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Sample records for pulpal chamber temperature

  1. Effects of different dentin thicknesses and air cooling on pulpal temperature rise during laser welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secilmis, Asli; Bulbul, Mehmet; Sari, Tugrul; Usumez, Aslihan

    2013-01-01

    The neodymium/yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd/YAG) laser has been suggested to repair broken prostheses in the mouth. This study investigated the effects of different dentin thicknesses and air cooling on pulpal temperature rise during laser welding. Three intact human maxillary molars were prepared for full-veneer crown. For each tooth, dentin thicknesses in mesiobuccal cusp was 2, 3, or 4 mm. Twenty dies were duplicated from each of the prepared teeth. For metal copings with 0.5-mm thickness, wax patterns were prepared with dip wax technique directly onto each of dies. All patterns were sprued and invested. The castings were made using a nickel-chromium alloy (Nicromed Premium, Neodontics). A hole with 0.5-mm diameter was prepared on the mesiobuccal cusp of each crown. The Nd/YAG laser (9.85 W; 1 Hz repetition rate; fluence, 1.230 J/cm(2); Fidelis Plus 3, Fotona) was used for welding with or without air cooling (n = 10). The temperature rise was measured in pulpal chamber with a J-type thermocouple wire that was connected to a data logger. Differences between start and highest temperature reading were taken, and temperature rise values were compared using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's honestly significant difference tests (α = .05). Pulpal temperature rise varied significantly depending on the dentin thickness and air cooling (p cooling group induced significantly the highest temperature increases. There were no significant differences between 2- and 3-mm dentin thicknesses groups (p > 0.05); however, pulpal temperature rise was the lowest for 4-mm dentin thickness group (p cooling was used in 2-mm dentin thickness group. Laser welding on base metal castings with Nd/YAG laser can be applied with air cooling to avoid temperature rises known to adversely affect pulpal health when dentin thickness is 2 or 3 mm.

  2. Effects of warm air-drying on intra-pulpal temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan, D; Kasloff, Z; Williams, P T

    1991-08-01

    This study was designed to determine what effects different warm air-drying conditions have on the intra-pulpal temperature (IPT), with or without chamber preparation and with or without an acid-etching treatment of the enamel. Four human maxillary centrals and four cuspids had lingual access openings prepared to accommodate a thermal sensor probe. Half of the specimens received a labial chamber preparation and half were acid-etched. All specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C prior to testing. Labial aspects were positioned at 2 cm and 6 cm from the nozzle of a 500W hair dryer and IPTs were recorded after 15, 30, 45, and 60-second exposures. Exposure times for the acid-etched samples were modified to 10 seconds at 2 cm and 15 seconds at 6 cm. Results showed that for unetched teeth, increases in the IPT were greater at the 2 cm/15-second exposure (a 10.4-12.0 degrees C increase) than at the 6 cm/15-second exposure (a 3.9-6.6 degrees C increase). Even greater temperature changes were seen as the exposure times were increased to 30, 45, and 60 seconds. When the teeth were acid-etched, IPT rises of 5.6-10.1 degrees C and 5.8-8.7 degrees C were measured at 2 cm/10 seconds and at 6 cm/15 seconds, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Temperature Studies for ATLAS MDT BOS Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Engl, A; Hertenberger, R; Mameghani, R; Merkl, D; Rauscher, F; Schaile, A D; Ströhmer, R

    2009-01-01

    Data sets with high statistics taken at the cosmic ray facility, equipped with 3 ATLAS BOS MDT chambers, in Garching (Munich) have been used to study temperature and pressure effects on gas gain and drifttime. The deformation of a thermally expanded chamber was reconstructed using the internal RasNik alignment monitoring system and the tracks from cosmic data. For these studies a heating system was designed to increase the temperature of the middle chamber by up to 20 Kelvins over room temperature. For comparison the temperature effects on gas properties have been simulated with Garfield. The maximum drifttime decreased under temperature raise by -2.21 +- 0.08 ns/K, in agreement with the results of pressure variations and the Garfield simulation. The increased temperatures led to a linear increase of the gas gain of about 2.1% 1/K. The chamber deformation has been analyzed with the help of reconstructed tracks. By the comparison of the tracks through the reference chambers with these through the test chamber ...

  4. Laser all-ceramic crown removal and pulpal temperature--a laboratory proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechmann, P; Buu, N C H; Rechmann, B M T; Finzen, F C

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this proof-of-principle laboratory pilot study was to evaluate the temperature increase in the pulp chamber in a worst case scenario during Er:YAG laser debonding of all-ceramic crowns. Twenty extracted molars were prepared to receive all-ceramic IPS E.max CAD full contour crowns. The crowns were bonded to the teeth with Ivoclar Multilink Automix. Times for laser debonding and temperature rise in the pulp chamber using micro-thermocouples were measured. The Er:YAG was used with 560 mJ/pulse. The irradiation was applied at a distance of 5 mm from the crown surface. Additional air-water spray for cooling was utilized. Each all-ceramic crown was successfully laser debonded with an average debonding time of 135 ± 35 s. No crown fractured, and no damage to the underlying dentin was detected. The bonding cement deteriorated, but no carbonization at the dentin/cement interface occurred. The temperature rise in the pulp chamber averaged 5.4° ± 2.2 °C. During 8 out of the 20 crown removals, the temperature rise exceeded 5.5 °C, lasting 5 to 43 s (average 18.8 ± 11.6 s). A temperature rise of 11.5 °C occurred only once, while seven times the temperature rise was limited to 6.8 ± 0.5 °C. Temperature rises above 5.5 °C occurred only when the laser was applied from one side and additional cooling from the side opposite the irradiation. Er:YAG laser energy can successfully be used to efficiently debond all-ceramic crowns from natural teeth. Temperature rises exceeding 5.5 °C only occur when an additional air/water cooling from a dental syringe is inaccurately directed. To avoid possible thermal damage and to allow further heat diffusion, clinically temperature-reduced water might be applied.

