WorldWideScience

Sample records for pulsar polar caps

  1. Influence of polar cap currents on pulsar polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, D

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a model for the polarization of curvature radiation for pulsars by taking into account the polar cap induced perturbation on the nonrotating (slowly rotating) dipolar magnetic field, where the rotation effects such as aberration and retardation can be ignored. We have simulated a set of typical pulse profiles to understand the role of induced magnetic field on radio emission of pulsars, and found to be significantly influencing the profile structure and polarization. Our model indicates that the intensity components and the polarization angle inflection point can get shifted to either leading or trailing side depending upon the prevailing conditions in the viewing geometry, the non-uniformity in source distribution (modulation) and the polar cap current induced perturbation. Also, we find an evidence for the origin of symmetric type circular polarization in addition to antisymmetric type. Our model predicts for a stronger trailing component compared to that on leading side of a given cone.

  2. Pulsar Polar Cap and Slot Gap Models: Confronting Fermi Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2012-01-01

    Rotation-powered pulsars are excellent laboratories for studying particle acceleration as well as fundamental physics of strong gravity, strong magnetic fields and relativity. I will review acceleration and gamma-ray emission from the pulsar polar cap and slot gap. Predictions of these models can be tested with the data set on pulsars collected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope over the last four years, using both detailed light curve fitting and population synthesis.

  3. On the polar cap cascade pair multiplicity of young pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Timokhin, A N

    2015-01-01

    We study the efficiency of pair production in polar caps of young pulsars under a variety of conditions to estimate the maximum possible multiplicity of pair plasma in pulsar magnetospheres. We develop a semi-analytic model for calculation of cascade multiplicity which allows efficient exploration of the parameter space and corroborate it with direct numerical simulations. Pair creation processes are considered separately from particle acceleration in order to assess different factors affecting cascade efficiency, with acceleration of primary particles described by recent self-consistent non-stationary model of pair cascades. We argue that the most efficient cascades operate in the curvature radiation/synchrotron regime, the maximum multiplicity of pair plasma in pulsar magnetospheres is ~few x 10^5. The multiplicity of pair plasma in magnetospheres of young energetic pulsars weakly depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of magnetic field lines and has a stronger dependence ...

  4. Polar Cap Model for Pulsar High-Energy Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K; Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alexander G.

    2002-01-01

    The study of physical processes associated with particle acceleration in the open field line region above the polar cap (PC) of an isolated neutron star (NS) plays a fundamental role in our understanding and interpretation of high-energy emission from pulsars. The systematic study of particle acceleration and formation of electron-positron pair fronts above the PCs of NSs was initiated two decades ago. The detailed analysis of these processes is now possible with the development of pair cascade codes that enables us to calculate the spectra and pulse profiles of high-energy emission from pulsars. The calculation of pair formation and gamma-ray production is being improved to include new results on the PC physics. We briefly outline the current status of the PC model for pulsar high-energy emission, focusing on some of our most recent results on the theoretical modeling of the PC acceleration and gamma-ray emission.

  5. Pulsar Pair Cascades in Magnetic Fields with Offset Polar Caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alex G.

    2012-01-01

    Neutron star magnetic fields may have polar caps (PC) that are offset from the dipole axis, through field-line sweepback near the light cylinder or non-symmetric currents within the star. The effects of such offsets on electron-positron pair cascades are investigated, using simple models of dipole magnetic fields with small distortions that shift the PCs by different amounts or directions. Using a Monte Carlo pair cascade simulation, we explore the changes in the pair spectrum, multiplicity and energy flux across the PC, as well as the trends in pair flux and pair energy flux with spin-down luminosity, L(sub sd). We also give an estimate of the distribution of heating flux from returning positrons on the PC for different offsets. We find that even modest offsets can produce significant increases in pair multiplicity, especially for pulsars that are near or beyond the pair death lines for centered PCs, primarily because of higher accelerating fields. Pair spectra cover several decades in energy, with the spectral range of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) two orders of magnitude higher than for normal pulsars, and PC offsets allow significant extension of all spectra to lower pair energies. We find that the total PC pair luminosity L(sub pair) is proportional to L(sub sd), with L(sub pair) approximates 10(exp -3) L(sub sd) for normal pulsars and L(sub pair) approximates 10(exp -2) L(sub sd) for MSPs. Remarkably, the total PC heating luminosity for even large offsets increases by less than a factor of two, even though the PC area increases by much larger factors, because most of the heating occurs near the magnetic axis.

  6. Gamma ray pulsars emission from extended polar cap cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Daugherty, J K; Daugherty, Joseph K; Harding, Alice K

    1995-01-01

    We have used a Monte Carlo simulation of a Polar Cap (PC) model of gamma-ray pulsars to estimate light curves and phase-resolved spectra for sources whose rotational and magnetic axes are oriented so that only one of the magnetic poles produces emission directed at the Earth. In this Single Polar Cap (SPC) scenario, even sources whose light curves have two distinct peaks (Crab, Vela, Geminga, PSR B1951+32) are due to emission concentrated near the rim of a single PC. If the inclination alpha is comparable to the half-width of the PC gamma-beam, alpha ~ theta_{b}, the peak-to-peak phase separation can have the large values (0.4 - 0.5) observed from these sources. In the model presented here we attribute the observed interpeak emission to pair cascades above the PC interior. Our simulation assumes the physics of conventional PC models, in which the gamma rays are due to photon-pair cascades initiated by curvature radiation from the acceleration of electrons above the PCs. In this work we assume that the acceler...

  7. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Light Curves in Offset Polar Cap Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.; DeCesar, Megan; Miller, M. Coleman

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that gamma-ray pulsar light curves are very sensitive to the geometry of the pulsar magnetic field. Pulsar magnetic field geometries, such as the retarded vacuum dipole and force-free magnetospheres, used to model high-energy light curves have distorted polar caps that are offset from the magnetic axis in the direction opposite to rotation. Since this effect is due to the sweepback of field lines near the light cylinder, offset polar caps are a generic property of pulsar magnetospheres and their effects should be included in gamma-ray pulsar light curve modeling. In slot gap models (having two-pole caustic geometry), the offset polar caps cause a strong azimuthal asymmetry of the particle acceleration around the magnetic axis. We have studied the effect of the offset polar caps in both retarded vacuum dipole and force-free geometry on the model high-energy pulse profile. We find that. corn pared to the profile:-; derived from :-;ymmetric caps, the flux in the pulse peaks, which are caustics formed along the trailing magnetic field lines. increases significantly relative to the off-peak emission. formed along leading field lines. The enhanced contrast produces greatly improved slot gap model fits to Fermi pulsar light curves like Vela, which show very little off-peak emIssIon.

  8. Pulsar Polar Cap Heating and Surface Thermal X-Ray Emission I. Curvature Radiation Pair Fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K; Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alexander G.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the effect of pulsar polar cap (PC) heating produced by positrons returning from the upper pair formation front. Our calculations are based on a self-consistent treatment of the pair dynamics and the effect of electric field screening by the returning positrons. We calculate the resultant X-ray luminosities, and discuss the dependence of the PC heating efficiencies on pulsar parameters, such as characteristic spin-down age, spin period, and surface magnetic field strength. In this study we concentrate on the regime where the pairs are produced in a magnetic field by curvature photons emitted by accelerating electrons. Our theoretical results are not in conflict with the available observational X-ray data and suggest that the effect of PC heating should significantly contribute to the thermal X-ray fluxes from middle-aged and old pulsars. The implications for current and future X-ray observations of pulsars are briefly outlined.

  9. QED-PIC simulations of electromagnetic cascades at the surface of pulsar's polar cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grismayer, Thomas; Vranic, Marija; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luis

    2016-10-01

    The recent implementation of the QED module in the OSIRIS 3.0 framework has enabled to simulate various scenarios where pair production or gamma-rays emission can be produced with ultra-intense lasers and/or relativistic particles beams. In this study we leverage on these numerical tools to study extreme astrophysical scenarios where self-consistent produced electron-positron pair plasmas are of relevance such as in pulsar magnetospheres. The dynamics of pulsar's polar cap cascade, based on the Ruderman-Sutherland model, has been investigated for the first time numerically in one dimension by Timokhin. Including quantum synchrotron radiation additionally to curvature photon radiation for the possible processes responsible for photon emission, we present the results of one and two dimensional QED-PIC simulations of the development of electromagnetic cascades at the surface of the polar cap and the subsequent plasma discharges that are accompanied by strong electrostatic waves.

  10. Pulsar bi-drifting: implications for polar cap geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    For many years it has been considered puzzling how pulsar radio emission, supposedly created by a circulating carousel of sub-beams, can produce the driftbands demonstrated by PSR J0815+09, and more recently PSR B1839-04, which simultaneously drift in opposing directions. Here we suggest that the carousels of these pulsars, and hence their beams, are not circular but elliptical with axes tilted with respect to the fiducial plane. We show that certain relatively unusual lines of sight can cause bi-drifting to be observed, and a simulation of the two known exemplars is presented. Although bi-drifting is rare, non-circular beams may be common among pulsars and reveal themselves by having profile centroids displaced from the fiducial plane identified by polarisation position angle swings. They may also result in profiles with asymmetric and frequency-dependent component evolution. It is further suggested that the carousels may change their tilt by specific amounts and later reverse them. This may occur suddenly, ...

  11. Identifying the Mysterious EGRET Sources Signatures of Polar Cap Pulsar Models

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G

    2001-01-01

    The advent of the next generation of gamma-ray experiments, led by GLAST, AGILE, INTEGRAL and a host of atmospheric \\v{C}erenkov telescopes coming on line in the next few years, will enable ground-breaking discoveries relating to the presently enigmatic set of EGRET/CGRO UID galactic sources that have yet to find definitive identifications. Pulsars are principal candidates for such sources, and many are expected to be detected by GLAST, some that are radio-selected, like most of the present EGRET/Comptel pulsars, and perhaps even more that are detected via independent pulsation searches. At this juncture, it is salient to outline the principal predictions of pulsar models that might aid identification of gamma-ray sources, and moreover propel subsequent interpretation of their properties. This review summarizes relevant characteristics of the polar cap model, emphasizing where possible distinctions from the competing outer gap model. Foremost among these considerations are the hard X-ray to gamma-ray spectral...

  12. $\\gamma$-ray and X-ray luminosities from spin-powered pulsars in the full polar cap cascade model

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B; Zhang, Bing; Harding, Alice K.

    2000-01-01

    We modify the conventional curvature radiation (inverse Compton scattering) + synchrotron radiation polar cap cascade model by including the inverse Compton scattering of the higher generation pairs. Within the framework of the space-charge-limited-flow acceleration model with frame-dragging proposed by Harding & Muslimov (1998), such a full polar cap cascade scenario can well reproduce the $L_\\gamma \\propto (L_{\\rm sd})^{1/2}$ and the $L_x \\sim 10^{-3} L_{\\rm sd}$ dependences observed from the known spin-powered pulsars. According to this model, the ``pulsed'' soft ROSAT-band X-rays from most of the millisecond pulsars might be of thermal origin, if there are no strong multipole magnetic components near their surfaces.

  13. Particle Acceleration Zones Above Pulsar Polar Caps Electron and Positron Pair Formation Fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K; Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alexander G.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate self-consistent particle acceleration near a pulsar polar cap (PC) by the electrostatic field due to the effect of inertial frame dragging. Test particles gain energy from the electric field parallel to the open magnetic field lines and lose energy by both curvature radiation (CR) and resonant and non-resonant inverse Compton scattering (ICS) with soft thermal X-rays from the neutron star (NS) surface. Gamma-rays radiated by electrons accelerated from the stellar surface produce pairs in the strong magnetic field, which screen the electric field beyond a pair formation front (PFF). Some of the created positrons can be accelerated back toward the surface and produce gamma-rays and pairs that create another PFF above the surface. We find that ICS photons control PFF formation near the surface, but due to the different angles at which the electron and positron scatter the soft photons, positron initiated cascades develop above the surface and screen the accelerating electric field. Stable accelera...

  14. Pulsar Polar Cap Heating and Surface Thermal X-Ray Emission. II. Inverse Compton Radiation Pair Fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Muslimov, A G; Muslimov, Alice K. Harding & Alexander

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the production of electron-positron pairs by inverse Compton scattered (ICS) photons above a pulsar polar cap (PC) and surface heating by returning positrons. This paper is a continuation of our self-consistent treatment of acceleration, pair dynamics and electric field screening above pulsar PCs. We calculate the altitude of the inverse Compton pair formation fronts, the flux of returning positrons and present the heating efficiencies and X-ray luminosities. We revise pulsar death lines implying cessation of pair formation, and present them in surface magnetic field-period space. We find that virtually all known radio pulsars are capable of producing pairs by resonant and non-resonant ICS photons radiated by particles accelerated above the PC in a pure star-centered dipole field, so that our ICS pair death line coincides with empirical radio pulsar death. Our calculations show that ICS pairs are able to screen the accelerating electric field only for high neutron star surface temperatures and ...

  15. Full polar cap cascade scenario $\\gamma$-ray and X-ray luminosities from spin-powered pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B; Zhang, Bing; Harding, Alice K.

    2000-01-01

    We modify polar cap cascade picture to include the ICS of the higher generation pairs. In such a ``full-cascade'' scenario, not only the perpendicular portion of the energy of the pairs goes to high energy radiation via SR, but the parallel portion of the energy of the pairs can also contribute to high energy emission via ICS with the soft thermal photons from either the full neutron star surface or the hot polar cap. An important output of such a scenario is that the soft tail of the ICS spectrum can naturally result in a non-thermal X-ray component which can contribute to the luminosities observed by ROSAT and ASCA. Here we present an analytic description of such a full polar cap cascade scenario within the framework of Harding & Muslimov acceleration model. We present the theoretical predictions of the $\\gamma$-ray luminosities, the thermal and non-thermal X-ray luminosities for the known spin-powered X-ray pulsars. Our results show that the observed different dependences of the high energy luminositie...

  16. Electric Field Screening with Back-Flow at Pulsar Polar Cap

    CERN Document Server

    Kisaka, Shota; Terasawa, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Recent $\\gamma$-ray observations suggest that the particle acceleration occurs at the outer region of the pulsar magnetosphere. The magnetic field lines in the outer acceleration region (OAR) are connected to the neutron star surface (NSS). If copious electron--positron pairs are produced near the NSS, such pairs flow into the OAR and screen the electric field there. To activate the OAR, the electromagnetic cascade due to the electric field near the NSS should be suppressed. However, since a return current is expected along the field lines through the OAR, the outflow extracted from the NSS alone cannot screen the electric field just above the NSS. In this paper, we analytically and numerically study the electric-field screening at the NSS taking into account the effects of the back-flowing particles from the OAR. In certain limited cases, the electric field is screened without significant pair cascade if only ultrarelativistic particles ($\\gamma\\gg1$) flow back to the NSS. On the other hand, if electron--pos...

  17. Polar Cap Patch Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-25

    cap arcs Citation: Hosokawa, K., J. I. Moen, K. Shiokawa, and Y. Otsuka ( 2011 ), Motion of polar cap arcs , J. Geophys. Res. , 116 , A01305, doi...K., J. I. Moen, K. Shiokawa, and Y. Otsuka , (2011), Decay of polar cap patch, J. Geophys. Res., 116, A05308, doi:10.1029/2010JA016287, Abstract. We

  18. Polarization observations of 20 millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Wenming; van Straten, Willem; Reynolds, John; Hobbs, George; Wang, Na; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Champion, David; Coles, William; Hotan, Aidan; Khoo, Jonathan; Oslowski, Stefan; Sarkissian, John; Verbiest, Joris; Yardley, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Polarization profiles are presented for 20 millisecond pulsars that are being observed as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project. The observations used the Parkes multibeam receiver with a central frequency of 1369 MHz and the Parkes digital filterbank pulsar signal-processing system PDFB2. Because of the large total observing time, the summed polarization profiles have very high signal/noise ratios and show many previously undetected profile features. Thirteen of the 20 pulsars show emission over more than half of the pulse period. Polarization variations across the profiles are complex and the observed position angle variations are generally not in accord with the rotating-vector model for pulsar polarization. Never-the-less, the polarization properties are broadly similar to those of normal (non-millisecond) pulsars, suggesting that the basic radio emission mechanism is the same in both classes of pulsar. The results support the idea that radio emission from millisecond pulsars originates high in t...

  19. Circular Polarization in Pulsar Integrated Profiles: Updates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We update the systematic studies of circular polarization in integrated pulse profiles by Han et al. Data of circular polarization profiles are compiled. Sense reversals can occur in core or cone components, or near the intersection between components. The correlation between the sense of circular polarization and the sense of position angle variation for conal-double pulsars is confirmed with a much large database. Circular polarization of some pulsars has clear changes with frequency.Circular polarization of millisecond pulsars is marginally different from that of normal pulsars.

  20. North Polar Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] This week we will be looking at five examples of laminar wind flow on the north polar cap. On Earth, gravity-driven south polar cap winds are termed 'catabatic' winds. Catabatic winds begin over the smooth expanse of the cap interior due to temperature differences between the atmosphere and the surface. Once begun, the winds sweep outward along the surface of the polar cap toward the sea. As the polar surface slopes down toward sealevel, the wind speeds increase. Catabatic wind speeds in the Antartic can reach several hundreds of miles per hour. In the images of the Martian north polar cap we can see these same type of winds. Notice the streamers of dust moving downslope over the darker trough sides, these streamers show the laminar flow regime coming off the cap. Within the trough we see turbulent clouds of dust, kicked up at the trough base as the winds slow down and enter a chaotic flow regime. The horizontal lines in these images are due to framelet overlap and lighting conditions over the bright polar cap. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 86.5, Longitude 64.5 East (295.5 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen

  1. High Energy Emission from the Polar Cap The Slot Gap Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Muslimov, A G

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of the high-energy emission from polar cap accelerators will be discussed. Particles accelerated in the "slot gap" near the polar cap rim will reach altitudes of several stellar radii before initiating pair cascades, producing a wide hollow cone of emission in young pulsars and some millisecond pulsars. Model X-ray and gamma-ray spectra and pulse profiles, based on Monte-Carlo simulations of polar cap pair cascades, will be presented.

  2. Polar Cap Retreat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    13 August 2004 This red wide angle Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a view of the retreating seasonal south polar cap in the most recent spring in late 2003. Bright areas are covered with frost, dark areas are those from which the solid carbon dioxide has sublimed away. The center of this image is located near 76.5oS, 28.2oW. The scene is large; it covers an area about 250 km (155 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  3. MeV Pulsars: Modeling Spectra and Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kust Harding, Alice; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos

    2017-08-01

    A sub-population of energetic rotation-powered pulsars show high fluxes of pulsed non-thermal hard X-ray emission. While this ‘MeV pulsar’ population includes some radio-loud pulsars like the Crab and PSR B1509-58, a significant number have no detected radio or GeV emission, a mystery since gamma-ray emission is a common characteristic of pulsars with high spin-down power. Their steeply rising hard X-ray spectral energy distributions (SEDs) suggest peaks at 0.1 - 1 MeV but they have not been detected above 200 keV. Several upcoming and planned telescopes may shed light on the MeV pulsars. The Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) will observe pulsars in the 0.2 - 12 keV band and may discover additional MeV pulsars. The All-Sky Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Observatory (AMEGO), in a study phase, can detect emission above 0.2 MeV and polarization in the 0.2 - 10 MeV band. We present a model for the spectrum and polarization of MeV pulsars where the X-ray emission comes from electron-positron pairs radiating in the outer magnetosphere and current sheet. This model predicts that the peak of the SED increases with surface magnetic field strength if the pairs are produced in polar cap cascades. For small inclination angles, viewing at large angles to the rotation axis can miss both the radio pulse and the GeV pulse from particles accelerating near the current sheet. Characterizing the emission and geometry of MeV pulsars can thus provide clues to the source of pairs and acceleration in the magnetosphere.

  4. Polarization in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Volpi, D; Amato, E; Bucciantini, N

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of our present work is to provide, for the first time, a simple computational tool that can be used to compute the brightness, the spectral index, the polarization, the time variability and the spectrum of the non-thermal light (both synchrotron and inverse Compton, IC) associated with the plasma dynamics resulting from given relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) simulations. The proposed method is quite general, and can be applied to any scheme for RMHD and to all non-thermal emitting sources, e.g. pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe), and in particular to the Crab Nebula (CN) as in the present proceeding. Here only the linear optical and X-ray polarization that characterizes the PWNe synchrotron emission is analyzed in order to infer information on the inner bulk flow structure, to provide a direct investigation of the magnetic field configuration, in particular the presence and the strength of a poloidal component, and to understand the origin of some emitting features, such as the knot, whose origi...

  5. Circular polarization shows the nature of pulsar magnetosphere composition

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, P B

    2015-01-01

    It has been argued in previous papers that an ion-proton plasma is formed at the polar caps of neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. The present paper does not offer a theory of the development of turbulence from the unstable Langmuir modes that grow in the outward accelerated plasma, but attempts to describe in qualitative terms the factors relevant to the emission of polarized radiation at frequencies below 1 - 10 GHz. The work of Karastergiou and Johnston is of particular importance in this respect because it demonstrates in high-resolution measurements of the profiles of 17 pulsars that the relative phase retardation between the O- and E-modes of the plasma is no greater than of the order of pi. Provided the source of the radiation is at low altitudes, as favoured by recent observations, this order of retardation is possible only for a plasma of baryonic-mass particles.

  6. Polarized Curvature Radiation in Pulsar Magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, P F; Han, J L

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of polarized emission in pulsar magnetosphere is investigated in this paper. The polarized waves are generated through curvature radiation from the relativistic particles streaming along curved magnetic field lines and co-rotating with the pulsar magnetosphere. Within the 1/{\\deg} emission cone, the waves can be divided into two natural wave mode components, the ordinary (O) mode and the extraord nary (X) mode, with comparable intensities. Both components propagate separately in magnetosphere, and are aligned within the cone by adiabatic walking. The refraction of O-mode makes the two components separated and incoherent. The detectable emission at a given height and a given rotation phase consists of incoherent X-mode and O-mode components coming from discrete emission regions. For four particle-density models in the form of uniformity, cone, core and patches, we calculate the intensities for each mode numerically within the entire pulsar beam. If the co-rotation of relativistic particles with...

  7. Pair Cascades and Deathlines in Magnetic Fields with Offset Polar Caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alex G.

    2012-01-01

    We present results of electron-positron pair cascade simulations in a dipole magnetic field whose polar cap is offset from the dipole axis. In such a field geometry, the polar cap is displaced a small fraction of the neutron star radius from the star symmetry axis and the field line radius of curvature is modified. Using the modified parallel electric field near the offset polar cap, we simulate pair cascades to determine the pair deathlines and pair multiplicities as a function of the offset. We find that the pair multiplicity can change dr;unatically with a modest offset, with a significant increase on one side of the polar cap. Lower pair deathlines allow a larger fraction of the pulsar population, that include old and millisecond pulsars, to produce cascades with high multiplicity. The results have some important implications for pulsar particle production, high-energy emission and cosmic-ray contribution.

  8. Motion of polar cap arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, K.; Moen, J. I.; Shiokawa, K.; Otsuka, Y.

    2011-01-01

    A statistics of motion of polar cap arcs is conducted by using 5 years of optical data from an all-sky imager at Resolute Bay, Canada (74.73°N, 265.07°E). We identified 743 arcs by using an automated arc detection algorithm and statistically examined their moving velocities as estimated by the method of Hosokawa et al. (2006). The number of the arcs studied is about 5 times larger than that in the previous statistics of polar cap arcs by Valladares et al. (1994); thus, we could expect to obtain more statistically significant results. Polar cap arcs are found to fall into two distinct categories: the By-dependent and By-independent arcs. The motion of the former arcs follows the rule reported by Valladares et al. (1994), who showed that stable polar cap arcs move in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By. About two thirds of the arcs during northward IMF conditions belong to this category. The latter arcs always move poleward irrespective of the sign of the IMF By, which possibly correspond to the poleward moving arcs in the morning side reported by Shiokawa et al. (1997). At least one third of the arcs belong to this category. The By-dependent arcs tend to move faster when the magnitude of the IMF By is larger, suggesting that the transport of open flux by lobe reconnection from one polar cap compartment to the other controls their motion. In contrast, the speed of the By-independent arcs does not correlate with the magnitude of the By. The motions of both the By-dependent and By-independent arcs are most probably caused by the magnetospheric convection. Convection in the region of By-dependent arcs is affected by the IMF By, which indicates that their sources may be on open field lines or in the closed magnetosphere adjacent to the open-closed boundary, whereas By-independent arcs seem to be well on closed field lines. Hence, the magnetospheric source of the two types of arc may be different. This implies that the mechanisms causing the

  9. On the high frequency polarization of pulsar radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Von Hoensbroech, A; Krawczyk, A

    1998-01-01

    We have analyzed the polarization properties of pulsars at an observing frequency of 4.9 GHz. Together with low frequency data, we are able to trace polarization profiles over more than three octaves into an interesting frequency regime. At those high frequencies the polarization properties often undergo important changes such as significant depolarization. A detailed analysis allowed us to identify parameters, which regulate those changes. A significant correlation was found between the integrated degree of polarization and the loss of rotational energy E^dot. The data were also used to review the widely established pulsar profile classification scheme of core- and cone-type beams. We have discovered the existence of pulsars which show a strongly increasing degree of circular polarization towards high frequencies. Previously unpublished average polarization profiles, recorded at the 100m Effelsberg radio telescope, are presented for 32 radio pulsars at 4.9 GHz. The data were used to derive polarimetric param...

  10. Intrinsic Instrumental Polarization and High-Precision Pulsar Timing

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, Griffin; Paulin, Remi; Carozzi, Tobia; Johnston, Simon; van Straten, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Radio telescopes are used to accurately measure the time of arrival (ToA) of radio pulses in pulsar timing experiments that target mostly millisecond pulsars (MSPs) due to their high rotational stability. This allows for detailed study of MSPs and forms the basis of experiments to detect gravitational waves. Apart from intrinsic and propagation effects, such as pulse-to-pulse jitter and dispersion variations in the interstellar medium, timing precision is limited in part by the following: polarization purity of the telescope's orthogonally polarized receptors, the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the pulsar profile, and the polarization fidelity of the system. Using simulations, we present how fundamental limitations in recovering the true polarization reduce the precision of ToA measurements. Any real system will respond differently to each source observed depending on the unique pulsar polarization profile. Using the profiles of known MSPs we quantify the limits of observing system specifications that yield s...

  11. Are there real orthogonal polarization modes in pulsar radio emission?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐仁新; 乔国俊

    2000-01-01

    The orthogonal polarization modes (OPM) have been reported observationally and widely accepted by pulsar researchers. However, no acceptable theory can explain the origin of the OPM, which becomes a mystery in pulsar research field. Here a possible way to solve this mystery is pre-sented. We ask a question: Does there exist any real so-called OPM in pulsar radiation? It is proposed that the ’observed OPM’ in individual pulses could be the results of depolarization of pulsar radiation and the observational uncertainties originated f rom polarimeter in observation. A possible method to check this idea is suggested. If the idea is verified, the pulsar research would be influenced significant-ly in theory and in observation.

  12. Are there real orthogonal polarization modes in pulsar radio emission?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The orthogonal polarization modes (OPM) have been reported observationally and widely accepted by pulsar researchers. However, no acceptable theory can explain the origin of the OPM, which becomes a mystery in pulsar research field. Here a possible way to solve this mystery is presented. We ask a question: Does there exist any real so-called OPM in pulsar radiation? It is proposed that the 'observed OPM' in individual pulses could be the results of depolarization of pulsar radiation and the observational uncertainties originated from polarimeter in observation. A possible method to check this idea is suggested. If the idea is verified, the pulsar research would be influenced significantly in theory and in observation.

  13. Martian north polar cap summer water cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adrian J; Becerra, Patricio; Byrne, Shane

    2016-01-01

    A key outstanding question in Martian science is 'are the polar caps gaining or losing mass and what are the implications for past, current and future climate?' To address this question, we use observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) of the north polar cap during late summer for multiple Martian years, to monitor the summertime water cycle in order to place quantitative limits on the amount of water ice deposited and sublimed in late summer. We establish here for the first time the summer cycle of water ice absorption band signatures on the north polar cap. We show that in a key region in the interior of the north polar cap, the absorption band depths grow until Ls=120, when they begin to shrink, until they are obscured at the end of summer by the north polar hood. This behavior is transferable over the entire north polar cap, where in late summer regions 'flip' from being net sublimating into net condensation mode. This transition or 'mode flip' happens earlier for ...

  14. Martian north polar cap summer water cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adrian J.; Calvin, Wendy M.; Becerra, Patricio; Byrne, Shane

    2016-10-01

    A key outstanding question in Martian science is "are the polar caps gaining or losing mass and what are the implications for past, current and future climate?" To address this question, we use observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) of the north polar cap during late summer for multiple Martian years, to monitor the summertime water cycle in order to place quantitative limits on the amount of water ice deposited and sublimed in late summer. We establish here for the first time the summer cycle of water ice absorption band signatures on the north polar cap. We show that in a key region in the interior of the north polar cap, the absorption band depths grow until Ls = 120, when they begin to shrink, until they are obscured at the end of summer by the north polar hood. This behavior is transferable over the entire north polar cap, where in late summer regions 'flip' from being net sublimating into net condensation mode. This transition or 'mode flip' happens earlier for regions closer to the pole, and later for regions close to the periphery of the cap. The observations and calculations presented herein estimate that on average a water ice layer ∼70 microns thick is deposited during the Ls = 135-164 period. This is far larger than the results of deposition on the south pole during summer, where an average layer 0.6-6 microns deep has been estimated by Brown et al. (2014) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 406, 102-109.

  15. Discovery of Optical Circular Polarization of the Crab Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktorowicz, Sloane; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Illing, Rainer M. E.; Nofi, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 50 years ago at the Lick 3-m Shane telescope, Wampler et al. (1969) discovered optical linear depolarization of the Crab pulsar's main pulse and interpulse regions, which led to the interpretation of synchrotron radiation as the source of pulsed emission. We present phase-resolved, simultaneous linear and circular polarization of the Crab pulsar using the POLISH2 aperture-integrated, optical polarimeter at the Lick 3-m telescope. The two photoelastic modulators in this instrument, used instead of waveplates, AC couple incident Stokes Q, U, and V to unique, independent frequencies between 10 and 200 kHz. Stokes I is measured from the time-averaged intensity of the beam. Thus, this instrument is capable of simultaneous measurement of Q/I, U/I, and V/I in 20 microsecond temporal bins with part-per-million nightly sensitivity on naked eye stars. From just one hour of observations, we confirm linear depolarization of the main pulse and interpulse regions, and we also discover significant optical circular polarization at all pulsar phases. Furthermore, we observe circular depolarization of the main pulse and interpulse regions with respect to the off-pulse region. Observations of strongly polarized calibration stars, as well as lamp observations with a linear polarizer inserted upstream of the modulators, demonstrate that circular polarization results obtained on the Crab pulsar are not due to spurious, instrumental conversion of linear to circular polarization. Therefore, using novel instrumentation, our observations shed new light on this enigmatic object, and we demonstrate that the Lick 3-m Shane telescope still remains at the cutting edge for optical polarimetry.

  16. Comparison of Polar Cap (PC) index calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauning, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) index introduced by Troshichev and Andrezen (1985) is derived from polar magnetic variations and is mainly a measure of the intensity of the transpolar ionospheric currents. These currents relate to the polar cap antisunward ionospheric plasma convection driven by the dawn-dusk electric field, which in turn is generated by the interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere. Coefficients to calculate PCN and PCS index values from polar magnetic variations recorded at Thule and Vostok, respectively, have been derived by several different procedures in the past. The first published set of coefficients for Thule was derived by Vennerstrøm, 1991 and is still in use for calculations of PCN index values by DTU Space. Errors in the program used to calculate index values were corrected in 1999 and again in 2001. In 2005 DMI adopted a unified procedure proposed by Troshichev for calculations of the PCN index. Thus there exists 4 different series of PCN index values. Similarly, at AARI three different sets of coefficients have been used to calculate PCS indices in the past. The presentation discusses the principal differences between the various PC index procedures and provides comparisons between index values derived from the same magnetic data sets using the different procedures. Examples from published papers are examined to illustrate the differences.

  17. Quantifying Solar Wind-Polar Cap Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, K. D.; Gerrard, A. J.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Huang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that the solar wind is a major driver of ultra-low frequency [ULF] power at ground locations from low to high latitudes. However, due to the scarcity of deep polar cap magnetometer sites, it is not clear when, where, or if this is true deep inside the polar cap on open field lines where interplanetary magnetic field [IMF] ULF waves could possibly be directly detected. Given recent observations of very large Joule heating estimates from DMSP data, together with the large heating reported by the CHAMP satellite, it is important to understand the degree to which ULF waves in the solar wind can directly cause such heating. Using a time series of lagged correlation sequences ("dynamic correlograms") between GSM Bz ULF power (computed via data obtained from NASA's Advanced Composition Explorer [ACE] ahead of Earth in the solar wind) and the horizontal ULF power (H^2=N^2+E^2) from ground-based magnetometers in Earth's southern polar cap, we investigate the direct penetration of ULF waves from the solar wind into the polar ionosphere during a gamut of space weather conditions at a distributed network of Automated Geophysical Observatories [AGOs] in Antarctica. To infer causation, a predicted lag correlation maximum at each time step is computed by simply dividing the associated distance of ACE from Earth by the concurrent bulk solar wind speed. This technique helps parse out direct penetration of solar wind ULF waves from other sources (e.g., via leakage from closed field line resonances due to the bulk solar wind plasma viscously interacting at dawn/dusk flanks inducing Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities [KHI] or compressional modes induced by impulses in solar wind dynamic pressure). The identified direct-penetrating ULF waves are related to the DMSP-derived Poynting fluxes by regression analysis, and conclusions are drawn for the importance of the ULF source for the measured heating.

  18. Improving the precision of pulsar timing through polarization statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Osłowski, Stefan; Demorest, Paul; Bailes, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    At the highest levels of pulsar timing precision achieved to date, experiments are limited by noise intrinsic to the pulsar. This stochastic wideband impulse modulated self-noise (SWIMS) limits pulsar timing precision by randomly biasing the measured times of arrival and thus increasing the root mean square (rms) timing residual. We discuss an improved methodology of removing this bias in the measured times of arrival by including information about polarized radiation. Observations of J0437-4715 made over a one-week interval at the Parkes Observatory are used to demonstrate a nearly 40 per cent improvement in the rms timing residual with this extended analysis. In this way, based on the observations over a 64 MHz bandwidth centred at 1341 MHz with integrations over 16.78 s we achieve a 476 ns rms timing residual. In the absence of systematic error, these results lead to a predicted rms timing residual of 30 ns in one hour integrations; however the data are currently limited by variable Faraday rotation in the...

  19. Polar cap index as a proxy for hemispheric Joule heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chun, F.K.; Knipp, D.J.; McHarg, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    The polar cap (PC) index measures the level of geomagnetic activity in the polar cap based on magnetic perturbations from overhead ionospheric currents and distant field-aligned currents on the poleward edge of the nightside auroral oval. Because PC essentially measures the main sources of energy...

  20. Stokes tomography of radio pulsar magnetospheres. I. Linear polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, C T Y

    2010-01-01

    Polarimetric studies of pulsar radio emission traditionally concentrate on how the Stokes vector (I, Q, U, V) varies with pulse longitude, with special emphasis on the position angle (PA) swing of the linearly polarized component. The interpretation of the PA swing in terms of the rotating vector model is limited by the assumption of an axisymmetric magnetic field and the degeneracy of the output with respect to the orientation and magnetic geometry of the pulsar; different combinations of the latter two properties can produce similar PA swings. This paper introduces Stokes phase portraits as a supplementary diagnostic tool with which the orientation and magnetic geometry can be inferred more accurately. The Stokes phase portraits feature unique patterns in the I-Q, I-U, and Q-U planes, whose shapes depend sensitively on the magnetic geometry, inclination angle, beam and polarization patterns, and emission altitude. We construct look-up tables of Stokes phase portraits and PA swings for pure and current-modif...

  1. Analysis of the COS B data for evidence of linear polarization of Vela pulsar gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattox, John R.; Mayer-Hasselwander, Hans A.; Strong, Andy W.

    1990-01-01

    The COS B spark chamber telescope observations of the Vela pulsar were analyzed for gamma-ray polarization. No significant quadrupole moment is found in the azimuthal distribution of the electron-positron pair production planes. However, analysis of the sensitivity indicates that even 100-percent polarization would not be detected. Therefore, the null result does not constrain the polarization of the Vela pulsar gamma-ray emission. This result contradicts the report of Caraveo et al. (1988) of possible evidence for polarization of the Vela pulsar gamma rays.

  2. Response of northern winter polar cap to auroral substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kan; Sotirelis, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The three-phase substorm sequence has been generally accepted and is often tied to the Dungey cycle. Although previous studies have mostly agreed on the increase and decrease in the polar cap area during an episode of substorm, there are disparate views on when the polar cap starts to contract relative to substorm onset. Here we address this conflict using high-resolution (~1-3 min) snapshot global auroral images from the ultraviolet imager on board the Polar spacecraft. On the basis of 28 auroral substorm events, all observed in the Northern Hemispheric winter, it is found that the polar cap inflated prior to onset in all events and it attained the largest area ~6 min prior to the substorm expansion phase onset, while the dayside polar cap area remained steady around the onset. The onset of nightside polar cap deflation is found to be attributed to intensifications of aurora on the poleward edge of the nightside oval, mostly in the midnight sector. Although this result supports the loading-unloading and reconnection substorm models, it is not clear if the initial polar cap deflation and the substorm expansion are parts of the same process.

  3. Polar cap index as a proxy for hemispheric Joule heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chun, F.K.; Knipp, D.J.; McHarg, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    The polar cap (PC) index measures the level of geomagnetic activity in the polar cap based on magnetic perturbations from overhead ionospheric currents and distant field-aligned currents on the poleward edge of the nightside auroral oval. Because PC essentially measures the main sources of energy...... input into the polar cap, we propose to use PC as a proxy for the hemispheric Joule heat production rate (JH). In this study, JH is estimated from the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure. We fit hourly PC values to hourly averages of JH. Using a data base approximately...... three times larger than studies, we find a quadratic relationship between JH and PC, differentiated by season. A comparison during the November 1993 storm interval with earlier reported methods using the AE index and the cross polar cap potential, shows that the PC-based Joule heating estimate...

  4. Phase-resolved polarization properties of the pulsar striped wind synchrotron emission

    CERN Document Server

    Petri, J

    2013-01-01

    Since the launch of the Fermi telescope more than five years ago, many new gamma-ray pulsars have been discovered with intriguing properties challenging our current understanding of pulsar physics. Observation of the Crab pulsar furnish today a broad band analysis of the pulsed spectrum with phase-resolved variability allowing to refine existing model to explain pulse shape, spectra and polarization properties. The latter gives inside into the geometry of the emitting region as well as on the structure of the magnetic field. Based on an exact analytical solution of the striped wind with finite current sheet thickness, we analyze in detail the phase-resolved polarization variability emanating from the synchrotron radiation. We assume that the main contribution to the wind emissivity comes from a thin transition layer where the dominant toroidal magnetic field reverses its polarity, the so-called current sheet. The resulting radiation is mostly linearly polarized. In the off-pulse region, the electric vector li...

  5. Solar illumination control of ionospheric outflow above polar cap arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Maes, L; De Keyser, J; Dandouras, I; Fear, R C; Fontaine, D; Haaland, S

    2016-01-01

    We measure the flux density, composition, and energy of outflowing ions above the polar cap, accelerated by quasi-static electric fields parallel to the magnetic field and associated with polar cap arcs, using Cluster. Mapping the spacecraft position to its ionospheric foot point, we analyze the dependence of these parameters on the solar zenith angle (SZA). We find a clear transition at SZA between We find a clear transition at SZA between $\\sim$94$^{\\circ}$ and $\\sim$107$^{\\circ}$, with the O$^{+}$ flux higher above the sunlit ionosphere. This dependence on the illumination of the local ionosphere indicates that significant O$^{+}$ upflow occurs locally above the polar ionosphere. The same is found for H$^{+}$, but to a lesser extent. This effect can result in a seasonal variation of the total ion upflow from the polar ionosphere. Furthermore, we show that low-magnitude field-aligned potential drops are preferentially observed above the sunlit ionosphere, suggesting a feedback effect of ionospheric conducti...

  6. Complete O(. cap alpha. ) corrections to polarized Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gongora-T, A.; Stuart, R.G.

    1989-04-01

    General expressions for Compton scattering and its O(..cap alpha..) real and virtual corrections are given for electron and photon beams with arbitrary polarization. The expressions obtained are suitable for use in Monte Carlo simulations of Compton polarimeters planned for polarized e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliders. The basis for the calculation are the spinor techniques recently applied to photon and gluon bremsstrahlung. The practical application of these techniques for massive fermions is discussed.

  7. Detection of polarized quasi-periodic microstructure emission in millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    De, Kishalay; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-01-01

    Microstructure emission, involving short time scale, often quasi-periodic, intensity fluctuations in subpulse emission, is well known in normal period pulsars. In this letter, we present the first detections of quasi-periodic microstructure emission from millisecond pulsars (MSPs), from Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations of two MSPs at 325 and 610 MHz. Similar to the characteristics of microstructure observed in normal period pulsars, we find that these features are often highly polarized, and exhibit quasi-periodic behavior on top of broader subpulse emission, with periods of the order of a few $\\mu$s. By measuring their widths and periodicities from single pulse intensity profiles and their autocorrelation functions, we extend the microstructure timescale - rotation period relationship by more than an order of magnitude down to rotation periods $\\sim$ 5 ms, and find it to be consistent with the relationship derived earlier for normal pulsars. The similarity of behavior is remarkable, given ...

  8. Vacuum nonlinear electrodynamic polarization effects in hard emission of pulsars and magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, V. I.; Sokolov, V. A.; Svertilov, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    The nonlinear electrodynamics influence of pulsar magnetic field on the electromagnetic pulse polarization is discussed from the point of observation interpretation. The calculations of pulsar magnetic field impact on the electromagnetic pulse polarization are made in such a way to make it easier to interpret these effects in space experiments. The law of hard emission pulse propagation in the pulsar magnetic field according to the vacuum (nonlinear electrodynamics is obtained. It has been shown, that due to the birefringence in the vacuum the front part of any hard emission pulse coming from a pulsar should be linearly polarized and the rest of pulse can have arbitrary polarization. The observational possibilities of vacuum birefringence are discussed. In this paper we give the estimations of detector parameters such as effective area, exposure time and necessity of polarization measurements with high accuracy. The combination of large area and extremely long exposure time gives the good opportunity to search the fine polarization effects like vacuum nonlinear electrodynamics birefringence.

  9. Effective area for northern Polar Cap index data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauning, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The northern (PCN) and southern (PCS) Polar Cap indices are used, among other, in applications to forecast geomagnetic storms and substorms. The index values are based on geomagnetic observations that for the forecast are transmitted in real-time from selected stations, PCN on data from Qaanaaq (Thule) in Greenland and PCS on geomagnetic data from Vostok in Antarctica. Observational conditions in the harsh polar environments are difficult and data transmission links are vulnerable. Hence, it could be advantageous to base real-time PC index values on data from multiple sites in order to safeguard the forecasts. The presentation shall compare PCN index values derived from a range of further observatories in Greenland and Canada in order to delimit an effective Polar Cap area for providing geomagnetic data for a useful index and to settle whether reliable (preliminary) index values could be derived from other than the standard observatories particularly during strongly disturbed conditions.

  10. Variations in the polar cap area during two substorm cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available This study employs observations from several sources to determine the location of the polar cap boundary, or open/closed field line boundary, at all local times, allowing the amount of open flux in the magnetosphere to be quantified. These data sources include global auroral images from the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI instrument on board the Polar spacecraft, SuperDARN HF radar measurements of the convection flow, and low altitude particle measurements from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA satellites, and the Fast Auroral SnapshoT (FAST spacecraft. Changes in the open flux content of the magnetosphere are related to the rate of magnetic reconnection occurring at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail, allowing us to estimate the day- and nightside reconnection voltages during two substorm cycles. Specifically, increases in the polar cap area are found to be consistent with open flux being created when the IMF is oriented southwards and low-latitude magnetopause reconnection is ongoing, and decreases in area correspond to open flux being destroyed at substorm breakup. The polar cap area can continue to decrease for 100 min following the onset of substorm breakup, continuing even after substorm-associated auroral features have died away. An estimate of the dayside reconnection voltage, determined from plasma drift measurements in the ionosphere, indicates that reconnection can take place at all local times along the dayside portion of the polar cap boundary, and hence presumably across the majority of the dayside magnetopause. The observation of ionospheric signatures of bursty reconnection over a wide extent of local times supports this finding.

    Key words. Ionosphere (plasma convection; polar ionosphere – Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics

  11. Space weather challenges of the polar cap ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Jøran; Oksavik, Kjellmar; Alfonsi, Lucilla; Daabakk, Yvonne; Romano, Vineenzo; Spogli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents research on polar cap ionosphere space weather phenomena conducted during the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) action ES0803 from 2008 to 2012. The main part of the work has been directed toward the study of plasma instabilities and scintillations in association with cusp flow channels and polar cap electron density structures/patches, which is considered as critical knowledge in order to develop forecast models for scintillations in the polar cap. We have approached this problem by multi-instrument techniques that comprise the EISCAT Svalbard Radar, SuperDARN radars, in-situ rocket, and GPS scintillation measurements. The Discussion section aims to unify the bits and pieces of highly specialized information from several papers into a generalized picture. The cusp ionosphere appears as a hot region in GPS scintillation climatology maps. Our results are consistent with the existing view that scintillations in the cusp and the polar cap ionosphere are mainly due to multi-scale structures generated by instability processes associated with the cross-polar transport of polar cap patches. We have demonstrated that the SuperDARN convection model can be used to track these patches backward and forward in time. Hence, once a patch has been detected in the cusp inflow region, SuperDARN can be used to forecast its destination in the future. However, the high-density gradient of polar cap patches is not the only prerequisite for high-latitude scintillations. Unprecedented high-resolution rocket measurements reveal that the cusp ionosphere is associated with filamentary precipitation giving rise to kilometer scale gradients onto which the gradient drift instability can operate very efficiently. Cusp ionosphere scintillations also occur during IMF BZ north conditions, which further substantiates that particle precipitation can play a key role to initialize plasma structuring. Furthermore, the cusp is associated with flow channels and

  12. Polarized synchrotron emission from the equatorial current sheet in gamma-ray pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, Benoît; Philippov, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    Polarization is a powerful diagnostic tool to constrain the site of the high-energy pulsed emission and particle acceleration in gamma-ray pulsars. Recent particle-in-cell simulations of pulsar magnetosphere suggest that high-energy emission results from particles accelerated in the equatorial current sheet emitting synchrotron radiation. In this study, we re-examine the simulation data to compute the phase-resolved polarization properties. We find that the emission is mildly polarized and that there is an anticorrelation between the flux and the degree of linear polarization (on-pulse: ~15%, off-pulse: ~30%). The decrease of polarization during pulses is mainly attributed to the formation of caustics in the current sheet. Each pulse of light is systematically accompanied by a rapid swing of the polarization angle due to the change of the magnetic polarity when the line of sight passes through the current sheet. The optical polarization pattern observed in the Crab can be well-reproduced for a pulsar inclinat...

  13. Probing circular polarization in stochastic gravitational wave background with pulsar timing arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    We study the detectability of circular polarization in a stochastic gravitational wave background from various sources such as supermassive black hole binaries, cosmic strings, and inflation in the early universe with pulsar timing arrays. We calculate generalized overlap reduction functions for the circularly polarized stochastic gravitational wave background. We find that the circular polarization can not be detected for an isotropic background. However, there is a chance to observe the circular polarization for an anisotropic gravitational wave background. We also show how to separate polarized gravitational waves from unpolarized gravitational waves.

  14. An analysis of radio pulsar nulling statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Survival analysis methods are used to seek correlations between the fraction of null pulsars and other pulsar characteristics for an ensemble of 72 radio pulsars. The strongest correlation is found between the null fraction and the pulse period, suggesting that nulling is a manifestation of a faltering emission mechanism. Correlations are also found between the fraction of null pulses and other parameters that have a strong dependence on the pulse period. The results presented here suggest that nulling is broad-band and may ultimately be explained in terms of polar cap models of pulsar emission.

  15. Review of methods to derive a Polar Cap (PC) index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauning, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Since a Polar Cap (PC) index was introduced in 1985, several different methods have been used to derive index values. Basically, the northern (PCN) and southern (PCS) are based on geomagnetic recordings at Qaanaaq (Thule) and Vostok, respectively. However, different derivation methods can give index values differing by more than a factor 2. The PC indices are used, among other, in scientific analyses to link solar wind conditions to relevant geophysical effects and in forecast efforts to establish numerical criteria for imminent risk of geomagnetic storms and substorms. Thus, it is unfortunate that several different versions of the PC index have been in use, often without specifically mentioning the index version being used or without ensuring that proper documention and specification of the derivation method is available. The presentation shall briefly describe the basic calculation of a Polar Cap index and point specifically to the differences between the different derivation methods and to the consequences for the index values

  16. Polar cap flow channel events: spontaneous and driven responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Sandholt

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We present two case studies of specific flow channel events appearing at the dusk and/or dawn polar cap boundary during passage at Earth of interplanetary (IP coronal mass ejections (ICMEs on 10 January and 25 July 2004. The channels of enhanced (>1 km/s antisunward convection are documented by SuperDARN radars and dawn-dusk crossings of the polar cap by the DMSP F13 satellite. The relationship with Birkeland currents (C1–C2 located poleward of the traditional R1–R2 currents is demonstrated. The convection events are manifest in ground magnetic deflections obtained from the IMAGE (International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects Svalbard chain of ground magnetometer stations located within 71–76° MLAT. By combining the ionospheric convection data and the ground magnetograms we are able to study the temporal behaviour of the convection events. In the two ICME case studies the convection events belong to two different categories, i.e., directly driven and spontaneous events. In the 10 January case two sharp southward turnings of the ICME magnetic field excited corresponding convection events as detected by IMAGE and SuperDARN. We use this case to determine the ground magnetic signature of enhanced flow channel events (the NH-dusk/By<0 variant. In the 25 July case a several-hour-long interval of steady southwest ICME field (Bz<0; By<0 gave rise to a long series of spontaneous convection events as detected by IMAGE when the ground stations swept through the 12:00–18:00 MLT sector. From the ground-satellite conjunction on 25 July we infer the pulsed nature of the polar cap ionospheric flow channel events in this case. The typical duration of these convection enhancements in the polar cap is 10 min.

  17. HIGH-FIDELITY RADIO ASTRONOMICAL POLARIMETRY USING A MILLISECOND PULSAR AS A POLARIZED REFERENCE SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Straten, W., E-mail: vanstraten.willem@gmail.com [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2013-01-15

    A new method of polarimetric calibration is presented in which the instrumental response is derived from regular observations of PSR J0437-4715 based on the assumption that the mean polarized emission from this millisecond pulsar remains constant over time. The technique is applicable to any experiment in which high-fidelity polarimetry is required over long timescales; it is demonstrated by calibrating 7.2 years of high-precision timing observations of PSR J1022+1001 made at the Parkes Observatory. Application of the new technique followed by arrival time estimation using matrix template matching yields post-fit residuals with an uncertainty-weighted standard deviation of 880 ns, two times smaller than that of arrival time residuals obtained via conventional methods of calibration and arrival time estimation. The precision achieved by this experiment yields the first significant measurements of the secular variation of the projected semimajor axis, the precession of periastron, and the Shapiro delay; it also places PSR J1022+1001 among the 10 best pulsars regularly observed as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project. It is shown that the timing accuracy of a large fraction of the pulsars in the PPTA is currently limited by the systematic timing error due to instrumental polarization artifacts. More importantly, long-term variations of systematic error are correlated between different pulsars, which adversely affects the primary objectives of any pulsar timing array experiment. These limitations may be overcome by adopting the techniques presented in this work, which relax the demand for instrumental polarization purity and thereby have the potential to reduce the development cost of next-generation telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array.

  18. Detection of Polarized Quasi-periodic Microstructure Emission in Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Kishalay; Gupta, Yashwant; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-12-01

    Microstructure emission, involving short timescale, often quasi-periodic, intensity fluctuations in subpulse emission, is well known in normal period pulsars. In this Letter, we present the first detections of quasi-periodic microstructure emission from millisecond pulsars (MSPs), from Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of two MSPs at 325 and 610 MHz. Similar to the characteristics of microstructure observed in normal period pulsars, we find that these features are often highly polarized and exhibit quasi-periodic behavior on top of broader subpulse emission, with periods of the order of a few μs. By measuring their widths and periodicities from single pulse intensity profiles and their autocorrelation functions, we extend the microstructure timescale-rotation period relationship by more than an order of magnitude down to rotation periods ˜5 ms, and find it to be consistent with the relationship derived earlier for normal pulsars. The similarity of behavior is remarkable, given the significantly different physical properties of MSPs and normal period pulsars, and rules out several previous speculations about the possible different characteristics of microstructure in MSP radio emission. We discuss the possible reasons for the non-detection of these features in previous high time resolution MSP studies along with the physical implications of our results, both in terms of a geometric beam sweeping model and temporal modulation model for micropulse production.

  19. Directional Statistics for Polarization Observations of Individual Pulses from Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    McKinnon, M M

    2010-01-01

    Radio polarimetry is a three-dimensional statistical problem. The three-dimensional aspect of the problem arises from the Stokes parameters Q, U, and V, which completely describe the polarization of electromagnetic radiation and conceptually define the orientation of a polarization vector in the Poincar'e sphere. The statistical aspect of the problem arises from the random fluctuations in the source-intrinsic polarization and the instrumental noise. A simple model for the polarization of pulsar radio emission has been used to derive the three-dimensional statistics of radio polarimetry. The model is based upon the proposition that the observed polarization is due to the incoherent superposition of two, highly polarized, orthogonal modes. The directional statistics derived from the model follow the Bingham-Mardia and Fisher family of distributions. The model assumptions are supported by the qualitative agreement between the statistics derived from it and those measured with polarization observations of the ind...

  20. The Green Bank Northern Celestial Cap Pulsar Survey - I: Survey Description, Data Analysis, and Initial Results

    CERN Document Server

    Stovall, K; Ransom, S M; Archibald, A M; Banaszak, S; Biwer, C M; Boyles, J; Dartez, L P; Day, D; Ford, A J; Flanigan, J; Garcia, A; Hessels, J W T; Hinojosa, J; Jenet, F A; Kaplan, D L; Karako-Argaman, C; Kaspi, V M; Kondratiev, V I; Leake, S; Lorimer, D R; Lunsford, G; Martinez, J G; Mata, A; McLaughlin, M A; Roberts, M S E; Rohr, M D; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; van Leeuwen, J; Walker, A N; Wells, B L

    2014-01-01

    We describe an ongoing search for pulsars and dispersed pulses of radio emission, such as those from rotating radio transients (RRATs) and fast radio bursts (FRBs), at 350 MHz using the Green Bank Telescope. With the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument, we record 100 MHz of bandwidth divided into 4,096 channels every 81.92 $\\mu s$. This survey will cover the entire sky visible to the Green Bank Telescope ($\\delta > -40^\\circ$, or 82% of the sky) and outside of the Galactic Plane will be sensitive enough to detect slow pulsars and low dispersion measure ($<$30 $\\mathrm{pc\\,cm^{-3}}$) millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with a 0.08 duty cycle down to 1.1 mJy. For pulsars with a spectral index of $-$1.6, we will be 2.5 times more sensitive than previous and ongoing surveys over much of our survey region. Here we describe the survey, the data analysis pipeline, initial discovery parameters for 62 pulsars, and timing solutions for 5 new pulsars. PSR J0214$+$5222 is an MSP in a long-period (512 days) orbit a...

  1. Earth's polar cap ionization patches lead to ion upflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q. H.; Zong, Q.; Lockwood, M. M.; Liang, J.; Zhang, B.; Moen, J. I.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Thomas, E. G.; Liu, R.; Dunlop, M. W.; Yang, H. G.; Hu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lester, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth constantly losses matter through ions escaping from the polar ionosphere. This makes the ionosphere as an important source of plasma for the magnetosphere and could modulate atmospheric isotope abundances on geological timescales, depending on what fraction of the upflowing ions subsequently return to the ionosphere and what fraction are ejected into interplanetary space. It has been proposed that the magnetosphere is dynamically modulated by the presence of the ionospheric ions, particularly heavy ions O+, during magnetic substorms and storms. The origin and formation mechanism of ionospheric ion upflow is, however, poorly understood, particularly under disturbed space weather conditions. We report simultaneous direct observations of ion upflow and a patch of ionization at the center of the polar cap region during a geomagnetic storm. Our observations indicate enhanced fluxes of upwelling O+ ions originate from the patch and were accelerated by the enhanced ambipolar electric field. This enhancement is caused by soft electron precipitations. Polar cap patches therefore provide an important source of upwelling ions for accelerations mechanisms at greater altitudes which can eject the ions. These observations give new insight into the processes of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling and the potential loss of terrestrial water dissociation products into space which, although extremely slow in the case of Earth, may be significant for other planets and moons.

  2. A Study of Multi-frequency Polarization Pulse Profiles of Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, S; Manchester, R N; Kerr, M; Shannon, R M; van Straten, W; Mata, A; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Coles, W A; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Levin, Y; Oslowski, S; Reardon, D; Ravi, V; Sarkissian, J M; Tiburzi, C; Toomey, L; Wang, H G; Wang, J -B; Wen, L; Xu, R X; Yan, W M; Zhu, X -J

    2015-01-01

    We present high signal-to-noise ratio, multi-frequency polarization pulse profiles for 24 millisecond pulsars that are being observed as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project. The pulsars are observed in three bands, centred close to 730, 1400 and 3100 MHz, using a dual-band 10 cm/50 cm receiver and the central beam of the 20 cm multibeam receiver. Observations spanning approximately six years have been carefully calibrated and summed to produce high S/N profiles. This allows us to study the individual profile components and in particular how they evolve with frequency. We also identify previously undetected profile features. For many pulsars we show that pulsed emission extends across almost the entire pulse profile. The pulse component widths and component separations follow a complex evolution with frequency; in some cases these parameters increase and in other cases they decrease with increasing frequency. The evolution with frequency of the polarization properties of the profile is also n...

  3. Pulsar Pair Cascades in a Distorted Magnetic Dipole Field

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, Alice K

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of a distorted neutron star dipole magnetic field on pulsar pair cascade multiplicity and pair death lines. Using a simple model for a distorted dipole field that produces an offset polar cap, we derive the accelerating electric field above the polar cap in space charge limited flow. We find that even a modest azimuthally asymmetric distortion can significantly increase the accelerating electric field on one side of the polar cap and, combined with a smaller field line radius of curvature, leads to larger pair multiplicity. The death line for producing pairs by curvature radiation moves downward in the P-Pdot diagram, allowing high pair multiplicities in a larger percentage of the radio pulsar population. These results could have important implications for the radio pulsar population, high energy pulsed emission and the pulsar contribution to cosmic ray positrons.

  4. Perspectives on Gamma-Ray Pulsar Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, Matthew G

    2010-01-01

    Pulsars are powerful sources of radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum. This paper highlights some theoretical insights into non-thermal, magnetospheric pulsar gamma-ray radiation. These advances have been driven by NASA's Fermi mission, launched in mid-2008. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on Fermi has afforded the discrimination between polar cap and slot gap/outer gap acceleration zones in young and middle-aged pulsars. Altitude discernment using the highest energy pulsar photons will be addressed, as will spectroscopic interpretation of the primary radiation mechanism in the LAT band, connecting to both polar cap/slot gap and outer gap scenarios. Focuses will mostly be on curvature radiation and magnetic pair creation, including population trends that may afford probes of the magnetospheric accelerating potential.

  5. Mars secular obliquity change due to the seasonal polar caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubincam, David P.

    1992-01-01

    There is a weak positive feedback mechanism between the astronomy and meteorology of Mars. The mechanism is this: the seasonal waxing and waning polar caps cause small changes in Mars' dynamical flattening. Because the changes in flattening are out of phase with the sun, there is a net annual solar torque on the planet which increases the angle between the equatorial and orbital phanes. On the basis of Viking observations of the present climate and simple atmospheric models of past climates, these seasonal shifts of mass between the atmosphere and polar caps are capable of secularly increasing Mars' obliquity by about 1 or 2 deg since the origin of the solar system. Thus, the climate, driven largely by the axial tilt, reacts back on the planet and slightly enhances the seasons on Mars as time progresses. More sophisticated models will probably not change this result much; therefore this mechanism probably produced only minor changes in Mars' climate. It causes negligible changes in the axial tilt and climate of the earth.

  6. North-Polar Martian Cap as Habitat for Elementary Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, M. K.; Wickramasinghe, J. T.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    2008-09-01

    North-polar cap over millenia Atmospheric water in Mars tends currently as for the past millenia to distil onto the polar caps and be buried under dust deposits. Diffusive release from ground-ice (and its excavation in meteorite impacts [1]) replenishes atmospheric water, allowing the gradual build up of polar ice-dust deposits. When sunlit, this warmed and sublimating ice-dust mix has interest as a potential habitat for micro-organisms. Modelling shows precipitable vapour at 10-50μm/yr, varying sensitively with small changes in orbitable obliquity around the present 25° [2]. The modelling applies to a globe with regionally uniform albedo, unlike the steep topography and dark layering of the north polar cap whose upper 300m have accumulated over the last 500 kyr [3]. The cliffs and ravines of the north-polar cap are thought to form through south-facing slopes sublimating and gaining a dirt-encrusted surface, while horizontal surfaces brighten through frost deposits. The two-phase surface derives from the dust and frost feedback on surface albedo [4] and the resulting terrain develops over diurnal cycles of frosting and sublimation, and over annual seasonal cycles. The steep south-facing sides of observed ravines when unshadowed would see for a few hours the full intensity of sunlight at near normal incidence, without the atmospheric dimming at similar inclinations on Earth. As exposed ice sublimates at T > 200K (partial pressure exceeds typical martian 0.1 Pa), a crust of dirt develops to maintain quasi-stability. The dirt crust's main function is to buffer the ice against diurnal temperature fluctuations, but it also slows down vapour diffusion - analogous to south polar ice sublimation [5] and the growth of ground-ice [6]. We envisage 1-10 mm/yr as the net sublimation rate, compatible with the 100 kyr life and scales of the north polar ravines. Modelling of icy-dirt crusts in the polar cap Plane-parallel layers have been used to model the changing temperature

  7. Modeling the Quiet Time Outflow Solution in the Polar Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glocer, Alex

    2011-01-01

    We use the Polar Wind Outflow Model (PWOM) to study the geomagnetically quiet conditions in the polar cap during solar maximum, The PWOM solves the gyrotropic transport equations for O(+), H(+), and He(+) along several magnetic field lines in the polar region in order to reconstruct the full 3D solution. We directly compare our simulation results to the data based empirical model of Kitamura et al. [2011] of electron density, which is based on 63 months of Akebono satellite observations. The modeled ion and electron temperatures are also compared with a statistical compilation of quiet time data obtained by the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR) and Intercosmos Satellites (Kitamura et al. [2011]). The data and model agree reasonably well. This study shows that photoelectrons play an important role in explaining the differences between sunlit and dark results, ion composition, as well as ion and electron temperatures of the quiet time polar wind solution. Moreover, these results provide validation of the PWOM's ability to model the quiet time ((background" solution.

