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Sample records for pulsar timing array

  1. Pulsar Timing Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, the use of an ensemble of radio pulsars to constrain the characteristic strain caused by a stochastic gravitational wave background has advanced the cause of detection of very low frequency gravitational waves significantly. This electromagnetic means of gravitational wave detection, called Pulsar Timing Array(PTA), is reviewed in this article. The principle of operation of PTA, the current operating PTAs and their status is presented along-with a discussion of the main ch...

  2. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, G

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project are to 1) make a direct detection of gravitational waves, 2) improve the solar system planetary ephemeris and 3) develop a pulsar-based time scale. In this article we describe the project, explain how the data are collected and processed and describe current research. Our current data sets are able to place an upper bound on the gravitational wave background that is the most stringent to date.

  3. The Future of Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stappers, B. W.

    Significant advances have been made in the sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays for the detection of gravitational waves in the last decade. This presentation looked forward to consider where the development of pulsar timing arrays might go as we head towards the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and then beyond. I reviewed where progress needs to be made in terms of sensitivity to gravitational waves, including improvements to existing observing approaches and new telescopes such as MeerKAT and FAST and techniques like LEAP. The dramatic increase in the number of millisecond pulsars is presented and how that might affect progress towards a first detection is discussed. Developments in analytic techniques were also discussed, including the removal of interstellar medium effects, red noise and pulse profile variations. A summary of how the SKA can contribute through an increased millisecond pulsar population and pulsar timing sensitivity was presented. With the likelihood that the SKA will implement some form of Key Science Project approach, some ideas of how will this affect how the International Pulsar Timing Array effort and how it might evolve into a KSP were discussed.

  4. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array Project

    CERN Document Server

    Manchester, R N; Bailes, M; Coles, W A; van Straten, W; Keith, M J; Shannon, R M; Bhat, N D R; Brown, A; Burke-Spolaor, S G; Champion, D J; Chaudhary, A; Edwards, R T; Hampson, G; Hotan, A W; Jameson, A; Jenet, F A; Kesteven, M J; Khoo, J; Kocz, J; Maciesiak, K; Oslowski, S; Ravi, V; Reynolds, J R; Sarkissian, J M; Verbiest, J P W; Wen, Z L; Wilson, W E; Yardley, D; Yan, W M; You, X P

    2012-01-01

    A "pulsar timing array" (PTA), in which observations of a large sample of pulsars spread across the celestial sphere are combined, allows investigation of "global" phenomena such as a background of gravitational waves or instabilities in atomic timescales that produce correlated timing residuals in the pulsars of the array. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) is an implementation of the PTA concept based on observations with the Parkes 64-m radio telescope. A sample of 20 millisecond pulsars is being observed at three radio-frequency bands, 50cm (~700 MHz), 20cm (~1400 MHz) and 10cm (~3100 MHz), with observations at intervals of 2 - 3 weeks. Regular observations commenced in early 2005. This paper describes the systems used for the PPTA observations and data processing, including calibration and timing analysis. The strategy behind the choice of pulsars, observing parameters and analysis methods is discussed. Results are presented for PPTA data in the three bands taken between 2005 March and 2011 March. For...

  5. Search for Millisecond Pulsars for the Pulsar Timing Array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, S.

    2012-03-01

    pulsar and Earth locations, as well as anywhere along the line­of­sight from the Earth and each of the pulsars. This in turn produces a modulation in the rhythm of the TOAs of the pulses from all the pulsars, with the variation in the TOAs having a strength which is proportional to the amplitude of the GW and a periodicity related to the frequency of the GW. Of course if they are caused by a common physical phenomenon (like a passing­by GW), these variations of the TOAs are expected to be somehow correlated between the various pulsars, allowing us to disentangle this effect from other effects which could mimic the occurrence of such modulation, like intrinsic irregularities in the rotation of a pulsar, changing interstellar medium along the line of sight, error in the reference clocks used for determining the TOAs and so on.The consideration of the aforementioned possible sources of additional effects which could mask the signature of a genuine GW shows that a safe direct detection of a GW cannot involve the observation and timing of a single pulsar. Instead, it has been theoretically shown that high precision timing over a 5­10 years data­span of a network of suitable MSPs forming a so­ called Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) ­ in which the pulsars are used as the endpoints of arms of a huge cosmic GW detector ­ would allow us to overcome the previous problems and open the possibility of a direct detection of GWs. In particular such apparatus is able to detect GWs in the frequency range between 10 ­9 and 10­7 Hz, with the best sensitivity around the nanoHz. Given the frequency range of operation, the most favorable source of GWs for a PTA appears to be the cosmological background of GWs produced by the coalescence of supermassive binary black­holes in the early stages of the Universe evolution, at redshift around 1­2. In order to set up a suitable PTA it is necessary on one hand to search for new MSPs having the required clock stability and

  6. Detecting nanohertz gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Xing-Jiang; Hobbs, George; Manchester, Richard N; Shannon, Ryan M

    2015-01-01

    Complementary to ground-based laser interferometers, pulsar timing array experiments are being carried out to search for nanohertz gravitational waves. Using the world's most powerful radio telescopes, three major international collaborations have collected $\\sim$10-year high precision timing data for tens of millisecond pulsars. In this paper we give an overview on pulsar timing experiments, gravitational wave detection in the nanohertz regime, and recent results obtained by various timing array projects.

  7. Gravitational wave detection and data analysis for pulsar timing arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haasteren, Rutger van

    2011-01-01

    Long-term precise timing of Galactic millisecond pulsars holds great promise for measuring long-period (months-to-years) astrophysical gravitational waves. In this work we develop a Bayesian data analysis method for projects called pulsar timing arrays; projects aimed to detect these gravitational w

  8. Pulsar timing noise and the minimum observation time to detect gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Lasky, Paul D; Ravi, Vikram; Hobbs, George

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays to gravitational waves is, at some level, limited by timing noise. Red timing noise - the stochastic wandering of pulse arrival times with a red spectrum - is prevalent in slow-spinning pulsars and has been identified in many millisecond pulsars. Phenomenological models of timing noise, such as from superfluid turbulence, suggest that the timing noise spectrum plateaus below some critical frequency, $f_c$, potentially aiding the hunt for gravitational waves. We examine this effect for individual pulsars by calculating minimum observation times, $T_{\\rm min}(f_c)$, over which the gravitational wave signal becomes larger than the timing noise plateau. We do this in two ways: 1) in a model-independent manner, and 2) by using the superfluid turbulence model for timing noise as an example to illustrate how neutron star parameters can be constrained. We show that the superfluid turbulence model can reproduce the data qualitatively from a number of pulsars observed as part of ...

  9. Towards Robust Gravitational Wave Detection with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Cornish, Neil J

    2015-01-01

    Precision timing of highly stable milli-second pulsars is a promising technique for the detection of very low frequency sources of gravitational waves. In any single pulsar, a stochastic gravitational wave signal appears as an additional source of timing noise that can be absorbed by the noise model, and so it is only by considering the coherent response across a network of pulsars that the signal can be distinguished from other sources of noise. In the limit where there are many gravitational wave sources in the sky, or many pulsars in the array, the signals produce a unique tensor correlation pattern that depends only on the angular separation between each pulsar pair. It is this distinct fingerprint that is used to search for gravitational waves using pulsar timing arrays. Here we consider how the prospects for detection are diminished when the statistical isotropy of the timing array or the gravitational wave signal is broken by having a finite number of pulsars and a finite number of sources. We find the...

  10. The International Pulsar Timing Array project: using pulsars as a gravitational wave detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobbs, G.; Archibald, A.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Backer, D.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N.D.R.; Burgay, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Champion, D.; Cognard, I.; Coles, W.; Cordes, J.; Demorest, P.; Desvignes, G.; Ferdman, R.D.; Finn, L.; Freire, P.; Gonzalez, M.; Hessels, J.; Hotan, A.; Janssen, G.; Jenet, F.; Jessner, A.; Jordan, C.; Kaspi, V.; Kramer, M.; Kondratiev, V.; Lazio, J.; Lazaridis, K.; Lee, K.J.; Levin, Y.; Lommen, A.; Lorimer, D.; Lynch, R.; Lyne, A.; Manchester, R.; McLaughlin, M.; Nice, D.; Oslowski, S.; Pilia, M.; Possenti, A.; Purver, M.; Ransom, S.; Reynolds, J.; Sanidas, S.; Sarkissian, J.; Sesana, A.; Shannon, R.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I.; Stappers, B.; Stinebring, D.; Theureau, G.; van Haasteren, R.; van Straten, W.; Verbiest, J.P.W.; Yardley, D.R.B.; You, X.P.

    2010-01-01

    The International Pulsar Timing Array project combines observations of pulsars from both northern and southern hemisphere observatories with the main aim of detecting ultra-low frequency (similar to 10(-9)-10(-8) Hz) gravitational waves. Here we introduce the project, review the methods used to sear

  11. Towards robust gravitational wave detection with pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Neil J.; Sampson, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Precision timing of highly stable millisecond pulsars is a promising technique for the detection of very low frequency sources of gravitational waves. In any single pulsar, a stochastic gravitational wave signal appears as an additional source of timing noise that can be absorbed by the noise model, and so it is only by considering the coherent response across a network of pulsars that the signal can be distinguished from other sources of noise. In the limit where there are many gravitational wave sources in the sky, or many pulsars in the array, the signals produce a unique tensor correlation pattern that depends only on the angular separation between each pulsar pair. It is this distinct fingerprint that is used to search for gravitational waves using pulsar timing arrays. Here we consider how the prospects for detection are diminished when the statistical isotropy of the timing array or the gravitational wave signal is broken by having a finite number of pulsars and a finite number of sources. We find the standard tensor-correlation analysis to be remarkably robust, with a mild impact on detectability compared to the isotropic limit. Only when there are very few sources and very few pulsars does the standard analysis begin to fail. Having established that the tensor correlations are a robust signature for detection, we study the use of "sky scrambles" to break the correlations as a way to increase confidence in a detection. This approach is analogous to the use of "time slides" in the analysis of data from ground-based interferometric detectors.

  12. Timing analysis for 20 millisecond pulsars in the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    CERN Document Server

    Reardon, D J; Coles, W; Levin, Y; Keith, M J; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Kerr, M; Lasky, P D; Manchester, R N; Osłowski, S; Ravi, V; Shannon, R M; van Straten, W; Toomey, L; Wang, J; Wen, L; You, X P; Zhu, X -J

    2015-01-01

    We present timing models for 20 millisecond pulsars in the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array. The precision of the parameter measurements in these models has been improved over earlier results by using longer data sets and modelling the non-stationary noise. We describe a new noise modelling procedure and demonstrate its effectiveness using simulated data. Our methodology includes the addition of annual dispersion measure (DM) variations to the timing models of some pulsars. We present the first significant parallax measurements for PSRs J1024-0719, J1045-4509, J1600-3053, J1603-7202, and J1730-2304, as well as the first significant measurements of some post-Keplerian orbital parameters in six binary pulsars, caused by kinematic effects. Improved Shapiro delay measurements have resulted in much improved pulsar mass measurements, particularly for PSRs J0437-4715 and J1909-3744 with $M_p=1.44\\pm0.07$ $M_\\odot$ and $M_p=1.47\\pm0.03$ $M_\\odot$ respectively. The improved orbital period-derivative measurement for PSR J043...

  13. Pulsar timing arrays: the promise of gravitational wave detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommen, Andrea N

    2015-12-01

    We describe the history, methods, tools, and challenges of using pulsars to detect gravitational waves. Pulsars act as celestial clocks detecting gravitational perturbations in space-time at wavelengths of light-years. The field is poised to make its first detection of nanohertz gravitational waves in the next 10 years. Controversies remain over how far we can reduce the noise in the pulsars, how many pulsars should be in the array, what kind of source we will detect first, and how we can best accommodate our large bandwidth systems. We conclude by considering the important question of how to plan for a post-detection era, beyond the first detection of gravitational waves.

  14. The Feasibility of Using Black Widow Pulsars in Pulsar Timing Arrays for Gravitational Wave Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Bochenek, Christopher; Demorest, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In the past five years, approximately one third of the 65 pulsars discovered by radio observations of Fermi unassociated sources are black widow pulsars (BWPs). BWPs are binary millisecond pulsars with companion masses ranging from 0.01-0.1 solar masses which often exhibit radio eclipses. The bloated companions in BWP systems exert small torques on the system causing the orbit to change on small but measurable time scales. Because adding parameters to a timing model reduces sensitivity to a gravitational wave (GW) signal, the need to fit many orbital frequency derivatives to the timing data is potentially problematic for using BWPs to detect GWs with pulsar timing arrays. Using simulated data with up to four orbital frequency derivatives, we show that fitting for orbital frequency derivatives absorbs less than 5% of the low frequency spectrum expected from a stochastic gravitational wave background signal. Furthermore, this result does not change with orbital period. Therefore, we suggest that if timing syste...

  15. Gravitational-Wave Detection and Astrophysics with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Burke-Spolaor, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    We have begun an exciting era for gravitational wave detection, as several world-leading experiments are breaching the threshold of anticipated signal strengths. Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are pan-Galactic gravitational wave detectors that are already cutting into the expected strength of gravitational waves from cosmic strings and binary supermassive black holes in the nHz-$\\mu$Hz gravitational wave band. These limits are leading to constraints on the evolutionary state of the Universe. Here, we provide a broad review of this field, from how pulsars are used as tools for detection, to astrophysical sources of uncertainty in the signals PTAs aim to see, to the primary current challenge areas for PTA work. This review aims to provide an up-to-date reference point for new parties interested in the field of gravitational wave detection via pulsar timing.

  16. Versatile Directional Searches for Gravitational Waves with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Madison, D R; Hobbs, G; Coles, W; Shannon, R M; Wang, J; Tiburzi, C; Manchester, R N; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Dempsey, J; Keith, M; Kerr, M; Lasky, P; Levin, Y; Oslowski, S; Ravi, V; Reardon, D; Rosado, P; Spiewak, R; van Straten, W; Toomey, L; Wen, L; You, X

    2015-01-01

    By regularly monitoring the most stable millisecond pulsars over many years, pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are positioned to detect and study correlations in the timing behaviour of those pulsars. Gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are an exciting potentially detectable source of such correlations. We describe a straight-forward technique by which a PTA can be "phased-up" to form time series of the two polarisation modes of GWs coming from a particular direction of the sky. Our technique requires no assumptions regarding the time-domain behaviour of a GW signal. This method has already been used to place stringent bounds on GWs from individual SMBHBs in circular orbits. Here, we describe the methodology and demonstrate the versatility of the technique in searches for a wide variety of GW signals including bursts with unmodeled waveforms. Using the first six years of data from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we conduct an all-sky search for a detectable excess of GW power fr...

  17. Versatile directional searches for gravitational waves with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, D. R.; Zhu, X.-J.; Hobbs, G.; Coles, W.; Shannon, R. M.; Wang, J. B.; Tiburzi, C.; Manchester, R. N.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Dai, S.; Dempsey, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Lasky, P.; Levin, Y.; Osłowski, S.; Ravi, V.; Reardon, D.; Rosado, P.; Spiewak, R.; van Straten, W.; Toomey, L.; Wen, L.; You, X.

    2016-02-01

    By regularly monitoring the most stable millisecond pulsars over many years, pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are positioned to detect and study correlations in the timing behaviour of those pulsars. Gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are an exciting potentially detectable source of such correlations. We describe a straightforward technique by which a PTA can be `phased-up' to form time series of the two polarization modes of GWs coming from a particular direction of the sky. Our technique requires no assumptions regarding the time-domain behaviour of a GW signal. This method has already been used to place stringent bounds on GWs from individual SMBHBs in circular orbits. Here, we describe the methodology and demonstrate the versatility of the technique in searches for a wide variety of GW signals including bursts with unmodelled waveforms. Using the first six years of data from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we conduct an all-sky search for a detectable excess of GW power from any direction. For the lines of sight to several nearby massive galaxy clusters, we carry out a more detailed search for GW bursts with memory, which are distinct signatures of SMBHB mergers. In all cases, we find that the data are consistent with noise.

  18. Detection and localization of continuous gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays: the role of pulsar terms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Xingjiang; Xiong, Jie; Xu, Yanjun; Wang, Yan; Mohanty, Soumya D; Hobbs, George; Manchester, Richard N

    2016-01-01

    A pulsar timing array is a Galactic-scale detector of nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs). Its target signals contain two components: the `Earth term' and the `pulsar term' corresponding to GWs incident on the Earth and pulsar respectively. In this work we present a Frequentist method for the detection and localization of continuous waves that takes into account the pulsar term and is significantly faster than existing methods. We investigate the role of pulsar terms by comparing a full-signal search with an Earth-term-only search for non-evolving black hole binaries. By applying the method to synthetic data sets, we find that (i) a full-signal search can slightly improve the detection probability (by about five percent); (ii) sky localization is biased if only Earth terms are searched for and the inclusion of pulsar terms is critical to remove such a bias; (iii) in the case of strong detections (with signal-to-noise ratio $\\gtrsim$ 30), it may be possible to improve pulsar distance estimation through GW meas...

  19. High-precision timing of 42 millisecond pulsars with the European Pulsar Timing Array

    CERN Document Server

    Desvignes, G; Lentati, L; Verbiest, J P W; Champion, D J; Stappers, B W; Janssen, G H; Lazarus, P; Osłowski, S; Babak, S; Bassa, C G; Brem, P; Burgay, M; Cognard, I; Gair, J R; Graikou, E; Guillemot, L; Hessels, J W T; Jessner, A; Jordan, C; Karuppusamy, R; Kramer, M; Lassus, A; Lazaridis, K; Lee, K J; Liu, K; Lyne, A G; McKee, J; Mingarelli, C M F; Perrodin, D; Petiteau, A; Possenti, A; Purver, M B; Rosado, P A; Sanidas, S; Sesana, A; Shaifullah, G; Smits, R; Taylor, S R; Theureau, G; Tiburzi, C; van Haasteren, R; Vecchio, A

    2016-01-01

    We report on the high-precision timing of 42 radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) observed by the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA). This EPTA Data Release 1.0 extends up to mid-2014 and baselines range from 7-18 years. It forms the basis for the stochastic gravitational-wave background, anisotropic background, and continuous-wave limits recently presented by the EPTA elsewhere. The Bayesian timing analysis performed with TempoNest yields the detection of several new parameters: seven parallaxes, nine proper motions and, in the case of six binary pulsars, an apparent change of the semi-major axis. We find the NE2001 Galactic electron density model to be a better match to our parallax distances (after correction from the Lutz-Kelker bias) than the M2 and M3 models by Schnitzeler (2012). However, we measure an average uncertainty of 80\\% (fractional) for NE2001, three times larger than what is typically assumed in the literature. We revisit the transverse velocity distribution for a set of 19 isolated and 57 bina...

  20. Harmonic space analysis of pulsar timing array redshift maps

    CERN Document Server

    Roebber, Elinore

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new framework for treating the angular information in the pulsar timing array response to a gravitational wave background based on standard cosmic microwave background techniques. We calculate the angular power spectrum of the all-sky gravitational redshift pattern induced at the earth for both a single bright source of gravitational radiation and a statistically isotropic, unpolarized Gaussian random gravitational wave background. The angular power spectrum is the harmonic transform of the Hellings & Downs curve. We use the power spectrum to examine the expected variance in the Hellings & Downs curve in both cases. Finally, we discuss the extent to which pulsar timing arrays are sensitive to the angular power spectrum and find that the power spectrum sensitivity is dominated by the quadrupole anisotropy of the gravitational redshift map.

  1. Tracking Interstellar Space Weather Toward Timing-Array Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Ord, S. M.; Tremblay, S. E.; Shannon, R. M.; van Straten, W.; Kaplan, D. L.; Macquart, J.-P.; Kirsten, F.

    2017-01-01

    The recent LIGO detection of milli-Hertz gravitational wave (GW) signals from black-hole merger events has further reinforced the important role of Pulsar timing array (PTA) experiments in the GW astronomy. PTAs exploit the clock-like stability of fast-spinning millisecond pulsars (MSPs) to make a direct detection of ultra-low frequency (nano-Hertz) gravitational waves, and this is a key science objective for the SKA. The science enabled by PTAs is highly complementary to that possible with LIGO-like detectors. PTA efforts of the past few years clearly suggest that interstellar propagation effects on pulsar signals may ultimately limit the detection sensitivity of PTAs if they are not accurately measured and corrected for in timing measurements. Interstellar medium (ISM) effects are much stronger at lower radio frequencies and therefore the MWA presents an exciting and unique opportunity to calibrate interstellar propagation delays. This will potentially lead to enhanced sensitivity and scientific impact of PTA projects. Since our demonstration early this year of our ability to form a coherent (tied-array) beam by re-processing the recorded VCS data (Bhat et al. 2016), we have successfully ported the full processing pipeline on to the Galaxy cluster of Pawsey and also demonstrated the value of high-sensitivity multi-band pulsar observations that are now possible with the MWA. Here we propose further observations of three most promising PTA pulsars that will be nightly objects in the 2017A period. The main science driver is to characterise the nature of the turbulent ISM through high-quality scintillation and dispersion studies including the investigation of chromatic (frequency-dependent) DMs. Success of these efforts will define the breadth and scope of a more ambitious program in the future, bringing in a new science niche for MWA and SKA-low.

  2. Including the pulsar-term in continuous gravitational-wave searches using pulsar timing arrays: a blessing and a curse

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Stephen; Gair, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We describe several new techniques which accelerate Bayesian searches for continuous gravitational-wave emission from supermassive black-hole binaries using pulsar timing arrays. These techniques mitigate the problematic increase of search-dimensionality with the size of the pulsar array which arises from having to include an extra parameter per pulsar as the array is expanded. This extra parameter corresponds to searching over the phase of the gravitational-wave as it propagates past each pulsar so that we can coherently include the pulsar-term in our search strategies. Our techniques make the analysis tractable with powerful evidence-evaluation packages like MultiNest. We find good agreement of our techniques with the parameter-estimation and Bayes factor evaluation performed with full signal templates, and conclude that these techniques make excellent first-cut tools for detection and characterisation of continuous gravitational-wave signals with pulsar timing arrays. Crucially, at low to moderate signal-t...

  3. The noise properties of 42 millisecond pulsars from the European Pulsar Timing Array and their impact on gravitational wave searches

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, R N; Lentati, L; Desvignes, G; Champion, D J; Verbiest, J P W; Janssen, G H; Stappers, B W; Kramer, M; Lazarus, P; Possenti, A; Tiburzi, C; Perrodin, D; Osłowski, S; Babak, S; Bassa, C G; Brem, P; Burgay, M; Cognard, I; Gair, J R; Graikou, E; Guillemot, L; Hessels, J W T; Karuppusamy, R; Lassus, A; Liu, K; McKee, J; Mingarelli, C M F; Petiteau, A; Purver, M B; Rosado, P A; Sanidas, S; Sesana, A; Shaifullah, G; Smits, R; Taylor, S R; Theureau, G; van Haasteren, R; Vecchio, A

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of Pulsar Timing Arrays to gravitational waves depends critically on the noise present in the individual pulsar timing data. Noise may be either intrinsic or extrinsic to the pulsar. Intrinsic sources of noise might come from rotational instabilities, for example. Extrinsic sources of noise include contributions from physical processes which are not sufficiently well modelled, for example, dispersion and scattering effects, analysis errors and instrumental instabilities. We present the results from a noise analysis for 42 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) observed with the European Pulsar Timing Array. For characterising the low-frequency, stochastic and achromatic noise component, or "timing noise", we employ two methods, based on Bayesian and frequentist statistics. For 25 MSPs, we achieve statistically significant measurements of their timing noise parameters and find that the two methods give consistent results. For the remaining 17 MSPs, we place upper limits on the timing noise amplitude at the...

  4. The European Pulsar Timing Array: current efforts and a LEAP toward the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdman, R D; Cognard, I; Desvignes, G [Station de Radioastronomie de Nancay, Observatoire de Paris, 18330 Nancay (France); Van Haasteren, R [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, PO Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Bassa, C G; Janssen, G H; Jordan, C; Keane, E F; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Burgay, M; Corongiu, A; D' Amico, N; Pilia, M; Possenti, A [INAF-Osservatorio di Cagliari, Ioc Poggio dei Pini, strada 54, 09012, Capoterra (Italy); Hessels, J W T [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Jessner, A; Karuppusamy, R; Lazaridis, K [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Levin, Y, E-mail: robert.ferdman@manchester.ac.u [Loretz Institute, Leiden University, PO Box 9506, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2010-04-21

    The European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) is a multi-institutional, multi-telescope collaboration, with the goal of using high-precision pulsar timing to directly detect gravitational waves. In this paper we discuss the EPTA member telescopes, current achieved timing precision and near-future goals. We report a preliminary upper limit to the amplitude of a gravitational wave background. We also discuss the Large European Array for Pulsars, in which the five major European telescopes involved in pulsar timing will be combined to provide a coherent array that will give similar sensitivity to the Arecibo radio telescope, and larger sky coverage.

  5. The International Pulsar Timing Array: First Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Verbiest, J P W; Hobbs, G; van Haasteren, R; Demorest, P B; Janssen, G H; Wang, J -B; Desvignes, G; Caballero, R N; Keith, M J; Champion, D J; Arzoumanian, Z; Babak, S; Bassa, C G; Bhat, N D R; Brazier, A; Brem, P; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Chamberlin, S J; Chatterjee, S; Christy, B; Cognard, I; Cordes, J M; Dai, S; Dolch, T; Ellis, J A; Ferdman, R D; Fonseca, E; Gair, J R; Garver-Daniels, N E; Gentile, P; Gonzalez, M E; Graikou, E; Guillemot, L; Hessels, J W T; Jones, G; Karuppusamy, R; Kerr, M; Kramer, M; Lam, M T; Lasky, P D; Lassus, A; Lazarus, P; Lazio, T J W; Lee, K J; Levin, L; Liu, K; Lynch, R S; Lyne, A G; Mckee, J; McLaughlin, M A; McWilliams, S T; Madison, D R; Manchester, R N; Mingarelli, C M F; Nice, D J; Oslowski, S; Palliyaguru, N T; Pennucci, T T; Perera, B B P; Perrodin, D; Possenti, A; Petiteau, A; Ransom, S M; Reardon, D; Rosado, P A; Sanidas, S A; Sesana, A; Shaifullah, G; Shannon, R M; Siemens, X; Simon, J; Smits, R; Spiewak, R; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Stinebring, D R; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J K; Taylor, S R; Theureau, G; Tiburzi, C; Toomey, L; Vallisneri, M; van Straten, W; Vecchio, A; Wang, Y; Wen, L; You, X P; Zhu, W W; Zhu, X -J

    2016-01-01

    The highly stable spin of neutron stars can be exploited for a variety of (astro-)physical investigations. In particular arrays of pulsars with rotational periods of the order of milliseconds can be used to detect correlated signals such as those caused by gravitational waves. Three such "Pulsar Timing Arrays" (PTAs) have been set up around the world over the past decades and collectively form the "International" PTA (IPTA). In this paper, we describe the first joint analysis of the data from the three regional PTAs, i.e. of the first IPTA data set. We describe the available PTA data, the approach presently followed for its combination and suggest improvements for future PTA research. Particular attention is paid to subtle details (such as underestimation of measurement uncertainty and long-period noise) that have often been ignored but which become important in this unprecedentedly large and inhomogeneous data set. We identify and describe in detail several factors that complicate IPTA research and provide r...

  6. Pulsar Timing Array Analysis for Black Hole Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Cornish, Neil J

    2013-01-01

    An astrophysical population of supermassive black hole binaries is thought to be the strongest source of gravitational waves in the frequency range covered by Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs). A potential cause for concern is that the standard cross-correlation method used in PTA data analysis assumes that the signals are isotropically distributed and Gaussian random, while the signals from a black hole population are likely to be anisotropic and deterministic. Here we argue that while the conventional analysis is not optimal, it is not hopeless either, as the standard Hellings-Downs correlation curve turns out to hold for point sources, and the small effective number of signal samples blurs the distinction between Gaussian and deterministic signals. Possible improvements to the standard cross-correlation analysis that account for the anisotropy of the signal are discussed.

  7. Pulsar Timing Arrays and Gravity Tests in the Radiative Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, K J

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on testing gravity theories in the radiative regime using pulsar timing array observations. After reviewing current techniques to measure the dispersion and alternative polarization of gravitational waves, we extend the framework to the most general situations, where the combinations of a massive graviton and alternative polarization modes are considered. The atlas of the Hellings-Downs functions is completed by the new calculations for these dispersive alternative polarization modes. We find that each mode and corresponding graviton mass introduce characteristic features in the Hellings-Downs function. Thus, in principal, we can not only detect each polarization mode, measure the corresponding graviton mass, but also discriminate the different scenarios. In this way, we can test gravity theories in the radiative regime in a generalized fashion, and such method is a direct experiment, where one can address the gauge symmetry of the gravity theories in their linearised limits. Although ...

  8. The stochastic background: scaling laws and time to detection for pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Siemens, Xavier; Jenet, Fredrick; Romano, Joseph D

    2013-01-01

    We derive scaling laws for the signal-to-noise ratio of the optimal cross-correlation statistic, and show that the large power-law increase of the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of the the observation time $T$ that is usually assumed holds only at early times. After enough time has elapsed, pulsar timing arrays enter a new regime where the signal to noise only scales as $\\sqrt{T}$. In addition, in this regime the quality of the pulsar timing data and the cadence become relatively un-important. This occurs because the lowest frequencies of the pulsar timing residuals become gravitational-wave dominated. Pulsar timing arrays enter this regime more quickly than one might naively suspect. For T=10 yr observations and typical stochastic background amplitudes, pulsars with residual RMSs of less than about $1\\,\\mu$s are already in that regime. The best strategy to increase the detectability of the background in this regime is to increase the number of pulsars in the array. We also perform realistic simulations ...

  9. Pulsar Timing Array Based Search for Supermassive Black Hole Binaries in the Square Kilometer Array Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Mohanty, Soumya D

    2017-04-14

    The advent of next generation radio telescope facilities, such as the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), will usher in an era where a pulsar timing array (PTA) based search for gravitational waves (GWs) will be able to use hundreds of well timed millisecond pulsars rather than the few dozens in existing PTAs. A realistic assessment of the performance of such an extremely large PTA must take into account the data analysis challenge posed by an exponential increase in the parameter space volume due to the large number of so-called pulsar phase parameters. We address this problem and present such an assessment for isolated supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) searches using a SKA era PTA containing 10^{3} pulsars. We find that an all-sky search will be able to confidently detect nonevolving sources with a redshifted chirp mass of 10^{10}  M_{⊙} out to a redshift of about 28 (corresponding to a rest-frame chirp mass of 3.4×10^{8}  M_{⊙}). We discuss the important implications that the large distance reach of a SKA era PTA has on GW observations from optically identified SMBHB candidates. If no SMBHB detections occur, a highly unlikely scenario in the light of our results, the sky-averaged upper limit on strain amplitude will be improved by about 3 orders of magnitude over existing limits.

  10. European Pulsar Timing Array limits on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentati, L.; Taylor, S.R.; Mingarelli, C.M.F.; Sesana, A.; Sanidas, S.A.; Vecchio, A.; Caballero, R.N.; Lee, K.J.; van Haasteren, R.; Babak, S.; Bassa, C.G.; Brem, P.; Burgay, M.; Champion, D.J.; Cognard, I.; Desvignes, G.; Gair, J.R.; Guillemot, L.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Janssen, G.H.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Lassus, A.; Lazarus, P.; Liu, K.; Osłowski, S.; Perrodin, D.; Petiteau, A.; Possenti, A.; Purver, M.B.; Rosado, P.A.; Smits, R.; Stappers, B.; Theureau, G.; Tiburzi, C.; Verbiest, J.P.W.

    2015-01-01

    We present new limits on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background (GWB) using a six pulsar data set spanning 18 yr of observations from the 2015 European Pulsar Timing Array data release. Performing a Bayesian analysis, we fit simultaneously for the intrinsic noise parameters for each p

  11. Coordinated Observations with Pulsar Timing Arrays and ISS-Lobster

    CERN Document Server

    Schnittman, Jeremy D

    2014-01-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries are the strongest gravitational wave sources in the universe. The systems most likely to be observed with pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) will have particularly high masses ($\\gtrsim 10^9 M_\\odot$), long periods ($T_{\\rm orb} \\gtrsim 1$ yr), and be in the local universe ($z \\lesssim 1$). These features are also the most favorable for bright electromagnetic counterparts, which should be easily observable with existing ground- and space-based telescopes. Wide-field X-ray observatories such as ISS-Lobster will provide independent candidates that can be used to lower the threshold for PTA detections of resolvable binary sources. The primary challenge lies in correctly identifying and characterizing binary sources with long orbital periods, as opposed to "normal" active galactic nuclei (AGN) hosting single black holes. Here too ISS-Lobster will provide valuable new understanding into the wide range of behaviors seen in AGN by vastly expanding our sample of X-ray light curves from accre...

  12. Search for the gravitational wave memory effect with the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jingbo; Wang, Na

    2012-01-01

    Gravitational wave bursts produced by supermassive binary black hole mergers will leave a persistent imprint on the space-time metric. Such gravitational wave memory signals are detectable by pulsar timing arrays as a glitch event that would seem to occur simultaneously for all pulsars. In this paper, we describe an initial algorithm which can be used to search for gravitational wave memory signals. We apply this algorithm to the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array data set. No significant gravitational wave memory signal is founded in the data set.

  13. A CMB-based approach to mapping gravitational-wave backgrounds: application to pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Gair, Jonathan R; Taylor, Stephen; Mingarelli, Chiara M F

    2014-01-01

    We describe an alternative approach to the analysis of gravitational-wave backgrounds, based on the formalism used to characterise the polarisation of the cosmic microwave background. An arbitrary background can be decomposed into modes whose angular dependence on the sky is given by gradients and curls of spherical harmonics. We derive the pulsar timing overlap reduction function for individual modes, which are given by simple combinations of spherical harmonics evaluated at the pulsar locations. We show how these can be used to recover the components of an arbitrary background, giving explicit results for both isotropic and anisotropic uncorrelated backgrounds. We also find that the response of a pulsar timing array to curl modes is identically zero, so half of the gravitational-wave sky will never be observed using pulsar timing, no matter how many pulsars are included in the array. An isotropic uncorrelated background can be accurately represented using only three components, and so a search of this type ...

  14. Searching for gravitational wave memory bursts with the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J B; Coles, W; Shannon, R M; Zhu, X J; Madison, D R; Kerr, M; Ravi, V; Keith, M J; Manchester, R N; Levin, Y; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Oslowski, S; van Straten, W; Toomey, L; Wang, N; Wen, L

    2014-01-01

    Anisotropic bursts of gravitational radiation produced by events such as super-massive black hole mergers leave permanent imprints on space. Such gravitational wave "memory" (GWM) signals are, in principle, detectable through pulsar timing as sudden changes in the apparent pulse frequency of a pulsar. If an array of pulsars is monitored as a GWM signal passes over the Earth, the pulsars would simultaneously appear to change pulse frequency by an amount that varies with their sky position in a quadrupolar fashion. Here we describe a search algorithm for such events and apply the algorithm to approximately six years of data from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array. We find no GWM events and set an upper bound on the rate for events which could have been detected. We show, using simple models of black hole coalescence rates, that this non-detection is not unexpected.

  15. The effect of small inter-pulsar distance variations in stochastic gravitational wave background searches with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Mingarelli, Chiara M F

    2014-01-01

    One of the primary objectives for Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs) is to detect a stochastic background generated by the incoherent superposition of gravitational waves (GWs), in particular from the cosmic population of supermassive black hole binaries. Current stochastic background searches assume that pulsars in a PTA are separated from each other and the Earth by many GW wavelengths. As more millisecond pulsars are discovered and added to PTAs, some may be separated by only a few radiation wavelengths or less, resulting in correlated GW phase changes between close pulsars in the array. Here we investigate how PTA overlap reduction functions (ORFs), up to quadrupole order, are affected by these additional correlated phase changes, and how they are in turn affected by relaxing the assumption that all pulsars are equidistant from the solar system barycenter. We find that in the low frequency GW background limit of $f\\sim10^{-9}$~Hz, and for pulsars at varying distances from the Earth, that these additional correla...

  16. Effectiveness of Null Signal Sky Localization in Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq Hazboun, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    A null stream is constructed from the timing residuals of three pulsars by noting that the same source polarization amplitudes appear in the data stream from each pulsar. Linear combinations of a set of individual pulsar data streams can be shown to be a two-parameter family (the two sky position angles of the source) that can be minimized to determine the location of the source on the sky. Taking the product of a number of null streams allows for an even stronger localization of the gravitational wave's source; a large advantage in a PTA where there are more independent signals than other gravitational wave detectors. While a null stream contains the same information as any other data stream with the same number of pulsars, the statistics of a product of noisy signals is inherently different than for a sum of those same signals.A comparison of how null signal searches compare to other techniques for sky localization of PTA sources will be discussed, as well as an assessment of the types of searches for which the method may be useful.

  17. Constraints of relic gravitational waves by Pulsar Timing Array: Forecasts for the FAST and SKA projects

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Wen; You, Xiao-Peng; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of the pulsar timing residuals provides a direct way to detect relic gravitational waves at the frequency $f\\sim 1/{\\rm yr}$. In this paper, we investigate the constraints on the inflationary parameters, the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r$ and the tensor spectral index $n_t$, by the current and future Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs). We find that Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) in China and the planned Square Kilometer Array (SKA) projects have the fairly strong abilities to test the phantom-like inflationary models. If $r=0.1$, FAST could give the constraint on the spectral index $n_t<0.38$, and SKA gives $n_t<0.30$. While an observation with the total time T=20yr, the pulsar noise level $\\sigma_w=30$ns and the monitored pulsar number $n=200$, could even constrain $n_t<0.05$. These are much tighter than those inferred from the current results of Parkers Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) and European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA). Especially, by studying the effects of various o...

  18. Gravitational waves from resolvable massive black hole binary systems and observations with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Sesana, A; Volonteri, M

    2008-01-01

    Massive black holes are key components of the assembly and evolution of cosmic structures and a number of surveys are currently on-going or planned to probe the demographics of these objects and to gain insight into the relevant physical processes. Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs) currently provide the only means to observe gravitational radiation from massive black hole binary systems with masses >10^7 solar masses. The whole cosmic population produces a stochastic background that could be detectable with upcoming Pulsar Timing Arrays. Sources sufficiently close and/or massive generate gravitational radiation that significantly exceeds the level of the background and could be individually resolved. We consider a wide range of massive black hole binary assembly scenarios, we investigate the distribution of the main physical parameters of the sources, such as masses and redshift, and explore the consequences for Pulsar Timing Arrays observations. Depending on the specific massive black hole population model, we est...

  19. Detecting super-Nyquist-frequency gravitational waves using a pulsar timing array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shu-Xu; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-08-01

    The maximum frequency of gravitational waves (GWs) detectable with traditional pulsar timing methods is set by the Nyquist frequency ( f Ny) of the observation. Beyond this frequency, GWs leave no temporal-correlated signals; instead, they appear as white noise in the timing residuals. The variance of the GW-induced white noise is a function of the position of the pulsars relative to the GW source. By observing this unique functional form in the timing data, we propose that we can detect GWs of frequency > f Ny (super-Nyquist frequency GWs; SNFGWs). We demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method with simulated timing data. Using a selected dataset from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array data release 1 and the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves publicly available datasets, we try to detect the signals from single SNFGW sources. The result is consistent with no GW detection with 65.5% probability. An all-sky map of the sensitivity of the selected pulsar timing array to single SNFGW sources is generated, and the position of the GW source where the selected pulsar timing array is most sensitive to is λs = -0.82, βs = -1.03 (rad); the corresponding minimum GW strain is h = 6.31 × 10-11 at f = 1 × 10-5 Hz.

  20. The Sensitivity of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array to Individual Sources of Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Yardley, D R B; Jenet, F A; Verbiest, J P W; Wen, Z L; Manchester, R N; Coles, W A; van Straten, W; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D J; Hotan, A W; Sarkissian, J M

    2010-01-01

    We present the sensitivity of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array to gravitational waves emitted by individual super-massive black-hole binary systems in the early phases of coalescing at the cores of merged galaxies. Our analysis includes a detailed study of the effects of fitting a pulsar timing model to non-white timing residuals. Pulsar timing is sensitive at nanoHertz frequencies and hence complementary to LIGO and LISA. We place a sky-averaged constraint on the merger rate of nearby ($z < 0.6$) black-hole binaries in the early phases of coalescence with a chirp mass of $10^{10}\\,\\rmn{M}_\\odot$ of less than one merger every seven years. The prospects for future gravitational-wave astronomy of this type with the proposed Square Kilometre Array telescope are discussed.

  1. Observing the dynamics of supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingarelli, C M F; Grover, K; Sidery, T; Smith, R J E; Vecchio, A

    2012-08-24

    Pulsar timing arrays are a prime tool to study unexplored astrophysical regimes with gravitational waves. Here, we show that the detection of gravitational radiation from individually resolvable supermassive black hole binary systems can yield direct information about the masses and spins of the black holes, provided that the gravitational-wave-induced timing fluctuations both at the pulsar and at Earth are detected. This in turn provides a map of the nonlinear dynamics of the gravitational field and a new avenue to tackle open problems in astrophysics connected to the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes. We discuss the potential, the challenges, and the limitations of these observations.

  2. Gravitational wave astronomy of single sources with a pulsar timing array

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, K J; Kramer, M; Stappers, B W; Bassa, C G; Janssen, G H; Karuppusamy, R; Smits, R

    2011-01-01

    Abbreviated: We investigate the potential of detecting the gravitational wave from individual binary black hole systems using pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) and calculate the accuracy for determining the GW properties. This is done in a consistent analysis, which at the same time accounts for the measurement of the pulsar distances via the timing parallax. We find that, at low redshift, a PTA is able to detect the nano-Hertz GW from super massive black hole binary systems with masses of $\\sim10^8 - 10^{10}\\,M_{\\sun}$ less than $\\sim10^5$\\,years before the final merger, and those with less than $\\sim10^3 - 10^4$ years before merger may allow us to detect the evolution of binaries. We derive an analytical expression to describe the accuracy of a pulsar distance measurement via timing parallax. We consider five years of bi-weekly observations at a precision of 15\\,ns for close-by ($\\sim 0.5 - 1$\\,kpc) pulsars. Timing twenty pulsars would allow us to detect a GW source with an amplitude larger than $5\\times 10^{-17}...

  3. From Spin Noise to Systematics: Stochastic Processes in the First International Pulsar Timing Array Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Lentati, L; Coles, W A; Verbiest, J P W; van Haasteren, R; Ellis, J A; Caballero, R N; Manchester, R N; Arzoumanian, Z; Babak, S; Bassa, C G; Bhat, N D R; Brem, P; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D; Chatterjee, S; Cognard, I; Cordes, J M; Dai, S; Demorest, P; Desvignes, G; Dolch, T; Ferdman, R D; Fonseca, E; Gair, J R; Gonzalez, M E; Graikou, E; Guillemot, L; Hessels, J W T; Hobbs, G; Janssen, G H; Jones, G; Karuppusamy, R; Keith, M; Kerr, M; Kramer, M; Lam, M T; Lasky, P D; Lassus, A; Lazarus, P; Lazio, T J W; Lee, K J; Levin, L; Liu, K; Lynch, R S; Madison, D R; McKee, J; McLaughlin, M; McWilliams, S T; Mingarelli, C M F; Nice, D J; Osłowski, S; Pennucci, T T; Perera, B B P; Perrodin, D; Petiteau, A; Possenti, A; Ransom, S M; Reardon, D; Rosado, P A; Sanidas, S A; Sesana, A; Shaifullah, G; Siemens, X; Smits, R; Stairs, I; Stappers, B; Stinebring, D R; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J; Taylor, S R; Theureau, G; Tiburzi, C; Toomey, L; Vallisneri, M; van Straten, W; Vecchio, A; Wang, J -B; Wang, Y; You, X P; Zhu, W W; Zhu, X -J

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the stochastic properties of the 49 pulsars that comprise the first International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA) data release. We use Bayesian methodology, performing model selection to determine the optimal description of the stochastic signals present in each pulsar. In addition to spin-noise and dispersion-measure (DM) variations, these models can include timing noise unique to a single observing system, or frequency band. We show the improved radio-frequency coverage and presence of overlapping data from different observing systems in the IPTA data set enables us to separate both system and band-dependent effects with much greater efficacy than in the individual PTA data sets. For example, we show that PSR J1643$-$1224 has, in addition to DM variations, significant band-dependent noise that is coherent between PTAs which we interpret as coming from time-variable scattering or refraction in the ionised interstellar medium. Failing to model these different contributions appropriately can dramatically...

  4. Tracking dispersion measure variations of timing array pulsars with the GMRT

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Ujjwal; van Straten, Willem; Oslowski, Stefan; Roy, Jayanta; Bhat, N D R; Bailes, Matthew; Keith, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    We present the results from nearly three years of monitoring of the variations in Dispersion Measure (DM) along the line-of-sight (LOS) to 11 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). These results demonstrate accuracies of single epoch DM estimates of the order of 5x10^(-4) cm^(-3) pc. A preliminary comparison with the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) data shows that the measured DM fluctuations are comparable. We show effects of DM variations due to the solar wind and solar corona and compare with the existing models.

  5. Understanding the Hellings and Downs curve for pulsar timing arrays in terms of sound and electromagnetic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jenet, Fredrick A

    2014-01-01

    Searches for gravitational-wave backgrounds using pulsar timing arrays look for correlations in the timing residuals induced by the background across the pulsars in the array. The correlation signature of an isotropic, unpolarized gravitational-wave background predicted by general relativity follows the so-called Hellings and Downs curve, which is a relatively simple function of the angle between a pair of pulsars. To aid students and beginning researchers interested in pulsar timing, we give a pedagogical discussion of the Helling and Downs curve for pulsar timing arrays, considering simpler analogous scenarios involving sound and electromagnetic waves. We calculate Hellings-and-Downs type functions for these two scenarios and develop a framework suitable for doing more general correlation calculations.

  6. Pulsar timing array based search for supermassive black hole binaries in the SKA era

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next generation radio telescope facilities, such as the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), will usher in an era where a Pulsar Timing Array (PTA) based search for gravitational waves (GWs) will be able to use hundreds of well timed millisecond pulsars rather than the few dozens in existing PTAs. A realistic assessment of the performance of such an extremely large PTA must take into account the data analysis challenge posed by an exponential increase in the parameter space volume due to the large number of so-called pulsar phase parameters. We address this problem and present such an assessment for isolated supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) searches using a SKA era PTA containing $10^3$ pulsars. We find that an all-sky search will be able to confidently detect non-evolving sources with redshifted chirp mass of $10^{10}$ $M_\\odot$ out to a redshift of about $28$. The detection of GW signals from optically identified SMBHB candidates similar to PSO J334+01 is assured. If no SMBHB detections occur, ...

  7. Detecting super-Nyquist-frequency gravitational waves using a pulsar timing array

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, S -X

    2016-01-01

    The maximum frequency of gravitational waves (GWs) detectable with traditional pulsar timing methods is set by the Nyquist frequency ($f_{\\rm{Ny}}$) of the observation. Beyond this frequency, GWs leave no temporal-correlated signals; instead, they appear as white noise in the timing residuals. The variance of the GW-induced white noise is a function of the position of the pulsars relative to the GW source. By observing this unique functional form in the timing data, we propose that we can detect GWs of frequency $>$ $f_{\\rm{Ny}}$ (super-Nyquist frequency GWs; SNFGWs). We demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method with simulated timing data. Using a selected dataset from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array data release 1 and the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves publicly available datasets, we try to detect the signals from single SNFGW sources. The result is consistent with no GW detection with 65.5\\% probability. An all-sky map of the sensitivity of the selected pulsar timing ar...

  8. Prospects of Gravitational Wave Detection Using Pulsar Timing Array for Chinese Future Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we estimate the sensitivity of gravitational wave (GW) detection for future Chinese pulsar timing array (PTA) projects. The calculation of sensitivity is based on the well-known Crámer-Rao bound idea. The red noise and dispersion measure (DM) variation noise has be included in the modeling. We demonstrate that the future Chinese telescope can be very valuable for future PTA experiments and GW detection efforts.

  9. Mapping gravitational-wave backgrounds in modified theories of gravity using pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Gair, Jonathan R; Taylor, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    We extend our previous work on applying CMB techniques to the mapping of gravitational-wave backgrounds to backgrounds which have non-GR polarisations. Our analysis and results are presented in the context of pulsar-timing array observations, but the overarching methods are general, and can be easily applied to LIGO or eLISA observations using appropriately modified response functions. Analytic expressions for the pulsar-timing response to gravitational waves with non-GR polarisation are given for each mode of a spin-weighted spherical-harmonic decomposition of the background, which permit the signal to be mapped across the sky to any desired resolution. We also derive the pulsar-timing overlap reduction functions for the various non-GR polarisations, finding analytic forms for anisotropic backgrounds with scalar-transverse ("breathing") and vector-longitudinal polarisations, and a semi-analytic form for scalar-longitudinal backgrounds. Our results indicate that pulsar-timing observations will be completely i...

  10. European Pulsar Timing Array Limits On An Isotropic Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Lentati, Lindley; Mingarelli, Chiara M F; Sesana, Alberto; Sanidas, Sotiris A; Vecchio, Alberto; Caballero, R Nicolas; Lee, K J; van Haasteren, Rutger; Babak, Stanislav; Bassa, Cees G; Brem, Patrick; Burgay, Marta; Champion, David J; Cognard, Ismael; Desvignes, Gregory; Gair, Jonathon R; Guillemot, Lucas; Hessels, Jason W T; Janssen, Gemma H; Karuppusamy, Ramesh; Kramer, Michael; Lassus, Antoine; Lazarus, Patrick; Liu, Kuo; Osłowski, Stefan; Perrodin, Delphine; Petiteau, Antoine; Possenti, Andrea; Purver, Mark B; Rosado, Pablo A; Smits, Roy; Stappers, Ben; Theureau, Gilles; Tiburzi, Caterina; Verbiest, Joris P W

    2015-01-01

    We present new limits on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background (GWB) using a six pulsar dataset spanning 18 yr of observations from the 2015 European Pulsar Timing Array data release (Desvignes et al. in prep.). Performing a Bayesian analysis, we fit simultaneously for the intrinsic noise parameters for each pulsar in this dataset, along with common correlated signals including clock, and Solar System ephemeris errors to obtain a robust 95$\\%$ upper limit on the dimensionless strain amplitude $A$ of the background of $A<3.0\\times 10^{-15}$ at a reference frequency of $1\\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ and a spectral index of $13/3$, corresponding to a background from inspiralling super-massive black hole binaries, constraining the GW energy density to $\\Omega_\\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2 < 3.6\\times10^{-10}$ at 2.8 nHz. We show that performing such an analysis when fixing the intrinsic noise parameters for the individual pulsars leads to an erroneously stringent upper limit, by a factor $\\sim 1.7$. We obtain a di...

  11. Null-stream pointing with pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Hazboun, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Locating sources on the sky is one of the largest challenges in gravitational wave astronomy, owing to the omni-directional nature of gravitational wave detection techniques, and the often intrinsically weak signals being observed. Ground-based detectors can address the pointing problem by observing with a network of detectors, effectively triangulating signal locations by observing the arrival times across the network. Space-based detectors will observe long-lived sources that persist while the detector moves relative to their location on the sky, using Doppler shifts of the signal to locate the sky position. While these methods improve the pointing capability of a detector or network, the angular resolution is still coarse compared to the standards one expects from electromagnetic astronomy. Another technique that can be used for sky localization is null-stream pointing. In the case where multiple independent data streams exist, a single astrophysical source of gravitational waves will appear in each of the...

  12. SCINTILLATION ARCS IN LOW-FREQUENCY OBSERVATIONS OF THE TIMING-ARRAY MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J0437–4715

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Ord, S. M.; Tremblay, S. E.; McSweeney, S. J.; Tingay, S. J. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia)

    2016-02-10

    Low-frequency observations of pulsars provide a powerful means for probing the microstructure in the turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). Here we report on high-resolution dynamic spectral analysis of our observations of the timing-array millisecond pulsar PSR J0437–4715 with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), enabled by our recently commissioned tied-array beam processing pipeline for voltage data recorded from the high time resolution mode of the MWA. A secondary spectral analysis reveals faint parabolic arcs akin to those seen in high-frequency observations of pulsars with the Green Bank and Arecibo telescopes. Data from Parkes observations at a higher frequency of 732 MHz reveal a similar parabolic feature with a curvature that scales approximately as the square of the observing wavelength (λ{sup 2}) to the MWA's frequency of 192 MHz. Our analysis suggests that scattering toward PSR J0437–4715 predominantly arises from a compact region about 115 pc from the Earth, which matches well with the expected location of the edge of the Local Bubble that envelopes the local Solar neighborhood. As well as demonstrating new and improved pulsar science capabilities of the MWA, our analysis underscores the potential of low-frequency pulsar observations for gaining valuable insights into the local ISM and for characterizing the ISM toward timing-array pulsars.

  13. Probing circular polarization in stochastic gravitational wave background with pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    We study the detectability of circular polarization in a stochastic gravitational wave background from various sources such as supermassive black hole binaries, cosmic strings, and inflation in the early universe with pulsar timing arrays. We calculate generalized overlap reduction functions for the circularly polarized stochastic gravitational wave background. We find that the circular polarization can not be detected for an isotropic background. However, there is a chance to observe the circular polarization for an anisotropic gravitational wave background. We also show how to separate polarized gravitational waves from unpolarized gravitational waves.

  14. Pulsar timing arrays and the challenge of massive black hole binary astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Sesana, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are designed to detect gravitational waves (GWs) at nHz frequencies. The expected dominant signal is given by the superposition of all waves emitted by the cosmological population of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. Such superposition creates an incoherent stochastic background, on top of which particularly bright or nearby sources might be individually resolved. In this contribution I describe the properties of the expected GW signal, highlighting its dependence on the overall binary population, the relation between SMBHs and their hosts, and their coupling with the stellar and gaseous environment. I describe the status of current PTA efforts, and prospect of future detection and SMBH binary astrophysics.

  15. Constraints on the Dynamical Environments of Supermassive Black-Hole Binaries Using Pulsar-Timing Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephen R; Simon, Joseph; Sampson, Laura

    2017-05-05

    We introduce a technique for gravitational-wave analysis, where Gaussian process regression is used to emulate the strain spectrum of a stochastic background by training on population-synthesis simulations. This leads to direct Bayesian inference on astrophysical parameters. For pulsar timing arrays specifically, we interpolate over the parameter space of supermassive black-hole binary environments, including three-body stellar scattering, and evolving orbital eccentricity. We illustrate our approach on mock data, and assess the prospects for inference with data similar to the NANOGrav 9-yr data release.

  16. All correlations must die: Assessing the significance of a stochastic gravitational-wave background in pulsar timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S. R.; Lentati, L.; Babak, S.; Brem, P.; Gair, J. R.; Sesana, A.; Vecchio, A.

    2017-02-01

    We present two methods for determining the significance of a stochastic gravitational-wave (GW) background affecting a pulsar-timing array, where detection is based on evidence for quadrupolar spatial correlations between pulsars. Rather than constructing noise simulations, we eliminate the GWB spatial correlations in the true data sets to assess detection significance with all real data features intact. In our first method, we perform random phase shifts in the signal-model basis functions. This phase shifting eliminates signal phase coherence between pulsars, while keeping the statistical properties of the pulsar timing residuals intact. We then explore a method to null correlations between pulsars by using a "scrambled" overlap-reduction function in the signal model for the array. This scrambled function is orthogonal to what we expect of a real GW background signal. We demonstrate the efficacy of these methods using Bayesian model selection on a set of simulated data sets that contain a stochastic GW signal, timing noise, undiagnosed glitches, and uncertainties in the Solar system ephemeris. Finally, we introduce an overarching formalism under which these two techniques are naturally linked. These methods are immediately applicable to all current pulsar-timing array data sets, and should become standard tools for future analyses.

  17. Are we there yet? Time to detection of nanohertz gravitational waves based on pulsar-timing array limits

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, S R; Ellis, J A; Mingarelli, C M F; Lazio, T J W; van Haasteren, R

    2015-01-01

    Decade-long timing observations of arrays of millisecond pulsars have placed highly constraining upper limits on the amplitude of the nanohertz gravitational-wave stochastic signal from the mergers of supermassive black-hole binaries ($\\sim 10^{-15}$ strain at $f = 1/\\mathrm{yr}$). These limits suggest that binary merger rates have been overestimated, or that environmental influences from nuclear gas or stars accelerate orbital decay, reducing the gravitational-wave signal at the lowest, most sensitive frequencies. This prompts the question whether nanohertz gravitational waves are likely to be detected in the near future. In this letter, we answer this question quantitatively using simple statistical estimates, deriving the range of true signal amplitudes that are compatible with current upper limits, and computing expected detection probabilities as a function of observation time. We conclude that small arrays consisting of the pulsars with the least timing noise, which yield the tightest upper limits, have...

  18. Expected properties of the first gravitational wave signal detected with pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Rosado, Pablo A; Gair, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we attempt to investigate the nature of the first gravitational wave (GW) signal to be detected by pulsar timing arrays (PTAs): will it be an individual, resolved supermassive black hole binary (SBHB), or a stochastic background made by the superposition of GWs produced by an ensemble of SBHBs? To address this issue, we analyse a broad set of simulations of the cosmological population of SBHBs, that cover the entire parameter space allowed by current electromagnetic observations in an unbiased way. For each simulation, we construct the expected GW signal and identify the loudest individual sources. We then employ appropriate detection statistics to evaluate the relative probability of detecting each type of source as a function of time for a variety of PTAs; we consider the current International PTA (IPTA), and speculate into the era of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The main properties of the first detectable individual SBHBs are also investigated. Contrary to previous work, we cast our resu...

  19. ARE WE THERE YET? TIME TO DETECTION OF NANOHERTZ GRAVITATIONAL WAVES BASED ON PULSAR-TIMING ARRAY LIMITS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, S. R.; Vallisneri, M.; Ellis, J. A.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Haasteren, R. van, E-mail: Stephen.R.Taylor@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Decade-long timing observations of arrays of millisecond pulsars have placed highly constraining upper limits on the amplitude of the nanohertz gravitational-wave stochastic signal from the mergers of supermassive black hole binaries (∼10{sup −15} strain at f = 1 yr{sup −1}). These limits suggest that binary merger rates have been overestimated, or that environmental influences from nuclear gas or stars accelerate orbital decay, reducing the gravitational-wave signal at the lowest, most sensitive frequencies. This prompts the question whether nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs) are likely to be detected in the near future. In this Letter, we answer this question quantitatively using simple statistical estimates, deriving the range of true signal amplitudes that are compatible with current upper limits, and computing expected detection probabilities as a function of observation time. We conclude that small arrays consisting of the pulsars with the least timing noise, which yield the tightest upper limits, have discouraging prospects of making a detection in the next two decades. By contrast, we find large arrays are crucial to detection because the quadrupolar spatial correlations induced by GWs can be well sampled by many pulsar pairs. Indeed, timing programs that monitor a large and expanding set of pulsars have an ∼80% probability of detecting GWs within the next 10 years, under assumptions on merger rates and environmental influences ranging from optimistic to conservative. Even in the extreme case where 90% of binaries stall before merger and environmental coupling effects diminish low-frequency gravitational-wave power, detection is delayed by at most a few years.

  20. Resolving multiple supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays II: genetic algorithm implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Petiteau, Antoine; Sesana, Alberto; de Araujo, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) might detect gravitational waves (GWs) from massive black hole (MBH) binaries within this decade. The signal is expected to be an incoherent superposition of several nearly-monochromatic waves of different strength. The brightest sources might be individually resolved, and the overall deconvolved, at least partially, in its individual components. In this paper we extend the maximum-likelihood based method developed in Babak & Sesana 2012, to search for individual MBH binaries in PTA data. We model the signal as a collection of circular monochromatic binaries, each characterized by three free parameters: two angles defining the sky location, and the frequency. We marginalize over all other source parameters and we apply an efficient multi-search genetic algorithm to maximize the likelihood function and look for sources in synthetic datasets. On datasets characterized by white Gaussian noise plus few injected sources with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the range 10-60, our search...

  1. Constraints on Individual Supermassive Black Hole Binaries from Pulsar Timing Array Limits on Continuous Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Schutz, Katelin

    2015-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are placing increasingly stringent constraints on the strain amplitude of continuous gravitational waves emitted by supermassive black hole binaries on subparsec scales. In this paper, we incorporate independent measurements of the dynamical masses $M_{\\rm bh}$ of supermassive black holes in specific galaxies at known distances and leverage this additional information to further constrain whether or not those galaxies could host a detectable supermassive black hole binary. We estimate the strain amplitudes from individual binaries as a function of binary mass ratio for two samples of nearby galaxies: (1) those with direct dynamical measurements of $M_{\\rm bh}$ in the literature, and (2) the 116 most massive early-type galaxies (and thus likely hosts of the most massive black holes) within 108 Mpc from the MASSIVE Survey. Our exploratory analysis shows that the current PTA upper limits on continuous waves can already constrain the mass ratios of hypothetical black hole binaries in a...

  2. Inflationary primordial black holes for the LIGO gravitational wave events and pulsar timing array experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Inomata, Keisuke; Mukaida, Kyohei; Tada, Yuichiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T

    2016-01-01

    Primordial black holes (PBHs) are one of the candidates to explain the gravitational wave (GW) signals observed by the LIGO detectors. Among several phenomena in the early Universe, cosmic inflation is a major example to generate PBHs. In this paper, we discuss the possibility to interpret the observed GW events as mergers of PBHs which are produced by cosmic inflation. We point out that the current pulsar timing array (PTA) experiments already put severe constraints on GWs generated via the second-order effects. In particular, it is found that the scalar power spectrum should have a very sharp fall-off above $f \\gtrsim 10^{-9}$ Hz to evade these constraints. Simple inflation models that generate PBHs via fluctuations of slowly rolling inflaton could be probed/excluded in the future.