  5. Temperature changes of pulp chamber during in vitro laser welding of orthodontic attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Işman, Eren; Okşayan, Rıdvan; Sökücü, Oral; Üşümez, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The use of lasers has been suggested for orthodontists to fabricate or repair orthodontic appliances by welding metals directly in the mouth. This work aimed to evaluate the temperature changes in the pulp chamber during welding of an orthodontic wire to an orthodontic molar band using Nd : YAG laser in vitro. A freshly extracted human third molar with eliminated pulpal tissues was used. J-type thermocouple wire was positioned in the pulp chamber. A conductor gel was used in the transferring of outside temperature changes to the thermocouple wire. An orthodontic band was applied to the molar tooth and bonded using light cured orthodontic cement. Twenty five mm length of 0.6 mm diameter orthodontic stainless steel wires was welded to the orthodontic band using Nd : YAG laser operated at 9.4 watt. Temperature variation was determined as the change from baseline temperature to the highest temperature was recorded during welding. The recorded temperature changes were between 1.8 and 6.8°C (mean: 3.3±1.1°C). The reported critical 5.5°C level was exceeded in only one sample. The results of this study suggest that intraoral use of lasers holds great potential for the future of orthodontics and does not present a thermal risk. Further studies with larger samples and structural analysis are required.

  6. Temperature Changes of Pulp Chamber during In Vitro Laser Welding of Orthodontic Attachments

    Science.gov (United States)

    İşman, Eren; Okşayan, Rıdvan; Sökücü, Oral; Üşümez, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The use of lasers has been suggested for orthodontists to fabricate or repair orthodontic appliances by welding metals directly in the mouth. This work aimed to evaluate the temperature changes in the pulp chamber during welding of an orthodontic wire to an orthodontic molar band using Nd : YAG laser in vitro. A freshly extracted human third molar with eliminated pulpal tissues was used. J-type thermocouple wire was positioned in the pulp chamber. A conductor gel was used in the transferring of outside temperature changes to the thermocouple wire. An orthodontic band was applied to the molar tooth and bonded using light cured orthodontic cement. Twenty five mm length of 0.6 mm diameter orthodontic stainless steel wires was welded to the orthodontic band using Nd : YAG laser operated at 9.4 watt. Temperature variation was determined as the change from baseline temperature to the highest temperature was recorded during welding. The recorded temperature changes were between 1.8 and 6.8°C (mean: 3.3 ± 1.1°C). The reported critical 5.5°C level was exceeded in only one sample. The results of this study suggest that intraoral use of lasers holds great potential for the future of orthodontics and does not present a thermal risk. Further studies with larger samples and structural analysis are required. PMID:24550714

  7. Temperature Changes of Pulp Chamber during In Vitro Laser Welding of Orthodontic Attachments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren İşman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of lasers has been suggested for orthodontists to fabricate or repair orthodontic appliances by welding metals directly in the mouth. This work aimed to evaluate the temperature changes in the pulp chamber during welding of an orthodontic wire to an orthodontic molar band using Nd : YAG laser in vitro. A freshly extracted human third molar with eliminated pulpal tissues was used. J-type thermocouple wire was positioned in the pulp chamber. A conductor gel was used in the transferring of outside temperature changes to the thermocouple wire. An orthodontic band was applied to the molar tooth and bonded using light cured orthodontic cement. Twenty five mm length of 0.6 mm diameter orthodontic stainless steel wires was welded to the orthodontic band using Nd : YAG laser operated at 9.4 watt. Temperature variation was determined as the change from baseline temperature to the highest temperature was recorded during welding. The recorded temperature changes were between 1.8 and 6.8°C (mean: 3.3 ± 1.1°C. The reported critical 5.5°C level was exceeded in only one sample. The results of this study suggest that intraoral use of lasers holds great potential for the future of orthodontics and does not present a thermal risk. Further studies with larger samples and structural analysis are required.

  8. In vitro study of the pulp chamber temperature rise during light-activated bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaise Graciele Carrasco

    2008-10-01

    -laser system. The tested light-curing units provided increases in the pulp chamber temperature that were compatible with pulpal health.

  9. Computational investigation of the temperature separation in vortex chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anish, S. [National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Mangalore (India); Setoguchi, T. [Institute of Ocean Energy, Saga University (Japan); Kim, H. D. [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The vortex chamber is a mechanical device, without any moving parts that separates compressed gas into a high temperature region and a low temperature region. Functionally vortex chamber is similar to a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube (RVHT), but it is a simpler and compact structure. The objective of the present study is to investigate computationally the physical reasoning behind the energy separation mechanism inside a vortex chamber. A computational analysis has been performed using three-dimensional compressible Navier Stokes equations. A fully implicit finite volume scheme was used to solve the governing equations. A commercial software ANSYS CFX is used for this purpose. The computational predictions were validated with existing experimental data. The results obtained show that the vortex chamber contains a large free vortex zone and a comparatively smaller forced vortex region. The physical mechanism that causes the heating towards periphery of the vortex chamber is identified as the work done by the viscous force. The cooling at the center may be due to expansion of the flow. The extent of temperature separation greatly depends on the outer diameter of the vortex chamber. A small amount of compression is observed towards the periphery of the vortex chamber when the outer diameter is reduced.

