in stellar eruptions), on particle acceleration in shock waves of stellar explosions (diffusive acceleration by shock wave, particle acceleration in symbiotic novae, particle acceleration in radio-detected supernovae), of research on low energy cosmic rays (galactic emission of nuclear gamma rays, non thermal soft X rays as new tracer of accelerated particles), and on the origin of short period radioactivities in the primitive solar system (extinguished radio-activities and formation of the solar system, origin of berylium-10 in the primitive solar system). The author concludes with some perspectives on non thermal phenomena in nuclear astrophysics, and on research and development for the future of medium-energy gamma astronomy [fr

  16. Electron acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma with nonthermal electrons and an electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S. V., E-mail: satyavir@iigs.iigm.res.in; Lakhina, G. S., E-mail: lakhina@iigs.iigm.res.in [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (W), Navi Mumbai (India); University of the Western Cape, Belville (South Africa); Devanandhan, S., E-mail: devanandhan@gmail.com [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (W), Navi Mumbai (India); Bharuthram, R., E-mail: rbharuthram@uwc.ac.za [University of the Western Cape, Belville (South Africa)

    2016-08-15

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to study the obliquely propagating electron acoustic solitary waves having nonthermal hot electrons, cold and beam electrons, and ions in a magnetized plasma. We have employed reductive perturbation theory to derive the Korteweg-de-Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) equation describing the nonlinear evolution of these waves. The two-dimensional plane wave solution of KdV-ZK equation is analyzed to study the effects of nonthermal and beam electrons on the characteristics of the solitons. Theoretical results predict negative potential solitary structures. We emphasize that the inclusion of finite temperature effects reduces the soliton amplitudes and the width of the solitons increases by an increase in the obliquity of the wave propagation. The numerical analysis is presented for the parameters corresponding to the observations of “burst a” event by Viking satellite on the auroral field lines.

  17. Field induced decrystallization of silicon: Evidence of a microwave non-thermal effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozariasbmarz, Amin; Dsouza, Kelvin; Vashaee, Daryoosh

    2018-02-01

    It is rather strange and not fully understood that some materials decrystallize when exposed to microwave radiation, and it is still debatable if such a transformation is a thermal or non-thermal effect. We hereby report experimental evidences that weight the latter effect. First, a single crystal silicon wafer exposed to microwaves showed strong decrystallization at high temperature. Second, when some areas of the wafer were masked with metal coating, only the exposed areas underwent decrystallization. Transmission electron microscopy analysis, x-ray diffraction data, and thermal conductivity measurements all indicated strong decrystallization, which occurred in the bulk of the material and was not a surface effect. These observations favor the existence of a non-thermal microwave effect.

  18. Optimization of nonthermal fusion power consistent with channeling of charged fusion product energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, P.B.; Herrmann, M.C.; Fisch, N.J.

    1994-01-01

    If the energy of charged fusion products can be diverted directly to fuel ions, non-Maxwellian fuel ion distributions and temperature differences between species will result. To determine the importance of these nonthermal effects, the fusion power density is optimized at constant-β for non-thermal distributions that are self-consistently maintained by channeling of energy from charged fusion products. For D-T and D- 3 He reactors, with 75% of charged fusion product power diverted to fuel ions, temperature differences between electrons and ions increase the reactivity by 40-70%, while non-Maxwellian fuel ion distributions and temperature differences between ionic species increase the reactivity by an additional 3-15%

  19. State of the art in medical applications using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Metelmann, Hans-Robert; Hori, Masaru

    2017-12-01

    Plasma medical science is a novel interdisciplinary field that combines studies on plasma science and medical science, with the anticipation that understanding the scientific principles governing plasma medical science will lead to innovations in the field. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma has been used for medical treatments, such as for cancer, blood coagulation, and wound healing. The interactions that occur between plasma and cells/tissues have been analyzed extensively. Direct and indirect treatment of cells with plasma has broadened the applications of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma in medicine. Examples of indirect treatment include plasma-assisted immune-therapy and plasma-activated medium. Controlling intracellular redox balance may be key in plasma cancer treatment. Animal studies are required to test the effectiveness and safety of these treatments for future clinical applications.

  20. Landau damping of dust acoustic waves in the presence of hybrid nonthermal nonextensive electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Taibany, W. F.; Zedan, N. A.; Taha, R. M.

    2018-06-01

    Based on the kinetic theory, Landau damping of dust acoustic waves (DAWs) propagating in a dusty plasma composed of hybrid nonthermal nonextensive distributed electrons, Maxwellian distributed ions and negatively charged dust grains is investigated using Vlasov-Poisson's equations. The characteristics of the DAWs Landau damping are discussed. It is found that the wave frequency increases by decreasing (increasing) the value of nonextensive (nonthermal) parameter, q (α ). It is recognized that α plays a significant role in observing damping or growing DAW oscillations. For small values of α , damping modes have been observed until reaching a certain value of α at which ω i vanishes, then a growing mode appears in the case of superextensive electrons. However, only damping DAW modes are observed in case of subextensive electrons. The present study is useful in the space situations where such distribution exists.

  1. Multi-dimensional instability of electrostatic solitary structures in magnetized nonthermal dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamun, A.A.; Russel, S.M.; Mendoza-Briceno, C.A.; Alam, M.N.; Datta, T.K.; Das, A.K.

    1999-05-01

    A rigorous theoretical investigation has been made of multi-dimensional instability of obliquely propagating electrostatic solitary structures in a hot magnetized nonthermal dusty plasma which consists of a negatively charged hot dust fluid, Boltzmann distributed electrons, and nonthermally distributed ions. The Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation for the electrostatic solitary structures that exist in such a dusty plasma system is derived by the reductive perturbation method. The multi-dimensional instability of these solitary waves is also studied by the small-k (long wavelength plane wave) perturbation expansion method. The nature of these solitary structures, the instability criterion, and their growth rate depending on dust-temperature, external magnetic field, and obliqueness are discussed. The implications of these results to some space and astrophysical dusty plasma situations are briefly mentioned. (author)

  2. Nonthermal electron-positron pairs and cold matter in the central engines of active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.

    1992-01-01

    The nonthermal e(+/-) pair model of the central engine of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is discussed. The model assumes that nonthermal e(+/-) pairs are accelerated to highly relativistic energies in a compact region close to the central black hole and in the vicinity of some cold matter. The model has a small number of free parameters and explains a large body of AGN observations from EUV to soft gamma-rays. In particular, the model explains the existence of the UV bump, the soft X-rays excess, the canonical hard X-ray power law, the spectral hardening above about 10 keV, and some of the variability patterns in the soft and hard X-rays. In addition, the model explains the spectral steepening above about 50 keV seen in NGC 4151.

  3. Nonlinear acoustic waves in nonthermal plasmas with negative and positive dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verheest, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Using a Sagdeev pseudopotential formalism where nonlinear structures are stationary in a co-moving frame, large dust-acoustic solitary waves and double layers have been studied in plasmas with negative and positive cold dust, in the presence of nonthermal electrons and ions. This has been done in a systematic way, to delimit the compositional parameter space in which such modes can be found. The existence domain of negative/positive solitary waves is limited by infinite compression of the negative/positive dust or by the occurrence of negative/positive double layers. These double layers require a sufficient nonthermality of the electrons/ions and the presence of enough positive/negative dust. There are parameter ranges where both negative and positive solitary structures coexist, sometimes both of the solitary wave type, sometimes one a solitary wave and the other a double layer. Typical Sagdeev pseudopotentials and solitary wave profiles have been presented.

  4. Compressive and rarefactive solitary waves in nonthermal two-component plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verheest, Frank; Hellberg, Manfred A.

    2010-01-01

    Using a Sagdeev pseudopotential formalism where nonlinear structures are stationary in a comoving frame, large ion-acoustic solitary waves and double layers have been studied in plasmas with positive ions and nonthermal electrons. The velocity range of positive, compressive solitary waves is limited by the ion density reaching infinite compression, whereas negative, rarefactive solitary waves and double layers can exist when the electron nonthermality exceeds a certain minimum. There are even regions of coexistence, the limits of which can be elucidated by considering the properties of the special Sagdeev pseudopotential at the acoustic speed. In particular, when the compositional parameters and Mach numbers admit only compressive or rarefactive solitary structures, these have to be superacoustic, their amplitude vanishing at the acoustic speed. When both compressive and rarefactive modes can occur, one of them is Korteweg-de Vries (KdV)-like, the other having a non-KdV character, with a finite amplitude at the acoustic speed.

  5. Statistical physics of non-thermal phase transitions from foundations to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Abaimov, Sergey G

    2015-01-01

    Statistical physics can be used to better understand non-thermal complex systems—phenomena such as stock-market crashes, revolutions in society and in science, fractures in engineered materials and in the Earth’s crust, catastrophes, traffic jams, petroleum clusters, polymerization, self-organized criticality and many others exhibit behaviors resembling those of thermodynamic systems. In particular, many of these systems possess phase transitions identical to critical or spinodal phenomena in statistical physics. The application of the well-developed formalism of statistical physics to non-thermal complex systems may help to predict and prevent such catastrophes as earthquakes, snow-avalanches and landslides, failure of engineering structures, or economical crises. This book addresses the issue step-by-step, from phenomenological analogies between complex systems and statistical physics to more complex aspects, such as correlations, fluctuation-dissipation theorem, susceptibility, the concept of free ener...

  6. Non-Thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-Level Mixed Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    DOE proposes to transport contact-handled LLMW from the Hanford Site to the Allied Technology Group (ATG) Mixed Waste Facility (MWF) in Richland, Washington, for non-thermal treatment and to return the treated waste to the Hanford Site for eventual land disposal. Over a 3-year period the waste would be staged to the ATG MWF, and treated waste would be returned to the Hanford Site. The ATG MWF would be located on an 18 hectare (ha) (45 acre [at]) ATG Site adjacent to ATG's licensed low-level waste processing facility at 2025 Battelle Boulevard. The ATG MWF is located approximately 0.8 kilometers (km) (0.5 miles [mi]) south of Horn Rapids Road and 1.6 km (1 mi) west of Stevens Drive. The property is located within the Horn Rapids triangle in northern Richland (Figure 2.1). The ATG MWF is to be located on the existing ATG Site, near the DOE Hanford Site, in an industrial area in the City of Richland. The effects of siting, construction, and overall operation of the MWF have been evaluated in a separate State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) EIS (City of Richland 1998). The proposed action includes transporting the LLMW from the Hanford Site to the ATG Facility, non-thermal treatment of the LLMW at the ATG MWF, and transporting the waste from ATG back to the Hanford Site. Impacts fi-om waste treatment operations would be bounded by the ATG SEPA EIS, which included an evaluation of the impacts associated with operating the non-thermal portion of the MWF at maximum design capacity (8,500 metric tons per year) (City of Richland 1998). Up to 50 employees would be required for non-thermal treatment portion of the MWF. This includes 40 employees that would perform waste treatment operations and 10 support staff. Similar numbers were projected for the thermal treatment portion of the MWF (City of Richland 1998).

  7. Whither has the nonthermal tail gone in nonrelativistic heavy ion collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukacs, B.; Racz, A.

    1990-06-01

    In a simplified model the evolution of the originally nonthermal momentum distribution has been followed. The result is, that, although the final entropy deficiency may be quite substantial at 800 MeV/nucleon beam energy for smaller nuclei, the detected process does not reflect the extent of deviation from equilibrium (quite substantial). The reason is the addition of flow velocities, different in different volume elements. (author) 26 refs.; 11 figs

  8. Chemically different non-thermal plasmas target distinct cell death pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Lunova, M.; Jirsa, M.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-17, č. článku 600. ISSN 2045-2322 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : chemically different * non-thermal plasmas * target distinct cell death pathways Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  9. Cell death induced by ozone and various non-thermal plasmas: therapeutic perspectives and limitations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Chánová, Eliška; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, NOV (2014), "7129-1"-"7129-11" ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1309 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100101219 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : cell death * non-thermal plasma * therapeutic perspectives Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; FH - Neurology (UEM-P); CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 5.578, year: 2014

  10. Possible wave modes of wideband nonthermal continuum radiation in its source region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grimald, S.; Santolík, Ondřej

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 115, - (2010), A06209/1-A06209/8 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1253; GA MŠk ME09107 Grant - others:ESA(XE) PECS98025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : nonthermal continuum * NTC * wave modes Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2010

  11. A tool to separate optical/infrared disc and jet emission in X-ray transient outbursts: the colour-magnitude diagrams of XTE J1550-564

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russell, D.M.; Maitra, D.; Dunn, R.J.H.; Fender, R.P.

    2011-01-01

    It is now established that thermal disc emission and non-thermal jet emission can both play a role at optical/infrared (OIR) wavelengths in X-ray transients. The spectra of the jet and disc components differ, as do their dependence on mass accretion properties. Here we demonstrate that the OIR

  12. A review on microbiological decontamination of fresh produce with nonthermal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignata, C; D'Angelo, D; Fea, E; Gilli, G

    2017-06-01

    Food safety is a critical public health issue for consumers and the food industry because microbiological contamination of food causes considerable social and economic burdens on health care. Most foodborne illness comes from animal production, but as of the mid-1990s in the United States and more recently in the European Union, the contribution of fresh produce to foodborne outbreaks has rapidly increased. Recent studies have suggested that sterilization with nonthermal plasma could be a viable alternative to the traditional methods for the decontamination of heat-sensitive materials or food because this technique proves capable of eliminating micro-organisms on surfaces without altering the substrate. In the last 10 years, researchers have used nonthermal plasma in a variety of food inoculated with many bacterial species. All of these experiments were conducted exclusively in a laboratory and, to our knowledge, this technique has not been used in an industrial setting. Thus, the purpose of this review is to understand whether this technology could be used at the industrial level. The latest researches using nonthermal plasma on fresh produce were analysed. These evaluations have focused on the log reduction of micro-organisms and the treatment time. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Simulations of planar non-thermal plasma assisted ignition at atmospheric pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, Tiernan A.

    2016-10-21

    The opportunity for ignition assistance by a pulsed applied voltage is investigated in a canonical one-dimensional configuration. An incipient ignition kernel, formed by localized energy deposition into a lean mixture of methane and air at atmospheric pressure, is subjected to sub-breakdown electric fields (E/N ≈ 100 Td) by a DC potential applied across the domain, resulting in non-thermal behavior of the plasma formed during the discharge. A two-fluid approach is employed to couple thermal neutrals and ions to the non-thermal electrons. A two-temperature plasma mechanism describing gas phase combustion, excitation of neutral species, and high-energy electron kinetics is employed to account for non-thermal effects. Charged species transported from the ignition zone drift rapidly through the domain, augmenting the magnitude of the electric field in the fresh gas during the pulse through a dynamic-electrode effect, which results in an increase in the energy of the electrons in the fresh mixture with increasing time. Enhanced fuel and oxidizer decomposition due to electron impact dissociation and interaction with excited neutrals generate a pool of radicals, mostly O and H, in the fresh gas ahead of the flame\\'s preheat zone. In the configuration considered, the effect of the nanosecond pulse is to increase the mass of fuel burned at equivalent times relative to the unsupported ignition through enhanced radical generation, resulting in an increased heat release rate in the immediate aftermath of the pulse.

  14. Non-thermal Plasma Exposure Rapidly Attenuates Bacterial AHL-Dependent Quorum Sensing and Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Padrig B.; Busetti, Alessandro; Wielogorska, Ewa; Chevallier, Olivier P.; Elliott, Christopher T.; Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Graham, William G.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma has been exhaustively characterised, however elucidation of the interactions between biomolecules produced and utilised by bacteria and short plasma exposures are required for optimisation and clinical translation of cold plasma technology. This study characterizes the effects of non-thermal plasma exposure on acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum sensing (QS). Plasma exposure of AHLs reduced the ability of such molecules to elicit a QS response in bacterial reporter strains in a dose-dependent manner. Short exposures (30–60 s) produce of a series of secondary compounds capable of eliciting a QS response, followed by the complete loss of AHL-dependent signalling following longer exposures. UPLC-MS analysis confirmed the time-dependent degradation of AHL molecules and their conversion into a series of by-products. FT-IR analysis of plasma-exposed AHLs highlighted the appearance of an OH group. In vivo assessment of the exposure of AHLs to plasma was examined using a standard in vivo model. Lettuce leaves injected with the rhlI/lasI mutant PAO-MW1 alongside plasma treated N-butyryl-homoserine lactone and n-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-homoserine lactone, exhibited marked attenuation of virulence. This study highlights the capacity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma to modify and degrade AHL autoinducers thereby attenuating QS-dependent virulence in P. aeruginosa. PMID:27242335

  15. Nonthermal plasma reactors for the production of light hydrocarbon olefins from heavy oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Prieto

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, nonthermal plasma technology was applied in many different fields, focusing attention on the destruction of harmful compounds in the air. This paper deals with nonthermal plasma reactors for the conversion of heavy oil into light hydrocarbon olefins, to be employed as gasoline components or to be added in small amounts for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide compounds in the treatment of exhaust gas at power plants. For the process, the plate-plate nonthermal plasma reactor driven by AC high voltage was selected. The reactor was modeled as a function of parameter characteristics, using the methodology provided by the statistical experimental design. The parameters studied were gap distance between electrodes, carrier gas flow and applied power. Results indicate that the reactions occurring in the process of heavy oil conversion have an important selective behavior. The products obtained were C1-C4 hydrocarbons with ethylene as the main compound. Operating the parameters of the reactor within the established operative window of the system and close to the optimum conditions, efficiencies as high as 70 (mul/joule were obtained. These values validate the process as an in-situ method to produce light olefins for the treatment of nitrogen oxides in the exhaust gas from diesel engines.

  16. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1 -- issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2 -- issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study -- drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering.

  17. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma possible application in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haertel, Beate; von Woedtke, Thomas; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2014-11-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma, also named cold plasma, is defined as a partly ionized gas. Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is a new innovative approach in medicine not only for the treatment of wounds, but with a wide-range of other applications, as e.g. topical treatment of other skin diseases with microbial involvement or treatment of cancer diseases. This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma can support wound healing by its antiseptic effects, by stimulation of proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells, by activation or inhibition of integrin receptors on the cell surface or by its pro-angiogenic effect. We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma. The outcome of first clinical trials regarding wound healing is pointed out.

  18. Effect of nonthermal electrons on oblique electrostatic excitations in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alinejad, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Science, Babol University of Technology, Babol 47148-71167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The linear and nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves are investigated in a magnetized electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma with nonthermal electrons. In the linear regime, the propagation of two possible modes and their evolution are studied via a dispersion relation. In the cases of parallel and perpendicular propagation, it is shown that these two possible modes are always stable. Then, the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the dynamics of ion-acoustic solitary waves is derived from a weakly nonlinear analysis. The influence on the solitary wave characteristics of relevant physical parameters such as nonthermal electrons, magnetic field, obliqueness, positron concentration, and temperature ratio is examined. It is observed that the increasing nonthermal electrons parameter makes the solitary structures much taller and narrower. Also, it is revealed that the magnetic field strength makes the solitary waves more spiky. The present investigation contributes to the physics of the nonlinear electrostatic ion-acoustic waves in space and laboratory e-p-i plasmas in which wave damping produces an electron tail.

  19. Transient thermal and nonthermal electron and phonon relaxation after short-pulsed laser heating of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-01-01

    Several dynamic thermal and nonthermal scattering processes affect ultrafast heat transfer in metals after short-pulsed laser heating. Even with decades of measurements of electron-phonon relaxation, the role of thermal vs. nonthermal electron and phonon scattering on overall electron energy transfer to the phonons remains unclear. In this work, we derive an analytical expression for the electron-phonon coupling factor in a metal that includes contributions from equilibrium and nonequilibrium distributions of electrons. While the contribution from the nonthermal electrons to electron-phonon coupling is non-negligible, the increase in the electron relaxation rates with increasing laser fluence measured by thermoreflectance techniques cannot be accounted for by only considering electron-phonon relaxations. We conclude that electron-electron scattering along with electron-phonon scattering have to be considered simultaneously to correctly predict the transient nature of electron relaxation during and after short-pulsed heating of metals at elevated electron temperatures. Furthermore, for high electron temperature perturbations achieved at high absorbed laser fluences, we show good agreement between our model, which accounts for d-band excitations, and previous experimental data. Our model can be extended to other free electron metals with the knowledge of the density of states of electrons in the metals and considering electronic excitations from non-Fermi surface states

  20. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    This report contains a review and evaluation of three systems analysis studies performed by LITCO on integrated thermal treatment systems and integrated nonthermal treatment systems for the remediation of mixed low-level waste stored throughout the US Department of Energy weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center, Science Applications International Corporation, the Waste Policy Institute, and Virginia Tech. The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1 -- issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2 -- issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study -- drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions of the studies were adequate to produce an unbiased review of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) to identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) to develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to assure a sound application of systems engineering

  1. Thermal or nonthermal? That is the question for ultrafast spin switching in GdFeCo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G P; George, Thomas F

    2013-09-11

    GdFeCo is among the most interesting magnets for producing laser-induced femtosecond magnetism, where light can switch its spin moment from one direction to another. This paper aims to set a criterion for the thermal/nonthermal mechanism: we propose to use the Fermi-Dirac distribution function as a reliable criterion. A precise value for the thermalization time is needed, and through a two-level model, we show that since there is no direct connection between the laser helicity and the definition of thermal/nonthermal processes, the helicity is a poor criterion for differentiating a thermal from a nonthermal process. In addition, we propose a four-site model system (Gd2Fe2) for investigating the transient ferromagnetic ordering between Gd and Fe ions. We find that states of two different kinds can allow such an ordering. One state is a pure ferromagnetic state with ferromagnetic ordering among all the ions, and the other is the short-ranged ferromagnetic ordering of a pair of Gd and Fe ions.

  2. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies. Topical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrani, H.A.; Schmidt, L.J.; Erickson, T.A.; Sondreal, E.A.; Erjavec, J.; Steadman, E.N.; Fabrycky, W.J.; Wilson, J.S.; Musich, M.A.

    1996-07-01

    This report analyzes three systems engineering (SE) studies performed on integrated thermal treatment systems (ITTSs) and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTSs) for the remediation of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stored throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), and Virginia Tech (VT). The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1--issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2--issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study--drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions taken in the studies might bias the resulting economic evaluations of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to produce sound SE applications

  3. NONTHERMALLY DOMINATED ELECTRON ACCELERATION DURING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN A LOW-β PLASMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaocan; Li, Gang; Guo, Fan; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    By means of fully kinetic simulations, we investigate electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection in a nonrelativistic proton–electron plasma with conditions similar to solar corona and flares. We demonstrate that reconnection leads to a nonthermally dominated electron acceleration with a power-law energy distribution in the nonrelativistic low-β regime but not in the high-β regime, where β is the ratio of the plasma thermal pressure and the magnetic pressure. The accelerated electrons contain most of the dissipated magnetic energy in the low-β regime. A guiding-center current description is used to reveal the role of electron drift motions during the bulk nonthermal energization. We find that the main acceleration mechanism is a Fermi-type acceleration accomplished by the particle curvature drift motion along the electric field induced by the reconnection outflows. Although the acceleration mechanism is similar for different plasma β, low-β reconnection drives fast acceleration on Alfvénic timescales and develops power laws out of thermal distribution. The nonthermally dominated acceleration resulting from magnetic reconnection in low-β plasma may have strong implications for the  highly efficient electron acceleration in solar flares and other astrophysical systems

  4. High-frequency irreversible electroporation (H-FIRE for non-thermal ablation without muscle contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arena Christopher B

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Therapeutic irreversible electroporation (IRE is an emerging technology for the non-thermal ablation of tumors. The technique involves delivering a series of unipolar electric pulses to permanently destabilize the plasma membrane of cancer cells through an increase in transmembrane potential, which leads to the development of a tissue lesion. Clinically, IRE requires the administration of paralytic agents to prevent muscle contractions during treatment that are associated with the delivery of electric pulses. This study shows that by applying high-frequency, bipolar bursts, muscle contractions can be eliminated during IRE without compromising the non-thermal mechanism of cell death. Methods A combination of analytical, numerical, and experimental techniques were performed to investigate high-frequency irreversible electroporation (H-FIRE. A theoretical model for determining transmembrane potential in response to arbitrary electric fields was used to identify optimal burst frequencies and amplitudes for in vivo treatments. A finite element model for predicting thermal damage based on the electric field distribution was used to design non-thermal protocols for in vivo experiments. H-FIRE was applied to the brain of rats, and muscle contractions were quantified via accelerometers placed at the cervicothoracic junction. MRI and histological evaluation was performed post-operatively to assess ablation. Results No visual or tactile evidence of muscle contraction was seen during H-FIRE at 250 kHz or 500 kHz, while all IRE protocols resulted in detectable muscle contractions at the cervicothoracic junction. H-FIRE produced ablative lesions in brain tissue that were characteristic in cellular morphology of non-thermal IRE treatments. Specifically, there was complete uniformity of tissue death within targeted areas, and a sharp transition zone was present between lesioned and normal brain. Conclusions H-FIRE is a feasible technique for

  5. Charging and Heating Dynamics of Nanoparticles in Nonthermal Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortshagen, Uwe R.

    2014-08-15

    The focus of this award was to understand the interactions of nanometer-sized particles with ionized gases, also called plasmas. Plasmas are widely used in the fabrication of electronic circuits such as microprocessors and memory devices, in plasma display panels, as well as in medical applications. Recently, these ionized gases are finding applications in the synthesis of advanced nanomaterials with novel properties, which are based on nanometer-sized particulate (nanoparticles) building blocks. As these nanoparticles grow in the plasma environment, they interact with the plasmas species such as electrons and ions which critically determines the nanoparticle properties. The University of Minnesota researchers conducting this project performed numerical simulations and developed analytical models that described the interaction of plasma-bound nanoparticles with the plasma ions. The plasma ions bombard the nanoparticle surface with substantial energy, which can result in the rearrangement of the nanoparticles’ atoms, giving them often desirable structures at the atomic scale. Being able to tune the ion energies allows to control the properties of nanoparticles produced in order to tailor their attributes for certain applications. For instance, when used in high efficiency light emitting devices, nanoparticles produced under high fluxes of highly energetic ions may show superior light emission to particles produced under low fluxes of less energetic ions. The analytical models developed by the University of Minnesota researchers enable the research community to easily determine the energy of ions bombarding the nanoparticles. The researchers extensively tested the validity of the analytical models by comparing them to sophisticated computer simulations based on stochastic particle modeling, also called Monte Carlo modeling, which simulated the motion of hundreds of thousands of ions and their interaction with the nanoparticle surfaces. Beyond the scientific

  6. Application of pulsed power and power modulation to the non-thermal plasma treatment of hazardous gaseous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.

    1992-10-01

    Acid rain, global warming, ozone depletion, and smog are preeminent environmental problems facing the world today. Non-thermal plasma techniques offer an innovative approach to the cost-effective solution of these problems. Many potential applications of non-thermal plasmas to air pollution control have already been demonstrated. The use of pulsed power and power modulation is essential to the successful implementation of non-thermal plasma techniques. This paper provides an overview of the most recent developments in non-thermal plasma systems that have been applied to gaseous waste treatment. In the non-thermal plasma approach, the nonequilibrium properties of the plasma are fully exploited. These plasmas are characterized by high electron temperatures, while the gas remains at near ambient temperature and pressure. The energy is directed preferentially to the undesirable components, which are often present in very small concentrations. These techniques utilize the dissociation and ionization of the background gas to produce radicals which, in turn, decompose the toxic compounds. The key to success in the non-thermal plasma approach is to produce a discharge in which the majority of the electrical energy goes into the production of energetic electrons, rather than into gas heating. For example, in a typical application to flue gas cleanup, these electrons produce radicals, such as O and OH, through the dissociation or ionization of molecules such as H 2 O or O 2 . The radicals diffuse through the gas and preferentially oxidize the nitrogen oxides and sulfur oxides to form acids that can then be easily neutralized to form non-toxic, easily-collectible (and commercially salable) compounds. Non-thermal plasmas can be created in essentially two different ways: by electron-beam irradiation, and by electrical discharges

  7. The Role of Higher-Order Modes on the Electromagnetic Whistler-Cyclotron Wave Fluctuations of Thermal and Non-Thermal Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.; Moya, Pablo S.; Navarro, Roberto; Araneda, Jamie A.

    2014-01-01

    Two fundamental challenging problems of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas are the understanding of the relaxation of a collisionless plasmas with nearly isotropic velocity distribution functions and the resultant state of nearly equipartition energy density with electromagnetic plasma turbulence. Here, we present the results of a study which shows the role that higher-order-modes play in limiting the electromagnetic whistler-like fluctuations in a thermal and non-thermal plasma. Our main results show that for a thermal plasma the magnetic fluctuations are confined by regions that are bounded by the least-damped higher order modes. We further show that the zone where the whistler-cyclotron normal modes merges the electromagnetic fluctuations shifts to longer wavelengths as the beta(sub e) increases. This merging zone has been interpreted as the beginning of the region where the whistler-cyclotron waves losses their identity and become heavily damped while merging with the fluctuations. Our results further indicate that in the case of nonthermal plasmas, the higher-order modes do not confine the fluctuations due to the effective higher-temperature effects and the excess of suprathermal plasma particles. The analysis presented here considers the second-order theory of fluctuations and the dispersion relation of weakly transverse fluctuations, with wave vectors parallel to the uniform background magnetic field, in a finite temperature isotropic bi-Maxwellian and Tsallis-kappa-like magnetized electron-proton plasma. Our results indicate that the spontaneously emitted electromagnetic fluctuations are in fact enhanced over these quasi modes suggesting that such modes play an important role in the emission and absorption of electromagnetic fluctuations in thermal or quasi-thermal plasmas.

  8. Evaluation on nitrogen oxides and nanoparticle removal and nitrogen monoxide generation using a wet-type nonthermal plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehana, Kotaro; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2018-05-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emitted from power plants and combustion sources cause air pollution problems. Selective catalytic reduction technology is remarkably useful for NOx removal. However, there are several drawbacks such as preparation of reducing agents, usage of harmful heavy metals, and higher cost. On the other hand, trace NO is a vasodilator agent and employed in inhalation therapies for treating pulmonary hypertension in humans. Considering these factors, in the present study, a wet-type nonthermal plasma reactor, which can control NOx and nanoparticle emissions and generate NO, is investigated. The fundamental characteristics of the reactor are investigated. First, the experiment of nanoparticle removal is carried out. Collection efficiencies of over 99% are achieved for nanoparticles at 50 and 100 ml min‑1 of liquid flow rates. Second, experiments of NOx removal under air atmosphere and NOx generation under nitrogen atmosphere are carried out. NOx-removal efficiencies of over 95% under the air plasma are achieved in 50–200 ml min‑1 liquid flow rates. Moreover, under nitrogen plasma, NOx is generated, of which the major portion is NO. For example, NO concentration is 25 ppm, while NOx concentration is 31 ppm at 50 ml min‑1 liquid flow rate. Finally, experiments of NO generation under the nitrogen atmosphere with or without flowing water are carried out. When water flows on the inner surface of the reactor, approximately 14 ppm of NO is generated. Therefore, NO generation requires flowing water. It is considered that the reaction of N and OH, which is similar to the extended Zeldovich mechanism, could occur to induce NO formation. From these results, it is verified that the wet-type plasma reactor is useful for NOx removal and NO generation under nitrogen atmosphere with flowing water.

  9. Cellular attachment and differentiation on titania nanotubes exposed to air- or nitrogen-based non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Yeon Seo

    Full Text Available The surface topography and chemistry of titanium implants are important factors for successful osseointegration. However, chemical modification of an implant surface using currently available methods often results in the disruption of topographical features and the loss of beneficial effects during the shelf life of the implant. Therefore, the aim of this study was to apply the recently highlighted portable non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ, elicited from one of two different gas sources (nitrogen and air, to TiO2 nanotube surfaces to further improve their osteogenic properties while preserving the topographical morphology. The surface treatment was performed before implantation to avoid age-related decay. The surface chemistry and morphology of the TiO2 nanotube surfaces before and after the NTAPPJ treatment were determined using a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a surface profiler, a contact angle goniometer, and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. The MC3T3-E1 cell viability, attachment and morphology were confirmed using calcein AM and ethidium homodimer-1 staining, and analysis of gene expression using rat mesenchymal stem cells was performed using a real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that both portable nitrogen- and air-based NTAPPJ could be used on TiO2 nanotube surfaces easily and without topographical disruption. NTAPPJ resulted in a significant increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces as well as changes in the surface chemistry, which consequently increased the cell viability, attachment and differentiation compared with the control samples. The nitrogen-based NTAPPJ treatment group exhibited a higher osteogenic gene expression level than the air-based NTAPPJ treatment group due to the lower atomic percentage of carbon on the surface that resulted from treatment. It was concluded that NTAPPJ treatment of TiO2 nanotube surfaces results in an increase in

  10. Accurate estimate of the relic density and the kinetic decoupling in nonthermal dark matter models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Ullio, Piero

    2011-01-01

    Nonthermal dark matter generation is an appealing alternative to the standard paradigm of thermal WIMP dark matter. We reconsider nonthermal production mechanisms in a systematic way, and develop a numerical code for accurate computations of the dark matter relic density. We discuss, in particular, scenarios with long-lived massive states decaying into dark matter particles, appearing naturally in several beyond the standard model theories, such as supergravity and superstring frameworks. Since nonthermal production favors dark matter candidates with large pair annihilation rates, we analyze the possible connection with the anomalies detected in the lepton cosmic-ray flux by Pamela and Fermi. Concentrating on supersymmetric models, we consider the effect of these nonstandard cosmologies in selecting a preferred mass scale for the lightest supersymmetric particle as a dark matter candidate, and the consequent impact on the interpretation of new physics discovered or excluded at the LHC. Finally, we examine a rather predictive model, the G2-MSSM, investigating some of the standard assumptions usually implemented in the solution of the Boltzmann equation for the dark matter component, including coannihilations. We question the hypothesis that kinetic equilibrium holds along the whole phase of dark matter generation, and the validity of the factorization usually implemented to rewrite the system of a coupled Boltzmann equation for each coannihilating species as a single equation for the sum of all the number densities. As a byproduct we develop here a formalism to compute the kinetic decoupling temperature in case of coannihilating particles, which can also be applied to other particle physics frameworks, and also to standard thermal relics within a standard cosmology.

  11. Non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma induces angiogenesis through reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Friedman, Gary; Fridman, Alexander; Clyne, Alisa Morss

    2012-01-07

    Vascularization plays a key role in processes such as wound healing and tissue engineering. Non-thermal plasma, which primarily produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), has recently emerged as an efficient tool in medical applications including blood coagulation, sterilization and malignant cell apoptosis. Liquids and porcine aortic endothelial cells were treated with a non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma in vitro. Plasma treatment of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and serum-free medium increased ROS concentration in a dose-dependent manner, with a higher concentration observed in serum-free medium compared with PBS. Species concentration inside cells peaked 1 h after treatment, followed by a decrease 3 h post treatment. Endothelial cells treated with a plasma dose of 4.2 J cm(-2) had 1.7 times more cells than untreated samples 5 days after plasma treatment. The 4.2 J cm(-2) plasma dose increased two-dimensional migration distance by 40 per cent compared with untreated control, while the number of cells that migrated through a three-dimensional collagen gel increased by 15 per cent. Tube formation was also enhanced by plasma treatment, with tube lengths in plasma-treated samples measuring 2.6 times longer than control samples. A fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) neutralizing antibody and ROS scavengers abrogated these angiogenic effects. These data indicate that plasma enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation is due to FGF-2 release induced by plasma-produced ROS. Non-thermal plasma may be used as a potential tool for applying ROS in precise doses to enhance vascularization.

  12. Evaluation of the differential energy distribution of systems of non-thermally activated molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    A non-thermally activated molecule may undergo pressure dependent deactivation or energy dependent decomposition. It should be possible to use the pressure dependent stabilization/decomposition yields to determine the energy distribution in non-thermal systems. The numerical technique of regularization has been applied to this chemical problem to evaluate this distribution. The resulting method has been tested with a number of simulated distributions and kinetic models. Application was then made to several real chemical systems to determine the energy distribution resulting from the primary excitation process. Testing showed the method to be quite effective in reproducing input distributions from simulated data in all test cases. The effect of experimental error proved to be negligible when the error-filled data were first smoothed with a parabolic spline. This method has been applied to three different hot atom activated systems. Application to 18 F-for-F substituted CH 3 CF 3 generated a broad distribution extending from 62 to 318 kcal/mol, with a median energy of 138 kcal/mol. The shape of this distribution (and those from the other applications) indicated the involvement of two mechanisms in the excitation process. Analysis of the T-for-H substituted CH 3 CH 2 F system showed a more narrow distribution (56-218 kcal/mol) with a median energy of 79.8 kcal/mol. The distribution of the T-for-H substituted CH 3 CH 2 Cl system, extending from 54.5 to 199 kcal/mol was seen to be quite similar. It was concluded that this method is a valid approach to evaluating differential energy distributions in non-thermal systems, specifically those activated by hot atom substitution

  13. Inactivation of possible microorganism food contaminants on packaging foils using nonthermal plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholtz, V.; Khun, J.; Soušková, H.; Čeřovský, M.

    2015-01-01

    The inactivation effect of nonthermal plasma generated in electric discharge burning in air atmosphere with water or hydrogen peroxide aerosol for the application to the microbial decontamination of packaging foils is studied. The microbial inactivation is studied on two bacterial, two yeasts, and two filamentous micromycete species. The inactivation of all contaminating microorganisms becomes on the area of full 8.5 cm in diameter circular sample after short times of several tens of seconds. Described apparatus may present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food packaging material or other thermolabile materials

  14. ICRF Wave Propagation and Absorption in Plasmas with Non-thermal Populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, R.J.; Phillips, C.K.; Smithe, D.N.