  8. Fourier spectra from exoplanets with polar caps and ocean glint

    CERN Document Server

    Visser, P M

    2015-01-01

    The weak orbital-phase dependent reflection signal of an exoplanet contains information on the planet surface, such as the distribution of continents and oceans on terrestrial planets. This light curve is usually studied in the time domain, but because the signal from a stationary surface is (quasi)periodic, analysis of the Fourier series may provide an alternative, complementary approach. We study Fourier spectra from reflected light curves for geometrically simple configurations. Depending on its atmospheric properties, a rotating planet in the habitable zone could have circular polar ice caps. Tidally locked planets, on the other hand, may have symmetric circular oceans facing the star. These cases are interesting because the high-albedo contrast at the sharp edges of the ice-sheets and the glint from the host star in the ocean may produce recognizable light curves with orbital periodicity, which could also be interpreted in the Fourier domain. We derive a simple general expression for the Fourier coeffici...

  9. An Index (PC) Aimed at Monitoring the (P)olar (C)ap for Magnetic Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — PC is an index for magnetic activity in the (P)olar (C)ap. It is based on data from a single nearpole station, and aimed to monitor the polar cap magnetic activity...

  10. Sublimation of the Martian CO2 Seasonal South Polar Cap

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Frederic; Doute, Sylvain; Forget, Francois; Jian, Jeng-Jong; Martin, Patrick; Langevin, Yves; Bibring, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The polar condensation/sublimation of CO2, that involve about one fourth of the atmosphere mass, is the major Martian climatic cycle. Early observations in visible and thermal infrared have shown that the sublimation of the Seasonal South Polar Cap (SSPC) is not symmetric around the geographic South Pole. Here we use observations by OMEGA/Mars Express in the near-infrared to detect unambiguously the presence of CO2 at the surface, and to estimate albedo. Second, we estimate the sublimation of CO2 released in the atmosphere and show that there is a two-step process. From Ls=180^\\circ to 220^\\circ, the sublimation is nearly symmetric with a slight advantage for the cryptic region. After Ls=220^\\circ the anti-cryptic region sublimation is stronger. Those two phases are not balanced such that there is 22%\\pm9 more mass the anti-cryptic region, arguing for more snow precipitation. We compare those results with the MOLA height measurements. Finally we discuss implications for the Martian atmosphere about general ci...

  11. Application of Polar Cap (PC) indices in analyses and forecasts of geophysical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauning, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) indices could be considered to represent the input of power from the solar wind to the Earth's magnetosphere. The indices have been used to analyse interplanetary electric fields, effects of solar wind pressure pulses, cross polar cap voltages and polar cap diameter, ionospheric Joule heating, and other issues of polar cap dynamics. The PC indices have also been used to predict auroral electrojet intensities and global auroral power as well as ring current intensities. For specific space weather purposes the PC indices could be used to forecast substorm development and predict associated power line disturbances in the subauroral regions. The presentation shall outline the general background for applying the PC indices in analyses or forecasts of solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions and provide illustrative examples of the use of the Polar Cap indices in specific cases

  12. Field-Aligned Electric Potential in the Polar Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, S.; Hildebrand, L.

    2014-12-01

    Reconnection with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the dayside magnetosphere opens the previously closed Earth's field line, allowing solar wind particles to enter the magnetosphere, some of which precipitate into the ionosphere. As the open-field line ExB convects to the nightside, fewer ions can enter the magnetosphere. As a result, field-aligned (parallel) electric potential increases with latitude to prevent more electrons from entering, in order to maintain charge quasi-neutrality. The APL open-field line model predicts that the parallel potential drop increases from cusp to mantle to polar rain. This trend has been confirmed in a study that compared phase space densities of ACE solar wind electrons to those of DMSP precipitating electrons. However, the same study also found that sometimes there is an anomaly: the parallel potential drop would have the opposite polarity such that solar wind electrons are accelerated downward in the afternoon polar cap. Using DMSP magnetometer and particle precipitation data, we show that this accelerating potential drop can be found often in the poleward upward field-aligned current region. The velocity shear at the magnetopause boundary leads to a voltage drop across the boundary, which drives the upward field-aligned currents. At higher latitude or further away from noon, the field line maps to the magnetopause location that is further down the magnetotail where the magnetosheath velocity shear is higher and density is lower. When the velocity shear and hence field-aligned current density (J//) is too high or density too low, parallel potential develops to accelerate more electron downward, in accordance with Knight relation.

  13. Signatures of moving polar cap arcs in the F-region PolarDARN echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Koustov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Joint observations of the all-sky camera at Resolute Bay (Nunavut, Canada and the Polar Dual Auroral Radar Network (PolarDARN HF radars at Rankin Inlet and Inuvik (Canada are considered to establish radar signatures of poleward moving polar cap arcs "detaching" from the auroral oval. Common features of the events considered are enhanced power or echo occurrence in the wake of the arcs and enhanced spectral width of these echoes. When the arcs were oriented along some of the radar beams, velocity reversals at the arc location were observed with the directions of the arc-associated flows corresponding to a converging electric field. For the event of 9 December 2007, two arcs were poleward progressing almost along the central beams of the Inuvik radar at the speed close to the E × B drift of the bulk of the F-region plasma as inferred from HF Doppler velocities and from independent measurements by the Resolute Bay ionosonde. In global-scale convection maps inferred from all Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN radar measurements, the polar cap arcs were often seen close to the reversal line of additional mesoscale convection cells located poleward of the normal cells related to the auroral oval.

  14. Broadband plasma waves observed in the polar cap boundary layer: Polar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Lakhina, G. S.; Ho, C. M.; Arballo, J. K.; Galvan, C.; Boonsiriseth, A.; Pickett, J. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Peterson, W. K.; Thorne, R. M.

    1998-08-01

    Polar observations indicate the presence of intense broadband plasma waves nearly all of the time (96% occurrence frequency in this study) near the apogee of the Polar trajectory (~6-8RE). The region of wave activity bounds the dayside (0500 to 1800 LT) polar cap magnetic fields, and we thus call these waves polar cap boundary layer (PCBL) waves. The waves are spiky signals spanning a broad frequency range from ~101 to 2×104Hz. The waves have a rough power law spectral shape. The wave magnetic component has on average a f-2.7 frequency dependence and appears to have an upper frequency cutoff of ~(6-7)×103Hz, which is the electron cyclotron frequency. The electric component has on average a f-2.2 frequency dependence and extends up to ~2×104Hz. The frequency dependences of the waves and the amplitude ratios of B'/E' indicate a possible mixture of obliquely propagating electromagnetic whistler mode waves plus electrostatic waves. There are no clear intensity peaks in either the magnetic or electric spectra which can identify the plasma instability responsible for the generation of the PCBL waves. The wave character (spiky nature, frequency dependence and admixture of electromagnetic and electrostatic components) and intensity are quite similar to those of the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) waves detected at and inside the low-latitude dayside magnetopause. Because of the location of the PCBL waves just inside the polar cap magnetic field lines, it is natural to assume that these waves are occurring on the same magnetic field lines as the LLBL waves, but at lower altitudes. Because of the similar wave intensities at both locations and the occurrence at all local times, we rule out an ionospheric source. We also find a magnetosheath origin improbable. The most likely scenario is that the waves are locally generated by field-aligned currents or current gradients. We find a strong relationship between the presence of ionospheric and magnetosheath ions and the

  15. Global Observation of Substorm Growth Phase Processes in the Polar Caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittnacher, M.; OFillingim, M. O.; Chua, D.; Wilber, M.; Parks, G. K.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.

    1998-01-01

    Global images of the polar cap region during the substorm growth phase by the Polar Ultraviolet Imager reveals evidence of the processes which are not completely explained by current models. In particular, it was found that size of the polar cap region increases during the growth phase even if the interplanetary magnetic field has no southward component. Three phenomena were observed to produce an increase in the size of the polar cap: (1) motion of the auroral oval to lower latitude, (2) thinning of the auroral oval, and (3) reduction of intense aurora[ precipitation in the polar region. Correlation of image intensities with in situ particle measurements from the FAST satellite are being conducted to study the three growth phase phenomena; and to help identify the source regions of the particles, the mechanisms involved in producing the auroral structures and what may be reducing the polar cap precipitation during the substorm growth phase.

  16. Power grid disturbances and polar cap index during geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauning, Peter

    2013-06-01

    The strong geomagnetic storm in the evening of 30 October 2003 caused high-voltage power grid disturbances in Sweden that expanded to produce hour-long power line outage in Malmö located in the southern part of the country. This was not a unique situation. The geomagnetic storm on 13 March 1989 caused extensive disruptions of high-voltage power circuits especially in the Province of Quebec, Canada, but also to a lesser degree in Scandinavia. Similar events have occurred earlier, among others, during the great storms of 13-14 July 1982 and 8-9 February 1986. These high-voltage power grid disturbances were related to impulsive magnetic variations accompanying extraordinarily intense substorm events. The events were preceded by lengthy intervals of unusually high values of the Polar Cap (PC) index caused by enhanced transpolar ionospheric convection. The transpolar convection transports magnetic flux from the dayside to nightside which causes equatorward displacements of the region of auroral activity enabling the substorms to hit vital power grids. During the 30 October 2003 event the intense solar proton radiation disabled the ACE satellite observations widely used to provide forecast of magnetic storm events. Hence in this case the alarmingly high PC index could provide useful warning of the storm as a back-up of the missing ACE-based forecast. In further cases, monitoring the PC index level could provide supplementary storm warnings to the benefit of power grid operators.

  17. On the polar caps of the 3 Musketeers

    CERN Document Server

    De Luca, A; Mereghetti, S; Negroni, M; Bignami, Giovanni Fabrizio

    2004-01-01

    XMM-Newton observations of PSR B0656+14, PSR B1055-52 and Geminga have substantially increased the statistics available for these three isolated neutron stars, so apparently similar to deserve the nickname of "Three Musketeers" (Becker & Truemper, 1997). Here we shall take advantage of the EPIC statistics to perform phase resolved spectroscopy for all three objects. The phase-averaged spectrum of the three musketeers is best described by a three component model. This includes two blackbody components, a cooler one, possibly originating from the bulk of the star surface, and a hotter one, coming from a smaller portion of the star surface (a "hot spot"), plus a power law. The relative contributions of the three components are seen to vary as a function of phase, as the stars' rotation bring into view different emitting regions. The hot spots, which have very different apparent dimensions (in spite of the similarity of the three neutron stars polar cap radii) are responsible for the bulk of the phase variati...

  18. Prediction filters for the Dst index and the polar cap potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, R. A.; Garrity, C. R.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Bargatze, L. F.

    1986-01-01

    The technique of linear prediction filtering is used to create filters relating solar wind parameters to the Dst index and to the polar cap potential. The square root of solar wind dynamic pressure and the solar wind electric field together are found to account for nearly 70 percent of the Dst variance. The prediction filter for the polar cap potential requires the square of the solar wind velocity and the solar wind electric field as inputs. The results suggest that both polar cap potential and ring current injection are primarily controlled by the solar wind, and that substorm expansions do not play a major role in ring current injection.

  19. A recent change in the optical and γ-ray polarization of the Crab nebula and pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, P.; Kyne, G.; Gouiffès, C.; Laurent, P.; Hallinan, G.; Redfern, R. M.; Shearer, A.

    2016-03-01

    We report on observations of the polarization of optical and γ-ray photons from the Crab nebula and pulsar system using the Galway Astronomical Stokes Polarimeter (GASP), the Hubble Space Telescope, Advanced Camera for Surveys and the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory satellite (INTEGRAL). These, when combined with other optical polarization observations, suggest that the polarized optical emission and γ-ray polarization changes in a similar manner. A change in the optical polarization angle has been observed by this work, from 109.5 ± 0.7° in 2005 to 85.3 ± 1.4° in 2012. On the other hand, the γ-ray polarization angle changed from 115 ± 11° in 2003-2007 to 80 ± 12° in 2012-2014. Strong flaring activities have been detected in the Crab nebula over the past few years by the high-energy γ-ray missions Agile and Fermi, and magnetic reconnection processes have been suggested to explain these observations. The change in the polarized optical and γ-ray emission of the Crab nebula/pulsar as observed, for the first time, by GASP and INTEGRAL may indicate that reconnection is possibly at work in the Crab nebula. We also report, for the first time, a non-zero measure of the optical circular polarization from the Crab pulsar+knot system.

  20. The role of multipolar magnetic fields in pulsar magnetospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Asséo, E; Asseo, Estelle; Khechinashvili, David

    2002-01-01

    We explore the role of complex multipolar magnetic fields in determining physical processes near the surface of rotation powered pulsars. We model the actual magnetic field as the sum of global dipolar and star-centered multipolar fields. In configurations involving axially symmetric and uniform multipolar fields, 'neutral points' and 'neutral lines' exist close to the stellar surface. Also, the curvature radii of magnetic field lines near the stellar surface can never be smaller than the stellar radius, even for very high order multipoles. Consequently, such configurations are unable to provide an efficient pair creation process above pulsar polar caps, necessary for plasma mechanisms of generation of pulsar radiation. In configurations involving axially symmetric and non-uniform multipoles, the periphery of the pulsar polar cap becomes fragmented into symmetrically distributed narrow sub-regions where curvature radii of complex magnetic field lines are less than the radius of the star. The pair production p...

  1. Albedo control of seasonal South Polar cap recession on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frédéric; Douté, Sylvain; Schmitt, Bernard; Vincendon, Mathieu; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Langevin, Yves; Omega Team

    2009-04-01

    Over the last few decades, General Circulation Models (GCM) have been used to simulate the current martian climate. The calibration of these GCMs with the current seasonal cycle is a crucial step in understanding the climate history of Mars. One of the main climatic signals currently used to validate GCMs is the annual atmospheric pressure cycle. It is difficult to use changes in seasonal deposits on the surface of Mars to calibrate the GCMs given the spectral ambiguities between CO 2 and H 2O ice in the visible range. With the OMEGA imaging spectrometer covering the near infra-red range, it is now possible to monitor both types of ice at a spatial resolution of about 1 km. At global scale, we determine the change with time of the Seasonal South Polar Cap (SSPC) crocus line, defining the edge of CO 2 deposits. This crocus line is not symmetric around the geographic South Pole. At local scale, we introduce the snowdrop distance, describing the local structure of the SSPC edge. Crocus line and snowdrop distance changes can now be used to calibrate GCMs. The albedo of the seasonal deposits is usually assumed to be a uniform and constant parameter of the GCMs. In this study, albedo is found to be the main parameter controlling the SSPC recession at both global and local scale. Using a defrost mass balance model (referred to as D-frost) that incorporates the effect of shadowing induced by topography, we show that the global SSPC asymmetry in the crocus line is controlled by albedo variations. At local scale, we show that the snowdrop distance is correlated with the albedo variability. Further GCM improvements should take into account these two results. We propose several possibilities for the origin of the asymmetric albedo control. The next step will be to identify and model the physical processes that create the albedo differences.

  2. On the Polar Caps of the Three Musketeers

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Mereghetti, S.; Negroni, M.; Bignami, G. F.

    2005-04-01

    XMM-Newton EPIC observations of PSR B0656+14, PSR B1055-52, and Geminga have substantially increased the collection of statistics available for these three isolated neutron stars, so apparently similar to deserve the nickname of the Three Musketeers, given to them by Becker & Trümper. Here we take advantage of the EPIC statistics to perform phase-resolved spectroscopy for all three objects. The phase-averaged spectrum of the Three Musketeers is best described by a three-component model. This includes two blackbody components-a cooler one, possibly originating from the bulk of the star surface, and a hotter one, coming from a smaller portion of the star surface (a ``hot spot'')-plus a power law. The relative contributions of the three components are seen to vary as a function of phase, as the stars' rotation brings into view different emitting regions. The hot spots, which have very different apparent dimensions (in spite of the similarity of the three neutron stars polar cap radii) are responsible for the bulk of the phase variation. The amplitude of the observed phase modulation is also markedly different for the three sources. Another striking aspect of our phase-resolved phenomenology is the apparent lack of any common phase alignment between the observed modulation patterns for the two blackbody components. They are seen to vary in phase in the case of PSR B1055-52 but in antiphase in the case of PSR B0656+14. These findings do not support standard and simplistic models of neutron star magnetic field configuration and surface temperature distribution. Based on observations with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA member states and the US (NASA).

  3. Constraining Gamma-Ray Pulsar Gap Models with a Simulated Pulsar Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierbattista, Marco; Grenier, I. A.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.

    2012-01-01

    With the large sample of young gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), population synthesis has become a powerful tool for comparing their collective properties with model predictions. We synthesised a pulsar population based on a radio emission model and four gamma-ray gap models (Polar Cap, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, and One Pole Caustic). Applying gamma-ray and radio visibility criteria, we normalise the simulation to the number of detected radio pulsars by a select group of ten radio surveys. The luminosity and the wide beams from the outer gaps can easily account for the number of Fermi detections in 2 years of observations. The wide slot-gap beam requires an increase by a factor of 10 of the predicted luminosity to produce a reasonable number of gamma-ray pulsars. Such large increases in the luminosity may be accommodated by implementing offset polar caps. The narrow polar-cap beams contribute at most only a handful of LAT pulsars. Using standard distributions in birth location and pulsar spin-down power (E), we skew the initial magnetic field and period distributions in a an attempt to account for the high E Fermi pulsars. While we compromise the agreement between simulated and detected distributions of radio pulsars, the simulations fail to reproduce the LAT findings: all models under-predict the number of LAT pulsars with high E , and they cannot explain the high probability of detecting both the radio and gamma-ray beams at high E. The beaming factor remains close to 1.0 over 4 decades in E evolution for the slot gap whereas it significantly decreases with increasing age for the outer gaps. The evolution of the enhanced slot-gap luminosity with E is compatible with the large dispersion of gamma-ray luminosity seen in the LAT data. The stronger evolution predicted for the outer gap, which is linked to the polar cap heating by the return current, is apparently not supported by the LAT data. The LAT sample of gamma-ray pulsars

  4. North-south geological differences between the residual polar caps on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P C; Malin, M C; Edgett, K S; Carr, M H; Hartmann, W K; Ingersoll, A P; James, P B; Soderblom, L A; Veverka, J; Sullivan, R

    2000-03-09

    Polar processes can be sensitive indicators of global climate, and the geological features associated with polar ice caps can therefore indicate evolution of climate with time. The polar regions on Mars have distinctive morphologic and climatologic features: thick layered deposits, seasonal CO2 frost caps extending to mid latitudes, and near-polar residual frost deposits that survive the summer. The relationship of the seasonal and residual frost caps to the layered deposits has been poorly constrained, mainly by the limited spatial resolution of the available data. In particular, it has not been known if the residual caps represent simple thin frost cover or substantial geologic features. Here we show that the residual cap on the south pole is a distinct geologic unit with striking collapse and erosional topography; this is very different from the residual cap on the north pole, which grades into the underlying layered materials. These findings indicate that the differences between the caps are substantial (rather than reflecting short-lived differences in frost cover), and so support the idea of long-term asymmetry in the polar climates of Mars.

  5. Intense field-aligned currents in the polar cap as evidenced from the Swarm satellite constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhr, H.; Kervalishvili, G.; Huang, T.

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally the polar cap has been considered as a region of low activity and reduced energy input. More recent observations, however, evidence more and more exceptions from that. For example, CHAMP and GRACE recorded significant mass density anomalies over the polar cap practically during every magnetic storm. The question is, which process provides enough Joule heating and/or particle precipitation along the open field lines. A promising mechanism is field-aligned currents (FACs). In the past it has been difficult to make reliable estimates of FACs in the polar cap from single satellite magnetic field measurements. An important assumption that the currents are organized in sheets is often not fulfilled in the polar cap. As a consequence current densities are largely underestimated. Only recently ESA's Swarm constellation mission offers reliable FAC estimates from dual-satellite measurements. Significant differences between single and dual-satellite estimates are found in the polar cap. We will show the relation between polar cap FAC patches and IMF orientation and solar wind conditions. Based on these results suggestions for possible current drivers are made.

  6. Gamma Rays From Rotation-Powered Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K

    2002-01-01

    The seven known gamma-ray pulsars represent a very small fraction of the more than 1000 presently known radio pulsars, yet they can give us valuable information about pulsar particle acceleration and energetics. Although the theory of acceleration and high-energy emission in pulsars has been studied for over 25 years, the origin of the pulsed gamma rays is a question that remains unanswered. Characteristics of the pulsars detected by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory could not clearly distinguish between an emission site at the magnetic poles (polar cap models) and emission from the outer magnetosphere (outer gap models). There are also a number of theoretical issues in both type of model which have yet to be resolved. The two types of models make contrasting predictions for the numbers of radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars and of their spectral characteristics. GLAST will probably detect at least 50 radio-selected pulsars and possibly many more radio-quiet pulsars. With this large sample, it will b...

  7. South Polar Residual Cap Geomorphology and Inferred Environmental Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, S.; Ingersoll, A.; Pathare, A.

    2003-12-01

    this varies from area to area. These features are smaller in scale than SCF?s and so may have information pertaining to more recent environmental events. We will present results from several avenues of research that we are pursuing: We are investigating the overall mass budget of the SRC. If the mass lost from expanding depressions is not condensed elsewhere on the cap then the SRC will disappear within a few Martian centuries. It seems unlikely to us that we are observing Mars at such a special time in its history. A large range of expansion rates is possible depending on the subsurface albedo profile (3,5). We will attempt to measure the subsurface albedo by examining images of exposed SCF walls. We are also improving our model to more accurately date features and by extension the environmental events that triggered their initiation. Previously we always initiated our modeled depressions from small pre-existing surface features. We are more closely investigating the genesis of SRC features and what environmental changes are required to cause them. We will continue to catalogue new population statistics for different regions in the SRC Each distinct feature population that we can identify may give us information on previous environmental events. Investigations into SRC features have the potential to describe changes in the Martian polar environment over timescales of millennia. It will provide a link from present conditions to longer-term variations in Martian climate, which are perhaps recorded in the layered deposits. [1] Thomas et al., Nature, 404. [2] Malin et al., Science, 294. [3] Byrne and Ingersoll, GRL, 30. [4] Malin and Edgett, JGR, 106. [5] Byrne and Ingersoll, Science, 299.

  8. Correlation of the asymmetrical retreat of the south polar cap and the polar layered terrain on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narumi, Y.; Iwasaki, K.

    2005-08-01

    During the southern springtime, the south polar cap retreats more rapidly in the polar region between longitudes 150W and 300W, compared with the other part of the southern polar region. The reason for this rapid retreat has remained enigmatic for a long time. Recently, Colaprete et al. (2005) proposed that the asymmetrical behavior of the south polar cap is caused by topographic forcing of atmospheric dynamics by the large basins, Argyre and Hellas. These results calculated by the Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) may be correct on the large-scale phenomena of Mars. However, we would like to point out that this region of rapid retreat is almost coincident with the extent of the southern polar layered terrain, and propose that the polar layered terrain would play some distinct role in the asymmetrical retreat of the south polar cap. The north and south polar layered terrains are characterized by about 3 km of relief and are believed to be composed primarily of water ice mixed with dust. Because of the abundant amount of water ice, the thermal inertia of the polar layered terrain may be higher than the usual surface soil on Mars. Our preliminary model calculation shows that a higher value of thermal inertia results in less precipitation of the surface carbon dioxide ice. We expect that a higher value of thermal inertia for the polar layered terrain could explain the asymmetric retreat of the south polar cap, with its reduced quantity and delayed carbon dioxide ice deposit during winter, and earlier evaporation of ice in the southern springtime.

  9. Gamma-Ray Pulsars Models and Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K

    2001-01-01

    Pulsed emission from gamma-ray pulsars originates inside the magnetosphere, from radiation by charged particles accelerated near the magnetic poles or in the outer gaps. In polar cap models, the high energy spectrum is cut off by magnetic pair production above an energy that is dependent on the local magnetic field strength. While most young pulsars with surface fields in the range B = 10^{12} - 10^{13} G are expected to have high energy cutoffs around several GeV, the gamma-ray spectra of old pulsars having lower surface fields may extend to 50 GeV. Although the gamma-ray emission of older pulsars is weaker, detecting pulsed emission at high energies from nearby sources would be an important confirmation of polar cap models. Outer gap models predict more gradual high-energy turnovers at around 10 GeV, but also predict an inverse Compton component extending to TeV energies. Detection of pulsed TeV emission, which would not survive attenuation at the polar caps, is thus an important test of outer gap models. N...

  10. Field-aligned currents in the dayside cusp and polar cap region during northward IMF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Moretto, T.; Olsen, Nils

    2002-01-01

    [1] The field-aligned currents in the dayside cusp and polar cap region are examined using magnetic data from the low-altitude polar-orbiting satellite Orsted. The study is confined to cases where the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) has a steady northward component and to a rather narrow region...

  11. Ir Spectral Mapping of the Martian South Polar Residual CAP Using Crism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jacqueline; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2016-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are considered to be important in theories of abiogenesis (Allamandola, 2011) . There is evidence that PAHs have been detected on two icy Saturnian satellites using the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on the Cassini spacecraft (Cruikshank et al., 2007). The hypothesised presence of PAHs in Mars south polar cap has not been systematically examined even though the Mars south polar cap may allow the preservation of organic molecules that are typically destroyed at the Martian surface by UV radiation (Dartnell et al. 2012). This hypothesis is supported by recent analyses of South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC) structural evolution (Thomas et al., 2009) that suggest the possibility that seasonal and long term sublimation may excavate dust particles from within the polar ice. Periodic sublimation is believed to be responsible for the formation of so-called "Swiss Cheese Terrain", a unique surface feature found only in the Martian south polar residual cap consisting of flat floored, circular depressions (Byrne, 2009). We show the first examples of work towards the detection of PAHs in Swiss Cheese Terrain, using data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM), on board NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). CRISM is designed to search for mineralogical indications of past and present water, thus providing extensive coverage of the south polar cap. In this work, we discuss whether CRISM infrared spectra can be used to detect PAHs in Swiss Cheese Terrain and demonstrate a number of maps showing shifts in spectral profiles over the SPRC.

  12. Central polar cap convection response to short duration southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Jayachandran

    Full Text Available Central polar cap convection changes associated with southward turnings of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF are studied using a chain of Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosondes (CADI in the northern polar cap. A study of 32 short duration (~1 h southward IMF transition events found a three stage response: (1 initial response to a southward transition is near simultaneous for the entire polar cap; (2 the peak of the convection speed (attributed to the maximum merging electric field propagates poleward from the ionospheric footprint of the merging region; and (3 if the change in IMF is rapid enough, then a step in convection appears to start at the cusp and then propagates antisunward over the polar cap with the velocity of the maximum convection. On the nightside, a substorm onset is observed at about the time when the step increase in convection (associated with the rapid transition of IMF arrives at the polar cap boundary.

    Key words: Ionosphere (plasma convection; polar ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (solar wind - magnetosphere interaction

  13. GPS scintillation effects associated with polar cap patches and substorm auroral activity: direct comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yaqi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We directly compare the relative GPS scintillation levels associated with regions of enhanced plasma irregularities called auroral arcs, polar cap patches, and auroral blobs that frequently occur in the polar ionosphere. On January 13, 2013 from Ny-Ålesund, several polar cap patches were observed to exit the polar cap into the auroral oval, and were then termed auroral blobs. This gave us an unprecedented opportunity to compare the relative scintillation levels associated with these three phenomena. The blobs were associated with the strongest phase scintillation (σϕ, followed by patches and arcs, with σϕ up to 0.6, 0.5, and 0.1 rad, respectively. Our observations indicate that most patches in the nightside polar cap have produced significant scintillations, but not all of them. Since the blobs are formed after patches merged into auroral regions, in space weather predictions of GPS scintillations, it will be important to enable predictions of patches exiting the polar cap.

  14. Geophysical phenomena in the polar cap during northward interplanetary magnetic field; IUGG General Assembly, 20th, Vienna, Austria, August 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshichev, O. A.; Burke, W. J.

    1994-02-01

    The interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the solar wind and northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) continues to raise scientific interest and controversy. A selected group of papers from a conference on this topic discuss the following subjects: electric field generation, theoretical models of polar-cap convection, polar-cap distributions, dependencies of the polar-cap auroral distribution, and boundary populations in the polar-caps. Also discussed are satellite observations of polar arcs and mapping of the ionospheric convection response. For individual titles, see A95-64935 through A95-64945.

  15. Multi-stage polar cap convection response to enhanced interplanetary driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandholt, Per Even; Farrugia, Charlie; Andalsvik, Yngvild

    2013-04-01

    In two case studies we investigate the response of ionospheric convection to enhanced magnetopause reconnection rate leading to repetitive substorm activity. Our interplanetary (IP) driver is coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The aim is to estimate the cross-polar cap potential (CPCP) at high temporal resolution (1 min). To achieve this, we use a method where we combine direct measurements of the CPCP from satellite ion drift data, which have limited temporal coverage, with high-resolution (1 min) ground observations of equivalent convection in the central polar cap, obtained from the polar cap index in the northern hemisphere (PCN). In our CPCP estimates we distinguish between contributions from different sectors of the polar cap (center and periphery) as well as from the dayside and nightside sources. The polar cap (PC) periphery is characterized by channels of enhanced antisunward flows, which are particularly pronounced in the winter hemisphere. These flow channels are continuously monitored by ground data from the IMAGE chain of magnetometers in Svalbard - Scandinavia - Finland. They are discussed as stages in the evolution of the Dungey flux circulation cycle driven by both dayside and nightside sources. Following Siscoe et al. (2011) we distinguish between two stages of the evolution of the convection response, i.e., an initial transient phase, and a subsequent persistent phase.

  16. Experimental Constraints on {\\gamma}-ray Pulsar Gap Models and the Pulsar GeV to Pulsar Wind Nebula TeV Connection

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U

    2015-01-01

    The pulsar emission mechanism in the gamma-ray energy band is poorly understood. Currently, there are several models under discussion in the pulsar community. These models can be constrained by studying the collective properties of a sample of pulsars, which became possible with the large sample of gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT). In this paper we develop a new experimental multi-wavelength technique to determine the beaming factor $\\left( f_\\Omega \\right)$ dependance on spin-down luminosity of a set of GeV pulsars. This technique requires three input parameters: pulsar spin-down luminosity, pulsar phase-averaged GeV flux and TeV or X-ray flux from the associated Pulsar Wind Nebula (PWN). The analysis presented in this paper uses the PWN TeV flux measurements to study the correlation between $f_\\Omega$ and $\\dot{E}$. The measured correlation has some features that favor the Outer Gap model over the Polar Cap, Slot Gap and One Pole Caustic models for pulsar emission i...

  17. Martian Polar Caps: Folding, Faulting, Flowing Glaciers of Multiple Interbedded Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J. S.

    2001-12-01

    The Martian south polar cap (permanent CO2 cap and polar layered deposits), exhibit abundant, varied, and widespread deformational phenomena. Folding and boudinage are very common. Strike-slip or normal faults are rarer. Common in the vicinity of major troughs and scarps are signs of convergent flow tectonics manifested as wrinkle-ridge-like surface folds, thrust faults, and viscous forebulges with thin-skinned extensional crevasses and wrinkle-ridge folds. Such flow convergence is predicted by theory. Boudinage and folding at the 300-m wavelength scale, indicating rheologically contrasting materials, is widely exposed at deep levels along erosional scarps. Independent morphologic evidence indicates south polar materials of contrasting volatility. Hence, the south polar cap appears to be a multiphase structure of interbedded ices. The north polar cap locally also exhibits flow indicators, though they are neither as common nor as varied as in the south. The large-scale quasi-spiral structure of the polar caps could be a manifestation of large-scale boudinage. According to this scenario, deep-level boudinage continuously originates under the glacial divide (the polar cap summit). Rod-like boudin structures are oriented transverse to flow and migrate outward with the large-scale flow field. Troughs develop over areas between major boudins. A dynamic competition, and possibly a rough balance, develops between the local flow field in the vicinity of a trough (which tends to close the trough by lateral closure and upwelling flow) and sublimation erosion (which tends to widen and deepen them). Over time, the troughs flow to the margins of the polar cap where they, along with other polar structures, are destroyed by sublimation. Major ice types contributing to rheological and volatility layering may include, in order of highest to lowest mechanical strength, CO2 clathrate hydrate, water ice containing inert/insoluble dust, pure water ice, water ice containing traces of

  18. Pulsars: Progress, Problems and Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Arons, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    I survey recent successes in the application of relativistic MHD and force-free electrodynamics to the modeling of the pulsars' rotational energy loss mechanism as well as to the structure and emission characteristics of Pulsar Wind Nebulae. I suggest that unsteady reconnection in the current sheet separating the closed from the open zones of the magnetosphere is responsible for the torque fluctuations observed in some pulsars, as well as for departures of the braking index from the canonical value of 3. I emphasize the significance of the boundary layer between the closed and open zones as the active site in the outer magnetopshere. I elaborate on the conflict between the models currently in use to interpret the gamma ray and X-ray pulses from these systems with the electric current flows found in the spin down models. Because the polar cap ``gap'' is the essential component in the supply of plasma to pulsar magnetospheres and to pulsar wind nebulae, I emphasize the importance of high sensitivity gamma ray o...

  19. Rethinking the polar cap: Eccentric dipole structuring of ULF power at the highest corrected geomagnetic latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Kevin D.; Gerrard, Andrew J.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.; Weatherwax, Allan T.

    2016-09-01

    The day-to-day evolution and statistical features of Pc3-Pc7 band ultralow frequency (ULF) power throughout the southern polar cap suggest that the corrected geomagnetic (CGM) coordinates do not adequately organize the observed hydromagnetic spatial structure. It is shown that that the local-time distribution of ULF power at sites along CGM latitudinal parallels exhibit fundamental differences and that the CGM latitude of a site in general is not indicative of the site's projection into the magnetosphere. Thus, ULF characteristics observed at a single site in the polar cap cannot be freely generalized to other sites of similar CGM latitude but separated in magnetic local time, and the inadequacy of CGM coordinates in the polar cap has implications for conjugacy/mapping studies in general. In seeking alternative, observationally motivated systems of "polar cap latitudes," it is found that eccentric dipole (ED) coordinates have several strengths in organizing the hydromagnetic spatial structure in the polar cap region. ED latitudes appear to better classify the local-time ULF power in both magnitude and morphology and better differentiate the "deep polar cap" (where the ULF power is largely UT dependent and nearly free of local-time structure) from the "peripheral polar cap" (where near-magnetic noon pulsations dominate at lower and lower frequencies as one increases in ED latitude). Eccentric local time is shown to better align the local-time profiles in the magnetic east component over several PcX bands but worsen in the magnetic north component. It is suggested that a hybrid ED-CGM coordinate system might capture the strengths of both CGM and ED coordinates. It is shown that the local-time morphology of median ULF power at high-latitude sites is dominantly driven by where they project into the magnetosphere, which is best quantified by their proximity to the low-altitude cusp on the dayside (which is not necessarily quantified by a site's CGM latitude), and that

  20. Thermosphere variation at different altitudes over the northern polar cap during magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanshi; Wu, Qian; Huang, Cheryl Y.; Su, Yi-Jiun

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we report observations and simulation results of heated neutrals at various altitudes inside the polar cap during two magnetic storms in January 2005. The Poynting flux measurements from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites show enhanced energy input in the polar cap during the storm main phase, which is underestimated in the TIE-GCM simulation. Neutral temperature measurements at 250 km from the ground-based Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) at Resolute Bay are presented, along with the neutral density observations at 360 km and 470 km from Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites, respectively. These data have been analyzed to demonstrate the altitudinal dependence of neutral response to the storm energy input. By comparing the TIE-GCM simulation results and the observations, we demonstrate that Poynting fluxes as well as the thermosphere response were underestimated in the model. The simulated neutral temperature at Resolute Bay increases by approximately 260° and 280° K for the two events, respectively, much lower than the observed temperature enhancements of 750° and 900° K. Neutral density enhancements with more than 30% increase over the background density were also observed at polar latitudes, with no clear distinction between the auroral zone and polar cap. All measurements indicate enhancements at high latitudes poleward of 80° magnetic latitude (MLAT) implying that substantial heating can occur within the polar cap during storms.

  1. Pulsar Magnetospheres: Beyond the Flat Spacetime Dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Gralla, Samuel E; Philippov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of the pulsar magnetosphere have assumed a pure magnetic dipole in flat spacetime. However, recent work suggests that the effects of general relativity are in fact of vital importance and that realistic pulsar magnetic fields may have a significant nondipolar component. We introduce a general analytical method for studying the axisymmetric force-free magnetosphere of a slowly-rotating star of arbitrary magnetic field, mass, radius and moment of inertia, including all the effects of general relativity. We confirm that spacelike current is generically present in the polar caps (suggesting a pair production region), irrespective of the stellar magnetic field. We show that general relativity introduces a ~60% correction to the formula for the dipolar component of the surface magnetic field inferred from spindown. Finally, we show that the location and size of the polar caps can be modified dramatically by even modestly strong higher moments. This can affect emission processes occurring near the star ...

  2. High-fidelity radio astronomical polarimetry using a millisecond pulsar as a polarized reference source

    CERN Document Server

    van Straten, W

    2012-01-01

    A new method of polarimetric calibration is presented in which the instrumental response is derived from regular observations of PSR J0437-4715 based on the assumption that the mean polarized emission from this millisecond pulsar remains constant over time. The technique is applicable to any experiment in which high-fidelity polarimetry is required over long time scales; it is demonstrated by calibrating 7.2 years of high-precision timing observations of PSR J1022+1001 made at the Parkes Observatory. Application of the new technique followed by arrival time estimation using matrix template matching yields post-fit residuals with an uncertainty-weighted standard deviation of 880 ns, two times smaller than that of arrival time residuals obtained via conventional methods of calibration and arrival time estimation. The precision achieved by this experiment yields the first significant measurements of the secular variation of the projected semi-major axis, the precession of periastron, and the Shapiro delay; it al...

  3. Substorms and polar cap convection: the 10 January 2004 interplanetary CME case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Andalsvik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The expansion-contraction model of Dungey cell plasma convection has two different convection sources, i.e. reconnections at the magnetopause and in the magnetotail. The spatial-temporal structure of the nightside source is not yet well understood. In this study we shall identify temporal variations in the winter polar cap convection structure during substorm activity under steady interplanetary conditions. Substorm activity (electrojets and particle precipitations is monitored by excellent ground-satellite DMSP F15 conjunctions in the dusk-premidnight sector. We take advantage of the wide latitudinal coverage of the IMAGE chain of ground magnetometers in Svalbard – Scandinavia – Russia for the purpose of monitoring magnetic deflections associated with polar cap convection and substorm electrojets. These are augmented by direct observations of polar cap convection derived from SuperDARN radars and cross-track ion drift observations during traversals of polar cap along the dusk-dawn meridian by spacecraft DMSP F13. The interval we study is characterized by moderate, stable forcing of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system (EKL = 4.0–4.5 mV m−1; cross polar cap potential (CPCP, Φ (Boyle = 115 kV during Earth passage of an interplanetary CME (ICME, choosing an 4-h interval where the magnetic field pointed continuously south-west (Bz < 0; By < 0. The combination of continuous monitoring of ground magnetic deflections and the F13 cross-track ion drift observations in the polar cap allows us to infer the temporal CPCP structure on time scales less than the ~10 min duration of F13 polar cap transits. We arrived at the following estimates of the dayside and nightside contributions to the CPCP (CPCP = CPCP/day + CPCP/night under two intervals of substorm activity: CPCP/day ~110 kV; CPCP/night ~50 kV (45% CPCP increase during substorms. The temporal CPCP structure during one of the

  4. Field-calibrated model of melt, refreezing, and runoff for polar ice caps: Application to Devon Ice Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard M.; Mair, Douglas W. F.; Nienow, Peter W.; Bell, Christina; Burgess, David O.; Wright, Andrew P.

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the controls on the amount of surface meltwater that refreezes, rather than becoming runoff, over polar ice masses is necessary for modeling their surface mass balance and ultimately for predicting their future contributions to global sea level change. We present a modified version of a physically based model that includes an energy balance routine and explicit calculation of near-surface meltwater refreezing capacity, to simulate the evolution of near-surface density and temperature profiles across Devon Ice Cap in Arctic Canada. Uniquely, our model is initiated and calibrated using high spatial resolution measurements of snow and firn densities across almost the entire elevation range of the ice cap for the summer of 2004 and subsequently validated with the same type of measurements obtained during the very different meteorological conditions of summer 2006. The model captures the spatial variability across the transect in bulk snowpack properties although it slightly underestimates the flow of meltwater into the firn of previous years. The percentage of meltwater that becomes runoff is similar in both years; however, the spatial pattern of this melt-runoff relationship is different in the 2 years. The model is found to be insensitive to variation in the depth of impermeable layers within the firn but is very sensitive to variation in air temperature, since the refreezing capacity of firn decreases with increasing temperature. We highlight that the sensitivity of the ice cap's surface mass balance to air temperature is itself dependent on air temperature.

  5. The Residual Polar Caps of Mars: Geological Differences and Possible Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P. C.; Sullivan, R.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Murray, B. C.; Danielson, G. E.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Soderblom, L.; Malin, M. C.; Edgett, K. S.; James, P. B.

    2000-01-01

    The Martian polar regions have been known to have thick layered sequences (presumed to consist of silicates and ice), CO2 seasonal frost, and residual frosts that remain through the summer: H2O in the north, largely CO2 in the south. The relationship of the residual frosts to the underlying layered deposits could not be determined from Viking images. The Mars Orbiter Camera on Mars Global Surveyor has provided a 50-fold increase in resolution that shows more differences between the two poles. The north residual cap surface has rough topography of pits, cracks, and knobs, suggestive of ablational forms. This topography is less than a few meters in height, and grades in to surfaces exposing the layers underneath. In contrast, the south residual cap has distinctive collapse and possibly ablational topography emplaced in four or more layers, each approx. two meters thick. The top surface has polygonal depressions suggestive of thermal contraction cracks. The collapse and erosional forms include circular and cycloidal depressions, long sinuous troughs, and nearly parallel sets of troughs. The distinctive topography occurs throughout the residual cap area, but not outside it. Unconformities exposed in polar layers, or other layered materials, do not approximate the topography seen on the south residual cap. The coincidence of a distinct geologic feature, several layers modified by collapse, ablation, and mass movement with the residual cap indicates a distinct composition and/or climate compared to both the remainder of the south polar layered units and those in the north.

  6. IR SPECTRAL MAPPING OF THE MARTIAN SOUTH POLAR RESIDUAL CAP USING CRISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Campbell

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are considered to be important in theories of abiogenesis (Allamandola, 2011 . There is evidence that PAHs have been detected on two icy Saturnian satellites using the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS on the Cassini spacecraft (Cruikshank et al., 2007. The hypothesised presence of PAHs in Mars south polar cap has not been systematically examined even though the Mars south polar cap may allow the preservation of organic molecules that are typically destroyed at the Martian surface by UV radiation (Dartnell et al. 2012. This hypothesis is supported by recent analyses of South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC structural evolution (Thomas et al., 2009 that suggest the possibility that seasonal and long term sublimation may excavate dust particles from within the polar ice. Periodic sublimation is believed to be responsible for the formation of so-called “Swiss Cheese Terrain”, a unique surface feature found only in the Martian south polar residual cap consisting of flat floored, circular depressions (Byrne, 2009. We show the first examples of work towards the detection of PAHs in Swiss Cheese Terrain, using data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM, on board NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO. CRISM is designed to search for mineralogical indications of past and present water, thus providing extensive coverage of the south polar cap. In this work, we discuss whether CRISM infrared spectra can be used to detect PAHs in Swiss Cheese Terrain and demonstrate a number of maps showing shifts in spectral profiles over the SPRC.

  7. Swarm in situ observations of F region polar cap patches created by cusp precipitation

    CERN Document Server

    Goodwin, L V; Miles, D M; Patra, S; van der Meeren, C; Buchert, S C; Burchill, J K; Clausen, L B N; Knudsen, D J; McWilliams, K A; Moen, J

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution in situ measurements from the three Swarm spacecraft, in a string-of-pearls configuration, provide new insights about the combined role of flow channel events and particle impact ionization in creating $\\textit{F}$ region electron density structures in the northern Scandinavian dayside cusp. We present a case of polar cap patch formation where a reconnection-driven low-density relative westward flow channel is eroding the dayside solar-ionized plasma but where particle impact ionization in the cusp dominates the initial plasma structuring. In the cusp, density features are observed which are twice as dense as the solar-ionized background. These features then follow the polar cap convection and become less structured and lower in amplitude. These are the first in situ observations tracking polar cap patch evolution from creation by plasma transport and enhancement by cusp precipitation, through entrainment in the polar cap flow and relaxation into smooth patches as they approach the nightside a...

  8. Field-Line Tracing from Locations of Polar Cap Neutral Density Anomalies to the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, E. K.; Lin, C. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Cooke, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Localized neutral density enhancement in the polar cap above 70o magnetic latitude have been frequently observed during major geomagnetic storms. It has been suggested that energy input responsible for producing localized neutral density spikes is the dominant energy deposition in the polar cap. To better understand the origin of polar cap neutral density anomalies (PCNDAs) we trace magnetic field lines from the polar cap region at about 400 km to the magnetosphere using the data-based Tsyganenko magnetic field model TS05 [Tsyganenko and Sitnov, 2005] for the periods when CHAMP detected PCNDAs during major magnetic storms with the minimum Dst , X. X. Zhang, S. Q. Liu, Y. L. Wang, and J. C. Gong (2010), A three-dimensional asymmetric magnetopause model, J. Geophys. Res., 115, A04207, doi:10.1029/2009JA014235.Tsyganenko, N. A., and M. I. Sitnov (2005), Modeling the dynamics of the inner magnetosphere during strong geomagnetic storms, J. Geophys. Res., 110, A03208, doi:10.1029/2004JA010798.

  9. How Thick is the North Polar Ice Cap on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This map shows the thickness of the north polar layered deposits on Mars as measured by the Shallow Radar instrument on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The Shallow Radar instrument was provided by the Italian Space Agency. Its operations are led by the University of Rome and its data are analyzed by a joint U.S.-Italian science team. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington

  10. How Thick is the North Polar Ice Cap on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This map shows the thickness of the north polar layered deposits on Mars as measured by the Shallow Radar instrument on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The Shallow Radar instrument was provided by the Italian Space Agency. Its operations are led by the University of Rome and its data are analyzed by a joint U.S.-Italian science team. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington

  11. Probing the Pulsar Wind Nebula of PSR B0355+54

    CERN Document Server

    McGowan, K E; Cropper, M; Kennea, J A; Vestrand, W T; Zane, S; Cordova, France A.; Cropper, Mark; Gowan, Katherine E. Mc; Kennea, Jamie A.; Zane, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    We present XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of the middle-aged radio pulsar PSR B0355+54. Our X-ray observations reveal emission not only from the pulsar itself, but also from a compact diffuse component extending ~50'' in the opposite direction to the pulsar's proper motion. There is also evidence for the presence of fainter diffuse emission extending ~5' from the point source. The compact diffuse feature is well-fitted with a power-law, the index of which is consistent with the values found for other pulsar wind nebulae. The morphology of the diffuse component is similar to the ram-pressure confined pulsar wind nebulae detected for other sources. The X-ray emission from the pulsar itself is described well by a thermal plus power-law fit, with the thermal emission most likely originating in a hot polar cap.

  12. OSCILLATION-DRIVEN MAGNETOSPHERIC ACTIVITY IN PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Meng-Xiang; Xu, Ren-Xin; Zhang, Bing, E-mail: linmx97@gmail.com, E-mail: r.x.xu@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-02-01

    We study the magnetospheric activity in the polar cap region of pulsars under stellar oscillations. The toroidal oscillation of the star propagates into the magnetosphere, which provides additional voltage due to unipolar induction, changes Goldreich-Julian charge density from the traditional value due to rotation, and hence influences particle acceleration. We present a general solution of the effect of oscillations within the framework of the inner vacuum gap model and consider three different inner gap modes controlled by curvature radiation, inverse Compton scattering, and two-photon annihilation, respectively. With different pulsar parameters and oscillation amplitudes, one of three modes would play a dominant role in defining the gap properties. When the amplitude of oscillation exceeds a critical value, mode changing occurs. Oscillations also lead to a change of the size of the polar cap. As applications, we show the inner gap properties under oscillations in both normal pulsars and anomalous X-ray pulsars/soft gamma-ray repeaters (AXPs/SGRs). We interpret the onset of radio emission after glitches/flares in AXPs/SGRs as due to oscillation-driven magnetic activities in these objects, within the framework of both the magnetar model and the solid quark star model. Within the magnetar model, radio activation may be caused by the enlargement of the effective polar cap angle and the radio emission beam due to oscillation, whereas within the solid quark star angle, it may be caused by activation of the pulsar inner gap from below the radio emission death line due to an oscillation-induced voltage enhancement. The model can also explain the glitch-induced radio profile change observed in PSR J1119–6127.

  13. Rocket measurements within a polar cap arc - Plasma, particle, and electric circuit parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, E. J.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Basu, S.; Carlson, H. C.; Hardy, D. A.; Maynard, N. C.; Kelley, M. C.; Fleischman, J. R.; Pfaff, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented from the Polar Ionospheric Irregularities Experiment (PIIE), conducted from Sondrestrom, Greenland, on March 15, 1985, designed for an investigation of processes which lead to the generation of small-scale (less than 1 km) ionospheric irregularities within polar-cap F-layer auroras. An instrumented rocket was launched into a polar cap F layer aurora to measure energetic electron flux, plasma, and electric circuit parameters of a sun-aligned arc, coordinated with simultaneous measurements from the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar and the AFGL Airborne Ionospheric Observatory. Results indicated the existence of two different generation mechanisms on the dawnside and duskside of the arc. On the duskside, parameters are suggestive of an interchange process, while on the dawnside, fluctuation parameters are consistent with a velocity shear instability.

  14. The pulsed nature of the nightside contribution to polar cap convection: Repetitive substorm activity under steady interplanetary driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandholt, P.; Farrugia, C. J.; Andalsvik, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the contributions of substorm processes to temporal structure of polar cap plasma convection. The central parameter is the cross-polar cap potential (CPCP). Selecting a ten hour-long interval of stable interplanetary driving by an interplanetary CME (ICME), we are able to distinguish between the dayside and nightside sources of the convection. The event was initiated by an abrupt enhancement of the magnetopause (MP) reconnection rate triggered by a southward turning of the ICME magnetic field. This was followed by long interval (ten hours) of steady and strong driving. Under the latter condition a long series of electrojet intensifications (polar cap contractions) was observed which recurred at 50 min. intervals. The detailed temporal structure of polar cap convection in relation to the polar cap contraction events is obtained by combining continuous ground observations of convection - related magnetic deflections (including polar cap magnetic indices in the northern and southern hemispheres, PCN and PCS) and the more direct but lower resolution ion drift data obtained from a satellite (DMSP F13) in polar orbit. The observed PCN enhancements combined with satellite observations (DMSP F13 and F15 data) of polar cap contractions during the evolution of selected substorm expansions allowed us to calculate the CPCP enhancements associated with each event in the series.

  15. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Menon

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by ~0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is ~30%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000, and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  16. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Menon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC emissions from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC emissions from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by ~0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is ~36%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000, and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  17. Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Beig, Gufran; Sahu, Saroj; Fasullo, John; Orlikowski, Daniel

    2010-04-15

    Recent thinning of glaciers over the Himalayas (sometimes referred to as the third polar region) have raised concern on future water supplies since these glaciers supply water to large river systems that support millions of people inhabiting the surrounding areas. Black carbon (BC) aerosols, released from incomplete combustion, have been increasingly implicated as causing large changes in the hydrology and radiative forcing over Asia and its deposition on snow is thought to increase snow melt. In India BC emissions from biofuel combustion is highly prevalent and compared to other regions, BC aerosol amounts are high. Here, we quantify the impact of BC aerosols on snow cover and precipitation from 1990 to 2010 over the Indian subcontinental region using two different BC emission inventories. New estimates indicate that Indian BC emissions from coal and biofuel are large and transport is expected to expand rapidly in coming years. We show that over the Himalayas, from 1990 to 2000, simulated snow/ice cover decreases by {approx}0.9% due to aerosols. The contribution of the enhanced Indian BC to this decline is {approx}36%, similar to that simulated for 2000 to 2010. Spatial patterns of modeled changes in snow cover and precipitation are similar to observations (from 1990 to 2000), and are mainly obtained with the newer BC estimates.

  18. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars: I. Spring sublimation activity and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C.J.; Byrne, S.; Portyankina, G.; Bourke, M.; Dundas, C.; McEwen, A.; Mellon, M.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.

    2013-01-01

    Spring sublimation of the seasonal CO2 northern polar cap is a dynamic process in the current Mars climate. Phenomena include dark fans of dune material propelled out onto the seasonal ice layer, polygonal cracks in the seasonal ice, sand flow down slipfaces, and outbreaks of gas and sand around the dune margins. These phenomena are concentrated on the north polar erg that encircles the northern residual polar cap. The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been in orbit for three Mars years, allowing us to observe three northern spring seasons. Activity is consistent with and well described by the Kieffer model of basal sublimation of the seasonal layer of ice applied originally in the southern hemisphere. Three typical weak spots have been identified on the dunes for escape of gas sublimed from the bottom of the seasonal ice layer: the crest of the dune, the interface of the dune with the interdune substrate, and through polygonal cracks in the ice. Pressurized gas flows through these vents and carries out material entrained from the dune. Furrows in the dunes channel gas to outbreak points and may be the northern equivalent of southern radially-organized channels (“araneiform” terrain), albeit not permanent. Properties of the seasonal CO2 ice layer are derived from timing of seasonal events such as when final sublimation occurs. Modification of dune morphology shows that landscape evolution is occurring on Mars today, driven by seasonal activity associated with sublimation of the seasonal CO2 polar cap.

  19. Magneto–Thermal Evolution of Neutron Stars with Emphasis to Radio Pulsars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U. Geppert

    2017-09-01

    The magnetic and thermal evolution of neutron stars is a very complex process with many non-linear interactions. For a decent understanding of neutron star physics, these evolutions cannot be considered isolated. A brief overview is presented, which describes the main magneto–thermal interactions that determine the fate of both isolated neutron stars and accreting ones. Special attention is devoted to the interplay of thermal and magnetic evolution at the polar cap of radio pulsars. There, a strong meridional temperature gradient is maintained over the lifetime of radio pulsars. It may be strong enough to drive thermoelectric magnetic field creation which perpetuate a toroidal magnetic field around the polar cap rim. Such a local field component may amplify and curve the poloidal surface field at the cap, forming a strong and small scale magnetic field as required for the radio emission of pulsars.

  20. Comment on "Electrostatic compressive and rarefactive shocks and solitons in relativistic plasmas occurring in polar regions of pulsar"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, M. G.; Talukder, M. R.; Hossain Ali, M.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this comment is to show the solution of the KdVB equation used by Shah et al. (Astrophys. Space Sci. 335:529-537, 2011, doi: 10.1007/s10509-011-0766-y) is not correct. So, the numerical results that are predicted in this manuscript should not be helpful for further investigations in a plasma laboratory. For this reason, we have employed the Bernoulli's equation method to obtain the correct form of analytical solution to this equation, which is appropriate for the study of electrostatic compressive and rarefactive shocks and solitons in relativistic plasmas occurring in polar regions of pulsar.

  1. A recent change in the optical and {\\gamma}-ray polarization of the Crab nebula and pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Moran, Paul; Gouiffes, Christian; 3,; Laurent, Philipe; Hallinan, Gregg; Redfern, Michael; Shearer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We report on observations of the polarization of optical and {\\gamma}-ray photons from the Crab nebula and pulsar system using the Galway Astronomical Stokes Polarimeter (GASP), the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) and the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory satellite (Integral). These, when combined with other optical polarization observations, suggest that the polarized optical emission and {\\gamma}-ray polarization changes in a similar manner. A change in the optical polarization angle has been observed by this work, from 109.5 \\pm 0.7\\deg in 2005 to 85.3 \\pm 1.4 \\deg in 2012. On the other hand, the {\\gamma}-ray polarization angle changed from 115 \\pm 11 \\deg in 2003-2007 to 80 \\pm 12 \\deg in 2012-2014. Strong flaring activities have been detected in the Crab nebula over the past few years by the high energy {\\gamma}-ray missions Agile and Fermi, and magnetic reconnection processes have been suggested to explain these observations. The change in the polarized optical...

  2. Sublimation and transport of water from the north residual polar cap on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberle, Robert M.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    1990-01-01

    The possible role of the north residual cap in the current Martian water cycle was examined using models to assess the ability of the cap to supply water to the atmosphere and the ability of the atmospheric circulation to transport it out of the polar regions to low northern latitudes. Results indicate that rather extreme circumstances would be required for the cap to provide all of the observed increase in atmospheric water, such as a combination of high surface winds, low cap emissivities, or substantial evaporation from dark material. But even if these conditions could be met, the high-latitude circulation is too localized in scale to move much water vapor out of the polar environment. Both the present calculations and the data from the Viking's Mars Atmospheric Water Detection Experiment show that about two thirds of the water appearing in the Martian northern hemisphere during summer must be supplied by other sources. It is suggested that the additional source is water desorbing from the nonpolar regolith.

  3. Sublimation and transport of water from the north residual polar cap on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberle, Robert M.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    1990-01-01

    The possible role of the north residual cap in the current Martian water cycle was examined using models to assess the ability of the cap to supply water to the atmosphere and the ability of the atmospheric circulation to transport it out of the polar regions to low northern latitudes. Results indicate that rather extreme circumstances would be required for the cap to provide all of the observed increase in atmospheric water, such as a combination of high surface winds, low cap emissivities, or substantial evaporation from dark material. But even if these conditions could be met, the high-latitude circulation is too localized in scale to move much water vapor out of the polar environment. Both the present calculations and the data from the Viking's Mars Atmospheric Water Detection Experiment show that about two thirds of the water appearing in the Martian northern hemisphere during summer must be supplied by other sources. It is suggested that the additional source is water desorbing from the nonpolar regolith.

  4. Production of polar cap electron density patches by transient magnetopause reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwood, M. (Rutherford Appleton Lab. (United Kingdom)); Carlson, H.C. Jr. (Phillips Lab., Bedford, MA (United States))

    1992-09-04

    Some implications are considered of recent theoretical work concerning the excitation of dayside ionospheric convection by magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. In particular, transient bursts of such reconnection ([open quote]flux transfer events[close quote]) are considered as a cause of polar cap [open quote]patches[close quote] of enhanced plasma density. Examples of such patches, as observed at European longitudes by the EISCAT radar, are presented and used to discuss the implications of the proposed mechanism.

  5. ULF/Lower-ELF Electromagnetic Field Measurements in the Polar Caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    pulsation phenomenon in the polar caps. There is another pulsation phenomenon which may be called IPIP (Irregular Pulsations of Increasing Period) by analogy...with induction magnetometers has been studied by Shand [1964]. The results of this study are not encouraging for measurements on the open Arctic Ocean ...J. Geophys. Res., 66, 747-776, 1961. Hunkins, K., "Waves on the Arctic Ocean ", J. Geophys. Res., 67, 2477- * •2489, 1962. 𔃾 Jacobs, J.A

  6. Quantification of summertime water ice deposition on the Martian north polar ice cap

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adrian J; Becerra, Patricio; Byrne, Shane

    2015-01-01

    We use observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) of the north polar cap during late summer for two Martian years, to monitor the complete summer cycle of albedo and water ice grain size in order to place quantitative limits of the amount of water ice deposited in late summer. We establish here for the first time the complete spring to summer cycle of water ice grain sizes on the north polar cap. The apparent grain sizes grow until Ls=132, when they appear to shrink again, until they are obscured at the end of summer by the north polar hood. Under the assumption that the shrinking of grain sizes is due to the deposition of find grained ice, we quantify the amount of water ice deposited per Martian boreal summer, and estimate the amount of water ice that must be transported equatorward. Interestingly, we find that the relative amount of water ice deposited in the north cap during boreal summer (0.7-7 microns) is roughly equivalent to the average amount of water ice depos...

  7. Imaging of fast moving electron-density structures in the polar cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Mitchell

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The imaging of fast-moving electron-density structures in the polar cap presents a unique set of challenges that are not encountered in other ionospheric imaging problems. GPS observations of total electron content in the polar cap are sparse compared to other regions in the Northern Hemisphere. Furthermore, the slow relative motion of the satellites across the sky complicates the problem since the velocity of the plasma can be large in comparison and traditional approaches could result in image blurring. This paper presents a Kalman-filter based method that incorporates a forward projection of the solution based on a model plasma drift velocity field. This is the first time that the plasma motion, rather than just integrations of electron density, has been used in an ionospheric imaging algorithm. The motion is derived from the Weimer model of the electric field. It is shown that this novel approach to the implementation of a Kalman filter provides a detailed view of the polar cap ionosphere under severe storm conditions. A case study is given for the October 2003 Halloween storm where verification is provided by incoherent scatter radars.

  8. Scintillation and irregularities from the nightside part of a Sun-aligned polar cap arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeren, Christer; Oksavik, Kjellmar; Lorentzen, Dag A.; Paxton, Larry J.; Clausen, Lasse B. N.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we study the presence of irregularities and scintillation in relation to the nightside part of a long-lived, Sun-aligned transpolar arc on 15 January 2015. The arc was observed in DMSP UV and particle data and lasted at least 3 h between 1700 and 2000 UT. The arc was more intense than the main oval during this time. From all-sky imagers on Svalbard we were able to study the evolution of the arc, which drifted slowly westward toward the dusk cell. The intensity of the arc as observed from ground was 10-17 kR in 557.7 nm and 2-3.5 kR in 630.0 nm, i.e., significant emissions in both green and red emission lines. We have used high-resolution raw data from global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers and backscatter from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radars to study irregularities and scintillation in relation to the polar cap arc. Even though the literature has suggested that polar cap arcs are potential sources for irregularities, our results indicate only very weak irregularities. This may be due to the background density in the northward IMF polar cap being too low for significant irregularities to be created.

