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Sample records for pulsar radio emission

  1. Coherent Radio Emission from Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Dipanjan; Gil, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    We review a physical model where the high brightness temperature of 10$^{25}-10^{30}$ K observed in pulsar radio emission is explained by coherent curvature radiation excited in the relativistic electron-positron plasma in the pulsar magnetosphere.

  2. Properties and geometry of radio pulsar emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Johannes Martinus

    2006-01-01

    This thesis consists of a number of studies on the radio emission of pulsars. The central topics are polarisation and multi frequency observations, which both lead to important information on the geometry of the emission. The first chapter introduces different aspects of pulsars that are related to

  3. Nature of microstructure in pulsar radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Machabeli, G Z; Melikidze, G I; Shapakidze, D; Machabeli, George; Khechinashvili, David; Melikidze, George; Shapakidze, David

    2000-01-01

    We present a model for microstructure in pulsar radio emission. We propose that micropulses result from the alteration of the radio wave generation region by nearly transverse drift waves propagating across the pulsar magnetic field and encircling the bundle of the open magnetic field lines. It is demonstrated that such waves can modify significantly curvature of these dipolar field lines. This in turn affects strongly fulfillment of the resonance conditions necessary for the excitation of radio waves. The time-scale of micropulses is therefore determined by the wavelength of drift waves. Main features of the microstructure are naturally explained in the frame of this model.

  4. The nature of pulsar radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyks, J.; Rudak, B.; Demorest, P.

    2010-01-01

    High-quality averaged radio profiles of some pulsars exhibit double, highly symmetric features both in emission and in absorption. It is shown that both types of feature are produced by a split fan beam of extraordinary-mode curvature radiation that is emitted/absorbed by radially extended streams of magnetospheric plasma. With no emissivity in the plane of the stream, such a beam produces bifurcated emission components (BFCs) when our line of sight passes through the plane. An example of a double component created in this way is present in the averaged profile of the 5-ms pulsar J1012+5307. We show that the component can indeed be very well fitted by the textbook formula for the non-coherent beam of curvature radiation in the polarization state that is orthogonal to the plane of electron trajectory. The observed width of the BFC decreases with increasing frequency at a rate that confirms the curvature origin. Likewise, the double absorption features (double notches) are produced by the same beam of the extraordinary-mode curvature radiation, when it is eclipsed by thin plasma streams. The intrinsic property of curvature radiation to create bifurcated fan beams explains the double features in terms of a very natural geometry and implies the curvature origin of pulsar radio emission. Similarly, the `double conal' profiles of class D result from a cut through a wider stream with finite extent in magnetic azimuth. Therefore, their width reacts very slowly to changes of viewing geometry resulting from geodetic precession. The stream-cut interpretation implies a highly non-orthodox origin of both the famous S-swing of polarization angle and the low-frequency pulse broadening in D profiles. The azimuthal structure of polarization modes in the curvature radiation beam provides an explanation for the polarized `multiple imaging' and the edge depolarization of pulsar profiles.

  5. The nature of pulsar radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Dyks, J; Demorest, P

    2009-01-01

    High-quality averaged radio profiles of some pulsars exhibit double, highly symmetric features both in `absorption' and emission. Averaged profile of a 5-ms pulsar J1012+5307 hosts a distinct, extremely symmetric, and bifurcated emission component (BFC) with deep central minimum. We show that the component can be very well fitted by the textbook formula for the non-coherent beam of curvature radiation (CR) in the polarisation state that is orthogonal to the plane of electron trajectory. The separation Delta_bfc of maxima in the BFC is observed to decrease with increasing frequency nu_obs at the rate that is consistent with the curvature origin (Delta_bfc proportional to nu_obs^(-1/3)). With zero emissivity in the plane of electron trajectory, the extraordinary-mode beam can naturally produce deep double absorption features (double notches) observed in other pulsars. The bifurcated emission components are observed when the line of sight passes through splitted fan beams produced by radially-extended streams of...

  6. Radio Emission Physics in the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Eilek, J A

    2016-01-01

    We review our high-time-resolution radio observations of the Crab pulsar and compare our data to a variety of models for the emission physics. The Main Pulse and the Low-Frequency Interpulse come from regions somewhere in the high-altitude emission zones (caustics) that also produce pulsed X-ray and gamma-ray emission. Although no emission model can fully explain these two components, the most likely models suggest they arise from a combination of beam-driven instabilities, coherent charge bunching and strong electromagnetic turbulence. Because the radio power fluctuates on a wide range of timescales, we know the emission zones are patchy and dynamic. It is tempting to invoke unsteady pair creation in high-altitude gaps as source of the variability, but current pair cascade models cannot explain the densities required by any of the likely models. It is harder to account for the mysterious High-Frequency Interpulse. We understand neither its origin within the magnetosphere nor the striking emission bands in it...

  7. Is Coherence Essential to Account for Pulsar Radio Emission?

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B; Qiao, G J; Zhang, Bing

    1999-01-01

    Based on definitions, two joint-criteria, namely, the optical-thin constraint and the energy budget constraint, are proposed to judge whether the emission nature of radio pulsars is incoherent or obligatory to be coherent. We find that the widely accepted criterion, $kT_B \\le \\epsilon$, is not a rational criterion to describe the optical-thin condition, even for the simplest case. The energy budget constraint could be released by introducing a certain efficient radiation mechanism (e.g. the inverse Compton scattering, QL98) with emission power of a single particle as high as a critical value $P_{sing,c} to interpret high luminosities of pulsars in terms of incoherent emission mechanisms, if the optical-thin constraint could be released by certain mechanism as well. Coherence may not be an essential condition to account for pulsar radio emission.

  8. A current circuit model of pulsar radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kunzl, T A; Jessner, A; Kunzl, Th.

    2002-01-01

    We present the outline of a new model for the coherent radio emission of pulsars that succeeds in reproducing the energetics and brightness temperatures of the observed radio emission from the observationally deduced distances of 50-100 pulsar radii above the neutron star in a narrow region. The restrictions imposed by energy conservation, plasma dynamics of the coherent radiation process and propagation effects are used to apply the action of a plasma process like coherent inverse Compton scattering (CICS) (see Benford, 1992). In accordance with our findings (Kunzl et al. 1998a) this process requires Lorentz factors of about 10 which are lower than in most other radio emission models. This implies that no significant pair production can take place near the surface and we expect charge densities close to the Goldreich-Julian value (Goldreich & Julian (1969)). To fulfill the energetic and electrodynamic constraints the model requires constant re-acceleration in dissipation regions which can be interpreted ...

  9. Upper limits on gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Agresti, J; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M; Bayer, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bogenstahl, J; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Busby, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkey, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chiadini, F; Christensen, N; Clark, J; Cochrane, P; Cokelaer, T; Coldwell, R; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Croce, R P; Crooks, D R M; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; D'Ambrosio, E; Dalrymple, J; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; De Bra, D; DeSalvo, R; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Demma, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Dickson, J; Diederichs, G; Dietz, A; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Dumas, J C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Díaz, M; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Fiumara, V; Fotopoulos, N; Franzen, A; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R E; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, J; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Gustafson, R; Günther, M; Hage, B; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Hoyland, D; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Innerhofer, E; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, Peter Ignaz Paul; Kalogera, V; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Krämer, M; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leiner, J; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Longo, M; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lyne, A G; MacInnis, M; Machenschalk, B; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Marano, S; Marka, S; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matone, L; Matta, V; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McKenzie, K; McWilliams, S; Meier, T; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Mikhailov, E; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow Lowry, C; Moylan, A; Mukherjee, S; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Müller, G; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pierro, V; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ribichini, L; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Rüdiger, A; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; Sancho de la Jordana, L; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Sidles, J A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Somiya, K; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vallisneri, M; Van Den Broeck, C; Varvella, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Ward, H; Ward, R; Watts, K; Weidner, A; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C

    2007-01-01

    We present upper limits on the gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars based on data from the third and fourth science runs of the LIGO and GEO600 gravitational wave detectors. The data from both runs have been combined coherently to maximise sensitivity. For the first time pulsars within binary (or multiple) systems have been included in the search by taking into account the signal modulation due to their orbits. Our upper limits are therefore the first measured for 56 of these pulsars. For the remaining 22, our results improve on previous upper limits by up to a factor of 10. For example, our tightest upper limit on the gravitational strain is 3.2e-25 for PSRJ1603-7202, and the equatorial ellipticity of PSRJ2124-3358 is less than 10e-6. Furthermore, our strain upper limit for the Crab pulsar is only three times greater than the fiducial spin-down limit.

  10. Upper limits on gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Ballmer, S.; Bantilan, H.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Belczynski, K.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Busby, D.; Butler, W. E.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Carter, K.; Casey, M. M.; Castaldi, G.; Cepeda, C.; Chalkey, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chiadini, F.; Chin, D.; Chin, E.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Clark, J.; Cochrane, P.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C. N.; Coldwell, R.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Croce, R. P.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Degree, M.; Demma, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; di Credico, A.; Diederichs, G.; Dietz, A.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dupuis, R. J.; Dwyer, J. G.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Finn, L. S.; Fiumara, V.; Fotopoulos, N.; Franzen, A.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Garofoli, J.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L.; González, G.; Gossler, S.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, J.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hammer, D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Harstad, E.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hosken, D.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D.; Innerhofer, E.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jackrel, D.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Kim, C.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lee, B.; Lei, M.; Leiner, J.; Leonhardt, V.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Lindquist, P.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Longo, M.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Marano, S.; Márka, S.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matone, L.; Matta, V.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McKenzie, K.; McNabb, J. W. C.; McWilliams, S.; Meier, T.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C. J.; Meyers, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C.; Moylan, A.; Mudge, D.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Numata, K.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Parameswariah, C.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Rabeling, D.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Regimbau, T.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ribichini, L.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rogan, A. M.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Samidi, M.; de La Jordana, L. Sancho; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, G. H.; Sannibale, V.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Sazonov, A.; Schediwy, S.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Sidles, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Somiya, K.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D. M.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K.-X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarallo, M.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tyler, W.; Ugolini, D.; Ungarelli, C.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Broeck, C.; van Putten, M.; Varvella, M.; Vass, S.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Villar, A.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, H.; Ward, R.; Watts, K.; Webber, D.; Weidner, A.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.; Weiss, R.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitbeck, D. M.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiley, S.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wise, S.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Woods, D.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yunes, N.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M.; Zur Mühlen, H.; Zweizig, J.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.

    2007-08-01

    We present upper limits on the gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars based on data from the third and fourth science runs of the LIGO and GEO 600 gravitational wave detectors. The data from both runs have been combined coherently to maximize sensitivity. For the first time, pulsars within binary (or multiple) systems have been included in the search by taking into account the signal modulation due to their orbits. Our upper limits are therefore the first measured for 56 of these pulsars. For the remaining 22, our results improve on previous upper limits by up to a factor of 10. For example, our tightest upper limit on the gravitational strain is 2.6×10-25 for PSR J1603-7202, and the equatorial ellipticity of PSR J2124 3358 is less than 10-6. Furthermore, our strain upper limit for the Crab pulsar is only 2.2 times greater than the fiducial spin-down limit.

  11. Spectral indices for radio emission of 228 pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun; Wang, Chen; Xu, Jun; Han, Jin-Lin

    2016-10-01

    We determine spectral indices of 228 pulsars by using Parkes pulsar data observed at 1.4 GHz, among which 200 spectra are newly determined. The indices are distributed in the range from ‑4.84 to ‑0.46. Together with known pulsar spectra from literature, we tried to find clues to the pulsar emission process. The weak correlations between the spectral index, the spin-down energy loss rate E and the potential drop in the polar gap ΔΨ hint that emission properties are related to the particle acceleration process in a pulsar's magnetosphere.

  12. On the high frequency polarization of pulsar radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Von Hoensbroech, A; Krawczyk, A

    1998-01-01

    We have analyzed the polarization properties of pulsars at an observing frequency of 4.9 GHz. Together with low frequency data, we are able to trace polarization profiles over more than three octaves into an interesting frequency regime. At those high frequencies the polarization properties often undergo important changes such as significant depolarization. A detailed analysis allowed us to identify parameters, which regulate those changes. A significant correlation was found between the integrated degree of polarization and the loss of rotational energy E^dot. The data were also used to review the widely established pulsar profile classification scheme of core- and cone-type beams. We have discovered the existence of pulsars which show a strongly increasing degree of circular polarization towards high frequencies. Previously unpublished average polarization profiles, recorded at the 100m Effelsberg radio telescope, are presented for 32 radio pulsars at 4.9 GHz. The data were used to derive polarimetric param...

  13. Scattering of pulsar radio emission by the interstellar plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Coles, W A; Gao, J J; Hobbs, G; Verbiest, J P W

    2010-01-01

    We present simulations of scattering phenomena which are important in pulsar observations, but which are analytically intractable. The simulation code, which has also been used for solar wind and atmospheric scattering problems, is available from the authors. These simulations reveal an unexpectedly important role of dispersion in combination with refraction. We demonstrate the effect of analyzing observations which are shorter than the refractive scale. We examine time-of-arrival fluctuations in detail: showing their correlation with intensity and dispersion measure; providing a heuristic model from which one can estimate their contribution to pulsar timing observations; and showing that much of the effect can be corrected making use of measured intensity and dispersion. Finally, we analyze observations of the millisecond pulsar J0437$-$4715, made with the Parkes radio telescope, that show timing fluctuations which are correlated with intensity. We demonstrate that these timing fluctuations can be corrected,...

  14. Observing the Plasma-Physical Processes of Pulsar Radio Emission with Arecibo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Joanna M.

    2017-01-01

    With their enormous densities and fields, neutron stars entail some of the most exotic physics in the cosmos. Similarly, the physical mechanisms of pulsar radio emission are no less exotic, and we are only now beginning to understand them. The talk will provide an introduction to the phenomenology of radio pulsar emission and focus on those aspects of the exquisite Arecibo observations that bear on their challenging emission physics.The commonalities of the radio beamforms of most slow pulsars (and some millisecond pulsars) argue strongly that their magnetic fields have a nearly dipolar structure at the height of their radio emission regions. These heights can often be determined by aberration/retardation analyses. Similarly, measurement of the orientation of the polarized radio emission with respect to the emitting magnetic field facilitates identification of the physical(X/O) emission modes and study of the plasma coupling to the electromagnetic radiation.While the physics of primary plasma generation above the pulsar polar cap is only beginning to be understood, it is clear that the radio pulsars we see are able to generate copious amounts of electron-positron plasma in their emission regions. Within the nearly dipolar field structure of these emission regions, the plasma density is near to that of the Goldreich-Julian model, and so the physical conditions in these regions can be accurately estimated.These conditions show that the plasma frequencies in the emission regions are much higher than the frequency of the emitted radiation, such that the plasma couples most easily to the extraordinary mode as observed. Therefore, the only surviving emission mechanism is curvature radiation from charged solitons, produced by the two-stream instability. Such soliton emission has probably been observed directly in the Crab pulsar; however, a physical theory of charged soliton radiation does not yet exist.

  15. Radio emissions from pulsar companions : a refutable explanation for galactic transients and fast radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Mottez, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    The six known highly dispersed fast radio bursts are attributed to extragalactic radio sources, of unknown origin but extremely energetic. We propose here a new explanation - not requiring an extreme release of energy - involving a body (planet, asteroid, white dwarf) orbiting an extragalactic pulsar. We investigate a theory of radio waves associated to such pulsar-orbiting bodies. We focus our analysis on the waves emitted from the magnetic wake of the body in the pulsar wind. After deriving their properties, we compare them with the observations of various transient radio signals in order to see if they could originate from pulsar-orbiting bodies. The analysis is based on the theory of Alfv\\'en wings: for a body immersed in a pulsar wind, a system of two stationary Alfv\\'en waves is attached to the body, provided that the wind is highly magnetized. When destabilized through plasma instabilities, Alfv\\'en wings can be the locus of strong radio sources convected with the pulsar wind. Assuming a cyclotron mase...

  16. Phase offsets between core and conal components of radio pulsars and their emission altitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Kapoor, R C

    2002-01-01

    We present a new method for investigating emission altitudes of radio pulsar core and conal components by attributing them different altitudes and by providing a framework to understand the resulting longitude offsets between them which are frequently observed. By investigating the contributions to these offsets due to aberration and the magnetic field line sweepback, we show that they are always dominated by aberration for all emission altitudes and inclination angles. This directly allows the conclusion that the core emission does not necessarily come from the surface. Our results and the observational trends imply that for a large number of pulsars the emission altitudes of core and conal components are close when compared to the light cylinder radius but not necessarily relative to the stellar radius. The core/cone altitude differences that we find are typically larger than the individual altitudes ascribed to them so far. Widely different core/cone altitudes for some pulsars are also supported by data an...

  17. Are there real orthogonal polarization modes in pulsar radio emission?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐仁新; 乔国俊

    2000-01-01

    The orthogonal polarization modes (OPM) have been reported observationally and widely accepted by pulsar researchers. However, no acceptable theory can explain the origin of the OPM, which becomes a mystery in pulsar research field. Here a possible way to solve this mystery is pre-sented. We ask a question: Does there exist any real so-called OPM in pulsar radiation? It is proposed that the ’observed OPM’ in individual pulses could be the results of depolarization of pulsar radiation and the observational uncertainties originated f rom polarimeter in observation. A possible method to check this idea is suggested. If the idea is verified, the pulsar research would be influenced significant-ly in theory and in observation.

  18. Are there real orthogonal polarization modes in pulsar radio emission?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The orthogonal polarization modes (OPM) have been reported observationally and widely accepted by pulsar researchers. However, no acceptable theory can explain the origin of the OPM, which becomes a mystery in pulsar research field. Here a possible way to solve this mystery is presented. We ask a question: Does there exist any real so-called OPM in pulsar radiation? It is proposed that the 'observed OPM' in individual pulses could be the results of depolarization of pulsar radiation and the observational uncertainties originated from polarimeter in observation. A possible method to check this idea is suggested. If the idea is verified, the pulsar research would be influenced significantly in theory and in observation.

  19. Detection of decametre-wavelength pulsed radio emission of 40 known pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharenko, V. V.; Vasylieva, I. Y.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Ulyanov, O. M.; Serylak, M.; Zarka, P.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Cognard, I.; Nikolaenko, V. S.

    2013-06-01

    The study of pulsars at the lowest radio frequencies observable from the ground (10-30 MHz) is complicated by strong interstellar (dispersion, scattering) and ionospheric (scintillation, refraction) propagation effects, as well as intense Galactic background noise and interference. However, it permits us to measure interstellar plasma parameters (the effects of which increase by a power of two to >4 times the wavelength), the spectrum and the pulse profile at low frequencies more accurately. Up to now, only ˜10 pulsars have been successfully detected at these frequencies. The recent upgrade of the receivers at the Ukrainian T-shaped Radio telescope, second modification (UTR-2) has increased its sensitivity and motivated a new search for pulsed radio emissions. In this work we carried out a survey of known pulsars with declination above -10°, period >0.1 s and dispersion measure (DM) < 30 pc cm-3, i.e. a sample of 74 sources. Our goal was either to detect pulsars not recorded before in the decametre range or to identify factors that prevent their detection. As a result, we have detected the radio emission of 40 pulsars, i.e. 55 per cent of the observed sample. For 30 of them, this was a first detection at these frequencies. Parameters of their average profiles have been calculated, including the intrinsic widening of the pulse (not due to interstellar scattering) with decreasing frequency. Furthermore, two pulsars beyond the selected DM (B0138+59 with DM ≈ 35 pc cm-3 and B0525+21 with DM ≈51 pc cm-3) were also detected. Our results indicate that there is still room to detect new transient and pulsed sources with low-frequency observations.

  20. Detection of radio emission from the gamma-ray pulsar J1732-3131 at 327 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Yogesh; Krishnakumar, M. A.; Naidu, Arun K.; Roy, Subhashis; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Kerr, Matthew; Manoharan, P. K.

    2017-10-01

    Although originally discovered as a radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar, J1732-3131 has exhibited intriguing detections at decameter wavelengths. We report an extensive follow-up of the pulsar at 327 MHz with the Ooty radio telescope. Using the previously observed radio characteristics, and with an effective integration time of 60 h, we present a detection of the pulsar at a confidence level of 99.82 per cent. The 327 MHz mean flux density is estimated to be 0.5-0.8 mJy, which establishes the pulsar to be a steep spectrum source and one of the least luminous pulsars known to date. We also phase-aligned the radio and gamma-ray profiles of the pulsar, and measured the phase-offset between the main peaks in the two profiles to be 0.24 ± 0.06. We discuss the observed phase-offset in the context of various trends exhibited by the radio-loud gamma-ray pulsar population, and suggest that the gamma-ray emission from J1732-3131 is best explained by outer magnetosphere models. Details of our analysis leading to the pulsar detection, and measurements of various parameters and their implications relevant to the pulsar's emission mechanism are presented.

  1. Optical polarisation of the Crab pulsar: precision measurements and comparison to the radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Słowikowska, Agnieszka; Kramer, Michael; Stefanescu, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The linear polarisation of the Crab pulsar and its close environment was derived from observations with the high-speed photo-polarimeter OPTIMA at the 2.56-m Nordic Optical Telescope in the optical spectral range (400 - 750 nm). Time resolution as short as 11 microseconds, which corresponds to a phase interval of 1/3000 of the pulsar rotation, and high statistics allow the derivation of polarisation details never achieved before. The degree of optical polarisation and the position angle correlate in surprising details with the light curves at optical wavelengths and at radio frequencies of 610 and 1400 MHz. Our observations show that there exists a subtle connection between presumed non-coherent (optical) and coherent (radio) emissions. This finding supports previously detected correlations between the optical intensity of the Crab and the occurrence of giant radio pulses. Interpretation of our observations require more elaborate theoretical models than those currently available in the literature.

  2. Radio emission from Sgr A*: pulsar transits through the accretion disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, I. M.; Petropoulou, M.; Mimica, P.; Giannios, D.

    2017-06-01

    Radiatively inefficient accretion flow models have been shown to accurately account for the spectrum and luminosity observed from Sgr A* in the X-ray regime down to mm wavelengths. However, observations at a few GHz cannot be explained by thermal electrons alone but require the presence of an additional non-thermal particle population. Here, we propose a model for the origin of such a population in the accretion flow via means of a pulsar orbiting the supermassive black hole in our Galaxy. Interactions between the relativistic pulsar wind with the disc lead to the formation of a bow shock in the wind. During the pulsar's transit through the accretion disc, relativistic pairs, accelerated at the shock front, are injected into the disc. The radio-emitting particles are long lived and remain within the disc long after the pulsar's transit. Periodic pulsar transits through the disc result in regular injection episodes of non-thermal particles. We show that for a pulsar with spin-down luminosity Lsd ∼ 3 × 1035 erg s-1 and a wind Lorentz factor of γw ∼ 104 a quasi-steady synchrotron emission is established with luminosities in the 1-10 GHz range comparable to the observed one.

  3. A Stochastic Acceleration Model of Radio Emission from Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, S.; Asano, K.

    2016-06-01

    The broadband emission of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) is well described by non-thermal emissions from accelerated electrons and positrons. However, the difference of spectral indices at radio and X-rays are not reproduced by the standard shock particle acceleration and cooling processes, and then, for example, the broken power-law spectrum for the particle energy distribution at the injection has been groundlessly adopted. Here, we propose a possible resolution for the particle distribution; the radio emitting particles are not accelerated at the pulsar wind termination shock but are stochastically accelerated by turbulence inside the PWNe. The turbulence may be induced by the interaction of the pulsar wind with the supernova ejecta. We upgrade our one-zone spectral evolution model including the stochastic acceleration and apply it to the Crab Nebula. We consider both continuous and impulsive injections of particles to the stochastic acceleration process. The radio emission in the Crab Nebula is reproduced by our stochastic acceleration model. The required forms of the momentum diffusion coefficient will be discussed.

  4. Particle acceleration and radio emission for SGRs/AXPs as white dwarf pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, R. V.; Coelho, Jaziel; Malheiro, M.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, an alternative model based on white dwarfs pulsars has been proposed to explain a class of pulsars known as Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGR) and Anomalus X-Ray Pulsars (AXP) [6][4], usually named as magnetars. In this model the magnetized white dwarfs can have surface magnetic field B ∼ 107 — 1010G and rotate very fast with frequencies ω ∼ 1 rad/s, allowing them to produce large electromagnetic (EM) potentials and generate electron-positron pairs. These EM potentials are comparable with the ones of neutron stars pulsars with strong magnetic fields. In our study we consider two possible processes associated with the particle acceleration: in one we have the pair production near to the star polar caps i.e., inside the light cylinder where magnetic-field lines are closed, on the other the creation of pair is in the Outer Magnetosphere i.e., far away of the star surface where magnetic field are open [1]. This analysis of the possibility of radio emission was done for all the 23 SGRs/AXPs of the McGill Online Magnetar Catalog [7] that contains the current information available on these sources. Our work is a first attempted to find an explanation for the puzzle why for all the SGRs/AXPs was expected radio emission, but it was observed in only four of them.

  5. High Frequency Cut-off and Changing of Radio Emission Mechanism in Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Kontorovich, V M

    2012-01-01

    Pulsars are the fast rotating neutron stars with strong magnetic field emitting over a wide frequency range. In spite of the efforts during 40 years after the discovery of pulsars, the mechanism of their radio emission remains to be unknown so far. We propose a new approach to solving this problem. The object of our study is a sample of pulsars with a high-frequency break of the spectrum from Pushchino catalogue. A theoretical explanation of the observed dependence of the high-frequency break from the pulsar period is given. The dependence of the break position from the magnetic field is predicted. This explanation is based on a new mechanism for electron emission in the inner polar gap. Radiation occurs when electrons are accelerated in the electric field rising from zero at the star surface. Acceleration passes through a maximum and tends to zero when the electron velocity approaches the velocity of light. The all radiated power is allocated to the radio band. The averaging over the polar cap, with some nat...

  6. Investigation of the Earth Ionosphere using the Radio Emission of Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Ulyanov, O M; Mukha, D V; Seredkina, A A

    2013-01-01

    The investigation of the Earth ionosphere both in a quiet and a disturbed states is still desirable. Despite recent progress in its modeling and in estimating the electron concentration along the line of sight by GPS signals, the impact of the disturbed ionosphere and magnetic field on the wave propagation still remains not sufficiently understood. This is due to lack of information on the polarization of GPS signals, and due to poorly conditioned models of the ionosphere at high altitudes and strong perturbations. In this article we consider a possibility of using the data of pulsar radio emission, along with the traditional GPS system data, for the vertical and oblique sounding of the ionosphere. This approach also allows to monitor parameters of the propagation medium, such as the dispersion measure and the rotation measure using changes of the polarization between pulses. By using a selected pulsar constellation it is possible to increase the number of directions in which parameters of the ionosphere and ...

  7. Probing Pulsar Emission on Short Timescales: Rotating Radio Transients, Cyclic Spectroscopy, and Single-Pulse Studies of Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palliyaguru, Nipuni Tharaka

    Rotating radio transients (RRATs) are neutron stars are that characterized by the emission of strong sporadic bursts. We have analysed the long- and short-term time dependence of the pulse arrival times and the pulse detection rates for eight RRAT sources from the Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey (PMPS). We find significant periodicities in the individual pulse arrival times from six RRATs. These periodicities range from ˜30 minutes to 2100 days and from one to 16 independent (i.e. non-harmonically related) periodicities are detected for each RRAT. In addition, we find that pulse emission is a random process on short (hour-long) time scales but that most of the objects exhibit longer term (months-years) non-random behaviour. We find that PSRs J1819--1458 and J1317--5759 emit more doublets (two consecutive pulses) and triplets (three consecutive pulses) than is expected in random pulse distributions. No evidence for such an excess is found for the other RRATs. There are several different models for RRAT emission depending on both extrinsic and intrinsic factors which are consistent with these properties. Light travel time changes due to gravitational waves may be detected within the next decade through precision timing of an array of millisecond pulsars. Removal of frequency-dependent interstellar medium (ISM) delays due to dispersion and scattering is a key issue in the detection process. Current timing algorithms routinely correct pulse times of arrival (TOAs) for time-variable delays due to cold plasma dispersion. However, none of the major pulsar timing groups routinely correct for delays due to scattering from multi-path propagation in the ISM. Scattering introduces a phase change in the signal that results in pulse broadening and arrival time delays. As a step toward a more comprehensive ISM propagation delay correction, we demonstrate through a simulation that we can accurately recover pulse broadening functions (PBFs), such as those that would be introduced

  8. Radio-quiet Gamma-ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lupin Chun-Che

    2016-09-01

    A radio-quiet γ-ray pulsar is a neutron star that has significant γ-ray pulsation but without observed radio emission or only limited emission detected by high sensitivity radio surveys. The launch of the Fermi spacecraft in 2008 opened a new epoch to study the population of these pulsars. In the 2nd Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog of γ-ray pulsars, there are 35 (30 % of the 117 pulsars in the catalog) known samples classified as radio-quiet γ-ray pulsars with radio flux density (S1400) of less than 30 μJy. Accompanying the observations obtained in various wavelengths, astronomers not only have the opportunity to study the emitting nature of radio-quiet γ-ray pulsars but also have proposed different models to explain their radiation mechanism. This article will review the history of the discovery, the emission properties, and the previous efforts to study pulsars in this population. Some particular cases known as Geminga-like pulsars (e.g., PSR J0633+1746, PSR J0007+7303, PSR J2021+4026, and so on) are also specified to discuss their common and specific features.

  9. Magnetar-like Activity and Radio Emission Variability from the High Magnetic Field Pulsar PSR J1119-6127

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Aaron B.; Majid, Walid A.; Horiuchi, Shinji; Kocz, Jonathon; Lippuner, Jonas; Prince, Thomas Allen

    2017-08-01

    We present results from a high frequency radio monitoring campaign of the high magnetic field pulsar PSR J1119-6127 with the Deep Space Network (DSN) 70 m antenna (DSS-43) in Canberra, Australia, following recently reported magnetar-like activity. Dramatic pulsed radio emission variability was observed over several months at S-band (2.3 GHz) and X-band (8.4 GHz) after an initial disappearance of radio pulsations. The S-band pulse profile evolved from a multiple-peaked structure into a single-peak over several weeks, which is extremely unusual for radio pulsars. We also observed significant differences between the polarized pulse profiles at both S-band and X-band. In addition, pulsed emission variability was observed on shorter timescales, of order tens of minutes, during individual observations.The spectral index from 2.3 GHz to 8.4 GHz varied between flux densities exceeding 0.49/0.27 Jy.Although PSR J1119-6127 is normally a rotation-powered pulsar, it is possible that the decay of the pulsar’s strong magnetic field, together with other magnetar-like mechanisms, may be responsible for the observed emission variability. We will discuss how these results could connect magnetars with high-B field pulsars.

  10. An analysis of radio pulsar nulling statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Survival analysis methods are used to seek correlations between the fraction of null pulsars and other pulsar characteristics for an ensemble of 72 radio pulsars. The strongest correlation is found between the null fraction and the pulse period, suggesting that nulling is a manifestation of a faltering emission mechanism. Correlations are also found between the fraction of null pulses and other parameters that have a strong dependence on the pulse period. The results presented here suggest that nulling is broad-band and may ultimately be explained in terms of polar cap models of pulsar emission.

  11. The Velocity Distribution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Arzoumanian, Z; Cordes, J M

    2002-01-01

    (Abridged) We infer the velocity distribution of radio pulsars by modelling their birth, evolution, and detection in large-scale 0.4 GHz pulsar surveys, and by comparing model distributions of measurable pulsar properties with survey data using a likelihood function. We test models that characterize a population's birth rate, luminosity, shutoff of radio emission, birth locations, and birth velocities. We infer that the radio beam luminosity (i) is comparable to the energy flux of relativistic particles in models for spin-driven magnetospheres, signifying that radio emission losses reach nearly 100% for the oldest pulsars; and (ii) scales approximately as sqrt(Edot) which, in magnetosphere models, is proportional to the voltage drop available for acceleration of particles. We find that a two-component velocity distribution with characteristic velocities of 90 km/s and 500 km/s is greatly preferred to any one-component distribution. We explore some consequences of the preferred birth velocity distribution: (i)...

  12. VARIABILITY OF THE PULSED RADIO EMISSION FROM THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD PULSAR PSR J0529-6652

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, F.; Altemose, D.; Li, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Lorimer, D. R. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2013-01-10

    We have studied the variability of PSR J0529-6652, a radio pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), using observations conducted at 1390 MHz with the Parkes 64 m telescope. PSR J0529-6652 is detectable as a single pulse emitter, with amplitudes that classify the pulses as giant pulses. This makes PSR J0529-6652 the second known giant pulse emitter in the LMC, after PSR B0540-69. The fraction of the emitted pulses detectable from PSR J0529-6652 at this frequency is roughly two orders of magnitude greater than it is for either PSR B0540-69 or the Crab pulsar (if the latter were located in the LMC). We have measured a pulse nulling fraction of 83.3% {+-} 1.5% and an intrinsic modulation index of 4.07 {+-} 0.29 for PSR J0529-6652. The modulation index is significantly larger than values previously measured for typical radio pulsars but is comparable to values reported for members of several other neutron star classes. The large modulation index, giant pulses, and large nulling fraction suggest that this pulsar is phenomenologically more similar to these other, more variable sources, despite having spin and physical characteristics that are typical of the unrecycled radio pulsar population. The large modulation index also does not appear to be consistent with the small value predicted for this pulsar by a model of polar cap emission outlined by Gil and Sendyk. This conclusion depends to some extent on the assumption that PSR J0529-6652 is exhibiting core emission, as suggested by its simple profile morphology, narrow profile width, and previously measured profile polarization characteristics.

  13. Low Frequency Radio Emission of Pulsar PSR J1907+0919 Associated with the Magnetar SGR 1900+14

    CERN Document Server

    Shitov, Yu P; Kutuzov, S M; Shitov, Yu. P.

    2000-01-01

    The soft gamma repeater SGR 1900+14 was observed in Pushchino observatorysince 1988 December using BSA radio telescope operating at 111 MHz. We havedetected the pulsed radio emission (Shitov 1999) with the same 5.16 s periodthat was reported earlier for this object. The timing analysis has shown thatthis new radio pulsar PSR J1907+0919 associated with SGR 1900+14 has asuperstrong magnetic field, which is 8.1 * 10^14 G, thereby confirming that itis a "magnetar". The dispersion measure of PSR J1907+0919 is 281.4(9) pc *cm^(-3) which gives an estimate of the pulsar's distance as about 5.8 kpc.

  14. Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Original Millisecond and Black Widow Pulsars: a case for Caustic Radio Emission?

    CERN Document Server

    Guillemot, L; Venter, C; Kerr, M; Pancrazi, B; Livingstone, M; Janssen, G H; Jaroenjittichai, P; Kramer, M; Cognard, I; Stappers, B W; Harding, A K; Camilo, F; Espinoza, C M; Freire, P C C; Gargano, F; Grove, J E; Johnston, S; Michelson, P F; Noutsos, A; Parent, D; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Shannon, R; Smith, D A; Theureau, G; Thorsett, S E; Webb, N

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma-ray emission from the fast millisecond pulsars (MSPs) B1937+21 (also known as J1939+2134) and B1957+20 (J1959+2048) using 18 months of survey data recorded by the \\emph{Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT) and timing solutions based on radio observations conducted at the Westerbork and Nan\\c{c}ay radio telescopes. In addition, we analyzed archival \\emph{RXTE} and \\emph{XMM-Newton} X-ray data for the two MSPs, confirming the X-ray emission properties of PSR B1937+21 and finding evidence ($\\sim 4\\sigma$) for pulsed emission from PSR B1957+20 for the first time. In both cases the gamma-ray emission profile is characterized by two peaks separated by half a rotation and are in close alignment with components observed in radio and X-rays. These two pulsars join PSRs J0034-0534 and J2214+3000 to form an emerging class of gamma-ray MSPs with phase-aligned peaks in different energy bands. The modeling of the radio and gamma-ray emission profiles suggests co-located emission regions...

  15. Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Original Millisecond and Black Widow Pulsars: A Case for Caustic Radio Emission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, L.; Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Kerr, M.; Pancrazi, B.; Livingstone, M.; Janssen, G. H.; Jaroenjittichai, P.; Kramer, M.; Cognard, I.; Stappers, B. W.; Harding, A. K.; Camilo, F.; Espinoza, C. M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Gargano, F.; Grove, J. E.; Johnston, S.; Michelson, P. F.; Noutsos, A.; Parent, D.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Shannon, R.; Smith, D. A.; Theureau, G.; Thorsett, S. E.; Webb, N.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma-ray emission from the fast millisecond pulsars (MSPs) B1937+21 (also known as J1939+2134) and B1957+20 (J1959+2048) using 18 months of survey data recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and timing solutions based on radio observations conducted at the Westerbork and Nançay radio telescopes. In addition, we analyzed archival Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and XMM-Newton X-ray data for the two MSPs, confirming the X-ray emission properties of PSR B1937+21 and finding evidence (~4σ) for pulsed emission from PSR B1957+20 for the first time. In both cases the gamma-ray emission profile is characterized by two peaks separated by half a rotation and are in close alignment with components observed in radio and X-rays. These two pulsars join PSRs J0034-0534 and J2214+3000 to form an emerging class of gamma-ray MSPs with phase-aligned peaks in different energy bands. The modeling of the radio and gamma-ray emission profiles suggests co-located emission regions in the outer magnetosphere.

  16. Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Original Millisecond and Black Widow Pulsars: A Case for Caustic Radio Emission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, L.; Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Kerr, M.; Pancrazi, B.; Livingstone, M.; Janssen, G. H.; Jaroenjittichai, P.; Kramer, M.; Cognard, I.; Stappers, B. W.; Harding, A. K.; Camilo, F.; Espinoza, C. M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Gargano, F.; Grove, J. E.; Johnston, S.; Michelson, P. F.; Noutsos, A.; Parent, D.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Shannon, R.; Smith, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma-ray emission from the fast millisecond pulsars (MSPs) B1937+21 (also known as J1939+2134) and B1957+20 (J1959+2048) using 18 months of survey data recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and timing solutions based on radio observations conducted at the Westerbork and Nancay radio telescopes. In addition, we analyzed archival RXTE and XMM-Newton X-ray data for the two MSPs, confirming the X-ray emission properties of PSR B1937+21 and finding evidence (approx. 4(sigma)) for pulsed emission from PSR B1957+20 for the first time. In both cases the gamma-ray emission profile is characterized by two peaks separated by half a rotation and are in close alignment with components observed in radio and X-rays. These two pulsars join PSRs J0034..0534 and J2214+3000 to form an emerging class of gamma-ray MSPs with phase-aligned peaks in different energy bands. The modeling of the radio and gamma-ray emission pro les suggests co-located emission regions in the outer magnetosphere.

  17. Exploring Radio Pulsars With New Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torne, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    Pulsars are rapidly-rotating, highly-magnetized compact neutron stars. Their strong gravitational and magnetic fields, together with the stability of their rotations and the precision with which we can measure them using radio telescopes, make pulsars unique laboratories for a wide variety of physical experiments. This thesis presents an investigation of the application of new receiver technologies and observing techniques at different radio wavelengths to the search for and study of pulsars. Discovering new pulsars always expands our capabilities to do new science. In general, the most exciting pulsars are those in binary systems because of their potential in high-precision tests of General Relativity and other gravity theories, and for constraining the Equation-of-State of ultra-dense matter. I present a search for pulsars in the Galactic Centre, where the probabilities of finding pulsar binaries, including the long-sought pulsar-black hole system, are high. The data were taken with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope and used high radio frequencies between 4.85 and 18.95 GHz to partially overcome the strong scattering in the direction to the centre of the Galaxy. With approximately 50 per cent of the results reviewed, no new pulsars have been discovered. We carried out a study of the sensitivity limits of the survey, finding that our sensitivity to Galactic Centre pulsars is highly reduced by the contributions to the total system noise of the Galactic Centre background and the atmosphere. We conclude that the paucity of detections in this and perhaps also previous similar surveys is likely due to insufficient sensitivity, and not a lack of pulsars in the region. In March 2013, a radio magnetar, one of the rarest types of pulsars, became suddenly visible from the Galactic Centre. I led two multifrequency observing campaigns on this source, SGR J1745-2900, in order to study its radio emission properties. Four different observatories were involved (including

  18. Searches for Radio Pulsars & Fast Transients and Multiwavelength Studies of Single-pulse Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaliger, Mitchell B.

    Pulsars are excellent tools for studying a wide array of astrophysical phenomena (e.g. gravitational waves, the interstellar medium, general relativity), yet they are still not fully understood. What are their emission processes and how do they change at different energies? How is giant pulse emission different from regular emission? How are different classes of pulsars (RRATs, magnetars, nulling pulsars, etc.) related? Answering these questions will not only help us to understand pulsars in general, but will also help improve techniques for pulsar searches and timing, gravitational wave searches, and single-pulse searches. The work we present here aims to answer these questions through studies of giant pulse emission, the discovery of new pulsars, and single-pulse studies of a large population of pulsars and RRATs. We took advantage of open telescope time on the 43-m telescope in Green Bank, WV to conduct a long-term study of giant pulses from the Crab pulsar at 1.2 GHz and 330 MHz. Over a timespan of 15 months, we collected a total of 95000 giant pulses which we correlated with both gamma-ray photons from the Fermi satellite and giant pulses collected at 8.9 GHz. Statistics of these pulses show that their amplitudes follow power-law distributions, with indices in the range of 2.1 to 3.1. The correlation with giant pulses at 8.9 GHz showed that the emission processes at 1.2 GHz and 8.9 GHz are related, despite significant profile differences. The correlation with Fermi gamma-ray photons was to test if increased pair production in the magnetosphere was the cause of giant pulses. Our findings suggest that, while it may play a role, increased pair production is not the dominant cause of giant pulses. As part of a single-pulse study, we reprocessed the archival Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey, discovering six previously unknown pulsars. PSR J0922-52 has a period of 9.68 ms and a DM of 122.4 pc cm-3. PSR J1147-66 has a period of 3.72 ms and a DM of 133.8 pc cm-3. PSR J

  19. Search for the Giant Pulses Search for the Giant Pulses - an extreme phenomenon in radio pulsar emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantsev, A N

    2016-01-01

    Here we present results of our search for Giant Pulses(GPs) from pulsars of Northern Hemisphere. Our survey was carried out at a frequency of 111 MHz using the Large Phased Array (LPA) radio telescope. Up to now we have detected regular generation of strong pulses satisfying the criteria of GPs from 2 pulsars: B1133+16, B1237+25.

  20. Radio polarimetry of Galactic centre pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Schnitzeler, D H F M; Ferrière, K; Kramer, M; Lee, K J; Noutsos, A; Shannon, R M

    2016-01-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic centre (GC) we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A*. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ~ 16-33 microgauss; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (~ 12 degrees). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsar...

  1. Populations and evolution of radio pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李向东; 汪珍如

    1996-01-01

    A new physical parameter Q=log(We/P2/3) is defined as a criterion for judging whether a radio pulsar is a normal pulsar or a recycled pulsar originating from accreting binary systems.Based on the definition,the observational characteristics and the evolution of the two groups of pulsars are discussed.

  2. A New Class of Radio Quiet Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.

    1997-01-01

    The complete absence of radio pulsars with periods exceeding a few seconds has lead to the popular notion of the existence of a high $P$ death line. In the standard picture, beyond this boundary, pulsars with low spin rates cannot accelerate particles above the stellar surface to high enough energies to initiated pair cascades through curvature radiation, and the pair creation needed for radio emission is strongly suppressed. In this paper we postulate the existence of another pulsar ``death line,'' corresponding to high magnetic fields $B$ in the upper portion of the $\\dot{P}$--$P$ diagram, a domain where few radio pulsars are observed. The origin of this high $B$ boundary, which occurs when $B$ becomes comparable to or exceeds $10^{13}$ Gauss, is again due to the suppression of magnetic pair creation $\\gamma\\to e^+e^-$, but in this instance, primarily because of ineffective competition with the exotic QED process of magnetic photon splitting. This paper describes the origin, shape and position of the new ``...

  3. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, A. D.; Keith, M.; Hobbs, G.; Norris, R. P.; Mao, M. Y.; Middelberg, E.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50 per cent duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  4. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    CERN Document Server

    Keith, A D Cameron M J; Norris, R P; Mao, M Y; Middelberg, E

    2011-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50% duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  5. Young Radio Pulsars in Galactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Boyles, Jason; Turk, Phil J; Mnatsakanov, Robert; Lynch, Ryan S; Ransom, Scott M; Freire, Paulo C; Belczynski, Khris

    2011-01-01

    Currently three isolated radio pulsars and one binary radio pulsar with no evidence of any previous recycling are known in 97 surveyed Galactic globular clusters. As pointed out by Lyne et al., the presence of these pulsars cannot be explained by core-collapse supernovae, as is commonly assumed for their counterparts in the Galactic disk. We apply a Bayesian analysis to the results from surveys for radio pulsars in globular clusters and find the number of potentially observable non-recycled radio pulsars present in all clusters to be -0.6. In this case, the potentially observable population of such young pulsars is 447^{+1420}_{-399} (the error bars give the 95% confidence interval) and their birth rate is 0.012^{+0.037}_{-0.010} pulsars per century. The mostly likely creation scenario to explain these pulsars is the electron capture supernova of a OMgNe white dwarf.

  6. Stokes tomography of radio pulsar magnetospheres. II. Millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, C T Y

    2011-01-01

    The radio polarization characteristics of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) differ significantly from those of non-recycled pulsars. In particular, the position angle (PA) swings of many MSPs deviate from the S-shape predicted by the rotating vector model, even after relativistic aberration is accounted for, indicating that they have non-dipolar magnetic geometries, likely due to a history of accretion. Stokes tomography uses phase portraits of the Stokes parameters as a diagnostic tool to infer a pulsar's magnetic geometry and orientation. This paper applies Stokes tomography to MSPs, generalizing the technique to handle interpulse emission. We present an atlas of look-up tables for the Stokes phase portraits and PA swings of MSPs with current-modified dipole fields, filled core and hollow cone beams, and two empirical linear polarization models. We compare our look-up tables to data from 15 MSPs and find that the Stokes phase portraits for a current-modified dipole approximately match several MSPs whose PA swings ...

  7. Discovery of Two High-Magnetic-Field Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Camilo, F M; Lyne, A G; Manchester, R N; Bell, J F; D'Amico, N; McKay, N P F; Crawford, F

    2000-01-01

    We report the discovery of two young isolated radio pulsars with very high inferred magnetic fields. PSR J1119-6127 has period P = 0.407 s, and the largest period derivative known among radio pulsars, Pdot = 4.0e-12. Under standard assumptions these parameters imply a characteristic spin-down age of only tau = 1.6 kyr and a surface dipole magnetic field strength of B = 4.1e13 G. We have measured a stationary period-second-derivative for this pulsar, resulting in a braking index of n = 2.91+-0.05. We have also observed a glitch in the rotation of the pulsar, with fractional period change Delta_P/P = -4.4e-9. Archival radio imaging data suggest the presence of a previously uncataloged supernova remnant centered on the pulsar. The second pulsar, PSR J1814-1744, has P = 3.975 s and Pdot = 7.4e-13. These parameters imply tau = 85 kyr, and B = 5.5e13 G, the largest of any known radio pulsar. Both PSR J1119-6127 and PSR J1814-1744 show apparently normal radio emission in a regime of magnetic field strength where som...

  8. Nonlinear reflection from the surface of neutron stars and features of radio emission from the pulsar in the Crab nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorovich, V. M.

    2016-08-01

    There are no explanations for the high-frequency component of the emission from the pulsar in the Crab nebula, but it may be a manifestation of instability in nonlinear reflection from the star's surface. Radiation from relativistic positrons flying from the magnetosphere to the star and accelerated by the electric field of the polar gap is reflected. The instability involves stimulated scattering on surface waves.

  9. Radio Quiet Pulsars with Ultra-Strong Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.

    1998-01-01

    The notable absence of radio pulsars having measured magnetic dipole surface field strengths above $B_0\\sim 3\\times 10^{13}$ Gauss naturally raises the question of whether this forms an upper limit to pulsar magnetization. Recently there has been increasing evidence that neutron stars possessing higher dipole spin-down fields do in fact exist, including a growing list of anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) with long periods and spinning down with high period derivatives, implying surface fields of $10^{14}$--$10^{15}$ Gauss. Furthermore, the recently reported X-ray period and period derivative for the Soft Gamma-ray Repeater (SGR) source SGR1806-20 suggest a surface field around $10^{15}$ Gauss. None of these high-field pulsars have yet been detected as radio pulsars. We propose that high-field pulsars should be radio-quiet because electron-positron pair production in their magnetospheres, thought to be essential for radio emission, is efficiently suppressed in ultra-strong fields ($B_0\\gtrsim 4\\times 10^{13}$ Gau...

  10. On magnetic fields of radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Nikitina, E B

    2016-01-01

    We used the magneto-dipole radiation mechanism for the braking of radio pulsars to calculate the new values of magnetic inductions at the surfaces of neutron stars. For this aim we estimated the angles ? between the rotation axis and the magnetic moment of the neutron star for 376 radio pulsars using three different methods. It was shown that there was the predominance of small inclinations of the magnetic axes. Using the obtained values of the angle ? we calculated the equatorial magnetic inductions for pulsars considered. These inductions are several times higher as a rule than corresponding values in the known catalogs.

  11. Youngest Radio Pulsar Revealed with Green Bank Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's (NSF) newly commissioned Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) have detected remarkably faint radio signals from an 820 year-old pulsar, making it the youngest radio-emitting pulsar known. This discovery pushes the boundaries of radio telescope sensitivity for discovering pulsars, and will enable scientists to conduct observations that could lead to a better understanding of how these stars evolve. The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope "Important questions about pulsars may be answered by long-term monitoring of objects such as the one we just detected," said Fernando Camilo of Columbia University in New York City. "Young pulsars are particularly rare, and being able to study such a young one at radio wavelengths provides an outstanding opportunity to learn critical facts about their evolution and workings." The results of this research, based on observations conducted on February 22-23, 2002, were accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. Scientists have long suspected that a pulsar - a rapidly spinning, superdense neutron star - was born when a giant star ended its life in a cataclysmic supernova explosion observed in late summer of 1181, as suggested by Japanese and Chinese historical records. For the past 20 years, astronomers have searched this supernova remnant (3C58), located 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia, for the telltale pulsations of a newly born pulsar. Late in 2001, data from NASA's Chandra X-ray satellite confirmed its existence, but it remained an elusive quarry for radio telescopes. "We believed from historical records and certainly knew from recent X-ray observations that this star was there," Camilo remarked, "but despite many attempts, no one had been able to find any radio pulsations from it because the signals are, it turns out, incredibly weak." For comparison, this pulsar's radio emission is some 250

  12. A Radio Pulsar Spinning at 716 Hz

    CERN Document Server

    Hessels, J W T; Stairs, I H; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Camilo, F; Hessels, Jason W.T.; Ransom, Scott M.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; Freire, Paulo C.C.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Camilo, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    We have discovered a 716-Hz eclipsing binary radio pulsar in the globular cluster Terzan 5 using the Green Bank Telescope. It is the fastest-spinning neutron star ever found, breaking the 23-year-old record held by the 642-Hz pulsar B1937+21. The difficulty in detecting this pulsar, due to its very low flux density and high eclipse fraction (~40% of the orbit), suggests that even faster-spinning neutron stars exist. If the pulsar has a mass less than 2 Msun, then its radius is constrained by the spin rate to be < 16 km. The short period of this pulsar also constrains models that suggest gravitational radiation, through an r-mode instability, limits the maximum spin frequency of neutron stars.

  13. Radio pulsar death lines to SGRs/AXPs and white dwarfs pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Malheiro, M. [Departamento de Física, Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, ITA - DCTA, Vila das Acácias, São José dos Campos, 12228-900 SP (Brazil); Coelho, J. G. [INPE - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Divisão de Astrofísica, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, São José dos Campos, 12227-010 SP (Brazil)

    2015-12-17

    Recently, an alternative model based on white dwarfs pulsars has been proposed to explain a class of pulsars known as Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGR) and Anomalus X-Ray Pulsars (AXP) [1], usually named as magnetars. In this model, the magnetized white dwarfs can have surface magnetic field B ∼ 10{sup 7} − 10{sup 10} G and rotate very fast with angular frequencies Ω ∼ 1 rad/s, allowing them to produce large electromagnetic (EM) potentials and generate electron-positron pairs. These EM potentials are comparable with the ones of neutron star pulsars with strong magnetic fields and even larger. In this study we consider two possible processes associated with the particle acceleration, both of them are common used to explain radio emission in neutron star pulsars: in the first process the pair production happens near to the star polar caps, i.e. inside of the light cylinder where magnetic field lines are closed; in the second one the creation of pair happens in the outer magnetosphere, i.e. far away of the star surface where magnetic field lines are open [2]. The analysis of the possibility of radio emission were done for 23 SGRs/AXPs of the McGill Online Magnetar Catalog [3] that contains the current information available on these sources. The results of this work show that the model where the particles production occur in the outer magnetosphere emission “o2” is the process compatible with the astronomical observations of absence of radio emission for almost all SGRs/AXPs when these sources are understood as white dwarf pulsars. Our work is a first attempted to find an explanation for the puzzle why for almost all the SGRs/AXPs was expected radio emission, but it was observed in only four of them. These four sources, as it was suggested recently [4], seem to belong to an high magnetic field neutron star pulsar category, different from all the others SGRs/AXPs that our work indicate to belong to a new class of white dwarf pulsars, very fast and magnetized.

  14. Radio pulsar death lines to SGRs/AXPs and white dwarfs pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Coelho, J. G.; Malheiro, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, an alternative model based on white dwarfs pulsars has been proposed to explain a class of pulsars known as Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGR) and Anomalus X-Ray Pulsars (AXP) [1], usually named as magnetars. In this model, the magnetized white dwarfs can have surface magnetic field B ˜ 107 - 1010 G and rotate very fast with angular frequencies Ω ˜ 1 rad/s, allowing them to produce large electromagnetic (EM) potentials and generate electron-positron pairs. These EM potentials are comparable with the ones of neutron star pulsars with strong magnetic fields and even larger. In this study we consider two possible processes associated with the particle acceleration, both of them are common used to explain radio emission in neutron star pulsars: in the first process the pair production happens near to the star polar caps, i.e. inside of the light cylinder where magnetic field lines are closed; in the second one the creation of pair happens in the outer magnetosphere, i.e. far away of the star surface where magnetic field lines are open [2]. The analysis of the possibility of radio emission were done for 23 SGRs/AXPs of the McGill Online Magnetar Catalog [3] that contains the current information available on these sources. The results of this work show that the model where the particles production occur in the outer magnetosphere emission "o2" is the process compatible with the astronomical observations of absence of radio emission for almost all SGRs/AXPs when these sources are understood as white dwarf pulsars. Our work is a first attempted to find an explanation for the puzzle why for almost all the SGRs/AXPs was expected radio emission, but it was observed in only four of them. These four sources, as it was suggested recently [4], seem to belong to an high magnetic field neutron star pulsar category, different from all the others SGRs/AXPs that our work indicate to belong to a new class of white dwarf pulsars, very fast and magnetized.

  15. Birth and Evolution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Faucher-Giguere, C A

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the birth and evolution of Galactic isolated radio pulsars. We begin by estimating their birth space velocity distribution from proper motion measurements of Brisken et al. (2002, 2003). We find no evidence for multimodality of the distribution and favor one in which the absolute one-dimensional velocity components are exponentially distributed and with a three-dimensional mean velocity of 380^{+40}_{-60} km s^-1. We then proceed with a Monte Carlo-based population synthesis, modelling the birth properties of the pulsars, their time evolution, and their detection in the Parkes and Swinburne Multibeam surveys. We present a population model that appears generally consistent with the observations. Our results suggest that pulsars are born in the spiral arms, with a Galactocentric radial distribution that is well described by the functional form proposed by Yusifov & Kucuk (2004), in which the pulsar surface density peaks at radius ~3 kpc. The birth spin period distribution extends to several h...

  16. Radio Emission from Globular Clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Radio emission of globular clusters is studied by analyzing the VLA radio survey data of the NVSS and FIRST. We find that 13 clusters have radio sources within their half-mass radii of clusters. Sources detected previously in NGC 7078and NGC 6440 are identified. Pulsars in NGC 6121, NGC 6440 and NGC 7078cannot be detected because of the insufficient survey sensitivity and resolution.There may be a pulsar in the core of Terzan 1. The nature of the extended radio source near the core of NGC 6440 remains unclear. In the core of a globular cluster,there may be many neutron stars or an intermediate mass black hole, but this cannot be clarified with the current radio observations.

  17. Hunting for Orphaned Central Compact Objects among Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, J; Ho, W C G; Bogdanov, S; Kaspi, V M; He, C

    2015-01-01

    Central compact objects (CCOs) are a handful of young neutron stars found at the center of supernova remnants (SNRs). They show high thermal X-ray luminosities but no radio emission. Spin-down rate measurements of the three CCOs with X-ray pulsations indicate surface dipole fields much weaker than those of typical young pulsars. To investigate if CCOs and known radio pulsars are objects at different evolutionary stages, we carried out a census of all weak-field (<1e11 G) isolated radio pulsars in the Galactic plane to search for CCO-like X-ray emission. None of the 12 candidates is detected at X-ray energies, with luminosity limits of 1e32-1e34 erg/s. We consider a scenario in which the weak surface fields of CCOs are due to rapid accretion of supernova materials and show that as the buried field diffuses back to the surface, a CCO descendant is expected to leave the P-Pdot parameter space of our candidates at a young age of a few times 10kyr. Hence, the candidates are likely to be just old ordinary pulsar...

  18. An X-ray View of Radio Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton have significantly increased our understanding of rotation-powered (radio) millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Deep Chandra studies of several globular clusters have detected X-ray counterparts to a host of MSPs, including 19 in 47 Tuc alone. These surveys have revealed that most MSPs exhibit thermal emission from their heated magnetic polar caps. Realistic models of this thermal X-ray emission have provided important insight into the basic physics of pulsars and neutron stars. In addition, intrabinary shock X-ray radiation observed in ``black-widow'' and peculiar globular cluster ``exchanged'' binary MSPs give interesting insight into MSP winds and relativistic shock. Thus, the X-ray band contains valuable information regarding the basic properties of MSPs that are not accesible by radio timing observations.

  19. Radio pulsar activity and the crustal Hall drift

    CERN Document Server

    Geppert, U; Melikidze, G

    2013-01-01

    Models of pulsar radio emission that are based on an inner accelerating region require the existence of very strong and small scale surface magnetic field structures at or near the canonical polar cap. The aim of this paper is to identify a mechanism that creates such field structures and maintains them over a pulsar's lifetime. The likely physical process that can create the required 'magnetic spots' is the Hall drift occurring in the crust of a neutron star. It is demonstrated, that the Hall drift can produce small scale strong surface magnetic field anomalies (spots) on timescales of $10^4$ years by means of non-linear interaction between poloidal and toroidal components of the subsurface magnetic field. These anomalies are characterized by strengths of about $10^{14}$ G and curvature radii of field lines of about $10^6$ cm, both of which are fundamental for generation of observable radio emission.

  20. Statistical study of the pulse width distribution for radio pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Pulse widths of standard pulse profiles for 262 pulsars were measured by using the Urumqi 25 m radio telescope at 1.54 GHz.For the simplest case of circular emission beam,we applied Monte Carlo simulations to the pulse width distribution.Different density functions of magnetic inclination angle α and observer angle ξ were considered.Using Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests,we derived the most probable distribution for α and ξ.

  1. Transient pulsed radio emission from a magnetar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, Fernando; Ransom, Scott M; Halpern, Jules P; Reynolds, John; Helfand, David J; Zimmerman, Neil; Sarkissian, John

    2006-08-24

    Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are slowly rotating neutron stars with very bright and highly variable X-ray emission that are believed to be powered by ultra-strong magnetic fields of >10(14) G, according to the 'magnetar' model. The radio pulsations that have been observed from more than 1,700 neutron stars with weaker magnetic fields have never been detected from any of the dozen known magnetars. The X-ray pulsar XTE J1810-197 was revealed (in 2003) as the first AXP with transient emission when its luminosity increased 100-fold from the quiescent level; a coincident radio source of unknown origin was detected one year later. Here we show that XTE J1810-197 emits bright, narrow, highly linearly polarized radio pulses, observed at every rotation, thereby establishing that magnetars can be radio pulsars. There is no evidence of radio emission before the 2003 X-ray outburst (unlike ordinary pulsars, which emit radio pulses all the time), and the flux varies from day to day. The flux at all radio frequencies is approximately equal--and at >20 GHz XTE J1810-197 is currently the brightest neutron star known. These observations link magnetars to ordinary radio pulsars, rule out alternative accretion models for AXPs, and provide a new window into the coronae of magnetars.