  10. Miniature environmental chambers for temperature humidity bias testing of microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Michael David; Mayer, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Environmental chambers are commonly used for reliability testing of microelectronics and other products and materials. These chambers are large, expensive, and limit electrical connectivity to devices under test. In this paper, we present a collection of ten small, low-cost environmental chambers, with humidity control based on mixtures of water and glycerol placed inside the chambers. We demonstrate relative humidities from 44% to 90%, at temperatures from 30 to 85 °C, enabling industry-standard testing at 85% humidity and 85 °C. The division of samples between ten separate chambers allows different conditions to be applied to each sample, in order to quickly characterize the effects of the environment on device reliability, enabling extrapolation to estimate lifetimes in working conditions.

  11. Optical Pressure-Temperature Sensor for a Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin; Gregory, Don

    2008-01-01

    A compact sensor for measuring temperature and pressure in a combusti on chamber has been proposed. The proposed sensor would include two optically birefringent, transmissive crystalline wedges: one of sapph ire (Al2O3) and one of magnesium oxide (MgO), the optical properties of both of which vary with temperature and pressure. The wedges wou ld be separated by a vapor-deposited thin-film transducer, which wou ld be primarily temperaturesensitive (in contradistinction to pressur e- sensitive) when attached to a crystalline substrate. The sensor w ould be housed in a rugged probe to survive the extreme temperatures and pressures in a combustion chamber.

  12. In-vitro Study on Temperature Changes in the Pulp Chamber Due to Thermo-Cure Glass Ionomer Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duinen, Raimond NB; Shahid, Saroash; Hill, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The application of the Glass Ionomer Cements in clinical dentistry is recommended due to properties such as fluoride release, chemical adhesion to tooth, negligible setting shrinkage, and coefficient of thermal expansion close to tooth, low creep, and good color stability. However, the cement is vulnerable to early exposure to moisture due to slow setting characteristics. The uses of external energy such as ultrasound and radiant heat (Thermo-curing) have been reported to provide acceleration of the setting chemistry and enhance physical properties. Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze temperature changes in the pulpal chamber when using radiant heat to accelerate the setting of GICs. Material and Methods:The encapsulated GIC Equia Forte was used for this study. The temperature changes in the pulp were measured using thermocouple in the cavities which were 2,6 and 4,7mm deep with and without filling. Results:The results showed that a temperature rise (ΔT) in the pulp chamber was 3,7°C. ΔT for the 2.6mm and 4.7mm deep cavity and without placing any restoration the temperature was 4,2°C and 2,6°C respectively. After the restoration has been placed, the ΔT range in the pulp chamber was lower ranging from 1.9°C to 2.4°C. Conclusion: It could be concluded that Thermo-curing of the GIC during the setting is safe for the pulp and can be recommended in clinical practice. PMID:28275275

  13. Kinetics of pulpal temperature rise during light curing of 6 bonding agents from different generations, using light emitting diode and quartz-tungsten-halogen units: An in-vitro simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaksaran, Najmeh Khatoon; Kashi, Tahereh Jafarzadeh; Rakhshan, Vahid; Zeynolabedin, Zahra Sadat; Bagheri, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Application of bonding agents (BA) into deep cavities and light curing them might increase pulpal temperature and threaten its health. The purpose of this study was to evaluate temperature rise of pulp by light curing six BA using two different light curing units (LCU), through a dent in wall of 0.5 mm. Materials and Methods: This in vitro experiment was carried out on 96 slices of the same number of human third molars (6 BAs × 2 LCUs × 8 specimens in each group). There were 6 groups of BAs: N Bond, G-Bond, OptiBond XTR, Clearfil SE, Adper Single Bond 2 and V Bond. Each group of BA (n = 16) had two subgroups of light emitting diode (LED) and quartz-tungsten-halogen light cure units (n = 8). Each of these 16 specimens were subjected to light emitting for 20 s, once without any BAs (control) and later when a BA was applied to surface of disk. Temperature rises in 140 s were evaluated. Their mean temperature change in first 20 s were calculated and analyzed using two-way repeated-measures and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey (α = 0.05). Furthermore rate of temperature increase was calculated for each material and LCU. Results: Minimum and maximum temperature rises in all subgroups were 1.7 and 2.8°C, respectively. Repeated measures ANOVA showed that both of adhesive and LCU types had significant effect on temperature rise after application of adhesives. Tukey post-hoc analysis showed Clearfil SE showed significantly higher temperature rise in comparison with Adper Single bond 2 (P = 0.047) and N Bond (P = 0.038). Temperature rose in a linear fashion during first 30-40 s and after that it was non-linear. Conclusion: 20 s of light curing seems safe for pulpal health (with critical threshold of 5.5°C). However, in longer durations and especially when using LED units, the process should be broken to two sessions. PMID:25878684