  9. Polar volatiles on Mars - Theory versus observation. [solid carbon dioxide in north residual cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B. C.; Malin, M. C.

    1973-01-01

    Synthesis of the results of the Mariner 9 mission, as they pertain to polar volatiles, and comparison of them with a description of the solid-vapor equilibrium relations believed to be presently active on Mars. The discovery by Mariner 9 of extensive volcanic deposits on portions of the Martian surface suggests that the total amount of CO2 liberated to the surface probably exceeds that now present in the atmosphere. Thus excess CO2 in the solid form is to be expected in the polar areas. Although the simplified model of Leighton and Murray (1966), which predicts a permanent CO2 cap, has significant deficiencies both theoretically and observationally, the seasonal caps are composed of CO2, as predicted, excess CO2 is quite likely, and a permanent deposit of solid CO2 evidently is in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2. It is suggested that there must be a large reservoir of solid CO2 in gaseous equilibrium with the atmosphere, but buried immediately below the exposed residual water-ice cap. This reservoir is believed to be located near the north pole. The principal effect of such a reservoir is to average out annual and longer-term fluctuations in the polar heat balance.

  10. Ion-proton pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  11. Ion-proton pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, P B

    2016-01-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  12. An examination of Mars' north seasonal polar cap using MGS: Composition and infrared radiation balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Gary B.

    2013-08-01

    A detailed analysis of data from one revolution of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) is presented. Approximately 80% of this revolution observes the mid-winter northern seasonal polar cap, which covers the surface to night. The surface composition and temperature are determined through analysis of 6-50 μm infrared spectra from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). The infrared radiative balance, which is the entire heat balance in the polar night except for small subsurface and atmospheric advection terms, is calculated for the surface and atmospheric column. The primary constituent, CO2 ice, also dominates the infrared spectral properties by variations in its grain size and by admixtures of dust and water ice, which cause large variations in the 20-50 μm emissivity. This is modified by incomplete areal coverage, and clouds or hazes. This quantitative analysis reveals CO2 grain radii ranging from ˜100 μm in isolated areas, to 1-5 mm in more widespread regions. The water ice content varies from none to about one part per thousand by mass, with a clear increase towards the periphery of the polar cap. The dust content is typically a few parts per thousand by mass, but is as much as an order of magnitude less abundant in "cold spot" regions, where the low emissivity of pure CO2 ice is revealed. This is the first quantitative analysis of thermal spectra of the seasonal polar cap and the first to estimate water ice content. Our models show that the cold spots represent cleaner, dust-free ice rather than finer grained ice than the background. Our guess is that the dust in cold spots is hidden in the center of the CO2 frost particles rather than not present. The fringes of the cap have more dust and water ice, and become patchy, with warmer water snow filling the gaps on the night side, and warmer bare soil on the day side. A low optical depth (night side, and appears with smaller optical depth on the day side. The infrared radiative balance at the surface is typically

  13. Particle Acceleration in Dissipative Pulsar Magnetospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanas, Z.; Kalapotharakos, C.; Harding, A.; Contopoulos, I.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsar magnetospheres represent unipolar inductor-type electrical circuits at which an EM potential across the polar cap (due to the rotation of their magnetic field) drives currents that run in and out of the polar cap and close at infinity. An estimate ofthe magnitude of this current can be obtained by dividing the potential induced across the polar cap V approx = B(sub O) R(sub O)(Omega R(sub O)/c)(exp 2) by the impedance of free space Z approx eq 4 pi/c; the resulting polar cap current density is close to $n {GJ} c$ where $n_{GJ}$ is the Goldreich-Julian (GJ) charge density. This argument suggests that even at current densities close to the GJ one, pulsar magnetospheres have a significant component of electric field $E_{parallel}$, parallel to the magnetic field, a condition necessary for particle acceleration and the production of radiation. We present the magnetic and electric field structures as well as the currents, charge densities, spin down rates and potential drops along the magnetic field lines of pulsar magnetospheres which do not obey the ideal MHD condition $E cdot B = 0$. By relating the current density along the poloidal field lines to the parallel electric field via a kind of Ohm's law $J = sigma E_{parallel}$ we study the structure of these magnetospheres as a function of the conductivity $sigma$. We find that for $sigma gg OmegaS the solution tends to the (ideal) Force-Free one and to the Vacuum one for $sigma 11 OmegaS. Finally, we present dissipative magnetospheric solutions with spatially variable $sigma$ that supports various microphysical properties and are compatible with the observations.

  14. The Polar Cap (PC) index. A critical review of methods and a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauning, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) index introduced by Troshichev and Andrezen (1985) is derived from polar magnetic variations and is mainly a measure of the intensity of the transpolar ionospheric currents. These currents relate to the polar cap antisunward ionospheric plasma convection driven by the dawn-dusk electric field, which in turn is generated by the interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere. Coefficients to calculate PCN and PCS index values from polar magnetic variations recorded at Thule and Vostok, respectively, have been derived by several different procedures in the past. Approval of a final PC index procedure is pending at the International Association for Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) for a decision possibly at the General Assembly in 2013. The presentation discusses the principal differences between the various PC index procedures and provides comparisons between coefficient and index values derived using the different procedures. It will be demonstrated that depending on the procedure, PC index values derived in the past, and used in many publications, may differ substantially although the same basic geomagnetic data were used. Finally, a new approach to define a unified PC index procedure, built from the best elements of the three different current versions, is outlined.

  15. The Polar Cap index: A critical review of methods and a new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauning, Peter

    2013-08-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) index introduced by Troshichev and Andrezen (1985) is derived from polar magnetic variations and is mainly a measure of the intensity of the transpolar ionospheric currents. These currents relate to the polar cap antisunward ionospheric plasma convection driven by the dawn-dusk electric fields, which in turn are generated by the interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere. Coefficients to calculate PCN and PCS index values from polar magnetic variations recorded at Thule and Vostok, respectively, have been derived by several different procedures in the past. The PCN index is found in seven different versions while the PCS index is found in five different versions in past publications. Recent publications (in 2011 and 2012) still convey three different PCN and two different PCS indices. The presentation here discusses the principal differences between the various PC index procedures and provides comparisons between coefficient and index values derived using the different procedures. Finally, a new approach to define a simplified PC index procedure is outlined.

  16. Mass balance of Mars' residual south polar cap from CTX images and other data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P. C.; Calvin, W.; Cantor, B.; Haberle, R.; James, P. B.; Lee, S. W.

    2016-04-01

    Erosion of pits in the residual south polar cap (RSPC) of Mars concurrent with deposition and fluctuating cap boundaries raises questions about the mass balance and long term stability of the cap. Determining a mass balance by measurement of a net gain or loss of atmospheric CO2 by direct pressure measurements (Haberle, R.M. et al. [2014]. Secular climate change on Mars: An update using one Mars year of MSL pressure data. American Geophysical Union (Fall). Abstract 3947), although perhaps the most direct method, has so far given ambiguous results. Estimating volume changes from imaging data faces challenges, and has previously been attempted only in isolated areas of the cap. In this study we use 6 m/pixel Context Imager (CTX) data from Mars year 31 to map all the morphologic units of the RSPC, expand the measurement record of pit erosion rates, and use high resolution images to place limits on vertical changes in the surface of the residual cap. We find the mass balance in Mars years 9-31 to be -6 to +4 km3/♂y, or roughly -0.039% to +0.026% of the mean atmospheric CO2 mass/♂y. The indeterminate sign results chiefly from uncertainty in the amounts of deposition or erosion on the upper surfaces of deposits (as opposed to scarp retreat). Erosion and net deposition in this period appear to be controlled by summertime planetary scale dust events, the largest occurring in MY 9, another, smaller one in MY 28. The rates of erosion and the deposition observed since MY 9 appear to be consistent with the types of deposits and erosional behavior found in most of the residual cap. However, small areas (deposits may require extended periods (>100 ♂y) of depositional and/or erosional conditions different from those occurring in the period since MY 9, although these environmental differences could be subtle.

  17. Motion of the dayside polar cap boundary during substorm cycles: II. Generation of poleward-moving events and polar cap patches by pulses in the magnetopause reconnection rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Using data from the EISCAT (European Incoherent Scatter VHF and CUTLASS (Co-operative UK Twin-Located Auroral Sounding System HF radars, we study the formation of ionospheric polar cap patches and their relationship to the magnetopause reconnection pulses identified in the companion paper by Lockwood et al. (2005. It is shown that the poleward-moving, high-concentration plasma patches observed in the ionosphere by EISCAT on 23 November 1999, as reported by Davies et al. (2002, were often associated with corresponding reconnection rate pulses. However, not all such pulses generated a patch and only within a limited MLT range (11:00-12:00 MLT did a patch result from a reconnection pulse. Three proposed mechanisms for the production of patches, and of the concentration minima that separate them, are analysed and evaluated: (1 concentration enhancement within the patches by cusp/cleft precipitation; (2 plasma depletion in the minima between the patches by fast plasma flows; and (3 intermittent injection of photoionisation-enhanced plasma into the polar cap. We devise a test to distinguish between the effects of these mechanisms. Some of the events repeat too frequently to apply the test. Others have sufficiently long repeat periods and mechanism (3 is shown to be the only explanation of three of the longer-lived patches seen on this day. However, effect (2 also appears to contribute to some events. We conclude that plasma concentration gradients on the edges of the larger patches arise mainly from local time variations in the subauroral plasma, via the mechanism proposed by Lockwood et al. (2000.

  18. PCN magnetic index and average convection velocity in the polar cap inferred from SuperDARN radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, R. A. D.; Koustov, A. V.; Boteler, D.; Makarevich, R. A.

    2009-07-01

    The relationship between the polar cap north (PCN) magnetic index and the average convection velocity of the plasma flow across the polar cap is investigated using data from both the Rankin Inlet (RKN) polar cap Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar and the entire SuperDARN network. Correlation between the PCN index and the average velocity, determined from the median RKN line of sight (LOS) velocity, maximizes near magnetic noon and midnight when the radar field of view is roughly aligned with the noon-midnight meridian. For observations between 1000 and 1100 MLT, a roughly linear increase of the average velocity was found for a PCN index between 0 and 2, but the rate of increase is ˜2 times faster than in previous publications in which the average velocity was estimated from DMSP ion drift measurements. Comparisons between the PCN index with the cross-polar cap velocity estimated from (1) SuperDARN convection maps and (2) median RKN LOS velocities show similar trends. Both the average cross-polar cap velocity (estimated by two methods) and the cross-polar cap potential show a tendency for saturation at PCN > 2. No significant seasonal change in the nature of the relationships was found.

  19. Thermal properties of three Fermi pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilenko, A.; Karpova, A.; Kirichenko, A.; Shibanov, Y.; Shternin, P.; Zharikov, S.; Zyuzin, D.

    2014-07-01

    We analysed thermal properties of the Fermi pulsars J0357+3205, J1741-2054, and J0633+0632 using data from the XMM-Newton and Chandra archives. The X-ray spectra of all three pulsars can be fitted by sum of thermal and power-law components. For J1741-2054, the thermal component is best described by a blackbody model whose normalization suggests that the thermal emission comes from the bulk of the neutron star surface. The effective temperature of 60 eV, which is rather large for a pulsar as old as J1741-2054, makes it similar to the well-studied pulsar B1055-52, one of ``the three musketeers''. The thermal components of PSRs J0357+3205 and J0633+0632 can be equally well described by blackbody or the hydrogen atmosphere models. In the former case the normalizations suggest hot polar cap as thermal emission origin and only upper limits on the neutron stars surface temperatures can be computed. For the hydrogen atmosphere models, the normalizations are in agreement with emission coming from a substantial part of neutron star surface. Thermal properties of the pulsars are confronted with similar data on other isolated neutron stars and predictions of the neutron star cooling theory.

  20. 2-D Visualization of Global D-region and Polar Cap Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, J.-H.; Choi, S.; Lee, J.; Bong, S.-C.

    2015-09-01

    We have visualized global D-region and polar cap absorption in two dimensions. We use the empirical relationship between solar x-ray flux (0.1-0.8 nm) and highest affected frequency at sub-solar point to calculate global D-region absorption. We also use the relation between the integral proton fluxes above certain energy thresholds and polar cap absorption. The calculation code was developed by C++ and refers to the result of Solar Position Algorithm (SPA) code of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in C. We also consider the relation between the angles of the geomagnetic system and the geographical one. We calculate the attenuation at 8.83 MHz because it is used in High Frequency (HF) communications by airplanes. The code needs input data such as x-ray flux, proton flux, and Kp index of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The attenuation is displayed in a world map, the Korean peninsula, and polar route.

  1. Polar cap convection/precipitation states during Earth passage of two ICMEs at solar minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Sandholt

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We report important new aspects of polar cap convection and precipitation (dawn-dusk and inter-hemisphere asymmetries associated with the different levels of forcing of the magnetosphere by two interplanetary (IP magnetic clouds on 20 November 2007 and 17 December 2008 during solar minimum. Focus is placed on two intervals of southward magnetic cloud field with large negative By components (Bx=−5 versus 0 nT and with high and low plasma densities, respectively, as detected by spacecraft Wind. The convection/precipitation states are documented by DMSP spacecraft (Southern Hemisphere and SuperDARN radars (Northern Hemisphere. The (negative By component of the cloud field is accompanied by a newly-discovered flow channel (called here FC 2 threaded by old open field lines (in polar rain precipitation at the dusk and dawn sides of the polar cap in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, respectively, and a corresponding Svalgaard-Mansurov (S-M effect in ground magnetic deflections. On 20 November 2007 the latter S-M effect in the Northern winter Hemisphere appears in the form of a sequence of six 5–10 min long magnetic deflection events in the 71–74° MLAT/14:30–16:00 MLT sector. The X-deflections are consistent with the flow direction in FC 2 (i.e. caused by Hall currents in both IP cloud cases. The presence of a lobe cell and associated polar arcs in the Southern (summer Hemisphere in the low density (1–2 cm−3 and Bx=0 ICME case is accompanied by the dropout of polar rain precipitation in the dusk-side regime of sunward polar cap convection and inward-directed Birkeland current. The low-altitude observations are discussed in terms of momentum transfer via dynamo processes in the high- and low-latitude boundary layers and Birkeland currents located poleward of the traditional R1-R2 system.

  2. Dependence of the cross polar cap potential saturation on the type of solar wind streams

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolaeva, N. S.; Yermolaev, Yu. I.; Lodkina, I. G.

    2013-01-01

    We compare of the cross polar cap potential (CPCP) saturation during magnetic storms induced by various types of the solar wind drivers. By using the model of Siscoe-Hill \\citep{Hilletal1976,Siscoeetal2002a,Siscoeetal2002b,Siscoeetal2004,Siscoe2011} we evaluate criteria of the CPCP saturation during the main phases of 257 magnetic storms ($Dst_{min} \\le -50$ nT) induced by the following types of the solar wind streams: magnetic clouds (MC), Ejecta, the compress region Sheath before MC ($Sh_{M...

  3. Ionospheric Plasma Circulation Associated with Polar Cap Arcs Detached from the Auroral Oval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymenko, K.; Koustov, A. V.; Hosokawa, K.; Shiokawa, K.

    2015-12-01

    Joint observations of the OMTI all-sky camera at Resolute Bay, NWT (Canada), the SuperDARN radars and Swarm satellites are considered to investigate horizontal plasma flows and vertical field-aligned currents (FACs) associated with polar cap arcs "detached" from the auroral oval but not penetrated deep into the polar cap. All cases are for the near winter solstice, positive IMF Bz and mostly dominating IMF By. We show that the arcs are usually co-exist with strong flow shears driven by electric fields of the converging type. The shears, being added to the background flow, produce unusual convection patterns, for example reverse (sunward) flows on the nightside, several MLT hours away from the noon-midnight line. We also investigate the distribution of FACs in the arcs' vicinity, both duskward and dawnward, for several Swarm passes. Electron density data onboard Swarm satellites are used to identify the arc and auroral oval boundaries, along with the ground-based optics. The data suggest that the arcs correspond to a separate current system excited in addition to the background plasma circulation governed by the reconnection processes.Joint observations of the OMTI all-sky camera at Resolute Bay, NWT (Canada), the SuperDARN radars and Swarm satellites are considered to investigate horizontal plasma flows and vertical field-aligned currents (FACs) associated with polar cap arcs "detached" from the auroral oval but not penetrated deep into the polar cap. All cases are for the near winter solstice, positive IMF Bz and mostly dominating IMF By. We show that the arcs are usually co-exist with strong flow shears driven by electric fields of the converging type. The shears, being added to the background flow, produce unusual convection patterns, for example reverse (sunward) flows on the nightside, several MLT hours away from the noon-midnight line. We also investigate the distribution of FACs in the arcs' vicinity, both duskward and dawnward, for several Swarm passes

  4. Relationship of O(+) Field-Aligned Flows and Densities to Convection Speed in the Polar Cap at 5000 km Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, B. A.; Horwitz, J. L.; Creel, B.; Elliott, H. A.; Comfort, R. H.; Su, Y. J.; Moore, T. E.; Craven, P. D.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of thermal O(+) ion number fluxes, densities, field-aligned velocities, and convective velocities from the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) on POLAR obtained near 5000 km altitude over the Southern hemisphere are examined. We find that the O(+) parallel velocities and densities are strongly related to the convection speeds. The polar cap densities decrease rapidly with convection speed, with a linear least square fit formula to bin averaged data giving the relationship log(N(sub (sub _)O(+))) = -0.33* V(sub (sub _)conv)) + 0.07, with a linear regression coefficient of r = -0.96. The parallel bulk flow velocities are on average slightly downward (0 - 2 km/s) for V(sub (sub _)conv) km/s, but tend to be upward (0 - 4 km/s) for average V(sub (sub _)conv) > 2.5 km/s. We interpret these relationships in terms of the Cleft Ion Fountain paradigm [e.g., Horwitz and Lockwood, 1985]. The densities decline with convection speed owing to increased spreading and resulting dilution from the restricted cleft source over the polar cap area with convection speed. The parallel velocities tend to be downward for low convection speeds because they fall earthward after initial cleft injection at shorter distances into the polar cap for low convection speeds. At the higher convection speeds, the initially-upward flows are transported further into the polar cap and thus occupy a larger area of the polar cap.

  5. Natural Limits for Currents in Charge Separated Pulsar Magnetospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Jessner, A; Kunzl, T A

    2002-01-01

    Rough estimates and upper limits on current and particle densities form the basis of most of the canonical pulsar models. Whereas the surface of the rotating neutron star is capable of supplying sufficient charges to provide a current that, given the polar cap potential, could easily fuel the observed energy loss processes, observational and theoretical constraints provide strict upper limits to the charge densities. The space charge of a current consisting solely of particles having only one sign creates a compensating potential that will make the maximum current dependent on potential and distance. In the non-relativistic case this fact is expressed in the familiar Child-Langmuir law. Its relativistic generalization and subsequent application to the inner pulsar magnetosphere provides clear limits on the strength and radial extension of charged currents originating on the polar cap. Violent Pierce-type oscillations set in, if one attempts to inject more current than the space charge limit into a given volum...

  6. Pulsar Magnetospheres: Beyond the Flat Spacetime Dipole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralla, Samuel E.; Lupsasca, Alexandru; Philippov, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Most studies of the pulsar magnetosphere have assumed a pure magnetic dipole in flat spacetime. However, recent work suggests that the effects of general relativity are in fact of vital importance and that realistic pulsar magnetic fields will have a significant nondipolar component. We introduce a general analytical method for studying the axisymmetric force-free magnetosphere of a slowly rotating star of arbitrary magnetic field, mass, radius, and moment of inertia, including all the effects of general relativity. We confirm that spacelike current is generically present in the polar caps (suggesting a pair production region), irrespective of the stellar magnetic field. We show that general relativity introduces a ∼ 60 % correction to the formula for the dipolar component of the surface magnetic field inferred from spindown. Finally, we show that the location and shape of the polar caps can be modified dramatically by even modestly strong higher moments. This can affect emission processes occurring near the star and may help explain the modified beam characteristics of millisecond pulsars.

  7. Reconfiguration of polar-cap plasma in the magnetic midnight sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Pryse

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Radio tomography and the EISCAT and SuperDARN radars have been used to identify long-lived, high-altitude, cold plasma in the antisunward convective flow across the polar cap. The projection of the feature to later times suggests that it was reconfigured in the Harang discontinuity to form an enhancement that was elongated in longitude in the sunward return flow of the high-latitude convection pattern. Comparison with a tomographic image at a later time supports the interpretation of a polar patch being reconfigured into a boundary blob. There is also evidence for a second plasma enhancement equatorward of the reconfigured blob, likely to have been produced by in situ precipitation. The observations indicate that the two mechanisms proposed in the literature for the production of boundary blobs are operating simultaneously to form two distinct density features separated slightly in latitude.

  8. A multi-satellite study of accelerated ionospheric ion beams above the polar cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Maggiolo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of nearly field-aligned outflowing ion beams observed on the Cluster satellites over the polar cap. Data are taken at geocentric radial distances of the order of 5–9 RE. The distinction is made between ion beams originating from the polar cusp/cleft and beams accelerated almost along the magnetic field line passing by the spacecraft. Polar cusp beams are characterized by nearly field-aligned proton and oxygen ions with an energy ratio EO+ / EH+, of the order of 3 to 4, due to the ion energy repartition inside the source and to the latitudinal extension of the source. Rapid variations in the outflowing ion energy are linked with pulses/modifications of the convection electric field. Cluster data allow one to show that these perturbations of the convection velocity and the associated ion structures propagate at the convection velocity.

    In contrast, polar cap local ion beams are characterized by field-aligned proton and oxygen ions with similar energies. These beams show the typical inverted V structures usually observed in the auroral zone and are associated with a quasi-static converging electric field indicative of a field-aligned electric field. The field-aligned potential drop fits well the ion energy profile. The simultaneous observation of precipitating electrons and upflowing ions of similar energies at the Cluster orbit indicates that the spacecraft are crossing the mid-altitude part of the acceleration region. In the polar cap, the parallel electric field can thus extend to altitudes higher than 5 Earth radii. A detailed analysis of the distribution functions shows that the ions are heated during their parallel acceleration and that energy is exchanged between H+ and O+. Furthermore, intense electrostatic waves are observed simultaneously. These observations could be due to an ion-ion two-stream instability.

  9. Elimination of surface band bending on N-polar InN with thin GaN capping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmík, J., E-mail: Jan.Kuzmik@savba.sk; Haščík, Š.; Kučera, M.; Kúdela, R.; Dobročka, E. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Adikimenakis, A. [Microelectronics Research Group (MRG), IESL, FORTH, P.O. Box 1385, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Mičušík, M. [Polymer Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravska cesta 9, 845 41 Bratislava (Slovakia); Gregor, M.; Plecenik, A. [Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mlynská dolina, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); Georgakilas, A. [Microelectronics Research Group (MRG), IESL, FORTH, P.O. Box 1385, 71110 Heraklion, Greece and Department of Physics, University of Crete, 71203 Heraklion (Greece)

    2015-11-09

    0.5–1 μm thick InN (0001) films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy with N- or In-polarity are investigated for the presence of native oxide, surface energy band bending, and effects introduced by 2 to 4 monolayers of GaN capping. Ex situ angle-resolved x-ray photo-electron spectroscopy is used to construct near-surface (GaN)/InN energy profiles, which is combined with deconvolution of In3d signal to trace the presence of InN native oxide for different types of polarity and capping. Downwards surface energy band bending was observed on bare samples with native oxide, regardless of the polarity. It was found that the In-polar InN surface is most readily oxidized, however, with only slightly less band bending if compared with the N-polar sample. On the other hand, InN surface oxidation was effectively mitigated by GaN capping. Still, as confirmed by ultra-violet photo-electron spectroscopy and by energy band diagram calculations, thin GaN cap layer may provide negative piezoelectric polarization charge at the GaN/InN hetero-interface of the N-polar sample, in addition to the passivation effect. These effects raised the band diagram up by about 0.65 eV, reaching a flat-band profile.

  10. Polar cap arcs from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere: kinetic modelling and observations by Cluster and TIMED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Maggiolo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available On 1 April 2004 the GUVI imager onboard the TIMED spacecraft spots an isolated and elongated polar cap arc. About 20 min later, the Cluster satellites detect an isolated upflowing ion beam above the polar cap. Cluster observations show that the ions are accelerated upward by a quasi-stationary electric field. The field-aligned potential drop is estimated to about 700 V and the upflowing ions are accompanied by a tenuous population of isotropic protons with a temperature of about 500 eV.

    The magnetic footpoints of the ion outflows observed by Cluster are situated in the prolongation of the polar cap arc observed by TIMED GUVI. The upflowing ion beam and the polar cap arc may be different signatures of the same phenomenon, as suggested by a recent statistical study of polar cap ion beams using Cluster data.

    We use Cluster observations at high altitude as input to a quasi-stationary magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI coupling model. Using a Knight-type current-voltage relationship and the current continuity at the topside ionosphere, the model computes the energy spectrum of precipitating electrons at the top of the ionosphere corresponding to the generator electric field observed by Cluster. The MI coupling model provides a field-aligned potential drop in agreement with Cluster observations of upflowing ions and a spatial scale of the polar cap arc consistent with the optical observations by TIMED. The computed energy spectrum of the precipitating electrons is used as input to the Trans4 ionospheric transport code. This 1-D model, based on Boltzmann's kinetic formalism, takes into account ionospheric processes such as photoionization and electron/proton precipitation, and computes the optical and UV emissions due to precipitating electrons. The emission rates provided by the Trans4 code are compared to the optical observations by TIMED. They are similar in size and intensity. Data and modelling results are consistent with the

  11. A Case for Microorganisms on Comets, Europa and the Polar Ice Caps of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Pikuta, Elena V.

    2003-01-01

    Microbial extremophiles live on Earth wherever there is liquid water and a source of energy. Observations by ground-based observatories, space missions, and satellites have provided strong evidence that water ice exists today on comets, Europa, Callisto, and Ganymede and in the snow, permafrost, glaciers and polar ice caps of Mars. Studies of the cryoconite pools and ice bubble systems of Antarctica suggest that solar heating of dark rocks entrained in ice can cause localized melting of ice providing ideal conditions for the growth of microbial communities with the creation of micro-environments where trapped metabolic gasses produce entrained isolated atmospheres as in the Antarctic ice-bubble systems. It is suggested that these considerations indicate that several groups of microorganisms should be capable of episodic growth within liquid water envelopes surrounding dark rocks in cometary ices and the permafrost and polar caps of Mars. We discuss some of the types of microorganisms we have encountered within the permafrost and snow of Siberia, the cryoconite pools of Alaska, and frozen deep within the Antarctic ice sheet above Lake Vostok.

  12. On the SuperDARN cross polar cap potential saturation effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Koustov

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Variation of the cross polar cap potential (CPCP with the interplanetary electric field (IEF, the merging electric field EKL, the Polar Cap North (PCN magnetic index, and the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling function EC of Newell et al. (2007 is investigated by considering convection data collected by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN in the Northern Hemisphere. Winter and summer observations are considered separately. All variations considered show close to linear trend at small values of the parameters and tendency for the saturation at large values. The threshold values starting from which the non-linearity was evident were estimated to be IEF*~EKL*~3 mV/m, PCN*~3–4, and EC*~1.5×104. The data indicate that saturation starts at larger values of the above parameters and reaches larger (up to 10 kV saturation levels during summer. Conclusions are supported by a limited data set of simultaneous SuperDARN observations in the Northern (summer and Southern (winter Hemispheres. It is argued that the SuperDARN CPCP saturation levels and the thresholds for the non-linearity to be seen are affected by the method of the CPCP estimates.

  13. Dynamical changes of the polar cap potential structure: an information theory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Coco

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Some features, such as vortex structures often observed through a wide spread of spatial scales, suggest that ionospheric convection is turbulent and complex in nature. Here, applying concepts from information theory and complex system physics, we firstly evaluate a pseudo Shannon entropy, H, associated with the polar cap potential obtained from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN and, then, estimate the degree of disorder and the degree of complexity of ionospheric convection under different Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF conditions. The aforementioned quantities are computed starting from time series of the coefficients of the 4th order spherical harmonics expansion of the polar cap potential for three periods, characterised by: (i steady IMF Bz > 0, (ii steady IMF Bz < 0 and (iii a double rotation from negative to positive and then positive to negative Bz. A neat dynamical topological transition is observed when the IMF Bz turns from negative to positive and vice versa, pointing toward the possible occurrence of an order/disorder phase transition, which is the counterpart of the large scale convection rearrangement and of the increase of the global coherence. This result has been confirmed by applying the same analysis to a larger data base of about twenty days of SuperDARN data, allowing to investigate the role of IMF By too.

  14. Scintillation and irregularities from the nightside part of a Sun-aligned polar cap arc

    CERN Document Server

    van der Meeren, Christer; Lorentzen, Dag A; Paxton, Larry J; Clausen, Lasse B N

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the presence of irregularities and scintillation in relation to the nightside part of a long-lived, Sun-aligned transpolar arc on 15 January 2015. The arc was observed in DMSP UV and particle data and lasted at least 3 h between 1700 and 2000 UT. The arc was more intense than the main oval during this time. From all-sky imagers on Svalbard we were able to study the evolution of the arc, which drifted slowly westward toward the dusk cell. The intensity of the arc as observed from ground was 10-17 kR in 557.7 nm and 2-3.5 kR in 630.0 nm, i.e., significant emissions in both green and red emission lines. We have used high-resolution raw data from global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers and backscatter from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radars to study irregularities and scintillation in relation to the polar cap arc. Even though the literature has suggested that polar cap arcs are potential sources for irregularities, our results indicate only very weak irregular...

  15. The Cyclase-associated Protein CAP as Regulator of Cell Polarity and cAMP Signaling in Dictyostelium

    OpenAIRE

    Noegel, Angelika A; Blau-Wasser, Rosemarie; Sultana, Hameeda; Müller, Rolf; Israel, Lars; Schleicher, Michael; Patel, Hitesh; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2004-01-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of the G-actin/F-actin ratio and, in yeast, is involved in regulating the adenylyl cyclase activity. We show that cell polarization, F-actin organization, and phototaxis are altered in a Dictyostelium CAP knockout mutant. Furthermore, in complementation assays we determined the roles of the individual domains in signaling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. We studied in detail the adenylyl cyclase activity and fo...

  16. Nightside auroral zone and polar cap ion outflow as a function of substorm size and phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, G. R.; Ober, D. M.; Germany, G. A.; Lund, E. J.

    2004-02-01

    Because the high latitude ionosphere is an important source of plasma for the magnetosphere under active conditions, we have undertaken a study of the way ion outflow from the nightside auroral zone and polar cap respond to substorm activity. We have combined data from the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on Polar with ion upflow measurements from the TEAMS instrument on the FAST spacecraft to construct a picture of ion upflow from these regions as a function of substorm size and as a function of time relative to substorm onset. We use data taken during solar minimum in the northern hemisphere between December 1996 and February 1997. We find that the total nightside auroral zone ion outflow rate (averaged over substorm phase) depends on the size of the substorm, increasing by about a factor of 10 for both O+ and H+ from the smallest to the largest substorms in our study. The combined outflow rate from both the polar cap and the nightside auroral zone goes up by a factor of 7 for both ions for the same change in conditions. Regardless of storm size, the nightside auroral zone outflow rate increases by about a factor of 2 after onset, reaching its peak level after about 20 min. These results indicate that the change in the nightside auroral zone ion outflow rate that accompanies substorm onset is not as significant as the change from low to high magnetic activity. As a consequence, the prompt increase in the near earth plasma sheet energy density of O+ and H+ ions that accompanies onset [, 1996] is likely due to local energization of ions already present rather than to the sudden arrival and energization of fresh ionospheric plasma.

  17. Locating the Polar Cap Boundary of Postnoon Sector from Observations of 630.0 nm Auroral Emission at Zhongshan Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We studied the ground observations of 630. 0 nm auroral emission at Zhongshan Station to de-termine the polar cap boundary with the latitudinal profile of emission intensity. The open-closed field lineboundary is assumed to lie at the boundary between polar rain and plasma sheet precipitation. We assumethat nonprecipitation-dependent sources of 630. 0 nm emission cause a spatially uniform luminosity in thepolar cap and that auroral zone luminosity is also spatially uniform. Therefore we determine the locationof the polar cap boundary of postnoon sector from the auroral emission data each time by finding the bestfit of the observations to a step function in latitude and we produce a time series of the location of the polarcap boundary. The average error of the practice in the paper is less than 0. 8 degree.

  18. XMM-Newton Observations of Four Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.

    2005-01-01

    I present an analysis of the XMM-Newton observations of four millisecond pulsars, J0437-4715, J2124-3358, J1024-0719, and J0034-0534. The new data provide strong evidence of thermal emission in the X-ray flux detected from the first three objects. This thermal component is best interpreted as radiation from pulsar polar caps covered with a nonmagnetic hydrogen atmosphere. A nonthermal power-law component, dominating at energies E greater than or equal to 3 keV, can also be present in the detected X-ray emission. For PSR J0437-4715, the timing analysis reveals that the shape and pulsed fraction of the pulsar light curves are energy dependent. This, together with the results obtained from the phase-resolved spectroscopy, supports the two-component (thermal plus nonthermal) interpretation of the pulsar's X-ray radiation. Highly significant pulsations have been found in the X-ray flux of PSRs 52124-3358 and 51024-0719. For PSR 50034-0534, a possible X-ray counterpart of the radio pulsar has been suggested. The inferred properties of the detected thermal emission are compared with predictions of radio pulsar models.

  19. The response of ionospheric convection in the polar cap to substorm activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lester

    Full Text Available We report multi-instrument observations during an isolated substorm on 17 October 1989. The EISCAT radar operated in the SP-UK-POLI mode measuring ionospheric convection at latitudes 71°λ-78°λ. SAMNET and the EISCAT Magnetometer Cross provide information on the timing of substorm expansion phase onset and subsequent intensifications, as well as the location of the field aligned and ionospheric currents associated with the substorm current wedge. IMP-8 magnetic field data are also included. Evidence of a substorm growth phase is provided by the equatorward motion of a flow reversal boundary across the EISCAT radar field of view at 2130 MLT, following a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. We infer that the polar cap expanded as a result of the addition of open magnetic flux to the tail lobes during this interval. The flow reversal boundary, which is a lower limit to the polar cap boundary, reached an invariant latitude equatorward of 71°λ by the time of the expansion phase onset. A westward electrojet, centred at 65.4°λ, occurred at the onset of the expansion phase. This electrojet subsequently moved poleward to a maximum of 68.1°λ at 2000 UT and also widened. During the expansion phase, there is evidence of bursts of plasma flow which are spatially localised at longitudes within the substorm current wedge and which occurred well poleward of the westward electrojet. We conclude that the substorm onset region in the ionosphere, defined by the westward electrojet, mapped to a part of the tail radially earthward of the boundary between open and closed magnetic flux, the "distant" neutral line. Thus the substorm was not initiated at the distant neutral line, although there is evidence that it remained active during the expansion phase. It is not obvious whether the electrojet mapped to a near-Earth neutral line, but at its most poleward, the expanded electrojet does not reach the estimated latitude of the polar cap

  20. EISCAT and Cluster observations in the vicinity of the dynamical polar cap boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Aikio

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the polar cap boundary and auroral oval in the nightside ionosphere are studied during late expansion and recovery of a substorm from the region between Tromsø (66.6° cgmLat and Longyearbyen (75.2° cgmLat on 27 February 2004 by using the coordinated EISCAT incoherent scatter radar, MIRACLE magnetometer and Cluster satellite measurements. During the late substorm expansion/early recovery phase, the polar cap boundary (PCB made zig-zag-type motion with amplitude of 2.5° cgmLat and period of about 30 min near magnetic midnight. We suggest that the poleward motions of the PCB were produced by bursts of enhanced reconnection at the near-Earth neutral line (NENL. The subsequent equatorward motions of the PCB would then represent the recovery of the merging line towards the equilibrium state (Cowley and Lockwood, 1992. The observed bursts of enhanced westward electrojet just equatorward of the polar cap boundary during poleward expansions were produced plausibly by particles accelerated in the vicinity of the neutral line and thus lend evidence to the Cowley-Lockwood paradigm.

    During the substorm recovery phase, the footpoints of the Cluster satellites at a geocentric distance of 4.4 RE mapped in the vicinity of EISCAT measurements. Cluster data indicate that outflow of H+ and O+ ions took place within the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL as noted in some earlier studies as well. We show that in this case the PSBL corresponded to a region of enhanced electron temperature in the ionospheric F region. It is suggested that the ion outflow originates from the F region as a result of increased ambipolar diffusion. At higher altitudes, the ions could be further energized by waves, which at Cluster altitudes were observed as BBELF (broad band extra low frequency fluctuations.

    The four-satellite configuration of Cluster revealed a sudden poleward expansion of the PSBL by 2° during

  1. Field-aligned currents in the dayside cusp and polar cap region during northward IMF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Moretto, T.; Olsen, Nils

    2002-01-01

    [1] The field-aligned currents in the dayside cusp and polar cap region are examined using magnetic data from the low-altitude polar-orbiting satellite Orsted. The study is confined to cases where the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) has a steady northward component and to a rather narrow region...... spanning similar to 4 hours around magnetic noon. We examine individual passes using a maximum variance analysis method, and we complement, for a single event, with ground-based data from the Greenland meridian chain of magnetometers. We suggest that when an east-west component B-y of the IMF exists...... for positive IMF B-z, the two NBZ (northward B-z) field-aligned currents that prevail over the polar region rotate to form the two field-aligned currents equatorward and poleward of the east-west flowing ionospheric DPY current in the dayside. The high accuracy of the Orsted data makes it possible to uncover...

  2. Modelling the light curves of Fermi LAT millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Venter, C; Harding, AK; Grove, JE

    2014-01-01

    We modelled the radio and gamma-ray light curves of millisecond pulsars using outer gap, two-pole caustic, low-altitude slot gap, and pair-starved polar cap geometric models, combined with a semi-empirical conal radio model. We find that no model fits all cases, with the outer gap and two-pole caustic models providing best fits for comparable numbers of millisecond pulsar light curves. We find a broad distribution of best-fit inclination angles as well as a clustering at large observer angles. The outer gap model furthermore seems to require relatively larger inclination angles, while the two-pole caustic model hints at an inverse trend between inclination angle and pulsar spin-down luminosity.

  3. Interannual observations and quantification of summertime H2O ice deposition on the Martian CO2 ice south polar cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adrian J.; Piqueux, Sylvain; Titus, Timothy N.

    2014-01-01

    The spectral signature of water ice was observed on Martian south polar cap in 2004 by the Observatoire pour l'Mineralogie, l'Eau les Glaces et l'Activite (OMEGA) ( Bibring et al., 2004). Three years later, the OMEGA instrument was used to discover water ice deposited during southern summer on the polar cap ( Langevin et al., 2007). However, temporal and spatial variations of these water ice signatures have remained unexplored, and the origins of these water deposits remains an important scientific question. To investigate this question, we have used observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft of the southern cap during austral summer over four Martian years to search for variations in the amount of water ice. We report below that for each year we have observed the cap, the magnitude of the H2O ice signature on the southern cap has risen steadily throughout summer, particularly on the west end of the cap. The spatial extent of deposition is in disagreement with the current best simulations of deposition of water ice on the south polar cap (Montmessin et al., 2007). This increase in water ice signatures is most likely caused by deposition of atmospheric H2O ice and a set of unusual conditions makes the quantification of this transport flux using CRISM close to ideal. We calculate a ‘minimum apparent‘ amount of deposition corresponding to a thin H2O ice layer of 0.2 mm (with 70% porosity). This amount of H2O ice deposition is 0.6–6% of the total Martian atmospheric water budget. We compare our ‘minimum apparent’ quantification with previous estimates. This deposition process may also have implications for the formation and stability of the southern CO2 ice cap, and therefore play a significant role in the climate budget of modern day Mars.

  4. Combined ESR and EISCAT observations of the dayside polar cap and auroral oval during the May 15, 1997 storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Liu

    Full Text Available The high-latitude ionospheric response to a major magnetic storm on May 15, 1997 is studied and different responses in the polar cap and the auroral oval are highlighted. Depletion of the F2 region electron density occurred in both the polar cap and the auroral zone, but due to different physical processes. The increased recombination rate of O+ ions caused by a strong electric field played a crucial role in the auroral zone. The transport effect, however, especially the strong upward ion flow was also of great importance in the dayside polar cap. During the main phase and the beginning of the recovery phase soft particle precipitation in the polar cap showed a clear relation to the dynamic pressure of the solar wind, with a maximum cross-correlation coefficient of 0.63 at a time lag of 5 min.

    Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; polar ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (storms and substorms

  5. Magnetospheric structure of rotation powered pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arons, J. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA) California Univ., Livermore, CA (USA). Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics)

    1991-01-07

    I survey recent theoretical work on the structure of the magnetospheres of rotation powered pulsars, within the observational constraints set by their observed spindown, their ability to power synchrotron nebulae and their ability to produce beamed collective radio emission, while putting only a small fraction of their energy into incoherent X- and gamma radiation. I find no single theory has yet given a consistent description of the magnetosphere, but I conclude that models based on a dense outflow of pairs from the polar caps, permeated by a lower density flow of heavy ions, are the most promising avenue for future research. 106 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Palmer Quest: A Feasible Nuclear Fission "Vision Mission" to the Mars Polar Caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsey, F. D.; Beegle, L. W.; Nakagawa, R.; Elliott, J. O.; Matthews, J. B.; Coleman, M. L.; Hecht, M. H.; Ivaniov, A. B.; Head, J. W.; Milkovich, S.

    2005-01-01

    We are engaged in a NASA Vision Mission study, called Palmer Quest after the American Antarctic explorer Nathaniel Palmer, to assess the presence of life and evaluate the habitability of the basal domain of the Mars polar caps. We address this goal through four objectives: 1. Determine the presence of amino acids, nutrients, and geochemical heterogeneity in the ice sheet. 2. Quantify and characterize the provenance of the amino acids in Mars ice. 3. Assess the stratification of outcropped units for indications of habitable zones. 4. Determine the accumulation of ice, mineralogic material, and amino acids in Mars ice caps over the present epoch. Because of the defined scientific goal for the vision mission, the Palmer Quest focus is astrobiological; however, the results of the study make us optimistic that aggressive multi-platform in-situ missions that address a wide range of objectives, such as climate change, can be supported by variations of the approach used on this mission. Mission Overview: The Palmer Quest baseline

  7. Pitting within the Martian South Polar Residual Cap: Evidence for Pressurized Subsurface Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, A.; Ingersoll, A.; Titus, T.; Byrne, S.

    2005-12-01

    We present observations of small-scale pitting within the Swiss cheese terrain of the carbon dioxide South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC) and consider the implications of their rapid cascade-like evolution. We show that such pitting cascades: (1) only occur near the walls of thick Swiss cheese mesas; (2) rarely occur in polygonally-cracked mesas; and (3) occur far more often in Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Years 2 and 3 than in MGS Year 1. We propose that pitting results from depressurization of a sealed layer, which requires subsurface heating that cannot be presently maintained by lateral heat conduction. Instead, we attribute the pressurization and heating implied by pitting to a solid state greenhouse initiated by the recent formation of slab CO2 ice during the southern spring and summer of MGS Year 1, which we show is consistent with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) 25-micron band depth measurements of the SPRC over the last three Mars years.

  8. Stratigraphy and evolution of the buried CO2 deposit in the Martian south polar cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierson, C. J.; Phillips, R. J.; Smith, I. B.; Wood, S. E.; Putzig, N. E.; Nunes, D.; Byrne, S.

    2016-05-01

    Observations by the Shallow Radar instrument on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveal several deposits of buried CO2 ice within the south polar layered deposits. Here we present mapping that demonstrates this unit is 18% larger than previously estimated, containing enough mass to double the atmospheric pressure on Mars if sublimated. We find three distinct subunits of CO2 ice, each capped by a thin (10-60 m) bounding layer (BL). Multiple lines of evidence suggest that each BL is dominated by water ice. We model the history of CO2 accumulation at the poles based on obliquity and insolation variability during the last 1 Myr assuming a total mass budget consisting of the current atmosphere and the sequestered ice. Our model predicts that CO2 ice has accumulated over large areas several times during that period, in agreement with the radar findings of multiple periods of accumulation.

  9. Variations in Surface Texture of the North Polar Residual Cap of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkovich, S. M.; Byrne, S.; Russell, P. S.

    2011-01-01

    The northern polar residual cap (NPRC) of Mars is a water ice deposit with a rough surface made up of pits, knobs, and linear depressions on scales of tens of meters. This roughness manifests as a series of bright mounds and dark hollows in visible images; these bright and dark patches have a characteristic wavelength and orientation. Spectral data indicate that the surface of the NPRC is composed of large-grained (and therefore old) water ice. Due to the presence of this old ice, it is thought that the NPRC is in a current state of net loss of material a result potentially at odds with impact crater statistics, which suggest ongoing deposition over the past 10-20 Kyr.

  10. Variations in Surface Texture of the North Polar Residual Cap of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkovich, S. M.; Byrne, S.; Russell, P. S.

    2011-01-01

    The northern polar residual cap (NPRC) of Mars is a water ice deposit with a rough surface made up of pits, knobs, and linear depressions on scales of tens of meters. This roughness manifests as a series of bright mounds and dark hollows in visible images; these bright and dark patches have a characteristic wavelength and orientation. Spectral data indicate that the surface of the NPRC is composed of large-grained (and therefore old) water ice. Due to the presence of this old ice, it is thought that the NPRC is in a current state of net loss of material a result potentially at odds with impact crater statistics, which suggest ongoing deposition over the past 10-20 Kyr.

  11. Arecibo radar imagery of Mars: II. Chryse-Xanthe, polar caps, and other regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, John K.; Nolan, Michael C.

    2017-01-01

    other ice processes in the dichotomy boundary region. The first delay-Doppler images of the radar-bright features from the north and south polar icecaps are presented. Both poles show the circular polarization inversion and high reflectivity characteristic of coherent volume backscatter from relatively clean ice. The south polar feature is primarily backscatter from the residual CO2 icecap (with a lesser contribution from the polar layered deposits), whose finite optical depth probably accounts for the feature's strong S/X-band wavelength dependence. Conversely, the north polar radar feature appears to be mostly backscatter from the H2O-ice-rich polar layered deposits rather than from the thin residual H2O cap. The north polar region shows additional radar-bright features from Korolev Crater and a few other outlying circumpolar ice deposits.

  12. Transients in oxygen outflow above the polar cap as observed by the Cluster spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, H.; Waara, M. [Swedish Inst. of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden); Marghitu, O. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany); Inst. for Space Sciences, Bucharest (RO)] (and others)

    2008-07-01

    Oxygen ion outflow associated with the cusp and cleft give rise to persistent oxygen ion beams which can be observed over the polar cap. For high altitude spacecraft such as Cluster these beams are often observed for several hours on each occasion. This allows for a study of typical temporal structures on the time scale of minutes. We have used 3 years of data from spring, January to May of years 2001 to 2003, for a study of the oxygen number flux variation in the polar cap ion outflow. The source of these oxygen ion beams is the cusp and cleft, and variations in ionospheric upflow on time scales of around 8 min have been reported from ground based studies using incoherent scatter radar. Such upflows typically do not reach escape velocity, and further energization above the ionosphere is required for outflow to occur. Our study shows that a typical time scale between sudden number flux enhancements observed by Cluster in a geocentric distance range of 5 R{sub E} to 12 R{sub E} is 5 to 10 min. A superposed epoch study does not reveal any significant convection velocity or temperature changes around the flux enhancement events. Sudden temperature enhancements occur with a typical time interval of about 4 min, A superposed epoch study does not reveal any number flux enhancements associated with the temperature enhancements. The clear modulation of the high altitude number flux in a manner which resembles the modulation of the ionospheric upflow indicates that this is the main limiting factor determining the total outflow. The process behind transient upflow events in the ionosphere is therefore important for the total ionospheric outflow. Subsequent h (orig.)

  13. A polar cap absorption model optimization based on the vertical ionograms analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaalov, N. Y.; Moskaleva, E. V.

    2016-11-01

    Space weather events significantly affect the high frequency (HF) radio wave propagation. The now-casting and forecasting of HF radio wave absorption is important for the HF communication industries. This paper assimilates vertical sounding data into an absorption model to improve its performance as a now-casting tool. The approach is a modification of the algorithm elaborated by Sauer and Wilkinson, which is based on the riometer data. The optimization is focused on accounting for short timescale variation of the absorption. It should be noted that the expression of the frequency dependence of absorption induced by the energetic particle precipitation employed in Sauer and Wilkinson model is based on the riometer data at frequencies of 20, 30, and 50 MHz. The approach suggested in this paper provides an opportunity for expanding the frequency dependence of the absorption for frequencies below 10 MHz. The simulation of the vertical ionograms in the polar cap region uses a computational model designed to overcome the high frequency wave propagation problem in high latitude of the Earth. HF radio wave absorption induced by solar UV illumination, X-ray flares and energetic particles precipitation is taken into consideration in our model. The absorption caused by the energetic particle precipitation is emphasized, because the study is focused on HF wave propagation in polar cap region. A comparison of observed and simulated vertical ionograms enables the coefficients, which relate absorption (day-time and night-time) to integral proton flux to be refined. The values of these coefficients determined from evaluation of the data recorded by any reliable ionosonde are valid for absorption calculation in high-latitude region.

  14. Interannual observations and quantification of summertime H2O ice deposition on the Martian CO2 ice south polar cap

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adrian J; Titus, Timothy N

    2014-01-01

    The spectral signature of water ice was observed on Martian south polar cap in 2004 by the Observatoire pour l'Mineralogie, l'Eau les Glaces et l'Activite (OMEGA) (Bibring et al., 2004). Three years later, the OMEGA instrument was used to discover water ice deposited during southern summer on the polar cap (Langevin et al., 2007). However, temporal and spatial variations of these water ice signatures have remained unexplored, and the origins of these water deposits remains an important scientific question. To investigate this question, we have used observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft of the southern cap during austral summer over four Martian years to search for variations in the amount of water ice. We report below that for each year we have observed the cap, the magnitude of the H2O ice signature on the southern cap has risen steadily throughout summer, particularly on the west end of the cap. The s...

  15. Identifying Surface Changes on HRSC Images of the Mars South Polar Residual CAP (sprc)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Alfiah Rizky Diana; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2016-06-01

    The surface of Mars has been an object of interest for planetary research since the launch of Mariner 4 in 1964. Since then different cameras such as the Viking Visual Imaging Subsystem (VIS), Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) have been imaging its surface at ever higher resolution. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on board of the European Space Agency (ESA) Mars Express, has been imaging the Martian surface, since 25th December 2003 until the present-day. HRSC has covered 100 % of the surface of Mars, about 70 % of the surface with panchromatic images at 10-20 m/pixel, and about 98 % at better than 100 m/pixel (Neukum et. al., 2004), including the polar regions of Mars. The Mars polar regions have been studied intensively recently by analysing images taken by the Mars Express and MRO missions (Plaut et al., 2007). The South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC) does not change very much in volume overall but there are numerous examples of dynamic phenomena associated with seasonal changes in the atmosphere. In particular, we can examine the time variation of layers of solid carbon dioxide and water ice with dust deposition (Bibring, 2004), spider-like channels (Piqueux et al., 2003) and so-called Swiss Cheese Terrain (Titus et al., 2004). Because of seasonal changes each Martian year, due to the sublimation and deposition of water and CO2 ice on the Martian south polar region, clearly identifiable surface changes occur in otherwise permanently icy region. In this research, good quality HRSC images of the Mars South Polar region are processed based on previous identification as the optimal coverage of clear surfaces (Campbell et al., 2015). HRSC images of the Martian South Pole are categorized in terms of quality, time, and location to find overlapping areas, processed into high quality Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) and

  16. IDENTIFYING SURFACE CHANGES ON HRSC IMAGES OF THE MARS SOUTH POLAR RESIDUAL CAP (SPRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. D. Putri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The surface of Mars has been an object of interest for planetary research since the launch of Mariner 4 in 1964. Since then different cameras such as the Viking Visual Imaging Subsystem (VIS, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO Context Camera (CTX and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE have been imaging its surface at ever higher resolution. The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC on board of the European Space Agency (ESA Mars Express, has been imaging the Martian surface, since 25th December 2003 until the present-day. HRSC has covered 100 % of the surface of Mars, about 70 % of the surface with panchromatic images at 10-20 m/pixel, and about 98 % at better than 100 m/pixel (Neukum et. al., 2004, including the polar regions of Mars. The Mars polar regions have been studied intensively recently by analysing images taken by the Mars Express and MRO missions (Plaut et al., 2007. The South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC does not change very much in volume overall but there are numerous examples of dynamic phenomena associated with seasonal changes in the atmosphere. In particular, we can examine the time variation of layers of solid carbon dioxide and water ice with dust deposition (Bibring, 2004, spider-like channels (Piqueux et al., 2003 and so-called Swiss Cheese Terrain (Titus et al., 2004. Because of seasonal changes each Martian year, due to the sublimation and deposition of water and CO2 ice on the Martian south polar region, clearly identifiable surface changes occur in otherwise permanently icy region. In this research, good quality HRSC images of the Mars South Polar region are processed based on previous identification as the optimal coverage of clear surfaces (Campbell et al., 2015. HRSC images of the Martian South Pole are categorized in terms of quality, time, and location to find overlapping areas, processed into high quality Digital Terrain Models (DTMs and

  17. Non-covalent synthesis of calix[4]arene-capped porphyrins in polar solvents via ionic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiammengo, Roberto; Timmerman, Peter; Huskens, Jurriaan; Versluis, Kees; Heck, Albert J.R.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2002-01-01

    Non-covalent synthesis of calix[4]arene capped porphyrins can be achieved in polar solvents (up to 45% molar fraction of water) via ionic interaction. Thus tetracationic meso-tetrakis(N-alkylpyridinium-3-yl) porphyrins 1a–d and tetra anionic 25,26,27,28-tetrakis(2-ethoxyethoxy)-calix[4]arene tetrasu

  18. Dayside and nightside contributions to cross-polar cap potential variations: the 20 March 2001 ICME case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Andalsvik

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the association between temporal-spatial structure of polar cap convection and auroral electrojet intensifications during a 5-h-long interval of strong forcing of the magnetosphere by an ICME/Magnetic cloud on 20 March 2001. We use data from coordinated ground-satellite observations in the 15:00–20:00 MLT sector. We take advantage of the good latitudinal coverage in the polar cap and in the auroral zone of the IMAGE chain of ground magnetometers in Svalbard – Scandinavia – Russia and the stable magnetic field conditions in ICMEs. The electrojet events are characterized by a sequence of 10 min-long AL excursions to −1000/−1500 nT followed by poleward expansions and auroral streamers. These events are superimposed on a high disturbance level when the AL index remains around −500 nT for several hours. These signatures are different from those appearing in classical substorms, most notably the absence of a complete recovery phase when AL usually reaches above −100 nT. We concentrate on polar cap convection in both hemispheres (DMSP F13 data in relation to the ICME By conditions, electrojet intensifications, and the global UV auroral configuration obtained from the IMAGE spacecraft. The temporal evolution of convection properties such as the cross-polar cap potential (CPCP drop and flow channels at the dawn/dusk polar cap (PC boundaries around the time of the electrojet events are investigated. This approach allows us to distinguish between dayside (magnetopause reconnection and nightside (magnetotail reconnection sources of the PC convection events within the context of the expanding-contracting model of high-latitude convection in the Dungey cycle. Inter-hemispheric symmetries/asymmetries in the presence of newly-discovered convection channels at the dawn or dusk side PC boundaries are determined.

  19. A Sublimation Model for the Martian Polar Swiss-Cheese Features. Observational and Modeling Studies of the South Polar Residual Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Shane; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2002-01-01

    In their pioneering work Leighton and Murray argued that the Mars atmosphere, which is 95 percent CO2 today, is controlled by vapor equilibrium with a much larger polar reservoir of solid CO2. Here we argue that the polar reservoir is small and cannot function as a long-term buffer to the more massive atmosphere. Our work is based on modeling the circular depressions (Swiss-cheese features) in the south polar cap. We argue that a solid CO2 layer approximately 8 meters thick is being etched away to reveal water ice underneath. Preliminary results from the THEMIS (Thermal Emission Imaging System) instrument seem to confirm our model.

  20. Dayside and nightside contributions to the cross polar cap potential: placing an upper limit on a viscous-like interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations of changes in size of the ionospheric polar cap allow the dayside and nightside reconnection rates to be quantified. From these it is straightforward to estimate the rate of antisunward transport of magnetic flux across the polar regions, quantified by the cross polar cap potential ΦPC. When correlated with upstream measurements of the north-south component of the IMF, ΦPC is found to increase for more negative Bz, as expected. However, we also find that ΦPC does not, on average, decrease to zero, even for strongly northward IMF. In the past this has been interpreted as evidence for a viscous interaction between the magnetosheath flow and the outer boundaries of the magnetosphere. In contrast, we show that this is the consequence of flows excited by tail reconnection, which is inherently uncorrelated with IMF Bz.

  1. RADIO POLARIZATION OBSERVATIONS OF THE SNAIL: A CRUSHED PULSAR WIND NEBULA IN G327.1–1.1 WITH A HIGHLY ORDERED MAGNETIC FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Y. K.; Ng, C.-Y. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Bucciantini, N. [INAF—Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, L.go E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Slane, P. O. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gaensler, B. M. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Temim, T., E-mail: ncy@bohr.physics.hku.hk [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are suggested to be acceleration sites of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. While the magnetic field plays an important role in the acceleration process, previous observations of magnetic field configurations of PWNe are rare, particularly for evolved systems. We present a radio polarization study of the “Snail” PWN inside the supernova remnant G327.1−1.1 using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This PWN is believed to have been recently crushed by the supernova (SN) reverse shock. The radio morphology is composed of a main circular body with a finger-like protrusion. We detected a strong linear polarization signal from the emission, which reflects a highly ordered magnetic field in the PWN and is in contrast to the turbulent environment with a tangled magnetic field generally expected from hydrodynamical simulations. This could suggest that the characteristic turbulence scale is larger than the radio beam size. We built a toy model to explore this possibility, and found that a simulated PWN with a turbulence scale of about one-eighth to one-sixth of the nebula radius and a pulsar wind filling factor of 50%–75% provides the best match to observations. This implies substantial mixing between the SN ejecta and pulsar wind material in this system.

  2. Study of the Polarization Properties of the Crab Nebula and Pulsar with BATSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, David J.; Vestrand, W. T.; McConnell, Mark

    1997-01-01

    Activities carried out under this proposal included: 1) development and refinements of Monte Carlo simulations of the atmospheric reflected albedo hard x-ray emissions, both unpolarized and polarized, 2) modeling and simulations of the off-axis response of the BATSE LAD detectors, and 3) comparison of our simulation results with numerous BATSE flare and cosmic burst data sets.

  3. The Structure of Galactic Gas at High Latitudes: The Southern Polar Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosachinskii, I. V.; Il'in, G. N.; Prozorov, V. A.

    2004-04-01

    We analyze the angular structure of the 21-cm interstellar neutral hydrogen emission at six and seven declinations in the northern (published previously) and southern polar caps of the Galaxy (Galactic latitudes from -40 deg to -90 deg), respectively, with an extent of 90 deg in right ascension. The RATAN-600 radio telescope has a beam width averaged over these regions of 2.0' x 30'. One-dimensional power spectra for the angular distribution of interstellar neutral hydrogen emission were computed in each 6.3-km/s-wide spectral channel by using the standard Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) code and were smoothed over 1 hour in right ascension. The Galactic latitude dependence of the mean parameters for the sky distribution of H I line emission at high latitudes was found to correspond to the distribution of gas in the form of a flat layer only in the northern region, while in the southern cap, the gas distribution is much less regular. In addition, the mean H I radial velocities are negative everywhere (-3.7 +/- 3.0 km/s in the north and -6.0+/-2.4 km/s in the south). The power spectra of the angular fluctuations in the range of angular periods from 10' to 6 deg appear as power laws. However, the spectral indices change greatly over the sky: from -3 to -1.2; on average, as the Galactic latitude increases and the H I column density decreases, the fluctuation spectrum of the interstellar gas emission becomes flatter. In the northern polar region, this behavior is much more pronounced, which probably stems from the fact that the gas column density in the south is generally a factor of 2 or 3 higher than that in the north. Therefore, the spectra are, on average, also steeper in the south, but the dependence on Galactic latitude is weaker. Using simulations, we show that the observed power-law spectrum of the H I emission distribution can be obtained in terms of not only a turbulent, but also a cloud model of interstellar gas if we use our previous spectra of the diameters

  4. Band engineering in a van der Waals heterostructure using a 2D polar material and a capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Beom; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2016-06-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures are expected to play a key role in next-generation electronic and optoelectronic devices. In this study, the band alignment of a vdW heterostructure with 2D polar materials was studied using first-principles calculations. As a model case study, single-sided fluorographene (a 2D polar material) on insulating (h-BN) and metallic (graphite) substrates was investigated to understand the band alignment behavior of polar materials. Single-sided fluorographene was found to have a potential difference along the out-of-plane direction. This potential difference provided as built-in potential at the interface, which shift the band alignment between h-BN and graphite. The interface characteristics were highly dependent on the interface terminations because of this built-in potential. Interestingly, this band alignment can be modified with a capping layer of graphene or BN because the capping layer triggered electronic reconstruction near the interface. This is because the bonding nature is not covalent, but van der Waals, which made it possible to avoid Fermi-level pinning at the interface. The results of this study showed that diverse types of band alignment can be achieved using polar materials and an appropriate capping layer.

  5. Regimes of Pulsar Pair Formation and Particle Energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K; Muslimov, A G; Harding, Alice K.; Zhang, Alexander G. Muslimov & Bing

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the conditions required for the production of electron-positron pairs above a pulsar polar cap (PC) and the influence of pair production on the energetics of the primary particle acceleration. Assuming space-charge limited flow acceleration including the inertial frame-dragging effect, we allow both one-photon and two-photon pair production by either curvature radiation (CR) photons or photons resulting from inverse-Compton scattering of thermal photons from the PC by primary electrons. We find that, while only the younger pulsars can produce pairs through CR, nearly all known radio pulsars are capable of producing pairs through non-resonant inverse-Compton scatterings. The effect of the neutron star equations of state on the pair death lines is explored. We show that pair production is facilitated in more compact stars and more massive stars. Therefore accretion of mass by pulsars in binary systems may allow pair production in most of the millisecond pulsar population. We also find that two-ph...