  2. Gamma-Ray Pulsars Expected in the Outer Gap Model of Gamma-Ray Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张力; 吴杰; 姜泽军; 梅冬成

    2003-01-01

    We study the possibility of high-energy gamma-ray emission from the known 1130 radio pulsars based on the outer gap model of high-energy emission from pulsars. We estimate the fractional size of outer gap, the integrated flux, the gamma-ray luminosity for each known radio pulsar, and find that only 14% of the known radio pulsars are gamma-ray emitters according to the outer gap model. In the sample of possible 156 gamma-ray pulsars, our statistical analysis indicates that the distributions of the spin-down powers and the ages of these pulsars concentrate mainly on 1033.5-1039 erg/s and 103-107 y, respectively. The predictions of gamma-ray pulsars detected by the AGILE and GLAST missions are given.

  3. Interpole Communication in Radio Pulsars and the Resulting Theoretical Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltevrede, P.; Wright, G.; Johnston, S.

    2012-12-01

    Here we discuss some recent, and less recent, radio observations that demonstrate an intimate link between the emission generated by opposite magnetic poles of neutron stars. More specifically, there are examples of pulsars which show quasi-periodic brightening of the emission generated by both poles with a time delay which remains fixed on a timescale of at least years. This implies that the opposite magnetic poles do not operate independently of each other, leading to the question about the nature of the communication channel. In the case of PSR B1055-52 this time delay is very large, corresponding to a light travel distance of many times the light cylinder radius. A number of physical models are explored and significant objections can be made to each model. So the communication channel between the magnetic poles of pulsars remains elusive, although its understanding could prove crucial to understanding the large-scale structure of magnetospheres.

  4. A search for dispersed radio bursts in archival Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey data

    CERN Document Server

    Bagchi, Manjari; McLaughlin, Maura

    2012-01-01

    A number of different classes of potentially extra-terrestrial bursts of radio emission have been observed in surveys with the Parkes 64m radio telescope, including "Rotating Radio Transients", the "Lorimer burst" and "perytons". Rotating Radio Transients are radio pulsars which are best detectable in single-pulse searches. The Lorimer burst is a highly dispersed isolated radio burst with properties suggestive of extragalactic origin. Perytons share the frequency-swept nature of the Rotating Radio Transients and Lorimer burst, but unlike these events appear in all thirteen beams of the Parkes Multibeam receiver and are probably a form of peculiar radio frequency interference. In order to constrain these and other radio source populations further, we searched the archival Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey data for events similar to any of these. We did not find any new Rotating Radio Transients or bursts like the Lorimer burst. We did, however, discover four peryton-like events. Similar to the perytons, these fou...

  5. New algorithms for radio pulsar search

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Kendrick M

    2016-01-01

    The computational cost of searching for new pulsars is a limiting factor for upcoming radio telescopes such as SKA. We introduce four new algorithms: an optimal constant-period search, a coherent tree search which permits optimal searching with O(1) cost per model, a semicoherent search which combines information from coherent subsearches while preserving as much phase information as possible, and a hierarchical search which interpolates between the coherent and semicoherent limits. Taken together, these algorithms improve the computational cost of pulsar search by several orders of magnitude. In this paper, we consider the simple case of a constant-acceleration phase model, but our methods should generalize to more complex search spaces.

  6. Radio-quiet and radio-loud pulsars: similar in Gamma-rays but different in X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Marelli, M; De Luca, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Salvetti, D; Hartog, P R Den; Wolff, M T

    2015-01-01

    We present new Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of eight radio-quiet Gamma-ray pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. For all eight pulsars we identify the X-ray counterpart, based on the X-ray source localization and the best position obtained from Gamma-ray pulsar timing. For PSR J2030+4415 we found evidence for an about 10 arcsec-long pulsar wind nebula. Our new results consolidate the work from Marelli et al. 2011 and confirm that, on average, the Gamma-ray--to--X-ray flux ratios (Fgamma/Fx) of radio-quiet pulsars are higher than for the radio-loud ones. Furthermore, while the Fgamma/Fx distribution features a single peak for the radio-quiet pulsars, the distribution is more dispersed for the radio-loud ones, possibly showing two peaks. We discuss possible implications of these different distributions based on current models for pulsar X-ray emission.

  7. Testing Relativistic Gravity with Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Wex, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Before the 1970s, precision tests for gravity theories were constrained to the weak gravitational fields of the Solar system. Hence, only the weak-field slow-motion aspects of relativistic celestial mechanics could be investigated. Testing gravity beyond the first post-Newtonian contributions was for a long time out of reach. The discovery of the first binary pulsar by Russell Hulse and Joseph Taylor in the summer of 1974 initiated a completely new field for testing the relativistic dynamics of gravitationally interacting bodies. For the first time the back reaction of gravitational wave emission on the binary motion could be studied. Furthermore, the Hulse-Taylor pulsar provided the first test bed for the orbital dynamics of strongly self-gravitating bodies. To date there are a number of pulsars known, which can be utilized for precision test of gravity. Depending on their orbital properties and their companion, these pulsars provide tests for various different aspects of relativistic dynamics. Besides tests...

  8. Modelling the $\\gamma$-ray and radio light curves of the double pulsar system

    CERN Document Server

    Seyffert, A S; Harding, A K; Johnson, T J

    2014-01-01

    Guillemot et al. recently reported the discovery of $\\gamma$-ray pulsations from the 22.7ms pulsar (pulsar A) in the famous double pulsar system J0737-3039A/B. The $\\gamma$-ray light curve (LC) of pulsar A has two peaks separated by approximately half a rotation, and these are non-coincident with the observed radio and X-ray peaks. This suggests that the $\\gamma$-ray emission originates in a part of the magnetosphere distinct from where the radio and X-ray radiation is generated. Thus far, three different methods have been applied to constrain the viewing geometry of pulsar A (its inclination and observer angles $\\alpha$ and $\\zeta$): geometric modelling of the radio and $\\gamma$-ray light curves, modelling of the position angle sweep in phase seen in the radio polarisation data, and independent studies of the time evolution of the radio pulse profile of pulsar A. These three independent, complementary methods have yielded consistent results: pulsar A's rotation axis is likely perpendicular to the orbital pla...

  9. Probing the X-ray emission of old nulling pulsars with high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posselt, Bettina

    2013-10-01

    We propose XMM-Newton observations of two nulling radio pulsars with magnetic fields B>10^(13)G. These long-period pulsars have spin-down properties, including characteristic ages, similar to those of the Magnificent Seven which are bright thermal X-ray emitters. Nulling pulsars have been suggested as evolutionary stage where the magnetospheric emission of a pulsar ceases. In contrast, no magnetospheric emission was detected at all at X-ray or radio wavelengths for the Magnificent Seven. The proposed XMM-Newton observations will probe the magneto-thermal NS evolution model as a potential link between the radio pulsar population and the Magnificent Seven. They will also provide for the first time an X-ray characterization of nulling pulsars with large magnetic fields.

  10. Inferring the Composition of Super-Jupiter Mass Companions of Pulsars with Radio Line Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Alak; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-02-01

    We propose using radio line spectroscopy to detect molecular absorption lines (such as OH at 1.6–1.7 GHz) before and after the total eclipse of black widow and other short orbital period binary pulsars with low-mass companions. The companion in such a binary may be ablated away by energetic particles and high-energy radiation produced by the pulsar wind. The observations will probe the eclipsing wind being ablated by the pulsar and constrain the nature of the companion and its surroundings. Maser emission from the interstellar medium stimulated by a pulsar beam might also be detected from the intrabinary medium. The short temporal resolution allowed by the millisecond pulsars can probe this medium with the high angular resolution of the pulsar beam.

  11. Radio Searches for Pulsars and Short-Duration Transients

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlin, Maura

    2011-01-01

    I discuss methods and current software packages for radio searches for pulsars and short-duration transients. I then describe the properties of the current pulsar population and the status of and predictions for ongoing and future surveys. The presently observed pulsar population numbers around 2000 and is expected to roughly double over the next five years, with the number of millisecond pulsars expected to more than triple. Finally, I discuss individual objects discovered in the Green Bank Telescope 350-MHz Drift-Scan Survey and the Arecibo Pulsar ALFA Survey.

  12. Radio Searches of Fermi LAT Sources and Blind Search Pulsars: The Fermi Pulsar Search Consortium

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, P S; Parent, D; Bhattacharya, D; Bhattacharyya, B; Camilo, F; Cognard, I; Theureau, G; Ferrara, E C; Harding, A K; Thompson, D J; Freire, P C C; Guillemot, L; Gupta, Y; Roy, J; Hessels, J W T; Johnston, S; Keith, M; Shannon, R; Kerr, M; Michelson, P F; Romani, R W; Kramer, M; McLaughlin, M A; Ransom, S M; Roberts, M S E; Parkinson, P M Saz; Ziegler, M; Smith, D A; Stappers, B W; Weltevrede, P; Wood, K S

    2012-01-01

    We present a summary of the Fermi Pulsar Search Consortium (PSC), an international collaboration of radio astronomers and members of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) collaboration, whose goal is to organize radio follow-up observations of Fermi pulsars and pulsar candidates among the LAT gamma-ray source population. The PSC includes pulsar observers with expertise using the world's largest radio telescopes that together cover the full sky. We have performed very deep observations of all 35 pulsars discovered in blind frequency searches of the LAT data, resulting in the discovery of radio pulsations from four of them. We have also searched over 300 LAT gamma-ray sources that do not have strong associations with known gamma-ray emitting source classes and have pulsar-like spectra and variability characteristics. These searches have led to the discovery of a total of 43 new radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) and four normal pulsars. These discoveries greatly increase the known population of MSPs in the Galactic disk...

  13. NEW DISCOVERIES FROM THE ARECIBO 327 MHz DRIFT PULSAR SURVEY RADIO TRANSIENT SEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deneva, J. S. [National Research Council, resident at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Stovall, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); McLaughlin, M. A.; Bagchi, M.; Garver-Daniels, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Bates, S. D. [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai, 600113 (India); Freire, P. C. C.; Martinez, J. G. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Bonn (Germany); Jenet, F. [Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    We present Clusterrank, a new algorithm for identifying dispersed astrophysical pulses. Such pulses are commonly detected from Galactic pulsars and rotating radio transients (RRATs), which are neutron stars with sporadic radio emission. More recently, isolated, highly dispersed pulses dubbed fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been identified as the potential signature of an extragalactic cataclysmic radio source distinct from pulsars and RRATs. Clusterrank helped us discover 14 pulsars and 8 RRATs in data from the Arecibo 327 MHz Drift Pulsar Survey (AO327). The new RRATs have DMs in the range 23.5–86.6 pc cm{sup −3} and periods in the range 0.172–3.901 s. The new pulsars have DMs in the range 23.6–133.3 pc cm{sup −3} and periods in the range 1.249–5.012 s, and include two nullers and a mode-switching object. We estimate an upper limit on the all-sky FRB rate of 10{sup 5} day{sup −1} for bursts with a width of 10 ms and flux density ≳83 mJy. The DMs of all new discoveries are consistent with a Galactic origin. In comparing statistics of the new RRATs with sources from the RRATalog, we find that both sets are drawn from the same period distribution. In contrast, we find that the period distribution of the new pulsars is different from the period distributions of canonical pulsars in the ATNF catalog or pulsars found in AO327 data by a periodicity search. This indicates that Clusterrank is a powerful complement to periodicity searches and uncovers a subset of the pulsar population that has so far been underrepresented in survey results and therefore in Galactic pulsar population models.

  14. Magnetic field decay in normal radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Igoshev, A P

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the origin of the magnetic field decay in normal radio pulsars found by us in a recent study. This decay has a typical time scale $\\sim 4 \\times 10^5$~yrs, and operates in the range $\\sim 10^5$~--~few$\\times 10^5$~yrs. We demonstrate that this field evolution may be either due to the Ohmic decay related to the scattering from phonons, or due to the Hall cascade which reaches the Hall attractor. According to our analysis the first possibility seems to be more reliable. So, we attribute the discovered field decay mainly to the Ohmic decay on phonons which is saturated at the age few$\\times 10^5$~yrs, when a NS cools down to the critical temperature below which the phonon scattering does not contribute much to the resistivity of the crust. Some role of the Hall effect and attractor is not excluded, and will be analysed in our further studies.

  15. SAS-2 gamma-ray observations of PSR 1747-46. [radio pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.; Lamb, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence is reported for the observation of gamma-ray emission from the radio pulsar PSR 1747-46 by the gamma-ray telescope aboard SAS 2. The evidence is based on the presence of both an approximately 3-sigma enhancement of gamma rays at the pulsar's location and an approximately 4-sigma peak in the phase plot of 79 gamma-ray events whose phase was calculated from the pulsar's known period. The gamma-ray pulsation is found to appear at a phase lag of about 0.16 from that predicted by the radio observations. The pulsed gamma-ray fluxes above 35 MeV and 100 MeV are estimated, and it is shown that the gamma-ray pulse width is similar to the radio pulse width. It is concluded that PSR 1747-46 is a most likely candidate for pulsed gamma-ray emission.

  16. A Cosmic Census of Radio Pulsars with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Keane, E F; Kramer, M; Stappers, B W; Bates, S D; Burgay, M; Chatterjee, S; Champion, D J; Eatough, R P; Hessels, J W T; Janssen, G; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Margueron, J; Oertel, M; Possenti, A; Ransom, S; Theureau, G; Torne, P

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will make ground breaking discoveries in pulsar science. In this chapter we outline the SKA surveys for new pulsars, as well as how we will perform the necessary follow-up timing observations. The SKA's wide field-of-view, high sensitivity, multi-beaming and sub-arraying capabilities, coupled with advanced pulsar search backends, will result in the discovery of a large population of pulsars. These will enable the SKA's pulsar science goals (tests of General Relativity with pulsar binary systems, investigating black hole theorems with pulsar-black hole binaries, and direct detection of gravitational waves in a pulsar timing array). Using SKA1-MID and SKA1-LOW we will survey the Milky Way to unprecedented depth, increasing the number of known pulsars by more than an order of magnitude. SKA2 will potentially find all the Galactic radio-emitting pulsars in the SKA sky which are beamed in our direction. This will give a clear picture of the birth properties of pulsars and of the gr...

  17. A Search for X-ray Counterparts of Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Prinz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    We describe a systematic search for X-ray counterparts of radio pulsars. The search was accomplished by cross-correlating the radio timing positions of all radio pulsars from the ATNF pulsar database (version 1.54) with archival XMM-Newton and Chandra observations publicly released by August 1st 2015. In total, 171 of the archival XMM-Newton observations and 215 of the archival Chandra datasets where found to have a radio pulsar serendipitously in the field of view. From the 283 radio pulsars covered by these datasets we identified 19 previously undetected X-ray counterparts. For 6 of them the statistics was sufficient to model the energy spectrum with one- or two-component models. For the remaining new detections and for those pulsars for which we determined an upper limit to their counting rate we computed the energy flux by assuming a Crab-like spectrum. Additionally, we derived upper limits on the neutron stars' surface temperature and on the non-thermal X-ray efficiency for those pulsars for which the sp...

  18. Very-high energy emission from pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Breed, M; Harding, A K

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) display exponentially cutoff spectra with cutoffs falling in a narrow band around a few GeV. Early spectral modelling predicted spectral cutoffs at energies of up to 100 GeV, assuming curvature radiation. It was therefore not expected that pulsars would be visible in the very-high energy (VHE) regime (>100 GeV). The VERITAS announcement of the detection of pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar at energies up to 400 GeV (and now up to 1.5 TeV as detected by MAGIC) therefore raised important questions about our understanding of the electrodynamics and local environment of pulsars. H.E.S.S. has now detected pulsed emission from the Vela pulsar down to tens of GeV, making this the second pulsar detected by a ground-based Cherenkov telescope. Deep upper limits have also been obtained by VERITAS and MAGIC for the Geminga pulsar. We will review the latest developments in VHE pulsar science, including an overview of the latest observations, ...

  19. The Radio and X-ray Mode-Switching Pulsar PSR B0943+10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereghetti, Sandro; Rigoselli, Michela

    2017-09-01

    Observations obtained in the last years challenged the widespread notion that rotation-powered neutron stars are steady X-ray emitters. Besides a few allegedly rotation-powered neutron stars that showed `magnetar-like' variability, a particularly interesting case is that of PSR B0943+10. Recent observations have shown that this pulsar, well studied in the radio band where it alternates between a bright and a quiescent mode, displays significant X-ray variations, anticorrelated in flux with the radio emission. The study of such synchronous radio/X-ray mode switching opens a new window to investigate the processes responsible for the pulsar radio and high-energy emission. Here we review the main X-ray properties of PSR B0943+10 derived from recent coordinated X-ray and radio observations.

  20. The Radio and X-ray Mode-Switching Pulsar PSR B0943+10

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandro Mereghetti; Michela Rigoselli

    2017-09-01

    Observations obtained in the last years challenged the widespread notion that rotation-powered neutron stars are steady X-ray emitters. Besides a few allegedly rotation-powered neutron stars that showed ‘magnetar-like’ variability, a particularly interesting case is that of PSR B0943+10. Recent observations have shown that this pulsar, well studied in the radio band where it alternates between a bright and a quiescent mode, displays significant X-ray variations, anticorrelated in flux with the radio emission. The study of such synchronous radio/X-ray mode switching opens a new window to investigate the processes responsible for the pulsar radio and high-energy emission. Here we review the main X-ray properties of PSR B0943+10 derived from recent coordinated X-ray and radio observations.

  1. RADIO-QUIET AND RADIO-LOUD PULSARS: SIMILAR IN GAMMA-RAYS BUT DIFFERENT IN X-RAYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marelli, M.; Mignani, R. P.; Luca, A. De; Salvetti, D. [INAF—Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133, Milano (Italy); Parkinson, P. M. Saz [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Hartog, P. R. Den [Stanford University HEPL/KIPAC, 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Wolff, M. T., E-mail: marelli@iasf-milano.inaf.it [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    We present new Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of eight radio-quiet (RQ) γ-ray pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. For all eight pulsars we identify the X-ray counterpart, based on the X-ray source localization and the best position obtained from γ-ray pulsar timing. For PSR J2030+4415 we found evidence for a ∼10″-long pulsar wind nebula. Our new results consolidate the work from Marelli et al. and confirm that, on average, the γ-ray-to-X-ray flux ratios (F{sub γ}/F{sub X}) of RQ pulsars are higher than for the radio-loud (RL) ones. Furthermore, while the F{sub γ}/F{sub X} distribution features a single peak for the RQ pulsars, the distribution is more dispersed for the RL ones, possibly showing two peaks. We discuss possible implications of these different distributions based on current models for pulsar X-ray emission.

  2. Simultaneous Observations of Giant Pulses from the Crab Pulsar, with the Murchison Widefield Array and Parkes Radio Telescope: Implications for the Giant Pulse Emission Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Oronsaye, S I; Bhat, N D R; Tremblay, S E; McSweeney, S J; Tingay, S J; van Straten, W; Jameson, A; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Deshpande, A A; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Lonsdale, C J; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Prabu, T; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2015-01-01

    We report on observations of giant pulses from the Crab pulsar performed simultaneously with the Parkes radio telescope and the incoherent combination of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) antenna tiles. The observations were performed over a duration of approximately one hour at a center frequency of 1382 MHz with 340 MHz bandwidth at Parkes, and at a center frequency of 193 MHz with 15 MHz bandwidth at the MWA. Our analysis has led to the detection of 55 giant pulses at the MWA and 2075 at Parkes above a threshold of 3.5$\\sigma$ and 6.5$\\sigma$ respectively. We detected 51$\\%$ of the MWA giant pulses at the Parkes radio telescope, with spectral indices in the range of $-3.6>\\alpha> -4.9$ ($S_{\\rm \

  3. The timing behaviour of radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, G

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this review paper is to summarise the pulsar timing method, to provide an overview of recent research into the spin-down of pulsars over decadal timescales and to highlight the science that can be achieved using high-precision timing of millisecond pulsars.

  4. Stokes tomography of radio pulsar magnetospheres. I. Linear polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, C T Y

    2010-01-01

    Polarimetric studies of pulsar radio emission traditionally concentrate on how the Stokes vector (I, Q, U, V) varies with pulse longitude, with special emphasis on the position angle (PA) swing of the linearly polarized component. The interpretation of the PA swing in terms of the rotating vector model is limited by the assumption of an axisymmetric magnetic field and the degeneracy of the output with respect to the orientation and magnetic geometry of the pulsar; different combinations of the latter two properties can produce similar PA swings. This paper introduces Stokes phase portraits as a supplementary diagnostic tool with which the orientation and magnetic geometry can be inferred more accurately. The Stokes phase portraits feature unique patterns in the I-Q, I-U, and Q-U planes, whose shapes depend sensitively on the magnetic geometry, inclination angle, beam and polarization patterns, and emission altitude. We construct look-up tables of Stokes phase portraits and PA swings for pure and current-modif...

  5. Correlation between X-ray Lightcurve Shape and Radio Arrival Time in the Vela Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Lommen, A; Gwinn, C; Arzoumanian, Z; Harding, A; Strickman, M S; Dodson, R; McCulloch, P; Moffett, D

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of simultaneous observations of the Vela pulsar in X-rays and radio from the RXTE satellite and the Mount Pleasant Radio Observatory in Tasmania. We sought correlations between the Vela's X-ray emission and radio arrival times on a pulse by pulse basis. At a confidence level of 99.8% we have found significantly higher flux density in Vela's main X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrived early. This excess flux shifts to the 'trough' following the 2nd X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrive later. Our results suggest that the mechanism producing the radio pulses is intimately connected to the mechanism producing X-rays. Current models using resonant absorption of radio emission in the outer magnetosphere as a cause of the X-ray emission are explored as a possible explanation for the correlation.

  6. Magneto–Thermal Evolution of Neutron Stars with Emphasis to Radio Pulsars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U. Geppert

    2017-09-01

    The magnetic and thermal evolution of neutron stars is a very complex process with many non-linear interactions. For a decent understanding of neutron star physics, these evolutions cannot be considered isolated. A brief overview is presented, which describes the main magneto–thermal interactions that determine the fate of both isolated neutron stars and accreting ones. Special attention is devoted to the interplay of thermal and magnetic evolution at the polar cap of radio pulsars. There, a strong meridional temperature gradient is maintained over the lifetime of radio pulsars. It may be strong enough to drive thermoelectric magnetic field creation which perpetuate a toroidal magnetic field around the polar cap rim. Such a local field component may amplify and curve the poloidal surface field at the cap, forming a strong and small scale magnetic field as required for the radio emission of pulsars.

  7. Correlations between pulsed X-ray flux and radio arrival time in the Vela pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Lommen, A N; Gwinn, C; Arzoumanian, Z; Harding, A; Strickman, M S; Dodson, R; McCulloch, P; Moffett, D

    2007-01-01

    We report the results of simultaneous observations of the Vela pulsar in X-rays and radio from the RXTE satellite and the Mount Pleasant Radio Observatory in Tasmania. We sought correlations between the Vela's X-ray and radio flux densities and radio arrival times on a pulse by pulse basis. We found significantly higher flux density in Vela's main X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrived early. This excess flux shifts to the 'trough' following the 2nd X-ray peak during radio pulses that arrive later. We suggest that the mechanism producing the radio pulses is intimately connected to the mechanism producing X-rays. Current models using resonant absorption in the outer magnetosphere as a cause of the radio emission, and less directly of the X-ray emission, are explored as a possible explanation for the correlation.

  8. Fast radio bursts as pulsar lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, J. I.

    2017-07-01

    There are striking phenomenological similarities between fast radio bursts (FRBs) and lightning in the Earth's and planetary atmospheres. Both have very low duty factors, ≲10-8-10-5 for FRBs and (very roughly) ˜10-4 for the main return strokes in an active thundercloud. Lightning occurs in an electrified insulating atmosphere when a conducting path is created by and permits current flow. FRBs may occur in neutron star magnetospheres whose plasma is believed to be divided by vacuum gaps. Vacuum is a perfect insulator unless electric fields are sufficient for electron-positron pair production by curvature radiation, a high-energy analogue of electrostatic breakdown in an insulating gas. FRB may be 'electrars' powered by the release of stored electrostatic energy, counterparts to soft gamma repeaters powered by the release of stored magnetostatic energy (magnetars). This frees pulsar FRB models from the constraint that their power not exceeds the instantaneous spin-down power. Energetic constraints imply that the sources of more energetic FRBs have shorter spin-down lifetimes, perhaps even less than the 3 yr over which FRB 121102 has been observed to repeat.

  9. Radio pulsars and transients in the Galactic center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazio, Joseph [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375-5351 (United States); Deneva, J S [Astronomy Department and NAIC, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Bower, Geoffrey C [Astronomy Department and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cordes, J M [Astronomy Department and NAIC, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hyman, Scott D [Department of Physics and Engineering, Sweet Briar College, Sweet Briar, VA 24595 (United States); Backer, D C [Astronomy Department and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bhat, R [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Chatterjee, S [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Demorest, P [Astronomy Department and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ransom, S M [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Vlemmings, W [Jodrell Bank Observatory, University of Manchester, Macclesfleld, Cheshire, SK11 9DL, UK (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    Radio pulsars and transients provide powerful probes of the star formation history, interstellar medium, and gravitational potential of the Galactic center. Historical radio observations of the Galactic center have not emphasized the time domain aspect of observing this region. We summarize a series of recent searches for and observations of radio transients and pulsars that make use of two advances in technology. The first is the formation of large fields of view ({approx}> 1{sup 0}) at relatively longer wavelengths ({lambda} > 1 m), and the second is the construction of receivers and instruments capable of collecting data on microsecond time scales at relatively short wavelengths ({approx} 3 cm)

  10. Post-outburst radio monitoring of the high magnetic field pulsar PSR J1119-6127

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Walid A.; Pearlman, Aaron B.; Kocz, Jonathan; Prince, Thomas A.; Lippuner, Jonas; Horiuchi, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    We have carried out radio monitoring observations of PSR J11119-6127 following its recent X-ray outburst in July 2016. While initial observations failed to detect the presence of pulsed emission, subsequent observations two weeks later show bright detections of the pulsar at S-band and a significant detection at X-band as the S-band pulse profile returns to a single-peaked shape. From these measurements, we were able to estimate a spectral index over a relatively wide range of radio wavelengths. We also detected an unusual multiple-peaked radio profile and single pulse events. Further observations show an evolving pulse profile that is quite unique among known radio pulsars. PSR J1119-6127 is clearly a transition object, i.e. a high-magnetic field neutron star that is normally a rotation-powered pulsar in radio and X-rays, but also shows transient magnetar-like behavior, i.e. behavior unlikely to be powered solely by rotation, but also by release of stored magnetic energy. We will discuss recent results and implications for understanding the emission behavior of high magnetic field pulsars.This research was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under the Research and Technology Development Program, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  11. Do the enigmatic ``Infrared-Faint Radio Sources'' include pulsars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, George; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Keith, Michael; Mao, Minnie; Champion, David

    2009-04-01

    The Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) team have surveyed seven square degrees of sky at 1.4GHz. During processing some unexpected infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS sources) were discovered. The nature of these sources is not understood, but it is possible that some of these sources may be pulsars within our own galaxy. We propose to observe the IFRS sources with steep spectral indices using standard search techniques to determine whether or not they are pulsars. A pulsar detection would 1) remove a subset of the IFRS sources from the ATLAS sample so they would not need to be observed with large optical/IR telescopes to find their hosts and 2) be intrinsically interesting as the pulsar would be a millisecond pulsar and/or have an extreme spatial velocity.

  12. New Discoveries from the Arecibo 327 MHz Drift Pulsar Survey Radio Transient Search

    CERN Document Server

    Deneva, J S; McLaughlin, M A; Bagchi, M; Bates, S D; Freire, P C C; Martinez, J G; Jenet, F; Garver-Daniels, N

    2016-01-01

    We present Clusterrank, a new algorithm for identifying dispersed astrophysical pulses. Such pulses are commonly detected from Galactic pulsars and rotating radio transients (RRATs), which are neutron stars with sporadic radio emission. More recently, isolated, highly dispersed pulses dubbed fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been identified as the potential signature of an extragalactic cataclysmic radio source distinct from pulsars and RRATs. Clusterrank helped us discover 14 pulsars and 8 RRATs in data from the Arecibo 327 MHz Drift Pulsar Survey (AO327). The new RRATs have DMs in the range $23.5 - 86.6$ pc cm$^{-3}$ and periods in the range $0.172 - 3.901$ s. The new pulsars have DMs in the range $23.6 - 133.3$ pc cm$^{-3}$ and periods in the range $1.249 - 5.012$ s, and include two nullers and a mode-switching object. We estimate an upper limit on the all-sky FRB rate of $10^5$ day$^{-1}$ for bursts with a width of 10 ms and flux density $\\gtrsim 83$ mJy. The DMs of all new discoveries are consistent with a G...

  13. Radio Pulsars: The Neutron Star Population & Fundamental Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaspi, Victoria M

    2016-01-01

    Radio pulsars are unique laboratories for a wide range of physics and astrophysics. Understanding how they are created, how they evolve and where we find them in the Galaxy, with or without binary companions, is highly constraining of theories of stellar and binary evolution. Pulsars' relationship with a recently discovered variety of apparently different classes of neutron stars is an interesting modern astrophysical puzzle which we consider in Part I of this review. Radio pulsars are also famous for allowing us to probe the laws of nature at a fundamental level. They act as precise cosmic clocks and, when in a binary system with a companion star, provide indispensable venues for precision tests of gravity. The different applications of radio pulsars for fundamental physics will be discussed in Part II. We finish by making mention of the newly discovered class of astrophysical objects, the Fast Radio Bursts, which may or may not be related to radio pulsars or neutron stars, but which were discovered in obser...

  14. Simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the radio-mode-switching pulsar PSR B1822-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, W.; Kuiper, L.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Mitra, D.; Rankin, J. M.; Stappers, B. W.; Wright, G. A. E.; Basu, R.; Szary, A.; van Leeuwen, J.

    2017-04-01

    We report on simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the radio-mode-switching pulsar PSR B1822-09 with ESA's XMM-Newton and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and Lovell radio telescopes. PSR B1822-09 switches between a radio-bright and radio-quiet mode, and we discovered a relationship between the durations of its modes and a known underlying radio-modulation time-scale within the modes. We discovered X-ray (energies 0.2-1.4 keV) pulsations with a broad sinusoidal pulse, slightly lagging the radio main pulse in phase by 0.094 ± 0.017, with an energy-dependent pulsed fraction varying from ∼0.15 at 0.3 keV to ∼0.6 at 1 keV. No evidence is found for simultaneous X-ray and radio mode switching. The total X-ray spectrum consists of a cool component (T ∼0.96 × 106 K, hotspot radius R ∼2.0 km) and a hot component (T ∼2.2 × 106 K, R ∼100 m). The hot component can be ascribed to the pulsed emission and the cool component to the unpulsed emission. The high-energy characteristics of PSR B1822-09 resemble those of middle-aged pulsars such as PSR B0656+14, PSR B1055-52 and Geminga, including an indication for pulsed high-energy gamma-ray emission in Fermi Large Area Telescope data. Explanations for the high pulsed fraction seem to require different temperatures at the two poles of this orthogonal rotator, or magnetic anisotropic beaming effects in its strong magnetic field. In our X-ray skymap, we found a harder source at only 5.1 ± 0.5 arcsec from PSR B1822-09, which might be a pulsar wind nebula.

  15. Pulsar VLBI to Measure Cosmological Rotation and Study Pulsar Emission Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwinn, C. R.

    2009-08-01

    Pulsars are useful for measuring the rotation of the universe. Also, their emission regions provide interesting laboratories for plasma physics. I describe here how VLBI of pulsars, and the VSOP-2 spacecraft, can contribute to such studies.

  16. Developing radio beam geometry and luminosity models of pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Gonthier, P L; Giacherio, B M; Arevalo, R A; Harding, A K

    2006-01-01

    Our recent studies of pulsar population statistics suggest that improvements of radio and gamma-ray beam geometry and luminosity models require further refinement. The goal of this project is to constrain the viewing geometry for some radio pulsars, especially three-peaked pulse profiles, in order to limit the uncertainty of the magnetic inclination and impact angles. We perform fits of the pulse profile and position angle sweep of radio pulsars for the available frequencies. We assume a single core and conal beams described by Gaussians. We incorporate three different size cones with frequency dependence from the work of Mitra & Deshpande (1999). We obtain separate spectral indices for the core and cone beams and explore the trends of the ratio of core to cone peak fluxes. This ratio is observed to have some dependence with period. However, we cannot establish the suggested functional form of this ratio as indicated by the work of Arzoumanian, Chernoff & Cordes (2002).

  17. Supermassive black hole binaries and transient radio events: studies in pulsar astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke-Spolaor, S.

    2011-06-01

    The field of pulsar astronomy encompasses a rich breadth of astrophysical topics. The research in this thesis contributes to two particular subjects of pulsar astronomy: gravitational wave science, and identifying celestial sources of pulsed radio emission. We first investigated the detection of supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries, which are the brightest expected source of gravitational waves for pulsar timing. We considered whether two electromagnetic SMBH tracers, velocity-resolved emission lines in active nuclei, and radio galactic nuclei with spatially-resolved, flat-spectrum cores, can reveal systems emitting gravitational waves in the pulsar timing band. We found that there are systems which may in principle be simultaneously detectable by both an electromagnetic signature and gravitational emission, however the probability of actually identifying such a system is low (they will represent much less than 1% of a randomly selected galactic nucleus sample). This study accents the fact that electromagnetic indicators may be used to explore binary populations down to the 'stalling radii' at which binary inspiral evolution may stall indefinitely at radii exceeding those which produce gravitational radiation in the pulsar timing band. We then performed a search for binary SMBH holes in archival Very Long Baseline Interferometry data for 3114 radio-luminous active galactic nuclei. One source was detected as a double nucleus. This result is interpreted in terms of post-merger timescales for SMBH centralisation, implications for 'stalling', and the relationship of radio activity in nuclei to mergers. Our analysis suggested that binary pair evolution of SMBHs (both of masses >108M circled bullet) spends less than 500Myr in progression from the merging of galactic stellar cores to within the purported stalling radius for SMBH pairs, giving no evidence for an excess of stalled binary systems at small separations. Circumstantial evidence showed that the relative state

  18. The Einstein@Home Search for Radio Pulsars and PSR J2007+2722 Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, B.; Knispel, B.; Cordes, J. M.; Deneva, J. S.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Demorest, P. B.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Hammer, D.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.; Machenschalk, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Messenger, C.; Pletsch, H. J.; Ransom, S. M.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Crawford, F.; Desvignes, G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Heald, G.; Jenet, F. A.; Lazarus, P.; Lee, K. J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lynch, R.; Papa, M. A.; Prix, R.; Rosen, R.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.; Zhu, W.

    2013-08-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 193 countries, to search for new neutron stars using data from electromagnetic and gravitational-wave detectors. This paper presents a detailed description of the search for new radio pulsars using Pulsar ALFA survey data from the Arecibo Observatory. The enormous computing power allows this search to cover a new region of parameter space; it can detect pulsars in binary systems with orbital periods as short as 11 minutes. We also describe the first Einstein@Home discovery, the 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar PSR J2007+2722, and provide a full timing model. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period. This neutron star is most likely a disrupted recycled pulsar, about as old as its characteristic spin-down age of 404 Myr. However, there is a small chance that it was born recently, with a low magnetic field. If so, upper limits on the X-ray flux suggest but cannot prove that PSR J2007+2722 is at least ~100 kyr old. In the future, we expect that the massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many additional radio pulsar discoveries.

  19. THE EINSTEIN-HOME SEARCH FOR RADIO PULSARS AND PSR J2007+2722 DISCOVERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B.; Knispel, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Cordes, J. M.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Deneva, J. S. [Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (United States); Hessels, J. W. T. [ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Anderson, D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Demorest, P. B. [NRAO (National Radio Astronomy Observatory), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Gotthelf, E. V. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Hammer, D. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A2T8 (Canada); Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Lyne, A. G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McLaughlin, M. A., E-mail: bruce.allen@aei.mpg.de [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); and others

    2013-08-20

    Einstein-Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 193 countries, to search for new neutron stars using data from electromagnetic and gravitational-wave detectors. This paper presents a detailed description of the search for new radio pulsars using Pulsar ALFA survey data from the Arecibo Observatory. The enormous computing power allows this search to cover a new region of parameter space; it can detect pulsars in binary systems with orbital periods as short as 11 minutes. We also describe the first Einstein-Home discovery, the 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar PSR J2007+2722, and provide a full timing model. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period. This neutron star is most likely a disrupted recycled pulsar, about as old as its characteristic spin-down age of 404 Myr. However, there is a small chance that it was born recently, with a low magnetic field. If so, upper limits on the X-ray flux suggest but cannot prove that PSR J2007+2722 is at least {approx}100 kyr old. In the future, we expect that the massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many additional radio pulsar discoveries.

  20. A Magnetar-like Outburst from a High-B Radio Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Archibald, R F; Tendulkar, S P; Scholz, P

    2016-01-01

    Radio pulsars are believed to have their emission powered by the loss of rotational kinetic energy. By contrast, magnetars show intense X-ray and gamma-ray radiation whose luminosity greatly exceeds that due to spin-down and is believed to be powered by intense internal magnetic fields. A basic prediction of this picture is that radio pulsars of high magnetic field should show magnetar-like emission. Here we report on a magnetar-like X-ray outburst from the radio pulsar PSR J1119-6127, heralded by two short bright X-ray bursts on 2016 July 27 and 28 (Kennea et al. 2016; Younes et al. 2016). Using Target-of-Opportunity data from the Swift X-ray Telescope and NuSTAR, we show that this pulsar's flux has brightened by a factor of > 160 in the 0.5-10 keV band, and its previously soft X-ray spectrum has undergone a strong hardening, with strong pulsations appearing for the first time above 2.5 keV, with phase-averaged emission detectable up to 25 keV. By comparing Swift-XRT and NuSTAR timing data with a pre-outburs...

  1. X-ray Observations of High-B Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Olausen, S A; Vogel, J K; Kaspi, V M; Lyne, A G; Espinoza, C M; Stappers, B W; Manchester, R N; McLaughlin, M A

    2013-01-01

    The study of high-magnetic-field pulsars is important for examining the relationships between radio pulsars, magnetars, and X-ray-isolated neutron stars (XINSs). Here we report on X-ray observations of three such high-magnetic-field radio pulsars. We first present the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of PSR J1734-3333, taken to follow up on its initial detection in 2009. The pulsar's spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a temperature of 300 +/- 60 eV, with bolometric luminosity L_bb = 2.0(+2.2 -0.7)e+32 erg/s = 0.0036E_dot for a distance of 6.1 kpc. We detect no X-ray pulsations from the source, setting a 1 sigma upper limit on the pulsed fraction of 60% in the 0.5-3 keV band. We compare PSR J1734-3333 to other rotation-powered pulsars of similar age and find that it is significantly hotter, supporting the hypothesis that the magnetic field affects the observed thermal properties of pulsars. We also report on XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of PSRs B1845-19 and J1001-5939. We do not detect eit...

  2. The LOFAR Pilot Surveys for Pulsars and Fast Radio Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Coenen, Thijs; Hessels, Jason W T; Stappers, Ben W; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Alexov, A; Breton, R P; Bilous, A; Cooper, S; Falcke, H; Fallows, R A; Gajjar, V; Grießmeier, J -M; Hassall, T E; Karastergiou, A; Keane, E F; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Noutsos, A; Osłowski, S; Pilia, M; Serylak, M; Schrijvers, C; Sobey, C; ter Veen, S; Verbiest, J; Weltevrede, P; Wijnholds, S; Zagkouris, K; van Amesfoort, A S; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Bell, M E; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Corstanje, A; Deller, A; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; van der Horst, A; Juette, E; Kuper, G; Law, C; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Munk, H; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Renting, A; Röttgering, H; Rowlinson, A; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Thoudam, S; Toribio, C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P; Zensus, A

    2014-01-01

    We have conducted two pilot surveys for radio pulsars and fast transients with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) around 140 MHz and here report on the first low-frequency fast-radio burst limit and the discovery of two new pulsars. The first survey, the LOFAR Pilot Pulsar Survey (LPPS), observed a large fraction of the northern sky, ~1.4 x 10^4 sq. deg, with 1-hr dwell times. Each observation covered ~75 sq. deg using 7 independent fields formed by incoherently summing the high-band antenna fields. The second pilot survey, the LOFAR Tied-Array Survey (LOTAS), spanned ~600 sq. deg, with roughly a 5-fold increase in sensitivity compared with LPPS. Using a coherent sum of the 6 LOFAR "Superterp" stations, we formed 19 tied-array beams, together covering 4 sq. deg per pointing. From LPPS we derive a limit on the occurrence, at 142 MHz, of dispersed radio bursts of 107 Jy for the narrowest searched burst duration of 0.66 ms. In LPPS, we re-detected 65 previously known pulsars. LOTAS discovered two pulsars, the firs...

  3. Radio Emission from Exoplanets

    OpenAIRE

    George, Samuel J.; Stevens, Ian R.

    2008-01-01

    We present results from new low frequency observations of two extrasolar planetary systems (Epsilon Eridani and HD128311) taken at 150 MHz with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We do not detect either system, but are able to place tight upper limits on their low frequency radio emission.

  4. The characteristics of millisecond pulsar emission; 2, Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Xilouris, K M; Jessner, A; Von Hoensbroech, A; Lorimer, D; Wielebinski, R; Wolszczan, A; Camilo, F M

    1998-01-01

    We have made polarimetric monitoring observations of millisecond pulsars visible from the northern hemisphere at 1410 MHz. Their emission properties are compared with those of normal pulsars. Although we demonstrated in paper I that millisecond pulsars exhibit the same flux density spectra and similar profile complexity, our results presented here suggest that millisecond pulsar profiles do not comply with the predictions of classification schemes based on ``normal'' pulsars. The frequency development of a large number of millisecond pulsar profiles is abnormal when compared with the development seen for normal pulsars. Moreover, the polarization characteristics suggest that millisecond-pulsar magnetospheres might not simply represent scaled versions of the magnetospheres of normal pulsars, supporting results of paper I. However, phenomena such as mode-changing activity in both intensity and polarization are recognized here for the first time (e.g., J1730--2304). This suggests that while the basic emission me...

  5. A Radio Pulsar/X-ray Binary Link

    CERN Document Server

    Archibald, Anne M; Ransom, Scott M; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Lorimer, Duncan R; McLaughlin, Maura A; Boyles, Jason; Hessels, Jason W T; Lynch, Ryan; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Roberts, Mallory S E; Jenet, Frederick; Champion, David J; Rosen, Rachel; Barlow, Brad N; Dunlap, Bart H; Remillard, Ronald A

    2009-01-01

    Radio pulsars with millisecond spin periods are thought to have been spun up by transfer of matter and angular momentum from a low-mass companion star during an X-ray-emitting phase. The spin periods of the neutron stars in several such low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) systems have been shown to be in the millisecond regime, but no radio pulsations have been detected. Here we report on detection and follow-up observations of a nearby radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) in a circular binary orbit with an optically identified companion star. Optical observations indicate that an accretion disk was present in this system within the last decade. Our optical data show no evidence that one exists today, suggesting that the radio MSP has turned on after a recent LMXB phase.

  6. UNDERSTANDING THE EVOLUTION OF CLOSE BINARY SYSTEMS WITH RADIO PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, O. G. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 1900 La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); De Vito, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (IALP), CCT-CONICET-UNLP. Paseo del Bosque S/N (B1900FWA), La Plata (Argentina); Horvath, J. E., E-mail: obenvenu@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar, E-mail: adevito@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar, E-mail: foton@astro.iag.usp.br [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Universidade de São Paulo R. do Matão 1226 (05508-090), Cidade Universitária, São Paulo SP (Brazil)

    2014-05-01

    We calculate the evolution of close binary systems (CBSs) formed by a neutron star (behaving as a radio pulsar) and a normal donor star, which evolve either to a helium white dwarf (HeWD) or to ultra-short orbital period systems. We consider X-ray irradiation feedback and evaporation due to radio pulsar irradiation. We show that irradiation feedback leads to cyclic mass transfer episodes, allowing CBSs to be observed in between episodes as binary radio pulsars under conditions in which standard, non-irradiated models predict the occurrence of a low-mass X-ray binary. This behavior accounts for the existence of a family of eclipsing binary systems known as redbacks. We predict that redback companions should almost fill their Roche lobe, as observed in PSR J1723-2837. This state is also possible for systems evolving with larger orbital periods. Therefore, binary radio pulsars with companion star masses usually interpreted as larger than expected to produce HeWDs may also result in such quasi-Roche lobe overflow states, rather than hosting a carbon-oxygen WD. We found that CBSs with initial orbital periods of P{sub i} < 1 day evolve into redbacks. Some of them produce low-mass HeWDs, and a subgroup with shorter P{sub i} becomes black widows (BWs). Thus, BWs descend from redbacks, although not all redbacks evolve into BWs. There is mounting observational evidence favoring BW pulsars to be very massive (≳ 2 M {sub ☉}). As they should be redback descendants, redback pulsars should also be very massive, since most of the mass is transferred before this stage.

  7. Understanding the evolution of close binary systems with radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuto, O G; Horvath, J E

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the evolution of close binary systems (CBSs) formed by a neutron star (behaving as a radio pulsar) and a normal donor star, evolving either to helium white dwarf (HeWD) or ultra short orbital period systems. We consider X-ray irradiation feedback and evaporation due to radio pulsar irradiation. We show that irradiation feedback leads to cyclic mass transfer episodes, allowing CBSs to be observed in-between as binary radio pulsars under conditions in which standard, non-irradiated models predict the occurrence of a low mass X-ray binary. This behavior accounts for the existence of a family of eclipsing binary systems known as redbacks. We predict that redback companions should almost fill their Roche lobe, as observed in PSR J1723-2837. This state is also possible for systems evolving with larger orbital periods. Therefore, binary radio pulsars with companion star masses usually interpreted as larger than expected to produce HeWDs may also result in such {\\it quasi - Roche Lobe Overflow} states, r...

  8. Detection of polarized quasi-periodic microstructure emission in millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    De, Kishalay; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-01-01

    Microstructure emission, involving short time scale, often quasi-periodic, intensity fluctuations in subpulse emission, is well known in normal period pulsars. In this letter, we present the first detections of quasi-periodic microstructure emission from millisecond pulsars (MSPs), from Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations of two MSPs at 325 and 610 MHz. Similar to the characteristics of microstructure observed in normal period pulsars, we find that these features are often highly polarized, and exhibit quasi-periodic behavior on top of broader subpulse emission, with periods of the order of a few $\\mu$s. By measuring their widths and periodicities from single pulse intensity profiles and their autocorrelation functions, we extend the microstructure timescale - rotation period relationship by more than an order of magnitude down to rotation periods $\\sim$ 5 ms, and find it to be consistent with the relationship derived earlier for normal pulsars. The similarity of behavior is remarkable, given ...

  9. Interpretation of the Low-Frequency Peculiarities in the Radio Profile Structure of the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Petrova, S A

    2008-01-01

    The theory of magnetized induced scattering off relativistic gyrating particles is developed. It is directly applicable to the magnetosphere of a pulsar, in which case the particles acquire gyration energies as a result of resonant absorption of radio emission. In the course of the radio beam scattering into background the scattered radiation concentrates along the ambient magnetic field. The scattering from different harmonics of the particle gyrofrequency takes place at different characteristic altitudes in the magnetosphere and, because of the rotational effect, gives rise to different components in the pulse profile. It is demonstrated that the induced scattering from the first harmonic into the state under the resonance can account for the so-called low-frequency component in the radio profile of the Crab pulsar. The precursor component is believed to result from the induced scattering between the two states well below the resonance. It is shown that these ideas are strongly supported by the polarization...

  10. Sampling the Radio Transient Universe: Studies of Pulsars and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennamangalam, Jayanth

    The transient radio universe is a relatively unexplored area of astronomy, offering a variety of phenomena, from solar and Jovian bursts, to flare stars, pulsars, and bursts of Galactic and potentially even cosmological origin. Among these, perhaps the most widely studied radio transients, pulsars are fast-spinning neutron stars that emit radio beams from their magnetic poles. In spite of over 40 years of research on pulsars, we have more questions than answers on these exotic compact objects, chief among them the nature of their emission mechanism. Nevertheless, the wealth of phenomena exhibited by pulsars make them one of the most useful astrophysical tools. With their high densities, pulsars are probes of the nature of ultra-dense matter. Characterized by their high timing stability, pulsars can be used to verify the predictions of general relativity, discover planets around them, study bodies in the solar system, and even serve as an interplanetary (and possibly some day, interstellar) navigation aid. Pulsars are also used to study the nature of the interstellar medium, much like a flashlight illuminating airborne dust in a dark room. Studies of pulsars in the Galactic center can help answer questions about the massive black hole in the region and the star formation history in its vicinity. Millisecond pulsars in globular clusters are long-lived tracers of their progenitors, low-mass X-ray binaries, and can be used to study the dynamical history of those clusters. Another source of interest in radio transient astronomy is the hitherto undetected engineered signal from extraterrestrial intelligence. The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) is an ongoing attempt at discovering the presence of technological life elsewhere in the Galaxy. In this work, I present my forays into two aspects of the study of the radio transient universe---pulsars and SETI. Firstly, I describe my work on the luminosity function and population size of pulsars in the globular

  11. On the pulse-width statistics in radio pulsars. III. Importance of the conal profile components

    CERN Document Server

    Maciesiak, K; Melikidze, G

    2012-01-01

    This work is a continuation of two previous papers of a series, in which we examined the pulse-width statistics of normal radio pulsars. In the first paper we compiled the largest ever database of pulsars with interpulses in their mean profiles. In the second one we confirmed the existence of the lower boundary in the scatter plot of core component pulse-widths versus pulsar period W50 sim 2.5 P^{-0.5}[deg], first discovered by Rankin using much smaller number of interpulse cases. In this paper we show that the same lower boundary also exists for conal profile components. Rankin proposed a very simple method of estimation of pulsar inclination angle based on comparing the width W50 of its core component with the period dependent value of the lower boundary. We claim that this method can be extended to conal components as well. To explain an existence of the lower boundary Rankin proposed that the core emission originates at or near the polar cap surface. We demonstrated clearly that no coherent pulsar radio e...

  12. X-ray and $\\gamma$-ray Studies of the Millisecond Pulsar and PossibleX-ray Binary/Radio Pulsar Transition Object PSR J1723-2837

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Crawford, Fronefield; Possenti, Andrea; McLaughlin, Maura A; Freire, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    We present X-ray observations of the ``redback'' eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar and candidate radio pulsar/X-ray binary transition object PSR J1723-2837. The X-ray emission from the system is predominantly non-thermal and exhibits pronounced variability as a function of orbital phase, with a factor of ~2 reduction in brightness around superior conjunction. Such temporal behavior appears to be a defining characteristic of this variety of peculiar millisecond pulsar binaries and is likely caused by a partial geometric occultation by the main-sequence-like companion of a shock within the binary. There is no indication of diffuse X-ray emission from a bow shock or pulsar wind nebula associated with the pulsar. We also report on a search for point source emission and $\\gamma$-ray pulsations in Fermi Large Area Telescope data using a likelihood analysis and photon probability weighting. Although PSR J1723-2837 is consistent with being a $\\gamma$-ray point source, due to the strong Galactic diffuse emission at i...

  13. A SEARCH FOR RAPIDLY SPINNING PULSARS AND FAST TRANSIENTS IN UNIDENTIFIED RADIO SOURCES WITH THE NRAO 43 METER TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Deborah; Crawford, Fronefield; Gilpin, Claire [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Langston, Glen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    We have searched 75 unidentified radio sources selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog for the presence of rapidly spinning pulsars and short, dispersed radio bursts. The sources are radio bright, have no identifications or optical source coincidences, are more than 5% linearly polarized, and are spatially unresolved in the catalog. If these sources are fast-spinning pulsars (e.g., sub-millisecond pulsars), previous large-scale pulsar surveys may have missed detection due to instrumental and computational limitations, eclipsing effects, or diffractive scintillation. The discovery of a sub-millisecond pulsar would significantly constrain the neutron star equation of state and would have implications for models predicting a rapid slowdown of highly recycled X-ray pulsars to millisecond periods from, e.g., accretion disk decoupling. These same sources were previously searched unsuccessfully for pulsations at 610 MHz with the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank. This new search was conducted at a different epoch with a new 800 MHz backend on the NRAO 43 m Telescope at a center frequency of 1200 MHz. Our search was sensitive to sub-millisecond pulsars in highly accelerated binary systems and to short transient pulses. No periodic or transient signals were detected from any of the target sources. We conclude that diffractive scintillation, dispersive smearing, and binary acceleration are unlikely to have prevented detection of the large majority of the sources if they are pulsars, though we cannot rule out eclipsing, nulling or intermittent emission, or radio interference as possible factors for some non-detections. Other (speculative) possibilities for what these sources might include radio-emitting magnetic cataclysmic variables or older pulsars with aligned magnetic and spin axes.

  14. Positron-Cyclotron Maser for the Core Emissions from Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, C; Wang, D; Wu, X; Ma, Chun-yu; Mao, Ding-yi; Wang, De-yu; Wu, Xin-ji

    1997-01-01

    We use the cyclotron-maser theory to explain the core emission from the magnetosphere of pulsars. As a kind of direct and efficient maser type of emission, it can give rise to escaping radiation with extremely high brightness temperature and narrow angle with respect to the magnetic axis. We find that the growth rates and real frequencies of the O-mode electromagnetic wave propagating parallel to the magnetic fields depend on the ratio of the plasma frequency $\\omega_p$ and the gyrofrequency $\\omega_b$ rather than the plasma frequency alone, as described by other models. The emission takes place in the region where the magnitude of $\\omega_p/\\omega_b$ is $10^{-2}$. The corresponding altitude is about a few decades of neutron star radius, where the magnetic field strength is about $10^6-10^8 G$. The qualitative spectrum and the lower frequency cut-off of the radio emission is obtained by this model.

  15. 50 pico arcsecond astrometry of pulsar emission

    CERN Document Server

    Pen, Ue-Li; Deller, Adam; Brisken, Walter

    2013-01-01

    We use VLBI imaging of the interstellar scattering speckle pattern associated with the pulsar PSR 0834+06 to measure the astrometric motion of its emission. The ~ 5AU interstellar baselines, provided by interference between speckles spanning the scattering disk, enable us to detect motions with sub nanoarcsecond accuracy. We measure a small pulse deflection of ~8+/-2 km (not including geometric uncertainties), which is 100 times smaller than the native resolution of this interstellar interferometer. This implies that the emission region is small, and at an altitude of a few hundred km, with the exact value depending on field geometry. This is substantially closer to the star than to the light cylinder. Future VLBI measurements can improve on this finding. This new regime of ultra-precise astrometry may enable precision parallax distance determination of pulsar binary displacements.

  16. RADIO DETECTION OF THE FERMI-LAT BLIND SEARCH MILLISECOND PULSAR J1311-3430

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Cheung, C. C. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Giroletti, M. [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Cognard, I. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement, LPCE UMR 6115 CNRS, F-45071 Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bhattacharyya, B. [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune 411 007 (India); Roy, J. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune 411 007 (India); Romani, R. W.; Kerr, M. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ferrara, E. C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Johnston, S.; Keith, M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia); Pletsch, H. J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Saz Parkinson, P. M., E-mail: Paul.Ray@nrl.navy.mil [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-01-20

    We report the detection of radio emission from PSR J1311-3430, the first millisecond pulsar (MSP) discovered in a blind search of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray data. We detected radio pulsations at 2 GHz, visible for <10% of {approx}4.5 hr of observations using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Observations at 5 GHz with the GBT and at several lower frequencies with Parkes, Nancay, and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope resulted in non-detections. We also report the faint detection of a steep spectrum continuum radio source (0.1 mJy at 5 GHz) in interferometric imaging observations with the Jansky Very Large Array. These detections demonstrate that PSR J1311-3430 is not radio quiet and provide additional evidence that radio-quiet MSPs are rare. The radio dispersion measure of 37.8 pc cm{sup -3} provides a distance estimate of 1.4 kpc for the system, yielding a gamma-ray efficiency of 30%, typical of LAT-detected MSPs. We see apparent excess delay in the radio pulses as the pulsar appears from eclipse and we speculate on possible mechanisms for the non-detections of the pulse at other orbital phases and observing frequencies.

  17. Radio Detection of the Fermi-LAT Blind Search Millisecond Pulsar J1311-3430

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Cheung, C. C.; Giroletti, M.; Cognard, I.; Camilo, F.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Roy, J.; Romani, R. W.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Kramer, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection of radio emission from PSR J1311.3430, the first millisecond pulsar (MSP) discovered in a blind search of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray data. We detected radio pulsations at 2 GHz, visible for less than 10% of approximately 4.5 hr of observations using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Observations at 5 GHz with the GBT and at several lower frequencies with Parkes, Nan cay, and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope resulted in non-detections. We also report the faint detection of a steep spectrum continuum radio source (0.1 mJy at 5 GHz) in interferometric imaging observations with the Jansky Very Large Array. These detections demonstrate that PSR J1311.3430 is not radio quiet and provide additional evidence that radio-quiet MSPs are rare. The radio dispersion measure of 37.8 pc cm(exp -3) provides a distance estimate of 1.4 kpc for the system, yielding a gamma-ray efficiency of 30%, typical of LAT-detected MSPs. We see apparent excess delay in the radio pulses as the pulsar appears from eclipse and we speculate on possible mechanisms for the non-detections of the pulse at other orbital phases and observing frequencies.

  18. Discovery of Low DM Fast Radio Transients: Geminga Pulsar Caught in the Act

    CERN Document Server

    Maan, Yogesh

    2015-01-01

    We report discovery of several energetic radio bursts at 34 MHz, using the Gauribidanur radio telescope. The radio bursts exhibit two important properties associated with the propagation of astronomical signals through the interstellar medium: (i) frequency dependent dispersive delays across the observing bandwidth, and (ii) Faraday rotation of the plane of linear polarization. These bursts sample a range of dispersion measures (DM; 1.4--3.6$~{\\rm pc}~{\\rm cm}^{-3}$), and show DM-variation at timescales of the order of a minute. Using groups of bursts having a consistent DM, we show that the bursts have originated from the radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar Geminga. Detection of these bursts supports the existence of occasional radio emission from Geminga. The rare occurrence of these bursts, and the short timescale variation in their DM (if really caused by the intervening medium or the pulsar magnetosphere), might provide clues as to why the pulsar has not been detected in earlier sensitive searches. We present d...

  19. Wide-Band, Low-Frequency Pulse Profiles of 100 Radio Pulsars with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Pilia, M; Stappers, B W; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; van Leeuwen, J; Weltevrede, P; Lyne, A G; Zagkouris, K; Hassall, T E; Bilous, A V; Breton, R P; Falcke, H; Grießmeier, J -M; Keane, E; Karastergiou, A; Kuniyoshi, M; Noutsos, A; Osłowski, S; Serylak, M; Sobey, C; ter Veen, S; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Bell, M E; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Bîrzan, L; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Ciardi, B; Corbel, S; de Geus, E; de Jong, A; Deller, A; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Heald, G; Horneffer, A; Jonker, P; Juette, E; Kuper, G; Maat, P; Mann, G; Markoff, S; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Miller-Jones, J C A; Nelles, A; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pietka, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Rowlinson, A; Schwarz, D; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Stewart, A; Swinbank, J D; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Thoudam, S; Toribio, M C; van der Horst, A J; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wijnands, R; Wijnholds, S J; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    LOFAR offers the unique capability of observing pulsars across the 10-240 MHz frequency range with a fractional bandwidth of roughly 50%. This spectral range is well-suited for studying the frequency evolution of pulse profile morphology caused by both intrinsic and extrinsic effects: such as changing emission altitude in the pulsar magnetosphere or scatter broadening by the interstellar medium, respectively. The magnitude of most of these effects increases rapidly towards low frequencies. LOFAR can thus address a number of open questions about the nature of radio pulsar emission and its propagation through the interstellar medium. We present the average pulse profiles of 100 pulsars observed in the two LOFAR frequency bands: High Band (120-167 MHz, 100 profiles) and Low Band (15-62 MHz, 26 profiles). We compare them with Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and Lovell Telescope observations at higher frequencies (350 and1400 MHz) in order to study the profile evolution. The profiles are aligned in abs...