    2002-01-01

    Some results obtained with the one dimensional, all orders, full wave code METS, which has been successfully employed in the past to describe a number of experiments, are reported. By using massively parallel computers, this code has been extended to handle non-thermal populations. Various physical situations, in which non-Maxwellian species are expected to be encountered, are studied, such as simultaneous neutral beam injection and high harmonic fast wave electron heating or ion cyclotron resonance heating in the presence of fusion products

  15. The interplay between biological and physical scenarios of bacterial death induced by non-thermal plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Jäger, Aleš; Polívka, Leoš; Syková, E.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 82, Mar (2016), s. 71-83 ISSN 0142-9612 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Grant - others:FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568; AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : non-thermal plasma * bacteria * cytotoxicity * apoptosis * bacterial inactivation * reactive oxygen species (ROS) Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 8.402, year: 2016

  16. Nonthermal inactivation of norovirus surrogates on blueberries using atmospheric cold plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Alison; Niemira, Brendan A; Gurtler, Joshua B; Sites, Joseph; Boyd, Glenn; Kingsley, David H; Li, Xinhui; Chen, Haiqiang

    2017-05-01

    Viruses are currently the leading cause of foodborne outbreaks, most of which are associated with foods consumed raw. Cold plasma (CP) is an emerging novel nonthermal technology that can be used to surface decontaminate foods. This study investigated CP technology for the nonthermal inactivation of human norovirus surrogates, Tulane virus (TV) and murine norovirus (MNV), on the surface of blueberries. Blueberries (5 g) were weighed into sterile 4 oz. glass jars and inoculated with TV, 5 log PFU/g. Samples were treated with atmospheric CP for 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 s at a working distance of 7.5 cm with 4 cubic feet/minute (cfm) of CP jet. Temperature readings were taken with an infrared camera prior to, and immediately following, CP treatments. In order to establish the impact of air flow during CP treatment (4 cfm), an additional 7 cfm jet of room temperature air was introduced from a separate nozzle. The experiment was repeated with 90 and 120 s as additional treatment time points. Viral titers were measured immediately after each treatment with a plaque assay using LLC-MK2 cells (TV) or RAW 264.7 cells (MNV). TV was significantly reduced 1.5 PFU/g compared to the control after treatment time of 45s, which was achieved regardless of temperature conditions. With the addition of 7 cfm of ambient air, the maximum log reduction for TV was 3.5 log PFU/g after 120s of treatment. MNV was significantly reduced by 0.5 log PFU/g compare to the control at 15s, and further treatment of MNV with ambient air brought the log reduction to greater than 5 log PFU/g at 90 s of treatment (Fig. 3). These results demonstrate that CP viral inactivation does not rely on thermal inactivation, and is therefore nonthermal in nature. With further optimization, CP may be used by food processors as a means of nonthermal inactivation of foodborne viruses. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Study of non-thermal effects from laser radiation on live tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotta, M.A.

    1987-02-01

    The functional biological effects related to the irradiation of live tissues with low power lasers, called non-thermal effects were theoretical and experimentally studied. For the experimental part, a device which allows to: irradiation lesions artificially created on the back of rats by a He-Ne laser, or put a moving ground glass in front of the laser beam, by irradiation of this same laser with its coherence degree decreased. The relevance of the radiation coherence in the lesion cicatrization process was shown. The electrical field distribution and the intensity distribution on a surface with micro-roughness when irradiated by coherent light are theoretically studied. (M.C.K.) [pt

  18. Ion-acoustic supersolitons and double layers in plasmas with nonthermal electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, D.-N.; Zhang, J.; Yang, Y.; Duan, W.-S.

    2017-08-01

    Supersoliton (SS) can be mainly featured in two ways, namely, by focusing on subsidiary maxima on its electric field or by meeting the requirement that the appropriate Sagdeev pseudopotential (SP) has three local extrema between the equilibrium conditions and its amplitude. In this paper, by using the SP method, double layers and ion-acoustic SSs are studied in a plasma with Maxwellian cold electrons, nonthermal hot electrons, and fluid ions. The existence of the SS regime in parameter space is obtained in a methodical fashion. The existence domains for positive solitary waves are also presented. It is found that there is no SSs at the acoustic speed.

  19. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats ?

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Haitham S.; Fahmy, Heba M.; Radwan, Nasr M.; Elsayed, Anwar A.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day). EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep) revealed that the REM sleep is more susc...

  20. Inactivation of possible microorganism food contaminants on packaging foils using nonthermal plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholtz, V., E-mail: Vladimir.Scholtz@vscht.cz; Khun, J. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Physics and Measurements, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic); Soušková, H. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Computing and Control Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic); Čeřovský, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Food Preservation, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-15

    The inactivation effect of nonthermal plasma generated in electric discharge burning in air atmosphere with water or hydrogen peroxide aerosol for the application to the microbial decontamination of packaging foils is studied. The microbial inactivation is studied on two bacterial, two yeasts, and two filamentous micromycete species. The inactivation of all contaminating microorganisms becomes on the area of full 8.5 cm in diameter circular sample after short times of several tens of seconds. Described apparatus may present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food packaging material or other thermolabile materials.

  1. Non-thermal plasma destruction of allyl alcohol in waste gas: kinetics and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVisscher, A.; Dewulf, J.; Van Durme, J.; Leys, C.; Morent, R.; Van Langenhove, H.

    2008-02-01

    Non-thermal plasma treatment is a promising technique for the destruction of volatile organic compounds in waste gas. A relatively unexplored technique is the atmospheric negative dc multi-pin-to-plate glow discharge. This paper reports experimental results of allyl alcohol degradation and ozone production in this type of plasma. A new model was developed to describe these processes quantitatively. The model contains a detailed chemical degradation scheme, and describes the physics of the plasma by assuming that the fraction of electrons that takes part in chemical reactions is an exponential function of the reduced field. The model captured the experimental kinetic data to less than 2 ppm standard deviation.

  2. Non-thermal plasma destruction of allyl alcohol in waste gas: kinetics and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visscher, A de; Dewulf, J; Durme, J van; Leys, C; Morent, R; Langenhove, H Van

    2008-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma treatment is a promising technique for the destruction of volatile organic compounds in waste gas. A relatively unexplored technique is the atmospheric negative dc multi-pin-to-plate glow discharge. This paper reports experimental results of allyl alcohol degradation and ozone production in this type of plasma. A new model was developed to describe these processes quantitatively. The model contains a detailed chemical degradation scheme, and describes the physics of the plasma by assuming that the fraction of electrons that takes part in chemical reactions is an exponential function of the reduced field. The model captured the experimental kinetic data to less than 2 ppm standard deviation

  3. Ion-acoustic double-layers in a magnetized plasma with nonthermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, L. A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas and Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Sistemas Complexos, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Galvão, R. M. O. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas and Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Sistemas Complexos, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05508-900 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    In the present work we investigate the existence of obliquely propagating ion-acoustic double layers in magnetized two-electron plasmas. The fluid model is used to describe the ion dynamics, and the hot electron population is modeled via a κ distribution function, which has been proved to be appropriate for modeling non-Maxwellian plasmas. A quasineutral condition is assumed to investigate these nonlinear structures, which leads to the formation of double-layers propagating with slow ion-acoustic velocity. The problem is investigated numerically, and the influence of parameters such as nonthermality is discussed.

  4. Non-thermal escape rates of atmospheric H and D from Mars using MAVEN data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacesa, M.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2017-12-01

    Geological evidence suggests that an ocean of liquid water existed on Mars until at least middle to late Noachian era (4.1 to 3.8 Ga) and possibly, at least episodically, as late as Hesperian. Between 67% and 87% of the total primordial amount of water, equal to about 70 to 110 meters equivalent (spread over the entire Mars' surface), is believed to have escape to space, while about 35 meters remains on or beneath the surface as water ice. Establishing better constraints on these numbers and identifying the responsible atmospheric loss processes remains the major objective of NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission. The ratio of atmospheric Deuterium and Hydrogen (D/H) on Mars is one of the best indicators of water loss to space. While majority of H and D escape through thermal Jeans escape, up to 10% of D can escape to space via non-thermal mechanisms, such as collisions with superthermal neutral atoms. In this study, we present new estimates of non-thermal escape rates of light molecules of interest to the water evolution, including H2, HD, OH, and OD, based on recent measurements of atmospheric density and temperature profiles by MAVEN. The escape mechanisms considered include photochemical sources of hot O, as well as collisions with energetic neutral atoms produced in charge-exchange of solar wind ions with atmospheric gases1,2. Energy transport and escape rates are modeled using quantum reactive scattering formalism3 and seasonal variations are illustrated. Finally, a simple estimate of the role of the non-thermal escape mechanisms in previous eras is given. We conclude that D escape rates can be affected by the non-thermal processes with consequences on the estimates of primordial water inventory based on the D/H ratio. [1] N. Lewkow and V. Kharchenko, Astroph. J., 790, 98 (2014) [2] M. Gacesa, N. Lewkow, V. Kharchenko, Icarus 284, 90 (2017) [3] M. Gacesa and V. Kharchenko, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L10203 (2012)

  5. Structure of proton centers and associated nonthermal bursts at microwave frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enome, S.; Tanaka, H.

    1972-01-01

    In the flaring region of the sun, a large variety of plasmas with various densities and a wide range of temperatures or energies is implied. These plasmas are heated and accelerated to subrelativistic and relativistic energies. Observational evidence is given on the characteristics of active regions which produced proton flares and on the structure of the associated nonthermal microwave bursts of the sun. The behavior of subrelativistic electrons on the sun is also described. Data are based on observations made with the Toyota interferometers at 3 and 8 cm, which have the same spatial resolution. (U.S.)

  6. THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHOCKED STELLAR WIND OF PULSAR GAMMA-RAY BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabalza, V.; Paredes, J. M. [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bosch-Ramon, V., E-mail: vzabalza@am.ub.es [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2011-12-10

    Gamma-ray-loud X-ray binaries are binary systems that show non-thermal broadband emission from radio to gamma rays. If the system comprises a massive star and a young non-accreting pulsar, their winds will collide producing broadband non-thermal emission, most likely originated in the shocked pulsar wind. Thermal X-ray emission is expected from the shocked stellar wind, but until now it has neither been detected nor studied in the context of gamma-ray binaries. We present a semi-analytic model of the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked stellar wind in pulsar gamma-ray binaries, and find that the thermal X-ray emission increases monotonically with the pulsar spin-down luminosity, reaching luminosities of the order of 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The lack of thermal features in the X-ray spectrum of gamma-ray binaries can then be used to constrain the properties of the pulsar and stellar winds. By fitting the observed X-ray spectra of gamma-ray binaries with a source model composed of an absorbed non-thermal power law and the computed thermal X-ray emission, we are able to derive upper limits on the spin-down luminosity of the putative pulsar. We applied this method to LS 5039, the only gamma-ray binary with a radial, powerful wind, and obtain an upper limit on the pulsar spin-down luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Given the energetic constraints from its high-energy gamma-ray emission, a non-thermal to spin-down luminosity ratio very close to unity may be required.

  7. Nonlinear structure formation in ion-temperature-gradient driven drift waves in pair-ion plasma with nonthermal electron distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaq, Javaria; Haque, Q.; Khan, Majid; Bhatti, Adnan Mehmood; Kamran, M.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2018-02-01

    Nonlinear structure formation in ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven waves is investigated in pair-ion plasma comprising ions and nonthermal electrons (kappa, Cairns). By using the transport equations of the Braginskii model, a new set of nonlinear equations are derived. A linear dispersion relation is obtained and discussed analytically as well as numerically. It is shown that the nonthermal population of electrons affects both the linear and nonlinear characteristics of the ITG mode in pair-ion plasma. This work will be useful in tokamaks and stellarators where non-Maxwellian population of electrons may exist due to resonant frequency heating, electron cyclotron heating, runaway electrons, etc.

  8. Nonlinear electron-acoustic rogue waves in electron-beam plasma system with non-thermal hot electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwakil, S. A.; El-hanbaly, A. M.; Elgarayh, A.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Kassem, A. I.

    2014-11-01

    The properties of nonlinear electron-acoustic rogue waves have been investigated in an unmagnetized collisionless four-component plasma system consisting of a cold electron fluid, non-thermal hot electrons obeying a non-thermal distribution, an electron beam and stationary ions. It is found that the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrodinger equation. The dependence of rogue wave profiles on the electron beam and energetic population parameter are discussed. The results of the present investigation may be applicable in auroral zone plasma.

  9. Effects of ultrasound energy density on the non-thermal pasteurization of chocolate milk beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Sara H M C; Silva, Eric Keven; Alvarenga, Verônica O; Moraes, Jeremias; Freitas, Mônica Q; Silva, Márcia C; Raices, Renata S L; Sant'Ana, Anderson S; Meireles, M Angela A; Cruz, Adriano G

    2018-04-01

    This study presents the emerging high-intensity ultrasound (HIUS) processing as a non-thermal alternative to high-temperature short-time pasteurization (HTST). Chocolate milk beverage (CMB) was subjected to different ultrasound energy densities (0.3-3.0 kJ/cm 3 ), as compared to HTST pasteurization (72 °C/15 s) aimed to verify the effect of the HIUS processing on the microbiological and physicochemical characteristics of the beverage. The application of HIUS at an energy density of 3.0 kJ/cm 3 was able to reduce 3.56 ± 0.02 logarithmic cycles in the total aerobic counts. In addition, the ultrasound energy density affected the physical properties of the beverage as the size distribution of fat globule and rheological behavior, as well as the chemical properties such as antioxidant activity, ACE inhibitory activity, fatty acid profile, and volatile profile. In general, the different energetic densities used as a non-thermal method of pasteurization of CMB were more effective when compared to the conventional pasteurization by HTST, since they improved the microbiological and physicochemical quality, besides preserving the bioactive compounds and the nutritional quality of the product. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Neutralized solar wind ahead of the Earth's magnetopause as contribution to non-thermal exospheric hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In a most recent paper by Qin and Waldrop (2016, it had been found that the scale height of hydrogen in the upper exosphere of the Earth, especially during solar minimum conditions, appears to be surprisingly large. This indicates that during minimum conditions when exobasic temperatures should be small, large exospheric H-scale heights predominate. They thus seem to indicate the presence of a non-thermal hydrogen component in the upper exosphere. In the following parts of the paper we shall investigate what fraction of such expected hot hydrogen atoms could have their origin from protons of the shocked solar wind ahead of the magnetopause converted into energetic neutral atoms (ENAs via charge-exchange processes with normal atmospheric, i.e., exospheric hydrogen atoms that in the first step evaporate from the exobase into the magnetosheath plasma region. We shall show that, dependent on the sunward location of the magnetopause, the density of these types of non-thermal hydrogen atoms (H-ENAs becomes progressively comparable with the density of exobasic hydrogen with increasing altitude. At low exobasic heights, however, their contribution is negligible. At the end of this paper, we finally study the question of whether the H-ENA population could even be understood as a self-consistency phenomenon of the H-ENA population, especially during solar activity minimum conditions, i.e., H-ENAs leaving the exosphere being replaced by H-ENAs injected into the exosphere.

  11. Neutralized solar wind ahead of the Earth's magnetopause as contribution to non-thermal exospheric hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, Hans J.; Nass, Uwe; Dutta-Roy, Robindro; Zoennchen, Jochen H.

    2018-03-01

    In a most recent paper by Qin and Waldrop (2016), it had been found that the scale height of hydrogen in the upper exosphere of the Earth, especially during solar minimum conditions, appears to be surprisingly large. This indicates that during minimum conditions when exobasic temperatures should be small, large exospheric H-scale heights predominate. They thus seem to indicate the presence of a non-thermal hydrogen component in the upper exosphere. In the following parts of the paper we shall investigate what fraction of such expected hot hydrogen atoms could have their origin from protons of the shocked solar wind ahead of the magnetopause converted into energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) via charge-exchange processes with normal atmospheric, i.e., exospheric hydrogen atoms that in the first step evaporate from the exobase into the magnetosheath plasma region. We shall show that, dependent on the sunward location of the magnetopause, the density of these types of non-thermal hydrogen atoms (H-ENAs) becomes progressively comparable with the density of exobasic hydrogen with increasing altitude. At low exobasic heights, however, their contribution is negligible. At the end of this paper, we finally study the question of whether the H-ENA population could even be understood as a self-consistency phenomenon of the H-ENA population, especially during solar activity minimum conditions, i.e., H-ENAs leaving the exosphere being replaced by H-ENAs injected into the exosphere.

  12. Toluene degradation by non-thermal plasma combined with a ferroelectric catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wen-Jun; Ma, Lin; Liu, Huan; Li, Jian

    2013-08-01

    Degradation of toluene in a gas by non-thermal plasma with a ferroelectric catalyst was studied at normal temperature and atmospheric pressure. Spontaneous polarization material (BaTiO3) and photocatalyst (TiO2) were added into plasma system simultively. Toluene degradation efficiency and specific energy density during the discharge process were investigated. Furthermore, byproducts and degradation mechanisms of toluene were also investigated. The toluene degradation efficiency increased when non-thermal plasma technology was combined with the catalyst. The toluene degradation efficiencies of the different catalysts tested were in the following order: BaTiO3/TiO2>BaTiO3>TiO2>no catalyst. A mass ratio of 2.38:1 was optimum for the BaTiO3 and TiO2 catalyst. The outlet gas was analyzed by gas chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and the main compounds detected were CO2, H2O, O3 and benzene ring derivatives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Non-thermal production of minimal dark matter via right-handed neutrino decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Mayumi; Toma, Takashi; Vicente, Avelino

    2015-01-01

    Minimal Dark Matter (MDM) stands as one of the simplest dark matter scenarios. In MDM models, annihilation and co-annihilation processes among the members of the MDM multiplet are usually very efficient, pushing the dark matter mass above O(10) TeV in order to reproduce the observed dark matter relic density. Motivated by this little drawback, in this paper we consider an extension of the MDM scenario by three right-handed neutrinos. Two specific choices for the MDM multiplet are studied: a fermionic SU(2) L quintuplet and a scalar SU(2) L septuplet. The lightest right-handed neutrino, with tiny Yukawa couplings, never reaches thermal equilibrium in the early universe and is produced by freeze-in. This creates a link between dark matter and neutrino physics: dark matter can be non-thermally produced by the decay of the lightest right-handed neutrino after freeze-out, allowing to lower significantly the dark matter mass. We discuss the phenomenology of the non-thermally produced MDM and, taking into account significant Sommerfeld corrections, we find that the dark matter mass must have some specific values in order not to be in conflict with the current bounds from gamma-ray observations

  14. A hybrid model for computing nonthermal ion distributions in a long mean-free-path plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xianzhu; McDevitt, Chris; Guo, Zehua; Berk, Herb

    2014-10-01

    Non-thermal ions, especially the suprathermal ones, are known to make a dominant contribution to a number of important physics such as the fusion reactivity in controlled fusion, the ion heat flux, and in the case of a tokamak, the ion bootstrap current. Evaluating the deviation from a local Maxwellian distribution of these non-thermal ions can be a challenging task in the context of a global plasma fluid model that evolves the plasma density, flow, and temperature. Here we describe a hybrid model for coupling such constrained kinetic calculation to global plasma fluid models. The key ingredient is a non-perturbative treatment of the tail ions where the ion Knudsen number approaches or surpasses order unity. This can be sharply constrasted with the standard Chapman-Enskog approach which relies on a perturbative treatment that is frequently invalidated. The accuracy of our coupling scheme is controlled by the precise criteria for matching the non-perturbative kinetic model to perturbative solutions in both configuration space and velocity space. Although our specific application examples will be drawn from laboratory controlled fusion experiments, the general approach is applicable to space and astrophysical plasmas as well. Work supported by DOE.

  15. Large-k exciton dynamics in GaN epilayers: Nonthermal and thermal regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinattieri, Anna; Bogani, Franco; Cavigli, Lucia; Manzi, Donatella; Gurioli, Massimo; Feltin, Eric; Carlin, Jean-François; Martin, Denis; Butté, Raphaël; Grandjean, Nicolas

    2013-02-01

    We present a detailed investigation performed at low temperature (T<50 K) concerning the exciton dynamics in GaN epilayers grown on c-plane sapphire substrates, focusing on the exciton formation and the transition from the nonthermal to the thermal regime. The time-resolved kinetics of longitudinal-optical-phonon replicas is used to address the energy relaxation in the excitonic band. From picosecond time-resolved spectra, we bring evidence for a long lasting nonthermal excitonic distribution, which accounts for the first 50 ps. Such a behavior is confirmed in different experimental conditions when both nonresonant and resonant excitations are used. At low excitation power density, the exciton formation and their subsequent thermalization are dominated by impurity scattering rather than by acoustic phonon scattering. The estimate of the average energy of the excitons as a function of delay after the excitation pulse provides information on the relaxation time, which describes the evolution of the exciton population to the thermal regime.

  16. Effect of CO on NO and N2O conversions in nonthermal argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Guibing; Argyle, Morris D.; Radosz, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    200-600 ppm of CO inhibit NO conversion in nonthermal Ar plasma, but do not produce N 2 O. However, 1.01% of CO has no effect on NO conversion, but produces N 2 O. In general, N 2 O conversion in Ar plasma decreases with increasing CO concentration. These experimental results cannot be explained by charge transfer reactions of Ar + . Selectivity analysis of all excited states of Ar possibly contributing to NO x conversion without and with CO suggests that only Ar( 3 P 2 ) contributes to NO x conversion and CO dissociation. A kinetic model of 43 reactions is required to model NO conversion or N 2 O conversion in Ar without CO, whereas 81 reactions are required to model NO conversion and N 2 O conversion in Ar with CO. At constant gas pressure, a single set of model parameters can predict NO conversion or N 2 O conversion without and with CO. All experimental results can be explained using a reaction mechanism in which excited neutral states of Ar are the only active species, which supports the conclusion that cations have a negligible impact on these nonthermal plasma reactions

  17. Non-thermal plasma instabilities induced by deformation of the electron energy distribution function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyatko, N. A.; Kochetov, I. V.; Napartovich, A. P.

    2014-08-01

    Non-thermal plasma is a key component in gas lasers, microelectronics, medical applications, waste gas cleaners, ozone generators, plasma igniters, flame holders, flow control in high-speed aerodynamics and others. A specific feature of non-thermal plasma is its high sensitivity to variations in governing parameters (gas composition, pressure, pulse duration, E/N parameter). This sensitivity is due to complex deformations of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) shape induced by variations in electric field strength, electron and ion number densities and gas excitation degree. Particular attention in this article is paid to mechanisms of instabilities based on non-linearity of plasma properties for specific conditions: gas composition, steady-state and decaying plasma produced by the electron beam, or by an electric current pulse. The following effects are analyzed: the negative differential electron conductivity; the absolute negative electron mobility; the stepwise changes of plasma properties induced by the EEDF bi-stability; thermo-current instability and the constriction of the glow discharge column in rare gases. Some of these effects were observed experimentally and some of them were theoretically predicted and still wait for experimental confirmation.

  18. Atmospheric non-thermal argon-oxygen plasma for sunflower seedling growth improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matra, Khanit

    2018-01-01

    Seedling growth enhancement of sunflower seeds by DC atmospheric non-thermal Ar-O2 plasma has been proposed. The plasma reactor was simply designed by the composition of multi-pin electrodes bonded on a solderable printed circuit board (PCB) anode. A stable plasma was exhibited in the non-periodical self-pulsing discharge mode during the seed treatment. The experimental results showed that non-thermal plasma treatment had a significant positive effect on the sunflower seeds. Ar-O2 mixed gas ratio, treatment time and power source voltage are the important parameters affecting growth stimulation of sunflower sprouts. In this research, the sunflower seeds treated with 3:3 liters per minute (LPM) of Ar-O2 plasma at a source voltage of 8 kV for 1 min showed the best results in stimulating the seedling growth. The results in this case showed that the dry weight and average shoot length of the sunflower sprouts were 1.79 and 2.69 times higher and heavier than those of the untreated seeds, respectively.

  19. Human Milk Composition and Preservation: Evaluation of High-pressure Processing as a Nonthermal Pasteurization Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Sílvia G; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Saraiva, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    Human milk is seen not only as a food, but as a functional and dynamic biologic system. It provides nutrients, bioactive components, and immune factors, promoting adequate and healthy growth of newborn infants. When mothers cannot supply their children, donated breast milk is the nutrition recommended by the World Health Organization, as it is a better alternative than infant formula. However, because of the manner in which donor milk is handled in human milk banks (HMB) many of the properties ascribed to mother's own milk are diminished or destroyed. The major process responsible for these losses is Holder pasteurization. High-pressure processing (HPP) is a novel nonthermal pasteurization technology that is being increasingly applied in food industries worldwide, primarily as an alternative to thermal treatment. This is due to its capacity to inactivate microorganisms while preserving both nutritional and bioactive components of foods. This review describes human milk composition and preservation, and critically discusses HMB importance and practices, highlighting HPP as a potential nonthermal pasteurization technology for human milk preservation. HPP technology is described and the few currently existing studies of its effects in human milk are presented.

  20. Non-thermal production of minimal dark matter via right-handed neutrino decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Mayumi [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kanazawa University,Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Toma, Takashi [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS - UMR 8627, Université de Paris-Sud 11,F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Vicente, Avelino [IFPA, Dep. AGO, Université de Liège,Bat B5, Sart-Tilman B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València,Apdo. 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2015-09-29

    Minimal Dark Matter (MDM) stands as one of the simplest dark matter scenarios. In MDM models, annihilation and co-annihilation processes among the members of the MDM multiplet are usually very efficient, pushing the dark matter mass above O(10) TeV in order to reproduce the observed dark matter relic density. Motivated by this little drawback, in this paper we consider an extension of the MDM scenario by three right-handed neutrinos. Two specific choices for the MDM multiplet are studied: a fermionic SU(2){sub L} quintuplet and a scalar SU(2){sub L} septuplet. The lightest right-handed neutrino, with tiny Yukawa couplings, never reaches thermal equilibrium in the early universe and is produced by freeze-in. This creates a link between dark matter and neutrino physics: dark matter can be non-thermally produced by the decay of the lightest right-handed neutrino after freeze-out, allowing to lower significantly the dark matter mass. We discuss the phenomenology of the non-thermally produced MDM and, taking into account significant Sommerfeld corrections, we find that the dark matter mass must have some specific values in order not to be in conflict with the current bounds from gamma-ray observations.

  1. Non-thermal production of minimal dark matter via right-handed neutrino decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Mayumi [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Toma, Takashi [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS - UMR 8627, Université de Paris-Sud 11, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Vicente, Avelino, E-mail: mayumi@hep.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp, E-mail: takashi.toma@th.u-psud.fr, E-mail: Avelino.Vicente@ulg.ac.be [IFPA, Dep. AGO, Université de Liège, Bat B5, Sart-Tilman B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium)

    2015-09-01

    Minimal Dark Matter (MDM) stands as one of the simplest dark matter scenarios. In MDM models, annihilation and co-annihilation processes among the members of the MDM multiplet are usually very efficient, pushing the dark matter mass above O(10) TeV in order to reproduce the observed dark matter relic density. Motivated by this little drawback, in this paper we consider an extension of the MDM scenario by three right-handed neutrinos. Two specific choices for the MDM multiplet are studied: a fermionic SU(2){sub L} quintuplet and a scalar SU(2){sub L} septuplet. The lightest right-handed neutrino, with tiny Yukawa couplings, never reaches thermal equilibrium in the early universe and is produced by freeze-in. This creates a link between dark matter and neutrino physics: dark matter can be non-thermally produced by the decay of the lightest right-handed neutrino after freeze-out, allowing to lower significantly the dark matter mass. We discuss the phenomenology of the non-thermally produced MDM and, taking into account significant Sommerfeld corrections, we find that the dark matter mass must have some specific values in order not to be in conflict with the current bounds from gamma-ray observations.

  2. Galaxy Cluster Outskirts from the Thermal SZ and Non-Thermal Synchrotron Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustuv Basu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Galaxy cluster merger shocks are the main agent for the thermalization of the intracluster medium and the energization of cosmic ray particles in it. Shock propagation changes the state of the tenuous intracluster plasma, and the corresponding signal variations are measurable with the current generation of X-ray and Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (SZ effect instruments. Additionally, non-thermal electrons (re-energized by the shocks sometimes give rise to extended and luminous synchrotron sources known as radio relics, which are prominent indicators of shocks propagating roughly in the plane of the sky. In this short review, we discuss how the joint modeling of the non-thermal and thermal signal variations across radio relic shock fronts is helping to advance our knowledge of the gas thermodynamical properties and magnetic field strengths in the cluster outskirts. We describe the first use of the SZ effect to measure the Mach numbers of relic shocks, for both the nearest (Coma and the farthest (El Gordo clusters with known radio relics.

  3. Surface modification of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds by non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatment for improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yu-Ri; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Song, Doo-Hoon; Choi, Eun Ha; Lee, Yong-Keun; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Mahn

    2013-01-01

    Surface modifications induced by non-thermal plasma have been used extensively in biomedical applications. The attachment and proliferation of osteoblast cells are important in bone tissue engineering using scaffolds. Hence the effect of non-thermal plasma on hydroxyapatite/β-tri-calcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) scaffolds in terms of improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation was investigated. Experimental groups were treated with non-thermal plasma for 10 min and 20 min and a control group was not treated with non-thermal plasma. For surface chemistry analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was carried out. The hydrophilicity was determined from contact angle measurement on the surface. Atomic force microscopy analysis (AFM) was used to test the change in surface roughness and cell attachment and proliferation were evaluated using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. XPS spectra revealed a decreased amount of carbon on the surface of the plasma-treated sample. The contact angle was also decreased following plasma treatment, indicating improved hydrophilicity of plasma-treated surfaces compared to the untreated disc. A significant increase in MC3T3E-1 cell attachment and proliferation was noted on plasma-treated samples as compared to untreated specimens. The results suggest that non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatments provide beneficial surface characteristics on HA/β-TCP scaffolds. - Highlights: ► Non-thermal plasma increased OH- and decreased C on biphasic scaffold. ► Non-thermal plasma had no effect on surface roughness. ► Non-thermal plasma resulted in hydrophilic surface. ► Non-thermal plasma resulted in better cell attachment and proliferation. ► Non-thermal plasma treatment on biphasic scaffold is useful for tissue engineering

  4. Emissions treatment of diesel engines by plasma outside of balance; Tratamiento de emisiones de motores diesel por plasma fuera de equilibrio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco P, M.; Pacheco S, J.; Valdivia B, R.; Garcia R, M.; Estrada M, N. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Santana D, A. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Lefort, B.; Le Moyne, L.; Zamilpa, C., E-mail: marquidia.pacheco@inin.gob.mx [Institut Superieur d l' Automobile et des Transports, 49 rue Madeimoiselle Bourgeois BP31, 58027 Nevers cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays, diesel engines are greatly developed in automobiles allowing the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions (CO{sub 2}); however high emissions of particulate matter (Mp) and nitric oxides (NO{sub x}) still remain. A technology based on non-thermal plasma to diminish toxic emissions is exposed in this work. From previous experimental and simulation results, a chemical mechanism is proposed showing a rapidly diminution of Mp and NO{sub x}, in presence of plasma. (Author)

  5. Non Thermal Emission from Clusters of Galaxies: the Importance of a Joint LOFAR/Simbol-X View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, C.

    2009-05-01

    Deep radio observations of galaxy clusters have revealed the existence of diffuse radio sources (``halos'' and ``relics'') related to the presence of relativistic electrons and weak magnetic fields in the intracluster volume. I will outline our current knowledge about the presence and properties of this non-thermal cluster component. Despite the recent progress made in observational and theoretical studies of the non-thermal emission in galaxy clusters, a number of open questions about its origin and its effects on the thermo-dynamical evolution of galaxy clusters need to be answered. I will show the importance of combining galaxy cluster observations by new-generation instruments such as LOFAR and Simbol-X. A deeper knowledge of the non-thermal cluster component, together with statistical studies of radio halos and relics, will allow to test the current cluster formation scenario and to better constrain the physics of large scale structure evolution.

  6. Non Thermal Emission from Clusters of Galaxies: the Importance of a Joint LOFAR/Simbol-X View

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.

    2009-01-01

    Deep radio observations of galaxy clusters have revealed the existence of diffuse radio sources ('halos' and 'relics') related to the presence of relativistic electrons and weak magnetic fields in the intracluster volume. I will outline our current knowledge about the presence and properties of this non-thermal cluster component. Despite the recent progress made in observational and theoretical studies of the non-thermal emission in galaxy clusters, a number of open questions about its origin and its effects on the thermo-dynamical evolution of galaxy clusters need to be answered. I will show the importance of combining galaxy cluster observations by new-generation instruments such as LOFAR and Simbol-X. A deeper knowledge of the non-thermal cluster component, together with statistical studies of radio halos and relics, will allow to test the current cluster formation scenario and to better constrain the physics of large scale structure evolution.

  7. Observation of reduction of secondary electron emission from helium ion impact due to plasma-generated nanostructured tungsten fuzz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollmann, E M; Doerner, R P; Nishijima, D; Pigarov, A Yu

    2017-01-01

    Growth of nanostructured fuzz on a tungsten target in a helium plasma is found to cause a significant (∼3×) reduction in ion impact secondary electron emission in a linear plasma device. The ion impact secondary electron emission is separated from the electron impact secondary electron emission by varying the target bias voltage and fitting to expected contributions from electron impact, both thermal and non-thermal; with the non-thermal electron contribution being modeled using Monte-Carlo simulations. The observed (∼3×) reduction is similar in magnitude to the (∼2×) reduction observed in previous work for the effect of tungsten fuzz formation on secondary electron emission due to electron impact. It is hypothesized that the observed reduction results from re-absorption of secondary electrons in the tungsten fuzz. (paper)

  8. Nonthermal processing technologies to improve the safety of raw meat and poultry products and ready-to-eat foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newly emerging nonthermal and advanced thermal processing technologies are now being adopted by the food processing industry for the purpose of providing safe and high quality food products to consumers. Scientists and engineers at USDA’s Eastern Regional Research Center in Wyndmoor, PA are activel...

  9. Fully nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary waves in a plasma with positive-negative ions and nonthermal electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabry, R.; Shukla, P. K.; Moslem, W. M.

    2009-01-01

    Properties of fully nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary waves in a plasma with positive-negative ions and nonthermal electrons are investigated. For this purpose, the hydrodynamic equations for the positive-negative ions, nonthermal electron density distribution, and the Poisson equation are used to derive the energy integral equation with a new Sagdeev potential. The latter is analyzed to examine the existence regions of the solitary pulses. It is found that the solitary excitations strongly depend on the mass and density ratios of the positive and negative ions as well as the nonthermal electron parameter. Numerical solution of the energy integral equation clears that both positive and negative potentials exist together. It is found that faster solitary pulses are taller and narrower. Furthermore, increasing the electron nonthermality parameter (negative-to-positive ions density ratio) decreases (increases) the localized excitation amplitude but increases (decreases) the pulse width. The present model is used to investigate the solitary excitations in the (H + ,O 2 - ) and (H + ,H - ) plasmas, where they are presented in the D- and F-regions of the Earth's ionosphere. This investigation should be helpful in understanding the salient features of the fully nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary waves in space and in laboratory plasmas where two distinct groups of ions and non-Boltzmann distributed electrons are present.

  10. Signatures of a Nonthermal Metastable State in Copropagating Quantum Hall Edge Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kosuke; Nakazawa, Ryo; Ota, Tomoaki; Hashisaka, Masayuki; Muraki, Koji; Fujisawa, Toshimasa

    2018-05-01

    A Tomonaga-Luttinger (TL) liquid is known as an integrable system, in which a nonequilibrium many-body state survives without relaxing to a thermalized state. This intriguing characteristic is tested experimentally in copropagating quantum Hall edge channels at bulk filling factor ν =2 . The unidirectional transport allows us to investigate the time evolution by measuring the spatial evolution of the electronic states. The initial state is prepared with a biased quantum point contact, and its spatial evolution is measured with a quantum-dot energy spectrometer. We find strong evidence for a nonthermal metastable state in agreement with the TL theory before the system relaxes to thermal equilibrium with coupling to the environment.

  11. Nonthermal plasma synthesis of size-controlled, monodisperse, freestanding germanium nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gresback, Ryan; Holman, Zachary; Kortshagen, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Germanium nanocrystals may be of interest for a variety of electronic and optoelectronic applications including photovoltaics, primarily due to the tunability of their band gap from the infrared into the visible range of the spectrum. This letter discusses the synthesis of monodisperse germanium nanocrystals via a nonthermal plasma approach which allows for precise control of the nanocrystal size. Germanium crystals are synthesized from germanium tetrachloride and hydrogen entrained in an argon background gas. The crystal size can be varied between 4 and 50 nm by changing the residence times of crystals in the plasma between ∼30 and 440 ms. Adjusting the plasma power enables one to synthesize fully amorphous or fully crystalline particles with otherwise similar properties

  12. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Haitham S.; Fahmy, Heba M.; Radwan, Nasr M.; Elsayed, Anwar A.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day). EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep) revealed that the REM sleep is more susceptible to modulated radiofrequency radiation fields (RFR) than the SWS. The latency of REM sleep increased due to radiation exposure indicating a change in the ultradian rhythm of normal sleep cycles. The cumulative and irreversible effect of radiation exposure was proposed and the interaction of the extremely low frequency radiation with the similar EEG frequencies was suggested. PMID:25685416

  13. Non-thermal transitions in a model inspired by moral decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamino, Roberto C

    2016-01-01

    This work introduces a model in which agents of a network act upon one another according to three different kinds of moral decisions. These decisions are based on an increasing level of sophistication in the empathy capacity of the agent, a hierarchy which we name Piaget ’ s ladder . The decision strategy of the agents is non-rational, in the sense they are arbitrarily fixed, and the model presents quenched disorder given by the distribution of its defining parameters. An analytical solution for this model is obtained in the large system limit as well as a leading order correction for finite-size systems which shows that typical realisations of the model develop a phase structure with both continuous and discontinuous non-thermal transitions. (paper)

  14. Non-thermal fixed points and solitons in a one-dimensional Bose gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Maximilian; Erne, Sebastian; Nowak, Boris; Sexty, Dénes; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Single-particle momentum spectra for a dynamically evolving one-dimensional Bose gas are analysed in the semi-classical wave limit. Representing one of the simplest correlation functions, these provide information on a possible universal scaling behaviour. Motivated by the previously discovered connection between (quasi-) topological field configurations, strong wave turbulence and non-thermal fixed points of quantum field dynamics, soliton formation is studied with respect to the appearance of transient power-law spectra. A random-soliton model is developed for describing the spectra analytically, and the analogies and differences between the emerging power laws and those found in a field theory approach to strong wave turbulence are discussed. The results open a new perspective on solitary wave dynamics from the point of view of critical phenomena far from thermal equilibrium and the possibility of studying this dynamics by experiment without the need for detecting solitons in situ. (paper)

  15. Nonthermal fusion reactor concept based on Hall-effect magnetohydrodynamics plasma theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witalis, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    The failure of magnetic confinement controlled thermonuclear fusion research to achieve its goal is attributed to its foundation on the incomplete MHD plasma description instead of the more general HMHD (Hall-effect magnetohydrodynamics) theory. The latter allows for a certain magnetic plasma self-confinement under described stringent conditions. A reactor concept based on the formation, acceleration, and forced disintegration of magnetized whirl structures, plasmoids, is proposed. The four conventional MHD theory objections, i.e., absence of dynamo action, fast decay caused by resistivity, non-existence of magnetic self-confinement, and negligible non-thermal fusion yield, are shown not to apply. Support for the scheme from dense plasma focus research is pointed out. (orig.) [de

  16. Cosmological bounds on large extra dimensions from nonthermal production of Kaluza-Klein modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh; Bird, Chris; Groot Nibbelink, Stefan; Pospelov, Maxim

    2004-01-01

    The existing cosmological constraints on theories with large extra dimensions rely on the thermal production of the Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes of gravitons and radions in the early Universe. Successful inflation and reheating, as well as baryogenesis, typically requires the existence of a TeV-scale field in the bulk, most notably the inflaton. The nonthermal production of KK modes with masses of order 100 GeV accompanying the inflaton decay sets the lower bounds on the fundamental scale M * . For a 1-TeV inflaton, the late decay of these modes distorts the successful predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis unless M * >35, 13, 7, 5, and 3 TeV for two, three, four, five, and six extra dimensions, respectively. This improves the existing bounds from cosmology on M * for four, five, and six extra dimensions. Even more stringent bounds are derived for a heavier inflaton

  17. Probing non-thermal density fluctuations in the one-dimensional Bose gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo De Nardis, Miłosz Panfil, Andrea Gambassi, Leticia F. Cugliandolo, Robert Konik, Laura Foini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantum integrable models display a rich variety of non-thermal excited states with unusual properties. The most common way to probe them is by performing a quantum quench, i.e., by letting a many-body initial state unitarily evolve with an integrable Hamiltonian. At late times, these systems are locally described by a generalized Gibbs ensemble with as many effective temperatures as their local conserved quantities. The experimental measurement of this macroscopic number of temperatures remains elusive. Here we show that they can be obtained by probing the dynamical structure factor of the system after the quench and by employing a generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorem that we provide. Our procedure allows us to completely reconstruct the stationary state of a quantum integrable system from state-of-the-art experimental observations.