  6. Dependence of the cross polar cap potential saturation on the type of solar wind streams

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolaeva, N S; Lodkina, I G

    2013-01-01

    We compare of the cross polar cap potential (CPCP) saturation during magnetic storms induced by various types of the solar wind drivers. By using the model of Siscoe-Hill \\citep{Hilletal1976,Siscoeetal2002a,Siscoeetal2002b,Siscoeetal2004,Siscoe2011} we evaluate criteria of the CPCP saturation during the main phases of 257 magnetic storms ($Dst_{min} \\le -50$ nT) induced by the following types of the solar wind streams: magnetic clouds (MC), Ejecta, the compress region Sheath before MC ($Sh_{MC}$) and before Ejecta ($Sh_{E}$), corotating interaction regions (CIR) and indeterminate type (IND). Our analysis shows that occurrence rate of the CPCP saturation is higher for storms induced by ICME ($13.2%$) than for storms driven by CIR ($3.5%$) or by IND ($3.5%$).The CPCP saturation was obtained more often for storms initiated by MC ($25%$) than by Ejecta ($2.9%$); it was obtained for $8.6%$ of magnetic storms induced by sum of MC and Ejecta, and for $21.5%$ magnetic storms induced by Sheath before them (sum of $Sh_...

  7. Planck intermediate results. XLIV. The structure of the Galactic magnetic field from dust polarization maps of the southern Galactic cap

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Arzoumanian, D; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Ballardini, M; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Basak, S; Benabed, K; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bracco, A; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Chiang, H C; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Di Valentino, E; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Dusini, S; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Fantaye, Y; Ferrière, K; Finelli, F; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frolov, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Gerbino, M; Ghosh, T; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hivon, E; Huang, Z; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Langer, M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Jeune, M Le; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Matarrese, S; Mauri, N; McEwen, J D; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Molinari, D; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Moss, A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Neveu, J; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Oppermann, N; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Plaszczynski, S; Polenta, G; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Ruiz-Granados, B; Salvati, L; Sandri, M; Savelainen, M; Scott, D; Sirignano, C; Soler, J D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Tenti, M; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Trombetti, T; Valiviita, J; Vansyngel, F; Van Tent, F; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2016-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of interstellar dust polarization at high Galactic latitude, using the Stokes parameter Planck maps at 353 GHz. Our aim is to advance the understanding of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM), and to provide a model of the polarized dust foreground for cosmic microwave background component-separation procedures. Focusing on the southern Galactic cap, we examine the statistical distributions of the polarization fraction ($p$) and angle ($\\psi$) to characterize the ordered and turbulent components of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF) in the solar neighbourhood. We relate patterns at large angular scales in polarization to the orientation of the mean (ordered) GMF towards Galactic coordinates $(l_0,b_0)=(70^\\circ \\pm 5^\\circ,24^\\circ \\pm 5^\\circ)$. The histogram of $p$ shows a wide dispersion up to 25 %. The histogram of $\\psi$ has a standard deviation of $12^\\circ$ about the regular pattern expected from the ordered GMF. We use these histograms to build a phenomenological...

  8. A multi-component Langmuir-mode source for the observed pulsar coherent emission

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, P B

    2015-01-01

    Several classes of neutron star are sources of coherent emission at frequencies of 10^2 - 10^3 MHz: others are radio-quiet. The primary emission spectra are broadly universal in form over many orders of magnitude in rotation period and polar-cap magnetic flux density. The existence of nulls and mode-changes in some radio-loud pulsars can be understood only as a manifestation of magnetospherical bistability. An ion-proton plasma with a possible background of electron-positron pairs is formed at the polar caps of stars with positive corotational charge density and is shown here to be a physical basis for the presence or absence of coherent emission and a likely reason why bistability may be present in the later stages of a pulsar lifetime.

  9. Spatial, temporal, and inter-annual variability of the Martian northern seasonal polar cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Christopher P.

    Earth and Mars have nearly the same axial tilt, so seasons on these two bodies progress in a similar manner. During fall and winter on Mars, the primarily CO2 atmosphere (~95% by volume) condenses out onto the poles as ice. Approximately 25% of the entire Martian atmosphere condenses, and then sublimes in the spring, making this cycle a dominant driver in the global climate. Because the water and dust cycles are coupled to this CO2 cycle, we must examine seasonal CO2 processes to understand the global (seasonal) distribution of H2O on Mars. The density of the ice may indicate whether it condensed in the atmosphere and precipitated as "snow" or condensed directly onto the surface as "slab". Variations in density may be controlled by geographic location and surface morphology. The distribution and variations in densities of seasonal deposits on the Martian poles gives us insight to the planet's volatile inventories. Here we analyze density variations over time on Mars' Northern Polar Seasonal Cap (NPSC) using observational data and energy balance techniques. We calculate the bulk density of surface CO2 ice by dividing the column mass abundance (the mass of CO2 per unit area) by the depth of the ice cap at a given location. We use seasonal rock shadow measurements from High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images to estimate ice depth. The length of a rock's shadow is related to its height through the solar incidence angle and the slope of the ground. From differences in the height of a rock measured in icy vs. ice-free images, we estimate the depth of surface ice at the time of the icy observation. Averaging over many rocks in a region yields the ice depth for that region. This technique yields minimums for ice depth and therefore maximums for density. Thermal properties of rocks may play an important role in observed ice depths. Crowns of ice may form on the tops of rocks with insufficient heat capacity to inhibit ice condensation, and may cause an

  10. On determining the noon polar cap boundary from SuperDARN HF radar backscatter characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pinnock

    Full Text Available Previous work has shown that ionospheric HF radar backscatter in the noon sector can be used to locate the footprint of the magnetospheric cusp particle precipitation. This has enabled the radar data to be used as a proxy for the location of the polar cap boundary, and hence measure the flow of plasma across it to derive the reconnection electric field in the ionosphere. This work used only single radar data sets with a field of view limited to ~2 h of local time. In this case study using four of the SuperDARN radars, we examine the boundary determined over 6 h of magnetic local time around the noon sector and its relationship to the convection pattern. The variation with longitude of the latitude of the radar scatter with cusp characteristics shows a bay-like feature. It is shown that this feature is shaped by the variation with longitude of the poleward flow component of the ionospheric plasma and may be understood in terms of cusp ion time-of-flight effects. Using this interpretation, we derive the time-of-flight of the cusp ions and find that it is consistent with approximately 1 keV ions injected from a subsolar reconnection site. A method for deriving a more accurate estimate of the location of the open-closed field line boundary from HF radar data is described.

    Key words: Ionosphere (ionosphere–magnetosphere interactions; plasma convection · Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause · cusp · and boundary layers

  11. Polar cap absorption events of November 2001 at Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Perrone

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Polar cap absorption (PCA events recorded during November 2001 are investigated by observations of ionospheric absorption of a 30MHz riometer installed at Terra Nova Bay (Antarctica, and of solar proton flux, monitored by the NOAA-GOES8 satellite in geo-synchronous orbit. During this period three solar proton events (SPE on 4, 19 and 23 November occurred. Two of these are among the dozen most intense events since 1954 and during the current solar cycle (23rd, the event of 4 November shows the greatest proton flux at energies >10MeV. Many factors contribute to the peak intensity of the two SPE biggest events, one is the Coronal Mass Ejection (CME speed, other factors are the ambient population of SPE and the shock front due to the CME. During these events absorption peaks of several dB (~20dB are observed at Terra Nova Bay, tens of minutes after the impact of fast halo CMEs on the geomagnetic field.

    Results of a cross-correlation analysis show that the first hour of absorption is mainly produced by 84–500MeV protons in the case of the 4 November event and by 15–44MeV protons for the event of 23 November, whereas in the entire event the contribution to the absorption is due chiefly to 4.2–82MeV (4 November and by 4.2–14.5MeV (23 November. Good agreement is generally obtained between observed and calculated absorption by the empirical flux-absorption relationship for threshold energy E0=10MeV. From the residuals one can argue that other factors (e.g. X-ray increases and geomagnetic disturbances can contribute to the ionospheric absorption.

    Key words. Ionosphere (Polar Ionosphere, Particle precipitation – Solar physics (Flares and mass ejections

  12. A study of the relationship between interplanetary parameters and large displacements of the nightside polar cap boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lester, M. (Univ. of Leicester (England)); Freeman, M.P.; Southwood, D.J. (Imperial College, London (England)); Waldock, J.A. (Sheffield City Polytechnic (England)); Singer, H.J. (Air Force Geophysics Lab., Bedford, MA (USA))

    1990-12-01

    On July 14, 1982 the Sweden and Britain Radar-Aurora Experiment (SABRE) observed the ionospheric flow reversal boundary at {approximately} 0400 MLT to move equatorward across the radar field of view and then later to return poleward. The polar cap appeared to be considerably inflated at this time. Concurrent observations by ISEE-3 at the L1 libration point of the solar wind speed and density, and of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) indicated that the solar wind conditions were unusual throughout the interval under consideration. A mapping of the solar wind parameters from the L1 point to the subsolar magnetopause and thence to the SABRE local time sector indicates that the equatorward motion of the polar cap boundary was controlled by a southward turning of the IMF. The inference of a concomitant increase in open magnetic flux is supported by a comparison of the magnetopause location observed by ISEE-1 on an inbound pass in the 2,100 MLT sector with a magnetopause model based upon the solar wind measurements made by ISEE-3. Some 20 minutes after the expansion of the polar cap boundary was first seen by SABRE, there was a rapid contraction of the boundary, the casue of which was independent of the INF and solar wind parameters, and which had a poleward velocity component in excess of 1,900 m s{sup {minus}1}. the boundary as it moved across the radar field of view was highly structured and oriented at a large angle to the ionospheric footprints of the magnetic L shells. Observations in the premidnight sector by the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory (AFGL) magnetometer array indicate that the polar cap contraction is caused by substorm draining of the polar cap flux and occurs without a clearly associated trigger in the interplanetary medium. The response time in the early morning local time sector to the substorm onset switch is approximately 20 minutes, equivalent to an ionospheric azimuthal phase velocity of some 5 km s{sup {minus}1}.

  13. Radio pulsar death lines to SGRs/AXPs and white dwarfs pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Malheiro, M. [Departamento de Física, Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, ITA - DCTA, Vila das Acácias, São José dos Campos, 12228-900 SP (Brazil); Coelho, J. G. [INPE - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Divisão de Astrofísica, Av. dos Astronautas 1758, São José dos Campos, 12227-010 SP (Brazil)

    2015-12-17

    Recently, an alternative model based on white dwarfs pulsars has been proposed to explain a class of pulsars known as Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGR) and Anomalus X-Ray Pulsars (AXP) [1], usually named as magnetars. In this model, the magnetized white dwarfs can have surface magnetic field B ∼ 10{sup 7} − 10{sup 10} G and rotate very fast with angular frequencies Ω ∼ 1 rad/s, allowing them to produce large electromagnetic (EM) potentials and generate electron-positron pairs. These EM potentials are comparable with the ones of neutron star pulsars with strong magnetic fields and even larger. In this study we consider two possible processes associated with the particle acceleration, both of them are common used to explain radio emission in neutron star pulsars: in the first process the pair production happens near to the star polar caps, i.e. inside of the light cylinder where magnetic field lines are closed; in the second one the creation of pair happens in the outer magnetosphere, i.e. far away of the star surface where magnetic field lines are open [2]. The analysis of the possibility of radio emission were done for 23 SGRs/AXPs of the McGill Online Magnetar Catalog [3] that contains the current information available on these sources. The results of this work show that the model where the particles production occur in the outer magnetosphere emission “o2” is the process compatible with the astronomical observations of absence of radio emission for almost all SGRs/AXPs when these sources are understood as white dwarf pulsars. Our work is a first attempted to find an explanation for the puzzle why for almost all the SGRs/AXPs was expected radio emission, but it was observed in only four of them. These four sources, as it was suggested recently [4], seem to belong to an high magnetic field neutron star pulsar category, different from all the others SGRs/AXPs that our work indicate to belong to a new class of white dwarf pulsars, very fast and magnetized.

  14. Radio pulsar death lines to SGRs/AXPs and white dwarfs pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Coelho, J. G.; Malheiro, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, an alternative model based on white dwarfs pulsars has been proposed to explain a class of pulsars known as Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGR) and Anomalus X-Ray Pulsars (AXP) [1], usually named as magnetars. In this model, the magnetized white dwarfs can have surface magnetic field B ˜ 107 - 1010 G and rotate very fast with angular frequencies Ω ˜ 1 rad/s, allowing them to produce large electromagnetic (EM) potentials and generate electron-positron pairs. These EM potentials are comparable with the ones of neutron star pulsars with strong magnetic fields and even larger. In this study we consider two possible processes associated with the particle acceleration, both of them are common used to explain radio emission in neutron star pulsars: in the first process the pair production happens near to the star polar caps, i.e. inside of the light cylinder where magnetic field lines are closed; in the second one the creation of pair happens in the outer magnetosphere, i.e. far away of the star surface where magnetic field lines are open [2]. The analysis of the possibility of radio emission were done for 23 SGRs/AXPs of the McGill Online Magnetar Catalog [3] that contains the current information available on these sources. The results of this work show that the model where the particles production occur in the outer magnetosphere emission "o2" is the process compatible with the astronomical observations of absence of radio emission for almost all SGRs/AXPs when these sources are understood as white dwarf pulsars. Our work is a first attempted to find an explanation for the puzzle why for almost all the SGRs/AXPs was expected radio emission, but it was observed in only four of them. These four sources, as it was suggested recently [4], seem to belong to an high magnetic field neutron star pulsar category, different from all the others SGRs/AXPs that our work indicate to belong to a new class of white dwarf pulsars, very fast and magnetized.

  15. Variations in the polar cap area during intervals of substorm activity on 20-21 March 1990 deduced from AMIE convection patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Taylor

    Full Text Available The dynamic behaviour of the northern polar cap area is studied employing Northern Hemisphere electric potential patterns derived by the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE procedure. The rate of change in area of the polar cap, which can be defined as the region of magnetospheric field lines open to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF, has been calculated during two intervals when the IMF had an approximately constant southward component (1100–2200 UT, 20 March 1990 and 1300–2100 UT, 21 March 1990. The estimates of the polar cap area are based on the approximation of the polar cap boundary by the flow reversal boundary. The change in the polar cap area is then compared to the predicted expansion rate based on a simple application of Faraday's Law. Furthermore, timings of magnetospheric substorms are also related to changes in the polar cap area. Once the convection electric field reconfigures following a southward turning of the IMF, the growth rate of the observed polar cap boundary is consistent with that predicted by Faraday's Law. A delay of typically 20 min to 50 min is observed between a substorm expansion phase onset and a reduction in the polar cap area. Such a delay is consistent with a synthesis between the near Earth neutral line and current disruption models of magnetospheric substorms in which the dipolarisation in the magnetotail may act as a trigger for reconnection. These delays may represent a propagation time between near geosynchronous orbit dipolarisation and subsequent reconnection further down tail. We estimate, from these delays, that the neutral X line occurs between ~35RE and ~75RE downstream in the tail.

  16. Pulsar Magnetospheres and Pulsar Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Beskin, Vasily S

    2016-01-01

    Surprisingly, the chronology of nearly 50 years of the pulsar magnetosphere and pulsar wind research is quite similar to the history of our civilization. Using this analogy, I have tried to outline the main results obtained in this field. In addition to my talk, the possibility of particle acceleration due to different processes in the pulsar magnetosphere is discussed in more detail.

  17. An onboard data analysis method to track the seasonal polar caps on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, K.L.; Castano, R.; Chien, S.; Ivanov, A.B.; Pounders, E.; Titus, T.N.; ,

    2005-01-01

    The Martian seasonal CO2 ice caps advance and retreat each year. They are currently studied using instruments such as the THermal EMission Imaging System (THEMIS), a visible and infra-red camera on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft [1]. However, each image must be downlinked to Earth prior to analysis. In contrast, we have developed the Bimodal Image Temperature (BIT) histogram analysis method for onboard detection of the cap edge, before transmission. In downlink-limited scenarios when the entire image cannot be transmitted, the location of the cap edge can still be identified and sent to Earth. In this paper, we evaluate our method on uncalibrated THEMIS data and find 1) agreement with manual cap edge identifications to within 28.2 km, and 2) high accuracy even with a smaller analysis window, yielding large reductions in memory requirements. This algorithm is currently being considered as a capability enhancement for the Odyssey second extended mission, beginning in fall 2006.

  18. SWIR spectral mapping of the Martian South Polar Residual Cap using CRISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jacqueline; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2016-10-01

    The Martian South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC) exhibits unique CO2 ice sublimation features that cover the surface. These flat floored, circular depressions are highly dynamic, with scarp retreat rates of up to 8m per Martian Year. As the scarps sublimate in Martian Southern Hemisphere spring, they expose dust particles previously trapped within the ice during winter. This allows a window of opportunity to analyse the dust for fragile organic molecules that might otherwise be rapidly destroyed when subjected to ultraviolet radiation at the Martian surface. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are one such type of organic compound that have not yet been reported as detected on Mars. PAHs are considered to be important in astrobiology as they potentially play a role in abiogenesis, and are a biomarker for extant life. PAHs are abundant on Earth, in deep space and in recent years have been identified on the Saturnian moons Iapetus and Phoebe.Utilising data from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on board NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), SPRC features have been spectrally mapped, the effects of H2O and CO2 ice on infrared spectra eliminated, and regions with obvious dust particles analysed to establish their mineral composition, and signatures indicative of PAHs compared to Mars data.Spectral mapping has identified compositional differences between depression rims and the majority of the SPRC, allowing regions of spectral interest to be selected for in-depth analysis. CRISM spectra have been compared with known Martian mineralogy and PAH laboratory data, with results suggesting Magnesium Carbonate dust content in depression rims, and rims have been found to have higher water content than regions of featureless ice. CO2 ice has been found to be the most limiting factor in looking for PAH diagnostic signatures on the SPRC. Further work is being undertaken with more detailed results to be presented in the future.The research leading

  19. Effects of deliquescent salts in soils of polar Mars on the flow of the Northern Ice Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, D. A.; Hecht, M. H.; Kounaves, S.; Catling, D.

    2008-12-01

    The discovery of substantial amounts of magnesium and perchlorate by Phoenix' "Wet Chemistry Lab" (WCL) in the soil of Polar Mars suggests that magnesium perchlorate could be the dominant salt in the polar region's soils. This prospect opens some unexpected doors for moving liquid water around at temperatures as low as -68C. In its fully hydrated form ,this salt water mixture has a high density (~ 1700 kgm /cubic meter) (Besley and Bottomley,1969) and a freezing point of -68C (Pestova et al., 2005).This perchlorate is very deliquescent and gives off heat as it melts ice. About 1.8 gram of ice can be 'melted' by 1 gm of pure magnesium perchlorate . If the reported 1 percent perchlorate is typical of polar soils and if 5 percent of the Northern Permanent Ice Cap is soil then the perchorate , makes up about 0.0005 the of the ice cap. Given the average thickness of the ice cap is about 2000 meters,this suggests there enough perchorate in the ice cap to generate about 2m of salty water at the bed. Because of its density the perclorate salty water would pool over impervious layers and make the bed into a perchorate sludge that could be mobilized and deformed by the overburden of ice. The deformation of mobile beds is a well known phenomenon on some terrestrial glaciers presently and was thought to have played a major role during the Wisconsinan ice age (Fisher et al., 1985) . The perchorate sludge would be deformed and moved outwards possibly resulting its re-introduction to the polar environment. Having a deliquescent salt sludge at the bed whose melting point is -68C would mean that the ice cap could slide on its deformable bed while the ice itself was still very cold and stiff . This possibility has been modeled with a 2D time varying model . Adding the deformable bed material allows ice cap motion even at ice temperatures cold enough to generate and preserve the scarp/trough features. When the perchlorate formation mechanisms and rates are known the ultimate

  20. An X-ray View of Radio Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton have significantly increased our understanding of rotation-powered (radio) millisecond pulsars (MSPs). Deep Chandra studies of several globular clusters have detected X-ray counterparts to a host of MSPs, including 19 in 47 Tuc alone. These surveys have revealed that most MSPs exhibit thermal emission from their heated magnetic polar caps. Realistic models of this thermal X-ray emission have provided important insight into the basic physics of pulsars and neutron stars. In addition, intrabinary shock X-ray radiation observed in ``black-widow'' and peculiar globular cluster ``exchanged'' binary MSPs give interesting insight into MSP winds and relativistic shock. Thus, the X-ray band contains valuable information regarding the basic properties of MSPs that are not accesible by radio timing observations.

  1. Can the inner gap sparking take place in millisecond pulsars?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Guang Wang; Guo-Jun Qiao; Ren-Xin Xu

    2003-01-01

    The inner vacuum gap model has become the foundation stone of most theories on pulsar radio emission. The fundamental picture of this model is the sparking, which was conjectured to be induced by magnetic absorption of background gamma photons. However, a question is, can the sparking be triggered in the millisecond pulsars (MSPs) with magnetic fields (B) only about 10s G? We investigate this problem by including the pair production above the inner gap. Under the assumption that the magnetic field is dipolar, our results show the background gamma-ray emission can not be the key factor that triggers the sparking, at least not in MSPs with B ~ 108 G, if the temperature in the polar cap region is only so high as is observed (< 4 × 106 K). Some other mechanisms are required.

  2. Radio pulsar activity and the crustal Hall drift

    CERN Document Server

    Geppert, U; Melikidze, G

    2013-01-01

    Models of pulsar radio emission that are based on an inner accelerating region require the existence of very strong and small scale surface magnetic field structures at or near the canonical polar cap. The aim of this paper is to identify a mechanism that creates such field structures and maintains them over a pulsar's lifetime. The likely physical process that can create the required 'magnetic spots' is the Hall drift occurring in the crust of a neutron star. It is demonstrated, that the Hall drift can produce small scale strong surface magnetic field anomalies (spots) on timescales of $10^4$ years by means of non-linear interaction between poloidal and toroidal components of the subsurface magnetic field. These anomalies are characterized by strengths of about $10^{14}$ G and curvature radii of field lines of about $10^6$ cm, both of which are fundamental for generation of observable radio emission.

  3. Radio Pulsar Death Line Revisited Is PSR J2144-3933 Anomalous?

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B; Muslimov, A G; Zhang, Bing; Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alexander G.

    2000-01-01

    We reinvestigate the radio pulsar ``death lines'' within the framework of two different types of polar cap acceleration models, i.e., the vacuum gap model and the space-charge-limited flow model, with either curvature radiation or inverse Compton scattering photons as the source of pairs. General relativistic frame-dragging is taken into account in both models. We find that the inverse Compton scattering induced space-charge-limited flow model can sustain strong pair production in some long-period pulsars, which allows the newly detected 8.5s pulsar PSR J2144-3933 to be radio loud, without assuming a special neutron star equation-of-state or ad hoc magnetic field configurations.

  4. Prospects for Neutron Star Equation of State Constraints using "Recycled" Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2015-01-01

    Rotation-powered "recycled" millisecond pulsars are a variety of rapidly-spinning neutron stars that typically show thermal X-ray radiation due to the heated surface of their magnetic polar caps. Detailed numerical modeling of the rotation-induced thermal X-ray pulsations observed from recycled millisecond pulsars, including all relevant relativistic and stellar atmospheric effects, has been identified as a promising approach towards an astrophysical determination of the true neutron star mass-radius relation, and by extension the state of cold matter at densities exceeding those of atomic nuclei. Herein, I review the basic model and methodology commonly used to extract information regarding neutron star structure from the pulsed X-ray radiation observed from millisecond pulsars. I also summarize the results of past X-ray observations of these objects and the prospects for precision neutron star mass-radius measurements with the upcoming Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) X-ray timing mission.

  5. Photon Splitting and Pair Creation in Highly Magnetized Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.

    2000-01-01

    The absence of radio pulsars with long periods has lead to the popular notion of a high P ``death line.'' In the standard picture, beyond this boundary, pulsars with low spin rates cannot accelerate particles above the stellar surface to high enough energies to initiate pair cascades, and the pair creation needed for radio emission is strongly suppressed. In this paper we explore the possibility of another pulsar ``death line'' in the context of polar cap models, corresponding to high magnetic fields B in the upper portion of the period-period derivative diagram, a domain where few radio pulsars are observed. The origin of this high B boundary, which may occur when B becomes comparable to or exceeds $B_{\\rm cr} = 4.4 \\times 10^{13}$ Gauss, is also due to the suppression of magnetic pair creation, but primarily because of ineffective competition with magnetic photon splitting. Threshold pair creation also plays a prominent role in the suppression of cascades. We present Monte Carlo calculations of the pair yie...

  6. Pulsars: Cosmic Permanent 'Neutromagnets'?

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, Johan

    2011-01-01

    We argue that pulsars may be spin-polarized neutron stars, i.e. cosmic permanent magnets. This would simply explain several observational facts about pulsars, including the 'beacon effect' itself i.e. the static/stable misalignment of rotational and magnetic axes, the extreme temporal stability of the pulses and the existence of an upper limit for the magnetic field strength - coinciding with the one observed in "magnetars". Although our model admittedly is speculative, this latter fact seems to us unlikely to be pure coincidence.

  7. The cyclase-associated protein CAP as regulator of cell polarity and cAMP signaling in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noegel, Angelika A; Blau-Wasser, Rosemarie; Sultana, Hameeda; Müller, Rolf; Israel, Lars; Schleicher, Michael; Patel, Hitesh; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2004-02-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of the G-actin/F-actin ratio and, in yeast, is involved in regulating the adenylyl cyclase activity. We show that cell polarization, F-actin organization, and phototaxis are altered in a Dictyostelium CAP knockout mutant. Furthermore, in complementation assays we determined the roles of the individual domains in signaling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. We studied in detail the adenylyl cyclase activity and found that the mutant cells have normal levels of the aggregation phase-specific adenylyl cyclase and that receptor-mediated activation is intact. However, cAMP relay that is responsible for the generation of propagating cAMP waves that control the chemotactic aggregation of starving Dictyostelium cells was altered, and the cAMP-induced cGMP production was significantly reduced. The data suggest an interaction of CAP with adenylyl cyclase in Dictyostelium and an influence on signaling pathways directly as well as through its function as a regulatory component of the cytoskeleton.

  8. Interannual and seasonal changes in the south seasonal polar cap of Mars: Observations from MY 28-31 using MARCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, W. M.; Cantor, B. A.; James, P. B.

    2017-08-01

    The Mars Color Imager (MARCI) camera on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter provides daily synoptic coverage that allows monitoring of seasonal cap retreat and interannual changes that occur between Mars Years (MY) and over the southern summer. We present the first analysis of this data for the southern seasonal cap evolution observed in MY 28, 29, 30 and 31 (2/2007 to 07/2013). Observation over multiple Mars years allows us to compare changes between years as well as longer-term evolution of the high albedo deposits at the poles. Seasonal cap retreat is similar in all years and to retreats observed in other years by both optical and thermal instruments. The cryptic terrain has a fairly consistent boundary in each year, but numerous small-scale variations occur in each MY observed. Additionally, numerous small dark deposits are identified outside the classically identified cyptic region, including Inca City and other locations not previously noted. The large water ice outlier is observed to retain seasonal frost the longest (outside the polar dome) and is also highly variable in each MY. The development of the cryptic/anti-cryptic hemispheres is inferred to occur due to albedo variations that develop after dust venting starts and may be caused by recondensation of CO2 ice on the brightest and coldest regions controlled by topographic winds. Ground ice may play a role in which regions develop cryptic terrain, as there is no elevation control on either cryptic terrain or the late season brightest deposits.

  9. Polar Volatiles on Mars--Theory versus Observation: Excess solid carbon dioxide is probably present in the north residual cap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B C; Malin, M C

    1973-11-02

    The residual frost caps of Mars are probably water-ice. They may be the source of the water vapor associated with seasonal polar hoods. A permanent reservoir of solid CO(2) is also probably present within the north residual cap and may comprise a mass of CO(2) some two to five times that of the present atmosphere of Mars. The martian atmospheric pressure is probably regulated by the temperature of the reservoir and not by the annual heat balance of exposed solid CO(2) (37). The present reservoir temperature presumably reflects a long-term average of the polar heat balance. The question of a large permanent north polar cap is reexamined in light of the Mariner 9 data. The lower general elevation of the north polar region compared to the south and the resulting occurrence in the north of a permanent CO(2) deposit are probably responsible for the differences in size and shape of the two residual caps. The details of the processes involved are less apparent, however. It might be argued that the stability of water-ice deposits depends on both insolation and altitude. The present north and south residual caps should be symmetrically located with respect to such a hypothetical stability field. However, the offset of the south cap from the geometrical pole, the non-symmetrical outline of the north cap, and the apparently uniform thickness of the thin, widespread water-ice all argue against control by simple solid-vapor equilibrium of water under present environmental conditions. We think that the present location of the water-ice may reflect, in part, the past location of the permanent CO(2) reservoir. The extreme stability of polar water-ice deposits increases the likelihood that past environmental conditions may be recorded there. Detailed information on elevations in the vicinity of the residual caps is needed before we can further elucidate the nature and history of the residual caps. This, along with measurements of polar infrared emission, should be given high

  10. Analyzing the Spectra of Accreting X-Ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Michael

    This proposal seeks funding for the analysis of accretion-powered X-ray pulsar spectra from NASA/ HEASARC archived X-ray data. Spectral modeling of accreting X-ray pulsars can tell us a great deal about the physical conditions in and near high mass X-ray binary systems. Such systems have accretion flows where plasma is initially channeled from an accretion disk by the strong neutron star magnetic field, eventually falling onto the magnetic polar cap of the neutron star compact object. Many of these accreting X-ray pulsars have X-ray spectra that consist of broad power-law continua with superposed cyclotron resonant scattering features indicating magnetic field strengths above 10^12 G. The energies of these cyclotron line features have recently been shown to vary with X-ray luminosity in a number of sources such as Her X-1 and V 0332+53, a phenomenon not well understood. Another recent development is the relatively new analytic model for the spectral continuum formation in accretion-powered pulsar systems developed by Becker & Wolff. In their formalism the accretion flows are assumed to go through radiation- dominated radiative shocks and settle onto the neutron star surface. The radiation field consists of strongly Comptonized bremsstrahlung emission from the entire plasma, Comptonized cyclotron emission from the de-excitations of Landau-excited electrons in the neutron star magnetic field, and Comptonized black-body emission from a thermal mound near the neutron star surface. We seek to develop the data analysis tools to apply this model framework to the X-ray data from a wide set of sources to make progress characterizing the basic accretion properties (e.g., magnetic field strength, plasma temperatures, polar cap size, accretion rate per unit area, dominance of bulk vs. thermal Comptonization) as well as understanding the variations of the cyclotron line energies with X-ray luminosity. The three major goals of our proposed work are as follows: In the first year

  11. A critical note on the IAGA-endorsed Polar Cap index procedure: effects of solar wind sector structure and reverse polar convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauning, P.

    2015-11-01

    The International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) has recently endorsed a new Polar Cap (PC) index version to supersede the previous seven different versions of the PCN (North) index and the five different PCS (South) index versions. However, the new PC index has some adverse features which should be known and taken into account by users of the index. It uses in its derivation procedure an "effective" quiet day level (QDC) composed of a "basic" QDC and an added solar wind sector term related to the azimuthal component (By) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The added IMF By-related terms may introduce unjustified contributions to the PC index of more than 2 index units (mV m-1). Furthermore, cases of reverse convection during strong northward IMF Bz (NBZ) conditions included in the database for calculation of index coefficients can cause unjustified index enhancements of 0.5-1 mV m-1 during calm conditions, reduction of index values by more than 20 % during disturbed conditions, and inconsistencies between index coefficients and index values for the northern and southern polar caps. The aim here is to specify these adverse features and quantify their effects, and to suggest alternative steps for future modifications of the index procedure.

  12. A critical note on the IAGA-endorsed Polar Cap index procedure. Effects of solar wind sector structure and reverse polar convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauning, P. [Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-07-01

    The International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) has recently endorsed a new Polar Cap (PC) index version to supersede the previous seven different versions of the PCN (North) index and the five different PCS (South) index versions. However, the new PC index has some adverse features which should be known and taken into account by users of the index. It uses in its derivation procedure an ''effective'' quiet day level (QDC) composed of a ''basic'' QDC and an added solar wind sector term related to the azimuthal component (B{sub y}) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The added IMF B{sub y}-related terms may introduce unjustified contributions to the PC index of more than 2 index units (mV m{sup -1}). Furthermore, cases of reverse convection during strong northward IMF B{sub z} (NBZ) conditions included in the database for calculation of index coefficients can cause unjustified index enhancements of 0.5-1 mV m{sup -1} during calm conditions, reduction of index values by more than 20% during disturbed conditions, and inconsistencies between index coefficients and index values for the northern and southern polar caps. The aim here is to specify these adverse features and quantify their effects, and to suggest alternative steps for future modifications of the index procedure.

  13. The characteristics of millisecond pulsar emission; 2, Polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Xilouris, K M; Jessner, A; Von Hoensbroech, A; Lorimer, D; Wielebinski, R; Wolszczan, A; Camilo, F M

    1998-01-01

    We have made polarimetric monitoring observations of millisecond pulsars visible from the northern hemisphere at 1410 MHz. Their emission properties are compared with those of normal pulsars. Although we demonstrated in paper I that millisecond pulsars exhibit the same flux density spectra and similar profile complexity, our results presented here suggest that millisecond pulsar profiles do not comply with the predictions of classification schemes based on ``normal'' pulsars. The frequency development of a large number of millisecond pulsar profiles is abnormal when compared with the development seen for normal pulsars. Moreover, the polarization characteristics suggest that millisecond-pulsar magnetospheres might not simply represent scaled versions of the magnetospheres of normal pulsars, supporting results of paper I. However, phenomena such as mode-changing activity in both intensity and polarization are recognized here for the first time (e.g., J1730--2304). This suggests that while the basic emission me...

  14. Low and mid-frequency pulsations in the polar cap: polarization pattern and MLT dependence of the spectral power during the descending phase of the solar cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Vellante

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a statistical analysis of ULF (1-100 mHz geomagnetic measurements conducted during years 2003-
    2006 at the Italian/French base of Concordia at Dome C, close to the geomagnetic pole, and at the Italian base
    «Mario Zucchelli» at Terra Nova Bay, also located in the polar cap, but at lower latitude. Our analysis shows that
    high latitude ULF pulsation power is largely controlled by the solar wind speed. At Terra Nova Bay the power
    shows a maximum at local noon, clearly related to cusp and closed field lines phenomena. At few mHz, the polarization
    pattern indicates field line resonances driven, just equatorward with respect to the station, by waves
    propagating tailward; the polarization of higher frequency pulsations, mostly originated from interplanetary upstream
    waves, suggests waves propagating sunward from the night sector. At Dome C the wave power shows a
    small enhancement in the local morning, more pronounced for mid-frequency pulsations; the polarization pattern,
    at all frequencies, appears to indicate waves propagating sunward from the night sector, suggesting a propagation
    channel to the ground via the magnetotail lobes.

  15. Observing the Plasma-Physical Processes of Pulsar Radio Emission with Arecibo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Joanna M.

    2017-01-01

    With their enormous densities and fields, neutron stars entail some of the most exotic physics in the cosmos. Similarly, the physical mechanisms of pulsar radio emission are no less exotic, and we are only now beginning to understand them. The talk will provide an introduction to the phenomenology of radio pulsar emission and focus on those aspects of the exquisite Arecibo observations that bear on their challenging emission physics.The commonalities of the radio beamforms of most slow pulsars (and some millisecond pulsars) argue strongly that their magnetic fields have a nearly dipolar structure at the height of their radio emission regions. These heights can often be determined by aberration/retardation analyses. Similarly, measurement of the orientation of the polarized radio emission with respect to the emitting magnetic field facilitates identification of the physical(X/O) emission modes and study of the plasma coupling to the electromagnetic radiation.While the physics of primary plasma generation above the pulsar polar cap is only beginning to be understood, it is clear that the radio pulsars we see are able to generate copious amounts of electron-positron plasma in their emission regions. Within the nearly dipolar field structure of these emission regions, the plasma density is near to that of the Goldreich-Julian model, and so the physical conditions in these regions can be accurately estimated.These conditions show that the plasma frequencies in the emission regions are much higher than the frequency of the emitted radiation, such that the plasma couples most easily to the extraordinary mode as observed. Therefore, the only surviving emission mechanism is curvature radiation from charged solitons, produced by the two-stream instability. Such soliton emission has probably been observed directly in the Crab pulsar; however, a physical theory of charged soliton radiation does not yet exist.

  16. Mars residual north polar cap - Earth-based spectroscopic confirmation of water ice as a major constituent and evidence for hydrated minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. N.; Mccord, T. B.

    1982-01-01

    A description is presented of new earth-based reflectance spectra of the Martian north residual polar cap. The spectra indicate that the composition is at least mostly water ice plus another component with a 'gray' reflectance. The other minerals in the ice cap appear to be hydrated. The data were obtained with a cooled circular variable filter spectrometer on February 20, 1978, using the 2.2-m telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. It is pointed out that the identification of water ice in the north polar cap alone does not indicate that water makes up all or even most of the bulk of the cap. Kieffer (1970) has shown that a small amount of water will mask the spectral features of CO2.

  17. Examination of the relationship between riometer-derived absorption and the integral proton flux in the context of modeling polar cap absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, R. A. D.; Danskin, D. W.

    2016-11-01

    Energetic protons can penetrate into the ionosphere increasing ionization in the D region causing polar cap absorption that may potentially block high-frequency radio communications for transpolar flights. The protons are guided by the geomagnetic field into the high-latitude polar cap region. Riometers monitor variations in ionospheric absorption by observing the level of background cosmic radio noise. Current polar cap absorption modeling techniques are based on the linear relationship between absorption and the square root of the integral proton flux, which has previously only been demonstrated using data from a single high-latitude polar station. The proportionality constant describing this relationship is evaluated for two different polar cap absorption events occurring 7-11 March 2012 and 23 January 2012 to 1 February 2012. Examination of the proportionality constant using data from riometers distributed between 60° and 90° magnetic latitude reveals a previously unreported latitudinal dependence for data at magnetic latitudes of ≤66.8° on the dayside and ≤70.8° on the nightside. Incorporating the latitudinal dependence into the current D Region Absorption Prediction absorption model improves the agreement between measurement-derived and modeled parameters by increasing the correlation coefficient between data sets, reducing the root-mean-square error, and reducing the bias.

  18. Can the Solid State Greenhouse Effect Produce ~100 Year Cycles in the Mars South Polar Residual CO2 Ice Cap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Line, M. R.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    2010-12-01

    Malin et al. (2001) reported that the south perennial cap consists of quasi-circular pits ~8 meters deep, with a flat surface in between. The walls of the pits are retreating at a rate of 1 to 3 meters per year. Byrne and Ingersoll (2003a, 2003b) showed evidence that the floors of the pits are water ice and the upper layer is CO2. This layer will be gone in a few Martian centuries, if the observations are taken at face value. This raises some difficult questions: How likely is it that mankind would be witnessing the final few hundred years of the residual CO2 frost on Mars? Can one imagine extreme weather events that could recharge the residual CO2 frost once it is gone? Both seem unlikely, and we propose a different mechanism. Kieffer et al. (2000) showed that sunlight can penetrate several meters through the seasonal CO2 frost, where it warms the surface below. We have observational evidence that the same is happening in the perennial CO2 frost. Further, we have a model that shows how this "solid-state greenhouse" can lead to cyclic behavior, in which layers of CO2 build up on a water ice substrate, are heated internally by sunlight and lose mass from within. Eventually the layer becomes too weak to support itself, and it collapses to form pits. Then a new CO2 layer accumulates and the process repeats. Our study addresses fundamental questions of long-term stability of the Martian polar caps and how the caps control the atmospheric pressure. Instead of invoking extreme climate events to explain the data, we propose that processes within the frost itself can lead to cyclic growth and collapse of the pits. Our model implies that there is no long-term change in the ~8 meter layer of CO2 and no extreme weather events to make it change.

  19. The hunt for new pulsars with the Green Bank Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Ryan S; Banaszak, Shawn; Becker, Alison; Berndsen, Aaron; Biwer, Chris; Boyles, Jason; Cardoso, Rogerio F; Cherry, Angus; Dartez, Louis P; Day, David; Epstein, Courtney R; Flanigan, Joe; Ford, Anthony; Garcia, Alejandro; Hessels, Jason W T; Jenet, Fredrick A; Kaplan, David L; Karako-Argaman, Chen; Kaspi, Victoria M; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Lorimer, Duncan R; Lunsford, Grady; Martinez, Jose; McLaughlin, Maura A; McPhee, Christie A; Pennucci, Tim; Ransom, Scott M; Roberts, Mallory S E; Rohr, Matt; Siemens, Xavi; Stairs, Ingrid H; Stovall, Kevin; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Walker, Arielle; Wells, Brad

    2013-01-01

    The Green Bank Telescope (GBT) is the largest fully steerable radio telescope in the world and is one of our greatest tools for discovering and studying radio pulsars. Over the last decade, the GBT has successfully found over 100 new pulsars through large-area surveys. Here I discuss the two most recent---the GBT 350 MHz Drift-scan survey and the Green Bank North Celestial Cap survey. The primary science goal of both surveys is to find interesting individual pulsars, including young pulsars, rotating radio transients, exotic binary systems, and especially bright millisecond pulsars (MSPs) suitable for inclusion in Pulsar Timing Arrays, which are trying to directly detect gravitational waves. These two surveys have combined to discover 85 pulsars to date, among which are 14 MSPs and many unique and fascinating systems. I present highlights from these surveys and discuss future plans. I also discuss recent results from targeted GBT pulsar searches of globular clusters and Fermi sources.

  20. Search for Differences between Radio-loud and Radio-quiet Gamma-Ray Pulsar Populations with Fermi-LAT Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, E. V.; Rubtsov, G. I.

    2016-12-01

    Observations by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) have enabled us to explore the population of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars with a set of 112 objects. It was recently noted that there are apparent differences in the properties of radio-quiet and radio-loud subsets. In particular, the average observed radio-loud pulsar is younger than the average radio-quiet one and is located at lower Galactic latitude. Even so, the analysis based on the full list of pulsars may suffer from selection effects. Namely, most radio-loud pulsars are first discovered in the radio band, while radio-quiet ones are found using the gamma-ray data. In this work we perform a blind search for gamma-ray pulsars using the Fermi-LAT data alone, using all point sources from the 3FGL catalog as the candidates. Unlike our previous work, the present catalog is constructed with a semi-coherent method based on the time-differencing technique and covers the full range of characteristic ages down to 1 kyr. The search resulted in a catalog of 40 non-recycled pulsars, 25 of which are radio-quiet. All pulsars found in the search were previously known gamma-ray pulsars. We find no statistically significant differences in age or in distributions in Galactic latitude for the radio-loud and radio-quiet pulsars, while the distributions in rotation period are marginally different with a statistical probability of 4× {10}-3. The fraction of radio-quiet pulsars is estimated as {ε }{RQ}=(63+/- 8) % . The results are in agreement with the predictions of the outer magnetosphere models, while the polar cap models are disfavored.

  1. The impact of meridional circulation on stellar butterfly diagrams and polar caps

    CERN Document Server

    Holzwarth, V R; MacKay, D H

    2006-01-01

    Observations of rapidly rotating solar-like stars show a significant mixture of opposite-polarity magnetic fields within their polar regions. To explain these observations, models describing the surface transport of magnetic flux demand the presence of fast meridional flows. Here, we link sub-surface and surface magnetic flux transport simulations to investigate (i) the impact of meridional circulations with peak velocities of <125m/s on the latitudinal eruption pattern of magnetic flux tubes and (ii) the influence of the resulting butterfly diagrams on polar magnetic field properties. Prior to their eruption, magnetic flux tubes with low field strengths and initial cross sections below about 300km experience an enhanced poleward deflection through meridional flows. In particular flux tubes which originate between low and intermediate latitudes within the convective overshoot region are strongly affected. This latitude-dependent poleward deflection of erupting magnetic flux renders the wings of stellar but...

  2. Chandra X-ray Observations of 12 Millisecond Pulsars in the Globular Cluster M28

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Servillat, Mathieu; Heinke, Craig O; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Stairs, Ingrid H; Ransom, Scott M; Freire, Paulo C C; Bégin, Steve; Becker, Werner

    2011-01-01

    We present a Chandra X-ray Observatory investigation of the millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in the globular cluster M28 (NGC 6626). In what is one of the deepest X-ray observations of a globular cluster, we firmly detect seven and possibly detect two of the twelve known M28 pulsars. With the exception of PSRs B1821-24 and J1824-2452H, the detected pulsars have relatively soft spectra, with X-ray luminosities 10^30-31 ergs s^-1 (0.3-8 keV),similar to most "recycled" pulsars in 47 Tucanae and the field of the Galaxy, implying thermal emission from the pulsar magnetic polar caps. We present the most detailed X-ray spectrum to date of the energetic PSR B1821-24. It is well described by a purely non-thermal spectrum with spectral photon index 1.23 and luminosity 1.4x10^33Theta(D/5.5 kpc)^2 ergs s^-1 (0.3-8 keV), where Theta is the fraction of the sky covered by the X-ray emission beam(s). We find no evidence for the previously reported line emission feature around 3.3 keV, most likely as a consequence of improvements i...

  3. An Annular Gap Acceleration Model for γ-ray Emission of Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    If the binding energy of the pulsar's surface is not so high (the case of a neutron star), both negative and positive charges will flow out freely from the surface of the star. An annular free flow model for γ-ray emission of pulsars is suggested. It is emphasized that:(1) Two kinds of acceleration regions (annular and core) need to be taken into account. The annular acceleration region is defined by the magnetic field lines that cross the null charge surface within the light cylinder. (2) If the potential drop in the annular region of a pulsar is high enough (normally the case for young pulsars), charges in both the annular and the core regions could be accelerated and produce primary gamma-rays. Secondary pairs are generated in both regions and stream outwards to power the broadband radiations. (3) The potential drop grows more rapidly in the annular region than in the core region. The annular acceleration process is a key process for producing the observed wide emission beams. (4)The advantages of both the polar cap and outer gap models are retained in this model. The geometric properties of the γ-ray emission from the annular flow are analogous to that presented in a previous work by Qiao et al., which match the observations well. (5) Since charges with different signs leave the pulsar through the annular and the core regions respectively, the current closure problem can be partially solved.

  4. On the pulse-width statistics in radio pulsars. III. Importance of the conal profile components

    CERN Document Server

    Maciesiak, K; Melikidze, G

    2012-01-01

    This work is a continuation of two previous papers of a series, in which we examined the pulse-width statistics of normal radio pulsars. In the first paper we compiled the largest ever database of pulsars with interpulses in their mean profiles. In the second one we confirmed the existence of the lower boundary in the scatter plot of core component pulse-widths versus pulsar period W50 sim 2.5 P^{-0.5}[deg], first discovered by Rankin using much smaller number of interpulse cases. In this paper we show that the same lower boundary also exists for conal profile components. Rankin proposed a very simple method of estimation of pulsar inclination angle based on comparing the width W50 of its core component with the period dependent value of the lower boundary. We claim that this method can be extended to conal components as well. To explain an existence of the lower boundary Rankin proposed that the core emission originates at or near the polar cap surface. We demonstrated clearly that no coherent pulsar radio e...

  5. Deep Chandra Observations of the Pulsar Wind Nebula Created by PSR B0355+54

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, Noel; Rangelov, Blagoy; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Pavlov, George G.; Romani, Roger W.; Posselt, Bettina; Slane, Patrick; Temim, Tea; Ng, C.-Y.; Bucciantini, Niccolò; Bykov, Andrei; Swartz, Douglas A.; Buehler, Rolf

    2016-12-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) observations of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) associated with PSR B0355+54 (eight observations with a 395 ks total exposure, performed over an eight month period). We investigated the spatial and spectral properties of the emission coincident with the pulsar, compact nebula (CN), and extended tail. We find that the CN morphology can be interpreted in a way that suggests a small angle between the pulsar spin axis and our line of sight, as inferred from the radio data. On larger scales, emission from the 7\\prime (≈ 2 pc) tail is clearly seen. We also found hints of two faint extensions nearly orthogonal to the direction of the pulsar’s proper motion. The spectrum extracted at the pulsar position can be described with an absorbed power-law + blackbody model. The nonthermal component can be attributed to magnetospheric emission, while the thermal component can be attributed to emission from either a hot spot (e.g., a polar cap) or the entire neutron star surface. Surprisingly, the spectrum of the tail shows only a slight hint of cooling with increasing distance from the pulsar. This implies either a low magnetic field with fast flow speed, or particle reacceleration within the tail. We estimate physical properties of the PWN and compare the morphologies of the CN and the extended tail with those of other bow shock PWNe observed with long CXO exposures.

  6. Deep Chandra Observations of the Pulsar Wind Nebula Created by PSR B0355+54

    CERN Document Server

    Klingler, Noel; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Pavlov, George G; Romani, Roger W; Posselt, Bettina; Slane, Patrick; Temim, Tea; Ng, C -Y; Bucciantini, Niccolò; Bykov, Andrei; Swartz, Douglas A; Buehler, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) observations of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) associated with PSR B0355+54 (eight observations with a 395 ks total exposure, performed over an 8 month period). We investigated the spatial and spectral properties of the emission coincident with the pulsar, compact nebula (CN), and extended tail. We find that the CN morphology can be interpreted in a way that suggests a small angle between the pulsar spin axis and our line-of-sight, as inferred from the radio data. On larger scales, emission from the 7' (2 pc) tail is clearly seen. We also found hints of two faint extensions nearly orthogonal to the direction of the pulsar's proper motion. The spectrum extracted at the pulsar position can be described with an absorbed power-law + blackbody model. The nonthermal component can be attributed to magnetospheric emission, while the thermal component can be attributed to emission from either a hot spot (e.g., a polar cap) or the entire neutron star surface. Surprisingly, the...

  7. Pleistocene reduction of polar ice caps: Evidence from Cariaco Basin marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poore, R.Z.; Dowsett, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Sea level is projected to rise between 13 and 94 cm over the next 100 yr due to continued climate warming. The sea-level projections assume that polar ice sheets will remain stable or even increase on time scales of centuries, but controversial geologic evidence suggests that current polar ice sheets have been eliminated or greatly reduced during previous Pleistocene interglacials indicating that modern polar ice sheets have become unstable within the natural range of interglacial climates. Sea level may have been more than 20 m higher than today during a presumably very warm interglacial about 400 ka during marine isotope stage 11. Because of the implications for future sea level rise, additional study of the conflicting evidence for warmer conditions and higher sea level during marine isotope stage 11 is needed. Here we present microfossil and isotopic data from marine sediments of the Cariaco Basin supporting the interpretation that global sea level was 10-20 m higher than today during marine isotope stage 11. The increased sea level requires reduction in modern polar ice sheets and is consistent with the interpretation that the West Antarctic ice sheet and the Greenland ice sheet were absent or greatly reduced during marine isotope stage 11. Our results show a warm marine isotope stage 11 interglacial climate with sea level as high as or above modern sea level that lasted for 25 to 30 k.y. Variations in Earth's orbit around the sun (Milankovitch cycles) are considered to be a primary external force driving glacial-interglacial cycles. Current and marine isotope stage 11 Milankovitch forcing are very similar, suggesting that the present interglacial (Holocene) that began ca. 10 ka will continue for another 15 to 20 k.y. Therefore any anthropogenic climate warming will accelerate the natural process toward reduction in polar ice sheets. The potential for increased rates of sea level rise related to polar ice sheet decay should be considered as a potential natural

  8. On the Response of Polar Cap Dynamics to Its Solar Wind and Magnetotail Drivers at High Levels of Geomagnetic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ye

    In this thesis, I investigate how polar cap dynamics, quantified by the northern polar cap (PCN) index, respond to solar wind direct driving and magnetotail energy unloading during intervals of strong solar wind driving. Using 53 one to two-day intervals with high cross polar cap potential subintervals, I find that, among 11 candidate coupling functions including the electric field of Kan and Lee (1979) and the universal coupling function of Newell et al. (2007), the PCN index correlates most closely with the electric field (EK-R) of Kivelson and Ridley (2008), a form in which the electric field imposed on the ionosphere by low-latitude magnetopause reconnection saturates at high levels of geomagnetic activity. It is found that magnetotail activity, as represented by an unloading AL index (ALU), makes a significant contribution to the PCN index. A linear model is constructed to relate the PCN index to its solar wind and magnetotail drivers. Based on this model, it is estimated that the portion of the PCN index directly driven by the solar wind electric field outweighs the contribution arising from energy release in the magnetotail by roughly a factor of 2. The solar wind dynamic pressure (pdyn) does not play a key role in controlling the PCN index. However, under intense solar wind driving, the number density (n) can influence the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling by changing the solar wind Alfvén conductance, which is incorporated in EK-R. The validity of the linear model is verified by comparing its results with those obtained from a more general, non-linear model, termed additive model. It is found that, except in anomalous events during which the auroral oval expanded poleward to the latitude of the PCN index station and the index increased because of proximity to auroral zone currents, the linear model is a good approximation, since more than 70% of the variation in the PCN index is explained by the linear model. Thus, this linear model provides a useful tool

  9. VHF scintillations, orientation of the anisotropy of F-region irregularities and direction of plasma convection in the polar cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Tereshchenko

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Scintillation data recorded at the polar cap station Barentsburg are shown to occasionally exhibit two or more peaks in the latitudinal profiles of the amplitude dispersion. Comparison with concurrent SuperDARN radar convection maps indicates that multiple peaks occur when Barentsburg is located within the area of strong changes in the plasma flow direction. When parameters of the ionospheric irregularities are inferred from the scintillation data, the orientation of the irregularity anisotropy in a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field is found to coincide well with the E×B flow direction, individually for each peak of the scintillation data. The differences were found to be mostly less than 20° for a data set comprised of 104 events. The conclusion is made that analysis of scintillation data allows one to infer the direction of plasma flow with a certain degree of detail.

  10. Prospects for neutron star equation of state constraints using ''recycled'' millisecond pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanov, Slavko [Columbia University, Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-02-15

    ''Recycled'' millisecond pulsars are a variety of rapidly spinning neutron stars that typically show thermal X-ray radiation due to the heated surface of their magnetic polar caps. Detailed numerical modeling of the rotation-induced thermal X-ray pulsations observed from recycled millisecond pulsars, including all relevant relativistic and stellar atmospheric effects, has been identified as a promising approach towards an astrophysical determination of the true neutron star mass-radius relation, and by extension the state of cold matter at densities exceeding those of atomic nuclei. Herein, I review the basic model and methodology commonly used to extract information regarding neutron star structure from the pulsed X-ray radiation observed from millisecond pulsars. I also summarize the results of past X-ray observations of these objects and the prospects for precision neutron star mass-radius measurements with the upcoming Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) X-ray timing mission. (orig.)

  11. Radio Polarization Observations of the Snail: A Crushed Pulsar Wind Nebula in G327.1-1.1 with a Highly Ordered Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Y K; Bucciantini, N; Slane, P O; Gaensler, B M; Temim, T

    2016-01-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are suggested to be acceleration sites of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. While the magnetic field plays an important role in the acceleration process, previous observations of magnetic field configurations of PWNe are rare, particularly for evolved systems. We present a radio polarization study of the "Snail" PWN inside the supernova remnant G327.1-1.1 using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This PWN is believed to have been recently crushed by the supernova (SN) reverse shock. The radio morphology is composed of a main circular body with a finger-like protrusion. We detected a strong linear polarization signal from the emission, which reflects a highly ordered magnetic field in the PWN and is in contrast to the turbulent environment with a tangled magnetic field generally expected from hydrodynamical simulations. This could suggest that the characteristic turbulence scale is larger than the radio beam size. We built a toy model to explore this possibility, and found that a simulat...

  12. Two Long-Term Intermittent Pulsars Discovered in the PALFA Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Freire, P. C. C.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kaspi, V. M.; Allen, B.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Cardoso, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Ferdman, R. D.; Jenet, F. A.; Knispel, B.; Lazarus, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Parent, E.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Seymour, A.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L. G.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J.; Wharton, R. S.; Zhu, W. W.

    2017-01-01

    We report the discovery of two long-term intermittent radio pulsars in the ongoing Pulsar Arecibo L-Band Feed Array survey. Following discovery with the Arecibo Telescope, extended observations of these pulsars over several years at Jodrell Bank Observatory have revealed the details of their rotation and radiation properties. PSRs J1910+0517 and J1929+1357 show long-term extreme bimodal intermittency, switching between active (ON) and inactive (OFF) emission states and indicating the presence of a large, hitherto unrecognized underlying population of such objects. For PSR J1929+1357, the initial duty cycle was fON = 0.008, but two years later, this changed quite abruptly to fON = 0.16. This is the first time that a significant evolution in the activity of an intermittent pulsar has been seen, and we show that the spin-down rate of the pulsar is proportional to the activity. The spin-down rate of PSR J1929+1357 is increased by a factor of 1.8 when it is in active mode, similar to the increase seen in the other three known long-term intermittent pulsars. These discoveries increase the number of known pulsars displaying long-term intermittency to five. These five objects display a remarkably narrow range of spin-down power (\\dot{E} ∼ {10}32 {erg} {{{s}}}-1) and accelerating potential above their polar caps. If confirmed by further discoveries, this trend might be important for understanding the physical mechanisms that cause intermittency.

  13. The melting sea ice of Arctic polar cap in the summer solstice month and the role of ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Yi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic sea ice is becoming smaller and thinner than climatological standard normal and more fragmented in the early summer. We investigated the widely changing Arctic sea ice using the daily sea ice concentration data. Sea ice data is generated from brightness temperature data derived from the sensors: Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP)-F13 Special Sensor Microwave/Imagers (SSM/Is), the DMSP-F17 Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) instrument on the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua satellite. We tried to figure out appearance of arctic sea ice melting region of polar cap from the data of passive microwave sensors. It is hard to explain polar sea ice melting only by atmosphere effects like surface air temperature or wind. Thus, our hypothesis explaining this phenomenon is that the heat from deep undersea in Arctic Ocean ridges and the hydrothermal vents might be contributing to the melting of Arctic sea ice.

  14. An evaluation of International Reference Ionosphere electron density in the polar cap and cusp using EISCAT Svalbard radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merete Bjoland, Lindis; Belyey, Vasyl; Løvhaug, Unni Pia; La Hoz, Cesar

    2016-09-01

    Incoherent scatter radar measurements are an important source for studies of ionospheric plasma parameters. In this paper the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR) long-term database is used to evaluate the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model. The ESR started operations in 1996, and the accumulated database up to 2012 thus covers 16 years, giving an overview of the ionosphere in the polar cap and cusp during more than one solar cycle. Data from ESR can be used to obtain information about primary plasma parameters: electron density, electron and ion temperature, and line-of-sight plasma velocity from an altitude of about 50 and up to 1600 km. Monthly averages of electron density and temperature and ion temperature and composition are also provided by the IRI model from an altitude of 50 to 2000 km. We have compared electron density data obtained from the ESR with the predicted electron density from the IRI-2016 model. Our results show that the IRI model in general fits the ESR data well around the F2 peak height. However, the model seems to underestimate the electron density at lower altitudes, particularly during winter months. During solar minimum the model is also less accurate at higher altitudes. The purpose of this study is to validate the IRI model at polar latitudes.

  15. High Frequency Cut-off and Changing of Radio Emission Mechanism in Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Kontorovich, V M

    2012-01-01

    Pulsars are the fast rotating neutron stars with strong magnetic field emitting over a wide frequency range. In spite of the efforts during 40 years after the discovery of pulsars, the mechanism of their radio emission remains to be unknown so far. We propose a new approach to solving this problem. The object of our study is a sample of pulsars with a high-frequency break of the spectrum from Pushchino catalogue. A theoretical explanation of the observed dependence of the high-frequency break from the pulsar period is given. The dependence of the break position from the magnetic field is predicted. This explanation is based on a new mechanism for electron emission in the inner polar gap. Radiation occurs when electrons are accelerated in the electric field rising from zero at the star surface. Acceleration passes through a maximum and tends to zero when the electron velocity approaches the velocity of light. The all radiated power is allocated to the radio band. The averaging over the polar cap, with some nat...

  16. The South Polar Residual Cap and Secular Climate Change on Mars: What Can We Learn From Observations and Models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberle, R. M.; Kahre, M.; Hollingsworth, J.; Barnes, J.; Forget, F.

    2009-12-01

    The prospect for multi-decadal secular climate change on Mars is a new concept that stems from observations of an apparently eroding South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC). Several years ago MOC images of the growth of circular depressions in the SPRC were interpreted to imply a net annual loss of approximately 2-10 x 10**9 m**3 of CO2 between 1999 and 2001 [1]. More recent studies using CTX images suggest a smaller loss, but one that is still potentially significant [2]. Taken together these data imply that if the all the CO2 sublimating from the SRPC goes into the atmosphere, as seems likely [3], an upper limit for the equivalent rate of increase in globally averaged surface pressure should be ~ 4 Pa per Mars Decade. About one and a half Mars decades have elapsed since the beginning of the Viking mission and the end of the Phoenix mission. If the net erosion of the SPRC has been steady during this period at the rate listed above, it would have produced about a 6 Pa increase in the global and annual mean surface pressure. Could such an increase be detected in the Viking and Phoenix pressure data? Clearly, this is a challenging question to answer, but one we feel needs careful examination. We report here the analysis of these data sets and the use of models to interpret them. Models are needed because surface pressure measurements at a few sites do not directly yield global mass budgets because dynamical processes and scale height changes influence surface pressure as well as seasonal exchange with the polar caps [4]. To reduce model uncertainties, we employ an ensemble of independently developed models including the NASA/Ames and LMD General Circulation Models, and the OSU MMM5 Mesoscale Model. References: [1] Malin, M.C. et al. (2001), Science, 294, 2146-2148. [2] Thomas, P. et al. (2009), Icarus, submitted. [3] Haberle, R.M. et al. (2009), 3rd International Workshop on Mars Polar Energy Balance and the CO2 Cycle (/http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meetings/mpeb2009). [4] Hourdin

  17. The temporal and spatial variations of low frequency geomagnetic pulsations at polar cusp and cap latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bitterly

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Geomagnetic field measurements at two Antarctic stations are compared during two weeks in the local summer (January 1-15, 1992. Low frequency (0.6-6 mHz pulsations are observed at each station near local magnetic noon. The same wave packets appear in some cases also at the other station, although with a significant attenuation, more clearly in the morning sector; the waves show a near noon reversal of the polarization sense from counter-clockwise in the morning to clockwise in the afternoon indicating a westward and an eastward propagation, respectively.