  3. The Benefits of VLBI Astrometry to Pulsar Timing Array Searches for Gravitational Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Madison, D R; Cordes, J M

    2012-01-01

    Precisely measured astrometric parameters are integral to successful pulsar timing campaigns. They are commonly measured by fitting the astrometric parameters of a deterministic timing model to a series of pulse times of arrival (TOAs). TOAs measured to microsecond precision over several-year spans can in this way provide astrometric parameters precise to sub-milliarcsecond levels. However, pulsars do not pulsate in a deterministic fashion. Many display significant amounts of red spin noise. Furthermore, a stochastic background of gravitational waves can lead to red noise-like structure in TOAs. We investigate how noise of different spectral types is absorbed by timing models and leads to significant estimation errors in the astrometric parameters. Independent of timing, very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) is capable of providing sub-milliarcsecond astrometric parameters for pulsars. We find that incorporating VLBI astrometric measurements into the timing models of pulsars for which only a couple of year...

  4. All correlations must die: Assessing the significance of a stochastic gravitational-wave background in pulsar-timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, S R; Babak, S; Brem, P; Gair, J R; Sesana, A; Vecchio, A

    2016-01-01

    We present two methods for determining the significance of a stochastic gravitational-wave background affecting a pulsar-timing array, where detection is based on recovering evidence for correlations between different pulsars, i.e. spatial correlations. Nulling these spatial correlations is crucial to understanding the response of our detection statistic under the null hypothesis so that we can properly assess the significance of plausible signals. The usual approach of creating many noise-only simulations is, albeit useful, undesirable since in that case detection significance is predicated on our (incomplete) understanding of all noise processes. Alternatively, destroying any possible correlations in our real datasets and using those (containing all actual noise features) is a much superior approach. In our first method, we perform random phase shifts in the signal-model basis functions, which has the effect of eliminating signal phase coherence between pulsars, while keeping the statistical properties of t...

  5. Detecting eccentric supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays: Resolvable source strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, S R; Gair, J R; McWilliams, S T

    2015-01-01

    The couplings between supermassive black-hole binaries and their environments within galactic nuclei have been well studied as part of the search for solutions to the final parsec problem. The scattering of stars by the binary or the interaction with a circumbinary disk may efficiently drive the system to sub-parsec separations, allowing the binary to enter a regime where the emission of gravitational-waves can drive it to merger within a Hubble time. However, these interactions can also affect the orbital parameters of the binary. In particular, they may drive an increase in binary eccentricity which survives until the system's gravitational-wave signal enters the pulsar-timing array band. Therefore, if we can measure the eccentricity from observed signals, we can potentially deduce some of the properties of the binary environment. To this end, we build on previous techniques to present a general Bayesian pipeline with which we can detect and estimate the parameters of an eccentric supermassive black-hole bi...

  6. Astrophysical constraints on massive black hole binary evolution from Pulsar Timing Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Middleton, Hannah; Farr, Will M; Sesana, Alberto; Vecchio, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We consider massive black hole binary systems and information that can be derived about their population and formation history solely from current and possible future pulsar timing array (PTA) results. We use models of the stochastic gravitational-wave background from circular massive black hole binaries with chirp mass in the range $10^6 - 10^{11} M_\\odot$ evolving solely due to radiation reaction. Our parameterised models for the black hole merger history make only weak assumptions about the properties of the black holes merging over cosmic time. We show that current PTA results place a model-independent upper limit on the merger density of massive black hole binaries, but provide no information about their redshift or mass distribution. We show that even in the case of a detection resulting from a factor of 10 increase in amplitude sensitivity, PTAs will only put weak constraints on the source merger density as a function of mass, and will not provide any additional information on the redshift distribution...

  7. Prospects for gravitational-wave detection and supermassive black hole astrophysics with pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Ravi, V; Shannon, R M; Hobbs, G

    2014-01-01

    [Abridged] Large-area sky surveys show that massive galaxies undergo at least one major merger in a Hubble time. If all massive galaxies host central supermassive black holes (SMBHs), as is inferred from observations in the local Universe, it is likely that there is a population of binary SMBHs at the centres of galaxy merger remnants. Numerous authors have proposed pulsar timing array (PTA) experiments to measure the gravitational wave (GW) emission from binary SMBHs. In this paper, using the latest observational estimates for a range of galaxy properties and scaling relations, we predict the amplitude of the GW background generated by the binary SMBH population. We also predict counts of individual binary SMBH GW sources. We assume that all binary SMBHs are in circular orbits evolving under GW emission alone, which is likely to be correct for binaries emitting GWs at frequencies >~10^-8 Hz. Our fiducial model results in a characteristic strain amplitude of the GW background of A_yr=1.2(+0.6-0.3)*10^-15 at a...

  8. On detection of the stochastic gravitational-wave background using the Parkes pulsar timing array

    CERN Document Server

    Yardley, D R B; Hobbs, G B; Verbiest, J P W; Manchester, R N; van Straten, W; Jenet, F A; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D J; Hotan, A W; Oslowski, S; Reynolds, J E; Sarkissian, J M

    2011-01-01

    We search for the signature of an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background in pulsar timing observations using a frequency-domain correlation technique. These observations, which span roughly 12 yr, were obtained with the 64-m Parkes radio telescope augmented by public domain observations from the Arecibo Observatory. A wide range of signal processing issues unique to pulsar timing and not previously presented in the literature are discussed. These include the effects of quadratic removal, irregular sampling, and variable errors which exacerbate the spectral leakage inherent in estimating the steep red spectrum of the gravitational-wave background. These observations are found to be consistent with the null hypothesis, that no gravitational-wave background is present, with 76 percent confidence. We show that the detection statistic is dominated by the contributions of only a few pulsars because of the inhomogeneity of this data set. The issues of detecting the signature of a gravitational-wave backg...

  9. Carrying the physics of black-hole binary evolution into gravitational-wave models for pulsar-timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephen; Sampson, Laura; Simon, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    There has recently been significant interest in how the galactic environments of supermassive black-hole binaries influences the stochastic gravitational-wave background signal from a population of these systems, and in how the resulting detection prospects for pulsar-timing arrays are effected. Tackling these problems requires us to have robust and computationally-efficient models for the strain spectrum as a function of different environment influences or the binary orbital eccentricity. In this talk we describe a new method of constructing these models from a small number of synthesized black-hole binary populations which have varying input physics. We use these populations to train an interpolant via Gaussian-process regression, allowing us to carry real physics into our subsequent pulsar-timing array inferences, and to also correctly propagate forward uncertainties from our interpolation.

  10. Targeting supermassive black hole binaries and gravitational wave sources for the pulsar timing array

    CERN Document Server

    Rosado, Pablo A

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a technique to search for supermassive black hole binaries (MBHBs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The search is based on the peculiar properties of merging galaxies that are found in a mock galaxy catalog from the Millennium Simulation. MBHBs are expected to be the main gravitational wave (GW) sources for pulsar timing arrays (PTAs); however, it is still unclear if the observed GW signal will be produced by a few single MBHBs, or if it will have the properties of a stochastic background. The goal of this work is to produce a map of the sky in which each galaxy is assigned a probability of having suffered a recent merger, and of hosting a MBHB that could be detected by PTAs. This constitutes a step forward in the understanding of the expected PTA signal: the skymap can be used to investigate the clustering properties of PTA sources and the spatial distribution of the observable GW signal power; moreover, galaxies with the highest probabilities could be used as inputs in targeted se...

  11. Inflationary primordial black holes for the LIGO gravitational wave events and pulsar timing array experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Mukaida, Kyohei; Tada, Yuichiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2017-06-01

    Primordial black holes (PBHs) are one of the candidates to explain the gravitational wave (GW) signals observed by the LIGO detectors. Among several phenomena in the early universe, cosmic inflation is a major example to generate PBHs from large primordial density perturbations. In this paper, we discuss the possibility to interpret the observed GW events as mergers of PBHs that are produced by cosmic inflation. The primordial curvature perturbation should be large enough to produce a sizable amount of PBHs, and thus we have several other probes to test this scenario. We point out that the current pulsar timing array (PTA) experiments already put severe constraints on GWs generated via the second-order effects, and that the observation of the cosmic microwave background puts severe restriction on its μ distortion. In particular, it is found that the scalar power spectrum should have a very sharp peak at k ˜1 06 Mpc-1 to fulfill the required abundance of PBHs while evading constraints from the PTA experiments together with the μ distortion. We propose a mechanism that can realize such a sharp peak. In the future, simple inflation models that generate PBHs via almost Gaussian fluctuations could be probed/excluded.

  12. Detecting gravitational waves with pulsar-timing arrays: a case of astrophysical forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallisneri, Michele

    2016-03-01

    Pulsar-timing arrays have recently reached maturity as the ``third way'' to gravitational-wave (GW) detection, besides ground-based interferometers and future space-based observatories. PTA campaigns target the very-low-frequency band centered around 10- 8 Hz, so they will yield science complementary to the other two programs. For this speaker, much of the fascination with PTAs lies in the fact that they represent a grand experiment in precision measurement that was set up by Nature herself, so we have rather little control on it, and few knobs to turn. Improvements in sensitivity will come as much from ever more powerful radiotelescopes as from a better understanding of the ``detectors'' (neutron stars, their dynamics in binaries, the interstellar medium, ...), and from deeper, more probing analyses of the data we already have. A positive GW detection claim will require making a watertight case of astrophysical forensics, proving beyond any reasonable doubt that systematics are under control, and designing the complex inference chain that points to the presence GWs in its most unequivocal and defensible form. I discuss how these goals and concerns informed the development of recently published constraints on the astrophysical population of supermassive black-hole binaries.

  13. Using pulsar timing arrays and the quantum normalization condition to constrain relic gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, Ming-Lei; Zhao, Wen; Liu, Jin-Zhong; Zhao, Cheng-Shi; Yang, Ting-Gao

    2013-01-01

    In the non-standard model of relic gravitational waves (RGWs) generated in the early universe, the theoretical spectrum of is mainly described by an amplitude $r$ and a spectral index $\\beta$, the latter usually being determined by the slope of the inflation potential. Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) data have imposed constraints on the amplitude of strain spectrum for a power-law form as a phenomenological model. Applying these constraints to a generic, theoretical spectrum with $r$ and $\\beta$ as independent parameters, we convert the PTAs constraint into an upper bound on the index $\\beta$, which turns out to be less stringent than those upper bounds from BBN, CMB, and LIGO/VIRGO, respectively. Moreover, it is found that PTAs constrain the non-standard RGWs more stringent than the standard RGWs. If the condition of the quantum normalization is imposed upon a theoretical spectrum of RGWs, $r$ and $\\beta$ become related. With this condition, a minimum requirement of the horizon size during inflation is greater t...

  14. Scintillation arcs in low-frequency observations of the timing-array millisecond pulsar J0437-4715

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, N D R; Tremblay, S E; McSweeney, S J; Tingay, S J

    2015-01-01

    Low-frequency observations of pulsars provide a powerful means for probing the microstructure in the turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). Here we report on high-resolution dynamic spectral analysis of our observations of the timing-array millisecond pulsar J0437-4715 with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), enabled by our recently commissioned tied-array beam processing pipeline for voltage data recorded from the high time resolution mode of the MWA. A secondary spectral analysis reveals faint parabolic arcs, akin to those seen in high-frequency observations of pulsars with the Green Bank and Arecibo telescopes. Data from Parkes observations at a higher frequency of 732 MHz reveal a similar parabolic feature, with a curvature that scales approximately as the square of the observing wavelength ($\\lambda^2$) to the MWA's frequency of 192 MHz. Our analysis suggests that scattering toward PSR J0437-4715 predominantly arises from a compact region about 115 pc from the Earth, which matches well with the expected l...

  15. Pulse Portraiture: Pulsar timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennucci, Timothy T.; Demorest, Paul B.; Ransom, Scott M.

    2016-06-01

    Pulse Portraiture is a wideband pulsar timing code written in python. It uses an extension of the FFTFIT algorithm (Taylor 1992) to simultaneously measure a phase (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM). The code includes a Gaussian-component-based portrait modeling routine. The code uses the python interface to the pulsar data analysis package PSRCHIVE (ascl:1105.014) and also requires the non-linear least-squares minimization package lmfit (ascl:1606.014).

  16. An all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves in the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array data set

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, X -J; Wen, L; Coles, W A; Wang, J -B; Shannon, R M; Manchester, R N; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Keith, M J; Kerr, M; Levin, Y; Madison, D R; Osłowski, S; Ravi, V; Toomey, L; van Straten, W

    2014-01-01

    We present results of an all-sky search in the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) Data Release 1 data set for continuous gravitational waves (GWs) in the frequency range from $5\\times 10^{-9}$ to $2\\times 10^{-7}$ Hz. Such signals could be produced by individual supermassive binary black hole systems in the early stage of coalescence. We phase up the pulsar timing array data set to form, for each position on the sky, two data streams that correspond to the two GW polarizations and then carry out an optimal search for GW signals on these data streams. Since no statistically significant GWs were detected, we place upper limits on the intrinsic GW strain amplitude $h_0$ for a range of GW frequencies. For example, at $10^{-8}$ Hz our analysis has excluded with $95\\%$ confidence the presence of signals with $h_0\\geqslant 1.7\\times 10^{-14}$. Our new limits are about a factor of four more stringent than those of Yardley et al. (2010) based on an earlier PPTA data set and a factor of two better than those reported in...

  17. Pulsar Ephemerides for Timing LAT Pulsars

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Timing pulsars with the LAT requires the use of an ephemeris that covers the time period being analyzed. Below are several resources to provide this useful input to...

  18. European Pulsar Timing Array Limits on Continuous Gravitational Waves from Individual Supermassive Black Hole Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Babak, Stanislav; Sesana, Alberto; Brem, Patrick; Rosado, Pablo A; Taylor, Stephen R; Lassus, Antoine; Hessels, Jason W T; Bassa, Cees G; Burgay, Marta; Caballero, R Nicolas; Champion, David J; Cognard, Ismael; Desvignes, Gregory; Gair, Jonathan R; Guillemot, Lucas; Janssen, Gemma H; Karuppusamy, Ramesh; Kramer, Michael; Lazarus, Patrick; Lee, K J; Lentati, Lindley; Liu, Kuo; Mingarelli, Chiara M F; Oslowsky, Stefan; Perrodin, Delphine; Possenti, Andrea; Purver, Mark B; Sanidas, Sotiris; Smits, Roy; Stappers, Ben; Theureau, Gilles; Tiburzi, Caterina; van Haasteren, Rutger; Vecchio, Alberto; Verbiest, Joris P W

    2015-01-01

    We have searched for continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals produced by individually resolvable, circular supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) in the latest EPTA dataset, which consists of ultra-precise timing data on 41 millisecond pulsars. We develop frequentist and Bayesian detection algorithms to search both for monochromatic and frequency-evolving systems. None of the adopted algorithms show evidence for the presence of such a CGW signal, indicating that the data are best described by pulsar and radiometer noise only. Depending on the adopted detection algorithm, the 95\\% upper limit on the sky-averaged strain amplitude lies in the range $6\\times 10^{-15}10^9$M$_\\odot$ out to a distance of about 25Mpc, and with $\\cal{M}_c>10^{10}$M$_\\odot$ out to a distance of about 1Gpc ($z\\approx0.2$). We show that state-of-the-art SMBHB population models predict $<1\\%$ probability of detecting a CGW with the current EPTA dataset, consistent with the reported non-detection. We stress, however, that PTA lim...

  19. LEAP: the large European array for pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Bassa, C G; Karuppusamy, R; Kramer, M; Lee, K J; Liu, K; McKee, J; Perrodin, D; Purver, M; Sanidas, S; Smits, R; Stappers, B W

    2015-01-01

    The Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP) is an experiment that harvests the collective power of Europe's largest radio telescopes in order to increase the sensitivity of high-precision pulsar timing. As part of the ongoing effort of the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA), LEAP aims to go beyond the sensitivity threshold needed to deliver the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The five telescopes presently included in LEAP are: the Effelsberg telescope, the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank, the Nan\\c cay radio telescope, the Sardinia Radio Telescope and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Dual polarization, Nyquist-sampled time-series of the incoming radio waves are recorded and processed offline to form the coherent sum, resulting in a tied-array telescope with an effective aperture equivalent to a 195-m diameter circular dish. All observations are performed using a bandwidth of 128 MHz centered at a frequency of 1396 MHz. In this paper, we present the design of the LEAP experiment, the ...

  20. Pulsar Timing Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Lommen, Andrea N

    2013-01-01

    We describe the procedure, nuances, issues, and choices involved in creating times-of-arrival (TOAs), residuals and error bars from a set of radio pulsar timing data. We discuss the issue of mis-matched templates, the problem that wide- bandwidth backends introduce, possible solutions to that problem, and correcting for offsets introduced by various observing systems.

  1. Selection bias in dynamically-measured super-massive black hole samples: consequences for pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Sesana, A; Bernardi, M; Sheth, R K

    2016-01-01

    Supermassive black hole -- host galaxy relations are key to the computation of the expected gravitational wave background (GWB) in the pulsar timing array (PTA) frequency band. It has been recently pointed out that standard relations adopted in GWB computations are in fact biased-high. We show that when this selection bias is taken into account, the expected GWB in the PTA band is a factor of about three smaller than previously estimated. Compared to other scaling relations recently published in the literature, the median amplitude of the signal at $f=1$yr$^{-1}$ drops from $1.3\\times10^{-15}$ to $4\\times10^{-16}$. Although this solves any potential tension between theoretical predictions and recent PTA limits without invoking other dynamical effects (such as stalling, eccentricity or strong coupling with the galactic environment), it also makes the GWB detection more challenging.

  2. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Yunes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein’s theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime. Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  3. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunes, Nicolás; Siemens, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein's theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime. Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  4. Constraints on Black Hole/Host Galaxy Co-evolution and Binary Stalling Using Pulsar Timing Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays are now setting increasingly tight limits on the gravitational wave background from binary supermassive black holes. But as upper limits grow more constraining, what can be implied about galaxy evolution? We investigate which astrophysical parameters have the largest impact on strain spectrum predictions and provide a simple framework to directly translate between measured values for the parameters of galaxy evolution and PTA limits on the gravitational wave background of binary supermassive black holes. We find that the most influential observable is the relation between a host galaxy's central bulge and its central black hole, $\\mbox{$M_{\\bullet}$-$M_{\\rm bulge}$}$, which has the largest effect on the mean value of the characteristic strain amplitude. However, the variance of each prediction is dominated by uncertainties in the galaxy stellar mass function. Using this framework with the best published PTA limit, we can set limits on the shape and scatter of the $\\mbox{$M_{\\bullet}$-$M_{...

  5. Interpreting the Recent Upper Limit on the Gravitational Wave Background from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    We provide comments on the article by Shannon et al. (Sep 2015) entitled "Gravitational waves from binary supermassive black holes missing in pulsar observations". The purpose of this letter is to address several misconceptions of the public and other scientists regarding the conclusions of that work.

  6. Variability, polarimetry, and timing properties of single pulses from PSR J1713+0747 using the Large European Array for Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.; Bassa, C. G.; Janssen, G. H.; Karuppusamy, R.; McKee, J.; Kramer, M.; Lee, K. J.; Perrodin, D.; Purver, M.; Sanidas, S.; Smits, R.; Stappers, B. W.; Weltevrede, P.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-12-01

    Single pulses preserve information about the pulsar radio emission and propagation in the pulsar magnetosphere, and understanding the behaviour of their variability is essential for estimating the fundamental limit on the achievable pulsar timing precision. Here we report the findings of our analysis of single pulses from PSR J1713+0747 with data collected by the Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP). We present statistical studies of the pulse properties that include distributions of their energy, phase and width. Two modes of systematic sub-pulse drifting have been detected, with a periodicity of seven and three pulse periods. The two modes appear at different ranges of pulse longitude but overlap under the main peak of the integrated profile. No evidence for pulse micro-structure is seen with a time resolution down to 140 ns. In addition, we show that the fractional polarization of single pulses increases with their pulse peak flux density. By mapping the probability density of linear polarization position angle with pulse longitude, we reveal the existence of two orthogonal polarization modes. Finally, we find that the resulting phase jitter of integrated profiles caused by single pulse variability can be described by a Gaussian probability distribution only when at least 100 pulses are used for integration. Pulses of different flux densities and widths contribute approximately equally to the phase jitter, and no improvement on timing precision is achieved by using a sub-set of pulses with a specific range of flux density or width.

  7. Why Gravitational Wave Science Needs Pulsar Timing Arrays And Why Pulsar Timing Arrays Need Both Arecibo and the GBT: A Response to the NSF-AST Portfolio Review from the NANOGrav Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) are ripples in space-time that are known to exist but have not yet been detected directly. Once they are, a key feature of any viable theory of gravity will be demonstrated and a new window on the Universe opened. GW astronomy was named as one of five key discovery areas in the New Worlds, New Horizons Decadal Report. Pulsar timing probes GW frequencies, and hence source classes, that are inaccessible to any other detection method and can uniquely constrain the nonlinear nature of General Relativity. Pulsar timing is therefore a critical capability with its own discovery space and potential. Fulfilling this capability requires the complementary enabling features of both the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) and the Arecibo Observatory.

  8. Variability, polarimetry, and timing properties of single pulses from PSR J1713+0747 using the Large European Array for Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, K; Janssen, G H; Karuppusamy, R; McKee, J; Kramer, M; Lee, K J; Perrodin, D; Purver, M; Sanidas, S; Smits, R; Stappers, B W; Weltevrede, P; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Single pulses preserve information about the pulsar radio emission and propagation in the pulsar magnetosphere, and understanding the behaviour of their variability is essential for estimating the fundamental limit on the achievable pulsar timing precision. Here we report the findings of our analysis of single pulses from PSR J1713+0747 with data collected by the Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP). We present statistical studies of the pulse properties that include distributions of their energy, phase and width. Two modes of systematic sub-pulse drifting have been detected, with a periodicity of 7 and 3 pulse periods. The two modes appear at different ranges of pulse longitude but overlap under the main peak of the integrated profile. No evidence for pulse micro-structure is seen with a time resolution down to 140 ns. In addition, we show that the fractional polarisation of single pulses increases with their pulse peak flux density. By mapping the probability density of linear polarisation position angle...

  9. Tempo: Pulsar timing data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, R.; Taylor, J.; Peters, W.; Weisberg, J.; Irwin, A.; Wex, N.; Stairs, I.; Demorest, P.; Nice, D.

    2015-09-01

    Tempo analyzes pulsar timing data. Pulse times of arrival (TOAs), pulsar model parameters, and coded instructions are read from one or more input files. The TOAs are fitted by a pulse timing model incorporating transformation to the solar-system barycenter, pulsar rotation and spin-down and, where necessary, one of several binary models. Program output includes parameter values and uncertainties, residual pulse arrival times, chi-squared statistics, and the covariance matrix of the model. In prediction mode, ephemerides of pulse phase behavior (in the form of polynomial expansions) are calculated from input timing models. Tempo is the basis for the Tempo2 (ascl:1210.015) code.

  10. Characterization of a Precision Pulsar Timing Gravitational Wave Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    We aim to construct a Galactic-scale detector comprised of an array of pulsars distributed across the sky in an effort to detect low-frequency (nanohertz) gravitational waves. Even without a detection, observations of pulsar timing arrays have allowed us to begin to place impactful astrophysical constraints on dynamical processes occurring during galaxy mergers. Understanding the detector is necessary for improving our sensitivity to gravitational waves and making a detection. Therefore, our goal is to characterize the entire propagation path through the pulsar timing array detector. To do so, we must understand: what intrinsic noise processes occur at the pulsar, what effects the interstellar medium has on pulsed radio emission, and what errors we introduce when measuring the incident electromagnetic radiation at our observatories.In this work, we observed of one of the most spin-stable objects known for 24 hours to understand the fundamental limits of precision pulsar timing. We investigated the effect of non-simultaneous, multi-frequency sampling of pulsar dispersion measures on timing and analyzed the cause of deterministic and stochastic temporal variations seen in dispersion measure time series. We analyzed errors in pulse arrival times and determined the white noise budget for pulsars on the timescale of a single observation. Finally, we measured the excess noise beyond the white noise model in pulsar timing residuals and incorporated our results into a global model over all pulsar populations to improve excess noise scaling relations.

  11. Improving Pulsar Timing Precision with Single Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The measurement error of pulse times of arrival (TOAs) in the high S/N limit is dominated by the quasi-random variation of a pulsar's emission profile from rotation to rotation. Like measurement noise, this noise is only reduced as the square root of observing time, posing a major challenge to future pulsar timing campaigns with large aperture telescopes, e.g. the Five-hundred-metre Aperture Spherical Telescope and the Square Kilometre Array. We propose a new method of pulsar timing that attempts to approximate the pulse-to-pulse variability with a small family of 'basis' pulses. If pulsar data are integrated over many rotations, this basis can be used to measure sub-pulse structure. Or, if high-time resolution data are available, the basis can be used to 'tag' single pulses and produce an optimal timing template. With realistic simulations, we show that these applications can dramatically reduce the effect of pulse-to-pulse variability on TOAs. Using high-time resolution data taken from the bright PSR J0835-...

  12. The timing behaviour of radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, G

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this review paper is to summarise the pulsar timing method, to provide an overview of recent research into the spin-down of pulsars over decadal timescales and to highlight the science that can be achieved using high-precision timing of millisecond pulsars.

  13. Towards robust detection of gravitational waves by pulsar timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Neil J.; Sampson, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Precision timing of highly stable milli-second pulsars is a promising technique for detecting very low frequency sources of gravitational waves. In any one pulsar, the gravitational wave signal appears as an additional source of timing noise, and it is only by considering the coherent response across a network of pulsars that the signal can be distinguished from other sources of noise. In the limit where there are many gravitational wave sources, or in the limit where there are many pulsars in the array, the waves produce a unique tensor correlation pattern that depends only on the angular separation of each pulsar pair. It is this distinct fingerprint that is used to search for gravitational waves using pulsar timing arrays. Here we consider how the prospects for detection are diminished when there are a finite number of signals and pulsars, which breaks the statistical isotropy of the timing array and of the gravitational wave sky. We also study the use of "sky-scrambles'' to break the signal correlations in the data as a way to increase confidence in a detection.

  14. Pulsar Timing with the Fermi LAT

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Paul S; Parent, Damien; PSC, the Fermi

    2010-01-01

    We present an overview of precise pulsar timing using data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi. We describe the analysis techniques including a maximum likelihood method for determining pulse times of arrival from unbinned photon data. In addition to determining the spindown behavior of the pulsars and detecting glitches and timing noise, such timing analyses allow the precise determination of the pulsar position, thus enabling detailed multiwavelength follow up.

  15. SKA-Japan Pulsar Science with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Keitaro; Iwata, Kengo; Kameya, Osamu; Kumamoto, Hiroki; Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Mikami, Ryo; Naruko, Atsushi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Shibata, Shinpei; Terasawa, Toshio; Yonemaru, Naoyuki; Yoo, Chulmoon

    2016-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array will revolutionize pulsar studies with its wide field-of-view, wide-band observation and high sensitivity, increasing the number of observable pulsars by more than an order of magnitude. Pulsars are of interest not only for the study of neutron stars themselves but for their usage as tools for probing fundamental physics such as general relativity, gravitational waves and nuclear interaction. In this article, we summarize the activity and interests of SKA-Japan Pulsar Science Working Group, focusing on an investigation of modified gravity theory with the supermassive black hole in the Galactic Centre, gravitational-wave detection from cosmic strings and binary supermassive black holes, a study of the physical state of plasma close to pulsars using giant radio pulses and determination of magnetic field structure of Galaxy with pulsar pairs.

  16. Nanohertz gravitational wave searches with interferometric pulsar timing experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinto, Massimo

    2011-05-13

    We estimate the sensitivity to nano-Hertz gravitational waves of pulsar timing experiments in which two highly stable millisecond pulsars are tracked simultaneously with two neighboring radio telescopes that are referenced to the same timekeeping subsystem (i.e., "the clock"). By taking the difference of the two time-of-arrival residual data streams we can exactly cancel the clock noise in the combined data set, thereby enhancing the sensitivity to gravitational waves. We estimate that, in the band (10(-9)-10(-8))  Hz, this "interferometric" pulsar timing technique can potentially improve the sensitivity to gravitational radiation by almost 2 orders of magnitude over that of single-telescopes. Interferometric pulsar timing experiments could be performed with neighboring pairs of antennas of the NASA's Deep Space Network and the forthcoming large arraying projects.

  17. Timing of 29 Pulsars Discovered in the PALFA Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Bogdanov, S.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Knispel, B.; Lynch, R.; Allen, B.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Cardoso, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Lazarus, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Madsen, E.; McKee, J.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Parent, E.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Seymour, A.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L. G.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J.; Wharton, R. S.; Zhu, W. W.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the discovery and timing observations of 29 distant long-period pulsars found in the ongoing Arecibo L-band Feed Array pulsar survey. Following discovery with the Arecibo Telescope, confirmation and timing observations of these pulsars over several years at Jodrell Bank Observatory have yielded high-precision positions and measurements of rotation and radiation properties. We have used multi-frequency data to measure the interstellar scattering properties of some of these pulsars. Most of the pulsars have properties that mirror those of the previously known pulsar population, although four show some notable characteristics. PSRs J1907+0631 and J1925+1720 are young and are associated with supernova remnants or plerionic nebulae: J1907+0631 lies close to the center of SNR G40.5‑0.5, while J1925+1720 is coincident with a high-energy Fermi γ-ray source. One pulsar, J1932+1500, is in a surprisingly eccentric, 199 day binary orbit with a companion having a minimum mass of 0.33 M⊙. Several of the sources exhibit timing noise, and two, PSRs J0611+1436 and J1907+0631, have both suffered large glitches, but with very different post-glitch rotation properties. In particular, the rotational period of PSR J0611+1436 will not recover to its pre-glitch value for about 12 years, a far greater recovery timescale than seen following any other large glitches.

  18. Prospects for High-Precision Pulsar Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, K; Kramer, M; Stappers, B W; van Straten, W; Cordes, J M

    2011-01-01

    Timing pulses of pulsars has proved to be a most powerful technique useful to a host of research areas in astronomy and physics. Importantly, the precision of this timing is not only affected by radiometer noise, but also by intrinsic pulse shape changes, interstellar medium (ISM) evolution, instrumental distortions, etc. In this paper we review the known causes of pulse shape variations and assess their effect on the precision and accuracy of a single measurement of pulse arrival time with current instrumentation. Throughout this analysis we use the brightest and most precisely timed millisecond pulsar (MSP), PSR J0437-4715, as a case study, and develop a set of diagnostic tools to evaluate profile stability in timing observations. We conclude that most causes of distortion can be either corrected by state-of-the-art techniques or taken into account in the estimation of time-of-arrival (TOA) uncertainties. The advent of a new generation of radio telescopes (e.g. the Square Kilometre Array, SKA), and their in...

  19. THE TIMING OF NINE GLOBULAR CLUSTER PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Ryan S. [Physics Department, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Freire, Paulo C. C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Ransom, Scott M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-4325 (United States); Jacoby, Bryan A., E-mail: rlynch@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: pfreire@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: sransom@nrao.edu, E-mail: bryan.jacoby@gmail.com [Aerospace Corporation, 15049 Conference Center Drive, Chantilly, VA 20151-3824 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    We have used the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope to time nine previously known pulsars without published timing solutions in the globular clusters (GCs) M62, NGC 6544, and NGC 6624. We have full timing solutions that measure the spin, astrometric, and (where applicable) binary parameters for six of these pulsars. The remaining three pulsars (reported here for the first time) were not detected enough to establish solutions. We also report our timing solutions for five pulsars with previously published solutions, and find good agreement with other authors, except for PSR J1701-3006B in M62. Gas in this system is probably responsible for the discrepancy in orbital parameters, and we have been able to measure a change in the orbital period over the course of our observations. Among the pulsars with new solutions we find several binary pulsars with very low mass companions (members of the so-called 'black widow' class) and we are able to place constraints on the mass-to-light ratio in two clusters. We confirm that one of the pulsars in NGC 6624 is indeed a member of the rare class of non-recycled pulsars found in GCs. We have also measured the orbital precession and Shapiro delay for a relativistic binary in NGC 6544. If we assume that the orbital precession can be described entirely by general relativity, which is likely, we are able to measure the total system mass (2.57190(73) M{sub Sun }) and companion mass (1.2064(20) M{sub Sun }), from which we derive the orbital inclination (sin i = 0.9956(14)) and the pulsar mass (1.3655(21) M{sub Sun }), the most precise such measurement ever obtained for a millisecond pulsar. The companion is the most massive known around a fully recycled pulsar.

  20. High-time Resolution Astrophysics and Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Shearer, Andy

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of pulsars in 1968 heralded an era where the temporal characteristics of detectors had to be reassessed. Up to this point detector integration times would normally be measured in minutes rather seconds and definitely not on sub-second time scales. At the start of the 21st century pulsar observations are still pushing the limits of detector telescope capabilities. Flux variations on times scales less than 1 nsec have been observed during giant radio pulses. Pulsar studies over the next 10 to 20 years will require instruments with time resolutions down to microseconds and below, high-quantum quantum efficiency, reasonable energy resolution and sensitive to circular and linear polarisation of stochastic signals. This chapter is review of temporally resolved optical observations of pulsars. It concludes with estimates of the observability of pulsars with both existing telescopes and into the ELT era.

  1. Pulsar timing noise from superfluid turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Melatos, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Shear-driven turbulence in the superfluid interior of a neutron star exerts a fluctuating torque on the rigid crust, causing the rotational phase to walk randomly. The phase fluctuation spectrum is calculated analytically for incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence and is found to be red; the half-power point is set by the observed spin-down rate, the crust-superfluid lag, and the dynamical response time of the superfluid. Preliminary limits are placed on the latter quantities using selected time- and frequency-domain data. It is found that measurements of the normalization and slope of the power spectrum are reproduced for reasonable choices of the turbulence parameters. The results point preferentially to the neutron star interior containing a turbulent superfluid rather than a turbulent Navier-Stokes fluid. The implications for gravitational wave detection by pulsar timing arrays are discussed briefly.

  2. Pulsar timing and general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D. C.; Hellings, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques are described for accounting for relativistic effects in the analysis of pulsar signals. Design features of instrumentation used to achieve millisecond accuracy in the signal measurements are discussed. The accuracy of the data permits modeling the pulsar physical characteristics from the natural glitches in the emissions. Relativistic corrections are defined for adjusting for differences between the pulsar motion in its spacetime coordinate system relative to the terrestrial coordinate system, the earth's motion, and the gravitational potentials of solar system bodies. Modifications of the model to allow for a binary pulsar system are outlined, including treatment of the system as a point mass. Finally, a quadrupole model is presented for gravitational radiation and techniques are defined for using pulsars in the search for gravitational waves.

  3. Pulsar timing and general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D. C.; Hellings, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques are described for accounting for relativistic effects in the analysis of pulsar signals. Design features of instrumentation used to achieve millisecond accuracy in the signal measurements are discussed. The accuracy of the data permits modeling the pulsar physical characteristics from the natural glitches in the emissions. Relativistic corrections are defined for adjusting for differences between the pulsar motion in its spacetime coordinate system relative to the terrestrial coordinate system, the earth's motion, and the gravitational potentials of solar system bodies. Modifications of the model to allow for a binary pulsar system are outlined, including treatment of the system as a point mass. Finally, a quadrupole model is presented for gravitational radiation and techniques are defined for using pulsars in the search for gravitational waves.

  4. Detecting gravitational waves from the galactic center with Pulsar Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Alak; Zwart, Simon Portegies

    2014-01-01

    Black holes orbiting the Super Massive Black Hole (SMBH) Sgr A* in the Milky-way galaxy center (GC) generate gravitational waves. The spectrum, due to stars and black holes, is continuous below 40 nHz while individual BHs within about 200 AU of the central SMBH stick out in the spectrum at higher frequencies. The GWs can be detected by timing radio pulsars within a few parsecs of this region. Future observations with the Square Kilometer Array of such pulsars with sufficient timing accuracy may be sensitive to signals from intermediate mass BHs (IMBH) in a 3 year observation baseline. The recent detection of radio pulsations from the magnetar SGR J1745-29 very near the GC opens up the possibilities of detecting millisecond pulsars (which can be used as probes of the GWs) through lines of sight with only moderate pulse and angular broadening due to scattering.

  5. The Timing of Nine Globular Cluster Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Ryan S; Ransom, Scott M; Jacoby, Bryan A

    2011-01-01

    We have used the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope to time nine previously known pulsars without published timing solutions in the globular clusters M62, NGC 6544, and NGC 6624. We have full timing solutions that measure the spin, astrometric, and (where applicable) binary parameters for six of these pulsars. The remaining three pulsars (reported here for the first time) were not detected enough to establish solutions. We also report our timing solutions for five pulsars with previously published solutions, and find good agreement with past authors, except for PSR J1701-3006B in M62. Gas in this system is probably responsible for the discrepancy in orbital parameters, and we have been able to measure a change in the orbital period over the course of our observations. Among the pulsars with new solutions we find several binary pulsars with very low mass companions (members of the so-called "black widow" class) and we are able to place constraints on the mass-to-light ratio in two clusters. We confirm that on...

  6. The NANOGrav Nine-Year Data Set: Excess Noise in Millisecond Pulsar Arrival Times

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, M T; Chatterjee, S; Arzoumanian, Z; Crowter, K; Demorest, P B; Dolch, T; Ellis, J A; Ferdman, R D; Fonseca, E; Gonzalez, M E; Jones, G; Jones, M L; Levin, L; Madison, D R; McLaughlin, M A; Nice, D J; Pennucci, T T; Ransom, S M; Shannon, R M; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J K; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational wave astronomy using a pulsar timing array requires high-quality millisecond pulsars, correctable interstellar propagation delays, and high-precision measurements of pulse times of arrival. Here we identify noise in timing residuals that exceeds that predicted for arrival time estimation for millisecond pulsars observed by the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves. We characterize the excess noise using variance and structure function analyses. We find that 26 out of 37 pulsars show inconsistencies with a white-noise-only model based on the short timescale analysis of each pulsar and we demonstrate that the excess noise has a red power spectrum for 15 pulsars. We also decompose the excess noise into chromatic (radio-frequency-dependent) and achromatic components. Associating the achromatic red-noise component with spin noise and including additional power-spectrum-based estimates from the literature, we estimate a scaling law in terms of spin parameters (frequency and freq...

  7. Pulsars at Parkes

    CERN Document Server

    Manchester, R N

    2012-01-01

    The first pulsar observations were made at Parkes on March 8, 1968, just 13 days after the publication of the discovery paper by Hewish and Bell. Since then, Parkes has become the world's most successful pulsar search machine, discovering nearly two thirds of the known pulsars, among them many highly significant objects. It has also led the world in pulsar polarisation and timing studies. In this talk I will review the highlights of pulsar work at Parkes from those 1968 observations to about 2006 when the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey was essentially completed and the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project was established.

  8. A Gravitational Wave Pulsar Timing Backend for DSN Telescopes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop a state-of-the-art pulsar timing processor to be installed at the DSN to demonstrate precision pulsar timing capability along with a novel signal processing...

  9. Measurement and correction of variations in interstellar dispersion in high-precision pulsar timing

    CERN Document Server

    Keith, M J; Shannon, R M; Hobbs, G B; Manchester, R N; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D J; Chaudhary, A; Hotan, A W; Khoo, J; Kocz, J; Oslowski, S; Ravi, V; Reynolds, J E; Sarkissian, J; van Straten, W; Yardley, D R B

    2012-01-01

    Signals from radio pulsars show a wavelength-dependent delay due to dispersion in the interstellar plasma. At a typical observing wavelength, this delay can vary by tens of microseconds on five-year time scales, far in excess of signals of interest to pulsar timing arrays, such as that induced by a gravitational-wave background. Measurement of these delay variations is not only crucial for the detection of such signals, but also provides an unparallelled measurement of the turbulent interstellar plasma at au scales. In this paper we demonstrate that without consideration of wavelength- independent red-noise, 'simple' algorithms to correct for interstellar dispersion can attenuate signals of interest to pulsar timing arrays. We present a robust method for this correction, which we validate through simulations, and apply it to observations from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array. Correction for dispersion variations comes at a cost of increased band-limited white noise. We discuss scheduling to minimise this additi...

  10. Simulated gamma-ray pulse profile of the Crab pulsar with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtovoi, A.; Zampieri, L.

    2016-07-01

    We present simulations of the very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray light curve of the Crab pulsar as observed by the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The CTA pulse profile of the Crab pulsar is simulated with the specific goal of determining the accuracy of the position of the interpulse. We fit the pulse shape obtained by the Major Atmospheric Gamma-Ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescope with a three-Gaussian template and rescale it to account for the different CTA instrumental and observational configurations. Simulations are performed for different configurations of CTA and for the ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) mini-array. The northern CTA configuration will provide an improvement of a factor of ˜3 in accuracy with an observing time comparable to that of MAGIC (73 h). Unless the VHE spectrum above 1 TeV behaves differently from what we presently know, unreasonably long observing times are required for a significant detection of the pulsations of the Crab pulsar with the high-energy-range sub-arrays. We also found that an independent VHE timing analysis is feasible with Large Size Telescopes. CTA will provide a significant improvement in determining the VHE pulse shape parameters necessary to constrain theoretical models of the gamma-ray emission of the Crab pulsar. One of such parameters is the shift in phase between peaks in the pulse profile at VHE and in other energy bands that, if detected, may point to different locations of the emission regions.

  11. The Scaling of the RMS with Dwell Time in NANOGrav Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Handzo, Emma; Lommen, Andrea N; Perrodin, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs) are collections of well-timed millisecond pulsars that are being used as detectors of gravitational waves (GWs). Given current sensitivity, projected improvements in PTAs and the predicted strength of the GW signals, the detection of GWs with PTAs could occur within the next decade. One way we can improve a PTA is to reduce the measurement noise present in the pulsar timing residuals. If the pulsars included in the array display uncorrelated noise, the root mean square (RMS) of the timing residuals is predicted to scale as $\\mathrm{T}^{-1/2}$, where T is the dwell time per observation. In this case, the sensitivity of the array can be increased by increasing T. We studied the 17 pulsars in the five year North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) data set to determine if the noise in the timing residuals of the pulsars observed was consistent with this property. For comparison, we performed the same analysis on PSR B1937+21, a pulsar that is known to dis...

  12. Bayesian inference for pulsar timing models

    CERN Document Server

    Vigeland, Sarah J

    2013-01-01

    The extremely regular, periodic radio emission from millisecond pulsars make them useful tools for studying neutron star astrophysics, general relativity, and low-frequency gravitational waves. These studies require that the observed pulse time of arrivals are fit to complicated timing models that describe numerous effects such as the astrometry of the source, the evolution of the pulsar's spin, the presence of a binary companion, and the propagation of the pulses through the interstellar medium. In this paper, we discuss the benefits of using Bayesian inference to obtain these timing solutions. These include the validation of linearized least-squares model fits when they are correct, and the proper characterization of parameter uncertainties when they are not; the incorporation of prior parameter information and of models of correlated noise; and the Bayesian comparison of alternative timing models. We describe our computational setup, which combines the timing models of tempo2 with the nested-sampling integ...

  13. Real-Time Signal Processor for Pulsar Studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. S. Ramkumar; A. A. Deshpande

    2001-12-01

    This paper describes the design, tests and preliminary results of a real-time parallel signal processor built to aid a wide variety of pulsar observations. The signal processor reduces the distortions caused by the effects of dispersion, Faraday rotation, doppler acceleration and parallactic angle variations, at a sustained data rate of 32 Msamples/sec. It also folds the pulses coherently over the period and integrates adjacent samples in time and frequency to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. The resulting data are recorded for further off-line analysis of the characteristics of pulsars and the intervening medium. The signal processing for analysis of pulsar signals is quite complex, imposing the need for a high computational throughput, typically of the order of a Giga operations per second (GOPS). Conventionally, the high computational demand restricts the flexibility to handle only a few types of pulsar observations. This instrument is designed to handle a wide variety of Pulsar observations with the Giant Metre Wave Radio Telescope (GMRT), and is flexible enough to be used in many other high-speed, signal processing applications. The technology used includes field-programmable-gate-array(FPGA) based data/code routing interfaces, PC-AT based control, diagnostics and data acquisition, digital signal processor (DSP) chip based parallel processing nodes and C language based control software and DSP-assembly programs for signal processing. The architecture and the software implementation of the parallel processor are fine-tuned to realize about 60 MOPS per DSP node and a multiple-instruction-multiple-data (MIMD) capability.

  14. Limitations in timing precision due to single-pulse shape variability in millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, R M; Dai, S; Bailes, M; Hobbs, G; Manchester, R N; van Straten, W; Raithel, C A; Ravi, V; Toomey, L; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Coles, W A; Keith, M J; Kerr, M; Levin, Y; Sarkissian, J M; Wang, J -B; Wen, L; Zhu, X -J

    2014-01-01

    High-sensitivity radio-frequency observations of millisecond pulsars usually show stochastic, broadband, pulse-shape variations intrinsic to the pulsar emission process. These variations induce jitter noise in pulsar timing observations; understanding the properties of this noise is of particular importance for the effort to detect gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays. We assess the short-term profile and timing stability of 22 millisecond pulsars that are part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array sample by examining intra-observation arrival time variability and single-pulse phenomenology. In 7 of the 22 pulsars, in the band centred at approximately 1400MHz, we find that the brightest observations are limited by intrinsic jitter. We find consistent results, either detections or upper limits, for jitter noise in other frequency bands. PSR J1909-3744 shows the lowest levels of jitter noise, which we estimate to contribute $\\sim$10 ns root mean square error to the arrival times for hour-duration observati...

  15. Pulsar braking: Time dependent moment of inertia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanec, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Pulsars rotate with extremely stable rotational frequency enabling one to measure its first and second time derivatives. These observed values can be combined to the so-called braking index. However observed values of braking index differ from the theoretical value of 3 corresponding to braking by magnetic dipole radiation being the dominant theoretical model. Such a difference can be explained by contribution of other mechanism like pulsar wind or quadrupole radiation, or by time dependency of magnetic field or moment of inertia. In this presentation we focus on influence of time dependent moment of inertia on the braking index. We will also discuss possible physical models for time-dependence of moment of inertia.

  16. Crab pulsar timing 1982-87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyne, A. G.; Pritchard, R. S.; Smith, F. G.

    1988-08-01

    Observations of the arrival times of pulses from the pulsar in the Crab Nebula over a six-year interval are presented. The data are intended to permit the investigation of the interior of the neutron star through the study of glitches and timing noise and to provide an ephemeris for high-energy observations. The first and second frequency derivatives provide a value for the braking index of n = 2.509 + or - 0.001, which is consistent with previous observations. The third frequency derivative can now be determined over an 18-yr span and is as expected for this braking index. The predominant deviations from a simple slow-down model form a sinusoid with a period of 20 months, attributable to an oscillation of the bulk of the neutron superfluid in the pulsar. One conspicuous glitch occurred in August, 1986 and the subsequent recovery was studied from only one hour after the event.

  17. Prospects for high-precision pulsar timing with the new Effelsberg PSRIX backend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, P.; Karuppusamy, R.; Graikou, E.; Caballero, R. N.; Champion, D. J.; Lee, K. J.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Kramer, M.

    2016-05-01

    The PSRIX backend is the primary pulsar timing instrument of the Effelsberg 100 m radio telescope since early 2011. This new ROACH-based system enables bandwidths up to 500 MHz to be recorded, significantly more than what was possible with its predecessor, the Effelsberg-Berkeley Pulsar Processor (EBPP). We review the first four years of PSRIX timing data for 33 pulsars collected as part of the monthly European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) observations. We describe the automated data analysis pipeline, COASTGUARD, that we developed to reduce these observations. We also introduce TOASTER, the EPTA timing data base, used to store timing results, processing information and observation metadata. Using these new tools, we measure the phase-averaged flux densities at 1.4 GHz of all 33 pulsars. For seven of these pulsars, our flux density measurements are the first values ever reported. For the other 26 pulsars, we compare our flux density measurements with previously published values. By comparing PSRIX data with EBPP data, we find an improvement of ˜2-5 times in signal-to-noise ratio, which translates to an increase of ˜2-5 times in pulse time-of-arrival (TOA) precision. We show that such an improvement in TOA precision will improve the sensitivity to the stochastic gravitational wave background. Finally, we showcase the flexibility of the new PSRIX backend by observing several millisecond-period pulsars (MSPs) at 5 and 9 GHz. Motivated by our detections, we discuss the potential for complementing existing pulsar timing array data sets with MSP monitoring campaigns at these higher frequencies.

  18. Simulated Gamma-Ray Pulse Profile of the Crab Pulsar with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Burtovoi, A

    2016-01-01

    We present simulations of the very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray light curve of the Crab pulsar as observed by the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The CTA pulse profile of the Crab pulsar is simulated with the specific goal of determining the accuracy of the position of the interpulse. We fit the pulse shape obtained by the MAGIC telescope with a three-Gaussian template and rescale it to account for the different CTA instrumental and observational configurations. Simulations are performed for different configurations of CTA and for the ASTRI mini-array. The northern CTA configuration will provide an improvement of a factor of ~3 in accuracy with an observing time comparable to that of MAGIC (73 hours). Unless the VHE spectrum above 1 TeV behaves differently from what we presently know, unreasonably long observing times are required for a significant detection of the pulsations of the Crab pulsar with the high-energy-range sub-arrays. We also found that an independent VHE timing analysis is feasible with Large ...

  19. Bayesian model-emulation of stochastic gravitational-wave spectra for probes of the final-parsec problem with pulsar-timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephen; Simon, Joseph; Sampson, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The final parsec of supermassive black-hole binary evolution is subject to the complex interplay of stellar loss-cone scattering, circumbinary disk accretion, and gravitational-wave emission, with binary eccentricity affected by all of these. The strain spectrum of gravitational-waves in the pulsar-timing band thus encodes rich information about the binary population's response to these various environmental mechanisms. Current spectral models have heretofore followed basic analytic prescriptions, and attempt to investigate these final-parsec mechanisms in an indirect fashion. Here we describe a new technique to directly probe the environmental properties of supermassive black-hole binaries through ``Bayesian model-emulation''. We perform black-hole binary population synthesis simulations at a restricted set of environmental parameter combinations, compute the strain spectra from these, then train a Gaussian process to learn the shape of spectrum at any point in parameter space. We describe this technique, demonstrate its efficacy with a program of simulated datasets, then illustrate its power by directly constraining final-parsec physics in a Bayesian analysis of the NANOGrav 5-year dataset. The technique is fast, flexible, and robust.

  20. Bayesian model-emulation of stochastic gravitational-wave spectra for probes of the final-parsec problem with pulsar-timing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephen R.; Simon, Joseph; Sampson, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The final parsec of supermassive black-hole binary evolution is subject to the complex interplay of stellar loss-cone scattering, circumbinary disk accretion, and gravitational-wave emission, with binary eccentricity affected by all of these. The strain spectrum of gravitational-waves in the pulsar-timing band thus encodes rich information about the binary population's response to these various environmental mechanisms. Current spectral models have heretofore followed basic analytic prescriptions, and attempt to investigate these final-parsec mechanisms in an indirect fashion. Here we describe a new technique to directly probe the environmental properties of supermassive black-hole binaries through "Bayesian model-emulation". We perform black-hole binary population synthesis simulations at a restricted set of environmental parameter combinations, compute the strain spectra from these, then train a Gaussian process to learn the shape of the spectrum at any point in parameter space. We describe this technique, demonstrate its efficacy with a program of simulated datasets, then illustrate its power by directly constraining final-parsec physics in a Bayesian analysis of the NANOGrav 5-year dataset. The technique is fast, flexible, and robust.

  1. Key Science with the Square Kilometer Array: Strong-field Tests of Gravity using Pulsars and Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, J. M.; Kramer, M.; Backer, D. C.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Science Working Groupthe Square Kilometer Array Team

    2005-12-01

    A Galactic census of pulsars with the SKA will discover most of the active pulsars in the Galaxy beamed toward us. The sheer number of pulsars discovered, along with the exceptional timing precision the SKA can provide, will revolutionize the field of pulsar astrophysics and will enable significant tests of theories of gravity. Census discoveries will almost certainly include pulsar-black hole binaries as well as pulsars orbiting the super-massive black hole in the Galactic center. These systems provide unique opportunties for probing the ultra-strong field limit of relativistic gravity and will complement future gravitational wave detections using LISA-like instruments. SKA measurements can be used to test the Cosmic Censorship Conjecture and the No-Hair theorem. The large number of millisecond pulsars discovered with the SKA will also provide a dense array of precision clocks on the sky that can be used as multiple arms of a cosmic gravitational wave detector, which can be used to detect and measure the stochastic cosmological gravitational wave background that is expected from a number of sources. In addition to gravitational tests, the large number of lines of sight will provide a detailed map of the Galaxy's electron density and magnetic fields and important information on the dynamics and evolutionary histories of neutron stars. The census will provide examples of nearly every possible outcome of the evolution of massive stars, including (as above) pulsar black-hole systems and sub-millisecond pulsars, if they exist. These objects will yield constraints on the equation of state of matter at super-nuclear densities. Masses of pulsars and their binary companions planets, white dwarfs, other neutron stars, and black holes will be determined to ˜ 1% for hundreds of objects. The SKA will also provide partial censuses of nearby galaxies through periodicity and giant-pulse detections, yielding important information on the intergalactic medium.

  2. Imprints of relic gravitational waves on pulsar timing

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, Ming-Lei; Zhao, Cheng-Shi; Gao, Feng; Yan, Bao-Rong; Yang, Ting-Gao; Gao, Yu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Relic gravitational waves (RGWs) , a background originated during inflation, would give imprints on the pulsar timing residuals. This makes RGWs be one of important sources for detection using the method of pulsar timing. In this paper, we discuss the effects of RGWs on the single pulsar timing, and give quantitively the timing residuals caused by RGWs with different model parameters. In principle, if the RGWs are strong enough today, they can be detected by timing a single millisecond pulsar with high precision after the intrinsic red noise in pulsar timing residuals were understood, even though observing simultaneously multiple millisecond pulsars is a more powerful technique in extracting gravitational wave signals. We corrected the normalization of RGWs using observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), which leads to the amplitudes of RGWs being reduced by two orders of magnitude or so compared to our previous works. We made new constraints on RGWs using the recent observations from the Parkes ...

  3. An analysis of the timing irregularities for 366 pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, G; Kramer, M

    2009-01-01

    We provide an analysis of timing irregularities observed for 366 pulsars. Observations were obtained using the 76-m Lovell radio telescope at the Jodrell Bank Observatory over the past 36 years. These data sets have allowed us to carry out the first large-scale analysis of pulsar timing noise over time scales of > 10yr, with multiple observing frequencies and for a large sample of pulsars. Our sample includes both normal and recycled pulsars. The timing residuals for the pulsars with the smallest characteristic ages are shown to be dominated by the recovery from glitch events, whereas the timing irregularities seen for older pulsars are quasi-periodic. We emphasise that previous models that explained timing residuals as a low-frequency noise process are not consistent with observation.

  4. Prospects for High-Precision Pulsar Timing with the New Effelsberg PSRIX Backend

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarus, P; Graikou, E; Caballero, R N; Champion, D J; Lee, K J; Verbiest, J P W; Kramer, M

    2016-01-01

    The PSRIX backend is the primary pulsar timing instrument of the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope since early 2011. This new ROACH-based system enables bandwidths up to 500 MHz to be recorded, significantly more than what was possible with its predecessor, the Effelsberg-Berkeley Pulsar Processor (EBPP). We review the first four years of PSRIX timing data for 33 pulsars collected as part of the monthly European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) observations. We describe the automated data analysis pipeline, CoastGuard, that we developed to reduce these observations. We also introduce TOASTER, the EPTA timing database used to store timing results, processing information and observation metadata. Using these new tools, we measure the phase-averaged flux densities at 1.4 GHz of all 33 pulsars. For 7 of these pulsars, our flux density measurements are the first values ever reported. For the other 26 pulsars, we compare our flux density measurements with previously published values. By comparing PSRIX data with EBPP data...

  5. The High Time Resolution Universe Pulsar Survey - VII: discovery of five millisecond pulsars and the different luminosity properties of binary and isolated recycled pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Burgay, M; Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D J; Coster, P; D'Amico, N; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Lyne, A G; Milia, S; Ng, C; Possenti, A; Stappers, B W; Thornton, D; Tiburzi, C; van Straten, W; Bassa, C G

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the discovery and timing parameters for five millisecond pulsars (MSPs), four in binary systems with probable white dwarf companions and one isolated, found in ongoing processing of the High Time Resolution Universe Pulsar Survey (HTRU). We also present high quality polarimetric data on four of them. These further discoveries confirm the high potential of our survey in finding pulsars with very short spin periods. At least two of these five MSPs are excellent candidates to be included in the Pulsar Timing Array projects. Thanks to the wealth of MSP discoveries in the HTRU survey, we revisit the question of whether the luminosity distributions of isolated and binary MSPs are different. Using the Cordes and Lazio distance model and our new and catalogue flux density measurements, we find that 41 of the 42 most luminous MSPs in the Galactic disk are in binaries and a statistical analysis suggests that the luminosity functions differ with 99.9% significance. We conclude that the formation proc...

  6. Weak microlensing effect and stability of pulsar time scale

    CERN Document Server

    Pshirkov, M S

    2006-01-01

    An influence of the weak microlensing effect on the pulsar timing is investigated for pulsar B1937+21. Average residuals of Time of Arrival (TOA) due to the effect would be as large as 10 ns in 20 years observation span. These residuals can be much greater (up to 1 ms in 20 years span) if pulsar is located in globular cluster (or behind it).

  7. 21-year timing of the black-widow pulsar J2051-0827

    CERN Document Server

    Shaifullah, G; Freire, P C C; Tauris, T M; Wex, N; Osłowski, S; Stappers, B W; Bassa, C G; Caballero, R N; Champion, D J; Cognard, I; Desvignes, G; Graikou, E; Guillemot, L; Janssen, G H; Jessner, A; Jordan, C; Karuppusamy, R; Kramer, M; Lazaridis, K; Lazarus, P; Lyne, A G; McKee, J W; Perrodin, D; Possenti, A; Tiburzi, C

    2016-01-01

    Timing results for the black-widow pulsar J2051-0827 are presented, using a 21-year dataset from four European Pulsar Timing Array telescopes and the Parkes radio telescope. This dataset, which is the longest published to date for a black-widow system, allows for an improved analysis that addresses previously unknown biases. While secular variations, as identified in previous analyses, are recovered, short-term variations are detected for the first time. Concurrently, a significant decrease of approx. 2.5x10-3 cm-3 pc in the dispersion measure associated with PSR J2051-0827 is measured for the first time and improvements are also made to estimates of the proper motion. Finally, PSR J2051-0827 is shown to have entered a relatively stable state suggesting the possibility of its eventual inclusion in pulsar timing arrays.

  8. 21 year timing of the black-widow pulsar J2051-0827

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaifullah, G.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Freire, P. C. C.; Tauris, T. M.; Wex, N.; Osłowski, S.; Stappers, B. W.; Bassa, C. G.; Caballero, R. N.; Champion, D. J.; Cognard, I.; Desvignes, G.; Graikou, E.; Guillemot, L.; Janssen, G. H.; Jessner, A.; Jordan, C.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Lazaridis, K.; Lazarus, P.; Lyne, A. G.; McKee, J. W.; Perrodin, D.; Possenti, A.; Tiburzi, C.

    2016-10-01

    Timing results for the black-widow pulsar J2051-0827 are presented, using a 21 year data set from four European Pulsar Timing Array telescopes and the Parkes radio telescope. This data set, which is the longest published to date for a black-widow system, allows for an improved analysis that addresses previously unknown biases. While secular variations, as identified in previous analyses, are recovered, short-term variations are detected for the first time. Concurrently, a significant decrease of ˜ 2.5 × 10- 3 cm- 3 pc in the dispersion measure associated with PSR J2051-0827 is measured for the first time and improvements are also made to estimates of the proper motion. Finally, PSR J2051-0827 is shown to have entered a relatively stable state suggesting the possibility of its eventual inclusion in pulsar timing arrays.

  9. Elementary Wideband Timing of Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Pennucci, Timothy T; Ransom, Scott M

    2014-01-01

    We present an algorithm for the simultaneous measurement of a pulse time-of-arrival (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM) from folded wideband pulsar data. We extend the prescription put forth by Taylor (1992) to accommodate a general two-dimensional template ``portrait'', the alignment of which can be used to measure a pulse phase and DM. We show that there is a dedispersion reference frequency that removes the covariance between the two measured quantities, and note that the recovered pulse profile scaling amplitudes can provide useful information. We experiment with pulse modeling by using Gaussian-component scheme that allows for independent component evolution with frequency, a ``fiducial component'', and the inclusion of scattering. A demonstration on three years of wideband data on the bright millisecond pulsar J1824-2452A (M28A) from the Green Bank Telescope, and a suite of Monte Carlo analyses showcase and validate the algorithm. By using a simple model portrait of M28A we obtain DM trends comparable to ...

  10. Pulsar Acceleration Searches on the GPU for the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Dimoudi, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Pulsar acceleration searches are methods for recovering signals from radio telescopes, that may otherwise be lost due to the effect of orbital acceleration in binary systems. The vast amount of data that will be produced by next generation instruments such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) necessitates real-time acceleration searches, which in turn requires the use of HPC platforms. We present our implementation of the Fourier Domain Acceleration Search (FDAS) algorithm on Graphics Processor Units (GPUs) in the context of the SKA, as part of the Astro-Accelerate real-time data processing library, currently under development at the Oxford e-Research Centre (OeRC), University of Oxford.