  18. Non-thermal plasma ethanol reforming in bubbles immersed in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Sharma, Ashish; Raja, Laxminarayan L

    2017-01-01

    Ethanol reforming in non-thermal plasma generated in atmospheric-pressure argon bubbles immersed in liquid ethanol/water solution is studied using a self-consistent multi-species fluid model. The influence of the dielectric constant of the liquid on the plasma dynamics and its effect on the generation of active species is analyzed. Several modes of discharge are obtained for large liquid dielectric constant. In these modes, we obtain either an axial streamer or a combination of two simultaneous streamers propagating along the bubble axis and near the liquid wall. The influence of these modes on the production of active species is also studied. The main reactions responsible for the generation of molecular hydrogen and light hydrocarbon species are analyzed. A possible mechanism of hydrogen generation in liquid phase is discussed. (paper)

  19. Non-thermal effects of 94 GHz radiation on bacterial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitt, Brittany J.

    Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Klebsiella pneumoniae were used to investigate the non-thermal effects of terahertz (THz) radiation exposure on bacterial cells. The THz source used was a 94 GHz (0.94 THz) Millitech Gunn Diode Oscillator with a power density of 1.3 mW/cm2. The cultures were placed in the middle sixty wells of two 96-well microplates, one serving as the experimental plate and one serving as a control. The experimental plate was placed on the radiation source for either two, eighteen, or twenty-four hours and the metabolism of the cells was measured in a spectrophotometer using the tetrazolium dye XTT. The results showed no consistent significant differences in either the growth rates or the metabolism of any of the bacterial species at this frequency and power density.

  20. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitham S. Mohammed

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day. EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep revealed that the REM sleep is more susceptible to modulated radiofrequency radiation fields (RFR than the SWS. The latency of REM sleep increased due to radiation exposure indicating a change in the ultradian rhythm of normal sleep cycles. The cumulative and irreversible effect of radiation exposure was proposed and the interaction of the extremely low frequency radiation with the similar EEG frequencies was suggested.

  1. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Nonthermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris Argyle; John Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Gui-Bing Zhao; Sanil John; Ji-Jun Zhang; Linna Wang

    2007-09-30

    The goal of this experimental project was to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a nonthermal plasma and to recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), but it was not achieved at the moderate pressure conditions used in this study. However, H{sub 2}S was successfully decomposed at energy efficiencies higher than any other reports for the high H{sub 2}S concentration and moderate pressures (corresponding to high reactor throughputs) used in this study.

  2. Non-thermal plasma technology for the development of antimicrobial surfaces: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Anton; Deng, Xiaolong; Xiong, Qing; Cvelbar, U.; DeGeyter, N.; Morent, R.; Leys, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial coatings are in high demand in many fields including the biomaterials and healthcare sectors. Within recent progress in nanoscience and engineering at the nanoscale, preparation of nanocomposite films containing metal nanoparticles (such as silver nanoparticles, copper nanoparticles, zinc oxide nanoparticles) is becoming an important step in manufacturing biomaterials with high antimicrobial activity. Controlled release of antibiotic agents and eliminating free nanoparticles are of equal importance for engineering antimicrobial nanocomposite materials. Compared to traditional chemical ‘wet’ methods, plasma deposition and plasma polymerization are promising approaches for the fabrication of nanocomposite films with the advantages of gas phase dry processes, effective use of chemicals and applicability to various substrates. In this article, we present a short overview of state-of-the-art engineering of antimicrobial materials based on the use of non-thermal plasmas at low and atmospheric pressure.

  3. Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure for ozone generation and volatile organic compounds decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekarek, S.; Khun, J.

    2006-01-01

    The non-thermal plasma technologies based on electrical discharges play an important role in ecological applications. The classical corona discharge is however relatively low power discharge. With the aim to extend its current-voltage range we studied hollow needle-to-plate DC corona discharge enhanced by the flow of a gas through the needle electrode. With this type of the discharge we performed an extensive study of ozone generation and volatile organic compounds decomposition. We found that supply of air through the needle substantially increases current-voltage range of the discharge in comparison with classical pin-to-plate corona discharge. Consequently the ozone generation as well as toluene decomposition efficiency was increased (Authors)

  4. Removal of dimethyl sulfide by the combination of non-thermal plasma and biological process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Z S; Li, H Q; He, J C; Ye, Q H; Huang, Q R; Luo, Y W

    2013-10-01

    A bench scale system integrated with a non-thermal plasma (NTP) and a biotricking filtration (BTF) unit for the treatment of gases containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) was investigated. DMS removal efficiency in the integrated system was up to 96%. Bacterial communities in the BTF were assessed by PCR-DGGE, which play the dominant role in the biological processes of metabolism, sulfur oxidation, sulfate-reducing and carbon oxidation. The addition of ozone from NTP made microbial community in BTF more complicated and active for DMS removal. The NTP oxidize DMS to simple compounds such as methanol and carbonyl sulfide; the intermediate organic products and DMS are further oxidized to sulfate, carbon dioxide, water vapors by biological degradation. These results show that NTP-BTF is achievable and open new possibilities for applying the integrated with NTP and BTF to odour gas treatment. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrated CO{sub 2} Capture and Utilization Using Non-Thermal Plasmolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, Matthew, E-mail: mmoss1@sheffield.ac.uk; Reed, Daniel G.; Allen, Ray W. K.; Styring, Peter [UK Centre for Carbon Dioxide Utilisation, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-02

    In this work, two simple processes for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) such as capture and utilization have been combined to form a whole systems approach to carbon capture and utilization (CCU). The first stage utilizes a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system, which offers many benefits over current amine technologies. It was found that high selectivity can be achieved with rapid adsorption/desorption times while employing a cheap, durable sorbent that exhibits no sorbent losses and is easily regenerated by simple pressure drops. The PSA system is capable of capturing and upgrading the CO{sub 2} concentration of a waste gas stream from 12.5% to a range of higher purities. As many CCU end processes have some tolerance toward impurities in the feed, in the form of nitrogen (N{sub 2}), for example, this is highly advantageous for this PSA system since CO{sub 2} purities in excess of 80% can be achieved with only a few steps and minimal energy input. Non-thermal plasma is one such technology that can tolerate, and even benefit from, small N{sub 2} impurities in the feed, therefore a 100% pure CO{sub 2} stream is not required. The second stage of this process deploys a nanosecond pulsed corona discharge reactor to split the captured CO{sub 2} into carbon monoxide (CO), which can then be used as a chemical feedstock for other syntheses. Corona discharge has proven industrial applications for gas cleaning and the benefit of pulsed power reduces the energy consumption of the system. The wire-in-cylinder geometry concentrates the volume of gas treated into the area of high electric field. Previous work has suggested that moderate conversions can be achieved (9%), compared to other non-thermal plasma methods, but with higher energy efficiencies (>60%).

  6. Summary of comparative results integrated nonthermal treatment and integrated thermal treatment systems studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    In July 1994, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), under a contract from U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Environment Management Office of Science and Technology (OST, EM-50) published a report entitled open-quotes Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study - Phase 1 Resultsclose quotes (EGG-MS-11211). This report was the culmination of over a year of analysis involving scientists and engineers within the DOE complex and from private industry. The purpose of that study was open-quotes to conduct a systematic engineering evaluation of a variety of mixed low level waste (MLLW) treatment system alternatives.close quotes The study also open-quotes identified the research and development, demonstrations, and testing and evaluation needed to assure unit operability in the most promising alternative system.close quotes This study evaluated ten primary thermal treatment technologies, organized into complete open-quotes cradle-to-graveclose quotes systems (including complete engineering flow sheets), to treat DOE MLLW and calculated mass balances and 20-year total life cycle costs (TLCC) for all systems. The waste input used was a representative heterogenous mixture of typical DOE MLLW. An additional study was conducted, and then, based on response to these studies, additional work was started to investigate and evaluate non-thermal treatment options on a footing comparable to the effort devoted to thermal options. This report attempts to present a summary overview of the thermal and non-thermal treatment technologies which were examined in detail in the process of the above mentioned reviews

  7. Non-thermal desorption from interstellar dust grains via exothermic surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrod, R. T.; Wakelam, V.; Herbst, E.

    2007-06-01

    Aims:The gas-phase abundance of methanol in dark quiescent cores in the interstellar medium cannot be explained by gas-phase chemistry. In fact, the only possible synthesis of this species appears to be production on the surfaces of dust grains followed by desorption into the gas. Yet, evaporation is inefficient for heavy molecules such as methanol at the typical temperature of 10 K. It is necessary then to consider non-thermal mechanisms for desorption. But, if such mechanisms are considered for the production of methanol, they must be considered for all surface species. Methods: Our gas-grain network of reactions has been altered by the inclusion of a non-thermal desorption mechanism in which the exothermicity of surface addition reactions is utilized to break the bond between the product species and the surface. Our estimated rate for this process derives from a simple version of classical unimolecular rate theory with a variable parameter only loosely constrained by theoretical work. Results: Our results show that the chemistry of dark clouds is altered slightly at times up to 106 yr, mainly by the enhancement in the gas-phase abundances of hydrogen-rich species such as methanol that are formed on grain surfaces. At later times, however, there is a rather strong change. Instead of the continuing accretion of most gas-phase species onto dust particles, a steady-state is reached for both gas-phase and grain-surface species, with significant abundances for the former. Nevertheless, most of the carbon is contained in an undetermined assortment of heavy surface hydrocarbons. Conclusions: The desorption mechanism discussed here will be better constrained by observational data on pre-stellar cores, where a significant accretion of species such as CO has already occurred.

  8. Pyrite-enhanced methylene blue degradation in non-thermal plasma water treatment reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benetoli, Luis Otavio de Brito, E-mail: luskywalcker@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Cadorin, Bruno Mena; Baldissarelli, Vanessa Zanon [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Geremias, Reginaldo [Departamento de Ciencias Rurais, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Curitibanos, SC (Brazil); Goncalvez de Souza, Ivan [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Debacher, Nito Angelo, E-mail: debacher@qmc.ufsc.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-10-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use O{sub 2} as the feed gas and pyrite was added to the non-thermal plasma reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The methylene blue removal by NTP increased in the presence of pyrite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The total organic carbon content decreased substantially. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acute toxicity test showed that the treated solution is not toxic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dye degradation occurs via electron impact as well as successive hydroxylation. - Abstract: In this study, methylene blue (MB) removal from an aqueous phase by electrical discharge non-thermal plasma (NTP) over water was investigated using three different feed gases: N{sub 2}, Ar, and O{sub 2}. The results showed that the dye removal rate was not strongly dependent on the feed gas when the electrical current was kept the same for all gases. The hydrogen peroxide generation in the water varied according to the feed gas (N{sub 2} < Ar < O{sub 2}). Using O{sub 2} as the feed gas, pyrite was added to the reactor in acid medium resulting in an accentuated increase in the dye removal, which suggests that pyrite acts as a Fenton-like catalyst. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the dye solution decreased slightly as the plasma treatment time increased, but in the presence of the pyrite catalyst the TOC removal increased substantially. The acute toxicity test using Artemia sp. microcrustaceans showed that the treated solution is not toxic when Ar, O{sub 2} or O{sub 2}-pyrite is employed. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis (ESI-MS) of the treated samples indicated that the dye degradation occurs via high energy electron impact as well as successive hydroxylation in the benzene rings of the dye molecules.

  9. NuSTAR Hard X-ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region. I. Hard X-ray Morphology and Spectroscopy of the Diffuse Emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Krivonos, Roman

    2015-01-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456-2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources, and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). Nu...

  10. Morphological Control of In x Ga 1–x P Nanocrystals Synthesized in a Nonthermal Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronstein, Noah D. [Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Wheeler, Lance M. [Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Anderson, Nicholas C. [Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Neale, Nathan R. [Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States

    2018-04-09

    We explore the growth of InxGa1-xP nanocrystals (x = 1, InP; x = 0, GaP; and 1 > x > 0, alloys) in a nonthermal plasma. By tuning the reactor conditions, we gain control over the morphology of the final product, producing either 10 nm diameter hollow nanocrystals or smaller 3 nm solid nanocrystals. We observe the gas-phase chemistry in the plasma reactor using plasma emission spectroscopy to understand the growth mechanism of the hollow versus solid morphology. We also connect this plasma chemistry to the subsequent native surface chemistry of the nanocrystals, which is dominated by the presence of both dative- and lattice-bound phosphine species. The dative phosphines react readily with oleylamine in an L-type ligand exchange reaction, evolving phosphines and allowing the particles to be dispersed in nonpolar solvents. Subsequent treatment by HF causes the solid InP1.5 and In0.5Ga0.5P1.3 to become photoluminescent, whereas the hollow particles remain nonemissive.

  11. Nonlinear dynamics of circularly polarized laser pulse propagating in a magnetized plasma with superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etemadpour, R.; Dorranian, D., E-mail: doran@srbiau.ac.ir [Laser Laboratory, Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sepehri Javan, N. [Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P.O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of a circularly polarized laser pulse propagating in the magnetized plasmas whose constituents are superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons is studied theoretically. A nonlinear equation which describes the dynamics of the slowly varying amplitude is obtained using a relativistic two-fluid model. Based on this nonlinear equation and taking into account some nonlinear phenomena such as modulational instability, self-focusing and soliton formation are investigated. Effect of the magnetized plasma with superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons on these phenomena is considered. It is shown that the nonthermality and superthermality of particles can substantially change the nonlinearity of medium.

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of circularly polarized laser pulse propagating in a magnetized plasma with superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etemadpour, R.; Dorranian, D.; Sepehri Javan, N.

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a circularly polarized laser pulse propagating in the magnetized plasmas whose constituents are superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons is studied theoretically. A nonlinear equation which describes the dynamics of the slowly varying amplitude is obtained using a relativistic two-fluid model. Based on this nonlinear equation and taking into account some nonlinear phenomena such as modulational instability, self-focusing and soliton formation are investigated. Effect of the magnetized plasma with superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons on these phenomena is considered. It is shown that the nonthermality and superthermality of particles can substantially change the nonlinearity of medium.

  13. Effect of external magnetic field and variable dust electrical charge on the shape and propagation of solitons in the two nonthermal ions dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghalambor Dezfuly, S.; Dorranian, D.

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, the effect of dust electrical charge, nonthermal ions, and external magnetic field on the shape and propagation of solitons in dusty plasma with two nonthermal ions is studied theoretically. Using the reductive perturbation theory, the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation for propagation of dust acoustic waves is extracted. Results show that external magnetic field does not affect the amplitude of solitary wave but width of solitons are effectively depend on the magnitude of external magnetic field. With increasing the charge of dust particles the amplitude of solution will increase while their width will decrease. Increasing the nonthermal ions lead to opposite effect.

  14. Signatures of Synchrotron: Low-cutoff X-ray emission and the hard X-ray spectrum of Cas A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Michael D.; Fedor, Emily Elizabeth; Martina-Hood, Hyourin

    2018-06-01

    In soft X-rays, bright, young Galactic remnants (Cas A, Kepler, Tycho, etc.) present thermal line emission and bremsstrahlung from ejecta, and synchrotron radiation from the shocks. Their hard X-ray spectra tend to be dominated by power-law sources. However, it can be non-trivial to discriminate between contributions from processes such as synchrotron and bremsstrahlung from nonthermally accelerated electrons, even though the energies of the electrons producing this radiation may be very different. Spatially-resolved spectroscopic analysis of 0.5-10 keV observations with, e.g., Chandracan provide leverage in identifying the processes and their locations. Previously, Stage & Allen (2006), Allen & Stage (2007) and Stage & Allen (2011) identified regions characterized by high-cutoff synchrotron radiation. Extrapolating synchrotron model fits to the emission in the Chandra band, they estimated the synchrotron contribution to the hard X-ray spectrum at about one-third the observed flux, fitting the balance with nonthermal bremsstrahlung emission produced by nonthermal electrons in the ejecta. Although it is unlikely this analysis missed regions of the highest-cutoff synchrotron emission, which supplies the bulk of the synchrotron above 15 keV, it may have missed regions of lower-cutoff emission, especially if they are near bright ejecta and the reverse shock. These regions cannot explain the emission at the highest energies (~50 keV), but may make significant contributions to the hard spectrum at lower energies (~10 keV). Using the technique described in Fedor, Martina-Hood & Stage (this meeting), we revisit the analysis to include regions that may be dominated by low-cutoff synchrotron, located in the interior of the remnant, and/or correlated with the reverse shock. Identifying X-ray emission from accelerated electrons associated with the reverse-shock would have important implications for synchrotron and non-thermal bremsstrahlung radiation above the 10 keV.

  15. Systematic search for very-high-energy gamma-ray emission from bow shocks of runaway stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arakawa, M.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Büchele, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Coffaro, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Decock, J.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'C.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Iwasaki, H.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katsuragawa, M.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khangulyan, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Nakashima, S.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Piel, Q.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Richter, S.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, S.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Seglar-Arroyo, M.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Takahashi, T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tsuji, N.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Rensburg, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zanin, R.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.

    2018-04-01

    Context. Runaway stars form bow shocks by ploughing through the interstellar medium at supersonic speeds and are promising sources of non-thermal emission of photons. One of these objects has been found to emit non-thermal radiation in the radio band. This triggered the development of theoretical models predicting non-thermal photons from radio up to very-high-energy (VHE, E ≥ 0.1 TeV) gamma rays. Subsequently, one bow shock was also detected in X-ray observations. However, the data did not allow discrimination between a hot thermal and a non-thermal origin. Further observations of different candidates at X-ray energies showed no evidence for emission at the position of the bow shocks either. A systematic search in the Fermi-LAT energy regime resulted in flux upper limits for 27 candidates listed in the E-BOSS catalogue. Aim. Here we perform the first systematic search for VHE gamma-ray emission from bow shocks of runaway stars. Methods: Using all available archival H.E.S.S. data we search for very-high-energy gamma-ray emission at the positions of bow shock candidates listed in the second E-BOSS catalogue release. Out of the 73 bow shock candidates in this catalogue, 32 have been observed with H.E.S.S. Results: None of the observed 32 bow shock candidates in this population study show significant emission in the H.E.S.S. energy range. Therefore, flux upper limits are calculated in five energy bins and the fraction of the kinetic wind power that is converted into VHE gamma rays is constrained. Conclusions: Emission from stellar bow shocks is not detected in the energy range between 0.14 and 18 TeV.The resulting upper limits constrain the level of VHE gamma-ray emission from these objects down to 0.1-1% of the kinetic wind energy.

  16. Electron beam non-thermal plasma hybrid system for reduction of NOx and SOx emissions from power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaroiu, Gh.; Zissulescu, E.; Sandu, M.; Roscia, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper an installation containing a negative corona discharge (DC) reactor, a pulse corona discharge reactor and a combined electron beam (EB) and microwave induced plasma reactor is presented. SO 2 is removed up to 42% through spontaneous reaction with ammonia without EB or microwave irradiation at the temperature below 70 o C. Considering the values of the removal efficiencies of 98% for SO 2 and 80% for NO x applying separate EB irradiation with a dose of 40 kGy, when the simultaneous EB and microwave irradiation is applied, the required absorbed dose is about two times smaller. The SO 2 removal efficiency of simultaneous DC or positive discharge and microwave discharge is higher than separate corona discharge, pulse and microwave discharge. Also, the applied voltage level at which the removal efficiency reaches the maximum value is less than that for the separate application of corona discharge or pulse discharge. The NO x removal efficiency of DC or pulse discharge suffers little change by additional use of the microwave energy. Based on this research and the results obtained by a pilot project built in collaboration with Electrostatica Bucharest, a project for an installation involving simultaneous SO 2 and NO x removal by irradiation with accelerated EBs and microwaves, has been proposed for Thermo-Power Plant CET-West-Bucharest of 550 MW. (author)

  17. Non-thermal gamma-ray emission from delayed pair breakdown in a magnetized and photon-rich outflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Ramandeep; Thompson, Christopher, E-mail: rgill@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    We consider delayed, volumetric heating in a magnetized outflow that has broken out of a confining medium and expanded to a high Lorentz factor (Γ ∼ 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}) and low optical depth to scattering (τ {sub T} ∼ 10{sup –3}-10{sup –2}). The energy flux at breakout is dominated by the magnetic field, with a modest contribution from quasi-thermal gamma rays whose spectrum was calculated in Paper I. We focus on the case of extreme baryon depletion in the magnetized material, but allow for a separate baryonic component that is entrained from a confining medium. Dissipation is driven by relativistic motion between these two components, which develops once the photon compactness drops below 4 × 10{sup 3}(Y{sub e} /0.5){sup –1}. We first calculate the acceleration of the magnetized component following breakout, showing that embedded MHD turbulence provides significant inertia, the neglect of which leads to unrealistically high estimates of flow Lorentz factor. After reheating begins, the pair and photon distributions are evolved self-consistently using a one-zone kinetic code that incorporates an exact treatment of Compton scattering, pair production and annihilation, and Coulomb scattering. Heating leads to a surge in pair creation, and the scattering depth saturates at τ {sub T} ∼ 1-4. The plasma maintains a very low ratio of particle to magnetic pressure, and can support strong anisotropy in the charged particle distribution, with cooling dominated by Compton scattering. High-energy power-law spectra with photon indices in the range observed in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; –3 < β < –3/2) are obtained by varying the ratio of heat input to the seed energy in quasi-thermal photons. We contrast our results with those for continuous heating across an expanding photosphere, and show that the latter model produces soft-to-hard evolution that is inconsistent with observations of GRBs.

  18. The NuSTAR view of the non-thermal emission from PSR J0437-4715

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillot, S.; Kaspi, V M; Archibald, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    We present a hard X-ray Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observation of PSR J0437-4715, the nearest millisecond pulsar. The known pulsations at the apparent pulse period similar to 5.76 ms are observed with a significance of 3.7 sigma, at energies up to 20 keV above which the Nu...... by combining model fits to the pulsar's phase-folded light curve with the pulsar's well-defined mass and distance from radio timing observations....

  19. Hard X-Ray Emission from Partially Occulted Solar Flares: RHESSI Observations in Two Solar Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Effenberger, Frederic; Costa, Fatima Rubio da; Petrosian, Vahé [Department of Physics and KIPAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Oka, Mitsuo; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Krucker, Säm [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Liu, Wei [Bay Area Environmental Research Institute, 625 2nd Street, Suite 209, Petaluma, CA 94952 (United States); Glesener, Lindsay, E-mail: feffen@stanford.edu, E-mail: frubio@stanford.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Flares close to the solar limb, where the footpoints are occulted, can reveal the spectrum and structure of the coronal looptop source in X-rays. We aim at studying the properties of the corresponding energetic electrons near their acceleration site, without footpoint contamination. To this end, a statistical study of partially occulted flares observed with Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager is presented here, covering a large part of solar cycles 23 and 24. We perform detailed spectra, imaging, and light curve analyses for 116 flares and include contextual observations from SDO and STEREO when available, providing further insights into flare emission that were previously not accessible. We find that most spectra are fitted well with a thermal component plus a broken power-law, non-thermal component. A thin-target kappa distribution model gives satisfactory fits after the addition of a thermal component. X-ray imaging reveals small spatial separation between the thermal and non-thermal components, except for a few flares with a richer coronal source structure. A comprehensive light curve analysis shows a very good correlation between the derivative of the soft X-ray flux (from GOES ) and the hard X-rays for a substantial number of flares, indicative of the Neupert effect. The results confirm that non-thermal particles are accelerated in the corona and estimated timescales support the validity of a thin-target scenario with similar magnitudes of thermal and non-thermal energy fluxes.

  20. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    The volume contains six papers which together provide an overall review of the inspection technique known as acoustic emission or stress wave emission. The titles are: a welder's introduction to acoustic emission technology; use of acoustic emission for detection of defects as they arise during fabrication; examples of laboratory application and assessment of acoustic emission in the United Kingdom; (Part I: acoustic emission behaviour of low alloy steels; Part II: fatigue crack assessment from proof testing and continuous monitoring); inspection of selected areas of engineering structures by acoustic emission; Japanese experience in laboratory and practical applications of acoustic emission to welded structures; and ASME acoustic emission code status. (U.K.)

  1. Proceedings of the 1997 diesel engine emissions reduction workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This conference was held July 28--31, 1997 in La Jolla, California. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on diesel engine emissions issues. Diesel engine manufacturers have significantly reduced emission of nitrogen oxides and particulates over the last 12 years. Currently there is concern about the 4% contribution of carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels to the atmosphere and its role in the greenhouse effect. The 56 papers in this report are arranged under the following topical headings: Agency diesel engine emissions and concerns; Human health effects -- Diesel exhaust; Aftertreatment -- Non-thermal plasma; Aftertreatment and in-cylinder emissions reduction; Combustion, fuel, and air management; Fuels and associated technology; and Advanced technology. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. Artificial vesicles as an animal cell model for the study of biological application of non-thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ki, S H; Park, J K; Sung, C; Lee, C B; Uhm, H; Choi, E H; Baik, K Y

    2016-01-01

    Artificial cell-like model systems can provide information which is hard to obtain with real biological cells. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV) containing intra-membrane DNA or OH radical-binding molecules are used to visualize the cytolytic activity of OH radicals. Changes in the GUV membrane are observed by microscopy or flow cytometry as performed for animal cells after non-thermal plasma treatment. The experimental data shows that OH radicals can be detected inside the membrane, although the biological effects are not as significant as for H 2 O 2 . This artificial model system can provide a systemic means to elucidate the complex interactions between biological materials and non-thermal plasma. (paper)

  3. Changing the surface properties on naval steel as result of non-thermal plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatiuc, B.; Sabău, A.; Dumitrache, C. L.; Hnatiuc, M.; Crețu, M.; Astanei, D.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of corrosion, related to Biofouling formation, is an issue with very high importance in the maritime domain. According to new rules, the paints and all the technologies for the conditioning of naval materials must fulfil more restrictive environmental conditions. In order to solve this issue, different new clean technologies have been proposed. Among them, the use of non-thermal plasmas produced at atmospheric pressure plays a very important role. This study concerns the opportunity of plasma treatment for preparation or conditioning of naval steel OL36 type. The plasma reactors chosen for the experiments can operate at atmospheric pressure and are easy to use in industrial conditions. They are based on electrical discharges GlidArc and Spark, which already proved their efficiency for the surface activation or even for coatings of the surface. The non-thermal character of the plasma is ensured by a gas flow blown through the electrical discharges. One power supply has been used for reactors that provide a 5 kV voltage and a maximum current of 100 mA. The modifications of the surface properties and composition have been studied by XPS technique (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). There were taken into consideration 5 samples: 4 of them undergoing a Mini-torch plasma, a Gliding Spark, a GlidArc with dry air and a GlidArc with CO2, respectively the fifth sample which is the untreated witness. Before the plasma treatment, samples of naval steel were processed in order to obtain mechanical gloss. The time of treatment was chosen to 12 minutes. In the spectroscopic analysis, done on a ULVAC-PHI, Inc. PHI 5000 Versa Probe scanning XPS microprobe, a monocromated Al Kα X-ray source with a spot size of 100 μm2 was used to scan each sample while the photoelectrons were collected at a 45-degree take-off angle. Differences were found between atomic concentrations in each individual case, which proves that the active species produced by each type of plasma affects

  4. Relationship between carbohydrate composition and fungal deterioration of functional strawberry juices preserved using non-thermal treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassani, Lucía; Quintana, Gabriel; Moreira, María R; Gómez-Zavaglia, Andrea

    2017-12-12

    The quantification of the main carbohydrates present in strawberry juices enriched with inulin and fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) and preserved by non-thermal techniques (vanillin and ultrasound) was conducted, in addition to an investigation of the evolution of these compounds and their relationship with fungal deterioration over 14 days of refrigerated storage. A simple and environmentally friendly analytical approach based on high-performance liquid chromatography with a reflection index detector was developed for simultaneous determination of inulin, FOS and mono- and disaccharides present in the juices. When analyzing the evolution of carbohydrates during storage, a direct relationship between the consumption of sucrose and the growth of yeasts and molds (main spoilage flora in strawberry) was observed, especially in untreated samples (control). By contrast, no sucrose consumption was observed during storage of the treated sample, thus demonstrating the efficiency of the non-thermal treatments for controlling yeasts and mold growth. In turn, inulin and FOS added to juices were not degraded during storage. The results obtained in the present study demonstrate that non-thermal treatments are adequate for preventing the growth of deteriorative flora in strawberry juices and that the addition of inulin and FOS can be a good strategy for functionalizing them, as well as improving their nutritional properties. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Mirage in the sky: Nonthermal dark matter, gravitino problem, and cosmic ray anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Sinha, Kuver; Leblond, Louis

    2009-01-01

    Recent anomalies in cosmic rays could be due to dark matter annihilation in our galaxy. In order to get the required large cross section to explain the data while still obtaining the right relic density, we rely on a nonstandard thermal history between dark matter freeze out and big-bang nucleosynthesis. We show that through a reheating phase from the decay of a heavy moduli or even the gravitino, we can produce the right relic density of dark matter if its self-annihilation cross section is large enough. In addition to fitting the recent data, this scenario solves the cosmological moduli and gravitino problems. We illustrate this mechanism with a specific example in the context of U(1) B-L extended minimal supersymmetric standard model where supersymmetry is broken via mirage mediation. These string motivated models naturally contain heavy moduli decaying to the gravitino, whose subsequent decay to the LSP can reheat the Universe at a low temperature. The right-handed sneutrino and the B-L gaugino can both be viable dark matter candidates with a large cross section. They are leptophilic because of B-L charges. We also show that it is possible to distinguish the nonthermal from the thermal scenario (using Sommerfeld enhancement) in direct detection experiments for certain regions of parameter space.

  6. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Surya B; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Eisenmann, Kathryn M; Ayan, Halim

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy.

  7. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya B. Karki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy.

  8. Analysis of the biological effects of a non-thermal plasma on saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Gyung S.; Baik, Ku Y.; Kim, Jung G.; Kim, Yun J.; Lee, Kyung A.; Jung, Ran J.; Cho, Guang S.

    2012-01-01

    The cellular and the molecular responses of eukaryotic yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to a non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure are analyzed. A plasma device with a dielectric barrier discharge is used in order to understand the mechanisms of the plasma action on eukaryotic microbes. When the yeast cells are exposed to a plasma (at a 2-mm distance) and then cultured on a YPD (yeast extract, peptone, and dextrose) - agar plate, the number of surviving cells is reduced over exposure time. More than a 50% reduction in number is observed after two exposures of 5 minutes' duration. In addition, very small whitish colonies appear after the two exposures. The microscopic analysis indicates that the yeast cells treated with this plasma exposure have rough and shrunken shapes in comparison to the oval shapes with smooth surfaces of the control cells. The profile of proteins analyzed by using 2-dimentional electrophoresis demonstrates that the level of proteins with high molecular weights is increased in plasma-treated cells.

  9. Synergistic Effect of Nanophotocatalysis and Nonthermal Plasma on the Removal of Indoor HCHO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanwei Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalysis is an effective method of air purification at the condition of a higher pollutant concentration. However, its wide application in indoor air cleaning is limited due to the low level of indoor air contaminants. Immobilizing the nanosized TiO2 particles on the surface of activated carbon filter (TiO2/AC film could increase the photocatalytic reaction rate as a local high pollutant concentration can be formed on the surface of TiO2 by the adsorption of AC. However, the pollutant removal still decreased quickly with the increase in flow velocity, which results in a decrease in air treatment capacity. In order to improve the air treatment capacity by the photocatalytic oxidation (PCO method, this paper used formaldehyde (HCHO as a contaminant to study the effect of combination of PCO with nonthermal plasma technology (NTP on the removal of HCHO. The experimental results show that HCHO removal is more effective with line-to-plate electrode discharge reactor; the HCHO removal and the reaction rate can be enhanced and the amount of air that needs to be cleaned can be improved. Meanwhile, the results show that there is the synergistic effect on the indoor air purification by the combination of PCO with NTP.

  10. Effects of gap and elevated pressure on ethanol reforming in a non-thermal plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, Trung Q; Zhu Xinli; Lobban, Lance L; Mallinson, Richard G

    2011-01-01

    Production of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles, mobile power generators and for hydrogen-enhanced combustion from ethanol is demonstrated using energy-efficient non-thermal plasma reforming. A tubular reactor with a multipoint electrode system operated in pulsed mode was used. Complete conversion can be achieved with high selectivity (based on ethanol) of H 2 and CO of 111% and 78%, respectively, at atmospheric pressure. An elevated pressure of 15 psig shows improvement of selectivity of H 2 and CO to 120% and 87%, with a significant reduction of C 2 H x side products. H 2 selectivity increased to 127% when a high ratio (29.2) of water-to-ethanol feed was used. Increasing CO 2 selectivity is observed at higher water-to-ethanol ratios indicating that the water gas shift reaction occurs. A higher productivity and lower C 2 H x products were observed at larger gas gaps. The highest overall energy efficiency achieved, including electrical power consumption, was 82% for all products or 66% for H 2 only.

  11. Non-thermal Power-Law Distributions in Solar and Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, M.; Battaglia, M.; Birn, J.; Chaston, C. C.; Effenberger, F.; Eriksson, E.; Fletcher, L.; Hatch, S.; Imada, S.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Kuhar, M.; Livadiotis, G.; Miyoshi, Y.; Retino, A.

    2017-12-01

    Particles are accelerated to very high, non-thermal energies in solar and space plasma environments. While energy spectra of accelerated particles often exhibit a power-law and are characterized by the power-law index δ, it remains unclear how particles are accelerated to high energies and how δ is determined. Here, we review previous observations of the power-law index δ in a variety of different plasma environments with a particular focus on sub-relativistic electrons. It appears that in regions more closely related to magnetic reconnection (such as the "above-the-looptop" solar hard X-ray source and the plasma sheet in Earth's magnetotail), the spectra are typically soft (δ> 4). This is in contrast to the typically hard spectra (δuniform in the plasma sheet, while power-law distributions still exist even in quiet times. The role of magnetotail reconnection in the electron power-law formation could therefore be confounded with these background conditions. Because different regions have been studied with different instrumentations and methodologies, we point out a need for more systematic and coordinated studies of power-law distributions for a better understanding of possible scaling laws in particle acceleration as well as their universality.

  12. Saturated Resin Ectopic Regeneration by Non-Thermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjing Hao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Textile dyes are some of the most refractory organic compounds in the environment due to their complex and various structure. An integrated resin adsorption/Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD plasma regeneration was proposed to treat the indigo carmine solution. It is the first time to report ectopic regeneration of the saturated resins by non-thermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge. The adsorption/desorption efficiency, surface functional groups, structural properties, regeneration efficiency, and the intermediate products between gas and liquid phase before and after treatment were investigated. The results showed that DBD plasma could maintain the efficient adsorption performance of resins while degrading the indigo carmine adsorbed by resins. The degradation rate of indigo carmine reached 88% and the regeneration efficiency (RE can be maintained above 85% after multi-successive regeneration cycles. The indigo carmine contaminants were decomposed by a variety of reactive radicals leading to fracture of exocyclic C=C bond, which could cause decoloration of dye solution. Based on above results, a possible degradation pathway for the indigo carmine by resin adsorption/DBD plasma treatment was proposed.

  13. Disinfection effect of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma for foodborne bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Mohammad Rasel; Inomata, Takanori; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Kakikawa, Makiko; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Yasunori; Yano, Toshihiro; Miwa, Shoji; Noguchi, Akinori

    2015-09-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NAPP) exposure can be a suitable alternative for bacteria inactivation in food processing industry. Specimen placed in the enclosure are exposed to various reactive radicals produced within the discharge chamber. It is also exposed to the periodic variation of the electric field strength in the chamber. Dielectric barrier discharge is produced by high voltage pulse (Vpp = 18 kV, pulse width 20 μs, repetition frequency 10 kHz) in a polypropylene box (volume = 350 cm3) using helium as main feed gas. Inactivation efficiency of NAPP depends on the duration of NAPP exposure, applied voltage pulse strength and type, pulse duration, electrode separation and feed gas composition. In this study we have investigated inactivation of Bacillus lichenformis spore as an example of food borne bacteria. Keeping applied voltage, electrode configuration and total gas flow rate constant, spores are exposed to direct NAPP for different time duration while O2 concentration in the feed gas composition is varied. 10 minutes NAPP exposure resulted in ~ 3 log reduction of Bacillus lichenformis spores for 1% O2concentration (initial concentration ~ 106 / specimen). This work is supported by research and development promotion grant provided by the Hokuriku Industrial Advancement Center.