  14. Kinetics of pulpal temperature rise during light curing of 6 bonding agents from different generations, using light emitting diode and quartz-tungsten-halogen units: An in-vitro simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Khatoon Khaksaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Application of bonding agents (BA into deep cavities and light curing them might increase pulpal temperature and threaten its health. The purpose of this study was to evaluate temperature rise of pulp by light curing six BA using two different light curing units (LCU, through a dent in wall of 0.5 mm. Materials and Methods: This in vitro experiment was carried out on 96 slices of the same number of human third molars (6 BAs × 2 LCUs × 8 specimens in each group. There were 6 groups of BAs: N Bond, G-Bond, OptiBond XTR, Clearfil SE, Adper Single Bond 2 and V Bond. Each group of BA (n = 16 had two subgroups of light emitting diode (LED and quartz-tungsten-halogen light cure units (n = 8. Each of these 16 specimens were subjected to light emitting for 20 s, once without any BAs (control and later when a BA was applied to surface of disk. Temperature rises in 140 s were evaluated. Their mean temperature change in first 20 s were calculated and analyzed using two-way repeated-measures and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey (α = 0.05. Furthermore rate of temperature increase was calculated for each material and LCU. Results: Minimum and maximum temperature rises in all subgroups were 1.7 and 2.8°C, respectively. Repeated measures ANOVA showed that both of adhesive and LCU types had significant effect on temperature rise after application of adhesives. Tukey post-hoc analysis showed Clearfil SE showed significantly higher temperature rise in comparison with Adper Single bond 2 (P = 0.047 and N Bond (P = 0.038. Temperature rose in a linear fashion during first 30-40 s and after that it was non-linear. Conclusion: 20 s of light curing seems safe for pulpal health (with critical threshold of 5.5°C. However, in longer durations and especially when using LED units, the process should be broken to two sessions.

  15. Temperature study on PHENIX Resistive Plate Chamber 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Mathew

    2012-10-01

    The PHENIX collaboration is investigating the results of polarized proton + proton collisions generated by the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Studying these collisions will help gain perspective on the overall spin structure of the proton. PHENIX has developed a trigger upgrade for the muon arms to select single high transverse momentum (p/T) muons. A major part of this upgrade is the inclusion of 2 stations of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) in each arm of PHENIX. The RPCs are constructed with two gas gaps made of Bakelite and coated with linseed oil, which closely follows the CMS design. These materials are known to be sensitive to high temperatures and within PHENIX a station of RPC's are installed between two large magnets, which could cause the temperature environment to elevate. In order to gain a better understanding of the temperature of the gas gaps, we will compare the externally monitored temperature data from Run-12 to the temperatures acquired from a dedicated temperature profile study. Overall this will help the collaboration operate the RPCs in a manner that will improve their performance and extend their lifetime.

  16. Gender determination from pulpal tissue

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    Manisha M. Khorate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of X (Barr body [BB] and Y (F body [FB] chromosomes observed in dental pulp tissue for gender determination of an individual. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 100 teeth (50 male and 50 female, which were indicated for extraction. The teeth were sectioned at various intervals (within 12 h to 49 days post-extraction, and the pulpal tissue was obtained. Two slides for each pulp tissue were prepared, one for 5% Quinacrine dihydrochloride stain (FB and the other for Hemotoxylin and Eosin stain (BB. The slides were then observed under the fluorescent microscope for FB and under the light microscope for the BB respectively. Results: Gender determination from human pulp is possible up to 7 weeks. The percentage of FB and BB decrease gradually as the time interval increases. Further, an equation was derived from the data based on the canonical discriminant function coefficients. Conclusion: The determination of gender based on a joint search for the presence or absence of X (BB and Y (FB Chromosome is a reliable and cost-effective technique.

  17. [Numerical Simulation of Heat Transfer in the Human Anterior Chamber at Different Corneal Temperatures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingmin; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Junming

    2015-12-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) model of human anterior chamber is reconstructed to explore the effect of different corneal temperatures on the heat transfer in the chamber. Based on the optical coherence tomography imaging of the volunteers with normal anterior chamber, a 3D anterior chamber model was reconstructed by the method of UG parametric design. Numerical simulation of heat transfer and aqueous humor flow in the whole anterior chamber were analyzed by the finite volume methods at different corneal temperatures. The results showed that different corneal temperatures had obvious influence on the temperature distribution and the aqueous flow in the anterior chamber. The temperature distribution is linear and axial symmetrical around the pupillary axis. As the temperature difference increases, the symmetry becomes poorer. Aqueous floated along the warm side and sank along the cool side which forms a vortexing flow. Its velocity increased with the addition of temperature difference. Heat fluxes of cornea, lens and iris were mainly affected by the aqueous velocity. The higher the velocity, the bigger more absolute value of the above-mentioned heat fluxes became. It is practicable to perform the numerical simulation of anterior chamber by the optical coherence tomography imaging. The results are useful for studying the important effect of corneal temperature on the heat transfer and aqueous humor dynamics in the anterior chamber.

  18. Supplemental pulpal anesthesia for mandibular teeth

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    Thangavel Boopathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical pulpal anesthesia is dependent on the interaction of three major factors. (1 the dentist (2 the patient and (3 local anesthesia. Many patients fear endodontic treatment due to a concern about pain. Although pain treatment is well managed in many endodontic patients, there exists a group of patients who do not receive adequate local anesthesia. The purpose of this review article is to discuss the possible reasons for pulpal anesthetic failures and also to focus on the measures for developing effective approaches for the same.