  11. Measuring the mass of solar system planets using pulsar timing

    CERN Document Server

    Champion, D J; Manchester, R N; Edwards, R T; Backer, D C; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Coles, W; Demorest, P B; Ferdman, R D; Folkner, W M; Hotan, A W; Kramer, M; Lommen, A N; Nice, D J; Purver, M B; Sarkissian, J M; Stairs, I H; van Straten, W; Verbiest, J P W; Yardley, D R B

    2010-01-01

    High-precision pulsar timing relies on a solar-system ephemeris in order to convert times of arrival (TOAs) of pulses measured at an observatory to the solar system barycenter. Any error in the conversion to the barycentric TOAs leads to a systematic variation in the observed timing residuals; specifically, an incorrect planetary mass leads to a predominantly sinusoidal variation having a period and phase associated with the planet's orbital motion about the Sun. By using an array of pulsars (PSRs J0437-4715, J1744-1134, J1857+0943, J1909-3744), the masses of the planetary systems from Mercury to Saturn have been determined. These masses are consistent with the best-known masses determined by spacecraft observations, with the mass of the Jovian system, 9.547921(2)E-4 Msun, being significantly more accurate than the mass determined from the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft, and consistent with but less accurate than the value from the Galileo spacecraft. While spacecraft are likely to produce the most accurate m...

  12. A Bayesian parameter estimation approach to pulsar time-of-arrival analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Messenger, C; Demorest, P; Ransom, S

    2011-01-01

    The increasing sensitivities of pulsar timing arrays to ultra-low frequency (nHz) gravitational waves promises to achieve direct gravitational wave detection within the next 5-10 years. While there are many parallel efforts being made in the improvement of telescope sensitivity, the detection of stable millisecond pulsars and the improvement of the timing software, there are reasons to believe that the methods used to accurately determine the time-of-arrival (TOA) of pulses from radio pulsars can be improved upon. More specifically, the determination of the uncertainties on these TOAs, which strongly affect the ability to detect GWs through pulsar timing, may be unreliable. We propose two Bayesian methods for the generation of pulsar TOAs starting from pulsar "search-mode" data and pre-folded data. These methods are applied to simulated toy-model examples and in this initial work we focus on the issue of uncertainties in the folding period. The final results of our analysis are expressed in the form of poster...

  13. Pulsar Timing for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D A; Camilo, F; Cognard, I; Dumora, D; Espinoza, C; Freire, P C C; Gotthelf, E V; Harding, A K; Hobbs, G B; Johnston, S; Kaspi, V M; Krämer, M; Livingstone, M A; Lyne, A G; Manchester, R N; Marshall, F E; McLaughlin, M A; Noutsos, A; Ransom, S M; Roberts, M S E; Romani, R W; Stappers, B W; Theureau, G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Wang, N; Weltevrede, P

    2008-01-01

    We describe a comprehensive pulsar monitoring campaign for the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the {\\em Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope} (formerly GLAST). The detection and study of pulsars in gamma rays give insights into the populations of neutron stars and supernova rates in the Galaxy, into particle acceleration mechanisms in neutron star magnetospheres, and into the ``engines'' driving pulsar wind nebulae. LAT's unprecedented sensitivity between 20 MeV and 300 GeV together with its 2.4 sr field-of-view makes detection of many gamma-ray pulsars likely, justifying the monitoring of over two hundred pulsars with large spin-down powers. To search for gamma-ray pulsations from most of these pulsars requires a set of phase-connected timing solutions spanning a year or more to properly align the sparse photon arrival times. We describe the choice of pulsars and the instruments involved in the campaign. Attention is paid to verifications of the LAT pulsar software, using for example giant radio pulses from the Cra...

  14. Observing Pulsars with a Phased Array Feed at the Parkes Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, X.; Chippendale, A. P.; Hobbs, G.; Johnston, S.; Dai, S.; George, D.; Kramer, M.; Karuppusamy, R.; Malenta, M.; Spitler, L.; Tzioumis, T.; Wieching, G.

    2017-07-01

    During 2016 February, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science and the Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy installed, commissioned, and carried out science observations with a phased array feed receiver system on the 64-m diameter Parkes radio telescope. Here, we demonstrate that the phased array feed can be used for pulsar observations and we highlight some unique capabilities. We demonstrate that the pulse profiles obtained using the phased array feed can be calibrated and that multiple pulsars can be simultaneously observed. Significantly, we find that an intrinsic polarisation leakage of -31 dB can be achieved with a phased array feed beam offset from the centre of the field of view. We discuss the possibilities for using a phased array feed for future pulsar observations and for searching for fast radio bursts with the Parkes and Effelsberg telescopes.

  15. Robust fitting for pulsar timing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yidi; Keith, Michael J.; Stappers, Benjamin; Zheng, Wei

    2017-07-01

    We introduce a robust fitting method into pulsar timing analysis to cope with the non-Gaussian noise. The general maximum likelihood estimator (M-estimator) can resist the impact of non-Gaussian noise by employing convex and bounded loss functions. Three loss functions, including the Huber function, the Bisquare function and the Welsch function, are investigated. The Shapiro-Wilk test is employed to test whether the uncertainty in the observed times of arrival is drawn from a non-Gaussian distribution. Two simulations, where the non-Gaussian distribution is modelled as contaminated Gaussian distributions, are performed. It is found that M-estimators are unbiased and could achieve a root-mean-square error smaller than that obtained by the least square (LS) at the cost of a slightly higher computation complexity in a non-Gaussian environment. M-estimators are also applied to the real timing data of PSR J1713+0747. The results have shown that the fitting results of M-estimators are more accurate than those of LS and are closer to the result of very long baseline interferometry.

  16. Timing of 29 Pulsars Discovered in the PALFA Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lyne, A G; Bogdanov, S; Ferdman, R; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Knispel, B; Lynch, R; Allen, B; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Cardoso, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J S; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Lazarus, P; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Madsen, E; McKee, J; McLaughlin, M A; Parent, E; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Scholz, P; Seymour, A; Siemens, X; Spitler, L G; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J; Wharton, R S; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    We report on the discovery and timing observations of 29 distant long-period pulsars discovered in the ongoing Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey. Following discovery with the Arecibo Telescope, confirmation and timing observations of these pulsars over several years at Jodrell Bank Observatory have yielded high-precision positions and measurements of rotation and radiation properties. We have used multi-frequency data to measure the interstellar scattering properties of some of these pulsars. Most of the pulsars have properties that mirror those of the previously known pulsar population, although four show some notable characteristics. PSRs J1907+0631 and J1925+1720 are young and are associated with supernova remnants or plerionic nebulae: J1907+0631 lies close to the center of SNR G40.5-0.5, while J1925+1720 is coincident with a high-energy Fermi gamma-ray source. One pulsar, J1932+1500, is in a surprisingly eccentric, 199-day binary orbit with a companion having a minimum mass of 0.33 solar masses. Several of the...

  17. Pulsar timing can constrain primordial black holes in the LIGO mass window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Katelin; Liu, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    The recent discovery of gravitational waves from merging black holes has generated interest in primordial black holes as a possible component of dark matter. In this paper, we show that pulsar timing may soon have sufficient data to constrain 1 - 1000 M⊙ primordial black holes (PBHs) via the nondetection of a third-order Shapiro time delay as the black holes move around the Galactic halo. We present the results of a Monte Carlo simulation which suggests that future data from known pulsars may be capable of constraining the PBH density more stringently than other existing methods in the mass range ˜1 - 30 M⊙ . We find that timing new pulsars discovered using the proposed Square Kilometre Array may constrain primordial black holes in this mass range to comprise less than ˜1 %- 10 % of the dark matter.

  18. Pulsar timing can constrain primordial black holes in the LIGO mass window

    CERN Document Server

    Schutz, Katelin

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of gravitational waves from merging black holes has generated interest in primordial black holes as a possible component of the dark matter. In this paper, we show that pulsar timing may soon have sufficient data to constrain $1$-$1000\\,M_{\\odot}$ primordial black holes via the non-detection of a third-order Shapiro time delay as the black holes move around the Galactic halo. We present the results of a Monte Carlo simulation which suggests that future data from known pulsars may be capable of constraining the PBH density more stringently than other existing methods in the mass range ~1-30$\\,M_{\\odot}$. We find that timing new pulsars discovered using the proposed Square Kilometre Array may constrain primordial black holes in this mass range to comprise less than ~1-10% of the dark matter.

  19. X-Ray Pulsar Based Navigation and Time Determination Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcosm will build on the Phase I X-ray pulsar-based navigation and timing (XNAV) feasibility assessment to develop a detailed XNAV simulation capability to...

  20. JPL pulsar timing observations. IV - Excess phase noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, G. S.; Krause-Polstorff, J.

    1986-01-01

    Previously published tables of geocentric arrival times for 24 pulsars covering a 12 year span are extended here to 14.5 years. The list of pulsars is extended by nine, most of which were observed for about 4 years. Known positins of these new objects are confirmed, and limits on the proper motions are obtained. Large phase excursions in PSR 0525 + 21 are found. The orbital parameters of the binary pulsar 0820 + 02 are tentatively confirmed. Short-term timing noise in excess of that expected from receiver considerations alone is established. Variations in the timing residuals for the original 24 pulsars are analyzed for correlations with other observable parameters. Little significant correlation with changes in pulse shape or energy or with the drift correction is found on time scales of 500 pulses or longer.

  1. Intrinsic Instrumental Polarization and High-Precision Pulsar Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, Griffin; Paulin, Remi; Carozzi, Tobia; Johnston, Simon; van Straten, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Radio telescopes are used to accurately measure the time of arrival (ToA) of radio pulses in pulsar timing experiments that target mostly millisecond pulsars (MSPs) due to their high rotational stability. This allows for detailed study of MSPs and forms the basis of experiments to detect gravitational waves. Apart from intrinsic and propagation effects, such as pulse-to-pulse jitter and dispersion variations in the interstellar medium, timing precision is limited in part by the following: polarization purity of the telescope's orthogonally polarized receptors, the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the pulsar profile, and the polarization fidelity of the system. Using simulations, we present how fundamental limitations in recovering the true polarization reduce the precision of ToA measurements. Any real system will respond differently to each source observed depending on the unique pulsar polarization profile. Using the profiles of known MSPs we quantify the limits of observing system specifications that yield s...

  2. The High Time Resolution Universe Pulsar Survey IV: Discovery and polarimetry of millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Keith, M J; Bailes, M; Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; D'Amico, N; Jameson, A; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Milia, S; Possenti, A; Stappers, B W; van Straten, W; Parent, D

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery of six millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey for pulsars and fast transients carried out with the Parkes radio telescope. All six are in binary systems with approximately circular orbits and are likely to have white dwarf companions. PSR J1017-7156 has a high flux density and a narrow pulse width, making it ideal for precision timing experiments. PSRs J1446-4701 and J1125-5825 are coincident with gamma-ray sources, and folding the high-energy photons with the radio timing ephemeris shows evidence of pulsed gamma-ray emission. PSR J1502-6752 has a spin period of 26.7 ms, and its low period derivative implies that it is a recycled pulsar. The orbital parameters indicate it has a very low mass function, and therefore a companion mass much lower than usually expected for such a mildly recycled pulsar. In addition we present polarisation profiles for all 12 MSPs discovered in the HTRU survey to date. Similar to previous observations of MSPs, we find ...

  3. Time-domain and spectral properties of pulsars at 154 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, M E; Johnston, S; Kaplan, D L; Croft, S; Hancock, P; Callingham, J R; Zic, A; Dobie, D; Swiggum, J K; Rowlinson, A; Hurley-Walker, N; Offringa, A R; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Deshpande, A A; Gaensler, B M; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Lonsdale, C J; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Ord, S M; Prabu, T; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Tingay, S J; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2016-01-01

    We present 154 MHz Murchison Widefield Array imaging observations and variability information for a sample of pulsars. Over the declination range $-80^{\\circ} < {\\delta} < 10^{\\circ}$ we detect 17 known pulsars with mean flux density greater than 0.3 Jy. We explore the variability properties of this sample on timescales of minutes to years. For three of these pulsars, PSR J0953+0755, PSR J0437-4715 and PSR J0630-2834 we observe interstellar scintillation and variability on timescales of greater than 2 minutes. One further pulsar, PSR J0034-0721, showed significant variability, the physical origins of which are difficult to determine. The dynamic spectra for PSR J0953+0755 and PSR J0437-4715 show discrete time and frequency structure consistent with diffractive interstellar scintillation and we present the scintillation bandwidth and timescales from these observations. The remaining pulsars within our sample were statistically non-variable. We also explore the spectral properties of this sample and find ...

  4. On time transfer in X-ray pulsar navigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhen; LI Ming; SHUAI Ping

    2009-01-01

    X-ray pulsar navigation (XPNAV) is a new approach for spacecraft autonomous navigation. The system gets position information utilizing accurate timing methods. Among the timing models, the high-order relativistic effects on the propagated signal must be incorporated to attain precise timing. The time transfer model is provided in detail here in two parts: the time frame transformation and the relativistic effects.

  5. Pulsar timing analysis in the presence of correlated noise

    CERN Document Server

    Coles, W; Champion, D J; Manchester, R N; Verbiest, J P W

    2011-01-01

    Pulsar timing observations are usually analysed with least-square-fitting procedures under the assumption that the timing residuals are uncorrelated (statistically "white"). Pulsar observers are well aware that this assumption often breaks down and causes severe errors in estimating the parameters of the timing model and their uncertainties. Ad hoc methods for minimizing these errors have been developed, but we show that they are far from optimal. Compensation for temporal correlation can be done optimally if the covariance matrix of the residuals is known using a linear transformation that whitens both the residuals and the timing model. We adopt a transformation based on the Cholesky decomposition of the covariance matrix, but the transformation is not unique. We show how to estimate the covariance matrix with sufficient accuracy to optimize the pulsar timing analysis. We also show how to apply this procedure to estimate the spectrum of any time series with a steep red power-law spectrum, including those wi...

  6. Particle Emission-dependent Timing Noise of Pulsars?

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xiongwei; Xu, Renxin; Qiao, Guojun

    2010-01-01

    Though pulsars spin regularly, the differences between the observed and predicted ToA (time of arrival), known as "timing noise", can still reach a few milliseconds or more. We try to understand the noise in this paper. As proposed by Xu & Qiao in 2001, both dipole radiation and particle emission would result in pulsar braking. Accordingly, possible fluctuation of particle current flow is suggested here to contribute significant ToA variation of pulsars. We find that the particle emission fluctuation could lead to timing noise which can't be eliminated in timing process, and that a longer period fluctuation would arouse a stronger noise. The simulated timing noise profile and amplitude are in accord with the observed timing behaviors on the timescale of years.

  7. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory: Discovery and Timing of Five New Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Rosen, R; McLaughlin, M A; Lorimer, D R; Yun, M; Heatherly, S; Boyles, J; Lynch, R; Kondratiev, V I; Scoles, S; Ransom, S M; Moniot, M L; Cottrill, A; Weaver, M; Snider, A; Thompson, C; Raycraft, M; Dudenhoefer, J; Allphin, L; Thorley, J; Meadows, B; Marchiny, G; Liska, A; O'Dwyer, A M; Butler, B; Bloxton, S; Mabry, H; Abate, H; Boothe, J; Pritt, S; Alberth, J; Green, A; Crowley, R J; Agee, A; Nagley, S; Sargent, N; Hinson, E; Smith, K; McNeely, R; Quigley, H; Pennington, A; Chen, S; Maynard, T; Loope, L; Bielski, N; McGough, J R; Gural, J C; Colvin, S; Tso, S; Ewen, Z; Zhang, M; Ciccarella, N; Bukowski, B; Novotny, C B; Gore, J; Sarver, K; Johnson, S; Cunningham, H; Collins, D; Gardner, D; Monteleone, A; Hall, J; Schweinhagen, R; Ayers, J; Jay, S; Uosseph, B; Dunkum, D; Pal, J; Dydiw, S; Sterling, M; Phan, E

    2012-01-01

    We present the discovery and timing solutions of five new pulsars by students involved in the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC), a NSF-funded joint program between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and West Virginia University designed to excite and engage high-school students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) and related fields. We encourage students to pursue STEM fields by apprenticing them within a professional scientific community doing cutting edge research, specifically by teaching them to search for pulsars. The students are analyzing 300 hours of drift-scan survey data taken with the Green Bank Telescope at 350 MHz. These data cover 2876 square degrees of the sky. Over the course of five years, more than 700 students have inspected diagnostic plots through a web-based graphical interface designed for this project. The five pulsars discovered in the data have spin periods ranging from 3.1 ms to 4.8 s. Among the new discoveries are - PSR J1926-1314, a long period, nulli...

  8. The High Time Resolution Universe Pulsar Survey VIII: The Galactic millisecond pulsar population

    CERN Document Server

    Levin, L; Barsdell, B R; Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D J; Coster, P; D'Amico, N; Jameson, A; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Milia, S; Ng, C; Possenti, A; Stappers, B; Thornton, D; van Straten, W

    2013-01-01

    We have used millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from the southern High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) intermediate latitude survey area to simulate the distribution and total population of MSPs in the Galaxy. Our model makes use of the scale factor method, which estimates the ratio of the total number of MSPs in the Galaxy to the known sample. Using our best fit value for the z-height, z=500 pc, we find an underlying population of MSPs of 8.3(\\pm 4.2)*10^4 sources down to a limiting luminosity of L_min=0.1 mJy kpc^2 and a luminosity distribution with a steep slope of d\\log N/d\\log L = -1.45(\\pm 0.14). However, at the low end of the luminosity distribution, the uncertainties introduced by small number statistics are large. By omitting very low luminosity pulsars, we find a Galactic population above L_min=0.2 mJy kpc^2 of only 3.0(\\pm 0.7)*10^4 MSPs. We have also simulated pulsars with periods shorter than any known MSP, and estimate the maximum number of sub-MSPs in the Galaxy to be 7.8(\\pm 5.0)*10^4 pulsars at L=0.1...

  9. A chaotic attractor in timing noise from the Vela pulsar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.; Shinbrot, Troy; Cordes, James M.

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen years of timing residual data from the Vela pulsar have been analyzed in order to determine if a chaotic dynamical process is the origin of timing noise. Using the correlation sum technique, a dimension of about 1.5 is obtained. This low dimension indicates underlying structure in the phase residuals which may be evidence for a chaotic attractor. It is therefore possible that nonlinear dynamics intrinsic to the spin-down may be the cause of the timing noise in the Vela pulsar. However, it has been found that the stimulated random walks in frequency and frequency derivative often used to model pulsar timing noise also have low fractal dimension, using the same analysis technique. Recent work suggesting that random processes with steep power spectra can mimic strange attractors seems to be confirmed in the case of these random walks. It appears that the correlation sum estimator for dimension is unable to distinguish between chaotic and random processes.

  10. Study on autonomous navigation based on pulsar timing model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The basic principle of pulsar timing model was introduced, and the general relativistic corrections were analyzed when pulse time of arrival (TOA) was transferred to coordinate TOA at the Solar System Barycentre. Based on the shifting, an iterative method of autonomous position determination for spacecraft was developed. Accordingly, the linear form of the position offset equation was evolved. Using the initial estimated value of spacecraft’s position as the input of pulsar timing equation, through calculation of the offset between measured or transferred and predicted TOA, the position offset can be solved by Least Squares. At last, the main error sources including modeling error and parameters error were discussed.

  11. Study on autonomous navigation based on pulsar timing model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI JianXun; KE XiZheng

    2009-01-01

    The basic principle of pulsar timing model was introduced, and the general relativistic corrections were analyzed when pulse time of arrival (TOA) was transferred to coordinate TOA at the Solar System Barycentre. Based on the shifting, an iterative method of autonomous position determination for spacecraft was developed. Accordingly, the linear form of the position offset equation was evolved. Using the initial estimated value of spacecraft's position as the input of pulsar timing equation, through calculation of the offset between measured or transferred and predicted TOA, the position offset can be solved by Least Squares. At last, the main error sources including modeling error and parameters error were discussed.

  12. The impact of a stochastic gravitational-wave background on pulsar timing parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, J; Verbiest, J P W

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational waves are predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity as well as other theories of gravity. The rotational stability of the fastest pulsars means that timing of an array of these objects can be used to detect and investigate gravitational waves. Simultaneously, however, pulsar timing is used to estimate spin period, period derivative, astrometric, and binary parameters. Here we calculate the effects that a stochastic background of gravitational waves has on pulsar timing parameters through the use of simulations and data from the millisecond pulsars PSR J0437--4715 and PSR J1713+0747. We show that the reported timing uncertainties become underestimated with increasing background amplitude by up to a factor of $\\sim10$ for a stochastic gravitational-wave background amplitude of $A=5\\times 10^{-15}$, where $A$ is the amplitude of the characteristic strain spectrum at one-year gravitational wave periods. We find evidence for prominent low-frequency spectral leakage in simulated data sets i...

  13. Pulsars and Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Manchester, R N

    2015-01-01

    Pulsars are wonderful gravitational probes. Their tiny size and stellar mass give their rotation periods a stablility comparable to that of atomic frequency standards. This is especially true of the rapidly rotating "millisecond pulsars" (MSPs). Many of these rapidly rotating pulsars are in orbit with another star, allowing pulsar timing to probe relativistic perturbations to the orbital motion. Pulsars have provided the most stringent tests of theories of relativistic gravitation, especially in the strong-field regime, and have shown that Einstein's general theory of relativity is an accurate description of the observed motions. Many other gravitational theories are effectively ruled out or at least severely constrained by these results. MSPs can also be used to form a "Pulsar Timing Array" (PTA). PTAs are Galactic-scale interferometers that have the potential to directly detect nanohertz gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. Orbiting super-massive black holes in the cores of distant galaxies are t...

  14. Low-Frequency Variability of - for Timing of Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, R.; Narayan, R.

    Rickett, Coles and Bourgois (1984) have argued that long-term (months to years) variation in pulsar flux is caused by fluctuations in the interstellar electron density on length scales ≡1013-16cm. In this paper the authors show that there should then be correlated fluctuations in the pulse arrival time, pulse width, and angular size. PSR 1937+21 is suitable for detecting some of the new effects. The timing noise and pulse width variation in this pulsar is estimated assuming a power-law spectrum for the electron density fluctuations, normalized using scintillation data.

  15. Observing Radio Pulsars in the Galactic Centre with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Eatough, R P; Casanellas, J; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Demorest, P B; Kramer, M; Lee, K J; Liu, K; Ransom, S M; Wex, N

    2015-01-01

    The discovery and timing of radio pulsars within the Galactic centre is a fundamental aspect of the SKA Science Case, responding to the topic of "Strong Field Tests of Gravity with Pulsars and Black Holes" (Kramer et al. 2004; Cordes et al. 2004). Pulsars have in many ways proven to be excellent tools for testing the General theory of Relativity and alternative gravity theories (see Wex (2014) for a recent review). Timing a pulsar in orbit around a companion, provides a unique way of probing the relativistic dynamics and spacetime of such a system. The strictest tests of gravity, in strong field conditions, are expected to come from a pulsar orbiting a black hole. In this sense, a pulsar in a close orbit ($P_{\\rm orb}$ < 1 yr) around our nearest supermassive black hole candidate, Sagittarius A* - at a distance of ~8.3 kpc in the Galactic centre (Gillessen et al. 2009a) - would be the ideal tool. Given the size of the orbit and the relativistic effects associated with it, even a slowly spinning pulsar would...

  16. Real-Time Pulsars Pipeline Using Many-Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclocco, Alessio; Van Nieuwpoort, R.; Bal, H. E.

    2014-04-01

    Exascale radio astronomy presents challenges to both astronomers and computer scientists. One of these challenges is processing the enormous amount of data that will be produced by exascale instruments, like the Square Kilometer Array (SKA). Traditional approaches, based on storing data to process them off-line, are common nowadays, but are unfeasible in the exascale era due to the high bandwidths. We investigate the use of many-core accelerators as a way to achieve real-time performance without exceeding cost and power constraints. In our current research, we aim at accelerating the pulsar searching process, and produce a real-time and scalable software pipeline for the exascale era. Our pipeline consists of three main steps: dedispersion, folding and signal-to-noise ratio computation. It is open source and implemented using the Open Computing Language (OpenCL). To achieve our goals of real-time performance, scalability and portability, we applied three different techniques. First, we designed all steps of the pulsars pipeline to run on many-core accelerators, even the less computational intensive. This way, communication between host and accelerator is minimized, avoiding a common bottleneck of many-core accelerated computing. Second, we parallelized the pipeline with a fine-grained approach. Because of this parallelization strategy, it is not only possible to distribute the input beams to different computation nodes, but also to define which part of the search space is explored by any node. This completely avoids inter-node communication, and scalability of the pipeline can simply be achieved by adding more machines. Third, we use extensive auto-tuning for both the single processing kernels and the pipeline as a whole. By using auto-tuning, we do not simply find the best possible parameter configuration, thus obtaining high-performance, but also make the pipeline portable among different computing devices, and adaptable to different telescopes and observational

  17. Time of arrival estimation in pulsar-based navigation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabakchiev, Chr.; Behar, V.; Buist, P.; Garvanov, I.; Kabakchieva, D.; Bentum, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the Time of Arrival (TOA) estimation problem related to new application of pulsar signals for airplane-based navigation. The aim of the paper is to propose and evaluate a possible algorithm for TOA estimation that consists of epoch folding, filtering, CFAR detection, crosscorre

  18. On time transfer in X-ray pulsar navigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    X-ray pulsar navigation(XPNAV) is a new approach for spacecraft autonomous navigation.The system gets position information utilizing accurate timing methods.Among the timing models,the high-order relativistic effects on the propagated signal must be incorporated to attain precise timing.The time transfer model is provided in detail here in two parts:the time frame transformation and the relativistic effects.

  19. Prospects for the detection of high-energy (E > 25 GeV) Fermi pulsars with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtovoi, A.; Saito, T. Y.; Zampieri, L.; Hassan, T.

    2017-10-01

    Around 160 gamma-ray pulsars were discovered by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) since 2008. The most energetic of them, 12 objects with emission above 25 GeV, are suitable candidates for the detection with the current and future Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes above few tens of GeV. We perform an analysis of the Fermi-LAT data of these high-energy pulsars in order to determine if such objects can be detected with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Our goal is to forecast the significance of their point source detection with CTA. We analyse 5 yr of the Fermi-LAT data fitting the spectra of each pulsar at energies E > 10 GeV with a power-law function. Assuming no spectral cut-off, we extrapolate the resulting spectra to the very high energy range (VHE, E > 0.1 TeV) and simulate CTA observations of all 12 pulsars with the ctools software package. Using different analysis tools, individual CTA sensitivity curves are independently calculated for each pulsar and cross-checked with the ctools results. Our simulations result in significant CTA detections of up to eight pulsars in 50 h. Observations of the most energetic Fermi pulsars with CTA will shed light on the nature of the high-energy emission of pulsars, clarifying whether the VHE emission detected in the Crab pulsar spectrum is present also in other gamma-ray pulsars.

  20. TIMING AND INTERSTELLAR SCATTERING OF 35 DISTANT PULSARS DISCOVERED IN THE PALFA SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nice, D. J. [Department of Physics, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042 (United States); Altiere, E.; Farrington, D.; Popa, L.; Wang, Y. [Department of Physics, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010 (United States); Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Cordes, J. M.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hessels, J. W. T. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990-AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Ransom, S. M. [NRAO, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Sanpa-arsa, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Allen, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Bhat, N. D. R. [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Champion, D. J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Crawford, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, PA 17604-3003 (United States); and others

    2013-07-20

    We have made extensive observations of 35 distant slow (non-recycled) pulsars discovered in the ongoing Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey. Timing observations of these pulsars over several years at Arecibo Observatory and Jodrell Bank Observatory have yielded high-precision positions and measurements of rotation properties. Despite being a relatively distant population, these pulsars have properties that mirror those of the previously known pulsar population. Many of the sources exhibit timing noise, and one underwent a small glitch. We have used multifrequency data to measure the interstellar scattering properties of these pulsars. We find scattering to be higher than predicted along some lines of sight, particularly in the Cygnus region. Finally, we present XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the youngest and most energetic of the pulsars, J1856+0245, which has previously been associated with the GeV-TeV pulsar wind nebula HESS J1857+026.

  1. Timing and Interstellar Scattering of Thirty-five Distant Pulsars Discovered in the PALFA Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Nice, D J; Bogdanov, S; Cordes, J M; Farrington, D; Hessels, J W T; Kaspi, V M; Lyne, A G; Popa, L; Ransom, S M; Sanpa-arsa, S; Stappers, B W; Wang, Y; Allen, B; Bhat, N D R; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Chatterjee, S; Crawford, F; Deneva, J S; Desvignes, G; Freire, P C C; Jenet, F A; Knispel, B; Lazarus, P; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Lynch, R; McLaughlin, M A; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; Venkataraman, A; Zhu, W

    2013-01-01

    We have made extensive observations of 35 distant slow (non-recycled) pulsars discovered in the ongoing Arecibo PALFA pulsar survey. Timing observations of these pulsars over several years at Arecibo Observatory and Jodrell Bank Observatory have yielded high-precision positions and measurements of rotation properties. Despite being a relatively distant population, the properties of these pulsars mirror those of the previously known pulsar population. Many of the sources exhibit timing noise, and one underwent a small glitch. We have used multifrequency data to measure the interstellar scattering properties of these pulsars. We find scattering to be higher than predicted along some lines of sight, particularly in the Cygnus region. Lastly, we present XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the youngest and most energetic of the pulsars, J1856+0245, which has previously been associated with the GeV-TeV pulsar wind nebula HESS J1857+026.

  2. Timing the Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsar in NGC 1851

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, P C; Gupta, Y; Freire, Paulo C.; Ransom, Scott M.; Gupta, Yashwant

    2007-01-01

    We have used the Green Bank Telescope to observe the millisecond pulsar PSR J0514-4002A on 43 occasions spread over 2 years. This 5-ms pulsar is located in the globular cluster NGC 1851; it belongs to a binary system and has a highly eccentric (e = 0.888) orbit. We have obtained a phase-coherent timing solution for this object, including very precise position, spin and orbital parameters. The pulsar is located 4.6" (about 1.3 core radii) from the center of the cluster, and is likely to lie on its more distant half. The non-detection of eclipses at superior conjunction can be used, given the peculiar geometry of this system, to rule out the possibility of an extended companion. We have measured the rate of advance of periastron for this binary system to be $\\dot{\\omega}$ = 0.01289(4) degrees per year, which if due completely to general relativity, implies a total system mass of 2.453(14) solar masses. Given the known mass function, the pulsar mass has to be 0.96 solar masses, implying that it is a heavy white...

  3. Taming outliers in pulsar-timing datasets with hierarchical likelihoods and Hamiltonian sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallisneri, Michele; van Haasteren, Rutger

    2017-01-01

    Pulsar-timing datasets have been analyzed with great success using probabilistic treatments based on Gaussian distributions, with applications ranging from studies of neutron-star structure to tests of general relativity and searches for nanosecond gravitational waves. As for other applications of Gaussian distributions, outliers in timing measurements pose a significant challenge to statistical inference, since they can bias the estimation of timing and noise parameters, and affect reported parameter uncertainties. We describe and demonstrate a practical end-to-end approach to perform Bayesian inference of timing and noise parameters robustly in the presence of outliers, and to identify these probabilistically. The method is fully consistent (i.e., outlier-ness probabilities vary in tune with the posterior distributions of the timing and noise parameters), and it relies on the efficient sampling of the hierarchical form of the pulsar-timing likelihood. Such sampling has recently become possible with a "no-U-turn" Hamiltonian sampler coupled to a highly customized reparametrization of the likelihood; this code is described elsewhere, but it is already available online. We recommend our method as a standard step in the preparation of pulsar-timing-array datasets: even if statistical inference is not affected, follow-up studies of outlier candidates can reveal unseen problems in radio observations and timing measurements; furthermore, confidence in the results of gravitational-wave searches will only benefit from stringent statistical evidence that datasets are clean and outlier-free.

  4. Taming outliers in pulsar-timing data sets with hierarchical likelihoods and Hamiltonian sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallisneri, Michele; van Haasteren, Rutger

    2017-04-01

    Pulsar-timing data sets have been analysed with great success using probabilistic treatments based on Gaussian distributions, with applications ranging from studies of neutron-star structure to tests of general relativity and searches for nanosecond gravitational waves. As for other applications of Gaussian distributions, outliers in timing measurements pose a significant challenge to statistical inference, since they can bias the estimation of timing and noise parameters, and affect reported parameter uncertainties. We describe and demonstrate a practical end-to-end approach to perform Bayesian inference of timing and noise parameters robustly in the presence of outliers, and to identify these probabilistically. The method is fully consistent (i.e. outlier-ness probabilities vary in tune with the posterior distributions of the timing and noise parameters), and it relies on the efficient sampling of the hierarchical form of the pulsar-timing likelihood. Such sampling has recently become possible with a 'no-U-turn' Hamiltonian sampler coupled to a highly customized reparametrization of the likelihood; this code is described elsewhere, but it is already available online. We recommend our method as a standard step in the preparation of pulsar-timing-array data sets: even if statistical inference is not affected, follow-up studies of outlier candidates can reveal unseen problems in radio observations and timing measurements; furthermore, confidence in the results of gravitational-wave searches will only benefit from stringent statistical evidence that data sets are clean and outlier-free.

  5. Improving the precision of pulsar timing through polarization statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Osłowski, Stefan; Demorest, Paul; Bailes, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    At the highest levels of pulsar timing precision achieved to date, experiments are limited by noise intrinsic to the pulsar. This stochastic wideband impulse modulated self-noise (SWIMS) limits pulsar timing precision by randomly biasing the measured times of arrival and thus increasing the root mean square (rms) timing residual. We discuss an improved methodology of removing this bias in the measured times of arrival by including information about polarized radiation. Observations of J0437-4715 made over a one-week interval at the Parkes Observatory are used to demonstrate a nearly 40 per cent improvement in the rms timing residual with this extended analysis. In this way, based on the observations over a 64 MHz bandwidth centred at 1341 MHz with integrations over 16.78 s we achieve a 476 ns rms timing residual. In the absence of systematic error, these results lead to a predicted rms timing residual of 30 ns in one hour integrations; however the data are currently limited by variable Faraday rotation in the...

  6. A 24 hr global campaign to assess precision timing of the millisecond pulsar J1713+0747

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolch, T.; Lam, M. T.; Cordes, J.; Chatterjee, S. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Bassa, C.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Janssen, G.; Kondratiev, V. [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Bhattacharyya, B.; Jordan, C.; Keith, M. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Champion, D. J.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Cognard, I. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement et de l' Espace, LPC2E UMR 6115 CNRS, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 02, and Station de radioastronomie de Nançay, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS/INSU, F-18330 Nançay (France); Crowter, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Demorest, P. B. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Jenet, F. A. [Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy, University of Texas, Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Jones, G., E-mail: tdolch@astro.cornell.edu [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); and others

    2014-10-10

    The radio millisecond pulsar J1713+0747 is regarded as one of the highest-precision clocks in the sky and is regularly timed for the purpose of detecting gravitational waves. The International Pulsar Timing Array Collaboration undertook a 24 hr global observation of PSR J1713+0747 in an effort to better quantify sources of timing noise in this pulsar, particularly on intermediate (1-24 hr) timescales. We observed the pulsar continuously over 24 hr with the Arecibo, Effelsberg, GMRT, Green Bank, LOFAR, Lovell, Nançay, Parkes, and WSRT radio telescopes. The combined pulse times-of-arrival presented here provide an estimate of what sources of timing noise, excluding DM variations, would be present as compared to an idealized √N improvement in timing precision, where N is the number of pulses analyzed. In the case of this particular pulsar, we find that intrinsic pulse phase jitter dominates arrival time precision when the signal-to-noise ratio of single pulses exceeds unity, as measured using the eight telescopes that observed at L band/1.4 GHz. We present first results of specific phenomena probed on the unusually long timescale (for a single continuous observing session) of tens of hours, in particular interstellar scintillation, and discuss the degree to which scintillation and profile evolution affect precision timing. This paper presents the data set as a basis for future, deeper studies.

  7. FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT DISPERSION MEASURES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PULSAR TIMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Shannon, R. M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Stinebring, D. R., E-mail: cordes@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: ryan.shannon@csiro.au, E-mail: dan.stinebring@oberlin.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH 44074 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency{sup 2}). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ∼ 4 × 10{sup −5} pc cm{sup −3} for pulsars at ∼1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm{sup −3} but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  8. ROSAT Timing of the LMC Pulsar 0540-69

    CERN Document Server

    Eikenberry, S S; Ransom, S M

    1997-01-01

    We present a timing study of the young rotation-powered pulsar 0540-69 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, based on 130 kiloseconds of archival ROSAT data spanning a $\\sim 3$-year period. We use ``$f- \\dot f$'' techniques to measure the pulsar frequency as a function of frequency derivative at 17 independent epochs. From these measurements we derive a timing solution with a braking index $n = 2.5^{+0.6}_{-0.7}$, and we compare this solution to previous timing studies of 0540-69. Using this frequency-based solution, we create 27 pulse profiles and perform a time-of-arrival (TOA) analysis to investigate further the pulsar's timing behavior. While we can successfully fit smooth spin-down models to subsets of the TOAs spanning up to 2 years, we are unable to obtain acceptable phase-coherent fits to the entire 3-year set of TOAs. This behavior provides the first clear evidence for timing noise in 0540-69. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding previous studies of the timing behavior of 0540-69.

  9. Time-Correlated Structure in Spin Fluctuations in Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Steve; Shore, Steve; Nice, David

    2012-01-01

    We study statistical properties of stochastic variations in pulse arrival times, timing noise, in radio pulsars using a new analysis method applied in the time domain. The method proceeds in two steps. First, we subtract low-frequency wander using a high-pass filter. Second, we calculate the discrete correlation function of the filtered data. As a complementary method for measuring correlations, we introduce a statistic that measures the dispersion of the data with respect to the data translated in time. The analysis methods presented here are robust and of general usefulness for studying arrival time variations over timescales approaching the average sampling interval. We apply these methods to timing data for 32 pulsars. In two radio pulsars, PSRs B1133+16 and B1933+16, we find that fluctuations in arrival times are correlated over timescales of 10 - 20 d with the distinct signature of a relaxation process. Though this relaxation response could be magnetospheric in origin, we argue that damping between the ...

  10. A 24-Hour Global Campaign To Assess Precision Timing of the Millisecond Pulsar J1713+0747

    CERN Document Server

    Dolch, T; Cordes, J M; Chatterjee, S; Bassa, C; Bhattacharyya, B; Champion, D J; Cognard, I; Crowter, K; Demorest, P B; Hessels, J W T; Janssen, G H; Jenet, F A; Jones, G; Jordan, C; Karuppusamy, R; Keith, M; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; Lazarus, P; Lazio, T J W; Lee, K J; McLaughlin, M A; Roy, J; Shannon, R M; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; Verbiest, J P W; Madison, D R; Palliyaguru, N; Perrodin, D; Ransom, S M; Stappers, B W; Zhu, W W; Dai, S; Desvignes, G; Guillemot, L; Liu, K; Lyne, A G; Perera, B B P; Petroff, E; Rankin, J M; Smits, R

    2014-01-01

    The radio millisecond pulsar J1713+0747 is regarded as one of the highest-precision clocks in the sky, and is regularly timed for the purpose of detecting gravitational waves. The International Pulsar Timing Array collaboration undertook a 24-hour global observation of PSR J1713+0747 in an effort to better quantify sources of timing noise in this pulsar, particularly on intermediate (1 - 24 hr) timescales. We observed the pulsar continuously over 24 hr with the Arecibo, Effelsberg, GMRT, Green Bank, LOFAR, Lovell, Nancay, Parkes, and WSRT radio telescopes. The combined pulse times-of-arrival presented here provide an estimate of what sources of timing noise, excluding DM variations, would be present as compared to an idealized root-N improvement in timing precision, where N is the number of pulses analyzed. In the case of this particular pulsar, we find that intrinsic pulse phase jitter dominates arrival time precision when the S/N of single pulses exceeds unity, as measured using the eight telescopes that ob...

  11. Autonomous Spacecraft Navigation Based on Pulsar Timing Information

    CERN Document Server

    Bernhardt, Mike Georg; Prinz, Tobias; Breithuth, Ferdinand Maximilian; Walter, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of an autonomous navigation system for spacecraft that is based on pulsar timing data. Pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars that are observable as variable celestial sources of electromagnetic radiation. Their periodic signals have timing stabilities comparable to atomic clocks and provide characteristic temporal signatures that can be used as natural navigation beacons, quite similar to the use of GPS satellites for navigation on Earth. By comparing pulse arrival times measured on-board the spacecraft with predicted pulse arrivals at some reference location, the spacecraft position can be determined autonomously with accuracies on the order of 5 kilometres. For a spacecraft at a distance of 10 astronomical units from Earth (e.g., Earth-Saturn), this means an improvement by a factor of 8 compared to conventional methods. Therefore this new technology is an alternative to standard navigation based on radio tracking by ground stations, without the disadvantages of uncertainty in...

  12. Measuring pulse times of arrival from broadband pulsar observations

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, K; Cognard, I; Stappers, B W; Verbiest, J P W; Lee, K J; Champion, D J; Kramer, M; Freire, P C C; Karuppusamy, R

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, instrumentation enabling pulsar observations with unprecedentedly high fractional bandwidth has been under development which can be used to substantially improve the precision of pulsar timing experiments. The traditional template-matching method used to calculate pulse times-of-arrival (ToAs), may not function effectively on these broadband data due to a variety of effects such as diffractive scintillation in the interstellar medium, profile variation as a function of frequency, dispersion measure (DM) evolution and so forth. In this paper, we describe the channelised Discrete Fourier Transform method that can greatly mitigate the influence of the aforementioned effects when measuring ToAs from broadband timing data. The method is tested on simulated data, and its potential in improving timing precision is shown. We further apply the method to PSR J1909$-$3744 data collected at the Nan\\c{c}ay Radio Telescope with the Nan\\c{c}ay Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument. We demonstrate a removal ...

  13. X-ray pulsar signal detection using photon interarrival time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Xie; Luping Xu; Hua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The distribution probability of the photon interarrival time (PIT) without signal initial phases is derived based on the Poisson model of X-ray pulsar signals, and a pulsar signal detec-tion algorithm employing the PIT sequence is put forward. The joint probability of the PIT sequence is regarded as a function of the distribution probability and used to compare a constant radiation intensity model with the nonhomogeneous Poisson model for the signal detection. The relationship between the number of detected photons and the probabilities of false negative and positive is stu-died, and the success rate and mean detection time are estimated based on the number of the given photons. For the spacecraft ve-locity data detection, the changes of time of photon arrival (TOPA) and PIT caused by spacecraft motion are presented first, then the influences on detection are analyzed respectively. By using the analytical pulse profile of PSR B0531+21, the simulation of the X-ray pulsar signal detection is implemented. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, and the contrast tests show that the proposed method is suitable for the spacecraft velocity data detection.

  14. Timing of Five PALFA-Discovered Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Stovall, K; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Cardoso, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J S; Ferdman, R; Freire, P C C; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F; Kaplan, D L; Karako-Argaman, C; Kaspi, V M; Knispel, B; Kotulla, R; Lazarus, P; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Lynch, R; Lyne, A G; Madsen, E; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Swiggum, J; Zhu, W W; Venkataraman, A

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery and timing results for five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from the Arecibo PALFA survey: PSRs J1906+0055, J1914+0659, J1933+1726, J1938+2516, and J1957+2516. Timing observations of the 5 pulsars were conducted with the Arecibo and Lovell telescopes for time spans ranging from 1.5 to 3.3 yr. All of the MSPs except one (PSR J1914+0659) are in binary systems with low eccentricities. PSR J1957+2516 is likely a redback pulsar, with a ~0.1 $M_\\odot$ companion and possible eclipses that last ~10% of the orbit. The position of PSR J1957+2516 is also coincident with a NIR source. All 5 MSPs are distant (>3.1 kpc) as determined from their dispersion measures, and none of them show evidence of $\\gamma$-ray pulsations in a search of Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope data. These 5 MSPs bring the total number of MSPs discovered by the PALFA survey to 26 and further demonstrate the power of this survey in finding distant, highly dispersed MSPs deep in the Galactic plane.

  15. Polarization observations of 20 millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Wenming; van Straten, Willem; Reynolds, John; Hobbs, George; Wang, Na; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Champion, David; Coles, William; Hotan, Aidan; Khoo, Jonathan; Oslowski, Stefan; Sarkissian, John; Verbiest, Joris; Yardley, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Polarization profiles are presented for 20 millisecond pulsars that are being observed as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project. The observations used the Parkes multibeam receiver with a central frequency of 1369 MHz and the Parkes digital filterbank pulsar signal-processing system PDFB2. Because of the large total observing time, the summed polarization profiles have very high signal/noise ratios and show many previously undetected profile features. Thirteen of the 20 pulsars show emission over more than half of the pulse period. Polarization variations across the profiles are complex and the observed position angle variations are generally not in accord with the rotating-vector model for pulsar polarization. Never-the-less, the polarization properties are broadly similar to those of normal (non-millisecond) pulsars, suggesting that the basic radio emission mechanism is the same in both classes of pulsar. The results support the idea that radio emission from millisecond pulsars originates high in t...

  16. Frequency-Dependent Dispersion Measures and Implications for Pulsar Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Cordes, J M; Stinebring, D R

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the frequency dependence of the dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, caused by multipath scattering from small scale electron-density fluctuations. The DM is slightly different along each propagation path and the transverse spread of paths varies greatly with frequency, yielding time-of-arrival (TOA) perturbations that scale differently than the inverse square of the frequency, the expected dependence for a cold, unmagnetized plasma. We quantify DM and TOA perturbations analytically for thin phase screens and extended media and verify the results with simulations of thin screens. The rms difference between DMs across an octave band near 1.5~GHz $\\sim 4\\times10^{-5}\\,{\\rm pc\\ cm^{-3}}$ for pulsars at $\\sim 1$~kpc distance. TOA errors from chromatic DMs are of order a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for pulsars with DM $\\lesssim 30$~pc~cm$^{-3}$ observed across an octave band but increase rapidly to microseconds or larger for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges....

  17. The NANOGrav Eleven-Year Data Set: High-precision timing of 48 Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nice, David J.; NANOGrav

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational waves from sources such as supermassive black hole binary systems perturb times-of-flight of signals traveling from pulsars to the Earth. The NANOGrav collaboration aims to measure these perturbations in high precision millisecond pulsar timing data and thus to directly detect gravitational waves and characterize the gravitational wave sources. By observing pulsars over time spans of many years, we are most sensitive to gravitational waves at nanohertz frequencies. This work is complimentary to ground based detectors such as LIGO, which are sensitive to gravitational waves with frequencies 10 orders of magnitude higher.In this presentation we describe the NANOGrav eleven-year data set. This includes pulsar time-of-arrival measurements from 48 millisecond pulsars made with the Arecibo Observatory (for pulsars with declinations between -1 and 39 degrees) and the Green Bank Telescope (for other pulsars, with two pulsars overlapping with Arecibo). The data set consists of more than 300,000 pulse time-of-arrival measurements made in nearly 7000 unique observations (a given pulsar observed with a given telescope receiver on a given day). In the best cases, measurement precision is better than 100 nanoseconds, and in nearly all cases it is better than 1 microsecond.All pulsars in our program are observed at intervals of 3 to 4 weeks. Observations use wideband data acquisition systems and are made at two receivers at widely separated frequencies at each epoch, allowing for characterization and mitigation of the effects of interstellar medium on the signal propagation. Observation of a large number of pulsars allows for searches for correlated perturbations among the pulsar signals, which is crucial for achieving high-significance detection of gravitational waves in the face of uncorrelated noise (from gravitational waves and rotation noise) in the individual pulsars. In addition, seven pulsars are observed at weekly intervals. This increases our sensitivity

  18. The High Time Resolution Universe Pulsar Survey XII : Galactic plane acceleration search and the discovery of 60 pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, C; Bailes, M; Barr, E D; Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Flynn, C M L; Jameson, A; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Petroff, E; Possenti, A; Stappers, B W; van Straten, W; Tiburzi, C; Eatough, R P; Lyne, A G

    2015-01-01

    We present initial results from the low-latitude Galactic plane region of the High Time Resolution Universe pulsar survey conducted at the Parkes 64-m radio telescope. We discuss the computational challenges arising from the processing of the terabyte-sized survey data. Two new radio interference mitigation techniques are introduced, as well as a partially-coherent segmented acceleration search algorithm which aims to increase our chances of discovering highly-relativistic short-orbit binary systems, covering a parameter space including potential pulsar-black hole binaries. We show that under a constant acceleration approximation, a ratio of data length over orbital period of ~0.1 results in the highest effectiveness for this search algorithm. From the 50 per cent of data processed thus far, we have re-detected 435 previously known pulsars and discovered a further 60 pulsars, two of which are fast-spinning pulsars with periods less than 30ms. PSR J1101-6424 is a millisecond pulsar whose heavy white dwarf (WD)...

  19. Timing of five millisecond pulsars discovered in the PALFA survey

    CERN Document Server

    Scholz, P; Lyne, A G; Stappers, B W; Bogdanov, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Hessels, J W T; Lorimer, D R; Stairs, I H; Allen, B; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Cardoso, R F; Chatterjee, S; Deneva, J S; Jenet, F A; Karako-Argaman, C; Knispel, B; Lazarus, P; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Ransom, S M; Siemens, X; Spitler, L G; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J K; Venkataraman, A; Zhu, W W

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from the PALFA Galactic plane survey using Arecibo. Four of these (PSRs J0557+1551, J1850+0244, J1902+0300, and J1943+2210) are binary pulsars whose companions are likely white dwarfs, and one (PSR J1905+0453) is isolated. Phase-coherent timing solutions, ranging from $\\sim$1 to $\\sim$3 years in length, and based on observations from the Jodrell Bank and Arecibo telescopes, provide precise determinations of spin, orbital, and astrometric parameters. All five pulsars have large dispersion measures ($>100$ pc cm$^{-3}$, within the top 20% of all known Galactic field MSPs) and are faint (1.4 GHz flux density < 0.1 mJy, within the faintest 5% of all known Galactic field MSPs), illustrating PALFA's ability to find increasingly faint, distant MSPs in the Galactic plane. In particular, PSR J1850+0244 has a dispersion measure of 540 pc cm$^{-3}$, the highest of all known MSPs. Such distant, faint MSPs are important input for accurately modeling the total ...

  20. TIMING OF FIVE MILLISECOND PULSARS DISCOVERED IN THE PALFA SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, P.; Kaspi, V. M.; Ferdman, R. D.; Karako-Argaman, C. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Cordes, J. M.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Crawford, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, PA 17604-3003 (United States); Freire, P. C. C. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Hessels, J. W. T. [ASTRON, Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990-AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Lorimer, D. R.; Cardoso, R. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Allen, B. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Deneva, J. S. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Jenet, F. A., E-mail: pscholz@physics.mcgill.ca [Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); and others

    2015-02-20

    We present the discovery of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from the PALFA Galactic plane survey using Arecibo. Four of these (PSRs J0557+1551, J1850+0244, J1902+0300, and J1943+2210) are binary pulsars whose companions are likely white dwarfs, and one (PSR J1905+0453) is isolated. Phase-coherent timing solutions, ranging from ∼1 to ∼3 yr in length, and based on observations from the Jodrell Bank and Arecibo telescopes, provide precise determinations of spin, orbital, and astrometric parameters. All five pulsars have large dispersion measures (>100 pc cm{sup –3}, within the top 20% of all known Galactic field MSPs) and are faint (1.4 GHz flux density ≲0.1 mJy, within the faintest 5% of all known Galactic field MSPs), illustrating PALFA's ability to find increasingly faint, distant MSPs in the Galactic plane. In particular, PSR J1850+0244 has a dispersion measure of 540 pc cm{sup –3}, the highest of all known MSPs. Such distant, faint MSPs are important input for accurately modeling the total Galactic MSP population.

  1. An alternative technique for timing the double pulsar system

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Zhu-Xing

    2012-01-01

    Freire et al. (2009, MNRAS, 396, 1764) have put forward a technique for timing the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B (hereafter A and B, respectively). Their technique can be used to determine the sense of rotation of A relative to its orbital plane. In this paper, we present another technique with the same purpose. Two well-known periods, the sidereal day and solar day, are often used to define the spin period of the earth. Their difference is caused by a kinematic effect which correlated with earth's rotation and revolution. We think that this kinematic effect should exist in the double pulsar system and can be used to determine the sense of rotation of the pulsars. Commonly, B's modulation frequency is considered to be equal to A's rotation frequency, because B's signal is modulated by A's energy flux. When the kinematic effect is considered, B's modulation frequency will be, similar to the solar day and sidereal day, a little higher or lower than A's rotation frequency. If this frequency offset can b...

  2. Using Pulsar Timing observations to understand the formation and evolution of supermassive black hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Neil; Sampson, Laura; McWilliams, Sean

    2015-04-01

    The astrophysical processes that form and harden supermassive black hole binaries impart distinct features that may be observed in the gravitational-wave spectrum within the sensitive frequency range of Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTA). We investigate how well the various formation and hardening mechanisms can be constrained by applying Bayesian inference to simulated PTA data sets. We find that even without strong priors on the merger rate, any detection of the signal will place interesting constraints on the astrophysical models. Folding in priors on the merger rate allows us to place interesting constraints on the astrophysical models even before a detection is made.

  3. Gravitational-wave limits from pulsar timing constrain supermassive black hole evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R M; Ravi, V; Coles, W A; Hobbs, G; Keith, M J; Manchester, R N; Wyithe, J S B; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Khoo, J; Levin, Y; Osłowski, S; Sarkissian, J M; van Straten, W; Verbiest, J P W; Wang, J-B

    2013-10-18

    The formation and growth processes of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are not well constrained. SMBH population models, however, provide specific predictions for the properties of the gravitational-wave background (GWB) from binary SMBHs in merging galaxies throughout the universe. Using observations from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we constrain the fractional GWB energy density (Ω(GW)) with 95% confidence to be Ω(GW)(H0/73 kilometers per second per megaparsec)(2) formation model implemented in the Millennium Simulation Project is inconsistent with our limit with 50% probability.

  4. Wide-band profile domain pulsar timing analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentati, L.; Kerr, M.; Dai, S.; Hobson, M. P.; Shannon, R. M.; Hobbs, G.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. Ramesh; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Coles, W.; Dempsey, J.; Lasky, P. D.; Levin, Y.; Manchester, R. N.; Osłowski, S.; Ravi, V.; Reardon, D. J.; Rosado, P. A.; Spiewak, R.; van Straten, W.; Toomey, L.; Wang, J.; Wen, L.; You, X.; Zhu, X.

    2017-04-01

    We extend profile domain pulsar timing to incorporate wide-band effects such as frequency-dependent profile evolution and broad-band shape variation in the pulse profile. We also incorporate models for temporal variations in both pulse width and in the separation in phase of the main pulse and interpulse. We perform the analysis with both nested sampling and Hamiltonian Monte Carlo methods. In the latter case, we introduce a new parametrization of the posterior that is extremely efficient in the low signal-to-noise regime and can be readily applied to a wide range of scientific problems. We apply this methodology to a series of simulations, and to between seven and nine years of observations for PSRs J1713+0747, J1744-1134 and J1909-3744 with frequency coverage that spans 700-3600 Mhz. We use a smooth model for profile evolution across the full frequency range, and compare smooth and piecewise models for the temporal variations in dispersion measure (DM). We find that the profile domain framework consistently results in improved timing precision compared to the standard analysis paradigm by as much as 40 per cent for timing parameters. Incorporating smoothness in the DM variations into the model further improves timing precision by as much as 30 per cent. For PSR J1713+0747, we also detect pulse shape variation uncorrelated between epochs, which we attribute to variation intrinsic to the pulsar at a level consistent with previously published analyses. Not accounting for this shape variation biases the measured arrival times at the level of ∼30 ns, the same order of magnitude as the expected shift due to gravitational waves in the pulsar timing band.

  5. Assessing the effects of timing irregularities on radio pulsars anomalous braking indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwude, A. E.; Chidi Odo, Finbarr

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the statistical effects of non-discrete timing irregularities on observed radio pulsar braking indices using correlations between the second derivative of the measured anomalous frequency (̈νobs) and some parameters that have been widely used to quantify pulsar timing fluctuations (the timing activity parameter (A), the amount of timing fluctuations absorbed by the cubic term (σR23) and a measure of pulsar rotational stability (σz)) in a large sample of 366 Jodrell Bank Observatory radio pulsars. The result demonstrates that anomalous braking indices are largely artifacts produced by aggregations of fluctuations that occur within or outside the pulsar system. For a subsample of 223 normal radio pulsars whose observed timing activity appeared consistent with instabilities in rotation of the underlying neutron stars (or timing noise) over timescales of ˜ 10 - 40 yr, |̈νobs| strongly correlates (with correlation coefficient |r| ˜ 0.80 - 0.90) with the pulsar timing activity parameters and spin-down properties. On the other hand, no meaningful correlations (r < 0.3) were found between ̈νobs and the timing activity diagnostics and spin-down parameters in the remaining 143 objects, whose timing activity appears significantly dominated by white noise fluctuations. The current result can be better understood if the timing noise in isolated pulsars originates from intrinsic spin-down processes of the underlying neutron stars, but white noise fluctuations largely arise from processes external to the pulsar system.

  6. The Parkes multibeam pulsar survey: VII. Timing of four millisecond pulsars and the underlying spin period distribution of the Galactic millisecond pulsar population

    CERN Document Server

    Lorimer, D R; Manchester, R N; Possenti, A; Lyne, A G; McLaughlin, M A; Kramer, M; Hobbs, G; Stairs, I H; Burgay, M; Eatough, R P; Keith, M J; Faulkner, A J; D'Amico, N; Camilo, F; Corongiu, A; Crawford, F

    2015-01-01

    We present timing observations of four millisecond pulsars discovered in the Parkes 20-cm multibeam pulsar survey of the Galactic plane. PSRs J1552-4937 and J1843-1448 are isolated objects with spin periods of 6.28 and 5.47 ms respectively. PSR J1727-2946 is in a 40-day binary orbit and has a spin period of 27 ms. The 4.43-ms pulsar J1813-2621 is in a circular 8.16-day binary orbit around a low-mass companion star with a minimum companion mass of 0.2 solar masses. Combining these results with detections from five other Parkes multibeam surveys, gives a well-defined sample of 56 pulsars with spin periods below 20 ms. We develop a likelihood analysis to constrain the functional form which best describes the underlying distribution of spin periods for millisecond pulsars. The best results were obtained with a log-normal distribution. A gamma distribution is less favoured, but still compatible with the observations. Uniform, power-law and Gaussian distributions are found to be inconsistent with the data. Galactic...

  7. Timed arrays wideband and time varying antenna arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Haupt, Randy L

    2015-01-01

    Introduces timed arrays and design approaches to meet the new high performance standards The author concentrates on any aspect of an antenna array that must be viewed from a time perspective. The first chapters briefly introduce antenna arrays and explain the difference between phased and timed arrays. Since timed arrays are designed for realistic time-varying signals and scenarios, the book also reviews wideband signals, baseband and passband RF signals, polarization and signal bandwidth. Other topics covered include time domain, mutual coupling, wideband elements, and dispersion. The auth

  8. Binary system delays and timing noise in searches for gravitational waves from known pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Pitkin, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    The majority of fast millisecond pulsars are in binary systems, so that any periodic signal they emit is modulated by both Doppler and relativistic effects. Here we show how well-established binary models can be used to account for these effects in searches for gravitational waves from known pulsars within binary systems. We also show how the effect of timing noise, with particular reference to the Crab pulsar, can be compensated for by using regularly updated timing ephemerides.

  9. The NANOGrav Nine-Year Data Set: Noise Budget for Pulsar Arrival Times on Intraday Timescales

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, M T; Chatterjee, S; Arzoumanian, Z; Crowter, K; Demorest, P B; Dolch, T; Ellis, J A; Ferdman, R D; Fonseca, E F; Gonzalez, M E; Jones, G; Jones, M L; Levin, L; Madison, D R; McLaughlin, M A; Nice, D J; Pennucci, T T; Ransom, S M; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J K; Zhu, W W

    2015-01-01

    The use of pulsars as astrophysical clocks for gravitational wave experiments demands the highest possible timing precision. Pulse times of arrival (TOAs) are limited by stochastic processes that occur in the pulsar itself, along the line of sight through the interstellar medium, and in the measurement process. On timescales of seconds to hours, the TOA variance exceeds that from template-fitting errors due to additive noise. We assess contributions to the total variance from two additional effects: amplitude and phase jitter intrinsic to single pulses and changes in the interstellar impulse response from scattering. The three effects have different dependencies on time, frequency, and pulse signal-to-noise ratio. We use data on 37 pulsars from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves to assess the individual contributions to the overall intraday noise budget for each pulsar. We detect jitter in 22 pulsars and estimate the average value of RMS jitter in our pulsars to be $\\sim 1\\%$ of ...