  14. Non-thermal hydrogen plasma processing effectively increases the antibacterial activity of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Zhigang; Ma, Yulong; Zhu, Zhongjie; Zhao, Hongwei; Wang, Qi; Huang, Qing

    2018-01-01

    Graphene-based materials (GMs) are promising antibacterial agents which provide an alternative route to treat pathogenic bacteria with resistance to conventional antibiotics. To further improve their antibacterial activity, many methods have been developed to functionalize the GMs with chemicals. However, the application of additional chemicals may pose potential risks to the environment and human being. Herein, a radio-frequency-driven inductively coupled non-thermal hydrogen plasma was used to treat and reduce graphene oxide (GO) without using any other chemicals, and we found that the plasma-reduced GO (prGO) is with significantly higher bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli. The mechanism of the increased antibacterial activity of prGO is due to that plasma processing breaks down the GO sheets into smaller layers with more rough surface defects, which can thus induce more destructive membrane damages to the bacteria. This work sets another good example, showing that plasma processing is a green and low-cost alternative for GM modification for biomedical applications.

  15. Nonthermal leptogenesis via direct inflaton decay without SU(2)L triplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dent, Thomas; Lazarides, George; Ruiz de Austri, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    We present a nonthermal leptogenesis scenario following standard supersymmetric hybrid inflation, in the case where light neutrinos acquire mass via the usual seesaw mechanism and inflaton decay to heavy right-handed neutrino superfields is kinematically disallowed, or the right-handed neutrinos which can be decay products of the inflaton are unable to generate sufficient baryon asymmetry via their subsequent decay. The primordial lepton asymmetry is generated through the decay of the inflaton into light particles by the interference of one-loop diagrams with exchange of different right-handed neutrinos. The mechanism requires superpotential couplings explicitly violating a U(1) R-symmetry and R-parity. We take into account the constraints from neutrino masses and mixing and the preservation of the primordial asymmetry. We consider two models, one without and one with SU(2) R gauge symmetry. We show that the former is viable, whereas the latter is ruled out. Although the broken R-parity need not have currently observable low-energy signatures, some R-parity-violating slepton decays may be detectable in the future colliders

  16. Non-thermal plasmas for non-catalytic and catalytic VOC abatement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenbroucke, Arne M.; Morent, Rino; De Geyter, Nathalie; Leys, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We review the current status of catalytic and non-catalytic VOC abatement based on a vast number of research papers. → The underlying mechanisms of plasma-catalysis for VOC abatement are discussed. → Critical process parameters that determine the influent are discussed and compared. - Abstract: This paper reviews recent achievements and the current status of non-thermal plasma (NTP) technology for the abatement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Many reactor configurations have been developed to generate a NTP at atmospheric pressure. Therefore in this review article, the principles of generating NTPs are outlined. Further on, this paper is divided in two equally important parts: plasma-alone and plasma-catalytic systems. Combination of NTP with heterogeneous catalysis has attracted increased attention in order to overcome the weaknesses of plasma-alone systems. An overview is given of the present understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-catalytic processes. In both parts (plasma-alone systems and plasma-catalysis), literature on the abatement of VOCs is reviewed in close detail. Special attention is given to the influence of critical process parameters on the removal process.

  17. Novel Therapeutic Effects of Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma for Muscle Regeneration and Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Won; Kang, Sung Un; Kim, Yang Eun; Park, Ju Kyeong; Yang, Sang Sik; Kim, Yeon Soo; Lee, Yun Sang; Lee, Yuijina; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can repair muscle tissue damage, but significant loss of muscle tissue or its long-lasting chronic degeneration makes injured skeletal muscle tissue difficult to restore. It has been demonstrated that non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTP) can be used in many biological areas including regenerative medicine. Therefore, we determined whether NTP, as a non-contact biological external stimulator that generates biological catalyzers, can induce regeneration of injured muscle without biomaterials. Treatment with NTP in the defected muscle of a Sprague Dawley (SD) rat increased the number of proliferating muscle cells 7 days after plasma treatment (dapt) and rapidly induced formation of muscle tissue and muscle cell differentiation at 14 dapt. In addition, in vitro experiments also showed that NTP could induce muscle cell proliferation and differentiation of human muscle cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that NTP promotes restoration of muscle defects through control of cell proliferation and differentiation without biological or structural supporters, suggesting that NTP has the potential for use in muscle tissue engineering and regenerative therapies. PMID:27349181

  18. Integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment technology and subsystem cost sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvego, L.A.; Schafer, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) authorized studies on alternative systems for treating contact-handled DOE mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW). The on-going Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems' (ITTS) and the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems' (INTS) studies satisfy this request. EM-50 further authorized supporting studies including this technology and subsystem cost sensitivity analysis. This analysis identifies areas where technology development could have the greatest impact on total life cycle system costs. These areas are determined by evaluating the sensitivity of system life cycle costs relative to changes in life cycle component or phase costs, subsystem costs, contingency allowance, facility capacity, operating life, and disposal costs. For all treatment systems, the most cost sensitive life cycle phase is the operations and maintenance phase and the most cost sensitive subsystem is the receiving and inspection/preparation subsystem. These conclusions were unchanged when the sensitivity analysis was repeated on a present value basis. Opportunity exists for technology development to reduce waste receiving and inspection/preparation costs by effectively minimizing labor costs, the major cost driver, within the maintenance and operations phase of the life cycle

  19. In vivo non-thermal irreversible electroporation impact on rat liver galvanic apparent internal resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golberg, A; Laufer, S; Rabinowitch, H D; Rubinsky, B

    2011-01-01

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a biophysical phenomenon which involves application of electric field pulses to cells or tissues, causing certain rearrangements in the membrane structure leading to cell death. The treated tissue ac impedance changes induced by electroporation were shown to be the indicators for NTIRE efficiency. In a previous study we characterized in vitro tissue galvanic apparent internal resistance (GAIR) changes due to NTIRE. Here we describe an in vivo study in which we monitored the GAIR changes of a rat liver treated by NTIRE. Electrical pulses were delivered through the same Zn/Cu electrodes by which GAIR was measured. GAIR was measured before and for 3 h after the treatment at 15 min intervals. The results were compared to the established ac bioimpedance measurement method. A decrease of 33% was measured immediately after the NTIRE treatment and a 40% decrease was measured after 3 h in GAIR values; in the same time 40% and 47% decrease respectively were measured by ac bioimpedance analyses. The temperature increase due to the NTIRE was only 0.5 deg. C. The results open the way for an inexpensive, self-powered in vivo real-time NTIRE effectiveness measurement.

  20. Non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of 4-chlorophenol in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao Xiaolong [Institute of Environmental Pollution Control Technologies, Xixi Campus, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028, Zhejiang (China); Zhou Ming Hua [Institute of Environmental Pollution Control Technologies, Xixi Campus, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028, Zhejiang (China); Lei Lecheng [Institute of Environmental Pollution Control Technologies, Xixi Campus, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310028, Zhejiang (China)]. E-mail: lclei@zju.edu.cn

    2007-03-22

    TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst (P-25) (50 mg L{sup -1}) was tentatively introduced into pulsed high-voltage discharge process for non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of the representative mode organic pollutant parachlorophenol (4-CP), including other compounds phenol and methyl red in water. The experimental results showed that rate constant of 4-CP degradation, energy efficiency for 4-CP removal and TOC removal with TiO{sub 2} were obviously increased. Pulsed high-voltage discharge process with TiO{sub 2} had a promoted effect for the degradation of these pollutants under a broad range of liquid conductivity. Furthermore, the apparent formation rates of chemically active species (e.g., ozone and hydrogen peroxide) were increased, the hydrogen peroxide formation rate from 1.10 x 10{sup -6} to 1.50 x 10{sup -6} M s{sup -1}, the ozone formation rate from 1.99 x 10{sup -8} to 2.35 x 10{sup -8} M s{sup -1}, respectively. In addition, this process had no influence on the photocatalytic properties of TiO{sub 2}. The introduction of TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst into pulsed discharge plasma process in the utilizing of ultraviolet radiation and electric field in pulsed discharge plasma process enhanced the yields of chemically active species, which were available for highly efficient removal and mineralization of organic pollutants.

  1. Non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of 4-chlorophenol in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiao Long; Zhou, Ming Hua; Lei, Le Cheng

    2007-03-22

    TiO(2) photocatalyst (P-25) (50mgL(-1)) was tentatively introduced into pulsed high-voltage discharge process for non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of the representative mode organic pollutant parachlorophenol (4-CP), including other compounds phenol and methyl red in water. The experimental results showed that rate constant of 4-CP degradation, energy efficiency for 4-CP removal and TOC removal with TiO(2) were obviously increased. Pulsed high-voltage discharge process with TiO(2) had a promoted effect for the degradation of these pollutants under a broad range of liquid conductivity. Furthermore, the apparent formation rates of chemically active species (e.g., ozone and hydrogen peroxide) were increased, the hydrogen peroxide formation rate from 1.10x10(-6) to 1.50x10(-6)Ms(-1), the ozone formation rate from 1.99x10(-8) to 2.35x10(-8)Ms(-1), respectively. In addition, this process had no influence on the photocatalytic properties of TiO(2). The introduction of TiO(2) photocatalyst into pulsed discharge plasma process in the utilizing of ultraviolet radiation and electric field in pulsed discharge plasma process enhanced the yields of chemically active species, which were available for highly efficient removal and mineralization of organic pollutants.

  2. Direct chemical oxidation: a non-thermal technology for the destruction of organic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balazs, G.B.; Cooper, J. F.; Lewis, P. R.; Adamson, M. G.

    1998-02-01

    Direct Chemical Oxidation (DCO) is a non-thermal, ambient pressure, aqueous-based technology for the oxidative destruction of the organic components of hazardous or mixed waste streams. The process has been developed for applications in waste treatment and chemical demilitarization and decontamination at LLNL since 1992, and is applicable to the destruction of virtually all solid or liquid organics, including: chlorosolvents, oils and greases, detergents, organic-contaminated soils or sludges, explosives, chemical and biological warfare agents, and PCB's. [1-15] The process normally operates at 80-100 C, a heating requirement which increases the difficulty of surface decontamination of large objects or, for example, treatment of a wide area contaminated soil site. The driver for DCO work in FY98 was thus to investigate the use of catalysts to demonstrate the effectiveness of the technology for organics destruction at temperatures closer to ambient. In addition, DCO is at a sufficiently mature stage of development that technology transfer to a commercial entity was a logical next step, and was thus included in FY98 tasks.

  3. Effects of non-thermal mobile phone radiation on breast adenocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Fourie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phone usage currently exceeds landline communication in Africa. The extent of this usage has raised concerns about the long-term health effects of the ongoing use of mobile phones. To assess the physiological effects of radiation from mobile phones in vitro, MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells were exposed to 2W/kg non-thermal 900-MHz mobile phone radiation. The effects investigated were those on metabolic activity, cell morphology, cell cycle progression, phosphatidylserine (PS externalisation and the generation of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen species. Statistically insignificant increases in mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity were observed in irradiated cells when compared to controls. Fluorescent detection of F-actin demonstrated an increase in F-actin stress fibre formation in irradiated MCF-7 cells. Cell cycle progression revealed no statistically significant variation. A small increase in early and late apoptotic events in irradiated MCF-7 cells was observed. No statistically significant changes were observed in reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species generation. In addition, quantitative and qualitative analyses of cell cycle activity and nuclear and cytosolic changes, respectively, revealed no significant changes. In conclusion, exposure to 1 h of 900-MHz irradiation induced an increase in PS externalisation and an increase in the formation of F-actin stress fibres in MCF-7 cells. Data obtained from this study, and their correlation with other studies, provides intriguing links between radio frequency radiation and cellular events and warrant further investigation.

  4. Improved oxidation of air pollutants in a non-thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roland, U.; Holzer, F.; Kopinke, F.-D.

    2002-01-01

    The performance of non-thermal plasma (NTP) for the removal of organic air pollutants (especially in low concentrations) is improved by the introduction of ferroelectric and catalytically active materials into the discharge zone of an NTP reactor. Experiments with model systems (various contaminants and packed-bed materials) have shown that such a modification of a homogeneous gas-phase plasma can overcome the most serious restrictions of the NTP technique at its present state of the art: the incomplete total oxidation (i.e. the low selectivity to CO 2 ) and the energetic inefficiency. Placing a ferroelectric packed-bed material in the discharge zone was shown to result in a lowering of the energy input required. The main effects of plasma catalysis enabled by the introduction of a catalytically active material were an enhanced conversion of pollutants and a higher CO 2 selectivity. These improvements are based on the presence of short-lived oxidising species in the inner volume of porous catalysts. Additionally, the formation of a reservoir of adsorbed oxidants in the NTP zone could be shown. The combination of both modifications (ferroelectric packed-bed materials and plasma catalysis) is a promising method to support the NTP-initiated oxidation of air pollutants

  5. In vivo non-thermal irreversible electroporation impact on rat liver galvanic apparent internal resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golberg, A; Laufer, S [Center for Bioengineering in the Service of Humanity and Society, School of Computer Science and Engineering, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Rabinowitch, H D [Robert H Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Robert H Smith Institute of Plant Science and Genetics in Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76 100 (Israel); Rubinsky, B, E-mail: Rabin@agri.huji.ac.il [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate Program in Biophysics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 84720 (United States)

    2011-02-21

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is a biophysical phenomenon which involves application of electric field pulses to cells or tissues, causing certain rearrangements in the membrane structure leading to cell death. The treated tissue ac impedance changes induced by electroporation were shown to be the indicators for NTIRE efficiency. In a previous study we characterized in vitro tissue galvanic apparent internal resistance (GAIR) changes due to NTIRE. Here we describe an in vivo study in which we monitored the GAIR changes of a rat liver treated by NTIRE. Electrical pulses were delivered through the same Zn/Cu electrodes by which GAIR was measured. GAIR was measured before and for 3 h after the treatment at 15 min intervals. The results were compared to the established ac bioimpedance measurement method. A decrease of 33% was measured immediately after the NTIRE treatment and a 40% decrease was measured after 3 h in GAIR values; in the same time 40% and 47% decrease respectively were measured by ac bioimpedance analyses. The temperature increase due to the NTIRE was only 0.5 deg. C. The results open the way for an inexpensive, self-powered in vivo real-time NTIRE effectiveness measurement.

  6. A universal mirror wave-mode threshold condition for non-thermal space plasma environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Leubner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic fluctuations are recognized in a large variety of space plasmas by increasingly high resolution, in situ observations as mirror wave mode structures. A typical requirement for the excitation of mirror modes is a dominant perpendicular pressure in a high-beta plasma environment. Contrary, we demonstrate from a realistic kinetic analysis how details of the velocity space distributions are of considerable significance for the instability threshold. Introducing the most common characteristics of observed ion and electron distributions by a mixed suprathermal-loss-cone, we derive a universal mirror instability criterion from an energy principle for collisionless plasmas. As a result, the transition from two temperature Maxwellians to realistic non-thermal features provides a strong source for the generation of mirror wave mode activity, reducing drastically the instability threshold. In particular, a number of space-related examples illuminate how the specific structure of the velocity space distribution dominates as a regulating excitation mechanism over the effects related to changes in the plasma parameters.

  7. Analysis of the step responses of laminar premixed flames to forcing by non-thermal plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna A.

    2016-07-16

    The step responses of lean methane-air flames to non-thermal plasma forcing is reported. The experimental setup consists of an axisymmetric burner, with a nozzle made of a quartz tube. The equivalence ratio is 0.95, allowing stabilization of the flame in a V-shape or an M-shape geometry, over a central stainless steel rod. The plasma is produced by short pulses of 10-ns duration, 8-kV maximum voltage amplitude, applied at 10 kHz. The central rod is used as a cathode, while the anode is a stainless steel ring, fixed on the outer surface of the quartz tube. Plasma forcing is produced by positive or negative steps of plasma. The step response of the flame is investigated through heat release rate (HRR) fluctuations, to facilitate comparisons with flame response to acoustic perturbations. The chemiluminescence of CH* between two consecutive pulses was recorded using an intensified camera equipped with an optical filter to estimate the HRR fluctuations. First, the results show that the flame does not respond to each single plasma pulse, but is affected only by the average plasma power, confirming the step nature of the forcing. The temporal evolutions of HRR are analyzed and the flame transfer functions are determined. A forcing mechanism, as a local increase in the reactivity of the fluid close to the rod, is proposed and compared with numerical simulations. Experiments and numerical simulations are in good qualitative agreement. © 2016.

  8. Growth and male reproduction improvement of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma treatment on chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao Zhang, Jiao; Luong Huynh, Do; Chandimali, Nisansala; Kang, Tae Yoon; Kim, Nameun; Mok, Young Sun; Kwon, Taeho; Jeong, Dong Kee

    2018-05-01

    This study investigated whether plasma treatment of fertilized eggs before hatching could affect the growth and reproduction of chickens. Three point five-day-incubated fertilized eggs exposed to non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma at 2.81 W of power for 2 min resulted in the highest growth in chickens. Plasma growth-promoting effect was regulated by the reactive oxygen species homeostasis and the improvement of energy metabolism via increasing serum hormones and adenosine triphosphate levels which were resulted from the regulation of genes involved in antioxidant defense, hormone biosynthesis and energetic metabolism. Interestingly, plasma-treated male chickens conspicuously grew faster than females. Further, aspects of male reproductive system (testosterone level and sperm quality) were improved by the plasma treatment but female reproduction (estradiol and progesterone levels, egg-laying rate and egg weight) had no significant changes. Unfortunately, offspring whose parents were the optimal plasma-treated chickens did not show any difference on growth characteristics and failed to inherit excellent growth features from their parents. Our results suggest a new method to improve the growth rate and male reproductive capacity in poultry but it is only effective in the plasma direct-treated generation.

  9. Non-thermal production of neutralino cold dark matter from cosmic string decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeannerot, R.; Zhang, X.; Brandenberger, R.

    1998-12-01

    We propose a mechanism of nonthermal production of a neutralino cold dark matter particle, χ, from the decay of cosmic strings which form from the spontaneous breaking of a U(1) gauge symmetry, such as U B-L (1), in an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). By explicit calculation, we point out that with a symmetry breaking scale η of around 10 8 GeV, the decay of cosmic strings can give rise to Ω χ ≅ 1. This gives a new constraint on supersymmetric models. For example, the dark matter produced from strings will over close the universe if η is near the electroweak symmetry breaking scale. To be consistent with Ω χ ≤ 1, the mass of the new U(1) gauge boson must be much larger than the Fermi scale which makes it unobservable in upcoming accelerator experiments. In a supersymmetric model with an extra U B-L (1) symmetry, the requirement of Ω χ ≤ 1 puts an upper bound on the neutrino mass of about 30eV provided neutrino masses are generated by the see-saw mechanisms. (author)

  10. Improvement of Polytetrafluoroethylene Surface Energy by Repetitive Pulse Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment in Atmospheric Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guoqing; Zhang Guanjun; Zhang Wenyuan

    2011-01-01

    Improvement of polytetrafluoroethylene surface energy by non-thermal plasma treatment is presented, using a nanosecond-positive-edge repetitive pulsed dielectric barrier discharge generator in atmospheric air. The electrical parameters including discharging power, peak and density of micro-discharge current were calculated, and the electron energy was estimated. Surface treatment experiments of polytetrafluoroethylene films were conducted for both different applied voltages and different treating durations. Results show that the surface energy of polytetrafluoroethylene film could be improved to 40 mJ/m 2 or more by plasma treatment. Surface roughness measurement and surface X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicate that there are chemical etching and implantation of polar oxygen groups in the sample surface treating process, resulting in the improvement of the sample surface energy. Compared with an AC source of 50 Hz, the dielectric barrier discharges generated by a repetitive pulsed source could provide higher peak power, lower mean power, larger micro-discharge current density and higher electron energy. Therefore, with the same applied peak voltage and treating duration, the improvement of polytetrafluoroethylene surface energy using repetitive pulsed plasma is more effective, and the plasma treatment process based on repetitive pulsed dielectric barrier discharges in air is thus feasible and applicable.

  11. Nonthermal pasteurization of fermented green table olives by means of high hydrostatic pressure processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyri, Anthoula A; Panagou, Efstathios Z; Nychas, George-John E; Tassou, Chrysoula C

    2014-01-01

    Green fermented olives cv. Halkidiki were subjected to different treatments of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing (400, 450, and 500 MPa for 15 or 30 min). Total viable counts, lactic acid bacteria and yeasts/moulds, and the physicochemical characteristics of the product (pH, colour, and firmness) were monitored right after the treatment and after 7 days of storage at 20(°)C to allow for recovery of injured cells. The treatments at 400 MPa for 15 and 30 min, 450 MPa for 15 and 30 min, and 500 MPa for 15 min were found insufficient as a recovery of the microbiota was observed. The treatment at 500 MPa for 30 min was effective in reducing the olive microbiota below the detection limit of the enumeration method after the treatment and after 1 week of storage and was chosen as being more appropriate for storing olives for an extended time period (5 months). After 5 months of storage at 20(°)C, no microbiota was detected in treated samples, while significant changes for both HHP treated and untreated olives were observed for colour parameters only (minor degradation). In conclusion, HHP treatment may introduce a reliable nonthermal pasteurization method to extend the microbiological shelf-life of fermented table olives.

  12. Non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of 4-chlorophenol in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiaolong; Zhou Ming Hua; Lei Lecheng

    2007-01-01

    TiO 2 photocatalyst (P-25) (50 mg L -1 ) was tentatively introduced into pulsed high-voltage discharge process for non-thermal plasma-induced photocatalytic degradation of the representative mode organic pollutant parachlorophenol (4-CP), including other compounds phenol and methyl red in water. The experimental results showed that rate constant of 4-CP degradation, energy efficiency for 4-CP removal and TOC removal with TiO 2 were obviously increased. Pulsed high-voltage discharge process with TiO 2 had a promoted effect for the degradation of these pollutants under a broad range of liquid conductivity. Furthermore, the apparent formation rates of chemically active species (e.g., ozone and hydrogen peroxide) were increased, the hydrogen peroxide formation rate from 1.10 x 10 -6 to 1.50 x 10 -6 M s -1 , the ozone formation rate from 1.99 x 10 -8 to 2.35 x 10 -8 M s -1 , respectively. In addition, this process had no influence on the photocatalytic properties of TiO 2 . The introduction of TiO 2 photocatalyst into pulsed discharge plasma process in the utilizing of ultraviolet radiation and electric field in pulsed discharge plasma process enhanced the yields of chemically active species, which were available for highly efficient removal and mineralization of organic pollutants

  13. Universal self-similar dynamics of relativistic and nonrelativistic field theories near nonthermal fixed points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeiro Orioli, Asier; Boguslavski, Kirill; Berges, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    We investigate universal behavior of isolated many-body systems far from equilibrium, which is relevant for a wide range of applications from ultracold quantum gases to high-energy particle physics. The universality is based on the existence of nonthermal fixed points, which represent nonequilibrium attractor solutions with self-similar scaling behavior. The corresponding dynamic universality classes turn out to be remarkably large, encompassing both relativistic as well as nonrelativistic quantum and classical systems. For the examples of nonrelativistic (Gross-Pitaevskii) and relativistic scalar field theory with quartic self-interactions, we demonstrate that infrared scaling exponents as well as scaling functions agree. We perform two independent nonperturbative calculations, first by using classical-statistical lattice simulation techniques and second by applying a vertex-resummed kinetic theory. The latter extends kinetic descriptions to the nonperturbative regime of overoccupied modes. Our results open new perspectives to learn from experiments with cold atoms aspects about the dynamics during the early stages of our universe.

  14. Continuum emission from the nucleus of NGC 1275

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longmore, A.J.; Sharples, R.M.; Robson, E.I.; Ade, P.A.R.; Radostitz, J.

    1984-01-01

    Sub-millimeter and multi-aperture near-infrared observations of NGC 1275 are presented. The luminosity of the extended stellar component within the near-infrared apertures has been determined, and consequently also the 1.25-3.5 μm energy distribution of the unresolved nucleus. The 1 μm-30 cm energy distribution is reviewed. It is argued that the most likely origin for the 100 μm-30 cm radiation is synchrotron emission, with this non-thermal component also contributing significant flux at 10 μm. (author)

  15. Photospheric Emission from Collapsar Jets in 3D Relativistic Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hirotaka; Matsumoto, Jin; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Warren, Donald C.; Barkov, Maxim V.

    2015-12-01

    We explore the photospheric emission from a relativistic jet breaking out from a massive stellar envelope based on relativistic hydrodynamical simulations and post-process radiation transfer calculations in three dimensions. To investigate the impact of three-dimensional (3D) dynamics on the emission, two models of injection conditions are considered for the jet at the center of the progenitor star: one with periodic precession and another without precession. We show that structures developed within the jet due to the interaction with the stellar envelope, as well as due to the precession, have a significant imprint on the resulting emission. Particularly, we find that the signature of precession activity by the central engine is not smeared out and can be directly observed in the light curve as a periodic signal. We also show that non-thermal features, which can account for observations of gamma-ray bursts, are produced in the resulting spectra even though only thermal photons are injected initially and the effect of non-thermal particles is not considered.

  16. Non-thermal electron acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks. II. Firehose-mediated Fermi acceleration and its dependence on pre-shock conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sironi, Lorenzo [NASA Einstein Postdoctoral Fellow. (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies is known to occur in low Mach number (M{sub s} ≲ 5) shocks in galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Using two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations, we showed in Paper I that electrons are efficiently accelerated in low Mach number (M{sub s} = 3) quasi-perpendicular shocks via a Fermi-like process. The electrons bounce between the upstream region and the shock front, with each reflection at the shock resulting in energy gain via shock drift acceleration. The upstream scattering is provided by oblique magnetic waves that are self-generated by the electrons escaping ahead of the shock. In the present work, we employ additional 2D PIC simulations to address the nature of the upstream oblique waves. We find that the waves are generated by the shock-reflected electrons via the firehose instability, which is driven by an anisotropy in the electron velocity distribution. We systematically explore how the efficiency of wave generation and of electron acceleration depend on the magnetic field obliquity, the flow magnetization (or equivalently, the plasma beta), and the upstream electron temperature. We find that the mechanism works for shocks with high plasma beta (≳ 20) at nearly all magnetic field obliquities, and for electron temperatures in the range relevant for galaxy clusters. Our findings offer a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  17. Thermal treatment and non-thermal technologies for remediation of manufactured gas plant sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowan, T.F.; Greer, B.A.; Lawless, M.

    1996-01-01

    More than 1,500 manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites exist throughout the US. Many are contaminated with coal tar from coal-fueled gas works which produced town gas from the mid-1800s through the 1950s. Virtually all old US cities have such sites. Most are in downtown areas as they were installed for central distribution of manufactured gas. While a few sites are CERCLA/Superfund, most are not. However, the contaminants and methods used for remediation are similar to those used for Superfund clean-ups of coal tar contamination from wood-treating and coke oven facilities. Clean-up of sites is triggered by regulatory pressure, property transfers and re-development as well as releases to the environment--in particular, via groundwater migration. Due to utility de-regulation, site clean-ups may also be triggered by sale of a utility or of a specific utility site to other utilities. Utilities have used two approaches in dealing with their MGP sites. The first is do nothing and hope for the best. History suggests that, sooner or later, these sites become a bigger problem via a release, citizen lawsuit or regulatory/public service commission intervention. The second, far better approach is to define the problem now and make plans /for waste treatment or immobilization. This paper describes recent experience with a high capacity/low cost thermal desorption process for this waste and reviews non-thermal technology, such as bio-treatment, capping, recycling, and dig and haul. Cost data are provided for all technologies, and a case study for thermal treatment is also presented

  18. Application of non-thermal plasma reactor and Fenton reaction for degradation of ibuprofen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marković, Marijana [Center of Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Jović, Milica; Stanković, Dalibor [Innovation Center, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 51, 11058 Belgrade 118 (Serbia); Kovačević, Vesna [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 44, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Roglić, Goran [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 51, 11058 Belgrade 118 (Serbia); Gojgić-Cvijović, Gordana [Center of Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Manojlović, Dragan, E-mail: manojlo@chem.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 51, 11058 Belgrade 118 (Serbia)

    2015-02-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds have been detected frequently in surface and ground water. Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) were reported as very efficient for removal of various organic compounds. Nevertheless, due to incomplete degradation, toxic intermediates can induce more severe effects than the parent compound. Therefore, toxicity studies are necessary for the evaluation of possible uses of AOPs. In this study the effectiveness and capacity for environmental application of three different AOPs were estimated. They were applied and evaluated for removal of ibuprofen from water solutions. Therefore, two treatments were performed in a non-thermal plasma reactor with dielectric barrier discharge with and without a homogenous catalyst (Fe{sup 2+}). The third treatment was the Fenton reaction. The degradation rate of ibuprofen was measured by HPLC-DAD and the main degradation products were identified using LC–MS TOF. Twelve degradation products were identified, and there were differences according to the various treatments applied. Toxicity effects were determined with two bioassays: Vibrio fischeri and Artemia salina. The efficiency of AOPs was demonstrated for all treatments, where after 15 min degradation percentage was over 80% accompanied by opening of the aromatic ring. In the treatment with homogenous catalyst degradation reached 99%. V. fischeri toxicity test has shown greater sensitivity to ibuprofen solution after the Fenton treatment in comparison to A. salina. - Highlights: • Twelve ibuprofen degradation products were identified in total. • The degradation percentage differed between treatments (DBD/Fe{sup 2+} was 99%). • In DBD/Fe{sup 2+} only aliphatic degradation products were identified. • V. fischeri was sensitive to ibuprofen solution after the Fenton treatment. • A. salina showed no toxic effect when exposed to all post treatment solutions.

  19. Temperature diagnostics of a non-thermal plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Jan

    2013-09-01

    The study reflects the concept of the temperature as a physical quantity resulting from the second thermodynamic law. The reliability of different approaches of the temperature diagnostics of open non-equilibrium systems is discussed using examples of low temperature atmospheric pressure discharges. The focus of this work is a miniaturized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet for local surface treatment at ambient atmosphere. The micro-discharge is driven with a capacitively coupled radio frequency electric field at 27.12 MHz and fed with argon at rates of about 1 slm through the capillary with an inner diameter of 4 mm. The discharge consists of several contracted filaments with diameter around 300 μm which are rotating azimuthally in the capillary in a self-organized manner. While the measured temperatures of the filament core exceed 700 K, the heat impact on a target below the plasma jet remains limited leading to target temperatures below 400 K. Different kinds of temperatures and energy transport processes are proposed and experimentally investigated. Nevertheless, a reliable and detailed temperature diagnostics is a challenge. We report on a novel diagnostics approach for the spatially and temporally resolved measurement of the gas temperature based on the optical properties of the plasma. Laser Schlieren Deflectometry is adapted to explore temperature profiles of filaments and their behaviour. In parallel, the method demonstrates a fundamental Fermat's principle of minimal energy. Information acquired with this method plays an important role for the optimization of local thin film deposition and surface functionalization by means of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The work was supported in part by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within SFB-TR 24.

  20. Application of non-thermal plasma reactor and Fenton reaction for degradation of ibuprofen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marković, Marijana; Jović, Milica; Stanković, Dalibor; Kovačević, Vesna; Roglić, Goran; Gojgić-Cvijović, Gordana; Manojlović, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds have been detected frequently in surface and ground water. Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) were reported as very efficient for removal of various organic compounds. Nevertheless, due to incomplete degradation, toxic intermediates can induce more severe effects than the parent compound. Therefore, toxicity studies are necessary for the evaluation of possible uses of AOPs. In this study the effectiveness and capacity for environmental application of three different AOPs were estimated. They were applied and evaluated for removal of ibuprofen from water solutions. Therefore, two treatments were performed in a non-thermal plasma reactor with dielectric barrier discharge with and without a homogenous catalyst (Fe 2+ ). The third treatment was the Fenton reaction. The degradation rate of ibuprofen was measured by HPLC-DAD and the main degradation products were identified using LC–MS TOF. Twelve degradation products were identified, and there were differences according to the various treatments applied. Toxicity effects were determined with two bioassays: Vibrio fischeri and Artemia salina. The efficiency of AOPs was demonstrated for all treatments, where after 15 min degradation percentage was over 80% accompanied by opening of the aromatic ring. In the treatment with homogenous catalyst degradation reached 99%. V. fischeri toxicity test has shown greater sensitivity to ibuprofen solution after the Fenton treatment in comparison to A. salina. - Highlights: • Twelve ibuprofen degradation products were identified in total. • The degradation percentage differed between treatments (DBD/Fe 2+ was 99%). • In DBD/Fe 2+ only aliphatic degradation products were identified. • V. fischeri was sensitive to ibuprofen solution after the Fenton treatment. • A. salina showed no toxic effect when exposed to all post treatment solutions

  1. Studies of photonuclear neutron emission during the start-up phase of the Alcator C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappas, D.S.; Furnstahl, R.; Kochanski, G.P.

    1981-05-01

    Alcator C operations commenced with discharge cleaning and tokamak operation using hydrogen filling gas. Prior to and during these experiments no deuterium gas was allowed into the device. The earliest operation resulted in dosimeter readings of a few Roentgen per shot in the vicinity of the limiter and a localized source of neutron emission of up to 10 9 neutrons/shot. A strong correlation of the neutron emissions with hard x-ray emissions from the limiter and nonthermal features on the synchrotron emissions was observed during these discharges. Gamma energy spectroscopy of the activated limiter after removal from Alcator allowed identification of 16 radioisotopes which were consistent with photonuclear processes (γ,n , γ,p , γ,α reactions) arising in the limiter. After seven months of hydrogen operation conditions were achieved that resulted in substantially less non-thermal activity. Typical neutron emission rates of equal to or less than 10 6 n/sec were observed, i.e., about four orders of magnitude less than the expected D-D thermonuclear neutron emission rates for the same type of discharge if D 2 was used as the filling gas

  2. Collective radio-emission from plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulos, K.; Freund, H.P.

    1979-01-01

    Collective radiation processes operating in laboratory and space plasmas are reviewed with an emphasis towards astrophysical applications. Particular stress is placed on the physics involved in the various processes rather than in the detailed derivation of the formulas. Radiation processes from stable non-thermal, weakly turbulent and strongly turbulent magnetized and unmagnetized plasmas are discussed. The general theoretical ideas involved in amplification processes such as stimulated scattering are presented along with their application to free electron and plasma lasers. Direct radio-emission of electromagnetic waves by linear instabilities driven by beams or velocity anisotropies are shown to be of relevance in space applications. Finally, as an example of the computational state of the art pertaining to plasma radiation, a study of the type III solar radio bursts is presented. (orig.)

  3. The efficacy of a combination non-thermal focused ultrasound and radiofrequency device for noninvasive body contouring in Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Samantha Y N; Yeung, Chi K; Chan, Johnny C Y; Chan, Henry H L

    2016-02-01

    Several studies have been published on the first generation non-thermal focused ultrasound with an average improvement of 0-3.95 cm reported. We aim to investigate the efficacy of the second-generation non-thermal focused ultrasound device with a combined radiofrequency hand piece. With the addition of radiofrequency energy, the temperature of the adipose tissue is raised before focused ultrasound is applied. This facilitates the mechanical disruption of fat cells by focused ultrasound. Twenty subjects were recruited and underwent three treatments biweekly. Caliper reading, abdominal circumference, and standardized photographs were taken with the Vectra(®) system at all visits. We aim to have the subjects stand and hold the same position and the photograph taken after exhalation. Caliper and circumference measurements carry uncertainty. It is impossible to eliminate all uncertainties but can be improved by having the same trained physician assistant perform the measurement at the same site and taking an average of three readings. Pain score and satisfaction were recorded by means of the visual analogue scale. The efficacy is defined by a statistically significant improvement in circumferential improvement based on intention-to-treat analysis. Seventeen subjects completed the treatment schedule. Abdominal circumference showed statistically significant improvement at 2 weeks post-second treatment (P = 0.023) and almost all subsequent follow-ups. Caliper readings were statistically significant at 2 weeks post-second treatment (P = 0.013) and almost all follow-ups. The mean pain score reported was 2.3 on the visual analog scale and 6% were unsatisfied with the overall treatments. Six incidents of wheal formation appeared immediately after treatment all of which subsided spontaneously within several hours. The combination non-thermal focused ultrasound and radiofrequency device is effective for improving body contour in Asians. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A wide low-mass binary model for the origin of axially symmetric non-thermal radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kool, M. de; Heuvel, E.P.J. van den

    1985-01-01

    An accreting binary model has been proposed by recent workers to account for the origin of the axially symmetric non-thermal radio sources. The authors show that the only type of binary system that can produce the observed structural properties, is a relatively wide neutron star binary, in which the companion of the neutron star is a low-mass giant. Binaries of this type are expected to resemble closely the eight brightest galactic bulge X-ray sources as well as the progenitors of the two wide radio pulsar binaries. (U.K.)

  5. Theoretical-experimental study of the non-thermal effects of the polarized laser radiation in living tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    In the present research we had as a fundamental objective to analyse the non-thermal effects of the laser polarized light in biological tissues. These effects were performed with low power laser output. The theoretical procedure consisted in looking for a simple model which connects the effect of light polarized with microscopically rough tissues using well established physical concepts. Experimentally, we created artificial wounds on the back of animals using liquid nitrogen (this method was chosen because it does not interfere in the biochemistry of the animal tissue). For the wound irradiation we have utilized a He-Ne attached to an optical system. (author)

  6. Phenotypic and genetic differentiation among yellow monkeyflower populations from thermal and non-thermal soils in Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekberg, Ylva; Roskilly, Beth; Hendrick, Margaret F; Zabinski, Catherine A; Barr, Camille M; Fishman, Lila

    2012-09-01

    In flowering plants, soil heterogeneity can generate divergent natural selection over fine spatial scales, and thus promote local adaptation in the absence of geographic barriers to gene flow. Here, we investigate phenotypic and genetic differentiation in one of the few flowering plants that thrives in both geothermal and non-thermal soils in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Yellow monkeyflowers (Mimulus guttatus) growing at two geothermal ("thermal") sites in YNP were distinct in growth form and phenology from paired populations growing nearby ( 0.34), which were only weakly differentiated from each other (all F (ST) geothermal gradient in Yellowstone.

  7. Emissions Trading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerdman, Edwin; Backhaus, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Emissions trading is a market-based instrument to achieve environmental targets in a cost-effective way by allowing legal entities to buy and sell emission rights. The current international dissemination and intended linking of emissions trading schemes underlines the growing relevance of this

  8. Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, J; Foest, R; Reuter, S; Kewitz, T; Šperka, J; Weltmann, K-D

    2012-10-01

    The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 ± 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 ± 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable

  9. Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, J.; Foest, R.; Reuter, S.; Weltmann, K.-D. [INP Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Kewitz, T. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, University Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Sperka, J. [Department of Physical Electronics, Masaryk University, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2012-10-15

    The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 {+-} 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 {+-} 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable

  10. Decontamination of Bacillus subtilis Spores in a Sealed Package Using a Non-thermal Plasma System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, Kevin M.; Jensen, J. L.; Valdramidis, V. P.; Byrne, E.; Connolly, J.; Mosnier, J. P.; Cullen, P. J.