  18. The Electrodynamic, Thermal, and Energetic Character of Intense Sun- Aligned Arcs in the Polar Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    Vici’jewski et 0/.. 19891. with " detailed analysis of its optical. ion production-loss rates, and u 200 ionizing flux properties. Observed in the UV by...kIEMNr INsmrumE 1IICAi 0 MIlL N ORCANIZATION I (if aipplicable) r~ lk. AD01MV; (Cafy, 5ldtV.,J#dli /If’COUdt) 10 Stu JICI. U FUNUING NUNiIRS ’l-IJiAM...sented by R’ifl and Run h 119851. Their analysis implies a 1380 VALLADARES AND CARLSON: POLAR ARC ELECTRODYNAMICS/ENERGETICS four-cell convection

  19. Twist-induced Magnetosphere Reconfiguration for Intermittent Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Lei; Tong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    We propose that the magnetosphere reconfiguration induced by magnetic twists in the closed field line region can account for the mode-switching of intermittent pulsars. We carefully investigate the properties of axisymmetric force-free pulsar magnetospheres with magnetic twists in closed field line region around the polar caps. The magnetosphere with twisted closed lines leads to enhanced spin-down rates. The enhancement in spin-down rate depends on the size of region with twisted closed lines. Typically, it is increased by a factor of $\\sim2$, which is consistent with the intermittent pulsars' spin down behavior during the `off' and `on' states. We find there is a threshold of maximal twist angle $\\Delta\\phi_{\\rm thres}\\sim1$. The magnetosphere is stable only if the closed line twist angle is less than $\\Delta\\phi_{\\rm thres}$. Beyond this value, the magnetosphere becomes unstable and gets untwisted. The spin-down rate would reduce to its off-state value. The quasi-periodicity in spin-down rate change can be...

  20. Ground-based observations of the auroral zone and polar cap ionospheric responses to dayside transient reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Davies

    Full Text Available Observations from the EISCAT VHF incoherent scatter radar system in northern Norway, during a run of the common programme CP-4, reveal a series of poleward-propagating F-region electron density enhancements in the pre-noon sector on 23 November 1999. These plasma density features, which are observed under conditions of a strongly southward interplanetary magnetic field, exhibit a recurrence rate of under 10 min and appear to emanate from the vicinity of the open/closed field-line boundary from where they travel into the polar cap; this is suggestive of their being an ionospheric response to transient reconnection at the day-side magnetopause (flux transfer events. Simultaneous with the density structures detected by the VHF radar, poleward-moving radar auroral forms (PMRAFs are observed by the Finland HF coherent scatter radar. It is thought that PM-RAFs, which are commonly observed near local noon by HF radars, are also related to flux transfer events, although the specific mechanism for the generation of the field-aligned irregularities within such features is not well understood. The HF observations suggest, that for much of their existence, the PMRAFs trace fossil signatures of transient reconnection rather than revealing the footprint of active reconnection itself; this is evidenced not least by the fact that the PMRAFs become narrower in spectral width as they evolve away from the region of more classical, broad cusp scatter in which they originate. Interpretation of the HF observations with reference to the plasma parameters diagnosed by the incoherent scatter radar suggests that as the PMRAFs migrate away from the reconnection site and across the polar cap, entrained in the ambient antisunward flow, the irregularities therein are generated by the presence of gradients in the electron density, with these gradients having been formed through structuring of the ionosphere in the cusp region in response to transient reconnection

  1. Seasonal evolution of Titan's polar caps: interaction between atmospheric and subsurface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotin, C.

    2012-12-01

    Titan is the only satellite of the solar system with a dense atmosphere. It is also the only object, besides Earth, with stable liquid bodies at its surface. The (P,T) conditions at Titan's surface suggest that methane and ethane are liquid. Ethane has been detected in the lakes [1] whereas the signature of liquid methane is hidden by that of atmospheric methane which is the second most abundant atmospheric component. Methane is irreversibly transformed into ethane by photolysis. Titan's atmosphere contains very little ethane, which suggests that it is present in the surface (lakes) or/and the subsurface. Lakes are mostly located in the polar areas with many more lakes on the North Pole than on the South Pole. Ethane clouds above the North Pole have been identified during the winter when the atmospheric circulation leads to the formation of downwellings at the North Pole. Remote sensing instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft have recently witnessed the formation of the South Polar vortex after the equinox in August 2009. Ethane rain may now happen over the South Pole. Laboratory experiments show that ethane and methane can react with ice to form clathrates that are denser and more stable than pure ice. Laboratory experiments also suggest that ethane clathrates are more stable than methane clathrates. The atmosphere can be replenished in methane through the substitution of methane by ethane that rains and percolates into the subsurface [2]. Because ethane clathrates are denser than methane clathrates, such a process would lead to significant subsidence on geological time scales. It may explain why Titan's flattening is larger than that due to spin rate only [2]. The amount of ethane required to explain Titan's shape is in agreement with the a global resurfacing event that would have occurred between a few hundreds of Myrs and 1 Gyr as suggested by the density of impact craters [3] and the age of the atmospheric methane [4]. The Cassini observations and results

  2. An unusual giant spiral arc in the polar cap region during the northward phase of a Coronal Mass Ejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rosenqvist

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The shock arrival of an Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME at ~09:50 UT on 22 November 1997 resulted in the development of an intense (Dst<−100 nT geomagnetic storm at Earth. In the early, quiet phase of the storm, in the sheath region of the ICME, an unusual large spiral structure (diameter of ~1000 km was observed at very high latitudes by the Polar UVI instrument. The evolution of this structure started as a polewardly displaced auroral bulge which further developed into the spiral structure spreading across a large part of the polar cap. This study attempts to examine the cause of the chain of events that resulted in the giant auroral spiral. During this period the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF was dominantly northward (Bz>25 nT with a strong duskward component (By>15 nT resulting in a highly twisted tail plasma sheet. Geotail was located at the equatorial dawnside magnetotail flank and observed accelerated plasma flows exceeding the solar wind bulk velocity by almost 60%. These flows are observed on the magnetosheath side of the magnetopause and the acceleration mechanism is proposed to be typical for strongly northward IMF. Identified candidates to the cause of the spiral structure include a By induced twisted magnetotail configuration, the development of magnetopause surface waves due to the enhanced pressure related to the accelerated magnetosheath flows aswell as the formation of additional magnetopause deformations due to external solar wind pressure changes. The uniqeness of the event indicate that most probably a combination of the above effects resulted in a very extreme tail topology. However, the data coverage is insufficient to fully investigate the physical mechanism behind the observations.

  3. Evidence for thermospheric gravity waves in the southern polar cap from ground-based vertical velocity and photometric observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Innis

    Full Text Available Zenith-directed Fabry-Perot Spectrometer (FPS and 3-Field Photometer (3FP observations of the λ630 nm emission (~240 km altitude were obtained at Davis station, Antarctica, during the austral winter of 1999. Eleven nights of suitable data were searched for significant periodicities common to vertical winds from the FPS and photo-metric variations from the 3FP. Three wave-like events were found, each of around one or more hours in duration, with periods around 15 minutes, vertical velocity amplitudes near 60 ms–1 , horizontal phase velocities around 300 ms–1 , and horizontal wavelengths from 240 to 400 km. These characteristics appear consistent with polar cap gravity waves seen by other workers, and we conclude this is a likely interpretation of our data. Assuming a source height near 125 km altitude, we determine the approximate source location by calculating back along the wave trajectory using the gravity wave property relating angle of ascent and frequency. The wave sources appear to be in the vicinity of the poleward border of the auroral oval, at magnetic local times up to 5 hours before local magnetic midnight.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides

  4. Effect of temporal variation rate of cross polar cap potential on the equatorial ionospheric vertical drift: A statistical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Wen; XU JiSheng; WANG Hui; XU Liang

    2012-01-01

    Based on the equatorial vertical ion drift measured by DMSP and cross polar cap potential (φcpc) from AMIE output during 2001 to 2003,this paper investigates the relationship of φcpc and its temporal variation rate (△φcpc) with the disturbed ion velocity (ΔVx) which is the difference between the disturbed days (Kp≥4) and quiet days (Kp<2).The statistical analysis shows:(1)The ΔVx correlates better with Δφcpc than with φcpc,indicating that the electric field penetration is more easily to occur when solar wind input rapidly varies with time.(2) The optimal delay time of electric field penetration from the high-latitude magnetosphere to equatorial ionosphere has local time dependence which is longer on the nightside than on the dayside.It may be due to more complicated electrodynamic process on the nightside.(3) With the linear relationship between Δφcpc and ΔVx,it is obtained that the penetration efficiency is about 4.5%-13.9% at day and 31%-42% at night,coinciding well with former studies.

  5. Mesospheric observations with the EISCAT UHF radar during polar cap absorption events: 1. Electron densities and negative ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, P.N. (EISCAT Scientific Association Kiruna (SE)); Rietveld, M.T. (EISCAT Scientific Association, Ramfjordbotn, (NO))

    1990-12-01

    Observations of mesospheric electron density were obtained by the EISCAT UHF radar during several polar cap absorption events (PCA's) in 1989. Both the latitudinal extent and the detailed vertical distribution of the excess ionisation were determined. Continuous observations over more than two days during one event allowed an investigation of the variations in electron density during four twilight intervals. It is shown that at sunrise, at heights above 70 km, electrons are released by ultraviolet photodetachment of a high-affinity negative ion, which may be NO{sub 3}{sup -}. Below 66 km altitude, the increase of electron density is delayed by about 30 min, indicating that the time taken for neutral oxygen species to build up is a controlling factor in producing the free electrons at these heights. Both these processes are operative between 66 and 70 km altitude. Nighttime profiles of the ratio of negative ion number density to electron number density are deduced, and empirical relationships of electron concentration at heights between 60 and 70 km are determined as a function of simultaneously observed proton flux.

  6. Detection of pulsed gamma-ays above 25 GeV from the Crab pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E

    2008-01-01

    One fundamental unanswered question about pulsars concerns the mechanism of their pulsed electromagnetic radiation. Measuring the high end region of a pulsar's spectrum would shed light on this question, but has challenged ground- based experiments for three decades. By developing a new type of electronic trigger, we could lower the threshold of the MAGIC Cherenkov telescope to 25 GeV, a major breakthrough for this kind of instrument. We detected pulsed gamma-ays from the Crab above 25 GeV, revealing a relatively high energy cut-off in the phase-averaged spectrum. This indicates that emission happens far out in the magnetosphere. Also, the main-pulse and secondary pulse have similar amplitudes at 25 GeV. These results exclude the polar cap model and challenge the slot gap emission model for Crab.

  7. Searching for Pulsars Using Image Pattern Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W. W.; Berndsen, A.; Madsen, E. C.; Tan, M.; Stairs, I. H.; Brazier, A.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Scholz, P.; Stovall, K.; Ransom, S. M.; Banaszak, S.; Biwer, C. M.; Cohen, S.; Dartez, L. P.; Flanigan, J.; Lunsford, G.; Martinez, J. G.; Mata, A.; Rohr, M.; Walker, A.; Allen, B.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Desvignes, G.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kaspi, V. M.; Knispel, B.; Lee, K. J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lyne, A. G.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L. G.; Venkataraman, A.

    2014-02-01

    In the modern era of big data, many fields of astronomy are generating huge volumes of data, the analysis of which can sometimes be the limiting factor in research. Fortunately, computer scientists have developed powerful data-mining techniques that can be applied to various fields. In this paper, we present a novel artificial intelligence (AI) program that identifies pulsars from recent surveys by using image pattern recognition with deep neural nets—the PICS (Pulsar Image-based Classification System) AI. The AI mimics human experts and distinguishes pulsars from noise and interference by looking for patterns from candidate plots. Different from other pulsar selection programs that search for expected patterns, the PICS AI is taught the salient features of different pulsars from a set of human-labeled candidates through machine learning. The training candidates are collected from the Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) survey. The information from each pulsar candidate is synthesized in four diagnostic plots, which consist of image data with up to thousands of pixels. The AI takes these data from each candidate as its input and uses thousands of such candidates to train its ~9000 neurons. The deep neural networks in this AI system grant it superior ability to recognize various types of pulsars as well as their harmonic signals. The trained AI's performance has been validated with a large set of candidates from a different pulsar survey, the Green Bank North Celestial Cap survey. In this completely independent test, the PICS ranked 264 out of 277 pulsar-related candidates, including all 56 previously known pulsars and 208 of their harmonics, in the top 961 (1%) of 90,008 test candidates, missing only 13 harmonics. The first non-pulsar candidate appears at rank 187, following 45 pulsars and 141 harmonics. In other words, 100% of the pulsars were ranked in the top 1% of all candidates, while 80% were ranked higher than any noise or interference. The

  8. Searching for pulsars using image pattern recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, W. W.; Berndsen, A.; Madsen, E. C.; Tan, M.; Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 6224 Agricultural Road, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Brazier, A. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Lazarus, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Lynch, R.; Scholz, P. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Stovall, K.; Cohen, S.; Dartez, L. P.; Lunsford, G.; Martinez, J. G.; Mata, A. [Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [NRAO, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Banaszak, S.; Biwer, C. M.; Flanigan, J.; Rohr, M., E-mail: zhuww@phas.ubc.ca, E-mail: berndsen@phas.ubc.ca [Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics. University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); and others

    2014-02-01

    In the modern era of big data, many fields of astronomy are generating huge volumes of data, the analysis of which can sometimes be the limiting factor in research. Fortunately, computer scientists have developed powerful data-mining techniques that can be applied to various fields. In this paper, we present a novel artificial intelligence (AI) program that identifies pulsars from recent surveys by using image pattern recognition with deep neural nets—the PICS (Pulsar Image-based Classification System) AI. The AI mimics human experts and distinguishes pulsars from noise and interference by looking for patterns from candidate plots. Different from other pulsar selection programs that search for expected patterns, the PICS AI is taught the salient features of different pulsars from a set of human-labeled candidates through machine learning. The training candidates are collected from the Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (PALFA) survey. The information from each pulsar candidate is synthesized in four diagnostic plots, which consist of image data with up to thousands of pixels. The AI takes these data from each candidate as its input and uses thousands of such candidates to train its ∼9000 neurons. The deep neural networks in this AI system grant it superior ability to recognize various types of pulsars as well as their harmonic signals. The trained AI's performance has been validated with a large set of candidates from a different pulsar survey, the Green Bank North Celestial Cap survey. In this completely independent test, the PICS ranked 264 out of 277 pulsar-related candidates, including all 56 previously known pulsars and 208 of their harmonics, in the top 961 (1%) of 90,008 test candidates, missing only 13 harmonics. The first non-pulsar candidate appears at rank 187, following 45 pulsars and 141 harmonics. In other words, 100% of the pulsars were ranked in the top 1% of all candidates, while 80% were ranked higher than any noise or interference. The

  9. Spectral indices for radio emission of 228 pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun; Wang, Chen; Xu, Jun; Han, Jin-Lin

    2016-10-01

    We determine spectral indices of 228 pulsars by using Parkes pulsar data observed at 1.4 GHz, among which 200 spectra are newly determined. The indices are distributed in the range from ‑4.84 to ‑0.46. Together with known pulsar spectra from literature, we tried to find clues to the pulsar emission process. The weak correlations between the spectral index, the spin-down energy loss rate E and the potential drop in the polar gap ΔΨ hint that emission properties are related to the particle acceleration process in a pulsar's magnetosphere.

  10. ST5 Observations of the Imbalance of Region 1 and 2 Field-Aligned Currents and Its Implication to the Cross-Polar Cap Pedersen Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Guan; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we use the in-situ magnetic field observations from Space Technology 5 mission to quantify the imbalance of Region 1 (R1) and Region 2 (R2) currents. During the three-month duration of the ST5 mission, geomagnetic conditions range from quiet to moderately active. We find that the R1 current intensity is consistently stronger than the R2 current intensity both for the dawnside and the duskside large-scale field-aligned current system. The net currents flowing into (out of) the ionosphere in the dawnside (duskside) are in the order of 5% of the total R1 currents. We also find that the net currents flowing into or out of the ionosphere are controlled by the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction in the same way as the field-aligned currents themselves are. Since the net currents due to the imbalance of the R1 and R2 currents require that their closure currents flow across the polar cap from dawn to dusk as Pedersen currents, our results indicate that the total amount of the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents is in the order of 0.1 MA. This study, although with a very limited dataset, is one of the first attempts to quantify the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents. Given the importance of the Joule heating due to Pedersen currents to the high-latitude ionospheric electrodynamics, quantifying the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents and associated Joule heating is needed for developing models of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling.

  11. Particle acceleration and radio emission for SGRs/AXPs as white dwarf pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, R. V.; Coelho, Jaziel; Malheiro, M.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, an alternative model based on white dwarfs pulsars has been proposed to explain a class of pulsars known as Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGR) and Anomalus X-Ray Pulsars (AXP) [6][4], usually named as magnetars. In this model the magnetized white dwarfs can have surface magnetic field B ∼ 107 — 1010G and rotate very fast with frequencies ω ∼ 1 rad/s, allowing them to produce large electromagnetic (EM) potentials and generate electron-positron pairs. These EM potentials are comparable with the ones of neutron stars pulsars with strong magnetic fields. In our study we consider two possible processes associated with the particle acceleration: in one we have the pair production near to the star polar caps i.e., inside the light cylinder where magnetic-field lines are closed, on the other the creation of pair is in the Outer Magnetosphere i.e., far away of the star surface where magnetic field are open [1]. This analysis of the possibility of radio emission was done for all the 23 SGRs/AXPs of the McGill Online Magnetar Catalog [7] that contains the current information available on these sources. Our work is a first attempted to find an explanation for the puzzle why for all the SGRs/AXPs was expected radio emission, but it was observed in only four of them.

  12. Off-Beam Gamma-Ray Pulsars and Unidentified EGRET Sources in the Gould Belt

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K; Harding, Alice K.; Zhang, Bing

    2001-01-01

    We investigate whether gamma-ray pulsars viewed at a large angle to the neutron star magnetic pole could contribute to the new population of galactic unidentified EGRET sources associated with the Gould Belt. The faint, soft nature of these sources is distinctly different from both the properties of unidentified EGRET sources along the galactic plane and of the known gamma-ray pulsars. We explore the possibility, within the polar cap model, that some of these sources are emission from pulsars seen at lines of sight that miss both the bright gamma-ray cone beams and the radio beam. The off-beam gamma-rays come from high-altitude curvature emission of primary particles, are radiated over a large solid angle and have a much softer spectrum than that of the main beams. We estimate that the detectability of such off-beam emission is about a factor of 4-5 higher than that of the on-beam emission. At least some of the radio-quiet Gould Belt sources detected by EGRET could therefore be such off-beam gamma-ray pulsars...

  13. Non-thermal emissions from accreting X-ray binary pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Jin, Hui; Dong, Ai-Jun

    2014-03-01

    We study non-thermal emissions from cascade processes in accreting X-ray binary pulsars. In the framework of the magnetospheric gap model, we consider three photon fields, which are respectively from the polar cap of a pulsar, its surrounding accretion disk and a massive companion star with a circumstellar disk, to shield the gap. The gap-accelerated ultra-relativistic electrons emit high-energy photons via curvature radiation and an inverse Compton scattering process, in which part of these high-energy photons absorbed by interactions with the surrounding photon fields can facilitate the following electromagnetic cascades. We first carry out numerical calculations of the cascade processes in order to obtain the predicted emission spectra. As an example, we subsequently apply this model to reproduce observations of LS I +61° 303. We find that the results can fit observations ranging from hard X-ray to γ-ray bands. In particular, they can explain the spectral cutoff feature at a few GeV. Finally, we suggest that the emissions detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope from X-ray binary pulsars originate in the magnetosphere region of the pulsar.

  14. Probing millisecond pulsar emission geometry using light curves from the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Venter, C; Guillemot, L

    2009-01-01

    An interesting new high-energy pulsar sub-population is emerging following early discoveries of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We present results from 3D emission modeling, including the Special Relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and also rotational sweepback of B-field lines, in the geometric context of polar cap (PC), outer gap (OG), and two-pole caustic (TPC) pulsar models. In contrast to the general belief that these very old, rapidly-rotating neutron stars (NSs) should have largely pair-starved magnetospheres due to the absence of significant pair production, we find that most of the light curves are best fit by TPC and OG models, which indicates the presence of narrow accelerating gaps limited by robust pair production -- even in these pulsars with very low spin-down luminosities. The gamma-ray pulse shapes and relative phase lags with respect to the radio pulses point to high-altitude emission being dominant for all geometries. We...

  15. Synchrotron Self-Compton Emission from the Crab and Other Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, Alice K

    2015-01-01

    Results of a simulation of synchrotron-self Compton (SSC) emission from a rotation-powered pulsar are presented. The radiating particles are assumed to be both accelerated primary electrons and a spectrum of electron-positron pairs produced in cascades near the polar cap. They follow trajectories in a slot gap using 3D force-free magnetic field geometry, gaining pitch angles through resonant cyclotron absorption of radio photons, radiating and scattering synchrotron emission at high altitudes out to and beyond the light cylinder. Full angular dependence of the synchrotron photon density is simulated in the scattering and all processes are treated in the inertial observer frame. Spectra for the Crab and Vela pulsars as well as two energetic millisecond pulsars, B1821-24 and B1937+21 are simulated using this model. The simulation of the Crab pulsar radiation can reproduce both the flux level and the shape of the observed optical to hard X-ray emission assuming a pair multiplicity of $M_+ = 3 \\times 10^5$, as we...

  16. Nature of eclipsing pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Khechinashvili, D; Gil, J; Khechinashvili, David; Melikidze, George; Gil, Janusz

    2000-01-01

    We present a model for pulsar radio eclipses in some binary systems, and test this model for PSRs B1957+20 and J2051-0827. We suggest that in these binaries the companion stars are degenerate dwarfs with strong surface magnetic fields. The magnetospheres of these stars are permanently infused by the relativistic particles of the pulsar wind. We argue that the radio waves emitted by the pulsar split into the eigenmodes of the electron-positron plasma as they enter the companion's magnetosphere and are then strongly damped due to cyclotron resonance with the ambient plasma particles. Our model explains in a natural way the anomalous duration and behavior of radio eclipses observed in such systems. In particular, it provides stable, continuous, and frequency-dependent eclipses, in agreement with the observations. We predict a significant variation of linear polarization both at eclipse ingress and egress. In this paper we also suggest several possible mechanisms of generation of the optical and $X$-ray emission ...

  17. Influence of X-ray and polar cap absorptions on vertical and oblique sounding ionograms on different latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaalov, N. Y.; Moskaleva, E. V.; Rogov, D. D.; Zernov, N. N.

    2015-12-01

    High frequency (HF) radio band is important for the long-range communications and over-the-horizon surveillance, particularly in the polar cap region where the ground infrastructure may be limited. However, the space weather events drastically affect the high frequency radio wave propagation so that the ability to provide now-casting and forecasting of HF radio wave absorption is important for users relying on the HF communications. During the space weather events such as solar proton events and X-ray flares the high-latitude ionosphere becomes a particularly efficient absorber of HF radio waves. There is therefore a need to develop accurate HF propagation prediction services. Absorption of the HF field caused by the X-ray flux, Solar Ultra-Violet flux and proton precipitations is investigated in this paper for the event of the solar flare observed on 11 April 2013. The effects of the X-ray flux and proton precipitations on the structure of the vertical and oblique ionograms for different latitudes are estimated. The simulation of the vertical and oblique ionograms was performed on the basis of the computational model of the ionosphere oriented to applications into the high frequency wave propagation problems. The absorption effects induced by the proton precipitations and X-ray flux are calculated according to the algorithm elaborated by Sauer and Wilkinson and D-region Absorption Model (D-RAP) available from the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center. The simulated vertical and oblique ionograms with the absorption effects taken into account and the measured ionograms exhibit a fairly good similarity.

  18. Ephemeral liquid water at the surface of the martian North Polar Residual Cap: Results of numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losiak, Anna; Czechowski, Leszek; Velbel, Michael A.

    2015-12-01

    Gypsum, a mineral that requires water to form, is common on the surface of Mars. Most of it originated before 3.5 Gyr when the Red Planet was more humid than now. However, occurrences of gypsum dune deposits around the North Polar Residual Cap (NPRC) seem to be surprisingly young: late Amazonian in age. This shows that liquid water was present on Mars even at times when surface conditions were as cold and dry as the present-day. A recently proposed mechanism for gypsum formation involves weathering of dust within ice (e.g., Niles, P.B., Michalski, J. [2009]. Nat. Geosci. 2, 215-220.). However, none of the previous studies have determined if this process is possible under current martian conditions. Here, we use numerical modelling of heat transfer to show that during the warmest days of the summer, solar irradiation may be sufficient to melt pure water ice located below a layer of dark dust particles (albedo ⩽ 0.13) lying on the steepest sections of the equator-facing slopes of the spiral troughs within martian NPRC. During the times of high irradiance at the north pole (every 51 ka; caused by variation of orbital and rotational parameters of Mars e.g., Laskar, J. et al. [2002]. Nature 419, 375-377.) this process could have taken place over larger parts of the spiral troughs. The existence of small amounts of liquid water close to the surface, even under current martian conditions, fulfils one of the main requirements necessary to explain the formation of the extensive gypsum deposits around the NPRC. It also changes our understanding of the degree of current geological activity on Mars and has important implications for estimating the astrobiological potential of Mars.

  19. Polar Cap Potential Saturation during the Bastille Day Storm using Next Generation Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Global MHD Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Y.; Nagatsuma, T.; Den, M.; Tanaka, T.; Fujita, S.

    2015-12-01

    We are developing a real-time numerical simulator for the solar-wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system using next generation magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling global MHD simulation called REPPU (REProduce Plasma Universe) code. The feature of simulation has an advanced robustness to strong solar wind case because a triangular grid is used, which is able to calculate in the uniform accuracy over the whole region. Therefore we can simulate extreme event such as the Bastille day storm. The resolution is 7682 grids in the horizontal direction and 240 grids in the radial direction. The inner boundary of the simulation box is set at 2.6 Re. We investigate the reproduction of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling simulation in strong solar wind case. Therefore we compared the simulation results with the observation of the Bastille day storm event (2000/7/15), in which the solar wind velocity is above 1000 km/s and the value of Bz reached -60 nT. Especially, we focus the cross polar cap potential (CPCP) saturation and time variation because the CPCP represents the value of magnetospheric - ionospheric convection strength via region 1 current. The CPCP depends on solar wind electric field, dynamic pressure and ionospheric conductivity [Siscoe et al., 2002; Kivelson et al., 2008]. The model of Kivelson et al. [2008] shows a good reproduction to the CPCP variation. However their study assumes that the ionospheric conductivity is constant. The conductivity in our simulation of the Bastille day event is varied by the auroral activity. In this lecture, we discuss the effect of both the auroral conductance and solar EUV-driven conductance to CPCP saturation.

  20. The Coughing Pulsar Magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Contopoulos, I

    2005-01-01

    Polar magnetospheric gaps consume a fraction of the electric potential that develops accross open field lines. This effect modifies significantly the structure of the axisymmetric pulsar magnetosphere. We present numerical stead-state solutions for various values of the gap potential. We show that a charge starved magnetosphere contains significantly less electric current than one with freely available electric charges. As a result, electromagnetic neutron star braking becomes inefficient. We argue that the magnetosphere may spontaneously rearrange itself to a lower energy configuration through a dramatic release of electromagnetic field energy and magentic flux. Our results might be relevant in understanding the recent December 27, 2004 burst observed in SGR 1806-20.

  1. VARIABILITY OF THE PULSED RADIO EMISSION FROM THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD PULSAR PSR J0529-6652

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, F.; Altemose, D.; Li, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Lorimer, D. R. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2013-01-10

    We have studied the variability of PSR J0529-6652, a radio pulsar in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), using observations conducted at 1390 MHz with the Parkes 64 m telescope. PSR J0529-6652 is detectable as a single pulse emitter, with amplitudes that classify the pulses as giant pulses. This makes PSR J0529-6652 the second known giant pulse emitter in the LMC, after PSR B0540-69. The fraction of the emitted pulses detectable from PSR J0529-6652 at this frequency is roughly two orders of magnitude greater than it is for either PSR B0540-69 or the Crab pulsar (if the latter were located in the LMC). We have measured a pulse nulling fraction of 83.3% {+-} 1.5% and an intrinsic modulation index of 4.07 {+-} 0.29 for PSR J0529-6652. The modulation index is significantly larger than values previously measured for typical radio pulsars but is comparable to values reported for members of several other neutron star classes. The large modulation index, giant pulses, and large nulling fraction suggest that this pulsar is phenomenologically more similar to these other, more variable sources, despite having spin and physical characteristics that are typical of the unrecycled radio pulsar population. The large modulation index also does not appear to be consistent with the small value predicted for this pulsar by a model of polar cap emission outlined by Gil and Sendyk. This conclusion depends to some extent on the assumption that PSR J0529-6652 is exhibiting core emission, as suggested by its simple profile morphology, narrow profile width, and previously measured profile polarization characteristics.

  2. The Nearest Millisecond Pulsar Revisited with XMM-Newton: Improved Mass-Radius Constraints for PSR J0437-4715

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2012-01-01

    I present an analysis of the deepest X-ray exposure of a radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) to date, an X-ray Multi Mirror-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera spectroscopic and timing observation of the nearest known MSP, PSR J0437--4715. The timing data clearly reveal a secondary broad X-ray pulse offset from the main pulse by $\\sim$0.55 in rotational phase. In the context of a model of surface thermal emission from the hot polar caps of the neutron star, this can be plausibly explained by a magnetic dipole field that is significantly displaced from the stellar center. Such an offset, if commonplace in MSPs, has important implications for studies of the pulsar population, high energy pulsed emission, and the pulsar contribution to cosmic ray positrons. The continuum emission shows evidence for at least three thermal components, with the hottest radiation most likely originating from the hot magnetic polar caps and the cooler emission from the bulk of the surface. I present pulse phase-resolved X-ray spectrosco...

  3. Pulsars at Parkes

    CERN Document Server

    Manchester, R N

    2012-01-01

    The first pulsar observations were made at Parkes on March 8, 1968, just 13 days after the publication of the discovery paper by Hewish and Bell. Since then, Parkes has become the world's most successful pulsar search machine, discovering nearly two thirds of the known pulsars, among them many highly significant objects. It has also led the world in pulsar polarisation and timing studies. In this talk I will review the highlights of pulsar work at Parkes from those 1968 observations to about 2006 when the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey was essentially completed and the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project was established.

  4. Modeling of Gamma-Ray Pulsar Light Curves with Force-Free Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) Gamma-ray emission from pulsars has long been modeled using a vacuum dipole field. This approximation ignores changes in the field structure caused by the magnetospheric plasma and strong plasma currents. We present the first results of gamma-ray pulsar light curve modeling using the more realistic field taken from 3D force-free magnetospheric simulations. Having the geometry of the field, we apply several prescriptions for the location of the emission zone, comparing the light curves to observations. We find that the conventional two-pole caustic model fails to produce double-peak pulse profiles, mainly because the size of the polar cap in force-free magnetosphere is larger than the vacuum field polar cap. The conventional outer-gap model is capable of producing only one peak under general conditions, because a large fraction of open field lines does not cross the null charge surface. We propose a novel "annular gap" model, where the high-energy emission originates from a thin layer on the open fi...

  5. HST optical polarimetry of the Vela pulsar and nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, P.; Mignani, R. P.; Shearer, A.

    2014-11-01

    Polarization measurements of pulsars offer a unique insight into the geometry of the emission regions in the neutron star magnetosphere. Therefore, they provide observational constraints on the different models proposed for the pulsar emission mechanisms. Optical polarization data of the Vela pulsar was obtained from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) archive. The data, obtained in two filters (F606W, central wavelength = 590.70 nm and F550M, central wavelength = 558.15 nm), consist of a series of observations of the pulsar taken with the HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys and cover a time span of 5 d. These data have been used to carry out the first high spatial resolution and multi-epoch study of the polarization of the pulsar. We produced polarization vector maps of the region surrounding the pulsar and measured the degree of linear polarization (P.D.) and the position angle (P.A.) of the pulsar's integrated pulse beam. We obtained P.D. = 8.1 ± 0.7 per cent and P.A. = 146.3° ± 2.4°, averaged over the time span covered by these observations. These results not only confirm those originally obtained by Wagner & Seifert and Mignani et al., both using the Very Large Telescope, but are of greater precision. Furthermore, we confirm that the P.A. of the pulsar polarization vector is aligned with the direction of the pulsar proper motion. The pulsar wind nebula is undetected in polarized light as is the case in unpolarized light, down to a flux limit of 26.8 mag arcsec-2.

  6. On the power spectra of the wind-fed X-ray binary pulsar GX 301 - 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandini, Mauro; Morfill, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    A phenomenological model of accretion which is applied to the wind-fed X-ray binary pulsar GX 301 - 2 is developed, assuming that the accretion onto the neutron star does not occur from a continuous flux of plasma, but from blobs of matter which are threaded by the magnetic field lines onto the magnetic polar caps of the neutron star. These 'lumps' are produced at the magnetospheric limit by magnetohydrodynamical instability, introducing a 'noise' in the accretion process, due to the discontinuity in the flux of matter onto the neutron star. This model is able to describe the change of slope observed in the continuum component of the power spectra of the X-ray binary pulsar GX 301 - 2, in the frequency range 0.01 - 0.1 Hz. The physical properties of the infalling blobs derived in the model are in agreement with the constraints imposed by observations.

  7. Probing Millisecond Pulsar Emission Geometry Using Light Curves From the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Christo; Harding, Alice; Guillemot, L.

    2009-01-01

    An interesting new high-energy pulsar sub-population is emerging following early discoveries of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We present results from 3D emission modeling, including the Special Relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and also rotational sweepback of 13-field lines, in the geometric context of polar cap (PC), slot gap (SG), outer gap (OG), and two-pole caustic (TPC) pulsar models. In contrast to the general belief that these very old, rapidly-rotating neutron stars (NSs) should have largely pair-starved magnetospheres due to the absence of significant pair production, we find that most of the light curves are best fit by SG and OG models, which indicates the presence of narrow accelerating gaps limited by robust pair production -- even in these pulsars with very low spin-down luminosities. The gamma-ray pulse shapes and relative phase lags with respect to the radio pulses point to high-altitude emission being dominant for all geometries. We also find exclusive differentiation of the current gamma-ray MSP population into two MSP sub-classes: light curve shapes and lags across wavebands impose either pair-starved PC (PSPC) or SG / OG-type geometries. In the first case, the radio pulse has a small lag with respect to the single gamma-ray pulse, while the (first) gamma-ray peak usually trails the radio by a large phase offset in the latter case. Finally, we find that the flux correction factor as a function of magnetic inclination and observer angles is typically of order unity for all models. Our calculation of light curves and flux correction factor f(_, _, P) for the case of MSPs is therefore complementary to the "ATLAS paper" of Watters et al. for younger pulsars.

  8. Cervical Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I Help Someone Who's Being Bullied? Volunteering Cervical Cap KidsHealth > For Teens > Cervical Cap Print A A ... and a female's egg. How Does a Cervical Cap Work? The cervical cap keeps sperm from entering ...

  9. Evaporites on Ice: Experimental Assessment of Evaporites Formation on Antarctica (and on Martian North Polar Residual Cap)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losiak, Anna; Derkowski, Arkadiusz; Skala, Aleksander; Trzcinski, Jerzy

    2016-04-01

    Evaporites are highly water soluble minerals, formed as a result of the evaporation or freezing of bodies of water. They are common weathering minerals found on rocks (including meteorites) on Antarctic ice sheet [1,2,3,4]. The water necessary for the reaction is produced by melting of ice below the dark-colored meteorites which can heat up to a few degrees above 0 °C due to insolation heating during wind-free summer days [5,6]. The Martian North Polar Residual Cap is surrounded by a young [7] dune field that is rich in evaporitic mineral: gypsum [8]. Its existence implies that relatively recently in the Martian history (in late Amazonian, when surface conditions were comparable to the current ones) there was a significant amount of liquid water present on the Mars surface. One of the proposed solutions to this problem is that gypsum is formed by weathering on/in ice [9,10,11,12,13], similarly to the process occurring on the Antarctic ice sheet. Recently, Losiak et al. 2015 showed that that during the warmest days of the Martian summer, solar irradiation may be sufficient to melt pure water ice located below a layer of dark dust particles lying on the steepest sections of the equator-facing slopes of the spiral troughs within Martian NPRC. Under the current irradiation conditions, melting is possible in very restricted areas of the NPRC and it lasts for up to couple of hours, but during the times of high irradiance at the north pole [15] this process could have been much more pronounced. Liquid water can be metastable at the NPRC because the pressure during the summer season is ~760-650 Pa [16] which is above the triple point of water. The rate of free-surface "clean" liquid water evaporation under average Martian conditions determined experimentally by [17] is comparable to the rate of melting determined by [21] (if there is no wind at the surface). In the current study we attempt to determine experimentally how many melting-freezing cycles are required to form

  10. On the Light Curve and Spectra of X-Rays and Gamma-Rays from the Crab Pulsar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; K. S. Cheng; MEI Dong-Cheng

    2000-01-01

    We use a three-dimensional pulsar magnetosphere model to study the light curve and spectra of x-rays and gamma-rays from the Crab pulsar. In this model, the vertical size of the outer gap is first determined by a self-consistent model in which the outer gap is limited by pair production from collisions of thermal photons produced by polar cap heating of backflow outer gap current and curvature photons emitted by gap accelerated charged particles. The transverse size of the outer gap is determined by local pair production conditions. In principle, there are two topologically disconnected outer gaps present in the magnetosphere of a pulsar, and both incoming and outgoing particle flows are allowed. However, double-peak light curves with strong bridges are most common, Making use of the three-dimensional structure of the outer gap and its local properties, we compare the results of our model with the light curve and phase-resolved spectra of the Crab pulsar.

  11. Polar cap mesosphere wind observations: comparisons of simultaneous measurements with a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a field-widened Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, G M; Killeen, T L; Wu, Q; Reeves, J M; Hays, P B; Gault, W A; Brown, S; Shepherd, G G

    2000-08-20

    Polar cap mesospheric winds observed with a Fabry-Perot interferometer with a circle-to-line interferometer optical (FPI/CLIO) system have been compared with measurements from a field-widened Michelson interferometer optimized for E-region winds (ERWIN). Both instruments observed the Meinel OH emission emanating from the mesopause region (approximately 86 km) at Resolute Bay, Canada (74.9 degrees N, 94.9 degrees W). This is the first time, to our knowledge, that winds measured simultaneously from a ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometer and a ground-based Michelson interferometer have been compared at the same location. The FPI/CLIO and ERWIN instruments both have a capability for high temporal resolution (less than 10 min for a full scan in the four cardinal directions and the zenith). Statistical comparisons of hourly mean winds for both instruments by scatterplots show excellent agreement, indicating that the two optical techniques provide equivalent observations of mesopause winds. Small deviations in the measured wind can be ascribed to the different zenith angles used by the two instruments. The combined measurements illustrate the dominance of the 12-h wave in the mesopause winds at Resolute Bay, with additional evidence for strong gravity wave activity with much shorter periods (tens of minutes). Future operations of the two instruments will focus on observation of complementary emissions, providing a unique passive optical capability for the determination of neutral winds in the geomagnetic polar cap at various altitudes near the mesopause.

  12. VISIONS: Remote Observations of a Spatially-Structured Filamentary Source of Energetic Neutral Atoms near the Polar Cap Boundary During an Auroral Substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Chornay, D.; Clemmons, J.; Keller, J. W.; Klenzing, J.; Kujawski, J.; McLain, J.; Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Zettergren, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report initial results from the VISualizing Ion Outflow via Neutral atom imaging during a Substorm (VISIONS) rocket that flew through and near several regions of enhanced auroral activity and also sensed regions of ion outflow both remotely and directly. The observed neutral atom fluxes were largest at the lower energies and generally higher in the auroral zone than in the polar cap. In this paper, we focus on data from the latter half of the VISIONS trajectory when the rocket traversed the polar cap region. During this period, many of the energetic neutral atom spectra show a peak at 100 electronvolts. Spectra with peaks around 100 electronvolts are also observed in the Electrostatic Ion Analyzer (EIA) data consistent with these ions comprising the source population for the energetic neutral atoms. The EIA observations of this low energy population extend only over a few tens of kilometers. Furthermore, the directionality of the arriving energetic neutral atoms is consistent with either this spatially localized source of energetic ions extending from as low as about 300 kilometers up to above 600 kilometers or a larger source of energetic ions to the southwest.

  13. XMM-Newton Observation of the nearby Pulsar B1133+16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szary, Andrzej; Gil, Janusz; Zhang, Bing; Haberl, Frank; Melikidze, George I.; Geppert, Ulrich; Mitra, Dipanjan; Xu, Ren-Xin

    2017-02-01

    We constrain the X-ray properties of the nearby (360 {pc}), old (5 {Myr}) pulsar B1133+16 with ∼ 100 {ks} effective exposure time by XMM-Newton. The observed pulsar flux in the 0.2–3 keV energy range is ∼ {10}-14 {erg} {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1, which results in the recording of ∼600 source counts with the EPIC pn and MOS detectors. The X-ray radiation is dominated by nonthermal radiation and is well described by both a single power-law model (PL) and a sum of blackbody and power-law emission (BB+PL). The BB+PL model results in a spectral photon index {{Γ }}={2.4}-0.3+0.4 and a nonthermal flux in the 0.2–3 keV energy range of (7+/- 2)× {10}-15 {erg} {{cm}}-2 {{{s}}}-1. The thermal emission is consistent with the blackbody emission from a small hot spot with a radius of {R}{pc}≈ {14}-5+7 {{m}} and a temperature of {T}{{s}}={2.9}-0.4+0.6 {MK}. Assuming that the hot spot corresponds to the polar cap of the pulsar, we can use the magnetic flux conservation law to estimate the magnetic field at the surface {B}{{s}}≈ 3.9× {10}14 {{G}}. The observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the partially screened gap model, which assumes the existence of small-scale surface magnetic field structures in the polar cap region.

  14. Soft X ray properties of the Geminga pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, J. P.; Ruderman, M.

    1993-01-01

    The ROSAT soft x ray spectrum and pulse profile of the Geminga pulsar are analyzed and interpreted in terms of thermal emission from the surface of the neutron star. The x ray spectrum appears to consist of two blackbody components with T1 = (5.2 +/- 1.0) x 10 5 K and T2 approximately 3 x 106 K, respectively. The inferred ratio of surface areas, A2/A1, is approximately 3 x 10-5. Both components are highly modulated at the pulsar rotation period, but the harder x ray pulse is narrower, and leads the main (soft) x ray pulse by about 105 deg of phase. The soft x ray component is interpreted as photospheric cooling of much of the neutron star's surface area, while the small, hot region could be part of the much smaller polar cap heated by energetic particles flowing inward from the magnetospheric accelerator which is responsible for the production of Geminga's gamma rays. Geminga's gamma ray emission is consistent with outer-magnetosphere accelerator models for highly inclined dipoles. These predict the beaming of energetic gamma rays close enough to the star to give copious e(+/-) production in the stellar magnetic field and a large circumstellar pair density from pair inflow toward the surface. These pairs may quench radio emission, and also reflect most of the hard polar cap x rays back to the stellar surface by cyclotron resonance scattering. They are then reemitted from that much larger area at the lower temperature T1. The single-peaked nature of the x ray pulse and its energy-dependent phase suggest an off-center dipole geometry for the surface magnetic field. Under the assumption that the soft x ray emission comes from the full surface of a neutron star of radius R = 10 km, a distance estimate of (150-400) pc is derived. This range is consistent with the fit interstellar column density of (1.5 +/- 0.5) x 1020 cm-2. Distances less than 150 pc are probably ruled out both by the lower limit on the column density, and also by the requirement that the Rayleigh

  15. Binary and Millisecond Pulsars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorimer Duncan R.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the main properties, demographics and applications of binary and millisecond radio pulsars. Our knowledge of these exciting objects has greatly increased in recent years, mainly due to successful surveys which have brought the known pulsar population to over 1800. There are now 83 binary and millisecond pulsars associated with the disk of our Galaxy, and a further 140 pulsars in 26 of the Galactic globular clusters. Recent highlights include the discovery of the young relativistic binary system PSR J1906+0746, a rejuvination in globular cluster pulsar research including growing numbers of pulsars with masses in excess of 1.5M_⊙, a precise measurement of relativistic spin precession in the double pulsar system and a Galactic millisecond pulsar in an eccentric (e = 0.44 orbit around an unevolved companion.

  16. Extended Acceleration in Slot Gaps and Pulsar High-Energy Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Muslimov, A G; Muslimov, Alex G.; Harding, Alice K.

    2003-01-01

    We revise the physics of primary electron acceleration in the "slot gap" (SG) above the pulsar polar caps (PCs), a regime originally proposed by Arons and Scharlemann (1979) in their electrodynamic model of pulsar PCs. We employ the standard definition of the SG as a pair-free space between the last open field lines and the boundary of the pair plasma column which is expected to develop above the bulk of the PC. The rationale for our revision is that the proper treatment of primary acceleration within the pulsar SGs should take into account the effect of the narrow geometry of the gap on the electrodynamics within the gap and also to include the effect of inertial frame dragging on the particle acceleration. The combination of the effects of frame dragging and geometrical screening in the gap region naturally gives rise to a regime of extended acceleration, that is not limited to "favorably curved" field lines as in earlier models, and the possibility of multiple-pair production by curvature photons at very h...

  17. The Attenuation of $\\gamma$-Ray Emission in Strongly-Magnetized Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Gonthier, P L; Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.; Gonthier, Peter L.

    1997-01-01

    Gamma-rays from pulsars can be efficiently attenuated in their magnetospheres via the mechanism of single-photon pair production and also the exotic QED process of photon splitting, which become prolific in fields approaching the quantum critical value of $B_{cr}=4.41\\times 10^{13}$ Gauss. Recently we have published results of our modelling of strongly-magnetized $\\gamma$-ray pulsars, which focused on the escape or attenuation of photons emitted near the pole at the neutron star surface in dipole fields, in a Schwarzschild metric. We found that pair production and splitting totally inhibit emission above around 10--30 MeV in PSR1509-58, whose surface field is inferred to be as high as $0.7B_{cr}$. Our model pulsar spectra are consistent with the EGRET upper limits for PSR1509-58 for a wide range of polar cap sizes. Here we review the principal predictions of our attenuation analysis, and identify how its powerful observational diagnostic capabilities relate to current and future gamma-ray experiments. Diagnos...

  18. Population synthesis of radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsars using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonthier, Peter L.; Koh, Yew-Meng; Kust Harding, Alice

    2016-04-01

    We present preliminary results of a new population synthesis of millisecond pulsars (MSP) from the Galactic disk using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to better understand the model parameter space. We include empirical radio and gamma-ray luminosity models that are dependent on the pulsar period and period derivative with freely varying exponents. The magnitudes of the model luminosities are adjusted to reproduce the number of MSPs detected by a group of thirteen radio surveys as well as the MSP birth rate in the Galaxy and the number of MSPs detected by Fermi. We explore various high-energy emission geometries like the slot gap, outer gap, two pole caustic and pair starved polar cap models. The parameters associated with the birth distributions for the mass accretion rate, magnetic field, and period distributions are well constrained. With the set of four free parameters, we employ Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations to explore the model parameter space. We present preliminary comparisons of the simulated and detected distributions of radio and gamma-ray pulsar characteristics. We estimate the contribution of MSPs to the diffuse gamma-ray background with a special focus on the Galactic Center.We express our gratitude for the generous support of the National Science Foundation (RUI: AST-1009731), Fermi Guest Investigator Program and the NASA Astrophysics Theory and Fundamental Program (NNX09AQ71G).

  19. Stokes tomography of radio pulsar magnetospheres. II. Millisecond pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, C T Y

    2011-01-01

    The radio polarization characteristics of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) differ significantly from those of non-recycled pulsars. In particular, the position angle (PA) swings of many MSPs deviate from the S-shape predicted by the rotating vector model, even after relativistic aberration is accounted for, indicating that they have non-dipolar magnetic geometries, likely due to a history of accretion. Stokes tomography uses phase portraits of the Stokes parameters as a diagnostic tool to infer a pulsar's magnetic geometry and orientation. This paper applies Stokes tomography to MSPs, generalizing the technique to handle interpulse emission. We present an atlas of look-up tables for the Stokes phase portraits and PA swings of MSPs with current-modified dipole fields, filled core and hollow cone beams, and two empirical linear polarization models. We compare our look-up tables to data from 15 MSPs and find that the Stokes phase portraits for a current-modified dipole approximately match several MSPs whose PA swings ...

  20. Solution to the Sigma-Problem of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Porth, Oliver; Keppens, Rony

    2012-01-01

    We present first results of three dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamical simulations of Pulsar Wind Nebulae. They show that the kink instability and magnetic dissipation inside these nebulae may be the key processes allowing to reconcile their observations with the theory of pulsar winds. In particular, the size of the termination shock, obtained in the simulations, agrees very well with the observations even for Poynting-dominated pulsar winds. Due to magnetic dissipation the total pressure in the simulated nebulae is particle-dominated and more or less uniform. While in the main body of the simulated nebulae the magnetic field becomes rather randomized, close to the termination shock, it is dominated by the regular toroidal field freshly injected by the pulsar wind. This field is responsible for driving polar outflows and may explain the high polarization observed in pulsar wind nebulae.

  1. Centrifugal acceleration of plasma in pulsar magnetosphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R T Gangadhara; V Krishna

    2003-12-01

    We present a relativistic model for the centrifugal acceleration of plasma bunches and the coherent radio emission in pulsar magnetosphere. We find that rotation broadens the width of leading component compared to the width of trailing component. We explain this difference in the component widths using the nested cone emission geometry. We estimate the effect of pulsar spin on the Stokes parameters, and find that the inclination between the rotation and magnetic axes can introduce an asymmetry in the circular polarization of the conal components. We analyse the single pulse polarization data of PSR B0329+54 at 606 MHz, and find that in its conal components, one sense of circular polarization dominates in the leading component while the other sense dominates in the trailing component. Our simulation shows that changing the sign of the impact parameter changes the sense of circular polarization as well as the swing of polarization angle.

  2. TOWARD AN EMPIRICAL THEORY OF PULSAR EMISSION. XI. UNDERSTANDING THE ORIENTATIONS OF PULSAR RADIATION AND SUPERNOVA “KICKS”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rankin, Joanna M., E-mail: Joanna.Rankin@uvm.edu [Physics Department, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States)

    2015-05-10

    Two entwined problems have remained unresolved since pulsars were discovered nearly 50 yr ago: the orientation of their polarized emission relative to the emitting magnetic field and the direction of putative supernova “kicks” relative to their rotation axes. The rotational orientation of most pulsars can be inferred only from the (“fiducial”) polarization angle of their radiation, when their beam points directly at the Earth and the emitting polar fluxtube field is ∥ to the rotation axis. Earlier studies have been unrevealing owing to the admixture of different types of radiation (core and conal, two polarization modes), producing both ∥ or ⊥ alignments. In this paper we analyze some 50 pulsars having three characteristics: core radiation beams, reliable absolute polarimetry, and accurate proper motions (PMs). The “fiducial” polarization angle of the core emission, we then find, is usually oriented ⊥ to the PM direction on the sky. The primary core emission is polarized ⊥ to the projected magnetic field in Vela and other pulsars where X-ray imaging reveals the orientation. This shows that the PMs usually lie ∥ to the rotation axes on the sky. Two key physical consequences then follow: first, to the extent that supernova “kicks” are responsible for pulsar PMs, they are mostly ∥ to the rotation axis; and, second, most pulsar radiation is heavily processed by the magnetospheric plasma such that the lowest altitude “parent” core emission is polarized ⊥ to the emitting field, propagating as the extraordinary (X) mode.

  3. Analysis of vanillic acid in polar ice cores as a biomass burning proxy - preliminary results from the Akademii Nauk Ice Cap in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieman, M. M.; Jimenez, R.; McConnell, J. R.; Fritzsche, D.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    Biomass burning influences global climate change and the composition of the atmosphere. The drivers, effects, and climate feedbacks related to fire are poorly understood. Many different proxies have been used to reconstruct past fire frequency from lake sediments and polar ice cores. Reconstruction of historical trends in biomass burning is challenging because of regional variability and the qualitative nature of various proxies. Vanillic acid (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid) is a product of the combustion of conifer lignin that is known to occur in biomass burning aerosols. Biomass burning is likely the only significant source of vanillic acid in polar ice. In this study we describe an analytical method for quantifying vanillic acid in polar ice using HPLC with electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometric detection. The method has a detection limit of 100 pM and a precision of × 10% at the 100 pM level for analysis of 100 μl of ice melt water. The method was used to analyze more than 1000 discrete samples from the Akademii Nauk ice cap on Severnaya Zemlya in the high Russia Arctic (79°30'N, 97°45'E) (Fritzsche et al., 2002; Fritzsche et al., 2005; Weiler et al., 2005). The samples range in age over the past 2,000 years. The results show a mean vanillic acid concentration of 440 × 710 pM (1σ), with elevated levels during the periods from 300-600 and 1450-1550 C.E.

  4. Observations of the northern seasonal polar cap on Mars II: HiRISE photometric analysis of evolution of northern polar dunes in spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Pommerol, Antoine; Aye, Klaus-Michael; Hansen, Candice J.; Thomas, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    We present an overview of our analyses of HiRISE observations of spring evolution of selected dune areas of the north polar erg. The north polar erg is covered annually by seasonal volatile ice layer, a mixture of CO2 and H2O with mineral dust contamination. In spring, this layer sublimes creating visually enigmatic phenomena, e.g. dark and bright fan-shaped deposits, dark-bright-dark bandings, dark down-slope streaks, and seasonal polygonal cracks. Similar phenomena in southern polar areas are believed to be related to the specific process of solid-state greenhouse effect. In the north, it is currently unclear if the solid-state greenhouse effect is able to explain all the observed phenomena especially because the increased influence of H2O on the time scales of this process has not yet been quantified. HiRISE observations of our selected locations show that the ground exhibits a temporal behaviour similar to the one observed in the southern polar areas: a brightening phase starting close to the spring equinox with a subsequent darkening towards summer solstice. The resolution of HiRISE enabled us to study dunes and substrate individually and even distinguish between different developments on windward and slip face sides of single dunes. Differences in the seasonal evolution between steep slip faces and flatter substrate and windward sides of dunes have been identified and compared to CRISM data of CO2 and H2O distributions on dunes. We also observe small scale dark blotches that appear in early observations and tend to sustain a low reflectivity throughout the spring. These blotches can be regarded as the analogue of dark fan deposits in southern polar areas, leading us to the conclusion that both martian polar areas follow similar spring evolutions.

  5. Time-dependent pair cascades in magnetospheres of neutron stars I. Dynamics of the polar cap cascade with no particle supply from the neutron star surface

    CERN Document Server

    Timokhin, A N

    2010-01-01

    I argue that the problem of electromagnetically driven electron-positron cascades in magnetospheres of neutron stars must be addressed starting from first principles. I describe a general numerical algorithm for doing self-consistent kinetic simulations of electron-positron cascades -- wherein particle acceleration, pair creation and screening of the electric field are calculated simultaneously -- and apply it to model the Ruderman and Sutherland (1975) cascade in one dimension. I find that pair creation is quite regular and quasi-periodic. In each cycle a blob of ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasma is generated, it propagates into the magnetosphere leaving a tail of less relativistic plasma behind, and the next discharge occurs when this mildly relativistic plasma leaves the polar cap. A short burst of pair formation is followed by a longer quiet phase when accelerating electric field is screened and no pairs are produced. Some of freshly injected electron-positrons pairs get trapped in plasma oscilla...

  6. On the possibility of upper mesosphere temperature changes observed in PMSE and incoherent scatter during a strong polar cap absorption event - revisited -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roettger, Juergen [EISCAT-CAWSES-Copernicus, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Max-Planck-Institute, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Middle of July 2000 an extremely strong solar proton event happened (named ''Bastille II''), which caused major polar cap absorption (PCA) due to the strong increase of D-region electron density by high energy particle precipitation. The concurrent ionospheric disturbances led to enhanced electric fields, which caused an increase of the ion drift and the neutral wind in the lower thermosphere and possibly the upper mesosphere as well. Through the enhanced ion drag, increases of ion and neutral temperature are usually resulting, which are also known as Joule heating. It is revisted here how it was tried to recognize this in coherent scatter observations of PMSE with the SOUSY Svalbard Radar (SSR on 53.5 MHz) and observations of incoherent scatter with the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR on 500 MHz). We find two independent observations, which indicate a potential small temperature increase of the upper mesopause region, which can be due to ion heating.

  7. Fermi pulsar revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Caraveo, Patrizia A

    2010-01-01

    2009 has been an extraordinary year for gamma-ray pulsar astronomy and 2010 promises to be equally good. Not only have we registered an extraordinary increase in the number of pulsars detected in gamma rays, but we have also witnessed the birth of new sub-families: first of all, the radio-quiet gamma pulsars and later an ever growing number of millisecond pulsars, a real surprise. We started with a sample of 7 gamma-ray emitting neutron stars (6 radio pulsars and Geminga) and now the Fermi-LAT harvest encompasses 24 "Geminga-like" new gamma-ray pulsars, a dozen millisecond pulsars and about thirty radio pulsars. Moreover, radio searches targeted to LAT unidentified sources yielded 18 new radio millisecond pulsars, several of which have been already detected also in gamma rays. Thus, currently the family of gamma-ray emitting neutron stars seems to be evenly divided between classical radio pulsars, millisecond pulsars and radio quiet neutron stars.

  8. The interannual variability of polar cap recessions as a measure of Martian climate and weather: Using Earth-based data to augment the time line for the Mars observer mapping mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L. J.; James, P. B.

    1992-01-01

    The recessions of the polar ice caps are the most visible and most studied indication of seasonal change on Mars. Circumstantial evidence links these recessions to the seasonal cycles of CO2, water, and dust. The possible advent of a planet encircling storm during the Mars Observer (MO) mission will provide a detailed correlation with a cap recession for that one Martian year. That cap recession will then be compared with other storm and nonstorm years. MO data will also provide a stronger link between cap recessions and the water and CO2 cycles. Cap recession variability might also be used to determine the variability of these cycles. After nearly a century of valiant attempts at measuring polar cap recessions, including Mariner 9 and Viking data, MO will provide the first comprehensive dataset. In contrast to MO, the older data are much less detailed and precise and could be forgotten, except that it will still be the only information on interannual variability. By obtaining simultaneous Earth-based observations (including those from Hubble) during the MO mission, direct comparisons can be made between the datasets.

  9. The braking indices in pulsar emission models

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, F; Gil, J; Gil, Janusz

    2003-01-01

    Using the method proposed in a previous paper, we calculate pulsar braking indices in the models with torque contributions from both inner and outer accelerating regions, assuming that the interaction between them is negligible. We suggest that it is likely that the inverse Compton scattering induced polar vacuum gap and the outer gap coexist in the pulsar magnetosphere. We include the new near threshold vacuum gap models with curvature-radiation and inverse Compton scattering induced cascades, respectively; and find that these models can well reproduce the measured values of the braking indices.

  10. Pulsar Ephemerides for Timing LAT Pulsars

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Timing pulsars with the LAT requires the use of an ephemeris that covers the time period being analyzed. Below are several resources to provide this useful input to...

  11. Srv2/CAP is required for polarized actin cable assembly and patch internalization during clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshima, Junko Y; Horikomi, Chika; Okada, Asuka; Hatori, Makiko N; Nagano, Makoto; Masuda, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Wataru; Siekhaus, Daria Elisabeth; Toshima, Jiro

    2016-01-15

    The dynamic assembly and disassembly of actin filaments is essential for the formation and transport of vesicles during endocytosis. In yeast, two types of actin structures, namely cortical patches and cytoplasmic cables, play a direct role in endocytosis, but how their interaction is regulated remains unclear. Here, we show that Srv2/CAP, an evolutionarily conserved actin regulator, is required for efficient endocytosis owing to its role in the formation of the actin patches that aid initial vesicle invagination and of the actin cables that these move along. Deletion of the SRV2 gene resulted in the appearance of aberrant fragmented actin cables that frequently moved past actin patches, the sites of endocytosis. We find that the C-terminal CARP domain of Srv2p is vitally important for the proper assembly of actin patches and cables; we also demonstrate that the N-terminal helical folded domain of Srv2 is required for its localization to actin patches, specifically to the ADP-actin rich region through an interaction with cofilin. These results demonstrate the in vivo roles of Srv2p in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton during clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

  12. Pulsars and Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Manchester, R N

    2015-01-01

    Pulsars are wonderful gravitational probes. Their tiny size and stellar mass give their rotation periods a stablility comparable to that of atomic frequency standards. This is especially true of the rapidly rotating "millisecond pulsars" (MSPs). Many of these rapidly rotating pulsars are in orbit with another star, allowing pulsar timing to probe relativistic perturbations to the orbital motion. Pulsars have provided the most stringent tests of theories of relativistic gravitation, especially in the strong-field regime, and have shown that Einstein's general theory of relativity is an accurate description of the observed motions. Many other gravitational theories are effectively ruled out or at least severely constrained by these results. MSPs can also be used to form a "Pulsar Timing Array" (PTA). PTAs are Galactic-scale interferometers that have the potential to directly detect nanohertz gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. Orbiting super-massive black holes in the cores of distant galaxies are t...

  13. First science with SALT: peering at the accreting polar caps of the eclipsing polar SDSS J015543.40+002807.2

    CERN Document Server

    O'Donoghue, D; Balona, L A; Bester, D; Botha, L; Brink, J; Carter, D B; Charles, P A; Christians, A; Ebrahim, F; Emmerich, R; Esterhuyse, W; Evans, G P; Fourie, C; Fourie, P; Gajjar, H; Gordon, M; Gumede, C; De Kock, M; Koeslag, A; Koorts, W P; Kriel, H; Marang, F; Meiring, J G; Menzies, J W; Menzies, P; Metcalfe, D; Meyer, B; Nel, L; O'Connor, J; Osman, F; Plessis, C; Rall, H; Riddick, A; Romero-Colmenero, E; Potter, S B; Sass, C; Schalekamp, H; Sessions, N; Siyengo, S; Sopela, V; Steyn, H; Stoffels, J; Stoltz, J; Swart, G; Swat, A; Swiegers, J; Tiheli, T; Väisänen, P; Whittaker, W; Van Wyk, F

    2006-01-01

    We describe briefly the properties of the recently completed Southern African Large Telescope (SALT), along with its first light imager SALTICAM. Using this instrument, we present 4.3 hr of high speed unfiltered photometric observations of the eclipsing polar SDSSJ015543.40+002807.2 with time resolution as short as 112 ms, the highest quality observations of this kind of any polar to date. The system was observed during its high luminosity state. Two accreting poles are clearly seen in the eclipse light curve. The binary system parameters have been constrained: the white dwarf mass is at the low end of the range expected for cataclysmic variables. Correlations between the positions of the accretion regions on or near the surface of the white dwarf and the binary system parameters were established. The sizes of the accretion regions and their relative movement from eclipse to eclipse were estimated: they are typically 4-7 deg depending on the mass of the white dwarf. The potential of these observations will on...