  20. Arecibo Pulsar Survey Using ALFA. III. Probing Radio Pulsar Intermittency and Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Deneva, J S; McLaughlin, M A; Nice, D J; Lorimer, D R; Crawford, F; Bhat, N D R; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Freire, P C C; Edel, S; Kondratiev, V I; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Kasian, L; Kaspi, V M; Krämer, M; Lazarus, P; Van Leeuwen, J; Ransom, S M; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Brazier, A; Venkataraman, A; Zollweg, J A

    2008-01-01

    We present radio transient search algorithms, results, and statistics from the ongoing Arecibo Pulsar ALFA (PALFA) Survey of the Galactic plane. We have discovered seven objects by detecting isolated dispersed pulses and one of the new discoveries has a duty cycle of 0.01%, the smallest known. The impact of selection effects on the detectability and classification of intermittent sources is discussed, and the relative efficiencies of periodicity vs. single pulse searches are compared for various pulsar classes. We find that scintillation, off-axis detection and few rotation periods within an observation may misrepresent normal periodic pulsars as intermittent sources. Finally, we derive constraints on transient pulse rate and flux density from the PALFA survey parameters and results.

  1. A Magnetar-like Outburst from a High-B Radio Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, R. F.; Kaspi, V. M.; Tendulkar, S. P.; Scholz, P.

    2016-09-01

    Radio pulsars are believed to have their emission powered by the loss of rotational kinetic energy. By contrast, magnetars show intense X-ray and γ-ray radiation whose luminosity greatly exceeds that due to spin down and magnetar luminosity is believed to be powered by intense internal magnetic fields. A basic prediction of this picture is that radio pulsars of high magnetic field should show magnetar-like emission. Here we report on a magnetar-like X-ray outburst from the radio pulsar PSR J1119-6127, heralded by two short bright X-ray bursts on 2016 July 27 and 28. Using target of opportunity data from the Swift X-ray Telescope and NuSTAR, we show that this pulsar’s flux has brightened by a factor of \\gt 160 in the 0.5-10 keV band, and that its previously soft X-ray spectrum has undergone a strong hardening with strong pulsations appearing for the first time above 2.5 keV, with phase-averaged emission detectable up to 25 keV. By comparing Swift-XRT and NuSTAR timing data with a pre-outburst ephemeris derived from Fermi Large Area Telescope data, we find that the source has contemporaneously undergone a large spin-up glitch of amplitude {{Δ }}ν /ν =5.74(8)× {10}-6. The collection of phenomena observed thus far in this outburst strongly mirrors those in most magnetar outbursts and provides an unambiguous connection between the radio pulsar and magnetar populations.

  2. Simultaneous Absolute Timing of the Crab Pulsar at Radio and Optical Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Oosterbroek, T; Golden, A; Verhoeve, P; Martin, D D E; Erd, C; Schulz, R; Stuewe, J A; Stankov, A; Ho, T

    2008-01-01

    The Crab pulsar emits across a large part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Determining the time delay between the emission at different wavelengths will allow to better constrain the site and mechanism of the emission. We have simultaneously observed the Crab Pulsar in the optical with S-Cam, an instrument based on Superconducting Tunneling Junctions (STJs) with $\\mu$s time resolution and at 2 GHz using the Nan\\c{c}ay radio telescope with an instrument doing coherent dedispersion and able to record giant pulses data. We have studied the delay between the radio and optical pulse using simultaneously obtained data therefore reducing possible uncertainties present in previous observations. We determined the arrival times of the (mean) optical and radio pulse and compared them using the tempo2 software package. We present the most accurate value for the optical-radio lag of 255 $\\pm$ 21 $\\mu$s and suggest the likelihood of a spectral dependence to the excess optical emission asociated with giant radio pulses.

  3. Pulsar Emission Geometry and Accelerating Field Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCesar, Megan E.; Harding, Alice K.; Miller, M. Coleman; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Parent, Damien

    2012-01-01

    The high-quality Fermi LAT observations of gamma-ray pulsars have opened a new window to understanding the generation mechanisms of high-energy emission from these systems, The high statistics allow for careful modeling of the light curve features as well as for phase resolved spectral modeling. We modeled the LAT light curves of the Vela and CTA I pulsars with simulated high-energy light curves generated from geometrical representations of the outer gap and slot gap emission models. within the vacuum retarded dipole and force-free fields. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo maximum likelihood method was used to explore the phase space of the magnetic inclination angle, viewing angle. maximum emission radius, and gap width. We also used the measured spectral cutoff energies to estimate the accelerating parallel electric field dependence on radius. under the assumptions that the high-energy emission is dominated by curvature radiation and the geometry (radius of emission and minimum radius of curvature of the magnetic field lines) is determined by the best fitting light curves for each model. We find that light curves from the vacuum field more closely match the observed light curves and multiwavelength constraints, and that the calculated parallel electric field can place additional constraints on the emission geometry

  4. X-ray and γ-ray studies of the millisecond pulsar and possible X-ray binary/radio pulsar transition object PSR J1723-2837

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanov, Slavko [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Esposito, Paolo [INAF-IASF Milano, via East Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Crawford III, Fronefield [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Possenti, Andrea [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Loc. Poggio dei Pini, Strada 54, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy); McLaughlin, Maura A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, 210E Hodges Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Freire, Paulo, E-mail: slavko@astro.columbia.edu [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-01-20

    We present X-ray observations of the 'redback' eclipsing radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) and candidate radio pulsar/X-ray binary transition object PSR J1723-2837. The X-ray emission from the system is predominantly non-thermal and exhibits pronounced variability as a function of orbital phase, with a factor of ∼2 reduction in brightness around superior conjunction. Such temporal behavior appears to be a defining characteristic of this variety of peculiar MSP binaries and is likely caused by a partial geometric occultation by the main-sequence-like companion of a shock within the binary. There is no indication of diffuse X-ray emission from a bow shock or pulsar wind nebula associated with the pulsar. We also report on a search for point source emission and γ-ray pulsations in Fermi Large Area Telescope data using a likelihood analysis and photon probability weighting. Although PSR J1723-2837 is consistent with being a γ-ray point source, due to the strong Galactic diffuse emission at its position a definitive association cannot be established. No statistically significant pulsations or modulation at the orbital period are detected. For a presumed detection, the implied γ-ray luminosity is ≲5% of its spin-down power. This indicates that PSR J1723-2837 is either one of the least efficient γ-ray producing MSPs or, if the detection is spurious, the γ-ray emission pattern is not directed toward us.

  5. Elementary Wideband Timing of Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Pennucci, Timothy T; Ransom, Scott M

    2014-01-01

    We present an algorithm for the simultaneous measurement of a pulse time-of-arrival (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM) from folded wideband pulsar data. We extend the prescription put forth by Taylor (1992) to accommodate a general two-dimensional template ``portrait'', the alignment of which can be used to measure a pulse phase and DM. We show that there is a dedispersion reference frequency that removes the covariance between the two measured quantities, and note that the recovered pulse profile scaling amplitudes can provide useful information. We experiment with pulse modeling by using Gaussian-component scheme that allows for independent component evolution with frequency, a ``fiducial component'', and the inclusion of scattering. A demonstration on three years of wideband data on the bright millisecond pulsar J1824-2452A (M28A) from the Green Bank Telescope, and a suite of Monte Carlo analyses showcase and validate the algorithm. By using a simple model portrait of M28A we obtain DM trends comparable to ...

  6. Detection of Polarized Quasi-periodic Microstructure Emission in Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Kishalay; Gupta, Yashwant; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-12-01

    Microstructure emission, involving short timescale, often quasi-periodic, intensity fluctuations in subpulse emission, is well known in normal period pulsars. In this Letter, we present the first detections of quasi-periodic microstructure emission from millisecond pulsars (MSPs), from Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of two MSPs at 325 and 610 MHz. Similar to the characteristics of microstructure observed in normal period pulsars, we find that these features are often highly polarized and exhibit quasi-periodic behavior on top of broader subpulse emission, with periods of the order of a few μs. By measuring their widths and periodicities from single pulse intensity profiles and their autocorrelation functions, we extend the microstructure timescale-rotation period relationship by more than an order of magnitude down to rotation periods ˜5 ms, and find it to be consistent with the relationship derived earlier for normal pulsars. The similarity of behavior is remarkable, given the significantly different physical properties of MSPs and normal period pulsars, and rules out several previous speculations about the possible different characteristics of microstructure in MSP radio emission. We discuss the possible reasons for the non-detection of these features in previous high time resolution MSP studies along with the physical implications of our results, both in terms of a geometric beam sweeping model and temporal modulation model for micropulse production.

  7. New limits on the photon mass with radio pulsars in the Magellanic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Er-Kang; Zhang, Song-Bo; Wu, Xue-Feng

    2017-02-01

    A conservative constraint on the rest mass of the photon can be estimated under the assumption that the frequency dependence of dispersion from astronomical sources is mainly contributed by the nonzero photon mass effect. Photon mass limits have been set earlier through the optical emissions of the Crab Nebula pulsar, but we demonstrate that these limits can be significantly improved with the dispersion measure (DM) measurements of radio pulsars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. The combination of DM measurements of pulsars and distances of the Magellanic Clouds provides a strict upper limit on the photon mass as low as mγ ≤2.0×10-45{ }{g}, which is at least four orders of magnitude smaller than the constraint from the Crab Nebula pulsar. Although our limit is not as tight as the current best result (∼10-47{ }{g}) from a fast radio burst (FRB 150418) at a cosmological distance, the cosmological origin of FRB 150418 remains under debate; and our limit can reach the same high precision of FRB 150418 when it has an extragalactic origin (∼10-45{ }{g}).

  8. New Limits on the Photon Mass with Radio Pulsars in the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Song-Bo; Wu, Xue-Feng

    2016-01-01

    A conservative constraint on the rest mass of the photon can be estimated under the assumption that the frequency dependence of dispersion from astronomical sources is mainly contributed by the nonzero photon mass effect. Photon mass limits have been earlier set through the optical emissions of the Crab Nebula pulsar, but we prove that these limits can be significantly improved with the dispersion measure (DM) measurements of radio pulsars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. The combination of DM measurements of pulsars and distances of the Magellanic Clouds provide a strict upper limit on the photon mass as low as $m_{\\gamma} \\leq2.0\\times10^{-45}~\\rm{g}$, which is at least four orders of magnitude smaller than the constraint from the Crab Nebula pulsar. Although our limit is not as tight as the current best result ($\\sim10^{-47}~\\rm{g}$) from a fast radio burst (FRB 150418) at a cosmological distance, the cosmological origin of FRB 150418 remains under debate; and our limit can reach the same high pre...

  9. Tests of gravitational symmetries with radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, LiJing; Wex, Norbert

    2016-09-01

    Symmetries play important roles in modern theories of physical laws. In this paper, we review several experimental tests of important symmetries associated with the gravitational interaction, including the universality of free fall for self-gravitating bodies, time-shift symmetry in the gravitational constant, local position invariance and local Lorentz invariance of gravity, and spacetime translational symmetries. Recent experimental explorations for post-Newtonian gravity are discussed, of which, those from pulsar astronomy are highlighted. All of these tests, of very different aspects of gravity theories, at very different length scales, favor to very high precision the predictions of the strong equivalence principle (SEP) and, in particular, general relativity which embodies SEP completely. As the founding principles of gravity, these symmetries are motivated to be promoted to even stricter tests in future.

  10. Tests of Gravitational Symmetries with Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Lijing

    2016-01-01

    Symmetries play important roles in modern theories of physical laws. In this paper, we review several experimental tests of important symmetries associated with the gravitational interaction, including the universality of free fall for self-gravitating bodies, time-shift symmetry in the gravitational constant, local position invariance and local Lorentz invariance of gravity, and spacetime translational symmetries. Recent experimental explorations for post-Newtonian gravity are discussed, of which, those from pulsar astronomy are highlighted. All of these tests, of very different aspects of gravity theories, at very different length scales, favor to very high precision the predictions of the strong equivalence principle (SEP) and, in particular, general relativity which embodies SEP completely. As the founding principles of gravity, these symmetries are motivated to be promoted to even stricter tests in future.

  11. A study of microglitches in Hartebeesthoek radio pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuchukwu, C. C.; Chukwude, A. E.

    2016-09-01

    We carried out a statistical analysis of microglitch events on a sample of radio pulsars. The distributions of microglitch events in frequency (ν) and first frequency derivative ({ν'}) indicate that the size of a microglitch and sign combinations of events in ν and {ν'} are purely randomized. Assuming that the probability of a given size of a microglitch event occurring scales inversely as the absolute size of the event in both ν and {ν'}, we constructed a cumulative distribution function (CDF) for the absolute sizes of microglitches. In most of the pulsars, the theoretical CDF matched the observed values. This is an indication that microglitches in pulsar may be interpreted as an avalanche process in which angular momentum is transferred erratically from the flywheel-like superfluid interior to the slowly decelerating solid crust. Analysis of the waiting time indicates that it is purely Poisson distributed with mean microglitch rate spin down rate (r˜-0.6) and the characteristic age of the pulsar (τ) with (r˜-0.4/{-}0.5).

  12. Population synthesis of radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsars using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonthier, Peter L.; Koh, Yew-Meng; Kust Harding, Alice

    2016-04-01

    We present preliminary results of a new population synthesis of millisecond pulsars (MSP) from the Galactic disk using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to better understand the model parameter space. We include empirical radio and gamma-ray luminosity models that are dependent on the pulsar period and period derivative with freely varying exponents. The magnitudes of the model luminosities are adjusted to reproduce the number of MSPs detected by a group of thirteen radio surveys as well as the MSP birth rate in the Galaxy and the number of MSPs detected by Fermi. We explore various high-energy emission geometries like the slot gap, outer gap, two pole caustic and pair starved polar cap models. The parameters associated with the birth distributions for the mass accretion rate, magnetic field, and period distributions are well constrained. With the set of four free parameters, we employ Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations to explore the model parameter space. We present preliminary comparisons of the simulated and detected distributions of radio and gamma-ray pulsar characteristics. We estimate the contribution of MSPs to the diffuse gamma-ray background with a special focus on the Galactic Center.We express our gratitude for the generous support of the National Science Foundation (RUI: AST-1009731), Fermi Guest Investigator Program and the NASA Astrophysics Theory and Fundamental Program (NNX09AQ71G).

  13. Discovery of two millisecond pulsars in Fermi sources with the Nancay Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Cognard, I; Johnson, T J; Smith, D A; Venter, C; Harding, A K; Wolff, M T; Cheung, C C; Donato, D; Abdo, A A; Ballet, J; Camilo, F; Desvignes, G; Dumora, D; Ferrara, E C; Freire, P C C; Grove, J E; Keith, M; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; Michelson, P F; Parent, D; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Romani, R W; Parkinson, P M Saz; Stappers, B W; Theureau, G; Thompson, D J; Weltevrede, P; Wood, K S

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of two millisecond pulsars in a search for radio pulsations at the positions of \\emph{Fermi Large Area Telescope} sources with no previously known counterparts, using the Nan\\c{c}ay radio telescope. The two millisecond pulsars, PSRs J2017+0603 and J2302+4442, have rotational periods of 2.896 and 5.192 ms and are both in binary systems with low-eccentricity orbits and orbital periods of 2.2 and 125.9 days respectively, suggesting long recycling processes. Gamma-ray pulsations were subsequently detected for both objects, indicating that they power the associated \\emph{Fermi} sources in which they were found. The gamma-ray light curves and spectral properties are similar to those of previously-detected gamma-ray millisecond pulsars. Detailed modeling of the observed radio and gamma-ray light curves shows that the gamma-ray emission seems to originate at high altitudes in their magnetospheres. Additionally, X-ray observations revealed the presence of an X-ray source at the position of PSR ...

  14. Pulsar B0329+54: scattering disk resolved by RadioAstron interferometer at 324 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, M.

    Propagation of pulsar radio emission through the interstellar plasma is accompanied with scattering by inhomogeneities of the plasma. The scattering produces a range of effects: angular broadening, pulse broadening, intensity modulation (scintillations), and distortion of radio spectra (diffraction pattern). In this presentation, we will primarily deal with scattering effects affecting interferometric measurements. Pulsars are point like radio sources at angular resolution provided by space VLBI even at largest baseline projections. Therefore, any structure, observed by the space-ground interferometer, is due to scattering effects. The objective of our study was to measure parameters of a scattering disk for the PSR B0329+54 at a frequency of 324 MHz with the space-ground interferometer RadioAstron. Observations were conducted on November 26-29 2012 in four sessions, one hour duration each, with progressively increasing baseline projections of 70, 90,175, and 235 thousand kilometers correspondingly. Only one ground radio telescope observed the pulsar together with the space radio telescope (SRT); it was 100-m telescope in Green Bank (GBT). Notable visibility amplitudes were detected at all baseline projections at a maximum level of 0.05 with the SNR of about 20. It was found that visibility function in delay consists of many isolated unresolved spikes. The overall spread of such spikes in delay corresponds to the scattering disk of about 4 mas at a half wide. Fine structure of the visibility amplitude in delay domain corresponds to a model of amplitude modulated noise (AMN). Fringe rate behavior with time indicates on dominant influence of refraction on traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID).

  15. Evolution of redback radio pulsars in globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuto, O. G.; De Vito, M. A.; Horvath, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    Context. We study the evolution of close binary systems composed of a normal, intermediate mass star and a neutron star considering a chemical composition typical of that present in globular clusters (Z = 0.001). Aims: We look for similarities and differences with respect to solar composition donor stars, which we have extensively studied in the past. As a definite example, we perform an application on one of the redbacks located in a globular cluster. Methods: We performed a detailed grid of models in order to find systems that represent the so-called redback binary radio pulsar systems with donor star masses between 0.6 and 2.0 solar masses and orbital periods in the range 0.2-0.9 d. Results: We find that the evolution of these binary systems is rather similar to those corresponding to solar composition objects, allowing us to account for the occurrence of redbacks in globular clusters, as the main physical ingredient is the irradiation feedback. Redback systems are in the quasi-RLOF state, that is, almost filling their corresponding Roche lobe. During the irradiation cycle the system alternates between semi-detached and detached states. While detached the system appears as a binary millisecond pulsar, called a redback. Circumstellar material, as seen in redbacks, is left behind after the previous semi-detached phase. Conclusions: The evolution of binary radio pulsar systems considering irradiation successfully accounts for, and provides a way for, the occurrence of redback pulsars in low-metallicity environments such as globular clusters. This is the case despite possible effects of the low metal content of the donor star that could drive systems away from redback configuration.

  16. THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHOCKED STELLAR WIND OF PULSAR GAMMA-RAY BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabalza, V.; Paredes, J. M. [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bosch-Ramon, V., E-mail: vzabalza@am.ub.es [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2011-12-10

    Gamma-ray-loud X-ray binaries are binary systems that show non-thermal broadband emission from radio to gamma rays. If the system comprises a massive star and a young non-accreting pulsar, their winds will collide producing broadband non-thermal emission, most likely originated in the shocked pulsar wind. Thermal X-ray emission is expected from the shocked stellar wind, but until now it has neither been detected nor studied in the context of gamma-ray binaries. We present a semi-analytic model of the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked stellar wind in pulsar gamma-ray binaries, and find that the thermal X-ray emission increases monotonically with the pulsar spin-down luminosity, reaching luminosities of the order of 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The lack of thermal features in the X-ray spectrum of gamma-ray binaries can then be used to constrain the properties of the pulsar and stellar winds. By fitting the observed X-ray spectra of gamma-ray binaries with a source model composed of an absorbed non-thermal power law and the computed thermal X-ray emission, we are able to derive upper limits on the spin-down luminosity of the putative pulsar. We applied this method to LS 5039, the only gamma-ray binary with a radial, powerful wind, and obtain an upper limit on the pulsar spin-down luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Given the energetic constraints from its high-energy gamma-ray emission, a non-thermal to spin-down luminosity ratio very close to unity may be required.

  17. Beating the Spin-Down Limit on Gravitational Wave Emission from the Crab Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Armor, P.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Ballmer, S.; Bantilan, H.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barton, M. A.; Bastarrika, M.; Bayer, K.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A.; Brown, D. A.; Brunet, G.; Bullington, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Casebolt, T.; Castaldi, G.; Cepeda, C.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Christensen, N.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Cokelaer, T.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, R. M.; Dalrymple, J.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Degree, M.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Duke, I.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dupuis, R. J.; Dwyer, J. G.; Echols, C.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Finn, L. S.; Flasch, K.; Fotopoulos, N.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Garofoli, J.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L.; González, G.; Gossler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grimaldi, F.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Harstad, E.; Hayama, K.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Hennessy, M.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hosken, D.; Hough, J.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D.; Ito, M.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kamat, S.; Kanner, J.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Khan, R.; Khazanov, E.; Kim, C.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Kozak, D.; Kozhevatov, I.; Krishnan, B.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lang, M. M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, M.; Leindecker, N.; Leonhardt, V.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lormand, M.; Lu, P.; Lubinski, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Mandic, V.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McIntyre, G.; McIvor, G.; McKechan, D.; McKenzie, K.; Meier, T.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C. J.; Meyers, D.; Miller, J.; Minelli, J.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; MowLowry, C.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, H.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Nelson, J.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Numata, K.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Petrie, T.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Principe, M.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramsunder, M.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rogan, A. M.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Samidi, M.; Sancho de la Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Schediwy, S. W.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.

    2008-08-01

    We present direct upper limits on gravitational wave emission from the Crab pulsar using data from the first 9 months of the fifth science run of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). These limits are based on two searches. In the first we assume that the gravitational wave emission follows the observed radio timing, giving an upper limit on gravitational wave emission that beats indirect limits inferred from the spin-down and braking index of the pulsar and the energetics of the nebula. In the second we allow for a small mismatch between the gravitational and radio signal frequencies and interpret our results in the context of two possible gravitational wave emission mechanisms.

  18. Fast Radio Burst Discovered in the Arecibo Pulsar ALFA Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Lorimer, D R; McLaughlin, M A; Chatterjee, S; Crawford, F; Deneva, J S; Kaspi, V M; Wharton, R S; Allen, B; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Freire, P C C; Jenet, F A; Karako-Argaman, C; Knispel, B; Lazarus, P; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Lynch, R; Lyne, A G; Ransom, S M; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J K; Venkataraman, A; Zhu, W W; Aulbert, C; Fehrmann, H

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising from a population of extragalactic sources, in which case they would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the intergalactic medium; they may also be linked to new source classes. Until now, however, all so-called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been detected with the Parkes radio telescope and its 13-beam receiver, casting some concern about the astrophysical nature of these signals. Here we present FRB 121102, the first FRB discovery from a geographic location other than Parkes. FRB 121102 was found in the Galactic anti-center region in the 1.4-GHz Pulsar ALFA survey with the Arecibo Observatory with a DM = 557.4 $\\pm$ 3 pc cm$^{-3}$, pulse width of $3\\; \\pm 0.5$ ms, and no evidence of interstellar scattering. The observed delay of the signal arrival time with frequency agrees precisely with the expectation...

  19. Ain't No Crab, PWN Got A Brand New Bag: Correlated radio and X-ray Structures in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, M S E; Gaensler, B M; Brogan, C L; Tam, C R; Romani, R W; Roberts, Mallory S.E.; Lyutikov, Maxim; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Brogan, Crystal; Tam, Cindy R.; Romani, Roger W.

    2004-01-01

    The traditional view of radio pulsar wind nebulae (PWN), encouraged by the Crab nebula's X-ray and radio morphologies, is that they are a result of the integrated history of their pulsars' wind. The radio emission should therefore be largely unaffected by recent pulsar activity, and hence minimally correlated with structures in the X-ray nebulae. Observations of several PWN, both stationary (sPWN) and rapidly moving (rPWN), now show clear morphological relationships between structures in the radio and X-ray with radio intensity variations on the order of unity. We present high-resolution X-ray and radio images of several PWN of both types and discuss the morphological relationships between the two wavebands.

  20. Differences between radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars as revealed by Fermi

    CERN Document Server

    Hui, C Y; Takata, J; Ng, C W; Cheng, K S

    2016-01-01

    By comparing the properties of non-recycled radio-loud $\\gamma-$ray pulsars and radio-quiet $\\gamma-$ray pulsars, we have searched for the differences between these two populations. We found that the $\\gamma-$ray spectral curvature of radio-quiet pulsars can be larger than that of radio-loud pulsars. Based on the full sample of non-recycled $\\gamma-$ray pulsars, their distributions of the magnetic field strength at the light cylinder are also found to be different. We notice that this might be resulted from the observational bias. In re-examining the previously reported difference of $\\gamma-$ray-to-X-ray flux ratios, we found the significance can be hampered by their statistical uncertainties. In the context of outer gap model, we discuss the expected properties of these two populations and compare with the possible differences identified in our analysis.

  1. The Einstein@Home search for radio pulsars and PSR J2007+2722

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, B; Cordes, J M; Deneva, J S; Hessels, J W T; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C; Bock, O; Brazier, A; Chatterjee, S; Demorest, P B; Eggenstein, H B; Fehrmann, H; Gotthelf, E V; Hammer, D; Kaspi, V M; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G; Machenschalk, B; McLaughlin, M A; Messenger, C; Pletsch, H J; Ransom, S M; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Bhat, N D R; Bogdanov, S; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Crawford, F; Desvignes, G; Freire, P C C; Heald, G; Jenet, F A; Lazarus, P; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Lynch, R; Papa, M A; Prix, R; Rosen, R; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Stovall, K; Venkataraman, A; Zhu, W

    2013-01-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries, to search for new neutron stars using data from electromagnetic and gravitational-wave detectors. This paper presents a detailed description of the search for new radio pulsars using PALFA survey data from the Arecibo Observatory. The enormous computing power allows this search to cover a new region of parameter space; it can detect pulsars in binary systems with orbital periods as short as 11 min. We also describe the first Einstein@Home discovery, the 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar PSR J2007+2722, and provide a full timing model. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period. This neutron star is most likely a disrupted recycled pulsar, about as old as its characteristic spin-down age of 404 Myr. However there is a small chance that it was born recently, with a low magnetic field. If so, upper limits on the X-ray flux suggest but can not prove that PSR J2007+27...

  2. Searching for debris disks around seven radio pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhongxiang; Wang, Xuebing [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Ng, C.-Y. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Li, Aigen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Kaplan, David L. [Physics Department, University of WisconsinMilwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We report on our searches for debris disks around seven relatively nearby radio pulsars, which are isolated sources that were carefully selected as targets on the basis of our deep K{sub s} -band imaging survey. The K{sub s} images obtained with the 6.5 m Baade Magellan Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory are analyzed together with the Spitzer/IRAC images at 4.5 and 8.0 μm and the WISE images at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 μm. No infrared counterparts of these pulsars are found, with flux upper limits of ∼μJy at near-infrared (λ < 10 μm) and ∼10-1000 μJy at mid-infrared wavelengths (λ > 10 μm). The results of this search are discussed in terms of the efficiency of converting the pulsar spin-down energy to thermal energy and X-ray heating of debris disks, with a comparison made of the two magnetars 4U 0142+61 and 1E 2259+586, which are suggested to harbor a debris disk.

  3. Directional Statistics for Polarization Observations of Individual Pulses from Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    McKinnon, M M

    2010-01-01

    Radio polarimetry is a three-dimensional statistical problem. The three-dimensional aspect of the problem arises from the Stokes parameters Q, U, and V, which completely describe the polarization of electromagnetic radiation and conceptually define the orientation of a polarization vector in the Poincar'e sphere. The statistical aspect of the problem arises from the random fluctuations in the source-intrinsic polarization and the instrumental noise. A simple model for the polarization of pulsar radio emission has been used to derive the three-dimensional statistics of radio polarimetry. The model is based upon the proposition that the observed polarization is due to the incoherent superposition of two, highly polarized, orthogonal modes. The directional statistics derived from the model follow the Bingham-Mardia and Fisher family of distributions. The model assumptions are supported by the qualitative agreement between the statistics derived from it and those measured with polarization observations of the ind...

  4. Long-term Radio Observations of the Intermittent Pulsar B1931+24

    CERN Document Server

    Young, N J; Lyne, A G; Weltevrede, P; Kramer, M; Cognard, I

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of approximately 13-yr of observations of the intermittent pulsar B1931+24 to further elucidate its behaviour. We find that while the source exhibits a wide range of nulling (~4-39 d) and radio-emitting (~1-19 d) timescales, it cycles between its different emission phases over an average timescale of approximately 38 d, which is remarkably stable over many years. On average, the neutron star is found to be radio emitting for 26 +- 6 % of the time. No evidence is obtained to suggest that the pulsar undergoes any systematic, intrinsic variations in pulse intensity during the radio-emitting phases. In addition, we find no evidence for any correlation between the length of consecutive emission phases. An analysis of the rotational behaviour of the source shows that it consistently assumes the same spin-down rates, i.e. nudot = -16 +- 1 x 10^-15 s^-2 when emitting and nudot = -10.8 +- 0.4 x 10^-15 s^-2 when not emitting, over the entire observation span. Coupled with the stable switching tim...

  5. A multi-component Langmuir-mode source for the observed pulsar coherent emission

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, P B

    2015-01-01

    Several classes of neutron star are sources of coherent emission at frequencies of 10^2 - 10^3 MHz: others are radio-quiet. The primary emission spectra are broadly universal in form over many orders of magnitude in rotation period and polar-cap magnetic flux density. The existence of nulls and mode-changes in some radio-loud pulsars can be understood only as a manifestation of magnetospherical bistability. An ion-proton plasma with a possible background of electron-positron pairs is formed at the polar caps of stars with positive corotational charge density and is shown here to be a physical basis for the presence or absence of coherent emission and a likely reason why bistability may be present in the later stages of a pulsar lifetime.

  6. Nulling, Mode-Changing and Drifting Subpulses in the Highly Asymmetric Conal Quadruple Radio Pulsar B2034+19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Joanna M.

    2017-09-01

    Radio pulsar B2034+19 exhibits all three `canonical' pulse-sequence phenomena—that is, pulse nulling, two distinct profile modes and subpulses with periodic modulation. Indeed, the bursts and nulls in the pulsar are short at several score pulses and quasi-periodic such that about 1/3 of the pulses are nulls. The pulsar's two modes have very different characteristics, the first shows emission almost completely confined to the leading half of the profile and highly modulated in a 2-period odd-even manner; whereas the second mode illuminates both the leading and trailing parts of the star's profile about equally with the appearance of drift bands at about a 3-period separation. The second mode occurs much less frequently than the first (about 15% of the time) and thus the leading part of the profile has a much larger average intensity than the trailing part. B2034+19 represents an interesting example of a pulsar with emission primarily in the leading part of its profile window with only occasional illumination in the trailing part. This suggests that there are pulsars that perhaps never emit in a part of their profile window, connecting with earlier work on pulsars with apparent `partial cone' profiles.

  7. On tests of general relativity with binary radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozzo, W.; Vecchio, A.

    2016-10-01

    The timing of radio pulsars in binary systems provides a superb testing ground of general relativity. Here we propose a Bayesian approach to carry out these tests, and a relevant efficient numerical implementation, that has several conceptual and practical advantages with respect to traditional methods based on least-squares fit that have been used so far: (i) it accounts for the actual structure of the likelihood function - and it is not predicated on the Laplace approximation which is implicitly built in least-squares fit that can potentially bias the inference - (ii) it provides the ratio of the evidences of any two models under consideration as the statistical quantity to compare different theories, and (iii) it allows us to put joint constraints from the monitoring of multiple systems, that can be expressed in terms of ratio of evidences or probability intervals of global (thus not system-dependent) parameters of the theory, if any exists. Our proposed approach optimally exploits the progress in timing of radio pulsars and the increase in the number of observed systems. We demonstrate the power of this framework using simulated data sets that are representative of current observations.

  8. Fast radio burst discovered in the Arecibo pulsar ALFA survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitler, L. G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P.; Lee, K. J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S.; Wharton, R. S.; Brazier, A. [Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Hessels, J. W. T. [ASTRON, Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Crawford, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, PA 17604-3003 (United States); Deneva, J. S. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kaspi, V. M.; Karako-Argaman, C. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Allen, B. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Jenet, F. A. [Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Knispel, B., E-mail: lspitler@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de [Leibniz Universität, Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); and others

    2014-08-01

    Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising from a population of extragalactic sources, in which case they would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the intergalactic medium; they may also be linked to new source classes. Until now, however, all so-called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been detected with the Parkes radio telescope and its 13-beam receiver, casting some concern about the astrophysical nature of these signals. Here we present FRB 121102, the first FRB discovery from a geographic location other than Parkes. FRB 121102 was found in the Galactic anti-center region in the 1.4 GHz Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) survey with the Arecibo Observatory with a DM = 557.4 ± 2.0 pc cm{sup –3}, pulse width of 3.0 ± 0.5 ms, and no evidence of interstellar scattering. The observed delay of the signal arrival time with frequency agrees precisely with the expectation of dispersion through an ionized medium. Despite its low Galactic latitude (b = –0.°2), the burst has three times the maximum Galactic DM expected along this particular line of sight, suggesting an extragalactic origin. A peculiar aspect of the signal is an inverted spectrum; we interpret this as a consequence of being detected in a sidelobe of the ALFA receiver. FRB 121102's brightness, duration, and the inferred event rate are all consistent with the properties of the previously detected Parkes bursts.

  9. Emission of extremely bright gamma-ray pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Machabeli, George

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper a theoretical interpretation of observational characteristics of the pulsar PSR J0540-6919 is suggested. In particular, we provide a theoretical model explaining the presence of two peaks in the radio domain and the brooding of these peaks at higher frequencies. The model also explains the pulse-phase coincidence of emission peaks at different frequencies and shows the physical, 'genetic' connection between the radio remission at frequencies of the order of GHz with gamma-ray emission up to GeV energies.

  10. Blind search for radio-quiet and radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars with Fermi-LAT data

    CERN Document Server

    Rubtsov, G I

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has observed more than a hundred of gamma-ray pulsars, about one third of which are radio-quiet, i.e. not detected at radio frequencies. The most of radio-loud pulsars are detected by Fermi LAT by using the radio timing models, while the radio-quiet ones are discovered in a blind search. The difference in the techniques introduces an observational selection bias and, consequently, the direct comparison of populations is complicated. In order to produce an unbiased sample, we perform a blind search of gamma-ray pulsations using Fermi-LAT data alone. No radio data or observations at optical or X-ray frequencies are involved in the search process. We produce a gamma-ray selected catalog of 25 non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars found in a blind search, including 16 radio-quiet and 9 radio-loud pulsars. This results in the direct measurement of the fraction of radio-quiet pulsars $\\varepsilon_{RQ} = 64\\pm 10\\%$, which is in agreement with the existing estimates from the population ...

  11. PSR J1907+0602: A Radio-Faint Gamma-Ray Pulsar Powering a Bright TeV Pulsar Wind Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A

    2010-01-01

    We present multiwavelength studies of the 106.6 ms gamma-ray pulsar PSR J1907+06 near the TeV source MGRO J1908+06. Timing observations with Fermi result in a precise position determination for the pulsar of R.A. = 19h07m547(2), decl. = +06:02:16(2) placing the pulsar firmly within the TeV source extent, suggesting the TeV source is the pulsar wind nebula of PSR J1907+0602. Pulsed gamma-ray emission is clearly visible at energies from 100 MeV to above 10 GeV. The phase-averaged power-law index in the energy range E > 0.1 GeV is = 1.76 \\pm 0.05 with an exponential cutoff energy E_{c} = 3.6 \\pm 0.5 GeV. We present the energy-dependent gamma-ray pulsed light curve as well as limits on off-pulse emission associated with the TeV source. We also report the detection of very faint (flux density of ~3.4 microJy) radio pulsations with the Arecibo telescope at 1.5 GHz having a dispersion measure DM = 82.1 \\pm 1.1 cm^{-3}pc. This indicates a distance of 3.2 \\pm 0.6 kpc and a pseudo-luminosity of L_{1400} ~ 0.035 mJy kpc...

  12. ON THE ORIGIN OF RADIO EMISSION FROM MAGNETARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szary, Andrzej; Melikidze, George I.; Gil, Janusz, E-mail: aszary@astro.ia.uz.zgora.pl [Kepler Institute of Astronomy, University of Zielona Góra, Lubuska 2, 65-265 Zielona Góra (Poland)

    2015-02-10

    Magnetars are the most magnetized objects in the known universe. Powered by the magnetic energy, and not by the rotational energy as in the case of radio pulsars, they have long been regarded as a completely different class of neutron stars. The discovery of pulsed radio emission from a few magnetars weakened the idea of a clean separation between magnetars and normal pulsars. We use the partially screened gap (PSG) model to explain radio emission of magnetars. The PSG model requires that the temperature of the polar cap is equal to the so-called critical value, i.e., the temperature at which the thermal ions outflowing from the stellar surface screen the acceleration gap. We show that a magnetar has to fulfill the temperature, power, and visibility conditions in order to emit radio waves. First, in order to form PSG, the residual temperature of the surface has to be lower than the critical value. Second, since the radio emission is powered by the rotational energy, it has to be high enough to enable heating of the polar cap by backstreaming particles to the critical temperature. Finally, the structure of the magnetic field has to be altered by magnetospheric currents in order to widen a radio beam and increase the probability of detection. Our approach allows us to predict whether a magnetar can emit radio waves using only its rotational period, period derivative, and surface temperature in the quiescent mode.

  13. A model for distortions of polarisation-angle curves in radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Dyks, J; Oslowski, S; Saha, L; Guillemot, L; Cognard, I; Rudak, B

    2016-01-01

    Some radio pulsar profiles (in particular those of millisecond pulsars contain wide emission structures which cover large intervals of pulse phase. Local distortions of an average curve of polarisation angle (PA) can be identified in such profiles, and they are often found to be associated with absorption features or narrow emission components. The features may be interpreted as a convolution of a lateral profile of an emitter with a microscopic radiation pattern of a non-negligible angular extent. We study a model which assumes that such an extended microbeam of the X-mode curvature radiation is spreading the radiation polarised at a fixed position angle within an interval of pulse phase. The model is capable of interpreting the strongly dissimilar polarisation of double notches in PSR B1821-24A (for which we present new polarisation data from the Nancay Radio Telescope) and PSR J0437-4715. It also explains a step-like change in PA observed at the bifurcated trailing component in the profile of J0437-4715. A...

  14. Toward an Empirical Theory of Pulsar Emission. X. On the Precursor and Postcursor Emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basu, R.; Mitra, D.; Rankin, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Precursors and postcursors (PPCs) are rare emission components, which appear beyond the main pulse emission, in some cases far away from it, and are detected in a handful of pulsar. In this paper we attempt to characterize the PPC emission in relation to the pulsar main pulse geometry. In our

  15. Assessing the effects of timing irregularities on radio pulsars anomalous braking indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwude, A. E.; Chidi Odo, Finbarr

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the statistical effects of non-discrete timing irregularities on observed radio pulsar braking indices using correlations between the second derivative of the measured anomalous frequency (̈νobs) and some parameters that have been widely used to quantify pulsar timing fluctuations (the timing activity parameter (A), the amount of timing fluctuations absorbed by the cubic term (σR23) and a measure of pulsar rotational stability (σz)) in a large sample of 366 Jodrell Bank Observatory radio pulsars. The result demonstrates that anomalous braking indices are largely artifacts produced by aggregations of fluctuations that occur within or outside the pulsar system. For a subsample of 223 normal radio pulsars whose observed timing activity appeared consistent with instabilities in rotation of the underlying neutron stars (or timing noise) over timescales of ˜ 10 - 40 yr, |̈νobs| strongly correlates (with correlation coefficient |r| ˜ 0.80 - 0.90) with the pulsar timing activity parameters and spin-down properties. On the other hand, no meaningful correlations (r < 0.3) were found between ̈νobs and the timing activity diagnostics and spin-down parameters in the remaining 143 objects, whose timing activity appears significantly dominated by white noise fluctuations. The current result can be better understood if the timing noise in isolated pulsars originates from intrinsic spin-down processes of the underlying neutron stars, but white noise fluctuations largely arise from processes external to the pulsar system.

  16. CONSTRAINING RADIO EMISSION FROM MAGNETARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazarus, P.; Kaspi, V. M.; Dib, R. [Department of Physics, Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Champion, D. J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Hessels, J. W. T., E-mail: plazar@physics.mcgill.ca [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands)

    2012-01-10

    We report on radio observations of five magnetars and two magnetar candidates carried out at 1950 MHz with the Green Bank Telescope in 2006-2007. The data from these observations were searched for periodic emission and bright single pulses. Also, monitoring observations of magnetar 4U 0142+61 following its 2006 X-ray bursts were obtained. No radio emission was detected for any of our targets. The non-detections allow us to place luminosity upper limits of L{sub 1950} {approx}< 1.60 mJy kpc{sup 2} for periodic emission and L{sub 1950,single} {approx}< 7.6 Jy kpc{sup 2} for single pulse emission. These are the most stringent limits yet for the magnetars observed. The resulting luminosity upper limits together with previous results are discussed, as is the importance of further radio observations of radio-loud and radio-quiet magnetars.

  17. Constraining Radio Emission from Magnetars

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarus, Patrick; Champion, David J; Hessels, Jason W T; Dib, Rim

    2011-01-01

    We report on radio observations of five magnetars and two magnetar candidates carried out at 1950 MHz with the Green Bank Telescope in 2006-2007. The data from these observations were searched for periodic emission and bright single pulses. Also, monitoring observations of magnetar 4U0142+61 following its 2006 X-ray bursts were obtained. No radio emission was detected was detected for any of our targets. The non-detections allow us to place luminosity upper limits (at 1950 MHz) of approximately L < 1.60 mJy kpc^2 for periodic emission and L < 7.6 Jy kpc^2 for single pulse emission. These are the most stringent limits yet for the magnetars observed. The resulting luminosity upper limits together with previous results are discussed, as is the importance of further radio observations of radio-loud and radio-quiet magnetars.

  18. Phenomenology of magnetospheric radio emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, T. D.; Desch, M. D.; Alexander, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Jupiter has now been observed over 24 octaves of the radio spectrum, from about 0.01 MHz to 300,000 MHz. Its radio emissions fill the entire spectral region where interplanetary electromagnetic propagation is possible at wavelengths longer than infrared. Three distinct types of radiation are responsible for this radio spectrum. Thermal emission from the atmosphere accounts for virtually all the radiation at the high frequency end. Synchrotron emission from the trapped high-energy particle belt deep within the inner magnetosphere is the dominant spectral component from about 4000 to 40 MHz. The third class of radiation consists of several distinct components of sporadic low frequency emission below 40 MHz. The decimeter wavelength emission is considered, taking into account the discovery of synchrotron emission, radiation by high-energy electrons in a magnetic field, and the present status of Jovian synchrotron phenomenology. Attention is also given to the decameter and hectometer wavelength emission, and emissions at kilometric wavelengths.

  19. Pulsar emission in the very-high-energy regime

    CERN Document Server

    Breed, M; Harding, A K

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of the pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) display spectra with exponential cutoffs falling in a narrow range around a few GeV. Early spectral modelling predicted spectral cutoff energies of up to 100 GeV. More modern studies estimated spectral cutoff energies in the 1-20 GeV range. It was therefore not expected that pulsars would be visible in the very-high-energy (VHE; >100 GeV) regime. The VERITAS detection (confirmed by MAGIC) of pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar up to 400 GeV (and now possibly up to 1 TeV) therefore raised important questions about our understanding of the electrodynamics and local environment of pulsars. H.E.S.S. has now detected pulsed emission from the Vela pulsar in the 20-120 GeV range, making this the second pulsar detected by a ground-based Cherenkov telescope. We will review the latest developments in VHE pulsar science, including an overview of recent observations and refinements to radiation models and magnetic field structures. This wi...

  20. PuMa-II: A wide band pulsar machine for the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karuppusamy, R.; Stappers, B.; van Straten, W.

    2008-01-01

    The Pulsar Machine II (PuMa-II) is the new flexible pulsar processing back-end system at the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT), specifically designed to take advantage of the upgraded WSRT. The instrument is based on a computer cluster running the Linux operating system, with minimal custo

  1. Match filtering approach for signal acquisition in radio-pulsar navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusdens, R.; Engelen, S.; Buist, P.J.; Noroozi, A.; Sundaramoorthy, P.P.; Verhoeven, C.J.M.; Bentum, M.; Gill, E.K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsars with their periodic pulses and known positions are ideal beacons for navigation. The challenge, however, is the detection of the very weak pulsar signals that are submerged in noise. Radio based approaches allow the use of advanced techniques and methods for the detection and acquisition of

  2. The Einstein@Home Search for Radio Pulsars and PSR J2007+2722 Discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, B.; Knispel, B.; Cordes, J.M.; Deneva, J.S.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Demorest, P.B.; Eggenstein, H.B.; Fehrmann, H.; Gotthelf, E.V.; Hammer, D.; Kaspi, V.M.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A.G.; Machenschalk, B.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Messenger, C.; Pletsch, H.J.; Ransom, S.M.; Stairs, I.H.; Stappers, B.W.; Bhat, N.D.R.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D.J.; Crawford, F.; Desvignes, G.; Freire, P.C.C.; Heald, G.; Jenet, F.A.; Lazarus, P.; Lee, K.J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lynch, R.; Papa, M.A.; Prix, R.; Rosen, R.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.; Zhu, W.

    2013-01-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 193 countries, to search for new neutron stars using data from electromagnetic and gravitational-wave detectors. This paper presents a detailed description of the search for new radio pulsars using Pulsar ALFA su

  3. Radio emission in Mercury magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, J.; Reville, V.; Brun, A. S.; Pantellini, F.; Zarka, P.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Active stars possess magnetized wind that has a direct impact on planets that can lead to radio emission. Mercury is a good test case to study the effect of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on radio emission driven in the planet magnetosphere. Such studies could be used as proxies to characterize the magnetic field topology and intensity of exoplanets. Aims: The aim of this study is to quantify the radio emission in the Hermean magnetosphere. Methods: We use the magnetohydrodynamic code PLUTO in spherical coordinates with an axisymmetric multipolar expansion for the Hermean magnetic field, to analyze the effect of the IMF orientation and intensity, as well as the hydrodynamic parameters of the solar wind (velocity, density and temperature), on the net power dissipated on the Hermean day and night side. We apply the formalism derived by Zarka et al. (2001, Astrophys. Space Sci., 277, 293), Zarka (2007, Planet. Space Sci., 55, 598) to infer the radio emission level from the net dissipated power. We perform a set of simulations with different hydrodynamic parameters of the solar wind, IMF orientations and intensities, that allow us to calculate the dissipated power distribution and infer the existence of radio emission hot spots on the planet day side, and to calculate the integrated radio emission of the Hermean magnetosphere. Results: The obtained radio emission distribution of dissipated power is determined by the IMF orientation (associated with the reconnection regions in the magnetosphere), although the radio emission strength is dependent on the IMF intensity and solar wind hydro parameters. The calculated total radio emission level is in agreement with the one estimated in Zarka et al. (2001, Astrophys. Space Sci., 277, 293) , between 5 × 105 and 2 × 106 W.

  4. Nulling, Mode-Changing and Drifting Subpulses in the Highly Asymmetric Conal Quadruple Radio Pulsar B2034+19

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joanna M. Rankin

    2017-09-01

    Radio pulsar B2034+19 exhibits all three ‘canonical’ pulse-sequence phenomena—that is, pulse nulling, two distinct profile modes and subpulses with periodic modulation. Indeed, the bursts and nulls in the pulsar are short at several score pulses and quasi-periodic such that about 1/3 of the pulses are nulls. The pulsar’s two modes have very different characteristics, the first shows emission almost completely confined to the leading half of the profile and highly modulated in a 2-period odd–even manner; whereas the second mode illuminates both the leading and trailing parts of the star’s profile about equally with the appearance of drift bands at about a 3-period separation. The second mode occurs much less frequently than the first (about 15% of the time) and thus the leading part of the profile has a much larger average intensity than the trailing part. B2034+19 represents an interesting example of a pulsar with emission primarily in the leading part of its profile window with only occasional illumination in the trailing part. This suggests that there are pulsars that perhaps never emit in a part of their profile window, connecting with earlier work on pulsars with apparent ‘partial cone’ profiles.

  5. Constraints on the Emission Geometries and Spin Evolution of Gamma-ray Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, T J; Harding, A K; Guillemot, L; Smith, D A; Kramer, M; Celik, O; Hartog, P R den; Ferrara, E C; Hou, X; Lande, J; Ray, P S

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are a growing class of gamma-ray emitters. Pulsed gamma-ray signals have been detected from more than 40 MSPs with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The wider radio beams and more compact magnetospheres of MSPs enable studies of emission geometries over a broader range of phase space than non-recycled radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. We have modeled the gamma-ray light curves of 40 LAT-detected MSPs using geometric emission models assuming a vacuum retarded-dipole magnetic field. We modeled the radio profiles using a single-altitude hollow-cone beam, with a core component when indicated by polarimetry; however, for MSPs with gamma-ray and radio light curve peaks occurring at nearly the same rotational phase we assume that the radio emission is co-located with the gamma rays and caustic in nature. The best-fit parameters and confidence intervals are determined using a maximum likelihood technique. We divide the light curves into three model classes, with gamma-ray peaks trailing (Cl...

  6. Probing Millisecond Pulsar Emission Geometry Using Light Curves From the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Christo; Harding, Alice; Guillemot, L.

    2009-01-01

    An interesting new high-energy pulsar sub-population is emerging following early discoveries of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We present results from 3D emission modeling, including the Special Relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and also rotational sweepback of 13-field lines, in the geometric context of polar cap (PC), slot gap (SG), outer gap (OG), and two-pole caustic (TPC) pulsar models. In contrast to the general belief that these very old, rapidly-rotating neutron stars (NSs) should have largely pair-starved magnetospheres due to the absence of significant pair production, we find that most of the light curves are best fit by SG and OG models, which indicates the presence of narrow accelerating gaps limited by robust pair production -- even in these pulsars with very low spin-down luminosities. The gamma-ray pulse shapes and relative phase lags with respect to the radio pulses point to high-altitude emission being dominant for all geometries. We also find exclusive differentiation of the current gamma-ray MSP population into two MSP sub-classes: light curve shapes and lags across wavebands impose either pair-starved PC (PSPC) or SG / OG-type geometries. In the first case, the radio pulse has a small lag with respect to the single gamma-ray pulse, while the (first) gamma-ray peak usually trails the radio by a large phase offset in the latter case. Finally, we find that the flux correction factor as a function of magnetic inclination and observer angles is typically of order unity for all models. Our calculation of light curves and flux correction factor f(_, _, P) for the case of MSPs is therefore complementary to the "ATLAS paper" of Watters et al. for younger pulsars.

  7. Perspectives on Gamma-Ray Pulsar Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, Matthew G

    2010-01-01

    Pulsars are powerful sources of radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum. This paper highlights some theoretical insights into non-thermal, magnetospheric pulsar gamma-ray radiation. These advances have been driven by NASA's Fermi mission, launched in mid-2008. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on Fermi has afforded the discrimination between polar cap and slot gap/outer gap acceleration zones in young and middle-aged pulsars. Altitude discernment using the highest energy pulsar photons will be addressed, as will spectroscopic interpretation of the primary radiation mechanism in the LAT band, connecting to both polar cap/slot gap and outer gap scenarios. Focuses will mostly be on curvature radiation and magnetic pair creation, including population trends that may afford probes of the magnetospheric accelerating potential.

  8. A pilot ASKAP survey of radio transient events in the region around the intermittent pulsar PSR J1107-5907

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, G; Bell, M E; Kerr, M; Rowlinson, A; Johnston, S; Shannon, R M; Voronkov, M A; Ward, C; Banyer, J; Hancock, P J; Murphy, Tara; Allison, J R; Amy, S W; Ball, L; Bannister, K; Bock, D C -J; Brodrick, D; Brothers, M; Brown, A J; Bunton, J D; Chapman, J; Chippendale, A P; Chung, Y; DeBoer, D; Diamond, P; Edwards, P G; Ekers, R; Ferris, R H; Forsyth, R; Gough, R; Grancea, A; Gupta, N; Harvey-Smith, L; Hay, S; Hayman, D B; Hotan, A W; Hoyle, S; Humphreys, B; Indermuehle, B; Jacka, C E; Jackson, C A; Jackson, S; Jeganathan, K; Joseph, J; Kendall, R; Kiraly, D; Koribalski, B; Leach, M; Lenc, E; MacLeod, A; Mader, S; Marquarding, M; Marvil, J; McClure-Griffiths, N; McConnell, D; Mirtschin, P; Neuhold, S; Ng, A; Norris, R P; O'Sullivan, J; Pearce, S; Phillips, C J; Popping, A; Qiao, R Y; Reynolds, J E; Roberts, P; Sault, R J; Schinckel, A E T; Serra, P; Shaw, R; Shimwell, T W; Storey, M; Sweetnam, A W; Tzioumis, A; Westmeier, T; Whiting, M; Wilson, C D

    2015-01-01

    We use observations from the Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope to search for transient radio sources in the field around the intermittent pulsar PSR J1107-5907. The pulsar is thought to switch between an "off" state in which no emission is detectable, a weak state and a strong state. We ran three independent transient detection pipelines on two-minute snapshot images from a 13 hour BETA observation in order to 1) study the emission from the pulsar, 2) search for other transient emission from elsewhere in the image and 3) to compare the results from the different transient detection pipelines. The pulsar was easily detected as a transient source and, over the course of the observations, it switched into the strong state three times giving a typical timescale between the strong emission states of 3.7 hours. After the first switch it remained in the strong state for almost 40 minutes. The other strong states lasted less than 4 minutes. Th...

  9. Polar Cap Model for Pulsar High-Energy Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K; Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alexander G.

    2002-01-01

    The study of physical processes associated with particle acceleration in the open field line region above the polar cap (PC) of an isolated neutron star (NS) plays a fundamental role in our understanding and interpretation of high-energy emission from pulsars. The systematic study of particle acceleration and formation of electron-positron pair fronts above the PCs of NSs was initiated two decades ago. The detailed analysis of these processes is now possible with the development of pair cascade codes that enables us to calculate the spectra and pulse profiles of high-energy emission from pulsars. The calculation of pair formation and gamma-ray production is being improved to include new results on the PC physics. We briefly outline the current status of the PC model for pulsar high-energy emission, focusing on some of our most recent results on the theoretical modeling of the PC acceleration and gamma-ray emission.

  10. Radio Phase-Resolved Spectra of the Conal-Double Pulsar B1133+16

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on dividing the profile into a number of absolute phase intervals, the phase-resolved spectra (PHRS) are derived from published time-aligned average profiles at radio frequencies over two decades for the classic conal-double pulsar B1133+16. The relative spectral index, defined as the difference between the spectral indices of a reference and the given arbitrary phase interval, is obtained by power-law fit at each phase interval. The derived phase-resolved spectra show an "M-like" shape, of which the leading part and trailing part are approximately symmetrical. The basic feature of the PHRS is that the spectrum first flattens then steepens as the pulse phase sweeps from the profile center to the profile edges. The PHRS provide a coherent explanation of the major features of profile evolution of B1133+16, namely, the pulse width shrinkage with increasing frequency and the frequency evolution of the relative intensity between the leading and trailing conal components, and the bridge emission. The PHRS may be an indicator for emission spectral variation across the pulsar magnetosphere. Possible mapping from PHRS to emission-location-dependent spectral variation is presented, and some intrinsic mechanisms are discussed.

  11. On the connection between accreting X-ray and radio millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Tauris, T M

    2012-01-01

    For many years it has been recognized that the terminal stages of mass transfer in a low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) should cause the magnetosphere of the accreting neutron star to expand, leading to a braking torque acting on the spinning pulsar. After the discovery of radio millisecond pulsars (MSPs) it was therefore somewhat a paradox (e.g. Ruderman et al. 1989) how these pulsars could retain their fast spins following the Roche-lobe decoupling phase, RLDP. Here I present a solution to this so-called "turn-off problem" which was recently found by combining binary stellar evolution models with torque computations (Tauris 2012). The solution is that during the RLDP the spin equilibrium of the pulsar is broken and therefore it remains a fast spinning object. I briefly discuss these findings in view of the two observed spin distributions in the populations of accreting X-ray millisecond pulsars (AXMSPs) and radio MSPs.

  12. Discovery of millisecond pulsars in radio searches of southern Fermi LAT sources

    CERN Document Server

    Keith, M J; Ray, P S; Ferrara, E C; Parkinson, P M Saz; Celik, O; Belfiore, A; Donato, D; Cheung, C C; Abdo, A A; Camilo, F; Freire, P C C; Guillemot, L; Harding, A K; Kramer, M; Michelson, P F; Ransom, S M; Romani, R W; Smith, D A; Thompson, D J; Weltevrede, P; Wood, K S

    2011-01-01

    Using the Parkes radio telescope we have carried out deep observations of eleven unassociated gamma-ray sources. Periodicity searches of these data have discovered two millisecond pulsars, PSR J1103-5403 (1FGL J1103.9-5355) and PSR J2241-5236 (1FGL J2241.9-5236), and a long period pulsar, PSR J1604-44 (1FGL J1604.7-4443). In addition we searched for but did not detect any radio pulsations from six gammaray pulsars discovered by the Fermi satellite to a level of - 0.04 mJy (for pulsars with a 10% duty cycle). Timing of the millisecond pulsar PSR J1103-5403 has shown that its position is 9' from the centroid of the gamma-ray source. Since these observations were carried out, independent evidence has shown that 1FGL J1103.9-5355 is associated with the flat spectrum radio source PKS 1101-536. It appears certain that the pulsar is not associated with the gamma-ray source, despite the seemingly low probability of a chance detection of a radio millisecond pulsar. We consider that PSR J1604-44 is a chance discovery o...

  13. X-Ray Emission from Rotation-Powered Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Gui-Fang; ZHANG Li

    2005-01-01

    @@ We study the properties of pulsed component of hard (2-10keV) x-ray emission from pulsars based on the new version of outer gap model we proposed previously [Astrophys.J.604 (2004) 317].On the frame of this outer gap model, we derive an expression of non-thermal pulsed x-ray luminosity of rotation-powered pulsars, and then apply it to the pulsars whose pulsed x-rays are detected by ASCA.Using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test,we determine the model parameter.The present results indicate LX ∝ L1.15sd for these x-ray pulsars, which is consistent with the observed data.

  14. Synchrotron Self-Compton Emission from the Crab and Other Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, Alice K

    2015-01-01

    Results of a simulation of synchrotron-self Compton (SSC) emission from a rotation-powered pulsar are presented. The radiating particles are assumed to be both accelerated primary electrons and a spectrum of electron-positron pairs produced in cascades near the polar cap. They follow trajectories in a slot gap using 3D force-free magnetic field geometry, gaining pitch angles through resonant cyclotron absorption of radio photons, radiating and scattering synchrotron emission at high altitudes out to and beyond the light cylinder. Full angular dependence of the synchrotron photon density is simulated in the scattering and all processes are treated in the inertial observer frame. Spectra for the Crab and Vela pulsars as well as two energetic millisecond pulsars, B1821-24 and B1937+21 are simulated using this model. The simulation of the Crab pulsar radiation can reproduce both the flux level and the shape of the observed optical to hard X-ray emission assuming a pair multiplicity of $M_+ = 3 \\times 10^5$, as we...

  15. Pulsar high energy emission due to inverse Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-06-15

    We discuss growing evidence that pulsar high energy is emission is generated via Inverse Compton mechanism. We reproduce the broadband spectrum of Crab pulsar, from UV to very high energy gamma-rays - nearly ten decades in energy, within the framework of the cyclotron-self-Compton model. Emission is produced by two counter-streaming beams within the outer gaps, at distances above ∼ 20 NS radii. The outward moving beam produces UV-X-ray photons via Doppler-booster cyclotron emission, and GeV photons by Compton scattering the cyclotron photons produced by the inward going beam. The scattering occurs in the deep Klein-Nishina regime, whereby the IC component provides a direct measurement of particle distribution within the magnetosphere. The required plasma multiplicity is high, ∼10{sup 6} – 10{sup 7}, but is consistent with the average particle flux injected into the pulsar wind nebula.

  16. On the origin of radio emission from magnetars

    CERN Document Server

    Szary, Andrzej; Gil, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    Magnetars are the most magnetized objects in the known universe. Powered by the magnetic energy, and not by the rotational energy as in the case of radio pulsars, have long been regarded as a completely different class of neutron stars. The discovery of pulsed radio emission from a few magnetars weakened the idea of a clean separation between magnetars and normal pulsars. We use the Partially Screened Gap (PSG) model to explain radio emission of magnetars. The PSG model requires that the temperature of the polar cap is equal to the so-called critical value, i.e. the temperature at which the thermal ions outflowing from the stellar surface screen the acceleration gap. We show that a magnetar has to fulfill the 'temperature', 'power' and 'visibility' conditions in order to emit radio waves. Firstly, in order to form PSG the residual temperature of the surface has to be lower than the critical value. Secondly, since the radio emission is powered by the rotational energy it has to be high enough to enable heating...