    The safety of packaged food and medical devices is a major concern to consumers and government officials. Recent inventions (PK-1 and PK-2) based on the principles of non-thermal, atmospheric plasma has shown significant reduction in bacterial contamination inside a sealed package. The objective of this study was to evaluate the PK-1 and PK-2 systems in the reduction of Bacillus subtilis spores using packages containing air or modified atmosphere (MA) gas (65% O2/30% CO2/5% N2). The experimental design consisted of the following parameters: (1) two voltage conditions: 13.5 kV with 1.0 cm electrode gap (PK-1) and 80 kV with 4.5 cm electrode gap (PK-2), (2) two treatment conditions: inside and outside the field of ionization, (3) PK-1 and PK-2 optimized treatment times: 300 and 120 s, respectively, and (4) two package gas types: air and modified atmosphere (MA) gas (65% O2/30% CO2/5% N2). Measurements included: (1) bacterial reductions of Bacillus subtilis var. niger (B. atrophaeus), (2) ozone, nitrous oxides (NOx), and carbon monoxide concentrations, and (3) relative humidity. Bacillus subtilis (1.7 × 106/strip) were loaded into sterile uncovered petri dishes and treated with ionization generated in packages using air or MA gas blend. Samples were treated for 300 s (PK-1) or 120 s (PK-2) and stored at room ­temperature for 24 h. Results documented relative humidity (RH) ranged from 20% to 30%. After 300 s of PK-1 treatment (13.5 kV/44 W/1.0 cm gap), ozone concentrations were 6,000 ppm (air) and 7,500 ppm (MA). After 120 s of PK-2 treatment (80 kV/150 W/4.5 cm), ozone concentrations were 7,500 ppm (air) and 12,000 ppm (MA). Ozone and NOx concentrations were non-detect (ND) after 24 h. PK-1 carbon monoxide levels were package ionization process.

  11. Emission Facilities - Air Emission Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Represents the Primary Facility type Air Emission Plant (AEP) point features. Air Emissions Plant is a DEP primary facility type related to the Air Quality Program....

  12. Emission inventory; Inventaire des emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontelle, J.P. [CITEPA, Centre Interprofessionnel Technique d`Etudes de la Pollution Atmospherique, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    Statistics on air pollutant (sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and ammonium) emissions, acid equivalent emissions and their evolution since 1990 in the various countries of Europe and the USA, are presented. Emission data from the industrial, agricultural, transportation and power sectors are given, and comparisons are carried out between countries based on Gnp and population, pollution import/export fluxes and compliance to the previous emission reduction objectives

  13. SU-F-J-215: Non-Thermal Pulsed High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy Combined with 5-Aminolevulinic Acid: An in Vivo Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B; He, W; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, L; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: It has recently been shown that non-thermal pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) has a cell-killing effect. The purpose of the study is to investigate the sonosensitizing effect of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid (5-ALA) in non-thermal pHIFU cancer therapy. Methods: FaDu human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells were injected subcutaneously in the flanks of nude mice. After one to two weeks, the tumors reached the volume of 112 ± 8 mm3 and were assigned randomly into a non-thermal pHIFU group (n=9) and a non-thermal sonodynamic therapy (pHIFU after 5-ALA administration) group (n=7). The pHIFU treatments (parameters: 1 MHz frequency; 25 W acoustic power; 0.1 duty cycle; 60 seconds duration) were delivered using an InSightec ExAblate 2000 system with a GE Signa 1.5T MR scanner. The mice in the non-thermal sonodynamic group received 5-ALA tail-vein injection 4 hours prior to the pHIFU treatment. The tumor growth was monitored using the CT scanner on a Sofie-Biosciences G8 PET/CT system. Results: The tumors in this study grew very aggressively and about 60% of the tumors in this study developed ulcerations at various stages. Tumor growth delay after treatments was observed by comparing the treated (n=9 in pHIFU group; n=7 in sonodynamic group) and untreated tumors (n=17). However, no statistically significant differences were found between the non-thermal pHIFU and non-thermal sonodynamic group. The mean normalized tumor volume of the untreated tumors on Day 7 after their first CT scans was 7.05 ± 0.54, while the normalized volume of the treated tumors on Day 7 after treatment was 5.89 ± 0.79 and 6.27 ± 0.47 for the sonodynamic group and pHIFU group, respectively. Conclusion: In this study, no significant sonosensitizing effects of 5-ALA were obtained on aggressive FaDu tumors despite apparent tumor growth delay in some mice treated with non-thermal sonodynamic therapy.

  14. Dust-acoustic shock waves in a charge varying electronegative magnetized dusty plasma with nonthermal ions: Application to Halley Comet plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Bacha, Mustapha [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B. P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2013-10-15

    Weak dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) are addressed in a nonthermal charge varying electronegative magnetized dusty plasmas with application to the Halley Comet. A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to derive a Korteweg-de Vries-Burger equation. The positive ion nonthermality, the obliqueness, and magnitude of the magnetic field are found to modify the dispersive and dissipative properties of the DA shock structure. Our results may aid to explain and interpret the nonlinear oscillations that may occur in the Halley Comet Plasma.

  15. Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectroscopy diagnostic system for the study of non-thermal electrons at Aditya tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, S; Joisa, Y S; Raval, J V; Ghosh, J; Tanna, R; Shukla, B K; Bhatt, S B

    2014-11-01

    Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectrometer diagnostic was developed to study the non-thermal electron for Aditya tokamak plasma. The diagnostic was mounted on a radial mid plane port at the Aditya. The objective of diagnostic includes the estimation of the non-thermal electron temperature for the ohmically heated plasma. Bi-Maxwellian plasma model was adopted for the temperature estimation. Along with that the study of high Z impurity line radiation from the ECR pre-ionization experiments was also aimed. The performance and first experimental results from the new X-ray spectrometer system are presented.

  16. Ion acoustic solitons and supersolitons in a magnetized plasma with nonthermal hot electrons and Boltzmann cool electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rufai, O. R., E-mail: rajirufai@gmail.com; Bharuthram, R., E-mail: rbharuthram@uwc.ac.za [University of the Western Cape, Belville (South Africa); Singh, S. V., E-mail: satyavir@iigs.iigm.res.in; Lakhina, G. S., E-mail: lakhina@iigs.iigm.res.in [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (W), Navi Mumbai (India)

    2014-08-15

    Arbitrary amplitude, ion acoustic solitons, and supersolitons are studied in a magnetized plasma with two distinct groups of electrons at different temperatures. The plasma consists of a cold ion fluid, cool Boltzmann electrons, and nonthermal energetic hot electrons. Using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique, the effect of nonthermal hot electrons on soliton structures with other plasma parameters is studied. Our numerical computation shows that negative potential ion-acoustic solitons and double layers can exist both in the subsonic and supersonic Mach number regimes, unlike the case of an unmagnetized plasma where they can only exist in the supersonic Mach number regime. For the first time, it is reported here that in addition to solitions and double layers, the ion-acoustic supersoliton solutions are also obtained for certain range of parameters in a magnetized three-component plasma model. The results show good agreement with Viking satellite observations of the solitary structures with density depletions in the auroral region of the Earth's magnetosphere.

  17. Non-Thermal Plasma Treatment Diminishes Fungal Viability and Up-Regulates Resistance Genes in a Plant Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panngom, Kamonporn; Lee, Sang Hark; Park, Dae Hoon; Sim, Geon Bo; Kim, Yong Hee; Uhm, Han Sup; Park, Gyungsoon; Choi, Eun Ha

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can have either harmful or beneficial effects on biological systems depending on the dose administered and the species of organism exposed, suggesting that application of reactive species can possibly produce contradictory effects in disease control, pathogen inactivation and activation of host resistance. A novel technology known as atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma represents a means of generating various reactive species that adversely affect pathogens (inactivation) while simultaneously up-regulating host defense genes. The anti-microbial efficacy of this technology was tested on the plant fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and its susceptible host plant species Solanum lycopercicum. Germination of fungal spores suspended in saline was decreased over time after exposed to argon (Ar) plasma for 10 min. Although the majority of treated spores exhibited necrotic death, apoptosis was also observed along with the up-regulation of apoptosis related genes. Increases in the levels of peroxynitrite and nitrite in saline following plasma treatment may have been responsible for the observed spore death. In addition, increased transcription of pathogenesis related (PR) genes was observed in the roots of the susceptible tomato cultivar (S. lycopercicum) after exposure to the same Ar plasma dose used in fungal inactivation. These data suggest that atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma can be efficiently used to control plant fungal diseases by inactivating fungal pathogens and up-regulating mechanisms of host resistance. PMID:24911947

  18. Changes in the biomechanical properties of a single cell induced by nonthermal atmospheric pressure micro-dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeongwon; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kyung Sook

    2017-10-01

    Mechanical properties of a single cell are closely related to the fate and functions of the cell. Changes in mechanical properties may cause diseases or cell apoptosis. Selective cytotoxic effects of nonthermal atmospheric pressure micro-dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma have been demonstrated on cancer cells. In this work, changes in the mechanical properties of a single cell induced by nonthermal atmospheric pressure micro-DBD plasma were investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa and SiHa) and normal human fibroblast cells (HFBs) were exposed to micro-DBD plasma for various exposure times. The elasticity of a single cell was determined by force-distance curve measurement using AFM. Young's modulus was decreased by plasma treatment for all cells. The Young's modulus of plasma-treated HeLa cells was decreased by 75% compared to nontreated HeLa cells. In SiHa cells and HFBs, elasticity was decreased slightly. Chemical changes induced by the plasma treatment, which were observed by Raman spectroscopy, were also significant in HeLa cells compared to SiHa cells and HFBs. These results suggested that the molecular changes induced by micro-DBD plasma were related to cell mechanical changes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Cell death induced on cell cultures and nude mouse skin by non-thermal, nanosecond-pulsed generated plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Duval

    Full Text Available Non-thermal plasmas are gaseous mixtures of molecules, radicals, and excited species with a small proportion of ions and energetic electrons. Non-thermal plasmas can be generated with any high electro-magnetic field. We studied here the pathological effects, and in particular cell death, induced by nanosecond-pulsed high voltage generated plasmas homogeneously applied on cell cultures and nude mouse skin. In vitro, Jurkat cells and HMEC exhibited apoptosis and necrosis, in dose-dependent manner. In vivo, on nude mouse skin, cell death occurred for doses above 113 J/cm(2 for the epidermis, 281 J/cm(2 for the dermis, and 394 J/cm(2 for the hypodermis. Using electron microscopy, we characterized apoptosis for low doses and necrosis for high doses. We demonstrated that these effects were not related to thermal, photonic or pH variations, and were due to the production of free radicals. The ability of cold plasmas to generate apoptosis on cells in suspension and, without any sensitizer, on precise skin areas, opens new fields of application in dermatology for extracorporeal blood cell treatment and the eradication of superficial skin lesions.

  20. COLLISIONLESS ELECTRON–ION SHOCKS IN RELATIVISTIC UNMAGNETIZED JET–AMBIENT INTERACTIONS: NON-THERMAL ELECTRON INJECTION BY DOUBLE LAYER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardaneh, Kazem; Cai, Dongsheng; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    The course of non-thermal electron ejection in relativistic unmagnetized electron–ion shocks is investigated by performing self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations. The shocks are excited through the injection of a relativistic jet into ambient plasma, leading to two distinct shocks (referred to as the trailing shock and leading shock) and a contact discontinuity. The Weibel-like instabilities heat the electrons up to approximately half of the ion kinetic energy. The double layers formed in the trailing and leading edges then accelerate the electrons up to the ion kinetic energy. The electron distribution function in the leading edge shows a clear, non-thermal power-law tail which contains ∼1% of electrons and ∼8% of the electron energy. Its power-law index is −2.6. The acceleration efficiency is ∼23% by number and ∼50% by energy, and the power-law index is −1.8 for the electron distribution function in the trailing edge. The effect of the dimensionality is examined by comparing the results of three-dimensional simulations with those of two-dimensional simulations. The comparison demonstrates that electron acceleration is more efficient in two dimensions.

  1. Effects of vortex-like and non-thermal ion distributions on non-linear dust-acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamun, A.A.; Cairns, R.A.; Shukla, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of vortex-like and non-thermal ion distributions are incorporated in the study of nonlinear dust-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma. It is found that owing to the departure from the Boltzmann ion distribution to a vortex-like phase space distribution, the dynamics of small but finite amplitude dust-acoustic waves is governed by a modified Kortweg endash de Vries equation. The latter admits a stationary dust-acoustic solitary wave solution, which has larger amplitude, smaller width, and higher propagation velocity than that involving adiabatic ions. On the other hand, consideration of a non-thermal ion distribution provides the possibility of coexistence of large amplitude rarefactive as well as compressive dust-acoustic solitary waves, whereas these structures appear independently when the wave amplitudes become infinitely small. The present investigation should help us to understand the salient features of the non-linear dust-acoustic waves that have been observed in a recent numerical simulation study. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  2. Preparation by low-temperature nonthermal plasma of graphite fiber and its characteristics for solid-phase microextraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Fan; Wu Zucheng; Tao Ping; Cong Yanqing

    2009-01-01

    Low-temperature nonthermal plasma has been used to prepare solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers with high adsorbability, long-term serviceability, and high reproducibility. Graphite rods serving as fiber precursors were treated by an air plasma discharged at 15.2-15.5 kV for a duration of 8 min. Sampling results revealed that the adsorptive capacity of the homemade fiber was 2.5-34.6 times that of a polyacrylate (PA) fiber for alcohols (methanol, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol), and about 1.4-1.6 times and 2.5-5.1 times that of an activated carbon fiber (ACF) for alcohols and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), respectively. It is confirmed from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer) and SEM (scanning electron microscope) analyses that the improvement in the adsorptive performance attributed to increased surface energy and roughness of the graphite fiber. Using gas chromatography (GC)-flame-ionization detector (FID), the limits of detection (LODs) of the alcohols and BTEX ranged between 0.19 and 3.75 μg L -1 , the linear ranges were between 0.6 and 35619 μg L -1 with good linearity (R 2 = 0.9964-0.9997). It was demonstrated that nonthermal plasma offers a fast and simple method for preparing an efficient graphite SPME fiber, and that SPME using the homemade fiber represents a sensitive and selective extraction method for the analysis of a wide range of organic compounds

  3. Preparation by low-temperature nonthermal plasma of graphite fiber and its characteristics for solid-phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fan; Wu, Zucheng; Tao, Ping; Cong, Yanqing

    2009-01-05

    Low-temperature nonthermal plasma has been used to prepare solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers with high adsorbability, long-term serviceability, and high reproducibility. Graphite rods serving as fiber precursors were treated by an air plasma discharged at 15.2-15.5 kV for a duration of 8 min. Sampling results revealed that the adsorptive capacity of the homemade fiber was 2.5-34.6 times that of a polyacrylate (PA) fiber for alcohols (methanol, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol), and about 1.4-1.6 times and 2.5-5.1 times that of an activated carbon fiber (ACF) for alcohols and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), respectively. It is confirmed from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer) and SEM (scanning electron microscope) analyses that the improvement in the adsorptive performance attributed to increased surface energy and roughness of the graphite fiber. Using gas chromatography (GC)-flame-ionization detector (FID), the limits of detection (LODs) of the alcohols and BTEX ranged between 0.19 and 3.75 microg L(-1), the linear ranges were between 0.6 and 35,619 microg L(-1) with good linearity (R(2)=0.9964-0.9997). It was demonstrated that nonthermal plasma offers a fast and simple method for preparing an efficient graphite SPME fiber, and that SPME using the homemade fiber represents a sensitive and selective extraction method for the analysis of a wide range of organic compounds.

  4. Effect of indirect non-thermal plasma on particle size distribution and composition of diesel engine particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linbo, GU; Yixi, CAI; Yunxi, SHI; Jing, WANG; Xiaoyu, PU; Jing, TIAN; Runlin, FAN

    2017-11-01

    To explore the effect of the gas source flow rate on the actual diesel exhaust particulate matter (PM), a test bench for diesel engine exhaust purification was constructed, using indirect non-thermal plasma technology. The effects of different gas source flow rates on the quantity concentration, composition, and apparent activation energy of PM were investigated, using an engine exhaust particle sizer and a thermo-gravimetric analyzer. The results show that when the gas source flow rate was large, not only the maximum peak quantity concentrations of particles had a large drop, but also the peak quantity concentrations shifted to smaller particle sizes from 100 nm to 80 nm. When the gas source flow rate was 10 L min-1, the total quantity concentration greatly decreased where the removal rate of particles was 79.2%, and the variation of the different mode particle proportion was obvious. Non-thermal plasma (NTP) improved the oxidation ability of volatile matter as well as that of solid carbon. However, the NTP gas source rate had little effects on oxidation activity of volatile matter, while it strongly influenced the oxidation activity of solid carbon. Considering the quantity concentration and oxidation activity of particles, a gas source flow rate of 10 L min-1 was more appropriate for the purification of particles.

  5. Dentin surface treatment using a non-thermal argon plasma brush for interfacial bonding improvement in composite restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritts, Andy Charles; Li, Hao; Yu, Qingsong; Xu, Changqi; Yao, Xiaomei; Hong, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the treatment effects of non-thermal atmospheric gas plasmas on dentin surfaces for composite restoration. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. The dentin surfaces were treated by using a non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush for various durations. The molecular changes of the dentin surfaces were analyzed using FTIR/ATR and an increase in carbonyl groups on dentin surfaces was detected with plasma treated dentin. Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive and Filtek Z250 dental composite were applied as directed. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, the teeth thus prepared were sectioned into micro-bars as the specimens for tensile test. Student Newman Keuls tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s plasma treatment. However, the bonding strength to plasma treated inner dentin did not show any improvement. It was found that plasma treatment of peripheral dentin surface up to 100 s gave an increase in interfacial bonding strength, while a prolong plasma treatment of dentin surfaces, e.g., 5 min treatments, showed a decrease in interfacial bonding strength. PMID:20831586

  6. Overview of non-thermal mixed waste treatment technologies: Treatment of mixed waste (ex situ); Technologies and short descriptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This compendium contains brief summaries of new and developing non- thermal treatment technologies that are candidates for treating hazardous or mixed (hazardous plus low-level radioactive) wastes. It is written to be all-encompassing, sometimes including concepts that presently constitute little more than informed ``ideas``. It bounds the universe of existing technologies being thought about or considered for application on the treatment of such wastes. This compendium is intended to be the very first step in a winnowing process to identify non-thermal treatment systems that can be fashioned into complete ``cradle-to-grave`` systems for study. The purpose of the subsequent systems paper studies is to investigate the cost and likely performance of such systems treating a representative sample of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mixed low level wastes (MLLW). The studies are called Integrated Non-thermal Treatment Systems (INTS) Studies and are being conducted by the Office of Science and Technology (OST) of the Environmental Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy. Similar studies on Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems have recently been published. These are not designed nor intended to be a ``downselection`` of such technologies; rather, they are simply a systems evaluation of the likely costs and performance of various non- thermal technologies that have been arranged into systems to treat sludges, organics, metals, soils, and debris prevalent in MLLW.

  7. Solar off-limb line widths with SUMER: revised value of the non-thermal velocity and new results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Dolla

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Alfvén waves and ion-cyclotron absorption of high-frequency waves are frequently brought into models devoted to coronal heating and fast solar-wind acceleration. Signatures of ion-cyclotron resonance have already been observed in situ in the solar wind and in the upper corona. In the lower corona, one can use the line profiles to infer the ion temperatures. But the value of the so-called "non-thermal" (or "unresolved" velocity, potentially related to the amplitude of Alfvén waves propagating in the corona, is critical in firmly identifying ion-cyclotron preferential heating. In a previous paper, we proposed a method to constrain both the Alfvén wave amplitude and the preferential heating, above a polar coronal hole observed with the SUMER/SOHO spectrometer. Taking into account the effect of instrumental stray light before analysing the line profiles, we ruled out any direct evidence of damping of the Alfvén waves and showed that ions with the lowest charge-to-mass ratios were preferentially heated. We re-analyse these data here to correct the derived non-thermal velocity, and we discuss the consequences on the main results. We also include a measure of the Fe VIII 1442.56 Å line width (second order, thus extending the charge-to-mass ratio domain towards ions more likely to experience cyclotron resonance.

  8. Nonthermal pasteurization of beer by high pressure processing: modelling the inactivation of saccharomyces cerevisiae ascospores in different alcohol beers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Elham A.; Silva, Filipa V. M.

    2016-10-01

    The industrial production of beer ends with a process of thermal pasteurization. In this research, the nonthermal pasteurization of beer by high pressure processing (HPP) was carried out. First, the effect of alcohol content on Saccharomyces cerevisiae ascospore inactivation at 400 MPa was studied. The number of ascospores in 0.0%, 4.8%, and 7.0% alc/vol beers for 10 min processing time decreased by 3.1, 4.9, and ≥ 6.0 log, respectively. The Weibull model fitted the ascospore inactivation by HPP in 0.0%, 4.8%, and 7.0% alc/vol beers. At 400 MPa, 7.2 s could ensure the minimum pasteurization of beers and for 600 MPa 5 s were enough for ≥ 7 log reductions. The overall flavour of HPP vs. untreated beers was evaluated for a lager and an ale, with no significant differences between the untreated and HPP beers. Thus, nonthermal HPP is a feasible technology to pasteurize beer with different alcohol contents without heat.

  9. Non-thermal plasma treatment diminishes fungal viability and up-regulates resistance genes in a plant host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panngom, Kamonporn; Lee, Sang Hark; Park, Dae Hoon; Sim, Geon Bo; Kim, Yong Hee; Uhm, Han Sup; Park, Gyungsoon; Choi, Eun Ha

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can have either harmful or beneficial effects on biological systems depending on the dose administered and the species of organism exposed, suggesting that application of reactive species can possibly produce contradictory effects in disease control, pathogen inactivation and activation of host resistance. A novel technology known as atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma represents a means of generating various reactive species that adversely affect pathogens (inactivation) while simultaneously up-regulating host defense genes. The anti-microbial efficacy of this technology was tested on the plant fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and its susceptible host plant species Solanum lycopercicum. Germination of fungal spores suspended in saline was decreased over time after exposed to argon (Ar) plasma for 10 min. Although the majority of treated spores exhibited necrotic death, apoptosis was also observed along with the up-regulation of apoptosis related genes. Increases in the levels of peroxynitrite and nitrite in saline following plasma treatment may have been responsible for the observed spore death. In addition, increased transcription of pathogenesis related (PR) genes was observed in the roots of the susceptible tomato cultivar (S. lycopercicum) after exposure to the same Ar plasma dose used in fungal inactivation. These data suggest that atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma can be efficiently used to control plant fungal diseases by inactivating fungal pathogens and up-regulating mechanisms of host resistance.

  10. Non-thermal plasma treatment diminishes fungal viability and up-regulates resistance genes in a plant host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamonporn Panngom

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can have either harmful or beneficial effects on biological systems depending on the dose administered and the species of organism exposed, suggesting that application of reactive species can possibly produce contradictory effects in disease control, pathogen inactivation and activation of host resistance. A novel technology known as atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma represents a means of generating various reactive species that adversely affect pathogens (inactivation while simultaneously up-regulating host defense genes. The anti-microbial efficacy of this technology was tested on the plant fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and its susceptible host plant species Solanum lycopercicum. Germination of fungal spores suspended in saline was decreased over time after exposed to argon (Ar plasma for 10 min. Although the majority of treated spores exhibited necrotic death, apoptosis was also observed along with the up-regulation of apoptosis related genes. Increases in the levels of peroxynitrite and nitrite in saline following plasma treatment may have been responsible for the observed spore death. In addition, increased transcription of pathogenesis related (PR genes was observed in the roots of the susceptible tomato cultivar (S. lycopercicum after exposure to the same Ar plasma dose used in fungal inactivation. These data suggest that atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma can be efficiently used to control plant fungal diseases by inactivating fungal pathogens and up-regulating mechanisms of host resistance.

  11. Formation of hydrophobic coating on glass surface using atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma in ambient air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Z; Qiu, Y; Kuffel, E

    2004-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas under atmospheric pressure are of great interest in material surface processing because of their convenience, effectiveness and low cost. In this paper, the treatment of a glass surface for improving hydrophobicity using a non-thermal plasma generated by a dielectric barrier corona discharge (DBCD) with a needle array-to-plane electrode arrangement in atmospheric air is conducted, and the surface properties of the glass before and after the DBCD treatment are studied using contact angle measurement, surface resistance measurement and the wet flashover voltage test. The effects of the plasma dose (the product of average discharge power and treatment time) of DBCD on the surface modification are studied, and the mechanism of interaction between the plasma and glass surface is discussed. It is found that a layer of hydrophobic coating is formed on the glass surface through DBCD treatment, and the improvement of hydrophobicity depends on the plasma dose of the DBCD. It seems that there is an optimum plasma dose for the surface treatment. The test results of thermal ageing and chemical ageing show that the hydrophobic layer has quite stable characteristics

  12. Overview of non-thermal mixed waste treatment technologies: Treatment of mixed waste (ex situ); Technologies and short descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This compendium contains brief summaries of new and developing non- thermal treatment technologies that are candidates for treating hazardous or mixed (hazardous plus low-level radioactive) wastes. It is written to be all-encompassing, sometimes including concepts that presently constitute little more than informed ''ideas''. It bounds the universe of existing technologies being thought about or considered for application on the treatment of such wastes. This compendium is intended to be the very first step in a winnowing process to identify non-thermal treatment systems that can be fashioned into complete ''cradle-to-grave'' systems for study. The purpose of the subsequent systems paper studies is to investigate the cost and likely performance of such systems treating a representative sample of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mixed low level wastes (MLLW). The studies are called Integrated Non-thermal Treatment Systems (INTS) Studies and are being conducted by the Office of Science and Technology (OST) of the Environmental Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy. Similar studies on Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems have recently been published. These are not designed nor intended to be a ''downselection'' of such technologies; rather, they are simply a systems evaluation of the likely costs and performance of various non- thermal technologies that have been arranged into systems to treat sludges, organics, metals, soils, and debris prevalent in MLLW

  13. Nonthermal effects on existence domains for dust-acoustic solitary structures in plasmas with two-temperature ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verheest, Frank; Hellberg, Manfred A.

    2010-01-01

    Large dust-acoustic waves are investigated in a multispecies plasma model consisting of adiabatic, negatively charged dust, in the presence of two ion species, a cooler one with a Boltzmann distribution and a hotter one with a nonthermal Cairns distribution. This is treated through a Sagdeev pseudopotential analysis, in a way which is physically transparent and puts great emphasis on the existence domains in compositional parameter space. The occurrence and properties of positive double layers have been studied, and this automatically also includes the existence domains for positive solitons with velocities and amplitudes smaller than the double layer values. A brief discussion is given of negative solitons and of conditions affecting the coexistence of negative and positive solitary structures for the same plasma properties. Subject to simple adjustments, these results apply equally to the conjugate plasma model of positive dust and two electron species, and in the limit without nonthermal effects, to the case of ion-acoustic solitary structures in a plasma with double Boltzmann electrons, and extensions of earlier results of that problem are presented.

  14. Absence of synergistic enhancement of non-thermal effects of ultrasound on cell killing induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, T.; Kano, E.

    1987-01-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the role of non-thermal effects (cavitation and direct effects) of ultrasound, in simultaneous combination with X-irradiation on the cytotoxicity of mouse L cells. Firstly, mouse L cells were exposed to X-rays and ultrasound (1 MHz continous wave, spatial peak temporal average intensity; 3.7 W/cm 2 ) simultaneously at 37 0 C under O 2 or Ar saturated conditions to examine the cavitational effect of ultrasound. Secondly, cells were exposed to X-rays and ultrasound at 37 0 C under N 2 O saturated conditions, which suppresses the cavitation, to examine the direct effects of ultrasound. The cavitational effect under O 2 and Ar saturated conditions induced an exponential decrease in cell survival, and resulted in an additive effect on cell killing with the combination of X-rays and ultrasound. The direct effect in the N 2 O conditions induced no cell killing and did not modify the cell killing induced by X-rays. These results suggested that the non-thermal effects of ultrasound did not interact synergistically with X-rays for cell killing. (author)

  15. Quantum Corrected Non-Thermal Radiation Spectrum from the Tunnelling Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subenoy Chakraborty

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The tunnelling mechanism is today considered a popular and widely used method in describing Hawking radiation. However, in relation to black hole (BH emission, this mechanism is mostly used to obtain the Hawking temperature by comparing the probability of emission of an outgoing particle with the Boltzmann factor. On the other hand, Banerjee and Majhi reformulated the tunnelling framework deriving a black body spectrum through the density matrix for the outgoing modes for both the Bose-Einstein distribution and the Fermi-Dirac distribution. In contrast, Parikh and Wilczek introduced a correction term performing an exact calculation of the action for a tunnelling spherically symmetric particle and, as a result, the probability of emission of an outgoing particle corresponds to a non-strictly thermal radiation spectrum. Recently, one of us (C. Corda introduced a BH effective state and was able to obtain a non-strictly black body spectrum from the tunnelling mechanism corresponding to the probability of emission of an outgoing particle found by Parikh and Wilczek. The present work introduces the quantum corrected effective temperature and the corresponding quantum corrected effective metric is written using Hawking’s periodicity arguments. Thus, we obtain further corrections to the non-strictly thermal BH radiation spectrum as the final distributions take into account both the BH dynamical geometry during the emission of the particle and the quantum corrections to the semiclassical Hawking temperature.

  16. Gamma rays from Cygnus X-1: Modeling and nonthermal pair production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermer, C.D.; Liang, E.P.

    1988-02-01

    The gamma-ray bump observed between 0.5 and 2 MeV in the spectrum of Cygnus X-1 can be interpreted as the thermal emissions from a hot (kT/approximately/400 keV) pair-dominated cloud. We argue that the X-rays and gamma rays are produced in separate emission regions, and calculate the photon-photon pair production rate from X-ray and gamma-ray interactions in the vicinity of Cyg X-1 by employing a simplified geometry for the two emitting regions

  17. Chemical characterization of milk after treatment with thermal (HTST and UHT) and nonthermal (turbulent flow ultraviolet) processing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappozzo, Jack C; Koutchma, Tatiana; Barnes, Gail

    2015-08-01

    As a result of growing interest to nonthermal processing of milk, the purpose of this study was to characterize the chemical changes in raw milk composition after exposure to a new nonthermal turbulent flow UV process, conventional thermal pasteurization process (high-temperature, short-time; HTST), and their combinations, and compare those changes with commercially UHT-treated milk. Raw milk was exposed to UV light in turbulent flow at a flow rate of 4,000L/h and applied doses of 1,045 and 2,090 J/L, HTST pasteurization, and HTST in combination with UV (before or after the UV). Unprocessed raw milk, HTST-treated milk, and UHT-treated milk were the control to the milk processed with the continuous turbulent flow UV treatment. The chemical characterization included component analysis and fatty acid composition (with emphasis on conjugated linoleic acid) and analysis for vitamin D and A and volatile components. Lipid oxidation, which is an indicator to oxidative rancidity, was evaluated by free fatty acid analysis, and the volatile components (extracted organic fraction) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to obtain mass spectral profile. These analyses were done over a 14-d period (initially after treatment and at 7 and 14 d) because of the extended shelf-life requirement for milk. The effect of UV light on proteins (i.e., casein or lactalbumin) was evaluated qualitatively by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. The milk or liquid soluble fraction was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE for changes in the protein profile. From this study, it appears that continuous turbulent flow UV processing, whether used as a single process or in combination with HTST did not cause any statistically significant chemical changes when compared with raw milk with regard to the proximate analysis (total fat, protein, moisture, or ash), the fatty acid profile, lipid oxidation with respect to volatile analysis, or protein profile. A 56% loss of vitamin D and a 95% loss of vitamin A

  18. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Non-Thermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Guibling Zhao; Ji-Jun Zhang; Sanil John

    2005-10-01

    The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a non-thermal plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. A pulsed corona discharge (PCD) reactor has been fabricated and used to dissociate H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur. A nonthermal plasma cannot be produced in pure H{sub 2}S with our reactor geometry, even at discharge voltages of up to 30 kV, because of the high dielectric strength of pure H{sub 2}S ({approx}2.9 times higher than air). Therefore, H{sub 2}S was diluted in another gas with lower breakdown voltage (or dielectric strength). Breakdown voltages of H{sub 2}S in four balance gases (Ar, He, N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}) have been measured at different H{sub 2}S concentrations and pressures. Breakdown voltages are proportional to the partial pressure of H{sub 2}S and the balance gas. H{sub 2}S conversion and the reaction energy efficiency depend on the balance gas and H{sub 2}S inlet concentrations. With increasing H{sub 2}S concentrations, H{sub 2}S conversion initially increases, reaches a maximum, and then decreases. H{sub 2}S conversion in atomic balance gases, such as Ar and He, is more efficient than that in diatomic balance gases, such as N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. These observations can be explained by the proposed reaction mechanism of H{sub 2}S dissociation in different balance gases. The results show that nonthermal plasmas are effective for dissociating H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur.

  19. Solitary waves of the Kadomstev-Petviashvili equation in warm dusty plasma with variable dust charge, two temperature ion and nonthermal electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakzad, Hamid Reza

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of nonlinear waves in warm dusty plasmas with variable dust charge, two temperature ion and nonthermal electron is studied. By using the reductive perturbation theory, the Kadomstev-Petviashivili (KP) equation is derived. Existence of rarefactive and compressive solitons is analyzed.

  20. The Binary Neutron Star Event LIGO/Virgo GW170817 160 Days after Merger: Synchrotron Emission across the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margutti, R.; Alexander, K. D.; Xie, X.; Sironi, L.; Metzger, B. D.; Kathirgamaraju, A.; Fong, W.; Blanchard, P. K.; Berger, E.; MacFadyen, A.; Giannios, D.; Guidorzi, C.; Hajela, A.; Chornock, R.; Cowperthwaite, P. S.; Eftekhari, T.; Nicholl, M.; Villar, V. A.; Williams, P. K. G.; Zrake, J.

    2018-03-01

    We report deep Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO), Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and Karl J. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the binary neutron star event GW170817 at t spectrum extending for eight orders of magnitude in frequency enables the most precise measurement of the index p of the distribution of non-thermal relativistic electrons N(γ )\\propto {γ }-p accelerated by a shock launched by a neutron star (NS)–NS merger to date. We find p = 2.17 ± 0.01, which indicates that radiation from ejecta with Γ ∼ 3–10 dominates the observed emission. While constraining the nature of the emission process, these observations do not constrain the nature of the relativistic ejecta. We employ simulations of explosive outflows launched in NS ejecta clouds to show that the spectral and temporal evolution of the non-thermal emission from GW170817 is consistent with both emission from radially stratified quasi-spherical ejecta traveling at mildly relativistic speeds, and emission from off-axis collimated ejecta characterized by a narrow cone of ultra-relativistic material with slower wings extending to larger angles. In the latter scenario, GW170817 harbored a normal short gamma-ray burst (SGRB) directed away from our line of sight. Observations at t ≤ 200 days are unlikely to settle the debate, as in both scenarios the observed emission is effectively dominated by radiation from mildly relativistic material.

  1. Fundamental harmonic electron cyclotron emission for hot, loss-cone type distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornatici, M.; Ruffina, U.; Westerhof, E.

    1988-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) is an important diagnostic tool for the study of hot plasmas. ECE can be used not only to measure the electron temperature but also to obtain information about non-thermal characteristics of the electron distribution function. One such a nonthermal characteristic is a loss-cone anisotropy. Loss-cone anisotropy can give rise to unstable growth of electro-magnetic waves around the harmonics of the electron cyclotron resonance and to increased emissivity of electron cyclotron waves. In case of high electron temperatures, also the dispersion properties of the extraordinary (X-) mode arond the fundamental electron cyclotron resonance are changed due to loss-cone anisotropy. The consequences of these dispersion properties for the emissivity of the fundamental harmonic X-mode are analyzed for perpendicular propagation. The emissivity, is calculated for two types of distribution functions having a loss-cone anisotropy. These distribution functions are a relativistic Dory-Guest-Harris type distribution function and modified relativistic Maxwellian distribution having a loss-cone with rounded edges (author). 9 refs.; 2 figs

  2. Hard X-ray emission from accretion shocks around galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Doron; Waxman, Eli

    2010-02-01

    We show that the hard X-ray (HXR) emission observed from several galaxy clusters is consistent with a simple model, in which the nonthermal emission is produced by inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons by electrons accelerated in cluster accretion shocks: The dependence of HXR surface brightness on cluster temperature is consistent with that predicted by the model, and the observed HXR luminosity is consistent with the fraction of shock thermal energy deposited in relativistic electrons being lesssim0.1. Alternative models, where the HXR emission is predicted to be correlated with the cluster thermal emission, are disfavored by the data. The implications of our predictions to future HXR observations (e.g. by NuStar, Simbol-X) and to (space/ground based) γ-ray observations (e.g. by Fermi, HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) are discussed.

  3. Hard X-ray emission from accretion shocks around galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushnir, Doron; Waxman, Eli, E-mail: doron.kushnir@weizmann.ac.il, E-mail: eli.waxman@weizmann.ac.il [Physics Faculty, Weizmann Institute of Science, PO Box 26, Rehovot (Israel)

    2010-02-01

    We show that the hard X-ray (HXR) emission observed from several galaxy clusters is consistent with a simple model, in which the nonthermal emission is produced by inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons by electrons accelerated in cluster accretion shocks: The dependence of HXR surface brightness on cluster temperature is consistent with that predicted by the model, and the observed HXR luminosity is consistent with the fraction of shock thermal energy deposited in relativistic electrons being ∼<0.1. Alternative models, where the HXR emission is predicted to be correlated with the cluster thermal emission, are disfavored by the data. The implications of our predictions to future HXR observations (e.g. by NuStar, Simbol-X) and to (space/ground based) γ-ray observations (e.g. by Fermi, HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) are discussed.