  10. Development of a pulsar-based timescale

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, G; Manchester, R N; Keith, M J; Shannon, R M; Chen, D; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D; Chaudhary, A; Hotan, A; Khoo, J; Kocz, J; Levin, Y; Oslowski, S; Preisig, B; Ravi, V; Reynolds, J E; Sarkissian, J; van Straten, W; Verbiest, J P W; Yardley, D; You, X P

    2012-01-01

    Using observations of pulsars from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project we develop the first pulsar-based timescale that has a precision comparable to the uncertainties in international atomic timescales. Our ensemble of pulsars provides an Ensemble Pulsar Scale (EPS) analogous to the free atomic timescale Echelle Atomique Libre (EAL). The EPS can be used to detect fluctuations in atomic timescales and therefore can lead to a new realisation of Terrestrial Time, TT(PPTA11). We successfully follow features known to affect the frequency of the International Atomic Timescale (TAI) and we find marginally significant differences between TT(PPTA11) and TT(BIPM11). We discuss the various phenomena that lead to a correlated signal in the pulsar timing residuals and therefore limit the stability of the pulsar timescale.

  11. Testing Gravity with Pulsars in the SKA Era

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Lijing; Antoniadis, John; Deller, Adam T; Freire, Paulo C C; Hessels, Jason W T; Janssen, Gemma H; Kramer, Michael; Kunz, Jutta; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Perlick, Volker; Possenti, Andrea; Ransom, Scott; Stappers, Benjamin W; van Straten, Willem

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will use pulsars to enable precise measurements of strong gravity effects in pulsar systems, which yield tests of gravitational theories that cannot be carried out anywhere else. The Galactic census of pulsars will discover dozens of relativistic pulsar systems, possibly including pulsar -- black hole binaries which can be used to test the "cosmic censorship conjecture" and the "no-hair theorem". Also, the SKA's remarkable sensitivity will vastly improve the timing precision of millisecond pulsars, allowing probes of potential deviations from general relativity (GR). Aspects of gravitation to be explored include tests of strong equivalence principles, gravitational dipole radiation, extra field components of gravitation, gravitomagnetism, and spacetime symmetries.

  12. Precision Timing of Two Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi; Chakrabarty; Steinberger

    1999-11-01

    We report on long-term X-ray timing of two anomalous X-ray pulsars, 1RXS J170849.0-400910 and 1E 2259+586, using the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer. In monthly observations made over 1.4 and 2.6 yr for the two pulsars, respectively, we have obtained phase-coherent timing solutions which imply that these objects have been rotating with great stability throughout the course of our observations. For 1RXS J170849.0-400910, we find a rotation frequency of 0.0909169331(5) Hz and frequency derivative -15.687&parl0;4&parr0;x10-14 Hz s-1 for epoch MJD 51215.931. For 1E 2259+586, we find a rotation frequency of 0.1432880613(2) Hz and frequency derivative -1.0026&parl0;7&parr0;x10-14 Hz s-1 for epoch MJD 51195.583. The rms phase residuals from these simple models are only approximately 0.01 cycles for both sources. We show that the frequency derivative for 1E 2259+586 is inconsistent with that inferred from incoherent frequency observations made over the last 20 yr. Our observations are consistent with the magnetar hypothesis and make binary accretion scenarios appear unlikely.

  13. High signal-to-noise ratio observations and the ultimate limits of precision pulsar timing

    CERN Document Server

    Oslowski, Stefan; Hobbs, George; Bailes, Matthew; Demorest, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the sensitivity of high-precision pulsar timing experiments will be ultimately limited by the broadband intensity modulation that is intrinsic to the pulsar's stochastic radio signal. That is, as the peak flux of the pulsar approaches that of the system equivalent flux density, neither greater antenna gain nor increased instrumental bandwidth will improve timing precision. These conclusions proceed from an analysis of the covariance matrix used to characterise residual pulse profile fluctuations following the template matching procedure for arrival time estimation. We perform such an analysis on 25 hours of high-precision timing observations of the closest and brightest millisecond pulsar, PSR J0437-4715. In these data, the standard deviation of the post-fit arrival time residuals is approximately four times greater than that predicted by considering the system equivalent flux density, mean pulsar flux and the effective width of the pulsed emission. We develop a technique based on principa...

  14. The High Time Resolution Universe Survey VI: An Artificial Neural Network and Timing of 75 Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, S D; Barsdell, B R; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D J; Coster, P; D'Amico, N; Jameson, A; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Lyne, A; Milia, S; Ng, C; Nietner, C; Possenti, A; Stappers, B; Thornton, D; van Straten, W

    2012-01-01

    We present 75 pulsars discovered in the mid-latitude portion of the High Time Resolution Universe survey, 54 of which have full timing solutions. All the pulsars have spin periods greater than 100 ms, and none of those with timing solutions are in binaries. Two display particularly interesting behaviour; PSR J1054-5944 is found to be an intermittent pulsar, and PSR J1809-0119 has glitched twice since its discovery. In the second half of the paper we discuss the development and application of an artificial neural network in the data-processing pipeline for the survey. We discuss the tests that were used to generate scores and find that our neural network was able to reject over 99% of the candidates produced in the data processing, and able to blindly detect 85% of pulsars. We suggest that improvements to the accuracy should be possible if further care is taken when training an artificial neural network; for example ensuring that a representative sample of the pulsar population is used during the training proc...

  15. Pulsar timing and the detection of black hole binary systems in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Jenet, F A; Lommen, A N; Jenet, Fredrick A.; Creighton, Teviet; Lommen, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    The possible existence of intermediate mass binary black holes (IMBBHs) in globular clusters (GCs) offers a unique geometry in which to detect space-time oscillations. For certain pulsar-IMBBH configurations possible within a GC, the usual far-field plane wave approximation for the IMBBH metric perturbation severely underestimates the magnitude of the induced pulsar pulse time-of-arrival (TOA) fluctuations. In this letter, the expected TOA fluctuations induced by an IMBBH lying close to the line-of-sight between a pulsar and the Earth are calculated for the first time. For an IMBBH consisting of 10 Msolar and 10^3 Msolar components, a 10 year orbital period, and located 0.1 lyr from the Earth-Pulsar line of sight, the induced pulsar timing residual amplitude will be of order 5 to 500 ns.

  16. Pulsar timing signal from ultralight axion in $f(R)$ theory

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Arata

    2016-01-01

    An ultralight axion around $10^{-23}$ eV is known as a viable dark matter candidate. A distinguished feature of such a dark matter is the oscillating pressure which produces the oscillation of the gravitational potential with frequency in the nano Hz range. Recently, Khmelnitsky and Rubakov pointed out that this time dependent potential induces the pulse arrival residual and could be observed by the SKA pulsar timing array experiment. In this paper, we study the detectability of the oscillating pressure of the axion in the framework of $f(R)$ theory, and show that the amplitude of the gravitational potential can be enhanced or suppressed compared to that in Einstein's theory depending on the parameters of $f(R)$ model and mass of the axion. In particular, we investigate the Hu-Sawicki model and find the condition that the Hu-Sawicki model is excluded.

  17. Gravitational-wave Limits from Pulsar Timing Constrain Supermassive Black Hole Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, R M; Coles, W A; Hobbs, G; Keith, M J; Manchester, R N; Wyithe, J S B; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Khoo, J; Levin, Y; Osłowski, S; Sarkissian, J M; van Straten, W; Verbiest, J P W; Wang, J-B

    2013-01-01

    The formation and growth processes of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are not well constrained. SMBH population models, however, provide specific predictions for the properties of the gravitational-wave background (GWB) from binary SMBHs in merging galaxies throughout the Universe. Using observations from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we constrain the fractional GWB energy density with 95% confidence to be ${\\Omega}_{GW}(H_0/73 {\\rm km} {\\rm s}^{-1} {\\rm Mpc}^{-1})^2 < 1.3 \\times 10^{-9}$ at a frequency of 2.8 nHz, which is approximately a factor of six more stringent than previous limits. We compare our limit to models of the SMBH population and find inconsistencies at confidence levels between 46% and 91%. For example, the standard galaxy formation model implemented in the Millennium simulations is inconsistent with our limit with 50% probability.

  18. X-ray Pulsars in the Magellanic Clouds: Time Evolution of their Luminosities and Spin Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Laycock, Silas; Coe, Malcolm J.; Drake, Jeremy J.; Hong, JaeSub; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Ho, Wynn C. G.

    2017-08-01

    We have collected and analyzed the complete archive of XMM-Newton (116), Chandra (151), and RXTE (952) observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), spanning 1997-2014. The resulting observational library provides a comprehensive view of the physical, temporal and statistical properties of the SMC pulsar population across the luminosity range of L_X= 10^{31.2}-10^{38} erg/s. From a sample of 65 pulsars we report 1654 individual pulsar detections, yielding 1393 pulse period measurements. Our pipeline generates a suite of products for each pulsar detection: spin period, flux, event list, high time-resolution light-curve, pulse-profile, periodogram, and X-ray spectrum. Combining all three satellites, we generated complete histories of the spin periods, pulse amplitudes, pulsed fractions and X-ray luminosities. Many of the pulsars show variations in pulse period due to the combination of orbital motion and accretion torques. Long-term spin-up/down trends are seen in 28/25 pulsars respectively, pointing to sustained transfer of mass and angular momentum to the neutron star on decadal timescales. The distributions of pulse detection and flux as functions of spin period provide interesting findings: mapping boundaries of accretion-driven X-ray luminosity, and showing that fast pulsars (Psearch for optical counterparts to X-ray sources in the local dwarf galaxy IC 10 to form a comparison sample for Magellanic Cloud X-ray pulsars.

  19. Outlook for Detecting Gravitational Waves with Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Though the recent discovery of GW150914 is a thrilling success in the field of gravitational-wave astronomy, LIGO is only one tool the scientific community is using to hunt for these elusive signals. After 10 years of unsuccessful searching, how likely is it that pulsar-timing-array projects will make their own first detection soon?Frequency ranges for gravitational waves produced by different astrophysical sources. Pulsar timing arrays such as the EPTA and IPTA are used to detect low-frequency gravitational waves generated by the stochastic background and supermassive black hole binaries. [Christopher Moore, Robert Cole and Christopher Berry]Supermassive BackgroundGround-based laser interferometers like LIGO are ideal for probing ripples in space-time caused by the merger of stellar-mass black holes; these mergers cause chirps in the frequency range of tens to thousands of hertz. But how do we pick up the extremely low-frequency, nanohertz background signal caused by the orbits of pairs of supermassive black holes? For that, we need pulsar timing arrays.Pulsar timing arrays are sets of pulsars whose signals are analyzed to look for correlations in the pulse arrival time. As the space-time between us and a pulsar is stretched and then compressed by a passing gravitational wave, the pulsars pulses should arrive a little late and then a little early. Comparing these timing residuals in an array of pulsars could theoretically allow for the detection of the gravitational waves causing them.Globally, there are currently four pulsar timing array projects actively searching for this signal, with a fifth planned for the future. Now a team of scientists led by Stephen Taylor (NASA-JPL/Caltech) has estimated the likelihood that these projects will successfully detect gravitational waves in the future.Probability for SuccessExpected detection probability of the gravitational-wave background as a function of observing time, for five different pulsar timing arrays. Optimistic

  20. PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Naidu, Arun; Manoharan, P K; Krishnakumar, M A

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a b...

  1. A Cosmic Census of Radio Pulsars with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Keane, E F; Kramer, M; Stappers, B W; Bates, S D; Burgay, M; Chatterjee, S; Champion, D J; Eatough, R P; Hessels, J W T; Janssen, G; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Margueron, J; Oertel, M; Possenti, A; Ransom, S; Theureau, G; Torne, P

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will make ground breaking discoveries in pulsar science. In this chapter we outline the SKA surveys for new pulsars, as well as how we will perform the necessary follow-up timing observations. The SKA's wide field-of-view, high sensitivity, multi-beaming and sub-arraying capabilities, coupled with advanced pulsar search backends, will result in the discovery of a large population of pulsars. These will enable the SKA's pulsar science goals (tests of General Relativity with pulsar binary systems, investigating black hole theorems with pulsar-black hole binaries, and direct detection of gravitational waves in a pulsar timing array). Using SKA1-MID and SKA1-LOW we will survey the Milky Way to unprecedented depth, increasing the number of known pulsars by more than an order of magnitude. SKA2 will potentially find all the Galactic radio-emitting pulsars in the SKA sky which are beamed in our direction. This will give a clear picture of the birth properties of pulsars and of the gr...

  2. The hunt for new pulsars with the Green Bank Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Ryan S; Banaszak, Shawn; Becker, Alison; Berndsen, Aaron; Biwer, Chris; Boyles, Jason; Cardoso, Rogerio F; Cherry, Angus; Dartez, Louis P; Day, David; Epstein, Courtney R; Flanigan, Joe; Ford, Anthony; Garcia, Alejandro; Hessels, Jason W T; Jenet, Fredrick A; Kaplan, David L; Karako-Argaman, Chen; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Lorimer, Duncan R; Lunsford, Grady; Martinez, Jose; McLaughlin, Maura A; McPhee, Christie A; Pennucci, Tim; Ransom, Scott M; Roberts, Mallory S E; Rohr, Matt; Siemens, Xavi; Stairs, Ingrid H; Stovall, Kevin; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Walker, Arielle; Wells, Brad

    2013-01-01

    The Green Bank Telescope (GBT) is the largest fully steerable radio telescope in the world and is one of our greatest tools for discovering and studying radio pulsars. Over the last decade, the GBT has successfully found over 100 new pulsars through large-area surveys. Here I discuss the two most recent---the GBT 350 MHz Drift-scan survey and the Green Bank North Celestial Cap survey. The primary science goal of both surveys is to find interesting individual pulsars, including young pulsars, rotating radio transients, exotic binary systems, and especially bright millisecond pulsars (MSPs) suitable for inclusion in Pulsar Timing Arrays, which are trying to directly detect gravitational waves. These two surveys have combined to discover 85 pulsars to date, among which are 14 MSPs and many unique and fascinating systems. I present highlights from these surveys and discuss future plans. I also discuss recent results from targeted GBT pulsar searches of globular clusters and Fermi sources.

  3. The High Time Resolution Universe Pulsar Survey I: System configuration and initial discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Keith, M J; van Straten, W; Bailes, M; Johnston, S; Kramer, M; Possenti, A; Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; D'Amico, N; Levin, L; Milia, S; Stappers, B W

    2010-01-01

    We have embarked on a survey for pulsars and fast transients using the 13-beam Multibeam receiver on the Parkes radio telescope. Installation of a digital backend allows us to record 400 MHz of bandwidth for each beam, split into 1024 channels and sampled every 64 us. Limits of the receiver package restrict us to a 340 MHz observing band centred at 1352 MHz. The factor of eight improvement in frequency resolution over previous multibeam surveys allows us to probe deeper into the Galactic plane for short duration signals such as the pulses from millisecond pulsars. We plan to survey the entire southern sky in 42641 pointings, split into low, mid and high Galactic latitude regions, with integration times of 4200, 540 and 270 s respectively. Simulations suggest that we will discover 400 pulsars, of which 75 will be millisecond pulsars. With ~30% of the mid-latitude survey complete, we have re-detected 223 previously known pulsars and discovered 27 pulsars, 5 of which are millisecond pulsars. The newly discovered...

  4. The effect of superfluid hydrodynamics on pulsar glitch sizes and waiting times

    CERN Document Server

    Haskell, Brynmor

    2016-01-01

    Pulsar glitches, sudden jumps in frequency observed in many radio pulsars, may be the macroscopic manifestation of superfluid vortex avalanches on the microscopic scale. Small scale quantum mechanical simulations of vortex motion in a decelerating container have shown that such events are possible and predict power-law distributions for the size of the events, and exponential distributions for the waiting time. Despite a paucity of data, this prediction is consistent with the size and waiting time distributions of most glitching pulsars. Nevertheless a few object appear to glitch quasi-periodically, and exhibit many large glitches, while a recent study of the Crab pulsar has suggested a cut-off deviations from a power-law distribution for smaller glitches. In this paper we incorporate the results of quantum mechanical simulations in a macroscopic scale superfluid hydrodynamics simulation. We show that the effect of vortex coupling to the neutron and proton fluids in the neutron star naturally leads to deviati...

  5. Pulsar observations with European telescopes for testing gravity and detecting gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Perrodin, D; Janssen, G H; Karuppusamy, R; Kramer, M; Lee, K; Liu, K; McKee, J; Purver, M; Sanidas, S; Smits, R; Stappers, B W; Zhu, W; Concu, R; Melis, A; Burgay, M; Casu, S; Corongiu, A; Egron, E; Iacolina, N; Pellizzoni, A; Pilia, M; Trois, A

    2016-01-01

    A background of nanohertz gravitational waves from supermassive black hole binaries could soon be detected by pulsar timing arrays, which measure the times-of-arrival of radio pulses from millisecond pulsars with very high precision. The European Pulsar Timing Array uses five large European radio telescopes to monitor high-precision millisecond pulsars, imposing in this way strong constraints on a gravitational wave background. To achieve the necessary precision needed to detect gravitational waves, the Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP) performs simultaneous observations of pulsars with all five telescopes, which allows us to coherently add the radio pulses, maximize the signal-to-noise of pulsar signals and increase the precision of times-of-arrival. We report on the progress made and results obtained by the LEAP collaboration, and in particular on the addition of the Sardinia Radio Telescope to the LEAP observations during its scientific validation phase. In addition, we discuss how LEAP can be used t...

  6. Gravitational Waves from Pulsars and Their Braking Indices: The Role of a Time Dependent Magnetic Ellipticity

    CERN Document Server

    de Araujo, José C N; Costa, César A

    2016-01-01

    We study the role of time dependent magnetic ellipticities ($\\epsilon_{B}$) on the calculation of the braking index of pulsars. Moreover, we study the consequences of such a $\\epsilon_{B}$ on the amplitude of gravitational waves (GWs) generated by pulsars with measured braking indices. We show that, since the ellipticity generated by the magnetic dipole is extremely small, the corresponding amplitude of GWs is much smaller than the amplitude obtained via the spindown limit.

  7. Time variation in the low frequency spectrum of Vela-like pulsar B1800-21

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Rahul; Lewandowski, Wojciech; Kijak, Jarosław; Dembska, Marta

    2016-01-01

    We report the flux measurement of the Vela like pulsar B1800-21 at the low radio frequency regime over multiple epochs spanning several years. The spectrum shows a turnover around the GHz frequency range and represents a typical example of gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) pulsar. Our observations revealed that the pulsar spectrum show a significant evolution during the observing period with the low frequency part of the spectrum becoming steeper, with a higher turnover frequency, for a period of several years before reverting back to the initial shape during the latest measurements. The spectral change over times spanning several years requires dense structures, with free electron densities around 1000--20000 cm$^{-3}$ and physical dimensions ~220 AU, in the interstellar medium (ISM) traversing across the pulsar line of sight. We look into the possible sites of such structures in the ISM and likely mechanisms particularly the thermal free-free absorption as possible explanations for the change.

  8. The discovery of two mildly recycled binary pulsars in the Northern High Time Resolution Universe pulsar survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezina, M.; Champion, D. J.; Freire, P. C. C.; Tauris, T. M.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Guillemot, L.; Cognard, I.; Barr, E. D.; Eatough, R. P.; Karuppusamy, R.; Spitler, L. G.; Desvignes, G.

    2017-10-01

    We report the discovery and the results of follow-up timing observations of PSR J2045+3633 and PSR J2053+4650, two binary pulsars found in the Northern High Time Resolution Universe pulsar survey being carried out with the Effelsberg radio telescope. Having spin periods of 31.7 and 12.6 ms, respectively, and both with massive white dwarf companions, Mc > 0.8 M⊙, the pulsars can be classified as mildly recycled. PSR J2045+3633 is remarkable due to its orbital period (32.3 d) and eccentricity e = 0.017 212 44(5), which is amongst the largest ever measured for this class. After almost two years of timing, the large eccentricity has allowed the measurement of the rate of advance of periastron at the 5σ level, 0.0010(2)°yr- 1. Combining this with a detection of the orthometric amplitude of the Shapiro delay, we obtained the following constraints on the component masses (within general relativity): Mp = 1.33^{+0.30}_{-0.28} M_{⊙}; and Mc = 0.94^{+0.14}_{-0.13} M_{⊙}. PSR J2053+4650 has a 2.45 d circular orbit inclined to the plane of the sky at an angle i = 85.0^{+0.8}_{-0.9} deg. In this nearly edge-on case the masses can be obtained from the Shapiro delay alone. Our timing observations resulted in a significant detection of this effect giving: Mp = 1.40^{+0.21}_{-0.18} M_{⊙}; and Mc = 0.86^{+0.07}_{-0.06} M_{⊙}.

  9. PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Arun; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Manoharan, P. K.; Krishnakumar, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a bandwidth of about four times larger (16 MHz) than that of the legacy system as well as its fluctuation spectrum with high temporal and frequency resolutions. The key point is that all the above modes operate in real time. This paper presents the design aspects of PONDER and outlines the design methodology for future similar backends. It also explains the principal operations of PONDER, illustrates its capabilities for a variety of pulsar and IPS observations and demonstrates its usefulness for a variety of astrophysical studies using the high sensitivity of the ORT.

  10. Constraining the solution to the last parsec problem with pulsar timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Laura; Cornish, Neil J.; McWilliams, Sean T.

    2015-04-01

    The detection of a stochastic gravitational-wave signal from the superposition of many inspiraling supermassive black holes with pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) is likely to occur within the next decade. With this detection will come the opportunity to learn about the processes that drive black-hole-binary systems toward merger through their effects on the gravitational-wave spectrum. We use Bayesian methods to investigate the extent to which effects other than gravitational-wave emission can be distinguished using PTA observations. We show that, even in the absence of a detection, it is possible to place interesting constraints on these dynamical effects for conservative predictions of the population of tightly bound supermassive-black-hole binaries. For instance, if we assume a relatively weak signal consistent with a low number of bound binaries and a low black-hole-mass to galaxy-mass correlation, we still find that a nondetection by a simulated array, with a sensitivity that should be reached in practice within a few years, disfavors gravitational-wave-dominated evolution with an odds ratio of ˜30 ∶1 . Such a finding would suggest either that all existing astrophysical models for the population of tightly bound binaries are overly optimistic, or else that some dynamical effect other than gravitational-wave emission is actually dominating binary evolution even at the relatively high frequencies/small orbital separations probed by PTAs.

  11. Constraining the Solution to the Last Parsec Problem with Pulsar Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Sampson, Laura; McWilliams, Sean T

    2015-01-01

    The detection of a stochastic gravitational-wave signal from the superposition of many inspiraling supermassive black holes with pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) is likely to occur within the next decade. With this detection will come the opportunity to learn about the processes that drive black-hole-binary systems toward merger through their effects on the gravitational-wave spectrum. We use Bayesian methods to investigate the extent to which effects other than gravitational-wave emission can be distinguished using PTA observations. We show that, even in the absence of a detection, it is possible to place interesting constraints on these dynamical effects for conservative predictions of the population of tightly bound supermassive black-hole binaries. For instance, if we assume a relatively weak signal consistent with a low number of bound binaries and a low black-hole-mass to galaxy-mass correlation, we still find that a non-detection by a simulated array, with a sensitivity that should be reached in practice wi...

  12. Time and Energy Measurement Electronics for Silicon Drift Detector Aimed for X-ray Pulsar Navigation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Er-Lei; Ye, Chun-Feng; Liu, Shu-Bin; Jin, Dong-Dong; Lian, Jian; Hu, Hui-Jun

    2016-01-01

    A readout electronic with high time and energy resolution performance is designed for the SDD (Silicon Drift Detector) signals readout, which is aimed for X-ray pulsar based navigation (XNAV). For time measurement, the input signal is fed into a fast shaping and Constant Fraction Discrimination (CFD) circuit, and then be digitalized by a Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) implemented in an Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), which is designed with a bin size of 2.5 ns. For energy measurement, a slow shaping and analog peak detection circuit is employed to acquire the energy information of input signals, which is then digitalized by a 14-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC). Both the time and energy measurement results are buffered and packaged in FPGA and then transmitted to Data Processing (DP) system. Test results indicate that the time resolution is about 3 ns, while the FWHM (Full Width at Half Maximum) of energy spectrum is better than 160 eV @ 5.9 keV, with the energy dynamic range from 1 keV to 10 keV....

  13. GRIFFIN's Fast-Timing Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaizola, Bruno; Griffin Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Gamma-Ray Infrastructure For Fundamental Investigations of Nuclei (GRIFFIN) is the new β-decay spectrometer facility at TRIUMF-ISAC. Consists of an array of 16 large-volume HPGe clover detectors with an unparalleled efficiency of 19% at 1.33 MeV. Its strongest advantage is the versatility of the ancillary detectors that can be coupled to the main array to tag on β particles, neutrons or precisely measure conversion electron spectra. An ancillary array of 8 LaBr3(Ce) detectors for γ-rays and a fast plastic scintillator for β-particles has been optimized for fast-timing experiments with GRIFFIN. The 51 mm x 51 mm cylindrical LaBr3(Ce) crystals are coupled to Hamamatsu R2083 photomultipliers. Timing resolutions as good as FWHM 200 ps and time-walks below +/- 30 ps have been obtained for individual crystals using analog electronics. There is also an ongoing project to develop an active BGO shield for the LaBr3(Ce) crystals. The LaBr3(Ce) array commissioning experiment to measure the 145,146Cs decay to 145,146Ba will test its capabilities over a wide range of lifetimes. Preliminary results on the lifetimes of some of the low-laying states will be presented.

  14. Periodic modulation in pulse arrival times from young pulsars: a renewed case for neutron star precession

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, Matthew; Johnston, Simon; Shannon, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    In a search for periodic variation in the arrival times of pulses from 151 young, energetic pulsars, we have identified seven cases of modulation consistent with one or two harmonics of a single fundamental with time-scale 0.5-1.5 yr. We use simulations to show that these modulations are statistically significant and of high quality (sinusoidal) even when contaminated by the strong stochastic timing noise common to young pulsars. Although planetary companions could induce such modulation, the large implied masses and 2:1 mean motion resonances challenge such an explanation. Instead, the modulation is likely to be intrinsic to the pulsar, arising from quasi-periodic switching between stable magnetospheric states, and we propose that precession of the neutron star may regulate this switching.

  15. Deep Chandra Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud. II. Timing Analysis of X-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, JaeSub; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Haberl, Frank; Sasaki, Manami; Drake, Jeremy J.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Laycock, Silas

    2017-09-01

    We report the timing analysis results of X-ray pulsars from a recent deep Chandra survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We analyzed a total exposure of 1.4 Ms from 31 observations over a 1.2 deg2 region in the SMC under a Chandra X-ray Visionary Program. Using the Lomb–Scargle and epoch-folding techniques, we detected periodic modulations from 20 pulsars and a new candidate pulsar. The survey also covered 11 other pulsars with no clear sign of periodic modulation. The 0.5–8 keV X-ray luminosity (L X ) of the pulsars ranges from 1034 to 1037 erg s‑1 at 60 kpc. All of the Chandra sources with L X ≳ 4 × 1035 erg s‑1 exhibit X-ray pulsations. The X-ray spectra of the SMC pulsars (and high-mass X-ray binaries) are in general harder than those of the SMC field population. All but SXP 8.02 can be fitted by an absorbed power-law model with a photon index of Γ ≲ 1.5. The X-ray spectrum of the known magnetar SXP 8.02 is better fitted with a two-temperature blackbody model. Newly measured pulsation periods of SXP 51.0, SXP 214, and SXP 701, are significantly different from the previous XMM-Newton and RXTE measurements. This survey provides a rich data set for energy-dependent pulse profile modeling. Six pulsars show an almost eclipse-like dip in the pulse profile. Phase-resolved spectral analysis reveals diverse spectral variations during pulsation cycles: e.g., for an absorbed power-law model, some exhibit an (anti)-correlation between absorption and X-ray flux, while others show more intrinsic spectral variation (i.e., changes in photon indices).

  16. The Parkes Observatory Pulsar Data Archive

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, G; Manchester, R N; Dempsey, J; Chapman, J M; Khoo, J; Applegate, J; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Bridle, R; Borg, A; Brown, A; Burnett, C; Camilo, F; Cattalini, C; Chaudhary, A; Chen, R; D'Amico, N; Kedziora-Chudczer, L; Cornwell, T; George, R; Hampson, G; Hepburn, M; Jameson, A; Keith, M; Kelly, T; Kosmynin, A; Lenc, E; Lorimer, D; Love, C; Lyne, A; McIntyre, V; Morrissey, J; Pienaar, M; Reynolds, J; Ryder, G; Sarkissian, J; Stevenson, A; Treloar, A; van Straten, W; Whiting, M; Wilson, G

    2011-01-01

    The Parkes pulsar data archive currently provides access to 144044 data files obtained from observations carried out at the Parkes observatory since the year 1991. Around 10^5 files are from surveys of the sky, the remainder are observations of 775 individual pulsars and their corresponding calibration signals. Survey observations are included from the Parkes 70cm and the Swinburne Intermediate Latitude surveys. Individual pulsar observations are included from young pulsar timing projects, the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array and from the PULSE@Parkes outreach program. The data files and access methods are compatible with Virtual Observatory protocols. This paper describes the data currently stored in the archive and presents ways in which these data can be searched and downloaded.

  17. Detecting Pulsars with Interstellar Scintillation in Variance Images

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, S; Bell, M E; Coles, W A; Hobbs, G; Ekers, R D; Lenc, E

    2016-01-01

    Pulsars are the only cosmic radio sources known to be sufficiently compact to show diffractive interstellar scintillations. Images of the variance of radio signals in both time and frequency can be used to detect pulsars in large-scale continuum surveys using the next generation of synthesis radio telescopes. This technique allows a search over the full field of view while avoiding the need for expensive pixel-by-pixel high time resolution searches. We investigate the sensitivity of detecting pulsars in variance images. We show that variance images are most sensitive to pulsars whose scintillation time-scales and bandwidths are close to the subintegration time and channel bandwidth. Therefore, in order to maximise the detection of pulsars for a given radio continuum survey, it is essential to retain a high time and frequency resolution, allowing us to make variance images sensitive to pulsars with different scintillation properties. We demonstrate the technique with Murchision Widefield Array data and show th...

  18. High-Precision Timing of 5 Millisecond Pulsars: Space Velocities, Binary Evolution and Equivalence Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, M E; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Nice, D J; Demorest, P B; Ransom, S M; Kramer, M; Camilo, F; Hobbs, G; Manchester, R N; Lyne, A G

    2011-01-01

    We present high-precision timing of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) carried out for more than seven years; four pulsars are in binary systems and one is isolated. We are able to measure the pulsars' proper motions and derive an estimate for their space velocities. The measured two-dimensional velocities are in the range 70-210 km/s, consistent with those measured for other MSPs. We also use all the available proper motion information for isolated and binary MSPs to update the known velocity distribution for these populations. As found by earlier works, we find that the velocity distribution of binary and isolated MSPs are indistinguishable with the current data. Four of the pulsars in our observing program are highly recycled with low-mass white dwarf companions and we are able to derive accurate binary parameters for these systems. For three of these binary systems we are able to place initial constraints on the pulsar masses with best-fit values in the range 1.0-1.6 M_sun. The implications of the results pr...

  19. Curious properties of the recycled pulsars and the potential of high precision timing

    CERN Document Server

    Bailes, M

    2007-01-01

    Binary and Millisecond pulsars have a great deal to teach us about stellar evolution and are invaluable tools for tests of relativistic theories of gravity. Our understanding of these objects has been transformed by large-scale surveys that have uncovered a great deal of new objects, exquisitely timed by ever-improving instrumentation. Here we argue that there exists a fundamental relation between the spin period of a pulsar and its companion mass, and that this determines many of the observable properties of a binary pulsar. No recycled pulsars exist in which the minimum companion mass exceeds (P/10 ms) Solar Masses. Furthermore, the three fastest disk millisecond pulsars are either single, or possess extremely low-mass companions Mc~0.02 Mo, consistent with this relation. Finally, the four relativistic binaries for which we have actual measurements of neutron star masses, suggest that not only are their spin periods related to the companion neutron star mass, but that the kick imparted to the system depends...

  20. The High Time Resolution Universe Survey II: Discovery of 5 Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; D'Amico, N; Jameson, A; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Lyne, A; Milia, S; Possenti, A; Stappers, B; van Straten, W

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery of 5 millisecond pulsars found in the mid-Galactic latitude portion of the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) Survey. The pulsars have rotational periods from ~2.3 to ~7.5 ms, and all are in binary systems with orbital periods ranging from ~0.3 to ~150 d. In four of these systems, the most likely companion is a white dwarf, with minimum masses of ~0.2 Solar Masses. The other pulsar, J1731-1847, has a very low mass companion and exhibits eclipses, and is thus a member of the "black widow" class of pulsar binaries. These eclipses have been observed in bands centred near frequencies of 700, 1400 and 3000 MHz, from which measurements have been made of the electron density in the eclipse region. These measurements have been used to examine some possible eclipse mechanisms. The eclipse and other properties of this source are used to perform a comparison with the other known eclipsing and "black widow" pulsars. These new discoveries occupy a short-period and high-dispersion measure (DM) re...

  1. The High Time Resolution Universe surveys for pulsars and fast transients

    CERN Document Server

    Keith, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    The High Time Resolution Universe survey for pulsars and transients is the first truly all-sky pulsar survey, taking place at the Parkes Radio Telescope in Australia and the Effelsberg Radio Telescope in Germany. Utilising multibeam receivers with custom built all-digital recorders the survey targets the fastest millisecond pulsars and radio transients on timescales of 64 us to a few seconds. The new multibeam digital filter-bank system at has a factor of eight improvement in frequency resolution over previous Parkes multibeam surveys, allowing us to probe further into the Galactic plane for short duration signals. The survey is split into low, mid and high Galactic latitude regions. The mid-latitude portion of the southern hemisphere survey is now completed, discovering 107 previously unknown pulsars, including 26 millisecond pulsars. To date, the total number of discoveries in the combined survey is 135 and 29 MSPs. These discoveries include the first magnetar to be discovered by it's radio emission, unusua...

  2. The High Time Resolution Universe Pulsar Survey X: Discovery of four millisecond pulsars and updated timing solutions of a further 12

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, C; Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D J; Coster, P; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Petroff, E; Possenti, A; Stappers, B W; van Straten, W; Thornton, D; Tiburzi, C; Bassa, C G; Freire, P C C; Guillemot, L; Lyne, A G; Tauris, T M; Shannon, R M; Wex, N

    2014-01-01

    We report on the discovery of four millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) pulsar survey being conducted at the Parkes 64-m radio telescope. All four MSPs are in binary systems and are likely to have white dwarf companions. In addition, we present updated timing solutions for 12 previously published HTRU MSPs, revealing new observational parameters such as five proper motion measurements and significant temporal dispersion measure variations in PSR J1017-7156. We discuss the case of PSR J1801-3210, which shows no significant period derivative after four years of timing data. Our best-fit solution shows a period derivative of the order of $10^{-23}$, an extremely small number compared to that of a typical MSP. However, it is likely that the pulsar lies beyond the Galactic Centre, and an unremarkable intrinsic period derivative is reduced to close to zero by the Galactic potential acceleration. Furthermore, we highlight the potential to employ PSR J1801-3210 in the strong equivale...

  3. The Effect of Pulsar Timing Noise and Glitches on Timing Analysis for Ground Based Telescopes Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oña-Wilhelmi, E.; de Jager, O. C.; Contreras, J. L.; de los Reyes, R.; Fonseca, V.; López, M.; Lucarelli, F.; MAGIC Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    Pulsed emission from a number of gamma-ray pulsars is expected to be detectable with next generation ground-based gamma-ray telescopes such as MAGIC and possibly H.E.S.S. within a few hours of observations. The sensitivity is however not sufficient to enable a detection within a few seconds as reached by radio surveys. In some cases we may be fortunate to do a period search given a few hours' data, but if the signal is marginal, the correct period parameters must be known to allow a folding of the gamma-ray arrival times. The residual phases are then sub jected to a test for uniformity from which the significance of a signal can be assessed. If contemporary radio parameters are not available, we have to extrap olate archival radio parameters to the observation time in question. Such an extrap olation must then be accurate enough to avoid significant pulse smearing. The pulsar ephemerides from the archival data of HartRAO and Princeton (b etween 1989 and 1998) provide an excellent opportunity to study the accuracy of extrap olations of such ephemerides to the present moment, if an appropriate time shift is intro duced. The aim of this study is to investigate the smear in the gamma-ray pulse profile during a single night of observations.

  4. Understanding and analysing time-correlated stochastic signals in pulsar timing

    CERN Document Server

    van Haasteren, Rutger

    2012-01-01

    Although it is widely understood that pulsar timing observations generally contain time-correlated stochastic signals (TCSSs; red timing noise is of this type), most data analysis techniques that have been developed make an assumption that the stochastic uncertainties in the data are uncorrelated, i.e. "white". Recent work has pointed out that this can introduce severe bias in determination of timing-model parameters, and that better analysis methods should be used. This paper presents a detailed investigation of timing-model fitting in the presence of TCSSs, and gives closed expressions for the post-fit signals in the data. This results in a Bayesian technique to obtain timing-model parameter estimates in the presence of TCSSs, as well as computationally more efficient expressions of their marginalised posterior distribution. A new method to analyse hundreds of mock dataset realisations simultaneously without significant computational overhead is presented, as well as a statistically rigorous method to check...

  5. Gravitational waves and pulsar timing: stochastic background, individual sources and parameter estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Sesana, A

    2010-01-01

    Massive black holes are key ingredients of the assembly and evolution of cosmic structures. Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTAs) currently provide the only means to observe gravitational radiation from massive black hole binary systems with masses >10^7 solar masses. The whole cosmic population produces a signal consisting of two components: (i) a stochastic background resulting from the incoherent superposition of radiation from the all the sources, and (ii) a handful of individually resolvable signals that raise above the background level and are produced by sources sufficiently close and/or massive. Considering a wide range of massive black hole binary assembly scenarios, we investigate both the level and shape of the background and the statistics of resolvable sources. We predict a characteristic background amplitude in the interval h_c(f = 10^-8 Hz)~5*10^-16 - 5*10^-15, within the detection range of the complete Parkes PTA. We also quantify the capability of PTAs of measuring the parameters of individual sources,...

  6. Timing and spectral properties of the accreting millisecond pulsar SWIFT J1756.9-2508

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linares, M.; Wijnands, R.; van der Klis, M.; Krimm, H.; Markwardt, C.B.; Chakrabarty, D.

    2008-01-01

    SWIFT J1756.9-2508 is one of the few accreting millisecond pulsars (AMPs) discovered to date. We report here the results of our analysis of its aperiodic X-ray variability, as measured with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer during the 2007 outburst of the source. We detect strong (~35%) flat-topped

  7. The Northern High Time Resolution Universe Pulsar Survey I: Setup and initial discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, Ewan D; Kramer, Michael; Eatough, Ralph P; Freire, Paulo C C; Karuppusamy, Ramesh; Lee, K J; Verbiest, Joris P W; Bassa, Cees G; Lyne, Andrew G; Stappers, Benjamin; Lorimer, Duncan R; Klein, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    We report on the setup and initial discoveries of the Northern High Time Resolution Universe survey for pulsars and fast transients, the first major pulsar survey conducted with the 100-m Effelsberg radio telescope and the first in 20 years to observe the whole northern sky at high radio frequencies. Using a newly developed 7-beam receiver system combined with a state-of-the-art polyphase filterbank, we record an effective bandwidth of 240 MHz in 410 channels centred on 1.36 GHz with a time resolution of 54 $\\mu$s. Such fine time and frequency resolution increases our sensitivity to millisecond pulsars and fast transients, especially deep inside the Galaxy, where previous surveys have been limited due to intra-channel dispersive smearing. To optimise observing time, the survey is split into three integration regimes dependent on Galactic latitude, with 1500-s, 180-s and 90-s integrations for latitude ranges $|b|15^{\\circ}$, respectively. The survey has so far resulted in the discovery of 15 radio pulsars, inc...

  8. A digital pulsar backend based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jin-Tao; Chen, Lan; Han, Jin-Lin; Esamdin, Ali; Wu, Ya-Jun; Li, Zhi-Xuan; Hao, Long-Fei; Zhang, Xiu-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    A digital pulsar backend based on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is developed. It is designed for incoherent de-dispersion of pulsar observations and has a maximum bandwidth of 512 MHz. The channel bandwidth is fixed to 1 MHz, and the highest time resolution is 10 {{μ }} s. Testing observations were carried out using the Urumqi 25-m telescope administered by Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory and the Kunming 40-m telescope administered by Yunnan Observatories, targeting PSR J0332+5434 in the L band and PSR J0437–4715 in the S band, respectively. The successful observation of PSR J0437–4715 demonstrates its ability to observe millisecond pulsars.

  9. Observing pulsars and fast transients with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Stappers, B W; Alexov, A; Anderson, K; Coenen, T; Hassall, T; Karastergiou, A; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; van Leeuwen, J; Mol, J D; Noutsos, A; Romein, J W; Weltevrede, P; Fender, R; Wijers, R A M J; Bähren, L; Bell, M E; Broderick, J; Daw, E J; Dhillon, V S; Eislöffel, J; Falcke, H; Griessmeier, J; Law, C; Markoff, S; Miller-Jones, J C A; Scheers, B; Spreeuw, H; Swinbank, J; ter Veen, S; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bennema, P; Bentum, M J; Best, P; Bregman, J; Brentjens, M; van de Brink, R H; Broekema, P C; Brouw, W N; Brüggen, M; de Bruyn, A G; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Conway, J; Dettmar, R -J; van Duin, A; van Enst, J; Garrett, M; Gerbers, M; Grit, T; Gunst, A; van Haarlem, M P; Hamaker, J P; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Holties, H; Horneffer, A; Koopmans, L V E; Kuper, G; Loose, M; Maat, P; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Miley, G; Morganti, R; Nijboer, R; Noordam, J E; Norden, M; Olofsson, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Polatidis, A; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Schoenmakers, A; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Sterks, C G M; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Vermeulen, R; Vermaas, N; Vogt, C; de Vos, M; Wijnholds, S J; Yatawatta, S; Zensus, A

    2011-01-01

    Low frequency radio waves, while challenging to observe, are a rich source of information about pulsars. The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) is a new radio interferometer operating in the lowest 4 octaves of the ionospheric "radio window": 10-240MHz, that will greatly facilitate observing pulsars at low radio frequencies. Through the huge collecting area, long baselines, and flexible digital hardware, it is expected that LOFAR will revolutionize radio astronomy at the lowest frequencies visible from Earth. LOFAR is a next-generation radio telescope and a pathfinder to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), in that it incorporates advanced multi-beaming techniques between thousands of individual elements. We discuss the motivation for low-frequency pulsar observations in general and the potential of LOFAR in addressing these science goals. We present LOFAR as it is designed to perform high-time-resolution observations of pulsars and other fast transients, and outline the various relevant observing modes and data reduct...

  10. A Trans-dimensional Bayesian Approach to Pulsar Timing Noise Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The modeling of intrinsic noise in pulsar timing residual data is of crucial importance for Gravitational Wave (GW) detection and pulsar timing (astro)physics in general. The noise budget in pulsars is a collection of several well studied effects including radiometer noise, pulse-phase jitter noise, dispersion measure (DM) variations, and low frequency spin noise. However, as pulsar timing data continues to improve, non-stationary and non-powerlaw noise terms are beginning to manifest which are not well modeled by current noise analysis techniques. In this work we use a trans-dimensional approach to model these non-stationary and non-powerlaw effects through the use of a wavelet basis and an interpolation based adaptive spectral modeling. In both cases, the number of wavelets and the number of control points in the interpolated spectrum are free parameters that are constrained by the data and then marginalized over in the final inferences, thus fully incorporating our ignorance of the noise model. We show tha...

  11. Absolute timing of the Crab pulsar with the INTEGRAL/SPI telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Molkov, S; Roques, J P

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the pulse shape evolution of the Crab pulsar emission in the hard X-ray domain of the electromagnetic spectrum. In particular, we have studied the alignment of the Crab pulsar phase profiles measured in the hard X-rays and in other wavebands. To obtain the hard X-ray pulse profiles, we have used six year (2003-2009, with a total exposure of about 4 Ms) of publicly available data of the SPI telescope on-board of the INTEGRAL observatory, folded with the pulsar time solution derived from the Jodrell Bank Crab Pulsar Monthly Ephemeris. We found that the main pulse in the hard X-ray 20-100 keV energy band is leading the radio one by $8.18\\pm0.46$ milliperiods in phase, or $275\\pm15 \\mu s$ in time. Quoted errors represent only statistical uncertainties.Our systematic error is estimated to be $\\sim 40 \\mu s$ and is mainly caused by the radio measurement uncertainties. In hard X-rays, the average distance between the main pulse and interpulse on the phase plane is $0.3989\\pm0.0009$. To compare o...

  12. Modelling and mitigating refractive propagation effects in precision pulsar timing observations

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, R M

    2016-01-01

    To obtain the most accurate pulse arrival times from radio pulsars, it is necessary to correct or mitigate the effects of the propagation of radio waves through the warm and ionised interstellar medium. We examine both the strength of propagation effects associated with large-scale electron-density variations and the methodology used to estimate infinite-frequency arrival times. Using simulations of two-dimensional phase-varying screens, we assess the strength and non-stationarity of timing perturbations associated with large-scale density variations. We identify additional contributions to arrival times that are stochastic in both radio frequency and time and therefore not amenable to correction solely using times of arrival. We attribute this to the frequency dependence of the trajectories of the propagating radio waves. We find that this limits the efficacy of low-frequency (metre-wavelength) observations. Incorporating low-frequency pulsar observations into precision timing campaigns is increasingly probl...

  13. Correcting for Interstellar Scattering Delay in High-precision Pulsar Timing: Simulation Results

    CERN Document Server

    Palliyaguru, Nipuni; McLaughlin, Maura; Demorest, Paul; Jones, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Light travel time changes due to gravitational waves may be detected within the next decade through precision timing of millisecond pulsars. Removal of frequency-dependent interstellar medium (ISM) delays due to dispersion and scattering is a key issue in the detection process. Current timing algorithms routinely correct pulse times of arrival (TOAs) for time-variable delays due to cold plasma dispersion. However, none of the major pulsar timing groups correct for delays due to scattering from multi-path propagation in the ISM. Scattering introduces a frequency-dependent phase change in the signal that results in pulse broadening and arrival time delays. Any method to correct the TOA for interstellar propagation effects must be based on multi-frequency measurements that can effectively separate dispersion and scattering delay terms from frequency-independent perturbations such as those due to a gravitational wave. Cyclic spectroscopy, first described in an astronomical context by Demorest (2011), is a potenti...

  14. Precision Astrometry with the Very Long Baseline Array: Parallaxes and Proper Motions for 14 Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, S; Vlemmings, W H T; Goss, W M; Lazio, T J W; Cordes, J M; Thorsett, S E; Fomalont, E B; Lyne, A G; Krämer, M

    2009-01-01

    Astrometry can bring powerful constraints to bear on a variety of scientific questions about neutron stars, including their origins, astrophysics, evolution, and environments. Using phase-referenced observations at the VLBA, in conjunction with pulsar gating and in-beam calibration, we have measured the parallaxes and proper motions for 14 pulsars. The smallest measured parallax in our sample is 0.13+-0.02 mas for PSR B1541+09, which has a most probable distance of 7.2+1.3-1.1 kpc. We detail our methods, including initial VLA surveys to select candidates and find in-beam calibrators, VLBA phase-referencing, pulsar gating, calibration, and data reduction. The use of the bootstrap method to estimate astrometric uncertainties in the presence of unmodeled systematic errors is also described. Based on our new model-independent estimates for distance and transverse velocity, we investigate the kinematics and birth sites of the pulsars and revisit models of the Galactic electron density distribution. We find that yo...

  15. Taming outliers in pulsar-timing datasets with hierarchical likelihoods and Hamiltonian sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Vallisneri, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Pulsar-timing datasets have been analyzed with great success using probabilistic treatments based on Gaussian distributions, with applications ranging from studies of neutron-star structure to tests of general relativity and searches for nanosecond gravitational waves. As for other applications of Gaussian distributions, outliers in timing measurements pose a significant challenge to statistical inference, since they can bias the estimation of timing and noise parameters, and affect reported parameter uncertainties. We describe and demonstrate a practical end-to-end approach to perform Bayesian inference of timing and noise parameters robustly in the presence of outliers, and to identify these probabilistically. The method is fully consistent (i.e., outlier-ness probabilities vary in tune with the posterior distributions of the timing and noise parameters), and it relies on the efficient sampling of the hierarchical form of the pulsar-timing likelihood. Such sampling has recently become possible with a "no-U-...

  16. Towards Practical Deep-Space Navigation using X-ray Pulsar Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemar, Setnam; Fraser, George; Heil, Lucy; Hindley, David; Martindale, Adrian; Molyneux, Philippa; Pye, John P.; Warwick, Robert; Lamb, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    We describe a recent study, conducted by the National Physical Laboratory and the University of Leicester for the European Space Agency, on the feasibility of using X-ray timing observations of pulsars for deep space navigation, a technique commonly referred to as ‘XNAV’. We have considered all primary aspects of the ‘system’, i.e. suitable pulsars and their sky distribution, available and future instrumentation, navigation methods and algorithms, and overall performance (e.g. position accuracy). We have used simulations to identify the best combinations of navigation method and X-ray pulsars with respect to predicted performance, taking account of current and future X-ray instrumentation. The XNAV technique would allow increased spacecraft autonomy, improved position accuracies and lower mission operating costs compared to the NASA and ESA Deep Space Networks (DSN). We have also used a high-level navigation algorithm together with real data (from the RXTE mission archive) for the Crab pulsar to demonstrate key elements of XNAV. X-ray instrumentation suitable for use as a spacecraft operational subsystem must be designed to use only modest spacecraft resources. We show that instrumentation designed for the Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer, in production for the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury, offers a roadmap for a practical XNAV system. We identify key areas for future study.

  17. The High Time Resolution Universe Survey - IX: Polarimetry of long-period pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Tiburzi, C; Bailes, M; Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D; Coster, P; D'Amico, N; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Milia, S; Ng, C; Possenti, A; Stappers, B W; Thornton, D; van Straten, W

    2013-01-01

    We present a polarimetric analysis of 49 long-period pulsars discovered as part of the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) southern survey. The sources exhibit the typical characteristics of "old" pulsars, with low fractional linear and circular polarisation and narrow, multicomponent profiles. Although the position angle swings are generally complex, for two of the analysed pulsars (J1622-3751 and J1710-2616) we obtained an indication of the geometry via the rotating vector model. We were able to determine a value of the rotation measure (RM) for 34 of the sources which, when combined with their dispersion measures (DM), yields an integrated magnetic field strength along the line of sight. With the data presented here, the total number of values of RM associated to pulsars discovered during the HTRU southern survey sums to 51. The RMs are not consistent with the hypothesis of a counter-clockwise direction of the Galactic magnetic field within an annulus included between 4 and 6 kpc from the Galactic centre....

  18. UV Timing and Spectroscopy of the Crab Nebula Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Lunqvist, Peter; Sollerman, Jesper; Lindler, Don; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have used the Hubble Space Telescope and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph to obtain Near Ultraviolet (NUV) (1600-3200 Angstroms) and Far Ultraviolet (FUV) (1140-1720 Angstroms) spectra and pulse profiles of the Crab Nebula's pulsar. The pulse period agrees well with the radio predictions. The NUV and FUV pulse profiles are little changed from the visible wavelength profile. Spectra obtained with the Nordic Optical Telescope were combined with the UV spectra for full coverage from 1140-9250Angstoms. Dereddening the spectrum with a standard extinction curve achieves a flat spectrum for E(B-V)=0.52, R=3.1. Lyman alpha absorption indicates a column density of 3.0=/-0.5 x 10(exp 21) cm -2, consistent with the E(B-V) of 0.52. The dereddened spectrum can be fitted by a power law with spectral index alpha=0.11+/-0.04. A broad, blueshifted absorption is seen in CIV (1550Angstroms), reaching a velocity of about 2500 kilometer per second.

  19. Time-domain Implementation of the Optimal Cross-Correlation Statistic for Stochastic Gravitational-Wave Background Searches in Pulsar Timing Data

    CERN Document Server

    Chamberlin, Sydney J; Demorest, Paul B; Ellis, Justin; Price, Larry R; Romano, Joseph D; Siemens, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries, cosmic strings, relic gravitational waves from inflation, and first order phase transitions in the early universe are expected to contribute to a stochastic background of gravitational waves in the 10^(-9) Hz-10^(-7) Hz frequency band. Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) exploit the high precision timing of radio pulsars to detect signals at such frequencies. Here we present a time-domain implementation of the optimal cross-correlation statistic for stochastic background searches in PTA data. Due to the irregular sampling typical of PTA data as well as the use of a timing model to predict the times-of-arrival of radio pulses, time-domain methods are better suited for gravitational wave data analysis of such data. We present a derivation of the optimal cross-correlation statistic starting from the likelihood function, a method to produce simulated stochastic background signals, and a rigorous derivation of the scaling laws for the signal-to-noise ratio of the cross-correlation statist...

  20. Searching for Pulsars Using Image Pattern Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W. W.; Berndsen, A.; Madsen, E. C.; Tan, M.; Stairs, I. H.; Brazier, A.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Scholz, P.; Stovall, K.; Ransom, S. M.; Banaszak, S.; Biwer, C. M.; Cohen, S.; Dartez, L. P.; Flanigan, J.; Lunsford, G.; Martinez, J. G.; Mata, A.; Rohr, M.; Walker, A.; Allen, B.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Desvignes, G.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kaspi, V. M.; Knispel, B.; Lee, K. J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lyne, A. G.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L. G.; Venkataraman, A.

    2014-02-01

    In the modern era of big data, many fields of astronomy are generating huge volumes of data, the analysis of which can sometimes be the limiting factor in research. Fortunately, computer scientists have developed powerful data-mining techniques that can be applied to various fields. In this paper, we present a novel artificial intelligence (AI) program that identifies pulsars from recent surveys by using image pattern recognition with deep neural nets—the PICS (Pulsar Image-based Classification System) AI. The AI mimics human experts and distinguishes pulsars from noise and interference by looking for patterns from candidate plots. Different from other pulsar selection programs that search for expected patterns, the PICS AI is taught the salient features of different pulsars from a set of human-labeled candidates through machine learning. The training candidates are collected from the Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) survey. The information from each pulsar candidate is synthesized in four diagnostic plots, which consist of image data with up to thousands of pixels. The AI takes these data from each candidate as its input and uses thousands of such candidates to train its ~9000 neurons. The deep neural networks in this AI system grant it superior ability to recognize various types of pulsars as well as their harmonic signals. The trained AI's performance has been validated with a large set of candidates from a different pulsar survey, the Green Bank North Celestial Cap survey. In this completely independent test, the PICS ranked 264 out of 277 pulsar-related candidates, including all 56 previously known pulsars and 208 of their harmonics, in the top 961 (1%) of 90,008 test candidates, missing only 13 harmonics. The first non-pulsar candidate appears at rank 187, following 45 pulsars and 141 harmonics. In other words, 100% of the pulsars were ranked in the top 1% of all candidates, while 80% were ranked higher than any noise or interference. The

  1. Searching for pulsars using image pattern recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, W. W.; Berndsen, A.; Madsen, E. C.; Tan, M.; Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 6224 Agricultural Road, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Brazier, A. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Lazarus, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Lynch, R.; Scholz, P. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Stovall, K.; Cohen, S.; Dartez, L. P.; Lunsford, G.; Martinez, J. G.; Mata, A. [Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [NRAO, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Banaszak, S.; Biwer, C. M.; Flanigan, J.; Rohr, M., E-mail: zhuww@phas.ubc.ca, E-mail: berndsen@phas.ubc.ca [Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    In the modern era of big data, many fields of astronomy are generating huge volumes of data, the analysis of which can sometimes be the limiting factor in research. Fortunately, computer scientists have developed powerful data-mining techniques that can be applied to various fields. In this paper, we present a novel artificial intelligence (AI) program that identifies pulsars from recent surveys by using image pattern recognition with deep neural nets—the PICS (Pulsar Image-based Classification System) AI. The AI mimics human experts and distinguishes pulsars from noise and interference by looking for patterns from candidate plots. Different from other pulsar selection programs that search for expected patterns, the PICS AI is taught the salient features of different pulsars from a set of human-labeled candidates through machine learning. The training candidates are collected from the Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) survey. The information from each pulsar candidate is synthesized in four diagnostic plots, which consist of image data with up to thousands of pixels. The AI takes these data from each candidate as its input and uses thousands of such candidates to train its ∼9000 neurons. The deep neural networks in this AI system grant it superior ability to recognize various types of pulsars as well as their harmonic signals. The trained AI's performance has been validated with a large set of candidates from a different pulsar survey, the Green Bank North Celestial Cap survey. In this completely independent test, the PICS ranked 264 out of 277 pulsar-related candidates, including all 56 previously known pulsars and 208 of their harmonics, in the top 961 (1%) of 90,008 test candidates, missing only 13 harmonics. The first non-pulsar candidate appears at rank 187, following 45 pulsars and 141 harmonics. In other words, 100% of the pulsars were ranked in the top 1% of all candidates, while 80% were ranked higher than any noise or interference. The

  2. Modelling and mitigating refractive propagation effects in precision pulsar timing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R. M.; Cordes, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    To obtain the most accurate pulse arrival times from radio pulsars, it is necessary to correct or mitigate the effects of the propagation of radio waves through the warm and ionized interstellar medium. We examine both the strength of propagation effects associated with large-scale electron-density variations and the methodology used to estimate infinite frequency arrival times. Using simulations of two-dimensional phase-varying screens, we assess the strength and non-stationarity of timing perturbations associated with large-scale density variations. We identify additional contributions to arrival times that are stochastic in both radio frequency and time and therefore not amenable to correction solely using times of arrival. We attribute this to the frequency dependence of the trajectories of the propagating radio waves. We find that this limits the efficacy of low-frequency (metre-wavelength) observations. Incorporating low-frequency pulsar observations into precision timing campaigns is increasingly problematic for pulsars with larger dispersion measures.

  3. The evolution of the magnetic inclination angle as an explanation of the long term red timing-noise of pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Shu-Xu

    2015-01-01

    We study the possibility that the long term red timing-noise in pulsars originates from the evolution of the magnetic inclination angle $\\chi$. The braking torque under consideration is a combination of the dipole radiation and the current loss. We find that the evolution of $\\chi$ can give rise to extra cubic and fourth-order polynomial terms in the timing residuals. These two terms are determined by the efficiency of the dipole radiation, the relative electric-current density in the pulsar tube and $\\chi$. The following observation facts can be explained with this model: a) young pulsars have positive $\\ddot{\

  4. Pulse intensity modulation and the timing stability of millisecond pulsars: A case study of PSR J1713+0747

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, Ryan M

    2012-01-01

    Most millisecond pulsars, like essentially all other radio pulsars, show timing errors well in excess of what is expected from additive radiometer noise alone. We show that changes in amplitude, shape and pulse phase for the millisecond pulsar J1713+0747 cause this excess error. These changes appear to be uncorrelated from one pulse period to the next. The resulting time of arrival variations are correlated across a wide frequency range and are observed with different backend processors on different days, confirming that they are intrinsic in origin and not an instrumental effect or caused by strongly frequency dependent interstellar scattering. Centroids of single pulses show an rms phase variation \\approx 40 microsec, which dominates the timing error and is the same phase jitter phenomenon long known in slower spinning, canonical pulsars. We show that the amplitude modulations of single pulses are modestly correlated with their arrival time fluctuations. We also demonstrate that single-pulse variations are ...

  5. A search for gravitational waves associated with the August 2006 timing glitch of the Vela pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    al, J Abadie et

    2010-01-01

    The physical mechanisms responsible for pulsar timing glitches are thought to excite quasi-normal mode oscillations in their parent neutron star that couple to gravitational wave emission. In August 2006, a timing glitch was observed in the radio emission of PSR B0833-45, the Vela pulsar. At the time of the glitch, the two co-located Hanford gravitational wave detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) were operational and taking data as part of the fifth LIGO science run (S5). We present the first direct search for the gravitational wave emission associated with oscillations of the fundamental quadrupole mode excited by a pulsar timing glitch. No gravitational wave detection candidate was found. We place Bayesian 90% confidence upper limits of 6.3e-21 to 1.4e-20 on the peak intrinsic strain amplitude of gravitational wave ring-down signals, depending on which spherical harmonic mode is excited. The corresponding range of energy upper limits is 5.0e44 to 1.3e45 erg.

  6. Search for gravitational waves associated with the August 2006 timing glitch of the Vela pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Behnke, B.; Benacquista, M.; Bennett, M. F.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bondarescu, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cain, J.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Cardenas, L.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R. C.; Cornish, N.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Daudert, B.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Dayanga, T.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Dergachev, V.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J.; Dueck, J.; Duke, I.; Dumas, J.-C.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Faltas, Y.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Finn, L. S.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Fotopoulos, N.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Garofoli, J. A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Goßler, S.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G. D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D. R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, R.; Khazanov, E.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Kuehn, G.; Kullman, J.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lang, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Lei, M.; Leindecker, N.; Leonor, I.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P. E.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lormand, M.; Lu, P.; Lubiński, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Mak, C.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Mehmet, M.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Merrill, L.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Miller, J.; Mino, Y.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moreno, G.; Mors, K.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C.; Mueller, G.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murray, P. G.; Nash, T.; Nawrodt, R.; Nelson, J.; Newton, G.; Nishida, E.; Nishizawa, A.; O'Dell, J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ochsner, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oldenburg, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Papa, M. A.; Patel, P.; Pathak, D.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Pickenpack, M.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Principe, M.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raics, Z.; Rakhmanov, M.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Riesen, R.