  17. Location of the emitting regions in the mode-switching radio pulsar PSR 1926 + 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of average single-frequency profiles of the radio pulsar PSR 1926 + 18 in two different modes. Assuming a purely dipolar field and taking into account retardation, aberration, magnetic line curvature, and ignoring the magnetic field line sweepback, we come to the following conclusions: (1) mode switching in PSR 1926 + 18 at 430 MHz may be understood in terms of different emission heights of the two modes; (2) the weaker mode appears when regions emitting the first two components move away from the star by an additional distance of not more than several kilometers from their original locations; (3) the trailing conal component is emitted essentially from the same layer of the magnetosphere in both modes, in contrast to the first conal component, which appears to change its location in the magnetosphere; (4) core and conal components are emitted from distinctly different emission heights: core components not more than 75 km, and conal components not less than 215 km from the surface of the star. Our model infers three-dimensional information about the emitting region from single-frequency observations. It has been tested previously with a mode switching pulsar that had one component in the average profile in two modes. This paper shows that the same model can explain positions and widths of the components in a more complex profile during mode switching, provided that the components can be traced from one mode to another.

  18. The braking indices in pulsar emission models

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, F; Gil, J; Gil, Janusz

    2003-01-01

    Using the method proposed in a previous paper, we calculate pulsar braking indices in the models with torque contributions from both inner and outer accelerating regions, assuming that the interaction between them is negligible. We suggest that it is likely that the inverse Compton scattering induced polar vacuum gap and the outer gap coexist in the pulsar magnetosphere. We include the new near threshold vacuum gap models with curvature-radiation and inverse Compton scattering induced cascades, respectively; and find that these models can well reproduce the measured values of the braking indices.

  19. Multifrequency radio observations of SNR J0536-6735 (N 59B) with associated pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzetto, L M; Crawford, E J; De Horta, A Y; Stupar, M

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of new Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) observations of supernova remnant, SNR J0536-6735. This remnant appears to follow a shell morphology with a diameter of D=36x29 pc (with 1 pc uncertainty in each direction). There is an embedded Hii region on the northern limb of the remnant which made various analysis and measurements (such as flux density, spectral index and polarisation) difficult. The radio-continuum emission followed the same structure as the optical emission, allowing for extent and flux density estimates at 20 cm. We estimate a surface brightness for the SNR at 1 GHz of 2.55x10^-21 W m^-2 Hz^-1 sr^-1. Also, we detect a distinctive radio-continuum point source which confirms the previous suggestion of this remnant being associated with a pulsar wind nebulae (PWN). The tail of this remnant isn't seen in the radio-continuum images and is only seen in the optical and X-ray images.

  20. Probing millisecond pulsar emission geometry using light curves from the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Venter, C; Guillemot, L

    2009-01-01

    An interesting new high-energy pulsar sub-population is emerging following early discoveries of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We present results from 3D emission modeling, including the Special Relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and also rotational sweepback of B-field lines, in the geometric context of polar cap (PC), outer gap (OG), and two-pole caustic (TPC) pulsar models. In contrast to the general belief that these very old, rapidly-rotating neutron stars (NSs) should have largely pair-starved magnetospheres due to the absence of significant pair production, we find that most of the light curves are best fit by TPC and OG models, which indicates the presence of narrow accelerating gaps limited by robust pair production -- even in these pulsars with very low spin-down luminosities. The gamma-ray pulse shapes and relative phase lags with respect to the radio pulses point to high-altitude emission being dominant for all geometries. We...

  1. Particle Emission-dependent Timing Noise of Pulsars?

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xiongwei; Xu, Renxin; Qiao, Guojun

    2010-01-01

    Though pulsars spin regularly, the differences between the observed and predicted ToA (time of arrival), known as "timing noise", can still reach a few milliseconds or more. We try to understand the noise in this paper. As proposed by Xu & Qiao in 2001, both dipole radiation and particle emission would result in pulsar braking. Accordingly, possible fluctuation of particle current flow is suggested here to contribute significant ToA variation of pulsars. We find that the particle emission fluctuation could lead to timing noise which can't be eliminated in timing process, and that a longer period fluctuation would arouse a stronger noise. The simulated timing noise profile and amplitude are in accord with the observed timing behaviors on the timescale of years.

  2. On tests of general relativity with binary radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Del Pozzo, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The timing of radio pulsars in binary systems provides a superb testing ground of general relativity. Here we propose a Bayesian approach to carry out these tests, and a relevant efficient numerical implementation, that has several conceptual and practical advantages with respect to traditional methods based on least-square-fits that have been used so far: (i) it accounts for the actual structure of the likelihood function - and it is not predicated on the Laplace approximation which is implicitly built in least-square fits that can potentially bias the inference - (ii) it provides the ratio of the evidences of any two models under consideration as the statistical quantity to compare different theories, and (iii) it allows us to put joint constraints from the monitoring of multiple systems, that can be expressed in terms of ratio of evidences or probability intervals of global (thus not system-dependent) parameters of the theory, if any exists. Our proposed approach optimally exploits the progress in timing o...

  3. Dispersion by pulsars, magnetars, fast radio bursts and massive electromagnetism at very low radio frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Bentum, Mark J; Spallicci, Alessandro D A M

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the universe relies mostly on electromagnetism. As photons are the messengers, fundamental physics is concerned in testing their properties. Photon mass upper limits have been earlier set through pulsar observations, but new investigations are offered by the excess of dispersion measure (DM) sometimes observed with pulsar and magnetar data at low frequencies, or with the fast radio bursts (FRBs), of yet unknown origin. Arguments for the excess of DM do not reach a consensus, but are not mutually exclusive. Thus, we remind that for massive electromagnetism, dispersion goes as the inverse of the frequency squared. Thereby, new avenues are offered also by the recently operating ground observatories in 10-80 MHz domain and by the proposed Orbiting Low Frequency Antennas for Radio astronomy (OLFAR). The latter acts as a large aperture dish by employing a swarm of nano-satellites observing the sky for the first time in the 0.1 - 15 MHz spectrum. The swarm must be deployed sufficiently away from...

  4. Dispersion by pulsars, magnetars, fast radio bursts and massive electromagnetism at very low radio frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentum, Mark J.; Bonetti, Luca; Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of the universe relies mostly on electromagnetism. As photons are the messengers, fundamental physics is concerned in testing their properties. Photon mass upper limits have been earlier set through pulsar observations, but new investigations are offered by the excess of dispersion measure (DM), sometimes observed with pulsar and magnetar data at low frequencies, or with the fast radio bursts (FRBs), of yet unknown origin. Arguments for the excess of DM do not reach a consensus, but are not mutually exclusive. Thus, we remind that for massive electromagnetism, dispersion goes as the inverse of the frequency squared. Thereby, new avenues are offered also by the recently operating ground observatories in 10-80 MHz domain and by the proposed Orbiting Low Frequency Antennas for Radio astronomy (OLFAR). The latter acts as a large aperture dish by employing a swarm of nano-satellites observing the sky for the first time in the 0.1-15 MHz spectrum. The swarm must be deployed sufficiently away from the ionosphere to avoid distorsions from terrestrial interference, especially during solar maxima, and offer stable conditions for calibration during observations.

  5. CONSTRAINTS ON THE EMISSION GEOMETRIES AND SPIN EVOLUTION OF GAMMA-RAY MILLISECOND PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, T. J. [National Research Council Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Venter, C. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001, 2520 Potchefstroom (South Africa); Harding, A. K.; Çelik, Ö.; Ferrara, E. C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Guillemot, L. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement, LPCE UMR 6115 CNRS, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 02 (France); Smith, D. A.; Hou, X. [Centre d' Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, IN2P3/CNRS, Université Bordeaux 1, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Den Hartog, P. R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lande, J. [Twitter Inc., 1355 Market Street 900, San Francisco, CA 94103 (United States); Ray, P. S., E-mail: tyrel.j.johnson@gmail.com, E-mail: Christo.Venter@nwu.ac.za, E-mail: ahardingx@yahoo.com [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are a growing class of gamma-ray emitters. Pulsed gamma-ray signals have been detected from more than 40 MSPs with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The wider radio beams and more compact magnetospheres of MSPs enable studies of emission geometries over a broader range of phase space than non-recycled radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. We have modeled the gamma-ray light curves of 40 LAT-detected MSPs using geometric emission models assuming a vacuum retarded-dipole magnetic field. We modeled the radio profiles using a single-altitude hollow-cone beam, with a core component when indicated by polarimetry; however, for MSPs with gamma-ray and radio light curve peaks occurring at nearly the same rotational phase, we assume that the radio emission is co-located with the gamma rays and caustic in nature. The best-fit parameters and confidence intervals are determined using a maximum likelihood technique. We divide the light curves into three model classes, with gamma-ray peaks trailing (Class I), aligned (Class II), or leading (Class III) the radio peaks. Outer gap and slot gap (two-pole caustic) models best fit roughly equal numbers of Class I and II, while Class III are exclusively fit with pair-starved polar cap models. Distinguishing between the model classes based on typical derived parameters is difficult. We explore the evolution of the magnetic inclination angle with period and spin-down power, finding possible correlations. While the presence of significant off-peak emission can often be used as a discriminator between outer gap and slot gap models, a hybrid model may be needed.

  6. Constraints On the Emission Geometries and Spin Evolution Of Gamma-Ray Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.; Guillemot, L.; Smith, D. A.; Kramer, M.; Celik, O.; den Hartog, P. R.; Ferrara, E. C.; Hou, X.; Lande, J.; Ray, P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are a growing class of gamma-ray emitters. Pulsed gamma-ray signals have been detected from more than 40 MSPs with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The wider radio beams and more compact magnetospheres of MSPs enable studies of emission geometries over a broader range of phase space than non-recycled radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. We have modeled the gamma-ray light curves of 40 LAT-detected MSPs using geometric emission models assuming a vacuum retarded-dipole magnetic field. We modeled the radio profiles using a single-altitude hollow-cone beam, with a core component when indicated by polarimetry; however, for MSPs with gamma-ray and radio light curve peaks occurring at nearly the same rotational phase, we assume that the radio emission is co-located with the gamma rays and caustic in nature. The best-fit parameters and confidence intervals are determined using amaximum likelihood technique.We divide the light curves into three model classes, with gamma-ray peaks trailing (Class I), aligned (Class II), or leading (Class III) the radio peaks. Outer gap and slot gap (two-pole caustic) models best fit roughly equal numbers of Class I and II, while Class III are exclusively fit with pair-starved polar cap models. Distinguishing between the model classes based on typical derived parameters is difficult. We explore the evolution of the magnetic inclination angle with period and spin-down power, finding possible correlations. While the presence of significant off-peak emission can often be used as a discriminator between outer gap and slot gap models, a hybrid model may be needed.

  7. PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Naidu, Arun; Manoharan, P K; Krishnakumar, M A

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a b...

  8. Extended Corbet Diagram of HMXBs,LMXBs and radio pulsar binaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ALI; Esamdin

    2010-01-01

    The evolutionary scenario of neutron star binaries is still an essential enigma in both stellar astrophysics and high energy astrophysics.In order to explore the scenario,we include the accumulation of data on the orbits and spins of compact binaries in multi-wavelength ranging from radio to X-ray,such as radio pulsar binaries,HMXBs,and LMXBs,filling them into the so called "Corbet Diagram" which initially investigated the period of orbit(Porb)~the period of spin(Pspin) correlation of HMXBs.We find that the evolutionary scenario comes more clearly and makes strong confirmation of the connection between LMXBs and radio pulsar binaries,predicted by the recycle process.However,the origins of radio pulsar binaries sre still unknown.Accretion Induced Collapse(AIP) process may be a mechanism which can explain the origin of the binary millisecond pulsars with relatively longer orbital periods.A correlation of P1/3orb~P-1spin of LMXBs and radio pulsar binaries may exist.

  9. A Radio Pulsar Search of the Gamma-ray Binaries LS I +61 303 and LS 5039

    CERN Document Server

    McSwain, M Virginia; Ransom, Scott M; Roberts, Mallory S E; Dougherty, Sean M; Pooley, Guy G

    2011-01-01

    LS I +61 303 and LS 5039 are exceptionally rare examples of HMXBs with MeV-TeV emission, making them two of only five known or proposed "gamma-ray binaries". There has been disagreement within the literature over whether these systems are microquasars, with stellar winds accreting onto a compact object to produce high energy emission and relativistic jets, or whether their emission properties might be better explained by a relativistic pulsar wind colliding with the stellar wind. Here we present an attempt to detect radio pulsars in both systems with the Green Bank Telescope. The upper limits of flux density are between 4.1-14.5 uJy, and we discuss the null results of the search. Our spherically symmetric model of the wind of LS 5039 demonstrates that any pulsar emission will be strongly absorbed by the dense wind unless there is an evacuated region formed by a relativistic colliding wind shock. LS I +61 303 contains a rapidly rotating Be star whose wind is concentrated near the stellar equator. As long as th...

  10. Polarization observations of 20 millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Wenming; van Straten, Willem; Reynolds, John; Hobbs, George; Wang, Na; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Champion, David; Coles, William; Hotan, Aidan; Khoo, Jonathan; Oslowski, Stefan; Sarkissian, John; Verbiest, Joris; Yardley, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Polarization profiles are presented for 20 millisecond pulsars that are being observed as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project. The observations used the Parkes multibeam receiver with a central frequency of 1369 MHz and the Parkes digital filterbank pulsar signal-processing system PDFB2. Because of the large total observing time, the summed polarization profiles have very high signal/noise ratios and show many previously undetected profile features. Thirteen of the 20 pulsars show emission over more than half of the pulse period. Polarization variations across the profiles are complex and the observed position angle variations are generally not in accord with the rotating-vector model for pulsar polarization. Never-the-less, the polarization properties are broadly similar to those of normal (non-millisecond) pulsars, suggesting that the basic radio emission mechanism is the same in both classes of pulsar. The results support the idea that radio emission from millisecond pulsars originates high in t...

  11. The Braking Index of Radio-quiet Gamma-ray Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, C J; Wu, J; Guillemot, L; Camilo, F; Johnson, T J; Kerr, M; Allen, B; Aulbert, C; Beer, C; Bock, O; Cuéllar, A; Eggenstein, H B; Fehrmann, H; Kramer, M; Machenschalk, B; Nieder, L

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery and timing measurements of PSR J1208-6238, a young and highly magnetized gamma-ray pulsar, with a spin period of 440 ms. The pulsar was discovered in gamma-ray photon data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during a blind-search survey of unidentified LAT sources, running on the distributed volunteer computing system Einstein@Home. No radio pulsations were detected in dedicated follow-up searches with the Parkes radio telescope, with a flux density upper limit at 1369 MHz of 30 $\\mu$Jy. By timing this pulsar's gamma-ray pulsations, we measure its braking index over five years of LAT observations to be $n = 2.598 \\pm 0.001 \\pm 0.1$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second estimates the bias due to timing noise. Assuming its braking index has been similar since birth, the pulsar has an estimated age of around 2,700 yr, making it the youngest pulsar to be found in a blind search of gamma-ray data and the youngest known radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar. Despite its you...

  12. Understanding pulsar magnetospheres with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Karastergiou, A; Andersson, N; Breton, R; Brook, P; Gwinn, C; Lewandowska, N; Keane, E; Kramer, M; Macquart, J -P; Serylak, M; Shannon, R; Stappers, B; van Leeuwen, J; Verbiest, J P W; Weltevrede, P; Wright, G

    2015-01-01

    The SKA will discover tens of thousands of pulsars and provide unprecedented data quality on these, as well as the currently known population, due to its unrivalled sensitivity. Here, we outline the state of the art of our understanding of magnetospheric radio emission from pulsars and how we will use the SKA to solve the open problems in pulsar magnetospheric physics.

  13. Understanding the Pulsar High Energy Emission: Macroscopic and Kinetic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Brambilla, Gabriele; Timokhin, Andrey; Kust Harding, Alice; Kazanas, Demos

    2017-08-01

    Pulsars are extraordinary objects powered by the rotation of magnetic fields of order 10^8, 10^12G anchored onto neutron stars and rotating with periods 10^(-3)-10s. These fields mediate the conversion of their rotational energy into MHD winds and at the same time accelerate particles to energies sufficiently high to produce GeV photons. Fermi, since its launch in 2008, has established several trends among the observed gamma-ray pulsar properties playing a catalytic role in the current modeling of the high energy emission in pulsar magnetospheres. We judiciously use the guidance provided by the Fermi data to yield meaningful constraints on the macroscopic parameters of our global dissipative pulsar magnetosphere models. Our FIDO (Force-Free Inside, Dissipative Outside) models indicate that the dissipative regions lie outside the light cylinder near the equatorial current sheet. Our models reproduce the light-curve phenomenology while a detailed comparison of the model spectral properties with those observed by Fermi reveals the dependence of the macroscopic conductivity parameter on the spin-down rate providing a unique insight into the understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the high-energy emission in pulsar magnetospheres. Finally, we further exploit these important results by building self-consistent 3D global kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) models which, eventually, provide the dependence of the macroscopic parameter behavior (e.g. conductivity) on the microphysical properties (e.g. particle multiplicities, particle injection rates). Our PIC models provide field structures and particle distributions that are not only consistent with each other but also able to reproduce a broad range of the observed gamma-ray phenomenology (light curves and spectral properties) of both young and millisecond pulsars.

  14. Search for Differences between Radio-loud and Radio-quiet Gamma-Ray Pulsar Populations with Fermi-LAT Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, E. V.; Rubtsov, G. I.

    2016-12-01

    Observations by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) have enabled us to explore the population of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars with a set of 112 objects. It was recently noted that there are apparent differences in the properties of radio-quiet and radio-loud subsets. In particular, the average observed radio-loud pulsar is younger than the average radio-quiet one and is located at lower Galactic latitude. Even so, the analysis based on the full list of pulsars may suffer from selection effects. Namely, most radio-loud pulsars are first discovered in the radio band, while radio-quiet ones are found using the gamma-ray data. In this work we perform a blind search for gamma-ray pulsars using the Fermi-LAT data alone, using all point sources from the 3FGL catalog as the candidates. Unlike our previous work, the present catalog is constructed with a semi-coherent method based on the time-differencing technique and covers the full range of characteristic ages down to 1 kyr. The search resulted in a catalog of 40 non-recycled pulsars, 25 of which are radio-quiet. All pulsars found in the search were previously known gamma-ray pulsars. We find no statistically significant differences in age or in distributions in Galactic latitude for the radio-loud and radio-quiet pulsars, while the distributions in rotation period are marginally different with a statistical probability of 4× {10}-3. The fraction of radio-quiet pulsars is estimated as {ε }{RQ}=(63+/- 8) % . The results are in agreement with the predictions of the outer magnetosphere models, while the polar cap models are disfavored.

  15. Radio emission in Mercury magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Varela, J; Brun, A S; Pantellini, F; Zarka, P

    2016-01-01

    Context: Active stars possess magnetized wind that has a direct impact on planets that can lead to radio emission. Mercury is a good test case to study the effect of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field on radio emission driven in the planet magnetosphere. Such studies could be used as proxies to characterize the magnetic field topology and intensity of exoplanets. Aims: The aim of this study is to quantify the radio emission in the Hermean magnetosphere. Methods: We use the MHD code PLUTO in spherical coordinates with an axisymmetric multipolar expansion for the Hermean magnetic field, to analyze the effect of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation and intensity, as well as the hydrodynamic parameters of the solar wind (velocity, density and temperature), on the net power dissipated on the Hermean day and night side. We apply the formalism derived by Zarka [2001, 2007] to infer the radio emission level from the net dissipated power. We perform a set of simulations with different hydr...

  16. Constraining Radio Emission from Magnetars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazarus, P.; Kaspi, V.M.; Champion, D.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Dib, R.

    2012-01-01

    We report on radio observations of five magnetars and two magnetar candidates carried out at 1950 MHz with the Green Bank Telescope in 2006-2007. The data from these observations were searched for periodic emission and bright single pulses. Also, monitoring observations of magnetar 4U 0142+61 follow

  17. Search for a Correlation Between Very-High-Energy Gamma Rays and Giant Radio Pulses in the Crab Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliu, E.; Archambault, S.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bouvier, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Dumm, J.; Falcone, A.; Federici, S.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Perkins, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a joint observational campaign between the Green Bank radio telescope and the VERITAS gamma-ray telescope, which searched for a correlation between the emission of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays ( E(sub Gamma) > 150 GeV) and giant radio pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 8.9 GHz. A total of 15,366 GRPs were recorded during 11.6 hr of simultaneous observations, which were made across four nights in 2008 December and in 2009 November and December. We searched for an enhancement of the pulsed gamma-ray emission within time windows placed around the arrival time of the GRP events. In total, eight different time windows with durations ranging from 0.033 ms to 72 s were positioned at three different locations relative to the GRP to search for enhanced gamma-ray emission which lagged, led, or was concurrent with, the GRP event. Furthermore, we performed separate searches on main pulse GRPs and interpulse GRPs and on the most energetic GRPs in our data sample. No significant enhancement of pulsed VHE emission was found in any of the preformed searches. We set upper limits of 5-10 times the average VHE flux of the Crab pulsar on the flux simultaneous with interpulse GRPs on single-rotation-period timescales. On approx. 8 s timescales around interpulse GRPs, we set an upper limit of 2-3 times the average VHE flux. Within the framework of recent models for pulsed VHE emission from the Crab pulsar, the expected VHE-GRP emission correlations are below the derived limits.

  18. Jiamusi Pulsar Observations: I. Abnormal emission events of PSR B0919+06

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Jun; Peng, Ling-Xiang; Tang, De-Yu; Wang, Jun; Li, Jun-Qiang; Wang, Chen; Yu, Ye-Zhao; Dong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    PSR B0919+06 generally radiates radio pulses in a normal phase range. It has been known for its occasional perplexing abnormal emission events wherein individual pulses come to an earlier phase range for a few tens of periods and then returns to its usual phase. Heretofore, only a few such events have been available for study. We observed PSR B0919+06 for about 30 hours using the Jiamusi 66-m telescope at Jiamusi Deep Space Station at S-band, and detected 92 abnormal emission events. We identify four types of events based on the abrupted or gradual phase-shifting of individual pulses. The abnormal emission events are seen to occur randomly some every 1000 to 3000 periods, and they affect the leading edge of the mean profile by up to 2\\% in amplitude. The abnormal emission events are probably related to gradual changes of emission processing in the pulsar magnetosphere.

  19. The Braking Index of a Radio-quiet Gamma-ray Pulsar

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, C J; Pletsch, H. J.; Wu, J.; Guillemot, L.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Kerr, M.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Beer, C; Bock, O.; Cuéllar, A.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Kramer, M.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery and timing measurements of PSR J1208-6238, a young and highly magnetized gamma-ray pulsar, with a spin period of 440 ms. The pulsar was discovered in gamma-ray photon data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during a blind-search survey of unidentified LAT sources, running on the distributed volunteer computing system Einstein@Home. No radio pulsations were detected in dedicated follow-up searches with the Parkes radio telescope, with a flux density upper limit a...

  20. Unusual Pulsed X-Ray Emission from the Young, High Magnetic Field Pulsar PSR J1119--6127

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, M E; Kaspi, V M; Camilo, F; Gaensler, B M; Pivovaroff, M J

    2005-08-05

    We present XMM-Newton observations of the radio pulsar PSR J1119-6127, which has an inferred age of 1,700 yr and surface dipole magnetic field strength of 4.1 x 10{sup 13} G. We report the first detection of pulsed X-ray emission from PSR J1119-6127. In the 0.5-2.0 keV range, the pulse profile shows a narrow peak with a very high pulsed fraction of (74 {+-} 14)%. In the 2.0-10.0 keV range, the upper limit for the pulsed fraction is 28% (99% confidence). The pulsed emission is well described by a thermal blackbody model with a temperature of T{infinity} = 2.4{sub -0.2}{sup +0.3} x 10{sup 6} K and emitting radius of 3.4{sub -0.3}{sup +1.8} km (at a distance of 8.4 kpc). Atmospheric models result in problematic estimates for the distance/emitting area. PSR J1119-6127 is now the radio pulsar with smallest characteristic age from which thermal X-ray emission has been detected. The combined temporal and spectral characteristics of this emission are unlike those of other radio pulsars detected at X-ray energies and challenge current models of thermal emission from neutron stars.

  1. A Search for Rapidly Spinning Pulsars and Fast Transients in Unidentified Radio Sources with the NRAO 43-Meter Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Deborah; Langston, Glen; Gilpin, Claire

    2013-01-01

    We have searched 75 unidentified radio sources selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) catalog for the presence of rapidly spinning pulsars and short, dispersed radio bursts. The sources are radio bright, have no identifications or optical source coincidences, are more than 5% linearly polarized, and are spatially unresolved in the catalog. If these sources are fast-spinning pulsars (e.g. sub-millisecond pulsars), previous large-scale pulsar surveys may have missed detection due to instrumental and computational limitations, eclipsing effects, or diffractive scintillation. The discovery of a sub-millisecond pulsar would significantly constrain the neutron star equation of state and would have implications for models predicting a rapid slowdown of highly recycled X-ray pulsars to millisecond periods from, e.g., accretion disk decoupling. These same sources were previously searched unsuccessfully for pulsations at 610 MHz with the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank. This new search was conducted at a differe...

  2. DEEP X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNG HIGH-MAGNETIC-FIELD RADIO PULSAR J1119-6127 AND SUPERNOVA REMNANT G292.2-0.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Ho, W. C. G. [School of Mathematics, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Weltevrede, P. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bogdanov, S. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Shannon, R. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Sciences, Australia Telescope National Facility, Marsfield, NSW 2210 (Australia); Gonzalez, M. E., E-mail: ncy@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2012-12-10

    High-magnetic-field radio pulsars are important transition objects for understanding the connection between magnetars and conventional radio pulsars. We present a detailed study of the young radio pulsar J1119-6127, which has a characteristic age of 1900 yr and a spin-down-inferred magnetic field of 4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G, and its associated supernova remnant G292.2-0.5, using deep XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray Observatory exposures of over 120 ks from each telescope. The pulsar emission shows strong modulation below 2.5 keV with a single-peaked profile and a large pulsed fraction of 0.48 {+-} 0.12. Employing a magnetic, partially ionized hydrogen atmosphere model, we find that the observed pulse profile can be produced by a single hot spot of temperature 0.13 keV covering about one-third of the stellar surface, and we place an upper limit of 0.08 keV for an antipodal hot spot with the same area. The non-uniform surface temperature distribution could be the result of anisotropic heat conduction under a strong magnetic field, and a single-peaked profile seems common among high-B radio pulsars. For the associated remnant G292.2-0.5, its large diameter could be attributed to fast expansion in a low-density wind cavity, likely formed by a Wolf-Rayet progenitor, similar to two other high-B radio pulsars.

  3. PSR J1723-2837: An Eclipsing Binary Radio Millisecond Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, F; Stairs, I H; Kaplan, D L; McLaughlin, M A; Freire, P C C; Burgay, M; Camilo, F; D'Amico, N; Faulkner, A; Kramer, M; Lorimer, D R; Manchester, R N; Possenti, A; Steeghs, D

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of PSR J1723-2837, an eclipsing, 1.86 ms millisecond binary radio pulsar discovered in the Parkes Multibeam survey. Radio timing indicates that the pulsar has a circular orbit with a 15 hr orbital period, a low-mass companion, and a measurable orbital period derivative. The eclipse fraction of ~15% during the pulsar's orbit is twice the Roche lobe size inferred for the companion. The timing behavior is significantly affected by unmodeled systematics of astrophysical origin, and higher-order orbital period derivatives are needed in the timing solution to account for these variations. We have identified the pulsar's (non-degenerate) companion using archival ultraviolet, optical, and infrared survey data and new optical photometry. Doppler shifts from optical spectroscopy confirm the star's association with the pulsar and indicate a pulsar-to-companion mass ratio of 3.3 +/- 0.5, corresponding to a companion mass range of 0.4 to 0.7 Msun and an orbital inclination angle range of between 30 and ...

  4. Discovery of Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Young Radio Pulsar PSR J1028-5819 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Radio pulsar PSR J1028-5819 was recently discovered in a high-frequency search (at 3.1 GHz)in the error circle of the EGRET source 3EG J1027-5817. The spin-down power of this young pulsar is great enough to make it very likely the counterpart for the EGRET source. We report here the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from PSR J1028-5819 in early observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The gamma-ray light curve shows two sharp peaks having phase separation of 0.460 +- 0.004, trailing the very narrow radio pulse by 0.200 +- 0.003 in phase, very similar to that of other known $\\gamma$-ray pulsars. The measured gamma-ray flux gives an efficiency for the pulsar of 10-20% (for outer magnetosphere beam models). No evidence of a surrounding pulsar wind nebula is seen in the current Fermi data but limits on associated emission are weak because the source lies in a crowded region with high background emission. However, the improved angular resolution afforded by the LAT ena...

  5. Discovery of Pulsed Gamma Rays from the Young Radio Pulsar PSR J1028-5819 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Baring, Matthew G.; /Rice U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle; Caliandro, G.A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /NASA, Goddard /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Radio pulsar PSR J1028-5819 was recently discovered in a high-frequency search (at 3.1 GHz) in the error circle of the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) source 3EG J1027-5817. The spin-down power of this young pulsar is great enough to make it very likely the counterpart for the EGRET source. We report here the discovery of {gamma}-ray pulsations from PSR J1028-5819 in early observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The {gamma}-ray light curve shows two sharp peaks having phase separation of 0.460 {+-} 0.004, trailing the very narrow radio pulse by 0.200 {+-} 0.003 in phase, very similar to that of other known {gamma}-ray pulsars. The measured {gamma}-ray flux gives an efficiency for the pulsar of {approx}10-20% (for outer magnetosphere beam models). No evidence of a surrounding pulsar wind nebula is seen in the current Fermi data but limits on associated emission are weak because the source lies in a crowded region with high background emission. However, the improved angular resolution afforded by the LAT enables the disentanglement of the previous COS-B and EGRET source detections into at least two distinct sources, one of which is now identified as PSR J1028-5819.

  6. Observing Radio Pulsars in the Galactic Centre with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Eatough, R P; Casanellas, J; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Demorest, P B; Kramer, M; Lee, K J; Liu, K; Ransom, S M; Wex, N

    2015-01-01

    The discovery and timing of radio pulsars within the Galactic centre is a fundamental aspect of the SKA Science Case, responding to the topic of "Strong Field Tests of Gravity with Pulsars and Black Holes" (Kramer et al. 2004; Cordes et al. 2004). Pulsars have in many ways proven to be excellent tools for testing the General theory of Relativity and alternative gravity theories (see Wex (2014) for a recent review). Timing a pulsar in orbit around a companion, provides a unique way of probing the relativistic dynamics and spacetime of such a system. The strictest tests of gravity, in strong field conditions, are expected to come from a pulsar orbiting a black hole. In this sense, a pulsar in a close orbit ($P_{\\rm orb}$ < 1 yr) around our nearest supermassive black hole candidate, Sagittarius A* - at a distance of ~8.3 kpc in the Galactic centre (Gillessen et al. 2009a) - would be the ideal tool. Given the size of the orbit and the relativistic effects associated with it, even a slowly spinning pulsar would...

  7. Statistics of interpulse radio pulsars: the key to solving the alignment/counter-alignment problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzamasskiy, L. I.; Beskin, V. S.; Pirov, K. K.

    2017-04-01

    At present, there are theoretical models of radio pulsar evolution that predict both the alignment, i.e. evolution of inclination angle χ between magnetic and rotational axes to 0°, and its counter-alignment, i.e. evolution to 90°. At the same time, both models describe well the pulsar distribution on the P-dot{P} diagram. For this reason, up to now it was impossible to determine the braking mechanisms since it was rather difficult to estimate the evolution of the inclination angle based on observations. In this paper, we demonstrate that the statistics of interpulse pulsars can give us the key to solve the alignment/counter-alignment problem as the number of interpulse pulsars (having both χ ∼ 0° and χ ∼ 90°) drastically depends on the evolution of the inclination angle.

  8. PSR J1723–2837: AN ECLIPSING BINARY RADIO MILLISECOND PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Fronefield [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Lyne, Andrew G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Stairs, Ingrid H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kaplan, David L. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); McLaughlin, Maura A.; Lorimer, Duncan R. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Freire, Paulo C. C.; Kramer, Michael [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Burgay, Marta; D' Amico, Nichi; Possenti, Andrea [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Poggio dei Pini, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy); Camilo, Fernando [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Faulkner, Andrew [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J. J. Thompson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Manchester, Richard N. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Steeghs, Danny, E-mail: fcrawfor@fandm.edu [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-10

    We present a study of PSR J1723–2837, an eclipsing, 1.86 ms millisecond binary radio pulsar discovered in the Parkes Multibeam survey. Radio timing indicates that the pulsar has a circular orbit with a 15 hr orbital period, a low-mass companion, and a measurable orbital period derivative. The eclipse fraction of ∼15% during the pulsar's orbit is twice the Roche lobe size inferred for the companion. The timing behavior is significantly affected by unmodeled systematics of astrophysical origin, and higher-order orbital period derivatives are needed in the timing solution to account for these variations. We have identified the pulsar's (non-degenerate) companion using archival ultraviolet, optical, and infrared survey data and new optical photometry. Doppler shifts from optical spectroscopy confirm the star's association with the pulsar and indicate a pulsar-to-companion mass ratio of 3.3 ± 0.5, corresponding to a companion mass range of 0.4 to 0.7 M{sub ☉} and an orbital inclination angle range of between 30° and 41°, assuming a pulsar mass range of 1.4-2.0 M{sub ☉}. Spectroscopy indicates a spectral type of G for the companion and an inferred Roche-lobe-filling distance that is consistent with the distance estimated from radio dispersion. The features of PSR J1723–2837 indicate that it is likely a 'redback' system. Unlike the five other Galactic redbacks discovered to date, PSR J1723–2837 has not been detected as a γ-ray source with Fermi. This may be due to an intrinsic spin-down luminosity that is much smaller than the measured value if the unmeasured contribution from proper motion is large.

  9. PSR J1723-2837: An Eclipsing Binary Radio Millisecond Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Fronefield; Lyne, Andrew G.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; Kaplan, David L.; McLaughlin, Maura A.; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Burgay, Marta; Camilo, Fernando; D'Amico, Nichi; Faulkner, Andrew; Kramer, Michael; Lorimer, Duncan R.; Manchester, Richard N.; Possenti, Andrea; Steeghs, Danny

    2013-10-01

    We present a study of PSR J1723-2837, an eclipsing, 1.86 ms millisecond binary radio pulsar discovered in the Parkes Multibeam survey. Radio timing indicates that the pulsar has a circular orbit with a 15 hr orbital period, a low-mass companion, and a measurable orbital period derivative. The eclipse fraction of ~15% during the pulsar's orbit is twice the Roche lobe size inferred for the companion. The timing behavior is significantly affected by unmodeled systematics of astrophysical origin, and higher-order orbital period derivatives are needed in the timing solution to account for these variations. We have identified the pulsar's (non-degenerate) companion using archival ultraviolet, optical, and infrared survey data and new optical photometry. Doppler shifts from optical spectroscopy confirm the star's association with the pulsar and indicate a pulsar-to-companion mass ratio of 3.3 ± 0.5, corresponding to a companion mass range of 0.4 to 0.7 M ⊙ and an orbital inclination angle range of between 30° and 41°, assuming a pulsar mass range of 1.4-2.0 M ⊙. Spectroscopy indicates a spectral type of G for the companion and an inferred Roche-lobe-filling distance that is consistent with the distance estimated from radio dispersion. The features of PSR J1723-2837 indicate that it is likely a "redback" system. Unlike the five other Galactic redbacks discovered to date, PSR J1723-2837 has not been detected as a γ-ray source with Fermi. This may be due to an intrinsic spin-down luminosity that is much smaller than the measured value if the unmeasured contribution from proper motion is large.

  10. The Braking Index of a Radio-quiet Gamma-Ray Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C. J.; Pletsch, H. J.; Wu, J.; Guillemot, L.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Kerr, M.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Beer, C.; Bock, O.; Cuéllar, A.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Kramer, M.; Machenschalk, B.; Nieder, L.

    2016-11-01

    We report the discovery and timing measurements of PSR J1208-6238, a young and highly magnetized gamma-ray pulsar, with a spin period of 440 ms. The pulsar was discovered in gamma-ray photon data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during a blind-search survey of unidentified LAT sources, running on the distributed volunteer computing system Einstein@Home. No radio pulsations were detected in dedicated follow-up searches with the Parkes radio telescope, with a flux density upper limit at 1369 MHz of 30 μJy. By timing this pulsar’s gamma-ray pulsations, we measure its braking index over five years of LAT observations to be n = 2.598 ± 0.001 ± 0.1, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second estimates the bias due to timing noise. Assuming its braking index has been similar since birth, the pulsar has an estimated age of around 2700 years, making it the youngest pulsar to be found in a blind search of gamma-ray data and the youngest known radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar. Despite its young age, the pulsar is not associated with any known supernova remnant or pulsar wind nebula. The pulsar’s inferred dipolar surface magnetic field strength is 3.8 × 1013 G, almost 90% of the quantum-critical level. We investigate some potential physical causes of the braking index deviating from the simple dipole model but find that LAT data covering a longer time interval will be necessary to distinguish between these.

  11. Radio Pulsar Death Line Revisited Is PSR J2144-3933 Anomalous?

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B; Muslimov, A G; Zhang, Bing; Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alexander G.

    2000-01-01

    We reinvestigate the radio pulsar ``death lines'' within the framework of two different types of polar cap acceleration models, i.e., the vacuum gap model and the space-charge-limited flow model, with either curvature radiation or inverse Compton scattering photons as the source of pairs. General relativistic frame-dragging is taken into account in both models. We find that the inverse Compton scattering induced space-charge-limited flow model can sustain strong pair production in some long-period pulsars, which allows the newly detected 8.5s pulsar PSR J2144-3933 to be radio loud, without assuming a special neutron star equation-of-state or ad hoc magnetic field configurations.

  12. SPAN512: A new mid-latitude pulsar survey with the Nancay Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Desvignes, Gregory; Champion, David; Lazarus, Patrick; Lespagnol, Patrice; Smith, David A; Theureau, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    We present an ongoing survey with the Nan\\c{c}ay Radio Telescope at L-band. The targeted area is $74^\\circ \\lesssim l <150^\\circ$ and $3.5^\\circ < |b| < 5^\\circ$. This survey is characterized by a long integration time (18 min), large bandwidth (512 MHz) and high time and frequency resolution (64 $\\mu$s and 0.5 MHz) giving a nominal sensitivity limit of 0.055 mJy for long period pulsars. This is about 2 times better than the mid-latitude HTRU survey, and is designed to be complementary with current large scale surveys. This survey will be more sensitive to transients (RRATs, intermittent pulsars), distant and faint millisecond pulsars as well as scintillating sources (or any other kind of radio faint sources) than all previous short-integration surveys.

  13. Synchronous X-ray and radio mode switches: a rapid global transformation of the pulsar magnetosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermsen, W.; Hessels, J.W.; Kuiper, L.; Leeuwen, van J.; Mitra, D.; Plaa, de J.; Rankin, J.M.; Stappers, B.W.; Wright, G.A.E.; Basu, R.; Alexov, A.; Coenen, T.; Griessmeier, J.M.; Hassall, T.E.; Karastergiou, A.; Keane, E.; Kondratiev, V.I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Noutsos, A.; Serylak, M.; Pilia, M.; Sobey, C.; Weltevrede, P.; Zagkouris, K.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I.M.; Batejat, F.; Bell, M.E.; Bell, M.R.; Bentum, M.J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Birzan, L.; Bonfede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H.R.; Ciardi, B.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M.A.; Gasperin, de F.; Geus, de E.; Gunst, A.W.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Homeffer, A.; Iabobelli, M.; Kuper, G.; Maat, P.; Macario, G.; Markoff, S.; McKean, J.P.; Mevius, M.; Miller-Jones, J.C.A.; Morganti, R.; Munk, H.; Orrú, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V.N.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.G.; Rawlings, S.; Reich, W.; Röttgering, H.; Scaife, A.M.M.; Schoenmakers, A.; Shulevski, A.; Sluman, J.; Steinmetz, M.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Veen, ter S.; Vermeulen, R.; Brink, van de R.H.; Weeren, van R.J.; Weijers, R.A.M.J.; Wise, M.W.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.

    2013-01-01

    Pulsars emit from low-frequency radio waves up to high-energy gamma-rays, generated anywhere from the stellar surface out to the edge of the magnetosphere. Detecting correlated mode changes across the electromagnetic spectrum is therefore key to understanding the physical relationship among the emis

  14. A study of the evolution of radio pulsars through improved population synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, J.W.; Bhattacharya, D.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Verbunt, F.

    1997-01-01

    We simulate the birth and evolution of radio pulsars throughout the Galaxy and their observation in a region around the Sun, using recently derived models for the velocity distribution of neutron stars and for the galactic distribution of free electrons. We confirm our previous result that the prope

  15. Radio upper limits for the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J17511-3057

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller-Jones, J.C.A.; Russell, D.M.; Migliari, S.

    2009-01-01

    We report on recent radio observations of the newly-detected accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar, IGR J17511-3057 (ATels #2196, #2197, #2198, #2199, #2215, #2216, #2220, #2221). We used the Very Large Array (VLA) to observe the source under observing program AM971. The array was in its relatively com

  16. The pulsar contribution to the diffuse galactic gamma-ray emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.; Kanbach, G.; Hunter, S.D.;

    1997-01-01

    There is active interest in the extent to which unresolved gamma-ray pulsars contribute to the Galactic diffuse emission, and in whether unresolved gamma-ray pulsars could be responsible for the excess of diffuse Galactic emission above 1 GeV that has been observed by EGRET. The diffuse gamma-ray...... for a reasonable number of directly observable gamma-ray pulsars (similar to 14). The latitude distribution of the diffuse emission caused by unresolved pulsars is narrower than that of the observed diffuse emission. While the excess above 1 GeV gamma-ray energy is observed up to at least 6 degrees-8 degrees off...... the plane, the pulsar contribution would be small there. Thus, pulsars do significantly contribute to the diffuse Galactic gamma-ray emission above 1 GeV, but they cannot be made responsible for all the discrepancies between observed intensity and model predictions in this energy range....

  17. Gamma rays from Galactic pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Gamma rays from young pulsars and milli-second pulsars are expected to contribute to the diffuse gamma-ray emission measured by the {\\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT) at high latitudes. We derive the contribution of the pulsars undetected counterpart by using information from radio to gamma rays and we show that they explain only a small fraction of the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background.

  18. PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Arun; Joshi, Bhal Chandra; Manoharan, P. K.; Krishnakumar, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a bandwidth of about four times larger (16 MHz) than that of the legacy system as well as its fluctuation spectrum with high temporal and frequency resolutions. The key point is that all the above modes operate in real time. This paper presents the design aspects of PONDER and outlines the design methodology for future similar backends. It also explains the principal operations of PONDER, illustrates its capabilities for a variety of pulsar and IPS observations and demonstrates its usefulness for a variety of astrophysical studies using the high sensitivity of the ORT.

  19. TOWARD AN EMPIRICAL THEORY OF PULSAR EMISSION. XI. UNDERSTANDING THE ORIENTATIONS OF PULSAR RADIATION AND SUPERNOVA “KICKS”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rankin, Joanna M., E-mail: Joanna.Rankin@uvm.edu [Physics Department, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States)

    2015-05-10

    Two entwined problems have remained unresolved since pulsars were discovered nearly 50 yr ago: the orientation of their polarized emission relative to the emitting magnetic field and the direction of putative supernova “kicks” relative to their rotation axes. The rotational orientation of most pulsars can be inferred only from the (“fiducial”) polarization angle of their radiation, when their beam points directly at the Earth and the emitting polar fluxtube field is ∥ to the rotation axis. Earlier studies have been unrevealing owing to the admixture of different types of radiation (core and conal, two polarization modes), producing both ∥ or ⊥ alignments. In this paper we analyze some 50 pulsars having three characteristics: core radiation beams, reliable absolute polarimetry, and accurate proper motions (PMs). The “fiducial” polarization angle of the core emission, we then find, is usually oriented ⊥ to the PM direction on the sky. The primary core emission is polarized ⊥ to the projected magnetic field in Vela and other pulsars where X-ray imaging reveals the orientation. This shows that the PMs usually lie ∥ to the rotation axes on the sky. Two key physical consequences then follow: first, to the extent that supernova “kicks” are responsible for pulsar PMs, they are mostly ∥ to the rotation axis; and, second, most pulsar radiation is heavily processed by the magnetospheric plasma such that the lowest altitude “parent” core emission is polarized ⊥ to the emitting field, propagating as the extraordinary (X) mode.

  20. The Arecibo 430-MHz Intermediate Galactic Latitude Survey: Discovery of Nine Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro, J; Freire, P C; Navarro, Jose; Anderson, Stuart; Freire, Paulo C.

    2003-01-01

    We have used the Arecibo Radio Telescope to search for millisecond pulsars in two intermediate Galactic latitude regions (7 deg < | b | < 20 deg) accessible to this telescope. For these latitudes the useful millisecond pulsar search volume achieved by Arecibo's 430-MHz beam is predicted to be maximal. Searching a total of 130 square degrees, we have discovered nine new pulsars and detected four previously known objects. We compare the results of this survey with those of other 430-MHz surveys carried out at Arecibo and of an intermediate latitude survey made at Parkes that included part of our search area; the latter independently found two of the nine pulsars we have discovered. At least six of our discoveries are isolated pulsars with ages between 5 and 300 Myr; one of these, PSR J1819+1305, exhibits very marked and periodic nulling. We have also found a recycled pulsar, PSR J2016+1948. With a rotational period of 65 ms, this is a member of a binary system with a 635-day orbital period. We discuss som...

  1. Search for differences between radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsar populations with Fermi-LAT data

    CERN Document Server

    Sokolova, E V

    2016-01-01

    Observations by Fermi LAT enabled us to explore the population of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars with the set of 89 objects. It was recently noted that there are apparent differences in properties of radio-quiet and radio-loud subsets. In particular, average observed radio-loud pulsar is younger than radio-quiet one and is located at smaller galactic latitude. Even so, the analysis based on the full list of pulsars may suffer from selection effects. Namely, most of radio-loud pulsars are first discovered in the radio-band, while radio-quiet ones are found using the gamma-ray data. In this work we perform a blind search for gamma-ray pulsars using the Fermi LAT data alone using all point sources from 3FGL catalog as the candidates. Unlike preceding blind search, the present catalog is constructed with novel semi-coherent method and covers the full range of characteristic ages down to 1 kyr. The search resulted in the catalog of 40 non-recycled pulsars, 26 of which are radio-quiet. There are no statistically si...

  2. A Compact X-ray Source in the Radio Pulsar-Wind Nebula G141.2+5.0

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a 50 ks Chandra observation of the recently discovered radio object G141.2+5.0, presumed to be a pulsar-wind nebula. We find a moderately bright unresolved X-ray source which we designate CXOU J033712.8 615302 coincident with the central peak radio emission. An absorbed power-law fit to the 241 counts describes the data well, with absorbing column $N_H = 6.7 (4.0, 9.7) \\times 10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ and photon index $\\Gamma = 1.8 (1.4, 2.2)$. For a distance of 4 kpc, the unabsorbed luminosity between 0.5 and 8 keV is $ 1.7^{+0.4}_{-0.3} \\times 10^{32}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (90\\% confidence intervals). Both $L_X$ and $\\Gamma$ are quite typical of pulsars in PWNe. No extended emission is seen; we estimate a conservative $3 \\sigma$ upper limit to the surface brightness of any X-ray PWN near the point source to be $3 \\times 10^{-17}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ arcsec$^{-2}$ between 0.5 and 8 keV, assuming the same spectrum as the point source; for a nebula of diameter $13"$, the flux limit is 6\\% of the f...

  3. A Compact X-Ray Source in the Radio Pulsar-wind Nebula G141.2+5.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a 50 ks Chandra observation of the recently discovered radio object G141.2+5.0, presumed to be a pulsar-wind nebula. We find a moderately bright unresolved X-ray source that we designate CXOU J033712.8 615302 coincident with the central peak radio emission. An absorbed power-law fit to the 241 counts describes the data well, with absorbing column {N}H=6.7(4.0,9.7)× {10}21 cm-2 and photon index {{Γ }}=1.8(1.4,2.2). For a distance of 4 kpc, the unabsorbed luminosity between 0.5 and 8 keV is {1.7}-0.3+0.4× {10}32 erg s-1 (90% confidence intervals). Both LX and Γ are quite typical of pulsars in PWNe. No extended emission is seen; we estimate a conservative 3σ upper limit to the surface brightness of any X-ray PWN near the point source to be 3× {10}-17 erg cm-2 s-1 arcsec-2 between 0.5 and 8 keV, assuming the same spectrum as the point source; for a nebula of diameter 13\\prime\\prime , the flux limit is 6% of the flux of the point source. The steep radio spectrum of the PWN (α ˜ -0.7), if continued to the X-ray without a break, predicts {L}{{X}} {{(nebula)}}˜ 1× {10}33 erg s-1, so additional spectral steepening between radio and X-rays is required, as is true of all known PWNe. The high Galactic latitude gives a z-distance of 350 pc above the Galactic plane, quite unusual for a Population I object.

  4. Teraelectronvolt pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar detected by MAGIC

    CERN Document Server

    Ahnen, M L; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Banerjee, B; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Buson, S; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Chatterjee, A; Clavero, R; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Mendez, C Delgado; Di Pierro, F; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Glawion, D Eisenacher; Elsaesser, D; Fernández-Barral, A; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giammaria, P; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gora, D; Guberman, D; Hadasch, D; Hahn, A; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hughes, G; Idec, W; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Manganaro, M; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Moretti, E; Nakajima, D; Neustroev, V; Niedzwiecki, A; Rosillo, M Nievas; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palacio, J; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Pedaletti, G; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Saito, T; Satalecka, K; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Verguilov, V; Vovk, I; Ward, J E; Will, M; Wu, M H; Zanin, R

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the extension of the very-high-energy spectral tail of the Crab pulsar at energies above 400 GeV. Methods: We analyzed $\\sim$320 hours of good quality data of Crab with the MAGIC telescope, obtained from February 2007 until April 2014. Results: We report the most energetic pulsed emission ever detected from the Crab pulsar reaching up to 1.5 TeV. The pulse profile shows two narrow peaks synchronized with the ones measured in the GeV energy range. The spectra of the two peaks follow two different power-law functions from 70 GeV up to 1.5 TeV and connect smoothly with the spectra measured above 10 GeV by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board of the Fermi satellite. When making a joint fit of the LAT and MAGIC data, above 10 GeV, the photon indices of the spectra differ by 0.5$\\pm$0.1. Conclusions: We measured with the MAGIC telescopes the most energetic pulsed photons from a pulsar to date. Such TeV pulsed photons require a parent population of electrons with a Lorentz factor of at least ...

  5. Searching towards the Galactic Centre region for pulsed radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Lawrence; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Bhat, Ramesh; Shannon, Ryan

    2014-10-01

    A search of archival Parkes survey data has uncovered a source similar to that of a radio pulsar, however the detection DM indicates that it may be either the closest pulsar ever discovered, or simply a case of mistaken identity and is in fact an RFI event that closely mimics that of a pulsar signal. We would like to propose a grid search of the location of this source, at 3 available frequency bands, in order to determine its nature.

  6. Algorithms for searching Fast radio bursts and pulsars in tight binary systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zackay, Barak

    2017-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRB's) are an exciting, recently discovered, astrophysical transients which their origins are unknown.Currently, these bursts are believed to be coming from cosmological distances, allowing us to probe the electron content on cosmological length scales. Even though their precise localization is crucial for the determination of their origin, radio interferometers were not extensively employed in searching for them due to computational limitations.I will briefly present the Fast Dispersion Measure Transform (FDMT) algorithm,that allows to reduce the operation count in blind incoherent dedispersion by 2-3 orders of magnitude.In addition, FDMT enables to probe the unexplored domain of sub-microsecond astrophysical pulses.Pulsars in tight binary systems are among the most important astrophysical objects as they provide us our best tests of general relativity in the strong field regime.I will provide a preview to a novel algorithm that enables the detection of pulsars in short binary systems using observation times longer than an orbital period.Current pulsar search programs limit their searches for integration times shorter than a few percents of the orbital period.Until now, searching for pulsars in binary systems using observation times longer than an orbital period was considered impossible as one has to blindly enumerate all options for the Keplerian parameters, the pulsar rotation period, and the unknown DM.Using the current state of the art pulsar search techniques and all computers on the earth, such an enumeration would take longer than a Hubble time. I will demonstrate that using the new algorithm, it is possible to conduct such an enumeration on a laptop using real data of the double pulsar PSR J0737-3039.Among the other applications of this algorithm are:1) Searching for all pulsars on all sky positions in gamma ray observations of the Fermi LAT satellite.2) Blind searching for continuous gravitational wave sources emitted by pulsars with

  7. The ratio of profile peak separations as a probe of pulsar radio-beam structure

    CERN Document Server

    Dyks, J

    2015-01-01

    The known population of pulsars contains objects with four and five component profiles, for which the peak-to-peak separations between the inner and outer components can be measured. These Q and M type profiles can be interpreted as a result of sightline cut through a nested cone beam, or through a set of azimuthal fan beams. We show that the ratio R_W of the components' separations provides a useful measure of the beam shape, which is mostly independent of parameters that determine the beam scale and complicate interpretation of simpler profiles. In particular, the method does not depend on the emission altitude and the dipole tilt distribution. The different structures of the radio beam imply manifestly different statistical distributions of R_W, with the conal model being several orders of magnitude less consistent with data than the fan beam model. To bring the conal model into consistency with data, strong effects of observational selection need to be called for, with 80% of Q and M profiles assumed to b...

  8. The ratio of profile peak separations as a probe of pulsar radio-beam structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyks, J.; Pierbattista, M.

    2015-12-01

    The known population of pulsars contains objects with four- and five-component profiles, for which the peak-to-peak separations between the inner and outer components can be measured. These Q- and M-type profiles can be interpreted as a result of sightline cut through a nested-cone beam, or through a set of azimuthal fan beams. We show that the ratio RW of the components' separations provides a useful measure of the beam shape, which is mostly independent of parameters that determine the beam scale and complicate interpretation of simpler profiles. In particular, the method does not depend on the emission altitude and the dipole tilt distribution. The different structures of the radio beam imply manifestly different statistical distributions of RW, with the conal model being several orders of magnitude less consistent with data than the fan-beam model. To bring the conal model into consistency with data, strong effects of observational selection need to be called for, with 80 per cent of Q and M profiles assumed to be undetected because of intrinsic blending effects. It is concluded that the statistical properties of Q and M profiles are more consistent with the fan-shaped beams, than with the traditional nested-cone geometry.

  9. The PALFA Survey: Going to great depths to find radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarus, P; Bhat, N D R; Bogdanov, S; Bouchard, A; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Cardoso, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J S; Desvignes, G; Freire, P C C; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Kaspi, V M; Knispel, B; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Lynch, R; Lyne, A G; McLaughlin, M A; Nice, D J; Ransom, S M; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J

    2012-01-01

    The on-going PALFA survey is searching the Galactic plane (|b| < 5 deg., 32 < l < 77 deg. and 168 < l < 214 deg.) for radio pulsars at 1.4 GHz using ALFA, the 7-beam receiver installed at the Arecibo Observatory. By the end of August 2012, the PALFA survey has discovered 100 pulsars, including 17 millisecond pulsars (P < 30 ms). Many of these discoveries are among the pulsars with the largest DM/P ratios, proving that the PALFA survey is capable of probing the Galactic plane for millisecond pulsars to a much greater depth than any previous survey. This is due to the survey's high sensitivity, relatively high observing frequency, and its high time and frequency resolution. Recently the rate of discoveries has increased, due to a new more sensitive spectrometer, two updated complementary search pipelines, the development of online collaborative tools, and access to new computing resources. Looking forward, focus has shifted to the application of artificial intelligence systems to identify puls...

  10. Toward an Empirical Theory of Pulsar Emission XI. Understanding the Orientations of Pulsar Radiation and Supernova "Kicks"

    CERN Document Server

    Rankin, Joanna M

    2015-01-01

    Two entwined problems have remained unresolved since pulsars were discovered nearly 50 years ago: the orientation of their polarized emission relative to the emitting magnetic field and the direction of putative supernova ``kicks' relative to their rotation axes. The rotational orientation of most pulsars can be inferred only from the (``fiducial') polarization angle of their radiation, when their beam points directly at the Earth and the emitting polar fluxtube field is $\\parallel$ to the rotation axis. Earlier studies have been unrevealing owing to the admixture of different types of radiation (core and conal, two polarization modes), producing both $\\parallel$ or $\\perp$ alignments. In this paper we analyze the some 50 pulsars having three characteristics: core radiation beams, reliable absolute polarimetry, and accurate proper motions. The ``fiducial' polarization angle of the core emission, we then find, is usually oriented $\\perp$ to the proper-motion direction on the sky. As the primary core emission i...

  11. Very Long Baseline Interferometry Experiment on Giant Radio Pulses of Crab Pulsar toward Fast Radio Burst Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Takefuji, K; Kondo, T; Mikami, R; Takeuchi, H; Misawa, H; Tsuchiya, F; Kita, H; Sekido, M

    2016-01-01

    We report on a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiment on giant radio pulses (GPs) from the Crab pulsar in the radio 1.4 to 1.7 GHz range to demonstrate a VLBI technique for searching for fast radio bursts (FRBs). We carried out the experiment on 26 July 2014 using the Kashima 34 m and Usuda 64 m radio telescopes of the Japanese VLBI Network (JVN) with a baseline of about 200 km. During the approximately 1 h observation, we could detect 35 GPs by high-time-resolution VLBI. Moreover, we determined the dispersion measure (DM) to be 56.7585 +/- 0.0025 on the basis of the mean DM of the 35 GPs detected by VLBI. We confirmed that the sensitivity of a detection of GPs using our technique is superior to that of a single-dish mode detection using the same telescope.

  12. NUSTAR OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNG, ENERGETIC RADIO PULSAR PSR B1509–58

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ge; Kaspi, Victoria M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); An, Hongjun [Department of Physics/KIPAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States); Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 169-221, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We report on Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of the young rotation-powered radio pulsar PSR B1509−59 in the supernova remnant MSH 15−52. We confirm the previously reported curvature in the hard X-ray spectrum, showing that a log parabolic model provides a statistically superior fit to the spectrum compared with the standard power law. The log parabolic model describes the NuSTAR data, as well as previously published γ-ray data obtained with COMPTEL and AGILE, all together spanning 3 keV through 500 MeV. Our spectral modeling allows us to constrain the peak of the broadband high energy spectrum to be at 2.6 ± 0.8 MeV, an improvement of nearly an order of magnitude in precision over previous measurements. In addition, we calculate NuSTAR spectra in 26 pulse phase bins and confirm previously reported variations of photon indices with phase. Finally, we measure the pulsed fraction of PSR B1509−58 in the hard X-ray energy band for the first time. Using the energy resolved pulsed fraction results, we estimate that the pulsar’s off-pulse emission has a photon index value between 1.26 and 1.96. Our results support a model in which the pulsar’s lack of GeV emission is due to viewing geometry, with the X-rays originating from synchrotron emission from secondary pairs in the magnetosphere.

  13. X-ray and Rotational Luminosity Correlation and Magnetic Heating of the Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Shibata, S; Yatsu, Y; Enoto, T; Bamba, A

    2016-01-01

    Previous works have suggested a correlation between the X-ray luminosity Lx and the rotational luminosity Lrot of the radio pulsars.However, none of the obtained regression lines are statistically acceptable due to large scatters. We construct a statistical model which has an intrinsic Lx-Lrot relation and reproduces the observed Lx distribution about it by using a Monte Carlo simulator, which takes into account the effects obscuring the intrinsic relation,i.e., the anisotropy of radiation, additional heating, uncertainty in distance and detection limit of the instruments. From the ATNF pulsar catalog we collect 57 `ordinary radio pulsars' with significant detection and 42 with upper limits.The sample does not include the high-magnetic field pulsars (>10^{13} G), which are separately analyzed. We obtain a statistically acceptable relation Lx (0.5 - 10 keV)= 10^{31.69} (Lrot / L_0)^{c_1} with c_1 = 1.03 \\pm 0.27 and L_0 =10^{35.38}. The distribution about the obtained Lx-Lrot relation is reproduced well by the...