  19. Evaluation of the temperature rise in pulp chamber during class V preparation with Er:YAG laser; Avaliacao da temperatura na camara pulpar durante preparo classe V com laser de Erbio:YAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picinini, Leonardo Santos

    2001-07-01

    One of the major concerns regarding laser irradiation in the dentistry field is the overheating in dental tissue, specially pulpal tissue. A temperature raise over 5.5 deg C is considered to be harmful to its vitality. The current study evaluated the temperature increase in the pulp chamber, during class V preparation, performed with the laser Er:YAG in 36 bovine incisive extracted teeth. The samples were eroded on the outer side of the vestibular wall to obtain the dentinal thickness of 2.0 mm (group I), 1.0 mm (group II) and 0.5 mm (group III). Thermocouples were fixed to the inner part of the vestibular wall using thermal paste, through the palatine opening of the samples. Class V cavities were prepared in the vestibular side only in 1 mm{sup 2} thick dentins. Irradiation parameters used were: 500 mJ/10 Hz, 850 mJ/10 Hz and 1 000 mJ/10 Hz for all the groups. The results were processed by a microcomputer. This study showed that the temperature increased into the pulpal cavity reached around 3 deg C for the groups I (2,0 mm thick dentine) and II (1.0 mm thick dentine). In the group III (0.5 mm thick) temperature was around 5.5 deg C. Thus, the parameters used for cavity preparation, using Er:YAG laser, were safe in relation to the temperature raise for dentinal thickness of 1,0 and 2,0 mm; in 0.5 mm thick dentins, temperature increase reached 5.5 deg C and an appropriate correction in the laser parameters was necessary. (author)

  20. Effect of Er:YAG laser on dentin bonding durability under simulated pulpal pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakry, Ahmed Samir; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of Er:YAG laser ablation on the microtensile bond strength and the nanoleakage of Er:YAG-lased dentin bonded to a self-etching adhesive system with and without pulpal pressure. Twenty flat dentin surfaces were obtained from extracted molars. Ten specimens were irradiated by Er:YAG laser, other specimens (control group) were ground using #600 SiC paper. Direct communication to the pulp chamber was created by cutting at a level approximately 1 mm below the cementoenamel junction and parallel to the occlusal surface. The experimental groups were exposed to a simulated pulpal pressure of 15 cm H2O. Each specimen was restored using an adhesive and a photocured composite. The specimens were then sectioned vertically to obtain dentin/adhesive slabs. Ninety-six slabs were prepared for microtensile bond testing. Sixty-four slabs were immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate tracer solution for 18 h, then rinsed thoroughly, and immersed in photodeveloping solution for 6 h prior to their examination by FE-SEM. The method of dentin preparation and the pulpal pressure storage condition significantly affected the microTBS, while the storage duration did not (p < 0.05). The nanoleakage patterns observed in the dentin/bond interface differed depending on whether the dentin was conventionally prepared or ablated by Er:YAG laser. Er:YAG laser ablation to dentin adversely affected the microTBS and the sealing ability of SE Bond bonded to dentin under simulated pulpal condition.

  1. Comparison of temperature rise in pulp chamber during polymerization of materials used for direct fabrication of provisional restorations: An in-vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajuria, Rajat R.; Madan, Ravi; Agarwal, Swatantra; Gupta, Reecha; Vadavadgi, Sunil V.; Sharma, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose is to compare temperature rise in the pulp chamber during fabrication of provisional crowns using different materials and on different types of teeth using direct technique. Materials and Methods: An extracted, sound, caries free maxillary central incisor and a mandibular molar were selected for the study and crown preparations of all ceramic and all metal were done on central incisor and mandibular molar, respectively. Materials tested were DPI tooth molding self-curing material and protemp-4. Addition silicone putty was used as a matrix and 80 provisional crowns were fabricated, of which 40 were on central incisor and 40 on mandibular molar. Depending on the type of material used, they were further divided into two subgroups: Each comprising 20 provisional crowns. Temperature readings were recorded using K type of thermocouple with 0.1°C precision digital thermometer. Statistical Analysis Used: Analysis of variance, Tukey honest significant difference and Kruskall–Wallis H-test. Results: Statistically significant difference exists between two materials tested on the basis of peak temperature achieved and time taken by a particular material to reach peak temperature. Peak temperature achieved was highest for provisional crowns with DPI tooth molding self-curing material on maxillary central incisor (40.39 + 0.46), followed by DPI tooth molding self-curing material on mandibular molar (40.03 + 0.32), protemp-4 on maxillary central incisor (39.46 + 0.26) and least with protemp-4 on mandibular molar (39.09 + 0.33). The time taken to reach peak temperature was almost double in DPI tooth molding self-curing material (5 min) than in protemp-4. Conclusion: Polymethyl methacrylate resin produced higher intra-pulpal rise when compared to newer generation bis-acrylic composite. PMID:26038649

  2. Constructal approach to bio-engineering: the ocular anterior chamber temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Umberto; Grisolia, Giulia; Dolcino, Daniela; Astori, Maria Rosa; Massa, Eugenio; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse the pressure inside the eyes anterior chamber, namedintraocular pressure (IOP), in relation to the biomechanical properties of corneas. The approach used was based on the constructal law, recently introduced in vision analysis. Results were expressed as the relation between the temperature of the ocular anterior chamber and the biomechanical properties of the cornea. The IOP, the elastic properties of the cornea, and the related refractive properties of the eye were demonstrated to be dependent on the temperature of the ocular anterior chamber. These results could lead to new perspectives for experimental analysis of the IOP in relation to the properties of the cornea.