  4. Hard X-ray emission from accretion shocks around galaxy clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushnir, Doron; Waxman, Eli

    2010-01-01

    We show that the hard X-ray (HXR) emission observed from several galaxy clusters is consistent with a simple model, in which the nonthermal emission is produced by inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons by electrons accelerated in cluster accretion shocks: The dependence of HXR surface brightness on cluster temperature is consistent with that predicted by the model, and the observed HXR luminosity is consistent with the fraction of shock thermal energy deposited in relativistic electrons being ∼<0.1. Alternative models, where the HXR emission is predicted to be correlated with the cluster thermal emission, are disfavored by the data. The implications of our predictions to future HXR observations (e.g. by NuStar, Simbol-X) and to (space/ground based) γ-ray observations (e.g. by Fermi, HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) are discussed

  5. Efficient models for photoionization produced by non-thermal gas discharges in air based on radiative transfer and the Helmholtz equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdon, A; Pasko, V P; Liu, N Y; Celestin, S; Segur, P; Marode, E

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents formulation of computationally efficient models of photoionization produced by non-thermal gas discharges in air based on three-group Eddington and improved Eddington (SP 3 ) approximations to the radiative transfer equation, and on effective representation of the classic integral model for photoionization in air developed by Zheleznyak et al (1982) by a set of three Helmholtz differential equations. The reported formulations represent extensions of ideas advanced recently by Segur et al (2006) and Luque et al (2007), and allow fast and accurate solution of photoionization problems at different air pressures for the range 0.1 O 2 O 2 is the partial pressure of molecular oxygen in air in units of Torr ( p O 2 = 150 Torr) at atmospheric pressure) and R in cm is an effective geometrical size of the physical system of interest. The presented formulations can be extended to other gases and gas mixtures subject to availability of related emission, absorption and photoionization coefficients. The validity of the developed models is demonstrated by performing direct comparisons of the results from these models and results obtained from the classic integral model. Specific validation comparisons are presented for a set of artificial sources of photoionizing radiation with different Gaussian dimensions, and for a realistic problem involving development of a double-headed streamer at ground pressure. The reported results demonstrate the importance of accurate definition of the boundary conditions for the photoionization production rate for the solution of second order partial differential equations involved in the Eddington, SP 3 and the Helmholtz formulations. The specific algorithms derived from the classic photoionization model of Zheleznyak et al (1982), allowing accurate calculations of boundary conditions for differential equations involved in all three new models described in this paper, are presented. It is noted that the accurate formulation of

  6. WHY IS NON-THERMAL LINE BROADENING OF SPECTRAL LINES IN THE LOWER TRANSITION REGION OF THE SUN INDEPENDENT OF SPATIAL RESOLUTION?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Pontieu, B.; Martinez-Sykora, J.; McIntosh, S.; Peter, H.; Pereira, T. M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral observations of the solar transition region (TR) and corona show broadening of spectral lines beyond what is expected from thermal and instrumental broadening. The remaining non-thermal broadening is significant (5–30 km s −1 ) and correlated with intensity. Here we study spectra of the TR Si iv 1403 Å line obtained at high resolution with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). We find that the large improvement in spatial resolution (0.″33) of IRIS compared to previous spectrographs (2″) does not resolve the non-thermal line broadening which, in most regions, remains at pre-IRIS levels of about 20 km s −1 . This invariance to spatial resolution indicates that the processes behind the broadening occur along the line-of-sight (LOS) and/or on spatial scales (perpendicular to the LOS) smaller than 250 km. Both effects appear to play a role. Comparison with IRIS chromospheric observations shows that, in regions where the LOS is more parallel to the field, magneto-acoustic shocks driven from below impact the TR and can lead to significant non-thermal line broadening. This scenario is supported by MHD simulations. While these do not show enough non-thermal line broadening, they do reproduce the long-known puzzling correlation between non-thermal line broadening and intensity. This correlation is caused by the shocks, but only if non-equilibrium ionization is taken into account. In regions where the LOS is more perpendicular to the field, the prevalence of small-scale twist is likely to play a significant role in explaining the invariance and correlation with intensity. (letters)

  7. Non-thermal effects on femtosecond laser ablation of polymers extracted from the oscillation of time-resolved reflectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumada, Takayuki, E-mail: kumada.takayuki@jaea.go.jp; Akagi, Hiroshi; Itakura, Ryuji; Otobe, Tomohito; Nishikino, Masaharu; Yokoyama, Atsushi [Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of femtosecond laser ablation of transparent polymers were examined using time-resolved reflectivity. When these polymers were irradiated by a pump pulse with fluence above the ablation threshold of 0.8–2.0 J/cm{sup 2}, we observed the oscillation of the reflectivity caused by the interference between the reflected probe pulses from the sample surface and the thin layer due to the non-thermal photomechanical effects of spallation. As the fluence of the pump pulse increased, the separation velocity of the thin layer increased from 6 km/s to the asymptotic value of 11 km/s. It is suggested that the velocities are determined by shock-wave velocities of the photo-excited layer.

  8. Non-Thermal Plasma (NTP) session overview: Second International Symposium on Environmental Applications of Advanced Oxidation Technologies (AOTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosocha, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced Oxidation Technologies (used in pollution control and treating hazardous wastes) has expanded from using hydroxyl radicals to treat organic compounds in water, to using reductive free radicals as well, and to application to pollutants in both gases and aqueous media. Non-Thermal Plasma (NTP) is created in a gas by an electrical discharge or energetic electron injection. Highly reactive species (O atoms, OH, N radicals, plasma electrons) react with entrained hazardous organic chemicals in the gas, converting them to CO2, H2O, etc. NTP can be used to simultaneously remove different kinds of pollutants (eg, VOCs, SOx, NOx in flue gases). This paper presents an overview of NTP technology for pollution control and hazardous waste treatment; it is intended as an introduction to the NTP session of the symposium

  9. Non-thermal plasma treatment as a new biotechnology in relation to seeds, dry fruits, and grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božena, ŠERÁ; Michal, ŠERÝ

    2018-04-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) technology offers wide potential use in the food technology, the same as in the unconventional agriculture. Some seeds, dry fruits, grains and their sprouts gain popularity in the culinary industry as ‘raw seeds’. This review paper draws the current research and trends in NTP pre-treatment of selected seeds/fruits that are useable as ‘raw seeds’. The main applications are connected with activation of seed germination, early growth of seedlings, microbial inactivation of seed/fruit surface, and possibility of increasing quantity of biological active compounds in sprouting seeds. The paper presents a list of plant species that are able to be used as ‘raw seed’ including current information about main type of NTP treatment implemented.

  10. Chemical Changes in Nonthermal Plasma-Treated N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) Solution and Their Contribution to Bacterial Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Utku K; Smith, Josh; Ji, Hai-Feng; Brooks, Ari D; Joshi, Suresh G

    2016-02-02

    In continuation of our previous reports on the broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of atmospheric non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma treated N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) solution against planktonic and biofilm forms of different multidrug resistant microorganisms, we present here the chemical changes that mediate inactivation of Escherichia coli. In this study, the mechanism and products of the chemical reactions in plasma-treated NAC solution are shown. UV-visible spectrometry, FT-IR, NMR, and colorimetric assays were utilized for chemical characterization of plasma treated NAC solution. The characterization results were correlated with the antimicrobial assays using determined chemical species in solution in order to confirm the major species that are responsible for antimicrobial inactivation. Our results have revealed that plasma treatment of NAC solution creates predominantly reactive nitrogen species versus reactive oxygen species, and the generated peroxynitrite is responsible for significant bacterial inactivation.

  11. The quantum nonthermal radiation and horizon surface gravity of an arbitrarily accelerating black hole with electric charge and magnetic charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Zhi-Kun; Pan Wei-Zhen; Yang Xue-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Using a new tortoise coordinate transformation, we discuss the quantum nonthermal radiation characteristics near an event horizon by studying the Hamilton-Jacobi equation of a scalar particle in curved space-time, and obtain the event horizon surface gravity and the Hawking temperature on that event horizon. The results show that there is a crossing of particle energy near the event horizon. We derive the maximum overlap of the positive and negative energy levels. It is also found that the Hawking temperature of a black hole depends not only on the time, but also on the angle. There is a problem of dimension in the usual tortoise coordinate, so the present results obtained by using a correct-dimension new tortoise coordinate transformation may be more reasonable

  12. Hawking effect and quantum nonthermal radiation of an arbitrarily accelerating charged black hole using a new tortoise coordinate transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Wei-Zhen; Yang Xue-Jun; Xie Zhi-Kun

    2011-01-01

    Using a new tortoise coordinate transformation, this paper investigates the Hawking effect from an arbitrarily accelerating charged black hole by the improved Damour—Ruffini method. After the tortoise coordinate transformation, the Klein—Gordon equation can be written as the standard form at the event horizon. Then extending the outgoing wave from outside to inside of the horizon analytically, the surface gravity and Hawking temperature can be obtained automatically. It is found that the Hawking temperatures of different points on the surface are different. The quantum nonthermal radiation characteristics of a black hole near the event horizon is also discussed by studying the Hamilton—Jacobi equation in curved spacetime and the maximum overlap of the positive and negative energy levels near the event horizon is given. There is a dimensional problem in the standard tortoise coordinate and the present results may be more reasonable. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  13. Investigation of atmospheric pressure capillary non-thermal plasmas and their applications to the degradation of volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shu-Min

    Atmospheric pressure capillary non-thermal plasma (AP-CNTP) has been investigated as a potential technology far the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Advanced Life Support Systems (ALS). AP-CNTP is a destructive technology far the removal of VOCs from air streams by active plasma species, such as electrons, ions, and excited molecules. Complete VOC destruction ideally results in the formation of water, carbon dioxide (CO2), and other by-product's may also form, including ozone (O3), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and decomposed hydrocarbons. Several organic compounds, such as BTEX, ethylene, n-heptane, isooctane, methanol and NH3, were tested in an AP-CNTP system. Parametric experiments were carried out by varying plasma discharge power, flowrates, and initial concentrations. The degradation efficiency varied depending on the chemical nature of the compounds. A plasmochemical kinetic model was derived for toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene and n-heptane.

  14. Dust-acoustic solitary modes in plasmas with isothermal and nonthermal ions: Polarity switches and coexistence domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verheest, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Large dust-acoustic waves are investigated in a multispecies plasma model consisting of cold negative dust in the presence of cooler Boltzmann and hotter nonthermal Cairns positive ions, in a Sagdeev pseudopotential formalism. Use of the pseudopotential at the acoustic speed itself yields in a systematic way compositional parameter values where negative/positive solitons interchange polarities and also where both polarities coexist. The latter requires that solitons at the acoustic speed exist, with finite amplitudes, compared to superacoustic solitons of the opposite polarity. The coexistence region starts when the pseudopotential at the acoustic speed has a negative root at the limit of infinite dust compression and ends when a positive double root is encountered. Outside the coexistence domain, only negative or positive superacoustic solitons can exist. Thus, the discussion and numerical evaluations are guided by precise physical and analytic arguments rather than mere numerical experimentation. Graphs of relevant Sagdeev pseudopotentials illustrate the link with the analytical constraints.

  15. Dust-acoustic solitary modes in plasmas with isothermal and nonthermal ions: Polarity switches and coexistence domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verheest, Frank [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Gent, Belgium and School of Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

    2011-08-15

    Large dust-acoustic waves are investigated in a multispecies plasma model consisting of cold negative dust in the presence of cooler Boltzmann and hotter nonthermal Cairns positive ions, in a Sagdeev pseudopotential formalism. Use of the pseudopotential at the acoustic speed itself yields in a systematic way compositional parameter values where negative/positive solitons interchange polarities and also where both polarities coexist. The latter requires that solitons at the acoustic speed exist, with finite amplitudes, compared to superacoustic solitons of the opposite polarity. The coexistence region starts when the pseudopotential at the acoustic speed has a negative root at the limit of infinite dust compression and ends when a positive double root is encountered. Outside the coexistence domain, only negative or positive superacoustic solitons can exist. Thus, the discussion and numerical evaluations are guided by precise physical and analytic arguments rather than mere numerical experimentation. Graphs of relevant Sagdeev pseudopotentials illustrate the link with the analytical constraints.

  16. The Coupling of Treeline Elevation and Temperature is Mediated by Non-Thermal Factors on the Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafeng Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the relationships between treeline elevation and climate at regional and local scales. It is compelling to fill this research gap with data from the Tibetan Plateau where some of the highest alpine treelines in the world are found. This research question partially results from the lack of in situ temperature data at treeline sites. Herein, treeline variables (e.g., elevation, topography, tree species and temperature data were collected from published investigations performed during this decade on the Tibetan Plateau. Temperature conditions near treeline sites were estimated using global databases and these estimates were corrected by using in situ air temperature measurements. Correlation analyses and generalized linear models were used to evaluate the effects of different variables on treeline elevation including thermal (growing-season air temperatures and non-thermal (latitude, longitude, elevation, tree species, precipitation, radiation factors. The commonality analysis model was applied to explore how several variables (July mean temperature, elevation of mountain peak, latitude were related to treeline elevation. July mean temperature was the most significant predictor of treeline elevation, explaining 55% of the variance in treeline elevation across the Tibetan Plateau, whereas latitude, tree species, and mountain elevation (mass-elevation effect explained 30% of the variance in treeline elevation. After considering the multicollinearity among predictors, July mean temperature (largely due to the influence of minimum temperature still showed the strongest association with treeline elevation. We conclude that the coupling of treeline elevation and July temperature at a regional scale is modulated by non-thermal factors probably acting at local scales. Our results contribute towards explaining the decoupling between climate warming and treeline dynamics.

  17. Preparation by low-temperature nonthermal plasma of graphite fiber and its characteristics for solid-phase microextraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Fan [Department of Environmental Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Key Laboratory of Polluted Environment Remediation and Ecological Health, MOE, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wu Zucheng [Department of Environmental Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Key Laboratory of Polluted Environment Remediation and Ecological Health, MOE, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: wuzc@zju.edu.cn; Tao Ping [Institute of Structural Mechanics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Cong Yanqing [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310012 (China)

    2009-01-05

    Low-temperature nonthermal plasma has been used to prepare solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers with high adsorbability, long-term serviceability, and high reproducibility. Graphite rods serving as fiber precursors were treated by an air plasma discharged at 15.2-15.5 kV for a duration of 8 min. Sampling results revealed that the adsorptive capacity of the homemade fiber was 2.5-34.6 times that of a polyacrylate (PA) fiber for alcohols (methanol, ethanol, isopropyl alcohol, n-butyl alcohol), and about 1.4-1.6 times and 2.5-5.1 times that of an activated carbon fiber (ACF) for alcohols and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes), respectively. It is confirmed from FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer) and SEM (scanning electron microscope) analyses that the improvement in the adsorptive performance attributed to increased surface energy and roughness of the graphite fiber. Using gas chromatography (GC)-flame-ionization detector (FID), the limits of detection (LODs) of the alcohols and BTEX ranged between 0.19 and 3.75 {mu}g L{sup -1}, the linear ranges were between 0.6 and 35619 {mu}g L{sup -1} with good linearity (R{sup 2} = 0.9964-0.9997). It was demonstrated that nonthermal plasma offers a fast and simple method for preparing an efficient graphite SPME fiber, and that SPME using the homemade fiber represents a sensitive and selective extraction method for the analysis of a wide range of organic compounds.

  18. Photon-induced Processing of Interstellar Ices in the Laboratory. Focus on Their Non-thermal Desorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Domenech, Rafael; Munoz Caro, Guillermo; Cruz-Diaz, Gustavo A.; Oberg, Karin I.

    2018-06-01

    Some of the processes that take place in the interstellar medium (ISM)can be simulated in laboratories on Earth under astrophysically relevant conditions. For example, the energetic processing of the ice mantles that accrete on top of dust grains in the coldest regions of the ISM, leading to the production of new species and their desorption to the gas phase. In particular, observation of complex organic molecules (COMs) in cold interstellar environments stress the need for not only a solid state formation but also for non-thermal desorption mechanisms that can account for the observed abundances in regions where thermal desorption is inhibited. Laboratory Astrophysics can be used to test different non-thermal desorption processes and extract yields than can be extrapolated to the astrophysical scenario with theoretical models. 0th generation COMs like CH3OH and H2CO can be formed at very low temperatures. In this talk, we present laboratory simulations of the UV photoprocessing of a binary ice mixture composed by water (the main component of astrophysical ices) and methane. Formation of CO, CO2, CH3OH and H2CO was confirmed by IR spectroscopy and subsequent TPD. At the same time, photodesorption of CO and H2CO was detected by means of a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer, with yields on the order of 10-4 and 10-5 molecules per incident photon, respectively. In general, photodesorption can take place through a direct mechanism, where the absorbing molecule (or its photofragments) are desorbed; or through an indirect mechanism where the absorbed energy is transferred to a surface molecule which is the one finally desorbing. In the case of photoproducts, the evolution of the photodesorption yield gives information on the photodesorption mechanism: a constant photodesorption yield is observed when the photoproducts are desorbed right after their formation; while an increasing yield is measured when the photoproducts are desorbed later after energy transfer from another

  19. Is the polarization of NGC1068 evidence for a non-thermal source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, I.S.; Aspin, C.; Heathcote, S.R.; McCaughrean, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    NGC1068 is one of the brightest galaxies included by Seyfert in his list of extragalactic objects having compact, luminous nuclei within which broad, high-excitation emission lines occur. It has been the subject of intensive studies at UV, optical, IR and radio wavelengths. Unresolved questions concern the nature and relationship of the sources of the excess flux seen in the UV and IR, their connection with the collimated jets apparent in high-resolution radio maps and their association with the extended region responsible for the broad emission lines. A further question is the location of any dust and its role in modifying the optical and UV spectrum. Observations are reported with two high-resolution optical spectro-polarimeters which throw new light on these questions. From detailed structure found in the linear polarization spectrum of the nucleus it is concluded that dilution by starlight modifies the polarization to an extent not previously appreciated. In fact the polarization of the non-stellar flux in the optical and near IR is approximately independent of wavelength (as expected for synchrotron emission or electron scattering) with a direction orthogonal to that of the radio jets; such an arrangement is reminiscent of certain quasars and radio galaxies. (author)

  20. PHOTOSPHERE EMISSION FROM A HYBRID RELATIVISTIC OUTFLOW WITH ARBITRARY DIMENSIONLESS ENTROPY AND MAGNETIZATION IN GRBs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, He [Current address: Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Center for Particle Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhang, Bing, E-mail: gaohe@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: hug18@psu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2015-03-10

    In view of the recent Fermi observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission spectra, we develop a theory of photosphere emission of a hybrid relativistic outflow with a hot fireball component (defined by dimensionless entropy η) and a cold Poynting-flux component (defined by magnetization σ{sub 0} at the central engine). We consider the scenarios both without and with sub-photospheric magnetic dissipations. Based on a simplified toy model of jet dynamics, we develop two approaches: a 'bottom-up' approach to predict the temperature (for a non-dissipative photosphere) and luminosity of the photosphere emission and its relative brightness for a given pair of (η, σ{sub 0}); and a 'top-down' approach to diagnose central engine parameters (η and σ{sub 0}) based on the observed quasi-thermal photosphere emission properties. We show that a variety of observed GRB prompt emission spectra with different degrees of photosphere thermal emission can be reproduced by varying η and σ{sub 0} within the non-dissipative photosphere scenario. In order to reproduce the observed spectra, the outflows of most GRBs need to have a significant σ, both at the central engine and at the photosphere. The σ value at 10{sup 15} cm from the central engine (a possible non-thermal emission site) is usually also greater than unity, so that internal-collision-induced magnetic reconnection and turbulence (ICMART) may be the mechanism to power the non-thermal emission. We apply our top-down approach to GRB 110721A and find that the temporal evolution behavior of its blackbody component can be well interpreted with a time-varying (η, σ{sub 0}) at the central engine, instead of invoking a varying engine base size r {sub 0} as proposed by previous authors.

  1. Synergistic effects of non-thermal plasma-assisted catalyst and ultrasound on toluene removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongli; Zhou, Libo; Zhang, Luhong; Sui, Hong

    2012-01-01

    A wire-mesh catalyst coated by La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 was combined with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor for toluene removal at atmospheric pressure. It was found that toluene removal efficiency and carbon dioxide selectivity were enhanced in the catalytic packed-bed reactor. In addition, ozone and nitrogen monoxide from the gas effluent byproducts decreased. This is the first time that ultrasound combined with plasma has been used for toluene removal. A synergistic effect on toluene removal was observed in the plasma-assisted ultrasound system. At the same time, the system increased toluene conversion and reduced ozone emission.

  2. Radio emission from embryonic superluminous supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omand, Conor M. B.; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Murase, Kohta

    2018-02-01

    It has been widely argued that Type-I superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) are driven by powerful central engines with a long-lasting energy injection after the core-collapse of massive progenitors. One of the popular hypotheses is that the hidden engines are fast-rotating pulsars with a magnetic field of B ˜ 1013-1015 G. Murase, Kashiyama & Mészáros proposed that quasi-steady radio/submm emission from non-thermal electron-positron pairs in nascent pulsar wind nebulae can be used as a relevant counterpart of such pulsar-driven supernovae (SNe). In this work, focusing on the nascent SLSN-I remnants, we examine constraints that can be placed by radio emission. We show that the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimetre Array can detect the radio nebula from SNe at DL ˜ 1 Gpc in a few years after the explosion, while the Jansky Very Large Array can also detect the counterpart in a few decades. The proposed radio follow-up observation could solve the parameter degeneracy in the pulsar-driven SN model for optical/UV light curves, and could also give us clues to young neutron star scenarios for SLSNe-I and fast radio bursts.

  3. Interpretation of the galactic radio-continuum and gamma-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuermann, K.P.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis is performed of the nonthermal radio-continuum and gamma-ray emission of the galactic disc, using a spiral-arm model of the Galaxy. The results for the 408 MHz brightness temperature and the >100 MeV gamma-ray line intensity as a function of galactic longitude at bsup(II)=0 deg are presented. The observational implications, as well as the uncertainties in the calculations, are briefly discussed. An estimate of the possible range of the inverse Compton contribution to the observed gamma-ray flux is made

  4. STATISTICS OF FLARING LOOPS OBSERVED BY THE NOBEYAMA RADIOHELIOGRAPH. III. ASYMMETRY OF TWO FOOTPOINT EMISSIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Guangli; Song Qiwu; Huang Yu

    2010-01-01

    Two footpoint (FP) emissions are compared in a total of 24 events with loop-like structures imaged by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH), which are divided into two groups: when the optically thin radio spectrum in the looptop is harder than those in the two FPs (group 1) and when it is softer than those in at least one FP (group 2). There are always correlative variations of the brightness temperatures and polarization degrees, the spectral indices, the column densities of nonthermal electrons, and magnetic field strengths in the two FPs. The maximum differences of these parameters in the two FPs may reach one or two orders of magnitude (except the polarization degree). The logarithm of the ratio of the magnetic field strengths in the two FPs is always anti-correlated with the logarithms of the ratios of the brightness temperatures in the two FPs, but correlated with the differences of the spectral indices in the two FPs. Only two anti-correlations exist in group 1, between the difference of the absolute polarization degrees in the two FPs and the logarithm of the ratio of the brightness temperatures in the two FPs and between the difference of the spectral indices in the two FPs and the logarithm of the ratio of the column densities of nonthermal electrons in the two FPs. Only two positive correlations appear in group 1, between the difference of the absolute polarization degrees in the two FPs and the relative ratio of magnetic field strengths in the two FPs and between the logarithm of the ratio of the column densities of nonthermal electrons in the two FPs and the logarithm of the ratio of the brightness temperatures in the two FPs. These four statistics in group 2 are just opposite to those in group 1, which may be directly explained by gyrosynchrotron theory. Moreover, the asymmetry of the two FP emissions in group 2 is more evident than that in group 1, which may be explained by two kinds of flare models, respectively, in the two groups of events, i

  5. Signatures of hot electrons and fluorescence in Mo Kα emission on Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, S. B.; Ampleford, D. J.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, B.; Jennings, C. A.; Coverdale, C. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Dunham, G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Ouart, N.; Dasgupta, A.; Giuliani, J. L. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Apruzese, J. P. [Consultant to NRL through Engility Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 20151 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Recent experiments on the Z accelerator have produced high-energy (17 keV) inner-shell K-alpha emission from molybdenum wire array z-pinches. Extensive absolute power and spectroscopic diagnostics along with collisional-radiative modeling enable detailed investigation into the roles of thermal, hot electron, and fluorescence processes in the production of high-energy x-rays. We show that changing the dimensions of the arrays can impact the proportion of thermal and non-thermal K-shell x-rays.

  6. Application to cleaning of waste plastic surfaces using atmospheric non-thermal plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya, Masayuki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Yuji, Toshifumi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)]. E-mail: t-yuji@hiroshima-cmt.ac.jp; Watanabe, Takayuki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Kashihara, Junzou [SHARP corporation, 1-9-2 Nakase, Mihama-Ku, Chiba 261-8520 (Japan); Sumida, Yoshitake [SHARP corporation, 2613-1 Ichinomoto-cho, Tenri 632-8567 (Japan)

    2007-03-12

    The removal of paint on the surface of waste plastics is difficult by the conventional process; in this research, a new cleaning mechanism using atmospheric plasmas was examined through optical emission spectroscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate that an increase of pulse frequency enables for a short processing time for the removal of the paint film, signifying that the production of radicals in plasma, especially oxygen radicals, can be controlled by pulse frequency. Plasma jets were generated under the experimental conditions of an input power of 250 W to 400 W, a pulse frequency of 2 kHz to 12 kHz, and a plasma gas flow rate of 30 L/min. Examination of the intensity ratio of the reactive species, as measured by emission spectroscopy, showed that the O/N value increased with an increase in pulse frequency. Results of analysis with electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis show that nitrogen atoms and molybdenum in only the paint film decreased through plasma processing.

  7. Application to cleaning of waste plastic surfaces using atmospheric non-thermal plasma jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, Masayuki; Yuji, Toshifumi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kashihara, Junzou; Sumida, Yoshitake

    2007-01-01

    The removal of paint on the surface of waste plastics is difficult by the conventional process; in this research, a new cleaning mechanism using atmospheric plasmas was examined through optical emission spectroscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate that an increase of pulse frequency enables for a short processing time for the removal of the paint film, signifying that the production of radicals in plasma, especially oxygen radicals, can be controlled by pulse frequency. Plasma jets were generated under the experimental conditions of an input power of 250 W to 400 W, a pulse frequency of 2 kHz to 12 kHz, and a plasma gas flow rate of 30 L/min. Examination of the intensity ratio of the reactive species, as measured by emission spectroscopy, showed that the O/N value increased with an increase in pulse frequency. Results of analysis with electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis show that nitrogen atoms and molybdenum in only the paint film decreased through plasma processing

  8. Development of Scaling Algorithms and Economic Evaluation for Non-Thermal Plasma Reactors - Adsorbant/Catalyzer Hybrid System for Control of NOx Released During Army and Related U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urashima, K

    1998-01-01

    Computer code (SUENTP-J) to predict scale-up and economic evaluation of several eligible non-thermal plasma processes for air pollution control - electron beam process, pulsed corona process, and corona radical shower...

  9. Acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straus, A.; Lopez Pumarega, M.I.; Di Gaetano, J.O.; D'Atellis, C.E.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is related to our activities on acoustic emission (A.E.). The work is made with different materials: metals and fibre reinforced plastics. At present, acoustic emission transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests to detect cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of A.E. for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of A.E. signals are also being performed. (Author)

  10. ON THE NONTHERMAL κ-DISTRIBUTED ELECTRONS IN PLANETARY NEBULAE AND H ii REGIONS: THE κ INDEX AND ITS CORRELATIONS WITH OTHER NEBULAR PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong [Space Astronomy Laboratory, Faculty of Science, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Zhang, Bing; Liu, Xiao-Wei, E-mail: zhangy96@hku.hk [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-01-20

    Recently, a suspicion arose that the free electrons in planetary nebulae (PNs) and H ii regions might have nonthermal energy distributions. In this scenario, a κ index is introduced to characterize the electron energy distributions, with smaller κ values indicating larger deviations from Maxwell–Boltzmann distributions. Assuming that this is the case, we determine the κ values for a sample of PNs and H ii regions by comparing the intensities of [O iii] collisionally excited lines and the hydrogen Balmer jump. We find the average κ indices of PNs and H ii regions to be 27 and 32, respectively. Correlations between the resultant κ values and various physical properties of the nebulae are examined to explore the potential origin of nonthermal electrons in photoionized gaseous nebulae. However, no positive result is obtained. Thus, the current analysis does not lend support to the idea that κ-distributed electrons are present in PNs and H ii regions.

  11. Preliminary results on the non-thermal effects of 200-350 GHz radiation on the growth rate of S. cerevisiae cells in microcolonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiloucas, S.; Chahal, M. S.; Bowen, J. W.

    2002-11-01

    We report preliminary results from studies of biological effects induced by non-thermal levels of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation. Exponentially growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells grown on dry media were exposed to electromagnetic fields in the 200-350 GHz frequency range at low power density to observe possible non-thermal effects on the microcolony growth. Exposure to the electromagnetic field was conducted over 2.5 h. The data from exposure and control experiments were grouped into either large-, medium- or small-sized microcolonies to assist in the accurate assessment of growth. The three groups showed significant differences in growth between exposed and control microcolonies. A statistically significant enhanced growth rate was observed at 341 GHz. Growth rate was assessed every 30 min via time-lapse photography. Possible interaction mechanisms are discussed, taking into account Frohlich's hypothesis.

  12. Preliminary results on the non-thermal effects of 200-350 GHz radiation on the growth rate of S. cerevisiae cells in microcolonies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadjiloucas, S; Chahal, M S; Bowen, J W [Department of Cybernetics, University of Reading, Whiteknights, RG6 6AY, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

    2002-11-07

    We report preliminary results from studies of biological effects induced by non-thermal levels of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation. Exponentially growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells grown on dry media were exposed to electromagnetic fields in the 200-350 GHz frequency range at low power density to observe possible non-thermal effects on the microcolony growth. Exposure to the electromagnetic field was conducted over 2.5 h. The data from exposure and control experiments were grouped into either large-, medium- or small-sized microcolonies to assist in the accurate assessment of growth. The three groups showed significant differences in growth between exposed and control microcolonies. A statistically significant enhanced growth rate was observed at 341 GHz. Growth rate was assessed every 30 min via time-lapse photography. Possible interaction mechanisms are discussed, taking into account Frohlich's hypothesis.

  13. Thermal and non-thermal preservation techniques of tiger nuts' beverage "horchata de chufa". Implications for food safety, nutritional and quality properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselló-Soto, Elena; Poojary, Mahesha M; Barba, Francisco J; Koubaa, Mohamed; Lorenzo, Jose M; Mañes, Jordi; Moltó, Juan Carlos

    2018-03-01

    "Horchata de chufa" is a traditional Spanish beverage produced from tiger nuts (Cyperus esculentus L.). Due to its richness in nutritional compounds, it is highly perishable and its conservation by pasteurization and/or adding preservatives is required. Although efficient, conventional thermal treatment for pasteurization induces changes in the nutritional and sensory properties. Replacing conventional pasteurization by non-thermal technologies such as pulsed electric fields, ultraviolet, and high pressure, combined with moderate temperatures (preservation of the most thermo-sensitive molecules. Accordingly, this review deals with the description of the most relevant non-thermal technologies applied to preserve "horchata" beverage in order to extend the shelf life and inactivate pathogenic microorganisms as well as to preserve the nutritional and quality properties of this food beverage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Performance evaluation of non-thermal plasma injection for elemental mercury oxidation in a simulated flue gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Jiutao; Shang, Kefeng; Lu, Na [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China); Jiang, Yuze [Shandong Electric Power Research Institute, Jinan 250002 (China); Wang, Tiecheng [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, Jie, E-mail: lijie@dlut.edu.cn [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China); Wu, Yan [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education of the People' s Republic of China, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The use of non-thermal plasma injection approach to oxidize Hg{sup 0} in simulated flue gas at 110 °C was studied. • A high Hg{sup 0} oxidation efficiency was observed in the mixed flue gas that included O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO and HCl. • Chemical and physical processes (e.g., ozone, N{sub 2} metastable states and UV-light) contributed to Hg{sup 0} oxidation. • Mercury species mainly existed in the form of HgO(s) adhering to the suspended aerosols in the gas-phase. - Abstract: The use of non-thermal plasma (NTP) injection approach to oxidize elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in simulated flue gas at 110 °C was studied, where a surface discharge plasma reactor (SDPR) inserted in the simulated flue duct was used to generate and inject active species into the flue gas. Approximately 81% of the Hg{sup 0} was oxidized and 20.5 μg kJ{sup −1} of energy yield was obtained at a rate of 3.9 J L{sup −1}. A maximal Hg{sup 0} oxidation efficiency was found with a change in the NTP injection air flow rate. A high Hg{sup 0} oxidation efficiency was observed in the mixed flue gas that included O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO and HCl. Chemical and physical processes (e.g., ozone, N{sub 2} metastable states and UV-light) were found to contribute to Hg{sup 0} oxidation, with ozone playing a dominant role. The deposited mercury species on the internal surface of the flue duct was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electronic probe microanalysis (EPMA), and the deposit was identified as HgO. The mercury species is thought to primarily exist in the form of HgO(s) by adhering to the suspended aerosols in the gas-phase.

  15. Ultrafast chemical interface scattering as an additional decay channel for nascent nonthermal electrons in small metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christophe; Abid, Jean-Pierre; Fermin, David; Girault, Hubert H

    2004-05-15

    The use of 4.2 nm gold nanoparticles wrapped in an adsorbates shell and embedded in a TiO2 metal oxide matrix gives the opportunity to investigate ultrafast electron-electron scattering dynamics in combination with electronic surface phenomena via the surface plasmon lifetimes. These gold nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit a large nonclassical broadening of the surface plasmon band, which is attributed to a chemical interface damping. The acceleration of the loss of surface plasmon phase coherence indicates that the energy and the momentum of the collective electrons can be dissipated into electronic affinity levels of adsorbates. As a result of the preparation process, gold NPs are wrapped in a shell of sulfate compounds that gives rise to a large density of interfacial molecules confined between Au and TiO2, as revealed by Fourier-transform-infrared spectroscopy. A detailed analysis of the transient absorption spectra obtained by broadband femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy allows separating electron-electron and electron-phonon interaction. Internal thermalization times (electron-electron scattering) are determined by probing the decay of nascent nonthermal electrons (NNEs) and the build-up of the Fermi-Dirac electron distribution, giving time constants of 540 to 760 fs at 0.42 and 0.34 eV from the Fermi level, respectively. Comparison with literature data reveals that lifetimes of NNEs measured for these small gold NPs are more than four times longer than for silver NPs with similar sizes. The surprisingly long internal thermalization time is attributed to an additional decay mechanism (besides the classical e-e scattering) for the energy loss of NNEs, identified as the ultrafast chemical interface scattering process. NNEs experience an inelastic resonant scattering process into unoccupied electronic states of adsorbates, that directly act as an efficient heat bath, via the excitation of molecular vibrational modes. The two-temperature model is no longer

  16. Nonthermal Ablation by Using Intravascular Oxygen Radical Generation with WST11: Dynamic Tissue Effects and Implications for Focal Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimm, Simon Y.; Tarin, Tatum V.; Monette, Sébastien; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Gerber, Daniel; Durack, Jeremy C.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Scardino, Peter T.; Scherz, Avigdor

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the hypothesis that vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP) with WST11 and clinically relevant parameters can be used to ablate target tissues in a non–tumor-bearing large-animal model while selectively sparing blood vessels and collagen. Materials and Methods By using an institutional animal care and use committee–approved protocol, 68 ablations were performed in the kidneys (cortex and medulla) and livers of 27 adult pigs. Posttreatment evaluation was conducted with contrast material–enhanced computed tomography in the live animals at 24 hours. Immunohistochemistry was evaluated and histologic examination with hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed at 4 hours, 24 hours, and 7 days. Intravenous infusion of WST11 (4 mg per kilogram of body weight) was followed by using near-infrared illumination (753 nm for 20 minutes) through optical fibers prepositioned in target tissues by using a fixed template. Treated areas were scanned, measured, and statistically analyzed by using the Student t test and two-way analysis of variance. Results Focal WST11 VTP treatment in the liver and kidney by using a single optical fiber resulted in well-demarcated cylindrical zones of nonthermal necrosis concentrically oriented around the light-emitting diffuser, with no intervening viable parenchymal cells. The radius of ablated tissue increased from approximately 5 mm at 150 mW to approximately 7 mm at 415 mW (P necrosis. Patterns of acute injury within 24 hours were consistent with microcirculatory flow arrest and collagen preservation (demonstrated with trichrome staining). In the peripheral ablation zone, blood vessels at least 40 μm in diameter were selectively preserved and remained functional at 7 days. Ablated tissues exhibited progressive fibrosis and chronic inflammatory cell infiltrates. No histologic changes consistent with thermal injury were observed in blood vessels or collagen. The renal hilum and collecting system did not show treatment

  17. Modeling and simulation of VOCs removal by nonthermal plasma discharge with photocatalysis in a continuous reactor: Synergetic effect and mass transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Assadi , Aymen Amine; Bouzaza , Abdelkrim; Merabet , Smail; Wolbert , Dominique

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This paper deals with photocatalysis (TiO2 + UV), nonthermal plasma (NTP) and their combinations. These processes have been widely studied for isovaleraldehyde (Isoval) treatment. Isoval removal, selectivity of CO2 and CO, and ozone formation are investigated in order to evaluate the performance of the combined process. The results show that the performance of the process has enhanced and a synergetic effect is observed. On the other hand, this work aims at investigati...

  18. Influence of non-thermal plasma on structural and electrical properties of globular and nanostructured conductive polymer polypyrrole in water suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galář, Pavel; Khun, Josef; Kopecký, Dušan; Scholtz, Vladimír; Trchová, Miroslava; Fučíková, Anna; Jirešová, Jana; Fišer, Ladislav

    2017-11-08

    Non-thermal plasma has proved its benefits in medicine, plasma assisted polymerization, food industry and many other fields. Even though, the ability of non-thermal plasma to modify surface properties of various materials is generally known, only limited attention has been given to exploitations of this treatment on conductive polymers. Here, we show study of non-thermal plasma treatment on properties of globular and nanostructured polypyrrole in the distilled water. We observe that plasma presence over the suspension level doesn't change morphology of the polymer (shape), but significantly influences its elemental composition and physical properties. After 60 min of treatment, the relative concentration of chloride counter ions decreased approximately 3 and 4 times for nanostructured and globular form, respectively and concentration of oxygen increased approximately 3 times for both forms. Simultaneously, conductivity decrease (14 times for globular and 2 times for nanostructured one) and changes in zeta potential characteristics of both samples were observed. The modification evolution was dominated by multi-exponential function with time constants having values approximately 1 and 10 min for both samples. It is expected that these time constants are related to two modification processes connected to direct presence of the spark and to long-lived species generated by the plasma.