  14. Possible optical detection of a fast, nearby radio pulsar PSR B1133+16

    CERN Document Server

    Zharikov, S V; Mennickent, R E; Komarova, V N

    2007-01-01

    Aims: We performed deep optical observations of the field of an old, fast-moving radio pulsar PSR B1133+16 in an attempt to detect its optical counterpart and a bow shock nebula. Methods: The observations were carried out using the direct imaging mode of FORS1 at the ESO VLT/UT1 telescope in the B, R, and H_alpha bands. We also used archival images of the same field obtained with the VLT in the B band and with the Chandra/ACIS in X-rays. Results: In the B band we detected a faint (B=28.1+/-0.3) source that may be the optical counterpart of PSR B1133+16, as it is positionally consistent with the radio pulsar and with the X-ray counterpart candidate published earlier. Its upper limit in the R band implies a color index B-R <0.5, which is compatible with the index values for most pulsars identified in the optical range. The derived optical luminosity and its ratio to the X-ray luminosity of the candidate are consistent with expected values derived from a sample of pulsars detected in both spectral domains. No...

  15. Parkes radio searches of Fermi gamma-ray sources and millisecond pulsar discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Camilo, F; Ray, P S; Ransom, S M; Sarkissian, J; Cromartie, H T; Johnston, S; Reynolds, J E; Wolff, M T; Freire, P C C; Bhattacharyya, B; Ferrara, E C; Keith, M; Michelson, P F; Parkinson, P M Saz; Wood, K S

    2015-01-01

    In a search with the Parkes radio telescope of 56 unidentified Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sources, we have detected 11 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), 10 of them discoveries, of which five were reported in Kerr et al. (2012). We did not detect radio pulsations from another six pulsars now known in these sources. We describe the completed survey, which included multiple observations of many targets done to minimize the impact of interstellar scintillation, acceleration effects in binary systems, and eclipses. We consider that 23 of the 39 remaining sources may still be viable pulsar candidates. We present timing solutions and polarimetry for five of the MSPs, and gamma-ray pulsations for PSR J1903-7051 (pulsations for five others were reported in the second Fermi-LAT catalog of gamma-ray pulsars). Two of the new MSPs are isolated and five are in >1 d circular orbits with 0.2-0.3 Msun presumed white dwarf companions. PSR J0955-6150, in a 24 d orbit with a ~0.25 Msun companion but eccentricity of 0.11, belongs to a recentl...

  16. Emission-rotation correlation in pulsars: new discoveries with optimal techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Brook, P R; Johnston, S; Kerr, M; Shannon, R M; Roberts, S J

    2015-01-01

    Pulsars are known to display short-term variability. Recently, examples of longer-term emission variability have emerged that are often correlated with changes in the rotational properties of the pulsar. To further illuminate this relationship, we have developed techniques to identify emission and rotation variability in pulsar data, and determine correlations between the two. Individual observations may be too noisy to identify subtle changes in the pulse profile. We use Gaussian process (GP) regression to model noisy observations and produce a continuous map of pulse profile variability. Generally, multiple observing epochs are required to obtain the pulsar spin frequency derivative ($\\dot{\

  17. Limits on gravitational wave emission from selected pulsars using LIGO data

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ageev, A; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Gossler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P H; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Steussy, D; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; Van Putten, M H P M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zaleski, K D; Zanolin, M; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zhu, R; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J; Krämer, M; Lyne, A G

    2004-01-01

    We place direct upper limits on the strain of the gravitational waves from 28 isolated radio pulsars by a coherent multi-detector analysis of the data collected during the second science run of the LIGO interferometric detectors. These are the first direct upper limits for 26 of the 28 pulsars. We use coordinated radio observations for the first time to build radio-guided phase templates for the expected gravitational wave signals. The unprecedented sensitivity of the detectors allow us to set strain upper limits as low as a few times $10^{-24}$. These strain limits translate into limits on the equatorial ellipticities of the pulsars, which are smaller than $10^{-5}$ for the four closest pulsars.

  18. Limits on gravitational-wave emission from selected pulsars using LIGO data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B; Abbott, R; Adhikari, R; Ageev, A; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Daw, E; DeBra, D; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Credico, A; Díaz, M; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Gossler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guenther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kötter, K; Kovalik, J; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Lück, H; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Márka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P H; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Steussy, D; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; van Putten, M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zaleski, K D; Zanolin, M; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zhu, R; Zotov, N; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J; Kramer, M; Lyne, A G

    2005-05-13

    We place direct upper limits on the amplitude of gravitational waves from 28 isolated radio pulsars by a coherent multidetector analysis of the data collected during the second science run of the LIGO interferometric detectors. These are the first direct upper limits for 26 of the 28 pulsars. We use coordinated radio observations for the first time to build radio-guided phase templates for the expected gravitational-wave signals. The unprecedented sensitivity of the detectors allows us to set strain upper limits as low as a few times 10(-24). These strain limits translate into limits on the equatorial ellipticities of the pulsars, which are smaller than 10(-5) for the four closest pulsars.

  19. Radio emission of the sun and planets

    CERN Document Server

    Zheleznyakov, V V

    1970-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Natural Philosophy, Volume 25: Radio Emission of the Sun and Planets presents the origin of the radio emission of the planets. This book examines the outstanding triumphs achieved by radio astronomy of the solar system. Comprised of 10 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the physical conditions in the upper layers of the Sun, the Moon, and the planets. This text then examines the three characteristics of radio emission, namely, the frequency spectrum, the polarization, and the angular spectrum. Other chapters consider the measurements of the i

  20. Radio upper limits for the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar IGR J17511-3057

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Russell, D. M.; Migliari, S.

    2009-10-01

    We report on recent radio observations of the newly-detected accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar, IGR J17511-3057 (ATels #2196, #2197, #2198, #2199, #2215, #2216, #2220, #2221). We used the Very Large Array (VLA) to observe the source under observing program AM971. The array was in its relatively compact 'C' and 'DNC' configurations, and the observations were made at 8.46 GHz. In no case was the source significantly detected.

  1. Beating the spin-down limit on gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Antonucci, F; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barnum, S; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Beker, M BejgerM G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birindelli, S; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Boyle, M; Braccini, S; 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Yoshida, S; Yu, P; Yvert, M; Zanolin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Z; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J; Buchner, S; Hotan, A; Palfreyman, J

    2011-01-01

    We present direct upper limits on continuous gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar using data from the Virgo detector's second science run. These upper limits have been obtained using three independent methods that assume the gravitational wave emission follows the radio timing. Two of the methods produce frequentist upper limits for an assumed known orientation of the star's spin axis and value of the wave polarization angle of, respectively, $1.9\\ee{-24}$ and $2.2\\ee{-24}$, with 95% confidence. The third method, under the same hypothesis, produces a Bayesian upper limit of $2.1\\ee{-24}$, with 95% degree of belief. These limits are below the indirect {\\it spin-down limit} of $3.3\\ee{-24}$ for the Vela pulsar, defined by the energy loss rate inferred from observed decrease in Vela's spin frequency, and correspond to a limit on the star ellipticity of $\\sim 10^{-3}$. Slightly less stringent results, but still well below the spin-down limit, are obtained assuming the star's spin axis inclination and ...

  2. Beating the Spin-down Limit on Gravitational Wave Emission from the Vela Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Belletoile, A.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birindelli, S.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Boyle, M.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brummit, A.; Budzyński, R.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cain, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campagna, E.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chaibi, O.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Clara, F.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Coward, D. M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Das, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; del Prete, M.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Kelner, M.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, N.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.

    2011-08-01

    We present direct upper limits on continuous gravitational wave emission from the Vela pulsar using data from the Virgo detector's second science run. These upper limits have been obtained using three independent methods that assume the gravitational wave emission follows the radio timing. Two of the methods produce frequentist upper limits for an assumed known orientation of the star's spin axis and value of the wave polarization angle of, respectively, 1.9 × 10-24 and 2.2 × 10-24, with 95% confidence. The third method, under the same hypothesis, produces a Bayesian upper limit of 2.1 × 10-24, with 95% degree of belief. These limits are below the indirect spin-down limit of 3.3 × 10-24 for the Vela pulsar, defined by the energy loss rate inferred from observed decrease in Vela's spin frequency, and correspond to a limit on the star ellipticity of ~10-3. Slightly less stringent results, but still well below the spin-down limit, are obtained assuming the star's spin axis inclination and the wave polarization angles are unknown.

  3. Multifrequency Study of Giant Radio Pulses from the Crab Pulsar with K5 VLBI Recording Terminal

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, M V; Kondratiev, V I; Bilous, A V; Moshkina, O; Oreshko, V V; Ilyasov, Yu P; Sekido, M; Kondo, T

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous multifrequency observations of the Crab pulsar giant pulses (GPs) were performed with the 64-m Kalyazin radio telescope at four frequencies 0.6, 1.4, 2.2 and 8.3 GHz using the K5 VLBI recording terminal. K5 terminal provided continuous recording in 16 4-MHz wide frequency channels distributed over 4 frequency bands. Several thousands of GPs were detected during about 6 hours of observations in two successive days in July 2005. Radio spectra of single GPs were analysed at separate frequencies and over whole frequency range. These spectra manifest notable modulation both on large ($\\Delta\

  4. Broadband pulsations from PSR B1821–24: Implications for emission models and the pulsar population of M28

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, T. J. [National Research Council Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Kerr, M.; Romani, R. W.; Wood, M. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Cognard, I. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement, LPCE UMR 6115 CNRS, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 02 (France); Ray, P. S.; Wolff, M. T.; Grove, J. E.; Cheung, C. C. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Bégin, S. [Département de physique, génie physique et optique, Université Laval, Québec (Canada); Janssen, G. H.; Espinoza, C. M. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Venter, C. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001, 2520 Potchefstroom (South Africa); Casandjian, J. M. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K., E-mail: tyrel.j.johnson@gmail.com, E-mail: guillemo@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: kerrm@stanford.edu, E-mail: icognard@cnrs-orleans.fr, E-mail: Paul.Ray@nrl.navy.mil [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); and others

    2013-12-01

    We report a 5.4σ detection of pulsed gamma rays from PSR B1821–24 in the globular cluster M28 using ∼44 months of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data that have been reprocessed with improved instrument calibration constants. We constructed a phase-coherent ephemeris, with post-fit residual rms of 3 μs, using radio data spanning ∼23.2 yr, enabling measurements of the multi-wavelength light-curve properties of PSR B1821–24 at the milliperiod level. We fold RXTE observations of PSR B1821–24 from 1996 to 2007 and discuss implications on the emission zones. The gamma-ray light curve consists of two peaks separated by 0.41 ± 0.02 in phase, with the first gamma-ray peak lagging behind the first radio peak by 0.05 ± 0.02 in phase, consistent with the phase of giant radio pulses. We observe significant emission in the off-peak interval of PSR B1821–24 with a best-fit LAT position inconsistent with the core of M28. We do not detect significant gamma-ray pulsations at the spin or orbital periods from any other known pulsar in M28, and we place limits on the number of energetic pulsars in the cluster. The derived gamma-ray efficiency, ∼2%, is typical of other gamma-ray pulsars with comparable spin-down power, suggesting that the measured spin-down rate (2.2 × 10{sup 36} erg s{sup –1}) is not appreciably distorted by acceleration in the cluster potential. This confirms PSR B1821–24 as the second very energetic millisecond pulsar in a globular cluster and raises the question of whether these represent a separate class of objects that only form in regions of very high stellar density.

  5. Discovery of the Millisecond Pulsar PSR J2043+1711 in a Fermi Source with the Nancay Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, L.; Freire, P. C. C.; Cognard, I.; Johnson, T. J.; Takahashi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Desvignes, G.; Camilo, F.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of the millisecond pulsar PSR J2043+1711 in a search of a Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) source with no known associations, with the Nancay Radio Telescope. The new pulsar, confirmed with the Green Bank Telescope, has a spin period of 2.38 ms, is relatively nearby (d approx. system have made PSR J2043+1711 one of the first new Fermi-selected millisecond pulsars to be added to pulsar gravitational wave timing arrays. It has also allowed a significant measurement of relativistic delays in the times of arrival of the pulses due to the curvature of space-time near the companion, but not yet with enough precision to derive useful masses for the pulsar and the companion. Nevertheless, a mass for the pulsar between 1.7 and 2.0 solar Mass can be derived if a standard millisecond pulsar formation model is assumed. In this paper, we also present a comprehensive summary of pulsar searches in Fermi LAT sources with the Nancay Radio Telescope to date.

  6. Searching for Very High Energy Emission from Pulsars Using the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Ochoa, C Alvarez; Belfiore, A; Carramiñana, A; Rivière, C; Barbosa, E Moreno

    2015-01-01

    There are currently over 160 known gamma-ray pulsars. While most of them are detected only from space, at least two are now seen also from the ground. MAGIC and VERITAS have measured the gamma ray pulsed emission of the Crab pulsar up to hundreds of GeV and more recently MAGIC has reported emission at $\\sim2$ TeV. Furthermore, in the Southern Hemisphere, H.E.S.S. has detected the Vela pulsar above 30 GeV. In addition, non-pulsed TeV emission coincident with pulsars has been detected by many groups, including the Milagro Collaboration. These GeV-TeV observations open the possibility of searching for very-high-energy (VHE, > 100GeV) pulsations from gamma-rays pulsars in the HAWC field of view.

  7. Repeating Fast Radio Bursts from Highly Magnetized Pulsars Travelling through Asteroid Belts

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Z G; Wu, X F; Huang, Y F

    2016-01-01

    Very recently Spitler et al. (2016) reported their detections of ten additional bright bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst (FRB) 121102. This repeating FRB is obviously distinct from the other non-repeating FRBs and thus challenges all of the energy source models but giant pulses from young pulsars. Here we propose a different model, in which highly magnetized pulsars travel through asteroid belts of other stars. We show that a repeating FRB could originate from this pulsar encountering with lots of asteroids in the belt. During such an impact, an electric field induced on a radially elongated, transversely compressed asteroid near the pulsar's surface is strong enough to accelerate electrons to an ultra-relativistic speed instantaneously. Subsequent movement of these electrons along the magnetic field lines not only gives rise to a current loop, but also produces coherent curvature radiation, which can well account for the properties of an FRB. While the high repetitive rate estimated is well c...

  8. Fast radio bursts as giant pulses from young rapidly rotating pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Burzawa, Lukasz; Popov, Sergei B.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss possible association of fast radio bursts (FRBs) with supergiant pulses emitted by young pulsars (ages ˜ tens to hundreds of years) born with regular magnetic field but very short - few milliseconds - spin periods. We assume that FRBs are extra-Galactic events coming from distances d ≲ 100 Mpc and that most of the dispersion measure (DM) comes from the material in the freshly ejected SNR shell. We then predict that for a given burst the DM should decrease with time and that FRBs are not expected to be seen below ˜300 MHz due to free-free absorption in the expanding ejecta. A supernova might have been detected years before the burst; FRBs are mostly associated with star-forming galaxies. The model requires that some pulsars are born with very fast spins, of the order of few milliseconds. The observed distribution of spin-down powers dot{E} in young energetic pulsars is consistent with equal birth rate per decade of dot{E}. Accepting this injection distribution and scaling the intrinsic brightness of FRBs with dot{E}, we predict the following properties of a large sample of FRBs: (i) the brightest observed events come from a broad distribution in distances; (ii) for repeating bursts brightness either remains nearly constant (if the spin-down time is longer than the age of the pulsar) or decreases with time otherwise; in the latter case DM ∝ dot{E}.

  9. Multi-wavelength emission region of gamma-ray pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Kisaka, Shota

    2011-01-01

    Recent obserbations by Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope of gamma-ray pulsars have revealed further details of the structure of the emission region. We investigate the emission region for the multi-wavelength light curve using outer gap model. We assume that gamma-ray and non-thermal X-ray photons are emitted from a particle acceleration region in the outer magnetosphere, and UV/optical photons originate above that region. We also assume that gamma-rays are radiated only by outwardly moving particles, whereas the other photons are produced by particles moving inward and outward. We parametrize the altitude of the emission region. We find that the outer gap model can explain the multi-wavelength pulse behavior. From observational fitting, we also find a general tendency for the altitude of the gamma-ray emission region to depend on the inclination angle. In particular, the emission region for low inclination angle is required to be located in very low altitude, which corresponds to the inner region within the la...

  10. On the puzzling high-energy pulsations of the energetic radio-quiet γ-ray pulsar J1813–1246

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marelli, M.; Pizzocaro, D.; De Luca, A.; Caraveo, P.; Salvetti, D. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Harding, A. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Wood, K. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Saz Parkinson, P. M. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Acero, F., E-mail: marelli@lambrate.inaf.it [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universit Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2014-11-10

    We have analyzed the new deep XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the energetic, radio-quiet pulsar J1813–1246. The X-ray spectrum is nonthermal, very hard, and absorbed. Based on spectral considerations, we propose that J1813 is located at a distance further than 2.5 kpc. J1813 is highly pulsed in the X-ray domain, with a light curve characterized by two sharp, asymmetrical peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase. We detected no significant X-ray spectral changes during the pulsar phase. We extended the available Fermi ephemeris to five years. We found two glitches. The γ-ray light curve is characterized by two peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase, with a bridge in between and no off-pulse emission. The spectrum shows clear evolution in phase, being softer at the peaks and hardening toward the bridge. Surprisingly, both X-ray peaks lag behind the γ-ray ones by a quarter of phase. We found a hint of detection in the 30-500 keV band with INTEGRAL, which is consistent with the extrapolation of both the soft X-ray and γ-ray emission of J1813. The unique X-ray and γ-ray phasing suggests a singular emission geometry. We discuss some possibilities within the current pulsar emission models. Finally, we develop an alternative geometrical model where the X-ray emission comes from polar cap pair cascades.

  11. Search for a correlation between very-high-energy gamma rays and giant radio pulses in the Crab pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Dumm, J; Falcone, A; Federici, S; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Gillanders, G H; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; LeBohec, S; Lee, K; Lyutikov, M; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nelson, T; de Bhroithe, A O'Faolain; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Senturk, G D; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tesic, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Welsing, R; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; Kondratiev, V

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a joint observational campaign between the Green Bank radio telescope and the VERITAS gamma-ray telescope, which searched for a correlation between the emission of very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays ($E_{\\gamma} >$ 150 GeV) and Giant Radio Pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 8.9 GHz. A total of 15366 GRPs were recorded during 11.6 hours of simultaneous observations, which were made across four nights in December 2008 and in November and December 2009. We searched for an enhancement of the pulsed gamma-ray emission within time windows placed around the arrival time of the GRP events. In total, 8 different time windows with durations ranging from 0.033 ms to 72 s were positioned at three different locations relative to the GRP to search for enhanced gamma-ray emission which lagged, led, or was concurrent with, the GRP event. Further, we performed separate searches on main pulse GRPs and interpulse GRPs and on the most energetic GRPs in our data sample. No significant enhancement of pu...

  12. On the evolution of the radio pulsar PSR J1734-3333

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalişkan, Ş.; Ertan, Ü.; Alpar, M. A.; Trümper, J. E.; Kylafis, N. D.

    2013-05-01

    Recent measurements showed that the period derivative of the `high-B' radio pulsar PSR J1734-3333 is increasing with time. For neutron stars evolving with fallback discs, this rotational behaviour is expected in certain phases of the long-term evolution. Using the same model as employed earlier to explain the evolution of anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters, we show that the period, the first and second period derivatives and the X-ray luminosity of this source can simultaneously acquire the observed values for a neutron star evolving with a fallback disc. We find that the required strength of the dipole field that can produce the source properties is in the range 1012-1013 G on the pole of the neutron star. When the model source reaches the current state properties of PSR J1734-3333, accretion on to the star has not started yet, allowing the source to operate as a regular radio pulsar. Our results imply that PSR J1734-3333 is at an age of ˜3 × 104-2 × 105 yr. Such sources will have properties like the X-ray dim isolated neutron stars or transient AXPs at a later epoch of weak accretion from the diminished fallback disc.

  13. RADIO POLARIZATION OBSERVATIONS OF THE SNAIL: A CRUSHED PULSAR WIND NEBULA IN G327.1–1.1 WITH A HIGHLY ORDERED MAGNETIC FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Y. K.; Ng, C.-Y. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Bucciantini, N. [INAF—Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, L.go E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Slane, P. O. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gaensler, B. M. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Temim, T., E-mail: ncy@bohr.physics.hku.hk [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are suggested to be acceleration sites of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. While the magnetic field plays an important role in the acceleration process, previous observations of magnetic field configurations of PWNe are rare, particularly for evolved systems. We present a radio polarization study of the “Snail” PWN inside the supernova remnant G327.1−1.1 using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This PWN is believed to have been recently crushed by the supernova (SN) reverse shock. The radio morphology is composed of a main circular body with a finger-like protrusion. We detected a strong linear polarization signal from the emission, which reflects a highly ordered magnetic field in the PWN and is in contrast to the turbulent environment with a tangled magnetic field generally expected from hydrodynamical simulations. This could suggest that the characteristic turbulence scale is larger than the radio beam size. We built a toy model to explore this possibility, and found that a simulated PWN with a turbulence scale of about one-eighth to one-sixth of the nebula radius and a pulsar wind filling factor of 50%–75% provides the best match to observations. This implies substantial mixing between the SN ejecta and pulsar wind material in this system.

  14. Gamma Rays From Rotation-Powered Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K

    2002-01-01

    The seven known gamma-ray pulsars represent a very small fraction of the more than 1000 presently known radio pulsars, yet they can give us valuable information about pulsar particle acceleration and energetics. Although the theory of acceleration and high-energy emission in pulsars has been studied for over 25 years, the origin of the pulsed gamma rays is a question that remains unanswered. Characteristics of the pulsars detected by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory could not clearly distinguish between an emission site at the magnetic poles (polar cap models) and emission from the outer magnetosphere (outer gap models). There are also a number of theoretical issues in both type of model which have yet to be resolved. The two types of models make contrasting predictions for the numbers of radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars and of their spectral characteristics. GLAST will probably detect at least 50 radio-selected pulsars and possibly many more radio-quiet pulsars. With this large sample, it will b...

  15. An X-ray Synchrotron Nebula Associated with the Radio Pulsar PSR B1853+01 in the Supernova Remnant W44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrus, I.; Hughes, J. P.

    1995-12-01

    We present results of a study using ASCA X-ray data from the vicinity of the radio pulsar PSR B1853+01 located within the supernova remnant (SNR) W44. PSR B1853+01 is a 267 ms pulsar, which to date has only been detected in the radio band. Previous observations at soft X-ray energies (e.g., ROSAT HRI) have failed to detect any significant X-ray emission (pulsed or unpulsed) from the pulsar. In addition, no high energy tail was seen in the Ginga spectrum of W44 leading to a 3sigma upper limit of 3.6x 10(-12) ergs cm(-2) s(-1) for the 2--10 keV flux of a Crab-like power-law component contributing to the spectrum of W44. Over the 0.5--5 keV band, the ASCA data show soft thermal (kT ~ 0.5 keV) emission from W44 with a morphology very similar to that observed before by Einstein and ROSAT. In the high energy band (5--10 keV) the SNR for the most part is not visible and instead an unresolved source coincident with the position of PSR B1853+01 is evident. The observed ASCA spectra are consistent with a power-law origin (photon index ~ 3.5) for the X-ray emission from this source at a flux level below the Ginga upper limit. The maximum allowed size for the source is determined directly from the ASCA data (1.5(') ). We also report on our timing analysis, which failed to detect pulsations from the X-ray source at the pulsar's period. Based on these lines of evidence, we suggest that the new hard source in W44 represents the X-ray synchrotron nebula surrounding PSR B1853+01, rather than the beamed output of the pulsar itself. The ratio of the nebula's X-ray luminosity to the spin-down energy loss of the pulsar is consistent with that of other known plerions, lending further support to our interpretation. This is the first indirect detection in the X-ray band of the pulsar associated with W44.

  16. Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer Observation of PSR B1706-44 and Implications for Theoretical Models of Pulsar Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, A K; Strickman, M S

    1999-01-01

    We report on results of an observation with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) of PSR B1706-44 with a live time of 132 ks, to search for pulsed X-ray emission. PSR B1706-44 is a radio and high-energy gamma-ray pulsar (detected by EGRET), but no pulsed emission has been detected in the X-ray band. Since most of the other known gamma-ray pulsars emit pulsed X-rays, it is expected that PSR B1706-44 would also be an X-ray pulsar. However, while the ROSAT PSPC detected a source at the pulsar position, it did not detect pulsations, giving a pulsed fraction upper limit of 18%. The RXTE observations to search for modulation at the pulsar period were carried out in November 1996 and May 1997, during the low states of the nearby X-ray binary 4U1705-44. No significant modulation was detected at the pulsar period, giving an upper limit of 10^{-6} photons cm^{-2} s^{-1} keV^{-1} in the interval 9 keV < E < 18.5keV. The implications of this upper limit of the pulsed flux from the RXTE observation, taken together ...

  17. X-RAY EMISSION FROM J1446–4701, J1311–3430, AND OTHER BLACK WIDOW PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arumugasamy, Prakash; Pavlov, George G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Garmire, Gordon P., E-mail: pxa151@ucs.psu.edu [Huntingdon Institute for X-ray Astronomy, LLC, 10677 Franks Road, Huntingdon, PA 16652 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of detailed X-ray analysis of two black-widow pulsars (BWPs), J1446–4701 and J1311–3430. PSR J1446–4701 is a BWP with orbital parameters near the median values of the sample of known BWPs. Its X-ray emission that was detected by XMM-Newton is well characterized by a soft power-law (PL) spectrum (photon index Γ ≈ 3), and it shows no significant orbital modulations. In view of a lack of radio eclipses and an optical non-detection, the system most likely has a low orbital inclination. PSR J1311–3430 is an extreme BWP with a very compact orbit and the lowest minimum mass companion. Our Chandra data confirm the hard Γ ≈ 1.3 emission seen in previous observations. Through phase-restricted spectral analysis, we found a hint (∼2.6σ) of spectral hardening around pulsar inferior conjunction. We also provide a uniform analysis of the 12 BWPs observed with Chandra and compare their X-ray properties. Pulsars with soft, Γ > 2.5 emission seem to have lower than average X-ray and γ-ray luminosities. We do not, however, see any other prominent correlation between the pulsar’s X-ray emission characteristics and any of its other properties. The contribution of the intra-binary shock to the total X-ray emission, if any, is not discernible in this sample of pulsars with shallow observations.

  18. UV emission from young and middle-aged pulsars: Connecting X-rays with the optical

    CERN Document Server

    Kargaltsev, O

    2006-01-01

    We present the UV spectroscopy and timing of three nearby pulsars (Vela, B0656+14 and Geminga) recently observed with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. We also review the optical and X-ray properties of these pulsars and establish their connection with the UV properties. We show that the multiwavelengths properties of neutron stars (NSs) vary significantly within the sample of middle-aged pulsars. Even larger differences are found between the thermal components of Ge-minga and B0656+14 as compared to those of radio-quiet isolated NSs. These differences could be attributed to different properties of the NS surface layers.

  19. The Correlation between Dispersion Measure and X-ray Column Density from Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    He, C; Kaspi, V M

    2013-01-01

    Pulsars are remarkable objects that emit across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, providing a powerful probe of the interstellar medium. In this study, we investigate the relation between dispersion measure (DM) and X-ray absorption column density NH using 68 radio pulsars detected at X-ray energies with the Chandra X-ray Observatory or XMM-Newton. We find a best-fit empirical linear relation of NH (10^20 cm^-2)= 0.30+0.13-0.09 DM (pc cm^-3), which corresponds to an average ionization of 10+4-3%, confirming the ratio of one free electron per ten neutral hydrogen atoms commonly assumed in the literature. We also compare different NH estimates and note that some NH values obtained from X-ray observations are higher than the total Galactic HI column density along the same line of sight, while the optical extinction generally gives the best NH predictions.

  20. HIGH-FIDELITY RADIO ASTRONOMICAL POLARIMETRY USING A MILLISECOND PULSAR AS A POLARIZED REFERENCE SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Straten, W., E-mail: vanstraten.willem@gmail.com [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2013-01-15

    A new method of polarimetric calibration is presented in which the instrumental response is derived from regular observations of PSR J0437-4715 based on the assumption that the mean polarized emission from this millisecond pulsar remains constant over time. The technique is applicable to any experiment in which high-fidelity polarimetry is required over long timescales; it is demonstrated by calibrating 7.2 years of high-precision timing observations of PSR J1022+1001 made at the Parkes Observatory. Application of the new technique followed by arrival time estimation using matrix template matching yields post-fit residuals with an uncertainty-weighted standard deviation of 880 ns, two times smaller than that of arrival time residuals obtained via conventional methods of calibration and arrival time estimation. The precision achieved by this experiment yields the first significant measurements of the secular variation of the projected semimajor axis, the precession of periastron, and the Shapiro delay; it also places PSR J1022+1001 among the 10 best pulsars regularly observed as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project. It is shown that the timing accuracy of a large fraction of the pulsars in the PPTA is currently limited by the systematic timing error due to instrumental polarization artifacts. More importantly, long-term variations of systematic error are correlated between different pulsars, which adversely affects the primary objectives of any pulsar timing array experiment. These limitations may be overcome by adopting the techniques presented in this work, which relax the demand for instrumental polarization purity and thereby have the potential to reduce the development cost of next-generation telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array.

  1. A Search for Gamma-ray Emission from Wind-Wind Interactions in Black Widow and Redback Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tyrel J.; Ray, Paul S.; Camilo, Fernando M.; Roberts, Mallory S. E.; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Recent radio surveys, particularly those targeting unassociated Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) sources with pulsar-like characteristics, have greatly increased the number of known millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in binary systems with short orbital periods (less than a day) and low-mass companions (of order 0.2 Solar masses for redbacks and less than 0.08 Solar masses for black widows). These systems are likely laboratories for studying wind-wind interactions, and we here describe a search for unpulsed gamma-ray emission, possibly arising from these interactions, in the off-peak intervals. We will also search the off-peak and phase-averaged data for evidence of modulation at the orbital periods, correcting for exposure variations, and stack the off-peak intervals in the event that the emission is below threshold in any given source. Studying this emission will allow us to better understand the pulsar wind and how these systems evolve. Portions of this research performed at the US Naval Research Laboratory are sponsored by NASA DPR S-15633-Y and Fermi GO proposal 061103.

  2. The Pulsar in the Crab Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Lewandowska, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    The Crab pulsar belongs to one of the most studied stellar objects in the sky. Since its accidental detection in 1968, its pulsed emission has been observed throughout most of the electromagnetic spectrum. Although currently one of more than 2000 known pulsars, its way of work has remained not understood making the Crab pulsar an object of continuous studies and interest. Referring to the pulsed emission of the Crab pulsar only at radio wavelengths, it reveals a diversity of different phenomena. They range from deviations of the predicted slowing down process of the pulsar with time (long time phenomena) to an irregularity of its single pulse emission (short time phenomena). Similar and different kinds of deviations are observed at other wavelengths. Consequently, the Crab pulsar provides a large diversity of different emission characteristics which have remained difficult to interpret with a uniform theoretical approach including all observed properties. Since a review of all currently examined properties of...

  3. Identification of HESS J1303-631 as a Pulsar Wind Nebula through gamma-ray, X-ray and radio observations

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Becker, J; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Gérard, L; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nguyen, N; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2012-01-01

    The previously unidentified very high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) \\gamma-ray source HESS J1303-631, discovered in 2004, is re-examined including new data from the H.E.S.S. Cherenkov telescope array. Archival data from the XMM-Newton X-ray satellite and from the PMN radio survey are also examined. Detailed morphological and spectral studies of VHE \\gamma-ray emission as well as of the XMM-Newton X-ray data are performed. Significant energy-dependent morphology of the \\gamma-ray source is detected with high-energy emission (E > 10 TeV) positionally coincident with the pulsar PSR J1301-6305 and lower energy emission (E <2 TeV) extending \\sim 0.4^{\\circ} to the South-East of the pulsar. The spectrum of the VHE source can be described with a power-law with an exponential cut-off N_{0} = (5.6 \\pm 0.5) X 10^{-12} TeV^-1 cm^-2 s^-1, \\Gamma = 1.5 \\pm 0.2) and E_{\\rm cut} = (7.7 \\pm 2.2) TeV. The PWN is also detected in X-rays, extending \\sim 2-3' from the pulsar position towards the center of the \\gamma-ray emission ...

  4. Envelope Soliton in Solar Radio Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-Yu; Wangde; G. P. Chernov

    2000-01-01

    Several envelope soliton fine structures have been observed in solar radio metric-wave emission. We present amodel of 1ongitudinal modulational instability to explain these fine structures. It is found that this instability canonly occur in the condition of sound velocity being larger than Alfven velocity in corona. Therefore, the envelopesoliton fine structures should display in the coronal region with high temperature and low magnetic field, whichcorresponds to the solar radio emission in the region of meter and decameter wavelength.

  5. TeV Gamma Ray Emission from Nearby Pulsar Wind Nebulae with HAWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Salesa Greus, Francisco; López-Coto, Rubén; Benzvi, Segev; Casanova, Sabrina; HAWC Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae are considered efficient electron/positron accelerators in our Galaxy. It has been suggested that particles accelerated by nearby pulsar wind nebulae, such as Geminga, would possibly account for the observed multi-GeV positron excess. The Geminga pulsar is one of the closest middle-aged pulsars and its pulsations were first discovered in X-rays. Milagro reported an extended TeV source spatially coincident with the Geminga pulsar, but IACT observations using standard analysis techniques have only provided upper limits. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory, located in central Mexico at 4100 m above sea level, is sensitive to gamma rays between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. With a field of view of 2 steradians, HAWC has a good sensitivity to extended sources such as pulsar wind nebulae. Early data collected with HAWC reveals an extended source coincident with the Geminga pulsar, similar to what Milagro has reported. We will present results of spectral and morphological analyses on extended TeV gamma-ray emission from Geminga and other nearby pulsar wind nebulae with HAWC data. The interpretation of whether positrons from nearby pulsar wind nebulae can explain the observed positron excess will be discussed as well.

  6. Gamma ray pulsars emission from extended polar cap cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Daugherty, J K; Daugherty, Joseph K; Harding, Alice K

    1995-01-01

    We have used a Monte Carlo simulation of a Polar Cap (PC) model of gamma-ray pulsars to estimate light curves and phase-resolved spectra for sources whose rotational and magnetic axes are oriented so that only one of the magnetic poles produces emission directed at the Earth. In this Single Polar Cap (SPC) scenario, even sources whose light curves have two distinct peaks (Crab, Vela, Geminga, PSR B1951+32) are due to emission concentrated near the rim of a single PC. If the inclination alpha is comparable to the half-width of the PC gamma-beam, alpha ~ theta_{b}, the peak-to-peak phase separation can have the large values (0.4 - 0.5) observed from these sources. In the model presented here we attribute the observed interpeak emission to pair cascades above the PC interior. Our simulation assumes the physics of conventional PC models, in which the gamma rays are due to photon-pair cascades initiated by curvature radiation from the acceleration of electrons above the PCs. In this work we assume that the acceler...

  7. Discovery of an X-Ray Synchrotron Nebula Associated with the Radio Pulsar PSR B1853+01 in the Supernova Remnant W44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrus, Ilana M.; Hughes, John P.; Helfand, David J.

    1996-06-01

    We report the detection, using data from the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), of a hard X-ray source in the vicinity of the radio pulsar PSR B1853+01, which is located within the supernova remnant (SNR) W44. PSR B1853+01, a 267 ms pulsar, has to date been detected only in the radio band. Previous observations at soft X-ray energies (e.g., with ROSAT HRI) have failed to detect any significant X-ray emission (pulsed or unpulsed) from the pulsar. In addition, no high-energy emission (>~4 keV) has been detected previously from W44. Over the 0.5--4.0 keV band, the ASCA data show soft thermal emission from W44, with a morphology very similar to that observed earlier by Einstein and ROSAT. In the high-energy band (4.0--9.5 keV), the SNR is, for the most part, invisible, although a source coincident with the position of PSR B1853+01 is evident. The observed ASCA spectra are consistent with a power-law origin (photon index ~2.3) for the X-ray emission from this source at a flux level (flux density ~0.5 mu Jy at 1 keV) consistent with previous upper limits. The maximum allowed size for the source is determined directly from the ASCA data (~30"). Timing analysis of the hard X-ray source failed to detect pulsations at the pulsar's period. Based on these lines of evidence, we conclude that the new hard source in W44 represents an X-ray synchrotron nebula associated with PSR B1853+01, rather than the beamed output of the pulsar itself. This discovery adds W44 to the small group of previously known plerionic SNRs. This nebula lies at the low end of, but is consistent with, the correlation between X-ray luminosity and pulsar spin-down energy loss found for such objects, lending further support to our interpretation.

  8. Precision astrometry of pulsars and other compact radio sources in the globular cluster M15

    CERN Document Server

    Kirsten, Franz; Freire, Paulo; Kramer, Michael; Rottmann, Helge; Campbell, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    The globular cluster (GC) M15 (NGC 7078) is host to at least eight pulsars and two low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) one of which is also visible in the radio regime. Here we present the results of a multi-epoch global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) campaign aiming at i) measuring the proper motion of the known compact radio sources, ii) finding and classifying thus far undetected compact radio sources in the GC, and iii) detecting a signature of the putative intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) proposed to reside at the core of M15. We measure the sky motion in right ascension ($\\mu_{\\alpha}$) and declination ($\\mu_{\\delta}$) of the pulsars M15A and M15C and of the LMXB AC211 to be $(\\mu_{\\alpha},\\,\\mu_{\\delta})_{\\text{M15A}}=(-0.54\\pm0.14,\\,-4.33\\pm0.25)\\,$mas$\\,$yr$^{-1}$, $(\\mu_{\\alpha},\\,\\mu_{\\delta})_{\\text{M15C}}=(-0.75\\pm0.09,\\,-3.52\\pm0.13)\\,$mas$\\,$yr$^{-1}$, and $(\\mu_{\\alpha},\\,\\mu_{\\delta})_{\\text{AC211}}=(-0.46\\pm0.08,\\,-4.31\\pm0.20)\\,$mas$\\,$yr$^{-1}$, respectively. Based on these measur...

  9. The origin of the frequency-dependent behaviour of pulsar radio profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Dyks, J

    2014-01-01

    We present further development of a pulsar emission model based on multiple streams diverging away from the magnetic dipole axis, and forming azimuthally-structured fan-shaped beams. It is shown that this geometry, successfully tested on profiles with bifurcated features, naturally solves several classical pulsar problems and avoids some difficulties of the traditional nested cone/core model. This is best visible for profiles with several components, such as those of class T, Q and M, because they most clearly exhibit a range of effects previously interpreted within the conal model. In particular, with no reference to the flaring boundary of the polar magnetic flux tube, the stream model explains the apparent radius-to-frequency mapping (RFM), including its reduced strength for the inner pair of components. The lag of the central component (apparent `core') with respect to the centroids of the flanking (`conal') components can also be naturally explained with no reference to emission rings located at disparat...

  10. The second FERMI large area telescope catalog of gamma-ray pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgay, M.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chaty, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, A. W.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cognard, I.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D' Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desvignes, G.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Espinoza, C. M.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Freire, P. C. C.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hessels, J.; Hewitt, J.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Janssen, G. H.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Johnston, S.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kramer, M.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R. N.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mignani, R. P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Pletsch, H. J.; Porter, T. A.; Possenti, A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renault, N.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Roy, J.; Ruan, J.; Sartori, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shannon, R.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Theureau, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Thorsett, S. E.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Venter, C.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Wang, N.; Weltevrede, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wolff, M. T.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.

    2013-09-19

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

  11. THE SECOND FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE CATALOG OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Allafort, A.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L. [Università di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Baring, M. G. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Belfiore, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhattacharyya, B. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune 411 007 (India); Bissaldi, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, and Università di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brigida, M., E-mail: hartog@stanford.edu [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' M. Merlin' ' dell' Università e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); and others

    2013-10-01

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

  12. The second fermi large area telescope catalog of gamma-ray pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgay, M.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chaty, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, A. W.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cognard, I.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D' Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desvignes, G.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Espinoza, C. M.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Freire, P. C. C.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hessels, J.; Hewitt, J.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Janssen, G. H.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Johnston, S.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kramer, M.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R. N.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mignani, R. P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Pletsch, H. J.; Porter, T. A.; Possenti, A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renault, N.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Roy, J.; Ruan, J.; Sartori, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shannon, R.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Theureau, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Thorsett, S. E.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Venter, C.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Wang, N.; Weltevrede, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wolff, M. T.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.

    2013-09-19

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

  13. Radio and Gamma-Ray Constraints on the Emission Geometry and Birthplace of PSR J2043+2740

    CERN Document Server

    Noutsos, A; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Busetto, G; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Camilo, F; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Chaty, S; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cognard, I; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colafrancesco, S; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; de Palma, F; Drell, P S; Dumora, D; Espinoza, C M; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Freire, P C C; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Godfrey, G; Grandi, P; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Hughes, R E; Jackson, M S; Johannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Johnston, S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Knoedlseder, J; Kramer, M; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Lee, S -H; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Lyne, A G; Makeev, A; Marelli, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Naumann-Godo, M; Nolan, P L; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Persic, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Rain, S; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Romani, R W; Sadrozinski, H F -W; Sander, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Sgro, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stappers, B W; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Theureau, G; Thompson, D J; Thorsett, S E; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Tramacere, A; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vianello, G; Vilchez, N; Villata, M; Vitale, V; von Kienlin, A; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Watters, K; Weltevrede, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Ziegler, M

    2010-01-01

    We report on the first year of Fermi gamma-ray observations of pulsed high-energy emission from the old PSR J2043+2740. The study of the gamma-ray efficiency of such old pulsars gives us an insight into the evolution of pulsars' ability to emit in gammma rays as they age. The gamma-ray lightcurve of this pulsar above 0.1 GeV is clearly defined by two sharp peaks, 0.353+/-0.035 periods apart. We have combined the gamma-ray profile characteristics of PSR J2043+2740 with the geometrical properties of the pulsar's radio emission, derived from radio polarization data, and constrained the pulsar-beam geometry in the framework of a Two Pole Caustic and an Outer Gap model. The ranges of magnetic inclination and viewing angle were determined to be {alpha,zeta}~{52-57,61-68} for the Two Pole Caustic model, and {alpha,zeta}~{62-73,74-81} and {alpha,zeta}~{72-83,60-75} for the Outer Gap model. Based on this geometry, we assess possible birth locations for this pulsar and derive a likely proper motion, sufficiently high t...

  14. Using HAWC to Discover Invisible Pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, Tim [Ohio State U., CCAPP; Auchettl, Katie [Ohio State U., CCAPP; Bramante, Joseph [Perimeter Inst. Theor. Phys.; Cholis, Ilias [Johns Hopkins U.; Fang, Ke [Maryland U.; Hooper, Dan [Fermilab; Karwal, Tanvi [Johns Hopkins U.; Li, Shirley Weishi [Ohio State U., CCAPP

    2017-03-28

    Observations by HAWC and Milagro have detected bright and spatially extended TeV gamma-ray sources surrounding the Geminga and Monogem pulsars. We argue that these observations, along with a substantial population of other extended TeV sources coincident with pulsar wind nebulae, constitute a new morphological class of spatially extended TeV halos. We show that HAWCs wide field-of-view unlocks an expansive parameter space of TeV halos not observable by atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Under the assumption that Geminga and Monogem are typical middle-aged pulsars, we show that ten-year HAWC observations should eventually observe 37$^{+17}_{-13}$ middle-aged TeV halos that correspond to pulsars whose radio emission is not beamed towards Earth. Depending on the extrapolation of the TeV halo efficiency to young pulsars, HAWC could detect more than 100 TeV halos from mis-aligned pulsars. These pulsars have historically been difficult to detect with existing multiwavelength observations. TeV halos will constitute a significant fraction of all HAWC sources, allowing follow-up observations to efficiently find pulsar wind nebulae and thermal pulsar emission. The observation and subsequent multi-wavelength follow-up of TeV halos will have significant implications for our understanding of pulsar beam geometries, the evolution of PWN, the diffusion of cosmic-rays near energetic pulsars, and the contribution of pulsars to the cosmic-ray positron excess.

  15. Fast radio bursts as giant pulses from young rapidly rotating pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Popov, Sergei B

    2016-01-01

    We discuss possible association of fast radio bursts (FRBs) with supergiant pulses emitted by young pulsars (ages $\\sim$ tens to hundreds of years) born with regular magnetic field but very short -- few milliseconds -- spin periods. FRBs are extra-Galactic events coming from distances $d \\lesssim 100$ Mpc. Most of the dispersion measure (DM) comes from the material in the freshly ejected SNR shell; for a given burst the DM should decrease with time. FRBs are not expected to be seen below $\\sim 300 $ MHz due to free-free absorption in the expanding ejecta. A supernova might have been detected years before the burst; FRBs are mostly associated with star forming galaxies. The model requires that some pulsars are born with very fast spins, of the order of few milliseconds. The observed distribution of spin-down powers $\\dot{E}$ in young energetic pulsars is consistent with equal birth rate per decade of $\\dot{E}$. Accepting this injection spectrum and scaling the intrinsic brightness of FRBs with $\\dot{E}$, we pr...

  16. A Radio Search For Pulsar Companions To SDSS Low-Mass White Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Agueros, Marcel A; Silvestri, Nicole M; Kleinman, S J; Anderson, Scott F; Liebert, James W

    2009-01-01

    We have conducted a search for pulsar companions to 15 low-mass white dwarfs (LMWDs; M < 0.4 M_Sun) at 820 MHz with the NRAO Green Bank Telescope (GBT). These LMWDs were spectroscopically identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and do not show the photometric excess or spectroscopic signature associated with a companion in their discovery data. However, LMWDs are believed to evolve in binary systems and to have either a more massive WD or a neutron star as a companion. Indeed, evolutionary models of low-mass X-ray binaries, the precursors of millisecond pulsars (MSPs), produce significant numbers of LMWDs (e.g., Benvenuto & De Vito 2005), suggesting that the SDSS LMWDs may have neutron star companions. No convincing pulsar signal is detected in our data. This is consistent with the findings of van Leeuwen et al. (2007), who conducted a GBT search for radio pulsations at 340 MHz from unseen companions to eight SDSS WDs (five are still considered LMWDs; the three others are now classified as "...

  17. New data of radio emission from three AXPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplykh, Daria

    2011-07-01

    Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are a group of 9 X-ray sources showing periodical pulsation at periods in the 2-12 s range. The main problem is the source of energy, because their X-ray luminosities much higher than can be provided by the rotational kinetic-energy losses. Many attempts have been made to detect radio emission. The first detection of periodical pulsations from the AXP 1E 2259+586 have been made at the frequency 111 MHz by Malofeev (Malofeev et al., 2001, 2005). The second transient AXP XTE J1810-197 and the third AXP candidate 1E1547.0-5408 (Camilo et al., 2006, 2007) have been detected in the large frequency band 0.69-42 GHz. In this report we present new data for three AXPs 1E 2259+586, 4U 0142+61 and XTE J1810-197 at low frequencies. The observations were carried out on two sensitive transit radio telescopes in the range 42-112 MHz. The flux densities and mean pulse profiles, the estimation of the distances and integrated radio luminosities are presented. We used new digital receivers to obtain pulse profiles and dynamic spectra. Comparison with X-ray data shows large differences in the mean pulse widths and luminosities.

  18. Investigating the magnetic inclination angle distribution of $\\gamma$-ray-loud radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Rookyard, S C; Johnston, S

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown the distribution of pulsars' magnetic inclination angles to be skewed towards low values compared with the distribution expected if the rotation and magnetic axes are placed randomly on the star. Here we focus on a sample of 28 $\\gamma$-ray-detected pulsars using data taken as part of the Parkes telescope's \\emph{FERMI} timing program. In doing so we find a preference in the sample for low magnetic inclination angles, $\\alpha$, in stark contrast to both the expectation that the magnetic and rotation axes are orientated randomly at the birth of the pulsar and to $\\gamma$-ray-emission-model-based expected biases. In this paper, after exploring potential explanations, we conclude that there are two possible causes of this preference, namely that low $\\alpha$ values are intrinsic to the sample, or that the emission regions extend outside what is traditionally thought to be the open-field-line region in a way which is dependent on the magnetic inclination. Each possibility is expected to...

  19. Probing dense matter in compact star cores with radio pulsar data

    CERN Document Server

    Alford, Mark G

    2014-01-01

    Astrophysical observations of compact stars provide, in addition to collider experiments, the other big source of information on matter under extreme conditions. The largest and most precise data set about neutron stars is the timing data of radio pulsars. We show how this unique data can be used to learn about the ultra-dense matter in the compact star interior. The method relies on astro-seismology based on special global oscillation modes (r-modes) that emit gravitational waves. They would prevent pulsars from spinning with their observed high frequencies, unless the damping of these modes, determined by the microscopic properties of matter, can prevent this. We show that for each form of matter there is a distinct region in a frequency/spindown-rate diagram where r-modes can be present. We find that stars containing ungapped quark matter are consistent with both the observed radio and x-ray data, whereas, even when taking into account the considerable uncertainties, neutron star models with standard visco...

  20. High-Energy $\\gamma$-Ray Observations of Two Young, Energetic Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaspi, V M; Mattox, J R; Manchester, R N; Bailes, M; Pace, R

    1999-01-01

    We present results of Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory EGRET observations of the unidentified high-energy gamma-ray sources 2EG J1049-5847 (GEV J1047-5840, 3EG J1048-5840) and 2EG J1103-6106 (3EG J1102-6103). These sources are spatially coincident with the young, energetic radio pulsars PSRs B1046-58 and J1105-6107, respectively. We find evidence for an association between PSR B1046-58 and 2EG J1049-5847. The gamma-ray pulse profile, obtained by folding time-tagged photons having energies above 400 MeV using contemporaneous radio ephemerides, has probability of arising by chance of 1.2E-4 according to the binning-independent H-test. A spatial analysis of the on-pulse photons reveals a point source of equivalent significance 10.2 sigma. Off-pulse, the significance drops to 5.8 sigma. Archival ASCA data show that the only hard X-ray point source in the 95% confidence error box of the gamma-ray source is spatially coincident with the pulsar within the 1' uncertainty (Pivovaroff, Kaspi & Gotthelf 1999). The doub...

  1. Radio emission from the high-mass X-ray binary BP Cru: first detection

    CERN Document Server

    Pestalozzi, M; Hobbs, G; Lopez-Sanchez, A R

    2009-01-01

    BP Cru is a well known high-mass X-ray binary composed of a late B hypergiant (Wray 977) and a neutron star, also observed as the X-ray pulsar GX 301-2. No information about emission from BP Cru in other bands than X-rays and optical has been reported to date in the literature, though massive X-ray binaries containing black holes can have radio emission from a jet. In order to assess the presence of a radio jet, we searched for radio emission towards BP Cru using the Australia Compact Array Telescope during a survey for radio emission from Be/X-ray transients. We probed the 41.5d orbit of BP Cru with the Australia Telescope Compact Array not only close to periastron but also close to apastron. BP Cru was clearly detected in our data on 4, possibly 6, of 12 occasions at 4.8 and 8.6 GHz. Our data suggest that the spectral index of the radio emission is modulated either by the X-ray flux or the orbital phase of the system. We propose that the radio emission of BP Cru probably arises from two components: a persis...

  2. Five New Millisecond Pulsars from a Radio Survey of 14 Unidentified Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, M.; Camilo, F.; Johnson, T. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guillemot, L.; Harding, A. K.; Hessels, J.; Johnson, S.; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sarkissian, J.; Wood, K. S.

    2012-01-01

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Ferm;'LAT sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephemeris derived from timing observations of PSR JOl01-6422 (P=2.57ms, DH=12pc/cubic cm ), we have detected gamma-ray pulsations and measured its proper motion. Its gamma-ray spectrum (a power law of Gamma = 0.9 with a cutoff at 1.6 GeV) and efficiency are typical of other MSPs, but its radio and gamma-ray light curves challenge simple geometric models of emission. The high success rate of this survey -- enabled by selecting gamma-ray sources based on their detailed spectral characteristics -- and other similarly successful searches indicate that a substantial fraction of the local population of MSPs may soon be known.

  3. FIVE NEW MILLISECOND PULSARS FROM A RADIO SURVEY OF 14 UNIDENTIFIED FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, M. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Johnson, T. J. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Hessels, J. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Johnston, S.; Keith, M.; Reynolds, J. E. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Sarkissian, J., E-mail: kerrm@stanford.edu, E-mail: fernando@astro.columbia.edu, E-mail: tyrel.j.johnson@gmail.com [CSIRO Parkes Observatory, Parkes, NSW 2870 (Australia)

    2012-03-20

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephemeris derived from timing observations of PSR J0101-6422 (P = 2.57 ms, DM = 12 pc cm{sup -3}), we have detected {gamma}-ray pulsations and measured its proper motion. Its {gamma}-ray spectrum (a power law of {Gamma} = 0.9 with a cutoff at 1.6 GeV) and efficiency are typical of other MSPs, but its radio and {gamma}-ray light curves challenge simple geometric models of emission. The high success rate of this survey-enabled by selecting {gamma}-ray sources based on their detailed spectral characteristics-and other similarly successful searches indicate that a substantial fraction of the local population of MSPs may soon be known.

  4. A 350-MHz GBT Survey of 50 Faint Fermi Gamma-ray Sources for Radio Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Hessels, Jason W T; McLaughlin, Maura A; Ray, Paul S; Bangale, Priyadarshini; Ransom, Scott M; Kerr, Matthew; Camilo, Fernando; DeCesar, Megan E

    2015-01-01

    We have used the Green Bank Telescope at 350MHz to search 50 faint, unidentified Fermi Gamma-ray sources for radio pulsations. So far, these searches have resulted in the discovery of 10 millisecond pulsars, which are plausible counterparts to these unidentified Fermi sources. Here we briefly describe this survey and the characteristics of the newly discovered MSPs.

  5. Five new millisecond pulsars from a radio survey of 14 unidentified Fermi-LAT gamma-ray sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kerr; F. Camilo; T.J. Johnson; E.C. Ferrara; L. Guillemot; A.K. Harding; J. Hessels; S. Johnston; M. Keith; M. Kramer; S.M. Ransom; P.S. Ray; J.E. Reynolds; J. Sarkissian; K.S. Wood

    2012-01-01

    We have discovered five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a survey of 14 unidentified Fermi Large Area Telescope sources in the southern sky using the Parkes radio telescope. PSRs J0101-6422, J1514-4946, and J1902-5105 reside in binaries, while PSRs J1658-5324 and J1747-4036 are isolated. Using an ephem

  6. Pulsar acceleration by asymmetric emission of sterile neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Nardi, E; Nardi, Enrico; Zuluaga, Jorge I.

    2001-01-01

    A convincing explanation for the observed pulsar large peculiar velocities is still missing. We argue that any viable particle physics solution would most likely involve the resonant production of a non-interacting neutrino $\

  7. Pulsar Discovery by Global Volunteer Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, B.; Allen, B.; Cordes, J. M.; Deneva, J. S.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Crawford, F.; Demorest, P. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Freire, P. C. C.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Hammer, D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Kasian, L.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Machenschalk, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Messenger, C.; Nice, D. J.; Papa, M. A.; Pletsch, H. J.; Prix, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2010-09-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to mine large data sets. It has now found a 40.8-hertz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722’s pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.

  8. Pulsar Discovery by Global Volunteer Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Knispel, B; Cordes, J M; Deneva, J S; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C; Bhat, N D R; Bock, O; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Chatterjee, S; Crawford, F; Demorest, P B; Fehrmann, H; Freire, P C C; Gonzalez, M E; Hammer, D; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Kasian, L; Kaspi, V M; Kramer, M; Lazarus, P; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Machenschalk, A G Lyne B; McLaughlin, M A; Messenger, C; Nice, D J; Papa, M A; Pletsch, H J; Prix, R; Ransom, S M; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Stovall, K; Venkataraman, A

    2010-01-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to "mine" large data sets. It has now found a 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.

  9. X-ray/GeV emissions from Crab-like pulsars in LMC

    CERN Document Server

    Takata, J

    2016-01-01

    We discuss X-ray and gamma-ray emissions from Crab-like pulsars, PSRs~J0537-6910 and~J0540-6919, in Large Magellanic Cloud. Fermi-LAT observations have resolved the gamma-ray emissions from these two pulsars and found the pulsed emissions from PSR~J0540-6919. The total pulsed radiation in the X-ray/gamma-ray energy bands of PSR~J0540-6919 is observed with the efficiency $\\eta_{J0540}\\sim 0.06$ (in 4$\\pi$ sr), which is about a factor of ten larger than $\\eta_{Crab}\\sim 0.006$ of the Crab pulsar. Although PSR~J0537-6910 has the highest spin-down power among currently known pulsars, the efficiency of the observed X-ray emissions is about two orders of magnitude smaller than that of PSR~J0540-6919. This paper mainly discusses what causes the difference in the radiation efficiencies of these three energetic Crab-like pulsars. We discuss electron/positron acceleration and high-energy emission processes within the outer gap model. By solving the outer gap structure with the dipole magnetic field, we show that the ra...

  10. Radio detection prospects for a bulge population of millisecond pulsars as suggested by Fermi LAT observations of the inner Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Calore, Francesca; Donato, Fiorenza; Hessels, Jason W T; Weniger, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Analogously to globular clusters, the dense stellar environment of the Galactic center has been proposed to host a large population of as-yet undetected millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Recently, this hypothesis found support in the analysis of gamma rays from the inner Galaxy seen by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi satellite, which revealed a possible excess of diffuse GeV photons in the inner 15 deg about the Galactic center (Fermi GeV excess). The excess can be interpreted as the collective emission of thousands of MSPs in the Galactic bulge, with a spherical distribution that strongly peaks towards the Galactic center. In order to fully establish the MSP interpretation, it is essential to find corroborating evidence in multi-wavelength searches, most notably through the detection of radio pulsation from individual bulge MSPs. Based on globular cluster observations and the gamma-ray emission from the inner Galaxy, we investigate the prospects for detecting MSPs in the Galactic bulge. While previ...

  11. X-Ray/GeV Emissions from Crab-like Pulsars in the LMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, J.; Cheng, K. S.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss X-ray and gamma-ray emissions from Crab-like pulsars, PSRs J0537-6910 and J0540-6919, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Fermi-LAT observations have resolved the gamma-ray emissions from these two pulsars and found pulsed emissions from PSR J0540-6919. The total pulsed radiation in the X-ray/gamma-ray energy bands of PSR J0540-6919 is observed with efficiency {η }J0540∼ 0.06 (in 4π sr), which is about a factor of ten larger than {η }{Crab}∼ 0.006 of the Crab pulsar. Although PSR J0537-6910 has the highest spin-down power among currently known pulsars, the efficiency of the observed X-ray emissions is about two orders of magnitude smaller than that of PSR J0540-6919. This paper mainly discusses what causes the difference in the radiation efficiencies of these three energetic Crab-like pulsars. We discuss electron/positron acceleration and high-energy emission processes within the outer gap model. By solving the outer gap structure with the dipole magnetic field, we show that the radiation efficiency decreases as the inclination angle between the magnetic axis and the rotation axis increases. To explain the difference in the pulse profile and in the radiation efficiency, our model suggests that PSR J0540-6919 has an inclination angle much smaller than that of the Crab pulsar (here we assume the inclination angles of both pulsars are α Earth viewing angle, and that we see PSR J0537-6910 with an Earth viewing angle \\zeta \\gg 90^\\circ (or \\ll 90^\\circ ) measured from the spin axis, while we see PSR J0540-6919 with \\zeta ∼ 90^\\circ .