    2011-02-01

    The physical mechanisms responsible for pulsar timing glitches are thought to excite quasinormal mode oscillations in their parent neutron star that couple to gravitational-wave emission. In August 2006, a timing glitch was observed in the radio emission of PSR B0833-45, the Vela pulsar. At the time of the glitch, the two colocated Hanford gravitational-wave detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO) were operational and taking data as part of the fifth LIGO science run (S5). We present the first direct search for the gravitational-wave emission associated with oscillations of the fundamental quadrupole mode excited by a pulsar timing glitch. No gravitational-wave detection candidate was found. We place Bayesian 90% confidence upper limits of 6.3×10-21 to 1.4×10-20 on the peak intrinsic strain amplitude of gravitational-wave ring-down signals, depending on which spherical harmonic mode is excited. The corresponding range of energy upper limits is 5.0×1044 to 1.3×1045erg.

  7. Timing of a Young Mildly Recycled Pulsar with a Massive White Dwarf Companion

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarus, P; Knispel, B; Freire, P C C; Deneva, J S; Kaspi, V M; Allen, B; Bogdanov, S; Chatterjee, S; Stairs, I H; Zhu, W W

    2013-01-01

    We report on timing observations of the recently discovered binary pulsar PSR J1952+2630 using the Arecibo Observatory. The mildly recycled 20.7-ms pulsar is in a 9.4-hr orbit with a massive, M_WD > 0.93 M_sun, white dwarf (WD) companion. We present, for the first time, a phase-coherent timing solution, with precise spin, astrometric, and Keplerian orbital parameters. This shows that the characteristic age of PSR J1952+2630 is 77 Myr, younger by one order of magnitude than any other recycled pulsar-massive WD system. We derive an upper limit on the true age of the system of 50 Myr. We investigate the formation of PSR J1952+2630 using detailed modelling of the mass-transfer process from a naked helium star on to the neutron star following a common-envelope phase (Case BB Roche-lobe overflow). From our modelling of the progenitor system, we constrain the accretion efficiency of the neutron star, which suggests a value between 100 and 300% of the Eddington accretion limit. We present numerical models of the chem...

  8. Timing and Spectroscopy of Accreting X-ray Pulsars: the State of Cyclotron Line Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Heindl, W A; Coburn, W; Staubert, R; Wilms, J; Kreykenbohm, I; Kretschmar, P

    2004-01-01

    A great deal of emphasis on timing in the RXTE era has been on pushing toward higher and higher frequency phenomena, particularly kHz QPOs. However, the large areas of the RXTE pointed instruments provide another capability which is key for the understanding of accreting X-ray pulsars -- the ability to accumulate high quality spectra in a limited observing time. For the accreting X-ray pulsars, with their relatively modest spin frequencies, this translates into an ability to study broad band spectra as a function of pulse phase. This is a critical tool, as pulsar spectra are strong functions of the geometry of the "accretion mound" and the observers' viewing angle to the ~10^12 G magnetic field. In particular, the appearance of "cyclotron lines" is sensitively dependent on the viewing geometry, which must change with the rotation of the star. These spectral features, seen in only a handful of objects, are quite important, as they give us our only direct measure of neutron star magnetic fields. Furthermore, th...

  9. Millisecond and Binary Pulsars as Nature's Frequency Standards; 3, Fourier Analysis and Spectral Sensitivity of Timing Observations to Low-Frequency Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeikin, S M; Kopeikin, Sergei M.; Potapov, Vladimir A.

    1998-01-01

    Millisecond and binary pulsars are the most stable natural frequency standards which admits to introduce modified versions of universal and ephemeris time scales based correspondingly on the intrinsic rotation of pulsar and on its orbital motion around barycenter of a binary system. Measured stability of these time scales depends on numerous physical phenomena which affect rotational and orbital motion of the pulsar and observer on the Earth, perturb propagation of electromagnetic pulses from pulsar to the observer and bring about random fluctuations in the rate of atomic clock used as a primary time reference in timing observations. On the long time intervals the main reason for the instability of the pulsar time scales is the presence of correlated, low-frequency timing noise in residuals of times of arrivals (TOA) of pulses from the pulsar which has both astrophysical and geophysical origin. Hence, the timing noise can carry out the important physical information about interstellar medium, interior structu...

  10. Detectability of gravitational effects of supernova neutrino emission through pulsar timing

    CERN Document Server

    Olum, Ken D

    2013-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae emit on the order of 3x10^53 ergs in high-energy neutrinos over a time of order 10 seconds, and so decrease their mass by about 0.2 solar mass. If the explosion is nearly spherically symmetric, there will be little gravitational wave emission. Nevertheless, the sudden decrease of mass of the progenitor may cause a change in the gravitational time delay of signals from a nearby pulsar. We calculate the change in arrival times as successive pulses pass through the neutrino shell at different times, and find that the effect may be detectable in ideal circumstances.

  11. Arecibo Pulsar and Transient Surveys Using ALFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, J. M.

    2008-02-01

    A large scale survey for pulsars and transients is being conducted at the Arecibo Observatory using the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA). Data acquisition so far has been with correlation spectrometers that analyze a 0.1 GHz bandwidth at 1.4 GHz. The 256 frequency channels limit dispersion smearing to 1.2 ms at DMmax = 103 pc cm-3 while the sampling interval of 64 μs equals the dispersion smearing at DM~54 pc cm-3, providing high sensitivity to millisecond pulsars with standard periods out to implied distances of several kpc at low Galactic latitudes. In early 2008, we will use a new set of polyphase filter bank systems that provide the same time and frequency resolutions but over ALFA's full 0.3 GHz bandwidth. Currently the survey covers sky positions within 5° of the Galactic plane that are reachable with Arecibo. Preliminary results are given for some of the discoveries made so far, which include millisecond pulsars, a relativistic binary pulsar, a likely counterpart of a Compton GRO/EGRET gamma-ray source, and transient pulsars (including `RRATs''). We discuss the methodology of the survey, which includes archival of raw survey data at the Cornell Center for Advanced Computing and processing at distributed sites. The survey and follow up observations, which include timing observations, multiwavelength searches for orbital companions in the case of binary pulsars, etc. are organized through the Pulsar-ALFA (PALFA) Consortium. We expect the Galactic plane survey to continue until at least 2010, most likely involving multiple passes on each sky position to optimize detection of variable sources. The ALFA system will also be used to survey intermediate Galactic latitudes for millisecond pulsars, relativistic binaries with large systemic velocities, and runaway pulsars that will escape the Galaxy.

  12. Correcting for Interstellar Scattering Delay in High-precision Pulsar Timing: Simulation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palliyaguru, Nipuni; Stinebring, Daniel; McLaughlin, Maura; Demorest, Paul; Jones, Glenn

    2015-12-01

    Light travel time changes due to gravitational waves (GWs) may be detected within the next decade through precision timing of millisecond pulsars. Removal of frequency-dependent interstellar medium (ISM) delays due to dispersion and scattering is a key issue in the detection process. Current timing algorithms routinely correct pulse times of arrival (TOAs) for time-variable delays due to cold plasma dispersion. However, none of the major pulsar timing groups correct for delays due to scattering from multi-path propagation in the ISM. Scattering introduces a frequency-dependent phase change in the signal that results in pulse broadening and arrival time delays. Any method to correct the TOA for interstellar propagation effects must be based on multi-frequency measurements that can effectively separate dispersion and scattering delay terms from frequency-independent perturbations such as those due to a GW. Cyclic spectroscopy, first described in an astronomical context by Demorest (2011), is a potentially powerful tool to assist in this multi-frequency decomposition. As a step toward a more comprehensive ISM propagation delay correction, we demonstrate through a simulation that we can accurately recover impulse response functions (IRFs), such as those that would be introduced by multi-path scattering, with a realistic signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). We demonstrate that timing precision is improved when scatter-corrected TOAs are used, under the assumptions of a high S/N and highly scattered signal. We also show that the effect of pulse-to-pulse “jitter” is not a serious problem for IRF reconstruction, at least for jitter levels comparable to those observed in several bright pulsars.

  13. CORRECTING FOR INTERSTELLAR SCATTERING DELAY IN HIGH-PRECISION PULSAR TIMING: SIMULATION RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palliyaguru, Nipuni; McLaughlin, Maura [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Stinebring, Daniel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Oberlin College, 110 North Professor Street, Oberlin, OH 44074 (United States); Demorest, Paul [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Jones, Glenn, E-mail: npalliya@mix.wvu.edu, E-mail: maura.mclaughlin@mail.wvu.edu, E-mail: dan.stinebring@oberlin.edu, E-mail: pdemores@nrao.edu, E-mail: glenn.caltech@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2015-12-20

    Light travel time changes due to gravitational waves (GWs) may be detected within the next decade through precision timing of millisecond pulsars. Removal of frequency-dependent interstellar medium (ISM) delays due to dispersion and scattering is a key issue in the detection process. Current timing algorithms routinely correct pulse times of arrival (TOAs) for time-variable delays due to cold plasma dispersion. However, none of the major pulsar timing groups correct for delays due to scattering from multi-path propagation in the ISM. Scattering introduces a frequency-dependent phase change in the signal that results in pulse broadening and arrival time delays. Any method to correct the TOA for interstellar propagation effects must be based on multi-frequency measurements that can effectively separate dispersion and scattering delay terms from frequency-independent perturbations such as those due to a GW. Cyclic spectroscopy, first described in an astronomical context by Demorest (2011), is a potentially powerful tool to assist in this multi-frequency decomposition. As a step toward a more comprehensive ISM propagation delay correction, we demonstrate through a simulation that we can accurately recover impulse response functions (IRFs), such as those that would be introduced by multi-path scattering, with a realistic signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). We demonstrate that timing precision is improved when scatter-corrected TOAs are used, under the assumptions of a high S/N and highly scattered signal. We also show that the effect of pulse-to-pulse “jitter” is not a serious problem for IRF reconstruction, at least for jitter levels comparable to those observed in several bright pulsars.

  14. X-Ray Pulsar Based Navigation and Time Determination Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DARPA recently initiated the XNAV program to undertake development of GPS independent, precision navigation and time determination based on observations of certain...

  15. Fifty Years of Pulsar Candidate Selection: From simple filters to a new principled real-time classification approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, R. J.; Stappers, B. W.; Cooper, S.; Brooke, J. M.; Knowles, J. D.

    2016-06-01

    Improving survey specifications are causing an exponential rise in pulsar candidate numbers and data volumes. We study the candidate filters used to mitigate these problems during the past fifty years. We find that some existing methods such as applying constraints on the total number of candidates collected per observation, may have detrimental effects on the success of pulsar searches. Those methods immune to such effects are found to be ill-equipped to deal with the problems associated with increasing data volumes and candidate numbers, motivating the development of new approaches. We therefore present a new method designed for on-line operation. It selects promising candidates using a purpose-built tree-based machine learning classifier, the Gaussian Hellinger Very Fast Decision Tree (GH-VFDT), and a new set of features for describing candidates. The features have been chosen so as to i) maximise the separation between candidates arising from noise and those of probable astrophysical origin, and ii) be as survey-independent as possible. Using these features our new approach can process millions of candidates in seconds (˜1 million every 15 seconds), with high levels of pulsar recall (90%+). This technique is therefore applicable to the large volumes of data expected to be produced by the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Use of this approach has assisted in the discovery of 20 new pulsars in data obtained during the LOFAR Tied-Array All-Sky Survey (LOTAAS).

  16. Towards practical autonomous deep-space navigation using X-Ray pulsar timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemar, Setnam; Fraser, George; Heil, Lucy; Hindley, David; Martindale, Adrian; Molyneux, Philippa; Pye, John; Warwick, Robert; Lamb, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the feasibility of deep-space navigation using the highly stable periodic signals from X-ray pulsars in combination with dedicated instrumentation on the spacecraft: a technique often referred to as `XNAV'. The results presented are based on the outputs from a study undertaken for the European Space Agency. The potential advantages of this technique include increased spacecraft autonomy and lower mission operating costs. Estimations of navigation uncertainties have been obtained using simulations of different pulsar combinations and navigation strategies. We find that the pulsar PSR B1937 + 21 has potential to allow spacecraft positioning uncertainties of ~2 and ~5 km in the direction of the pulsar after observation times of 10 and 1 h respectively, for ranges up to 30 AU. This could be achieved autonomously on the spacecraft using a focussing X-ray instrument of effective area ~50 cm2 together with a high performance atomic clock. The Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (MIXS) instrument, due to be launched on the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury in 2018, is an example of an instrument that may be further developed as a practical telescope for XNAV. For a manned mission to Mars, where an XNAV system could provide valuable redundancy, observations of the three pulsars PSR B1937 + 21, B1821-24 and J0437-4715 would enable a three-dimensional positioning uncertainty of ~30 km for up to 3 months without the need to contact Earth-based systems. A lower uncertainty may be achieved, for example, by use of extended observations or, if feasible, by use of a larger instrument. X-ray instrumentation suitable for use in an operational XNAV subsystem must be designed to require only modest resources, especially in terms of size, mass and power. A system with a focussing optic is required in order to reduce the sky and particle background against which the source must be measured. We examine possible options for future developments in terms of simpler, lower

  17. The Green Bank Telescope 350 MHz Drift-scan Survey II: Data Analysis and the Timing of 10 New Pulsars, Including a Relativistic Binary

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Ryan S; Ransom, Scott M; Stairs, Ingrid H; Lorimer, Duncan R; McLaughlin, Maura A; Hessels, Jason W T; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Archibald, Anne M; Berndsen, Aaron; Cardoso, Rogerio F; Cherry, Angus; Karako-Argaman, Chen; van Leeuwen, Joeri; McPhee, Christie A; Pennucci, Tim; Roberts, Mallory S E

    2012-01-01

    We have completed a 350 MHz drift scan survey using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope with the goal of finding new radio pulsars, especially millisecond pulsars that can be timed to high precision. This survey covered ~10300 square degrees and all of the data have now been fully processed. We have discovered a total of 31 new pulsars, seven of which are recycled pulsars. A companion paper by Boyles et al. (2012) describes the survey strategy, sky coverage, and instrumental set-up, and presents timing solutions for the first 13 pulsars. Here we describe the data analysis pipeline, survey sensitivity, and follow-up observations of new pulsars, and present timing solutions for 10 other pulsars. We highlight several sources---two interesting nulling pulsars, an isolated millisecond pulsar with a measurement of proper motion, and a partially recycled pulsar, PSR J0348+0432, which has a white dwarf companion in a relativistic orbit. PSR J0348+0432 will enable unprecedented tests of theories of gravity.

  18. Understanding the residual patterns of timing solutions of radio pulsars with a model of magnetic field oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Yi, Shu-Xu; Xie, Yi; Fu, Jian-Ning

    2016-06-01

    We explain some phenomena existing generally in the timing residuals: amplitude and sign of the second derivative of a pulsar's spin-frequency (ddot{ν }), some sophisticated residual patterns, which also change with the time span of data segments. The sample is taken from Hobbs et al., in which the pulsar's spin-frequency and its first derivative have been subtracted from the timing solution fitting. We first classify the timing residual patterns into different types based on the sign of ddot{ν }. Then we use the magnetic field oscillation model developed in our group to fit successfully the different kinds of timing residuals with the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. Finally, we simulate the spin evolution over 20 years for a pulsar with typical parameters and analyse the data with the conventional timing solution fitting. By choosing different segments of the simulated data, we find that most of the observed residual patterns can be reproduced successfully. This is the first time that the observed residual patterns are fitted by a model and reproduced by simulations with very few parameters. From the distribution of the different residual patterns in the P-dot{P} diagram, we argue that (1) a single magnetic field oscillation mode exists commonly in all pulsars throughout their lifetimes; (2) there may be a transition period over the lifetimes of pulsars, in which multiple magnetic field oscillation modes exist.

  19. Statistical Analysis of I Stokes Parameter of Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Panahi, Hossein; Monadi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) and box counting method, we test spacial correlation and fractality of Polarization Pulse Profiles (PPPs) of 24 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) which were observed in Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project. DFA analysis indicates that MSPs' PPPs are persistent and the results of box counting method confirm the fractality in the majority of PPPs. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test indicates that isolated MSPs have more complex PPPs than binary ones. Then we apply our analysis on a random sample of normal pulsars. Comparing the results of our analysis on MSPs and normal pulsars shows that MSPs have more complex PPPs which is resulted from smaller angular half-width of the emission cone and more peaks in MSPs PPPs. On the other hand, high values of Hurst exponent in MSPs confirm compact emission regions in these pulsars.

  20. Search for pulsed multi-TeV gamma rays from the Crab pulsar using the Tibet-III air shower array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M

    2007-01-01

    We searched for pulsed gamma-ray emissions from the Crab pulsar using data of the Tibet-III air shower array from November 1999 through November 2005. No evidence for the pulsed emissions was found in our analysis. Upper limits at different energies were calculated for a $3 \\sigma$ confidence level in the energy range of multi-TeV to several hundred TeV.

  1. Characterising the rotational irregularities of the Vela pulsar from 21 yr of phase-coherent timing

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, R M; Kerr, M; Johnston, S; Hobbs, G; Manchester, R N

    2016-01-01

    Pulsars show two classes of rotational irregularities that can be used to understand neutron-star interiors and magnetospheres: glitches and timing noise. Here we present an analysis of the Vela pulsar spanning nearly 21 yr of observation and including 8 glitches. We identify the relative pulse number of all of the observations between glitches, with the only pulse-number ambiguities existing over glitch events. We use the phase coherence of the timing solution to simultaneously model the timing noise and glitches in a Bayesian framework, allowing us to select preferred models for both. We find the glitches can be described using only permanent and transient changes in spin frequency, i.e., no step changes in frequency derivative. For all of the glitches, we only need two exponentially decaying changes in spin frequency to model the transient components. In contrast to previous studies, we find that the dominant transient components decay on a common $\\approx$ 1300 d time scale, and that a larger fraction ( $...

  2. Monolithic Time Delay Integrated APD Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall goal of the proposed program by Epitaxial Technologies is to develop monolithic time delay integrated avalanche photodiode (APD) arrays with sensitivity...

  3. Simultaneous Absolute Timing of the Crab Pulsar at Radio and Optical Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Oosterbroek, T; Golden, A; Verhoeve, P; Martin, D D E; Erd, C; Schulz, R; Stuewe, J A; Stankov, A; Ho, T

    2008-01-01

    The Crab pulsar emits across a large part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Determining the time delay between the emission at different wavelengths will allow to better constrain the site and mechanism of the emission. We have simultaneously observed the Crab Pulsar in the optical with S-Cam, an instrument based on Superconducting Tunneling Junctions (STJs) with $\\mu$s time resolution and at 2 GHz using the Nan\\c{c}ay radio telescope with an instrument doing coherent dedispersion and able to record giant pulses data. We have studied the delay between the radio and optical pulse using simultaneously obtained data therefore reducing possible uncertainties present in previous observations. We determined the arrival times of the (mean) optical and radio pulse and compared them using the tempo2 software package. We present the most accurate value for the optical-radio lag of 255 $\\pm$ 21 $\\mu$s and suggest the likelihood of a spectral dependence to the excess optical emission asociated with giant radio pulses.

  4. Using Long-term Millisecond Pulsar Timing to Obtain Physical Characteristics of the Bulge Globular Cluster Terzan 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Brian J.; Ransom, Scott M.; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; Arras, Phil; Cadelano, Mario

    2017-08-01

    Over the past decade, the discovery of three unique stellar populations and a large number of confirmed pulsars within the globular cluster Terzan 5 has raised questions over its classification. Using the long-term radio pulsar timing of 36 ms pulsars in the cluster core, we provide new measurements of key physical properties of the system. As Terzan 5 is located within the galactic bulge, stellar crowding and reddening make optical and near-infrared observations difficult. Pulsar accelerations, however, allow us to study the intrinsic characteristics of the cluster independent of reddening and stellar crowding and probe the mass density profile without needing to quantify the mass-to-light ratio. Relating the spin and orbital periods of each pulsar to the acceleration predicted by a King model, we find a core density of {1.58}-0.13+0.13 × 106 {M}⊙ pc-3, a core radius of {0.16}-0.01+0.01 pc, a pulsar density profile of n\\propto {r}-{3.14-0.53+0.52}, and a total mass of {M}{{T}}({R}\\perp < 1.0 pc) ≃ 3.0 × 105 {M}⊙ , assuming a cluster distance of 5.9 kpc. Using this information, we argue against Terzan 5 being a disrupted dwarf galaxy and discuss the possibility of it being a fragment of the Milky Way’s proto-bulge. We also discuss whether low-mass pulsars were formed via electron-capture supernovae or exist in a core full of heavy white dwarfs and hard binaries. Finally, we provide an upper limit for the mass of a possible black hole at the core of the cluster of {M}{BH}≃ 3× {10}4 {M}⊙ .

  5. Time Domain Science and Fundamental Physics with the Next-generation Very Large Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demorest, Paul; Bower, Geoffrey C.; ngVLA Time Domain/Physics Science Working Group

    2017-01-01

    The Next-generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) is a design concept for a future large-area radio telescope under development by the NRAO and interested members of the scientific community. The approximate ngVLA specifications call for a frequency range of ~1--116 GHz, ten times the effective collecting area and moderately increased field of view versus the current VLA, and an array configuration consisting of a dense (~km-scale) array core with some baselines extending out to hundreds of km. This instrument will enable new discoveries in many diverse areas of research relevant to modern astronomy; our group has explored the impact the ngVLA will have in time domain astronomy and fundamental physics.Here we present several key science topics considered as part of this work. These include: Searching for and timing radio pulsars at the galactic center -- the frequency coverage and sensitivity of the ngVLA will allow detection of highly-scattered pulsars near Sgr A*. Monitoring these sources will permit unprecedented tests of general relativity. Detecting and characterizing explosive transient sources -- electromagnetic observations of gravitational-wave sources provide complementary information to the GW signals themselves. Observations across the wide frequency range spanned by the ngVLA are critical for energy calorimetry of these events. Finally, with sufficient long-baseline coverage, novel astrometric approaches to cosmology become possible, by watching the expansion of the universe in real time through correlated proper motions of many extragalactic radio sources.

  6. The High Time Resolution Universe Survey - V: Single-pulse energetics and modulation properties of 315 pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Burke-Spolaor, S; Bailes, M; Bates, S D; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Champion, D J; D'Amico, N; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Possenti, S Milia A; Stappers, B; van Straten, W

    2012-01-01

    We report on the pulse-to-pulse energy distributions and phase-resolved modulation properties for catalogued pulsars in the southern High Time Resolution Universe intermediate-latitude survey. We selected the 315 pulsars detected in a single-pulse search of this survey, allowing a large sample unbiased regarding any rotational parameters of neutron stars. We found that the energy distribution of many pulsars is well-described by a log-normal distribution, with few deviating from a small range in log-normal scale and location parameters. Some pulsars exhibited multiple energy states corresponding to mode changes, and implying that some observed "nulling" may actually be a mode-change effect. PSRJ1900-2600 was found to emit weakly in its previously-identified "null" state. We found evidence for another state-change effect in two pulsars, which show bimodality in their nulling time scales; that is, they switch between a continuous-emission state and a single-pulse-emitting state. Large modulation occurs in many ...

  7. Relativistic Measurements from Timing the Binary Pulsar PSR B1913+16

    CERN Document Server

    Weisberg, Joel M

    2016-01-01

    We present relativistic analyses of 9257 measurements of times-of-arrival from the first binary pulsar, PSR B1913+16, acquired over the last thirty-five years. The determination of the 'Keplerian' orbital elements plus two relativistic terms completely characterizes the binary system, aside from an unknown rotation about the line of sight; leading to a determination of the masses of the pulsar and its companion: 1.438 $\\pm$ 0.001 solar masses and 1.390 $\\pm$ 0.001 solar masses, respectively. In addition, the complete system characterization allows the creation of tests of relativistic gravitation by comparing measured and predicted sizes of various relativistic phenomena. We find that the ratio of observed orbital period decrease due to gravitational wave damping (corrected by a kinematic term) to the general relativistic prediction, is 0.9983 pm 0.0016; thereby confirming the existence and strength of gravitational radiation as predicted by general relativity. For the first time in this system, we have also ...

  8. Timing and spectral studies of the transient X-ray pulsar GX 304-1 during an outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Devasia, Jincy; Paul, Biswajit; Indulekha, Kavila

    2011-01-01

    We present the timing and spectral properties of the transient X-ray pulsar GX 304-1 during its recent outburst in 2010 August, using observations carried out with the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) instrument on-board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite. We detected strong intensity and energy dependent variations in the pulse profiles during the outburst. The pulse profile showed significant evolution over the outburst. It showed complex structures consisting of a main peak with steps on both sides during the start of the outburst. On some days, a sharp dip like feature was seen which disappeared at the end of the outburst; when the profile evolved into a sinusoidal shape. At low energies, the pulse profiles appeared complex, consisting of multiple peaks and a narrow minimum. The amplitude of the second brightest peak in low energies decreased with energy, and above 12 keV, the shape of the pulse profile changed to a single broad peak with a dip like feature. The dip had energy dependence, bo...

  9. Millisecond and Binary Pulsars as Nature's Frequency Standards; 2, Effects of Low-Frequency Timing Noise on Residuals and Measured Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeikin, S M

    1998-01-01

    Pulsars are the most stable natural frequency standards. They can be applied to a number of principal problems of modern astronomy and time-keeping metrology. The full exploration of pulsar properties requires obtaining unbiased estimates of the spin and orbital parameters. These estimates depend essentially on the random noise component being revealed in the residuals of time of arrivals (TOA). In the present paper, the influence of low-frequency ("red") timing noise with spectral indices from 1 to 6 on TOA residuals, variances, and covariances of estimates of measured parameters of single and binary pulsars are studied. In order to determine their functional dependence on time, an analytic technique of processing of observational data in time domain is developed which takes into account both stationary and non-stationary components of noise. Our analysis includes a simplified timing model of a binary pulsar in a circular orbit and procedure of estimation of pulsar parameters and residuals under the influenc...

  10. Impact of the orbital uncertainties on the timing of pulsars in binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Caliandro, G Andrea; Rea, Nanda

    2012-01-01

    The detection of pulsations from an X-ray binary is an unambiguous signature of the presence of a neutron star in the system. When the pulsations are missed in the radio band, their detection at other wavelengths, like X-ray or gamma-rays, requires orbital demodulation, since the length of the observations are often comparable to, or longer than the system orbital period. The detailed knowledge of the orbital parameters of binary systems plays a crucial role in the detection of the spin period of pulsars, since any uncertainty in their determination translates into a loss in the coherence of the signal during the demodulation process. In this paper, we present an analytical study aimed at unveiling how the uncertainties in the orbital parameters might impact on periodicity searches. We find a correlation between the power of the signal in the demodulated arrival time series and the uncertainty in each of the orbital parameters. This correlation is also a function of the pulsar frequency. We test our analytica...

  11. Analysis and Comparisons of Four Kinds of Ensemble Pulsar Time Algorithm%四种综合脉冲星时算法比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仲崇霞; 杨廷高

    2009-01-01

    Pulsars, rapidly rotating neutron stars, have extremely stable rotating periods. The pulsar time denned by a single pulsar is influenced by several noise resources. To weaken these influences, the ensemble analysis method is used to obtain the ensemble pulsar time so that the long-term stability of the ensemble pulsar time can be improved. In this paper, four algorithms — the classical weighted average algorithm, the wavelet analysis algorithm, the Wiener filtration analysis algorithm and the Wiener filtration analysis in wavelet domain — are applied to synthetically make an ensemble pulsar time. The data used are the residuals of the two millisecond pulsars (PSR B1855+09 and PSR B1937+21) observed by Arecibo Observatory. First, the classical weighted average algorithm is developed by Petit, in which only one weight can be chosen within the whole interval of the observation on each single pulsar time, and the criterion for weight is the stability σ_x~2(T) of each single pulsar time. Second, an ensemble pulsar time algorithm is developed based on the wavelet multi-resolution analysis and the wavelet packet analysis, which can be obtained by decomposing the observation residuals of pulsars, extracting the components of different frequency domain and then choosing the weight according to the stability of different component denoted with wavelet variance. Third, the pulsar timing residuals are caused by reference atomic clock and pulsar itself, which are uncorrelated. Considering this uncorrelation and the peculiarity of Wiener filtration, we put forward an ensemble pulsar time algorithm of Wiener filtration. Using this algorithm, the error can be separated from an atomic clock and the pulsar itself in the post-fit pulsar timing residuals. The atomic scale component can be filtered from the pulsar phase variations and the remains can be integrated to the ensemble pulsar time. Weights are chosen according to the mean square root. Forth, the wavelet analysis and the

  12. An Update on the Timing of the Millisecond Pulsar in a Triple System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Scott M.; Archibald, Anne; Stairs, Ingrid H.; Hessels, Jason; Lorimer, Duncan; Lynch, Ryan S.

    2017-01-01

    The millisecond pulsar J0337+1715, in a hierarchical triple system with two white dwarfs, is providing continued high-precision timing and a unique new test of general relativity. Our relativistic timing model of the system, based on accurate three-body gravitational integrations, has provided high-precision orbital inclinations and masses of all three stars, and we have begun to measure secular changes in the inner orbit. Limits on predicted systematic variations of the shape of the inner orbit based on our fantastic timing data, primarily now from Arecibo and the GBT, are providing the best-ever test of the Strong Equivalence Principle (SEP). This test will have important implications for basic physics since general relativity is the only known workable theory of gravity where the SEP must hold.

  13. An Evidence Based Time-Frequency Search Method for Gravitational Waves from Pulsar Glitches

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, J; Pitkin, M; Woan, G

    2007-01-01

    We review and expand on a Bayesian model selection technique for the detection of gravitational waves from neutron star ring-downs associated with pulsar glitches. The algorithm works with power spectral densities constructed from overlapping time segments of gravitational wave data. Consequently, the original approach was at risk of falsely identifying multiple signals where only one signal was present in the data. We introduce an extension to the algorithm which uses posterior information on the frequency content of detected signals to cluster events together. The requirement that we have just one detection per signal is now met with the additional bonus that the belief in the presence of a signal is boosted by incorporating information from adjacent time segments.

  14. Pulsar population synthesis using palfa detections and pulsar search collaboratory discoveries including a wide DNS system and a nearby MSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiggum, Joseph Karl

    Using the ensemble of detections from pulsar surveys, we can learn about the sizes and characteristics of underlying populations. In this thesis, I analyze results from the Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) precursor and Green Bank Telescope 350 MHz Drift Scan surveys; I examine survey sensitivity to see how detections can inform pulsar population models, I look at new ways of including young scientists -- high school students -- in the discovery process and I present timing solutions for students' discoveries (including a nearby millisecond pulsar and a pulsar in a wide-orbit double neutron star system). The PALFA survey is on-going and uses the ALFA 7-beam receiver at 1400 MHz to search both inner and outer Galactic sectors visible from Arecibo (32° ?£? 77° and 168° ?£? 214°) close to the Galactic plane (|b| ? 5°) for pulsars. The PALFA precursor survey observed a subset of this region, (|b| ? 1°) and detected 45 pulsars, including one known millisecond pulsar (MSP) and 11 previously unknown, long-period (normal) pulsars. I assess the sensitivity of the PALFA precursor survey and use the number of normal pulsar and MSP detections to infer the size of each underlying Galactic population. Based on 44 normal pulsar detections and one MSP, we constrain each population size to 107,000+36,000-25,000 and 15,000 +85,000-6,000 respectively with 95% confidence. Based on these constraints, we predict yields for the full PALFA survey and find a deficiency in normal pulsar detections, possibly due to radio frequency interference and/or scintillation, neither of which are currently accounted for in population simulations. The GBT 350 MHz Drift Scan survey collected data in the summer of 2007 while the GBT was stationary, undergoing track replacement. Results discussed here come from ~20% of the survey data, which were processed and donated to the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC). The PSC is a joint outreach program between WVU and NRAO, involving high school

  15. Spectral and timing properties of the accreting X-ray millisecond pulsar IGR J17498-2921

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falanga, M.; Kuiper, L.; Poutanen, J.; Galloway, D.K.; Bozzo, E.; Goldwurm, A.; Hermsen, W.; Stella, L.

    2012-01-01

    Context. IGR J17498-2921 is the third X-ray transient accreting millisecond pulsar discovered by INTEGRAL. It was in outburst for about 40 days beginning on August 08, 2011. Aims. We analyze the spectral and timing properties of the object and the characteristics of X-ray bursts to constrain the phy

  16. The NANOGrav Nine-year Data Set: Observations, Arrival Time Measurements, and Analysis of 37 Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Arzoumanian, Z; Burke-Spolaor, S; Chamberlin, S; Chatterjee, S; Christy, B; Cordes, J M; Cornish, N; Crowter, K; Demorest, P B; Dolch, T; Ellis, J A; Ferdman, R D; Fonseca, E; Garver-Daniels, N; Gonzalez, M E; Jenet, F A; Jones, G; Jones, M; Kaspi, V M; Koop, M; Lazio, T J W; Lam, M T; Levin, L; Lommen, A N; Lorimer, D R; Luo, J; Lynch, R S; Madison, D; McLaughlin, M A; McWilliams, S T; Nice, D J; Palliyaguru, N; Pennucci, T T; Ransom, S M; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stinebring, D R; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J K; Vallisneri, M; van Haasteren, R; Wang, Y; Zhu, W

    2015-01-01

    We present high-precision timing observations spanning up to nine years for 37 millisecond pulsars monitored with the Green Bank and Arecibo radio telescopes as part of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) project. We describe the observational and instrumental setups used to collect the data, and methodology applied for calculating pulse times of arrival; these include novel methods for measuring instrumental offsets and characterizing low signal-to-noise ratio timing results. The time of arrival data are fit to a physical timing model for each source, including terms that characterize time-variable dispersion measure and frequency-dependent pulse shape evolution. In conjunction with the timing model fit, we have performed a Bayesian analysis of a parameterized timing noise model for each source, and detect evidence for time-correlated "red" signals in 10 of the pulsars. Subsequent papers in this series will present further analysis of this data set aimed at detecting o...

  17. Correlations between pulsed X-ray flux and radio arrival time in the Vela pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Lommen, A N; Gwinn, C; Arzoumanian, Z; Harding, A; Strickman, M S; Dodson, R; McCulloch, P; Moffett, D

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of simultaneous observations of the Vela pulsar in X-rays and radio from the RXTE satellite and the Mount Pleasant Radio Observatory in Tasmania. We sought correlations between the Vela's X-ray and radio flux densities and radio arrival times on a pulse by pulse basis. We found significantly higher flux density in Vela's main X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrived early. This excess flux shifts to the 'trough' following the 2nd X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrive later. We suggest that the mechanism producing the radio pulses is intimately connected to the mechanism producing X-rays. Current models using resonant absorption in the outer magnetosphere as a cause of the radio emission, and less directly of the X-ray emission, are explored as a possible explanation for the correlation.

  18. Correlation between X-ray Lightcurve Shape and Radio Arrival Time in the Vela Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Lommen, A; Gwinn, C; Arzoumanian, Z; Harding, A; Strickman, M S; Dodson, R; McCulloch, P; Moffett, D

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of simultaneous observations of the Vela pulsar in X-rays and radio from the RXTE satellite and the Mount Pleasant Radio Observatory in Tasmania. We sought correlations between the Vela's X-ray emission and radio arrival times on a pulse by pulse basis. At a confidence level of 99.8% we have found significantly higher flux density in Vela's main X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrived early. This excess flux shifts to the 'trough' following the 2nd X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrive later. Our results suggest that the mechanism producing the radio pulses is intimately connected to the mechanism producing X-rays. Current models using resonant absorption of radio emission in the outer magnetosphere as a cause of the X-ray emission are explored as a possible explanation for the correlation.

  19. A LOFAR census of millisecond pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratiev, V. I.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bilous, A. V.; Stappers, B. W.; Kramer, M.; Keane, E. F.; Noutsos, A.; Osłowski, S.; Breton, R. P.; Hassall, T. E.; Alexov, A.; Cooper, S.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Karastergiou, A.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Pilia, M.; Sobey, C.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Weltevrede, P.; Bell, M. E.; Broderick, J. W.; Corbel, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Markoff, S.; Rowlinson, A.; Swinbank, J. D.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wijnands, R.; Zarka, P.

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of 48 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) out of 75 observed thus far using the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) in the frequency range 110-188 MHz. We have also detected three MSPs out of nine observed in the frequency range 38-77 MHz. This is the largest sample of MSPs ever observed at these low frequencies, and half of the detected MSPs were observed for the first time atfrequencies below 200 MHz. We present the average pulse profiles of the detected MSPs, their effective pulse widths, and flux densities and compare these with higher observing frequencies. The flux-calibrated, multifrequency LOFAR pulse profiles are publicly available via the European Pulsar Network Database of Pulsar Profiles. We also present average values of dispersion measures (DM) and discuss DM and profile variations. About 35% of the MSPs show strong narrow profiles, another 25% exhibit scattered profiles, and the rest are only weakly detected. A qualitative comparison of the LOFAR MSP profiles with those at higher radio frequencies shows constant separation between profile components. Similarly, the profile widths are consistent with those observed at higher frequencies, unless scattering dominates at the lowest frequencies. This is very different from what is observed for normal pulsars and suggests a compact emission region in the MSP magnetosphere. The amplitude ratio of the profile components, on the other hand, can dramatically change towards low frequencies, often with the trailing component becoming dominant. As previously demonstrated this can be caused by aberration and retardation. This data set enables high-precision studies of pulse profile evolution with frequency, dispersion, Faraday rotation, and scattering in the interstellar medium. Characterising and correcting these systematic effects may improve pulsar-timing precision at higher observing frequencies, where pulsar timing array projects aim to directly detect gravitational waves.

  20. Millisecond pulsars: Timekeepers of the cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi, Victoria M.

    1995-01-01

    A brief discussion on the characteristics of pulsars is given followed by a review of millisecond pulsar discoveries including the very first, PRS B1937+21, discovered in 1982. Methods of timing millisecond pulsars and the accuracy of millisecond pulsars as clocks are discussed. Possible reasons for the pulse residuals, or differences between the observed and predicted pulse arrival times for millisecond pulsars, are given.

  1. Arecibo pulsar survey using ALFA. III. Precursor survey and population synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiggum, J. K.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Bates, S. D.; Senty, T. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Champion, D. J.; Lazarus, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Ransom, S. M. [NRAO, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hessels, J. W. T. [ASTRON, Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Nice, D. J. [Department of Physics, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042 (United States); Ellis, J.; Allen, B. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee WI 53211 (United States); Bhat, N. D. R. [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Crawford, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, PA 17604-3003 (United States); Deneva, J. S. [Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (United States); and others

    2014-06-01

    The Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) Survey uses the ALFA 7-beam receiver to search both inner and outer Galactic sectors visible from Arecibo (32° ≲ ℓ ≲ 77° and 168° ≲ ℓ ≲ 214°) close to the Galactic plane (|b| ≲ 5°) for pulsars. The PALFA survey is sensitive to sources fainter and more distant than have previously been seen because of Arecibo's unrivaled sensitivity. In this paper we detail a precursor survey of this region with PALFA, which observed a subset of the full region (slightly more restrictive in ℓ and |b| ≲ 1°) and detected 45 pulsars. Detections included 1 known millisecond pulsar and 11 previously unknown, long-period pulsars. In the surveyed part of the sky that overlaps with the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey (36° ≲ ℓ ≲ 50°), PALFA is probing deeper than the Parkes survey, with four discoveries in this region. For both Galactic millisecond and normal pulsar populations, we compare the survey's detections with simulations to model these populations and, in particular, to estimate the number of observable pulsars in the Galaxy. We place 95% confidence intervals of 82,000 to 143,000 on the number of detectable normal pulsars and 9000 to 100,000 on the number of detectable millisecond pulsars in the Galactic disk. These are consistent with previous estimates. Given the most likely population size in each case (107,000 and 15,000 for normal and millisecond pulsars, respectively), we extend survey detection simulations to predict that, when complete, the full PALFA survey should have detected 1000{sub −230}{sup +330} normal pulsars and 30{sub −20}{sup +200} millisecond pulsars. Identical estimation techniques predict that 490{sub −115}{sup +160} normal pulsars and 12{sub −5}{sup +70} millisecond pulsars would be detected by the beginning of 2014; at the time, the PALFA survey had detected 283 normal pulsars and 31 millisecond pulsars, respectively. We attribute the deficiency in normal pulsar

  2. Timing of the accreting millisecond pulsar SAX J1748.9-2021 during its 2015 outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Sanna, A; Riggio, A; Pintore, F; Di Salvo, T; Gambino, A F; Iaria, R; Matranga, M; Scarano, F

    2016-01-01

    We report on the timing analysis of the 2015 outburst of the intermittent accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1748.9-2021 observed on March 4 by the X-ray satellite XMM-Newton. By phase-connecting the time of arrivals of the observed pulses, we derived the best-fit orbital solution for the 2015 outburst. We investigated the energy pulse profile dependence finding that the pulse fractional amplitude increases with energy while no significant time lags are detected. Moreover, we investigated the previous outbursts from this source, finding previously undetected pulsations in some intervals during the 2010 outburst of the source. Comparing the updated set of orbital parameters, in particular the value of the time of passage from the ascending node, with the orbital solutions reported from the previous outbursts, we estimated for the first time the orbital period derivative corresponding with $\\dot{P}_{orb}=(1.1\\pm0.3)\\times 10^{-10}$ s/s. We note that this value is significant at 3.5 sigma confidence level, ...

  3. Test of Weak Equivalence Principle with the Multi-band Timing of the Crab Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yueyang; Gong, Biping

    2017-03-01

    The Weak Equivalent Principle (WEP) can be tested through the parameterized post-Newtonian parameter γ, representing the space curvature produced by unit rest mass. The parameter γ in turn has been constrained by comparing the arrival times of photons originating in distant transient events, such as gamma-ray bursts, fast radio bursts, and giant pulses of pulsars. Those measurements normally correspond to an individual burst event with very limited energy bands and signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns). In this paper, the discrepancy in the pulse arrival times of the Crab Pulsar between different energy bands is obtained by the phase difference between corresponding pulse profiles. This allows us to compare the pulse arrival times at the largest energy band differences, between radio and optical, radio and X-ray, and radio and gamma-ray respectively. Because the pulse profiles are generated by phase-folding thousands of individual pulses, the time discrepancies between two energy bands are actually measured from thousands of events at each energy band, which corresponds to a much higher S/N. The upper limit of the γ discrepancy set by such an extensively observed and well-modeled source is as follows: {γ }{radio}{--}{γ }γ {- {ray}}< 3.28× {10}-9 at the energy difference of {E}γ {- {ray}}/{E}{radio}∼ {10}13, {γ }{radio}{--}{γ }{{X} - {ray}}< 4.01× {10}-9 at the energy difference of {E}{{X} - {ray}}/{E}{radio}∼ {10}9, {γ }{radio}{--}{γ }{optical}< 2.63× {10}-9 at {E}{optical}/{E}{radio}∼ {10}5, and {γ }{optical}{--}{γ }γ {- {ray}}< 3.03× {10}-10 at {E}γ {- {ray}}/{E}{optical}∼ {10}8. This actually measures the arrival times of freely falling photons in the gravitational field of the Milky Way with the largest amount of events and with data of the highest S/N, which tests WEP at energy band differences that have never been reached before.

  4. arXiv Superradiance in rotating stars and pulsar-timing constraints on dark photons

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Vitor; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2017-06-30

    In the presence of massive bosonic degrees of freedom, rotational superradiance can trigger an instability that spins down black holes. This leads to peculiar gravitational-wave signatures and distribution in the spin-mass plane, which in turn can impose stringent constraints on ultralight fields. Here, we demonstrate that there is an analogous spindown effect for conducting stars. We show that rotating stars amplify low-frequency electromagnetic waves, and that this effect is largest when the time scale for conduction within the star is of the order of a light crossing time. This has interesting consequences for dark photons, as massive dark photons would cause stars to spin down due to superradiant instabilities. The time scale of the spindown depends on the mass of the dark photon, and on the rotation rate, compactness, and conductivity of the star. Existing measurements of the spindown rate of pulsars place direct constraints on models of dark sectors. Our analysis suggests that dark photons of mass mV∼...

  5. Pulsar Magnetospheres and Pulsar Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Beskin, Vasily S

    2016-01-01

    Surprisingly, the chronology of nearly 50 years of the pulsar magnetosphere and pulsar wind research is quite similar to the history of our civilization. Using this analogy, I have tried to outline the main results obtained in this field. In addition to my talk, the possibility of particle acceleration due to different processes in the pulsar magnetosphere is discussed in more detail.

  6. Timing of the first eclipsing accretion-powered millisecond X-ray pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Altamirano, D; Patruno, A; Watts, A; Linares, M; Degenaar, N; Kalamkar, M; van der Klis, M; Rea, N; Casella, P; Padilla, M Armas; Kaur, R; Yang, Y J; Soleri, P; Wijnands, R

    2010-01-01

    We report on the timing analysis of the first eclipsing accretion-powered millisecond X-ray pulsar (AMXP): SWIFT J1749.4-2807. The neutron star rotates at a frequency of ~517.9 Hz and is in a binary system with an orbital period of 8.8 hrs and a projected semi-major axis of ~1.90 lt-s. Based on the mass function and the eclipse half-angle, we constrain the inclination of the system to be between ~76 and ~80 deg. This is to date the tightest constraint on the orbital inclination of any AMXP. We also estimate the mass of the companion to be in the 0.6-0.8 Msun range. As in other AMXPs, the pulse profile shows harmonic content up to the 3rd overtone. However, this is the first AMXP to show a 1st overtone with rms amplitudes between 5 and 25%, which is the strongest ever seen, and which can be more than two times stronger than the fundamental. The fact that SWIFT J1749.4-2807 is an eclipsing system which shows uncommonly strong harmonic content suggests that it might be the best source to date to set constraints ...

  7. High-Resolution Timing Observations of Spin-Powered Pulsars with the AGILE Gamma-Ray Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Pellizzoni, A; Possenti, A; Fornari, F; Caraveo, P; Del Monte, E; Mereghetti, S; Tavani, M; Argan, A; Trois, A; Burgay, M; Chen, A; Cognard, I; Costa, E; D'Amico, N; Esposito, P; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Fuschino, F; Giuliani, A; Halpern, J; Hobbs, G; Hotan, A; Johnston, S; Krämer, M; Longo, F; Manchester, R N; Marisaldi, M; Palfreyman, J; Weltevrede, P; Barbiellini, G; Boffelli, F; Bulgarelli, A; Cattaneo, P W; Cocco, V; D'Ammando, F; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Donnarumma, I; Fiorini, M; Froysland, T; Galli, M; Gianotti, F; Harding, A; Labanti, C; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Mauri, F; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Prest, M; Pucella, G; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Soffitta, P; Trifoglio, M; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Vittorini, V; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; Preger, B; Santolamazza, P; Giommi, P; Salotti, L

    2008-01-01

    AGILE is a small gamma-ray astronomy satellite mission of the Italian Space Agency dedicated to high-energy astrophysics launched in 2007 April. Its 1 microsecond absolute time tagging capability coupled with a good sensitivity in the 30 MeV-30 GeV range, with simultaneous X-ray monitoring in the 18-60 keV band, makes it perfectly suited for the study of gamma-ray pulsars following up on the CGRO/EGRET heritage. In this paper we present the first AGILE timing results on the known gamma-ray pulsars Vela, Crab, Geminga and B 1706-44. The data were collected from 2007 July to 2008 April, exploiting the mission Science Verification Phase, the Instrument Timing Calibration and the early Observing Pointing Program. Thanks to its large field of view, AGILE collected a large number of gamma-ray photons from these pulsars (about 10,000 pulsed counts for Vela) in only few months of observations. The coupling of AGILE timing capabilities, simultaneous radio/X-ray monitoring and new tools aimed at precise photon phasing,...

  8. The LOFAR Pilot Surveys for Pulsars and Fast Radio Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Coenen, Thijs; Hessels, Jason W T; Stappers, Ben W; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Alexov, A; Breton, R P; Bilous, A; Cooper, S; Falcke, H; Fallows, R A; Gajjar, V; Grießmeier, J -M; Hassall, T E; Karastergiou, A; Keane, E F; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Noutsos, A; Osłowski, S; Pilia, M; Serylak, M; Schrijvers, C; Sobey, C; ter Veen, S; Verbiest, J; Weltevrede, P; Wijnholds, S; Zagkouris, K; van Amesfoort, A S; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Bell, M E; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Corstanje, A; Deller, A; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; van der Horst, A; Juette, E; Kuper, G; Law, C; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Munk, H; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Renting, A; Röttgering, H; Rowlinson, A; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Thoudam, S; Toribio, C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P; Zensus, A

    2014-01-01

    We have conducted two pilot surveys for radio pulsars and fast transients with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) around 140 MHz and here report on the first low-frequency fast-radio burst limit and the discovery of two new pulsars. The first survey, the LOFAR Pilot Pulsar Survey (LPPS), observed a large fraction of the northern sky, ~1.4 x 10^4 sq. deg, with 1-hr dwell times. Each observation covered ~75 sq. deg using 7 independent fields formed by incoherently summing the high-band antenna fields. The second pilot survey, the LOFAR Tied-Array Survey (LOTAS), spanned ~600 sq. deg, with roughly a 5-fold increase in sensitivity compared with LPPS. Using a coherent sum of the 6 LOFAR "Superterp" stations, we formed 19 tied-array beams, together covering 4 sq. deg per pointing. From LPPS we derive a limit on the occurrence, at 142 MHz, of dispersed radio bursts of 107 Jy for the narrowest searched burst duration of 0.66 ms. In LPPS, we re-detected 65 previously known pulsars. LOTAS discovered two pulsars, the firs...

  9. Long-Term Time Variability in the X-Ray Pulse Shape of the Crab Nebula Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.

    2000-01-01

    This is the final performance report for our grant 'Long-Term Time Variability in the X-Ray Pulse Shape of the Crab Nebula Pulsar.' In the first year of this grant, we received the 50,000-second ROSAT (German acronym for X-ray satellite) High Resolution Images (HRI) observation of the Crab Nebula pulsar. We used the data to create a 65-ms-resolution pulse profile and compared it to a similar pulse profile obtained in 1991. No statistically significant differences were found. These results were presented at the January 1998 meeting of the American Astronomical Society. Since then, we have performed more sensitive analyses to search for potential changes in the pulse profile shape between the two data sets. Again, no significant variability was found. In order to augment this long (six-year) baseline data set, we have analyzed archival observations of the Crab Nebula pulsar with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). While these observations have shorter time baselines than the ROSAT data set, their higher signal-to-noise offers similar sensitivity to long-term variability. Again, no significant variations have been found, confirming our ROSAT results. This work was done in collaboration with Prof. Stephen Eikenberry, Cornell University. These analyses will be included in Cornell University graduate student Dae-Sik Moon's doctoral thesis.

  10. Long-Term Timing and Glitch Characteristics of Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 1RXS J170849.0-400910

    CERN Document Server

    Mus, Sinem Sasmaz

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of our detailed timing studies of an anomalous X-ray pulsar, 1RXS J170849.0-400910, using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations spanning over ~6 yr from 2005 until the end of RXTE mission. We constructed the long-term spin characteristics of the source and investigated time and energy dependence of pulse profile and pulsed count rates. We find that pulse profile and pulsed count rates in the 2-10 keV band do not show any significant variations in ~6 yr. 1RXS J170849.0-400910 has been the most frequently glitching anomalous X-ray pulsar: three spin-up glitches and three candidate glitches were observed prior to 2005. Our extensive search for glitches later in the timeline resulted in no unambiguous glitches though we identified two glitch candidates (with Delta(nu)/nu ~10^{-6}) in two data gaps: a strong candidate around MJD 55532 and another one around MJD 54819, which is slightly less robust. We discuss our results in the context of pulsar glitch models and expectancy of glit...

  11. Timing, polarimetry and physics of the bright, nearby millisecond pulsar PSR J0437-4715 - a single-pulse perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Osłowski, S; Bailes, M; Jameson, A; Hobbs, G

    2014-01-01

    Single pulses from radio pulsars contain a wealth of information about emission and propagation in the magnetosphere and insight into their timing properties. It was recently demonstrated that single-pulse emission is responsible for limiting the timing stability of the brightest of millisecond pulsars. We report on an analysis of more than a million single-pulses from PSR J0437-4715 and present various statistical properties such as the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) distribution, timing and polarimetry of average profiles integrated from subpulses with chosen S/N cut-offs, modulation properties of the emission, phase-resolved statistics of the S/N, and two dimensional spherical histograms of the polarization vector orientation. The last of these indicates the presence of orthogonally polarised modes (OPMs). Combined with the dependence of the polarisation fraction on the S/N and polarimetry of the brightest pulses, the existence of OPMs constrains pulsar emission mechanisms and models for the plasma physics in...

  12. Timing of the accreting millisecond pulsar SAX J1748.9-2021 during its 2015 outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, A.; Burderi, L.; Riggio, A.; Pintore, F.; Di Salvo, T.; Gambino, A. F.; Iaria, R.; Matranga, M.; Scarano, F.

    2016-06-01

    We report on the timing analysis of the 2015 outburst of the intermittent accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar SAX J1748.9-2021 observed on March 4 by the X-ray satellite XMM-Newton. By phase connecting the time of arrivals of the observed pulses, we derived the best-fitting orbital solution for the 2015 outburst. We investigated the energy pulse profile dependence finding that the pulse fractional amplitude increases with energy while no significant time lags are detected. Moreover, we investigated the previous outbursts from this source, finding previously undetected pulsations in some intervals during the 2010 outburst of the source. Comparing the updated set of orbital parameters, in particular the value of the time of passage from the ascending node, with the orbital solutions reported from the previous outbursts, we estimated for the first time the orbital period derivative corresponding with dot{P}_{orb}=(1.1± 0.3)× 10^{-10} s s-1. We note that this value is significant at 3.5σ confidence level, because of significant fluctuations with respect to the parabolic trend and more observations are needed in order to confirm the finding. Assuming the reliability of the result, we suggest that the large value of the orbital-period derivative can be explained as a result of a highly non-conservative mass transfer driven by emission of gravitational waves, which implies the ejection of matter from a region close to the inner Lagrangian point. We also discuss possible alternative explanations.

  13. Real time processor for array speckle interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Gordon; Florez, Jose; Borelli, Renan; Fong, Wai; Miko, Joseph; Trujillo, Carlos

    1989-01-01

    The authors are constructing a real-time processor to acquire image frames, perform array flat-fielding, execute a 64 x 64 element two-dimensional complex FFT (fast Fourier transform) and average the power spectrum, all within the 25 ms coherence time for speckles at near-IR (infrared) wavelength. The processor will be a compact unit controlled by a PC with real-time display and data storage capability. This will provide the ability to optimize observations and obtain results on the telescope rather than waiting several weeks before the data can be analyzed and viewed with offline methods. The image acquisition and processing, design criteria, and processor architecture are described.

  14. Time Delay Interferometry with Moving Spacecraft Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Tinto, M; Armstrong, J W; Tinto, Massimo; Estabrook, Frank B.; Armstrong, adn J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Space-borne interferometric gravitational wave detectors, sensitive in the low-frequency (millihertz) band, will fly in the next decade. In these detectors the spacecraft-to-spacecraft light-travel-times will necessarily be unequal, time-varying, and (due to aberration) have different time delays on up- and down-links. Reduction of data from moving interferometric laser arrays in solar orbit will in fact encounter non-symmetric up- and downlink light time differences that are about 100 times larger than has previously been recognized. The time-delay interferometry (TDI) technique uses knowledge of these delays to cancel the otherwise dominant laser phase noise and yields a variety of data combinations sensitive to gravitational waves. Under the assumption that the (different) up- and downlink time delays are constant, we derive the TDI expressions for those combinations that rely only on four inter-spacecraft phase measurements. We then turn to the general problem that encompasses time-dependence of the light...

  15. Long Term Study of the Double Pulsar J0737-3039 with XMM-Newton: pulsar timing

    CERN Document Server

    Iacolina, M N; Egron, E; Possenti, A; Breton, R; Lyutikov, M; Kramer, M; Burgay, M; Motta, S E; De Luca, A; Tiengo, A

    2015-01-01

    The relativistic double neutron star binary PSR J0737-3039 shows clear evidence of orbital phase-dependent wind-companion interaction, both in radio and X-rays. In this paper we present the results of timing analysis of PSR J0737-3039 performed during 2006 and 2011 XMM-Newton Large Programs that collected ~20,000 X-ray counts from the system. We detected pulsations from PSR J0737-3039A (PSR A) through the most accurate timing measurement obtained by XMM-Newton so far, the spin period error being of 2x10^-13 s. PSR A's pulse profile in X-rays is very stable despite significant relativistic spin precession that occurred within the time span of observations. This yields a constraint on the misalignment between the spin axis and the orbital momentum axis Delta_A ~6.6^{+1.3}_{-5.4} deg, consistent with estimates based on radio data. We confirmed pulsed emission from PSR J0737-3039B (PSR B) in X-rays even after its disappearance in radio. The unusual phenomenology of PSR B's X-ray emission includes orbital pulsed f...

  16. Simultaneous Observations of Giant Pulses from the Crab Pulsar, with the Murchison Widefield Array and Parkes Radio Telescope: Implications for the Giant Pulse Emission Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Oronsaye, S I; Bhat, N D R; Tremblay, S E; McSweeney, S J; Tingay, S J; van Straten, W; Jameson, A; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Deshpande, A A; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Lonsdale, C J; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Prabu, T; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2015-01-01

    We report on observations of giant pulses from the Crab pulsar performed simultaneously with the Parkes radio telescope and the incoherent combination of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) antenna tiles. The observations were performed over a duration of approximately one hour at a center frequency of 1382 MHz with 340 MHz bandwidth at Parkes, and at a center frequency of 193 MHz with 15 MHz bandwidth at the MWA. Our analysis has led to the detection of 55 giant pulses at the MWA and 2075 at Parkes above a threshold of 3.5$\\sigma$ and 6.5$\\sigma$ respectively. We detected 51$\\%$ of the MWA giant pulses at the Parkes radio telescope, with spectral indices in the range of $-3.6>\\alpha> -4.9$ ($S_{\\rm \

  17. Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Observation of PSR B1706-44 and Implications for Theoretical Models of Pulsar Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, A K; Strickman, M S

    1999-01-01

    We report on results of an observation with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) of PSR B1706-44 with a live time of 132 ks, to search for pulsed X-ray emission. PSR B1706-44 is a radio and high-energy gamma-ray pulsar (detected by EGRET), but no pulsed emission has been detected in the X-ray band. Since most of the other known gamma-ray pulsars emit pulsed X-rays, it is expected that PSR B1706-44 would also be an X-ray pulsar. However, while the ROSAT PSPC detected a source at the pulsar position, it did not detect pulsations, giving a pulsed fraction upper limit of 18%. The RXTE observations to search for modulation at the pulsar period were carried out in November 1996 and May 1997, during the low states of the nearby X-ray binary 4U1705-44. No significant modulation was detected at the pulsar period, giving an upper limit of 10^{-6} photons cm^{-2} s^{-1} keV^{-1} in the interval 9 keV < E < 18.5keV. The implications of this upper limit of the pulsed flux from the RXTE observation, taken together ...

  18. The High Time Resolution Universe Pulsar Survey - I. System configuration and initial discoveries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keith, M.J.; Jameson, A.; van Straten, W.; Bailes, M.; Johnston, S.; Kramer, M.; Possenti, A.; Bates, S.D.; Bhat, N.D.R.; Burgay, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; D'Amico, N.; Levin, L.; McMahon, P.L.; Milia, S.; Stappers, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    We have embarked on a survey for pulsars and fast transients using the 13-beam multibeam receiver on the Parkes Radio Telescope. Installation of a digital backend allows us to record 400 MHz of bandwidth for each beam, split into 1024 channels and sampled every 64 μs. Limits of the receiver package

  19. Algebraically special space-time in relativity, black holes, and pulsar models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, R. J.; Sheffield, C.

    1973-01-01

    The entire field of astronomy is in very rapid flux, and at the center of interest are problems relating to the very dense, rotating, neutron stars observed as pulsars. the hypothesized collapsed remains of stars known as black holes, and quasars. Degenerate metric form, or Kerr-Schild metric form, was used to study several problems related to intense gravitational fields.

  20. THE NANOGRAV NINE-YEAR DATA SET: OBSERVATIONS, ARRIVAL TIME MEASUREMENTS, AND ANALYSIS OF 37 MILLISECOND PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arzoumanian, Zaven [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology and X-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brazier, Adam; Chatterjee, Shami; Cordes, James M.; Dolch, Timothy [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Demorest, Paul B. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Chamberlin, Sydney [Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Christy, Brian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Cornish, Neil [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Crowter, Kathryn; Fonseca, Emmanuel; Gonzalez, Marjorie E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Ellis, Justin A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr. Pasadena CA 91109 (United States); Ferdman, Robert D.; Kaspi, Victoria M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue Universite, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Garver-Daniels, Nathan; Jones, Megan L. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6315, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Jenet, Fredrick A. [Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Jones, Glenn, E-mail: pdemores@nrao.edu [Department of Physics, Columbia University, 550 W. 120th St. New York, NY 10027 (United States); Collaboration: NANOGrav Collaboration; and others

    2015-11-01

    We present high-precision timing observations spanning up to nine years for 37 millisecond pulsars monitored with the Green Bank and Arecibo radio telescopes as part of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) project. We describe the observational and instrumental setups used to collect the data, and methodology applied for calculating pulse times of arrival; these include novel methods for measuring instrumental offsets and characterizing low signal-to-noise ratio timing results. The time of arrival data are fit to a physical timing model for each source, including terms that characterize time-variable dispersion measure and frequency-dependent pulse shape evolution. In conjunction with the timing model fit, we have performed a Bayesian analysis of a parameterized timing noise model for each source, and detect evidence for excess low-frequency, or “red,” timing noise in 10 of the pulsars. For 5 of these cases this is likely due to interstellar medium propagation effects rather than intrisic spin variations. Subsequent papers in this series will present further analysis of this data set aimed at detecting or limiting the presence of nanohertz-frequency gravitational wave signals.