  19. Non-planar ion-acoustic solitary waves and their head-on collision in a plasma with nonthermal electrons and warm adiabatic ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Jiuning; He Yonglin; Chen Yan; Zhang Kezhi; Ma Baohong [College of Physics and Electromechanical Engineering, Hexi University, Zhangye 734000 (China)

    2013-01-15

    By using the model of Cairns et al.[Geophys. Rev. Lett. 22, 2709 (1995)], the head-on collision of cylindrical/spherical ion-acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized non-planar plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions and nonthermally distributed electrons is investigated. The extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation method is used to derive the modified Korteweg-de Vries equations for ion-acoustic solitary waves in this plasma system. The effects of the plasma geometry m, the ion to electron temperature ratio {sigma}, and the nonthermality of the electron distribution {alpha} on the interaction of the colliding solitary waves are studied. It is found that the plasma geometries have a big impact on the phase shifts of solitary waves. Also it is important to note that the phase shifts induced by the collision of compressive and rarefactive solitary waves are very different. We point out that this study is useful to the investigations about the observations of electrostatic solitary structures in astrophysical as well as in experimental plasmas with nonthermal energetic electrons.

  20. The role of non-thermal atmospheric pressure biocompatible plasma in the differentiation of osteoblastic precursor cells, MC3T3-E1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ihn; Choi, Eun Ha

    2017-05-30

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is ionized matter, composed of highly reactive species that include positive ions, negative ions, free radicals, neutral atoms, and molecules. Recent reports have suggested that non-thermal biocompatible plasma (NBP) can selectively kill a variety of cancer cells, and promote stem cell differentiation. However as of yet, the regulation of proliferation and differentiation potential of NBP has been poorly understood.Here, we investigated the effects of NBP on the osteogenic differentiation of precursor cell lines of osteoblasts, MC3T3 E1 and SaOS-2. For in vitro osteogenic differentiation, precursor cell lines were treated with NBP, and cultured with osteogenic induction medium. After 10 days of treatment, the NBP was shown to be effective in osteogenic differentiation in MC3T3 E1 cells by von Kossa and Alizarin Red S staining assay. Real-time PCR was then performed to investigate the expression of osteogenic specific genes, Runx2, OCN, COL1, ALP and osterix in MC3T3 E1 cells after treatment with NBP for 4 days. Furthermore, analysis of the protein expression showed that NBP treatment significantly reduced PI3K/AKT signaling and MAPK family signaling. However, p38 controlled phosphorylation of transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) that related to cell differentiation with increased phosphorylated p38. These results suggest that non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma can induce osteogenic differentiation, and enhance bone formation.

  1. Morphological study of polymer surfaces exposed to non-thermal plasma based on contact angle and the use of scaling laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, T., E-mail: tsfelix81@gmail.com [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Cassini, F.A.; Benetoli, L.O.B. [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Dotto, M.E.R. [Physics Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Debacher, N.A. [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Polymeric surfaces were etched using non-thermal plasma at different intensities. • Polymers of low mechanical hardness reached the saturation level faster. • A mathematical model based on scaling laws was proposed. - Abstract: The experiments presented in this communication have the purpose to elaborate an explanation for the morphological evolution of the growth of polymeric surfaces provided by the treatment of non-thermal plasma. According to the roughness analysis and the model proposed by scaling laws it is possible relate to a predictable or merely random effect. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and poly(etherether)ketone (PEEK) samples were exposed to a non-thermal plasma discharge and the resulting surfaces roughness were analyzed based on the measurements from contact angle, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy coupled with scaling laws analysis which can help to describe and understand the dynamic of formation of a wide variety of rough surfaces. The roughness, R{sub RMS} (RMS- Root Mean Square) values for polymer surface range between 19.8 nm and 110.9 nm. The contact angle and the AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) measurements as a function of the plasma exposure time were in agreement with both polar and dispersive components according to the surface roughness and also with the morphology evaluated described by Wolf-Villain model, with proximate values of α between 0.91{sub (PET)} and 0.88{sub (PEEK)}, β = 0.25{sub (PET)} and z = 3,64{sub (PET)}.

  2. Removal of gas phase low-concentration toluene over Mn, Ag and Ce modified HZSM-5 catalysts by periodical operation of adsorption and non-thermal plasma regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenzheng; Wang, Honglei; Zhu, Tianle; Fan, Xing

    2015-07-15

    Ag/HZSM-5, Mn/HZSM-5, Ce/HZSM-5, Ag-Mn/HZSM-5 and Ce-Mn/HZSM-5 were prepared by impregnation method. Both their adsorption capacity and catalytic activity were investigated for the removal of gas phase low-concentration toluene by periodical operation of adsorption and non-thermal plasma regeneration. Results show that catalysts loaded with Ag (Ag/HZSM-5 and Ag-Mn/HZSM-5) had larger adsorption capacity for toluene than the other catalysts. And Ag-Mn/HZSM-5 displayed the best catalytic performance for both toluene oxidation by non-thermal plasma and byproducts suppression. On the other hand, the deactivated catalyst can be fully regenerated by calcining in air stream when its adsorption capacity and catalytic activity of the Ag-Mn/HZSM-5 catalyst was found to be decreased after 10 cycles of periodical adsorption and non-thermal regeneration. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Statistical interpretation of chromatic indicators in correlation to phytochemical profile of a sulfur dioxide-free mulberry (Morus nigra) wine submitted to non-thermal maturation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchabo, William; Ma, Yongkun; Kwaw, Emmanuel; Zhang, Haining; Xiao, Lulu; Apaliya, Maurice T

    2018-01-15

    The four different methods of color measurement of wine proposed by Boulton, Giusti, Glories and Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) were applied to assess the statistical relationship between the phytochemical profile and chromatic characteristics of sulfur dioxide-free mulberry (Morus nigra) wine submitted to non-thermal maturation processes. The alteration in chromatic properties and phenolic composition of non-thermal aged mulberry wine were examined, aided by the used of Pearson correlation, cluster and principal component analysis. The results revealed a positive effect of non-thermal processes on phytochemical families of wines. From Pearson correlation analysis relationships between chromatic indexes and flavonols as well as anthocyanins were established. Cluster analysis highlighted similarities between Boulton and Giusti parameters, as well as Glories and CIE parameters in the assessment of chromatic properties of wines. Finally, principal component analysis was able to discriminate wines subjected to different maturation techniques on the basis of their chromatic and phenolics characteristics. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Saturn radio emission and the solar wind - Voyager-2 studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desch, M.D.; Rucker, H.O.; Observatorium Lustbuhel, Graz, Austria)

    1985-01-01

    Voyager 2 data from the Plasma Science experiment, the Magnetometer experiment and the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment were used to analyze the relationship between parameters of the solar wind/interplanetary medium and the nonthermal Saturn radiation. Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field properties were combined to form quantities known to be important in controlling terrestrial magnetospheric processes. The Voyager 2 data set used in this investigation consists of 237 days of Saturn preencounter measurements. However, due to the immersion of Saturn and the Voyager 2 spacecraft into the extended Jupiter magnetic tail, substantial periods of the time series were lacking solar wind data. To cope with this problem a superposed epoch method (CHREE analysis) was used. The results indicate the superiority of the quantities containing the solar wind density in stimulating the radio emission of Saturn - a result found earlier using Voyager 1 data - and the minor importance of quantities incorporating the interplanetary magnetic field. 10 references

  5. A giant radio flare from Cygnus X-3 with associated γ-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbel, S.; Dubus, G.; Tomsick, J. A.; Szostek, A.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Richards, J. L.; Pooley, G.; Trushkin, S.; Dubois, R.; Hill, A. B.; Kerr, M.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Bodaghee, A.; Tudose, V.; Parent, D.; Wilms, J.; Pottschmidt, K.

    2012-04-01

    With frequent flaring activity of its relativistic jets, Cygnus X-3 (Cyg X-3) is one of the most active microquasars and is the only Galactic black hole candidate with confirmed high-energy γ-ray emission, thanks to detections by Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi/LAT) and AGILE. In 2011, Cyg X-3 was observed to transit to a soft X-ray state, which is known to be associated with high-energy γ-ray emission. We present the results of a multiwavelength campaign covering a quenched state, when radio emission from Cyg X-3 is at its weakest and the X-ray spectrum is very soft. A giant (˜20 Jy) optically thin radio flare marks the end of the quenched state, accompanied by rising non-thermal hard X-rays. Fermi/LAT observations (E≥ 100 MeV) reveal renewed γ-ray activity associated with this giant radio flare, suggesting a common origin for all non-thermal components. In addition, current observations unambiguously show that the γ-ray emission is not exclusively related to the rare giant radio flares. A three-week period of γ-ray emission is also detected when Cyg X-3 was weakly flaring in radio, right before transition to the radio quenched state. No γ-rays are observed during the ˜1-month long quenched state, when the radio flux is weakest. Our results suggest transitions into and out of the ultrasoft X-ray (radio-quenched) state trigger γ-ray emission, implying a connection to the accretion process, and also that the γ-ray activity is related to the level of radio flux (and possibly shock formation), strengthening the connection to the relativistic jets.

  6. The origin of the near-infrared emission in Palomar Green Quasars - The case for hot dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berriman, G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper uses the variation with redshift of the near-infrared colors of the Palomar Green Bright Quasars as the basis for an analysis of the origin of their infrared light. Comparison of the data with simple models of the continuum, appropriately redshifted, show that the flux ratios start to decline when blue optical emission is redshifted into the infrared bandpasses. The rise in vFv(2.2 microns)/vFv(1.65 microns) is attributable to the declining importance of starlight. The range of vFv(2.2 microns)/vFv(1.65 microns) at maximum is attributable to a nonthermal emission only if it has an unusually steep range of spectra, with alpha = -1.7 on average and alpha = -2.2 in the extreme. At the same time, this emission does not vary and is unpolarized. Such a combination of properties has not been seen in any known nonthermal source. Emission from hot dust, probably from a broad range of temperatures centered near 1000 K, is a much simpler interpretation. It supplies on average 25 percent of the total 2.2 microns light at z = 0 and 35 percent in the extreme. 42 refs

  7. A novel approach to the pacemaker infection with non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchen; Li, Yu; Li, Yinglong; Yu, Shuang; Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Jue

    2017-08-01

    Although the pacemaker (PM) is a key cardiac implantable electrical device for life-threatening arrhythmias treatment, the related infection is a challenge. Thus, the aim of this study is to validate cold plasma as a potential technology for the disinfection of infected pacemakers. Fifty donated PMs were cleaned and sterilized before use and then infected with Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus). Then, each experimental group was treated with cold plasma treatment for 1 min, 3 min, 5 min and 7 min, while the control group was immersed with sterilized water. Effectiveness of disinfection was evaluated by using CFU counting method and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The physicochemical properties of water treated with cold plasma at different time were evaluated, including water temperature change and oxidation reduction potential (ORP). The major reactive species generated by the cold plasma equipment during cold plasma were analyzed with optical emission spectroscopy (OES). No live bacteria were detected with CFU counting method after 7 min of cold plasma treatment, which matches with the CLSM results. The ORP value of water and H2O2 concentration changed significantly after treating with cold plasma. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), especially NO, O (777 nm) and O (844 nm) were probably key inactivation agents in cold plasma treatment. These results indicate that cold plasma could be an effective technology for the disinfection of implantable devices.

  8. Development of super-clean diesel engine and combustor using nonthermal plasma hybrid aftertreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    One of important and successful environmental applications of atmospheric-pressure corona discharge or plasma is electrostatic precipitator (ESP), which have been widely used for coal- or oil-fired boilers in electric power plants and particulate matter control emitted from industries such as glass melting furnace system, etc. In the ESPs, steady high voltage is usually applied to a pair of electrodes (at least, one of these has sharp edge). Unsteady pulsed high voltage is often applied for the collection of high-resistivity particulate matter (PM) to avoid reverse corona phenomena which reduce the collection efficiency of the ESPs. It was found that unsteady high voltage can treat hazardous gaseous components (NO x , SO x , hydrocarbon, and CO, etc.) in the exhaust gas, and researches were shifted from PM removal to hazardous gases aftertreatment with unsteady corona discharge induced plasmas. In the paper, recent results on diesel engine and industrial boiler emission controls are mainly reviewed among these our research topics. (paper)

  9. Effects of background fluid on the efficiency of inactivating yeast with non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Hyo Ryu

    Full Text Available Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure has been actively applied to sterilization. However, its efficiency for inactivating microorganisms often varies depending on microbial species and environments surrounding the microorganisms. We investigated the influence of environmental factors (surrounding media on the efficiency of microbial inactivation by plasma using an eukaryotic model microbe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to elucidate the mechanisms for differential efficiency of sterilization by plasma. Yeast cells treated with plasma in water showed the most severe damage in viability and cell morphology as well as damage to membrane lipids, and genomic DNA. Cells in saline were less damaged compared to those in water, and those in YPD (Yeast extract, Peptone, Dextrose were least impaired. HOG1 mitogen activated protein kinase was activated in cells exposed to plasma in water and saline. Inactivation of yeast cells in water and saline was due to the acidification of the solutions by plasma, but higher survival of yeast cells treated in saline may have resulted from the additional effect related to salt strength. Levels of hydroxyl radical (OH· produced by plasma were the highest in water and the lowest in YPD. This may have resulted in differential inactivation of yeast cells in water, saline, and YPD by plasma. Taken together, our data suggest that the surrounding media (environment can crucially affect the outcomes of yeast cell plasma treatment because plasma modulates vital properties of media, and the toxic nature of plasma can also be altered by the surrounding media.

  10. Bacterial attachment on titanium surfaces is dependent on topography and chemical changes induced by nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Won-Seok; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Uhm, Soo-Hyuk; Ha Choi, Eun; Kim, Kwang-Mahn

    2017-07-26

    Here, we investigated the antibacterial effects of chemical changes induced by nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTAPP) on smooth and rough Ti. The morphologies of smooth and rough surfaces of Ti were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both Ti specimens were then treated for 10 min by NTAPP with nitrogen gas. The surface roughness, chemistry, and wettability were examined by optical profilometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and water contact angle analysis, respectively. Bacterial attachment was measured by determining the number of colony forming units and by SEM analysis. The rough Ti showed irregular micropits, whereas smooth Ti had a relatively regular pattern on the surface. There were no differences in morphology between samples before and after NTAPP treatment. NTAPP treatment resulted in changes from hydrophobic to hydrophilic properties on rough and smooth Ti; rough Ti showed relatively higher hydrophilicity. Before NTAPP treatment, Streptococcus sanguinis (S. sanguinis) showed greater attachment on rough Ti, and after NTAPP treatment, there was a significant reduction in bacterial attachment. Moreover, the bacterial attachment rate was significantly lower on rough Ti, and the structure of S. sanguinis colonies were significantly changed on NTAPP-treated Ti. NTAPP treatment inhibited bacterial attachment surrounding titanium implants, regardless of surface topography. Therefore, NTAPP treatment on Ti is a next-generation tool for antibacterial applications in the orthopaedic and dental fields.

  11. Development of hydrophilic dental wax without surfactant using a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Yong-Hee; Choi, Eun-Ha

    2014-01-01

    Dental wax (DW), a low-melting and high-molecular-weight organic mixture, is widely used in dentistry for forming moulds of teeth. Hydrophilicity is an important property for DW, as a wet dental investment is used to surround the wax before wax burnout is performed. However, recent attempts to improve the hydrophilicity of DW using a surfactant have resulted in the reduced mechanical properties of the dental investment, leading to the failure of the dental restoration. This study applied a non-thermal air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (AAPPJ) for DW surface treatment and investigated its effect on both DW hydrophilicity and the dental investment's mechanical properties. The results showed that the application of the AAPPJ significantly improved the hydrophilicity of the DW, and that the results were similar to that of cleaner-treated DW using commercially available products with surfactant. A surface chemical analysis indicated that the improvement of hydrophilicity was related to an increase in the number of oxygen-related bonds on the DW surface following the removal of carbon hydrate in both AAPPJ and cleaner-treated DW. However, cleaner treatment compromised the mechanical property of the dental investment when the dental investment was in contact with the treated DW, while the AAPPJ treatment did not. Therefore, the use of AAPPJ to treat DW is a promising method for accurate dental restoration, as it induces an improvement in hydrophilicity without harming the dental investment. (paper)

  12. Time-dependent effects of ultraviolet and nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma on the biological activity of titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Hwan; Jeong, Won-Seok; Cha, Jung-Yul; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Yu, Hyung-Seog; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Hwang, Chung-Ju

    2016-09-01

    Here, we evaluated time-dependent changes in the effects of ultraviolet (UV) and nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTAPPJ) on the biological activity of titanium compared with that of untreated titanium. Grade IV machined surface titanium discs (12-mm diameter) were used immediately and stored up to 28 days after 15-min UV or 10-min NTAPPJ treatment. Changes of surface characteristics over time were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, surface profiling, contact angle analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and surface zeta-potential. Changes in biological activity over time were as determined by analysing bovine serum albumin adsorption, MC3T3-E1 early adhesion and morphometry, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity between groups. We found no differences in the effects of treatment on titanium between UV or NTAPPJ over time; both treatments resulted in changes from negatively charged hydrophobic (bioinert) to positively charged hydrophilic (bioactive) surfaces, allowing enhancement of albumin adsorption, osteoblastic cell attachment, and cytoskeleton development. Although this effect may not be prolonged for promotion of cell adhesion until 4 weeks, the effects were sufficient to maintain ALP activity after 7 days of incubation. This positive effect of UV and NTAPPJ treatment can enhance the biological activity of titanium over time.

  13. Oxidation of clofibric acid in aqueous solution using a non-thermal plasma discharge or gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madureira, Joana; Ceriani, Elisa; Pinhão, Nuno; Marotta, Ester; Melo, Rita; Cabo Verde, Sandra; Paradisi, Cristina; Margaça, Fernanda M. A.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we study degradation of clofibric acid (CFA) in aqueous solution using either ionizing radiation from a $^{60}$Co source or a non-thermal plasma produced by discharges in the air above the solution. The results obtained with the two technologies are compared in terms of effectiveness of CFA degradation and its by-products. In both cases the CFA degradation follows a quasi-exponential decay in time well modelled by a kinetic scheme which considers the competition between CFA and all reaction intermediates for the reactive species generated in solution as well as the amount of the end product formed. A new degradation law is deduced to explain the results. Although the end-product CO$_2$ was detected and the CFA conversion found to be very high under the studied conditions, HPLC analysis reveals several degradation intermediates still bearing the aromatic ring with the chlorine substituent. The extent of mineralization is rather limited. The energy yield is found to be higher in the gamma radiation experiments.

  14. Low temperature synthesis of silicon quantum dots with plasma chemistry control in dual frequency non-thermal plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Bibhuti Bhusan; Yin, Yongyi; Han, Jeon Geon; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-06-21

    The advanced materials process by non-thermal plasmas with a high plasma density allows the synthesis of small-to-big sized Si quantum dots by combining low-temperature deposition with superior crystalline quality in the background of an amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride matrix. Here, we make quantum dot thin films in a reactive mixture of ammonia/silane/hydrogen utilizing dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas with high atomic hydrogen and nitrogen radical densities. Systematic data analysis using different film and plasma characterization tools reveals that the quantum dots with different sizes exhibit size dependent film properties, which are sensitively dependent on plasma characteristics. These films exhibit intense photoluminescence in the visible range with violet to orange colors and with narrow to broad widths (∼0.3-0.9 eV). The observed luminescence behavior can come from the quantum confinement effect, quasi-direct band-to-band recombination, and variation of atomic hydrogen and nitrogen radicals in the film growth network. The high luminescence yields in the visible range of the spectrum and size-tunable low-temperature synthesis with plasma and radical control make these quantum dot films good candidates for light emitting applications.

  15. Development of non-thermal plasma jet and its potential application for color degradation of organic pollutant in wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirdo Kasih, Tota; Kharisma, Angel; Perdana, Muhammad Kevin; Murphiyanto, Richard Dimas Julian

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the development of non-thermal plasma-based AOPs for color degradation in wastewater treatment. The plasma itself was generated by an in-house high voltage power supply (HVPS). Instead of gas-phase plasma system, we applied plasma jet system underwater during wastewater treatment without additional any chemicals (chemical-free processing). The method is thought to maximize the energy transfer and increase the efficient interaction between plasma and solution during the process. Our plasma jet system could proceed either by using helium (He), argon (Ar) and air as the medium in an open air atmosphere. Exploring the developed plasma to be applied in organic wastewater treatment, we demonstrated that the plasma jet could be generated underwater and yields in color degradation of methylene blue (MB) wastewater model. When using Ar gas as a medium, the color degradation of MB could be achieved within 90 minutes. Whereas, by using Ar with an admixing of oxygen (O2) gas, the similar result could be accomplished within 60 minutes. Additional O2 gas in the latter might produce more hydroxyl radicals and oxygen-based species which speed up the oxidative reaction with organic pollutants, and hence accelerate the process of color degradation.

  16. Inactivation of Candida biofilms by non-thermal plasma and its enhancement for fungistatic effect of antifungal drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Sun

    Full Text Available We investigated the antifungal effect of non-thermal plasma, as well as its combination with common antifungal drugs, against Candida biofilms. A direct current atmospheric pressure He/O(2 (2% plasma microjet (PMJ was used to treat Candida biofilms in a 96-well plate. Inactivation efficacies of the biofilms were evaluated by XTT assay and counting colony forming units (CFUs. Morphological properties of the biofilms were evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. The sessile minimal inhibitory concentrations (SMICs of fluconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin for the biofilms were also tested. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR spectroscopy was used to detect the reactive oxygen species (ROS generated directly and indirectly by PMJ. The Candida biofilms were completely inactivated after 1 min PMJ treatment, where severely deformed fungal elements were observed in SEM images. The SMICs of the tested antifungal drugs for the plasma-treated biofilms were decreased by 2-6 folds of dilution, compared to those of the untreated controls. ROS such as hydroxyl radical ((•OH, superoxide anion radical ((•O(2 (- and singlet molecular oxygen ((1O(2 were detected by ESR. We hence conclude that He/O(2 (2% plasma alone, as well as in combination with common antifungal drugs, is able to inactivate Candida biofilms rapidly. The generation of ROS is believed to be one of the underlying mechanisms for the fungicidal activity of plasma.

  17. Non-thermal plasma induces mitochondria-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway via ROS generation in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yu, K N; Ma, Jie; Shen, Jie; Cheng, Cheng; Zhou, Fangjian; Cai, Zhiming; Han, Wei

    2017-11-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for anticancer treatment. Although increasing evidence suggests that NTP selectively induces apoptosis in some types of tumor cells, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear. In this study, we further investigated possible molecular mechanisms for NTP-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells. The results showed that NTP exposure significantly inhibited the growth and viability of HeLa cells. Morphological observation and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that NTP exposure induced HeLa cell apoptosis. NTP exposure also activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, which subsequently cleaved poly (ADP- ribose) polymerase. Furthermore, NTP exposure suppressed Bcl-2 expression, enhanced Bax expression and translocation to mitochondria, activated mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway, followed by the release of cytochrome c. Further studies showed that NTP treatment led to ROS generation, whereas blockade of ROS generation by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC, ROS scavengers) significantly prevented NTP-induced mitochondrial alteration and subsequent apoptosis of HeLa cells via suppressing Bax translocation, cytochrome c and caspase-3 activation. Taken together, our results indicated that NTP exposure induced mitochondria-mediated intrinsic apoptosis of HeLa cells was activated by ROS generation. These findings provide insights to the therapeutic potential and clinical research of NTP as a novel tool in cervical cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. CGRO/BATSE Data Support the New Paradigm For GRB Prompt Emission and the New L-i(nTh)-E-peak,i(nTh,rest) Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiriec, S.; Gonzalez, M.M.; Sacahui, J.R.; Kouveliotou, C.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J.

    2016-01-01

    The paradigm for gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission is changing. Since early in the Compton Gamma RayObservatory (CGRO) era, the empirical Band function has been considered a good description of the keV-MeV-gamma-ray prompt emission spectra despite the fact that its shape was very often inconsistent with the theoretical predictions, especially those expected in pure synchrotron emission scenarios. We have recently established a new observational model analyzing data of the NASA Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In this model, GRB prompt emission would be a combination of three main emission components: (i) a thermal-like component that we have interpreted so far as emission from the jet photosphere, (ii) a non-thermal component that we have interpreted so far as either synchrotron radiation from the propagating and accelerated charged particles within the jet or reprocessed jet photospheric emission, and (iii) an additional non-thermal (cutoff) power law (PL) extending from low to high energies in gamma-rays and most likely of inverse Compton origin. In this article we reanalyze some of the bright GRBs, namely GRBs 941017, 970111, and 990123, observed with the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board CGRO with the new model. We conclude that BATSE data for these three GRBs are fully consistent with the recent results obtained with Fermi: some bright BATSE GRBs exhibit three separate components during the prompt phase with similar spectral parameters as those reported from Fermi data. In addition, the analysis of the BATSE GRBs with the new prompt emission model results in a relation between the time-resolved energy flux of the non-thermal component, F(in)(Th), and its corresponding nuFnu spectral peak energy,Epeak,inTh (i.e., FinThEpeak,inTh ), which has a similar index when fitted to a PL as the one initially derived from Fermi data. For GRBs with known redshifts (z) this results in a possible universal relation between the luminosity of the non-thermal

  19. Observable Emission Features of Black Hole GRMHD Jets on Event Horizon Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Hung-Yi [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, ON, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Wu, Kinwah [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Younsi, Ziri; Mizuno, Yosuke [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Max-von-Laue-Straße 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Asada, Keiichi; Nakamura, Masanori, E-mail: hpu@perimeterinstitute.ca, E-mail: asada@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: nakamura@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: kinwah.wu@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: younsi@th.physik.uni-frankfurt.de, E-mail: mizuno@th.physik.uni-frankfurt.de [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, 11F of Astronomy-Mathematics Building, AS/NTU No. 1, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2017-08-20

    The general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamical (GRMHD) formulation for black hole-powered jets naturally gives rise to a stagnation surface, where inflows and outflows along magnetic field lines that thread the black hole event horizon originate. We derive a conservative formulation for the transport of energetic electrons, which are initially injected at the stagnation surface and subsequently transported along flow streamlines. With this formulation the energy spectra evolution of the electrons along the flow in the presence of radiative and adiabatic cooling is determined. For flows regulated by synchrotron radiative losses and adiabatic cooling, the effective radio emission region is found to be finite, and geometrically it is more extended along the jet central axis. Moreover, the emission from regions adjacent to the stagnation surface is expected to be the most luminous as this is where the freshly injected energetic electrons are concentrated. An observable stagnation surface is thus a strong prediction of the GRMHD jet model with the prescribed non-thermal electron injection. Future millimeter/submillimeter (mm/sub-mm) very-long-baseline interferometric observations of supermassive black hole candidates, such as the one at the center of M87, can verify this GRMHD jet model and its associated non-thermal electron injection mechanism.

  20. FLARE-LIKE VARIABILITY OF THE Mg II {lambda}2800 EMISSION LINE IN THE {gamma}-RAY BLAZAR 3C 454.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon-Tavares, J. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Chavushyan, V.; Patino-Alvarez, V.; Carraminana, A.; Carrasco, L. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Apartado Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Valtaoja, E. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-20100 Turku (Finland); Arshakian, T. G. [I. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Popovic, L. C. [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11160 Belgrade 74 (Serbia); Tornikoski, M.; Laehteenmaeki, A. [Aalto University Metsaehovi Radio Observatory, Metsaehovintie 114, FI-02540 Kylmaelae (Finland); Lobanov, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-02-01

    We report the detection of a statistically significant flare-like event in the Mg II {lambda}2800 emission line of 3C 454.3 during the outburst of autumn 2010. The highest levels of emission line flux recorded over the monitoring period (2008-2011) coincide with a superluminal jet component traversing through the radio core. This finding crucially links the broad emission line fluctuations to the non-thermal continuum emission produced by relativistically moving material in the jet and hence to the presence of broad-line region clouds surrounding the radio core. If the radio core were located at several parsecs from the central black hole, then our results would suggest the presence of broad-line region material outside the inner parsec where the canonical broad-line region is envisaged to be located. We briefly discuss the implications of broad emission line material ionized by non-thermal continuum in the context of virial black hole mass estimates and gamma-ray production mechanisms.

  1. Electron beam non-thermal plasma hybrid system for reduction of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions from power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaroiu, Gh [Department of Power Plants, University Polytechnic of Bucharest, 313 Splaiul Independentei Street, 060042 Bucharest (Romania); Zissulescu, E [ICPET ECO SA Bucharest, 104 Berceni Street, 041912 Bucharest (Romania); Sandu, M [Technical University of Civil Engineering of Bucharest, 124 Lacul Tei Street, 020396 Bucharest (Romania); Roscia, M [University of Bergamo, 5 Marconi Street, 24044 Dalmine, Bergamo (Italy)

    2007-12-15

    In this paper an installation containing a negative corona discharge (DC) reactor, a pulse corona discharge reactor and a combined electron beam (EB) and microwave induced plasma reactor is presented. SO{sub 2} is removed up to 42% through spontaneous reaction with ammonia without EB or microwave irradiation at the temperature below 70{sup o}C. Considering the values of the removal efficiencies of 98% for SO{sub 2} and 80% for NO{sub x} applying separate EB irradiation with a dose of 40 kGy, when the simultaneous EB and microwave irradiation is applied, the required absorbed dose is about two times smaller. The SO{sub 2} removal efficiency of simultaneous DC or positive discharge and microwave discharge is higher than separate corona discharge, pulse and microwave discharge. Also, the applied voltage level at which the removal efficiency reaches the maximum value is less than that for the separate application of corona discharge or pulse discharge. The NO{sub x} removal efficiency of DC or pulse discharge suffers little change by additional use of the microwave energy. Based on this research and the results obtained by a pilot project built in collaboration with Electrostatica Bucharest, a project for an installation involving simultaneous SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal by irradiation with accelerated EBs and microwaves, has been proposed for Thermo-Power Plant CET-West-Bucharest of 550 MW. (author)

  2. Ozone synthesis improves by increasing number density of plasma channels and lower voltage in a nonthermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif Malik, Muhammad; Hughes, David

    2016-04-01

    Improvements in ozone synthesis from air and oxygen by increasing the number density of plasma channels and lower voltage for the same specific input energy (SIE) were explored in a nonthermal plasma based on a sliding discharge. The number of plasma channels and energy per pulse increased in direct proportion to the increase in the effective length of the anode (the high voltage electrode). Decreasing the discharge gap increased the energy per pulse for the same length and allowed the installation of more electrode pairs in the same space. It allowed the increase of the number of plasma channels in the same space to achieve the same SIE at a lower peak voltage with less energy per plasma channel. The ozone concentration gradually increased to ~1500 ppmv (140 to 50 g kWh-1) from air and to ~6000 ppmv (400 to 200 g kWh-1) from oxygen with a gradual increase in the SIE to ~200 J L-1, irrespective of the variations in electrode geometry, applied voltage or flow rate of the feed gas. A gradual increase in SIE beyond 200 J L-1 gradually increased the ozone concentration to a certain maximum value followed by a decline, but the rate of increase and the maximum value was higher for the greater number of plasma channels and lower peak voltage combination. The maximum ozone concentration was ~5000 ppmv (~30 g kWh-1) from air and ~22 000 ppmv (~80 g kWh-1) from oxygen. The results are explained on the basis of characteristics of the plasma and ozone synthesis mechanism.

  3. Oxidation mechanisms of CF2Br2 and CH2Br2 induced by air nonthermal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiorlin, Milko; Marotta, Ester; Dal Molin, Marta; Paradisi, Cristina

    2013-01-02

    Oxidation mechanisms in air nonthermal plasma (NTP) at room temperature and atmospheric pressure were investigated in a corona reactor energized by +dc, -dc, or +pulsed high voltage.. The two bromomethanes CF(2)Br(2) and CH(2)Br(2) were chosen as model organic pollutants because of their very different reactivities with OH radicals. Thus, they served as useful mechanistic probes: they respond differently to the presence of humidity in the air and give different products. By FT-IR analysis of the postdischarge gas the following products were detected and quantified: CO(2) and CO in the case of CH(2)Br(2), CO(2) and F(2)C ═ O in the case of CF(2)Br(2). F(2)C ═ O is a long-lived oxidation intermediate due to its low reactivity with atmospheric radicals. It is however removed from the NTP processed gas by passage through a water scrubber resulting in hydrolysis to CO(2) and HF. Other noncarbon containing products of the discharge were also monitored by FT-IR analysis, including HNO(3) and N(2)O. Ozone, an important product of air NTP, was never detected in experiments with CF(2)Br(2) and CH(2)Br(2) because of the highly efficient ozone depleting cycles catalyzed by BrOx species formed from the bromomethanes. It is concluded that, regardless of the type of corona applied, CF(2)Br(2) reacts in air NTP via a common intermediate, the CF(2)Br radical. The possible reactions leading to this radical are discussed, including, for -dc activation, charge exchange with O(2)(-), a species detected by APCI mass spectrometry.

  4. Non-thermal near-infrared exposure photobiomodulates cellular responses to ionizing radiation in human full thickness skin models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Anke; Zöller, Nadja; Kippenberger, Stefan; Bernd, August; Kaufmann, Roland; Layer, Paul G; Heselich, Anja

    2018-01-01

    Ionizing and near-infrared radiation are both part of the therapeutic spectrum in cancer treatment. During cancer therapy ionizing radiation is typically used for non-invasive reduction of malignant tissue, while near-infrared photobiomodulation is utilized in palliative medical approaches, e.g. for pain reduction or impairment of wound healing. Furthermore, near-infrared is part of the solar wavelength spectrum. A combined exposure of these two irradiation qualities - either intentionally during medical treatment or unintentionally due to solar exposure - is therefore presumable for cancer patients. Several studies in different model organisms and cell cultures show a strong impact of near-infrared pretreatment on ionizing radiation-induced stress response. To investigate the risks of non-thermal near-infrared (NIR) pretreatment in patients, a human in vitro full thickness skin models (FTSM) was evaluated for radiation research. FTSM were pretreated with therapy-relevant doses of NIR followed by X-radiation, and then examined for DNA-double-strand break (DSB) repair, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Double-treated FTSM revealed a clear influence of NIR on X-radiation-induced stress responses in cells in their typical tissue environment. Furthermore, over a 24h time period, double-treated FTSM presented a significant persistence of DSBs, as compared to samples exclusively irradiated by X-rays. In addition, NIR pretreatment inhibited apoptosis induction of integrated fibroblasts, and counteracted the radiation-induced proliferation inhibition of basal keratinocytes. Our work suggests that cancer patients treated with X-rays should be prevented from uncontrolled NIR irradiation. On the other hand, controlled double-treatment could provide an alternative therapy approach, exposing the patient to less radiation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Terahertz radiation induces non-thermal structural changes associated with Fröhlich condensation in a protein crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundholm, Ida V; Rodilla, Helena; Wahlgren, Weixiao Y; Duelli, Annette; Bourenkov, Gleb; Vukusic, Josip; Friedman, Ran; Stake, Jan; Schneider, Thomas; Katona, Gergely

    2015-09-01

    Whether long-range quantum coherent states could exist in biological systems, and beyond low-temperature regimes where quantum physics is known to be applicable, has been the subject to debate for decades. It was proposed by Fröhlich that vibrational modes within protein molecules can order and condense into a lowest-frequency vibrational mode in a process similar to Bose-Einstein condensation, and thus that macroscopic coherence could potentially be observed in biological systems. Despite the prediction of these so-called Fröhlich condensates almost five decades ago, experimental evidence thereof has been lacking. Here, we present the first experimental observation of Fröhlich condensation in a protein structure. To that end, and to overcome the challenges associated with probing low-frequency molecular vibrations in proteins (which has hampered understanding of their role in proteins' function), we combined terahertz techniques with a highly sensitive X-ray crystallographic method to visualize low-frequency vibrational modes in the protein structure of hen-egg white lysozyme. We found that 0.4 THz electromagnetic radiation induces non-thermal changes in electron density. In particular, we observed a local increase of electron density in a long α-helix motif consistent with a subtle longitudinal compression of the helix. These observed electron density changes occur at a low absorption rate indicating that thermalization of terahertz photons happens on a micro- to milli-second time scale, which is much slower than the expected nanosecond time scale due to damping of delocalized low frequency vibrations. Our analyses show that the micro- to milli-second lifetime of the vibration can only be explained by Fröhlich condensation, a phenomenon predicted almost half a century ago, yet never experimentally confirmed.

  6. Robotically Assisted Sonic Therapy as a Noninvasive Nonthermal Ablation Modality: Proof of Concept in a Porcine Liver Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolock, Amanda R; Cristescu, Mircea M; Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, Annette; Green, Chelsey; Cannata, Jonathan; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J; Lee, Fred T

    2018-05-01

    Purpose To determine the feasibility of creating a clinically relevant hepatic ablation (ie, an ablation zone capable of treating a 2-cm liver tumor) by using robotically assisted sonic therapy (RAST), a noninvasive and nonthermal focused ultrasound therapy based on histotripsy. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional animal use and care committee. Ten female pigs were treated with RAST in a single session with a prescribed 3-cm spherical treatment region and immediately underwent abdominal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Three pigs (acute group) were sacrificed immediately following MR imaging. Seven pigs (chronic group) were survived for approximately 4 weeks and were reimaged with MR imaging immediately before sacrifice. Animals underwent necropsy and harvesting of the liver for histologic evaluation of the ablation zone. RAST ablations were performed with a 700-kHz therapy transducer. Student t tests were performed to compare prescribed versus achieved ablation diameter, difference of sphericity from 1, and change in ablation zone volume from acute to chronic imaging. Results Ablation zones had a sphericity index of 0.99 ± 0.01 (standard deviation) (P < .001 vs sphericity index of 1). Anteroposterior and transverse dimensions were not significantly different from prescribed (3.4 ± 0.7; P = .08 and 3.2 ± 0.8; P = .29, respectively). The craniocaudal dimension was significantly larger than prescribed (3.8 ± 1.1; P = .04), likely because of respiratory motion. The central ablation zone demonstrated complete cell destruction and a zone of partial necrosis. A fibrous capsule surrounded the ablation zone by 4 weeks. On 4-week follow-up images, ablation zone volumes decreased by 64% (P < .001). Conclusion RAST is capable of producing clinically relevant ablation zones in a noninvasive manner in a porcine model. © RSNA, 2018.