  12. Identification of HESS J1303-631 as a pulsar wind nebula through γ-ray, X-ray, and radio observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Acero, F.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Bochow, A.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Büsching, I.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Charbonnier, A.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Fallon, L.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Gast, H.; Gérard, L.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Glück, B.; Göring, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Häffner, S.; Hague, J. D.; Hahn, J.; Hampf, D.; Harris, J.; Hauser, M.; Heinz, S.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Krayzel, F.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Masbou, J.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Medina, M. C.; Méhault, J.; Menzler, U.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Naumann, C. L.; Naumann-Godo, M.; de Naurois, M.; Nedbal, D.; Nekrassov, D.; Nguyen, N.; Nicholas, B.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Ripken, J.; Rob, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sheidaei, F.; Skilton, J. L.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorobiov, S.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Ward, M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2012-12-01

    Aims: The previously unidentified very high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) γ-ray source HESS J1303-631, discovered in 2004, is re-examined including new data from the H.E.S.S. Cherenkov telescope array in order to identify this object. Archival data from the XMM-Newton X-ray satellite and from the PMN radio survey are also examined. Methods: Detailed morphological and spectral studies of VHE γ-ray emission as well as of the XMM-Newton X-ray data are performed. Radio data from the PMN survey are used as well to construct a leptonic model of the source. The γ-ray and X-ray spectra and radio upper limit are used to construct a one zone leptonic model of the spectral energy distribution (SED). Results: Significant energy-dependent morphology of the γ-ray source is detected with high-energy emission (E > 10 TeV) positionally coincident with the pulsar PSR J1301-6305 and lower energy emission (E < 2 TeV) extending 0.4° to the southeast of the pulsar. The spectrum of the VHE source can be described with a power-law with an exponential cut-off N0 = (5.6 ± 0.5) × 10-12 TeV-1 cm-2 s-1, Γ = 1.5 ± 0.2) and Ecut = (7.7 ± 2.2) TeV. The pulsar wind nebula (PWN) is also detected in X-rays, extending 2-3' from the pulsar position towards the center of the γ-ray emission region. A potential radio counterpart from the PMN survey is also discussed, showing a hint for a counterpart at the edge of the X-ray PWN trail and is taken as an upper limit in the SED. The extended X-ray PWN has an unabsorbed flux of F_2{-10 keV ˜ 1.6+0.2-0.4× 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1} and is detected at a significance of 6.5σ. The SED is well described by a one zone leptonic scenario which, with its associated caveats, predicts a very low average magnetic field for this source. Conclusions: Significant energy-dependent morphology of this source, as well as the identification of an associated X-ray PWN from XMM-Newton observations enable identification of the VHE source as an evolved PWN associated to the

  13. Theory of High-Energy Emission from the Pulsar/Be Star System PSR 1259-63. I. Radiation Mechanisms and Interaction Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, Marco; Arons, Jonathan

    1997-03-01

    We study the physical processes in the system containing the 47 ms radio pulsar PSR B1259-63 orbiting around a Be star in a highly eccentric orbit. This system is the only known binary where a radio pulsar is observed to interact with gaseous material from a Be star. A rapidly rotating radio pulsar such as PSR B1259-63 is expected to produce a wind of electromagnetic emission and relativistic particles, and this binary is an ideal astrophysical laboratory to study the mass outflow/pulsar interaction in a highly time-variable environment. Motivated by the results of a recent multiwavelength campaign during the 1994 January periastron passage of PSR B1259-63, we discuss several issues regarding the mechanism of high-energy emission. Unpulsed power-law emission from the PSR B1259-63 system was detected near periastron in the energy range 1-200 keV. The observed X-ray/soft γ-ray emission is characterized by moderate luminosity, small and constant column density, lack of detectable pulsations, and peculiar spectral and intensity variability. In principle, high-energy (X-ray and gamma-ray) emission from the system can be produced by different mechanisms including (1) mass accretion onto the surface of the neutron star, (2) ``propeller''-like magnetospheric interaction at a small pulsar distance, and (3) shock-powered emission in a pulsar wind termination shock at a large distance from the pulsar. We carry out a series of calculations aimed at modeling the high-energy data of the PSR B1259-63 system throughout its orbit and especially near periastron. We find that the observed high-energy emission from the PSR B1259-63 system is not compatible with accretion or propeller-powered emission. This conclusion is supported by a model based on standard properties of Be stars and for plausible assumptions about the pulsar/outflow interaction geometry. We find that shock-powered high-energy emission produced by the pulsar/outflow interaction is consistent with all the

  14. Characterising Radio Emissions in Cosmic Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. O.

    2014-02-01

    A growing number of radio studies probe galaxy clusters into the low-power regime in which star formation is the dominant source of radio emission. However, at the time of writing no comparably deep observations have focused exclusively on the radio populations of cosmic filaments. This thesis describes the ATCA 2.1 GHz observations and subsequent analysis of two such regions - labelled Zone 1 (between clusters A3158 and A3125/A3128) and Zone 2 (between A3135 and A3145) - in the Horologium-Reticulum Supercluster (HRS). Source count profiles of both populations are discussed and a radio luminosity function for Zone 1 is generated. While the source counts of Zone 2 appear to be consistent with expected values, Zone 1 exhibits an excess of counts across a wide flux range (1 mJy< S_1.4 < 200 mJy). An excess in radio activity at the lower extent of this range (log P_1.4 < 22.5; within the SF-dominated regime) is also suggested by the radio luminosity function for that region, and brief colour analysis suggests that such an excess is indeed predominantly associated with a starforming population. The differences between the two filamentary zones is attributed to cosmic variation. The regions are both small (~ 1 degree square), and are significantly separated in the HRS. Further radio observations of filaments are required and the results combined into a larger sample size in order to arrive at a generalised model filamentary population.

  15. MULTIWAVELENGTH CONSTRAINTS ON PULSAR POPULATIONS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, R. S.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Deneva, J. S. [Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (Puerto Rico); Lazio, T. J. W., E-mail: rwharton@astro.cornell.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, M/S 138-308, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-07-10

    The detection of radio pulsars within the central few parsecs of the Galaxy would provide a unique probe of the gravitational and magneto-ionic environments in the Galactic center (GC) and, if close enough to Sgr A*, precise tests of general relativity in the strong-field regime. While it is difficult to find pulsars at radio wavelengths because of interstellar scattering, the payoff from detailed timing of pulsars in the GC warrants a concerted effort. To motivate pulsar surveys and help define search parameters for them, we constrain the pulsar number and spatial distribution using a wide range of multiwavelength measurements. These include the five known radio pulsars within 15' of Sgr A*, non-detections in high-frequency pulsar surveys of the central parsec, radio and gamma-ray measurements of diffuse emission, a catalog of radio point sources from an imaging survey, infrared observations of massive star populations in the central few parsecs, candidate pulsar wind nebulae in the inner 20 pc, and estimates of the core-collapse supernova rate based on X-ray measurements. We find that under current observational constraints, the inner parsec of the Galaxy could harbor as many as {approx}10{sup 3} active radio pulsars that are beamed toward Earth. Such a large population would distort the low-frequency measurements of both the intrinsic spectrum of Sgr A* and the free-free absorption along the line of sight of Sgr A*.

  16. Detection of radio continuum emission from Procyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Stephen A.; Simon, Theodore; Brown, Alexander

    1993-01-01

    We have detected the F5 IV-V star Procyon as a weak and variable 3.6 cm radio continuum source using the VLA. The inferred radio luminosity is similar to, though some-what higher than, the X-band luminosity of the active and flaring sun. The 33 micro-Jy flux density level at which we detected Procyon on four of five occasions is close to the 36 micro-Jy radio flux density expected from a model in which the radio emission consists of two components: optically thick 'stellar disk' emission with a 3.6 cm brightness temperature of 20,000 K that is 50 percent larger than the solar value, and optically thin coronal emission with an emission measure the same as that indicated by Einstein and EXOSAT X-ray flux measurements in 1981 and 1983. The maximum mass-loss rate of a warm stellar wind is less than 2 x 10 exp -11 solar mass/yr. An elevated flux density of 115 micro-Jy observed on a single occasion provides circumstantial evidence for the existence of highly localized magnetic fields on the surface of Procyon.

  17. LMXB and IMXB Evolution: I. The Binary Radio Pulsar PSR J1614-2230

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Jinrong; Podsiadlowski, Ph; Nelson, L; Paxton, B; Todorov, P

    2010-01-01

    We have computed an extensive grid of binary evolution tracks to represent low- and intermediate mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs and IMXBs). The grid includes 42,000 models which covers 60 initial donor masses over the range of 1-4 solar masses and, for each of these, 700 initial orbital periods over the range of 10-250 hours. These results can be applied to understanding LMXBs and IMXBs: those that evolve analogously to CVs; those that form ultracompact binaries with orbital periods in the range of 6-50 minutes; and those that lead to wide orbits with giant donors. We also investigate the relic binary recycled radio pulsars into which these systems evolve. To evolve the donor stars in this study, we utilized a newly developed stellar evolution code called "MESA" that was designed, among other things, to be able to handle very low-mass and degenerate donors. This first application of the results is aimed at an understanding of the newly discovered pulsar PSR J1614-2230 which has a 1.97 solar masses neutron star, o...

  18. Modulated Gamma-ray emission from compact millisecond pulsar binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bednarek, W

    2013-01-01

    A significant amount of the millisecond pulsars has been discovered within binary systems. In several such binary systems the masses of the companion stars have been derived allowing to distinguish two classes of objects, called the Black Widow and the Redback binaries. Pulsars in these binary systems are expected to produce winds which, colliding with stellar winds, create conditions for acceleration of electrons. These electrons should interact with the anisotropic radiation from the companion stars producing gamma-ray emission modulated with the orbital period of the binary system. We consider the interaction of a millisecond pulsar (MSP) wind with a very inhomogeneous stellar wind from the companion star within binary systems of the Black Widow and Redback types. It is expected that the pulsar wind should mix efficiently with the inhomogeneous stellar wind. Electrons accelerated in such mixed, turbulent winds can interact with the magnetic field and also strong radiation from the companion star producing ...

  19. High magnetic field pulsars and magnetars a unified picture

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B; Zhang, Bing; Harding, Alice K.

    2000-01-01

    We propose a unified picture of high magnetic field radio pulsars and magnetars by arguing that they are all rotating high-field neutron stars, but have different orientations of their magnetic axes with respective to their rotation axes. In strong magnetic fields where photon splitting suppresses pair creation near the surface, the high-field pulsars can have active inner accelerators while the anomalous X-ray pulsars cannot. This can account for the very different observed emission characteristics of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 2259+586 and the high field radio pulsar PSR J1814-1744. A predicted consequence of this picture is that radio pulsars having surface magnetic field greater than about $2\\times 10^{14}$ G should not exist.

  20. The low-mass X-ray binary-millisecond radio pulsar birthrate problem revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the birthrate problem for low-mass X-ray binaries(LMXBs) and millisecond radio pulsars(MRPs) in this paper.We consider intermediate-mass and low-mass X-ray binaries(I/LMXBs) to be the progenitors of MRPs,and calculate their evolutionary response to the cosmic star formation rate(SFR) both semi-analytically and numerically.With a typical value(1 Gyr) of the LMXB lifetime,one may expect comparable birthrates of LMXBs and MRPs,but the calculated number of LMXBs is an order of magnitude higher than that observed in the Galaxy.Instead,we suggest that the birthrate problem could be solved if most MRPs have evolved from faint to rather than bright LMXBs.The former may have a population of-104 in the Galaxy.

  1. The birth of radio millisecond pulsars and their high-energy signature

    CERN Document Server

    Tam, P H T; Kong, A K H; Takata, J; Leung, G C K; Cheng, K S; Hui, C Y

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are thought to born in low-mass X-ray binaries when the neutron star has gained enough angular momentum from the accreting materials of its companion star. It is generally believed that a radio MSP is born when the neutron star stops accreting and enters a rotation-powered state. Exactly what happens during the transition time was poorly understood until a year ago. In the past year, observations have revealed a few objects that not only switched from one state to the other (as predicted in the above picture), but also have swung between the two states within weeks to years. In this work, we present observations of two of these transition objects (PSR J1023+0038 and XSS J12270-4859) and a theoretical framework that tries to explain their high-energy radiation.

  2. Search for 150 MHz radio emission from extrasolar planets in the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirothia, S. K.; Lecavelier des Etangs, A.; Gopal-Krishna; Kantharia, N. G.; Ishwar-Chandra, C. H.

    2014-02-01

    The ongoing radio continuum TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS) using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 150 MHz offers an unprecedented opportunity to undertake a fairly deep search for low-frequency radio emission from nearby extrasolar planets. Currently TGSS images are available for a little over a steradian, encompassing 175 confirmed exoplanetary systems. We have searched for their radio counterparts in the TGSS (150 MHz), supplemented with a search in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and the VLA FIRST survey at 1.4 GHz. For 171 planetary systems, we find no evidence of radio emission in the TGSS maps, placing a 3σ upper limit between 8.7 mJy and 136 mJy (median ~24.8 mJy) at 150 MHz. These non-detections include the 55 Cnc system for which we place a 3σ upper limit of 28 mJy at 150 MHz. Nonetheless, for four of the extrasolar planetary systems, we find TGSS radio sources coinciding with or located very close to their coordinates. One of these is 61 Vir: for this system a large radio flux density was predicted in the scenario involving magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and rotation-induced radio emission. We also found 150 MHz emissions toward HD 86226 and HD 164509, where strong radio emission can be produced by the presence of a massive satellite orbiting a rapidly rotating planet. We also detected 150 MHz emission within a synthesized beam from 1RXS1609 b, a pre-main-sequence star harboring a ~14 Jupiter mass planet (or a brown dwarf). With a bright X-ray-UV star and a high mass, the planet 1RXS1609 b presents the best characteristics for rotation-induced emissions with high radio power. Deeper high-resolution observations toward these planetary systems are needed to discriminate between the possibilities of background radio-source and radio-loud planets. At 1.4 GHz, radio emission toward the planet-harboring pulsar PSR B1620-26 is detected in the NVSS. Emissions at 1.4 GHz are also detected toward the very-hot-Jupiter WASP-77A b (in the FIRST survey

  3. Possible distance indicators in gamma-ray pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Distance measurement of gamma-ray pulsars is a current challenge in pulsar studies. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi gamma-ray observatory discovered more than 70 gamma-ray pulsars including 24 new gamma-selected pulsars with almost no distance information. We study the relation between gammaray emission efficiency (η = Lγ/E) and pulsar parameters for young radio-selected gamma-ray pulsars with known distance information in the first gamma-ray pulsar catalog reported by Fermi/LAT. We have introduced three generation-order parameters to describe the gamma-ray emission properties of pulsars, and find a strong correlation of rη- ζ3, a generation-order parameter which reflects γ-ray photon generation in the pair cascade processes induced by magnetic field absorption in a pulsar's magnetosphere.A good correlation of η- BLC, the magnetic field at the light cylinder radius, is also found. These correlations are the distance indicators in gamma-ray pulsars used to evaluate distances for gamma-selected pulsars. Distances of 25 gamma-selected pulsars are estimated, which could be tested by other distance measurement methods. The physical origin of the correlations may also be interesting for pulsar studies.

  4. Diffuse Radio Emission in Abell 754

    CERN Document Server

    Kale, Ruta

    2009-01-01

    We present a low frequency study of the diffuse radio emission in the galaxy cluster A754. We present new 150 MHz image of the galaxy cluster A754 made with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) and discuss the detection of 4 diffuse features. We compare the 150 MHz image with the images at 74, 330 and 1363 MHz; one new diffuse feature is detected. The flux density upperlimits at 330 and 1363 MHz imply a synchrotron spectral index, $\\alpha > 2$, ($S\\propto \

  5. An Annular Gap Acceleration Model for γ-ray Emission of Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    If the binding energy of the pulsar's surface is not so high (the case of a neutron star), both negative and positive charges will flow out freely from the surface of the star. An annular free flow model for γ-ray emission of pulsars is suggested. It is emphasized that:(1) Two kinds of acceleration regions (annular and core) need to be taken into account. The annular acceleration region is defined by the magnetic field lines that cross the null charge surface within the light cylinder. (2) If the potential drop in the annular region of a pulsar is high enough (normally the case for young pulsars), charges in both the annular and the core regions could be accelerated and produce primary gamma-rays. Secondary pairs are generated in both regions and stream outwards to power the broadband radiations. (3) The potential drop grows more rapidly in the annular region than in the core region. The annular acceleration process is a key process for producing the observed wide emission beams. (4)The advantages of both the polar cap and outer gap models are retained in this model. The geometric properties of the γ-ray emission from the annular flow are analogous to that presented in a previous work by Qiao et al., which match the observations well. (5) Since charges with different signs leave the pulsar through the annular and the core regions respectively, the current closure problem can be partially solved.

  6. A Ray-Tracing Model of the Vela Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Hirano, C

    2001-01-01

    In the relativistic plasma surrounding a pulsar, a subluminal ordinary-mode electromagnetic wave will propagate along a magnetic field line. After some distance, it can break free of the field line and escape the magnetosphere to reach an observer. We describe a simple model of pulsar radio emission based on this scenario and find that applying this model to the case of the Vela pulsar reproduces qualitative characteristics of the observed Vela pulse profile.

  7. X-Ray Measurement of the Spin-down of Calvera: A Radio- and Gamma-Ray-Quiet Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, J. P.; Bogdanov, S.; Gotthelf, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    We measure spin-down of the 59 ms X-ray pulsar Calvera by comparing the XMM-Newton discovery data from 2009 with new Chandra timing observations taken in 2013. Its period derivative is \\dot{P}=(3.19+/- \\,0.08)\\times 10^{-15}, which corresponds to spin-down luminosity \\dot{E}=6.1\\times 10^{35} erg s-1, characteristic age \\tau _c\\equiv P/2\\dot{P}=2.9\\times 10^5 yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength Bs = 4.4 × 1011 G. These values rule out a mildly recycled pulsar, but Calvera could be an orphaned central compact object (anti-magnetar), with a magnetic field that was initially buried by supernova debris and is now reemerging and approaching normal strength. We also performed unsuccessful searches for high-energy γ-rays from Calvera in both imaging and timing of >100 MeV Fermi photons. Even though the distance to Calvera is uncertain by an order of magnitude, an upper limit of d < 2 kpc inferred from X-ray spectra implies a γ-ray luminosity limit of <3.3 × 1032 erg s-1, which is less than that of any pulsar of comparable \\dot{E}. Calvera shares some properties with PSR J1740+1000, a young radio pulsar that we show by virtue of its lack of proper motion was born outside of the Galactic disk. As an energetic, high-Galactic-latitude pulsar, Calvera is unique in being undetected in both radio and γ-rays to faint limits, which should place interesting constraints on models for particle acceleration and beam patterns in pulsar magnetospheres.

  8. The search for exomoon radio emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyola, Joaquin P.

    The field of exoplanet detection has seen many new developments since the discovery of the first exoplanet. Observational surveys by the NASA Kepler Mission and several other instrument have led to the confirmation of over 1900 exoplanets, and several thousands of exoplanet potential candidates. All this progress, however, has yet to provide the first confirmed exomoon. Since all previous attempts to discover exomoons have failed, a novel method to detect them is proposed in this dissertation, which describes development of the method and its applications to select the best exomoon candidates for observational searches. The main goal of these searches is to verify the validity and effectiveness of the method, and discover the first exomoon by using the world largest and most suitable radio telescopes. The discovery of first exomoon would begin a new era of exploratory research in exoplanetary systems. The idea that exomoons can be discovered with radio telescopes was proposed by Noyola, Satyal and Musielak et al. (2014), who suggested that the interaction between Io and the Jovian magnetosphere could also be found in exoplanet-exomoon pairs, and the resulting radio emissions could be used to directly detect these systems. The main results of the original study obtained for single prograde exomoons are also described in this dissertation, which in addition extends the previous study to multiple exomoon systems, as well as retrograde orbits. The main objective of these studies is to identify the best exomoon candidates for detection by chosen radio telescopes. One such candidates, Epsilon Eridani b, was selected and observed by the Giant Metre Radio Telescope (GMRT) in India. The preliminary results of these observations do not show any expected radio emission from the chosen systems. Thus, implementation of several important improvements to the method is discussed in details in this dissertation.

  9. Space 'beachballs' generate pulsar bursts

    CERN Multimedia

    Wasowicz, L

    2003-01-01

    Researchers have analyzed radio emissions from a pulsar at the center of the Crab Nebula and have found 'subpulses' that last around 2 nanoseconds. They speculate this means the regions in which these ultra-short pulses are generated can be no larger than about 2 feet across - the distance light travels in 2 nanoseconds (2 pages).

  10. Analysis and Modeling of Jovian Radio Emissions Observed by Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menietti, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    Our studies of Jovian radio emission have resulted in the publication of five papers in refereed journals, with three additional papers in progress. The topics of these papers include the study of narrow-band kilometric radio emission; the apparent control of radio emission by Callisto; quasi-periodic radio emission; hectometric attenuation lanes and their relationship to Io volcanic activity; and modeling of HOM attenuation lanes using ray tracing. A further study of the control of radio emission by Jovian satellites is currently in progress. Abstracts of each of these papers are contained in the Appendix. A list of the publication titles are also included.

  11. The optical counterpart of sax j1808.4{3658 in quiescence: evidence of an active radio pulsar?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Burderi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available La contraparte optica del pulsar binario SAX J1808.4-3658 que emite en rayos X con un per odo de milisegundos, ha sido detectada durante su estapa de quietud a V = 21.5 mag; lo cual es inconsistente con la d ebil emisi on de la estrella compa~nera. Proponemos que la emisi on en el optico de este sistema durante su etapa de quietud es debida a la irradiaci on de la estrella compa~nera y a un disco de acreci on permanente provocado por la energ a rotacional producida por el r apido giro de la estrella de neutrones que act ua como un dipolo magn etico rotante (radio pulsar. En este escenario, la compa~nera se comporta como un bol ometro, reprocesando en el optico parte de la potencia emitida por el pulsar. La fracci on reprocesada depende s olo de par ametros conocidos del sistema binario; la temperatura de cuerpo negro asociada a la estrella compa~nera puede predecirse y rati carse con observaciones. Nuestros c alculos indican que las magnitudes opticas observadas son totalmente compatibles con esta hip otesis. En el caso de que esto sea as , la luminosidad observada en el optico puede ser la primera evidencia de que hay un radio pulsar activo en este sistema en quietud.

  12. Instant Radio Spectra of Giant Pulses from the Crab Pulsar Over Decimeter to Decameter Wave Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, M. V.; Kuzmin, A. D.; Ulyanov, O. M.; Deshpande, A. A.; Ershov, A. A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kostyuk, S. V.; Losovsky, B. Ya.; Soglasnov, V. A.; Zakharenko, V. V.

    2006-08-01

    We present results of simultaneous multi-frequency observations of giant radio pulses (GPs) from the Crab pulsar PSR B0531+21 at frequencies of 23, 111 and 600 MHz. For the first time GPs were detected at such low frequency as 23 MHz. Among 45 GPs detected in the overall observations time with 600 MHz, 12 GPs were identified as simultaneous ones at 600 and 23 MHz. At 111 MHz among 128 GPs detected in the overall observations time with 600 MHz, 21 GPs were identified as simultaneous ones at 600 and 111 MHz. Spectral indexes for the power-law frequency dependence of GPs energy were enclosed between -3.1 and -1.6. Mean spectral index equals to -2.7 ± 0.1 and is the same for both frequency combinations 600-111 MHz and 600-23 MHz. A big scatter in values of the individual spectral indexes and a large number of unidentified giant pulses, indicate that a real form of spectra of individual giant pulses does not follow a simple power law. The shape of giant pulses at all three frequencies is governed by the scattering of radio waves on the inhomogeneities of the interstellar plasma. The pulse scatter broadening and their frequency dependence was measured as τ[SC]=20(ν/100)^-3.5^±^0.1 ms, where frequency ν is in MHz. The main results of these observations are present on the figure bellow.

  13. Precision astrometry of pulsars and other compact radio sources in the globular cluster M15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsten, Franz; Vlemmings, Wouter; Freire, Paulo; Kramer, Michael; Rottmann, Helge; Campbell, Robert M.

    2014-05-01

    The globular cluster (GC) M15 (NGC 7078) is host to at least eight pulsars and two low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), one of which is also visible in the radio regime. Here we present the results of a multi-epoch global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) campaign aiming at i) measuring the proper motion of the known compact radio sources; ii) finding and classifying thus far undetected compact radio sources in the GC; and iii) detecting a signature of the putative intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) proposed to reside at the core of M15. We measure the sky motion in right ascension (μα) and declination (μδ) of the pulsars M15A and M15C and of the LMXB AC211 to be (μα,μδ)M15A = (-0.54 ± 0.14, -4.33 ± 0.25) mas yr-1, (μα,μδ)M15C = (-0.75 ± 0.09, -3.52 ± 0.13) mas yr-1, and (μα,μδ)AC211 = (-0.46 ± 0.08, - 4.31 ± 0.20) mas yr-1, respectively. Based on these measurements we estimate the global proper motion of M15 to be (μα,μδ) = (-0.58 ± 0.18, -4.05 ± 0.34) mas yr-1. We detect two previously known but unclassified compact sources within our field of view. Our observations indicate that one them is of extragalactic origin while the other one is a foreground source, quite likely an LMXB. The double neutron star system M15C became fainter during the observations, disappeared for one year and is now observable again - an effect possibly caused by geodetic precession. The LMXB AC211 shows a double lobed structure in one of the observations indicative of an outburst during this campaign. With the inclusion of the last two of a total of seven observations we confirm the upper mass limit for a putative IMBH to be M•< 500 M⊙.

  14. ARCADE 2 Observations of Galactic Radio Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A; Levin, S M; Limon, M; Lubin, P M; Mirel, P; Seiffert, M; Singal, J; Villela, T; Wollack, E; Wünsche, C A

    2009-01-01

    We use absolutely calibrated data from the ARCADE 2 flight in July 2006 to model Galactic emission at frequencies 3, 8, and 10 GHz. The spatial structure in the data is consistent with a superposition of free-free and synchrotron emission. Emission with spatial morphology traced by the Haslam 408 MHz survey has spectral index beta_synch = -2.5 +/- 0.1, with free-free emission contributing 0.10 +/- 0.01 of the total Galactic plane emission in the lowest ARCADE 2 band at 3.15 GHz. We estimate the total Galactic emission toward the polar caps using either a simple plane-parallel model with csc|b| dependence or a model of high-latitude radio emission traced by the COBE/FIRAS map of CII emission. Both methods are consistent with a single power-law over the frequency range 22 MHz to 10 GHz, with total Galactic emission towards the north polar cap T_Gal = 0.498 +/- 0.028 K and spectral index beta = -2.55 +/- 0.03 at reference frequency 1 GHz. The well calibrated ARCADE 2 maps provide a new test for spinning dust emi...

  15. "Magnetar-like Emission from the Young Pulsar in Kes 75"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrill, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Livingstone, M.; Gotthelf, E.; Kaspi, V.; Woods, P.

    2008-01-01

    Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) are thought to be magnetars - isolated neutron stars with ultra-high magnetic fields. These sources exhibit X-ray and gamma-ray bursts, and week to month-long flux enhancements, all too bright to be accounted for by their spindown luminosity. A mystery in neutron star astrophysics is why such emission has never been seen from rotation-powered pulsars with magnetar-like fields. Here we report the first detection of magnetar-like X-ray bursts from what has been long thought to be a rotation-powered pulsar, PSR 51846-0258, at the center of the supernova remnant Kes 75. PSR J1846-0258 has an inferred surface dipolar magnetic field of 4.9 X 1103 G, which is sixth highest among the > 1700 known rotation-powered pulsars, but less than those of the approximately 12 confirmed magnetars. The bursts coincided with a sudden flux increase and an unprecedented change in timing behavior, f m l y establishing PSR 51 846-0258 as a rotation-powered pulsar/magnetar transition object. These observations demonstrate that magnetar-like emission can be seen from sources with fields lower than the magnetars, and suggest that the intensity of magnetar-like activity in neutron stars depends on magnetic field strength in a more continuous way than previously thought.

  16. Radio emission from RS CVn binary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doiron, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The RS CVn binary stellar systems UX Ari, HR 1099, AR Lac, HR 5110, II Peg, lambda And, and SZ Psc were investigated by use of radio interferometry during the period from July 1982 through August 1983. Interferometry took two forms: Very Large Array (VLA) observations and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). The VLA observations determined the characteristic polarization and flux behavior of the centimeter wavelength radio emission. The observed spectral index was near zero during quiescent periods, rising to between 0.5 and 1.0 during active periods. No net linear polarization is observed to a limit of 1.7%. This is expected since the Faraday depth of thermal electrons deduced from x-ray observations is approx. 10/sup 5/. Circular polarization is observed to be less than 20% at all frequencies often with a helicity reversal between 1.6 GHz and 5 GHz. The VLBI observations have shown that the brightness temperatures are often T/sub B/ approx.> 10/sup 10/ /sup 0/K and size sources smaller than or comparable to the overall size of the binary system. These data are consistent with incoherent gyrosynchrotron emission from mildly relativistic electrons which are optically thick to their own radiation at 1.6 GHz and optically thin at 5 GHz and above. The spectral behavior suggests that the radio emission is due to a power-law distribution of electrons.

  17. Dark Matter-induced Collapse of Neutron Stars: A Possible Link Between Fast Radio Bursts and the Missing Pulsar Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are an emerging class of short and bright radio transients whose sources remain enigmatic. Within the galactic center, the non-detection of pulsars within the inner $\\sim \\!10\\,{\\rm pc}$ has created a missing pulsar problem that has intensified with time. With all reserve, we advance the notion that the two problems could be linked by a common solution: the collapse of neutron stars (NS) due to capture and sedimentation of dark matter (DM) within their cores. Bramante \\& Linden (2014), Phys.\\ Rev.\\ Lett.~19, 191301 showed that certain DM properties allow for rapid NS collapse within the high DM density environments near galactic centers while permitting NS survival elsewhere. Each DM-induced collapse could generate an FRB as the NS magnetosphere is suddenly expelled. This scenario could explain several features of FRBs: their short time scales, large energies, locally produced scattering tails, and high event rates. Our scenario predicts that FRBs are localized to galactic centers...

  18. The Quasi-Roche lobe overflow state in the evolution of Close Binary Systems containing a radio pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuto, O G; Horvath, J E

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of close binary systems formed by a normal (solar composition), intermediate mass donor star together with a neutron star. We consider models including irradiation feedback and evaporation. These non-standard ingredients deeply modify the mass transfer stages of these binaries. While models that neglect irradiation feedback undergo continuous, long standing mass transfer episodes, models including these effect suffer a number cycles of mass transfer and detachment. During mass transfer the systems should reveal themselves as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whereas when detached they behave as a binary radio pulsars. We show that at these stages irradiated models are in a Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) state or in a quasi-RLOF state. Quasi-RLOF stars have a radius slightly smaller than its Roche lobe. Remarkably, these conditions are attained for orbital period and donor mass values in the range corresponding to a family of binary radio pulsars known as "redbacks". Thus, redback companions ...

  19. Pulse variation of the optical emission of Crab pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Karpov, S; Biryukov, A; Plokhotnichenko, V; Debur, V; Shearer, A

    2007-01-01

    The stability of the optical pulse of the Crab pulsar is analyzed based on the 1 $\\mu$s resolution observations with the Russian 6-meter and William Hershel telescopes equipped with different photon-counting detectors. The search for the variations of the pulse shape along with its arrival time stability is performed. Upper limits on the possible short time scale free precession of the pulsar are placed. The evidence of pulse time of arrival (TOA) variations on 1.5-2 hours time scale is presented, along with evidence of small light curve (shape and separation of main and secondary peaks) changes between data sets, on time scale of years. Also, the fine structure of the main pulse is studied.

  20. Electrodynamics of pulsar magnetospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    We review electrodynamics of rotating magnetized neutron stars, from the early vacuum model to recent numerical experiments with plasma-filled magnetospheres. Significant progress became possible due to the development of global particle-in-cell simulations which capture particle acceleration, emission of high-energy photons, and electron-positron pair creation. The numerical experiments show from first principles how and where electric gaps form, and promise to explain the observed pulsar activity from radio waves to gamma-rays.

  1. Consecutive Bright Pulses in the Vela Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Palfreyman, Jim L; Dickey, John M; Young, Timothy G; Hotan, Claire E; 10.1088/2041-8205/735/1/L17

    2011-01-01

    We report on the discovery of consecutive bright radio pulses from the Vela pulsar, a new phenomenon that may lead to a greater understanding of the pulsar emission mechanism. This results from a total of 345 hr worth of observations of the Vela pulsar using the University of Tasmania's 26 m radio telescope to study the frequency and statistics of abnormally bright pulses and sub-pulses. The bright pulses show a tendency to appear consecutively. The observations found two groups of six consecutive bright pulses and many groups of two to five bright pulses in a row. The strong radio emission process that produces the six bright pulses lasts between 0.4 and 0.6 s. The numbers of bright pulses in sequence far exceed what would be expected if individual bright pulses were independent random events. Consecutive bright pulses must be generated by an emission process that is long lived relative to the rotation period of the neutron star.

  2. Implementation of a goodness-of-fit test for finding optimal concurrent radio and {\\gamma}-ray pulsar light curves

    CERN Document Server

    Seyffert, A S; Harding, A K; Allison, J; Schutte, W D

    2016-01-01

    Since the launch of the Fermi Large Area Telescope in 2008 the number of known ${\\gamma}$-ray pulsars has increased immensely to over 200, many of which are also visible in the radio and X-ray bands. Seyffert et al. (2011) demonstrated how constraints on the viewing geometries of some of these pulsars could be obtained by comparing their observed radio and ${\\gamma}$-ray light curves by eye to light curves from geometric models. While these constraints compare reasonably well with those yielded by more rigorous single-wavelength approaches, they are still a somewhat subjective representation of how well the models reproduce the observed radio and ${\\gamma}$-ray light curves. Constructing a more rigorous approach is, however, made difficult by the large uncertainties associated with the ${\\gamma}$-ray light curves as compared to those associated with the radio light curves. Naively applying a ${\\chi}^{2}$-like goodness-of-fit test to both bands invariably results in constraints dictated by the radio light curv...

  3. 脉冲星巡天观测进展和近邻脉冲星样本估算%Progress on Radio Pulsar Survey and Estimate the Neighbor Pulsar Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蕾; 王培; 李菂; 张洁; 岳友岭; 刘姝

    2015-01-01

    射电脉冲星巡天是探测获取更多脉冲星的重要途径.首先介绍了影响射电脉冲星巡天效率的因素,着重分析灵敏度和观测频率两个重要因素,并通过定义脉冲星探测率,简化对脉冲星巡天效率的估算.此外,总结了现有脉冲星巡天项目,利用Parkes多波束脉冲星及两次扩充巡天(Swinburne中纬度脉冲星巡天和Parkes高纬度脉冲星巡天)结果,采用包含时间演化的脉冲星分布模拟软件PsrPopPy,模拟得到脉冲星在银河系中分布的样本,并对近邻太阳系1kpc距离内的脉冲星数目进行了估算,获得了近邻脉冲星样本,可为脉冲星高能辐射对探测宇宙线正电子谱影响等研究提供可靠输入量.%Radio surveys are an important way to detect new pulsars. We first reviewed the main factors affecting sensitivities of pulsar searches in radio bands. These factors can be grouped into two categories. First, the instrumental factors include telescope size, observation frequency, observation bandwidth, integration time, sampling rate, digitization loss, and system temperature. Second, the intrinsic properties of pulsars include dispersion, period, and effective pulse width. We defined a generic detection rate (DR) that combine all these factors to be the number of pulsars detected with specific integration time per pointing. We summarized the results of all radio pulsar surveys. The most successful pulsar survey so far is Parkes multibeam pulsar survey (PKSMB), which detected 1086 normal pulsars. The PKSMB was expanded by two more surveys, namely, Parkes-Swinbume multibeam survey (PKSSW) and Parkes high-latitude multibeam pulsar survey (PKSHL), which in total detected 1377 normal pulsars. We utilized the software package PsrPopPy, which adopts a time evolution model of pulsar parameters, to simulate the Galactic pulsar distribution. The results of Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey and its two extensions were used as inputs of PsrPopPy to constrain

  4. Phase-resolved polarization properties of the pulsar striped wind synchrotron emission

    CERN Document Server

    Petri, J

    2013-01-01

    Since the launch of the Fermi telescope more than five years ago, many new gamma-ray pulsars have been discovered with intriguing properties challenging our current understanding of pulsar physics. Observation of the Crab pulsar furnish today a broad band analysis of the pulsed spectrum with phase-resolved variability allowing to refine existing model to explain pulse shape, spectra and polarization properties. The latter gives inside into the geometry of the emitting region as well as on the structure of the magnetic field. Based on an exact analytical solution of the striped wind with finite current sheet thickness, we analyze in detail the phase-resolved polarization variability emanating from the synchrotron radiation. We assume that the main contribution to the wind emissivity comes from a thin transition layer where the dominant toroidal magnetic field reverses its polarity, the so-called current sheet. The resulting radiation is mostly linearly polarized. In the off-pulse region, the electric vector li...

  5. Correlation between radio and broad-line emissions in radio-loud quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, X; Cao, Xinwu

    1999-01-01

    Radio emission is a good indicator of the jet power of radio-loud quasars, while the emission in broad-line can well represent the accretion disc radiation in quasars. We compile a sample of all sources of which the broad-line fluxes are available from 1 Jy, S4 and S5 radio source catalogues. A correlation between radio and broad-line emission for this sample of radio-loud quasars is presented, which is in favour of a close link between the accretion processes and the relativistic jets. The BL Lac objects seem to follow the statistical behaviour of the quasars, but with fainter broad-line emission.

  6. Search for VHE gamma-ray emission from Geminga pulsar and nebula with the MAGIC telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Buson, S.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Clavero, R.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Peresano, M.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Vanzo, G.; Verguilov, V.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.

    2016-06-01

    The Geminga pulsar, one of the brighest gamma-ray sources, is a promising candidate for emission of very-high-energy (VHE > 100 GeV) pulsed gamma rays. Also, detection of a large nebula has been claimed by water Cherenkov instruments. We performed deep observations of Geminga with the MAGIC telescopes, yielding 63 h of good-quality data, and searched for emission from the pulsar and pulsar wind nebula. We did not find any significant detection, and derived 95% confidence level upper limits. The resulting upper limits of 5.3 × 10-13 TeV cm-2 s-1 for the Geminga pulsar and 3.5 × 10-12 TeV cm-2 s-1 for the surrounding nebula at 50 GeV are the mostconstraining ones obtained so far at VHE. To complement the VHE observations, we also analyzed 5 yr of Fermi-LAT data from Geminga, finding that the sub-exponential cut-off is preferred over the exponential cut-off that has been typically used in the literature. We also find that, above 10 GeV, the gamma-ray spectra from Geminga can be described with a power law with index softer than 5. The extrapolation of the power-law Fermi-LAT pulsed spectra to VHE goes well below the MAGIC upper limits, indicating that the detection of pulsed emission from Geminga with the current generation of Cherenkov telescopes is very difficult.

  7. Non-thermal emissions from accreting X-ray binary pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Jin, Hui; Dong, Ai-Jun

    2014-03-01

    We study non-thermal emissions from cascade processes in accreting X-ray binary pulsars. In the framework of the magnetospheric gap model, we consider three photon fields, which are respectively from the polar cap of a pulsar, its surrounding accretion disk and a massive companion star with a circumstellar disk, to shield the gap. The gap-accelerated ultra-relativistic electrons emit high-energy photons via curvature radiation and an inverse Compton scattering process, in which part of these high-energy photons absorbed by interactions with the surrounding photon fields can facilitate the following electromagnetic cascades. We first carry out numerical calculations of the cascade processes in order to obtain the predicted emission spectra. As an example, we subsequently apply this model to reproduce observations of LS I +61° 303. We find that the results can fit observations ranging from hard X-ray to γ-ray bands. In particular, they can explain the spectral cutoff feature at a few GeV. Finally, we suggest that the emissions detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope from X-ray binary pulsars originate in the magnetosphere region of the pulsar.

  8. DETECTION OF RADIO EMISSION FROM FIREBALLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obenberger, K. S.; Taylor, G. B.; Dowell, J.; Henning, P. A.; Schinzel, F. K.; Stovall, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Hartman, J. M. [NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ellingson, S. W. [Bradley Department of Electrical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Helmboldt, J. F.; Wilson, T. L. [US Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7213, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kavic, M. [Department of Physics, Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Simonetti, J. H. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    We present the findings from the Prototype All-Sky Imager, a back end correlator of the first station of the Long Wavelength Array, which has recorded over 11,000 hr of all-sky images at frequencies between 25 and 75 MHz. In a search of this data for radio transients, we have found 49 long-duration (10 s of seconds) transients. Ten of these transients correlate both spatially and temporally with large meteors (fireballs), and their signatures suggest that fireballs emit a previously undiscovered low frequency, non-thermal pulse. This emission provides a new probe into the physics of meteors and identifies a new form of naturally occurring radio transient foreground.

  9. X-ray emission from the double neutron star binary B1534+12: Powered by the pulsar wind?

    CERN Document Server

    Kargaltsev, O; Garmire, G P

    2006-01-01

    We report the detection of the double neutron star binary (DNSB) B1534+12 (= J1537+1155) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This DNSB (orbital period 10.1 hr) consists of the millisecond (recycled) pulsar J1537+1155A (P_A=37.9 ms) and a neutron star not detected in the radio. After the remarkable double pulsar binary J0737-3039, it is the only other DNSB detected in X-rays. We measured the flux of (2.2\\pm 0.6)\\times10^{-15} ergs s^{-1} cm^{-2} in the 0.3-6 keV band. The small number of collected counts allows only crude estimates of spectral parameters. The power-law fit yields the photon index of 3.2\\pm 0.5 and the unabsorbed 0.2-10 keV luminosity L_X=6\\times10^{29} ergs s^{-1} = 3\\times 10^{-4}Edot_A, where Edot_A is the spin-down power of J1537+1155A. Alternatively, the spectrum can be fitted by a blackbody model with T = 2.2 MK and the projected emitting area of ~ 5\\times 10^3 m^2. The distribution of photon arrival times over binary orbital phase shows a deficit of X-ray emission around apastron, which ...

  10. The Fastest Rotating Pulsar: a Strange Star?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐仁新; 徐轩彬; 吴鑫基

    2001-01-01

    According to the observational limits on the radius and mass, the fastest rotating pulsar (PSR 1937+21) is probably a strange star, or at least some neutron star equations of state should be ruled out, if we suggest that a dipole magnetic field is relevant to its radio emission. We presume that the millisecond pulsar is a strange star with much low mass, small radius and weak magnetic moment.

  11. Wide-Band Spectra of Giant Radio Pulses from the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Mikami, Ryo; Tanaka, Shuta J; Kisaka, Shota; Sekido, Mamoru; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Misawa, Hiroaki; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Kita, Hajime; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Terasawa, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of the simultaneous observation of the Giant Radio Pulses (GRPs) from the Crab pulsar at 0.3, 1.6, 2.2, 6.7 and 8.4 GHz with four telescopes in Japan. We obtain 3194 and 272 GRPs occurring at the main pulse and the interpulse phases, respectively. A few GRPs detected at both 0.3 and 8.4 GHz are the most wide-band samples ever reported. In the frequency range from 0.3 to 2.2 GHz, we find that about 70\\% or more of the GRP spectra are consistent with single power-laws and the spectral indices of them are distributed from $-4$ to $-1$. We also find that a significant number of GRPs have so hard spectral index $\\sim -1$) that the fluence at 0.3 GHz is below the detection limit (``dim-hard' GRPs). Stacking light curves of such dim-hard GRPs at 0.3 GHz, we detect consistent enhancement compared to the off-GRP light curve. Our samples show apparent correlations between the fluences and the spectral hardness, which indicates that more energetic GRPs tend to show softer spectra. Our comprehensiv...

  12. Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries, Millisecond Radio Pulsars, and the Cosmic Star Formation Rate

    CERN Document Server

    White, N E; White, Nicholas E.; Ghosh, Pranab

    1998-01-01

    We report on the implications of the peak in the cosmic star-formation rate (SFR) at redshift z ~ 1.5 for the resulting population of low-mass X-ray binaries(LMXB) and for that of their descendants, the millisecond radio pulsars (MRP). Since the evolutionary timescales of LMXBs, their progenitors, and their descendants are thought be significant fractions of the time-interval between the SFR peak and the present epoch, there is a lag in the turn-on of the LMXB population, with the peak activity occurring at z ~ 0.5 - 1.0. The peak in the MRP population is delayed further, occurring at z < 0.5. We show that the discrepancy between the birthrate of LMXBs and MRPs, found under the assumption of a stead-state SFR, can be resolved for the population as a whole when the effects of a time-variable SFR are included. A discrepancy may persist for LMXBs with short orbital periods, although a detailed population synthesis will be required to confirm this. Further, since the integrated X-ray luminosity distribution of...

  13. NuSTAR observations of the young, energetic radio pulsar PSR B1509-58

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ge; Kaspi, Victoria M; Harrison, Fiona; Madsen, Kristen; Stern, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We report on Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of the young rotation-powered radio pulsar PSR B1509$-$58 in the supernova remnant MSH 15$-$52. We confirm the previously reported curvature in the hard X-ray spectrum, showing that a log parabolic model provides a statistically superior fit to the spectrum compared with the standard power law. The log parabolic model describes the NuSTAR data, as well as previously published gamma-ray data obtained with COMPTEL and AGILE, all together spanning 3 keV through 500 MeV. Our spectral modelling allows us to constrain the peak of the broadband high energy spectrum to be at 2.6$\\pm$0.8 MeV, an improvement of nearly an order of magnitude over previous measurements. In addition, we calculate NuSTAR spectra in 26 pulse phase bins and confirm previously reported variations of photon indices with phase. Finally, we measure the pulsed fraction of PSR B1509$-$58 in the hard X-ray energy band for the first time. Using the energy resolved pul...

  14. Multiwavelength Constraints on Pulsar Populations in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Wharton, R S; Cordes, J M; Deneva, J S; Lazio, T J W

    2011-01-01

    The detection of radio pulsars within the central few parsecs of the Galaxy would provide a unique probe of the gravitational and magneto-ionic environments in the Galactic Center (GC) and, if close enough to Sgr A*, precise tests of general relativity in the strong-field regime. While it is difficult to find pulsars at radio wavelengths because of interstellar scattering, the payoff from detailed timing of pulsars in the GC warrants a concerted effort. To motivate pulsar surveys and help define search parameters for them, we constrain the pulsar number and spatial distribution using a wide range of multiwavelength measurements. These include the five known radio pulsars within 15 arcmin of Sgr A*, radio and gamma-ray measurements of diffuse emission, non-detections in high frequency pulsar surveys of the central parsec, a catalog of radio point sources from an imaging survey, infrared observations of massive star populations in the central few parsecs, candidate pulsar wind nebulae in the inner 20 pc and est...

  15. Observations of transients and pulsars with LOFAR international stations

    CERN Document Server

    Serylak, Maciej; Williams, Chris; Armour, Wes

    2012-01-01

    The LOw FRequency ARray - LOFAR is a new radio telescope that is moving the science of radio pulsars and transients into a new phase. Its design places emphasis on digital hardware and flexible software instead of mechanical solutions. LOFAR observes at radio frequencies between 10 and 240 MHz where radio pulsars and many transients are expected to be brightest. Radio frequency signals emitted from these objects allow us to study the intrinsic pulsar emission and phenomena such as propagation effects through the interstellar medium. The design of LOFAR allows independent use of its stations to conduct observations of known bright objects, or wide field monitoring of transient events. One such combined software/hardware solution is called the Advanced Radio Transient Event Monitor and Identification System (ARTEMIS). It is a backend for both targeted observations and real-time searches for millisecond radio transients which uses Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) technology to remove interstellar dispersion and d...

  16. Fermi pulsar revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Caraveo, Patrizia A

    2010-01-01

    2009 has been an extraordinary year for gamma-ray pulsar astronomy and 2010 promises to be equally good. Not only have we registered an extraordinary increase in the number of pulsars detected in gamma rays, but we have also witnessed the birth of new sub-families: first of all, the radio-quiet gamma pulsars and later an ever growing number of millisecond pulsars, a real surprise. We started with a sample of 7 gamma-ray emitting neutron stars (6 radio pulsars and Geminga) and now the Fermi-LAT harvest encompasses 24 "Geminga-like" new gamma-ray pulsars, a dozen millisecond pulsars and about thirty radio pulsars. Moreover, radio searches targeted to LAT unidentified sources yielded 18 new radio millisecond pulsars, several of which have been already detected also in gamma rays. Thus, currently the family of gamma-ray emitting neutron stars seems to be evenly divided between classical radio pulsars, millisecond pulsars and radio quiet neutron stars.

  17. Detection of VHE Bridge emission from the Crab pulsar with the MAGIC Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, T Y; Hirotani, K

    2015-01-01

    The Crab pulsar is the only astronomical pulsed source detected above 100 GeV. The emission mechanism of very high energy gamma-ray pulsation is not yet fully understood, although several theoretical models have been proposed. In order to test the new models, we measured the light curve and the spectra of the Crab pulsar with high precision by means of deep observations. We analyzed 135 hours of selected MAGIC data taken between 2009 and 2013 in stereoscopic mode. In order to discuss the spectral shape in connection with lower energies, 4.6 years of Fermi-LAT data were also analyzed. The known two pulses per period were detected with a significance of 8.0 sigma and 12.6 sigma. In addition, significant bridge emission was found between the two pulses with 6.2 sigma. This emission can not be explained with the existing theories. These data can be used for testing new theoretical models.

  18. Very high energy emission of Crab-like pulsars driven by the Cherenkov drift radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Osmanov, Z

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the generation of very high energy (VHE) emission in Crab-like pulsars driven by means of the feedback of Cherenkov drift waves on distribution of magnetospheric electrons. We have found that the unstable Cherenkov drift modes lead to the quasi-linear diffusion (QLD), keeping the pitch angles from vanishing, which in turn, maintains the synchrotron mechanism. Considering the Crab-like pulsars it has been shown that the growth rate of the Cherenkov drift instability (ChDI) is quite high, indicating high efficiency of the process. Analyzing the mechanism for the typical parameters we have found that the Cherenkov drift emission from the extreme UV to hard $X$-rays is strongly correlated with the VHE synchrotron emission in the GeV band.

  19. Search for Pulsed TeV $\\gamma$-ray Emission from the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Lessard, R W; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Burdett, A M; Carter-Lewis, D A; Catanese, M; Cawley, M F; D'Vali, M; Fegan, D J; Finley, J P; Gaidos, J A; Gillanders, G H; Hall, T; Hillas, A M; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Masterson, C; Moriarty, P; Quinn, J; Rose, H J; Samuelson, F W; Sembroski, G H; Srinivasan, R; Vasilev, V; Weekes, T C

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of a search for pulsed TeV emission from the Crab pulsar using the Whipple Observatory's 10 m gamma-ray telescope. The direction of the Crab pulsar was observed for a total of 73.4 hours between 1994 November and 1997 March. During this period the Whipple 10 m telescope was operated at its lowest energy threshold to date. Spectral analysis techniques were applied to search for the presence of a gamma-ray signal from the Crab pulsar over the energy band 250 GeV to 4 TeV. We do not see any evidence of the 33 ms pulsations present in other energy bands from the Crab pulsar. The 99.9% confidence level upper limit for pulsed emission above 250 GeV is derived to be 4.8x10^-12 cm^-2 s^-1 or <3% of the steady flux from the Crab Nebula. These results imply a sharp cut-off of the power-law spectrum seen by the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. If the cut-off is exponential, it must begin at 60 GeV or lower to accommodate these upper limits.

  20. A Search for Pulsed TeV $\\gamma$ Ray Emission from the Crab Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Burdett, A M; Boyle, P J; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Carter-Lewis, D A; Catanese, M; Cawley, M F; D'Vali, M; Fegan, D J; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Gaidos, J A; Gillanders, G H; Hall, T A; Hillas, A M; Kildea, J; Knapp, J; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Lessard, R W; Masterson, C; Moriarty, P; Quinn, J; Rose, H J; Samuelson, F W; Sembroski, G H; Srinivasan, R; Vasilev, V; Weekes, T C

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of a search for pulsed TeV emission from the Crab pulsar using the Whipple Observatory's 10m gamma-ray telescope. The direction of the Crab pulsar was observed for a total of 73.4 hours between 1994 November and 1997 March. Spectral analysis techniques were applied to search for the presence of a gamma-ray signal from the Crab pulsar over the energy band 250GeV to 4TeV. At these energies we do not see any evidence of the 33ms pulsations present at lower energies from the Crab pulsar. The 99.9% confidence level upper limit for pulsed emission above 250GeV is derived to be 4.8 10^-12 cm^-2 s^-1 or <3% of the steady flux from the Crab Nebula. These results imply a sharp cut-off of the power-law spectrum seen by the EGRET instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. If the cut-off is exponential, it must begin at 60GeV or lower to accommodate these upper limits.

  1. Very high energy emission as a probe of relativistic magnetic reconnection in pulsar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Mochol, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    The population of gamma-ray pulsars, including Crab observed in the TeV range, and Vela detected above 50 GeV, challenges existing models of pulsed high-energy emission. Such models should be universally applicable, yet they should account for spectral differences among the pulsars. We show that the gamma-ray emission of Crab and Vela can be explained by synchrotron radiation from the current sheet of a striped wind, expanding with a modest Lorentz factor $\\Gamma\\lesssim100$ in the Crab case, and $\\Gamma\\lesssim50$ in the Vela case. In the Crab spectrum a new synchrotron self-Compton component is expected to be detected by the upcoming experiment CTA. We suggest that the gamma-ray spectrum directly probes the physics of relativistic magnetic reconnection in the striped wind. In the most energetic pulsars, like Crab, with $\\dot{E}_{38}^{3/2}/P_{-2}\\gtrsim0.002$ (where $\\dot{E}$ is the spin down power, $P$ is the pulsar period, and $X=X_i\\times10^i$ in CGS units), reconnection proceeds in the radiative cooling ...

  2. Search for VHE gamma-ray emission from Geminga pulsar and nebula with the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Ahnen, M L; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Banerjee, B; Bangale, P; de Almeida, U Barres; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Bil, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Chatterjee, A; Clavero, R; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de O na; Mendez, C Delgado; Di Pierro, F; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Glawion, D Eisenacher; Elsaesser, D; Fernández-Barral, A; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Giammaria, P; Godinovic, N; Muñoz, A González; Guberman, D; Hahn, A; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Hughes, G; Idec, W; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Manganaro, M; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Mira, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Moretti, E; Nakajima, D; Neustroev, V; Niedzwiecki, A; Rosillo, M Nievas; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palacio, J; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prini, E; Puljak, I; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Saito, T; Satalecka, K; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpaa, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzic, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Verguilov, V; Vovk, I; Ward, J E; Will, M; Wu, M H; Zanin, R

    2016-01-01

    The Geminga pulsar, one of the brighest gamma-ray sources, is a promising candidate for emission of very-high-energy (VHE > 100 GeV) pulsed gamma rays. Also, detection of a large nebula have been claimed by water Cherenkov instruments. We performed deep observations of Geminga with the MAGIC telescopes, yielding 63 hours of good-quality data, and searched for emission from the pulsar and pulsar wind nebula. We did not find any significant detection, and derived 95% confidence level upper limits. The resulting upper limits of 5.3 x 10^{-13} TeV cm^{-2} s^{-1} for the Geminga pulsar and 3.5 x 10^{-12} TeV cm^{-2} s^{-1} for the surrounding nebula at 50 GeV are the most constraining ones obtained so far at VHE. To complement the VHE observations, we also analyzed 5 years of Fermi-LAT data from Geminga, finding that the sub-exponential cut-off is preferred over the exponential cut-off that has been typically used in the literature. We also find that, above 10 GeV, the gamma-ray spectra from Geminga can be describ...

  3. Vacuum nonlinear electrodynamic polarization effects in hard emission of pulsars and magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, V. I.; Sokolov, V. A.; Svertilov, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    The nonlinear electrodynamics influence of pulsar magnetic field on the electromagnetic pulse polarization is discussed from the point of observation interpretation. The calculations of pulsar magnetic field impact on the electromagnetic pulse polarization are made in such a way to make it easier to interpret these effects in space experiments. The law of hard emission pulse propagation in the pulsar magnetic field according to the vacuum (nonlinear electrodynamics is obtained. It has been shown, that due to the birefringence in the vacuum the front part of any hard emission pulse coming from a pulsar should be linearly polarized and the rest of pulse can have arbitrary polarization. The observational possibilities of vacuum birefringence are discussed. In this paper we give the estimations of detector parameters such as effective area, exposure time and necessity of polarization measurements with high accuracy. The combination of large area and extremely long exposure time gives the good opportunity to search the fine polarization effects like vacuum nonlinear electrodynamics birefringence.

  4. Programmable Ultra Lightweight System Adaptable Radio (PULSAR) Low Cost Telemetry - Access from Space Advanced Technologies or Down the Middle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims. Herb; Varnavas, Kosta; Eberly, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Software Defined Radio (SDR) technology has been proven in the commercial sector since the early 1990's. Today's rapid advancement in mobile telephone reliability and power management capabilities exemplifies the effectiveness of the SDR technology for the modern communications market. In contrast, presently qualified satellite transponder applications were developed during the early 1960's space program. Programmable Ultra Lightweight System Adaptable Radio (PULSAR, NASA-MSFC SDR) technology revolutionizes satellite transponder technology by increasing data through-put capability by, at least, an order of magnitude. PULSAR leverages existing Marshall Space Flight Center SDR designs and commercially enhanced capabilities to provide a path to a radiation tolerant SDR transponder. These innovations will (1) reduce the cost of NASA Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Deep Space transponders, (2) decrease power requirements, and (3) a commensurate volume reduction. Also, PULSAR increases flexibility to implement multiple transponder types by utilizing the same hardware with altered logic - no analog hardware change is required - all of which can be accomplished in orbit. This provides high capability, low cost, transponders to programs of all sizes. The final project outcome would be the introduction of a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 7 low-cost CubeSat to SmallSat telemetry system into the NASA Portfolio.

  5. Testing the Young Neutron Star Scenario with Persistent Radio Emission Associated with FRB 121102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiyama, Kazumi; Murase, Kohta

    2017-04-01

    Recently a repeating fast radio burst (FRB) 121102 has been confirmed to be an extragalactic event and a persistent radio counterpart has been identified. While other possibilities are not ruled out, the emission properties are broadly consistent with Murase et al. that theoretically proposed quasi-steady radio emission as a counterpart of both FRBs and pulsar-driven supernovae. Here, we constrain the model parameters of such a young neutron star scenario for FRB 121102. If the associated supernova has a conventional ejecta mass of M ej ≳ a few M ⊙, a neutron star with an age of t age ∼ 10–100 years, an initial spin period of P i ≲ a few ms, and a dipole magnetic field of B dip ≲ a few × 1013 G can be compatible with the observations. However, in this case, the magnetically powered scenario may be favored as an FRB energy source because of the efficiency problem in the rotation-powered scenario. On the other hand, if the associated supernova is an ultra-stripped one or the neutron star is born by the accretion-induced collapse with M ej ∼ 0.1 M ⊙, a younger neutron star with t age ∼ 1–10 years can be the persistent radio source and might produce FRBs with the spin-down power. These possibilities can be distinguished by the decline rate of the quasi-steady radio counterpart.

  6. THE QUASI-ROCHE LOBE OVERFLOW STATE IN THE EVOLUTION OF CLOSE BINARY SYSTEMS CONTAINING A RADIO PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, O. G.; De Vito, M. A. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata and Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (IALP), CCT-CONICET-UNLP. Paseo del Bosque S/N (B1900FWA), La Plata (Argentina); Horvath, J. E., E-mail: adevito@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar, E-mail: foton@iag.usp.br [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Universidade de São Paulo R. do Matão 1226 (05508-090), Cidade Universitária, São Paulo SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-01

    We study the evolution of close binary systems formed by a normal (solar composition), intermediate-mass-donor star together with a neutron star. We consider models including irradiation feedback and evaporation. These nonstandard ingredients deeply modify the mass-transfer stages of these binaries. While models that neglect irradiation feedback undergo continuous, long-standing mass-transfer episodes, models including these effects suffer a number of cycles of mass transfer and detachment. During mass transfer, the systems should reveal themselves as low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whereas when they are detached they behave as binary radio pulsars. We show that at these stages irradiated models are in a Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) state or in a quasi-RLOF state. Quasi-RLOF stars have radii slightly smaller than their Roche lobes. Remarkably, these conditions are attained for an orbital period as well as donor mass values in the range corresponding to a family of binary radio pulsars known as ''redbacks''. Thus, redback companions should be quasi-RLOF stars. We show that the characteristics of the redback system PSR J1723-2837 are accounted for by these models. In each mass-transfer cycle these systems should switch from LMXB to binary radio pulsar states with a timescale of approximately one million years. However, there is recent and fast growing evidence of systems switching on far shorter, human timescales. This should be related to instabilities in the accretion disk surrounding the neutron star and/or radio ejection, still to be included in the model having the quasi-RLOF state as a general condition.

  7. Radio Emission in the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Araya-Melo, Pablo A; Brueggen, Marcus; Hoeft, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    We explore the possibility of detecting radio emission in the \\emph{cosmic web} by analyzing shock waves in the MareNostrum cosmological simulation. This requires a careful calibration of shock finding algorithms in Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics simulations, which we present here. Moreover, we identify the elements of the cosmic web, namely voids, walls, filaments and clusters with the use of the SpineWeb technique, a procedure that classifies the structure in terms of its topology. Thus, we are able to study the Mach number distribution as a function of its environment. We find that the median Mach number, for clusters is $\\mathcal{M}_{\\mathrm{clusters}}\\approx1.8$, for filaments is $\\mathcal{M}_{\\mathrm{filaments}}\\approx 6.2$, for walls is $\\mathcal{M}_{\\mathrm{walls}}\\approx 7.5$, and for voids is $\\mathcal{M}_{\\mathrm{voids}}\\approx 18$. We then estimate the radio emission in the cosmic web using the formalism derived in Hoeft & Br\\"{u}ggen (2007). We also find that in order to match our simulation...