  1. A Comprehensive Library of X-Ray Pulsars in the Small Magellanic Cloud: Time Evolution of Their Luminosities and Spin Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Laycock, S. G. T.; Christodoulou, D. M.; Fingerman, S.; Coe, M. J.; Drake, J. J.

    2017-04-01

    We have collected and analyzed the complete archive of XMM-Newton (116), Chandra (151), and RXTE (952) observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), spanning 1997-2014. The resulting observational library provides a comprehensive view of the physical, temporal, and statistical properties of the SMC pulsar population across the luminosity range of {L}X={10}31.2{--}{10}38 erg s-1. From a sample of 65 pulsars we report ˜1654 individual pulsar detections, yielding ˜1260 pulse-period measurements. Our pipeline generates a suite of products for each pulsar detection: spin period, flux, event list, high time-resolution light curve, pulse profile, periodogram, and spectrum. Combining all three satellites, we generated complete histories of the spin periods, pulse amplitudes, pulsed fractions, and X-ray luminosities. Some pulsars show variations in pulse period due to the combination of orbital motion and accretion torques. Long-term spin-up/spin-down trends are seen in 12/11 pulsars, respectively, pointing to sustained transfer of mass and angular momentum to the neutron star on decadal timescales. Of the sample, 30 pulsars have a relatively very small spin period derivative and may be close to equilibrium spin. The distributions of pulse detection and flux as functions of spin period provide interesting findings: mapping boundaries of accretion-driven X-ray luminosity and showing that fast pulsars (P public release of the library so that it can be used by other researchers. We intend the library to be useful in driving improved models of neutron star magnetospheres and accretion physics.

  2. Time/Wavelength Fiber Bragg Grating Multiplexing Sensor Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel time/wavelength-multiplexed fiber Bragg grating sensor array is presented. This type of sensor array has the advantages of more points for multi-point measurement, simple structure and low cost.

  3. {Interstellar Plasma Weather Effects in Long-term Multi-frequency Timing of Pulsar B1937+21

    CERN Document Server

    Ramachandran, R; Cognard, I; Demorest, P; Lommen, A N

    2006-01-01

    We report here on variable propagation effects in over twenty years of multi-frequency timing analysis of pulsar PSR B1937+21 that determine small-scale properties of the intervening plasma as it drifts through the sight line. The phase structure function derived from the dispersion measure variations is in remarkable agreement with that expected from the Kolmogorov spectrum, with a power law index of $3.66\\pm 0.04$, valid over an inferred scale range of 0.2--50 A.U. The observed flux variation time scale and the modulation index, along with their frequency dependence, are discrepant with the values expected from a Kolmogorov spectrum with infinitismally small inner scale cutoff, suggesting a caustic-dominated regime of interstellar optics. This implies an inner scale cutoff to the spectrum of $\\sim 1.3\\times 10^9$ meters. Our timing solutions indicate a transverse velocity of 9 km sec$^{-1}$ with respect to the solar system barycenter, and 80 km sec$^{-1}$ with respect to the pulsar's LSR. We interpret the f...

  4. The High Time Resolution Universe Survey - XI. Discovery of five recycled pulsars and the optical detectability of survey white dwarf companions

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, S D; Bailes, M; Barr, E; Bassa, C G; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D J; Flynn, C M L; Jameson, A; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Levin, L; Lyne, A; Milia, S; Ng, C; Petroff, E; Possenti, A; Stappers, B W; van Straten, W; Tiburzi, C

    2014-01-01

    We present the discovery of a further five recycled pulsar systems in the mid-Galactic latitude portion of the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) Survey. The pulsars have rotational periods ranging from 2 ms to 66 ms, and four are in binary systems with orbital periods between 10.8 hours and 9.0 days. Three of these binary systems are particularly interesting; PSR J1227-6208 has a pulse period of 34.5 ms and the highest mass function of all pulsars with near-circular orbits. The circular orbit suggests that the companion is not another neutron star, so future timing experiments may reveal one of the heaviest white dwarfs ever found ($>$ 1.3 M$_\\odot$). Timing observations of PSR J1431$-$4715 indicate that it is eclipsed by its companion which has a mass indicating it belongs to the redback class of eclipsing millisecond pulsars. PSR J1653-2054 has a companion with a minimum mass of only $0.08$ M$_\\odot$, placing it among the class of pulsars with low-mass companions. Unlike the majority of such systems, how...

  5. Luminosity-dependent spectral and timing properties of the accreting pulsar GX 304-1 measured with INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Malacaria, Christian; Santangelo, Andrea; Staubert, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Context: Be/X-ray binaries show outbursts with peak luminosities up to a few times $10^{37}\\,$erg/s, during which they can be observed and studied in detail. Most (if not all) Be/X-ray binaries harbour accreting pulsars, whose X-ray spectra in many cases contain cyclotron resonant scattering features related to the magnetic field of the sources. Spectral variations as a function of luminosity and of the rotational phase of the neutron star are observed in many accreting pulsars. Aims: We explore X-ray spectral and timing properties of the Be/X-ray binary GX 304-1 during an outburst episode. Specifically, we investigate the behavior of the cyclotron resonant scattering feature, the continuum spectral parameters, the pulse period, and the energy- and luminosity-resolved pulse profiles. We combine the luminosity-resolved spectral and timing analysis to probe the accretion geometry and the beaming patterns of the rotating neutron star. Methods: We analyze the INTEGRAL data from the two JEM-X modules, ISGRI and SP...

  6. Discovery of the Millisecond Pulsar PSR J2043+1711 in a Fermi Source with the Nancay Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Cognard, I.; Johnson, T. J.; Takahashi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Desvignes, G.; Camilo, F.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of the millisecond pulsar PSR J2043+1711 in a search of a Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) source with no known associations, with the Nancay Radio Telescope. The new pulsar, confirmed with the Green Bank Telescope, has a spin period of 2.38 ms, is relatively nearby (d approx. system have made PSR J2043+1711 one of the first new Fermi-selected millisecond pulsars to be added to pulsar gravitational wave timing arrays. It has also allowed a significant measurement of relativistic delays in the times of arrival of the pulses due to the curvature of space-time near the companion, but not yet with enough precision to derive useful masses for the pulsar and the companion. Nevertheless, a mass for the pulsar between 1.7 and 2.0 solar Mass can be derived if a standard millisecond pulsar formation model is assumed. In this paper, we also present a comprehensive summary of pulsar searches in Fermi LAT sources with the Nancay Radio Telescope to date.

  7. A Library of known X-ray Pulsars in the Small Magellanic Cloud: Time Evolution of their Luminosities and Spin Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Laycock, Silas; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Drake, Jeremy J.; Hong, Jaesub; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Coe, Malcolm; Ho, Wynn

    2017-01-01

    We have collected and analyzed 116 {\\itshape XMM-Newton\\/}, 151 {\\itshape Chandra\\/}, and 952 {\\itshape RXTE\\/} observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), spanning 1997-2014. The resulting observational library provides a comprehensive view of the physical, temporal and statistical properties of the SMC pulsar population across the luminosity range of $L_X= 10^{31.5}-10^{38}$~erg~s$^{-1}$. We report $\\sim$1600 individual pulsar detections, yielding $\\sim$1300 pulse period measurements. Our pipeline generates a suite of products for each pulsar detection: period, flux, event list, high time-resolution light-curve, pulse-profile, periodogram and X-ray spectrum. Upper-limits are estimated for all non-detections bringing the combined database to $\\sim$37,000 observations of 67 pulsars. Combining all three satellites, we generated complete histories of the spin periods, pulse amplitudes, pulse fractions and X-ray luminosities. Many of the pulsars show variations in pulse period due to the combination of orbital motion and accretion torques. Long-term spin-up/down trends are seen in 27/25 pulsars respectively, pointing to sustained transfer of mass and angular momentum to the neutron star on decadal timescales. The distributions of pulse-detection and flux as functions of spin-period provide interesting findings: mapping boundaries of accretion-driven X-ray luminosity, and showing that fast pulsars ($Prarely detected, yet are more prone to giant outburst. Accompanying this paper is an initial public release of the library so that it can be used by other researchers. We intend the database and pulse profile library to be useful in driving improved models of neutron star magnetospheres and accretion physics.

  8. A complete library of X-ray pulsars in the Magellanic Clouds: A new resource for modeling the time evolution of luminosity and pulse profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Laycock, Silas; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Fingerman, Samuel; Cappallo, Rigel; Zezas, Andreas; Antoniou, Vallia; Hong, Jaesub; Ho, Wynn; Coe, Malcolm; Klus, Helen

    2016-01-01

    We have collected and analyzed all XMM-Newton and Chandra (˜ 300) observations of the known pulsars in the Small & Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC, LMC). We aim to classify various pulsar properties with amplitude logLX = 33 ˜ 38 erg/s and incorporate the related parameters in theoretical models. With the high time-resolution data from the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) and the latest calibration files and the Science Analysis System (SAS) software from High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center Software (HEASOFT), our pipeline generates a suite of useful products for each pulsar detection: point-source event lists, pulse profiles, periodograms, and spectra for the broad energy band, the soft band (0.2-2 keV), and the hard band (2-12 keV). Of 59 SMC pulsars in the EPIC field of view, we were able to measure 29 with pulse periods and power spectra. From XMM for example, for 16 of them, we find 12 are spinning up and 4 are spinning down. We also compare the observed pulse profiles to geometric models of the pulsars in order to constrain the magnetospheric parameters of each of these sources. Our motivation is to provide a library for time domain studies and profile modeling.

  9. Observations of transients and pulsars with LOFAR international stations

    CERN Document Server

    Serylak, Maciej; Williams, Chris; Armour, Wes

    2012-01-01

    The LOw FRequency ARray - LOFAR is a new radio telescope that is moving the science of radio pulsars and transients into a new phase. Its design places emphasis on digital hardware and flexible software instead of mechanical solutions. LOFAR observes at radio frequencies between 10 and 240 MHz where radio pulsars and many transients are expected to be brightest. Radio frequency signals emitted from these objects allow us to study the intrinsic pulsar emission and phenomena such as propagation effects through the interstellar medium. The design of LOFAR allows independent use of its stations to conduct observations of known bright objects, or wide field monitoring of transient events. One such combined software/hardware solution is called the Advanced Radio Transient Event Monitor and Identification System (ARTEMIS). It is a backend for both targeted observations and real-time searches for millisecond radio transients which uses Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) technology to remove interstellar dispersion and d...

  10. Conducting The Deepest All-Sky Pulsar Survey Ever: The All-Sky High Time Resolution Universe Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, Cherry

    2014-01-01

    The extreme conditions found in and around pulsars make them fantastic natural laboratories, providing insights to a rich variety of fundamental physics and astronomy. To discover more pulsars we have begun the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey: a blind survey of the northern sky with the 100-m Effelsberg radio telescope in Germany and a twin survey of the southern sky with the 64-m Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The HTRU is an international collaboration with expertise shared among the MPIfR in Germany, ATNF/CASS and Swinburne University of Technology in Australia, University of Manchester in the UK and INAF in Italy. The HTRU survey uses multi-beam receivers and backends constructed with recent advancements in technology, providing unprecedentedly high time and frequency resolution, allowing us to probe deeper into the Galaxy than ever before. While a general overview of HTRU has been given by Keith at this conference, here we focus on three further aspects of HTRU discoveries and highlights...

  11. Time-shared optical tweezers with a microlens array for dynamic microbead arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshio; Wakida, Shin-Ichi

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic arrays of microbeads and cells offer great flexibility and potential as platforms for sensing and manipulation applications in various scientific fields, especially biology and medicine. Here, we present a simple method for assembling and manipulating dense dynamic arrays based on time-shared scanning optical tweezers with a microlens array. Three typical examples, including the dynamic and simultaneous bonding of microbeads in real-time, are demonstrated. The optical design and the hardware setup for our approach are also described.

  12. A millisecond pulsar in an extremely wide binary system

    CERN Document Server

    Bassa, C G; Stappers, B W; Tauris, T M; Wevers, T; Jonker, P G; Lentati, L; Verbiest, J P W; Desvignes, G; Graikou, E; Guillemot, L; Freire, P C C; Lazarus, P; Caballero, R N; Champion, D J; Cognard, I; Jessner, A; Jordan, C; Karuppusamy, R; Kramer, M; Lazaridis, K; Lee, K J; Liu, K; Lyne, A G; McKee, J; Oslowski, S; Perrodin, D; Sanidas, S; Shaifullah, G; Smits, R; Theureau, G; Tiburzi, C; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    We report on 22 yrs of radio timing observations of the millisecond pulsar J1024$-$0719 by the telescopes participating in the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA). These observations reveal a significant second derivative of the pulsar spin frequency and confirm the discrepancy between the parallax and Shklovskii distances that has been reported earlier. We also present optical astrometry, photometry and spectroscopy of 2MASS J10243869$-$0719190. We find that it is a low-metallicity main-sequence star (K7V spectral type, $\\mathrm{[M/H]}=-1.0$, $T_\\mathrm{eff}=4050\\pm50$ K) and that its position, proper motion and distance are consistent with those of PSR J1024$-$0719. We conclude that PSR J1024$-$0719 and 2MASS J10243869$-$0719190 form a common proper motion pair and are gravitationally bound. The gravitational interaction between the main-sequence star and the pulsar accounts for the spin frequency derivatives, which in turn resolves the distance discrepancy. Our observations suggest that the pulsar and main...

  13. Pulsar lensing geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Siqi; Macquart, J-P; Brisken, Walter; Deller, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Our analysis of archival VLBI data of PSR 0834+06 revealed that its scintillation properties can be precisely modelled using the inclined sheet model (Pen & Levin 2014), resulting in two distinct lens planes. These data strongly favour the grazing sheet model over turbulence as the primary source of pulsar scattering. This model can reproduce the parameters of the observed diffractive scintillation with an accuracy at the percent level. Comparison with new VLBI proper motion results in a direct measure of the ionized ISM screen transverse velocity. The results are consistent with ISM velocities local to the PSR 0834+06 sight-line (through the Galaxy). The simple 1D structure of the lenses opens up the possibility of using interstellar lenses as precision probes for pulsar lens mapping, precision transverse motions in the ISM, and new opportunities for removing scattering to improve pulsar timing. We describe the parameters and observables of this double screen system. While relative screen distances can i...

  14. Pulsar virtual observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Keith, M; Lyne, A; Brooke, J

    2007-01-01

    The Pulsar Virtual Observatory will provide a means for scientists in all fields to access and analyze the large data sets stored in pulsar surveys without specific knowledge about the data or the processing mechanisms. This is achieved by moving the data and processing tools to a grid resource where the details of the processing are seen by the users as abstract tasks. By developing intelligent scheduling middle-ware the issues of interconnecting tasks and allocating resources are removed from the user domain. This opens up large sets of radio time-series data to a wider audience, enabling greater cross field astronomy, in line with the virtual observatory concept. Implementation of the Pulsar Virtual Observatory is underway, utilising the UK National Grid Service as the principal grid resource.

  15. PROSPECTS FOR PROBING THE SPACETIME OF Sgr A* WITH PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, K.; Wex, N.; Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Cordes, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Lazio, T. J. W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, M/S 138-308, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    The discovery of radio pulsars in compact orbits around Sgr A* would allow an unprecedented and detailed investigation of the spacetime of this supermassive black hole. This paper shows that pulsar timing, including that of a single pulsar, has the potential to provide novel tests of general relativity, in particular its cosmic censorship conjecture and no-hair theorem for rotating black holes. These experiments can be performed by timing observations with 100 {mu}s precision, achievable with the Square Kilometre Array for a normal pulsar at frequency above 15 GHz. Based on the standard pulsar timing technique, we develop a method that allows the determination of the mass, spin, and quadrupole moment of Sgr A*, and provides a consistent covariance analysis of the measurement errors. Furthermore, we test this method in detailed mock data simulations. It seems likely that only for orbital periods below {approx}0.3 yr is there the possibility of having negligible external perturbations. For such orbits, we expect a {approx}10{sup -3} test of the frame dragging and a {approx}10{sup -2} test of the no-hair theorem within five years, if Sgr A* is spinning rapidly. Our method is also capable of identifying perturbations caused by distributed mass around Sgr A*, thus providing high confidence in these gravity tests. Our analysis is not affected by uncertainties in our knowledge of the distance to the Galactic center, R{sub 0}. A combination of pulsar timing with the astrometric results of stellar orbits would greatly improve the measurement precision of R{sub 0}.

  16. A Real-time Modeling of Photovoltaic Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王魏; 李柠; 李少远

    2012-01-01

    This paper mainly aims at the modeling problem of the photovoltaic (PV) array with a 30 kW PV grid-connected generation system. An iterative method for the time-varying parameters is proposed to model a plant of PV array. The relationship of PV cell and PV array is obtained and the solution for PV array model is unique. The PV grid-connected generation system is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method by comparing the calculated values with the actual output of the system.

  17. HIGH-FIDELITY RADIO ASTRONOMICAL POLARIMETRY USING A MILLISECOND PULSAR AS A POLARIZED REFERENCE SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Straten, W., E-mail: vanstraten.willem@gmail.com [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2013-01-15

    A new method of polarimetric calibration is presented in which the instrumental response is derived from regular observations of PSR J0437-4715 based on the assumption that the mean polarized emission from this millisecond pulsar remains constant over time. The technique is applicable to any experiment in which high-fidelity polarimetry is required over long timescales; it is demonstrated by calibrating 7.2 years of high-precision timing observations of PSR J1022+1001 made at the Parkes Observatory. Application of the new technique followed by arrival time estimation using matrix template matching yields post-fit residuals with an uncertainty-weighted standard deviation of 880 ns, two times smaller than that of arrival time residuals obtained via conventional methods of calibration and arrival time estimation. The precision achieved by this experiment yields the first significant measurements of the secular variation of the projected semimajor axis, the precession of periastron, and the Shapiro delay; it also places PSR J1022+1001 among the 10 best pulsars regularly observed as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project. It is shown that the timing accuracy of a large fraction of the pulsars in the PPTA is currently limited by the systematic timing error due to instrumental polarization artifacts. More importantly, long-term variations of systematic error are correlated between different pulsars, which adversely affects the primary objectives of any pulsar timing array experiment. These limitations may be overcome by adopting the techniques presented in this work, which relax the demand for instrumental polarization purity and thereby have the potential to reduce the development cost of next-generation telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array.

  18. Two-dimensional random arrays for real time volumetric imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Richard E.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Smith, Stephen W.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional arrays are necessary for a variety of ultrasonic imaging techniques, including elevation focusing, 2-D phase aberration correction, and real time volumetric imaging. In order to reduce system cost and complexity, sparse 2-D arrays have been considered with element geometries...... real time volumetric imaging system, which employs a wide transmit beam and receive mode parallel processing to increase image frame rate. Depth-of-field comparisons were made from simulated on-axis and off-axis beamplots at ranges from 30 to 160 mm for both coaxial and offset transmit and receive...... selected ad hoc, by algorithm, or by random process. Two random sparse array geometries and a sparse array with a Mills cross receive pattern were simulated and compared to a fully sampled aperture with the same overall dimensions. The sparse arrays were designed to the constraints of the Duke University...

  19. Coherently dedispersed gated imaging of millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Jayanta

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the need for rapid localisation of newly discovered faint millisecond pulsars (MSPs) we have developed a coherently dedispersed gating correlator. This gating correlator accounts for the orbital motions of MSPs in binaries while folding the visibilities with best-fit topocentric rotational model derived from periodicity search in simultaneously generated beamformer output. Unique applications of the gating correlator for sensitive interferometric studies of MSPs are illustrated using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) interferometric array. We could unambiguously localise five newly discovered Fermi MSPs in the on-off gated image plane with an accuracy of +-1". Immediate knowledge of such precise position allows the use of sensitive coherent beams of array telescopes for follow-up timing observations, which substantially reduces the use of telescope time (~ 20X for the GMRT). In addition, precise a-priori astrometric position reduces the effect of large covariances in timing fit (with dis...

  20. Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer and BeppoSAX Observations of the Transient X-Ray Pulsar XTE J1859+083

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbet, R. H. D.; in't Zand, J. J. M.; Levine, A. M.; Marshall, F. E.

    2009-04-01

    We present observations of the 9.8 s X-ray pulsar XTE J1859+083 made with the All Sky Monitor (ASM) and Proportional Counter Array (PCA) on board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, and the Wide Field Camera (WFC) on board BeppoSAX. The ASM data cover a 12 year time interval and show that an extended outburst occurred between approximately MJD 50,250 and 50,460 (1996 June 16 to 1997 January 12). The ASM data excluding this outburst interval suggest a possible modulation with a period of 60.65 ± 0.08 days. Eighteen sets of PCA observations were obtained over an approximately one month interval in 1999. The flux variability measured with the PCA appears consistent with the possible period found with the ASM. The PCA measurements of the pulse period showed it to decrease nonmonotonically and then to increase significantly. Doppler shifts due to orbital motion rather than accretion torques appear to be better able to explain the pulse period changes. Observations with the WFC during the extended outburst give a position that is consistent with a previously determined PCA error box, but which has a significantly smaller error. The transient nature of XTE J1859+083 and the length of its pulse period are consistent with it being a Be/neutron star binary. The possible 60.65 day orbital period would be of the expected length for a Be star system with a 9.8 s pulse period.

  1. Time-dependent modeling of pulsar wind nebulae: Study on the impact of the diffusion-loss approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jonatan; Rea, Nanda

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present a leptonic, time-dependent model of pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). The model seeks a solution for the lepton distribution function considering the full time-energy dependent diffusion-loss equation. The time-dependent lepton population is balanced by injection, energy losses, and escape. We include synchrotron, inverse Compton (IC, with the cosmic-microwave background as well as with IR/optical photon fields), self-synchrotron Compton (SSC), and bremsstrahlung processes, all devoid of any radiative approximations. With this model in place we focus on the Crab nebula as an example and present its time dependent evolution. Afterwards, we analyze the impact of different approximations made at the level of the diffusion-loss equation, as can be found in the literature. Whereas previous models ignored the escape term, e.g., with the diffusion-loss equation becoming advective, others approximated the losses as catastrophic, so that the equation has only time derivatives. Additional approximati...

  2. Estimating Time Delays With Antenna Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the problem of estimating the time delays of multipath signals in wireless communications. The new multipath channel model is presented. And based on this new channel model, we generalize the classical MUSIC algorithm to estimate the time delays of multipath signals. Simulation examples are included to illustrate the algorithm performance.

  3. The Pulsar in the Crab Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Lewandowska, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    The Crab pulsar belongs to one of the most studied stellar objects in the sky. Since its accidental detection in 1968, its pulsed emission has been observed throughout most of the electromagnetic spectrum. Although currently one of more than 2000 known pulsars, its way of work has remained not understood making the Crab pulsar an object of continuous studies and interest. Referring to the pulsed emission of the Crab pulsar only at radio wavelengths, it reveals a diversity of different phenomena. They range from deviations of the predicted slowing down process of the pulsar with time (long time phenomena) to an irregularity of its single pulse emission (short time phenomena). Similar and different kinds of deviations are observed at other wavelengths. Consequently, the Crab pulsar provides a large diversity of different emission characteristics which have remained difficult to interpret with a uniform theoretical approach including all observed properties. Since a review of all currently examined properties of...

  4. Pulsar observations at Mt. Pleasant

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, D R; McCulloch, P M

    2002-01-01

    Two daily pulsar monitoring programs are progressing at the Mount Pleasant Observatory, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. A new system involving the 26-metre radio telescope monitors 10 young pulsars daily and is focussed on near-real-time glitch finding. This will allow Target of Opportunity observations to measure post-glitch heating of the neutron star surface (Helfand, Gotthelf, & Halpern 2000). The 14-metre continues its 21st year of daily monitoring of the Vela pulsar with a recent comprehensive frontend upgrade. This is prior to an upgrade of the backend equipment currently in progress. The 14-metre observed the most recent glitch of the Vela pulsar in January 2000 to the highest time resolution of any glitch and revealed a particularly short-term decay component (Dodson, McCulloch, & Lewis 2002). This decay component will provide constraints to the nature of the coupling of the stellar crust to the liquid interior.

  5. The characteristics of millisecond pulsar emission; 2, Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Xilouris, K M; Jessner, A; Von Hoensbroech, A; Lorimer, D; Wielebinski, R; Wolszczan, A; Camilo, F M

    1998-01-01

    We have made polarimetric monitoring observations of millisecond pulsars visible from the northern hemisphere at 1410 MHz. Their emission properties are compared with those of normal pulsars. Although we demonstrated in paper I that millisecond pulsars exhibit the same flux density spectra and similar profile complexity, our results presented here suggest that millisecond pulsar profiles do not comply with the predictions of classification schemes based on ``normal'' pulsars. The frequency development of a large number of millisecond pulsar profiles is abnormal when compared with the development seen for normal pulsars. Moreover, the polarization characteristics suggest that millisecond-pulsar magnetospheres might not simply represent scaled versions of the magnetospheres of normal pulsars, supporting results of paper I. However, phenomena such as mode-changing activity in both intensity and polarization are recognized here for the first time (e.g., J1730--2304). This suggests that while the basic emission me...

  6. Detection of cyclotron resonance scattering feature in high-mass X-ray binary pulsar SMC X-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Naik, Sachindra

    2016-09-01

    We report broad-band spectral properties of the high-mass X-ray binary pulsar SMC X-2 by using three simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopy Telescope Array and Swift/XRT observations during its 2015 outburst. The pulsar was significantly bright, reaching a luminosity up to as high as ˜5.5 × 1038 erg s-1 in 1-70 keV range. Spin period of the pulsar was estimated to be 2.37 s. Pulse profiles were found to be strongly luminosity dependent. The 1-70 keV energy spectrum of the pulsar was well described with three different continuum models such as (i) negative and positive power law with exponential cutoff, (ii) Fermi-Dirac cutoff power law and (iii) cutoff power-law models. Apart from the presence of an iron line at ˜6.4 keV, a model independent absorption like feature at ˜27 keV was detected in the pulsar spectrum. This feature was identified as a cyclotron absorption line and detected for the first time in this pulsar. Corresponding magnetic field of the neutron star was estimated to be ˜2.3 × 1012 G. The cyclotron line energy showed a marginal negative dependence on the luminosity. The cyclotron line parameters were found to be variable with pulse phase and interpreted as due to the effect of emission geometry or complicated structure of the pulsar magnetic field.

  7. Reconfigurable time-steered array-antenna beam former.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, M Y; Esman, R D

    1997-12-10

    We present and analyze a hardware-optimized technique that provides true-time-delay steering for broadband two-dimensional array-antenna applications. The technique improves on previous approaches by the reduction of the two-dimensional beam-former architecture complexity, by the provision of flexibility in time-delay unit selection, and by the potential reduction of optical loss. The technique relies on a one-dimensional bank of time-delay units to form the required time-delay gradient for proper off-broadside angle steering. A reconfigurable optical interconnection fabric is used to reassign dynamically the connections between the time-delay units and individual array elements of a two-dimensional array to effect the proper steering angle along the off-broadside cone.

  8. Beyond the 2nd Fermi Pulsar Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Xian; Reposeur, Thierry; Rousseau, Romain

    2013-01-01

    Over thirteen times more gamma-ray pulsars have now been studied with the Large Area Telescope on NASA's Fermi satellite than the ten seen with the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory in the nineteen-nineties. The large sample is diverse, allowing better understanding both of the pulsars themselves and of their roles in various cosmic processes. Here we explore the prospects for even more gamma-ray pulsars as Fermi enters the 2nd half of its nominal ten-year mission. New pulsars will naturally tend to be fainter than the first ones discovered. Some of them will have unusual characteristics compared to the current population, which may help discriminate between models. We illustrate a vision of the future with a sample of six pulsars discovered after the 2nd Fermi Pulsar Catalog was written.

  9. Spectral and timing properties of the accreting X-ray millisecond pulsar IGR J17511-3057

    CERN Document Server

    Falanga, M; Poutanen, J; Galloway, D K; Bonning, E W; Bozzo, E; Goldwurm, A; Hermsen, W; Stella, L

    2010-01-01

    IGR J17511-3057 is the second X-ray transient accreting millisecond pulsar discovered by INTEGRAL. It was in outburst for about a month from September 13, 2009. The broad-band average spectrum is well described by thermal Comptonization with an electron temperature of kT_e ~ 25 keV, soft seed photons of kT_bb ~ 0.6 keV, and Thomson optical depth \\tau_T ~ 2 in a slab geometry. During the outburst the spectrum stays remarkably stable with plasma and soft seed photon temperatures and scattering optical depth being constant within errors. We fitted the outburst profile with the exponential model, and using the disk instability model we inferred the outer disk radius to be (4.8 - 5.4) \\times 1010 cm. The INTEGRAL and RXTE data reveal the X-ray pulsation at a period of 4.08 milliseconds up to ~ 120 keV. The pulsed fraction is shown to decrease from ~22% at 3 keV to a constant pulsed fraction of ~17-18% between 7-30 keV, and then to decrease again down to ~13% at 60 keV. The nearly sinusoidal pulses show soft lags m...

  10. Pulsar Discovery by Global Volunteer Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, B.; Allen, B.; Cordes, J. M.; Deneva, J. S.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Crawford, F.; Demorest, P. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Freire, P. C. C.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Hammer, D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Kasian, L.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Machenschalk, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Messenger, C.; Nice, D. J.; Papa, M. A.; Pletsch, H. J.; Prix, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2010-09-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to mine large data sets. It has now found a 40.8-hertz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722’s pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.

  11. Pulsar Discovery by Global Volunteer Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Knispel, B; Cordes, J M; Deneva, J S; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C; Bhat, N D R; Bock, O; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Chatterjee, S; Crawford, F; Demorest, P B; Fehrmann, H; Freire, P C C; Gonzalez, M E; Hammer, D; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Kasian, L; Kaspi, V M; Kramer, M; Lazarus, P; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Machenschalk, A G Lyne B; McLaughlin, M A; Messenger, C; Nice, D J; Papa, M A; Pletsch, H J; Prix, R; Ransom, S M; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Stovall, K; Venkataraman, A

    2010-01-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to "mine" large data sets. It has now found a 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.

  12. Timing and spectral studies of the transient X-ray pulsar EXO 053109-6609.2 with ASCA and Beppo-SAX

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, B; Naik, S; Agrawal, P C

    2004-01-01

    We report timing and spectral properties of the transient Be X-ray pulsar EXO 053109--6609.2 studied using observations made with the ASCA and BeppoSAX observatories. Though there must have been at least one spin-down episode of the pulsar since its discovery, the new pulse period measurements show a monotonic spin-up trend since 1996. The pulse profile is found to have marginal energy dependence. There is also evidence for strong luminosity dependence of the pulse profile, a single peaked profile at low luminosity that changes to a double peaked profile at high luminosity. This suggests a change in the accretion pattern at certain luminosity level. The X-ray spectrum is found to consist of a simple power-law with photon index in the range of 0.4--0.8. At high intensity level the spectrum also shows presence of weak iron emission line.

  13. Directional spectrum of ocean waves from array measurements using phase/time/path difference methods

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Menon, H.B.

    Wave direction has for the first time been consistently, accurately and unambiguously evaluated from array measurements using the phase/time/path difference (PTPD) methods of Esteva in case of polygonal arrays and Borgman in case of linear arrays...

  14. Stability of pulsar rotational and orbital periods

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeikin, Sergei

    2009-01-01

    Millisecond and binary pulsars are the most stable astronomical standards of frequency. They can be applied to solving a number of problems in astronomy and time-keeping metrology including the search for a stochastic gravitational wave background in the early universe, testing general relativity, and establishing a new time-scale. The full exploration of pulsar properties requires that proper unbiased estimates of spin and orbital parameters of the pulsar be obtained. These estimates depend essentially on the random noise components present in pulsar timing residuals. The instrumental white noise has predictable statistical properties and makes no harm for interpretation of timing observations, while the astrophysical/geophysical low-frequency noise corrupts them, thus, reducing the quality of tests of general relativity and decreasing the stability of the pulsar time scale.

  15. EINSTEIN-HOME DISCOVERY OF 24 PULSARS IN THE PARKES MULTI-BEAM PULSAR SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knispel, B.; Kim, H.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Eatough, R. P.; Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Anderson, D. [University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Crawford, F.; Rastawicki, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Hammer, D.; Papa, M. A.; Siemens, X. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Lyne, A. G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Miller, R. B. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, 111 White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Sarkissian, J., E-mail: benjamin.knispel@aei.mpg.de [CSIRO Parkes Observatory, Parkes, NSW 2870 (Australia); and others

    2013-09-10

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of Almost-Equal-To 17, 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein-Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop s{sup -1}. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, 18 of which were isolated pulsars, and 6 were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM ( Almost-Equal-To 420 pc cm{sup -3}). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2536 likely belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Three of the isolated pulsars show long-term nulling or intermittency in their emission, further increasing this growing family. Our discoveries demonstrate the value of distributed volunteer computing for data-driven astronomy and the importance of applying new analysis methods to extensively searched data.

  16. Einstein@Home Discovery of 24 Pulsars in the Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, B.; Eatough, R. P.; Kim, H.; Keane, E. F.; Allen, B.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Crawford, F.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H.; Hammer, D.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.; Machenschalk, B.; Miller, R. B.; Papa, M. A.; Rastawicki, D.; Sarkissian, J.; Siemens, X.; Stappers, B. W.

    2013-09-01

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of ≈17, 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein@Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop s-1. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, 18 of which were isolated pulsars, and 6 were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM (≈420 pc cm-3). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2536 likely belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Three of the isolated pulsars show long-term nulling or intermittency in their emission, further increasing this growing family. Our discoveries demonstrate the value of distributed volunteer computing for data-driven astronomy and the importance of applying new analysis methods to extensively searched data.

  17. What brakes the Crab pulsar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čadež, A.; Zampieri, L.; Barbieri, C.; Calvani, M.; Naletto, G.; Barbieri, M.; Ponikvar, D.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Optical observations provide convincing evidence that the optical phase of the Crab pulsar follows the radio one closely. Since optical data do not depend on dispersion measure variations, they provide a robust and independent confirmation of the radio timing solution. Aims: The aim of this paper is to find a global mathematical description of Crab pulsar's phase as a function of time for the complete set of published Jodrell Bank radio ephemerides (JBE) in the period 1988-2014. Methods: We apply the mathematical techniques developed for analyzing optical observations to the analysis of JBE. We break the whole period into a series of episodes and express the phase of the pulsar in each episode as the sum of two analytical functions. The first function is the best-fitting local braking index law, and the second function represents small residuals from this law with an amplitude of only a few turns, which rapidly relaxes to the local braking index law. Results: From our analysis, we demonstrate that the power law index undergoes "instantaneous" changes at the time of observed jumps in rotational frequency (glitches). We find that the phase evolution of the Crab pulsar is dominated by a series of constant braking law episodes, with the braking index changing abruptly after each episode in the range of values between 2.1 and 2.6. Deviations from such a regular phase description behave as oscillations triggered by glitches and amount to fewer than 40 turns during the above period, in which the pulsar has made more than 2 × 1010 turns. Conclusions: Our analysis does not favor the explanation that glitches are connected to phenomena occurring in the interior of the pulsar. On the contrary, timing irregularities and changes in slow down rate seem to point to electromagnetic interaction of the pulsar with the surrounding environment.

  18. Some linear-time algorithms for systolic arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Brent, Richard P; Kung, H T

    2010-01-01

    We survey some results on linear-time algorithms for systolic arrays. In particular, we show how the greatest common divisor (GCD) of two polynomials of degree n over a finite field can be computed in time O(n) on a linear systolic array of O(n) cells; similarly for the GCD of two n-bit binary numbers. We show how n * n Toeplitz systems of linear equations can be solved in time O(n) on a linear array of O(n) cells, each of which has constant memory size (independent of n). Finally, we outline how a two-dimensional square array of O(n)* O(n) cells can be used to solve (to working accuracy) the eigenvalue problem for a symmetric real n* n matrix in time O(nS(n)). Here S(n) is a slowly growing function of n; for practical purposes S(n) can be regarded as a constant. In addition to their theoretical interest, these results have potential applications in the areas of error-correcting codes, symbolic and algebraic computations, signal processing and image processing.

  19. Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, Paulo C C

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we review the recent discovery of several millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in eccentric binary systems. Timing these MSPs we were able to estimate (and in one case precisely measure) their masses. These results suggest that, as a class, MSPs have a much wider range of masses (1.3 to > 2 solar masses) than the normal and mildly recycled pulsars found in double neutron star (DNS) systems (1.25 < Mp < 1.44 solar masses). This is very likely to be due to the prolonged accretion episode that is thought to be required to form a MSP. The likely existence of massive MSPs makes them a powerful probe for understanding the behavior of matter at densities larger than that of the atomic nucleus; in particular, the precise measurement of the mass of PSR J1903+0327 ($1.67 +/- 0.01 solar masses) excludes several "soft" equations of state for dense matter.

  20. Clocks in the sky the story of pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    McNamara, Geoff

    2008-01-01

    Pulsars are rapidly spinning neutron stars, the collapsed cores of once massive stars that ended their lives as supernova explosions. Pulsar rotation rates can reach incredible speeds, up to hundreds of times per second. This title explores the history, subsequent discovery and contemporary research into pulsar astronomy.

  1. Research Progress of Timing Noise of Normal Pulsar%正常脉冲星计时噪声的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高旭东; 张双南; 付建宁

    2016-01-01

    脉冲星自转的稳定性是其最显著的特征之一,利用这种特征可以提供脉冲星自身自转减慢的精确信息,研究强引力场中的广义相对论效应,检验引力波,探测太阳系外行星,以及提供计时标准。然而,在脉冲星自转的长期观测中,两种有趣的不规则性被观测到,这其中把广泛存在于脉冲星中且最为普遍的现象称为“计时噪声”,多表现为相当连续且不稳定的行为,并且多由低频结构组成。对于具有较大周期导数的脉冲星而言,通常会具有更加明显的计时噪声。全面地研究计时噪声有助于深入了解中子星的内部结构。在回顾分析脉冲星自转减慢模型的基础上,对近年来脉冲星计时噪声的观测进展进行了概述。针对现有的观测数据,讨论了目前关于计时噪声分类以及观测制动指数中存在的问题。另外,介绍和评述了脉冲星计时噪声的相关理论模型。最后,展望了未来观测方面的发展方向和前景。%One of the most remarkable features of pulsars is their rotational stability. Through measuring the times of arrival of pulsars, a surprisingly large amount of information can be obtained, such as, providing precise information on rotational slowdown of pulsars, testing the general relativity and gravitational waves, detecting exoplanets, determining fun-damental parameters of binary systems, and also providing time standard with stabilities comparable to that of the best atomic clocks. The angular momentum of an isolated pulsar only changes through the braking torque of the magnetic dipole radiation; therefore, the effect on the pulse times of arrival would be usually predictable and smooth. However, two interesting irregularities in pulsar rotation have been observed. The first kind is ‘glitches’ which sudden increases in their rotation rates followed by a period of relaxation. Glitches occur more frequently in younger

  2. X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Roland

    2016-01-01

    X-ray pulsars shine thanks to the conversion of the gravitational energy of accreted material to X-ray radiation. The accretion rate is modulated by geometrical and hydrodynamical effects in the stellar wind of the pulsar companions and/or by instabilities in accretion discs. Wind driven flows are highly unstable close to neutron stars and responsible for X-ray variability by factors $10^3$ on time scale of hours. Disk driven flows feature slower state transitions and quasi periodic oscillations related to orbital motion and precession or resonance. On shorter time scales, and closer to the surface of the neutron star, X-ray variability is dominated by the interactions of the accreting flow with the spinning magnetosphere. When the pulsar magnetic field is large, the flow is confined in a relatively narrow accretion column, whose geometrical properties drive the observed X-ray emission. In low magnetized systems, an increasing accretion rate allows the ignition of powerful explosive thermonuclear burning at t...

  3. Simulations of Time Reversing Arrays in Shallow Ocean Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    using a customized version of RAM that allows us to recover the amplitude and phase of the computed field. We have also developed Monte-Carlo...Simulations of Time Reversing Arrays in Shallow Ocean Waters David R. Dowling Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics University...1-0628 http://www.personal.engin.umich.edu/~drd LONG-TERM GOAL The long term goals of this project are: i) to predict and understand time reversing

  4. Discovery of Giant Pulses from the Pulsar B1237+25(J1239+2453)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantsev, A. N.; Potapov, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    To search for Giant Pulses (GPs) from pulsars, we have carried out during 2011--2013 a survey of about 20 second-period radio pulsars of the Northern Hemisphere. The observations were carried out at a frequency of 111-MHz using the Large Phased Array (LPA LPI) scanning radio telescope in Pushchino. We have detected regular generation of strong individuals pulses from the pulsar PSR B1237+25 (J1239+2453). The peak flux density of the pulses was up to 70 times as strong as an average profile. The flux density of these pulses has a bimodal power-law distribution function, which is typical of GPs when usual pulses are log-normally distributed. The strongest detected GP had a flux density of about 900 Jy.

  5. The disturbance of a millisecond pulsar magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, R M; Kerr, M; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Coles, W A; Dai, S; Dempsey, J; Hobbs, G; Keith, M J; Lasky, P D; Levin, Y; Manchester, R N; Oslowski, S; Ravi, V; Reardon, D J; Rosado, P A; Spiewak, R; van Straten, W; Toomey, L; Wang, J -B; Wen, L; You, X -P; Zhu, X -J

    2016-01-01

    Pulsar timing has enabled some of the strongest tests of fundamental physics. Central to the technique is the assumption that the detected radio pulses can be used to accurately measure the rotation of the pulsar. Here we report on a broad-band variation in the pulse profile of the millisecond pulsar J1643-1224. A new component of emission suddenly appears in the pulse profile, decays over 4 months, and results in a permanently modified pulse shape. Profile variations such as these may be the origin of timing noise observed in other millisecond pulsars. The sensitivity of pulsar-timing observations to gravitational radiation can be increased by accounting for this variability.

  6. Acoustical Direction Finding with Time-Modulated Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ben; Flint, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Time-Modulated Linear Arrays (TMLAs) offer useful efficiency savings over conventional phased arrays when applied in parameter estimation applications. The present paper considers the application of TMLAs to acoustic systems and proposes an algorithm for efficiently deriving the arrival angle of a signal. The proposed technique is applied in the frequency domain, where the signal and harmonic content is captured. Using a weighted average method on harmonic amplitudes and their respective main beam angles, it is possible to determine an estimate for the signal’s direction of arrival. The method is demonstrated and evaluated using results from both numerical and practical implementations and performance data is provided. The use of Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) sensors allows time-modulation techniques to be applied at ultrasonic frequencies. Theoretical predictions for an array of five isotropic elements with half-wavelength spacing and 1000 data samples suggest an accuracy of ±1∘ within an angular range of approximately ±50∘. In experiments of a 40 kHz five-element microphone array, a Direction of Arrival (DoA) estimation within ±2.5∘ of the target signal is readily achieved inside a ±45∘ range using a single switched input stage and a simple hardware setup. PMID:27973432

  7. Acoustical Direction Finding with Time-Modulated Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Clark

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Time-Modulated Linear Arrays (TMLAs offer useful efficiency savings over conventional phased arrays when applied in parameter estimation applications. The present paper considers the application of TMLAs to acoustic systems and proposes an algorithm for efficiently deriving the arrival angle of a signal. The proposed technique is applied in the frequency domain, where the signal and harmonic content is captured. Using a weighted average method on harmonic amplitudes and their respective main beam angles, it is possible to determine an estimate for the signal’s direction of arrival. The method is demonstrated and evaluated using results from both numerical and practical implementations and performance data is provided. The use of Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS sensors allows time-modulation techniques to be applied at ultrasonic frequencies. Theoretical predictions for an array of five isotropic elements with half-wavelength spacing and 1000 data samples suggest an accuracy of ± 1 ∘ within an angular range of approximately ± 50 ∘ . In experiments of a 40 kHz five-element microphone array, a Direction of Arrival (DoA estimation within ± 2 . 5 ∘ of the target signal is readily achieved inside a ± 45 ∘ range using a single switched input stage and a simple hardware setup.

  8. Pulsars in Globular Clusters with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Hessels, J W T; Bailes, M; Bassa, C G; Freire, P C C; Lorimer, D R; Lynch, R; Ransom, S M; Stairs, I H

    2015-01-01

    Globular clusters are highly efficient radio pulsar factories. These pulsars can be used as precision probes of the clusters' structure, gas content, magnetic field, and formation history; some of them are also highly interesting in their own right because they probe exotic stellar evolution scenarios as well as the physics of dense matter, accretion, and gravity. Deep searches with SKA1-MID and SKA1-LOW will plausibly double to triple the known population. Such searches will only require one to a few tied-array beams, and can be done during early commissioning of the telescope - before an all-sky pulsar survey using hundreds to thousands of tied-array beams is feasible. With SKA2 it will be possible to observe most of the active radio pulsars within a large fraction of the Galactic globular clusters, an estimated population of 600 - 3700 observable pulsars (those beamed towards us). This rivals the total population of millisecond pulsars that can be found in the Galactic field; fully characterizing it will p...

  9. Einstein@Home Discovery of 24 Pulsars in the Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Knispel, B.; Eatough, R.; Kim, H.; Keane, E; Allen, B.; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Crawford, F; Eggenstein, H.; Fehrmann, H.; Hammer, D.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A,; Machenschalk, B.

    2013-01-01

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of approximately 17000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein@Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop/s. We discovered 24 n...

  10. Time multiplexed pinhole array based lensless three-dimensional imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Ariel; Wang, Jingang; Shemer, Amir; Zalevsky, Zeev; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-06-01

    We present an overview of multi variable coded aperture (MVCA) for lensless three-dimensional integral imaging (3D II) systems. The new configuration is based on a time multiplexing method using a variable pinholes array design. The system provides higher resolution 3D images with improved light intensity and signal to noise ratio as compared to single pinhole system. The MVCA 3D II system configuration can be designed to achieve high light intensity for practical use as micro lenslets arrays. This new configuration preserves the advantages of pinhole optics while solving the resolution limitation problem and the long exposure time of such systems. The three dimensional images are obtained with improved resolution, signal to noise ratio and sensitivity efficiency. This integral imaging lensless system is characterized by large depth of focus, simplicity and low cost. In this paper we present numerical simulations as well as experimental results that validate the proposed lensless imaging configuration.

  11. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A dense globular star cluster near the center of our Milky Way Galaxy holds a buzzing beehive of rapidly-spinning millisecond pulsars, according to astronomers who discovered 21 new pulsars in the cluster using the National Science Foundation's 100-meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The cluster, called Terzan 5, now holds the record for pulsars, with 24, including three known before the GBT observations. Pulsar Diagram Pulsar Diagram: Click on image for more detail. "We hit the jackpot when we looked at this cluster," said Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, VA. "Not only does this cluster have a lot of pulsars -- and we still expect to find more in it -- but the pulsars in it are very interesting. They include at least 13 in binary systems, two of which are eclipsing, and the four fastest-rotating pulsars known in any globular cluster, with the fastest two rotating nearly 600 times per second, roughly as fast as a household blender," Ransom added. Ransom and his colleagues reported their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA, and in the online journal Science Express. The star cluster's numerous pulsars are expected to yield a bonanza of new information about not only the pulsars themselves, but also about the dense stellar environment in which they reside and probably even about nuclear physics, according to the scientists. For example, preliminary measurements indicate that two of the pulsars are more massive than some theoretical models would allow. "All these exotic pulsars will keep us busy for years to come," said Jason Hessels, a Ph.D student at McGill University in Montreal. Globular clusters are dense agglomerations of up to millions of stars, all of which formed at about the same time. Pulsars are spinning, superdense neutron stars that whirl "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is

  12. Two Long-Term Intermittent Pulsars Discovered in the PALFA Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Freire, P. C. C.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kaspi, V. M.; Allen, B.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Cardoso, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Ferdman, R. D.; Jenet, F. A.; Knispel, B.; Lazarus, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Parent, E.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Seymour, A.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L. G.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J.; Wharton, R. S.; Zhu, W. W.

    2017-01-01

    We report the discovery of two long-term intermittent radio pulsars in the ongoing Pulsar Arecibo L-Band Feed Array survey. Following discovery with the Arecibo Telescope, extended observations of these pulsars over several years at Jodrell Bank Observatory have revealed the details of their rotation and radiation properties. PSRs J1910+0517 and J1929+1357 show long-term extreme bimodal intermittency, switching between active (ON) and inactive (OFF) emission states and indicating the presence of a large, hitherto unrecognized underlying population of such objects. For PSR J1929+1357, the initial duty cycle was fON = 0.008, but two years later, this changed quite abruptly to fON = 0.16. This is the first time that a significant evolution in the activity of an intermittent pulsar has been seen, and we show that the spin-down rate of the pulsar is proportional to the activity. The spin-down rate of PSR J1929+1357 is increased by a factor of 1.8 when it is in active mode, similar to the increase seen in the other three known long-term intermittent pulsars. These discoveries increase the number of known pulsars displaying long-term intermittency to five. These five objects display a remarkably narrow range of spin-down power (\\dot{E} ∼ {10}32 {erg} {{{s}}}-1) and accelerating potential above their polar caps. If confirmed by further discoveries, this trend might be important for understanding the physical mechanisms that cause intermittency.

  13. Real-time threat detection using magnetometer arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, Mark D.; Tchernychev, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present a discussion of using an array of atomic magnetometers to locate the presence of ferrous materials, such as concealed weapons, in real time. Ferrous materials create magnetic field anomalies. In order to determine the location of such objects, readings from many positions must be analyzed. This field inversion is typically done in post processing, once readings over a survey area or region of interest have been gathered. With the recent development of small and low power sensors, the dozen or so sensors required to provide information for magnetic field inversion may be deployed. We have built such an array and present here the results of using a realtime inversion algorithm. The inversion algorithm accurately determines target properties at a rate of 10 times per second as objects move past the array. Accuracies are as good as those obtained with target inversion methods used in analyzing data for unexploded ordnance detection. While those methods are typically applied in post processing, we show here those methods work even better when applied in real-time. We further present some analyses of the predicted performance of arrays in various geometries to address issues in security, such as crowd or perimeter monitoring. Target inversion methods may be accurately simulated, allowing for the development and testing of algorithms in an efficient manner. Additional processing may be done using the time history of the inversion results to remove false alarms and enhance detection. The key step is to start with an inversion method, utilizing the mathematical properties of magnetic fields and the known geometry of the measurements.

  14. Real-Time Hand-Held Magnetometer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    detection because of their sensitivity in spite of their large size and power consumption. Large batteries are required to power the system, which...metal detector array with real-time processing algorithms that accurately determines the position, depth, and size of magnetic anomalies from...electronics design using a novel digital approach. We achieved order of magnitude reductions in the size and power consumption of total field

  15. Autonomous Spacecraft Navigation With Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Werner; Jessner, Axel

    2013-01-01

    An external reference system suitable for deep space navigation can be defined by fast spinning and strongly magnetized neutron stars, called pulsars. Their beamed periodic signals have timing stabilities comparable to atomic clocks and provide characteristic temporal signatures that can be used as natural navigation beacons, quite similar to the use of GPS satellites for navigation on Earth. By comparing pulse arrival times measured on-board a spacecraft with predicted pulse arrivals at a reference location, the spacecraft position can be determined autonomously and with high accuracy everywhere in the solar system and beyond. The unique properties of pulsars make clear already today that such a navigation system will have its application in future astronautics. In this paper we describe the basic principle of spacecraft navigation using pulsars and report on the current development status of this novel technology.

  16. FOUR HIGHLY DISPERSED MILLISECOND PULSARS DISCOVERED IN THE ARECIBO PALFA GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Stovall, K. [Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Nice, D. J. [Department of Physics, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042 (United States); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Lazarus, P. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Hessels, J. W. T. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990-AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Freire, P. C. C.; Champion, D. J.; Desvignes, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Bhat, N. D. R.; Camilo, F. [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Bogdanov, S. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cognard, I. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement et de l' Espace, LPC2E, CNRS et Universite d' Orleans, and Station de radioastronomie de Nancay, Observatoire de Paris, F-18330 Nancay (France); Deneva, J. S., E-mail: fcrawfor@fandm.edu [Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (United States); and others

    2012-09-20

    We present the discovery and phase-coherent timing of four highly dispersed millisecond pulsars (MSPs) from the Arecibo PALFA Galactic plane survey: PSRs J1844+0115, J1850+0124, J1900+0308, and J1944+2236. Three of the four pulsars are in binary systems with low-mass companions, which are most likely white dwarfs, and which have orbital periods on the order of days. The fourth pulsar is isolated. All four pulsars have large dispersion measures (DM >100 pc cm{sup -3}), are distant ({approx}> 3.4 kpc), faint at 1.4 GHz ({approx}< 0.2 mJy), and are fully recycled (with spin periods P between 3.5 and 4.9 ms). The three binaries also have very small orbital eccentricities, as expected for tidally circularized, fully recycled systems with low-mass companions. These four pulsars have DM/P ratios that are among the highest values for field MSPs in the Galaxy. These discoveries bring the total number of confirmed MSPs from the PALFA survey to 15. The discovery of these MSPs illustrates the power of PALFA for finding weak, distant MSPs at low-Galactic latitudes. This is important for accurate estimates of the Galactic MSP population and for the number of MSPs that the Square Kilometer Array can be expected to detect.

  17. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorimer Duncan R.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the main properties, demographics and applications of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1800. There are now 83 binary and millisecond pulsars associated with the disk of our Galaxy, and a further 140 pulsars in 26 of the Galactic globular clusters. Recent highlights include the discovery of the young relativistic binary system PSR J1906+0746, a rejuvination in globular cluster pulsar research including growing numbers of pulsars with masses in excess of 1.5M_⊙, a precise measurement of relativistic spin precession in the double pulsar system and a Galactic millisecond pulsar in an eccentric (e = 0.44 orbit around an unevolved companion.

  18. Rotation measure variations for 20 millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Wenming; van Straten, Willem; Reynolds, John; Hobbs, George; Wang, Na; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Champion, David; Chaudhary, Ankur; Coles, William; Hotan, Aidan; Khoo, Jonathan; Oslowski, Stefan; Sarkissian, John; Yardley, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We report on variations in the mean position angle of the 20 millisecond pulsars being observed as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project. It is found that the observed variations are dominated by changes in the Faraday rotation occurring in the Earth's ionosphere. Two ionospheric models are used to correct for the ionospheric contribution and it is found that one based on the International Reference Ionosphere gave the best results. Little or no significant long-term variation in interstellar RM was found with limits typically about 0.1 rad m$^{-2}$ yr$^{-1}$ in absolute value. In a few cases, apparently significant RM variations over timescales of a few 100 days or more were seen. These are unlikely to be due to localised magnetised regions crossing the line of sight since the implied magnetic fields are too high. Most probably they are statistical fluctuations due to random spatial and temporal variations in the interstellar electron density and magnetic field along the line of sight.

  19. Pulsar Observations of Extreme Scattering Events

    CERN Document Server

    Coles, W A; Shannon, R M; Hobbs, G; Manchester, R N; You, X P; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Dai, S; Keith, M J; Levin, Y; Oslowski, S; Ravi, V; Reardon, D; Toomey, L; van Straten, W; Wang, J B; Wen, L; Zhu, X J

    2015-01-01

    Extreme scattering events (ESEs) in the interstellar medium (ISM) were first observed in regular flux measurements of compact extragalactic sources. They are characterized by a flux variation over a period of weeks, suggesting the passage of a "diverging plasma lens" across the line of sight. Modeling the refraction of such a lens indicates that the structure size must be of order AU and the electron density of order 10s of cm^{-3}. Similar structures have been observed in measurements of pulsar intensity scintillation and group delay. Here we report observations of two ESEs showing increases in both intensity scintillation and dispersion made with the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA). These allow us to make more complete models of the ESE, including an estimate of the "outer-scale" of the turbulence in the plasma lens. These observations show clearly that the ESE structure is fully turbulent on an AU scale. They provide some support for the idea that the structures are extended along the line of sight, such...

  20. The TAIGA timing array HiSCORE - first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tluczykont M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of gamma rays up to several 100 TeV are particularly important to spectrally resolve the cutoff regime of the long-sought Pevatrons, the cosmic-ray PeV accelerators. One component of the TAIGA hybrid detector is the TAIGA-HiSCORE timing array, which currently consists of 28 wide angle (0.6 sr air Cherenkov timing stations distributed on an area of 0.25 km2. The HiSCORE concept is based on (non-imaging air shower front sampling with Cherenkov light. First results are presented.

  1. Observational features of pulsar glitches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Pulsar glitches are sudden increases in the rotation rate which probably result from angular momentum transfer within the neutron star. We review the observational features of the 39 glitches detected at Nanshan from 2000 to 2008, including several events which appear to be slow glitches. A wide variety of post-glitch behavior is observed with very little recovery in some pulsars and over-recovery in others. Analysis of the whole sample of known glitches shows that fractional glitch amplitudes are correlated with characteristic age with a peak at about 105 years, but there is a spread of two or three orders of magnitude at all ages. For individual pulsars with many glitches, the time until the next glitch is sometimes proportional to the fractional glitch amplitude.

  2. Pulsar data analysis with PSRCHIVE

    CERN Document Server

    van Straten, Willem; Osłowski, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    PSRCHIVE is an open-source, object-oriented, scientific data analysis software library and application suite for pulsar astronomy. It implements an extensive range of general-purpose algorithms for use in data calibration and integration, statistical analysis and modeling, and visualisation. These are utilised by a variety of applications specialised for tasks such as pulsar timing, polarimetry, radio frequency interference mitigation, and pulse variability studies. This paper presents a general overview of PSRCHIVE functionality with some focus on the integrated interfaces developed for the core applications.

  3. Cluster Computing For Real Time Seismic Array Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, M.; Giudicepietro, F.

    A seismic array is an instrument composed by a dense distribution of seismic sen- sors that allow to measure the directional properties of the wavefield (slowness or wavenumber vector) radiated by a seismic source. Over the last years arrays have been widely used in different fields of seismological researches. In particular they are applied in the investigation of seismic sources on volcanoes where they can be suc- cessfully used for studying the volcanic microtremor and long period events which are critical for getting information on the volcanic systems evolution. For this reason arrays could be usefully employed for the volcanoes monitoring, however the huge amount of data produced by this type of instruments and the processing techniques which are quite time consuming limited their potentiality for this application. In order to favor a direct application of arrays techniques to continuous volcano monitoring we designed and built a small PC cluster able to near real time computing the kinematics properties of the wavefield (slowness or wavenumber vector) produced by local seis- mic source. The cluster is composed of 8 Intel Pentium-III bi-processors PC working at 550 MHz, and has 4 Gigabytes of RAM memory. It runs under Linux operating system. The developed analysis software package is based on the Multiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm and is written in Fortran. The message-passing part is based upon the LAM programming environment package, an open-source imple- mentation of the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The developed software system includes modules devote to receiving date by internet and graphical applications for the continuous displaying of the processing results. The system has been tested with a data set collected during a seismic experiment conducted on Etna in 1999 when two dense seismic arrays have been deployed on the northeast and the southeast flanks of this volcano. A real time continuous acquisition system has been simulated by

  4. Interstellar Medium Effects on Radio Pulsars PSR B1937+21 and PSR B2224+65, and Implications for Gravitational Wave Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolch, Timothy; Chatterjee, Shami; Cordes, James M.; Paul, Demorest; Halmrast, Daniel; Jessup, Cody; Jones, Glenn; Lam, Michael T.; Lyne, Andrew; McLaughlin, Maura; Ramette, Joshua; Stinebring, Dan; Stappers, Benjamin; Stovall, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Noise in pulsar timing residuals due to the ionized interstellar medium (IISM) is a critical limiting factor for pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) as gravitational wave detectors. PSR B1937+21 is the brightest millisecond pulsar in the northern sky and serves as a laboratory for studying uncertainties and systematic changes in pulse times-of-arrival. Its high flux, its high degree of scattering along the line-of-sight, and its giant pulses interact in a dynamic way to affect individual times-of-arrival on different timescales. Noise budget results on this pulsar are relevant to understanding the timing of other millisecond pulsars. We present data from an Arecibo Observatory campaign on PSR B1937+21 at 1.4GHz, the standard radio frequency at which the times-of-arrival of PSR B1937+21 and other PTA pulsars are routinely measured for the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav). The campaign was strategized to probe the pulsar’s noise budget, particularly with respect to the IISM from high S/N dynamic spectra that show flux distributed irregularly across the bandwidth from interstellar scintillation. Similarly, PSR B2224+65, while not a NANOGrav pulsar, is associated with the Guitar Nebula, a region with significant ISM density fluctuations. We also present data from a Green Bank Telescope monitoring campaign on PSR B2224+65 at 342MHz and 1.4GHz, which uses dispersion measure (DM) variations to constrain the influence of the IISM on the pulsar’s times-of-arrival. By utilizing the dynamic spectra, single pulse, and DM data from these campaigns, we analyze the noise budgets of these pulsars on very short and very long timescales due to the changing intervening IISM.

  5. Detecting pulsars in the Galactic Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajwade, K. M.; Lorimer, D. R.; Anderson, L. D.

    2017-10-01

    Although high-sensitivity surveys have revealed a number of highly dispersed pulsars in the inner Galaxy, none have so far been found in the Galactic Centre (GC) region, which we define to be within a projected distance of 1 pc from Sgr A*. This null result is surprising given that several independent lines of evidence predict a sizable population of neutron stars in the region. Here, we present a detailed analysis of both the canonical and millisecond pulsar populations in the GC and consider free-free absorption and multipath scattering to be the two main sources of flux density mitigation. We demonstrate that the sensitivity limits of previous surveys are not sufficient to detect GC pulsar population, and investigate the optimum observing frequency for future surveys. Depending on the degree of scattering and free-free absorption in the GC, current surveys constrain the size of the potentially observable population (i.e. those beaming towards us) to be up to 52 canonical pulsars and 10 000 millisecond pulsars. We find that the optimum frequency for future surveys is in the range of 9-13 GHz. We also predict that future deeper surveys with the Square Kilometre array will probe a significant portion of the existing radio pulsar population in the GC.