  7. Collaborative Research: A Model of Partially Ionized Plasma Flows with Kinetic Treatment of Neutral Atoms and Nonthermal Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelov, Nikolai; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Interactions of flows of partially ionized, magnetized plasma are frequently accompanied by the presence of both thermal and non-thermal (pickup) ion components. Such interactions cannot be modeled using traditional MHD equations and require more advanced approaches to treat them. If a nonthermal component of ions is formed due to charge exchange and collisions between the thermal (core) ions and neutrals, it experiences the action of magnetic field, its distribution function is isotropized, and it soon acquires the velocity of the ambient plasma without being thermodynamically equilibrated. This situation, e. g., takes place in the outer heliosphere -- the part of interstellar space beyond the solar system whose properties are determined by the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. This is also possible in laboratory, at million degrees and above, when plasma is conducting electricity far too well, which makes Ohmic heating ineffective. To attain the target temperatures one needs additional heating eventually playing a dominant role. Among such sources is a so-called neutral particle beam heating. This is a wide-spread technique (Joint European Torus and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiments) based on the injection of powerful beams of neutral atoms into ohmically preheated plasma. In this project we have investigated the energy and density separation between the thermal and nonthermal components in the solar wind and interstellar plasmas. A new model has been developed in which we solve the ideal MHD equations for mixture of all ions and the kinetic Boltzmann equation to describe the transport of neutral atoms. As a separate capability, we can treat the flow of neutral atoms in a multi-component fashion, where neutral atoms born in each thermodynamically distinct region are governed by the Euler gas dynamic equations. We also describe the behavior of pickup ions either kinetically, using the Fokker--Planck equation, or

  8. Collaborative Research: A Model of Partially Ionized Plasma Flows with Kinetic Treatment of Neutral Atoms and Nonthermal Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelov, Nikolai [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States); Zhang, Ming [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States)

    2016-07-31

    Interactions of flows of partially ionized, magnetized plasma are frequently accompanied by the presence of both thermal and non-thermal (pickup) ion components. Such interactions cannot be modeled using traditional MHD equations and require more advanced approaches to treat them. If a nonthermal component of ions is formed due to charge exchange and collisions between the thermal (core) ions and neutrals, it experiences the action of magnetic field, its distribution function is isotropized, and it soon acquires the velocity of the ambient plasma without being thermodynamically equilibrated. This situation, e. g., takes place in the outer heliosphere –- the part of interstellar space beyond the solar system whose properties are determined by the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. This is also possible in laboratory, at million degrees and above, when plasma is conducting electricity far too well, which makes Ohmic heating ineffective. To attain the target temperatures one needs additional heating eventually playing a dominant role. Among such sources is a so-called neutral particle beam heating. This is a wide-spread technique (Joint European Torus and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiments) based on the injection of powerful beams of neutral atoms into ohmically preheated plasma. In this project we have investigated the energy and density separation between the thermal and nonthermal components in the solar wind and interstellar plasmas. A new model has been developed in which we solve the ideal MHD equations for mixture of all ions and the kinetic Boltzmann equation to describe the transport of neutral atoms. As a separate capability, we can treat the flow of neutral atoms in a multi-component fashion, where neutral atoms born in each thermodynamically distinct region are governed by the Euler gas dynamic equations. We also describe the behavior of pickup ions either kinetically, using the Fokker--Planck equation

  9. Collaborative Research: A Model of Partially Ionized Plasma Flows with Kinetic Treatment of Neutral Atoms and Nonthermal Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelov, Nikolai [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States). Dept. of Space Science. Center for Space Plasma and; Zhang, Ming [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States). Physics and Space Sciences Dept.; Borovikov, Sergey [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States). Dept. of Space Science. Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research; Heerikhuisen, Jacob [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States). Dept. of Space Science. Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research; Zank, Gary [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States). Dept. of Space Science. Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research; Gamayunov, Konstantin [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States). Physics and Space Sciences Dept.; Colella, Phillip [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-07-31

    Interactions of flows of partially ionized, magnetized plasma are frequently accompanied by the presence of both thermal and non-thermal (pickup) ion components. Such interactions cannot be modeled using traditional MHD equations and require more advanced approaches to treat them. If a nonthermal component of ions is formed due to charge exchange and collisions between the thermal (core) ions and neutrals, it experiences the action of magnetic field, its distribution function is isotropized, and it soon acquires the velocity of the ambient plasma without being thermodynamically equilibrated. This situation, e. g., takes place in the outer heliosphere - the part of interstellar space beyond the solar system whose properties are determined by the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. This is also possible in laboratory, at million degrees and above, when plasma is conducting electricity far too well, which makes Ohmic heating ineffective. To attain the target temperatures one needs additional heating eventually playing a dominant role. Among such sources is a so-called neutral particle beam heating. This is a wide-spread technique (Joint European Torus and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiments) based on the injection of powerful beams of neutral atoms into ohmically preheated plasma. In this project we have investigated the energy and density separation between the thermal and nonthermal components in the solar wind and interstellar plasmas. A new model has been developed in which we solve the ideal MHD equations for mixture of all ions and the kinetic Boltzmann equation to describe the transport of neutral atoms. As a separate capability, we can treat the flow of neutral atoms in a multi-component fashion, where neutral atoms born in each thermodynamically distinct regions are governed by the Euler gas dynamic equations. We also describe the behavior of pickup ions either kinetically, using the Fokker–Planck equation, or

  10. Electron cyclotron emission measurements at the stellarator TJ-K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sichardt, Gabriel; Ramisch, Mirko [Institut fuer Grenzflaechenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Koehn, Alf [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Electron temperature (T{sub e}) measurements in the magnetised plasmas of the stellarator TJ-K are currently performed by means of Langmuir probes. The use of these probes is restricted to relatively low temperatures and the measurement of temperature profiles requires the acquisition of the local current-voltage characteristics which limits strongly the sampling rate. As an alternative, T{sub e} can be measured using the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) that is generated by the gyration of electrons in magnetised plasmas. Magnetic field gradients in the plasma lead to a spatial distribution of emission frequencies and thus the measured intensity at a given frequency can be related to its point of origin. The T{sub e} dependence of the intensity then leads to a temperature profile along the line of sight for Maxwellian velocity distributions. A diagnostic system for T{sub e} measurements using ECE is currently being set up at TJ-K. When non-thermal electrons are present the emission spectrum changes dramatically. Therefore, the ECE can also be used to investigate the contribution of fast electrons to previously observed toroidal net currents in TJ-K. Simulations are used to examine the role of electron drift orbits in generating these currents.

  11. Kinetic parameters, collision rates, energy exchanges and transport coefficients of non-thermal electrons in premixed flames at sub-breakdown electric field strengths

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-02

    The effects of an electric field on the collision rates, energy exchanges and transport properties of electrons in premixed flames are investigated via solutions to the Boltzmann kinetic equation. The case of high electric field strength, which results in high-energy, non-thermal electrons, is analysed in detail at sub-breakdown conditions. The rates of inelastic collisions and the energy exchange between electrons and neutrals in the reaction zone of the flame are characterised quantitatively. The analysis includes attachment, ionisation, impact dissociation, and vibrational and electronic excitation processes. Our results suggest that Townsend breakdown occurs for E/N = 140 Td. Vibrational excitation is the dominant process up to breakdown, despite important rates of electronic excitation of CO, CO2 and N2 as well as impact dissociation of O2 being apparent from 50 Td onwards. Ohmic heating in the reaction zone is found to be negligible (less than 2% of peak heat release rate) up to breakdown field strengths for realistic electron densities equal to 1010 cm-3. The observed trends are largely independent of equivalence ratio. In the non-thermal regime, electron transport coefficients are insensitive to mixture composition and approximately constant across the flame, but are highly dependent on the electric field strength. In the thermal limit, kinetic parameters and transport coefficients vary substantially across the flame due to the spatially inhomogeneous concentration of water vapour. A practical approach for identifying the plasma regime (thermal versus non-thermal) in studies of electric field effects on flames is proposed. © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  12. Morphological study of polymer surfaces exposed to non-thermal plasma based on contact angle and the use of scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felix, T.; Cassini, F.A.; Benetoli, L.O.B.; Dotto, M.E.R.; Debacher, N.A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Polymeric surfaces were etched using non-thermal plasma at different intensities. • Polymers of low mechanical hardness reached the saturation level faster. • A mathematical model based on scaling laws was proposed. - Abstract: The experiments presented in this communication have the purpose to elaborate an explanation for the morphological evolution of the growth of polymeric surfaces provided by the treatment of non-thermal plasma. According to the roughness analysis and the model proposed by scaling laws it is possible relate to a predictable or merely random effect. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and poly(etherether)ketone (PEEK) samples were exposed to a non-thermal plasma discharge and the resulting surfaces roughness were analyzed based on the measurements from contact angle, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy coupled with scaling laws analysis which can help to describe and understand the dynamic of formation of a wide variety of rough surfaces. The roughness, R_R_M_S (RMS- Root Mean Square) values for polymer surface range between 19.8 nm and 110.9 nm. The contact angle and the AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) measurements as a function of the plasma exposure time were in agreement with both polar and dispersive components according to the surface roughness and also with the morphology evaluated described by Wolf-Villain model, with proximate values of α between 0.91_(_P_E_T_) and 0.88_(_P_E_E_K_), β = 0.25_(_P_E_T_) and z = 3,64_(_P_E_T_).

  13. The origin of infrared emission from the nucleus of NGC 1068

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.W.; Stein, W.A.

    1975-01-01

    Recent infrared observational results for the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1068 are reviewed and analyzed in terms consistent with information available at other wavelengths. It is concluded that the infrared and optical data imply that approximately-greater-than85 percent of the infrared emission at 10μ is radiation from dust grains in the nucleus. Observed reddening of spectral lines implies geometrical optical depths at visual wavelengths approx.7--15 if the nuclear dust cloud is approximately spherically symmetric. The dust grains emitting the infrared radiation could be silicates with a 10-μ optical depth near unity, but this identification is not uniquely established. The grains are heated radiatively by an underlying source or sources of radiation also responsible for ionizing the emission-line-producing gas. The underlying source could be nonthermal, or it could be a hot plasma. Physical constraints on each of these models are derived

  14. Infrared and optical polarimetry of the radio elliptical IC 5063 (PKS2048-57): discovery of a highly polarized non-thermal nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hough, J H; Brindle, C; Axon, D J; Bailey, J; Sparks, W B

    1987-02-15

    Two-aperture optical and near-infrared polarization and flux measurements of the radio elliptical galaxy IC 5063 are presented. Analysis of the polarized flux shows that the large infrared excess in the nucleus most likely arises from a steep-spectrum non-thermal source with a polarization of 17 per cent and near-infrared luminosity 6x10/sup 41/ erg s/sup -1/. This result suggests that IC5063 is closely related to the more luminous blazars. The origin of the polarization in the optical is, however, not clear.

  15. Final Report: Fiscal Year 1997 demonstration of omnivorous non-thermal mixed waste treatment: Direct chemical oxidation of organic solids and liquids using peroxydisulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.F.; Ballazs G.B.

    1998-01-01

    Direct Chemical Oxidation (DCO) is a non-thermal, ambient pressure, aqueous-based technology for the oxidative destruction of the organic components of hazardous or mixed waste streams. The process has been developed for applications in waste treatment, chemical demilitarization and decontamination at LLNL since 1992. The process uses solutions of the peroxydisulfate ion (typically sodium or ammonium salts) to completely mineralize the organics to carbon dioxide and water. The expended oxidant may be electrolytically regenerated to minimize secondary waste. The paper briefly describes: free radical and secondary oxidant formation; electrochemical regeneration; offgas stream; and throughput

  16. Infrared and optical polarimetry of the radio elliptical IC 5063 (PKS2048-57): discovery of a highly polarized non-thermal nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hough, J.H.; Brindle, C.; Axon, D.J.; Bailey, J.; Sparks, W.B.

    1987-01-01

    Two-aperture optical and near-infrared polarization and flux measurements of the radio elliptical galaxy IC 5063 are presented. Analysis of the polarized flux shows that the large infrared excess in the nucleus most likely arises from a steep-spectrum non-thermal source with a polarization of 17 per cent and near-infrared luminosity 6x10 41 erg s -1 . This result suggests that IC5063 is closely related to the more luminous blazars. The origin of the polarization in the optical is, however, not clear. (author)

  17. Very High Energy astronomy from H.E.S.S. to CTA. Opening of a new astronomical window on the non-thermal Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naurois, Mathieu de

    2012-01-01

    The last ten years saw the emergence of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes as a mature and efficient technique for the study of the Very High Energy Universe, leading to the successful opening, mainly by the HESS experiment, of our understanding of the non-thermal Universe. This Habilitation thesis summaries ten years of research in Very High Energy gamma-ray astronomy with HESS and CTA. In the first part, instrumental aspects such as the experiment conception, its calibration, the reconstruction of the events and the data analysis are presented. The second parts draws a panorama of the main discoveries in the domain. (author)

  18. Using the Pairs of Lines Broadened by Collisions with Neutral and Charged Particles for Gas Temperature Determination of Argon Non-Thermal Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Yubero

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The spectroscopic method for gas temperature determination in argon non-thermal plasmas sustained at atmospheric pressure proposed recently by Spectrochimica Acta Part B 129 14 (2017—based on collisional broadening measurements of selected pairs of argon atomic lines, has been applied to other pairs of argon atomic lines, and the discrepancies found in some of these results have been analyzed. For validation purposes, the values of the gas temperature obtained using the different pairs of lines have been compared with the rotational temperatures derived from the OH ro-vibrational bands, using the Boltzmann-plot technique.

  19. Final Report: Fiscal Year 1997 demonstration of omnivorous non-thermal mixed waste treatment: Direct chemical oxidation of organic solids and liquids using peroxydisulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Direct Chemical Oxidation (DCO) is a non-thermal, ambient pressure, aqueous-based technology for the oxidative destruction of the organic components of hazardous or mixed waste streams. The process has been developed for applications in waste treatment, chemical demilitarization and decontamination at LLNL since 1992. The process uses solutions of the peroxydisulfate ion (typically sodium or ammonium salts) to completely mineralize the organics to carbon dioxide and water. The expended oxidant may be electrolytically regenerated to minimize secondary waste. The paper briefly describes: free radical and secondary oxidant formation; electrochemical regeneration; offgas stream; and throughput.

  20. Polarization of hard X-rays, a contribution to the measurement of the non-thermal electron distribution function (L.H.C.D.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, M.; Platz, P.

    1990-01-01

    The hard X-ray spectrum emitted by a plasma containing non-thermal electrons generated during Lower Hybrid Current Drive experiments has already been measured on several tokamaks, but the properties of the bremsstrahlung have not yet been studied. The present study starts with the comparison of tractable analytical expressions of cross-sections with more precise computer-calculated values; then an evaluation of the polarization is carried out under real tokamak current drive situations and finally a proposal of a new diagnostic for the Tore Supra LHCD experiment is presented. (author) 6 refs., 6 figs

  1. Proposed Use of Zero Bias Diode Arrays as Thermal Electric Noise Rectifiers and Non-Thermal Energy Harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valone, Thomas F.

    2009-03-01

    cells are also considered for possible higher frequency ZPE transduction. Diode arrays of self-assembled molecular rectifiers or preferably, nano-sized cylindrical diodes are shown to reasonably provide for rectification of electron fluctuations from thermal and non-thermal ZPE sources to create an alternative energy DC electrical generator in the picowatt per diode range.

  2. Treatment of methyl orange by nitrogen non-thermal plasma in a corona reactor: The role of reactive nitrogen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadorin, Bruno Mena, E-mail: brunomenacadorin@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil); Tralli, Vitor Douglas [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil); Ceriani, Elisa [Department of Chemical Sciences, Università di Padova (Italy); Benetoli, Luís Otávio de Brito [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil); Marotta, Ester, E-mail: ester.marotta@unipd.it [Department of Chemical Sciences, Università di Padova (Italy); Ceretta, Claudio [Department of Industrial Engineering, Università di Padova (Italy); Debacher, Nito Angelo [Department of Chemistry, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil); Paradisi, Cristina [Department of Chemical Sciences, Università di Padova (Italy)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Nitration of methyl orange is one of the main processes in treatment with N{sub 2}-plasma. • MS/MS analysis shows preferred nitration of methyl orange in ortho position. • N{sub 2} plasma, N{sub 2}-PAW, reaction with NO{sub 2}{sup −} or NO{sub 2}{sup −}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at pH 2 give the same products. - Abstract: Methyl orange (MO) azo dye served as model organic pollutant to investigate the role of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in non-thermal plasma (NTP) induced water treatments. The results of experiments in which MO aqueous solutions were directly exposed to N{sub 2}-NTP are compared with those of control experiments in which MO was allowed to react with nitrite, nitrate and hydrogen peroxide, which are species formed in water exposed to N{sub 2}-NTP. Treatment of MO was also performed in PAW, Plasma Activated Water, that is water previously exposed to N{sub 2}-NTP. Both direct N{sub 2}-NTP and N{sub 2}-PAW treatments induced the rapid decay of MO. No appreciable reaction was instead observed when MO was treated with NO{sub 3}{sup −} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} either under acidic or neutral pH. In contrast, in acidic solutions MO decayed rapidly when treated with NO{sub 2}{sup −} and with a combination of NO{sub 2}{sup −} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Thorough product analysis was carried out by HPLC coupled with UV–vis and ESI–MS/MS detectors. In all experiments in which MO reaction was observed, the major primary product was a derivative nitro-substituted at the ortho position with respect to the N,N-dimethylamino group of MO. The reactions of RNS are discussed and a mechanism for the observed nitration products is proposed.

  3. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Non-Thermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Guibing Zhao; Sanil John

    2006-09-30

    The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a non-thermal plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. Several pulsed corona discharge (PCD) reactors have been fabricated and used to dissociate H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur. Visual observation shows that the corona is not uniform throughout the reactor. The corona is stronger near the top of the reactor in argon, while nitrogen and mixtures of argon or nitrogen with H{sub 2}S produce stronger coronas near the bottom of the reactor. Both of these effects appear to be explainable base on the different electron collision interactions with monatomic versus polyatomic gases. A series of experiments varying reactor operating parameters, including discharge capacitance, pulse frequency, and discharge voltage were performed while maintaining constant power input to the reactor. At constant reactor power input, low capacitance, high pulse frequency, and high voltage operation appear to provide the highest conversion and the highest energy efficiency for H{sub 2}S decomposition. Reaction rates and energy efficiency per H{sub 2}S molecule increase with increasing flow rate, although overall H{sub 2}S conversion decreases at constant power input. Voltage and current waveform analysis is ongoing to determine the fundamental operating characteristics of the reactors. A metal infiltrated porous ceramic membrane was prepared using vanadium as the metal and an alumina tube. Experiments with this type of membrane are continuing, but the results thus far have been consistent with those obtained in previous project years: plasma driven permeation or superpermeability

  4. STEADY-STATE HADRONIC GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM 100-MYR-OLD FERMI BUBBLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, Roland M.; Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Sutherland, Ralph S. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Carretti, Ettore; Hill, Alex S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Marsfield, N.S.W. (Australia)

    2014-08-20

    Fermi Bubbles are enigmatic γ-ray features of the Galactic bulge. Both putative activity (within few × Myr) connected to the Galactic center super-massive black hole and, alternatively, nuclear star formation have been claimed as the energizing source of the Bubbles. Likewise, both inverse-Compton emission by non-thermal electrons (''leptonic'' models) and collisions between non-thermal protons and gas (''hadronic'' models) have been advanced as the process supplying the Bubbles' γ-ray emission. An issue for any steady state hadronic model is that the very low density of the Bubbles' plasma seems to require that they accumulate protons over a multi-gigayear timescale, much longer than other natural timescales occurring in the problem. Here we present a mechanism wherein the timescale for generating the Bubbles' γ-ray emission via hadronic processes is ∼few × 10{sup 8} yr. Our model invokes the collapse of the Bubbles' thermally unstable plasma, leading to an accumulation of cosmic rays and magnetic field into localized, warm (∼10{sup 4} K), and likely filamentary condensations of higher-density gas. Under the condition that these filaments are supported by non-thermal pressure, the hadronic emission from the Bubbles is L {sub γ} ≅ 2 × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1} M-dot {sub in}/(0.1 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup –1} ) T{sub FB}{sup 2}/(3.5×10{sup 7} K){sup 2} M {sub fil}/M {sub pls}, equal to their observed luminosity (normalizing to the star-formation-driven mass flux into the Bubbles and their measured plasma temperature and adopting the further result that the mass in the filaments, M {sub fil} is approximately equal to the that of the Bubbles' plasma, M {sub pls})

  5. MODELING THE RADIO EMISSION FROM Cyg OB2 NO. 5: A QUADRUPLE SYSTEM?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, M.; Dougherty, S. M.; Fink, A.; Williams, P. M.

    2010-01-01

    Fifty observations at frequencies between 1.4 GHz and 43 GHz of the 6.6 day O6.5-7+O5.5-6 binary Cyg OB2 No. 5 using the Very Large Array over 20 years are re-examined. The aim is to determine the location and character of the previously detected variable radio emission. The radio emission from the system consists of a primary component that is associated with the binary, and a non-thermal source (NE), 0.''8 to the NE of the binary that has been ascribed to a wind-collision region (WCR) between the stellar winds of the binary and that of a B-type star (Star D) to the NE. Previous studies have not accounted for the potential contribution of NE to the total radio emission, most especially in observations where the primary and NE sources are not resolved as separate sources. NE shows no evidence of variation in 23 epochs where it is resolved separately from the primary radio component, demonstrating that the variable emission arises in the primary component. Since NE is non-variable, the radio flux from the primary can now be well determined for the first time, most especially in observations that do not resolve both the primary and NE components. The variable radio emission from the primary component has a period of 6.7 ± 0.3 years which is described by a simple model of a non-thermal source orbiting within the stellar wind envelope of the binary. Such a model implies the presence of a third, unresolved stellar companion (Star C) orbiting the 6.6 day binary with a period of 6.7 years and independent of Star D to the NE. The variable non-thermal emission arises from either a WCR between Star C and the binary system, or possibly from Star C directly. The model gives a mass-loss rate of 3.4 x 10 -5 M sun yr -1 for Cyg OB2 No. 5, unusually high for an Of supergiant and comparable to that of WR stars, and consistent with an unusually strong He I 1.083 μm emission line, also redolent of WR stars. An examination of radial velocity observations available from the

  6. The Multi-component X-ray Emission of 3C 273

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldi, S.; Türler, M.; Paltani, S.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.

    2009-05-01

    3C 273 is the brightest quasar in the sky and among the most extensively observed and studied AGN, therefore one of the most suitable targets for a long-term, multi-frequency study. The superposition of a thermal Comptonisation component, similar to that observed in Seyfert galaxies, and of a non-thermal component, related to the jet emission, seems to explain some of the spectral and timing properties of the X-ray emission of 3C 273. Yet, during some observations this dichotomy has not been observed and the variability properties could also be consistent with a single-component scenario, characterised by two parameters varying independently. In order to understand the nature of the X-ray emission in 3C 273, a series of observations up to 80-100 keV, possibly catching the source in different flux states, are essential. Simbol-X will be able to study the emission of 3C 273 in the broad 0.5-80 keV band with high sensitivity, allowing us to disentangle the emission from different spectral components, with 20-30 ks long observations. In addition, the shape and the origin of the high-energy emission of this quasar will be further constrained thanks to the AGILE and Fermi satellites, monitoring the γ-ray sky in the MeV-GeV energy domain.

  7. RELATIVISTIC PLASMA AS THE DOMINANT SOURCE OF THE OPTICAL CONTINUUM EMISSION IN THE BROAD-LINE RADIO GALAXY 3C 120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon-Tavares, J.; Lobanov, A. P.; Arshakian, T. G.; Chavushyan, V. H.; Doroshenko, V. T.; Sergeev, S. G.; Efimov, Y. S.; Nazarov, S. V.

    2010-01-01

    We report a relation between radio emission in the inner jet of the Seyfert galaxy 3C 120 and optical continuum emission in this galaxy. Combining the optical variability data with multi-epoch high-resolution very long baseline interferometry observations reveals that an optical flare rises when a superluminal component emerges into the jet, and its maxima is related to the passage of such component through the location of a stationary feature at a distance of ∼1.3 pc from the jet origin. This indicates that a significant fraction of the optical continuum produced in 3C 120 is non-thermal, and it can ionize material in a sub-relativistic wind or outflow. We discuss implications of this finding for the ionization and structure of the broad emission line region, as well as for the use of broad emission lines for determining black hole masses in radio-loud active galactic nucleus.

  8. Plasma heating in solar flares and their soft and hard X-ray emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falewicz, R.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the energy budgets of two single-loop-like flares observed in X-ray are analyzed under the assumption that nonthermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 February 20 and June 2, respectively. Using a one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic code for both flares, the energy deposited in the chromosphere was derived applying RHESSI observational data. The use of the Fokker-Planck formalism permits the calculation of distributions of the NTEs in flaring loops and thus spatial distributions of the X-ray nonthermal emissions and integral fluxes for the selected energy ranges that were compared with the observed ones. Additionally, a comparative analysis of the spatial distributions of the signals in the RHESSI images was conducted for the footpoints and for all the flare loops in selected energy ranges with these quantities' fluxes obtained from the models. The best compatibility of the model and observations was obtained for the 2002 June 2 event in the 0.5-4 Å GOES range and total fluxes in the 6-12 keV, 12-25 keV, 20-25 keV, and 50-100 keV energy bands. Results of photometry of the individual flaring structures in a high energy range show that the best compliance occurred for the 2002 June 2 flare, where the synthesized emissions were at least 30% higher than the observed emissions. For the 2002 February 20 flare, synthesized emission is about four times lower than the observed one. However, in the low energy range the best conformity was obtained for the 2002 February 20 flare, where emission from the model is about 11% lower than the observed one. The larger inconsistency occurs for the 2002 June 2 solar flare, where synthesized emission is about 12 times greater or even more than the observed emission. Some part of these differences may be caused by inevitable flaws of the applied methodology, like by an assumption that the model of the flare is

  9. Plasma Heating in Solar Flares and their Soft and Hard X-Ray Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falewicz, R.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the energy budgets of two single-loop-like flares observed in X-ray are analyzed under the assumption that nonthermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 February 20 and June 2, respectively. Using a one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic code for both flares, the energy deposited in the chromosphere was derived applying RHESSI observational data. The use of the Fokker-Planck formalism permits the calculation of distributions of the NTEs in flaring loops and thus spatial distributions of the X-ray nonthermal emissions and integral fluxes for the selected energy ranges that were compared with the observed ones. Additionally, a comparative analysis of the spatial distributions of the signals in the RHESSI images was conducted for the footpoints and for all the flare loops in selected energy ranges with these quantities' fluxes obtained from the models. The best compatibility of the model and observations was obtained for the 2002 June 2 event in the 0.5-4 Å GOES range and total fluxes in the 6-12 keV, 12-25 keV, 20-25 keV, and 50-100 keV energy bands. Results of photometry of the individual flaring structures in a high energy range show that the best compliance occurred for the 2002 June 2 flare, where the synthesized emissions were at least 30% higher than the observed emissions. For the 2002 February 20 flare, synthesized emission is about four times lower than the observed one. However, in the low energy range the best conformity was obtained for the 2002 February 20 flare, where emission from the model is about 11% lower than the observed one. The larger inconsistency occurs for the 2002 June 2 solar flare, where synthesized emission is about 12 times greater or even more than the observed emission. Some part of these differences may be caused by inevitable flaws of the applied methodology, like by an assumption that the model of the flare is

  10. Mechanism and comparison of needle-type non-thermal direct and indirect atmospheric pressure plasma jets on the degradation of dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attri, Pankaj; Yusupov, Maksudbek; Park, Ji Hoon; Lingamdinne, Lakshmi Prasanna; Koduru, Janardhan Reddy; Shiratani, Masaharu; Choi, Eun Ha; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2016-10-01

    Purified water supply for human use, agriculture and industry is the major global priority nowadays. The advanced oxidation process based on atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been used for purification of wastewater, although the underlying mechanisms of degradation of organic pollutants are still unknown. In this study we employ two needle-type atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma jets, i.e., indirect (ID-APPJ) and direct (D-APPJ) jets operating at Ar feed gas, for the treatment of methylene blue, methyl orange and congo red dyes, for two different times (i.e., 20 min and 30 min). Specifically, we study the decolorization/degradation of all three dyes using the above mentioned plasma sources, by means of UV-Vis spectroscopy, HPLC and a density meter. We also employ mass spectroscopy to verify whether only decolorization or also degradation takes place after treatment of the dyes by the NTP jets. Additionally, we analyze the interaction of OH radicals with all three dyes using reactive molecular dynamics simulations, based on the density functional-tight binding method. This investigation represents the first report on the degradation of these three different dyes by two types of NTP setups, analyzed by various methods, and based on both experimental and computational studies.

  11. Morphological study of polymer surfaces exposed to non-thermal plasma based on contact angle and the use of scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, T.; Cassini, F. A.; Benetoli, L. O. B.; Dotto, M. E. R.; Debacher, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    The experiments presented in this communication have the purpose to elaborate an explanation for the morphological evolution of the growth of polymeric surfaces provided by the treatment of non-thermal plasma. According to the roughness analysis and the model proposed by scaling laws it is possible relate to a predictable or merely random effect. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and poly(etherether)ketone (PEEK) samples were exposed to a non-thermal plasma discharge and the resulting surfaces roughness were analyzed based on the measurements from contact angle, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy coupled with scaling laws analysis which can help to describe and understand the dynamic of formation of a wide variety of rough surfaces. The roughness, RRMS (RMS- Root Mean Square) values for polymer surface range between 19.8 nm and 110.9 nm. The contact angle and the AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) measurements as a function of the plasma exposure time were in agreement with both polar and dispersive components according to the surface roughness and also with the morphology evaluated described by Wolf-Villain model, with proximate values of α between 0.91(PET) and 0.88(PEEK), β = 0.25(PET) and z = 3,64(PET).

  12. Effect of nonthermal plasma treatment on surface chemistry of commercially-pure titanium and shear bond strength to autopolymerizing acrylic resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vechiato-Filho, Aljomar José, E-mail: aljomarvechiatoflo@gmail.com [Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Univ. Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Aracatuba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Silva Vieira Marques, Isabella da [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Santos, Daniela Micheline dos [Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Univ. Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Aracatuba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira Matos, Adaias [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; Cruz, Nilson Cristino da [Laboratory of Technological Plasmas (LaPTec), Engineering College, Univ. Estadual Paulista — UNESP, Sorocaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo [Department of Prosthodontics and Periodontology, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-03-01

    The effect of nonthermal plasma on the surface characteristics of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti), and on the shear bond strength between an autopolymerizing acrylic resin and cp-Ti was investigated. A total of 96 discs of cp-Ti were distributed into four groups (n = 24): Po (no surface treatment), SB (sandblasting), Po + NTP and SB + NTP (methane plasma). Surface characterization was performed through surface energy, surface roughness, scanning microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction tests. Shear bond strength test was conducted immediately and after thermocycling. Surface treatment affected the surface energy and roughness of cp-Ti discs (P < .001). SEM–EDS showed the presence of the carbide thin film. XRD spectra revealed no crystalline phase changes. The SB + NTP group showed the highest bond strength values (6.76 ± 0.70 MPa). Thermocycling reduced the bond strength of the acrylic resin/cp-Ti interface (P < .05), except for Po group. NTP is an effective treatment option for improving the shear bond strength between both materials. - Highlights: • We tested the bond strength between two widely used materials in dentistry (acrylic and titanium). • We performed an innovative surface treatment with nonthermal plasma. • Increasing adhesion will avoid complications of full-arch implant-retained prostheses.

  13. Emission Inventory for Fugitive Emissions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plejdrup, Marlene Schmidt; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Nielsen, Malene

    This report presents the methodology and data used in the Danish inventory of fugitive emissions from fuels for the years until 2007. The inventory of fugitive emissions includes CO2, CH4, N2O, NOx, CO, NMVOC, SO2, dioxin, PAH and particulate matter. In 2007 the total Danish emission of greenhouse...

  14. Radio emission from Sgr A*: pulsar transits through the accretion disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, I. M.; Petropoulou, M.; Mimica, P.; Giannios, D.

    2017-06-01

    Radiatively inefficient accretion flow models have been shown to accurately account for the spectrum and luminosity observed from Sgr A* in the X-ray regime down to mm wavelengths. However, observations at a few GHz cannot be explained by thermal electrons alone but require the presence of an additional non-thermal particle population. Here, we propose a model for the origin of such a population in the accretion flow via means of a pulsar orbiting the supermassive black hole in our Galaxy. Interactions between the relativistic pulsar wind with the disc lead to the formation of a bow shock in the wind. During the pulsar's transit through the accretion disc, relativistic pairs, accelerated at the shock front, are injected into the disc. The radio-emitting particles are long lived and remain within the disc long after the pulsar's transit. Periodic pulsar transits through the disc result in regular injection episodes of non-thermal particles. We show that for a pulsar with spin-down luminosity Lsd ˜ 3 × 1035 erg s-1 and a wind Lorentz factor of γw ˜ 104 a quasi-steady synchrotron emission is established with luminosities in the 1-10 GHz range comparable to the observed one.

  15. The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in protein molecules in living systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiao-feng

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism and properties of bio-photon emission and absorption in bio-tissues were studied using Pang's theory of bio-energy transport, in which the energy spectra of protein molecules are obtained from the discrete dynamic equation. From the energy spectra, it was determined that the protein molecules could both radiate and absorb bio-photons with wavelengths of energy level transitions of the excitons. These results were consistent with the experimental data; this consisted of infrared absorption data from collagen, bovine serum albumin, the protein-like molecule acetanilide, plasma, and a person's finger, and the laser-Raman spectra of acidity I-type collagen in the lungs of a mouse, and metabolically active Escherichia coli. We further elucidated the mechanism responsible for the non-thermal biological effects produced by the infrared light absorbed by the bio-tissues, using the above results. No temperature rise was observed; instead, the absorbed infrared light promoted the vibrations of amides as well the transport of the bio-energy from one place to other in the protein molecules, which changed their conformations. These experimental results, therefore, not only confirmed the validity of the mechanism of bio-photon emission, and the newly developed theory of bio-energy transport mentioned above, but also explained the mechanism and properties of the non-thermal biological effects produced by the absorption of infrared light by the living systems.

  16. Gamma-ray emission from internal shocks in novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P.; Dubus, G.; Jean, P.; Tatischeff, V.; Dosne, C.

    2018-04-01

    Context. Gamma-ray emission at energies ≥100 MeV has been detected from nine novae using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), and can be explained by particle acceleration at shocks in these systems. Eight out of these nine objects are classical novae in which interaction of the ejecta with a tenuous circumbinary material is not expected to generate detectable gamma-ray emission. Aim. We examine whether particle acceleration at internal shocks can account for the gamma-ray emission from these novae. The shocks result from the interaction of a fast wind radiatively-driven by nuclear burning on the white dwarf with material ejected in the initial runaway stage of the nova outburst. Methods: We present a one-dimensional model for the dynamics of a forward and reverse shock system in a nova ejecta, and for the associated time-dependent particle acceleration and high-energy gamma-ray emission. Non-thermal proton and electron spectra are calculated by solving a time-dependent transport equation for particle injection, acceleration, losses, and escape from the shock region. The predicted emission is compared to LAT observations of V407 Cyg, V1324 Sco, V959 Mon, V339 Del, V1369 Cen, and V5668 Sgr. Results: The ≥100 MeV gamma-ray emission arises predominantly from particles accelerated up to 100 GeV at the reverse shock and undergoing hadronic interactions in the dense cooling layer downstream of the shock. The emission rises within days after the onset of the wind, quickly reaches a maximum, and its subsequent decrease reflects mostly the time evolution of the wind properties. Comparison to gamma-ray data points to a typical scenario where an ejecta of mass 10-5-10-4 M⊙ expands in a homologous way with a maximum velocity of 1000-2000 km s-1, followed within a day by a wind with a velocity values of which result in the majority of best-fit models having gamma-ray spectra with a high-energy turnover below 10 GeV. Our typical model is able to account for the main

  17. Shock Acceleration of Electrons and Synchrotron Emission from the Dynamical Ejecta of Neutron Star Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Maeda, Keiichi; Kawanaka, Norita

    2018-05-01

    Neutron star mergers (NSMs) eject energetic subrelativistic dynamical ejecta into circumbinary media. Analogous to supernovae and supernova remnants, the NSM dynamical ejecta are expected to produce nonthermal emission by electrons accelerated at a shock wave. In this paper, we present the expected radio and X-ray signals by this mechanism, taking into account nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) and magnetic field amplification. We suggest that the NSM is unique as a DSA site, where the seed relativistic electrons are abundantly provided by the decays of r-process elements. The signal is predicted to peak at a few 100–1000 days after the merger, determined by the balance between the decrease of the number of seed electrons and the increase of the dissipated kinetic energy, due to the shock expansion. While the resulting flux can ideally reach the maximum flux expected from near-equipartition, the available kinetic energy dissipation rate of the NSM ejecta limits the detectability of such a signal. It is likely that the radio and X-ray emission are overwhelmed by other mechanisms (e.g., an off-axis jet) for an observer placed in a jet direction (i.e., for GW170817). However, for an off-axis observer, to be discovered once a number of NSMs are identified, the dynamical ejecta component is predicted to dominate the nonthermal emission. While the detection of this signal is challenging even with near-future facilities, this potentially provides a robust probe of the creation of r-process elements in NSMs.

  18. Spectral and interferometric observation of four emission nebulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozinskaya, T.A.; Klement'eva, A.Yu.; Zhukov, G.V.; Shenavrin, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    Results of spectrophotometric and interferometric observations of four emission nebulae are presented; electron temperature Te and electron density Ne are estimated; mean beam velocities and parameters of the internal motion in the nebylae are determined. The following objects have been investigated: 1) a bright compact nebulae of unknown nature 2.5 in size which is identified with the non-thermal radiosource G6.4-0.5 in the region W28; 2) nebulae RCW171 5' in size which is identified with the radiosource G23.1+0.6; 3) the nebulae Simeiz 34/Sharpless 261/d 1950 =6sup(h)05sup(m), sigma 1950 =+15 deg 49'; its diameter is approximately 30 an extensive complex of bright emission fibres in the nebulae Swan, which are partially projected into a possible remainder of the outburst of a supernova W63; L 1950 =20sup(h)17sup(m); S 1950 =45 deg 30' its diameter is approximately 1 deg 5

  19. Observations of the 10 micrometer natural laser emission from the mesospheres of Mars and Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deming, D.; Espenak, F.; Jennings, D.; Kostiuk, T.; Mumma, M.J.

    1983-06-01

    Observations of the total flux and center to limb dependence of the nonthermal emission occurring in the cores of the 9.4 and 10.4 micrometers CO2 bands on Mars are compared to a theoretical model based on this mechanism. The model successfully reproduces the observed center to limb dependence of this emission, to within the limits imposed by the spatial resolution of the observations of Mars and Venus. The observed flux from Mars agrees closely with the prediction of the model the flux observed from Venus is 74% of the flux predicted by the model. This emission is used to obtain the kinetic temperatures of the Martian and Venusian mesospheres. For Mars near 70 km altitude, a rotational temperature analysis using five lines gives T 135 + or - 20 K. The frequency width of the emission is also analyzed to derive a temperature of 126 + or - 6 K. In the case of the Venusian mesosphere near 109 km, the frequency wid