  8. EINSTEIN-HOME DISCOVERY OF 24 PULSARS IN THE PARKES MULTI-BEAM PULSAR SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knispel, B.; Kim, H.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Eatough, R. P.; Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Anderson, D. [University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Crawford, F.; Rastawicki, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Hammer, D.; Papa, M. A.; Siemens, X. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Lyne, A. G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Miller, R. B. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, 111 White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Sarkissian, J., E-mail: benjamin.knispel@aei.mpg.de [CSIRO Parkes Observatory, Parkes, NSW 2870 (Australia); and others

    2013-09-10

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of Almost-Equal-To 17, 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein-Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop s{sup -1}. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, 18 of which were isolated pulsars, and 6 were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM ( Almost-Equal-To 420 pc cm{sup -3}). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2536 likely belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Three of the isolated pulsars show long-term nulling or intermittency in their emission, further increasing this growing family. Our discoveries demonstrate the value of distributed volunteer computing for data-driven astronomy and the importance of applying new analysis methods to extensively searched data.

  9. Einstein@Home Discovery of 24 Pulsars in the Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, B.; Eatough, R. P.; Kim, H.; Keane, E. F.; Allen, B.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Crawford, F.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H.; Hammer, D.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.; Machenschalk, B.; Miller, R. B.; Papa, M. A.; Rastawicki, D.; Sarkissian, J.; Siemens, X.; Stappers, B. W.

    2013-09-01

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of ≈17, 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein@Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop s-1. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, 18 of which were isolated pulsars, and 6 were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM (≈420 pc cm-3). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2536 likely belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Three of the isolated pulsars show long-term nulling or intermittency in their emission, further increasing this growing family. Our discoveries demonstrate the value of distributed volunteer computing for data-driven astronomy and the importance of applying new analysis methods to extensively searched data.

  10. On the puzzling high-energy pulsations of the energetic radio-quiet $\\gamma$-ray pulsar J1813$-$1246

    CERN Document Server

    Marelli, M; Pizzocaro, D; De Luca, A; Wood, K S; Caraveo, P; Salvetti, D; Parkinson, P M Saz; Acero, F

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed the new deep {\\it XMM-Newton} and {\\it Chandra} observations of the energetic radio-quiet pulsar J1813$-$1246. The X-ray spectrum is non-thermal, very hard and absorbed. Based on spectral considerations, we propose that J1813 is located at a distance further than 2.5 kpc. J1813 is highly pulsed in the X-ray domain, with a light curve characterized by two sharp, asymmetrical peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase. We detected no significant X-ray spectral changes during the pulsar phase. We extended the available {\\it Fermi} ephemeris to five years. We found two glitches. The $\\gamma$-ray lightcurve is characterized by two peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase, with a bridge in between and no off-pulse emission. The spectrum shows clear evolution in phase, being softer at the peaks and hardenning towards the bridge. The X-ray peaks lag the $\\gamma$-ray ones by 0.25 in phase. We found a hint of detection in the 30-500 keV band with {\\it INTEGRAL} IBIS/ISGRI, that is consistent with the extrapolation of bo...

  11. The disturbance of a millisecond pulsar magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, R M; Kerr, M; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Coles, W A; Dai, S; Dempsey, J; Hobbs, G; Keith, M J; Lasky, P D; Levin, Y; Manchester, R N; Oslowski, S; Ravi, V; Reardon, D J; Rosado, P A; Spiewak, R; van Straten, W; Toomey, L; Wang, J -B; Wen, L; You, X -P; Zhu, X -J

    2016-01-01

    Pulsar timing has enabled some of the strongest tests of fundamental physics. Central to the technique is the assumption that the detected radio pulses can be used to accurately measure the rotation of the pulsar. Here we report on a broad-band variation in the pulse profile of the millisecond pulsar J1643-1224. A new component of emission suddenly appears in the pulse profile, decays over 4 months, and results in a permanently modified pulse shape. Profile variations such as these may be the origin of timing noise observed in other millisecond pulsars. The sensitivity of pulsar-timing observations to gravitational radiation can be increased by accounting for this variability.

  12. Radio Polarization Observations of the Snail: A Crushed Pulsar Wind Nebula in G327.1-1.1 with a Highly Ordered Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Y K; Bucciantini, N; Slane, P O; Gaensler, B M; Temim, T

    2016-01-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are suggested to be acceleration sites of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. While the magnetic field plays an important role in the acceleration process, previous observations of magnetic field configurations of PWNe are rare, particularly for evolved systems. We present a radio polarization study of the "Snail" PWN inside the supernova remnant G327.1-1.1 using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This PWN is believed to have been recently crushed by the supernova (SN) reverse shock. The radio morphology is composed of a main circular body with a finger-like protrusion. We detected a strong linear polarization signal from the emission, which reflects a highly ordered magnetic field in the PWN and is in contrast to the turbulent environment with a tangled magnetic field generally expected from hydrodynamical simulations. This could suggest that the characteristic turbulence scale is larger than the radio beam size. We built a toy model to explore this possibility, and found that a simulat...

  13. Polarized synchrotron emission from the equatorial current sheet in gamma-ray pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, Benoît; Philippov, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    Polarization is a powerful diagnostic tool to constrain the site of the high-energy pulsed emission and particle acceleration in gamma-ray pulsars. Recent particle-in-cell simulations of pulsar magnetosphere suggest that high-energy emission results from particles accelerated in the equatorial current sheet emitting synchrotron radiation. In this study, we re-examine the simulation data to compute the phase-resolved polarization properties. We find that the emission is mildly polarized and that there is an anticorrelation between the flux and the degree of linear polarization (on-pulse: ~15%, off-pulse: ~30%). The decrease of polarization during pulses is mainly attributed to the formation of caustics in the current sheet. Each pulse of light is systematically accompanied by a rapid swing of the polarization angle due to the change of the magnetic polarity when the line of sight passes through the current sheet. The optical polarization pattern observed in the Crab can be well-reproduced for a pulsar inclinat...

  14. Planetary and stellar auroral magnetospheric radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speirs, David; Cairns, Robert A.; Bingham, Robert; Kellett, Barry J.; McConville, Sandra L.; Gillespie, Karen M.; Vorgul, Irena; Phelps, Alan D. R.; Cross, Adrian W.; Ronald, Kevin

    2012-10-01

    A variety of astrophysical radio emissions have been identified to date in association with non-uniform magnetic fields and accelerated particle streams [1]. Such sources are spectrally well defined and for the planetary cases [1,2] show a high degree of extraordinary (X-mode) polarisation within the source region. It is now widely accepted that these emissions are generated by an electron cyclotron-maser instability driven by a horseshoe shaped electron velocity distribution. Although the generation mechanism is well established, a satisfactory explanation does not yet exist for the observed field aligned beaming of the radiation out-with the source region [2]. In the current context, the results of PiC simulations will be presented investigating the spatial growth of the horseshoe-maser instability in an unbounded interaction geometry, with a view to studying the wave vector of emission, spectral properties and RF conversion efficiency. In particular, the potential for backward-wave coupling is investigated as a viable precursor to a model of upward refraction and field-aligned beaming of the radiation [3].[4pt] [1] A.P. Zarka, Advances in Space Research, 12, pp. 99 (1992).[0pt] [2] R.E. Ergun et al., Astrophys. J., 538, pp. 456 (2000)[0pt] [3] J.D. Menietti et al., J. Geophys. Res., 116, A12219 (2011).

  15. High-fidelity radio astronomical polarimetry using a millisecond pulsar as a polarized reference source

    CERN Document Server

    van Straten, W

    2012-01-01

    A new method of polarimetric calibration is presented in which the instrumental response is derived from regular observations of PSR J0437-4715 based on the assumption that the mean polarized emission from this millisecond pulsar remains constant over time. The technique is applicable to any experiment in which high-fidelity polarimetry is required over long time scales; it is demonstrated by calibrating 7.2 years of high-precision timing observations of PSR J1022+1001 made at the Parkes Observatory. Application of the new technique followed by arrival time estimation using matrix template matching yields post-fit residuals with an uncertainty-weighted standard deviation of 880 ns, two times smaller than that of arrival time residuals obtained via conventional methods of calibration and arrival time estimation. The precision achieved by this experiment yields the first significant measurements of the secular variation of the projected semi-major axis, the precession of periastron, and the Shapiro delay; it al...

  16. X-ray investigation of the diffuse emission around plausible gamma-ray emitting pulsar wind nebulae in Kookaburra region

    CERN Document Server

    Kishishita, Tetsuichi; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2012-01-01

    We report on the results from {\\it Suzaku} X-ray observations of the radio complex region called Kookaburra, which includes two adjacent TeV $\\gamma$-ray sources HESS J1418-609 and HESS J1420-607. The {\\it Suzaku} observation revealed X-ray diffuse emission around a middle-aged pulsar PSR J1420-6048 and a plausible PWN Rabbit with elongated sizes of $\\sigma_{\\rm X}=1^{\\prime}.66$ and $\\sigma_{\\rm X}=1^{\\prime}.49$, respectively. The peaks of the diffuse X-ray emission are located within the $\\gamma$-ray excess maps obtained by H.E.S.S. and the offsets from the $\\gamma$-ray peaks are $2^{\\prime}.8$ for PSR J1420-6048 and $4^{\\prime}.5$ for Rabbit. The X-ray spectra of the two sources were well reproduced by absorbed power-law models with $\\Gamma=1.7-2.3$. The spectral shapes tend to become softer according to the distance from the X-ray peaks. Assuming the one zone electron emission model as the first order approximation, the ambient magnetic field strengths of HESS J1420-607 and HESS J1418-609 can be estimate...

  17. Phenomenology of Neptune's radio emissions observed by the Voyager planetary radio astronomy experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, B. M.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Aubier, M. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Neptune flyby in 1989 added a new planet to the known number of magnetized planets generating nonthermal radio emissions. We review the Neptunian radio emission morphology as observed by the planetary radio astronomy experiment on board Voyager 2 during a few weeks before and after closest approach. We present the characteristics of the two observed recurrent main components of the Neptunian kilometric radiation, i.e., the 'smooth' and the 'bursty' emissions, and we describe the many specific features of the radio spectrum during closest approach.

  18. Solar system radio emissions studies with the largest low-frequency radio telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharenko, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Litvinenko, G.; Kolyadin, V.; Zarka, P.; Mylostna, K.; Vasylieva, I.; Griessmeier, J.-M.; Sidorchuk, M.; Rucker, H.; Fischer, G.; Cecconi, B.; Coffre, A.; Denis, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Nikolaenko, V.

    2014-04-01

    We describe the trends and tasks in the field of lowfrequency studies of radio emission from the Solar system's objects. The world's largest decameter radio telescopes UTR-2 and URAN have a unique combination of sensitivity and time/frequency resolution parameters, providing the capability of the most detailed studies of various types of solar and planetary emissions.

  19. PSR J2021+3651 A Young Radio Pulsar Coincident with an Unidentified EGRET Gamma-ray Source

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, M S E; Ransom, S M; Kaspi, V M; Freire, P C C; Crawford, F; Lorimer, D R; Roberts, Mallory S.E.; Hessels, Jason W.T.; Ransom, Scott M.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Freire, Paulo C.C.; Crawford, Fronefield; Lorimer, Duncan R.

    2002-01-01

    We report on a deep search for radio pulsations toward five unidentified ASCA X-ray sources coincident with EGRET gamma-ray sources. This search has led to the discovery of a young and energetic pulsar using data obtained with the new Wideband Arecibo Pulsar Processor. PSR J2021+3651 is likely associated with the X-ray source AX J2021.1+3651, which in turn is likely associated with the COS B high energy gamma-ray source 2CG 075+00, also known as GeV J2020+3658 or 3EG J2021+3716. PSR J2021+3651 has a rotation period P = 104 ms and P_dot = 9.6x10^{-14}, implying a characteristic age ~17 kyr and a spin-down luminosity E_dot ~ 3.4x10^{36}ergs/s. The dispersion measure DM ~ 371 pc cm^{-3} is by far the highest of any observed pulsar in the Galactic longitude range 55 10 kpc, and a high gamma-ray efficiency of \\~15%, but the true distance may be closer if there is a significant contribution to the DM from excess gas in the Cygnus region. The implied luminosity of the associated X-ray source suggests the X-ray emis...

  20. Nature of eclipsing pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Khechinashvili, D; Gil, J; Khechinashvili, David; Melikidze, George; Gil, Janusz

    2000-01-01

    We present a model for pulsar radio eclipses in some binary systems, and test this model for PSRs B1957+20 and J2051-0827. We suggest that in these binaries the companion stars are degenerate dwarfs with strong surface magnetic fields. The magnetospheres of these stars are permanently infused by the relativistic particles of the pulsar wind. We argue that the radio waves emitted by the pulsar split into the eigenmodes of the electron-positron plasma as they enter the companion's magnetosphere and are then strongly damped due to cyclotron resonance with the ambient plasma particles. Our model explains in a natural way the anomalous duration and behavior of radio eclipses observed in such systems. In particular, it provides stable, continuous, and frequency-dependent eclipses, in agreement with the observations. We predict a significant variation of linear polarization both at eclipse ingress and egress. In this paper we also suggest several possible mechanisms of generation of the optical and $X$-ray emission ...

  1. Pulsar Populations and Unidentified Gamma-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K; Grenier, I A; Perrot, C A

    2003-01-01

    The EGRET telescope on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory detected over 200 sources and the majority of these are still unidentified. At least three subpopulations of EGRET sources have been associated with the Galaxy: bright sources lying along the Galactic plane, weaker sources spatially correlated with the Gould Belt and a high-latitude, halo population. Many of these sources may be pulsars and there are more than two-dozen radio pulsars in or near EGRET source error boxes, most of them recently discovered in the Parkes Multibeam Survey. We present results from several population synthesis studies of pulsars in the Galaxy, which predict the number of pulsars detected by gamma-ray and radio surveys assuming models for the high-energy emission beam and its relation to the radio beam. Future gamma-ray pulsar detections by AGILE and GLAST together with the recent large rise in the radio pulsar population will give greatly improved statistics. The relative numbers of radio and gamma-ray pulsars detected in the p...

  2. Emission mechanism of GeV-quiet soft gamma-ray pulsars; A case for peculiar geometry?

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y; Takata, J; Leung, Gene C K; Cheng, K S

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing new class of young spin-down powered pulsars called GeV-quiet soft gamma-ray pulsar; (1) spectral turnover appears around~10MeV, (2) the X-ray spectra of below 20 keV can be described by power law with photon index around 1.2 and (3) the light curve in X-ray/soft gamma-ray bands shows single broad pulse. Their emission properties are distinct from the normal gamma-ray pulsars, for which the spectral peak in $\

  3. Pulsed VHE emission from the Crab Pulsar in the context of magnetocentrifugal particle acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Osmanov, Z

    2016-01-01

    The Crab Pulsar has been recently detected at very high energies (VHE) with its pulsed VHE emission reaching up to $1.5$ TeV. The VHE peaks appear synchronised with the peaks at GeV energies and show VHE spectra following hard power-law functions. These new findings have been interpreted as evidence for a gamma-ray production that happens very close to the light cylinder. Motivated by these experimental results we consider the efficiency of magnetocentrifugal particle acceleration in the magnetosphere of the Crab Pulsar, reexamining and extending results obtained in a previous work (Osmanov & Rieger 2009). It is shown that efficient magnetocentrifugal acceleration close to the light cylinder could provide the required electron Lorentz factors of $5\\times 10^6$ and that the resulting inverse Compton (IC) scattering off thermal photons might explain the enigmatic TeV emission of the pulsar. We estimate the corresponding VHE luminosity and provide a derivation of its spectral characteristics, that appear rem...

  4. Probing the Pulsar Wind Nebula of PSR B0355+54

    CERN Document Server

    McGowan, K E; Cropper, M; Kennea, J A; Vestrand, W T; Zane, S; Cordova, France A.; Cropper, Mark; Gowan, Katherine E. Mc; Kennea, Jamie A.; Zane, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the middle-aged radio pulsar PSR B0355+54. Our X-ray observations reveal emission not only from the pulsar itself, but also from a compact diffuse component extending ~50'' in the opposite direction to the pulsar's proper motion. There is also evidence for the presence of fainter diffuse emission extending ~5' from the point source. The compact diffuse feature is well-fitted with a power-law, the index of which is consistent with the values found for other pulsar wind nebulae. The morphology of the diffuse component is similar to the ram-pressure confined pulsar wind nebulae detected for other sources. The X-ray emission from the pulsar itself is described well by a thermal plus power-law fit, with the thermal emission most likely originating in a hot polar cap.

  5. An inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model of pulsar emission II. frequency behavior of pulse profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Qiao, G J; Zhang, B; Han, J L

    2001-01-01

    The shapes of pulse profiles, especially their variations with respect to observing frequencies, are very important to understand emission mechanisms of pulsars, while no previous attempt has been made in interpreting the complicated phenomenology. In this paper, we present theoretical simulations for the integrated pulse profiles and their frequency evolution within the framework of the inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model proposed by Qiao (1988) and Qiao & Lin (1998). Using the phase positions of the pulse components predicted by the ``beam-frequency figure'' of the ICS model, we present Gaussian fits to the multi-frequency pulse profiles for some pulsars. It is shown that the model can reproduce various types of the frequency evolution behaviors of pulse profiles observed.

  6. Neptune's non-thermal radio emissions - Phenomenology and source locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabl, Gerald K. F.; Ladreiter, H.-P.; Rucker, Helmut O.; Kaiser, Michael L.

    1992-01-01

    During the inbound and the outbound leg of Voyager 2's encounter with Neptune, the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) experiment aboard the spacecraft detected short radio bursts at frequencies within the range of about 500-1300 kHz, and broad-banded smoothly varying emission patterns within the frequency range from about 40-800 kHz. Both emissions can be described in terms of a period of 16.1 hours determining Neptune's rotation period. Furthermore, just near closest approach, a narrow-banded smoothly varying radio component was observed occurring between 600 and 800 kHz. After giving a brief overview about some general characteristics of Neptune's nonthermal radio emission, the source locations of Neptune's emission components are determined, using an offset tilted dipole model for Neptune's magnetic field. Assuming that the emission originates near the electron gyrofrequency a geometrical beaming model is developed in order to fit the observed emission episodes.

  7. New millisecond pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and the radio/gamma-ray connection

    CERN Document Server

    Espinoza, C M; Celik, O; Weltevrede, P; Stappers, B W; Smith, D A; Kerr, M; Zavlin, V E; Cognard, I; Eatough, R P; Freire, P C C; Janssen, G H; Camilo, F; Desvignes, G; Hewitt, J W; Hou, X; Johnston, S; Keith, M; Kramer, M; Lyne, A; Manchester, R N; Ransom, S M; Ray, P S; Shannon, R; Theureau, G; Webb, N

    2012-01-01

    We report on the discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and timing ephemerides provided by various radio observatories. We also present confirmation of the gamma-ray pulsations from a sixth source, PSR J2051-0827. Five of these six MSPs are in binary systems: PSRs J1713+0747, J1741+1351, J1600-3053 and the two black widow binary pulsars PSRs J0610-2100 and 2051-0827. The only isolated MSP is the nearby PSR J1024-0719, which is also known to emit X-rays. We present X-ray observations in the direction of PSRs J1600-3053 and J2051-0827. While the latter is firmly detected, we an only give upper limits for the X-ray flux of the former. There are no dedicated X-ray observations available for the other 3 objects. The MSPs mentioned above, together with most of the MSPs detected by Fermi, are used to put together a sample of 30 gamma-ray MSPs which is used to study the morphology and phase connection of radio and gamma-ray pulse profiles. We ...

  8. Investigation of the bi-drifting subpulses of radio pulsar B1839-04 utilising the open-source data-analysis project PSRSALSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltevrede, P.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: The usefulness and versatility of the PSRSALSA open-source pulsar data-analysis project is demonstrated through an analysis of the radio pulsar B1839-04. This study focuses on the phenomenon of bi-drifting, an effect where the drift direction of subpulses is systematically different in different pulse profile components. Bi-drifting is extremely rare in the pulsar population, and the theoretical implications are discussed after comparing B1839-04 with the only other known bi-drifter. Methods: Various tools in PSRSALSA, including those allowing quantification of periodicities in the subpulse modulation, their flux distribution, and polarization properties, are exploited to obtain a comprehensive picture of the radio properties of PSR B1839-04. In particular, the second harmonic in the fluctuation spectra of the subpulse modulation is exploited to convincingly demonstrate the existence of bi-drifting in B1839-04. Bi-drifting is confirmed with a completely independent method allowing the average modulation cycle to be determined. Polarization measurements were used to obtain a robust constraint on the magnetic inclination angle. Results: The angle between the rotation and magnetic axis is found to be smaller than 35°. Two distinct emission modes are discovered to be operating, with periodic subpulse modulation being present only during the weaker mode. Despite the variability of the modulation cycle and interruption by mode-changes, the modulation pattern responsible for the bi-drifting is strictly phase locked over a timescale of years such that the variability is identical in the different components. Conclusions: The phase locking implies that a single physical origin is responsible for both drift directions. Phase locking is hard to explain for many models, including those specifically proposed in the literature to explain bi-drifting, and they are therefore shown to be implausible. It is argued that within the framework of circulating beamlets, bi

  9. Pulsar Polar Cap Heating and Surface Thermal X-Ray Emission. II. Inverse Compton Radiation Pair Fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Muslimov, A G; Muslimov, Alice K. Harding & Alexander

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the production of electron-positron pairs by inverse Compton scattered (ICS) photons above a pulsar polar cap (PC) and surface heating by returning positrons. This paper is a continuation of our self-consistent treatment of acceleration, pair dynamics and electric field screening above pulsar PCs. We calculate the altitude of the inverse Compton pair formation fronts, the flux of returning positrons and present the heating efficiencies and X-ray luminosities. We revise pulsar death lines implying cessation of pair formation, and present them in surface magnetic field-period space. We find that virtually all known radio pulsars are capable of producing pairs by resonant and non-resonant ICS photons radiated by particles accelerated above the PC in a pure star-centered dipole field, so that our ICS pair death line coincides with empirical radio pulsar death. Our calculations show that ICS pairs are able to screen the accelerating electric field only for high neutron star surface temperatures and ...

  10. Prospects for Pulsar Studies with the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), due to launch in November 2007, will have unprecedented sensitivity and energy resolution for gamma-rays in the range of 30 MeV to 200 GeV. GLAST is therefore expected to provide major advances in the understanding of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars. As the only presently known galactic GeV source class; pulsars will be one of the most important sources for study with GLAST. The main science goals of the LAT for pulsar studies include an increase in the number of detected radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars, including millisecond pulsars, giving much better statistics for elucidating population characteristics, measurement of the high-energy spectrum and the shape of spectral cutoffs and determining pulse profiles for a variety of pulsars of different age. Further, measurement of phase-resolved spectra and energy dependent pulse profiles of the brighter pulsars should allow detailed tests of magnetospheric particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms, by comparing data with theoretical models that have been developed. Additionally, the LAT will have the sensitivity to allow blind pulsation searches of nearly all unidentified EGRET sources, to possibly uncover more radio-quiet Geminga-like pulsars.

  11. Amplified radio emission from cosmic ray air showers in thunderstorms

    CERN Document Server

    Buitink, S; Asch, T; Badea, F; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blumer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Bruggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Butcher, H; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Huege, T; Kampert, K H; Kolotaev, Y; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Meurer, C; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Nigl, A; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Over, S; Petcu, M; Petrovic, J; Pierog, T; Plewnia, S; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Sima, O; Singh, K; Stumpert, M; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Van Buren, J; Walkowiak, W; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; Zimmermann, D; Buitink, Stijn

    2007-01-01

    Cosmic ray air showers produce radio emission, consisting in large part of geosynchrotron emission. Since the radiation mechanism is based on particle acceleration, the atmospheric electric field can play an important role. Especially inside thunderclouds large electric fields can be present. We examine the contribution of an electric field to the emission mechanism theoretically and experimentally. Two mechanisms of amplification of radio emission are considered: the acceleration radiation of the shower particles and the radiation from the current that is produced by ionization electrons moving in the electric field. We selected and evaluated LOPES data recorded during thunderstorms, periods of heavy cloudiness and periods of cloudless weather. We find that during thunderstorms the radio emission can be strongly enhanced. No amplified pulses were found during periods of cloudless sky or heavy cloudiness, suggesting that the electric field effect for radio air shower measurements can be safely ignored during ...

  12. Constraining Gamma-Ray Pulsar Gap Models with a Simulated Pulsar Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierbattista, Marco; Grenier, I. A.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.

    2012-01-01

    With the large sample of young gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), population synthesis has become a powerful tool for comparing their collective properties with model predictions. We synthesised a pulsar population based on a radio emission model and four gamma-ray gap models (Polar Cap, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, and One Pole Caustic). Applying gamma-ray and radio visibility criteria, we normalise the simulation to the number of detected radio pulsars by a select group of ten radio surveys. The luminosity and the wide beams from the outer gaps can easily account for the number of Fermi detections in 2 years of observations. The wide slot-gap beam requires an increase by a factor of 10 of the predicted luminosity to produce a reasonable number of gamma-ray pulsars. Such large increases in the luminosity may be accommodated by implementing offset polar caps. The narrow polar-cap beams contribute at most only a handful of LAT pulsars. Using standard distributions in birth location and pulsar spin-down power (E), we skew the initial magnetic field and period distributions in a an attempt to account for the high E Fermi pulsars. While we compromise the agreement between simulated and detected distributions of radio pulsars, the simulations fail to reproduce the LAT findings: all models under-predict the number of LAT pulsars with high E , and they cannot explain the high probability of detecting both the radio and gamma-ray beams at high E. The beaming factor remains close to 1.0 over 4 decades in E evolution for the slot gap whereas it significantly decreases with increasing age for the outer gaps. The evolution of the enhanced slot-gap luminosity with E is compatible with the large dispersion of gamma-ray luminosity seen in the LAT data. The stronger evolution predicted for the outer gap, which is linked to the polar cap heating by the return current, is apparently not supported by the LAT data. The LAT sample of gamma-ray pulsars

  13. Investigation of the bi-drifting subpulses of radio pulsar B1839-04 utilising the open-source data-analysis project PSRSALSA

    CERN Document Server

    Weltevrede, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The usefulness and versatility of the PSRSALSA open-source pulsar data-analysis project is demonstrated through an analysis of the radio pulsar B1839-04. This study focuses on the phenomenon of bi-drifting, an effect where the drift direction of subpulses is systematically different in different pulse profile components. Bi-drifting is extremely rare in the pulsar population. Various tools in PSRSALSA, including those allowing quantification of periodicities in the subpulse modulation, their flux distribution, and polarization properties, are exploited to obtain a comprehensive picture of the radio properties of PSR B1839-04. In particular, the second harmonic in the fluctuation spectra of the subpulse modulation is exploited to convincingly demonstrate the existence of bi-drifting. Bi-drifting is confirmed with a completely independent method allowing the average modulation cycle to be determined. Polarization measurements were used to obtain a robust constraint on the magnetic inclination angle of less than...

  14. Multi-wavelength emission region of gamma-ray emitting pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Kisaka, Shota

    2011-01-01

    Using the outer gap model, we investigate the emission region for the multi-wavelength light curve from energetic pulsars. We assume that gamma-ray and non-thermal X-ray photons are emitted from a particle acceleration region in the outer magnetosphere, and UV/optical photons originate above that region. We assume that gamma-rays are radiated only by outwardly moving particles, whereas the other photons are produced by particles moving inward and outward. We parameterize the altitude of the emission region as the deviation from the rotating dipole in vacuum and determine it from the observed multi-wavelength pulse profile using the observationally constrained magnetic dipole inclination angle and viewing angle of the pulsars. We find that the outer gap model can explain the multi-wavelength pulse behavior by a simple distribution of emissivity, and discuss the possibility of further improvement. From observational fitting, we also find a general tendency for the altitude of the gamma-ray emission region to de...

  15. The Crab Pulsar at Centimeter Wavelengths: I. Ensemble Characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Hankins, T H; Eilek, J A

    2015-01-01

    We have observed the pulsar in the Crab Nebula at high radio frequencies and high time resolution. We present continuously sampled data at 640-ns time resolution, and individual bright pulses recorded at down to 0.25-ns time resolution. Combining our new data with previous data from our group and from the literature shows the dramatic changes in the pulsar's radio emission between low and high radio frequencies. Below about 5 GHz the mean profile is dominated by the bright Main Pulse and Low-Frequency Interpulse. Everything changes, however, above about 5 GHz; the Main Pulse disappears, the mean profile of the Crab pulsar is dominated by the High-Frequency Interpulse (which is quite different from its low-frequency counterpart) and the two High-Frequency Components. We present detailed observational characteristics of these different components which future models of the pulsar's magnetosphere must explain.

  16. The Attenuation of $\\gamma$-Ray Emission in Strongly-Magnetized Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Gonthier, P L; Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.; Gonthier, Peter L.

    1997-01-01

    Gamma-rays from pulsars can be efficiently attenuated in their magnetospheres via the mechanism of single-photon pair production and also the exotic QED process of photon splitting, which become prolific in fields approaching the quantum critical value of $B_{cr}=4.41\\times 10^{13}$ Gauss. Recently we have published results of our modelling of strongly-magnetized $\\gamma$-ray pulsars, which focused on the escape or attenuation of photons emitted near the pole at the neutron star surface in dipole fields, in a Schwarzschild metric. We found that pair production and splitting totally inhibit emission above around 10--30 MeV in PSR1509-58, whose surface field is inferred to be as high as $0.7B_{cr}$. Our model pulsar spectra are consistent with the EGRET upper limits for PSR1509-58 for a wide range of polar cap sizes. Here we review the principal predictions of our attenuation analysis, and identify how its powerful observational diagnostic capabilities relate to current and future gamma-ray experiments. Diagnos...

  17. Non-thermal emissions from outer magnetospheric accelerators of middle-aged pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Takata, J

    2008-01-01

    We discuss $\\gamma$-ray emissions from the outer gap accelerators of middle-aged pulsars for part of the series of our studies. A two-dimensional electrodynamic model is used to solve the distribution of accelerating electric fields with electron and positron pair creation and radiation processes in the magnetic meridional plane. We compute the curvature radiation and the synchrotron radiation by solving the evolution of the Lorentz factor and the pitch angle. The calculated spectra are compared with observed phase-averaged spectra. We also use a three-dimensional geometrical model to discuss the pulse profiles. We argue that the outer gap of middle-aged pulsars occupies the whole region between the last-open field lines and the critical magnetic field lines, which are perpendicular to the rotational axis at the light cylinder. We assume that there is no outer gap accelerator inside the light cylinder between the rotational axis and the critical magnetic field lines. For the Geminga pulsar, we demonstrate tha...

  18. On gigahertz spectral turnovers in pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Rajwade, Kaustubh; Anderson, Loren D

    2015-01-01

    Pulsars are known to emit non-thermal radio emission that is generally a power-law function of frequency. In some cases, a turnover is seen at frequencies around 100~MHz. Kijak et al. have reported the presence of a new class of ''Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum'' (GPS) pulsars that show spectral turnovers at frequencies around 1 GHz. We apply a model based on free-free thermal absorption to explain these turnovers in terms of surrounding material such as the dense environments found in HII regions, Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe), or in cold, partially ionized molecular clouds. We show that the turnover frequency depends on the electron temperature of the environment close to the pulsar, as well as the emission measure along the line of sight. We fitted this model to the radio fluxes of known GPS pulsars and show that it can replicate the GHz turnover. From the thermal absorption model, we demonstrate that normal pulsars would exhibit a GPS-like behaviour if they were in a dense environment. We discuss the application ...

  19. X-ray and radio emission from colliding stellar winds

    CERN Document Server

    Pittard, J M; Coker, R F; Corcoran, M F

    2004-01-01

    The collision of the hypersonic winds in early-type binaries produces shock heated gas, which radiates thermal X-ray emission, and relativistic electrons, which emit nonthermal radio emission. We review our current understanding of the emission in these spectral regions and discuss models which have been developed for the interpretation of this emission. Physical processes which affect the resulting emission are reviewed and ideas for the future are noted.

  20. High space velocities of single radio pulsars versus low orbital eccentricities and masses of double neutron stars: Evidence for two different neutron star formation mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, E.P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio pulsars tend to be high-velocity objects, which implies that the majority of them received a velocity kick of several hundreds of km s(-1) at birth. However, six of the eight known double neutron stars in the galactic disk have quite low orbital eccentricities (0.085-0.27), indicating - taking

  1. High space velocities of single radio pulsars versus low orbital eccentricities and masses of double neutron stars: Evidence for two different neutron star formation mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, E.P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio pulsars tend to be high-velocity objects, which implies that the majority of them received a velocity kick of several hundreds of km s(-1) at birth. However, six of the eight known double neutron stars in the galactic disk have quite low orbital eccentricities (0.085-0.27), indicating - taking

  2. Fossil shell emission in dying radio loud AGNs

    CERN Document Server

    Kino, M; Kawakatu, N; Orienti, M; Nagai, H; Wajima, K; Itoh, R

    2015-01-01

    We investigate shell emission associated with dying radio loud AGNs. First, based on our recent work by Ito et al. (2015), we describe the dynamical and spectral evolutions of shells after stopping the jet energy injection. We find that the shell emission overwhelms that of the radio lobes soon after stopping the jet energy injection because fresh electrons are continuously supplied into the shell via the forward shock while the radio lobes rapidly fade out without jet energy injection. We find that such fossil shells can be a new class of target sources for SKA telescope. Next, we apply the model to the nearby radio source 3C84. Then, we find that the fossil shell emission in 3C84 is less luminous in radio band while it is bright in TeV gamma-ray band and it can be detectable by CTA.

  3. Study of the high energy gamma-ray emission from the crab pulsar with the MAGIC telescope and Fermi-LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Takayuki

    2010-12-06

    My thesis deals with a fundamental question of high energy gamma-ray astronomy. Namely, I studied the cut-off shape of the Crab pulsar spectrum to distinguish between the leading scenarios for the pulsar models. Pulsars are celestial objects, which emit periodic pulsed electromagnetic radiation (pulsation) from radio to high energy gamma-rays. Two major scenarios evolved in past 40 years to explain the pulsation mechanism: the inner magnetosphere scenario and the outer magnetosphere scenario. Both scenarios predict a high energy cut-off in the gamma-ray energy spectrum, but with different cut-off sharpness. An exponential cut-off is expected for the outer magnetosphere scenario while a super-exponential cut-off is predicted for the inner magnetosphere scenario. Therefore, one of the best ways to confirm or refute these scenarios is to measure the energy spectrum of a pulsar at around the cut-off energy, i.e., at energies between a few GeV and a few tens of GeV. All past attempts to measure pulsar spectra with ground-based instruments have failed while satellite-borne detectors had a too small area to study detailed spectra in the GeV domain. In this thesis, the gamma-ray emission at around the cut-off energy from the Crab pulsar is studied with the MAGIC telescope. The public data of the satellite-borne gamma-ray detector, Fermi-LAT, are also analyzed in order to discuss the MAGIC observation results in comparison with the adjacent energy band. In late 2007, a new trigger system (SUM trigger system) allowed to reduce the threshold energy of the MAGIC telescope from 50 GeV to 25 GeV and the Crab pulsar was successfully detected during observations from October 2007 and January 2009. My analysis reveals that the energy spectrum is consistent with a simple power law between 25 GeV to 100 GeV. The extension of the energy spectrum up to 100 GeV rules out the inner magnetosphere scenario. Fermi-LAT started operation in August 2008. The Fermi-LAT data reveal that a power

  4. Detectability of gravitational effects of supernova neutrino emission through pulsar timing

    CERN Document Server

    Olum, Ken D

    2013-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae emit on the order of 3x10^53 ergs in high-energy neutrinos over a time of order 10 seconds, and so decrease their mass by about 0.2 solar mass. If the explosion is nearly spherically symmetric, there will be little gravitational wave emission. Nevertheless, the sudden decrease of mass of the progenitor may cause a change in the gravitational time delay of signals from a nearby pulsar. We calculate the change in arrival times as successive pulses pass through the neutrino shell at different times, and find that the effect may be detectable in ideal circumstances.

  5. Extended radio emission and the nature of blazars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonucci, R.R.J.; Ulvestad, J.S.

    1985-07-01

    The VLA has been used at 20 cm to map all 23 of the 54 confirmed blazars listed in the Angel and Stockman review paper that had not been mapped before at high resolution. (Blazars include BL Lac objects and optically violently variable quasars.) In addition, data on most of the previously mapped blazars have been reprocessed in order to achieve higher dynamic range. Extended emission has been detected associated with 49 of the 54 objects. The extended radio emission has been used to test the hypothesis that blazars are normal radio galaxies and radio quasars viewed along the jet axes. We find that blazars have substantial extended power, consistent with this hypothesis. Many have extended powers as high as the luminous Fanaroff-Riley class 2 radio doubles. The projected linear sizes are small, as expected from foreshortening of the extended sources, and many blazars have the expected core-halo morphology. There are also several small doubles, a head-tail source, and some one-sided sources, and these could be in cases where the line of sight is slightly off the jet axis, or projections of asymmetrical radio galaxies and quasars. The ratio of core to extended radio emission has been studied as a possible indicator of viewing aspect or beaming intensity. It is found to correlate with optical polarization, optical and radio core variability, and one-sided radio morphology. We can go beyond these consistency checks and work toward a proof of the hypothesis under discussion. The flux from the extended emission alone is sufficient in some blazars to qualify them for inclusion in the 3C and 4C catalogs. Suppose that the radio core emission is anisotropic, but the extended emission is predominantly isotropic. The isotropy of the extended emission implies that these blazars would be in the catalogs even if viewed from the side.

  6. SIZE OF THE VELA PULSAR'S EMISSION REGION AT 18 cm WAVELENGTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwinn, C. R.; Johnson, M. D. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Reynolds, J. E.; Jauncey, D. L.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Edwards, P. G. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Hirabayashi, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Murata, Y. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuou-ku Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Dougherty, S.; Carlson, B.; Del Rizzo, D. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, BC V2A 6J9 (Canada); Quick, J. F. H.; Flanagan, C. S. [Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 443, Krugersdorp 1740 (South Africa); McCulloch, P. M., E-mail: cgwinn@physics.ucsb.edu [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)

    2012-10-10

    We present measurements of the linear diameter of the emission region of the Vela pulsar at observing wavelength {lambda} = 18 cm. We infer the diameter as a function of pulse phase from the distribution of visibility on the Mopra-Tidbinbilla baseline. As we demonstrate, in the presence of strong scintillation, finite size of the emission region produces a characteristic W-shaped signature in the projection of the visibility distribution onto the real axis. This modification involves heightened probability density near the mean amplitude, decreased probability to either side, and a return to the zero-size distribution beyond. We observe this signature with high statistical significance, as compared with the best-fitting zero-size model, in many regions of pulse phase. We find that the equivalent FWHM of the pulsar's emission region decreases from more than 400 km early in the pulse to near zero at the peak of the pulse and then increases again to approximately 800 km near the trailing edge. We discuss possible systematic effects and compare our work with previous results.

  7. PSR J2030+364I: Radio Discovery and Gamma-ray Study of a Middle-aged Pulsar in the Now Identified Fermi-LAT Source 1FGL J2030.0+3641

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, F.; Kerr, M.; Ray, P. S.; Ransom, S. M.; Johnston, S.; Romani, R. W.; Parent, D.; Decesar, M. E.; Harding, A. K.; Donato, D.; SazParkinson, P. M.; Ferrara, E. C.; Freire, P. C. C.; Guillemot, L; Keith, M.; Kramer, M.; Wood, K. S.

    2011-01-01

    In a radio search with the Green Bank Telescope of three unidentified low Galactic latitude Fermi-LAT sources, we have discovered the middle-aged pulsar J2030+3641, associated with IFGL J2030.0+3641 (2FGL J2030.0+3640). Following the detection of gamma-ray pulsations using a radio ephemeris, we have obtained a phase-coherent timing solution based on gamma-ray and radio pulse arrival times that spans the entire Fermi mission. With a rotation period of 0.28, spin-down luminosity of 3 x 10(exp 34) erg/s, and characteristic age of 0.5 Myr, PSR J2030+3641 is a middle-aged neutron star with spin parameters similar to those of the exceedingly gamma-ray-bright and radio-undetected Geminga. Its gamma-ray flux is 1 % that of Geminga, primarily because of its much larger distance, as suggested by the large integrated column density of free electrons, DM = 246 pc/cu cm. We fit the gamma-ray light curve, along with limited radio polarimetric constraints, to four geometrical models of magnetospheric emission, and while none of the fits have high significance some are encouraging and suggest that further refinements of these models may be worthwhile. We argue that not many more non-millisecond radio pulsars may be detected along the Galactic plane that are responsible for LAT sources, but that modified methods to search for gamma-ray pulsations should be productive - PSR J2030+364 I would have been found blindly in gamma rays if only > or approx. 0.8 GeV photons had been considered, owing to its relatively flat spectrum and location in a region of high soft background.

  8. SAS-2 high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The Second Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-2) high-energy (in excess of 35 MeV) gamma-ray telescope has detected pulsed gamma-ray emission at the radio period from PSR 0833-45, the Vela pulsar, as well as an unpulsed flux from the Vela region. The pulsed emission consists of two peaks following the single radio peak by about 13 ms and 48 ms. The luminosity of the pulsed emission above 100 MeV from Vela is about 0.1 that of the pulsar NP 0532 in the Crab nebula, whereas the pulsed emission from Vela at optical wavelengths is less than 0.0002 that from the Crab. The relatively high intensity of the pulsed gamma-ray emission, and the double peak structure, compared with the single pulse in the radio emission, suggest that the high-energy gamma-ray pulsar emission may be produced under different conditions from those at lower energies.

  9. An extensive and autonomous deep space navigation system using radio pulsars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kestilä, A.A.; Engelen, S.; Gill, E.K.A.; Verhoeven, C.J.M.; Bentum, M.J.; Irahhauten, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Interstellar navigation poses significant challenges in all aspects of a spacecraft. One of them is reliable, low-cost, real-time navigation, especially when there is a considerable distance between Earth and the spacecraft in question. In this paper, a complete system for navigation using pulsar

  10. An extensive and autonomous deep space navigation system using radio pulsars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kestillä, A.A.; Engelen, S.; Gill, E.K.A.; Verhoeven, C.J.M.; Bentum, M.J.; Irahhauten, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Interstellar navigation poses significant challenges in all aspects of a spacecraft. One of them is reliable, low-cost, real-time navigation, especially when there is a considerable distance between Earth and the spacecraft in question. In this paper, a complete system for navigation using pulsar ra

  11. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorimer Duncan R.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the main properties, demographics and applications of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1800. There are now 83 binary and millisecond pulsars associated with the disk of our Galaxy, and a further 140 pulsars in 26 of the Galactic globular clusters. Recent highlights include the discovery of the young relativistic binary system PSR J1906+0746, a rejuvination in globular cluster pulsar research including growing numbers of pulsars with masses in excess of 1.5M_⊙, a precise measurement of relativistic spin precession in the double pulsar system and a Galactic millisecond pulsar in an eccentric (e = 0.44 orbit around an unevolved companion.

  12. MeV Pulsars: Modeling Spectra and Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kust Harding, Alice; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos

    2017-08-01

    A sub-population of energetic rotation-powered pulsars show high fluxes of pulsed non-thermal hard X-ray emission. While this ‘MeV pulsar’ population includes some radio-loud pulsars like the Crab and PSR B1509-58, a significant number have no detected radio or GeV emission, a mystery since gamma-ray emission is a common characteristic of pulsars with high spin-down power. Their steeply rising hard X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) suggest peaks at 0.1 - 1 MeV but they have not been detected above 200 keV. Several upcoming and planned telescopes may shed light on the MeV pulsars. The Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) will observe pulsars in the 0.2 - 12 keV band and may discover additional MeV pulsars. The All-Sky Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Observatory (AMEGO), in a study phase, can detect emission above 0.2 MeV and polarization in the 0.2 - 10 MeV band. We present a model for the spectrum and polarization of MeV pulsars where the X-ray emission comes from electron-positron pairs radiating in the outer magnetosphere and current sheet. This model predicts that the peak of the SED increases with surface magnetic field strength if the pairs are produced in polar cap cascades. For small inclination angles, viewing at large angles to the rotation axis can miss both the radio pulse and the GeV pulse from particles accelerating near the current sheet. Characterizing the emission and geometry of MeV pulsars can thus provide clues to the source of pairs and acceleration in the magnetosphere.

  13. Extended Radio Emission in MOJAVE Blazars: Challenges to Unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharb, P.; Lister, M. L.; Cooper, N. J.

    2010-02-01

    We present the results of a study on the kiloparsec-scale radio emission in the complete flux density limited MOJAVE sample, comprising 135 radio-loud active galactic nuclei. New 1.4 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) radio images of six quasars and previously unpublished images of 21 blazars are presented, along with an analysis of the high-resolution (VLA A-array) 1.4 GHz emission for the entire sample. While extended emission is detected in the majority of the sources, about 7% of the sources exhibit only radio core emission. We expect more sensitive radio observations, however, to detect faint emission in these sources, as we have detected in the erstwhile "core-only" source, 1548+056. The kiloparsec-scale radio morphology varies widely across the sample. Many BL Lac objects exhibit extended radio power and kiloparsec-scale morphology typical of powerful FRII jets, while a substantial number of quasars possess radio powers intermediate between FRIs and FRIIs. This poses challenges to the simple radio-loud unified scheme, which links BL Lac objects to FRIs and quasars to FRIIs. We find a significant correlation between extended radio emission and parsec-scale jet speeds: the more radio powerful sources possess faster jets. This indicates that the 1.4 GHz (or low-frequency) radio emission is indeed related to jet kinetic power. Various properties such as extended radio power and apparent parsec-scale jet speeds vary smoothly between different blazar subclasses, suggesting that, at least in terms of radio jet properties, the distinction between quasars and BL Lac objects, at an emission-line equivalent width of 5 Å, is essentially an arbitrary one. While the two blazar subclasses display a smooth continuation in properties, they often reveal differences in the correlation test results when considered separately. This can be understood if, unlike quasars, BL Lac objects do not constitute a homogeneous population, but rather include both FRI and FRII radio galaxies for

  14. Measurement of radio emission from extensive air showers with LOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoerandel, J.R., E-mail: j.horandel@astro.ru.n [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Apel, W.D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Arteaga, J.C. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Asch, T. [IPE, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Badea, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Baehren, L. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Bertaina, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita di Torino (Italy); Biermann, P.L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie Bonn (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Brueggemann, M.; Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Buitink, S. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Department of Astrophysics, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita di Torino (Italy); Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplan etario, INAF Torino (Italy); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita di Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Daumiller, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Souza, V. de [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-02-21

    A new method is explored to detect extensive air showers: the measurement of radio waves emitted during the propagation of the electromagnetic shower component in the magnetic field of the Earth. Recent results of the pioneering experiment LOPES are discussed. It registers radio signals in the frequency range between 40 and 80 MHz. The intensity of the measured radio emission is investigated as a function of different shower parameters, such as shower energy, angle of incidence, and distance to shower axis. In addition, new antenna types are developed in the framework of LOPES{sup star} and new methods are explored to realize a radio self-trigger algorithm in real time.

  15. Measurement of Radio Emission from Extensive Air Showers with LOPES

    CERN Document Server

    Hoerandel, J R

    2009-01-01

    A new method is explored to detect extensive air showers: the measurement of radio waves emitted during the propagation of the electromagnetic shower component in the magnetic field of the Earth. Recent results of the pioneering experiment LOPES are discussed. It registers radio signals in the frequency range between 40 and 80 MHz. The intensity of the measured radio emission is investigated as a function of different shower parameters, such as shower energy, angle of incidence, and distance to shower axis. In addition, new antenna types are developed in the framework of LOPES-Star and new methods are explored to realize a radio self-trigger algorithm in real time.

  16. Detection of Exomoons Through Their Modulation of Exoplanetary Radio Emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Noyola, Joaquin P; Musielak, Zdzislaw E

    2013-01-01

    In the Jupiter-Io system, the moon's motion produces currents along the field lines that connect the moon to the Jupiter's polar regions, where the radio emission is modulated by the currents. Based on this process, we suggest that such modulation of planetary radio emissions may reveal the presence of exomoons around giant planets in exoplanetary systems. The required physical conditions for the modulation are established and used to select potential candidates for exomoon's detection. A cautiously optimistic scenario of possible detection of such exomoons with the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) and the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) radio telescopes is provided.

  17. Interstellar Medium Effects on Radio Pulsars PSR B1937+21 and PSR B2224+65, and Implications for Gravitational Wave Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolch, Timothy; Chatterjee, Shami; Cordes, James M.; Paul, Demorest; Halmrast, Daniel; Jessup, Cody; Jones, Glenn; Lam, Michael T.; Lyne, Andrew; McLaughlin, Maura; Ramette, Joshua; Stinebring, Dan; Stappers, Benjamin; Stovall, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Noise in pulsar timing residuals due to the ionized interstellar medium (IISM) is a critical limiting factor for pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) as gravitational wave detectors. PSR B1937+21 is the brightest millisecond pulsar in the northern sky and serves as a laboratory for studying uncertainties and systematic changes in pulse times-of-arrival. Its high flux, its high degree of scattering along the line-of-sight, and its giant pulses interact in a dynamic way to affect individual times-of-arrival on different timescales. Noise budget results on this pulsar are relevant to understanding the timing of other millisecond pulsars. We present data from an Arecibo Observatory campaign on PSR B1937+21 at 1.4GHz, the standard radio frequency at which the times-of-arrival of PSR B1937+21 and other PTA pulsars are routinely measured for the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav). The campaign was strategized to probe the pulsar’s noise budget, particularly with respect to the IISM from high S/N dynamic spectra that show flux distributed irregularly across the bandwidth from interstellar scintillation. Similarly, PSR B2224+65, while not a NANOGrav pulsar, is associated with the Guitar Nebula, a region with significant ISM density fluctuations. We also present data from a Green Bank Telescope monitoring campaign on PSR B2224+65 at 342MHz and 1.4GHz, which uses dispersion measure (DM) variations to constrain the influence of the IISM on the pulsar’s times-of-arrival. By utilizing the dynamic spectra, single pulse, and DM data from these campaigns, we analyze the noise budgets of these pulsars on very short and very long timescales due to the changing intervening IISM.

  18. An outer gap model of high-energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, J

    1994-01-01

    We describe a refined calculation of high energy emission from rotation-powered pulsars based on the Outer Gap model of Cheng, Ho \\&~Ruderman (1986a,b). We have improved upon previous efforts to model the spectra from these pulsars (e. g. Cheng, et al. 1986b; Ho 1989) by following the variation in particle production and radiation properties with position in the outer gap. Curvature, synchrotron and inverse-Compton scattering fluxes vary significantly over the gap and their interactions {\\it via} photon-photon pair production build up the radiating charge populations at varying rates. We have also incorporated an approximate treatment of the transport of particle and photon fluxes between gap emission zones. These effects, along with improved computations of the particle and photon distributions, provide very important modifications of the model gamma-ray flux. In particular, we attempt to make specific predictions of pulse profile shapes and spectral variations as a function of pulse phase and suggest fu...

  19. Gamma-ray Emission from the Vela Pulsar Modeled with the Annular Gap and Core Gap

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Y J; Qiao, G J; Chou, C K

    2011-01-01

    The Vela pulsar represents a distinct group of {\\gamma}-ray pulsars. Fermi {\\gamma}-ray observations reveal that it has two sharp peaks (P1 and P2) in the light curve with a phase separation of 0.42 and a third peak (P3) in the bridge. The location and intensity of P3 are energy-dependent. We use the 3D magnetospheric model for the annular gap and core gap to simulate the {\\gamma}-ray light curves, phase-averaged and phase-resolved spectra. We found that the acceleration electric field along a field line in the annular gap region decreases with heights. The emission at high energy GeV band is originated from the curvature radiation of accelerated primary particles, while the synchrotron radiation from secondary particles have some contributions to low energy {\\gamma}-ray band (0.1 - 0.3 GeV). The {\\gamma}-ray light curve peaks P1 and P2 are generated in the annular gap region near the altitude of null charge surface, whereas P3 and the bridge emission is generated in the core gap region. The intensity and loc...

  20. Constraint on the pulsar wind nebula scenario of origin of the TeV gamma ray emission from MGRO J2019+37 in the Cygnus region

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Lab

    2014-01-01

    Origin of the TeV gamma ray emission from MGRO J2019+37 discovered by the Milagro experiment is investigated within the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) scenario using multiwavelength information on sources suggested to be associated with this object. We find that the PWN scenario is severely constrained by the upper limit on the radio flux from the region around MGRO J2019+37 given by the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) as well as by the x-ray flux upper limit from SWIFT/XRT. Specifically, we find that within the synchrotron self-compton mechanism of production of TeV photons by electrons within the nebula, the GMRT and/or SWIFT/XRT flux upper limits impose upper limits of O($10^{-4}$ pc) on the effective characteristic size of the emission region within the PWN for an assumed distance of $\\sim$ few kpc to the source. This is about four orders of magnitude less than the characteristic size of the emission region typically invoked in explaining the TeV emission from a "standard" PWN such as the Crab Nebula.

  1. Topology and Polarisation of Subbeams Associated With Pulsar 0943+10's ``Drifting''-Subpulse Emission I. Analysis of Arecibo 430- and 111-MHz Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Rankin, J M

    2000-01-01

    The ``drifting'' subpulses exhibited by some radio pulsars have fascinated both observers and theorists for 30 years, and have been widely regarded as one of the most critical and potentially insightful aspects of their emission. Here, we report on detailed studies of pulsar B0943+10, whose nearly coherent sequences of ``drifting'' subpulses have permitted us to identify their origin as a system of subbeams that appear to circulate around the star's magnetic axis. We introduce several new techniques of analysis, and we find that both the primary and secondary features in the star's fluctuation spectra are aliases of their actual values. We have also developed a method of tracing the underlying pattern responsible for the observed sequences, using a ``cartographic'' transform and its inverse, permitting us to study the characteristics of the polar-cap emission ``map'' and to confirm that such a ``map'' in turn represents the observed sequence. We apply these techniques to the study of three different Arecibo o...

  2. Distribution of inhomogeneities in the interstellar plasma in the directions of three distant pulsars from observations with the RadioAstron ground-space interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, M. V.; Andrianov, A. S.; Bartel, N.; Gwinn, C.; Joshi, B. C.; Jauncey, D.; Kardashev, N. S.; Rudnitskii, A. G.; Smirnova, T. V.; Soglasnov, V. A.; Fadeev, E. N.; Shishov, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The RadioAstron ground-space interferometer has been used to measure the angular sizes of the scattering disks of the three distant pulsars B1641-45, B1749-28, and B1933+16. The observations were carried out with the participation of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope; two 32-m telescopes at Torun, Poland and Svetloe, Russia (the latter being one antenna of the KVAZAR network); the Saint Croix VLBA antenna; the Arecibo radio telescope; the Parkes, Narrabri (ATCA), Mopra, Hobart, and Ceduna Australian radio telescopes; and the Hartebeesthoek radio telescope in South Africa. The full widths at half maximum of the scattering disks were 27 mas at 1668 MHz for B1641-45, 0.5 mas at 1668 MHz for B1749-28, and 12.3 at 316 MHz and 0.84 mas at 1668 MHz for B1933+16. The characteristic time scales for scatter-broadening of the pulses on inhomogeneities in the interstellar plasma τsc were also measured for these pulsars using various methods. Joint knowledge of the size of the scattering disk and the scatter-broadening time scale enables estimation of the distance to the effective scattering screen d. For B1641-45, d = 3.0 kpc for a distance to the pulsar D = 4.9 kpc, and for B1749-28, d = 0.95 kpc for D = 1.3 kpc. Observations of B1933+16 were carried out simultaneously at 316 and 1668 MHz. The positions of the screen derived using the measurements at the two frequencies agree: d 1 = 2.6 and d 2 = 2.7 kpc, for a distance to the pulsar of 3.7 kpc. Two screens were detected for this pulsar from an analysis of parabolic arcs in the secondary dynamic spectrum at 1668 MHz, at 1.3 and 3.1 kpc. The scattering screens for two of the pulsars are identified with real physical objects located along the lines of sight toward the pulsars: G339.1-04 (B1641-45) and G0.55-0.85 (B1749-28).

  3. Radio emission of air showers with extremely high energy measured by the Yakutsk Radio Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knurenko, S. P.; Petrov, Z. E.; Petrov, I. S.

    2017-09-01

    The Yakutsk Array is designed to study cosmic rays at energy 1015 -1020 eV . It consists several independent arrays that register charged particles, muons with energy E ≥ 1 GeV , Cherenkov light and radio emission. The paper presents a technical description of the Yakutsk Radio Array and some preliminary results obtained from measurements of radio emission at 30-35 MHz frequency induced by air shower particles with energy ε ≥ 1 ·1017 eV . The data obtained at the Yakutsk array in 1986-1989 (first set of measurements) and 2009-2014 (new set of measurements). Based on the obtained results we determined: Lateral distribution function (LDF) of air showers radio emission with energy ≥1017 eV . Radio emission amplitude empirical connection with air shower energy. Determination of depth of maximum by ratio of amplitude at different distances from the shower axis. For the first time, at the Yakutsk array radio emission from the air shower with energy >1019 eV was registered including the shower with the highest energy ever registered at the Yakutsk array with energy ∼ 2 ·1020 eV .

  4. Polarized radio emission from extensive air showers measured with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, P.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Enriquez, J. E.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J. R.; Krause, M.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Scholten, O.; ter Veen, S.; Thoudam, S.; Trinh, T.N.G.

    2014-01-01

    We present LOFAR measurements of radio emission from extensive air showers. We find that this emission is strongly polarized, with a median degree of polarization of nearly 99%, and that the angle between the polarization direction of the electric field and the Lorentz force acting on the particles,

  5. High energy emission from the nebula around the Black Widow binary system containing millisecond pulsar B1957+20

    CERN Document Server

    Bednarek, W

    2013-01-01

    The features of pulsed $\\gamma$-ray emission from classical and millisecond pulsars indicate that the high energy radiation processes in their inner magnetospheres occur in a similar way. In the last decade several TeV $\\gamma$-ray nebulae have been discovered around classical pulsars. The above facts suggest that $\\gamma$-rays should be produced also in the surroundings of millisecond pulsars. We discuss a model for the bow shock nebula around the well known Black Widow binary system containing the millisecond pulsar B1957+20. This model predicts the existence of a synchrotron X-ray and inverse Compton $\\gamma$-ray nebula around this system. We want to find out whether $\\gamma$-ray emission from the nebula around B1957+20 could be detected by the future and present Cherenkov telescopes. Using the Monte Carlo method we followed the propagation of relativistic electrons in the vicinity of the pulsar. We calculated the very high energy radiation produced by them in the synchrotron process and the inverse Compto...

  6. Multiwavelength analysis of four millisecond pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, L.; Cognard, I.; Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.

    2011-08-01

    Radio timing observations of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in support of Fermi LAT observations of the gamma-ray sky enhance the sensitivity of high-energy pulsation searches. With contemporaneous ephemerides we have detected gamma-ray pulsations from PSR B1937+21, the first MSP ever discovered, and B1957+20, the first known black-widow system. The two MSPs share a number of properties: they are energetic and distant compared to other gamma-ray MSPs, and both of them exhibit aligned radio and gamma-ray emission peaks, indicating co-located emission regions in the outer magnetosphere of the pulsars. However, radio observations are also crucial for revealing MSPs in Fermi unassociated sources. In a search for radio pulsations at the position of such unassociated sources, the Nançay Radio Telescope discovered two MSPs, PSRs J2017+0603 and J2302+4442, increasing the sample of known Galactic disk MSPs. Subsequent radio timing observations led to the detection of gamma-ray pulsations from these two MSPs as well. We describe multiwavelength timing and spectral analysis of these four pulsars, and the modeling of their gamma-ray light curves in the context of theoretical models.

  7. OSCILLATION-DRIVEN MAGNETOSPHERIC ACTIVITY IN PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Meng-Xiang; Xu, Ren-Xin; Zhang, Bing, E-mail: linmx97@gmail.com, E-mail: r.x.xu@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-02-01

    We study the magnetospheric activity in the polar cap region of pulsars under stellar oscillations. The toroidal oscillation of the star propagates into the magnetosphere, which provides additional voltage due to unipolar induction, changes Goldreich-Julian charge density from the traditional value due to rotation, and hence influences particle acceleration. We present a general solution of the effect of oscillations within the framework of the inner vacuum gap model and consider three different inner gap modes controlled by curvature radiation, inverse Compton scattering, and two-photon annihilation, respectively. With different pulsar parameters and oscillation amplitudes, one of three modes would play a dominant role in defining the gap properties. When the amplitude of oscillation exceeds a critical value, mode changing occurs. Oscillations also lead to a change of the size of the polar cap. As applications, we show the inner gap properties under oscillations in both normal pulsars and anomalous X-ray pulsars/soft gamma-ray repeaters (AXPs/SGRs). We interpret the onset of radio emission after glitches/flares in AXPs/SGRs as due to oscillation-driven magnetic activities in these objects, within the framework of both the magnetar model and the solid quark star model. Within the magnetar model, radio activation may be caused by the enlargement of the effective polar cap angle and the radio emission beam due to oscillation, whereas within the solid quark star angle, it may be caused by activation of the pulsar inner gap from below the radio emission death line due to an oscillation-induced voltage enhancement. The model can also explain the glitch-induced radio profile change observed in PSR J1119–6127.