  3. Determining Temperature Differential to Prevent Hardware Cross-Contamination in a Vacuum Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David

    2013-01-01

    When contamination-sensitive hardware must be tested in a thermal vacuum chamber, cross-contamination from other hardware present in the chamber, or residue from previous tests, becomes a concern. Typical mitigation strategies involve maintaining the temperature of the critical item above that of other hardware elements at the end of the test. A formula for relating the pumping speed of a chamber, the surface area of contamination sources, and the temperatures of the chamber, source, and contamination-sensitive items has been developed. The formula allows the determination of a temperature threshold about which contamination will not condense on the sensitive items. It defines a parameter alpha that is the fraction given by (contaminant source area)/[chamber pumping speed (time under vacuum) 0.5]. If this parameter is less than 10(exp -6), cross-contamination from common spacecraft material will not occur when the sensitive hardware is at the same temperature as the source of contamination (The chamber is isothermal within 5 C.). Knowing when it becomes safe to have the hardware isothermal permits faster and easier thermal transitions when compared with maintaining an arbitrary temperature differential between parts. Furthermore, the standard temperature differential may not be adequate under some conditions (alpha>10(exp -4)).

  4. Effects of inlet distortion on gas turbine combustion chamber exit temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqsood, Omar Shahzada

    Damage to a nozzle guide vane or blade, caused by non-uniform temperature distributions at the combustion chamber exit, is deleterious to turbine performance and can lead to expensive and time consuming overhaul and repair. A test rig was designed and constructed for the Allison 250-C20B combustion chamber to investigate the effects of inlet air distortion on the combustion chamber's exit temperature fields. The rig made use of the engine's diffuser tubes, combustion case, combustion liner, and first stage nozzle guide vane shield. Rig operating conditions simulated engine cruise conditions, matching the quasi-non-dimensional Mach number, equivalence ratio and Sauter mean diameter. The combustion chamber was tested with an even distribution of inlet air and a 4% difference in airflow at either side. An even distribution of inlet air to the combustion chamber did not create a uniform temperature profile and varying the inlet distribution of air exacerbated the profile's non-uniformity. The design of the combustion liner promoted the formation of an oval-shaped toroidal vortex inside the chamber, creating localized hot and cool sections separated by 90° that appeared in the exhaust. Uneven inlet air distributions skewed the oval vortex, increasing the temperature of the hot section nearest the side with the most mass flow rate and decreasing the temperature of the hot section on the opposite side. Keywords: Allison 250, Combustion, Dual-Entry, Exit Temperature Profile, Gas Turbine, Pattern Factor, Reverse Flow.

  5. A zero-power warming chamber for investigating plant responses to rising temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Lewin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Advances in understanding and model representation of plant and ecosystem responses to rising temperature have typically required temperature manipulation of research plots, particularly when considering warming scenarios that exceed current climate envelopes. In remote or logistically challenging locations, passive warming using solar radiation is often the only viable approach for temperature manipulation. However, current passive warming approaches are only able to elevate the mean daily air temperature by  ∼  1.5 °C. Motivated by our need to understand temperature acclimation in the Arctic, where warming has been markedly greater than the global average and where future warming is projected to be  ∼  2–3 °C by the middle of the century; we have developed an alternative approach to passive warming. Our zero-power warming (ZPW chamber requires no electrical power for fully autonomous operation. It uses a novel system of internal and external heat exchangers that allow differential actuation of pistons in coupled cylinders to control chamber venting. This enables the ZPW chamber venting to respond to the difference between the external and internal air temperatures, thereby increasing the potential for warming and eliminating the risk of overheating. During the thaw season on the coastal tundra of northern Alaska our ZPW chamber was able to elevate the mean daily air temperature 2.6 °C above ambient, double the warming achieved by an adjacent passively warmed control chamber that lacked our hydraulic system. We describe the construction, evaluation and performance of our ZPW chamber and discuss the impact of potential artefacts associated with the design and its operation on the Arctic tundra. The approach we describe is highly flexible and tunable, enabling customization for use in many different environments where significantly greater temperature manipulation than that possible with existing passive warming

  6. Rectal temperature changes and oxygen toxicity in dogs treated in a monoplace chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmalberg, Justin; Davies, Wendy; Lopez, Stacy; Shmalberg, Danielle; Zilberschtein, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen treatments are increasingly administered to pet dogs, using veterinary-specific monoplace chambers. The basic physiologic responses, chamber performance and oxygen toxicity rates have not yet been evaluated in dogs in a clinical setting. As a result, a series of consecutive 45-minute, 2-atmospheres absolute (atm abs) hyperbaric treatments with 100% oxygen were evaluated in a veterinary rehabilitation center (n = 285). 65 dogs with a mean body weight of 21 ± 15 kg (1.4-71 kg) were treated with an average of four sessions each. The mean rectal temperature of canine patients decreased 0.07 degrees C (0.1 degrees F) during treatments (p = 0.04). Intra-chamber temperature and humidity both increased: +1.0 degrees C (1.7 degrees F, p 0.75) were identified between body weights, body condition scores, maximal oxygen concentrations, starting or ending rectal temperature, chamber humidity and chamber temperature. Oxygen toxicity was not observed during the observational period. Patients were most commonly treated for intervertebral disc disease (n = 16 dogs) and extensive traumatic wounds (n = 10 dogs), which represented a large number of the total study sessions (19% and 16%, respectively).