  14. Statistical Analysis of I Stokes Parameter of Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Panahi, Hossein; Monadi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) and box counting method, we test spacial correlation and fractality of Polarization Pulse Profiles (PPPs) of 24 millisecond pulsars (MSPs) which were observed in Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project. DFA analysis indicates that MSPs' PPPs are persistent and the results of box counting method confirm the fractality in the majority of PPPs. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test indicates that isolated MSPs have more complex PPPs than binary ones. Then we apply our analysis on a random sample of normal pulsars. Comparing the results of our analysis on MSPs and normal pulsars shows that MSPs have more complex PPPs which is resulted from smaller angular half-width of the emission cone and more peaks in MSPs PPPs. On the other hand, high values of Hurst exponent in MSPs confirm compact emission regions in these pulsars.

  15. Revealing the X-ray emission processes of old rotation-powered pulsars: XMM-Newton Observations of PSR B0950+08,PSR B0823+26 and PSR J2043+2740

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, W; Tennant, A F; Jessner, A; Dyks, J; Harding, A K; Zhang, S N; Becker, Werner; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Jessner, Axel; Dyks, Jaroslaw; Harding, Alice K.; Zhang, Shuang N.

    2004-01-01

    We have completed part of a program to study the X-ray emission properties of old rotation-powered pulsars with XMM-Newton in order to probe and identify the origin of their X-radiation. The X-ray emission from these old pulsars is largely dominated by non-thermal processes. None of the observed spectra required adding a thermal component consisting of either a hot polar cap or surface cooling emission to model the data. The X-ray spectrum of PSR 0950+08 is best described by a single power law of photon-index 1.93^{+0.14}_{-0.12}.Taking optical data from the VLT FORS1 into account a broken power law model is found to describe the pulsar's broadband spectrum from the optical to the X-ray band. Temperature upper limits for possible contributions from a heated polar cap or the whole neutron star surface are T_{pc} < 0.87 x10^6 K and T_s < 0.48 x 10^6 K, respectively. We also find that the X-ray emission from PSR 0950+08 is pulsed with two peaks per rotation period. The phase separation between the two X-ra...

  16. Toward an Empirical Theory of Pulsar Emission XI. Understanding the Orientations of Pulsar Radiation and Supernova "Kicks"

    CERN Document Server

    Rankin, Joanna M

    2015-01-01

    Two entwined problems have remained unresolved since pulsars were discovered nearly 50 years ago: the orientation of their polarized emission relative to the emitting magnetic field and the direction of putative supernova ``kicks' relative to their rotation axes. The rotational orientation of most pulsars can be inferred only from the (``fiducial') polarization angle of their radiation, when their beam points directly at the Earth and the emitting polar fluxtube field is $\\parallel$ to the rotation axis. Earlier studies have been unrevealing owing to the admixture of different types of radiation (core and conal, two polarization modes), producing both $\\parallel$ or $\\perp$ alignments. In this paper we analyze the some 50 pulsars having three characteristics: core radiation beams, reliable absolute polarimetry, and accurate proper motions. The ``fiducial' polarization angle of the core emission, we then find, is usually oriented $\\perp$ to the proper-motion direction on the sky. As the primary core emission i...

  17. Pulsar Death at an Advanced Age

    CERN Document Server

    Arons, J

    1999-01-01

    I summarize the theory of acceleration of non-neutral particle beams by starvation electric fields along the polar magnetic field lines of rotation powered pulsars, including the effect of dragging of inertial frames which dominates the acceleration of a space charge limited beam. I apply these results to a new calculation of the radio pulsar death line, under the hypotheses that pulsar ``death'' corresponds to cessation of pair creation over the magnetic poles {\\it and} that the magnetic field has a locally dipolar topology. The frame dragging effect in star centered dipole geometry does improve comparison of the theory with observation, but an unacceptably large conflict between observation and theory still persists. Offsetting the dipole improves the comparison, but a fully satisfactory theory requires incorporating magnetic conversion of inverse Compton gamma rays, created by scattering thermal photons from the surface of old neutron stars ($t > 10^8 $ years) kept warm ($T \\geq 10^5$ K) by friction betwee...

  18. Modelling and simulation of large-scale polarized dust emission over the southern Galactic cap using the GASS HI data

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Tuhin; Martin, Peter G; Bracco, Andrea; Vansyngel, Flavien; Aumont, Jonathan; Bock, Jamie; Doré, Olivier; Haud, Urmas; Kalberla, Peter M W; Serra, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The Planck survey has quantified polarized Galactic foregrounds and established that they are a main limiting factor in the quest for the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode signal induced by primordial gravitational waves during cosmic inflation. The necessity of achieving an accurate separation of the Galactic foregrounds therefore binds the search for the signal from cosmic inflation to our understanding of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM). The two most relevant observational results coming out of Planck data analysis are the line of sight depolarization due to the fluctuations of the Galactic magnetic field orientation and the alignment of the dust filamentary structures with the magnetic field at high Galactic latitude. Furthermore, Planck and HI emission data in combination indicate that most of the dust filamentary structures are present in the cold neutral medium. The goal of this paper is to test whether together these salient observational results can account fully for the statistical p...

  19. Planck intermediate results: XLIV. Structure of the Galactic magnetic field from dust polarization maps of the southern Galactic cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I R; Arzoumanian, D.

    2016-01-01

    components of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF) in the solar neighbourhood. The Q and U maps show patterns at large angular scales, which we relate to the mean orientation of the GMF towards Galactic coordinates (l0,b0) = (70° ± 5°,24° ± 5°). The histogram of the observed p values shows a wide dispersion up...... fraction (p0) of dust emission. To compute the Stokes parameters, we approximate the integration along the line of sight (LOS) as a sum over a set of N independent polarization layers, in each of which the turbulent component of the GMF is obtained from Gaussian realizations of a power-law power spectrum....... We are able to reproduce the observed p and ψ distributions using a p0 value of 26%, a ratio of 0.9 between the strengths of the turbulent and mean components of the GMF, and a small value of N. The mean value of p (inferred from the fit of the large-scale patterns in the Stokes maps) is 12 ± 1%. We...

  20. Pulsar coherent de-dispersion system of Urumqi Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyong, Liu; Esamdin, Ali; Jin, Zhang

    Pulsar coherent de-dispersion experiment has been carried by using the 25-m Nanshan radio telescope of Urumqi Observatory It uses a dual polarization receiver operating at 18cm and a VLBI back-end Mark5A The data processing system is based on a C program on Linux and a 4-node Beowulf cluster A high quality data acquisition system and a cluster with more processors are needed to build an on-line pulsar coherent de-dispersion system in future Key words Astronomical instrument Pulsar Coherent de-dispersion Parallel computing Cluster Mark5A

  1. Pulsar Coherent De-dispersion Experiment at Urumqi Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Yong; Ali, Esamdin; Zhang, Jin

    2006-12-01

    A Pulsar coherent de-dispersion experiment has been carried out using the 25-m Nanshan radio telescope at Urumqi Observatory. It uses a dual polarization receiver operating at 18 cm and a VLBI back-end: Mark5A, the minimum sampling time is 5 ns. The data processing system is based on a C program on Linux and a 4-node Beowulf cluster. A high quality data acquisition system and a cluster with more processors are needed to build an on-line pulsar coherent de-dispersion system in future. The main directions for the instrument are studies of pulsar timing, scintillation monitoring, etc.

  2. Exploring Radio Pulsars With New Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torne, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    simultaneous observations): the Nançay 94-m equivalent, the Effelsberg 100-m, the IRAM 30-m, and the APEX 12-m radio telescopes, allowing us to cover a frequency range from 2.54 to 472 GHz. The observations at the short millimetre range made use of new broad-band instrumentation never before used for pulsar observations. These observations resulted in the detection of SGR J1745-2900 from 2.54 to 291 GHz, providing measurements of its variable flux density, its also-varying spectrum, and evidence for polarized millimetre emission. The detections above 144 GHz are the highest radio frequency detections of pulsed emission from neutron stars to date, results that set new constraints on the still poorly-understood radio emission mechanism of pulsars. Since the study of the properties of pulsar emission at very high radio frequencies is relevant for understanding the radio emission process, further observations of a sample of six normal pulsars between 87 and 154 GHz were carried out using the IRAM 30-m. The initial results of this ongoing project include the detections of PSR B0355+54 up to 138 GHz, together with flux density measurements. For the other five pulsars, no obvious detections were achieved. Above 87 GHz, our detections of PSR B0355+54 are the highest-frequency detections of emission from a normal pulsar in the radio band, showing that normal pulsars continue emitting in the short millimetre regime. We found no evidence of a flattening or turn-up in the spectrum, a feature that could provide information about the emission mechanism. The intensity of this pulsar apparently decreases at and above 87 GHz, but our results suffer from uncertainties in the calibration and the possible intrinsic intensity variability of the pulsar. Forthcoming precise calibration information about the instrument will allow us to revisit the data providing stronger conclusions on the the nature of PSR B0355+54's apparent varying intensity at the millimetre wavelengths. In addition to the

  3. Case study of the 19 October 1989 polar-cap-absorption event using the imaging riometer for ionospheric studies. Master's thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, T.C.

    1990-01-01

    A polar cap absorption (PCA) event, beginning on 19 October 1989, is examined using the Imaging Riometer for Ionospheric Studies (IRIS) developed at the Univ. of Maryland. IRIS is a 49-beam (7 x 7) phased-array 38.2 MHz radiowave imaging system and operating at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica. After applying a low-pass (>10 minute) filter, we perform a cross-correlation between the central beam and the other beams in the array. From the cross-correlation analysis, we attempt to determine whether there is any delay of effects during event onset and early main phase (plateau) within the array. For most of the period studied, no delay was detected; i.e. features of each beam's absorption time series were essentially simultaneous. However, significant delays (approx. 2 minutes) occurred at the equatorward edge during a local absorption peak occurring just prior to magnetic local noon. The peak is coincident with short-term energetic particle flux enhancements detected by GOES-7. Two possible mechanisms are proposed: a local time variation of cutoff rigidities possibly associated with the relative position of the dayside cusp, and a short-term change in energetic particle rigidity spectrum.

  4. Absolute kinematics of radio-source components in the complete S5 polar cap sample. IV. Proper motions of the radio cores over a decade and spectral properties

    CERN Document Server

    Marti-Vidal, I; Marcaide, J M; Guirado, J C; Perez-Torres, M A; Ros, E

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out a high-precision astrometric analysis of two very-long-baseline-interferometry (VLBI) epochs of observation of the 13 extragalactic radio sources in the complete S5 polar cap sample. The VLBI epochs span a time baseline of 10 years and enable us to achieve precisions in the proper motions of the source cores up to a few micro-arcseconds per year. The observations were performed at 14.4 GHz and 43.1 GHz, and enable us to estimate the frequency core-shifts in a subset of sources, for which the spectral-index distributions can be computed. We study the source-position stability by analysing the changes in the relative positions of fiducial source points (the jet cores) over a decade. We find motions of 0.1-0.9 mas among close-by sources between the two epochs, which imply drifts in the jet cores of approximately a few tens of micro-as per year. These results have implications for the standard Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) jet model (where the core locations are supposed to be stable in time)....

  5. On the relations between proton influx and D-region electron densities during the polar-cap absorption event of 28-29 October 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Hargreaves

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations by incoherent-scatter radar have been applied to explore relationships between the fluxes of incident protons and the resulting D-region electron densities during a polar-cap radio-absorption event. Using proton flux data from a GOES geosynchronous satellite, the energy band having the greatest influence at a selected height is estimated by a process of trial and error, and empirical relationships are defined. The height profiles of the effective recombination coefficient are determined for day and night, and the transition over the evening twilight is investigated for the height range 60-70 km.

    The results show that the day-night change is confined to heights below 80 km, night-time values at the lower levels being consistent with a balance between negative ions and electrons controlled by 3-body attachment and collisional detachment. The daytime results confirm that, contrary to the prediction of some chemical models, a square-law continuity equation may be strictly applied. It is confirmed that, as previously reported, the timing of the sunset change varies with altitude.

  6. On the relations between proton influx and D-region electron densities during the polar-cap absorption event of 28-29 October 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargreaves, J.K. [Dept. of Communication Systems, Univ. of Lancaster, Bailrigg, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Centre for Astrophysics, Univ. of Central Lancashire, Preston (United Kingdom); Birch, M.J. [Centre for Astrophysics, Univ. of Central Lancashire, Preston (United Kingdom); Dept. of Computing, Univ. of Central Lancashire, Preston (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    Observations by incoherent-scatter radar have been applied to explore relationships between the fluxes of incident protons and the resulting D-region electron densities during a polar-cap radio-absorption event. Using proton flux data from a GOES geosynchronous satellite, the energy band having the greatest influence at a selected height is estimated by a process of trial and error, and empirical relationships are defined. The height profiles of the effective recombination coefficient are determined for day and night, and the transition over the evening twilight is investigated for the height range 60-70 km. The results show that the day-night change is confined to heights below 80 km, night-time values at the lower levels being consistent with a balance between negative ions and electrons controlled by 3-body attachment and collisional detachment. The daytime results confirm that, contrary to the prediction of some chemical models, a square-law continuity equation may be strictly applied. It is confirmed that, as previously reported, the timing of the sunset change varies with altitude. (orig.)

  7. High resolution observations of sporadic-E layers within the polar cap ionosphere using a new incoherent scatter radar experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Damtie

    west and north. Thus, the layer could also be produced by the electric field mechanism. This means that both mechanisms may be active simultaneously. Their relative importance could not be determined in this study.

    Key words. Ionosphere; polar ionosphere, instruments and techniques

  8. New Observations Reveal How the Martian Residual South Polar Cap Develops Quasi-Circular Pits, Heart-Shaped Pits, Troughs, and Moats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, Peter Benjamin; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Ehlmann, Bethany; Fassett, Caleb; Head, James W.

    2016-10-01

    The martian residual south polar cap (RSPC) is a ~1-10 m thick deposit of CO2 ice perched on the much larger H2O ice cap. Because it is the only known CO2 reservoir annually exchanging with the predominantly-CO2 martian atmosphere, understanding its evolution is important to understanding the modern martian climate. The 8 x 105 m2 RSPC is perennial and characterized by mesas dissected by quasi-circular pits, heart-shaped pits, linear troughs and ridges, and moats (a low, CO2-free boundary surrounding a mesa wholly contained within another mesa) that evolve at meter-scales each year [1,2]. However, the underlying processes leading to the development of these landforms have not yet been described. Using repeat-coverage HiRISE (25-50 cm/px) imagery, we observe previously undescribed features on the RSPC, which reveal the processes leading to the emergence of its meter-to-kilometer-scale morphology. We observe dark fans emanating from the sides of RSPC mesas and widespread fracturing and collapse of the upper surface of mesas, which we interpret as evidence for sublimation in the interiors of mesas. On relatively smooth areas of the RSPC, even small relief (~10 cm) collapses generate surface roughness, which concentrates sunlight and enhances sublimation, leading to the development of steep, eroding scarps. Typically, CO2 deposition during the winter then smooths terrain and creates gently sloping scarps (although uneven CO2 deposition can also create steep scarps). A collapse that drops down, such that it is entirely bounded by a steep scarp, develops into a quasi-circular pit. However, when a portion of the collapsing area remains attached to the upper surface, the perimeter is partially bounded by a steep scarp and partially bounded by a gently sloping ramp, which develops into either a heart-shaped pit, linear trough, or moat, depending on the local interplay between deposition and erosion. Finally, we use the spatial distribution of pits in order to determine the

  9. The nature of pulsar radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyks, J.; Rudak, B.; Demorest, P.

    2010-01-01

    High-quality averaged radio profiles of some pulsars exhibit double, highly symmetric features both in emission and in absorption. It is shown that both types of feature are produced by a split fan beam of extraordinary-mode curvature radiation that is emitted/absorbed by radially extended streams of magnetospheric plasma. With no emissivity in the plane of the stream, such a beam produces bifurcated emission components (BFCs) when our line of sight passes through the plane. An example of a double component created in this way is present in the averaged profile of the 5-ms pulsar J1012+5307. We show that the component can indeed be very well fitted by the textbook formula for the non-coherent beam of curvature radiation in the polarization state that is orthogonal to the plane of electron trajectory. The observed width of the BFC decreases with increasing frequency at a rate that confirms the curvature origin. Likewise, the double absorption features (double notches) are produced by the same beam of the extraordinary-mode curvature radiation, when it is eclipsed by thin plasma streams. The intrinsic property of curvature radiation to create bifurcated fan beams explains the double features in terms of a very natural geometry and implies the curvature origin of pulsar radio emission. Similarly, the `double conal' profiles of class D result from a cut through a wider stream with finite extent in magnetic azimuth. Therefore, their width reacts very slowly to changes of viewing geometry resulting from geodetic precession. The stream-cut interpretation implies a highly non-orthodox origin of both the famous S-swing of polarization angle and the low-frequency pulse broadening in D profiles. The azimuthal structure of polarization modes in the curvature radiation beam provides an explanation for the polarized `multiple imaging' and the edge depolarization of pulsar profiles.

  10. Absolute kinematics of radio-source components in the complete S5 polar cap sample. IV. Proper motions of the radio cores over a decade and spectral properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Vidal, I.; Abellán, F. J.; Marcaide, J. M.; Guirado, J. C.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Ros, E.

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out a high-precision astrometric analysis of two very-long-baseline-interferometry (VLBI) epochs of observation of the 13 extragalactic radio sources in the complete S5 polar cap sample. The VLBI epochs span a time baseline of ten years and enable us to achieve precisions in the proper motions of the source cores up to a few micro-arcseconds per year. The observations were performed at 14.4 GHz and 43.1 GHz, and enable us to estimate the frequency core-shifts in a subset of sources, for which the spectral-index distributions can be computed. We study the source-position stability by analysing the changes in the relative positions of fiducial source points (the jet cores) over a decade. We find motions of 0.1-0.9 mas among close-by sources between the two epochs, which imply drifts in the jet cores of approximately a few tens of μas per year. These results have implications for the standard Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) jet model (where the core locations are supposed to be stable in time). For one of our sources, 0615+820, the morphological and spectral properties in year 2010, as well as the relative astrometry between years 2000 and 2010, suggest the possibility of either a strong parsec-scale interaction of the AGN jet with the ISM, a gravitational lens with 1 mas diameter, or a resolved massive binary black hole. Reduced images as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A27

  11. Analysis of Spatial and Temporal Coverage of Multi-Instrument Optical Images for Change Detection Research on the Mars South Polar Residual Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Alfiah Rizky Diana; Sidiropoulos, Panagiotis; Muller, Jan-Peter; iMars Team

    2016-10-01

    Interest in Mars' surface started in 1965 with Mariner 4. Since then cameras on other fly-by satellites, such as the NASA Mariner 6 (1965), Mariner 7(1971), Mariner 9 (1972) and then orbiting satellites from Viking 1 and 2 (1975-1980), MGS MOC-NA and MOC-WA (1997-2006), Mars Odyssey THEMIS-VIS (2001-present), ESA Mars Express HRSC and SRC (2003-present), NASA MRO HiRISE and CTX (2006-present) and the latest ExoMars TGO CaSSIS launched in March 2016. Both poles of Mars are very fascinating because of their seasonal changes, such as Carbon Dioxide ice layers staying even in summer on South Polar Residual Cap (SPRC). On which features like so-called Swiss Cheese Terrain, spiders, polar dune flow and dust deposition under layers of ice have been identified. To detect changes between images, we need two or more co-registered images of the same area, and from different time periods, for seasonal features. We have studied the spatial and temporal coverage of images over SPRC. Using a single instrument, full SPRC spatial coverage is available for Viking, HRSC, and CTX images. Images from 25cm HiRISE and ≤10m MOC-NA however, are necessary to detect changes at sufficiently high resolution. The longest period for images from one instrument is 5 MY (for CTX and HiRISE, from MY 28-32). Combining multi-instrument images, we can lengthen the period to 10 MY (from MY 23-32, N.B. we are in MY 33 as present). We can compare the surface images over the 10 MY with the surface from MY 12 from Viking Orbiters. Using multi-instrument images we can increase the number of overlapping images over an area. Overlap information for a single instrument is important to obtain stereo-pairs to be used in DTM production. Overlap information from HRSC images and its DTMs can be used to map changes not only horizontally, but also vertically. We will demonstrate in this study the areas which can be most fruitfully employed for change detection research. The research leading to these results has

  12. Wide Band Artificial Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Zackary

    2017-01-01

    The Wide Band Artificial Pulsar (WBAP) is an instrument verification device designed and built by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virgina. The site currently operates the Green Bank Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument (GUPPI) and the Versatile Green Bank Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) digital backends for their radio telescopes. The commissioning and continued support for these sophisticated backends has demonstrated a need for a device capable of producing an accurate artificial pulsar signal. The WBAP is designed to provide a very close approximation to an actual pulsar signal. This presentation is intended to provide an overview of the current hardware and software implementations and to also share the current results from testing using the WBAP.

  13. Pulsars and Extreme Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell-Burnell, Jocelyn

    2004-10-01

    Pulsars were discovered 35 years ago. What do we know about them now, and what have they taught us about the extremes of physics? With an average density comparable to that of the nucleus, magnetic fields around 108 T and speeds close to c these objects have stretched our understanding of the behaviour of matter. They serve as extrememly accurate clocks with which to carry out precision experiments in relativity. Created in cataclysmic explosions, pulsars are a (stellar) form of life after death. After half a billion revolutions most pulsars finally die, but amazingly some are born again to yet another, even weirder, afterlife. Pulsar research continues lively, delivering exciting, startling and almost unbelievable results!

  14. Pulse Portraiture: Pulsar timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennucci, Timothy T.; Demorest, Paul B.; Ransom, Scott M.

    2016-06-01

    Pulse Portraiture is a wideband pulsar timing code written in python. It uses an extension of the FFTFIT algorithm (Taylor 1992) to simultaneously measure a phase (TOA) and dispersion measure (DM). The code includes a Gaussian-component-based portrait modeling routine. The code uses the python interface to the pulsar data analysis package PSRCHIVE (ascl:1105.014) and also requires the non-linear least-squares minimization package lmfit (ascl:1606.014).

  15. Pulsar Timing Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, the use of an ensemble of radio pulsars to constrain the characteristic strain caused by a stochastic gravitational wave background has advanced the cause of detection of very low frequency gravitational waves significantly. This electromagnetic means of gravitational wave detection, called Pulsar Timing Array(PTA), is reviewed in this article. The principle of operation of PTA, the current operating PTAs and their status is presented along-with a discussion of the main ch...

  16. Eclipsing Binary Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, P C C

    2004-01-01

    The first eclipsing binary pulsar, PSR B1957+20, was discovered in 1987. Since then, 13 other eclipsing low-mass binary pulsars have been found, 12 of these are in globular clusters. In this paper we list the known eclipsing binary pulsars and their properties, with special attention to the eclipsing systems in 47 Tuc. We find that there are two fundamentally different groups of eclipsing binary pulsars; separated by their companion masses. The less massive systems (M_c ~ 0.02 M_sun) are a product of predictable stellar evolution in binary pulsars. The systems with more massive companions (M_c ~ 0.2 M_sun) were formed by exchange encounters in globular clusters, and for that reason are exclusive to those environments. This class of systems can be used to learn about the neutron star recycling fraction in the globular clusters actively forming pulsars. We suggest that most of these binary systems are undetectable at radio wavelengths.

  17. Revised Pulsar Spindown

    CERN Document Server

    Contopoulos, I; Contopoulos, Ioannis; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2005-01-01

    We address the issue of electromagnetic pulsar spindown by combining our experience from the two limiting idealized cases which have been studied in great extent in the past: that of an aligned rotator where ideal MHD conditions apply, and that of a misaligned rotator in vacuum. We construct a spindown formula that takes into account the misalignment of the magnetic and rotation axes, and the magnetospheric particle acceleration gaps. We show that near the death line aligned rotators spin down much slower than orthogonal ones. In order to test this approach, we use a simple Monte Carlo method to simulate the evolution of pulsars and find a good fit to the observed pulsar distribution in the P-Pdot diagram without invoking magnetic field decay. Our model may also account for individual pulsars spinning down with braking index n 3, and that the older pulsar population has preferentially smaller magnetic inclination angles. We discuss possible signatures of such alignment in the existing pulsar data.

  18. Photon Attenuation and Pair Creation in Highly-Magnetized Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.

    1999-01-01

    Developments over the last couple of years have supported the interpretation that anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) possess unusually high magnetic fields, and furthermore may represent a class or classes of neutron stars distinct from the population of conventional radio pulsars. We have recently suggested that such a dichotomization of the pulsar population may naturally arise due to the inherently different conditions in subcritical and supercritical magnetic fields. In this paper, we summarize, within the polar gap model, expectations for observable properties of highly magnetized pulsars, conventional or anomalous. This includes a discussion of the potential suppression of pair production and cascade generation in very strong fields by photon splitting and by threshold pair creation, which might explain radio quiescence in AXPs and SGRs. X-ray and hard gamma-ray spectral properties and trends are identified, with a view to establishing goals for future high energy experimenta...

  19. The 3D Space and Spin Velocities of a Gamma-ray Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2016-04-01

    PSR J2030+4415 is a LAT-discovered 0.5My-old gamma-ray pulsar with an X-ray synchrotron trail and a rare Halpha bowshock. We have obtained GMOS IFU spectroscopic imaging of this shell, and show a sweep through the remarkable Halpha structure, comparing with the high energy emission. These data provide a unique 3D map of the momentum distribution of the relativistic pulsar wind. This shows that the pulsar is moving nearly in the plane of the sky and that the pulsar wind has a polar component misaligned with the space velocity. The spin axis is shown to be inclined some 95degrees to the Earth line of sight, explaining why this is a radio-quiet, gamma-only pulsar. Intriguingly, the shell also shows multiple bubbles that suggest that the pulsar wind power has varied substantially over the past 500 years.

  20. Coherent Radio Emission from Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Dipanjan; Gil, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    We review a physical model where the high brightness temperature of 10$^{25}-10^{30}$ K observed in pulsar radio emission is explained by coherent curvature radiation excited in the relativistic electron-positron plasma in the pulsar magnetosphere.

  1. On the puzzling high-energy pulsations of the energetic radio-quiet γ-ray pulsar J1813–1246

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marelli, M.; Pizzocaro, D.; De Luca, A.; Caraveo, P.; Salvetti, D. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Harding, A. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Wood, K. S. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Saz Parkinson, P. M. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Acero, F., E-mail: marelli@lambrate.inaf.it [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universit Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2014-11-10

    We have analyzed the new deep XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the energetic, radio-quiet pulsar J1813–1246. The X-ray spectrum is nonthermal, very hard, and absorbed. Based on spectral considerations, we propose that J1813 is located at a distance further than 2.5 kpc. J1813 is highly pulsed in the X-ray domain, with a light curve characterized by two sharp, asymmetrical peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase. We detected no significant X-ray spectral changes during the pulsar phase. We extended the available Fermi ephemeris to five years. We found two glitches. The γ-ray light curve is characterized by two peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase, with a bridge in between and no off-pulse emission. The spectrum shows clear evolution in phase, being softer at the peaks and hardening toward the bridge. Surprisingly, both X-ray peaks lag behind the γ-ray ones by a quarter of phase. We found a hint of detection in the 30-500 keV band with INTEGRAL, which is consistent with the extrapolation of both the soft X-ray and γ-ray emission of J1813. The unique X-ray and γ-ray phasing suggests a singular emission geometry. We discuss some possibilities within the current pulsar emission models. Finally, we develop an alternative geometrical model where the X-ray emission comes from polar cap pair cascades.

  2. Pulsars: Gigantic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Renxin

    2011-01-01

    What is the real nature of pulsars? This is essentially a question of the fundamental strong interaction between quarks at low-energy scale and hence of the non-perturbative quantum chromo-dynamics, the solution of which would certainly be meaningful for us to understand one of the seven millennium prize problems (i.e., "Yang-Mills Theory") named by the Clay Mathematical Institute. After a historical note, it is argued here that a pulsar is very similar to an extremely big nucleus, but is a little bit different from the {\\em gigantic nucleus} speculated 80 years ago by L. Landau. The paper demonstrates the similarity between pulsars and gigantic nuclei from both points of view: the different manifestations of compact stars and the general behavior of the strong interaction.

  3. Pulsar lensing geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Siqi; Macquart, J-P; Brisken, Walter; Deller, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Our analysis of archival VLBI data of PSR 0834+06 revealed that its scintillation properties can be precisely modelled using the inclined sheet model (Pen & Levin 2014), resulting in two distinct lens planes. These data strongly favour the grazing sheet model over turbulence as the primary source of pulsar scattering. This model can reproduce the parameters of the observed diffractive scintillation with an accuracy at the percent level. Comparison with new VLBI proper motion results in a direct measure of the ionized ISM screen transverse velocity. The results are consistent with ISM velocities local to the PSR 0834+06 sight-line (through the Galaxy). The simple 1D structure of the lenses opens up the possibility of using interstellar lenses as precision probes for pulsar lens mapping, precision transverse motions in the ISM, and new opportunities for removing scattering to improve pulsar timing. We describe the parameters and observables of this double screen system. While relative screen distances can i...

  4. Pulsar virtual observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Keith, M; Lyne, A; Brooke, J

    2007-01-01

    The Pulsar Virtual Observatory will provide a means for scientists in all fields to access and analyze the large data sets stored in pulsar surveys without specific knowledge about the data or the processing mechanisms. This is achieved by moving the data and processing tools to a grid resource where the details of the processing are seen by the users as abstract tasks. By developing intelligent scheduling middle-ware the issues of interconnecting tasks and allocating resources are removed from the user domain. This opens up large sets of radio time-series data to a wider audience, enabling greater cross field astronomy, in line with the virtual observatory concept. Implementation of the Pulsar Virtual Observatory is underway, utilising the UK National Grid Service as the principal grid resource.

  5. Handbook of pulsar astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Lorimer, Duncan

    2005-01-01

    Radio pulsars are rapidly rotating highly magnetized neutron stars. Studies of these fascinating objects have provided applications in solid-state physics, general relativity, galactic astronomy, astrometry, planetary physics and even cosmology. Most of these applications and much of what we know about neutron stars are derived from single-dish radio observations using state-of-the-art receivers and data acquisition systems. This comprehensive 2004 book is a unique resource that brings together the key observational techniques, background information and a review of results, including the discovery of a double pulsar system. Useful software tools are provided which can be used to analyse example data, made available on a related website. This work will be of great value not only to graduate students but also to researchers wishing to carry out and interpret a wide variety of radio pulsar observations.

  6. Current Flows in Pulsar Magnetospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The global structure of .current flows in pulsar magnetosphere is investigated, with rough calculations of the circuit elements. It is emphasized that the potential of the critical field lines (the field lines that intersect the null surface at the light cylinder radius) should be the same as that of interstellar medium, and that pulsars whose rotation axes and magnetic dipole axes are parallel should be positively charged, in order to close the pulsar's current flows. The statistical relation between the radio luminosity and pulsar's electric charge (or the spindown power) may hint that the millisecond pulsars could be low-mass bare strange stars.

  7. The Pulsar Search Collaboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Rosen, Rachel; McLaughlin, Maura A; Lynch, Ryan; Kondratiev, Vlad I; Boyles, Jason R; Wilson, M Terry; Lorimer, Duncan R; Ransom, Scott; 10.3847/AER2010004

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsar Search Collaboratory [PSC, NSF #0737641] is a joint project between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University (WVU) designed to interest high school students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics [STEM] related career paths by helping them to conduct authentic scientific research. The 3- year PSC program, which began in summer 2008, teaches students to analyze astronomical radio data acquired with the 100-m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope for the purpose of discovering new pulsars. We present the results of the first complete year of the PSC, which includes two astronomical discoveries.

  8. Pulsars in FIRST Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We identify 16 pulsars from the Survey of Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST) at 1.4 GHz. Their positions and total flux densities are extracted from the FIRST catalog. By comparing the source positions with those in the PSR catalog, we obtain better determined positions of PSR J1022+1001,J1518+4904, J1652+2651, and proper motion upper limits of PSR J0751+1807,J1012+5307, and J1640+2224. The proper motions of the other ten pulsars are consistent with the catalog values.

  9. Cradle Cap (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Cradle Cap (Infantile Seborrheic Dermatitis) KidsHealth > For Parents > Cradle Cap ( ... many babies develop called cradle cap. About Cradle Cap Cradle cap is the common term for seborrheic ...

  10. Pulsar Timing Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Lommen, Andrea N

    2013-01-01

    We describe the procedure, nuances, issues, and choices involved in creating times-of-arrival (TOAs), residuals and error bars from a set of radio pulsar timing data. We discuss the issue of mis-matched templates, the problem that wide- bandwidth backends introduce, possible solutions to that problem, and correcting for offsets introduced by various observing systems.

  11. The evolution of the englacial temperature distribution in the superimposed ice zone of a polar ice cap during a summer season

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greuell, W.; Oerlemans, J.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to provide more insight into the processes affecting the evolution of the englacial temperature distribution at a non-temperate location on a glacier. Measurements were made in the top 10 m of the ice at the summit of Laika Ice Cap (Canadian Arctic) during th

  12. Observations of Accreting Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bildsten, Lars; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Chiu, John; Finger, Mark H.; Koh, Danny T.; Nelson, Robert W.; Prince, Thomas A.; Rubin, Bradley C.; Scott, D. Matthew; Stollberg, Mark; Vaughan, Brian A.; Wilson, Colleen A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    We summarize 5 years of continuous monitoring of accretion-powered pulsars with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Our 20-70 keV observations have determined or refined the orbital parameters of 13 binaries, discovered five new transient accreting pulsars, measured the pulsed flux history during outbursts of 12 transients (GRO J1744-28, 4U 0115+634, GRO J1750-27, GS 0834-430, 2S 1417-624, GRO J1948+32, EXO 2030+375, GRO J1008-57, A0535+26, GRO J2058+42, 4U 1145-619, and A1118-616), and also measured the accretion torque history during outbursts of six of those transients whose orbital param- eters were also known. We have also continuously measured the pulsed flux and spin frequency for eiaht persistently accreting pulsars (Her X-1, Cen X-3, Vela X-1, OAO 1657-415, GX 301-2, 4U 1626-67, 4U 1538-52, and GX 1+4). Because of their continuity and uniformity over a long baseline, BATSE observations have provided new insights into the long-term behavior of accreting magnetic neutron stars. We have found that all accreting pulsars show stochastic variations in their spin frequencies and luminosities, including those displaying secular spin-up or spin-down on long timescales, which blurs the con- ventional distinction between disk-fed and wind-fed binaries. Pulsed flux and accretion torque are strongly correlated in outbursts of transient accreting pulsars but are uncorrelated, or even anti- correlated, in persistent sources. We describe daily folded pulse profiles, frequency, and flux measurements that are available through the Compton Observatory Science Support Center at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center.

  13. On the randomness of pulsar nulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Rankin, Joanna M.

    2009-05-01

    Pulsar nulling is not always a random process; most pulsars, in fact, null non-randomly. The Wald-Wolfowitz statistical runs test is a simple diagnostic that pulsar astronomers can use to identify pulsars that have non-random nulls. It is not clear at this point how the dichotomy in pulsar nulling randomness is related to the underlying nulling phenomenon, but its nature suggests that there are at least two distinct reasons that pulsars null.

  14. Highly-Magnetized Pulsars and Integral

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.

    1998-01-01

    The complete absence of radio pulsars with periods exceeding a few seconds has lead to the popular notion of the existence of a high period death line. We have recently postulated the existence of another radio quiescence boundary at high magnetic fields ($B\\gtrsim 4\\times 10^{13}$G) in the upper portion of the period-period derivative diagram, a domain where no radio pulsars are observed. The origin of this high B boundary is also due to the suppression of magnetic pair creation, $\\gamma\\to e^{\\pm}$, but mainly because of competition with the exotic QED process of magnetic photon splitting, $\\gamma\\to\\gamma\\gamma$, coupled with ground state pair creation. This mechanism could also explain the low spectral cutoff energy of the gamma-ray pulsar PSR1509-58, which lies near the high B death-line. In this paper, we summarize the hypothesis of this new ``death line,'' and discuss some subtleties of pair suppression that relate to photon polarization and positronium formation. We identify several ways in which Inte...

  15. LEAP: the large European array for pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Bassa, C G; Karuppusamy, R; Kramer, M; Lee, K J; Liu, K; McKee, J; Perrodin, D; Purver, M; Sanidas, S; Smits, R; Stappers, B W

    2015-01-01

    The Large European Array for Pulsars (LEAP) is an experiment that harvests the collective power of Europe's largest radio telescopes in order to increase the sensitivity of high-precision pulsar timing. As part of the ongoing effort of the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA), LEAP aims to go beyond the sensitivity threshold needed to deliver the first direct detection of gravitational waves. The five telescopes presently included in LEAP are: the Effelsberg telescope, the Lovell telescope at Jodrell Bank, the Nan\\c cay radio telescope, the Sardinia Radio Telescope and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Dual polarization, Nyquist-sampled time-series of the incoming radio waves are recorded and processed offline to form the coherent sum, resulting in a tied-array telescope with an effective aperture equivalent to a 195-m diameter circular dish. All observations are performed using a bandwidth of 128 MHz centered at a frequency of 1396 MHz. In this paper, we present the design of the LEAP experiment, the ...

  16. Pulsar Coherent De-dispersion System on the Urumqi Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Yong; Ali, Esamdin; Zhang, Jin

    2007-03-01

    Pulsar coherent de-dispersion experiment was carried out by using the 25m Nanshan radio telescope in the Urumqi Observatory. It uses a dual polarization receiver operating at 18cm and a VLBI back-end, Mark5A. The data processing system is based on a C program on the Linux and a 4-node Beowulf cluster. A high quality data acquisition system and a cluster with more processors are needed to build an online pulsar coherent de-dispersion system in the future.

  17. Death cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudbæk, Torsten R; Kofoed, Pernille Bouteloup; Bove, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    Death cap (Amanita phalloides) is commonly found and is one of the five most toxic fungi in Denmark. Toxicity is due to amatoxin, and poisoning is a serious medical condition, causing organ failure with potential fatal outcome. Acknowledgement and clarification of exposure, symptomatic and focused...

  18. X-ray pulsar rush in 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, K.; Tsujimoto, K.; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Yokogawa, J.; Koyama, K. [Kyoto Univ., Faculty of Science, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    We present recent remarkable topics about discoveries of X-ray pulsars. 1. Pulsations from two Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters: These pulsars have enormously strong magnetic field (B {approx} 10{sup 15} G), thus these are called as 'magnetar', new type of X-ray pulsars. 2. New Crab-like pulsars: These discoveries lead to suggesting universality of Crab-like pulsars. 3. An X-ray bursting millisecond pulsar: This is strong evidence for the recycle theory of generating radio millisecond pulsars. 4. X-ray pulsar rush in the SMC: This indicates the younger star formation history in the SMC. (author)

  19. Adjustment of the electric current in pulsar magnetospheres and origin of subpulse modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    The subpulse modulation of pulsar radio emission goes to prove that the plasma flow in the open field line tube breaks into isolated narrow streams. I propose a model which attributes formation of streams to the process of the electric current adjustment in the magnetosphere. A mismatch between the magnetospheric current distribution and the current injected by the polar cap accelerator gives rise to reverse plasma flows in the magnetosphere. The reverse flow shields the electric field in the polar gap and thus shuts up the plasma production process. I assume that a circulating system of streams is formed such that the upward streams are produced in narrow gaps separated by downward streams. The electric drift is small in this model because the potential drop in narrow gaps is small. The gaps have to drift because by the time a downward stream reaches the star surface and shields the electric field, the corresponding gap has to shift. The transverse size of the streams is determined by the condition that the ...

  20. DA495 - an aging pulsar wind nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Kothes, R; Reich, W; Safi-Harb, S; Arzoumanian, Z

    2008-01-01

    We present a radio continuum study of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) DA 495 (G65.7+1.2), including images of total intensity and linear polarization from 408 to 10550 MHz based on the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey and observations with the Effelsberg 100-m Radio Telescope. Removal of flux density contributions from a superimposed \\ion{H}{2} region and from compact extragalactic sources reveals a break in the spectrum of DA 495 at 1.3 GHz, with a spectral index ${\\alpha}={-0.45 \\pm 0.20}$ below the break and ${\\alpha}={-0.87 \\pm 0.10}$ above it (${S}_\

  1. Thermal cracking of CO2 slab ice as the main driving force for albedo increase of the martian seasonal polar caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, S.; Schmitt, B.; Beck, P.; Brissaud, O.

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the microphysical processes occuring on the Martian seasonal cap is critical since their radiative properties can affect the martian climate. A well documented phenomenom is the albedo increase of the Martian seasonal caps during spring, Fig.1. There are a lot of hypotheses that have been proposed as an explanation for this observation : the decrease of the CO2 grain size [2], a cleaning process of the CO2 slab that would imply either the sinking or the ejection of the dust contained in its volume ([1], [2], [5]), a water-layer accumulation on the top of the slab [5], the role played by aerosols [2] etc ... So far, no experimental simulations have been realized to discriminate between these processes. We designed an experiment to investigate the hypothesis of CO2 ice grain size decrease through thermal cracking as well as that of dust segregation as the possible reasons for albedo increase.

  2. Gamma rays from Galactic pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Gamma rays from young pulsars and milli-second pulsars are expected to contribute to the diffuse gamma-ray emission measured by the {\\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT) at high latitudes. We derive the contribution of the pulsars undetected counterpart by using information from radio to gamma rays and we show that they explain only a small fraction of the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background.

  3. Geminga’s Puzzling Pulsar Wind Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posselt, B.; Pavlov, G. G.; Slane, P. O.; Romani, R.; Bucciantini, N.; Bykov, A. M.; Kargaltsev, O.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Ng, C.-Y.

    2017-01-01

    We report on six new Chandra observations of the Geminga pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The PWN consists of three distinct elongated structures—two ≈ 0.2{d}250 pc long lateral tails and a segmented axial tail of ≈ 0.05{d}250 pc length, where {d}250=d/(250 {pc}). The photon indices of the power-law spectra of the lateral tails, {{Γ }}≈ 1, are significantly harder than those of the pulsar ({{Γ }}≈ 1.5) and the axial tail ({{Γ }}≈ 1.6). There is no significant diffuse X-ray emission between the lateral tails—the ratio of the X-ray surface brightness between the south tail and this sky area is at least 12. The lateral tails apparently connect directly to the pulsar and show indications of moving footpoints. The axial tail comprises time-variable emission blobs. However, there is no evidence for constant or decelerated outward motion of these blobs. Different physical models are consistent with the observed morphology and spectra of the Geminga PWN. In one scenario, the lateral tails could represent an azimuthally asymmetric shell whose hard emission is caused by the Fermi acceleration mechanism of colliding winds. In another scenario, the lateral tails could be luminous, bent polar outflows, while the blobs in the axial tail could represent a crushed torus. In a resemblance to planetary magnetotails, the blobs of the axial tail might also represent short-lived plasmoids, which are formed by magnetic field reconnection in the relativistic plasma of the pulsar wind tail.

  4. Interplanetary spacecraft navigation using pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, X P; You, X P; Li, M T; Keith, M J; Shannon, R M; Coles, W; Manchester, R N; Zheng, J H; Yu, X Z; Gao, D; Wu, X; Chen, D

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how observations of pulsars can be used to help navigate a spacecraft travelling in the solar system. We make use of archival observations of millisecond pulsars from the Parkes radio telescope in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method and highlight issues, such as pulsar spin irregularities, which need to be accounted for. We show that observations of four millisecond pulsars every seven days using a realistic X-ray telescope on the spacecraft throughout a journey from Earth to Mars can lead to position determinations better than approx. 20km and velocity measurements with a precision of approx. 0.1m/s.

  5. A Search for Rapidly Spinning Pulsars and Fast Transients in Unidentified Radio Sources with the NRAO 43-Meter Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Deborah; Langston, Glen; Gilpin, Claire

    2013-01-01

    We have searched 75 unidentified radio sources selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) catalog for the presence of rapidly spinning pulsars and short, dispersed radio bursts. The sources are radio bright, have no identifications or optical source coincidences, are more than 5% linearly polarized, and are spatially unresolved in the catalog. If these sources are fast-spinning pulsars (e.g. sub-millisecond pulsars), previous large-scale pulsar surveys may have missed detection due to instrumental and computational limitations, eclipsing effects, or diffractive scintillation. The discovery of a sub-millisecond pulsar would significantly constrain the neutron star equation of state and would have implications for models predicting a rapid slowdown of highly recycled X-ray pulsars to millisecond periods from, e.g., accretion disk decoupling. These same sources were previously searched unsuccessfully for pulsations at 610 MHz with the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank. This new search was conducted at a differe...

  6. New Observations of the Crab Nebula and Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tennant, Allyn F.; ODell, Stephen L.; Elsner, Ronald f.; Yakovlev, Dmitry R.; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.; Becker, Werner

    2010-01-01

    We present a phase-resolved study of the X-ray spectrum of the Crab Pulsar, using data obtained in a special mode with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The superb angular resolution easily enables discerning the Pulsar from the surrounding nebulosity, even at pulse minimum. We find that the Pulsar's X-ray spectral index varies sinusoidally with phase---except over the same phase range for which rather abrupt changes in optical polarization magnitude and position angle have been reported. In addition, we use the X-ray data to constrain the surface temperature for various neutron-star equations of state and atmospheres. Finally, we present new data on dynamical variations of structure within the Nebula.

  7. Models of Pulsar Glitches

    CERN Document Server

    Haskell, Brynmor

    2015-01-01

    Radio pulsars provide us with some of the most stable clocks in the universe. Nevertheless several pulsars exhibit sudden spin-up events, known as glitches. More than forty years after their first discovery, the exact origin of these phenomena is still open to debate. It is generally thought that they an observational manifestation of a superfluid component in the stellar interior and provide an insight into the dynamics of matter at extreme densities. In recent years there have been several advances on both the theoretical and observational side, that have provided significant steps forward in our understanding of neutron star interior dynamics and possible glitch mechanisms. In this article we review the main glitch models that have been proposed and discuss our understanding, in the light of current observations.

  8. Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, Paulo C C

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we review the recent discovery of several millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in eccentric binary systems. Timing these MSPs we were able to estimate (and in one case precisely measure) their masses. These results suggest that, as a class, MSPs have a much wider range of masses (1.3 to > 2 solar masses) than the normal and mildly recycled pulsars found in double neutron star (DNS) systems (1.25 < Mp < 1.44 solar masses). This is very likely to be due to the prolonged accretion episode that is thought to be required to form a MSP. The likely existence of massive MSPs makes them a powerful probe for understanding the behavior of matter at densities larger than that of the atomic nucleus; in particular, the precise measurement of the mass of PSR J1903+0327 ($1.67 +/- 0.01 solar masses) excludes several "soft" equations of state for dense matter.

  9. La Estrella Polar. Memorias de un Juez de Instrucción. España 1934-1939, de Eduardo Capó Bonnafous: conflictos, ética y humor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Manera

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available El artículo se propone rescatar la relevante trayectoria de un notable escritor del exilio republicano español: Eduardo Capó Bonnafous (1906-1976, a través de su atípico testimonio de los años inmediatamente anteriores al destierro, La Estrella Polar. Memorias de un Juez de Instrucción. España 1934-1939 (1964, que se centra sobre todo en su trabajo como juez en la provincia de Granada (Huéscar, Guadix y Baza. En medio de tantos eventos dramáticos, sin abdicar nunca a sus deberes, defiende una pauta de sensatez y equilibrio, procurando mitigar los excesos: su línea de conducta es no dejarse dominar por las pasiones políticas, evitar injusticias por fanatismo, impedir las ejecuciones capitales toda vez que sea posible. Y no pierde una empatía alegre y sensible, un confortante sentido del humor, un talante afable y participativo. Se ofrecen además noticias y fotografías obtenidas de su hija Natalia Capó (Barcelona 1938. The study aims to rescue the profile of a notable writer of the Spanish republican exile: Eduardo Capó Bonnafous (1906-1976, through his atypical testimony of the years immediately prior to the exile, La Estrella Polar. Memorias de un Juez de Instrucción. España 1934-1939 (1964, which focuses mainly on his work as a judge in the province of Granada (Huéscar, Guadix and Baza. In the midst of so many dramatic events, he never gives up his duties and tries to mitigate the excesses: his line of conduct is to avoid injustice caused by political passions and fanaticism and to prevent capital executions whenever possible. He does not lose a cheerful and sensitive empathy, a comforting sense of humor, an affable and participative mood. Some data and photographs are obtained from his daughter Natalia Capó (Barcelona 1938.

  10. Electrodynamics of pulsar magnetospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Cerutti, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    We review electrodynamics of rotating magnetized neutron stars, from the early vacuum model to recent numerical experiments with plasma-filled magnetospheres. Significant progress became possible due to the development of global particle-in-cell simulations which capture particle acceleration, emission of high-energy photons, and electron-positron pair creation. The numerical experiments show from first principles how and where electric gaps form, and promise to explain the observed pulsar activity from radio waves to gamma-rays.

  11. Strange-pulsar model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, O.G.; Horvath, J.E.; Vucetich, H. (Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, 1900 La Plata, Argentina Nacional de La Plata, Calle 49 y 115, Casilla de Correo 67, 1900 La Plata, (Argentina))

    1990-02-12

    Deep modifications to the current strange-star structure can occur if strange matter is not stable all the way down to zero pressure. This would be the case, for example, if some stable particle is formed at relatively low pressure and/or temperature. We show that the inclusion of a likely specific candidate particle (quark {alpha}) in the strange-matter picture leads to stellar models that present more realistic behavior in the light of current pulsar understanding.

  12. X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Roland

    2016-01-01

    X-ray pulsars shine thanks to the conversion of the gravitational energy of accreted material to X-ray radiation. The accretion rate is modulated by geometrical and hydrodynamical effects in the stellar wind of the pulsar companions and/or by instabilities in accretion discs. Wind driven flows are highly unstable close to neutron stars and responsible for X-ray variability by factors $10^3$ on time scale of hours. Disk driven flows feature slower state transitions and quasi periodic oscillations related to orbital motion and precession or resonance. On shorter time scales, and closer to the surface of the neutron star, X-ray variability is dominated by the interactions of the accreting flow with the spinning magnetosphere. When the pulsar magnetic field is large, the flow is confined in a relatively narrow accretion column, whose geometrical properties drive the observed X-ray emission. In low magnetized systems, an increasing accretion rate allows the ignition of powerful explosive thermonuclear burning at t...

  13. Pulsar Wind Nebulae Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Bucciantini, N

    2013-01-01

    Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe) are ideal astrophysical laboratories where high energy relativistic phenomena can be investigated. They are close, well resolved in our observations, and the knowledge derived in their study has a strong impact in many other fields, from AGNs to GRBs. Yet there are still unresolved issues, that prevent us from a full clear understanding of these objects. The lucky combination of high resolution X-ray imaging and numerical codes to handle the outflow and dynamical properties of relativistic MHD, has opened a new avenue of investigation that has lead to interesting progresses in the last years. Despite all of this, we do not understand yet how particles are accelerated, and the functioning of the pulsar wind and pulsar magnetosphere, that power PWNe. I will review what is now commonly known as the MHD paradigm, and in particular I will focus on various approaches that have been and are currently used to model these systems. For each I will highlight its advantages, limitations, and de...

  14. Some problems of pulsar physics. [magnetospheric plasma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arons, J.

    1979-01-01

    The theories of particle acceleration along polar field lines are reviewed, and the total energization of the charge separated plasma is summarized, when pair creation is absent. The application of these theories and plasma supply to pulsars is discussed, with attention given to the total amount of electron-positron plasma created and its momentum distribution. Various aspects of radiation emission and transport are analyzed, based on a polar current flow model with pair creation, and the phenomenon of marching subpulses is considered. The coronation beaming and the relativistically expanding current sheet models for pulsar emission are also outlined, and the paper concludes with a brief discussion of the relation between the theories of polar flow with pair plasma and the problem of the energization of the Crab Nebula.

  15. Apical cap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLoud, T.C.; Isler, R.J.; Novelline, R.A.; Putman, C.E.; Simeone, J.; Stark, P.

    1981-08-01

    Apical caps, either unilateral or bilateral, are a common feature of advancing age and are usually the result of subpleural scarring unassociated with other diseases. Pancoast (superior sulcus) tumors are a well recognized cause of unilateral asymmetric apical density. Other lesions arising in the lung, pleura, or extrapleural space may produce unilateral or bilateral apical caps. These include: (1) inflammatory: tuberculosis and extrapleural abscesses extending from the neck; (2) post radiation fibrosis after mantle therapy for Hodgkin disease or supraclavicular radiation in the treatment of breast carcinoma; (3) neoplasm: lymphoma extending from the neck or mediastinum, superior sulcus bronchogenic carcinoma, and metastases; (4) traumatic: extrapleural dissection of blood from a ruptured aorta, fractures of the ribs or spine, or hemorrhage due to subclavian line placement; (5) vascular: coarctation of the aorta with dilated collaterals over the apex, fistula between the subclavian artery and vein; and (6) miscellaneous: mediastinal lipomatosis with subcostal fat extending over the apices.

  16. CONSTRAINTS ON THE EMISSION GEOMETRIES AND SPIN EVOLUTION OF GAMMA-RAY MILLISECOND PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, T. J. [National Research Council Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Venter, C. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001, 2520 Potchefstroom (South Africa); Harding, A. K.; Çelik, Ö.; Ferrara, E. C. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Guillemot, L. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement, LPCE UMR 6115 CNRS, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 02 (France); Smith, D. A.; Hou, X. [Centre d' Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, IN2P3/CNRS, Université Bordeaux 1, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Den Hartog, P. R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lande, J. [Twitter Inc., 1355 Market Street 900, San Francisco, CA 94103 (United States); Ray, P. S., E-mail: tyrel.j.johnson@gmail.com, E-mail: Christo.Venter@nwu.ac.za, E-mail: ahardingx@yahoo.com [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are a growing class of gamma-ray emitters. Pulsed gamma-ray signals have been detected from more than 40 MSPs with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The wider radio beams and more compact magnetospheres of MSPs enable studies of emission geometries over a broader range of phase space than non-recycled radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. We have modeled the gamma-ray light curves of 40 LAT-detected MSPs using geometric emission models assuming a vacuum retarded-dipole magnetic field. We modeled the radio profiles using a single-altitude hollow-cone beam, with a core component when indicated by polarimetry; however, for MSPs with gamma-ray and radio light curve peaks occurring at nearly the same rotational phase, we assume that the radio emission is co-located with the gamma rays and caustic in nature. The best-fit parameters and confidence intervals are determined using a maximum likelihood technique. We divide the light curves into three model classes, with gamma-ray peaks trailing (Class I), aligned (Class II), or leading (Class III) the radio peaks. Outer gap and slot gap (two-pole caustic) models best fit roughly equal numbers of Class I and II, while Class III are exclusively fit with pair-starved polar cap models. Distinguishing between the model classes based on typical derived parameters is difficult. We explore the evolution of the magnetic inclination angle with period and spin-down power, finding possible correlations. While the presence of significant off-peak emission can often be used as a discriminator between outer gap and slot gap models, a hybrid model may be needed.

  17. Constraints On the Emission Geometries and Spin Evolution Of Gamma-Ray Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. J.; Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.; Guillemot, L.; Smith, D. A.; Kramer, M.; Celik, O.; den Hartog, P. R.; Ferrara, E. C.; Hou, X.; Lande, J.; Ray, P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are a growing class of gamma-ray emitters. Pulsed gamma-ray signals have been detected from more than 40 MSPs with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The wider radio beams and more compact magnetospheres of MSPs enable studies of emission geometries over a broader range of phase space than non-recycled radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. We have modeled the gamma-ray light curves of 40 LAT-detected MSPs using geometric emission models assuming a vacuum retarded-dipole magnetic field. We modeled the radio profiles using a single-altitude hollow-cone beam, with a core component when indicated by polarimetry; however, for MSPs with gamma-ray and radio light curve peaks occurring at nearly the same rotational phase, we assume that the radio emission is co-located with the gamma rays and caustic in nature. The best-fit parameters and confidence intervals are determined using amaximum likelihood technique.We divide the light curves into three model classes, with gamma-ray peaks trailing (Class I), aligned (Class II), or leading (Class III) the radio peaks. Outer gap and slot gap (two-pole caustic) models best fit roughly equal numbers of Class I and II, while Class III are exclusively fit with pair-starved polar cap models. Distinguishing between the model classes based on typical derived parameters is difficult. We explore the evolution of the magnetic inclination angle with period and spin-down power, finding possible correlations. While the presence of significant off-peak emission can often be used as a discriminator between outer gap and slot gap models, a hybrid model may be needed.

  18. Excitation of wakefield around pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Berezhiani, V; Belic, M

    2016-01-01

    We study the generation of the wakefields by means of the high energy radiation of pulsars. The problem is considered in the framework of a one dimensional approach. We linearize the set of governing equations consisting of the momentum equation, continuity equation an Poisson equation and show that a wavelike structure will inevitably arise relatively close to the pulsar.

  19. Populations and evolution of radio pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李向东; 汪珍如

    1996-01-01

    A new physical parameter Q=log(We/P2/3) is defined as a criterion for judging whether a radio pulsar is a normal pulsar or a recycled pulsar originating from accreting binary systems.Based on the definition,the observational characteristics and the evolution of the two groups of pulsars are discussed.

  20. Pulsars as Fantastic Objects and Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J L

    2009-01-01

    Pulsars are fantastic objects, which show the extreme states of matters and plasma physics not understood yet. Pulsars can be used as probes for the detection of interstellar medium and even the gravitational waves. Here I review the basic facts of pulsars which should attract students to choose pulsar studies as their future projects.

  1. Magnetars and white dwarf pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Ronaldo V.; Malheiro, Manuel; Coelho, Jaziel G.

    2016-07-01

    The anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) are a class of pulsars understood as neutron stars (NSs) with super strong surface magnetic fields, namely B ≳ 1014G, and for that reason are known as magnetars. However, in the last years, some SGRs/AXPs with low surface magnetic fields B ˜ (1012-1013)G have been detected, challenging the magnetar description. Moreover, some fast and very magnetic white dwarfs (WDs) have also been observed, and at least one showed X-ray energy emission as an ordinary pulsar. Following this fact, an alternative model based on WDs pulsars has been proposed to explain this special class of pulsars. In this model, AXPs and SGRs as dense and magnetized WDs can have surface magnetic field B ˜ 107-1010 G and rotate very fast with frequencies Ω ˜ 1rad/s, consistent with the observed rotation periods P ˜ (2-12)s.

  2. Pulsar timing and general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D. C.; Hellings, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques are described for accounting for relativistic effects in the analysis of pulsar signals. Design features of instrumentation used to achieve millisecond accuracy in the signal measurements are discussed. The accuracy of the data permits modeling the pulsar physical characteristics from the natural glitches in the emissions. Relativistic corrections are defined for adjusting for differences between the pulsar motion in its spacetime coordinate system relative to the terrestrial coordinate system, the earth's motion, and the gravitational potentials of solar system bodies. Modifications of the model to allow for a binary pulsar system are outlined, including treatment of the system as a point mass. Finally, a quadrupole model is presented for gravitational radiation and techniques are defined for using pulsars in the search for gravitational waves.

  3. Pulsar timing and general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D. C.; Hellings, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques are described for accounting for relativistic effects in the analysis of pulsar signals. Design features of instrumentation used to achieve millisecond accuracy in the signal measurements are discussed. The accuracy of the data permits modeling the pulsar physical characteristics from the natural glitches in the emissions. Relativistic corrections are defined for adjusting for differences between the pulsar motion in its spacetime coordinate system relative to the terrestrial coordinate system, the earth's motion, and the gravitational potentials of solar system bodies. Modifications of the model to allow for a binary pulsar system are outlined, including treatment of the system as a point mass. Finally, a quadrupole model is presented for gravitational radiation and techniques are defined for using pulsars in the search for gravitational waves.

  4. Mammalian CAP interacts with CAP, CAP2, and actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubberstey, A; Yu, G; Loewith, R; Lakusta, C; Young, D

    1996-06-01

    We previously identified human CAP, a homolog of the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein. Previous studies suggest that the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of CAP have distinct functions. We have explored the interactions of human CAP with various proteins. First, by performing yeast two-hybrid screens, we have identified peptides from several proteins that interact with the C-terminal and/or the N-terminal domains of human CAP. These peptides include regions derived from CAP and BAT3, a protein with unknown function. We have further shown that MBP fusions with these peptides can associate in vitro with the N-terminal or C-terminal domains of CAP fused to GST. Our observations indicate that CAP contains regions in both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains that are capable of interacting with each other or with themselves. Furthermore, we found that myc-epitope-tagged CAP coimmunoprecipitates with HA-epitope-tagged CAP from either yeast or mammalian cell extracts. Similar results demonstrate that human CAP can also interact with human CAP2. We also show that human CAP interacts with actin, both by the yeast two-hybrid test and by coimmunoprecipitation of epitope-tagged CAP from yeast or mammalian cell extracts. This interaction requires the C-terminal domain of CAP, but not the N-terminal domain. Thus CAP appears to be capable of interacting in vivo with other CAP molecules, CAP2, and actin. We also show that actin co-immunoprecipitates with HA-CAP2 from mammalian cell extracts.

  5. Millisecond pulsars: Timekeepers of the cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi, Victoria M.

    1995-01-01

    A brief discussion on the characteristics of pulsars is given followed by a review of millisecond pulsar discoveries including the very first, PRS B1937+21, discovered in 1982. Methods of timing millisecond pulsars and the accuracy of millisecond pulsars as clocks are discussed. Possible reasons for the pulse residuals, or differences between the observed and predicted pulse arrival times for millisecond pulsars, are given.

  6. Simultaneous multi-frequency single pulse observations of pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, A.; Joshi, B. C.; Manoharan, P. K.; KrishnaKumar, M. A.