  6. Fermi pulsar revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Caraveo, Patrizia A

    2010-01-01

    2009 has been an extraordinary year for gamma-ray pulsar astronomy and 2010 promises to be equally good. Not only have we registered an extraordinary increase in the number of pulsars detected in gamma rays, but we have also witnessed the birth of new sub-families: first of all, the radio-quiet gamma pulsars and later an ever growing number of millisecond pulsars, a real surprise. We started with a sample of 7 gamma-ray emitting neutron stars (6 radio pulsars and Geminga) and now the Fermi-LAT harvest encompasses 24 "Geminga-like" new gamma-ray pulsars, a dozen millisecond pulsars and about thirty radio pulsars. Moreover, radio searches targeted to LAT unidentified sources yielded 18 new radio millisecond pulsars, several of which have been already detected also in gamma rays. Thus, currently the family of gamma-ray emitting neutron stars seems to be evenly divided between classical radio pulsars, millisecond pulsars and radio quiet neutron stars.

  7. Hard X-ray timing and spectral characteristics of the energetic pulsar PSR J0205+6449 in supernova remnant 3C58

    CERN Document Server

    Kuiper, L; Urama, J O; Hartog, P R den; Lyne, A G; Stappers, B W

    2010-01-01

    PSR J0205+6449 is a young rotation-powered pulsar in SNR 3C 58. It is one of only three young (100 MeV) $\\gamma$-rays. The other two young pulsars are the Crab and PSR B1509-58. Our aim is to derive the timing and spectral characteristics of PSR J0205+6449 over the broad X-ray band from ~0.5 to ~270 keV. We used all publicly available RXTE observations of PSR J0205+6449 to first generate accurate ephemerides over the period September 30, 2000 - March 18, 2006. Next, phase-folding procedures yielded pulse profiles using data from RXTE PCA and HEXTE, and XMM-Newton EPIC PN. While our timing solutions are consistent with earlier results, our work shows sharper structures in the PCA X-ray profile. The X-ray pulse profile consists of two sharp pulses, separated in phase by 0.488(2), which can be described with 2 asymmetric Lorentzians, each with the rising wing steeper than the trailing wing, and full-width-half-maximum 1.41(5) ms and 2.35(22) ms, respectively. We find an indication for a flux increase by a factor...

  8. Advanced X-Ray Timing Array (AXTAR) Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Randall C.; Thompson, Kevin S.

    2011-01-01

    The animation depicts NASA's concept for a next-generation Advanced X-ray Timing Mission. The models and their textures doe not necessarily represent the final iteration. Delivery specifications include launch with Taurus II or Falcon 9, mass of 2650 kg, with a circular low earth orbit at approximately 600 km. The inclination depends on the launch vehicle and spacecraft mass. AXTAR's prime instrument will probe the physics of neutron stars and black holes through X-ray timing and spectral measurements. The primary instrument will be the Large Area Timing Array (LATA). The Sky Monitor Clusters configuration consists of 27 Sky Monitor cameras th at are grouped in five clusters. This configuration will achieve approximately 85 percent all sky coverage. Spacecraft components include a science bus to house the LATA of supermodules; a spacecraft bus to house components such as propulsion tanks, avionics, and reaction wheels; solar arrays configured from space-qualified GaAs 3-junction cells; star trackers for attitude knowledge; a propulsion system of four pods, each containing one 100 lbf and two 5 lbf engines; a launch vehicle adaptor; and a radiation shield.

  9. Real-Time Calibration of the Murchison Widefield Array

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, D A; Wayth, R B; Sault, R J; Lonsdale, C J; Cappallo, R J; Morales, M F; Ord, S M

    2008-01-01

    The interferometric technique known as peeling addresses many of the challenges faced when observing with low-frequency radio arrays, and is a promising tool for the associated calibration systems. We investigate a real-time peeling implementation for next-generation radio interferometers such as the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). The MWA is being built in Australia and will observe the radio sky between 80 and 300 MHz. The data rate produced by the correlator is just over 19 GB/s (a few Peta-Bytes/day). It is impractical to store data generated at this rate, and software is currently being developed to calibrate and form images in real time. The software will run on-site on a high-throughput real-time computing cluster at several tera-flops, and a complete cycle of calibration and imaging will be completed every 8 seconds. Various properties of the implementation are investigated using simulated data. The algorithm is seen to work in the presence of strong galactic emission and with realistic ionospheric c...

  10. Millisecond Pulsars in 47 Tucanae

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, P C C; Lorimer, D R; Lyne, A G; Manchester, R N; Freire, Paulo C.; Camilo, Fernando; Lorimer, Duncan R.; Lyne, Andrew G.; Manchester, Richard N.

    1999-01-01

    Recent observations of the globular cluster 47 Tuc, made with the Parkes telescope at a wavelength of 20 cm, have resulted in the discovery of nine new millisecond pulsars, all in binary systems. The number of timing solutions available has risen from two to 14. These results will make possible a more detailed study of the cluster dynamics.

  11. Early pulsar observations with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessels, J.; Stappers, B.; Hassall, T.; Weltevrede, P.; Alexov, A.; Coenen, T.; van Leeuwen, J.; Kondratiev, V.; Mol, J.D.; Kramer, M.; Noutsos, A.; Karastergiou, A.

    2010-01-01

    This contribution to the proceedings of "A New Golden Age for Radio Astronomy" is simply intended to give some of the highlights from pulsar observations with LOFAR at the time of its official opening: June 12th, 2010. These observations illustrate that, though LOFAR is still under construction and

  12. A LOFAR census of millisecond pulsars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kondratiev, V.I.; Verbiest, J.P.W.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Bilous, A.V.; Stappers, B.W.; Kramer, M.; Keane, E.F.; Noutsos, A.; Osłowski, S.; Breton, R.P.; Hassall, T.E.; Alexov, A.; Cooper, S.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.M.; Karastergiou, A.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Pilia, M.; Sobey, C.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Weltevrede, P.; Bell, M.E.; Broderick, J.W.; Corbel, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Markoff, S.; Rowlinson, A.; Swinbank, J.D.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Wijnands, R.; Zarka, P.

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of 48 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) out of 75 observed thus far using the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) in the frequency range 110-188 MHz. We have also detected three MSPs out of nine observed in the frequency range 38-77 MHz. This is the largest sample of MSPs ever observed at

  13. A LOFAR census of millisecond pulsars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kondratiev, V.I.; Verbiest, J.P.W.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Bilous, A.V.; Stappers, B.W.; Kramer, M.; Keane, E.F.; Noutsos, A.; Osłowski, S.; Breton, R.P.; Hassall, T.E.; Alexov, A.; Cooper, S.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.M.; Karastergiou, A.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Pilia, M.; Sobey, C.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Weltevrede, P.; Bell, M.E.; Broderick, J.W.; Corbel, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Markoff, S.; Rowlinson, A.; Swinbank, J.D.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Wijnands, R.; Zarka, P.

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of 48 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) out of 75 observed thus far using the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) in the frequency range 110-188 MHz. We have also detected three MSPs out of nine observed in the frequency range 38-77 MHz. This is the largest sample of MSPs ever observed at t

  14. Towards marine seismological Network: real time small aperture seismic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinskiy, Dmitry

    2017-04-01

    Most powerful and dangerous seismic events are generated in underwater subduction zones. Existing seismological networks are based on land seismological stations. Increased demands for accuracy of location, magnitude, rupture process of coming earthquakes and at the same time reduction of data processing time require information from seabed seismic stations located near the earthquake generation area. Marine stations provide important contribution for clarification of the tectonic settings in most active subduction zones of the world. Early warning system for subduction zone area is based on marine seabed array which located near the area of most hazardous seismic zone in the region. Fast track processing for location of the earthquake hypocenter and energy takes place in buoy surface unit. Information about detected and located earthquake reaches the onshore seismological center earlier than the first break waves from the same earthquake will reach the nearest onshore seismological station. Implementation of small aperture array is based on existed and shown a good proven performance and costs effective solutions such as weather moored buoy and self-pop up autonomous seabed seismic nodes. Permanent seabed system for real-time operation has to be installed in deep sea waters far from the coast. Seabed array consists of several self-popup seismological stations which continuously acquire the data, detect the events of certain energy class and send detected event parameters to the surface buoy via acoustic link. Surface buoy unit determine the earthquake location by receiving the event parameters from seabed units and send such information in semi-real time to the onshore seismological center via narrow band satellite link. Upon the request from the cost the system could send wave form of events of certain energy class, bottom seismic station battery status and other environmental parameters. When the battery life of particular seabed unit is close to became empty

  15. Einstein@Home Discovery of 24 Pulsars in the Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Knispel, B; Kim, H; Keane, E F; Allen, B; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C; Bock, O; Crawford, F; Eggenstein, H -B; Fehrmann, H; Hammer, D; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; Machenschalk, B; Miller, R B; Papa, M A; Rastawicki, D; Sarkissian, J; Siemens, X; Stappers, B W

    2013-01-01

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of approximately 17 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein@Home, which has a sustained computing power of about one PFlop/s. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, of which 18 were isolated pulsars, and six were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM (420 pc cm^{-3}). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2531 li...

  16. Cherenkov Telescopes Results on Pulsar Wind Nebulae and Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmi, Emma De Oña

    The last few years have seen a revolution in very high γ-ray astronomy (VHE; E>100 GeV) driven largely by a new generation of Cherenkov telescopes. These new facilities, namely H.E.S.S. (High Energy Stereoscopic System), MAGIC (Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov Telescope) and its upgrade MAGIC 2, VERITAS (Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System) and CANGAROO (Collaboration of Australia and Nippon for a Gamma Ray Observatory in the Outback) were designed to increase the flux sensitivity in the energy regime of hundreds of GeV, expanding the observed energy range from 50 to multi-TeV, and fostered as a result a period of rapid growth in our understanding of the Non-ThermalUniverse. As a result of this fast development the number of pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) detected has increased from a few in the early 90's to more than two dozen of firm candidates nowadays. Also, the low energy threshold achieved allows to investigate the pulsed spectra of the high energy pulsars powering PWNe. A review of the most relevant VHE results concerning pulsars and their relativistic winds is discussed here in the context of Cherenkov telescopes.

  17. On magnetic fields of radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Nikitina, E B

    2016-01-01

    We used the magneto-dipole radiation mechanism for the braking of radio pulsars to calculate the new values of magnetic inductions at the surfaces of neutron stars. For this aim we estimated the angles ? between the rotation axis and the magnetic moment of the neutron star for 376 radio pulsars using three different methods. It was shown that there was the predominance of small inclinations of the magnetic axes. Using the obtained values of the angle ? we calculated the equatorial magnetic inductions for pulsars considered. These inductions are several times higher as a rule than corresponding values in the known catalogs.

  18. Fifty Years of Pulsar Candidate Selection: From simple filters to a new principled real-time classification approach

    CERN Document Server

    Lyon, R J; Cooper, S; Brooke, J M; Knowles, J D

    2016-01-01

    Improving survey specifications are causing an exponential rise in pulsar candidate numbers and data volumes. We study the candidate filters used to mitigate these problems during the past fifty years. We find that some existing methods such as applying constraints on the total number of candidates collected per observation, may have detrimental effects on the success of pulsar searches. Those methods immune to such effects are found to be ill-equipped to deal with the problems associated with increasing data volumes and candidate numbers, motivating the development of new approaches. We therefore present a new method designed for on-line operation. It selects promising candidates using a purpose-built tree-based machine learning classifier, the Gaussian Hellinger Very Fast Decision Tree (GH-VFDT), and a new set of features for describing candidates. The features have been chosen so as to i) maximise the separation between candidates arising from noise and those of probable astrophysical origin, and ii) be as...

  19. Real-Time Discrete SPAD Array Readout Architecture for Time of Flight PET

    CERN Document Server

    Tétrault, M -A; Boisvert, A; Thibaudeau, C; Dubois, F; Fontaine, R; Pratte, J -F

    2014-01-01

    Single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) arrays have proven themselves as serious candidates for time of flight positron emission tomography (PET). Discrete readout schemes mitigate the low-noise requirements of analog schemes and offer very fine control over threshold levels and timing pickup strategies. A high optical fill factor is paramount to timing performance in such detectors, and consequently space is limited for closely integrated electronics. Nonetheless, a production, daily used PET scanner must minimize bandwidth usage, data volume, data analysis time and power consumption and therefore requires a real-time readout and data processing architecture as close to the detector as possible. We propose a fully digital, embedded real-time readout architecture for SPAD-based detector. The readout circuit is located directly under the SPAD array instead of within or beside it to remove the fill factor versus circuit capabilities tradeoff. The overall real-time engine reduces transmitted data by a factor of 8 i...

  20. Minimum Requirements for Detecting a Stochastic Gravitational Wave Background Using Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Cordes, J M

    2011-01-01

    We assess the detectability of a nanohertz gravitational wave (GW) background with respect to additive red and white noise in the timing of millisecond pulsars. We develop detection criteria based on the cross-correlation function summed over pulsar pairs in a pulsar timing array. The distribution of correlation amplitudes is found to be non-Gaussian and highly skewed, which significantly influences detection and false-alarm probabilities. When only white noise and GWs contribute, our detection results are consistent with those found by others. Red noise, however, drastically alters the results. We discuss methods to meet the challenge of GW detection ("climbing mount significance") by distinguishing between GW-dominated and red or white-noise limited regimes. We characterize detection regimes by evaluating the number of millisecond pulsars that must be monitored in a high-cadence, 5-year timing program for a GW background spectrum $h_c(f) = A f^{-2/3}$ with $A = 10^{-15}$ yr$^{-2/3}$. Unless a sample of 20 s...

  1. A stroboscopic method for phase resolved pulsar observations

    CERN Document Server

    Vidrih, S; Carramiñana, A; Vidrih, Simon; Cadez, Andrej; Carraminana, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    We present a stroboscopic system developed for optical observations of pulsars and its application in the CLYPOS survey. The stroboscopic device is connected to a GPS clock and provides absolute timing to the stroboscopic shutter relative to the pulsar's radio ephemerides. By changing the phase we can examine the pulsar's light curve. The precisely timed stroboscope in front of the CCD camera can perform highly accurate time resolved pulsar photometry and offers the advantages of CCD cameras, which are high quantum efficiency as well as relatively large field of view, which is important for flux calibrations. CLYPOS (Cananea Ljubljana Young Pulsar Optical Survey) is an extensive search for optical counterparts of about 30 northern hemisphere radio pulsars. It is a collaboration between the INAOE, Mexico and the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics of the University of Ljubljana. Stroboscopic observations were done between December 1998 and November 2000 at the 2.12 m telescope of the Observatory Guillermo Haro ...

  2. Braking Index of Isolated Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Hamil, Oliver Q; Urbanec, Martin; Urbancova, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Isolated pulsars are rotating neutron stars with accurately measured angular velocities $\\Omega$, and their time derivatives that show unambiguously that the pulsars are slowing down. The commonly accepted view is that it arises through emission of magnetic dipole radiation (MDR) from a rotating magnetized body. The calculated energy loss by a rotating pulsar with a constant moment of inertia is assumed proportional to a model dependent power of $\\Omega$. This relation leads to the power law $\\dot{\\Omega}$ = -K $\\Omega^{\\rm n}$ where $n$ is called the braking index. The MDR model predicts $n$ exactly equal to 3. Selected observations of isolated pulsars provide rather precise values of $n$, individually accurate to a few percent or better, in the range 1$ <$ n $ < $ 2.8, which is consistently less than the predictions of the MDR model. In spite of an extensive investigation of various modifications of the MDR model, no satisfactory explanation of observation has been found yet. The aim of this work is t...

  3. Post-Keplerian perturbations of the orbital time shift in binary pulsars: an analytical formulation with applications to the galactic center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2017-07-01

    We develop a general approach to analytically calculate the perturbations Δ δ τ _ {p} of the orbital component of the change δ τ _ {p} of the times of arrival of the pulses emitted by a binary pulsar p induced by the post-Keplerian accelerations due to the mass quadrupole Q_2, and the post-Newtonian gravitoelectric (GE) and Lense-Thirring (LT) fields. We apply our results to the so-far still hypothetical scenario involving a pulsar orbiting the supermassive black hole in the galactic center at Sgr A^*. We also evaluate the gravitomagnetic and quadrupolar Shapiro-like propagation delays δ τ _ {prop}. By assuming the orbit of the existing main sequence star S2 and a time span as long as its orbital period P_b, we obtain | Δ δ τ _ {p}^ {GE}| ≲ 10^3 {s}, | Δ δ τ _ {p}^ {LT}| ≲ 0.6 {s},| Δ δ τ _ {p}^{Q_2}| ≲ 0.04 {s}. Faster ( P_b= 5 {years}) and more eccentric ( e=0.97) orbits would imply net shifts per revolution as large as | < Δ δ τ _ {p}^ {GE}\\rangle | ≲ 10 {Ms}, | < Δ δ τ _ {p}^ {LT}\\rangle | ≲ 400 {s},| < Δ δ τ _ {p}^{Q_2}\\rangle | ≲ 10^3 {s}, depending on the other orbital parameters and the initial epoch. For the propagation delays, we have | δ τ _ {prop}^ {LT}| ≲ 0.02 {s}, | δ τ _ {prop}^{Q_2}| ≲ 1 μs. The results for the mass quadrupole and the Lense-Thirring field depend, among other things, on the spatial orientation of the spin axis of the Black Hole. The expected precision in pulsar timing in Sgr A^* is of the order of 100 μs, or, perhaps, even 1-10 μs. Our method is, in principle, neither limited just to some particular orbital configuration nor to the dynamical effects considered in the present study.

  4. Photon-Counting Arrays for Time-Resolved Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Michel Antolovic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a camera comprising 512 × 128 pixels capable of single-photon detection and gating with a maximum frame rate of 156 kfps. The photon capture is performed through a gated single-photon avalanche diode that generates a digital pulse upon photon detection and through a digital one-bit counter. Gray levels are obtained through multiple counting and accumulation, while time-resolved imaging is achieved through a 4-ns gating window controlled with subnanosecond accuracy by a field-programmable gate array. The sensor, which is equipped with microlenses to enhance its effective fill factor, was electro-optically characterized in terms of sensitivity and uniformity. Several examples of capture of fast events are shown to demonstrate the suitability of the approach.

  5. 基于卡尔曼滤波的脉冲星计时研究%Research of Pulsars-Based Timing by Using Kalman Filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙守明; 郑伟; 汤国建; 李满

    2009-01-01

    Pulsar is a neutron star with stable and short rotation period, which is free from the risk of being destroyed by human, so it can be used as the absolute timing criterion. In this paper, a new pulsar-based timing method which adopts the Kalman Filter is proposed. Taking the sun-geosynchronous orbit for example, the clock control by using Kalman Filter and the effect of position errors and the measurement accuracy of time-of-arrival (TOA) of pulses on timing accuracy are simulated. The results show that the clock error could be corrected and controlled in this method and the precision problem is well solved when the space vehicle is equipped with the common clock.%脉冲星是高速自转的中子星,其自转周期稳定,不受人为干扰破坏,可作为绝对时间的参考量.论文提出一种基于卡尔曼滤波算法的脉冲星授时方法,以太阳某同步轨道为例,对基于卡尔曼滤波的钟差控制以及脉冲星星表误差和脉冲到达时间(TOA)测量精度对授时精度的影响进行了仿真分析.结果表明,该方法可以有效消除星载时钟钟差并抑制其随时间的增加,解决了航天器搭载低成本时钟精度不能满足要求的问题.

  6. "Missing Link" Revealing Fast-Spinning Pulsar Mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Astronomers have discovered a unique double-star system that represents a "missing link" stage in what they believe is the birth process of the most rapidly-spinning stars in the Universe -- millisecond pulsars. "We've thought for some time that we knew how these pulsars get 'spun up' to rotate so swiftly, and this system looks like it's showing us the process in action," said Anne Archibald, of McGill University in Montreal, Canada. Pulsar and Companion Neutron star with accretion disk (left) drawing material from companion star (right). CREDIT:Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Animations of this system and its evolution. Pulsars are superdense neutron stars, the remnants left after massive stars have exploded as supernovae. Their powerful magnetic fields generate lighthouse-like beams of light and radio waves that sweep around as the star rotates. Most rotate a few to tens of times a second, slowing down over thousands of years. However, some, dubbed millisecond pulsars, rotate hundreds of times a second. Astronomers believe the fast rotation is caused by a companion star dumping material onto the neutron star and spinning it up. The material from the companion would form a flat, spinning disk around the neutron star, and during this period, the radio waves characteristic of a pulsar would not be seen coming from the system. As the amount of matter falling onto the neutron star decreased and stopped, the radio waves could emerge, and the object would be recognized as a pulsar. This sequence of events is apparently what happened with a binary-star system some 4000 light-years from Earth. The millisecond pulsar in this system, called J1023, was discovered by the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia in 2007 in a survey led by astronomers at West Virginia University and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The astronomers then found that the object had been detected by NSF's Very Large Array (VLA) radio

  7. Exploring Radio Pulsars With New Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torne, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    scientific exploitation of the these four telescopes, I investigated technical aspects of two next-generation radio receivers planned for the the Effelsberg 100-m: the new Ultra-Broad-Band receiver (UBB), and the future Phased Array Feed (PAF). The tests for the UBB included the investigation of its optimum focusing set-up and its frequency-dependent system noise. We found the optimum focus to be that which optimized the gain at the highest frequencies of its operating band. We have also shown that the sensitivity of the UBB was significantly lower when the receiver is installed at the telescope (by a factor 3) in comparison to measurements taken in the laboratory. Our investigation points to strong Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) as the cause of this sensitivity deficit. I also designed and carried out the first scientific experiment with the UBB during its commissioning: a search for pulsars in detected gamma-ray sources with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) with no associated counterparts. No new radio pulsars were discovered in this survey, but the data analysis demonstrated that large parts of the observing frequency range ( 50-80 per cent) were unusable due to persistent RFI. We also showed that the strong RFI in the local environment made the receiver enter often into saturation. For the PAF, our tests at Effelsberg on a sample element of the future Checkerboard PAF MkII array confirmed that the front-end should be able to operate at Effelsberg without a persistent saturation by RFI. Overall, the results confirm that these new receivers can be used in electromagnetically-polluted areas, but require careful designs of the electronics in order to strongly suppress those frequency ranges particularly polluted by man-made radio signals.

  8. A Large Glitch in the Crab Pulsar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using a new pulsar timing system at the 25-m radio telescope of Urumqi Astronomical Observatory, we have detected a large glitch in the Crab pulsar which occurred in 2000 July. The size of the gfitch is Av/v ~ 2.4 × 10-8, with a rela tive increment in frequency derivative Av/v ~ 5 × 10-3. The observing system is introduced and the observed properties of the glitch are discussed.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ATNF Pulsar Catalogue (Manchester+, 2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, R. N.; Hobbs, G. B.; Teoh, A.; Hobbs, M.

    2016-05-01

    The catalogue is a compilation of the principal observed parameters of pulsars, including positions, timing parameters, pulse widths, flux densities, proper motions, distances, and dispersion, rotation, and scattering measures. It also lists the orbital elements of binary pulsars, and some commonly used parameters derived from the basic measurements. The catalogue includes all published rotation-powered pulsars, including those detected only at high energies. It also includes Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters (SGRs) for which coherent pulsations have been detected. However, it excludes accretion-powered pulsars such as Her X-1 and the recently discovered X-ray millisecond pulsars. (2 data files).

  10. PEACE: pulsar evaluation algorithm for candidate extraction - a software package for post-analysis processing of pulsar survey candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. J.; Stovall, K.; Jenet, F. A.; Martinez, J.; Dartez, L. P.; Mata, A.; Lunsford, G.; Cohen, S.; Biwer, C. M.; Rohr, M.; Flanigan, J.; Walker, A.; Banaszak, S.; Allen, B.; Barr, E. D.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Desvignes, G.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kaspi, V. M.; Knispel, B.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Lyne, A.; McLaughlin, M.; Ransom, S.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L.; Stairs, I.; Tan, M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2013-07-01

    Modern radio pulsar surveys produce a large volume of prospective candidates, the majority of which are polluted by human-created radio frequency interference or other forms of noise. Typically, large numbers of candidates need to be visually inspected in order to determine if they are real pulsars. This process can be labour intensive. In this paper, we introduce an algorithm called Pulsar Evaluation Algorithm for Candidate Extraction (PEACE) which improves the efficiency of identifying pulsar signals. The algorithm ranks the candidates based on a score function. Unlike popular machine-learning-based algorithms, no prior training data sets are required. This algorithm has been applied to data from several large-scale radio pulsar surveys. Using the human-based ranking results generated by students in the Arecibo Remote Command Center programme, the statistical performance of PEACE was evaluated. It was found that PEACE ranked 68 per cent of the student-identified pulsars within the top 0.17 per cent of sorted candidates, 95 per cent within the top 0.34 per cent and 100 per cent within the top 3.7 per cent. This clearly demonstrates that PEACE significantly increases the pulsar identification rate by a factor of about 50 to 1000. To date, PEACE has been directly responsible for the discovery of 47 new pulsars, 5 of which are millisecond pulsars that may be useful for pulsar timing based gravitational-wave detection projects.

  11. Astronomers Discover Fastest-Spinning Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope have discovered the fastest-spinning neutron star ever found, a 20-mile-diameter superdense pulsar whirling faster than the blades of a kitchen blender. Their work yields important new information about the nature of one of the most exotic forms of matter known in the Universe. Pulsar Graphic Pulsars Are Spinning Neutron Stars CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) "We believe that the matter in neutron stars is denser than an atomic nucleus, but it is unclear by how much. Our observations of such a rapidly rotating star set a hard upper limit on its size, and hence on how dense the star can be.," said Jason Hessels, a graduate student at McGill University in Montreal. Hessels and his colleagues presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Washington, DC. Pulsars are spinning neutron stars that sling "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is left after a massive star explodes at the end of its "normal" life. With no nuclear fuel left to produce energy to offset the stellar remnant's weight, its material is compressed to extreme densities. The pressure squeezes together most of its protons and electrons to form neutrons; hence, the name "neutron star." "Neutron stars are incredible laboratories for learning about the physics of the fundamental particles of nature, and this pulsar has given us an important new limit," explained Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and one of Hessels' collaborators on this work. The scientists discovered the pulsar, named PSR J1748-2446ad, in a globular cluster of stars called Terzan 5, located some 28,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius. The newly-discovered pulsar is spinning 716 times per second, or at 716 Hertz (Hz), readily beating the previous record of 642 Hz from a pulsar

  12. Birth and Evolution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Faucher-Giguere, C A

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the birth and evolution of Galactic isolated radio pulsars. We begin by estimating their birth space velocity distribution from proper motion measurements of Brisken et al. (2002, 2003). We find no evidence for multimodality of the distribution and favor one in which the absolute one-dimensional velocity components are exponentially distributed and with a three-dimensional mean velocity of 380^{+40}_{-60} km s^-1. We then proceed with a Monte Carlo-based population synthesis, modelling the birth properties of the pulsars, their time evolution, and their detection in the Parkes and Swinburne Multibeam surveys. We present a population model that appears generally consistent with the observations. Our results suggest that pulsars are born in the spiral arms, with a Galactocentric radial distribution that is well described by the functional form proposed by Yusifov & Kucuk (2004), in which the pulsar surface density peaks at radius ~3 kpc. The birth spin period distribution extends to several h...

  13. Observations of Binary and Millisecond Pulsars at Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jingbo Wang; Na Wang; Jianping Yuan; Zhiyong Liu

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of radio timing observations of binary and millisecond pulsars in China. We have timed four binary pulsars for 9 years, using Nanshan 25-m radio telescope. The long time span has enabled us to determine their rotation and orbital parameters.

  14. ON DETECTING MILLISECOND PULSARS AT THE GALACTIC CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macquart, Jean-Pierre [ICRAR/Curtin University, Curtin Institute of Radio Astronomy, Perth WA 6845 (Australia); Kanekar, Nissim, E-mail: J.Macquart@curtin.edu.au [Swarnajayanti Fellow, National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Ganeshkhind, Pune-411007 (India)

    2015-06-01

    The lack of detected pulsars at the Galactic Center (GC) region is a long-standing mystery. We argue that the high stellar density in the central parsec around the GC is likely to result in a pulsar population dominated by millisecond pulsars (MSPs), similar to the situation in globular cluster environments. Earlier GC pulsar searches have been largely insensitive to such an MSP population, accounting for the lack of pulsar detections. We estimate the best search frequency for such an MSP population with present and upcoming broad-band radio telescopes for two possible scattering scenarios, the “weak-scattering” case suggested by the recent detection of a magnetar close to the GC, and the “strong-scattering” case, with the scattering screen located close to the GC. The optimal search frequencies are ≈8 GHz (weak-scattering) and ≈25 GHz (strong-scattering), for pulsars with periods 1–20 ms, assuming that GC pulsars have a luminosity distribution similar to that those in the rest of the Milky Way. We find that 10–30 hr integrations with the Very Large Array and the Green Bank Telescope would be sufficient to detect MSPs at the GC distance in the weak-scattering case. However, if the strong-scattering case is indeed applicable to the GC, observations with the full Square Kilometre Array would be needed to detect the putative MSP population.

  15. High magnetic field pulsars and magnetars a unified picture

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B; Zhang, Bing; Harding, Alice K.

    2000-01-01

    We propose a unified picture of high magnetic field radio pulsars and magnetars by arguing that they are all rotating high-field neutron stars, but have different orientations of their magnetic axes with respective to their rotation axes. In strong magnetic fields where photon splitting suppresses pair creation near the surface, the high-field pulsars can have active inner accelerators while the anomalous X-ray pulsars cannot. This can account for the very different observed emission characteristics of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 2259+586 and the high field radio pulsar PSR J1814-1744. A predicted consequence of this picture is that radio pulsars having surface magnetic field greater than about $2\\times 10^{14}$ G should not exist.

  16. A Study of Multi-frequency Polarization Pulse Profiles of Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, S; Manchester, R N; Kerr, M; Shannon, R M; van Straten, W; Mata, A; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Coles, W A; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Levin, Y; Oslowski, S; Reardon, D; Ravi, V; Sarkissian, J M; Tiburzi, C; Toomey, L; Wang, H G; Wang, J -B; Wen, L; Xu, R X; Yan, W M; Zhu, X -J

    2015-01-01

    We present high signal-to-noise ratio, multi-frequency polarization pulse profiles for 24 millisecond pulsars that are being observed as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project. The pulsars are observed in three bands, centred close to 730, 1400 and 3100 MHz, using a dual-band 10 cm/50 cm receiver and the central beam of the 20 cm multibeam receiver. Observations spanning approximately six years have been carefully calibrated and summed to produce high S/N profiles. This allows us to study the individual profile components and in particular how they evolve with frequency. We also identify previously undetected profile features. For many pulsars we show that pulsed emission extends across almost the entire pulse profile. The pulse component widths and component separations follow a complex evolution with frequency; in some cases these parameters increase and in other cases they decrease with increasing frequency. The evolution with frequency of the polarization properties of the profile is also n...

  17. Multiple oligo nucleotide arrays: Methods to reduce manufacture time and cost

    CERN Document Server

    Ning, Kang

    2010-01-01

    The customized multiple arrays are becoming vastly used in microarray experiments for varies purposes, mainly for its ability to handle a large quantity of data and output high quality results. However, experimenters who use customized multiple arrays still face many problems, such as the cost and time to manufacture the masks, and the cost for production of the multiple arrays by costly machines. Although there is some research on the multiple arrays, there is little concern on the manufacture time and cost, which is actually important to experimenters. In this paper, we have proposed methods to reduce the time and cost for the manufacture of the customized multiple arrays. We have first introduced a heuristic algorithm for the mask decomposition problem for multiple arrays. Then a streamline method is proposed for the integration of different steps of manufacture on a higher level. Experiments show that our methods are very effective in reduction of the time and cost of manufacture of multiple arrays.

  18. Probing Pulsar Emission on Short Timescales: Rotating Radio Transients, Cyclic Spectroscopy, and Single-Pulse Studies of Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palliyaguru, Nipuni Tharaka

    Rotating radio transients (RRATs) are neutron stars are that characterized by the emission of strong sporadic bursts. We have analysed the long- and short-term time dependence of the pulse arrival times and the pulse detection rates for eight RRAT sources from the Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey (PMPS). We find significant periodicities in the individual pulse arrival times from six RRATs. These periodicities range from ˜30 minutes to 2100 days and from one to 16 independent (i.e. non-harmonically related) periodicities are detected for each RRAT. In addition, we find that pulse emission is a random process on short (hour-long) time scales but that most of the objects exhibit longer term (months-years) non-random behaviour. We find that PSRs J1819--1458 and J1317--5759 emit more doublets (two consecutive pulses) and triplets (three consecutive pulses) than is expected in random pulse distributions. No evidence for such an excess is found for the other RRATs. There are several different models for RRAT emission depending on both extrinsic and intrinsic factors which are consistent with these properties. Light travel time changes due to gravitational waves may be detected within the next decade through precision timing of an array of millisecond pulsars. Removal of frequency-dependent interstellar medium (ISM) delays due to dispersion and scattering is a key issue in the detection process. Current timing algorithms routinely correct pulse times of arrival (TOAs) for time-variable delays due to cold plasma dispersion. However, none of the major pulsar timing groups routinely correct for delays due to scattering from multi-path propagation in the ISM. Scattering introduces a phase change in the signal that results in pulse broadening and arrival time delays. As a step toward a more comprehensive ISM propagation delay correction, we demonstrate through a simulation that we can accurately recover pulse broadening functions (PBFs), such as those that would be introduced

  19. A Pulsar and a Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Recent, unusual X-ray observations from our galactic neighbor, the Small Magellanic Cloud, have led to an interesting model for SXP 214, a pulsar in a binary star system.Artists illustration of the magnetic field lines of a pulsar, a highly magnetized, rotating neutron star. [NASA]An Intriguing BinaryAn X-ray pulsar is a magnetized, rotating neutron star in a binary system with a stellar companion. Material is fed from the companion onto the neutron star, channeled by the objects magnetic fields onto a hotspot thats millions of degrees. This hotspot rotating past our line of sight is what produces the pulsations that we observe from X-ray pulsars.Located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SXP 214 is a transient X-ray pulsar in a binary with a Be-type star. This star is spinning so quickly that material is thrown off of it to form a circumstellar disk.Recently, a team of authors led by JaeSub Hong (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) have presented new Chandra X-ray observations of SXP 214, tracking it for 50 ks (~14 hours) in January 2013. These observations reveal some very unexpected behavior for this pulsar.X-ray PuzzleThe energy distribution of the X-ray emission from SXP 214 over time. Dark shades or blue colors indicate high counts, and light shades or yellow colors indicate low counts. Lower-energy X-ray emission appeared only later, after about 20 ks. [Hong et al. 2016]Three interesting pieces of information came from the Chandra observations:SXP 214s rotation period was measured to be 211.5 s an increase in the spin rate since the discovery measurement of a 214-second period. Pulsars usually spin down as they lose angular momentum over time so what caused this one to spin up?Its overall X-ray luminosity steadily increased over the 50 ks of observations.Its spectrum became gradually softer (lower energy) over time; in the first 20 ks, the spectrum only consisted of hard X-ray photons above 3 keV, but after 20 ks, softer X-ray photons below 2 ke

  20. A pilot ASKAP survey of radio transient events in the region around the intermittent pulsar PSR J1107-5907

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, G; Bell, M E; Kerr, M; Rowlinson, A; Johnston, S; Shannon, R M; Voronkov, M A; Ward, C; Banyer, J; Hancock, P J; Murphy, Tara; Allison, J R; Amy, S W; Ball, L; Bannister, K; Bock, D C -J; Brodrick, D; Brothers, M; Brown, A J; Bunton, J D; Chapman, J; Chippendale, A P; Chung, Y; DeBoer, D; Diamond, P; Edwards, P G; Ekers, R; Ferris, R H; Forsyth, R; Gough, R; Grancea, A; Gupta, N; Harvey-Smith, L; Hay, S; Hayman, D B; Hotan, A W; Hoyle, S; Humphreys, B; Indermuehle, B; Jacka, C E; Jackson, C A; Jackson, S; Jeganathan, K; Joseph, J; Kendall, R; Kiraly, D; Koribalski, B; Leach, M; Lenc, E; MacLeod, A; Mader, S; Marquarding, M; Marvil, J; McClure-Griffiths, N; McConnell, D; Mirtschin, P; Neuhold, S; Ng, A; Norris, R P; O'Sullivan, J; Pearce, S; Phillips, C J; Popping, A; Qiao, R Y; Reynolds, J E; Roberts, P; Sault, R J; Schinckel, A E T; Serra, P; Shaw, R; Shimwell, T W; Storey, M; Sweetnam, A W; Tzioumis, A; Westmeier, T; Whiting, M; Wilson, C D

    2015-01-01

    We use observations from the Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope to search for transient radio sources in the field around the intermittent pulsar PSR J1107-5907. The pulsar is thought to switch between an "off" state in which no emission is detectable, a weak state and a strong state. We ran three independent transient detection pipelines on two-minute snapshot images from a 13 hour BETA observation in order to 1) study the emission from the pulsar, 2) search for other transient emission from elsewhere in the image and 3) to compare the results from the different transient detection pipelines. The pulsar was easily detected as a transient source and, over the course of the observations, it switched into the strong state three times giving a typical timescale between the strong emission states of 3.7 hours. After the first switch it remained in the strong state for almost 40 minutes. The other strong states lasted less than 4 minutes. Th...

  1. Observing peculiar γ-ray pulsars with AGILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilia, M.; Pellizzoni, A.

    2011-08-01

    The AGILE γ-ray satellite provides large sky exposure levels (>=109 cm2 s per year on the Galactic Plane) with sensitivity peaking at E ~100 MeV where the bulk of pulsar energy output is typically released. Its ~1 μs absolute time tagging capability makes it perfectly suited for the study of γ-ray pulsars. AGILE collected a large number of γ-ray photons from EGRET pulsars (>=40,000 pulsed counts for Vela) in two years of observations unveiling new interesting features at sub-millisecond level in the pulsars' high-energy light-curves, γ-ray emission from pulsar glitches and Pulsar Wind Nebulae. AGILE detected about 20 nearby and energetic pulsars with good confidence through timing and/or spatial analysis. Among the newcomers we find pulsars with very high rotational energy losses, such as the remarkable PSR B1509-58 with a magnetic field in excess of 1013 Gauss, and PSR J2229+6114 providing a reliable identification for the previously unidentified EGRET source 3EG2227+6122. Moreover, the powerful millisecond pulsar B1821-24, in the globular cluster M28, is detected during a fraction of the observations.

  2. Detection of 107 glitches in 36 southern pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, M; Hobbs, G; Johnston, S; Kaspi, V M; Keith, M; Lyne, A G; Qiao, G J; Ravi, V; Sarkissian, J M; Shannon, R; Xu, R X

    2012-01-01

    Timing observations from the Parkes 64-m radio telescope for 165 pulsars between 1990 and 2011 have been searched for period glitches. A total of 107 glitches were identified in 36 pulsars, where 61 have previously been reported and 46 are new discoveries. Glitch parameters were measured by fitting the timing residual data. Observed relative glitch sizes \\Delta\

  3. Rad Hard Imaging Array with Picosecond Timing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For a wide range of remote sensing applications, there is a critical need to develop imaging arrays that simultaneously achieve high spatial resolution, high...

  4. MULTIWAVELENGTH CONSTRAINTS ON PULSAR POPULATIONS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, R. S.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Deneva, J. S. [Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (Puerto Rico); Lazio, T. J. W., E-mail: rwharton@astro.cornell.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, M/S 138-308, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-07-10

    The detection of radio pulsars within the central few parsecs of the Galaxy would provide a unique probe of the gravitational and magneto-ionic environments in the Galactic center (GC) and, if close enough to Sgr A*, precise tests of general relativity in the strong-field regime. While it is difficult to find pulsars at radio wavelengths because of interstellar scattering, the payoff from detailed timing of pulsars in the GC warrants a concerted effort. To motivate pulsar surveys and help define search parameters for them, we constrain the pulsar number and spatial distribution using a wide range of multiwavelength measurements. These include the five known radio pulsars within 15' of Sgr A*, non-detections in high-frequency pulsar surveys of the central parsec, radio and gamma-ray measurements of diffuse emission, a catalog of radio point sources from an imaging survey, infrared observations of massive star populations in the central few parsecs, candidate pulsar wind nebulae in the inner 20 pc, and estimates of the core-collapse supernova rate based on X-ray measurements. We find that under current observational constraints, the inner parsec of the Galaxy could harbor as many as {approx}10{sup 3} active radio pulsars that are beamed toward Earth. Such a large population would distort the low-frequency measurements of both the intrinsic spectrum of Sgr A* and the free-free absorption along the line of sight of Sgr A*.

  5. What brakes the Crab pulsar?

    CERN Document Server

    Čadež, A; Barbieri, C; Calvani, M; Naletto, G; Barbieri, M; Ponikvar, D

    2015-01-01

    Optical observations provide convincing evidence that the optical phase of the Crab pulsar follows the radio one closely. Since optical data do not depend on dispersion measure variations, they provide a robust and independent confirmation of the radio timing solution. The aim of this paper is to find a global mathematical description of Crab pulsar's phase as a function of time for the complete set of published Jodrell Bank radio ephemerides (JBE) in the period 1988-2014. We apply the mathematical techniques developed for analyzing optical observations to the analysis of JBE. We break the whole period into a series of episodes and express the phase of the pulsar in each episode as the sum of two analytical functions. The first function is the best-fitting local braking index law, and the second function represents small residuals from this law with an amplitude of only a few turns, which rapidly relaxes to the local braking index law. From our analysis, we demonstrate that the power law index undergoes "inst...

  6. Application of X-Ray Pulsar Navigation: A Characterization of the Earth Orbit Trade Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wayne Hong

    2016-01-01

    The potential for pulsars as a navigation source has been studied since their discovery in 1967. X-ray pulsar navigation (XNAV) is a celestial navigation system that uses the consistent timing nature of x-ray photons from millisecond pulsars (MSP) to perform space navigation. By comparing the detected arrival of x-ray photons to a reference database of expected pulsar light-curve timing models, one can infer a range and range rate measurement based on light time delay. Much of the challenge of XNAV comes from the faint signal, availability, and distant nature of pulsars. This is a study of potential pulsar XNAV measurements to measure extended Kalman filter (EKF) tracking performance with a wide trade space of bounded Earth orbits, using a simulation of existing x-ray detector space hardware. An example of an x-ray detector for XNAV is the NASA Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation (SEXTANT) mission, a technology demonstration of XNAV set to perform on the International Space Station (ISS) in late 2016early 2017. XNAV hardware implementation is driven by trajectory and environmental influences which add noise to the x-ray pulse signal. In a closed Earth orbit, the radiation environment can exponentially increase the signal noise from x-ray pulsar sources, decreasing the quality and frequency of measurements. The SEXTANT mission in particular improves on the signal to noise ratio by focusing an array of 56 x-ray silicon drift detectors at one pulsar target at a time. This reduces timing glitches and other timing noise contributions from ambient x-ray sources to within a 100 nanosecond resolution. This study also considers the SEXTANT scheduling challenges inherent in a single target observation. Finally, as the navigation sources are now relatively inertial targets, XNAV measurements are also subject to periods of occultation from various celestial bodies. This study focuses on the characterization of these drivers in closed Earth orbits and is not a

  7. A decade of timing an accretion-powered millisecond pulsar: The continuing spin down and orbital evolution of SAX J1808.4-3658

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, J M; Chakraborty, D; Markwardt, C B; Morgan, E H; Van der Klis, M; Wijnands, R

    2009-01-01

    The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer has observed five outbursts from the transient 2.5 ms accretion-powered pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 during 1998-2008. We present a pulse timing study of the most recent outburst and compare it with the previous timing solutions. The spin frequency of the source continues to decrease at a rate of (-5.5+/-1.2)x10^-18 Hz/s, which is consistent with the previously determined spin derivative. The spin-down occurs mostly during quiescence, and it is most likely due to the magnetic dipole torque from a B = 1.5x10^8 G dipolar field at the neutron star surface. We also find that the 2 hr binary orbital period is increasing at a rate of (3.80+/-0.06)x10^-12 s/s, also consistent with previous measurements. It remains uncertain whether this orbital change reflects secular evolution or short-term variability.

  8. Cochlear implantation with Pulsar Med El: a novel small incision technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuda, D

    2009-04-01

    Although still widely implanted, Pulsar Med-El is rarely considered for small incision approach. Overall, 30 teen-age and adult patients were operated upon with a novel small incision (4-5 cm). Full insertion of the electrode array was achieved in all cases. No major intra-operative complications occurred. At follow-up, no flap-related complications and no migration of the receiver-stimulator were observed in the "device suture" (14 patients) or "no device suture" groups (16 patients). All patients are full-time users of the device. In conclusion, a small incision for the Pulsar Med-El cochlear implant is feasible, safe and reproducible. Ligature fixation of the device is not critical with this operation. Also with this device, in adult and teen-age patients, it is, therefore, possible to retain several typical advantages of small incision approaches.

  9. Geminga's puzzling pulsar wind nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Posselt, B; Slane, P O; Romani, R; Bucciantini, N; Bykov, A M; Kargaltsev, O; Weisskopf, M C; Ng, C -Y

    2016-01-01

    We report on six new Chandra observations of the Geminga pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The PWN consists of three distinct elongated structures - two $\\approx 0.2 d_{250}$ pc long lateral tails and a segmented axial tail of $\\approx 0.05 d_{250}$ pc length, where $d_{250}=d/(250 {\\rm pc})$. The photon indices of the power law spectra of the lateral tails, $\\Gamma \\approx 1$, are significantly harder than those of the pulsar ($\\Gamma \\approx 1.5$) and the axial tail ($\\Gamma \\approx 1.6$). There is no significant diffuse X-ray emission between the lateral tails -- the ratio of the X-ray surface brightness between the south tail and this sky area is at least 12. The lateral tails apparently connect directly to the pulsar and show indication of moving footpoints. The axial tail comprises time-variable emission blobs. However, there is no evidence for constant or decelerated outward motion of these blobs. Different physical models are consistent with the observed morphology and spectra of the Geminga PWN. In one scena...

  10. The KaVA and KVN Pulsar Project

    CERN Document Server

    Dodson, Richard; Sohn, Bongwon; Rioja, Mar\\'\\ia J; Jung, Taehyun; Seymour, Andrew; Raja, Wasim

    2014-01-01

    We present our work towards using the Korean VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometer) Network (KVN) and VLBI Exploration of Radio Astronomy (VERA) arrays combined into the KVN and VERA Array (KaVA) for observations of radio pulsars at high frequencies ($\\simeq$22-GHz). Pulsar astronomy is generally focused at frequencies approximately 0.3 to several GHz and pulsars are usually discovered and monitored with large, single-dish, radio telescopes. For most pulsars, reduced radio flux is expected at high frequencies due to their steep spectrum, but there are exceptions where high frequency observations can be useful. Moreover, some pulsars are observable at high frequencies only, such as those close to the Galactic Center. The discoveries of a radio-bright magnetar and a few dozen extended Chandra sources within 15 arc-minute of the Galactic Center provide strong motivations to make use of the KaVA frequency band for searching pulsars in this region. Here, we describe the science targets and report progresses made...

  11. Wide Band Artificial Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Zackary

    2017-01-01

    The Wide Band Artificial Pulsar (WBAP) is an instrument verification device designed and built by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virgina. The site currently operates the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument (GUPPI) and the Versatile Green Bank Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) digital backends for their radio telescopes. The commissioning and continued support for these sophisticated backends has demonstrated a need for a device capable of producing an accurate artificial pulsar signal. The WBAP is designed to provide a very close approximation to an actual pulsar signal. This presentation is intended to provide an overview of the current hardware and software implementations and to also share the current results from testing using the WBAP.

  12. Pulsars and Extreme Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell-Burnell, Jocelyn

    2004-10-01

    Pulsars were discovered 35 years ago. What do we know about them now, and what have they taught us about the extremes of physics? With an average density comparable to that of the nucleus, magnetic fields around 108 T and speeds close to c these objects have stretched our understanding of the behaviour of matter. They serve as extrememly accurate clocks with which to carry out precision experiments in relativity. Created in cataclysmic explosions, pulsars are a (stellar) form of life after death. After half a billion revolutions most pulsars finally die, but amazingly some are born again to yet another, even weirder, afterlife. Pulsar research continues lively, delivering exciting, startling and almost unbelievable results!

  13. Searches for Radio Pulsars & Fast Transients and Multiwavelength Studies of Single-pulse Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaliger, Mitchell B.

    Pulsars are excellent tools for studying a wide array of astrophysical phenomena (e.g. gravitational waves, the interstellar medium, general relativity), yet they are still not fully understood. What are their emission processes and how do they change at different energies? How is giant pulse emission different from regular emission? How are different classes of pulsars (RRATs, magnetars, nulling pulsars, etc.) related? Answering these questions will not only help us to understand pulsars in general, but will also help improve techniques for pulsar searches and timing, gravitational wave searches, and single-pulse searches. The work we present here aims to answer these questions through studies of giant pulse emission, the discovery of new pulsars, and single-pulse studies of a large population of pulsars and RRATs. We took advantage of open telescope time on the 43-m telescope in Green Bank, WV to conduct a long-term study of giant pulses from the Crab pulsar at 1.2 GHz and 330 MHz. Over a timespan of 15 months, we collected a total of 95000 giant pulses which we correlated with both gamma-ray photons from the Fermi satellite and giant pulses collected at 8.9 GHz. Statistics of these pulses show that their amplitudes follow power-law distributions, with indices in the range of 2.1 to 3.1. The correlation with giant pulses at 8.9 GHz showed that the emission processes at 1.2 GHz and 8.9 GHz are related, despite significant profile differences. The correlation with Fermi gamma-ray photons was to test if increased pair production in the magnetosphere was the cause of giant pulses. Our findings suggest that, while it may play a role, increased pair production is not the dominant cause of giant pulses. As part of a single-pulse study, we reprocessed the archival Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey, discovering six previously unknown pulsars. PSR J0922-52 has a period of 9.68 ms and a DM of 122.4 pc cm-3. PSR J1147-66 has a period of 3.72 ms and a DM of 133.8 pc cm-3. PSR J

  14. Eclipsing Binary Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, P C C

    2004-01-01

    The first eclipsing binary pulsar, PSR B1957+20, was discovered in 1987. Since then, 13 other eclipsing low-mass binary pulsars have been found, 12 of these are in globular clusters. In this paper we list the known eclipsing binary pulsars and their properties, with special attention to the eclipsing systems in 47 Tuc. We find that there are two fundamentally different groups of eclipsing binary pulsars; separated by their companion masses. The less massive systems (M_c ~ 0.02 M_sun) are a product of predictable stellar evolution in binary pulsars. The systems with more massive companions (M_c ~ 0.2 M_sun) were formed by exchange encounters in globular clusters, and for that reason are exclusive to those environments. This class of systems can be used to learn about the neutron star recycling fraction in the globular clusters actively forming pulsars. We suggest that most of these binary systems are undetectable at radio wavelengths.

  15. Revised Pulsar Spindown

    CERN Document Server

    Contopoulos, I; Contopoulos, Ioannis; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2005-01-01

    We address the issue of electromagnetic pulsar spindown by combining our experience from the two limiting idealized cases which have been studied in great extent in the past: that of an aligned rotator where ideal MHD conditions apply, and that of a misaligned rotator in vacuum. We construct a spindown formula that takes into account the misalignment of the magnetic and rotation axes, and the magnetospheric particle acceleration gaps. We show that near the death line aligned rotators spin down much slower than orthogonal ones. In order to test this approach, we use a simple Monte Carlo method to simulate the evolution of pulsars and find a good fit to the observed pulsar distribution in the P-Pdot diagram without invoking magnetic field decay. Our model may also account for individual pulsars spinning down with braking index n 3, and that the older pulsar population has preferentially smaller magnetic inclination angles. We discuss possible signatures of such alignment in the existing pulsar data.

  16. The Double Pulsar System J0737-3039

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorimer, D. R.

    The double pulsar system J0737 - 3039 - a 22.7 ms pulsar in a compact 2.4 hr orbit about a 2.7 s pulsar was one of the long-awaited "holy grails" of pulsar astronomy. After only two years of timing, the system is close to surpassing the original Hulse-Taylor binary as a test of general relativity. On-going timing should soon reveal second-order effects in the post-Newtonian parameters. In addition, the observed interactions of the radio beams of the two pulsars provide a unique laboratory for probing neutron star magnetospheres and relativistic winds. Finally, a revised estimate of the cosmic rate of double neutron star mergers including J0737 - 3039 boosts previous estimates by an order of magnitude and suggests a high detection rate for the advanced LIGO gravitational wave detector.

  17. Verification measurements of the Karoo Array timing system: a laser radar based time transfer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebrits, R.; Bauermeister, E.; Gamatham, R.; Adams, G.; Malan, J. A.; Burger, J. P.; Kapp, F.; Gibbon, T.; Kriel, H.; Abbott, T.

    2016-02-01

    An optical fiber based laser radar time transfer system has been developed for the 64-dish MeerKAT radiointerferometer telescope project to provide accurate atomic time to the receivers of the telescope system. This time transfer system is called the Karoo Array Timing System (KATS). Calibration of the time transfer system is essential to ensure that time is accurately transferred to the digitisers that form part of the receivers. Frequency domain reflectometry via vector network analysers is also used to verify measurements taken using time interval counters. This paper details the progress that is made in the verification measurements of the system in order to ensure that time, accurate to within a few nanoseconds of the Universal Coordinated Time (UTC, is available at the point where radio signals from astronomical sources are received. This capability enables world class transient and timing studies with a compact radio interferometer, which has inherent advantages over large single dish radio-telescopes, in observing the transient sky.

  18. Binary pulsars as dark-matter probes

    CERN Document Server

    Pani, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    During the motion of a binary pulsar around the galactic center, the pulsar and its companion experience a wind of dark-matter particles that can affect the orbital motion through dynamical friction. We show that this effect produces a characteristic seasonal modulation of the orbit and causes a secular change of the orbital period whose magnitude can be well within the astonishing precision of various binary-pulsar observations. Our analysis is valid for binary systems with orbital period longer than a day. By comparing this effect with pulsar-timing measurements, it is possible to derive model-independent upper bounds on the dark-matter density at different distances $D$ from the galactic center. For example, the precision timing of J1713+0747 imposes $\\rho_{\\rm DM}\\lesssim 10^5\\,{\\rm GeV/cm}^3$ at $D\\approx7\\,{\\rm kpc}$. The detection of a binary pulsar at $D\\lesssim 10\\,{\\rm pc}$ could provide stringent constraints on dark-matter halo profiles and on growth models of the central black hole. The Square Kil...

  19. Statistical properties of giant pulses from the Crab pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, M V

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the statistics of giant pulses from the Crab pulsar for the first time with particular reference to their widths. We have analyzed data collected during 3.5 hours of observations conducted with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope operated in a tied-array mode at a frequency of 1200 MHz. The PuMa pulsar backend provided voltage recording of X and Y linear polarization states in two conjugate 10 MHz bands. We restricted the time resolution to 4 microseconds to match the scattering on the interstellar inhomogeneities. In total about 18000 giant pulses (GP) were detected in full intensity with a threshold level of 6 sigma. Cumulative probability distributions (CPD) of giant pulse energies were analyzed for groups of GPs with different effective widths in the range 4 to 65 microseconds. The CPDs were found to manifest notable differences for the different GP width groups. The slope of a power-law fit to the high-energy portion of the CPDs evolves from -1.7 to -3.2 when going from the shortest ...

  20. Chandra Associates Pulsar and Historic Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    SAN DIEGO -- Scientists using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory have found new evidence that a pulsar in the constellation of Sagittarius was created when a massive star exploded, witnessed by Chinese astronomers in the year 386 AD. If confirmed, this will be only the second pulsar to be clearly associated with a historic event. These results were presented today by Victoria Kaspi and Mallory Roberts of McGill University at the American Astronomical Society meeting. Also participating in the research were Gautum Vasisht from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Eric Gotthelf from Columbia University, Michael Pivovaroff from Therma-Wave, Inc., and Nobuyuki Kawai from the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Japan. The scientists used Chandra to locate the pulsar exactly at the geometric center of the supernova remnant known as G11.2-0.3. This location provides very strong evidence that the pulsar, a neutron star that is rotating 14 times a second, was formed in the supernova of 386 AD, and therefore has an age of 1615 years. "Determining the true ages of astronomical objects is notoriously difficult, and for this reason, historical records of supernovas are of great importance,"said Kaspi."In roughly the past 2,000 years, fewer than 10 reports of probable supernovae have been archived mostly by Asian astronomers. Of those handful, the remnant of 1054 AD, the Crab Nebula, was until now the only pulsar whose birth could be associated with a historic event - and, hence, the only neutron star that has a firm age." Between mid-April and mid-May in the year 386 AD, a young "guest star", presumably a supernova, was recorded by Chinese observers in the direction of the sky now known as the constellation of Sagittarius. In the 1970s, radio astronomers discovered an expanding nebula of gas and high-energy particles, called G11.2-0.3, that is believed to be the remnant of that explosion. In 1997, a team of X-ray astronomers used Japan’s ASCA satellite to discover a pulsar

  1. An unified timing and spectral model for the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars XTE J1810-197 and CXOU J164710.2-455216

    CERN Document Server

    Albano, A; Israel, G L; Zane, S; Nobili, L; Stella, L

    2010-01-01

    Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) are two small classes of X-ray sources strongly suspected to host a magnetar, i.e. an ultra-magnetized neutron star with $B\\approx 10^14-10^15 G. Many SGRs/AXPs are known to be variable, and recently the existence of genuinely "transient" magnetars was discovered. Here we present a comprehensive study of the pulse profile and spectral evolution of the two transient AXPs (TAXPs) XTE J1810-197 and CXOU J164710.2-455216. Our analysis was carried out in the framework of the twisted magnetosphere model for magnetar emission. Starting from 3D Monte Carlo simulations of the emerging spectrum, we produced a large database of synthetic pulse profiles which was fitted to observed lightcurves in different spectral bands and at different epochs. This allowed us to derive the physical parameters of the model and their evolution with time, together with the geometry of the two sources, i.e. the inclination of the line-of-sight and of the magnetic axis with resp...

  2. Testing gravity with pulsar scintillation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Pen, Ue-Li

    2017-04-01

    We propose to use pulsar scintillation measurements to test predictions of alternative theories of gravity. Compared to single-path pulsar timing measurements, the scintillation measurements can achieve an accuracy of one part in a thousand within one wave period, which means picosecond scale resolution in time, due to the effect of multipath interference. Previous scintillation measurements of PSR B 0834 +06 have hours of data acquisition, making this approach sensitive to mHz gravitational waves. Therefore it has unique advantages in measuring the effect of gravity or other mechanisms on light propagation. We illustrate its application in constraining the scalar gravitational-wave background, in which case the sensitivities can be greatly improved with respect to previous limits. We expect much broader applications in testing gravity with existing and future pulsar scintillation observations.

  3. Testing Gravity with Pulsar Scintillation Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Huan; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-01-01

    We propose to use pulsar scintillation measurements to test predictions of alternative theories of gravity. Comparing to single-path pulsar timing measurements, the scintillation measurements can achieve a factor of 10^5 improvement in timing accuracy, due to the effect of multi-path interference. Previous scintillation measurements of PSR B0834+06 have data acquisition for hours, making this approach sensitive to mHz gravitational waves. Therefore it has unique advantages in measuring gravitational effect or other mechanisms (at mHz and above frequencies) on light propagation. We illustrate its application in constraining scalar gravitational-wave background, in which case the sensitivities can be greatly improved with respect to previous limits. We expect much broader applications in testing gravity with existing and future pulsar scintillation observations.

  4. Gravitational Radiation from Compact Binary Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, John

    2014-01-01

    An outstanding question in modern Physics is whether general relativity (GR) is a complete description of gravity among bodies at macroscopic scales. Currently, the best experiments supporting this hypothesis are based on high-precision timing of radio pulsars. This chapter reviews recent advances in the field with a focus on compact binary millisecond pulsars with white-dwarf (WD) companions. These systems - if modeled properly - provide an unparalleled test ground for physically motivated alternatives to GR that deviate significantly in the strong-field regime. Recent improvements in observational techniques and advances in our understanding of WD interiors have enabled a series of precise mass measurements in such systems. These masses, combined with high-precision radio timing of the pulsars, result to stringent constraints on the radiative properties of gravity, qualitatively very different from what was available in the past.

  5. A LaBr{sub 3}: Ce fast-timing array for DESPEC at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Oliver J., E-mail: O.J.Roberts@brighton.ac.uk [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Brighton, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Bruce, Alison M. [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Brighton, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Regan, Patrick H. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); National Physics Laboratory, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Podolyák, Zsolt; Townsley, Christopher M. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Smith, John F.; Mulholland, Kieran F. [School of Engineering, The University of the West of Scotland, Paisley PA1 2BE (United Kingdom); Smith, Andrew [The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    The design of a fast-timing γ-ray detection array aimed at measuring sub-nanosecond half-lives using LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillation crystals is presented. This array will complement novel and existing charged particle and neutron detector arrays at the low-energy branch of a fragment separator (Super-FRS) to be built within the NuSTAR collaboration as part of the future Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR). The array will be used in conjunction with the Advanced Implantation Detector Array (AIDA), to measure implant-decay correlations. Monte-Carlo simulations have been performed to determine the design of the proposed fast-timing array around a localised implantation point. In particular, simulations were used to determine the full-energy peak efficiencies for single cylindrical, conical and ‘hybrid’ detector geometries, as well as complete array configurations of ‘hybrid’ and ∅1.5 in.×2 in. cylindrical crystals. Timing precision calculations were then used to determine the timing response for each configuration based on its simulated efficiency. An informed decision based on the simulated efficiencies and timing precision calculations allowed the optimum configuration for the array to be determined.