  7. Pulpal regeneration following allogenic tooth transplantation into mouse maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Hideki; Suzuki, Hironobu; Nakakura-Ohshima, Kuniko; Jung, Han-Sung; Ohshima, Hayato

    2009-04-01

    Autogenic tooth transplantation is now a common procedure in dentistry for replacing a missing tooth. However, there are many difficulties in clinical application of allogenic tooth transplantation because of immunological rejection. This study aims to clarify pulpal regeneration following allogenic tooth transplantation into the mouse maxilla by immunohistochemistry for 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and nestin, and by the histochemistry for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). The upper right first molar (M1) of 2-week-old mice was extracted and allografted in the original socket in both the littermate and non-littermate after the extraction of M1. Tooth transplantation weakened the nestin-positive reactions in the pulp tissue that had shown immunoreactivity for nestin before operation. On postoperative Days 5-7, tertiary dentin formation commenced next to the preexisting dentin where nestin-positive odontoblast-like cells were arranged in all cases of the littermate group until Day 14, except for one case showing immunological rejection in the pulp chamber. In the non-littermate group, bone-like tissue formation occurred in the pulp chamber in addition to tertiary dentin formation until Day 14. The rate of tertiary dentin was 38%, and the rate of the mixed form of dentin and bone-like tissue formation was 23% (the remainder was immunological rejection). Interestingly, the periodontal tissue recovered even in the case of immunological rejection in which the pulp chamber was replaced by sparse connective tissue. These results suggest that the selection of littermate or non-littermate is decisive for the survival of odontoblast-lineage cells and that the immunological rejection does not influence the periodontal regeneration.

  8. Pulpal and periodontal diseases increase triglyceride levels in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; da Silva Facundo, Aguinaldo Cândido; Azuma, Mariane Maffei; Sumida, Dóris Hissako; Astolphi, Rafael Dias; Bomfim, Suely Regina Mogami; Narciso, Luís Gustavo; Gomes-Filho, João Eduardo

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate triglyceride and cholesterol levels in diabetic rats and their relationship with pulpal and periodontal diseases. Eighty male rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus, Wistar) were divided into the following eight groups comprising ten animals each: normal rats (G1), rats with pulpal diseases (G2), rats with periodontal diseases (G3), rats with both pulpal and periodontal diseases (G4), diabetic rats (G5), diabetic rats with pulpal diseases (G6), diabetic rats with periodontal diseases (G7), and diabetic rats with both periodontal and pulpal diseases (G8). Diabetes was induced by injecting streptozotocin, periapical lesions were induced by exposing pulpal tissue to the oral environment, and periodontal diseases were induced by periodontal ligature. The animals were killed after 30 days, and lipid profile was enzymatically measured using Trinder's method. The total assessed values were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey test (p triglyceride levels of diabetic rats with periodontal disease and of diabetic rats with both periodontal and pulpal diseases were significantly higher than those of normal rats and nondiabetic group rats, respectively. The differences in the cholesterol levels among the groups were not significant. We found that the association of pulpal and periodontal diseases with diabetes increased triglyceride levels in rats. Changes in lipid profile may be related to the presence of oral infections and diabetes.

  9. Temperature changes in the pulp chamber during dentin ablation with Er:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Zhao, Haibin; Zhan, Zhenlin; Guo, Wenqing; Xie, Shusen

    2012-12-01

    To examine the temperature changes in the pulp chamber during cavity preparation in dentin with the Er:YAG laser (2940 nm), a total 20 intact premolars teeth were divided into 4 groups for dentin ablation with different radiant exposures at 4Hz and 8Hz with and without water spray. A K-type thermocouple was used to monitor the temperature changes in pulp chamber during laser treatment. The total time of irradiation was 70 sec. the water spray rate was 3 mL/min. It showed that maximum temperature rise increases with the increasing of radiant exposure and pulse repetition rate and the additional water cooling during laser ablation can significantly reduce the temperature rise in pulp chamber which will benefit to avoid or reduce thermal damage to tooth structure and dental pulp. The highest rise of temperature in the pulp was achieved with 20 J/cm2 and 8 Hz (19.83°C ). For all sample without water spray, the rise of temperature was exceed 5 °C . In contrast, with water spray, the temperature rise in the pulp can be firmly controlled under 1°C. The results also indicated that ablation rate and efficiency can be enhanced by increasing the incident radiant exposure and pulse repetition rate, which simultaneously producing more heat accumulation in dental tissue and causing thermal damage to dental tissue. By applying an additional water spray, thermal damage can be significantly reduced in clinical application.

  10. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonks, James P.; Galloway, Ewan C.; King, Martin O.; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F.

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  11. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, James P., E-mail: james.tonks@awe.co.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Galloway, Ewan C., E-mail: ewan.galloway@awe.co.uk; King, Martin O. [AWE Plc, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kerherve, Gwilherm [VACGEN Ltd, St. Leonards-On-Sea, East Sussex TN38 9NN (United Kingdom); Watts, John F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  12. Experimental investigation of a temperature separation effect inside a short vortex chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Beliavsky, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Room temperature compressed air was pumped into a short (H/D = 0.18) vortex chamber. Experiments revealed temperature separation. The highest temperature of the periphery was 465 degC, and the lowest temperature of the central zone was -45 degC. During the process, heat was transferred to periphery in the opposite direction of the powerful vortex flow. This heat transfer cannot be explained by conventional heat transfer processes. To explain this phenomenon, the concept of Pressure Gradient Waves (PGW) is proposed in the paper. PGW are elastic waves which operate in compressible fluids with pressure gradients and density fluctuations.