    2017-08-01

    Aims: We report on simultaneous multi-frequency single pulse observations of a sample of pulsars with previously reported, frequency dependent subpulse drift inferred from non-simultaneous and short observations. We aim to clarify if the frequency dependence is a result of multiple drift modes in these pulsars. Methods: We performed simultaneous observations at 326.5 MHz with the Ooty Radio Telescope and at 326, 610, and 1308 MHz with the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope for a sample of 12 pulsars, where frequency dependent single pulse behaviour was reported. The single pulse sequences were analysed with three types of fluctuation analysis techniques, namely longitude-resolved fluctuation spectrum technique, two-dimensional fluctuation spectrum technique and sliding two-dimensional fluctuation spectrum technique. The first two techniques are sensitive to average fluctuation properties of the pulses, whereas the last technique is used for examining the temporal behaviour of the pulses. Results: We report subpulse drifting in PSR J0934-5249 for the first time. We also report pulse nulling measurements in PSRs J0934-5249, B1508+55, J1822-2256, B1845-19, and J1901-0906 for the first time. Our measurements of subpulse drifting and pulse nulling for the rest of the pulsars are consistent with previously reported values. Contrary to previous belief, we find no evidence for a frequency dependent drift pattern in PSR B2016+28 as reported in previous studies. In PSRs B1237+25, J1822-2256, J1901-0906, and B2045-16, our longer and more sensitive observations reveal multiple drift rates with distinct P3. We increase the sample of pulsars showing concurrent nulling across multiple frequencies by more than 100 percent, adding four more pulsars to this sample. Our results confirm and further strengthen the understanding that the subpulse drifting and pulse nulling are consistent in the broadband with previous studies and are closely tied to physics of polar gap.

  7. The Pulsating Pulsar Magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Tsui, K H

    2015-01-01

    Following the basic principles of a charge separated pulsar magnetosphere \\citep{goldreich1969}, we consider the magnetosphere be stationary in space, instead of corotating, and the electric field be uploaded from the potential distribution on the pulsar surface, set up by the unipolar induction. Consequently, the plasma of the magnetosphere undergoes guiding center drifts of the gyro motion due to the transverse forces to the magnetic field. These forces are the electric force, magnetic gradient force, and field line curvature force. Since these plasma velocities are of drift nature, there is no need to introduce an emf along the field lines, which would contradict the $E_{\\parallel}=\\vec E\\cdot\\vec B=0$ plasma condition. Furthermore, there is also no need to introduce the critical field line separating the electron and ion open field lines. We present a self-consistent description where the magnetosphere is described in terms of electric and magnetic fields and also in terms of plasma velocities. The fields...

  8. Tempo: Pulsar timing data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, R.; Taylor, J.; Peters, W.; Weisberg, J.; Irwin, A.; Wex, N.; Stairs, I.; Demorest, P.; Nice, D.

    2015-09-01

    Tempo analyzes pulsar timing data. Pulse times of arrival (TOAs), pulsar model parameters, and coded instructions are read from one or more input files. The TOAs are fitted by a pulse timing model incorporating transformation to the solar-system barycenter, pulsar rotation and spin-down and, where necessary, one of several binary models. Program output includes parameter values and uncertainties, residual pulse arrival times, chi-squared statistics, and the covariance matrix of the model. In prediction mode, ephemerides of pulse phase behavior (in the form of polynomial expansions) are calculated from input timing models. Tempo is the basis for the Tempo2 (ascl:1210.015) code.

  9. Topology and Polarisation of Subbeams Associated With Pulsar 0943+10's ``Drifting''-Subpulse Emission I. Analysis of Arecibo 430- and 111-MHz Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Rankin, J M

    2000-01-01

    The ``drifting'' subpulses exhibited by some radio pulsars have fascinated both observers and theorists for 30 years, and have been widely regarded as one of the most critical and potentially insightful aspects of their emission. Here, we report on detailed studies of pulsar B0943+10, whose nearly coherent sequences of ``drifting'' subpulses have permitted us to identify their origin as a system of subbeams that appear to circulate around the star's magnetic axis. We introduce several new techniques of analysis, and we find that both the primary and secondary features in the star's fluctuation spectra are aliases of their actual values. We have also developed a method of tracing the underlying pattern responsible for the observed sequences, using a ``cartographic'' transform and its inverse, permitting us to study the characteristics of the polar-cap emission ``map'' and to confirm that such a ``map'' in turn represents the observed sequence. We apply these techniques to the study of three different Arecibo o...

  10. Light-Curve Modelling Constraints on the Obliquities and Aspect Angles of the Young Fermi Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierbattista, M.; Harding, A. K.; Grenier, I. A.; Johnson, T. J.; Caraveo, P. A.; Kerr, M.; Gonthier, P. L.

    2015-01-01

    In more than four years of observation the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite has identified pulsed gamma-ray emission from more than 80 young or middle-aged pulsars, in most cases providing light curves with high statistics. Fitting the observed profiles with geometrical models can provide estimates of the magnetic obliquity alpha and of the line of sight angle zeta, yielding estimates of the radiation beaming factor and radiated luminosity. Using different gamma-ray emission geometries (Polar Cap, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, One Pole Caustic) and core plus cone geometries for the radio emission, we fit gamma-ray light curves for 76 young or middle-aged pulsars and we jointly fit their gamma-ray plus radio light curves when possible. We find that a joint radio plus gamma-ray fit strategy is important to obtain (alpha, zeta) estimates that can explain simultaneously detectable radio and gamma-ray emission: when the radio emission is available, the inclusion of the radio light curve in the fit leads to important changes in the (alpha, gamma) solutions. The most pronounced changes are observed for Outer Gap and One Pole Caustic models for which the gamma-ray only fit leads to underestimated alpha or zeta when the solution is found to the left or to the right of the main alpha-zeta plane diagonal respectively. The intermediate-to-high altitude magnetosphere models, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, and One pole Caustic, are favored in explaining the observations. We find no apparent evolution of a on a time scale of 106 years. For all emission geometries our derived gamma-ray beaming factors are generally less than one and do not significantly evolve with the spin-down power. A more pronounced beaming factor vs. spin-down power correlation is observed for Slot Gap model and radio-quiet pulsars and for the Outer Gap model and radio-loud pulsars. The beaming factor distributions exhibit a large dispersion that is less pronounced for the Slot Gap case and that decreases from

  11. Light-Curve Modelling Constraints on the Obliquities and Aspect Angles of the Young Fermi Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierbattista, M.; Harding, A. K.; Grenier, I. A.; Johnson, T. J.; Caraveo, P. A.; Kerr, M.; Gonthier, P. L.

    2015-01-01

    In more than four years of observation the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite has identified pulsed gamma-ray emission from more than 80 young or middle-aged pulsars, in most cases providing light curves with high statistics. Fitting the observed profiles with geometrical models can provide estimates of the magnetic obliquity alpha and of the line of sight angle zeta, yielding estimates of the radiation beaming factor and radiated luminosity. Using different gamma-ray emission geometries (Polar Cap, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, One Pole Caustic) and core plus cone geometries for the radio emission, we fit gamma-ray light curves for 76 young or middle-aged pulsars and we jointly fit their gamma-ray plus radio light curves when possible. We find that a joint radio plus gamma-ray fit strategy is important to obtain (alpha, zeta) estimates that can explain simultaneously detectable radio and gamma-ray emission: when the radio emission is available, the inclusion of the radio light curve in the fit leads to important changes in the (alpha, gamma) solutions. The most pronounced changes are observed for Outer Gap and One Pole Caustic models for which the gamma-ray only fit leads to underestimated alpha or zeta when the solution is found to the left or to the right of the main alpha-zeta plane diagonal respectively. The intermediate-to-high altitude magnetosphere models, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, and One pole Caustic, are favored in explaining the observations. We find no apparent evolution of a on a time scale of 106 years. For all emission geometries our derived gamma-ray beaming factors are generally less than one and do not significantly evolve with the spin-down power. A more pronounced beaming factor vs. spin-down power correlation is observed for Slot Gap model and radio-quiet pulsars and for the Outer Gap model and radio-loud pulsars. The beaming factor distributions exhibit a large dispersion that is less pronounced for the Slot Gap case and that decreases from

  12. The quiescent state of the accreting X-ray pulsar SAX J2103.5+4545

    CERN Document Server

    Reig, P; Zezas, A

    2014-01-01

    We present an X-ray timing and spectral analysis of the Be/X-ray binary SAX J2103.5+4545 at a time when the Be star's circumstellar disk had disappeared and thus the main reservoir of material available for accretion had extinguished. In this very low optical state, pulsed X-ray emission was detected at a level of L_X~10^{33} erg/s. This is the lowest luminosity at which pulsations have ever been detected in an accreting pulsar. The derived spin period is 351.13 s, consistent with previous observations. The source continues its overall long-term spin-up, which reduced the spin period by 7.5 s since its discovery in 1997. The X-ray emission is consistent with a purely thermal spectrum, represented by a blackbody with kT=1 keV. We discuss possible scenarios to explain the observed quiescent luminosity and conclude that the most likely mechanism is direct emission resulting from the cooling of the polar caps, heated either during the most recent outburst or via intermittent accretion in quiescence.

  13. The Pulsar Kick Velocity Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, B M S; Hansen, Brad M. S.

    1997-01-01

    We analyse the sample of pulsar proper motions, taking detailed account of the selection effects of the original surveys. We treat censored data using survival statistics. From a comparison of our results with Monte Carlo simulations, we find that the mean birth speed of a pulsar is 250-300 km/s, rather than the 450 km/s foundby Lyne & Lorimer (1994). The resultant distribution is consistent with a maxwellian with dispersion $ \\sigma_v = 190 km/s$. Despite the large birth velocities, we find that the pulsars with long characteristic ages show the asymmetric drift, indicating that they are dynamically old. These pulsars may result from the low velocity tail of the younger population, although modified by their origin in binaries and by evolution in the galactic potential.

  14. Pulsar Electrodynamics: an unsolved problem

    CERN Document Server

    Melrose, D B

    2016-01-01

    Pulsar electrodynamics is reviewed emphasizing the role of the inductive electric field in an oblique rotator and the incomplete screening of its parallel component by charges, leaving `gaps' with $E_\\parallel\

  15. Pulsar observations at Mt. Pleasant

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, D R; McCulloch, P M

    2002-01-01

    Two daily pulsar monitoring programs are progressing at the Mount Pleasant Observatory, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. A new system involving the 26-metre radio telescope monitors 10 young pulsars daily and is focussed on near-real-time glitch finding. This will allow Target of Opportunity observations to measure post-glitch heating of the neutron star surface (Helfand, Gotthelf, & Halpern 2000). The 14-metre continues its 21st year of daily monitoring of the Vela pulsar with a recent comprehensive frontend upgrade. This is prior to an upgrade of the backend equipment currently in progress. The 14-metre observed the most recent glitch of the Vela pulsar in January 2000 to the highest time resolution of any glitch and revealed a particularly short-term decay component (Dodson, McCulloch, & Lewis 2002). This decay component will provide constraints to the nature of the coupling of the stellar crust to the liquid interior.

  16. Higgs portals to pulsar collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Bramante, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Pulsars apparently missing from the galactic center could have been destroyed by asymmetric fermionic dark matter ($m_X = 1-100$ GeV) coupled to a light scalar ($m_{\\phi}= 5-20$ MeV), which mixes with the Higgs boson. We point out that this pulsar-collapsing dark sector can resolve the core-cusp problem and will either be excluded or discovered by upcoming direct detection experiments. Another implication is a maximum pulsar age curve that increases with distance from the galactic center, with a normalization that depends on the couplings and masses of dark sector particles. In addition, we use old pulsars outside the galactic center to place bounds on asymmetric Higgs portal models.

  17. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, G

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project are to 1) make a direct detection of gravitational waves, 2) improve the solar system planetary ephemeris and 3) develop a pulsar-based time scale. In this article we describe the project, explain how the data are collected and processed and describe current research. Our current data sets are able to place an upper bound on the gravitational wave background that is the most stringent to date.

  18. Neutron Stars and Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Neutron stars are the most compact astronomical objects in the universe which are accessible by direct observation. Studying neutron stars means studying physics in regimes unattainable in any terrestrial laboratory. Understanding their observed complex phenomena requires a wide range of scientific disciplines, including the nuclear and condensed matter physics of very dense matter in neutron star interiors, plasma physics and quantum electrodynamics of magnetospheres, and the relativistic magneto-hydrodynamics of electron-positron pulsar winds interacting with some ambient medium. Not to mention the test bed neutron stars provide for general relativity theories, and their importance as potential sources of gravitational waves. It is this variety of disciplines which, among others, makes neutron star research so fascinating, not only for those who have been working in the field for many years but also for students and young scientists. The aim of this book is to serve as a reference work which not only review...

  19. Pulsars In The Headlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Puerto, C.

    1967 was the year of the so-called “war of the six days” or “third Arab Israeli war”, the year of the Che Guevara's death in Bolivia, the year of the military coup in Greece and, in medicine, the year of the first human heart transplant. Moreover, the signing of the international agreement on the use of space with peaceful means and the crash of the Russian shuttle Soyuz-1, with Cosmonaut Vladimir Kamarov on board also happened that year. Likewise, Spanish writer and professor of journalists, José Azorín, passed away. However, here we are interested in 1967 because it was the year of the detection of pulsars, which astronomers initially confused with signals from extraterrestrials or Little Green Men. Nowadays, they are still present in the headlines.

  20. Effectiveness of Null Signal Sky Localization in Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq Hazboun, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    A null stream is constructed from the timing residuals of three pulsars by noting that the same source polarization amplitudes appear in the data stream from each pulsar. Linear combinations of a set of individual pulsar data streams can be shown to be a two-parameter family (the two sky position angles of the source) that can be minimized to determine the location of the source on the sky. Taking the product of a number of null streams allows for an even stronger localization of the gravitational wave's source; a large advantage in a PTA where there are more independent signals than other gravitational wave detectors. While a null stream contains the same information as any other data stream with the same number of pulsars, the statistics of a product of noisy signals is inherently different than for a sum of those same signals.A comparison of how null signal searches compare to other techniques for sky localization of PTA sources will be discussed, as well as an assessment of the types of searches for which the method may be useful.

  1. Versatile directional searches for gravitational waves with Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, D. R.; Zhu, X.-J.; Hobbs, G.; Coles, W.; Shannon, R. M.; Wang, J. B.; Tiburzi, C.; Manchester, R. N.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Dai, S.; Dempsey, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Lasky, P.; Levin, Y.; Osłowski, S.; Ravi, V.; Reardon, D.; Rosado, P.; Spiewak, R.; van Straten, W.; Toomey, L.; Wen, L.; You, X.

    2016-02-01

    By regularly monitoring the most stable millisecond pulsars over many years, pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are positioned to detect and study correlations in the timing behaviour of those pulsars. Gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are an exciting potentially detectable source of such correlations. We describe a straightforward technique by which a PTA can be `phased-up' to form time series of the two polarization modes of GWs coming from a particular direction of the sky. Our technique requires no assumptions regarding the time-domain behaviour of a GW signal. This method has already been used to place stringent bounds on GWs from individual SMBHBs in circular orbits. Here, we describe the methodology and demonstrate the versatility of the technique in searches for a wide variety of GW signals including bursts with unmodelled waveforms. Using the first six years of data from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we conduct an all-sky search for a detectable excess of GW power from any direction. For the lines of sight to several nearby massive galaxy clusters, we carry out a more detailed search for GW bursts with memory, which are distinct signatures of SMBHB mergers. In all cases, we find that the data are consistent with noise.

  2. Young Radio Pulsars in Galactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Boyles, Jason; Turk, Phil J; Mnatsakanov, Robert; Lynch, Ryan S; Ransom, Scott M; Freire, Paulo C; Belczynski, Khris

    2011-01-01

    Currently three isolated radio pulsars and one binary radio pulsar with no evidence of any previous recycling are known in 97 surveyed Galactic globular clusters. As pointed out by Lyne et al., the presence of these pulsars cannot be explained by core-collapse supernovae, as is commonly assumed for their counterparts in the Galactic disk. We apply a Bayesian analysis to the results from surveys for radio pulsars in globular clusters and find the number of potentially observable non-recycled radio pulsars present in all clusters to be -0.6. In this case, the potentially observable population of such young pulsars is 447^{+1420}_{-399} (the error bars give the 95% confidence interval) and their birth rate is 0.012^{+0.037}_{-0.010} pulsars per century. The mostly likely creation scenario to explain these pulsars is the electron capture supernova of a OMgNe white dwarf.

  3. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A dense globular star cluster near the center of our Milky Way Galaxy holds a buzzing beehive of rapidly-spinning millisecond pulsars, according to astronomers who discovered 21 new pulsars in the cluster using the National Science Foundation's 100-meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The cluster, called Terzan 5, now holds the record for pulsars, with 24, including three known before the GBT observations. Pulsar Diagram Pulsar Diagram: Click on image for more detail. "We hit the jackpot when we looked at this cluster," said Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, VA. "Not only does this cluster have a lot of pulsars -- and we still expect to find more in it -- but the pulsars in it are very interesting. They include at least 13 in binary systems, two of which are eclipsing, and the four fastest-rotating pulsars known in any globular cluster, with the fastest two rotating nearly 600 times per second, roughly as fast as a household blender," Ransom added. Ransom and his colleagues reported their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA, and in the online journal Science Express. The star cluster's numerous pulsars are expected to yield a bonanza of new information about not only the pulsars themselves, but also about the dense stellar environment in which they reside and probably even about nuclear physics, according to the scientists. For example, preliminary measurements indicate that two of the pulsars are more massive than some theoretical models would allow. "All these exotic pulsars will keep us busy for years to come," said Jason Hessels, a Ph.D student at McGill University in Montreal. Globular clusters are dense agglomerations of up to millions of stars, all of which formed at about the same time. Pulsars are spinning, superdense neutron stars that whirl "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is

  4. Towards a Realistic Pulsar Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Harding, Alice; Contopoulos, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    We present the magnetic and electric field structures as well as the currents ami charge densities of pulsar magnetospberes which do not obey the ideal condition, E(raised dot) B = O. Since the acceleration of particles and the production of radiation requires the presence of an electric field component parallel to the magnetic field, E(sub ll) the structure of non-Ideal pulsar magnetospheres is intimately related to the production of pulsar radiation. Therefore, knowledge of the structure of non-Ideal pulsar maglletospheres is important because their comparison (including models for t he production of radiation) with observations will delineate the physics and the parameters underlying the pulsar radiation problem. We implement a variety of prescriptions that support nonzero values for E(sub ll) and explore their effects on the structure of the resulting magnetospheres. We produce families of solutions that span the entire range between the vacuum and the (ideal) Force-Free Electrodynamic solutions. We also compute the amount of dissipation as a fraction of the Poynting flux for pulsars of different angles between the rotation and magnetic axes and conclude that tltis is at most 20-40% (depending on t he non-ideal prescription) in the aligned rotator and 10% in the perpendicular one. We present also the limiting solutions with the property J = pc and discuss their possible implicatioll on the determination of the "on/ off" states of the intermittent pulsars. Finally, we find that solutions with values of J greater than those needed to null E(sub ll) locally produce oscillations, potentially observable in the data.

  5. What brakes the Crab pulsar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čadež, A.; Zampieri, L.; Barbieri, C.; Calvani, M.; Naletto, G.; Barbieri, M.; Ponikvar, D.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Optical observations provide convincing evidence that the optical phase of the Crab pulsar follows the radio one closely. Since optical data do not depend on dispersion measure variations, they provide a robust and independent confirmation of the radio timing solution. Aims: The aim of this paper is to find a global mathematical description of Crab pulsar's phase as a function of time for the complete set of published Jodrell Bank radio ephemerides (JBE) in the period 1988-2014. Methods: We apply the mathematical techniques developed for analyzing optical observations to the analysis of JBE. We break the whole period into a series of episodes and express the phase of the pulsar in each episode as the sum of two analytical functions. The first function is the best-fitting local braking index law, and the second function represents small residuals from this law with an amplitude of only a few turns, which rapidly relaxes to the local braking index law. Results: From our analysis, we demonstrate that the power law index undergoes "instantaneous" changes at the time of observed jumps in rotational frequency (glitches). We find that the phase evolution of the Crab pulsar is dominated by a series of constant braking law episodes, with the braking index changing abruptly after each episode in the range of values between 2.1 and 2.6. Deviations from such a regular phase description behave as oscillations triggered by glitches and amount to fewer than 40 turns during the above period, in which the pulsar has made more than 2 × 1010 turns. Conclusions: Our analysis does not favor the explanation that glitches are connected to phenomena occurring in the interior of the pulsar. On the contrary, timing irregularities and changes in slow down rate seem to point to electromagnetic interaction of the pulsar with the surrounding environment.

  6. Ferromagnetism of polythiophene-capped Au nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, K.; Zhang, H.; Saito, K.; Garitaonandia, J. S.; Goikolea, E.; Insausti, M.

    2011-04-01

    The magnetic and electrical transport properties of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene)-capped Au nanoparticles (NPs) doped with iodine have been investigated to clarify the effectiveness of conductive polymer capping on the induction of ferromagnetism in Au. The room-temperature magnetization curve of the undoped polythiophene-capped Au NPs exhibits a clear hysteresis behavior with a coercive force of 160 Oe. The spontaneous magnetization normalized by the mass of Au is 2.0 × 10-2 emu/g. The spontaneous magnetization was found virtually unaffected by iodine doping, whereas the electrical conductivity is enhanced dramatically to ˜10 S/cm. Our results show that polythiophene capping could lead to spontaneous magnetic polarization in Au NPs, and the conductivity of the polymer capping does not affect the ferromagnetism of the Au nanoparticles, opening a possibility for further investigation into the magnetotransport behavior of ferromagnetic Au NPs.

  7. Search for Millisecond Pulsars for the Pulsar Timing Array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milia, S.

    2012-03-01

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating highly magnetised neutron stars (i.e. ultra dense stars, where about one solar mass is concentrated in a sphere with a radius of ~ 10 km), which irradiate radio beams in a fashion similar to a lighthouse. As a consequence, whenever the beams cut our line of sight we perceive a radio pulses, one (or two) per pulsar rotation, with a frequency up to hundred of times a second. Owing to their compact nature, rapid spin and high inertia, pulsars are in general fairly stable rotators, hence the Times of Arrival (TOAs) of the pulses at a radio telescope can be used as the ticks of a clock. This holds true in particular for the sub­class of the millisecond pulsars (MSPs), having a spin period smaller than the conventional limit of 30 ms, whose very rapid rotation and relatively older age provide better rotational stability than the ordinary pulsars. Indeed, some MSPs rotate so regularly that they can rival the best atomic clocks on Earth over timespan of few months or years.This feature allows us to use MSPs as tools in a cosmic laboratory, by exploiting a procedure called timing, which consists in the repeated and regular measurement of the TOAs from a pulsar and then in the search for trends in the series of the TOAs over various timespans, from fraction of seconds to decades.For example the study of pulsars in binary systems has already provided the most stringent tests to date of General Relativity in strong gravitational fields and has unambiguously showed the occurrence of the emission of gravitational waves from a binary system comprising two massive bodies in a close orbit. In last decades a new exciting perspective has been opened, i.e. to use pulsars also for a direct detection of the so far elusive gravitational waves and thereby applying the pulsar timing for cosmological studies. In fact, the gravitational waves (GWs) going across our Galaxy pass over all the Galactic pulsars and the Earth, perturbing the space­time at the

  8. Understanding pulsar magnetospheres with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Karastergiou, A; Andersson, N; Breton, R; Brook, P; Gwinn, C; Lewandowska, N; Keane, E; Kramer, M; Macquart, J -P; Serylak, M; Shannon, R; Stappers, B; van Leeuwen, J; Verbiest, J P W; Weltevrede, P; Wright, G

    2015-01-01

    The SKA will discover tens of thousands of pulsars and provide unprecedented data quality on these, as well as the currently known population, due to its unrivalled sensitivity. Here, we outline the state of the art of our understanding of magnetospheric radio emission from pulsars and how we will use the SKA to solve the open problems in pulsar magnetospheric physics.

  9. Using HAWC to Discover Invisible Pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, Tim [Ohio State U., CCAPP; Auchettl, Katie [Ohio State U., CCAPP; Bramante, Joseph [Perimeter Inst. Theor. Phys.; Cholis, Ilias [Johns Hopkins U.; Fang, Ke [Maryland U.; Hooper, Dan [Fermilab; Karwal, Tanvi [Johns Hopkins U.; Li, Shirley Weishi [Ohio State U., CCAPP

    2017-03-28

    Observations by HAWC and Milagro have detected bright and spatially extended TeV gamma-ray sources surrounding the Geminga and Monogem pulsars. We argue that these observations, along with a substantial population of other extended TeV sources coincident with pulsar wind nebulae, constitute a new morphological class of spatially extended TeV halos. We show that HAWCs wide field-of-view unlocks an expansive parameter space of TeV halos not observable by atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Under the assumption that Geminga and Monogem are typical middle-aged pulsars, we show that ten-year HAWC observations should eventually observe 37$^{+17}_{-13}$ middle-aged TeV halos that correspond to pulsars whose radio emission is not beamed towards Earth. Depending on the extrapolation of the TeV halo efficiency to young pulsars, HAWC could detect more than 100 TeV halos from mis-aligned pulsars. These pulsars have historically been difficult to detect with existing multiwavelength observations. TeV halos will constitute a significant fraction of all HAWC sources, allowing follow-up observations to efficiently find pulsar wind nebulae and thermal pulsar emission. The observation and subsequent multi-wavelength follow-up of TeV halos will have significant implications for our understanding of pulsar beam geometries, the evolution of PWN, the diffusion of cosmic-rays near energetic pulsars, and the contribution of pulsars to the cosmic-ray positron excess.

  10. The timing behaviour of radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, G

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this review paper is to summarise the pulsar timing method, to provide an overview of recent research into the spin-down of pulsars over decadal timescales and to highlight the science that can be achieved using high-precision timing of millisecond pulsars.

  11. Observations of the Crab Nebula and pulsar in the optical and gamma-ray bands with STACEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Pascal

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope that detects cosmic gamma-rays using the wavefront-sampling technique. STACEE uses the large mirror area of the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) to achieve an energy threshold below 200 GeV. This telescope was used to search for high-energy gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula and pulsar. A statistical excess of 4.07sigma in the number of on-source events compared to off-source events was detected in 15 hours of on-source observing time, corresponding to an integral flux above the energy threshold (Ethr = 185 +/- 35 GeV) of I(E > Ethr) = (2.5 +/- 0.6) x 10-10 photons cm -2 s-1. The observed flux is in agreement with the previous result obtained by STACEE-32 and consistent with the power law spectrum seen at higher energies. A special instrument was developed to make simultaneous observations of the Crab in the optical and gamma-ray bands. Pulsed emission was detected in the optical band, demonstrating the accuracy of the barycentering and epoch folding analysis tools. After barycentering the arrival times and calculating the rotational phases of gamma-ray events, no evidence for pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar was found. The upper limit on the pulsed fraction of the signal was 16.4% at the 99.9% confidence level. Unfortunately, neither the polar cap model, nor the outer gap model is excluded by this new upper limit.

  12. Dissipation, energy transfer, and spin-down luminosity in 2.5D PIC simulations of the pulsar magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.

    2015-05-01

    We perform 2.5D axisymmetric simulations of the pulsar magnetosphere (aligned dipole rotator) using the charge conservative, relativistic, electromagnetic particle in cell code PICSAR. Particle in cell codes are a powerful tool to use for studying the pulsar magnetosphere, because they can handle the force-free and vacuum limits and provide a self-consistent treatment of magnetic reconnection. In the limit of dense plasma throughout the magnetosphere, our solutions are everywhere in the force-free regime except for dissipative regions at the polar caps, in the current layers, and at the Y-point. These dissipative regions arise self-consistently, since we do not have any explicit dissipation in the code. A minimum of ≈15-20 per cent of the electromagnetic spin-down luminosity is transferred to the particles inside 5 light cylinder radii. However, the particles can carry as much as ≳ 50 per cent of the spin-down luminosity if there is insufficient plasma in the outer magnetosphere to screen the component of electric field parallel to the magnetic field. In reality, the component of the spin-down luminosity carried by the particles could be radiated as gamma-rays, but high-frequency synchrotron emission would need to be implemented as a sub-grid process in our simulations and is not present for the current suite of runs. The value of the spin-down luminosity in our simulations is within ≈10 per cent of the force-free value, and the structure of the electromagnetic fields in the magnetosphere is on the whole consistent with the force-free model.

  13. Magnetars and White Dwarf Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Lobato, Ronaldo V; Coelho, Jaziel G

    2016-01-01

    The Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters (SGRs) are a class of pulsars understood as neutron stars (NSs) with super strong surface magnetic fields, namely $B\\gtrsim10^{14}$ G, and for that reason are known as Magnetars. However, in the last years some SGRs/AXPs with low surface magnetic fields $B\\sim(10^{12}-10^{13})$ G have been detected, challenging the Magnetar description. Moreover, some fast and very magnetic white dwarfs (WDs) have also been observed, and at least one showed X-Ray energy emission as an ordinary pulsar. Following this fact, an alternative model based on white dwarfs pulsars has been proposed to explain this special class of pulsars. In this model, AXPs and SGRs as dense and magnetized white dwarfs can have surface magnetic field $B\\sim 10^{7}-10^{10}$ G and rotate very fast with frequencies $\\Omega\\sim 1$ rad/s, consistent with the observed rotation periods $P\\sim (2-12)$ s.

  14. How Much Winter Stratospheric Polar-cap Warming Is Explained By Upward-propagating Planetary Waves In CMIP5 Models?: Part 1. An Indirect Approach Using A Wave Interference Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Kim, B.

    2013-12-01

    The breaking of upward-propagating planetary (typically characterized by the combination of zonal wave number 1 and 2) waves in the stratosphere is regarded as one of the factors that provoke the sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) and the accompanying collapse of stratospheric polar vortex during winter. It is also known that if the anomalous stationary wave pattern is in phase with that of the climatology during a certain period, this period is dynamically favorable for the upward propagation and amplification of planetary waves. This kind of phenomenon that amplitude of resultant wave increases by combining two or more waves in phase is called the constructive interference. Our research evaluates whether and to what degree the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models simulate such a relation between tropospheric wave interference and Northern polar stratosphere temperature anomaly during winter. Here the 500-hPa wave interference index (WII500) is defined as the coefficient that is obtained by projecting the anomaly of wave number 1 and 2 components of 500-hPa geopotential height onto its climatology. Using monthly outputs of the CMIP5 historical runs currently available to us, we examine the lagged relationship (R-square) between the WII500 during November-December-January (NDJ) and the polar-cap temperature anomaly at 50 hPa (PCT50) during December-January-February (DJF) on an interannual timescale. By sampling uncertainty in R-squares of 33-yr samples (chosen fit with the modern reanalysis period, 1980-2012) with bootstrap resampling, we obtain the sampled medians for all models. The observed relations are then calculated using six reanalyses (ERA-40, ERA-Interim, JRA-25, MERRA, NCEP-R1, and NCEP-R2), and the 5-95% confidence interval of their observed R-square is obtained again with bootstrap resampling of all six reanalyses blended. Then we evaluate which CMIP5 model simulates the WII500-PCT50 relation within the probable range of

  15. Observational features of pulsar glitches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Pulsar glitches are sudden increases in the rotation rate which probably result from angular momentum transfer within the neutron star. We review the observational features of the 39 glitches detected at Nanshan from 2000 to 2008, including several events which appear to be slow glitches. A wide variety of post-glitch behavior is observed with very little recovery in some pulsars and over-recovery in others. Analysis of the whole sample of known glitches shows that fractional glitch amplitudes are correlated with characteristic age with a peak at about 105 years, but there is a spread of two or three orders of magnitude at all ages. For individual pulsars with many glitches, the time until the next glitch is sometimes proportional to the fractional glitch amplitude.

  16. Autonomous Spacecraft Navigation With Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Werner; Jessner, Axel

    2013-01-01

    An external reference system suitable for deep space navigation can be defined by fast spinning and strongly magnetized neutron stars, called pulsars. Their beamed periodic signals have timing stabilities comparable to atomic clocks and provide characteristic temporal signatures that can be used as natural navigation beacons, quite similar to the use of GPS satellites for navigation on Earth. By comparing pulse arrival times measured on-board a spacecraft with predicted pulse arrivals at a reference location, the spacecraft position can be determined autonomously and with high accuracy everywhere in the solar system and beyond. The unique properties of pulsars make clear already today that such a navigation system will have its application in future astronautics. In this paper we describe the basic principle of spacecraft navigation using pulsars and report on the current development status of this novel technology.

  17. Pulsar Timing Arrays and Gravity Tests in the Radiative Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, K J

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on testing gravity theories in the radiative regime using pulsar timing array observations. After reviewing current techniques to measure the dispersion and alternative polarization of gravitational waves, we extend the framework to the most general situations, where the combinations of a massive graviton and alternative polarization modes are considered. The atlas of the Hellings-Downs functions is completed by the new calculations for these dispersive alternative polarization modes. We find that each mode and corresponding graviton mass introduce characteristic features in the Hellings-Downs function. Thus, in principal, we can not only detect each polarization mode, measure the corresponding graviton mass, but also discriminate the different scenarios. In this way, we can test gravity theories in the radiative regime in a generalized fashion, and such method is a direct experiment, where one can address the gauge symmetry of the gravity theories in their linearised limits. Although ...

  18. Search for Pulsations from a Nearby Millisecond Pulsar and Wasilewski 49: Mirror for a Hidden Seyfert 1 Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1999-03-01

    Five studies are reported in this final report. The recently discovered 5.3 ms pulsar J1012+5307 at a distance of 520 pc is in an area of the sky which is particularly deficient in absorbing gas. The column density along the line of sight is less than 7.5 x 1019 CM-2 which facilitates soft X-ray observations. Halpern reported a possible ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) detection of the pulsar in a serendipitous, off-axis observation. We have now confirmed the X-ray emission of PSR J1012+,5307 in a 23 ksec observation with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI). A point source is detected within 3" of the radio position. Its count rate of 1.6 +/- 0.3 x 10-3 s-1 corresponds to an unabsorbed 0. 1-2.4 keV flux of 6.4 x 10-14 ergs cm-2 s-1, similar to that reported previously. This counts-to-flux conversion is valid for NH = 5 x 1019 cm-2, and either a power-law spectrum of photon index 2.5 or a blackbody of kT = 0.1 keV. The implied X-ray luminosity of 2.0 x 1030 ergs s-1 is 5 X 10-4 of the pulsar's spin-down power dot-E, and similar to that of the nearest millisecond pulsar J0437-4715, which is nearly a twin of J1012+5307 in P dot-E. We subjected the 37 photons (and 13 background counts) within the source region to a pulsar search, but no evidence for pulsation was found. The pulsar apparently emits over a large fraction of its rotation cycle, and the absence of sharp modulation can be taken as evidence for surface thermal emission, as is favored for PSR J0437-4715, rather than magnetospheric X-ray emission which is apparent in the sharp pulses of the much more energetic millisecond pulsar B1821-24. A further test of this interpretation will be made with a longer ROSAT observation, which will increase the number of photons collected by a factor of 5, and permit a more sensitive examination of the light curve for modulation due to emission from heated polar caps. If found, such modulation will be further evidence that surface reheating by the impact

  19. Pulsar data analysis with PSRCHIVE

    CERN Document Server

    van Straten, Willem; Osłowski, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    PSRCHIVE is an open-source, object-oriented, scientific data analysis software library and application suite for pulsar astronomy. It implements an extensive range of general-purpose algorithms for use in data calibration and integration, statistical analysis and modeling, and visualisation. These are utilised by a variety of applications specialised for tasks such as pulsar timing, polarimetry, radio frequency interference mitigation, and pulse variability studies. This paper presents a general overview of PSRCHIVE functionality with some focus on the integrated interfaces developed for the core applications.

  20. Development of a pulsar-based timescale

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, G; Manchester, R N; Keith, M J; Shannon, R M; Chen, D; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D; Chaudhary, A; Hotan, A; Khoo, J; Kocz, J; Levin, Y; Oslowski, S; Preisig, B; Ravi, V; Reynolds, J E; Sarkissian, J; van Straten, W; Verbiest, J P W; Yardley, D; You, X P

    2012-01-01

    Using observations of pulsars from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) project we develop the first pulsar-based timescale that has a precision comparable to the uncertainties in international atomic timescales. Our ensemble of pulsars provides an Ensemble Pulsar Scale (EPS) analogous to the free atomic timescale Echelle Atomique Libre (EAL). The EPS can be used to detect fluctuations in atomic timescales and therefore can lead to a new realisation of Terrestrial Time, TT(PPTA11). We successfully follow features known to affect the frequency of the International Atomic Timescale (TAI) and we find marginally significant differences between TT(PPTA11) and TT(BIPM11). We discuss the various phenomena that lead to a correlated signal in the pulsar timing residuals and therefore limit the stability of the pulsar timescale.

  1. Can gluon condensate in pulsar cores explain pulsar glitches ?

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, R D

    1998-01-01

    Making use of the possibility that gluon condensate can be formed in neutron star core, we study the vortex pinning force between the crust and the interior of the neutron star. Our estimations indicate an increase in pinning strength with the age of the neutron star. This helps in explaining observed pulsar glitches and removes some difficulties faced by vortex creep model.

  2. Millisecond Pulsars in 47 Tucanae

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, P C C; Lorimer, D R; Lyne, A G; Manchester, R N; Freire, Paulo C.; Camilo, Fernando; Lorimer, Duncan R.; Lyne, Andrew G.; Manchester, Richard N.

    1999-01-01

    Recent observations of the globular cluster 47 Tuc, made with the Parkes telescope at a wavelength of 20 cm, have resulted in the discovery of nine new millisecond pulsars, all in binary systems. The number of timing solutions available has risen from two to 14. These results will make possible a more detailed study of the cluster dynamics.

  3. Early pulsar observations with LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessels, J.; Stappers, B.; Hassall, T.; Weltevrede, P.; Alexov, A.; Coenen, T.; van Leeuwen, J.; Kondratiev, V.; Mol, J.D.; Kramer, M.; Noutsos, A.; Karastergiou, A.

    2010-01-01

    This contribution to the proceedings of "A New Golden Age for Radio Astronomy" is simply intended to give some of the highlights from pulsar observations with LOFAR at the time of its official opening: June 12th, 2010. These observations illustrate that, though LOFAR is still under construction and

  4. Space 'beachballs' generate pulsar bursts

    CERN Multimedia

    Wasowicz, L

    2003-01-01

    Researchers have analyzed radio emissions from a pulsar at the center of the Crab Nebula and have found 'subpulses' that last around 2 nanoseconds. They speculate this means the regions in which these ultra-short pulses are generated can be no larger than about 2 feet across - the distance light travels in 2 nanoseconds (2 pages).

  5. Braking Index of Isolated Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Hamil, Oliver Q; Urbanec, Martin; Urbancova, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Isolated pulsars are rotating neutron stars with accurately measured angular velocities $\\Omega$, and their time derivatives that show unambiguously that the pulsars are slowing down. The commonly accepted view is that it arises through emission of magnetic dipole radiation (MDR) from a rotating magnetized body. The calculated energy loss by a rotating pulsar with a constant moment of inertia is assumed proportional to a model dependent power of $\\Omega$. This relation leads to the power law $\\dot{\\Omega}$ = -K $\\Omega^{\\rm n}$ where $n$ is called the braking index. The MDR model predicts $n$ exactly equal to 3. Selected observations of isolated pulsars provide rather precise values of $n$, individually accurate to a few percent or better, in the range 1$ <$ n $ < $ 2.8, which is consistently less than the predictions of the MDR model. In spite of an extensive investigation of various modifications of the MDR model, no satisfactory explanation of observation has been found yet. The aim of this work is t...

  6. The cervical cap (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cervical cap is a flexible rubber cup-like device that is filled with spermicide and self-inserted over the cervix ... left in place several hours after intercourse. The cap is a prescribed device fitted by a health ...

  7. One blind and three targeted searches for (sub)millisecond pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Davoust, E.; G. Petit; Fayard, T.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted one blind and three targeted searches for millisecond and submillisecond pulsars. The blind search was conducted within 3deg of the Galactic plane and at longitudes between 20 and 110deg. It takes 22073 pointings to cover this region, and 5487 different positions in the sky. The first targeted search was aimed at Galactic globular clusters, the second one at 24 bright polarized and pointlike radiosources with steep spectra, and the third at 65 faint polarized and pointlike radios...

  8. Cradle Cap: Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cradle cap Treatment Cradle cap usually doesn't require medical treatment. It clears up on its own within a few months. In the meantime, wash ... tips can help you control and manage cradle cap. Gently rub your baby's scalp with your fingers ...

  9. Probing for Pulsars in XMM Study of the Composite SNRS G327.1-1.1 and CTA 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotsky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Slane, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    The subject grant is for analysis of XMM data from the supernova remnant CTA1. Our investigation centered on the study of the compact source RX 50007.0+7302 that, based on our previous observations, appears to be a neutron star powering a wind nebula in the remnant interior. This compact source has also been suggested as the counterpart of the EGRET source 2EG J0008+7307. The analysis of the data from the compact source is complete. We find that the spectrum of the source is well described by a power law with the addition of a soft thermal component that may correspond to emission from hot polar cap regions or to cooling emission from a light element atmosphere over the entire star. There is evidence of extended emission on small spatial scales which may correspond to structure in the underlying synchrotron nebula. Extrapolation of the nonthermal emission component to gamma-ray energies yields a flux that is consistent with that of 2EG J0008+7307, thus strengthening the proposition that there is a gamma-ray emitting pulsar at the center of CTA 1. Our timing studies with the EPIC pn data revealed no evidence for pulsations, however; we set an upper limit of 61% on the pulsed fraction from this source. The results from this study were presented.

  10. Pulsar VLBI to Measure Cosmological Rotation and Study Pulsar Emission Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwinn, C. R.

    2009-08-01

    Pulsars are useful for measuring the rotation of the universe. Also, their emission regions provide interesting laboratories for plasma physics. I describe here how VLBI of pulsars, and the VSOP-2 spacecraft, can contribute to such studies.

  11. F-Layer Polar Cap Arcs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    0920 UT, 26 January !985 32 m U 4/ - 4’. -4-4 m -~ I o 4’. .4 @1 - p .1?. ’I.. 0 r B- ~~4~9~ - I ~1 3 ~Dl ~ ~ *-~ N ’~ 4 D 0z 3a .4 c~.) *~*~) ID * 4-S... Mango , "Ionospheric Irregularities and Their Potential Impact on Synthetic Aperture Radar", Radio Science, v.18, no.5, pp. 765-774, September October

  12. Collaborative Studies of Polar Cap Ionospheric Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-12

    quantities such as integration time, look angle directions, the count level of integration corresponding to the desired level of meassurement accuracy...monitored by a shaft encoder and this value is recorded by the computer through a 16 bit BCD interface. The datataking software modifications * 6...fundamental diurnal character, in accord with model predictions, with typical speeds of -200m/sec, generally in an anti-sunward direction. A large

  13. Non-Cosmological FRB's from Young Supernova Remnant Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Connor, Liam; Pen, Ue-Li

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new extragalactic but non-cosmological explanation for FRB's based on very young pulsars in supernova remnants. Within a few hundred years of a core-collapse supernova the ejecta is confined within $\\sim$1 pc, providing a high enough column density of free electrons for the observed 500-1500 pc/cm$^3$. By extrapolating a Crab-like pulsar to its infancy in an environment like that of SN 1987A, we hypothesize such an object could emit supergiant pulses sporadically which would be bright enough to be seen at a few hundred megaparsecs. In this scenario Faraday rotation at the source gives RM's much larger than the expected cosmological contribution. If the emission were pulsar-like, then the polarization vector could swing over the duration of the burst, which is not expected from non-rotating objects. In this model, the scattering, large DM, and commensurate RM all come from one place which is not the case for the cosmological interpretation. The model also provides testable predictions of the flux ...

  14. Transient Phenomena in Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Israel, GianLuca; Burgay, Marta; Rea, Nanda; Possenti, Andrea; Dall'Osso, Simone; Stella, and Luigi

    2007-01-01

    In 2003 a previously unpulsed Einstein and ROSAT source cataloged as soft and dim (Lx of few 10^33 ergs) thermal emitting object, namely XTE J1810-197, was identified as the first unambiguous transient Anomalous X-ray Pulsar. Two years later this source was also found to be a bright highly polarized transient radio pulsar, a unique property among both AXPs and radio pulsars. In September 2006 the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) detected an intense burst from the candidate AXP CXOU J164710.2-455216, which entered in an outburst state reaching a peak emission of at least a factor of 300 higher than quiescence. Here, we briefly outline the recent results concerning the outburst phenomena observed in these two AXPs. In particular, XTE J1810-197 has probed to be a unique laboratory to monitor the timing and spectral properties of a cooling/fading AXP, while new important information have been inferred from X-ray and radio band simultaneous observations. CXOU J164710.2-455216 has been monitored in X-rays and radi...

  15. Measurement of Gravitational Spin-Orbit Coupling in a Binary Pulsar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stairs, I. H.; Thorsett. S. E.; Arzoumanian, Z.

    2004-01-01

    In relativistic gravity, a spinning pulsar will precess as it orbits a compact companion star. We have measured the effect of such precession on the average shape and polarization of the radiation from PSR B1534+12. We have also detected, with limited precision, special-relativistic aberration of the revolving pulsar beam due to orbital motion. Our observations fix the system geometry, including the misalignment between the spin and orbital angular momenta, and yield a measurement of the precession timescale consistent with the predictions of General Relativity.

  16. A Pulsar and a Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Recent, unusual X-ray observations from our galactic neighbor, the Small Magellanic Cloud, have led to an interesting model for SXP 214, a pulsar in a binary star system.Artists illustration of the magnetic field lines of a pulsar, a highly magnetized, rotating neutron star. [NASA]An Intriguing BinaryAn X-ray pulsar is a magnetized, rotating neutron star in a binary system with a stellar companion. Material is fed from the companion onto the neutron star, channeled by the objects magnetic fields onto a hotspot thats millions of degrees. This hotspot rotating past our line of sight is what produces the pulsations that we observe from X-ray pulsars.Located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SXP 214 is a transient X-ray pulsar in a binary with a Be-type star. This star is spinning so quickly that material is thrown off of it to form a circumstellar disk.Recently, a team of authors led by JaeSub Hong (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) have presented new Chandra X-ray observations of SXP 214, tracking it for 50 ks (~14 hours) in January 2013. These observations reveal some very unexpected behavior for this pulsar.X-ray PuzzleThe energy distribution of the X-ray emission from SXP 214 over time. Dark shades or blue colors indicate high counts, and light shades or yellow colors indicate low counts. Lower-energy X-ray emission appeared only later, after about 20 ks. [Hong et al. 2016]Three interesting pieces of information came from the Chandra observations:SXP 214s rotation period was measured to be 211.5 s an increase in the spin rate since the discovery measurement of a 214-second period. Pulsars usually spin down as they lose angular momentum over time so what caused this one to spin up?Its overall X-ray luminosity steadily increased over the 50 ks of observations.Its spectrum became gradually softer (lower energy) over time; in the first 20 ks, the spectrum only consisted of hard X-ray photons above 3 keV, but after 20 ks, softer X-ray photons below 2 ke

  17. The Pulsar in the Crab Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Lewandowska, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    The Crab pulsar belongs to one of the most studied stellar objects in the sky. Since its accidental detection in 1968, its pulsed emission has been observed throughout most of the electromagnetic spectrum. Although currently one of more than 2000 known pulsars, its way of work has remained not understood making the Crab pulsar an object of continuous studies and interest. Referring to the pulsed emission of the Crab pulsar only at radio wavelengths, it reveals a diversity of different phenomena. They range from deviations of the predicted slowing down process of the pulsar with time (long time phenomena) to an irregularity of its single pulse emission (short time phenomena). Similar and different kinds of deviations are observed at other wavelengths. Consequently, the Crab pulsar provides a large diversity of different emission characteristics which have remained difficult to interpret with a uniform theoretical approach including all observed properties. Since a review of all currently examined properties of...

  18. Beyond the 2nd Fermi Pulsar Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Xian; Reposeur, Thierry; Rousseau, Romain

    2013-01-01

    Over thirteen times more gamma-ray pulsars have now been studied with the Large Area Telescope on NASA's Fermi satellite than the ten seen with the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory in the nineteen-nineties. The large sample is diverse, allowing better understanding both of the pulsars themselves and of their roles in various cosmic processes. Here we explore the prospects for even more gamma-ray pulsars as Fermi enters the 2nd half of its nominal ten-year mission. New pulsars will naturally tend to be fainter than the first ones discovered. Some of them will have unusual characteristics compared to the current population, which may help discriminate between models. We illustrate a vision of the future with a sample of six pulsars discovered after the 2nd Fermi Pulsar Catalog was written.

  19. No-Hair Theorem for Weak Pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Gruzinov, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that there exists a class of pulsars, called weak pulsars, for which the large-scale magnetosphere, and hence the gamma-ray emission, are independent of the detailed pattern of plasma production. The weak pulsar magnetosphere and its gamma-ray emission are uniquely determined by just three parameters: spin, dipole, and the spin-dipole angle. We calculate this supposedly unique pulsar magnetosphere in the axisymmetric case. The magnetosphere is found to be very close to (although interestingly not fully identical with) the magnetosphere we have previously calculated, explaining the phenomenological success of the old calculation. We offer only a highly tentative proof of this "Pulsar No-Hair Theorem". Our analytics, while convincing in its non-triviality, is incomplete, and counts only as a plausibility argument. Our numerics, while complete, is dubious. The plasma flow in the weak pulsar magnetosphere turns out to be even more intricate than what we have previously proposed: some particles, aft...

  20. Pulsar Timing with the Fermi LAT

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Paul S; Parent, Damien; PSC, the Fermi

    2010-01-01

    We present an overview of precise pulsar timing using data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi. We describe the analysis techniques including a maximum likelihood method for determining pulse times of arrival from unbinned photon data. In addition to determining the spindown behavior of the pulsars and detecting glitches and timing noise, such timing analyses allow the precise determination of the pulsar position, thus enabling detailed multiwavelength follow up.

  1. Cherenkov Telescopes Results on Pulsar Wind Nebulae and Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmi, Emma De Oña

    The last few years have seen a revolution in very high γ-ray astronomy (VHE; E>100 GeV) driven largely by a new generation of Cherenkov telescopes. These new facilities, namely H.E.S.S. (High Energy Stereoscopic System), MAGIC (Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov Telescope) and its upgrade MAGIC 2, VERITAS (Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System) and CANGAROO (Collaboration of Australia and Nippon for a Gamma Ray Observatory in the Outback) were designed to increase the flux sensitivity in the energy regime of hundreds of GeV, expanding the observed energy range from 50 to multi-TeV, and fostered as a result a period of rapid growth in our understanding of the Non-ThermalUniverse. As a result of this fast development the number of pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) detected has increased from a few in the early 90's to more than two dozen of firm candidates nowadays. Also, the low energy threshold achieved allows to investigate the pulsed spectra of the high energy pulsars powering PWNe. A review of the most relevant VHE results concerning pulsars and their relativistic winds is discussed here in the context of Cherenkov telescopes.

  2. The spin evolution of young pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Espinoza, Cristobal M

    2012-01-01

    The current understanding of the spin evolution of young pulsars is reviewed through a compilation of braking index measurements. An immediate conclusion is that the spin evolution of all pulsars with a measured braking index is not purely caused by a constant magnetic dipole. The case of PSR J1734-3333 and its upward movement towards the magnetars is used as a guide to try to understand why pulsars evolve with n < 3. Evolution between different pulsar families, driven by the emergence of a hidden internal magnetic field, appears as one possible picture.

  3. Searching for gravitational waves from known pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Pitkin, M; Ageev, A; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Díaz, M; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Goler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P H; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Steussy, D; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; Van Putten, M H P M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zaleski, K D; Zanolin, M; Zawischa, I; Abbott, R; Zhang, L; Zhu, R; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J; Pitkin, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    We present upper limits on the amplitude of gravitational waves from 28 isolated pulsars using data from the second science run of LIGO. The results are also expressed as a constraint on the pulsars' equatorial ellipticities. We discuss a new way of presenting such ellipticity upper limits that takes account of the uncertainties of the pulsar moment of inertia. We also extend our previous method to search for known pulsars in binary systems, of which there are about 80 in the sensitive frequency range of LIGO and GEO 600.

  4. Pulsar Discovery by Global Volunteer Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, B.; Allen, B.; Cordes, J. M.; Deneva, J. S.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Crawford, F.; Demorest, P. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Freire, P. C. C.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Hammer, D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Kasian, L.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Machenschalk, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Messenger, C.; Nice, D. J.; Papa, M. A.; Pletsch, H. J.; Prix, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2010-09-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to mine large data sets. It has now found a 40.8-hertz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722’s pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.

  5. Pulsar Discovery by Global Volunteer Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Knispel, B; Cordes, J M; Deneva, J S; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C; Bhat, N D R; Bock, O; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Chatterjee, S; Crawford, F; Demorest, P B; Fehrmann, H; Freire, P C C; Gonzalez, M E; Hammer, D; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Kasian, L; Kaspi, V M; Kramer, M; Lazarus, P; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Machenschalk, A G Lyne B; McLaughlin, M A; Messenger, C; Nice, D J; Papa, M A; Pletsch, H J; Prix, R; Ransom, S M; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Stovall, K; Venkataraman, A

    2010-01-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to "mine" large data sets. It has now found a 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.

  6. A SEARCH FOR RAPIDLY SPINNING PULSARS AND FAST TRANSIENTS IN UNIDENTIFIED RADIO SOURCES WITH THE NRAO 43 METER TELESCOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Deborah; Crawford, Fronefield; Gilpin, Claire [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Langston, Glen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    We have searched 75 unidentified radio sources selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalog for the presence of rapidly spinning pulsars and short, dispersed radio bursts. The sources are radio bright, have no identifications or optical source coincidences, are more than 5% linearly polarized, and are spatially unresolved in the catalog. If these sources are fast-spinning pulsars (e.g., sub-millisecond pulsars), previous large-scale pulsar surveys may have missed detection due to instrumental and computational limitations, eclipsing effects, or diffractive scintillation. The discovery of a sub-millisecond pulsar would significantly constrain the neutron star equation of state and would have implications for models predicting a rapid slowdown of highly recycled X-ray pulsars to millisecond periods from, e.g., accretion disk decoupling. These same sources were previously searched unsuccessfully for pulsations at 610 MHz with the Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank. This new search was conducted at a different epoch with a new 800 MHz backend on the NRAO 43 m Telescope at a center frequency of 1200 MHz. Our search was sensitive to sub-millisecond pulsars in highly accelerated binary systems and to short transient pulses. No periodic or transient signals were detected from any of the target sources. We conclude that diffractive scintillation, dispersive smearing, and binary acceleration are unlikely to have prevented detection of the large majority of the sources if they are pulsars, though we cannot rule out eclipsing, nulling or intermittent emission, or radio interference as possible factors for some non-detections. Other (speculative) possibilities for what these sources might include radio-emitting magnetic cataclysmic variables or older pulsars with aligned magnetic and spin axes.

  7. The pulsar planet production process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phinney, E. S.; Hansen, B. M. S.

    1993-01-01

    Most plausible scenarios for the formation of planets around pulsars end with a disk of gas around the pulsar. The supplicant author then points to the solar system to bolster faith in the miraculous transfiguration of gas into planets. We here investigate this process of transfiguration. We derive analytic sequences of quasi-static disks which give good approximations to exact solutions of the disk diffusion equation with realistic opacity tables. These allow quick and efficient surveys of parameter space. We discuss the outward transfer of mass in accretion disks and the resulting timescale constraints, the effects of illumination by the central source on the disk and dust within it, and the effects of the widely different elemental compositions of the disks in the various scenarios, and their extensions to globular clusters. We point out where significant uncertainties exist in the appropriate grain opacities, and in the effect of illumination and winds from the neutron star.

  8. What brakes the Crab pulsar?

    CERN Document Server

    Čadež, A; Barbieri, C; Calvani, M; Naletto, G; Barbieri, M; Ponikvar, D

    2015-01-01

    Optical observations provide convincing evidence that the optical phase of the Crab pulsar follows the radio one closely. Since optical data do not depend on dispersion measure variations, they provide a robust and independent confirmation of the radio timing solution. The aim of this paper is to find a global mathematical description of Crab pulsar's phase as a function of time for the complete set of published Jodrell Bank radio ephemerides (JBE) in the period 1988-2014. We apply the mathematical techniques developed for analyzing optical observations to the analysis of JBE. We break the whole period into a series of episodes and express the phase of the pulsar in each episode as the sum of two analytical functions. The first function is the best-fitting local braking index law, and the second function represents small residuals from this law with an amplitude of only a few turns, which rapidly relaxes to the local braking index law. From our analysis, we demonstrate that the power law index undergoes "inst...

  9. Geminga's puzzling pulsar wind nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Posselt, B; Slane, P O; Romani, R; Bucciantini, N; Bykov, A M; Kargaltsev, O; Weisskopf, M C; Ng, C -Y

    2016-01-01

    We report on six new Chandra observations of the Geminga pulsar wind nebula (PWN). The PWN consists of three distinct elongated structures - two $\\approx 0.2 d_{250}$ pc long lateral tails and a segmented axial tail of $\\approx 0.05 d_{250}$ pc length, where $d_{250}=d/(250 {\\rm pc})$. The photon indices of the power law spectra of the lateral tails, $\\Gamma \\approx 1$, are significantly harder than those of the pulsar ($\\Gamma \\approx 1.5$) and the axial tail ($\\Gamma \\approx 1.6$). There is no significant diffuse X-ray emission between the lateral tails -- the ratio of the X-ray surface brightness between the south tail and this sky area is at least 12. The lateral tails apparently connect directly to the pulsar and show indication of moving footpoints. The axial tail comprises time-variable emission blobs. However, there is no evidence for constant or decelerated outward motion of these blobs. Different physical models are consistent with the observed morphology and spectra of the Geminga PWN. In one scena...

  10. Supernova remnant G292.2-0.5, its pulsar, and the Galactic magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, J. L.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2004-08-01

    The extended low-brightness Galactic radio source G292.2-0.5 is one of the few supernova remnants (SNRs) showing a likely association with a young pulsar. New observations of the remnant with the Australia Telescope Compact Array yield a distance of 8.4 kpc determined from HI absorption measurements, and the first detection of linear polarization. The polarization was studied at two frequencies near 5 GHz, revealing a high mean rotation measure, approximately +800 rad m-2, strikingly similar to that of the pulsar. This similarity, and the compatibility of the pulsar distance estimate with the new SNR distance, now provides overwhelming evidence that the pulsar is indeed embedded within the SNR, and that both were presumably born in the same supernova event. The ratio of rotation measure to pulsar dispersion measure yields a value of -1.4 μG (towards us) for the (density-weighted) average line-of-sight component of magnetic field for the 8.4-kpc path-length to the SNR and pulsar. The unusually high rotation measure, together with the large distance over which it has accumulated, argues that this field is a persistent feature on a large scale that outweighs smaller-scale fluctuations and reversals. The 8.4-kpc path-length lies almost wholly within the Carina spiral arm of our Galaxy and thus this portion of the arm possesses an average clockwise field of 1.4 μG. We interpret other evidence to suggest that the clockwise field extends for at least a further 8.5 kpc along the same arm, in the region where it is usually referred to as the Sagittarius arm. Observations such as these provide a powerful tool for exploring the large-scale structure of the Galactic magnetic field in relation to the spiral-arm structure.

  11. Polarimetric evidence of a white dwarf pulsar in the binary system AR Scorpii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, D. A. H.; Meintjes, P. J.; Potter, S. B.; Marsh, T. R.; Gänsicke, B. T.

    2017-01-01

    The variable star AR Scorpii (AR Sco) was recently discovered to pulse in brightness every 1.97 min from ultraviolet wavelengths into the radio regime. The system is composed of a cool, low-mass star in a tight, 3.55-hour orbit with a more massive white dwarf. Here we report new optical observations of AR Sco that show strong linear polarization (up to 40%) that varies strongly and periodically on both the spin period of the white dwarf and the beat period between the spin and orbital period, as well as low-level (up to a few per cent) circular polarization. These observations support the notion that, similar to neutron-star pulsars, the pulsed luminosity of AR Sco is powered by the spin-down of the rapidly rotating white dwarf that is highly magnetized (up to 500 MG). The morphology of the modulated linear polarization is similar to that seen in the Crab pulsar, albeit with a more complex waveform owing to the presence of two periodic signals of similar frequency. Magnetic interactions between the two component stars, coupled with synchrotron radiation from the white dwarf, power the observed polarized and non-polarized emission. AR Sco is therefore the first example of a white dwarf pulsar.

  12. PuMaII: A wide band pulsar machine for the WSRT

    CERN Document Server

    Karuppusamy, Ramesh; van Straten, Willem

    2008-01-01

    The Pulsar Machine II (PuMa II) is the new flexible pulsar processing backend system at the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT), specifically designed to take advantage of the upgraded WSRT. The instrument is based on a computer cluster running the Linux operating system, with minimal custom hardware. A maximum of 160 MHz analogue bandwidth sampled as 8X20 MHz subbands with 8-bit resolution can be recorded on disks attached to separate computer nodes. Processing of the data is done in the additional 32-nodes allowing near real time coherent dedispersion for most pulsars observed at the WSRT. This has doubled the bandwidth for pulsar observations in general, and has enabled the use of coherent dedispersion over a bandwidth eight times larger than was previously possible at the WSRT. PuMa II is one of the widest bandwidth coherent dedispersion machines currently in use and has a maximum time resolution of 50ns. The system is now routinely used for high precision pulsar timing studies, polarization studi...

  13. Fermi LAT Pulsed Detection of PSR J0737-3039A in the Double Pulsar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M.; Johnson, T. J.; Craig, H. A.; Romani, R. W.; Venter, C.; Harding, A. K.; Ferdman, R. D.; Stairs, I. H.; Kerr, M.

    2013-01-01

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope discovery of gamma-ray pulsations from the 22.7 ms pulsar A in the double pulsar system J0737-3039A/B. This is the first mildly recycled millisecond pulsar (MSP) detected in the GeV domain. The 2.7 s companion object PSR J0737-3039B is not detected in gamma rays. PSR J0737-3039A is a faint gamma-ray emitter, so that its spectral properties are only weakly constrained; however, its measured efficiency is typical of other MSPs. The two peaks of the gamma-ray light curve are separated by roughly half a rotation and are well offset from the radio and X-ray emission, suggesting that the GeV radiation originates in a distinct part of the magnetosphere from the other types of emission. From the modeling of the radio and the gamma-ray emission profiles and the analysis of radio polarization data, we constrain the magnetic inclination alpha and the viewing angle zeta to be close to 90 deg., which is consistent with independent studies of the radio emission from PSR J0737-3039A. A small misalignment angle between the pulsar's spin axis and the system's orbital axis is therefore favored, supporting the hypothesis that pulsar B was formed in a nearly symmetric supernova explosion as has been discussed in the literature already.