  6. Coherent Radio Emission from Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Dipanjan; Gil, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    We review a physical model where the high brightness temperature of 10$^{25}-10^{30}$ K observed in pulsar radio emission is explained by coherent curvature radiation excited in the relativistic electron-positron plasma in the pulsar magnetosphere.

  7. The Millisecond Pulsars in NGC 6760

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, P C C; Nice, D J; Ransom, S M; Lorimer, D R; Stairs, I H; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Nice, David J.; Ransom, Scott M.; Lorimer, Duncan R.; Stairs, Ingrid H.

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of recent Arecibo and Green Bank observations of the globular cluster NGC 6760. Using Arecibo, a phase-coherent timing solution has been obtained for the previously known binary pulsar in this cluster, PSR J1911+0102A. We have also discovered a new millisecond pulsar in NGC 6760, PSR J1911+0101B, an isolated object with a rotational period of 5.38 ms and a dispersion measure DM = 196.7 cm-3 pc. Both pulsars are located within 1.3 core radii of the cluster center and have negative period derivatives. The resulting lower limits for the accelerations of the pulsars are within the range expected given a simple model of the cluster. A search for eclipses in the PSR J1911+0102A binary system using both telescopes yielded negative results. The corresponding limits on the extra gas column density at superior conjunction are consistent with the hypothesis that the observational properties of ultra-low-mass binary pulsars like PSR J1911+0102A are strongly affected by the inclination of the orbita...

  8. The Ages, Speeds and Offspring of Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Bradley Miles Stougaard

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the cooling of low mass white dwarfs with helium cores. We construct a detailed numerical model using the most modern input physics, including our own calculations of low temperature hydrogen opacities. We use our models to constrain the ages of binary millisecond pulsars from the optical observations of their white dwarf companions. We use this to place limits on the initial spin periods, magnetic field decay times and accretion histories of the millisecond pulsars. Our models can also be used along with observations of spectroscopic gravities and radial velocities to place interesting constraints on the neutron star equation of state. We provide grids of temperature and luminosity as a function of age for various white dwarf masses and surface compositions to facilitate future analyses. We have investigated the effect of the pulsar wind on the atmospheric composition of binary companions. The spallation of atmospheric helium to hydrogen increases the cooling age of the white dwarf. We find that all white dwarf companions in binaries with orbital period censored data using survival statistics, we arrive at an estimate of the characteristic pulsar birth velocity ~300 km.s ^{-1}, 2/3 that of Lyne & Lorimer. We also show that the older pulsar population shows the effects of the asymmetric drift, indicating that it must be dynamically old.

  9. Multiwavelength Constraints on Pulsar Populations in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Wharton, R S; Cordes, J M; Deneva, J S; Lazio, T J W

    2011-01-01

    The detection of radio pulsars within the central few parsecs of the Galaxy would provide a unique probe of the gravitational and magneto-ionic environments in the Galactic Center (GC) and, if close enough to Sgr A*, precise tests of general relativity in the strong-field regime. While it is difficult to find pulsars at radio wavelengths because of interstellar scattering, the payoff from detailed timing of pulsars in the GC warrants a concerted effort. To motivate pulsar surveys and help define search parameters for them, we constrain the pulsar number and spatial distribution using a wide range of multiwavelength measurements. These include the five known radio pulsars within 15 arcmin of Sgr A*, radio and gamma-ray measurements of diffuse emission, non-detections in high frequency pulsar surveys of the central parsec, a catalog of radio point sources from an imaging survey, infrared observations of massive star populations in the central few parsecs, candidate pulsar wind nebulae in the inner 20 pc and est...

  10. Real-time assessment of a linear pyroelectric sensor array for object classication

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, William E., III; Brown, Jeremy B.; Chari, Srikant; Jacobs, Eddie L.

    2010-10-01

    Pyroelectric linear arrays can be used to generate profiles of targets. Simulations have shown that generated profiles can be used to classify human and animal targets. A pyroelectric array system was used to collect data and classify targets as either human or non-human in real time. The pyroelectric array system consists of a 128-element Dias 128LTI pyroelectric linear array, an F/0.86 germanium lens, and an 18F4550 pic microcontroller for A/D conversion and communication. The classifier used for object recognition was trained using data collected in petting zoos and tested using data collected at the US-Mexico border in Arizona.

  11. Two-dimensional catheter arrays for real-time intracardiac volumetric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Edward D.; Fiering, Jason O.; Lee, Warren; Wolf, Patrick D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    1999-06-01

    We have previously described 2D arrays of several thousand elements operating up to 5.0 MHz for transthoracic cardiac imaging. Lately, there has been interest in developing catheter based intracardiac imaging systems to aid in the precise tracking of anatomical features for improved diagnoses and therapies. We have constructed several arrays for real time intracardiac volumetric imaging based upon two different designs; a 10 X 10 equals 100 element 5.0 MHz forward looking 2D array, and a 13 X 11 equals 143 element 5.0 MHz 2D array for side scanning applications.

  12. Real Time Photovoltaic Array Simulator for Testing Grid-Connected PV Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sera, Dezso; Valentini, Massimo; Raducu, Alin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a real time flexible PV array simulator is presented. It is a system that can simulate different PV panel arrays in specific environmental conditions. To evaluate performance of the Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) of grid-connected Photovoltaic (PV) inverters only measurements...

  13. Super-Orthogonal space-time trellis codes for virtual antenna arrays

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sokoya, OA

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the performance of super-orthogonal space time trellis codes when Virtual Antenna Arrays (VAA) is employed. The concept of virtual antenna arrays was developed to emulate Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) schemes...

  14. Are Superfluid Vortices in Pulsars Violating the Weak Equivalence Principle?

    CERN Document Server

    de Matos, Clovis Jacinto

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper we argue that timing irregularities in pulsars, like glitches and timing noise, could be associated with the violation of the weak equivalence principle for vortices in the superfluid core of rotating neutron stars.

  15. HST optical polarimetry of the Vela pulsar and nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, P.; Mignani, R. P.; Shearer, A.

    2014-11-01

    Polarization measurements of pulsars offer a unique insight into the geometry of the emission regions in the neutron star magnetosphere. Therefore, they provide observational constraints on the different models proposed for the pulsar emission mechanisms. Optical polarization data of the Vela pulsar was obtained from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) archive. The data, obtained in two filters (F606W, central wavelength = 590.70 nm and F550M, central wavelength = 558.15 nm), consist of a series of observations of the pulsar taken with the HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys and cover a time span of 5 d. These data have been used to carry out the first high spatial resolution and multi-epoch study of the polarization of the pulsar. We produced polarization vector maps of the region surrounding the pulsar and measured the degree of linear polarization (P.D.) and the position angle (P.A.) of the pulsar's integrated pulse beam. We obtained P.D. = 8.1 ± 0.7 per cent and P.A. = 146.3° ± 2.4°, averaged over the time span covered by these observations. These results not only confirm those originally obtained by Wagner & Seifert and Mignani et al., both using the Very Large Telescope, but are of greater precision. Furthermore, we confirm that the P.A. of the pulsar polarization vector is aligned with the direction of the pulsar proper motion. The pulsar wind nebula is undetected in polarized light as is the case in unpolarized light, down to a flux limit of 26.8 mag arcsec-2.

  16. An astrometry parsing to the data of pulsar timing%脉冲星计时数据的天体测量解析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵铭; 黄天衣

    2009-01-01

    已有的研究表明,通过对毫秒脉冲星脉冲到达观测者的时刻(time of arrival,TOA)的记录和分析,实现航天器的自主定位是可行的.我们对TOA所合成分作了解析,导出和解释了TOA与观测者质心位置间关系的基本方程,并与其他一些作者的结果进行比较和讨论.作者认为,TOA和太阳系质心(SSB)处的脉冲到达时刻无关,和SSB的日心坐标无关,也和SSB处的引力时延无关.因此,不应如Sheikh所做的那样,试图在观测者和SSB之间计算较差到达时刻和较差引力时延.%Some available studies have indicated that it is feasible for a spacecraft to self-position based on the data of Time Of Arrival (TOA) of pulses from millisecond pulsars. In this paper, the components included in TOA are parsed, and the essential expression relating to the TOA and the barycentral position of the spacecraft is educed and compared with those of other authors. We conclude that observed TOA are irrelative to the pulses arrival time at Solar System Barycentre (SSB), to the heliocentric position of SSB, and to the gravitational delay at SSB. Therefore, it is not supposed to calculate the differential TOA as well as differential gravitational delay between the observer and SSB, like as that given by Sheikh.

  17. Progress in two-dimensional arrays for real-time volumetric imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, E D; Davidsen, R E; Fiering, J O; Hruschka, T A; Smith, S W

    1998-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation of two dimensional array transducers for real-time volumetric imaging are described. The transducers we have previously described operated at frequencies below 3 MHz and were unwieldy to the operator because of the interconnect schemes used in connecting to the transducer handle. Several new transducers have been developed using new connection technology. A 40 x 40 = 1,600 element, 3.5 MHz array was fabricated with 256 transmit and 256 receive elements. A 60 x 60 = 3,600 element 5.0 MHz array was constructed with 248 transmit and 256 receive elements. An 80 x 80 = 6,400 element, 2.5 MHz array was fabricated with 256 transmit and 208receive elements. 2-D transducer arrays were also developed for volumetric scanning in an intra cardiac catheter, a 10 x 10 = 100 element 5.0 MHz forward-looking array and an 11 x 13 = 143 element 5.0 MHz side-scanning array. The-6dB fractional bandwidths for the different arrays varied from 50% to 63%, and the 50 omega insertion loss for all the transducers was about-64 dB. The transducers were used to generate real-time volumetric images in phantoms and in vivo using the Duke University real time volumetric imaging system, which is capable of generating multiple planes at any desired angle and depth within the pyramidal volume.

  18. Nature of microstructure in pulsar radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Machabeli, G Z; Melikidze, G I; Shapakidze, D; Machabeli, George; Khechinashvili, David; Melikidze, George; Shapakidze, David

    2000-01-01

    We present a model for microstructure in pulsar radio emission. We propose that micropulses result from the alteration of the radio wave generation region by nearly transverse drift waves propagating across the pulsar magnetic field and encircling the bundle of the open magnetic field lines. It is demonstrated that such waves can modify significantly curvature of these dipolar field lines. This in turn affects strongly fulfillment of the resonance conditions necessary for the excitation of radio waves. The time-scale of micropulses is therefore determined by the wavelength of drift waves. Main features of the microstructure are naturally explained in the frame of this model.

  19. Systematic evaluation of three microRNA profiling platforms: microarray, beads array, and quantitative real-time PCR array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Howel, Paul; Bruheim, Skjalg; Ju, Jingfang; Owen, Laurie B; Fodstad, Oystein; Xi, Yaguang

    2011-02-11

    A number of gene-profiling methodologies have been applied to microRNA research. The diversity of the platforms and analytical methods makes the comparison and integration of cross-platform microRNA profiling data challenging. In this study, we systematically analyze three representative microRNA profiling platforms: Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) microarray, beads array, and TaqMan quantitative real-time PCR Low Density Array (TLDA). The microRNA profiles of 40 human osteosarcoma xenograft samples were generated by LNA array, beads array, and TLDA. Results show that each of the three platforms perform similarly regarding intra-platform reproducibility or reproducibility of data within one platform while LNA array and TLDA had the best inter-platform reproducibility or reproducibility of data across platforms. The endogenous controls/probes contained in each platform have been observed for their stability under different treatments/environments; those included in TLDA have the best performance with minimal coefficients of variation. Importantly, we identify that the proper selection of normalization methods is critical for improving the inter-platform reproducibility, which is evidenced by the application of two non-linear normalization methods (loess and quantile) that substantially elevated the sensitivity and specificity of the statistical data assessment. Each platform is relatively stable in terms of its own microRNA profiling intra-reproducibility; however, the inter-platform reproducibility among different platforms is low. More microRNA specific normalization methods are in demand for cross-platform microRNA microarray data integration and comparison, which will improve the reproducibility and consistency between platforms.

  20. Time multiplexing super resolution using a 2D Barker-based array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilovitsh, Asaf; Ilovitsh, Tali; Preter, Eyal; Levanon, Nadav; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2016-03-01

    We propose the use of a two dimensional Barker-based array in order to improve the performance of the standard time multiplexing super resolution system. The Barker-based array is a 2D generalization of the standard 1D Barker code. It enables achieving a two dimensional super resolution image using only one dimensional scan, by exploiting its unique auto correlation property. A sequence of low resolution images are captured at different lateral positions of the array, and are decoded properly using the same array. In addition, we present the use of a mismatched array for the decoding process. The cross correlation between the Barker-based array and the mismatched array has a perfect peak to sidelobes ratio, making it ideal for the super resolution process. Also, we propose the projection of this array onto the object using a phase-only spatial light modulator. Projecting the array eliminates the need for printing it, mechanically shifting it, and having a direct contact with the object, which is not feasible in many imaging applications. The proposed method is presented analytically, demonstrated via numerical simulation, and validated by laboratory experiments.

  1. Giant pulses from the Crab pulsar: A wide-band study

    CERN Document Server

    Karuppusamy, R; van Straten, W

    2010-01-01

    The Crab pulsar is well-known for its anomalous giant radio pulse emission. Past studies have concentrated only on the very bright pulses or were insensitive to the faint end of the giant pulse luminosity distribution. With our new instrumentation offering a large bandwidth and high time resolution combined with the narrow radio beam of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT), we seek to probe the weak giant pulse emission regime. The WSRT was used in a phased array mode, resolving a large fraction of the Crab nebula. The resulting pulsar signal was recorded using the PuMa II pulsar backend and then coherently dedispersed and searched for giant pulse emission. After careful flux calibration, the data were analysed to study the giant pulse properties. The analysis includes the distributions of the measured pulse widths, intensities, energies, and scattering times. The weak giant pulses are shown to form a separate part of the intensity distribution. The large number of giant pulses detected were used t...

  2. A Unified Timing and Spectral Model for the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars XTE J1810-197 and CXOU J164710.2-455216

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, A.; Turolla, R.; Israel, G. L.; Zane, S.; Nobili, L.; Stella, L.

    2010-10-01

    Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) are two small classes of X-ray sources strongly suspected to host a magnetar, i.e., an ultra-magnetized neutron star with B ≈ 1014-1015 G. Many SGRs/AXPs are known to be variable, and recently the existence of genuinely "transient" magnetars was discovered. Here, we present a comprehensive study of the pulse profile and spectral evolution of the two transient AXPs (TAXPs) XTE J1810-197 and CXOU J164710.2-455216. Our analysis was carried out in the framework of the twisted magnetosphere model for magnetar emission. Starting from three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of the emerging spectrum, we produced a large database of synthetic pulse profiles which was fitted to observed light curves in different spectral bands and at different epochs. This allowed us to derive the physical parameters of the model and their evolution with time, together with the geometry of the two sources, i.e., the inclination of the line of sight and the magnetic axis with respect to the rotation axis. We then fitted the (phase-averaged) spectra of the two TAXPs at different epochs using a model similar to that used to calculate the pulse profiles (ntzang in XSPEC) freezing all parameters to the values obtained from the timing analysis and leaving only the normalization free to vary. This provided acceptable fits to XMM-Newton data in all the observations we analyzed. Our results support a picture in which a limited portion of the star surface close to one of the magnetic poles is heated at the outburst onset. The subsequent evolution is driven both by the cooling/varying size of the heated cap and by a progressive untwisting of the magnetosphere.

  3. Pulsars: Gigantic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Renxin

    2011-01-01

    What is the real nature of pulsars? This is essentially a question of the fundamental strong interaction between quarks at low-energy scale and hence of the non-perturbative quantum chromo-dynamics, the solution of which would certainly be meaningful for us to understand one of the seven millennium prize problems (i.e., "Yang-Mills Theory") named by the Clay Mathematical Institute. After a historical note, it is argued here that a pulsar is very similar to an extremely big nucleus, but is a little bit different from the {\\em gigantic nucleus} speculated 80 years ago by L. Landau. The paper demonstrates the similarity between pulsars and gigantic nuclei from both points of view: the different manifestations of compact stars and the general behavior of the strong interaction.

  4. Handbook of pulsar astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Lorimer, Duncan

    2005-01-01

    Radio pulsars are rapidly rotating highly magnetized neutron stars. Studies of these fascinating objects have provided applications in solid-state physics, general relativity, galactic astronomy, astrometry, planetary physics and even cosmology. Most of these applications and much of what we know about neutron stars are derived from single-dish radio observations using state-of-the-art receivers and data acquisition systems. This comprehensive 2004 book is a unique resource that brings together the key observational techniques, background information and a review of results, including the discovery of a double pulsar system. Useful software tools are provided which can be used to analyse example data, made available on a related website. This work will be of great value not only to graduate students but also to researchers wishing to carry out and interpret a wide variety of radio pulsar observations.

  5. Current Flows in Pulsar Magnetospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The global structure of .current flows in pulsar magnetosphere is investigated, with rough calculations of the circuit elements. It is emphasized that the potential of the critical field lines (the field lines that intersect the null surface at the light cylinder radius) should be the same as that of interstellar medium, and that pulsars whose rotation axes and magnetic dipole axes are parallel should be positively charged, in order to close the pulsar's current flows. The statistical relation between the radio luminosity and pulsar's electric charge (or the spindown power) may hint that the millisecond pulsars could be low-mass bare strange stars.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Arecibo Pulsar-ALFA (PALFA) survey. IV. (Lazarus+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, P.; Brazier, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Swiggum, J.; Zhu, W. W.; Allen, B.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Cardoso, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Ferdman, R.; Freire, P. C. C.; Jenet, F. A.; Knispel, B.; Lee, K. J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L. G.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2016-02-01

    The Arecibo Pulsar-ALFA (PALFA) survey observations have been restricted to the two regions of the Galactic plane (|b|<5°) visible from the Arecibo observatory, the inner Galaxy (32°<~l<~77°), and the outer Galaxy (168°<~l<~214°). Integration times are 268s and 180s for inner and outer Galaxy observations, respectively. Observations conducted with the 7-beam Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) receiver of the Arecibo Observatory William E. Gordon 305m Telescope have a bandwidth of 322MHz centered at 1375MHz. PALFA survey data have been recorded with the Mock spectrometers since 2009. (2 data files).

  7. Burst activity of the Crab Nebula and its pulsar at high and ultra-high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidvansky, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    Characteristics of the flares of gamma rays detected from the Crab Nebula by the AGILE and Fermi-LAT satellite instruments are compared with those of a gamma ray burst recorded by several air shower arrays on February 23, 1989 and with one recent observation made by ARGO-YBJ array. It is demonstrated that though pulsar-periodicity and energy spectra of emissions at 100 MeV (satellite gamma ray telescopes) and 100 TeV (EAS arrays) are different, their time structures seem to be similar. Moreover, may be the difference between "flares" and "waves" recently found in the Crab Nebula emission by AGILE team also exists at ultra-high energies.

  8. Time Reversal Acoustic Structural Health Monitoring Using Array of Embedded Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) structural health monitoring with an embedded sensor array represents a new approach to in-situ nondestructive evaluation of air-space...

  9. Pulsar Coherent De-dispersion Experiment at Urumqi Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Yong; Ali, Esamdin; Zhang, Jin

    2006-12-01

    A Pulsar coherent de-dispersion experiment has been carried out using the 25-m Nanshan radio telescope at Urumqi Observatory. It uses a dual polarization receiver operating at 18 cm and a VLBI back-end: Mark5A, the minimum sampling time is 5 ns. The data processing system is based on a C program on Linux and a 4-node Beowulf cluster. A high quality data acquisition system and a cluster with more processors are needed to build an on-line pulsar coherent de-dispersion system in future. The main directions for the instrument are studies of pulsar timing, scintillation monitoring, etc.

  10. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Rosen, Rachel; McLaughlin, Maura A; Lynch, Ryan; Kondratiev, Vlad I; Boyles, Jason R; Wilson, M Terry; Lorimer, Duncan R; Ransom, Scott; 10.3847/AER2010004

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsar Search Collaboratory [PSC, NSF #0737641] is a joint project between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University (WVU) designed to interest high school students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics [STEM] related career paths by helping them to conduct authentic scientific research. The 3- year PSC program, which began in summer 2008, teaches students to analyze astronomical radio data acquired with the 100-m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope for the purpose of discovering new pulsars. We present the results of the first complete year of the PSC, which includes two astronomical discoveries.

  11. Pulsars: Cosmic Permanent 'Neutromagnets'?

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, Johan

    2011-01-01

    We argue that pulsars may be spin-polarized neutron stars, i.e. cosmic permanent magnets. This would simply explain several observational facts about pulsars, including the 'beacon effect' itself i.e. the static/stable misalignment of rotational and magnetic axes, the extreme temporal stability of the pulses and the existence of an upper limit for the magnetic field strength - coinciding with the one observed in "magnetars". Although our model admittedly is speculative, this latter fact seems to us unlikely to be pure coincidence.

  12. Pulsars in FIRST Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We identify 16 pulsars from the Survey of Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST) at 1.4 GHz. Their positions and total flux densities are extracted from the FIRST catalog. By comparing the source positions with those in the PSR catalog, we obtain better determined positions of PSR J1022+1001,J1518+4904, J1652+2651, and proper motion upper limits of PSR J0751+1807,J1012+5307, and J1640+2224. The proper motions of the other ten pulsars are consistent with the catalog values.

  13. True Time Delay Scheme for X-band Phased Array Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zheng

    2007-01-01

    The system of a true-time delay line for X-band and 8-unit phased array antennas is introduced. Changing the length of a chirp grating with piezotranslator(PZT), the variable delay is obtained. The scheme is applied to X-band phased array radar whose searching data rate is 56/s. It is simulated that the beam squinting is influenced by the error of real time delay. The relation between the beamforming mode and its modifying volt is discussed.

  14. A HIGH BRAKING INDEX FOR A PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald, R. F.; Ferdman, R. D.; Kaspi, V. M.; Tendulkar, S. P. [Department of Physics and McGill Space Institute, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montréal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Gotthelf, E. V. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027-6601 (United States); Guillot, S. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Harrison, F. A. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1216 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Keane, E. F. [SKA Organization, Jodrell Bank Observatory, Cheshire SK11 9DL (United Kingdom); Pivovaroff, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550-9234 (United States); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Tomsick, J. A. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States)

    2016-03-01

    We present a phase-coherent timing solution for PSR J1640–4631, a young 206 ms pulsar using X-ray timing observations taken with NuSTAR. Over this timing campaign, we have measured the braking index of PSR J1640–4631 to be n = 3.15 ± 0.03. Using a series of simulations, we argue that this unusually high braking index is not due to timing noise, but is intrinsic to the pulsar's spin-down. We cannot, however, rule out contamination due to an unseen glitch recovery, although the recovery timescale would have to be longer than most yet observed. If this braking index is eventually proven to be stable, it demonstrates that pulsar braking indices greater than three are allowed in nature; hence, other physical mechanisms such as mass or magnetic quadrupoles are important in pulsar spin-down. We also present a 3σ upper limit on the pulsed flux at 1.4 GHz of 0.018 mJy.

  15. Pulsar discovery by global volunteer computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knispel, B.; Allen, B.; Cordes, J.M.; Deneva, J.S.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bhat, N.D.R.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D.J.; Chatterjee, S.; Crawford, F.; Demorest, P.B.; Fehrmann, H.; Freire, P.C.C.; Gonzalez, M.E.; Hammer, D.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Jenet, F.A.; Kasian, L.; Kaspi, V.M.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D.R.; Lyne, A.G.; Machenschalk, B.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Messenger, C.; Nice, D.J.; Papa, M.A.; Pletsch, H.J.; Prix, R.; Ransom, S.M.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I.H.; Stappers, B.W.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to mine large data sets. It has now found a 40.8-hertz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pul

  16. Towards on-chip time-resolved thermal mapping with micro-/nanosensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haixiao; Sun, Weiqiang; Xiang, An; Shi, Tuanwei; Chen, Qing; Xu, Shengyong

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, thin-film thermocouple (TFTC) array emerged as a versatile candidate in micro-/nanoscale local temperature sensing for its high resolution, passive working mode, and easy fabrication. However, some key issues need to be taken into consideration before real instrumentation and industrial applications of TFTC array. In this work, we will demonstrate that TFTC array can be highly scalable from micrometers to nanometers and that there are potential applications of TFTC array in integrated circuits, including time-resolvable two-dimensional thermal mapping and tracing the heat source of a device. Some potential problems and relevant solutions from a view of industrial applications will be discussed in terms of material selection, multiplexer reading, pattern designing, and cold-junction compensation. We show that the TFTC array is a powerful tool for research fields such as chip thermal management, lab-on-a-chip, and other novel electrical, optical, or thermal devices.

  17. Towards on-chip time-resolved thermal mapping with micro-/nanosensor arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haixiao; Sun, Weiqiang; Xiang, An; Shi, Tuanwei; Chen, Qing; Xu, Shengyong

    2012-08-29

    In recent years, thin-film thermocouple (TFTC) array emerged as a versatile candidate in micro-/nanoscale local temperature sensing for its high resolution, passive working mode, and easy fabrication. However, some key issues need to be taken into consideration before real instrumentation and industrial applications of TFTC array. In this work, we will demonstrate that TFTC array can be highly scalable from micrometers to nanometers and that there are potential applications of TFTC array in integrated circuits, including time-resolvable two-dimensional thermal mapping and tracing the heat source of a device. Some potential problems and relevant solutions from a view of industrial applications will be discussed in terms of material selection, multiplexer reading, pattern designing, and cold-junction compensation. We show that the TFTC array is a powerful tool for research fields such as chip thermal management, lab-on-a-chip, and other novel electrical, optical, or thermal devices.

  18. 3D Pattern Synthesis of Time-Modulated Conformal Arrays with a Multiobjective Optimization Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the synthesis of the three-dimensional (3D radiation patterns of the time-modulated conformal arrays. Due to the nature of periodic time modulation, harmonic radiation patterns are generated at the multiples of the modulation frequency in time-modulated arrays. Thus, the optimization goal of the time-modulated conformal array includes the optimization of the sidelobe level at the operating frequency and the sideband levels (SBLs at the harmonic frequency, and the design can be regarded as a multiobjective problem. The multiobjective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO is applied to optimize the switch-on instants and pulse durations of the time-modulated conformal array. To significantly reduce the optimization variables, the modified Bernstein polynomial is employed in the synthesis process. Furthermore, dual polarized patch antenna is designed as radiator to achieve low cross-polarization level during the beam scanning. A 12 × 13 (156-element conical conformal microstrip array is simulated to demonstrate the proposed synthesis mechanism, and good results reveal the promising ability of the proposed algorithm in solving the synthesis of the time-modulated conformal arrays problem.

  19. Detection of the Crab Pulsar with VERITAS above 100 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    McCann, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the recent detection of pulsed gamma-ray emission from the Crab Pulsar above 100 GeV with the VERITAS array of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Gamma-ray emission at theses energies is not expected in present pulsar models. We find that the photon spectrum of pulsed emission between 100 MeV and 400 GeV can be described by a broken power law, and that it is statistically preferred over a power law with an exponential cut-off. In the VERITAS energy range the spectrum can be described with a simple power law with a spectral index of -3.8 and a flux normalization at 150 GeV that is equivalent to 1% of the Crab Nebula gamma-ray flux. The detection of pulsed emission above 100 GeV and the absence of an exponential cutoff rules out curvature radiation as the primary gamma-ray-producing mechanism. The pulse profile exhibits the characteristic two pulses of the Crab Pulsar at phases 0.0 and 0.4, albeit 2-3 times narrower than below 10 GeV. The narrowing can be interpreted as a tapered particle acceleration...

  20. Three-dimensional analytical description of magnetized winds from oblique pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; Philippov, Alexander; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2016-04-01

    Rotating neutron stars, or pulsars and magnetars, are plausibly the source of power behind many astrophysical systems, such as gamma-ray bursts, supernovae, pulsar wind nebulae, and supernova remnants. In the past several years, three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations made it possible to compute pulsar spin-down luminosity from first principles and revealed that oblique pulsar winds are more powerful than aligned ones. However, what causes this enhanced power output of oblique pulsars is not understood. In this work, using time-dependent 3D magnetohydrodynamic and force-free simulations, we show that, contrary to the standard paradigm, the open magnetic flux, which carries the energy away from the pulsar, is laterally non-uniform. We argue that this non-uniformity is the primary reason for the increased luminosity of oblique pulsars. To demonstrate this, we construct simple analytic descriptions of aligned and orthogonal pulsar winds and combine them to obtain an accurate 3D description of the pulsar wind for any obliquity. Our approach describes both the warped magnetospheric current sheet and the smooth variation of pulsar wind properties outside of it. We find that the jump in magnetic field components across the current sheet decreases with increasing obliquity, which could be a mechanism that reduces dissipation in near-orthogonal pulsars. Our analytical description of the pulsar wind can be used for constructing models of pulsar gamma-ray emission, pulsar wind nebulae, neutron star powered ultra-luminous X-ray sources, and magnetar-powered core-collapse gamma-ray bursts and supernovae.

  1. The Advanced X-ray Timing Array (AXTAR)

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Strohmayer, Tod E

    2008-01-01

    AXTAR is an X-ray observatory mission concept, currently under study in the U.S., that combines very large collecting area, broadband spectral coverage, high time resolution, highly flexible scheduling, and an ability to respond promptly to time-critical targets of opportunity. It is optimized for submillisecond timing of bright Galactic X-ray sources in order to study phenomena at the natural time scales of neutron star surfaces and black hole event horizons, thus probing the physics of ultradense matter, strongly curved spacetimes, and intense magnetic fields. AXTAR's main instrument is a collimated, thick Si pixel detector with 2-50 keV coverage and 8 square meters collecting area. For timing observations of accreting neutron stars and black holes, AXTAR provides at least an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over both RXTE and Constellation-X. AXTAR also carries a sensitive sky monitor that acts as a trigger for pointed observations of X-ray transients and also provides continuous monitoring of...

  2. Search for the Giant Pulses Search for the Giant Pulses - an extreme phenomenon in radio pulsar emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantsev, A N

    2016-01-01

    Here we present results of our search for Giant Pulses(GPs) from pulsars of Northern Hemisphere. Our survey was carried out at a frequency of 111 MHz using the Large Phased Array (LPA) radio telescope. Up to now we have detected regular generation of strong pulses satisfying the criteria of GPs from 2 pulsars: B1133+16, B1237+25.

  3. Cryogenic time-domain multiplexer based on SQUID arrays and superconducting/normal conducting switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beev, N.; Kiviranta, M.; van der Kuur, J.; Bruijn, M.; Brandel, O.; Linzen, S.; Fritzsch, L.; Ahoranta, J.; Penttilä, J.; Roschier, L.

    2014-05-01

    We have demonstrated the operation of a 12-channel Beyer-style SQUID-based time domain multiplexer. It was manufactured using a fabrication process that is cross-compatible between VTT and IPHT-Jena. The multiplexer consists of twelve 12-SQUID series arrays, each shunted by a Zappe-style interferometer array acting as a flux-controlled superconducting/normal conducting switch. By keeping all switches but one in the superconducting state, it is possible to select one active readout channel at a time. A flux feedback coil common to all SQUID arrays allows realization of a flux-locked loop. We present characteristics of the multiplexer and measurement data from experiments with a 25-pixel X-ray calorimeter array operated at T < 100 mK in a dilution refrigerator.

  4. Observations of Accreting Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bildsten, Lars; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Chiu, John; Finger, Mark H.; Koh, Danny T.; Nelson, Robert W.; Prince, Thomas A.; Rubin, Bradley C.; Scott, D. Matthew; Stollberg, Mark; Vaughan, Brian A.; Wilson, Colleen A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    We summarize 5 years of continuous monitoring of accretion-powered pulsars with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Our 20-70 keV observations have determined or refined the orbital parameters of 13 binaries, discovered five new transient accreting pulsars, measured the pulsed flux history during outbursts of 12 transients (GRO J1744-28, 4U 0115+634, GRO J1750-27, GS 0834-430, 2S 1417-624, GRO J1948+32, EXO 2030+375, GRO J1008-57, A0535+26, GRO J2058+42, 4U 1145-619, and A1118-616), and also measured the accretion torque history during outbursts of six of those transients whose orbital param- eters were also known. We have also continuously measured the pulsed flux and spin frequency for eiaht persistently accreting pulsars (Her X-1, Cen X-3, Vela X-1, OAO 1657-415, GX 301-2, 4U 1626-67, 4U 1538-52, and GX 1+4). Because of their continuity and uniformity over a long baseline, BATSE observations have provided new insights into the long-term behavior of accreting magnetic neutron stars. We have found that all accreting pulsars show stochastic variations in their spin frequencies and luminosities, including those displaying secular spin-up or spin-down on long timescales, which blurs the con- ventional distinction between disk-fed and wind-fed binaries. Pulsed flux and accretion torque are strongly correlated in outbursts of transient accreting pulsars but are uncorrelated, or even anti- correlated, in persistent sources. We describe daily folded pulse profiles, frequency, and flux measurements that are available through the Compton Observatory Science Support Center at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center.

  5. A Bayesian method for pulsar template generation

    CERN Document Server

    Imgrund, M; Kramer, M; Lesch, H

    2015-01-01

    Extracting Times of Arrival from pulsar radio signals depends on the knowledge of the pulsars pulse profile and how this template is generated. We examine pulsar template generation with Bayesian methods. We will contrast the classical generation mechanism of averaging intensity profiles with a new approach based on Bayesian inference. We introduce the Bayesian measurement model imposed and derive the algorithm to reconstruct a "statistical template" out of noisy data. The properties of these "statistical templates" are analysed with simulated and real measurement data from PSR B1133+16. We explain how to put this new form of template to use in analysing secondary parameters of interest and give various examples: We implement a nonlinear filter for determining ToAs of pulsars. Applying this method to data from PSR J1713+0747 we derive ToAs self consistently, meaning all epochs were timed and we used the same epochs for template generation. While the average template contains fluctuations and noise as unavoida...

  6. Testing Relativistic Gravity with Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Wex, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Before the 1970s, precision tests for gravity theories were constrained to the weak gravitational fields of the Solar system. Hence, only the weak-field slow-motion aspects of relativistic celestial mechanics could be investigated. Testing gravity beyond the first post-Newtonian contributions was for a long time out of reach. The discovery of the first binary pulsar by Russell Hulse and Joseph Taylor in the summer of 1974 initiated a completely new field for testing the relativistic dynamics of gravitationally interacting bodies. For the first time the back reaction of gravitational wave emission on the binary motion could be studied. Furthermore, the Hulse-Taylor pulsar provided the first test bed for the orbital dynamics of strongly self-gravitating bodies. To date there are a number of pulsars known, which can be utilized for precision test of gravity. Depending on their orbital properties and their companion, these pulsars provide tests for various different aspects of relativistic dynamics. Besides tests...

  7. Eight New Millisecond Pulsars in NGC 6440 and NGC 6441

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, Paulo C C; Begin, Steve; Stairs, Ingrid H; Hessels, Jason W T; Frey, Lucille H; Camilo, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    Motivated by the recent discovery of 30 new millisecond pulsars in Terzan 5, made using the Green Bank Telescope's S-band receiver and the Pulsar Spigot spectrometer, we have set out to use the same observing system in a systematic search for pulsars in other globular clusters. Here we report on the discovery of five new pulsars in NGC 6440 and three in NGC 6441; each cluster previously had one known pulsar. Using the most recent distance estimates to these clusters, we conclude that there are as many potentially observable pulsars in NGC 6440 and NGC 6441 as in Terzan 5. We present timing solutions for all of the pulsars in these globular clusters. Four of the new discoveries are in binary systems; one of them, PSR J1748-2021B (NGC 6440B), has a wide (P_b = 20.5 d) and eccentric (e = 0.57) orbit. This allowed a measurement of its rate of advance of periastron: 0.00391(18) degrees per year. If due to the effects of general relativity, the total mass of this binary system is 2.92 +/- 0.20 solar masses (1 sigma...

  8. A Search for X-ray Counterparts of Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Prinz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    We describe a systematic search for X-ray counterparts of radio pulsars. The search was accomplished by cross-correlating the radio timing positions of all radio pulsars from the ATNF pulsar database (version 1.54) with archival XMM-Newton and Chandra observations publicly released by August 1st 2015. In total, 171 of the archival XMM-Newton observations and 215 of the archival Chandra datasets where found to have a radio pulsar serendipitously in the field of view. From the 283 radio pulsars covered by these datasets we identified 19 previously undetected X-ray counterparts. For 6 of them the statistics was sufficient to model the energy spectrum with one- or two-component models. For the remaining new detections and for those pulsars for which we determined an upper limit to their counting rate we computed the energy flux by assuming a Crab-like spectrum. Additionally, we derived upper limits on the neutron stars' surface temperature and on the non-thermal X-ray efficiency for those pulsars for which the sp...

  9. HST optical polarimetry of the Vela pulsar & nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Moran, P; Shearer, A

    2014-01-01

    Polarisation measurements of pulsars offer an unique insight into the geometry of the emission regions in the neutron star magnetosphere. Therefore, they provide observational constraints on the different models proposed for the pulsar emission mechanisms. Optical polarisation data of the Vela pulsar was obtained from the {\\em Hubble Space Telescope} ({\\em HST}) archive. The data, obtained in two filters (F606W; central wavelength = 590.70 nm, and F550M; central wavelength = 558.15 nm), consists of a series of observations of the pulsar taken with the {\\em HST}/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and covers a time span of 5 days. This data have been used to carry out the first high-spatial resolution and multi-epoch study of the polarisation of the pulsar. We produced polarisation vector maps of the region surrounding the pulsar and measured the degree of linear polarisation (P.D.) and the position angle (P.A.) of the pulsar's integrated pulse beam. %This yielded We obtained $\\rm P.D.=8.1\\%\\pm0.7\\%$ and $\\rm P....

  10. Single photon imaging and timing array sensor apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. Clayton

    2003-06-24

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for generating a three-dimension image of an object or target. The apparatus is comprised of a photon source for emitting a photon at a target. The emitted photons are received by a photon receiver for receiving the photon when reflected from the target. The photon receiver determines a reflection time of the photon and further determines an arrival position of the photon on the photon receiver. An analyzer is communicatively coupled to the photon receiver, wherein the analyzer generates a three-dimensional image of the object based upon the reflection time and the arrival position.

  11. The Crab Pulsar at Centimeter Wavelengths: I. Ensemble Characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Hankins, T H; Eilek, J A

    2015-01-01

    We have observed the pulsar in the Crab Nebula at high radio frequencies and high time resolution. We present continuously sampled data at 640-ns time resolution, and individual bright pulses recorded at down to 0.25-ns time resolution. Combining our new data with previous data from our group and from the literature shows the dramatic changes in the pulsar's radio emission between low and high radio frequencies. Below about 5 GHz the mean profile is dominated by the bright Main Pulse and Low-Frequency Interpulse. Everything changes, however, above about 5 GHz; the Main Pulse disappears, the mean profile of the Crab pulsar is dominated by the High-Frequency Interpulse (which is quite different from its low-frequency counterpart) and the two High-Frequency Components. We present detailed observational characteristics of these different components which future models of the pulsar's magnetosphere must explain.

  12. Effects of phase transition induced density fluctuations on pulsar dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Bagchi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We show that density fluctuations during phase transitions in pulsar cores may have non-trivial effects on pulsar timings, and may also possibly account for glitches and anti-glitches. These density fluctuations invariably lead to non-zero off-diagonal components of the moment of inertia, leading to transient wobbling of star. Thus, accurate measurements of pulsar timing and intensity modulations (from wobbling may be used to identify the specific pattern of density fluctuations, hence the particular phase transition, occurring inside the pulsar core. Changes in quadrupole moment from rapidly evolving density fluctuations during the transition, with very short time scales, may provide a new source for gravitational waves.

  13. Discovery of gamma-ray emission from the extragalactic pulsar wind nebula N157B with the High Energy Stereoscopic System

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Becker, J; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Gérard, L; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi1, B; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nguyen, N; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2012-01-01

    We present the significant detection of the first extragalactic pulsar wind nebula (PWN) detected in gamma rays, N157B, located in the large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Pulsars with high spin-down luminosity are found to power energised nebulae that emit gamma rays up to energies of several tens of TeV. N157B is associated with PSRJ0537-6910, which is the pulsar with the highest known spin-down luminosity. The High Energy Stereoscopic System telescope array observed this nebula on a yearly basis from 2004 to 2009 with a dead-time corrected exposure of 46 h. The gamma-ray spectrum between 600 GeV and 12 TeV is well-described by a pure power-law with a photon index of 2.8 \\pm 0.2(stat) \\pm 0.3(syst) and a normalisation at 1 TeV of (8.2 \\pm 0.8(stat) \\pm 2.5(syst)) \\times 10^-13 cm^-2s^-1TeV^-1. A leptonic multi-wavelength model shows that an energy of about 4 \\times 10^49erg is stored in electrons and positrons. The apparent efficiency, which is the ratio of the TeV gamma-ray luminosity to the pulsar's spindown lum...

  14. On the randomness of pulsar nulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Rankin, Joanna M.

    2009-05-01

    Pulsar nulling is not always a random process; most pulsars, in fact, null non-randomly. The Wald-Wolfowitz statistical runs test is a simple diagnostic that pulsar astronomers can use to identify pulsars that have non-random nulls. It is not clear at this point how the dichotomy in pulsar nulling randomness is related to the underlying nulling phenomenon, but its nature suggests that there are at least two distinct reasons that pulsars null.

  15. Evolution of the pulsar inclination angle in the wind braking model

    CERN Document Server

    Kou, F F; Wang, N

    2016-01-01

    In a plasma filled magnetosphere, in addition to providing a torque to brake down the pulsar, the magnetosphere will also generate a torque to align the pulsar magnetic and rotational axes. The evolution of pulsar inclination angle in the wind braking model is calculated. In the wind braking model, the oblique pulsar tends to align. The pulsar alignment will also affect the spin-down behavior. Braking index will increase firstly and then decrease as the pulsar evolving from the magneto-dipole radiation dominated case to the wind braking dominated case. Braking index may be larger than $3$ in the early time. And during the following long time, braking index will be always smaller than $3$. This can explain braking index observations of larger than $3$ and smaller than $3$. Besides, the pulsar will evolve downwards straightly to the death valley after pulsar death in the $P-\\dot{P}$ diagram. This may explain the observed maximum spinning period of pulsars. And the long-term evolution of pulsars in the wind brak...

  16. Late-Time Evolution of Composite Supernova Remnants: Deep Chandra Observations and Hydrodynamical Modeling of a Crushed Pulsar Wind Nebula in SNR G327.1-1.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temim, Tea; Slane, Patrick; Kolb, Christopher; Blondin, John; Hughes, John P.; Bucciantini, Niccolo

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the evolution of composite supernova remnants (SNRs) and the eventual fate of relativistic particles injected by their pulsars, we present a multifaceted investigation of the interaction between a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and its host SNR G327.1-1.1. Our 350 ks Chandra X-ray observations of SNR G327.1-1.1 reveal a highly complex morphology; a cometary structure resembling a bow shock, prong-like features extending into large arcs in the SNR interior, and thermal emission from the SNR shell. Spectral analysis of the non-thermal emission offers clues about the origin of the PWN structures, while enhanced abundances in the PWN region provide evidence for mixing of supernova ejecta with PWN material. The overall morphology and spectral properties of the SNR suggest that the PWN has undergone an asymmetric interaction with the SNR reverse shock(RS) that can occur as a result of a density gradient in the ambient medium and or a moving pulsar that displaces the PWN from the center of the remnant. We present hydrodynamical simulations of G327.1-1.1 that show that its morphology and evolution can be described by a approx. 17,000 yr old composite SNR that expanded into a density gradient with an orientation perpendicular to the pulsar's motion. We also show that the RSPWN interaction scenario can reproduce the broadband spectrum of the PWN from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths. The analysis and modeling presented in this work have important implications for our general understanding of the structure and evolution of composite SNRs.

  17. The Einstein@Home Gamma-ray Pulsar Survey. I. Search Methods, Sensitivity and Discovery of New Young Gamma-ray Pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, C J; Wu, J.; Pletsch, H. J.; Guillemot, L.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Beer, C; Bock, O.; Cuéllar, A.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Kramer, M.; Machenschalk, B.; Nieder, L.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the results of a recent blind search survey for gamma-ray pulsars in Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data being carried out on the distributed volunteer computing system, Einstein@Home. The survey has searched for pulsations in 118 unidentified pulsar-like sources, requiring about 10,000 years of CPU core time. In total, this survey has resulted in the discovery of 17 new gamma-ray pulsars, of which 13 are newly reported in this work, and an accompanying paper. These pulsars are...

  18. Gamma-ray Pulsar Revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Caraveo, Patrizia A

    2013-01-01

    Isolated Neutron Stars (INSs) were the first sources identified in the field of high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. At first, in the 70s, there were only two identified sources, the Crab and Vela pulsars. However, although few in number, these objects were crucial in establishing the very concept of a gamma-ray source. Moreover, they opened up significant discovery space both in the theoretical and phenomenological fronts. The need to explain the copious gamma-ray emission of these pulsars led to breakthrough developments in understanding the structure and physics of neutron star magnetospheres. In parallel, the 20-year-long chase to understand the nature of Geminga unveiled the existence of a radio-quiet, gamma-ray-emitting, INS, adding a new dimension to the INS family. Today we are living through an extraordinary time of discovery. The current generation of gamma-ray detectors has vastly increased the population of known of gamma-ray-emitting neutron stars. The 100 mark was crossed in 2011 and we are now appr...

  19. Did the Crab Pulsar Undergo a Small Glitch in 2006 late March/early April?

    CERN Document Server

    Vivekanand, M

    2016-01-01

    On 2006 August 23 the Crab Pulsar underwent a glitch, that was reported by the Jodrell Bank and the Xinjiang radio observatories. Neither data are available to the public. However, the Jodrell group publishes monthly arrival times of the Crab Pulsar pulse (their actual observations are done daily), using which it is shown that about five months earlier, the Crab Pulsar most probably underwent a small glitch, which has not been reported before. Neither observatory discusses the detailed analysis of data from 2006 March to August; either they may not have detected this small glitch, or may have attributed it to timing noise in the Crab Pulsar. The above result is verified using X-ray data from the RXTE observatory. If this is indeed true, this may probably be the smallest glitch observed in the Crab Pulsar so far, whose implications are discussed. This work addresses the confusion possible between small magnitude glitches and timing noise in pulsars.

  20. Late-time Evolution of Composite Supernova Remnants: Deep Chandra Observations and Hydrodynamical Modeling of a Crushed Pulsar Wind Nebula in SNR G327.1-1.1

    CERN Document Server

    Temim, Tea; Kolb, Christopher; Blondin, John; Hughes, John P; Bucciantini, Niccolo

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the evolution of composite supernova remnants (SNRs) and the eventual fate of relativistic particles injected by their pulsars, we present a multifaceted investigation of the interaction between a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and its host SNR G327.1-1.1. Our 350 ks Chandra X-ray observations of SNR G327.1-1.1 reveal a highly complex morphology; a cometary structure resembling a bow shock, prong-like features extending into large arcs in the SNR interior, and thermal emission from the SNR shell. Spectral analysis of the non-thermal emission offers clues about the origin of the PWN structures, while enhanced abundances in the PWN region provide evidence for mixing of supernova ejecta with PWN material. The overall morphology and spectral properties of the SNR suggest that the PWN has undergone an asymmetric interaction with the SNR reverse shock (RS) that can occur as a result of a density gradient in the ambient medium and/or a moving pulsar that displaces the PWN from the center ...

  1. PSRs J0248+6021 and J2240+5832: Young Pulsars in the Northern Galactic Plane. Discovery, Timing, and Gamma-ray observations

    CERN Document Server

    Theureau, G; Cognard, I; Desvignes, G; Smith, D A; Casandjian, J M; Cheung, C C; Craig, H A; Donato, D; Foster, R; Guillemot, L; Harding, A K; Lestrade, J -F; Ray, P S; Romani, R W; Thompson, D J; Tian, W W; Watters, K

    2010-01-01

    Pulsars PSR J0248+6021 (rotation period P=217 ms and spin-down power Edot = 2.13E35 erg/s) and PSR J2240+5832 (P=140 ms, Edot = 2.12E35 erg/s) were discovered in 1997 with the Nancay radio telescope during a northern Galactic plane survey, using the Navy-Berkeley Pulsar Processor (NBPP) filter bank. GeV gamma-ray pulsations from both were discovered using the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Twelve years of radio and polarization data allow detailed investigations. The two pulsars resemble each other both in radio and in gamma-ray data. Both are rare in having a single gamma-ray pulse offset far from the radio peak. The high dispersion measure for PSR J0248+6021 (DM = 370 pc cm^-3) is most likely due to its being within the dense, giant HII region W5 in the Perseus arm at a distance of 2 kpc, not beyond the edge of the Galaxy as obtained from models of average electron distributions. Its high transverse velocity and the low magnetic field along the line-of-sight favor this small distance. Neither gamma-ray, X-ray,...

  2. X-ray pulsar rush in 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, K.; Tsujimoto, K.; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Yokogawa, J.; Koyama, K. [Kyoto Univ., Faculty of Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We present recent remarkable topics about discoveries of X-ray pulsars. 1. Pulsations from two Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters: These pulsars have enormously strong magnetic field (B {approx} 10{sup 15} G), thus these are called as 'magnetar', new type of X-ray pulsars. 2. New Crab-like pulsars: These discoveries lead to suggesting universality of Crab-like pulsars. 3. An X-ray bursting millisecond pulsar: This is strong evidence for the recycle theory of generating radio millisecond pulsars. 4. X-ray pulsar rush in the SMC: This indicates the younger star formation history in the SMC. (author)

  3. Pulsar radiation in post-Maxwellian vacuum nonlinear electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, V. I.; Shvilkin, B. N.; Sokolov, V. A.; Vasili'ev, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics are most clearly pronounced in a strong electromagnetic field close to Schwinger limit. Electromagnetic fields of such intensity can be obtained in laboratory conditions only on very few extreme laser facilities and during a short time interval. At the same time, the astrophysical compact objects with a strong electromagnetic field such as pulsars and magnetars are the best suited to study the effects of nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics. We present analytical calculations for pulsar proper radiation in parametrized post-Maxwellian nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics. Based on the obtained solutions, the effect of nonlinear vacuum corrections to pulsar spin down is being investigated. The analysis of torque functions show that the nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics corrections to the electromagnetic radiation for some pulsars may be comparable to the energy loss by gravitational radiation.

  4. Upper limits on gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M; Bayer, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; D'Ambrosio, E; Dalrymple, J; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; DeSalvo, R; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Dickson, J; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Díaz, M; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R E; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Gustafson, R; Günther, M; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Krämer, M; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lyne, A G; MacInnis, M; Machenschalk, B; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Müller, G; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Rüdiger, A; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Ward, H; Ward, R; Watts, K; Weidner, A; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C

    2007-01-01

    We present upper limits on the gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars based on data from the third and fourth science runs of the LIGO and GEO600 gravitational wave detectors. The data from both runs have been combined coherently to maximise sensitivity. For the first time pulsars within binary (or multiple) systems have been included in the search by taking into account the signal modulation due to their orbits. Our upper limits are therefore the first measured for 56 of these pulsars. For the remaining 22, our results improve on previous upper limits by up to a factor of 10. For example, our tightest upper limit on the gravitational strain is 3.2e-25 for PSRJ1603-7202, and the equatorial ellipticity of PSRJ2124-3358 is less than 10e-6. Furthermore, our strain upper limit for the Crab pulsar is only three times greater than the fiducial spin-down limit.

  5. Gamma rays from Galactic pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Gamma rays from young pulsars and milli-second pulsars are expected to contribute to the diffuse gamma-ray emission measured by the {\\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT) at high latitudes. We derive the contribution of the pulsars undetected counterpart by using information from radio to gamma rays and we show that they explain only a small fraction of the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background.

  6. Efficient Data Capture and Post-Processing for Real-Time Imaging Using AN Ultrasonic Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, L.; Hunter, A. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2010-02-01

    Over the past few years, ultrasonic phased arrays have shown good potential for nondestructive testing (NDT), thanks to high resolution imaging algorithms. Many algorithms are based on the full matrix capture, obtained by firing each element of an ultrasonic array independently, and collecting the data with all elements. Because of the finite sound velocity in the specimen, two consecutive firings must be separated by a minimum time interval. Therefore, more array elements require longer data acquisition times. Moreover, if the array has N elements, then the full matrix contains N2 temporal signals to be processed. Because of the limited calculation speed of current computers, a large matrix of data can result in long post-processing times. In an industrial context where real-time imaging is desirable, it is crucial to reduce acquisition and/or post-processing times. This paper investigates methods designed to reduce acquisition and post-processing times for the total focusing method and wavenumber imaging algorithms. Limited transmission cycles are used to reduce data capture and post-processing. Post-processing times are further reduced by demodulating the data to temporal baseband frequencies. Results are presented so that a compromise can be made between acquisition time, post-processing time and image quality.

  7. Interplanetary spacecraft navigation using pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, X P; You, X P; Li, M T; Keith, M J; Shannon, R M; Coles, W; Manchester, R N; Zheng, J H; Yu, X Z; Gao, D; Wu, X; Chen, D

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how observations of pulsars can be used to help navigate a spacecraft travelling in the solar system. We make use of archival observations of millisecond pulsars from the Parkes radio telescope in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method and highlight issues, such as pulsar spin irregularities, which need to be accounted for. We show that observations of four millisecond pulsars every seven days using a realistic X-ray telescope on the spacecraft throughout a journey from Earth to Mars can lead to position determinations better than approx. 20km and velocity measurements with a precision of approx. 0.1m/s.

  8. Mathematical analysis of the real time array PCR (RTA PCR) process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksman J.F.; Pierik, A.

    2012-01-01

    Real Time Array PCR is a recently developed biochemical technique that measures amplification curves (like quantitative real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR)) of a multitude of different templates ina sample. It combines two different techniques to profit from theadvantages of both techniques,

  9. Mathematical analysis of the real time array PCR (RTA PCR) process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksman, Johan Frederik; Pierik, A.

    2012-01-01

    Real time array PCR (RTA PCR) is a recently developed biochemical technique that measures amplification curves (like with quantitative real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT PCR)) of a multitude of different templates in a sample. It combines two different methods in order to profit from the

  10. Pore size distribution, survival probability, and relaxation time in random and ordered arrays of fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomadakis, Manolis M.; Robertson, Teri J.

    2003-07-01

    We present a random walk based investigation of the pore size probability distribution and its moments, the survival probability and mean survival time, and the principal relaxation time, for random and ordered arrays of cylindrical fibers of various orientation distributions. The dimensionless mean survival time, principal relaxation time, mean pore size, and mean square pore size are found to increase with porosity, remain practically independent of the directionality of random fiber beds, and attain lower values for ordered arrays. Wide pore size distributions are obtained for random fiber structures and relatively narrow for ordered square arrays, all in very good agreement with theoretically predicted limiting values. Analytical results derived for the pore size probability and its lower moments for square arrays of fibers practically coincide with the corresponding simulation results. Earlier variational bounds on the mean survival time and principal relaxation time are obeyed by our numerical results in all cases, and are found to be quite sharp up to very high porosities. Dimensionless groups representing the deviation of such bounds from our simulation results vary in practically the same range as the corresponding values reported earlier for beds of spherical particles. A universal scaling expression of the literature relating the mean survival time to the mean pore size [S. Torquato and C. L. Y. Yeong, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8814 (1997)] agrees very well with our results for all types of fiber structures, thus validated for the first time for anisotropic porous media.

  11. A Maximum Time Difference Pipelined Arithmetic Unit Based on CMOS Gate Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐志敏; 夏培肃

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a maximum time difference pipelined arithmetic chip,the 36-bit adder and subtractor based on 1.5μm CMOS gate array.The chip can operate at 60MHz,and consumes less than 0.5Watt.The results are also studied,and a more precise model of delay time difference is proposed.

  12. Mathematical analysis of the real time array PCR (RTA PCR) process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksman J.F.; Pierik, A.

    2012-01-01

    Real Time Array PCR is a recently developed biochemical technique that measures amplification curves (like quantitative real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR)) of a multitude of different templates ina sample. It combines two different techniques to profit from theadvantages of both techniques,

  13. Using adaptive antenna array in LTE with MIMO for space-time processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdourahamane Ahmed Ali

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The actual methods of improvement the existent wireless transmission systems are proposed. Mathematical apparatus is considered and proved by models, graph of which are shown, using the adaptive array antenna in LTE with MIMO for space-time processing. The results show that improvements, which are joined with space-time processing, positively reflects on LTE cell size or on throughput

  14. Mathematical analysis of the real time array PCR (RTA PCR) process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksman, J.F.; Pierik, A.

    2012-01-01

    Real time array PCR (RTA PCR) is a recently developed biochemical technique that measures amplification curves (like with quantitative real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT PCR)) of a multitude of different templates in a sample. It combines two different methods in order to profit from the adva

  15. Braking index of isolated pulsars. II. A novel two-dipole model of pulsar magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamil, O.; Stone, N. J.; Stone, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic dipole radiation model is currently the best approach we have to explain pulsar radiation. However, a most characteristic parameter of the observed radiation, the braking index nobs , shows deviations for all the eight best studied isolated pulsars, from the simple model prediction ndip=3 . The index depends upon the rotational frequency and its first and second time derivatives but also on the assumption that the magnetic dipole moment and inclination angle and the moment of inertia of the pulsar are constant in time. In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. D 91, 063007 (2015)], we showed conclusively that changes in the moment of inertia with frequency alone cannot explain the observed braking indices. Possible observational evidence for the magnetic dipole moment migrating away from the rotational axis at a rate α ˙ ˜0.6 ° per 100 years over the lifetime of the Crab pulsar has been recently suggested by Lyne et al. In this paper, we explore the magnetic dipole radiation model with constant moment of inertia and magnetic dipole moment but variable inclination angle α . We first discuss the effect of the variation of α on the observed braking indices and show they all can be understood. However, no explanation for the origin of the change in α is provided. After discussion of the possible source(s) of magnetism in pulsars, we propose a simple mechanism for the change in α based on a toy model in which the magnetic structure in pulsars consists of two interacting dipoles. We show that such a system can explain the Crab observation and the measured braking indices.

  16. Models of Pulsar Glitches

    CERN Document Server

    Haskell, Brynmor

    2015-01-01

    Radio pulsars provide us with some of the most stable clocks in the universe. Nevertheless several pulsars exhibit sudden spin-up events, known as glitches. More than forty years after their first discovery, the exact origin of these phenomena is still open to debate. It is generally thought that they an observational manifestation of a superfluid component in the stellar interior and provide an insight into the dynamics of matter at extreme densities. In recent years there have been several advances on both the theoretical and observational side, that have provided significant steps forward in our understanding of neutron star interior dynamics and possible glitch mechanisms. In this article we review the main glitch models that have been proposed and discuss our understanding, in the light of current observations.

  17. Electrodynamics of pulsar magnetospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    We review electrodynamics of rotating magnetized neutron stars, from the early vacuum model to recent numerical experiments with plasma-filled magnetospheres. Significant progress became possible due to the development of global particle-in-cell simulations which capture particle acceleration, emission of high-energy photons, and electron-positron pair creation. The numerical experiments show from first principles how and where electric gaps form, and promise to explain the observed pulsar activity from radio waves to gamma-rays.

  18. Strange-pulsar model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, O.G.; Horvath, J.E.; Vucetich, H. (Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, 1900 La Plata, Argentina Nacional de La Plata, Calle 49 y 115, Casilla de Correo 67, 1900 La Plata, (Argentina))

    1990-02-12

    Deep modifications to the current strange-star structure can occur if strange matter is not stable all the way down to zero pressure. This would be the case, for example, if some stable particle is formed at relatively low pressure and/or temperature. We show that the inclusion of a likely specific candidate particle (quark {alpha}) in the strange-matter picture leads to stellar models that present more realistic behavior in the light of current pulsar understanding.

  19. Proper motions of 15 pulsars: a comparison between Bayesian and frequentist algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Li, L; Yuan, J P; Wang, J B; Hobbs, G; Lentati, L; Manchester, R N

    2016-01-01

    We present proper motions for 15 pulsars which are observed regularly by the Nanshan 25-m radio telescope. Two methods, the frequentist method (Coles et al.2011) and the Bayesian (Lentati et al. 2014) method, are used and the results are compared. We demonstrate that the two methods can be applied to young pulsar data sets that exhibit large amounts of timing noise with steep spectral exponents and give consistent results. The measured positions also agree with very-long-baseline interferometric positions. Proper motions for four pulsars are obtained for the first time, and improved values are obtained for five pulsars.

  20. Revisiting the Magnetic and Spin Evolution of Two Young X-ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdman, Robert; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Archibald, Robert Frederic

    2014-08-01

    We present results from timing analysis of two young X-ray pulsars found in the large Magellanic Cloud: the Crab-like energetic pulsar PSR B0540-69 and the so-called "big glitcher", PSR J0537-6910. In both cases, we analyze data taken with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. This work extends the published data sets for these pulsars by approximately doubling their respective data spans. We revisit the glitching activity of these neutron stars, particularly that of PSR J0537-6910, determine more precise glitch and spin parameters, and discuss the implications for the spin and magnetospheric evolution of these interesting pulsars.