  8. High-energy emission from the nebula around the Black Widow binary system containing millisecond pulsar B1957+20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarek, W.; Sitarek, J.

    2013-02-01

    Context. The features of pulsed γ-ray emission from classical and millisecond pulsars indicate that the high energy radiation processes in their inner magnetospheres occur in a similar way. In the past decade several TeV γ-ray nebulae have been discovered around classical pulsars. The above facts suggest that γ-rays should be produced also in the surroundings of millisecond pulsars. Aims: We discuss a model for the bow shock nebula around the well known Black Widow binary system containing the millisecond pulsar B1957+20. This model predicts the existence of a synchrotron X-ray and inverse Compton γ-ray nebula around this system. We want to find out whether γ-ray emission from the nebula around B1957+20 could be detected by the future and present Cherenkov telescopes. Methods: Using the Monte Carlo method we followed the propagation of relativistic electrons in the vicinity of the pulsar. We calculated the very high energy radiation produced by them in the synchrotron process and the inverse Compton scattering of the microwave background radiation and of the infrared radiation from the galactic disk. We also computed the X-ray emission produced by the electrons in the synchrotron process. Results: We show that the hard X-ray tail emission observed from the vicinity of B1957+20 can be explained by our model. Moreover, we predict that the TeV γ-ray emission produced by the electrons in the inverse Compton process should be detectable by the future Cherenkov Telescope Array and possibly by the long term observations with the present Cherenkov arrays such as MAGIC and VERITAS. The γ-ray emission from B1957+20 is expected to be extended, inhomogeneous, and shifted from the present location of the binary system by a distance comparable to the radius of the nebula.

  9. X-ray measurement of the spin-down of CalverA: A radio- and gamma-ray-quiet pulsar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halpern, J. P.; Bogdanov, S.; Gotthelf, E. V., E-mail: jules@astro.columbia.edu [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027-6601 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We measure spin-down of the 59 ms X-ray pulsar Calvera by comparing the XMM-Newton discovery data from 2009 with new Chandra timing observations taken in 2013. Its period derivative is P-dot =(3.19± 0.08)×10{sup −15}, which corresponds to spin-down luminosity E-dot =6.1×10{sup 35} erg s{sup –1}, characteristic age τ{sub c}≡P/2 P-dot =2.9×10{sup 5} yr, and surface dipole magnetic field strength B{sub s} = 4.4 × 10{sup 11} G. These values rule out a mildly recycled pulsar, but Calvera could be an orphaned central compact object (anti-magnetar), with a magnetic field that was initially buried by supernova debris and is now reemerging and approaching normal strength. We also performed unsuccessful searches for high-energy γ-rays from Calvera in both imaging and timing of >100 MeV Fermi photons. Even though the distance to Calvera is uncertain by an order of magnitude, an upper limit of d < 2 kpc inferred from X-ray spectra implies a γ-ray luminosity limit of <3.3 × 10{sup 32} erg s{sup –1}, which is less than that of any pulsar of comparable E-dot . Calvera shares some properties with PSR J1740+1000, a young radio pulsar that we show by virtue of its lack of proper motion was born outside of the Galactic disk. As an energetic, high-Galactic-latitude pulsar, Calvera is unique in being undetected in both radio and γ-rays to faint limits, which should place interesting constraints on models for particle acceleration and beam patterns in pulsar magnetospheres.

  10. Binary Millisecond Pulsar Discovery via Gamma-Ray Pulsations

    CERN Document Server

    Pletsch, H J; Fehrmann, H; Allen, B; Kramer, M; Aulbert, C; Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; de Angelis, A; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Brandt, T J; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Celik, Ö; Charles, E; Chaves, R C G; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M -H; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hartog, P R den; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hill, A B; Hou, X; Hughes, R E; Johannesson, G; Jackson, M S; Jogler, T; Johnson, A S; Johnson, W N; Kataoka, J; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Massaro, F; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; de Palma, F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Raino, S; Rando, R; Ray, P S; Razzano, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Romoli, C; Sanchez, D A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schulz, A; Sgro, C; Silva, E do Couto e; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Suson, D J; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Troja, E; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S; 10.1126/science.1229054

    2012-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs), old neutron stars spun-up by accreting matter from a companion star, can reach high rotation rates of hundreds of revolutions per second. Until now, all such "recycled" rotation-powered pulsars have been detected by their spin-modulated radio emission. In a computing-intensive blind search of gamma-ray data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (with partial constraints from optical data), we detected a 2.5-millisecond pulsar, PSR J1311-3430. This unambiguously explains a formerly unidentified gamma-ray source that had been a decade-long enigma, confirming previous conjectures. The pulsar is in a circular orbit with an orbital period of only 93 minutes, the shortest of any spin-powered pulsar binary ever found.

  11. Characterization of a Precision Pulsar Timing Gravitational Wave Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    We aim to construct a Galactic-scale detector comprised of an array of pulsars distributed across the sky in an effort to detect low-frequency (nanohertz) gravitational waves. Even without a detection, observations of pulsar timing arrays have allowed us to begin to place impactful astrophysical constraints on dynamical processes occurring during galaxy mergers. Understanding the detector is necessary for improving our sensitivity to gravitational waves and making a detection. Therefore, our goal is to characterize the entire propagation path through the pulsar timing array detector. To do so, we must understand: what intrinsic noise processes occur at the pulsar, what effects the interstellar medium has on pulsed radio emission, and what errors we introduce when measuring the incident electromagnetic radiation at our observatories.In this work, we observed of one of the most spin-stable objects known for 24 hours to understand the fundamental limits of precision pulsar timing. We investigated the effect of non-simultaneous, multi-frequency sampling of pulsar dispersion measures on timing and analyzed the cause of deterministic and stochastic temporal variations seen in dispersion measure time series. We analyzed errors in pulse arrival times and determined the white noise budget for pulsars on the timescale of a single observation. Finally, we measured the excess noise beyond the white noise model in pulsar timing residuals and incorporated our results into a global model over all pulsar populations to improve excess noise scaling relations.

  12. Radio emission of the sun at millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagnibeda, V. G.; Piotrovich, V. V.

    This review article deals with the radio emission originating from different solar atmospheric regions - the quiet solar atmosphere, active regions and solar flares. All experimental data of the quiet Sun brightness temperature at the region of 0.1 - 20 mm wavelength are summarized. The quiet Sun brightness distributions across the disk and values of the solar radio radius are reviewed. The properties of the sources of sunspot-associated active region emission and radio brightness depression associated with Hα-filaments are considered in comparison with observations at centimetre and optical domains. The observational properties of millimetre wave bursts and their correlations with similar phenomena at other domains are reviewed. Special reference is devoted to nearly 100% correlation impulsive radio bursts with hard X-ray bursts. Existence of the fine temporal structure containing many spikes with time scales up to 10 ms as well as observations of quasi-periodic millisecond oscillations are discussed.

  13. Pulsar Pair Cascades in a Distorted Magnetic Dipole Field

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, Alice K

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of a distorted neutron star dipole magnetic field on pulsar pair cascade multiplicity and pair death lines. Using a simple model for a distorted dipole field that produces an offset polar cap, we derive the accelerating electric field above the polar cap in space charge limited flow. We find that even a modest azimuthally asymmetric distortion can significantly increase the accelerating electric field on one side of the polar cap and, combined with a smaller field line radius of curvature, leads to larger pair multiplicity. The death line for producing pairs by curvature radiation moves downward in the P-Pdot diagram, allowing high pair multiplicities in a larger percentage of the radio pulsar population. These results could have important implications for the radio pulsar population, high energy pulsed emission and the pulsar contribution to cosmic ray positrons.

  14. A burst in a wind bubble and the impact on baryonic ejecta: high-energy gamma-ray flashes and afterglows from fast radio bursts and pulsar-driven supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kohta; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Mészáros, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Tenuous wind bubbles, which are formed by the spin-down activity of central compact remnants, are relevant in some models of fast radio bursts (FRBs) and superluminous supernovae (SNe). We study their high-energy signatures, focusing on the role of pair-enriched bubbles produced by young magnetars, rapidly rotating neutron stars, and magnetized white dwarfs. (i) First, we study the nebular properties and the conditions allowing for escape of high-energy gamma-rays and radio waves, showing that their escape is possible for nebulae with ages of ≳10-100 yr. In the rapidly rotating neutron star scenario, we find that radio emission from the quasi-steady nebula itself may be bright enough to be detected especially at sub-mm frequencies, which is relevant as a possible counterpart of pulsar-driven SNe and FRBs. (ii) Secondly, we consider the fate of bursting emission in the nebulae. We suggest that an impulsive burst may lead to a highly relativistic flow, which would interact with the nebula. If the shocked nebula is still relativistic, pre-existing non-thermal particles in the nebula can be significantly boosted by the forward shock, leading to short-duration (maybe millisecond or longer) high-energy gamma-ray flashes. Possible dissipation at the reverse shock may also lead to gamma-ray emission. (iii) After such flares, interactions with the baryonic ejecta may lead to afterglow emission with a duration of days to weeks. In the magnetar scenario, this burst-in-bubble model leads to the expectation that nearby (≲10-100 Mpc) high-energy gamma-ray flashes may be detected by the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory and the Cherenkov Telescope Array, and the subsequent afterglow emission may be seen by radio telescopes such as the Very Large Array. (iv) Finally, we discuss several implications specific to FRBs, including constraints on the emission regions and limits on soft gamma-ray counterparts.

  15. Polarized radio emission from a magnetar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, M.; Stappers, B.W.; Jessner, A.; Lyne, A.G.; Jordan, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    We present polarization observations of the radio emitting magnetar AXPJ1810-197. Using simultaneous multifrequency observations performed at 1.4, 4.9 and 8.4 GHz, we obtained polarization information for single pulses and the average pulse profile at several epochs. We find that in several respects

  16. Radio emission from rapidly-rotating cool giant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Stephen A.; Walter, Frederick M.; Florkowski, David R.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a VLA program are reported to examine the radio continuum emission from 11 rapidly-rotating cool giant stars, all of which were originally believed to be single stars. Six of the 11 stars were detected as radio sources, including FK Com and HR 9024, for which there exist multifrequency observations. HD 199178, UZ Lib (now known to be a binary system), and HD 82558, for which there is only 6-cm data. The radio properties of these stars are compared with those of the active, rapidly rotating evolved stars found in the RS CVn binary systems.

  17. Radio continuum emission from knots in the DG Tau jet

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, L F; Raga, A C; Canto, J; Riera, A; Loinard, L; Dzib, S A; Zapata, L A

    2011-01-01

    Context: HH 158, the jet from the young star DG Tau, is one of the few sources of its type where jet knots have been detected at optical and X-ray wavelengths. Aims: To search, using Very Large Array observations of this source, radio knots and if detected, compare them with the optical and X-ray knots. To model the emission from the radio knots. Methods: We analyzed archive data and also obtained new Very Large Array observations of this source, as well as an optical image, to measure the present position of the knots. We also modeled the radio emission from the knots in terms of shocks in a jet with intrinsically time-dependent ejection velocities. Results: We detected radio knots in the 1996.98 and 2009.62 VLA data. These radio knots are,within error, coincident with optical knots. We also modeled satisfactorily the observed radio flux densities as shock features from a jet with intrinsic variability. All the observed radio, optical, and X-ray knot positions can be intepreted as four successive knots, ejec...

  18. Implications on the X-ray emission of evolved pulsar wind nebulae based on VHE gamma-ray observations

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, Michael J; Jung, Ira; Valerius, Kathrin; Stegmann, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Energetic pulsars power winds of relativistic leptons which produce photon nebulae (so-called pulsar wind nebulae, PWNe) detectable across the electromagnetic spectrum up to energies of several TeV. The spectral energy distribution has a double-humped structure: the first hump lies in the X-ray regime, the second in the gamma-ray range. The X-ray emission is generally understood as synchrotron radiation by highly energetic electrons, the gamma-ray emission as Inverse Compton scattering of energetic electrons with ambient photon fields. The evolution of the spectral energy distribution is influenced by the time-dependent spin-down of the pulsar and the decrease of the magnetic field strength with time. Thus, the present spectral appearance of a PWN depends on the age of the pulsar: while young PWNe are bright in X-rays and gamma-rays, the X-ray emission of evolved PWNe is suppressed. Hence, evolved PWNe may offer an explanation of the nature of some of the unidentified VHE gamma-ray sources not yet associated ...

  19. Probing the radio emission from air showers with polarization measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bardenet, R.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Foerster, N.; Fox, B. D.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PeÂķala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Pontz, M.; Porcelli, A.; Preda, T.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Rühle, C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Straub, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Taşcǎu, O.; Thao, N. T.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    The emission of radio waves from air showers has been attributed to the so-called geomagnetic emission process. At frequencies around 50 MHz this process leads to coherent radiation which can be observed with rather simple setups. The direction of the electric field induced by this emission process depends only on the local magnetic field vector and on the incoming direction of the air shower. We report on measurements of the electric field vector where, in addition to this geomagnetic component, another component has been observed that cannot be described by the geomagnetic emission process. The data provide strong evidence that the other electric field component is polarized radially with respect to the shower axis, in agreement with predictions made by Askaryan who described radio emission from particle showers due to a negative charge excess in the front of the shower. Our results are compared to calculations which include the radiation mechanism induced by this charge-excess process.

  20. 3D modelling of stellar auroral radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leto, P.; Trigilio, C.; Buemi, C. S.; Umana, G.; Ingallinera, A.; Cerrigone, L.

    2016-06-01

    The electron cyclotron maser is the coherent emission process that gives rise to the radio lighthouse effect observed in the hot magnetic chemically peculiar star CU Virginis. It has also been proposed to explain the highly circularly polarized radio pulses observed in some ultracool dwarfs with spectral type earlier than M7. Coherent events of this kind resemble auroral radio emission from the magnetized planets of the Solar system. In this article, we present a three-dimensional model able to simulate the timing and profile of the pulses emitted by those stars characterized by a dipolar magnetic field by following the hypothesis of the laminar source model, used to explain the beaming of terrestrial auroral kilometric radiation. This model proves to be a powerful tool with which to understand the auroral radio emission phenomenon, allowing us to derive some general conclusions about the effects of the model's free parameters on the features of coherent pulses and to learn more about the detectability of such pulsed radio emission.

  1. Quasi-Quiescent Radio Emission from the First Radio-Emitting T Dwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Peter K G; Zauderer, B Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Radio detections of ultracool dwarfs provide insight into their magnetic fields and the dynamos that maintain them, especially at the very bottom of the main sequence, where other activity indicators dramatically weaken. Until recently, the coolest brown dwarf detected in the radio was only of spectral type L3.5, but this has changed with the Arecibo detection of rapid polarized flares from the T6.5 dwarf 2MASS J10475385+2124234. Here, we report the detection of quasi-quiescent radio emission from this source at 5.8 GHz using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. The luminosity is {\

  2. Tests of the universality of free fall for strongly self-gravitating bodies with radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Paulo C. C.; Kramer, Michael; Wex, Norbert

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we review tests of the strong equivalence principle (SEP) derived from pulsar-white dwarf binary data. The extreme difference in the binding energy between both components and the precise measurement of the orbital motion provided by pulsar timing allow the only current precision SEP tests for strongly self-gravitating bodies. We start by highlighting why such tests are conceptually important. We then review previous work where limits on SEP violation are obtained with an ensemble of wide binary systems with small eccentricity orbits. Then, we propose a new SEP violation test based on the measurement of the variation of the orbital eccentricity (ė). This new method has the following advantages: (a) unlike previous methods it is not based on probabilistic considerations, (b) it can make a direct detection of SEP violation and (c) the measurement of ė is not contaminated by any known external effects, which implies that this SEP test is only restricted by the measurement precision of ė. In the final part of the review, we conceptually compare the SEP test with the test for dipolar radiation damping, a phenomenon closely related to SEP violation, and speculate on future prospects by new types of tests in globular clusters and future triple systems.

  3. Tests of the universality of free fall for strongly self-gravitating bodies with radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, Paulo C C; Wex, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we review tests of the strong equivalence principle (SEP) derived from binary pulsar data. The extreme difference in binding energy between both components and the precise measurement of the orbital motion provided by pulsar timing allow the only current precision SEP tests for strongly self-gravitating bodies. We start by highlighting why such tests are conceptually important. We then review previous work where limits on SEP violation are obtained with an ensemble of wide binary systems with small eccentricity orbits. Then we propose a new SEP violation test based on the measurement of the variation of the orbital eccentricity de/dt. This new method has the following advantages: a) unlike previous methods it is not based on probabilistic considerations, b) it can make a direct detection of SEP violation, c) the measurement of de/dt is not contaminated by any known external effects, which implies that this SEP test is only restricted by the measurement precision of de/dt. In the final part of t...

  4. Ion-proton pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  5. Ion-proton pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, P B

    2016-01-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  6. X-ray variability and evidence for pulsations from the unique radio pulsar/X-ray binary transition object FIRST J102347.6+003841

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archibald, A.M.; Kaspi, V.M.; Bogdanov, S.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Stairs, I.H.; Ransom, S.M.; McLaughlin, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    We report on observations of the unusual neutron-star binary system FIRST J102347.6+003841 carried out using the XMM-Newton satellite. This system consists of a radio millisecond pulsar (PSR J1023+0038) in a 0.198 day orbit with a ~0.2 M sun Roche-lobe-filling companion and appears to have had an ac

  7. Fine spectral structures in Jovian decametric radio emission observed by ground-based radio telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, M.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.

    2014-04-01

    Jupiter with the largest planetary magnetosphere in the solar system emits intense coherent non-thermal radio emission in a wide frequency range. This emission is a result of a complicated interaction between the dynamic Jovian magnetosphere and energetic particles supplying the free energy from planetary rotation and the interaction between Jupiter and the Galilean moons. Decametric radio emission (DAM) is the strongest component of Jovian radiation observed in a frequency range from few MHz up to 40 MHz. This emission is generated via cyclotron maser mechanism in sources located along Jovian magnetic field lines. Depending on the time scales the Jovian DAMexhibits different complex spectral structures. We present the observations of the Jovian decametric radio emission using the large ground-based radio telescope URAN- 2 (Poltava, Ukraine) operated in the decametric frequency range. This telescope is one of the largest low frequency telescopes in Europe equipped with high performance digital radio spectrometers. The antenna array of URAN-2 consists of 512 crossed dipoles with an effective area of 28 000m2 and beam pattern size of 3.5 x 7 deg. (at 25 MHz). The instrument enables continuous observations of the Jovian radio during long period of times. Jovian DAM was observed continuously since Sep. 2012 (depending on Jupiter visibility) with relatively high time-frequency resolution (4 kHz - 100ms) in the broad frequency range (8-32MHz). We have detected a big amount of the fine spectral structures in the dynamic spectra of DAM such as trains of S-bursts, quasi-continuous narrowband emission, narrow-band splitting events and zebra stripe-like patterns. We analyzed mainly the fine structures associated with non-Io controlled DAM. We discuss how the observed narrowband structures which most probably are related to the propagation of the decametric radiation in the Jupiter's ionosphere can be used to study the plasma parameters in the inner Jovian magnetosphere.

  8. Discussing the processes constraining the Jovian synchrotron radio emission's features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Costa, Daniel; Bolton, Scott J.

    2008-03-01

    Our recent analysis and understanding of the Jovian synchrotron radio emission with a radiation-belt model is presented. In this work, the electron population is determined by solving the Fokker-Planck diffusion equation and considering different physical processes. The results of the modeling are first compared to in situ particle data, brightness distributions, radio spectrum, and beaming curves to verify the simulated particle distributions. The dynamics of high-energy electrons in Jupiter's inner magnetosphere and their related radio emission are then examined. The results demonstrate that the Jovian moons set the extension and intensity of the synchrotron emission's brightness distribution along the magnetic equator. Simulations show that moons and dust both control the transport toward the planet by significantly reducing the abundance of particles constrained to populate, near the equator and inside 1.8 Jovian radii, the innermost region of the magnetosphere. Due to interactions with dust and synchrotron mechanism, radiation-belt electrons are moved along field lines, between Metis (1.79 Jovian radii) and Amalthea (2.54 Jovian radii), toward high latitudes. The quantity of particles transported away from the equator is sufficient to produce measurable secondary radio emissions. Among all the phenomena acting in the inner magnetosphere, the moons (Amalthea and Thebe) are the primary moderator for the radiation's intensity at high latitudes. Moon losses also affect the characteristics of the total radio flux with longitude. The sweeping effect amplifies the 10-h modulation of the beaming curve's amplitude while energy resonances occurring near Amalthea and Thebe belong to phenomena adjusting it to the right level. Interactions with dust do not significantly constrain radio spectrum features. Resonances near Amalthea and Thebe are responsible for the Jovian radio spectrum's particular slope.

  9. Radio Emissions from Plasma with Electron Kappa-Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, G. D.; Kuznetsov, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Gregory Fleishman (New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, USA)Alexey Kuznetsov (Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Irkutsk, Russia), Currently there is a concern about the ability of the classical thermal (Maxwellian) distribution to describe quasisteady-state plasma in the solar atmosphere, including active regions. In particular, other distributions have been proposed to better fit observations, for example, kappa-distributions. If present, these distributions will generate radio emissions with different observable properties compared with the classical gyroresonance (GR) or free-free emission, which implies a way of remotely detecting these kappa distributions in the radio observations. Here we present analytically derived GR and free-free emissivities and absorption coefficients for the kappa-distribution, and discuss their properties, which are in fact remarkably different from the classical Maxwellian plasma. In particular, the radio brightness temperature from a gyrolayer increases with the optical depth τ for kappa-distribution. This property has a remarkable consequence allowing a straightforward observational test: the GR radio emission from the non-Maxwellian distributions is supposed to be noticeably polarized even in the optically thick case, where the emission would have strictly zero polarization in the case of Maxwellian plasma. This offers a way of remote probing the plasma distribution in astrophysical sources, including solar active regions as a vivid example. In this report, we present analytical formulae and computer codes to calculate the emission parameters. We simulate the gyroresonance emission under the conditions typical of the solar active regions and compare the results for different electron distributions. We discuss the implications of our findings for interpretation of radio observations. This work was supported in part by NSF grants AGS-1250374 and AGS-1262772, NASA grant NNX14AC87G to New Jersey Institute of Technology

  10. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    University of British Columbia in Vancouver. The processor, named, appropriately, the Pulsar Spigot, was built in a collaboration between the NRAO and the California Institute of Technology. The processor, which generates almost 100 GigaBytes of data per hour, allowed the astronomers to gather and analyze radio waves over a wide range of frequencies (1650-2250 MegaHertz), adding to the sensitivity of their system. Eight more observations between July and November of 2004 discovered seven additional pulsars in Terzan 5. In addition, the astronomers' data show evidence for several more pulsars that still need to be confirmed. Future studies of the pulsars in Terzan 5 will help scientists understand the nature of the cluster and the complex interactions of the stars at its dense core. Also, several of the pulsars offer a rich yield of new scientific information. The scientists suspect that one pulsar, which shows strange eclipses of its radio emission, has recently traded its original binary companion for another, and two others have white-dwarf companions that they believe may have been produced by the collision of a neutron star and a red-giant star. Subtle effects seen in these two systems can be explained by Einstein's general relativistic theory of gravity, and indicate that the neutron stars are more massive than some theories allow. The material in a neutron star is as dense as that in an atomic nucleus, so that fact has implications for nuclear physics as well as astrophysics. "Finding all these pulsars has been extremely exciting, but the excitement really has just begun," Ransom said. "Now we can start to use them as a rich and valuable cosmic laboratory," he added. In addition to Ransom, Hessels and Stairs, the research team included Paulo Freire of Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, Fernando Camilo of Columbia University, Victoria Kaspi of McGill University, and David Kaplan of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a

  11. XMM-Newton Observations of Four Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.

    2005-01-01

    I present an analysis of the XMM-Newton observations of four millisecond pulsars, J0437-4715, J2124-3358, J1024-0719, and J0034-0534. The new data provide strong evidence of thermal emission in the X-ray flux detected from the first three objects. This thermal component is best interpreted as radiation from pulsar polar caps covered with a nonmagnetic hydrogen atmosphere. A nonthermal power-law component, dominating at energies E greater than or equal to 3 keV, can also be present in the detected X-ray emission. For PSR J0437-4715, the timing analysis reveals that the shape and pulsed fraction of the pulsar light curves are energy dependent. This, together with the results obtained from the phase-resolved spectroscopy, supports the two-component (thermal plus nonthermal) interpretation of the pulsar's X-ray radiation. Highly significant pulsations have been found in the X-ray flux of PSRs 52124-3358 and 51024-0719. For PSR 50034-0534, a possible X-ray counterpart of the radio pulsar has been suggested. The inferred properties of the detected thermal emission are compared with predictions of radio pulsar models.

  12. Mean and extreme radio properties of quasars and the origin of radio emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzer, Rachael M.; Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of both the radio-loud fraction (RLF) and (using stacking analysis) the mean radio loudness of quasars. We consider how these properties evolve as a function of redshift and luminosity, black hole (BH) mass and accretion rate, and parameters related to the dominance of a wind in the broad emission-line region. We match the FIRST source catalog to samples of luminous quasars (both spectroscopic and photometric), primarily from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. After accounting for catastrophic errors in BH mass estimates at high redshift, we find that both the RLF and the mean radio luminosity increase for increasing BH mass and decreasing accretion rate. Similarly, both the RLF and mean radio loudness increase for quasars that are argued to have weaker radiation line driven wind components of the broad emission-line region. In agreement with past work, we find that the RLF increases with increasing optical/UV luminosity and decreasing redshift, while the mean radio loudness evolves in the exact opposite manner. This difference in behavior between the mean radio loudness and the RLF in L−z may indicate selection effects that bias our understanding of the evolution of the RLF; deeper surveys in the optical and radio are needed to resolve this discrepancy. Finally, we argue that radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) quasars may be parallel sequences, but where only RQ quasars at one extreme of the distribution are likely to become RL, possibly through slight differences in spin and/or merger history.

  13. X-ray pulsar rush in 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, K.; Tsujimoto, K.; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Yokogawa, J.; Koyama, K. [Kyoto Univ., Faculty of Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We present recent remarkable topics about discoveries of X-ray pulsars. 1. Pulsations from two Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters: These pulsars have enormously strong magnetic field (B {approx} 10{sup 15} G), thus these are called as 'magnetar', new type of X-ray pulsars. 2. New Crab-like pulsars: These discoveries lead to suggesting universality of Crab-like pulsars. 3. An X-ray bursting millisecond pulsar: This is strong evidence for the recycle theory of generating radio millisecond pulsars. 4. X-ray pulsar rush in the SMC: This indicates the younger star formation history in the SMC. (author)

  14. The Aid of Optical Studies in Understanding Millisecond Pulsar Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Venter, Christo; Boettcher, Markus

    2016-01-01

    A large number of new "black widow" and "redback" energetic millisecond pulsars with irradiated stellar companions have been discovered through radio and optical searches of unidentified \\textit{Fermi} sources. Synchrotron emission, from particles accelerated up to several TeV in the intrabinary shock, exhibits modulation at the binary orbital period. Our simulated double-peaked X-ray light curves modulated at the orbital period, produced by relativistic Doppler-boosting along the intrabinary shock, are found to qualitatively match those observed in many sources. In this model, redbacks and transitional pulsar systems where the double-peaked X-ray light curve is observed at inferior conjunction have intrinsically different shock geometry than other millisecond pulsar binaries where the light curve is centered at superior conjunction. We discuss, and advocate, how current and future optical observations may aid in constraining the emission geometry, intrabinary shock and the unknown physics of pulsar winds.

  15. The 3D Space and Spin Velocities of a Gamma-ray Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2016-04-01

    PSR J2030+4415 is a LAT-discovered 0.5My-old gamma-ray pulsar with an X-ray synchrotron trail and a rare Halpha bowshock. We have obtained GMOS IFU spectroscopic imaging of this shell, and show a sweep through the remarkable Halpha structure, comparing with the high energy emission. These data provide a unique 3D map of the momentum distribution of the relativistic pulsar wind. This shows that the pulsar is moving nearly in the plane of the sky and that the pulsar wind has a polar component misaligned with the space velocity. The spin axis is shown to be inclined some 95degrees to the Earth line of sight, explaining why this is a radio-quiet, gamma-only pulsar. Intriguingly, the shell also shows multiple bubbles that suggest that the pulsar wind power has varied substantially over the past 500 years.

  16. Rotational modulation of Saturn's auroral radio emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, L.

    2011-10-01

    Among the persistent questions raised by the existence of a rotational modulation of the Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR), the origin of the variability of the 10.8 hours SKR period at a 1% level over weeks to years remains intriguing. While its short-term fluctuations (20-30 days) have been related to the variations of the solar wind speed, its long-term fluctuations (months to years) were proposed to be triggered by Enceladus mass-loading and/or seasonal variations. This situation has become even more complicated since the recent identification of two separated periods at 10.8h and 10.6h, each varying with time, corresponding to SKR sources located in the southern (S) and the northern (N) hemispheres, respectively. Here, six years of Cassini continuous radio measurements have been used to derive long-term radio periods and phase systems separately for each hemisphere 1. The S phase has then been used to investigate the S SKR rotational modulation (see Figure 1), shown to be consistent with an intrinsically rotating phenomenon, in contrast with the early Voyager picture, but in agreement with the diurnal modulation observed in other kronian auroral phenomena.

  17. Radio emissions from double RHESSI TGFs

    CERN Document Server

    Mezentsev, Andrew; Gjesteland, Thomas; Albrechtsen, Kjetil; Lehtinen, Nikolai; Marisaldi, Martino; Smith, David; Cummer, Steven

    2016-01-01

    A detailed analysis of Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) is performed in association with World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) sources and very low frequency (VLF) sferics recorded at Duke University. RHESSI clock offset is evaluated and found to experience changes on the 5 August 2005 and 21 October 2013, based on the analysis of TGF-WWLLN matches. The clock offsets were found for all three periods of observations with standard deviations less than 100 {\\mu}s. This result opens the possibility for the precise comparative analyses of RHESSI TGFs with the other types of data (WWLLN, radio measurements, etc.) In case of multiple-peak TGFs, WWLLN detections are observed to be simultaneous with the last TGF peak for all 16 cases of multipeak RHESSI TGFs simultaneous with WWLLN sources. VLF magnetic field sferics were recorded for two of these 16 events at Duke University. These radio measurements also attribute VLF sferics to the second pea...

  18. Estimating the GeV Emission of Millisecond Pulsars in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, Miles; Bechtol, Keith; Vandenbroucke, Justin

    2016-01-01

    We estimate the conventional astrophysical emission intrinsic to dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way, focusing on millisecond pulsars (MSPs), and evaluate the potential for confusion with dark matter (DM) annihilation signatures at GeV energies. In low-density stellar environments, such as dSphs, the abundance of MSPs is expected to be proportional to stellar mass. Accordingly, we construct the $\\gamma$-ray luminosity function of MSPs in the Milky Way disk, where $>90$ individual MSPs have been detected with the $\\textit{Fermi}$ Large Area Telescope (LAT), and scale this luminosity function to the stellar masses of 30 dSphs to estimate the cumulative emission from their MSP populations. We predict that MSPs in the highest stellar mass dSphs, Fornax and Sculptor, produce a $\\gamma$-ray flux $>500$ MeV of $\\sim10^{-11}$~ph~cm$^{-2}$~s$^{-1}$, which is a factor $\\sim10$ below the current LAT sensitivity at high Galactic latitudes. The MSP emission in ultra-faint dSphs, including targets ...

  19. Mechanism of generation of the emission bands in the dynamic spectrum of the Crab pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Ardavan, H; Singleton, J; Pérez, M

    2008-01-01

    We show that the proportionately spaced emission bands in the dynamic spectrum of the Crab pulsar (Hankins T. H. & Eilek J. A., 2007, ApJ, 670, 693) fit the oscillations of the square of a Bessel function whose argument exceeds its order. This function has already been encountered in the analysis of the emission from a polarization current with a superluminal distribution pattern: a current whose distribution pattern rotates (with an angular frequency $\\omega$) and oscillates (with a frequency $\\Omega>\\omega$ differing from an integral multiple of $\\omega$) at the same time (Ardavan H., Ardavan A. & Singleton J., 2003, J Opt Soc Am A, 20, 2137). Using the results of our earlier analysis, we find that the dependence on frequency of the spacing and width of the observed emission bands can be quantitatively accounted for by an appropriate choice of the value of the single free parameter $\\Omega/\\omega$. In addition, the value of this parameter, thus implied by Hankins & Eilek's data, places the last ...

  20. Multi-Spacecraft Observations of Saturn Kilometric Radio Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Hess, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) is the auroral radio emission of Saturn, which has been observed by Voyager 1 & 2, Cassini, and Ulysses. Ulysses is able to detect the intense intervals of SKR from distances up to 10 AU, because of its long antennas (72 m tip-to-tip) and sensitive radio receivers. Studies of SKR by A. Lecacheux gave the surprising result that the periodicity of SKR varied with time; it was not locked to a planetary rotation of Saturn. This result has been confirmed by Cassini radio observations. Here, we compare Ulysses and Cassini observations of SKR to constrain a mode! for the SKR emission geometry. SpecifIcally, we examine the question - are the brighter sources of 5KR fixed in Saturn longitude or local time? The results have significant consequences for our understanding of SKR and its varying periodicity

  1. A burst in a wind bubble and the impact on external matter: high-energy gamma-ray flares and implications for fast radio bursts and pulsar-driven supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Murase, Kohta; Meszaros, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Tenuous wind bubble, which are formed by spin-down activities of central compact remnants, are relevant in some models of fast radio bursts (FRBs) and super-luminous supernovae. In this work, we study the role of such pair-enriched bubbles produced by young magnetars, rapidly-rotating neutron stars, and magnetized white dwarfs. We calculate the nebular emission and the conditions allowing for escape of high-energy gamma-rays and radio waves, showing that their escape is possible for nebulae with ages of >10-100 yr. In the rapidly-rotating neutron star scenario, we find that radio emission from the quasi-steady nebula itself may be bright enough to be detected especially at submm frequencies, which is relevant as a possible counterpart of pulsar-driven SNe and FRBs. An impulsive burst may lead to a highly relativistic flow, which would interact with the nebula. If the shocked nebula is still relativistic, pre-existing non-thermal particles in the unshocked nebula can be significantly boosted by the forward sho...

  2. Gamma Ray Burst reverse shock emission in early radio afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Resmi, Lekshmi

    2016-01-01

    Reverse shock (RS) emission from Gamma Ray Bursts is an important tool in investigating the nature of the ejecta from the central engine. If the ejecta magnetization is not high enough to suppress the RS, a strong RS emission component, usually peaking in the optical/IR band early on, would give important contribution to early afterglow light curves. In the radio band, synchrotron self-absorption may suppress early RS emission, and also delay the RS peak time. In this paper, we calculate the self-absorbed RS emission in the radio band for different dynamical conditions. In particular, we stress that the RS radio emission is subject to self-absorption in both reverse and forward shocks. We calculate the ratio between the reverse to forward shock flux at the RS peak time for different frequencies, which is a measure of the detectability of the RS emission component. We then constrain the range of physical parameters for a detectable RS, in particular the role of magnetization. We notice that unlike optical RS e...

  3. Broadband nuclear emission in two radio-loud BAL quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, M; Janiuk, A

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray weakness of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars in comparison to non-BAL objects is possibly caused by the absorption of X-ray emission by the shielding material near the equatorial plane. On the other hand, the radio-loud BALQSOs are more X-ray loud than the radio-quiet ones. This suggests that part of the X-ray emission may arise from the radio jet. To investigate this possibility, we modelled the nuclear spectra of two radio-loud BALQSOs. We focus on the emission from the very centres of these two objects. The source of emission was approximated by a single, homogeneous component that produces synchrotron and inverse-Compton (IC) radiation. The simplicity of the model allowed us to estimate the basic physical parameters of the emitting regions, using a universal analytic approach. Such methods have already been used in blazars. For the first time we propose this solution for quasars. In addition, we modelled the radiation spectra of the accretion disk and its corona to compare them with the jets'...

  4. Measurement of radio emission from extensive air showers

    OpenAIRE

    Hoerandel, Joerg R.

    2009-01-01

    A new promising development in astroparticle physics is to measure the radio emission from extensive air showers. The particles in the cascade emit synchrotron radiation (30 - 90 MHz) which is detected with arrays of dipole antennas. Recent experimental efforts are discussed.

  5. A simple capacitor model for radio emission associated with earthquakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ares de Parga Gonzalo; Ram(I)rez-Rojas Alejandro

    2004-01-01

    In this brief report we propose a simple model based on the properties of an electric capacitor under short-circuit conditions as a possible mechanism of radio emissions associated with earthquakes. This model can be considered as complementary to other models concerning the same problem.

  6. A free-electron laser in the pulsar magnetosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fung, P.K.; Kuijpers, J.M.E.

    2004-01-01

    We have studied systematically the free-electron laser in the context of high brightness pulsar radio emission. In this paper, we have numerically examined the case where a transverse electromagnetic wave is distorting the motion of a relativistic electron beam while travelling over one stellar radi

  7. Search for Millisecond Pulsars for the Pulsar Timing Array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, S.

    2012-03-01

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating highly magnetised neutron stars (i.e. ultra dense stars, where about one solar mass is concentrated in a sphere with a radius of ~ 10 km), which irradiate radio beams in a fashion similar to a lighthouse. As a consequence, whenever the beams cut our line of sight we perceive a radio pulses, one (or two) per pulsar rotation, with a frequency up to hundred of times a second. Owing to their compact nature, rapid spin and high inertia, pulsars are in general fairly stable rotators, hence the Times of Arrival (TOAs) of the pulses at a radio telescope can be used as the ticks of a clock. This holds true in particular for the sub­class of the millisecond pulsars (MSPs), having a spin period smaller than the conventional limit of 30 ms, whose very rapid rotation and relatively older age provide better rotational stability than the ordinary pulsars. Indeed, some MSPs rotate so regularly that they can rival the best atomic clocks on Earth over timespan of few months or years.This feature allows us to use MSPs as tools in a cosmic laboratory, by exploiting a procedure called timing, which consists in the repeated and regular measurement of the TOAs from a pulsar and then in the search for trends in the series of the TOAs over various timespans, from fraction of seconds to decades.For example the study of pulsars in binary systems has already provided the most stringent tests to date of General Relativity in strong gravitational fields and has unambiguously showed the occurrence of the emission of gravitational waves from a binary system comprising two massive bodies in a close orbit. In last decades a new exciting perspective has been opened, i.e. to use pulsars also for a direct detection of the so far elusive gravitational waves and thereby applying the pulsar timing for cosmological studies. In fact, the gravitational waves (GWs) going across our Galaxy pass over all the Galactic pulsars and the Earth, perturbing the space­time at the

  8. The AGN content of deep radio surveys and radio emission in radio-quiet AGN. Why every astronomer should care about deep radio fields

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, P; Miller, N; Kellermann, K I; Mainieri, V; Rosati, P; Tozzi, P; Vattakunnel, S

    2014-01-01

    We present our very recent results on the sub-mJy radio source populations at 1.4 GHz based on the Extended Chandra Deep Field South VLA survey, which reaches ~ 30 {\\mu}Jy, with details on their number counts, evolution, and luminosity functions. The sub-mJy radio sky turns out to be a complex mix of star-forming galaxies and radio-quiet AGN evolving at a similar, strong rate and declining radio-loud AGN. While the well-known flattening of the radio number counts below 1 mJy is mostly due to star-forming galaxies, these sources and AGN make up an approximately equal fraction of the sub-mJy sky. Our results shed also light on a fifty-year-old issue, namely radio emission from radio-quiet AGN, and suggest that it is closely related to star formation, at least at z ~ 1.5 - 2. The implications of our findings for future, deeper radio surveys, including those with the Square Kilometre Array, are also discussed. One of the main messages, especially to non-radio astronomers, is that radio surveys are reaching such f...

  9. Star formation in quasar hosts and the origin of radio emission in radio-quiet quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zakamska, Nadia L; Petric, Andreea; Dicken, Daniel; Greene, Jenny E; Heckman, Timothy M; Hickox, Ryan C; Ho, Luis C; Krolik, Julian H; Nesvadba, Nicole P H; Strauss, Michael A; Geach, James E; Oguri, Masamune; Strateva, Iskra V

    2015-01-01

    Radio emission from radio-quiet quasars may be due to star formation in the quasar host galaxy, to a jet launched by the supermassive black hole, or to relativistic particles accelerated in a wide-angle radiatively-driven outflow. In this paper we examine whether radio emission from radio-quiet quasars is a byproduct of star formation in their hosts. To this end we use infrared spectroscopy and photometry from Spitzer and Herschel to estimate or place upper limits on star formation rates in hosts of ~300 obscured and unobscured quasars at z<1. We find that low-ionization forbidden emission lines such as [NeII] and [NeIII] are likely dominated by quasar ionization and do not provide reliable star formation diagnostics in quasar hosts, while PAH emission features may be suppressed due to the destruction of PAH molecules by the quasar radiation field. While the bolometric luminosities of our sources are dominated by the quasars, the 160 micron fluxes are likely dominated by star formation, but they too should...

  10. Young radio sources: the duty-cycle of the radio emission and prospects for gamma-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Orienti, M; Giovannini, G; Giroletti, M; D'Ammando, F

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary stage of a powerful radio source originated by an AGN is related to its linear size. In this context, compact symmetric objects (CSOs), which are powerful and intrinsically small objects, should represent the young stage in the individual radio source life. However, the fraction of young radio sources in flux density-limited samples is much higher than what expected from the number counts of large radio sources.This indicates that a significant fraction of young radio sources does not develop to the classical Fanaroff-Riley radio galaxies,suggesting an intermittent jet activity. As the radio jets are expanding within the dense and inhomogeneous interstellar medium,the ambient may play a role in the jet growth, for example slowing down or even disrupting its expansion when a jet-cloud interaction takes place. Moreover, this environment may provide the thermal seed photons that scattered by the lobes' electrons may be responsible for high energy emission, detectable by Fermi-LAT.

  11. Post-glitch exponential relaxation of radio pulsars and magnetars in terms of vortex creep across flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gügercinoğlu, Erbil

    2017-08-01

    Timing observations of rapidly rotating neutron stars revealed a great number of glitches, observed from both canonical radio pulsars and magnetars. Among them, 76 glitches have shown exponential relaxation(s) with characteristic decay times ranging from several days to a few months, followed by a more gradual recovery. Glitches displaying exponential relaxation with single or multiple decay time constants are analysed in terms of a model based on the interaction of the vortex lines with the toroidal arrangement of flux tubes in the outer core of the neutron star. Model results agree with the observed time-scales in general. Thus, the glitch phenomenon can be used to deduce valuable information about neutron star structure, in particular on the interior magnetic field configuration which is unaccessible from surface observations. One immediate conclusion is that the magnetar glitch data are best explained with a much cooler core and therefore require that direct Urca-type fast-cooling mechanisms should be effective for magnetars.

  12. THERMAL ABSORPTION AS THE CAUSE OF GIGAHERTZ-PEAKED SPECTRA IN PULSARS AND MAGNETARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewandowski, Wojciech; Rożko, Karolina; Kijak, Jarosław; Melikidze, George I., E-mail: boe@astro.ia.uz.zgora.pl [Institute of Astronomy, University of Zielona Gora, Szafrana 2, 65-516 Zielona Gora (Poland)

    2015-07-20

    We present a model that explains the observed deviation of the spectra of some pulsars and magnetars from the power-law spectra that are seen in the bulk of the pulsar population. Our model is based on the assumption that the observed variety of pulsar spectra can be naturally explained by the thermal free–free absorption that takes place in the surroundings of the pulsars. In this context, the variety of the pulsar spectra can be explained according to the shape, density, and temperature of the absorbing media and the optical path of the line of sight across it. We have put specific emphasis on the case of the radio magnetar SGR J1745–2900 (also known as the Sgr A* magnetar), modeling the rapid variations of the pulsar spectrum after the outburst of 2013 April as due to the free–free absorption of the radio emission in the electron material ejected during the magnetar outburst. The ejecta expands with time and consequently the absorption rate decreases and the shape of the spectrum changes in such a way that the peak frequency shifts toward the lower radio frequencies. In the hypothesis of an absorbing medium, we also discuss the similarity between the spectral behavior of the binary pulsar B1259–63 and the spectral peculiarities of isolated pulsars.

  13. Simulating radio emission from air showers with CoREAS

    CERN Document Server

    Huege, T; James, C W

    2013-01-01

    CoREAS is a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of radio emission from extensive air showers. It implements the endpoint formalism for the calculation of electromagnetic radiation directly in CORSIKA. As such, it is parameter-free, makes no assumptions on the emission mechanism for the radio signals, and takes into account the complete complexity of the electron and positron distributions as simulated by CORSIKA. In this article, we illustrate the capabilities of CoREAS with simulations carried out in different frequency ranges from tens of MHz up to GHz frequencies, and describe in particular the emission characteristics at high frequencies due to Cherenkov effects arising from the varying refractive index of the atmosphere.

  14. 3D-modelling of the stellar auroral radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Leto, P; Buemi, C S; Umana, G; Ingallinera, A; Cerrigone, L

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron maser is the coherent emission process that gives rise to the radio lighthouse effect observed in the hot magnetic chemically peculiar star CU Virginis. It has also been proposed to explain the highly circularly polarized radio pulses observed on some ultra cool dwarfs, with spectral type earlier than M7. Such kind of coherent events resemble the auroral radio emission from the magnetized planets of the solar system. In this paper, we present a tridimensional model able to simulate the timing and profile of the pulses emitted by those stars characterized by a dipolar magnetic field by following the hypothesis of the laminar source model, used to explain the beaming of the terrestrial auroral kilometric radiation. This model proves to be a powerful tool to understand the auroral radio-emission phenomenon, allowing us to derive some general conclusions about the effects of the model's free parameters on the features of the coherent pulses, and to learn more about the detectability of such...

  15. High resolution radio emission from RCW 49/Westerlund 2

    CERN Document Server

    Benaglia, Paula; Peri, Cintia S; Marti, Josep; Sanchez-Sutil, Juan R; Dougherty, Sean M; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The HII region RCW 49 and its ionizing cluster form an extensive, complex region that has been widely studied at infrared and optical wavelengths. Molonglo 843 MHz and ATCA data at 1.4 and 2.4 GHz showed two shells. Recent high-resolution IR images revealed a complex dust structure and ongoing star formation. New high-bandwidth and high-resolution data of the RCW 49 field have been obtained to survey the radio emission at arcsec scale and investigate the small-scale features and nature of the HII region. Radio observations were collected with the new 2-GHz bandwidth receivers and the ATCA CABB correlator, at 5.5 and 9.0 GHz. In addition, archival observations at 1.4 and 2.4 GHz have been re-reduced and re-analyzed in conjunction with observations in the optical, infrared, X-ray and gamma-ray regimes.- The new 2-GHz bandwidth data result in the most detailed radio continuum images of RCW 49 to date. The radio emission closely mimics the near-IR emission observed by Spitzer, showing pillars and filaments. The b...

  16. No radio emission from SN 2006X after 2 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Poonam; Chevalier, Roger; Patat, Ferdinando

    2008-02-01

    We observed Type Ia supernova SN 2006X (IAUC 8667) with the VLA for 2 hours in 8.46 GHz band at 2008 Feb 19.47 UT mean time. We did not detect any radio emission, indicating it to be a normal Type Ia supernova. The map rms is 18 uJy and the flux density at the supernova position is 4 +/-18 uJy. We thank VLA staff for making this observation possible. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  17. Mean and Extreme Radio Properties of Quasars and the Origin of Radio Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kratzer, Rachael M

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of both the radio-loud fraction (RLF) and (using stacking analysis) the mean radio-loudness of quasars. We consider how these values evolve as a function of redshift and luminosity, black hole (BH) mass and accretion rate, and parameters related to the dominance of a wind in the broad emission line region. We match the FIRST source catalog to samples of luminous quasars (both spectroscopic and photometric), primarily from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. After accounting for catastrophic errors in BH mass estimates at high-redshift, we find that both the RLF and the mean radio luminosity increase for increasing BH mass and decreasing accretion rate. Similarly both the RLF and mean radio loudness increase for quasars which are argued to have weaker radiation line driven wind components of the broad emission line region. In agreement with past work, we find that the RLF increases with increasing luminosity and decreasing redshift while the mean radio-loudness evolves in the exact oppos...

  18. RFID Transponders' Radio Frequency Emissions in Aircraft Communication and Navigation Radio Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Williams, Reuben A.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Salud, Maria Theresa P.

    2006-01-01

    Radiated emissions in aircraft communication and navigation bands are measured from several active radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. The individual tags are different in design and operations. They may also operate in different frequency bands. The process for measuring the emissions is discussed, and includes tag interrogation, reverberation chamber testing, and instrument settings selection. The measurement results are described and compared against aircraft emission limits. In addition, interference path loss for the cargo bays of passenger aircraft is measured. Cargo bay path loss is more appropriate for RFID tags than passenger cabin path loss. The path loss data are reported for several aircraft radio systems on a Boeing 747 and an Airbus A320.

  19. Implementation of an offset-dipole magnetic field in a pulsar modelling code

    CERN Document Server

    Breed, M; Harding, A K; Johnson, T J

    2014-01-01

    The light curves of gamma-ray pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope show great variety in profile shape and position relative to their radio profiles. Such diversity hints at distinct underlying magnetospheric and/or emission geometries for the individual pulsars. We implemented an offset-dipole magnetic field in an existing geometric pulsar modelling code which already includes static and retarded vacuum dipole fields. In our model, this offset is characterised by a parameter epsilon (with epsilon = 0 corresponding to the static dipole case). We constructed sky maps and light curves for several pulsar parameters and magnetic fields, studying the effect of an offset dipole on the resulting light curves. A standard two-pole caustic emission geometry was used. As an application, we compared our model light curves with Fermi data for the bright Vela pulsar.

  20. A Search for Radio Emission from Nearby Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maps, Amethyst D.; Bastian, Timothy S.; Beasley, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first extrasolar planet orbiting a main sequence star more than 20 years ago, the study of exoplanets has become a burgeoning field with more than 3300 confirmed extrasolar planets now known. A variety of techniques has been used to discover exoplanets orbiting main sequence stars and to deduce their properties: timing, radial velocities, direct imaging, microlensing, and transits in the optical/IR bands. Absent from this list so far is the detection of exoplanets at radio wavelengths, but not for lack of trying. Searches for radio emission from exoplanets predate their discovery (Winglee et al. 1986) and have continued sporadically to this day. The majority of searches for radio emission from exoplanets has searched for coherent radio emission. It is indeed the case that in our own solar system, all magnetized planets are powerful radio emitters, the likely emission mechanism being the cyclotron maser instability. The outstanding example is Jupiter, which emits 1010-1011 W at decameter wavelengths (frequencies planets in other solar systems, many must surely emit CMI radiation. The emitted radiation could be orders of magnitude more intense than Jupiter’s if the interaction between the magnetized planet and the wind from the primary star is stronger than the Sun/Jupiter interaction - due, for example, to a more powerful wind and/or the planet being closer to the star.We have initiated a new search for radio emission from exoplanets, focusing on all known exoplanetary systems within 20 pc - more than 50 systems containing nearly 100 planets using the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) in three frequency bands: 1-2 GHz, 2-4 GHz, and 4-8 GHz with a target sensitivity of ~10 microJy. We have completed the 2-4 GHz survey and report our preliminary results, which include the detection of two systems. We discuss whether the emission is from a planet or from the star and the implications of our conclusions for habitability of exoplanets.

  1. A New Solar Radio Emission Component Observed at Hectometric Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, M.; Kaiser, M.; Fainberg, J.

    2003-04-01

    From May 17 to 22, 2002 a highly circularly polarized solar radio source was observed by the WAVES receivers on the Wind spacecraft. This unique event, which became quite intense and definite after May 19 and which was observed continuously for 6 days, was characterized by fine frequency structures, 1 to 2 hour amplitude periodicities, and a peaked frequency spectrum. Indeed, this emission has characteristics more typical of planetary emissions than of solar emissions. This is the only such event observed by Wind/WAVES in its 8 years of operation. (The only other example of an event of similar nature may have been observed more than 20 years ago by the ISEE-3 spacecraft.) The direction-finding analysis for this event indicates a relatively small radio source that may lie somewhere between 0.06 and 0.36 AU from the sun. The radiation from this event was very weak at the onset, being nearly an order of magnitude below the galactic background radiation level. It is speculated that this radio event may be a unique hectometric manifestation of a moving type IV burst. The radiation mechanism is unknown--possibilities include plasma emission, gyro-synchrotron, and cyclotron maser.

  2. 363. WE-Heraeus seminar on neutron stars and pulsars - 40 years after the discovery. Posters and contributed talks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, W.; Huang, H.H. (eds.)

    2007-07-01

    The following topics were dealt with: X-ray observation of pulsars, gamma-ray observation of pulsars, radio observations of pulsars, theory of neutron stars and pulsars, AXPs, SGRs, and strange stars, gravitayional waves, analysis tools with software. (HSI)

  3. RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSION FROM THE MAGNETAR SGR J1745-2900: INTERACTION WITH GAS ORBITING Sgr A*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Diesing, R.; Royster, M.; Roberts, D. [CIERA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Wardle, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Sjouwerman, L. O. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Cotton, W. D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Heinke, C. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Room #238 CEB, 11322-89 Avenue, Edmonton AB T6G 2G7 (Canada)

    2015-10-01

    We present radio continuum light curves of the magnetar SGR J1745−2900 and Sgr A* obtained with multi-frequency, multi-epoch Very Large Array observations between 2012 and 2014. During this period, a powerful X-ray outburst from SGR J1745−2900 occurred on 2013 April 24. Enhanced radio emission is delayed with respect to the X-ray peak by about seven months. In addition, the flux density of the emission from the magnetar fluctuates by a factor of 2–4 at frequencies between 21 and 41 GHz and its spectral index varies erratically. Here, we argue that the excess fluctuating emission from the magnetar arises from the interaction of a shock generated from the X-ray outburst with the orbiting ionized gas at the Galactic center. In this picture, variable synchrotron emission is produced by ram pressure variations due to inhomogeneities in the dense ionized medium of the Sgr A West bar. The pulsar with its high transverse velocity is moving through a highly blueshifted ionized medium. This implies that the magnetar is at a projected distance of ∼0.1 pc from Sgr A* and that the orbiting ionized gas is partially or largely responsible for a large rotation measure detected toward the magnetar. Despite the variability of Sgr A* expected to be induced by the passage of the G2 cloud, monitoring data show a constant flux density and spectral index during this period.

  4. THE FUNDAMENTAL PLANE FOR RADIO MAGNETARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rea, Nanda; Torres, Diego F. [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Torre C5, 2a Planta, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Pons, Jose A. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat d' Alacant, Ap. Correus 99, 03080 Alacant (Spain); Turolla, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2012-03-20

    High magnetic fields are a distinguishing feature of neutron stars and the existence of sources (the soft gamma repeaters, SGRs, and the anomalous X-ray pulsars) hosting an ultramagnetized neutron star (or magnetar) has been recognized in the past few decades. Magnetars are believed to be powered by magnetic energy and not by rotation, as with normal radio pulsars. Until recently, the radio quietness and magnetic fields typically above the quantum critical value (B{sub Q} {approx_equal} 4.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G) were among the characterizing properties of magnetars. The recent discovery of radio-pulsed emission from a few of them, and of a low dipolar magnetic field SGR, weakened further the idea of a clean separation between normal pulsars and magnetars. In this Letter, we show that radio emission from magnetars might be powered by rotational energy, similarly to what occurs in normal radio pulsars. The peculiar characteristics of magnetars radio emission should be traced in the complex magnetic geometry of these sources. Furthermore, we propose that magnetar radio activity or inactivity can be predicted from the knowledge of the star's rotational period, its time derivative, and the quiescent X-ray luminosity.

  5. Tracing star formation with non-thermal radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Klessen, Ralf S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of galaxies and in particular their star formation history is a central challenge of modern cosmology. Theoretical scenarios will be constrained by future ultra deep radio surveys. In this paper we present an analytical tool for analyzing radio data. Our physical model, based on an analytical description of the steady-state cosmic ray spectrum, explains the correlation between the non-thermal radio flux and the star formation rate (SFR). As cosmic rays are produced in supernova remnants, their injection rate is proportional to the supernova rate and thus also to the SFR. When these highly energetic charged particles travel in the magnetized interstellar medium they emit synchrotron radiation. As a result there is a relation between the SFR and the non-thermal radio emission. A crucial point is that synchrotron emission can be absorbed again by the free-free mechanism. This suppression becomes stronger with increasing number density of the gas, more precisely of the free electrons, ...

  6. Non-detection of pulsed radio emission from magnetar Swift J1834.9-0846: constraint on the fundamental plane of magnetar radio emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Tong; Jian-Ping Yuan; Zhi-Yong Liu

    2013-01-01

    The magnetar Swift J1834.9-0846 is observed using the Nanshan 25 mradio telescope.No pulsed radio emission is detected.The upper limit on the pulsed radio emission from this source is 0.5 mJy.According to the "fundamental plane"for radio magnetars,this source should have radio emission.Therefore,our results put constraints on the existence of a fundamental plane of magnetar radio emission.We argue that a magnetar's ability to emit radio emission may have little to do with the spin down luminosity and is related to the magnetar's X-ray luminosity.The only necessary condition is a relatively low X-ray luminosity.

  7. Physical Analysis of the Jovian Synchrotron Radio Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Costa, D.; Bolton, S. J.; Levin, S. M.; Thorne, R. M.

    2006-12-01

    We present results of our recent investigation of the Jovian synchrotron emission based on a particle transport code. The features of the two-dimensional brightness distributions, radio spectra and beaming curves are correlated to the different phenomena driven the dynamics of the electron radiation belts. The adiabatic invariant theory was used for performing this analysis work. The theoretical approach first enabled us to describe the electron radiation belts by modeling the interactions between high-energy trapped particles and plasmas, neutrals, moons, dust and magnetic field. Then radio observations were used to discuss the computed particle distributions in the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. The simulated brightness mappings were compared with VLA observations made at two wavelengths (20 and 6 cm). The beaming curve comparisons at 13-cm wavelength were performed for different epochs in order to evaluate the dependence of the model to the geometric factor De. The computed radio spectra were discussed with measurements made in the [0.5-20] GHz radio band. The simulation results match the different remote observations very well and thus allowed us to study the phenomenology of the Jovian synchrotron radio emission. The analysis of the Jovian synchrotron emission demonstrates that during the inward particle transport, local losses associated with the Jovian moons set the extension and intensity of the synchrotron radiation along the magnetic equator. Close to the planet, trapped electrons suffer from the interactions with dust and magnetic field, resulting in the transport of particles toward the high latitudes. The quantity of particles transported away from the equator is sufficient to produce the measurable secondary radio emissions. The simulations show that the moon sweeping effect controls both the transport toward the planet and at high latitudes by reducing the abundance of particles constrained to populate the regions out of the equator. Among the

  8. Multiwavelength analysis of four millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Guillemot, Lucas; Johnson, Tyrel J; Venter, Christo; Harding, Alice K

    2015-01-01

    Radio timing observations of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in support of Fermi LAT observations of the gamma-ray sky enhance the sensitivity of high-energy pulsation searches. With contemporaneous ephemerides we have detected gamma-ray pulsations from PSR B1937+21, the first MSP ever discovered, and B1957+20, the first known black-widow system. The two MSPs share a number of properties: they are energetic and distant compared to other gamma-ray MSPs, and both of them exhibit aligned radio and gamma-ray emission peaks, indicating co-located emission regions in the outer magnetosphere of the pulsars. However, radio observations are also crucial for revealing MSPs in Fermi unassociated sources. In a search for radio pulsations at the position of such unassociated sources, the Nan\\c{c}ay Radio Telescope discovered two MSPs, PSRs J2017+0603 and J2302+4442, increasing the sample of known Galactic disk MSPs. Subsequent radio timing observations led to the detection of gamma-ray pulsations from these two MSPs as well. W...

  9. Obse