  14. THE TIMING OF NINE GLOBULAR CLUSTER PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Ryan S. [Physics Department, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Freire, Paulo C. C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Ransom, Scott M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-4325 (United States); Jacoby, Bryan A., E-mail: rlynch@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: pfreire@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: sransom@nrao.edu, E-mail: bryan.jacoby@gmail.com [Aerospace Corporation, 15049 Conference Center Drive, Chantilly, VA 20151-3824 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    We have used the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope to time nine previously known pulsars without published timing solutions in the globular clusters (GCs) M62, NGC 6544, and NGC 6624. We have full timing solutions that measure the spin, astrometric, and (where applicable) binary parameters for six of these pulsars. The remaining three pulsars (reported here for the first time) were not detected enough to establish solutions. We also report our timing solutions for five pulsars with previously published solutions, and find good agreement with other authors, except for PSR J1701-3006B in M62. Gas in this system is probably responsible for the discrepancy in orbital parameters, and we have been able to measure a change in the orbital period over the course of our observations. Among the pulsars with new solutions we find several binary pulsars with very low mass companions (members of the so-called 'black widow' class) and we are able to place constraints on the mass-to-light ratio in two clusters. We confirm that one of the pulsars in NGC 6624 is indeed a member of the rare class of non-recycled pulsars found in GCs. We have also measured the orbital precession and Shapiro delay for a relativistic binary in NGC 6544. If we assume that the orbital precession can be described entirely by general relativity, which is likely, we are able to measure the total system mass (2.57190(73) M{sub Sun }) and companion mass (1.2064(20) M{sub Sun }), from which we derive the orbital inclination (sin i = 0.9956(14)) and the pulsar mass (1.3655(21) M{sub Sun }), the most precise such measurement ever obtained for a millisecond pulsar. The companion is the most massive known around a fully recycled pulsar.

  15. Properties and geometry of radio pulsar emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Johannes Martinus

    2006-01-01

    This thesis consists of a number of studies on the radio emission of pulsars. The central topics are polarisation and multi frequency observations, which both lead to important information on the geometry of the emission. The first chapter introduces different aspects of pulsars that are related to

  16. Radio-quiet Gamma-ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lupin Chun-Che

    2016-09-01

    A radio-quiet γ-ray pulsar is a neutron star that has significant γ-ray pulsation but without observed radio emission or only limited emission detected by high sensitivity radio surveys. The launch of the Fermi spacecraft in 2008 opened a new epoch to study the population of these pulsars. In the 2nd Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog of γ-ray pulsars, there are 35 (30 % of the 117 pulsars in the catalog) known samples classified as radio-quiet γ-ray pulsars with radio flux density (S1400) of less than 30 μJy. Accompanying the observations obtained in various wavelengths, astronomers not only have the opportunity to study the emitting nature of radio-quiet γ-ray pulsars but also have proposed different models to explain their radiation mechanism. This article will review the history of the discovery, the emission properties, and the previous efforts to study pulsars in this population. Some particular cases known as Geminga-like pulsars (e.g., PSR J0633+1746, PSR J0007+7303, PSR J2021+4026, and so on) are also specified to discuss their common and specific features.

  17. Non-Recycled Pulsars in Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Ryan S; Lorimer, Duncan R; Mnatsakanov, Robert; Turk, Philip J; Ransom, Scott M

    2011-01-01

    We place limits on the population of non-recycled pulsars originating in globular clusters through Monte Carlo simulations and frequentist statistical techniques. We set upper limits on the birth rates of non-recycled cluster pulsars and predict how many may remain in the clusters, and how many may escape the cluster potentials and enter the field of the Galaxy.

  18. Pulsar observations with the MAGIC telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Jezabel R.; Dazzi, F.; Idec, W.; Moretti, E.; Schweizer, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Bonnefoy, S.; Carreto-Fidalgo, D.; Lopez, M. [Universitad Compultense, Madrid (Spain); Galindo, D.; Zanin, R. [Universitat de Barcelona, ICC/IEEC-UB, Barcelona (Spain); Ona Wilhelmi, E. de [Institute for Space Sciences (CSIC/IEEC), Barcelona (Spain); Reichardt, I. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Padova (Italy); Saito, T. [Kyoto University, Hakubi Center (Japan); Collaboration: MAGIC-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    MAGIC is a stereoscopic system of two IACTs, located at the ORM (Spain). Since 2008, MAGIC has played a big role in Pulsar physics due to the discovery of the first VHE gamma-ray emission from the Crab pulsar. Such a discovery was possible thanks to a revolutionary trigger technique used in the initial MAGIC mono system, the Sum-Trigger, that provided a 25 GeV energy threshold. The study of the Crab keeps providing numerous important results for the understanding of pulsar physics. The most recent ones are the bridge emission at VHE and the detection of the Crab pulsations at TeV energies. MAGIC has been also searching for new pulsars, providing recently interesting results about the Geminga pulsar and nebula. This talk reviews the essential MAGIC results about VHE pulsars and their implications for pulsar physics.Also we discuss the development of a new stereo trigger system, the Sum-Trigger-II, and the importance of the observation windows that this system opens for the study of VHE pulsars.

  19. Recycled Pulsars: Spins, Masses and Ages

    CERN Document Server

    Tauris, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Recycled pulsars are mainly characterized by their spin periods, B-fields and masses. All these quantities are affected by previous interactions with a companion star in a binary system. Therefore, we can use these quantities as fossil records and learn about binary evolution. Here, I briefly review the distribution of these observed quantities and summarize our current understanding of the pulsar recycling process.

  20. Very-high energy emission from pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Breed, M; Harding, A K

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of pulsars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) display exponentially cutoff spectra with cutoffs falling in a narrow band around a few GeV. Early spectral modelling predicted spectral cutoffs at energies of up to 100 GeV, assuming curvature radiation. It was therefore not expected that pulsars would be visible in the very-high energy (VHE) regime (>100 GeV). The VERITAS announcement of the detection of pulsed emission from the Crab pulsar at energies up to 400 GeV (and now up to 1.5 TeV as detected by MAGIC) therefore raised important questions about our understanding of the electrodynamics and local environment of pulsars. H.E.S.S. has now detected pulsed emission from the Vela pulsar down to tens of GeV, making this the second pulsar detected by a ground-based Cherenkov telescope. Deep upper limits have also been obtained by VERITAS and MAGIC for the Geminga pulsar. We will review the latest developments in VHE pulsar science, including an overview of the latest observations, ...

  1. Rotational properties of strange-pulsar models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, O.G. (Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N, (1900) La Plata, Argentina (AR)); Horvath, J.E. (Instituto Astronomico e Geofisico, Departamento de Astronomia, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 30627, 01051 Sao Paulo, Brazil (BR)); Vucetich, H. (Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67, (1900) La Plata, Argentina (AR))

    1991-07-15

    We present a study of the rotational properties of strange pulsars: strange-matter stars capable of supporting glitches. It is shown that their differentiated internal structure implies a lower maximum rotational frequency than that of homogeneous strange stars. Nevertheless, they are able to fit the known pulsar properties.

  2. Rotational properties of strange-pulsar models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, O.G. (Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N, (1900) La Plata (Argentina)); Horvath, J.E. (Instituto Astronomico e Geofisico, Departamento de Astronomia, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 30627, 01051 Sao Paulo (Brazil)); Vucetich, H. (Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67, (1900) La Plata (Argentina))

    1991-08-15

    We present a study of the rotational properties of strange pulsars: strange-matter stars capable of supporting glitches. It is shown that their differentiated internal structure implies a lower maximum rotational frequency than that of homogeneous strange stars. Nevertheless, they are able to fit the known pulsar properties.

  3. Sampling the Radio Transient Universe: Studies of Pulsars and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennamangalam, Jayanth

    clusters Terzan 5, 47 Tucanae, and M 28. Applying Bayesian statistics to our data set consisting of the number of detected pulsars, their flux densities, and the amount of diffuse radio emission from the direction of these clusters, we show that the number of potentially observable pulsars in Terzan 5 should be within a 95 per cent credible interval of 147+112-65 For 47 Tucanae and M 28, our results are 83+54-35 and 100+91-52 , spectively. We also constrain the luminosity function parameters for the pulsars in these clusters. The Galactic center pulsar population has been an interesting target for various studies, especially given that only one pulsar has been detected in the region, when we expect hundreds of pulsars to be present. In this work, we use the scattering measurements from recent observations of PSR J1745--2900, the Galactic center pulsar, and show that the size of the potentially observable pulsar population has a conservative upper limit of ~200. We show that the observational results so far are consistent with this number and make predictions for future radio pulsar surveys of the region. The Versatile GBT Astronomical Spectrometer (VEGAS) is a heterogeneous instrument used mainly for pulsar studies with the Green Bank Telescope. I describe our work on the GPU spectrometer that we developed as part of VEGAS. The GPU code supports a dual-polarization bandwidth of up to 600 MHz. In the field of SETI, I discuss two works. SERENDIP VI is a heterogeneous SETI spectrometer to be installed both at the Green Bank Telescope and at the Arecibo Observatory. In this work, we describe the design of the GPU spectrometer that forms part of SERENDIP VI. In the second work, we speculate on a novel search strategy for SETI, based on the idea that technological civilizations lacking the advancement required to build high-powered beacons may choose to build a modulator situated around a nearby pulsar, depending on whether it is energetically favorable. We discuss observational

  4. Polar Diving

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    3 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers exposed by erosion in a trough within the north polar residual cap of Mars, diving beneath a younger covering of polar materials. The layers have, since the Mariner 9 mission in 1972, been interpreted to be composed of a combination of dust and ice in unknown proportions. In this scene, a layer of solid carbon dioxide, which was deposited during the previous autumn and winter, blankets the trough as well as the adjacent terrain. Throughout northern spring, the carbon dioxide will be removed; by summer, the layers will be frost-free. Location near: 81.4oN, 352.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  5. The Crab Pulsar at Centimeter Wavelengths II: Single Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Hankins, T H; Jones, G

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out new, high-frequency, high-time-resolution observations of the Crab pulsar. Combining these with our previous data, we characterize bright single pulses associated with the Main Pulse, both the Low-Frequency and High-Frequency Interpulses, and the two High-Frequency Components. Our data include observations at frequencies ranging from 1 to 43 GHz with time resolution down to a fraction of a nanosecond. We find at least two types of emission physics are operating in this pulsar. Both Main Pulses and Low-Frequency Interpulses, up to about 10 GHz, are characterized by nanoshot emission - overlapping clumps of narrow-band nanoshots, each with its own polarization signature. High-Frequency Interpulses, between 5 and 30 GHz, are characterized by spectral band emission - linearly polarized emission containing about 30 proportionately spaced spectral bands. We cannot say whether the longer-duration High-Frequency Component pulses are due to a scattering process, or if they come from yet another typ...

  6. High-time Resolution Astrophysics and Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Shearer, Andy

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of pulsars in 1968 heralded an era where the temporal characteristics of detectors had to be reassessed. Up to this point detector integration times would normally be measured in minutes rather seconds and definitely not on sub-second time scales. At the start of the 21st century pulsar observations are still pushing the limits of detector telescope capabilities. Flux variations on times scales less than 1 nsec have been observed during giant radio pulses. Pulsar studies over the next 10 to 20 years will require instruments with time resolutions down to microseconds and below, high-quantum quantum efficiency, reasonable energy resolution and sensitive to circular and linear polarisation of stochastic signals. This chapter is review of temporally resolved optical observations of pulsars. It concludes with estimates of the observability of pulsars with both existing telescopes and into the ELT era.

  7. A Radio Pulsar Spinning at 716 Hz

    CERN Document Server

    Hessels, J W T; Stairs, I H; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Camilo, F; Hessels, Jason W.T.; Ransom, Scott M.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; Freire, Paulo C.C.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Camilo, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    We have discovered a 716-Hz eclipsing binary radio pulsar in the globular cluster Terzan 5 using the Green Bank Telescope. It is the fastest-spinning neutron star ever found, breaking the 23-year-old record held by the 642-Hz pulsar B1937+21. The difficulty in detecting this pulsar, due to its very low flux density and high eclipse fraction (~40% of the orbit), suggests that even faster-spinning neutron stars exist. If the pulsar has a mass less than 2 Msun, then its radius is constrained by the spin rate to be < 16 km. The short period of this pulsar also constrains models that suggest gravitational radiation, through an r-mode instability, limits the maximum spin frequency of neutron stars.

  8. Searching for Pulsars with the SKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Scott

    2007-12-01

    One of the SKA Key Science Projects involves "strong field tests of gravity using pulsars and black holes". However, we currently don't know of any pulsar - black hole binaries! Another component of this key science project involves the detection of nano-Hertz gravitational waves using an ensemble of many tens or hundreds of very high-precision millisecond pulsars, many of which are also, as yet, unknown. It is clear that some of the first major pulsar projects conducted with early phases of the SKA will involve large-area surveys. Given the likely nature of the mid-frequency-range SKA (i.e. large numbers of small dishes), such surveys will be incredibly challenging, and will require extremely large data and computational rates. However, the technical issues are likely surmountable, and the resulting surveys will find thousands of new pulsars, many of which will be useful for these and other basic physics tests.

  9. Stability of pulsar rotational and orbital periods

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeikin, Sergei

    2009-01-01

    Millisecond and binary pulsars are the most stable astronomical standards of frequency. They can be applied to solving a number of problems in astronomy and time-keeping metrology including the search for a stochastic gravitational wave background in the early universe, testing general relativity, and establishing a new time-scale. The full exploration of pulsar properties requires that proper unbiased estimates of spin and orbital parameters of the pulsar be obtained. These estimates depend essentially on the random noise components present in pulsar timing residuals. The instrumental white noise has predictable statistical properties and makes no harm for interpretation of timing observations, while the astrophysical/geophysical low-frequency noise corrupts them, thus, reducing the quality of tests of general relativity and decreasing the stability of the pulsar time scale.

  10. The disturbance of a millisecond pulsar magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, R M; Kerr, M; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Coles, W A; Dai, S; Dempsey, J; Hobbs, G; Keith, M J; Lasky, P D; Levin, Y; Manchester, R N; Oslowski, S; Ravi, V; Reardon, D J; Rosado, P A; Spiewak, R; van Straten, W; Toomey, L; Wang, J -B; Wen, L; You, X -P; Zhu, X -J

    2016-01-01

    Pulsar timing has enabled some of the strongest tests of fundamental physics. Central to the technique is the assumption that the detected radio pulses can be used to accurately measure the rotation of the pulsar. Here we report on a broad-band variation in the pulse profile of the millisecond pulsar J1643-1224. A new component of emission suddenly appears in the pulse profile, decays over 4 months, and results in a permanently modified pulse shape. Profile variations such as these may be the origin of timing noise observed in other millisecond pulsars. The sensitivity of pulsar-timing observations to gravitational radiation can be increased by accounting for this variability.

  11. The Parkes Observatory Pulsar Data Archive

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, G; Manchester, R N; Dempsey, J; Chapman, J M; Khoo, J; Applegate, J; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Bridle, R; Borg, A; Brown, A; Burnett, C; Camilo, F; Cattalini, C; Chaudhary, A; Chen, R; D'Amico, N; Kedziora-Chudczer, L; Cornwell, T; George, R; Hampson, G; Hepburn, M; Jameson, A; Keith, M; Kelly, T; Kosmynin, A; Lenc, E; Lorimer, D; Love, C; Lyne, A; McIntyre, V; Morrissey, J; Pienaar, M; Reynolds, J; Ryder, G; Sarkissian, J; Stevenson, A; Treloar, A; van Straten, W; Whiting, M; Wilson, G

    2011-01-01

    The Parkes pulsar data archive currently provides access to 144044 data files obtained from observations carried out at the Parkes observatory since the year 1991. Around 10^5 files are from surveys of the sky, the remainder are observations of 775 individual pulsars and their corresponding calibration signals. Survey observations are included from the Parkes 70cm and the Swinburne Intermediate Latitude surveys. Individual pulsar observations are included from young pulsar timing projects, the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array and from the PULSE@Parkes outreach program. The data files and access methods are compatible with Virtual Observatory protocols. This paper describes the data currently stored in the archive and presents ways in which these data can be searched and downloaded.

  12. Improving Pulsar Distances by Modelling Interstellar Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Deshpande, A A

    1998-01-01

    We present here a method to study the distribution of electron density fluctuations in pulsar directions as well as to estimate pulsar distances. The method, based on a simple two-component model of the scattering medium discussed by Gwinn et al. (1993), uses scintillation & proper motion data in addition to the measurements of angular broadening & temporal broadening to solve for the model parameters, namely, the fractional distance to a discrete scatterer and the ascociated relative scattering strength. We show how this method can be used to estimate pulsar distances reliably, when the location of a discrete scatterer (e.g. an HII region), if any, is known. Considering the specific example of PSR B0736-40, we illustrate how a simple characterization of the Gum nebula region (using the data on the Vela pulsar) is possible and can be used along with the temporal broadening measurements to estimate pulsar distances.

  13. Synthesis of Leishmania cap-4 intermediates, cap-2 and cap-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewdorowicz, Magdalena; Stepinski, Janusz; Kierzek, Ryszard; Jemielity, Jacek; Zuberek, Joanna; Yoffe, Yael; Shapira, Michal; Stolarski, Ryszard; Darzynkiewicz, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Synthesis of Leishmania mRNA 5'-cap analogs, m(7)Gpppm(2)(6)AmpAm (cap-2), and m(7)Gpppm(2)(6)AmpAmpCm (cap-3) is reported. Binding affinities of those cap analogs for LeishIF4E proteins were determined using fluorescence spectroscopy. Cap-3 showed similar affinity to LeishIF4Es compared to the mature trypanosomatids cap structure (cap-4).

  14. EINSTEIN-HOME DISCOVERY OF 24 PULSARS IN THE PARKES MULTI-BEAM PULSAR SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knispel, B.; Kim, H.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H.; Machenschalk, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Eatough, R. P.; Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Anderson, D. [University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Crawford, F.; Rastawicki, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); Hammer, D.; Papa, M. A.; Siemens, X. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Lyne, A. G. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Miller, R. B. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, 111 White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Sarkissian, J., E-mail: benjamin.knispel@aei.mpg.de [CSIRO Parkes Observatory, Parkes, NSW 2870 (Australia); and others

    2013-09-10

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of Almost-Equal-To 17, 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein-Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop s{sup -1}. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, 18 of which were isolated pulsars, and 6 were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM ( Almost-Equal-To 420 pc cm{sup -3}). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2536 likely belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Three of the isolated pulsars show long-term nulling or intermittency in their emission, further increasing this growing family. Our discoveries demonstrate the value of distributed volunteer computing for data-driven astronomy and the importance of applying new analysis methods to extensively searched data.

  15. Einstein@Home Discovery of 24 Pulsars in the Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, B.; Eatough, R. P.; Kim, H.; Keane, E. F.; Allen, B.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Crawford, F.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H.; Hammer, D.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.; Machenschalk, B.; Miller, R. B.; Papa, M. A.; Rastawicki, D.; Sarkissian, J.; Siemens, X.; Stappers, B. W.

    2013-09-01

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of ≈17, 000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein@Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop s-1. We discovered 24 new pulsars in our search, 18 of which were isolated pulsars, and 6 were members of binary systems. Despite the wide filterbank channels and relatively slow sampling time of the PMPS data, we found pulsars with very large ratios of dispersion measure (DM) to spin period. Among those is PSR J1748-3009, the millisecond pulsar with the highest known DM (≈420 pc cm-3). We also discovered PSR J1840-0643, which is in a binary system with an orbital period of 937 days, the fourth largest known. The new pulsar J1750-2536 likely belongs to the rare class of intermediate-mass binary pulsars. Three of the isolated pulsars show long-term nulling or intermittency in their emission, further increasing this growing family. Our discoveries demonstrate the value of distributed volunteer computing for data-driven astronomy and the importance of applying new analysis methods to extensively searched data.

  16. Microtubule's conformational cap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chretien, D.; Janosi, I.; Taveau, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that allow elongation of the unstable microtubule lattice remain unclear. It is usually thought that the GDP-liganded tubulin lattice is capped by a small layer of GTP- or GDP-P(i)-liganded molecules, the so called "GTP-cap". Here, we point-out that the elastic properties...

  17. GOALS, STRATEGIES AND FIRST DISCOVERIES OF AO327, THE ARECIBO ALL-SKY 327 MHz DRIFT PULSAR SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deneva, J. S. [Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (United States); Stovall, K.; Martinez, J. G.; Jenet, F. [Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); McLaughlin, M. A.; Bates, S. D.; Bagchi, M. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, 111 White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Freire, P. C. C. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-09-20

    We report initial results from AO327, a drift survey for pulsars with the Arecibo telescope at 327 MHz. The first phase of AO327 will cover the sky at declinations of –1° to 28°, excluding the region within 5° of the Galactic plane, where high scattering and dispersion make low-frequency surveys sub-optimal. We record data from a 57 MHz bandwidth with 1024 channels and 125 μs sampling time. The 60 s transit time through the AO327 beam means that the survey is sensitive to very tight relativistic binaries even with no acceleration searches. To date we have detected 44 known pulsars with periods ranging from 3 ms to 2.21 s and discovered 24 new pulsars. The new discoveries include 3 ms pulsars, three objects with periods of a few tens of milliseconds typical of young as well as mildly recycled pulsars, a nuller, and a rotating radio transient. Five of the new discoveries are in binary systems. The second phase of AO327 will cover the sky at declinations of 28°-38°. We compare the sensitivity and search volume of AO327 to the Green Bank North Celestial Cap survey and the GBT350 drift survey, both of which operate at 350 MHz.

  18. Motion of charged particles in pulsar magnetospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariades, Haris Andrea

    The motion of charges in the magnetosphere of pulsars is studied from two complementary points of view: (1) for the case of aligned magnetic and rotational axes we solve a fluid version of the Lorentz-Dirac equation, in the Landau approximation, for a two-component plasma. We start from an approximately force-free initial condition and numerically integrate the equations of motion for a time equal to 1.6 percent of one stellar rotation period. We find that the system tends to a charge-separated state in which a negative charge region above the poles is separated by a vacuum gap from a positive charge region near the equator. We see the formation of force-free regions and a tendency of the vacuum gap to spread as the integrations proceed. The energies attained by the charges are only mildly relativistic and radiation reaction does not play an important role during the integrations. The negative charge above the polar region is electrostatically bound and there is a force-free region towards which negative charge tends to flow. Some positive charge is magnetically confined near the stellar equator and other positive charge crosses magnetic field lines moving outward to the region beyond the light cylinder. The outward motion of positive charge is due to the relative magnitudes of the electric and magnetic fields. (2) For the case of non-aligned axes we study the single particle dynamics for electrons moving in the region beyond the light cylinder, again using the Landau approximation to the Lorentz-Dirac equation. The effect of the inner magnetosphere is taken into account by adding a central attractive charge. We find that there exists a class of solutions corresponding to bounded orbits beyond the light cylinder. In an independent particle picture, particles started with different initial conditions within the basin of attraction of this class of orbits eventually form corotating patterns beyond the light cylinder. For a frequently occurring particle configuration

  19. Cradle Cap: Symptoms and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cradle cap Symptoms and causes By Mayo Clinic Staff Common signs of cradle cap include: Patchy scaling or thick crusts on the ... on the ears, eyelids, nose and groin. Cradle cap is common in newborns. It usually isn't ...

  20. Cosmic-Ray Positrons Produced by Pulsar Winds from Mature Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li

    2001-01-01

    In the frame of the γ-ray pulsar outer gap model, e± pairs in the pulsar magnetosphere are produced by the cascade of e+ pairs through synchrotron radiation of the return current from the outer gap. These pairs are accelerated mono-energetically to relativistic energies in the pulsar wind driven by low-frequency electromagnetic waves. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we generate a sample of the mature γ-ray pulsars in our Galaxy and calculate the positron production rate from these pulsars. With a simple leaky box model, we calculate the ratio of cosmic-ray positron to total electrons. Our result indicates that the pulsar contribution to the cosmic-ray positron peaks at about 40 GeV and the observed e+ / (e- + e+) ratio can be explained by this model.

  1. The LOFAR Known Pulsar Data Pipeline

    CERN Document Server

    Alexov, A; Mol, J D; Stappers, B; van Leeuwen, J

    2010-01-01

    Transient radio phenomena and pulsars are one of six LOFAR Key Science Projects (KSPs). As part of the Transients KSP, the Pulsar Working Group (PWG) has been developing the LOFAR Pulsar Data Pipelines to both study known pulsars as well as search for new ones. The pipelines are being developed for the Blue Gene/P (BG/P) supercomputer and a large Linux cluster in order to utilize enormous amounts of computational capabilities (50Tflops) to process data streams of up to 23TB/hour. The LOFAR pipeline output will be using the Hierarchical Data Format 5 (HDF5) to efficiently store large amounts of numerical data, and to manage complex data encompassing a variety of data types, across distributed storage and processing architectures. We present the LOFAR Known Pulsar Data Pipeline overview, the pulsar beam-formed data format, the status of the pipeline processing as well as our future plans for developing the LOFAR Pulsar Search Pipeline. These LOFAR pipelines and software tools are being developed as the next gen...

  2. Searching for pulsars using image pattern recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, W W; Madsen, E C; Tan, M; Stairs, I H; Brazier, A; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Scholz, P; Stovall, K; Random, S M; Banaszak, S; Biwer, C M; Cohen, S; Dartez, L P; Flanigan, J; Lunsford, G; Matinez, J G; Mata, A; Rohr, M; Walker, A; Allen, B; Bhat, N D R; Bogdanov, S; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J S; Desvignes, G; Ferdman, R D; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Kaplan, D; Kaspi, V M; Knispel, B; Lee, K J; van Leeuwen, J; Lyne, A G; McLaughlin, M A; Spitler, L G

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel artificial intelligence (AI) program that identifies pulsars from recent surv eys using image pattern recognition with deep neural nets---the PICS(Pulsar Image-based Classification System) AI. The AI mimics human experts and distinguishes pulsars from noise and interferences by looking for patterns from candidate. The information from each pulsar candidate is synthesized in four diagnostic plots, which consist of up to thousands pixel of image data. The AI takes these data from each candidate as its input and uses thousands of such candidates to train its $\\sim$9000 neurons. Different from other pulsar selection programs which use pre-designed patterns, the PICS AI teaches itself the salient features of different pulsars from a set of human-labeled candidates through machine learning. The deep neural networks in this AI system grant it superior ability in recognizing various types of pulsars as well as their harmonic signals. The trained AI's performance has been validated wi...

  3. Arecibo Pulsar and Transient Surveys Using ALFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, J. M.

    2008-02-01

    A large scale survey for pulsars and transients is being conducted at the Arecibo Observatory using the Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA). Data acquisition so far has been with correlation spectrometers that analyze a 0.1 GHz bandwidth at 1.4 GHz. The 256 frequency channels limit dispersion smearing to 1.2 ms at DMmax = 103 pc cm-3 while the sampling interval of 64 μs equals the dispersion smearing at DM~54 pc cm-3, providing high sensitivity to millisecond pulsars with standard periods out to implied distances of several kpc at low Galactic latitudes. In early 2008, we will use a new set of polyphase filter bank systems that provide the same time and frequency resolutions but over ALFA's full 0.3 GHz bandwidth. Currently the survey covers sky positions within 5° of the Galactic plane that are reachable with Arecibo. Preliminary results are given for some of the discoveries made so far, which include millisecond pulsars, a relativistic binary pulsar, a likely counterpart of a Compton GRO/EGRET gamma-ray source, and transient pulsars (including `RRATs''). We discuss the methodology of the survey, which includes archival of raw survey data at the Cornell Center for Advanced Computing and processing at distributed sites. The survey and follow up observations, which include timing observations, multiwavelength searches for orbital companions in the case of binary pulsars, etc. are organized through the Pulsar-ALFA (PALFA) Consortium. We expect the Galactic plane survey to continue until at least 2010, most likely involving multiple passes on each sky position to optimize detection of variable sources. The ALFA system will also be used to survey intermediate Galactic latitudes for millisecond pulsars, relativistic binaries with large systemic velocities, and runaway pulsars that will escape the Galaxy.

  4. Pulsar Search Using Supervised Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, John M.

    2017-05-01

    Pulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars which emit a strong beam of energy through mechanisms that are not entirely clear to physicists. These very dense stars are used by astrophysicists to study many basic physical phenomena, such as the behavior of plasmas in extremely dense environments, behavior of pulsar-black hole pairs, and tests of general relativity. Many of these tasks require a large ensemble of pulsars to provide enough statistical information to answer the scientific questions posed by physicists. In order to provide more pulsars to study, there are several large-scale pulsar surveys underway, which are generating a huge backlog of unprocessed data. Searching for pulsars is a very labor-intensive process, currently requiring skilled people to examine and interpret plots of data output by analysis programs. An automated system for screening the plots will speed up the search for pulsars by a very large factor. Research to date on using machine learning and pattern recognition has not yielded a completely satisfactory system, as systems with the desired near 100% recall have false positive rates that are higher than desired, causing more manual labor in the classification of pulsars. This work proposed to research, identify, propose and develop methods to overcome the barriers to building an improved classification system with a false positive rate of less than 1% and a recall of near 100% that will be useful for the current and next generation of large pulsar surveys. The results show that it is possible to generate classifiers that perform as needed from the available training data. While a false positive rate of 1% was not reached, recall of over 99% was achieved with a false positive rate of less than 2%. Methods of mitigating the imbalanced training and test data were explored and found to be highly effective in enhancing classification accuracy.

  5. Einstein@Home Discovery of 24 Pulsars in the Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Knispel, B.; Eatough, R.; Kim, H.; Keane, E; Allen, B.; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Crawford, F; Eggenstein, H.; Fehrmann, H.; Hammer, D.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A,; Machenschalk, B.

    2013-01-01

    We have conducted a new search for radio pulsars in compact binary systems in the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey (PMPS) data, employing novel methods to remove the Doppler modulation from binary motion. This has yielded unparalleled sensitivity to pulsars in compact binaries. The required computation time of approximately 17000 CPU core years was provided by the distributed volunteer computing project Einstein@Home, which has a sustained computing power of about 1 PFlop/s. We discovered 24 n...

  6. Current Flow and Pair Creation at Low Altitude in Rotation-Powered Pulsars' Force-Free Magnetospheres: Space Charge Limited Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timokhin, A. N.; Arons, J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation of particle acceleration and electron-positron plasma generation at low altitude in the polar magnetic flux tubes of rotation-powered pulsars, when the stellar surface is free to emit whatever charges and currents are demanded by the force-free magnetosphere. We apply a new 1D hybrid plasma simulation code to the dynamical problem, using Particle-in-Cell methods for the dynamics of the charged particles, including a determination of the collective electrostatic fluctuations in the plasma, combined with a Monte Carlo treatment of the high-energy gamma-rays that mediate the formation of the electron-positron pairs.We assume the electric current flowing through the pair creation zone is fixed by the much higher inductance magnetosphere, and adopt the results of force-free magnetosphere models to provide the currents which must be carried by the accelerator. The models are spatially one dimensional, and designed to explore the physics, although of practical relevance to young, high-voltage pulsars. We observe novel behaviour (a) When the current density j is less than the Goldreich-Julian value (0 1), the system develops high voltage drops (TV or greater), causing emission of curvature gamma-rays and intense bursts of pair creation. The bursts exhibit limit cycle behaviour, with characteristic time-scales somewhat longer than the relativistic fly-by time over distances comparable to the polar cap diameter (microseconds). (c) In return current regions, where j/j(sub GJ) rotating frame), finding that such steady flows can occupy only a small fraction of the current density parameter space exhibited by the force-free magnetospheric model. The generic polar flow dynamics and pair creation are strongly time dependent. The model has an essential difference from almost all previous quantitative studies, in that we sought the accelerating voltage (with pair creation, when the voltage drops are sufficiently large; without, when they are

  7. Millisecond Pulsars in Close Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Tauris, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    In this Habilitationsschrift (Habilitation thesis) I present my research carried out over the last four years at the Argelander Institute for Astronomy (AIfA) and the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR). The thesis summarizes my main findings and has been written to fulfill the requirements for the Habilitation qualification at the University of Bonn. Although my work is mainly focused on the topic of millisecond pulsars (MSPs), there is a fairly broad spread of research areas ranging from the formation of neutron stars (NSs) in various supernova (SN) events, to their evolution, for example, via accretion processes in binary and triple systems, and finally to their possible destruction in merger events. The thesis is organized in the following manner: A general introduction to neutron stars and millisecond pulsars is given in Chapter 1. A selection of key papers published in 2011-2014 are presented in Chapters 2-10, ordered within five main research areas (ultra-stripped SNe in close binaries, ma...

  8. Gamma-ray Pulsar Revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Caraveo, Patrizia A

    2013-01-01

    Isolated Neutron Stars (INSs) were the first sources identified in the field of high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. At first, in the 70s, there were only two identified sources, the Crab and Vela pulsars. However, although few in number, these objects were crucial in establishing the very concept of a gamma-ray source. Moreover, they opened up significant discovery space both in the theoretical and phenomenological fronts. The need to explain the copious gamma-ray emission of these pulsars led to breakthrough developments in understanding the structure and physics of neutron star magnetospheres. In parallel, the 20-year-long chase to understand the nature of Geminga unveiled the existence of a radio-quiet, gamma-ray-emitting, INS, adding a new dimension to the INS family. Today we are living through an extraordinary time of discovery. The current generation of gamma-ray detectors has vastly increased the population of known of gamma-ray-emitting neutron stars. The 100 mark was crossed in 2011 and we are now appr...

  9. Investigation of the Earth Ionosphere using the Radio Emission of Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Ulyanov, O M; Mukha, D V; Seredkina, A A

    2013-01-01

    The investigation of the Earth ionosphere both in a quiet and a disturbed states is still desirable. Despite recent progress in its modeling and in estimating the electron concentration along the line of sight by GPS signals, the impact of the disturbed ionosphere and magnetic field on the wave propagation still remains not sufficiently understood. This is due to lack of information on the polarization of GPS signals, and due to poorly conditioned models of the ionosphere at high altitudes and strong perturbations. In this article we consider a possibility of using the data of pulsar radio emission, along with the traditional GPS system data, for the vertical and oblique sounding of the ionosphere. This approach also allows to monitor parameters of the propagation medium, such as the dispersion measure and the rotation measure using changes of the polarization between pulses. By using a selected pulsar constellation it is possible to increase the number of directions in which parameters of the ionosphere and ...

  10. A digital pulsar backend based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jin-Tao; Chen, Lan; Han, Jin-Lin; Esamdin, Ali; Wu, Ya-Jun; Li, Zhi-Xuan; Hao, Long-Fei; Zhang, Xiu-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    A digital pulsar backend based on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is developed. It is designed for incoherent de-dispersion of pulsar observations and has a maximum bandwidth of 512 MHz. The channel bandwidth is fixed to 1 MHz, and the highest time resolution is 10 {{μ }} s. Testing observations were carried out using the Urumqi 25-m telescope administered by Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory and the Kunming 40-m telescope administered by Yunnan Observatories, targeting PSR J0332+5434 in the L band and PSR J0437–4715 in the S band, respectively. The successful observation of PSR J0437–4715 demonstrates its ability to observe millisecond pulsars.

  11. On magnetic fields of radio pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Nikitina, E B

    2016-01-01

    We used the magneto-dipole radiation mechanism for the braking of radio pulsars to calculate the new values of magnetic inductions at the surfaces of neutron stars. For this aim we estimated the angles ? between the rotation axis and the magnetic moment of the neutron star for 376 radio pulsars using three different methods. It was shown that there was the predominance of small inclinations of the magnetic axes. Using the obtained values of the angle ? we calculated the equatorial magnetic inductions for pulsars considered. These inductions are several times higher as a rule than corresponding values in the known catalogs.

  12. Dark matter vs. Pulsars: Catching the impostor

    CERN Document Server

    Mirabal, N

    2013-01-01

    Evidence of excess GeV emission nearly coinciding with the Galactic Centre has been interpreted as a possible signature of annihilating dark matter. In this paper, we argue that it seems too early to discard pulsars as a viable explanation for the observed excess. On the heels of the recently released Second Fermi LAT Pulsar Catalogue (2FPC), it is still possible that a population of hard (Gamma < 1) millisecond pulsars (MSPs) either endemic to the innermost region or part of a larger nascent collection of hard MSPs that appears to be emerging in the 2FPC could explain the GeV excess near the Galactic Centre.

  13. Magnetic Fields in Supernova Remnants and Pulsar-Wind Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stephen P.; Gaensler, B. M.; Bocchino, Fabrizio

    2012-05-01

    We review the observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) and pulsar-wind nebulae (PWNe) that give information on the strength and orientation of magnetic fields. Radio polarimetry gives the degree of order of magnetic fields, and the orientation of the ordered component. Many young shell supernova remnants show evidence for synchrotron X-ray emission. The spatial analysis of this emission suggests that magnetic fields are amplified by one to two orders of magnitude in strong shocks. Detection of several remnants in TeV gamma rays implies a lower limit on the magnetic-field strength (or a measurement, if the emission process is inverse-Compton upscattering of cosmic microwave background photons). Upper limits to GeV emission similarly provide lower limits on magnetic-field strengths. In the historical shell remnants, lower limits on B range from 25 to 1000 μG. Two remnants show variability of synchrotron X-ray emission with a timescale of years. If this timescale is the electron-acceleration or radiative loss timescale, magnetic fields of order 1 mG are also implied. In pulsar-wind nebulae, equipartition arguments and dynamical modeling can be used to infer magnetic-field strengths anywhere from ˜5 μG to 1 mG. Polarized fractions are considerably higher than in SNRs, ranging to 50 or 60% in some cases; magnetic-field geometries often suggest a toroidal structure around the pulsar, but this is not universal. Viewing-angle effects undoubtedly play a role. MHD models of radio emission in shell SNRs show that different orientations of upstream magnetic field, and different assumptions about electron acceleration, predict different radio morphology. In the remnant of SN 1006, such comparisons imply a magnetic-field orientation connecting the bright limbs, with a substantial density gradient across the remnant.

  14. Astronomers Discover Fastest-Spinning Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope have discovered the fastest-spinning neutron star ever found, a 20-mile-diameter superdense pulsar whirling faster than the blades of a kitchen blender. Their work yields important new information about the nature of one of the most exotic forms of matter known in the Universe. Pulsar Graphic Pulsars Are Spinning Neutron Stars CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) "We believe that the matter in neutron stars is denser than an atomic nucleus, but it is unclear by how much. Our observations of such a rapidly rotating star set a hard upper limit on its size, and hence on how dense the star can be.," said Jason Hessels, a graduate student at McGill University in Montreal. Hessels and his colleagues presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Washington, DC. Pulsars are spinning neutron stars that sling "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is left after a massive star explodes at the end of its "normal" life. With no nuclear fuel left to produce energy to offset the stellar remnant's weight, its material is compressed to extreme densities. The pressure squeezes together most of its protons and electrons to form neutrons; hence, the name "neutron star." "Neutron stars are incredible laboratories for learning about the physics of the fundamental particles of nature, and this pulsar has given us an important new limit," explained Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and one of Hessels' collaborators on this work. The scientists discovered the pulsar, named PSR J1748-2446ad, in a globular cluster of stars called Terzan 5, located some 28,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius. The newly-discovered pulsar is spinning 716 times per second, or at 716 Hertz (Hz), readily beating the previous record of 642 Hz from a pulsar

  15. Cradle Cap (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is the common term for seborrheic dermatitis , or seborrhea, which is called dandruff in older kids and ... another factor in the development of cradle cap. Seborrhea happens most often in babies and teenagers. In ...

  16. An unexpected drop in the magnetic field of the X-ray pulsar V0332+53 after the bright outburst occurred in 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Cusumano, G; D'Ai, A; Segreto, A; Tagliaferri, G; Barthelmy, S D; Gehrels, N

    2016-01-01

    How the accreted mass settling on the surface of a neutron star affects the topology of the magnetic field and how the secular evolution of the binary system depends on the magnetic field change is still an open issue. We report evidence for a clear drop in the observed magnetic field in the accreting pulsar V0332+53 after undergoing a bright 3-month long X-ray outburst. We determine the field from the position of the fundamental cyclotron line in its X-ray spectrum and relate it to the luminosity. For equal levels of luminosity, in the declining phase we measure a systematically lower value of the cyclotron line energy with respect to the rising phase. This results in a drop of ~1.7 x 10^11 G of the observed field between the onset and the end of the outburst. The settling of the accreted plasma onto the polar cap seems to induce a distortion of the magnetic field lines weakening their intensity along the accretion columns. Therefore the dissipation rate of the magnetic field could be much faster than previo...

  17. Observing pulsars and fast transients with LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Stappers, B W; Alexov, A; Anderson, K; Coenen, T; Hassall, T; Karastergiou, A; Kondratiev, V I; Kramer, M; van Leeuwen, J; Mol, J D; Noutsos, A; Romein, J W; Weltevrede, P; Fender, R; Wijers, R A M J; Bähren, L; Bell, M E; Broderick, J; Daw, E J; Dhillon, V S; Eislöffel, J; Falcke, H; Griessmeier, J; Law, C; Markoff, S; Miller-Jones, J C A; Scheers, B; Spreeuw, H; Swinbank, J; ter Veen, S; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bennema, P; Bentum, M J; Best, P; Bregman, J; Brentjens, M; van de Brink, R H; Broekema, P C; Brouw, W N; Brüggen, M; de Bruyn, A G; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Conway, J; Dettmar, R -J; van Duin, A; van Enst, J; Garrett, M; Gerbers, M; Grit, T; Gunst, A; van Haarlem, M P; Hamaker, J P; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Holties, H; Horneffer, A; Koopmans, L V E; Kuper, G; Loose, M; Maat, P; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Miley, G; Morganti, R; Nijboer, R; Noordam, J E; Norden, M; Olofsson, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Polatidis, A; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Schoenmakers, A; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Sterks, C G M; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Vermeulen, R; Vermaas, N; Vogt, C; de Vos, M; Wijnholds, S J; Yatawatta, S; Zensus, A

    2011-01-01

    Low frequency radio waves, while challenging to observe, are a rich source of information about pulsars. The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) is a new radio interferometer operating in the lowest 4 octaves of the ionospheric "radio window": 10-240MHz, that will greatly facilitate observing pulsars at low radio frequencies. Through the huge collecting area, long baselines, and flexible digital hardware, it is expected that LOFAR will revolutionize radio astronomy at the lowest frequencies visible from Earth. LOFAR is a next-generation radio telescope and a pathfinder to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), in that it incorporates advanced multi-beaming techniques between thousands of individual elements. We discuss the motivation for low-frequency pulsar observations in general and the potential of LOFAR in addressing these science goals. We present LOFAR as it is designed to perform high-time-resolution observations of pulsars and other fast transients, and outline the various relevant observing modes and data reduct...

  18. The origin of the Guitar pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Tetzlaff, Nina; Hohle, Markus M

    2009-01-01

    Among a sample of 140 OB associations and clusters, we want to identify probable parent associations for the Guitar pulsar (PSR B2224+65) which would then also constrain its age. For this purpose, we are using an Euler-Cauchy technique treating the vertical component of the galactic potential to calculate the trajectories of the pulsar and each association into the past. To include errors we use Monte-Carlo simulations varying the initial parameters within their error intervals. The whole range of possible pulsar radial velocities is taken into account during the simulations. We find that the Guitar pulsar most probably originated from the Cygnus OB3 association ~0.8 Myr ago inferring a current radial velocity of v_r~-30 km/s, consistent with the inclination of its bow shock.

  19. The origin of the Guitar pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, N.; Neuhäuser, R.; Hohle, M. M.

    2009-11-01

    Among a sample of 140 OB associations and clusters, we want to identify probable parent associations for the Guitar pulsar (PSR B2224+65), which would then also constrain its age. For this purpose, we are using an Euler-Cauchy technique, treating the vertical component of the Galactic potential to calculate the trajectories of the pulsar and each association into the past. To include errors, we use Monte Carlo simulations varying the initial parameters within their error intervals. The whole range of possible pulsar radial velocities is taken into account during the simulations. We find that the Guitar pulsar most probably originated from the Cygnus OB3 association ~0.8Myr ago, inferring a current radial velocity of vr ~ -30kms-1, consistent with the inclination of its bow shock.

  20. Outlook for Detecting Gravitational Waves with Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Though the recent discovery of GW150914 is a thrilling success in the field of gravitational-wave astronomy, LIGO is only one tool the scientific community is using to hunt for these elusive signals. After 10 years of unsuccessful searching, how likely is it that pulsar-timing-array projects will make their own first detection soon?Frequency ranges for gravitational waves produced by different astrophysical sources. Pulsar timing arrays such as the EPTA and IPTA are used to detect low-frequency gravitational waves generated by the stochastic background and supermassive black hole binaries. [Christopher Moore, Robert Cole and Christopher Berry]Supermassive BackgroundGround-based laser interferometers like LIGO are ideal for probing ripples in space-time caused by the merger of stellar-mass black holes; these mergers cause chirps in the frequency range of tens to thousands of hertz. But how do we pick up the extremely low-frequency, nanohertz background signal caused by the orbits of pairs of supermassive black holes? For that, we need pulsar timing arrays.Pulsar timing arrays are sets of pulsars whose signals are analyzed to look for correlations in the pulse arrival time. As the space-time between us and a pulsar is stretched and then compressed by a passing gravitational wave, the pulsars pulses should arrive a little late and then a little early. Comparing these timing residuals in an array of pulsars could theoretically allow for the detection of the gravitational waves causing them.Globally, there are currently four pulsar timing array projects actively searching for this signal, with a fifth planned for the future. Now a team of scientists led by Stephen Taylor (NASA-JPL/Caltech) has estimated the likelihood that these projects will successfully detect gravitational waves in the future.Probability for SuccessExpected detection probability of the gravitational-wave background as a function of observing time, for five different pulsar timing arrays. Optimistic

  1. The Velocity Distribution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Arzoumanian, Z; Cordes, J M

    2002-01-01

    (Abridged) We infer the velocity distribution of radio pulsars by modelling their birth, evolution, and detection in large-scale 0.4 GHz pulsar surveys, and by comparing model distributions of measurable pulsar properties with survey data using a likelihood function. We test models that characterize a population's birth rate, luminosity, shutoff of radio emission, birth locations, and birth velocities. We infer that the radio beam luminosity (i) is comparable to the energy flux of relativistic particles in models for spin-driven magnetospheres, signifying that radio emission losses reach nearly 100% for the oldest pulsars; and (ii) scales approximately as sqrt(Edot) which, in magnetosphere models, is proportional to the voltage drop available for acceleration of particles. We find that a two-component velocity distribution with characteristic velocities of 90 km/s and 500 km/s is greatly preferred to any one-component distribution. We explore some consequences of the preferred birth velocity distribution: (i)...

  2. Birth and Evolution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Faucher-Giguere, C A

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the birth and evolution of Galactic isolated radio pulsars. We begin by estimating their birth space velocity distribution from proper motion measurements of Brisken et al. (2002, 2003). We find no evidence for multimodality of the distribution and favor one in which the absolute one-dimensional velocity components are exponentially distributed and with a three-dimensional mean velocity of 380^{+40}_{-60} km s^-1. We then proceed with a Monte Carlo-based population synthesis, modelling the birth properties of the pulsars, their time evolution, and their detection in the Parkes and Swinburne Multibeam surveys. We present a population model that appears generally consistent with the observations. Our results suggest that pulsars are born in the spiral arms, with a Galactocentric radial distribution that is well described by the functional form proposed by Yusifov & Kucuk (2004), in which the pulsar surface density peaks at radius ~3 kpc. The birth spin period distribution extends to several h...

  3. Searching for Pulsars in Close Binary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jouteux, S; Stappers, B W; Jonker, P; Van der Klis, M

    2001-01-01

    We present a detailed mathematical analysis of the Fourier response of binary pulsar signals whose frequencies are modulated by circular orbital motion. The fluctuation power spectrum of such signals is found to be \

  4. Finding Pulsars with Einstein@Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, Benjamin; Allen, B.; Cordes, J.; Deneva, J.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Crawford, F.; Demorest, P. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Freire, P. C. C.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Hammer, D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Kasian, L.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Machenschalk, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Messenger, C.; Nice, D. J.; Papa, M. A.; Pletsch, H. J.; Prix, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.; Desvignes, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Einstein@Home project is a global distributed computing project and aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to "mine" large data sets. Its long-term goal is the detection of continuous gravitational waves in data from the LIGO interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Since March 2009 about a third of Einstein@Home's computation cycles is also used to search for tight binary pulsars in PALFA radio data from the Arecibo observatory. In July 2010, two new pulsars were found by Einstein@Home, J2007+2722 and J1952+26, the latter in a binary system with 9.4 hours orbital period. Here, we present an overview of the status of the Einstein@Home project and describe its search for radio pulsars in binaries with periods larger than 11 minutes. Further, we briefly review Einstein@Home's pulsar discoveries.

  5. Testing Gravity with Pulsars in the SKA Era

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Lijing; Antoniadis, John; Deller, Adam T; Freire, Paulo C C; Hessels, Jason W T; Janssen, Gemma H; Kramer, Michael; Kunz, Jutta; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Perlick, Volker; Possenti, Andrea; Ransom, Scott; Stappers, Benjamin W; van Straten, Willem

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will use pulsars to enable precise measurements of strong gravity effects in pulsar systems, which yield tests of gravitational theories that cannot be carried out anywhere else. The Galactic census of pulsars will discover dozens of relativistic pulsar systems, possibly including pulsar -- black hole binaries which can be used to test the "cosmic censorship conjecture" and the "no-hair theorem". Also, the SKA's remarkable sensitivity will vastly improve the timing precision of millisecond pulsars, allowing probes of potential deviations from general relativity (GR). Aspects of gravitation to be explored include tests of strong equivalence principles, gravitational dipole radiation, extra field components of gravitation, gravitomagnetism, and spacetime symmetries.

  6. The Fastest Rotating Pulsar: a Strange Star?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐仁新; 徐轩彬; 吴鑫基

    2001-01-01

    According to the observational limits on the radius and mass, the fastest rotating pulsar (PSR 1937+21) is probably a strange star, or at least some neutron star equations of state should be ruled out, if we suggest that a dipole magnetic field is relevant to its radio emission. We presume that the millisecond pulsar is a strange star with much low mass, small radius and weak magnetic moment.

  7. A Large Glitch in the Crab Pulsar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using a new pulsar timing system at the 25-m radio telescope of Urumqi Astronomical Observatory, we have detected a large glitch in the Crab pulsar which occurred in 2000 July. The size of the gfitch is Av/v ~ 2.4 × 10-8, with a rela tive increment in frequency derivative Av/v ~ 5 × 10-3. The observing system is introduced and the observed properties of the glitch are discussed.

  8. Statistical properties of giant pulses from the Crab pulsar

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, M V

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the statistics of giant pulses from the Crab pulsar for the first time with particular reference to their widths. We have analyzed data collected during 3.5 hours of observations conducted with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope operated in a tied-array mode at a frequency of 1200 MHz. The PuMa pulsar backend provided voltage recording of X and Y linear polarization states in two conjugate 10 MHz bands. We restricted the time resolution to 4 microseconds to match the scattering on the interstellar inhomogeneities. In total about 18000 giant pulses (GP) were detected in full intensity with a threshold level of 6 sigma. Cumulative probability distributions (CPD) of giant pulse energies were analyzed for groups of GPs with different effective widths in the range 4 to 65 microseconds. The CPDs were found to manifest notable differences for the different GP width groups. The slope of a power-law fit to the high-energy portion of the CPDs evolves from -1.7 to -3.2 when going from the shortest ...

  9. Chandra Confirmation of a Pulsar Wind Nebula in DA 495

    CERN Document Server

    Arzoumanian, Z; Landecker, T L; Kothes, R; Camilo, F

    2008-01-01

    As part of a multiwavelength study of the unusual radio supernova remnant DA 495, we present observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Imaging and spectroscopic analysis confirms the previously detected X-ray source at the heart of the annular radio nebula, establishing the radiative properties of two key emission components: a soft unresolved source with a blackbody temperature of 1 MK consistent with a neutron star, surrounded by a nonthermal nebula 40'' in diameter exhibiting a power-law spectrum with photon index Gamma = 1.6+/-0.3, typical of a pulsar wind nebula. The implied spin-down luminosity of the neutron star, assuming a conversion efficiency to nebular flux appropriate to Vela-like pulsars, is ~10^{35} ergs/s, again typical of objects a few tens of kyr old. Morphologically, the nebular flux is slightly enhanced along a direction, in projection on the sky, independently demonstrated to be of significance in radio polarization observations; we argue that this represents the orientation o...

  10. The Timing of Nine Globular Cluster Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Ryan S; Ransom, Scott M; Jacoby, Bryan A

    2011-01-01

    We have used the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope to time nine previously known pulsars without published timing solutions in the globular clusters M62, NGC 6544, and NGC 6624. We have full timing solutions that measure the spin, astrometric, and (where applicable) binary parameters for six of these pulsars. The remaining three pulsars (reported here for the first time) were not detected enough to establish solutions. We also report our timing solutions for five pulsars with previously published solutions, and find good agreement with past authors, except for PSR J1701-3006B in M62. Gas in this system is probably responsible for the discrepancy in orbital parameters, and we have been able to measure a change in the orbital period over the course of our observations. Among the pulsars with new solutions we find several binary pulsars with very low mass companions (members of the so-called "black widow" class) and we are able to place constraints on the mass-to-light ratio in two clusters. We confirm that on...

  11. Pulsar Navigation in the Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Jiang

    2008-01-01

    The X-ray Pulsar-based Autonomous Navigation(XNAV) were recently tested which use the Crab pulsar (PSR B0531+21) in the USA Experiment on flown by the Navy on the Air Force Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS) under the Space Test Program. It provide the way that the spacecraft could autonomously determine its position with respect to an inertial origin. Now I analysis the sensitivity of the exist instrument and the signal process to use radio pulsar navigation and discuss the integrated navigation use pulsar,then give the different navigation mission analysis and design process basically which include the space, the airborne, the ship and the land of the planet or the lunar.So the pulsar navigation can give the continuous position in deep spaces, that means we can freedom fly successfully in the solar system use celestial navigation that include pulsar and traditional star sensor.It also can less or abolish the depend of Global Navigation Satellite System which include GPS, GRONSS, Gali...

  12. The Future of Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stappers, B. W.

    Significant advances have been made in the sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays for the detection of gravitational waves in the last decade. This presentation looked forward to consider where the development of pulsar timing arrays might go as we head towards the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and then beyond. I reviewed where progress needs to be made in terms of sensitivity to gravitational waves, including improvements to existing observing approaches and new telescopes such as MeerKAT and FAST and techniques like LEAP. The dramatic increase in the number of millisecond pulsars is presented and how that might affect progress towards a first detection is discussed. Developments in analytic techniques were also discussed, including the removal of interstellar medium effects, red noise and pulse profile variations. A summary of how the SKA can contribute through an increased millisecond pulsar population and pulsar timing sensitivity was presented. With the likelihood that the SKA will implement some form of Key Science Project approach, some ideas of how will this affect how the International Pulsar Timing Array effort and how it might evolve into a KSP were discussed.

  13. On gigahertz spectral turnovers in pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Rajwade, Kaustubh; Anderson, Loren D

    2015-01-01

    Pulsars are known to emit non-thermal radio emission that is generally a power-law function of frequency. In some cases, a turnover is seen at frequencies around 100~MHz. Kijak et al. have reported the presence of a new class of ''Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum'' (GPS) pulsars that show spectral turnovers at frequencies around 1 GHz. We apply a model based on free-free thermal absorption to explain these turnovers in terms of surrounding material such as the dense environments found in HII regions, Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe), or in cold, partially ionized molecular clouds. We show that the turnover frequency depends on the electron temperature of the environment close to the pulsar, as well as the emission measure along the line of sight. We fitted this model to the radio fluxes of known GPS pulsars and show that it can replicate the GHz turnover. From the thermal absorption model, we demonstrate that normal pulsars would exhibit a GPS-like behaviour if they were in a dense environment. We discuss the application ...

  14. Detecting pulsars in the Galactic Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajwade, K. M.; Lorimer, D. R.; Anderson, L. D.

    2017-10-01

    Although high-sensitivity surveys have revealed a number of highly dispersed pulsars in the inner Galaxy, none have so far been found in the Galactic Centre (GC) region, which we define to be within a projected distance of 1 pc from Sgr A*. This null result is surprising given that several independent lines of evidence predict a sizable population of neutron stars in the region. Here, we present a detailed analysis of both the canonical and millisecond pulsar populations in the GC and consider free-free absorption and multipath scattering to be the two main sources of flux density mitigation. We demonstrate that the sensitivity limits of previous surveys are not sufficient to detect GC pulsar population, and investigate the optimum observing frequency for future surveys. Depending on the degree of scattering and free-free absorption in the GC, current surveys constrain the size of the potentially observable population (i.e. those beaming towards us) to be up to 52 canonical pulsars and 10 000 millisecond pulsars. We find that the optimum frequency for future surveys is in the range of 9-13 GHz. We also predict that future deeper surveys with the Square Kilometre array will probe a significant portion of the existing radio pulsar population in the GC.

  15. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array Project

    CERN Document Server

    Manchester, R N; Bailes, M; Coles, W A; van Straten, W; Keith, M J; Shannon, R M; Bhat, N D R; Brown, A; Burke-Spolaor, S G; Champion, D J; Chaudhary, A; Edwards, R T; Hampson, G; Hotan, A W; Jameson, A; Jenet, F A; Kesteven, M J; Khoo, J; Kocz, J; Maciesiak, K; Oslowski, S; Ravi, V; Reynolds, J R; Sarkissian, J M; Verbiest, J P W; Wen, Z L; Wilson, W E; Yardley, D; Yan, W M; You, X P

    2012-01-01

    A "pulsar timing array" (PTA), in which observations of a large sample of pulsars spread across the celestial sphere are combined, allows investigation of "global" phenomena such as a background of gravitational waves or instabilities in atomic timescales that produce correlated timing residuals in the pulsars of the array. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) is an implementation of the PTA concept based on observations with the Parkes 64-m radio telescope. A sample of 20 millisecond pulsars is being observed at three radio-frequency bands, 50cm (~700 MHz), 20cm (~1400 MHz) and 10cm (~3100 MHz), with observations at intervals of 2 - 3 weeks. Regular observations commenced in early 2005. This paper describes the systems used for the PPTA observations and data processing, including calibration and timing analysis. The strategy behind the choice of pulsars, observing parameters and analysis methods is discussed. Results are presented for PPTA data in the three bands taken between 2005 March and 2011 March. For...

  16. Millisecond Pulsars, their Evolution and Applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. N. Manchester

    2017-09-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are short-period pulsars that are distinguished from “normal” pulsars, not only by their short period, but also by their very small spin-down rates and high probability of being in a binary system. These properties are consistent with MSPs having a different evolutionary history to normal pulsars, viz., neutron-star formation in an evolving binary system and spin-up due to accretion from the binary companion. Their very stable periods make MSPs nearly ideal probes of a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena. For example, they have been used to detect planets around pulsars, to test the accuracy of gravitational theories, to set limits on the low-frequency gravitational-wave background in the Universe, and to establish pulsar-based timescales that rival the best atomic-clock timescales in long-term stability. MSPs also provide a window into stellar and binary evolution, often suggesting exotic pathways to the observed systems. The X-ray accretion-powered MSPs, and especially those that transition between an accreting X-ray MSP and a non-accreting radio MSP, give important insight into the physics of accretion on to highly magnetized neutron stars.

  17. Pulsars in Globular Clusters with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Hessels, J W T; Bailes, M; Bassa, C G; Freire, P C C; Lorimer, D R; Lynch, R; Ransom, S M; Stairs, I H

    2015-01-01

    Globular clusters are highly efficient radio pulsar factories. These pulsars can be used as precision probes of the clusters' structure, gas content, magnetic field, and formation history; some of them are also highly interesting in their own right because they probe exotic stellar evolution scenarios as well as the physics of dense matter, accretion, and gravity. Deep searches with SKA1-MID and SKA1-LOW will plausibly double to triple the known population. Such searches will only require one to a few tied-array beams, and can be done during early commissioning of the telescope - before an all-sky pulsar survey using hundreds to thousands of tied-array beams is feasible. With SKA2 it will be possible to observe most of the active radio pulsars within a large fraction of the Galactic globular clusters, an estimated population of 600 - 3700 observable pulsars (those beamed towards us). This rivals the total population of millisecond pulsars that can be found in the Galactic field; fully characterizing it will p...

  18. Millisecond Pulsars, their Evolution and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, R. N.

    2017-09-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are short-period pulsars that are distinguished from "normal" pulsars, not only by their short period, but also by their very small spin-down rates and high probability of being in a binary system. These properties are consistent with MSPs having a different evolutionary history to normal pulsars, viz., neutron-star formation in an evolving binary system and spin-up due to accretion from the binary companion. Their very stable periods make MSPs nearly ideal probes of a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena. For example, they have been used to detect planets around pulsars, to test the accuracy of gravitational theories, to set limits on the low-frequency gravitational-wave background in the Universe, and to establish pulsar-based timescales that rival the best atomic-clock timescales in long-term stability. MSPs also provide a window into stellar and binary evolution, often suggesting exotic pathways to the observed systems. The X-ray accretion-powered MSPs, and especially those that transition between an accreting X-ray MSP and a non-accreting radio MSP, give important insight into the physics of accretion on to highly magnetized neutron stars.

  19. Radio polarimetry of Galactic centre pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Schnitzeler, D H F M; Ferrière, K; Kramer, M; Lee, K J; Noutsos, A; Shannon, R M

    2016-01-01

    To study the strength and structure of the magnetic field in the Galactic centre (GC) we measured Faraday rotation of the radio emission of pulsars which are seen towards the GC. Three of these pulsars have the largest rotation measures (RMs) observed in any Galactic object with the exception of Sgr A*. Their large dispersion measures, RMs and the large RM variation between these pulsars and other known objects in the GC implies that the pulsars lie in the GC and are not merely seen in projection towards the GC. The large RMs of these pulsars indicate large line-of-sight magnetic field components between ~ 16-33 microgauss; combined with recent model predictions for the strength of the magnetic field in the GC this implies that the large-scale magnetic field has a very small inclination angle with respect to the plane of the sky (~ 12 degrees). Foreground objects like the Radio Arc or possibly an ablated, ionized halo around the molecular cloud G0.11-0.11 could contribute to the large RMs of two of the pulsar...

  20. Scaling from Jupiter to pulsars and the acceleration of cosmic ray particles by pulsars, 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, C. Y.

    1985-01-01

    An expression for the rate of energy generation by a pulsar an estimate of contribution from all the pulsars in our galaxy to the observed cosmic ray intensity was presented. The theory was then developed to an expanded version, and observational facts supporting the theory were cited.