  13. Raman measurements of substrate temperature in a molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchins, T.; Nazari, M.; Eridisoorya, M.; Myers, T. M.; Holtz, M., E-mail: Mark.Holtz@txstate.edu [Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    A method is described for directly measuring the temperature of a substrate in a molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth system. The approach relies on the establishment of the temperature dependence of Raman-active phonons of the substrate material using independently known calibration points across the range of interest. An unknown temperature in this range is then determined based on the Raman peak position with the substrate in situ the MBE chamber. The apparatus relies on conventional optics and Raman components. Shifting and broadening of the Raman spectrum are described based on the effects of thermal expansion and anharmonic decay. The choice of reference temperature is discussed. The method is qualified by examining the substrate temperature dependence, relative to that of a standard thermocouple, during a commonly used ramp procedure. Both temperature difference and time lag are obtained.

  14. Raman measurements of substrate temperature in a molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, T; Nazari, M; Eridisoorya, M; Myers, T M; Holtz, M

    2015-01-01

    A method is described for directly measuring the temperature of a substrate in a molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth system. The approach relies on the establishment of the temperature dependence of Raman-active phonons of the substrate material using independently known calibration points across the range of interest. An unknown temperature in this range is then determined based on the Raman peak position with the substrate in situ the MBE chamber. The apparatus relies on conventional optics and Raman components. Shifting and broadening of the Raman spectrum are described based on the effects of thermal expansion and anharmonic decay. The choice of reference temperature is discussed. The method is qualified by examining the substrate temperature dependence, relative to that of a standard thermocouple, during a commonly used ramp procedure. Both temperature difference and time lag are obtained.

  15. Effect of simulated pulpal pressure on composite bond strength to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... Bonding to dentin with adhesive systems is affected by the tubular fluid flow induced by pulpal pressure. ... microtensile bond strength of an adhesive to dentin surface prepared by laser irradiation. Crowns of ..... composition.

  16. Temperature field distribution from cooling of a magma chamber in La Primavera Caldera, Jalisco, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, S.P. [Laboratorio de Energia Solar, Temixco, UNAM (Mexico); Rodriguez-Gonzalez, U. [Facultad de Ciencias de la Tierra, Linares, UANL (Mexico)

    1997-02-01

    The temperature field distribution in La Primavera geothermal area, Jalisco, located in the western part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB), has been simulated from cooling of a shallow magma chamber (assumed as the primary heat source) during the entire volcanic history of the caldera. Similar to the other two geothermal fields of the MVB (Los Humeros and Los Azufres), it is considered that the evolution of the magma chamber is controlled by the processes of fractional crystallization as well as magma recharge. Besides these processes, heat contribution is also taken into account from decay of natural radioactive elements, U, Th, and K, present in all geological materials. In some models presented in this work, convection in the geothermal reservoir is simulated by assigning higher values of thermal conductivities (up to 20 times the rock conductivities) to respective geologic units. The heat transfer equation has been solved by a finite element implicit method. The results of temperature simulations from the magma chamber are compared with undisturbed formation temperatures in three drill wells. (author)

  17. Influence of whitening gel on pulp chamber temperature rise by in-office bleaching technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Cordeiro Loretto

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dental bleaching is a conservative method for the aesthetic restoration of stained teeth. However, whitening treatments are likely to cause adverse effects when not well planned and executed. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the influence of whitening gel on temperature rise in the pulp chamber, using the in-office photoactivated dental bleaching technique. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The root portion of an upper central human incisor was sectioned 3mm below the cemento-enamel junction. The root canal was enlarged to permit the insertion of the K-type thermocouple sensor (MT-401 into the pulp chamber, which was filled with thermal paste to facilitate the transfer of heat during bleaching. Three photosensitive whitening agents (35% hydrogen peroxide were used: Whiteness HP (FGM, Whiteness HP Maxx (FGM and Lase Peroxide Sensy (DMC. An LED photocuring light (Flash Lite - Discus Dental was used to activate the whitening gels. Six bleaching cycles were performed on each group tested. The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA and LSD t-test (α<0.05. RESULT: The lowest mean temperature variation (ºC was detected for Lase Peroxide Sensy (0.20, while the highest was recorded for Whiteness HP (1.50. CONCLUSION: The Whiteness HP and Whiteness HP Maxx whitening gels significantly affected the temperature rise in the pulp chamber during bleaching, and this variation was dependent on the type of whitening gel used.

  18. Temperature and performance variations along single chamber solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Bertrand; Roberge, Réal; Savoie, Sylvio; Napporn, Teko W.; Meunier, Michel

    The catalytic activity of single chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SC-SOFCs) with respect to hydrocarbon fuels induces a major overheating of the fuel cell, temperature variations along its length, and changes in the original fuel/air composition mainly over the anode component. This paper assesses the temperature gradients and the variations in performance along electrolyte-supported Ni-YSZ/YSZ/LSM cells fed with methane gas. The investigations are performed in a useful range of CH 4/O 2 ratios between 1.0 and 2.0, in which the furnace temperature and flow rate of methane-air mixtures are held constant at 700 °C and 450 sccm, respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used to sense the temperature at the location where smaller size cathodes are positioned on the opposite side of a full-size anode. Due to temperature increases, cells always perform better when the small cathodes are located at the inlet as well as at a CH 4/O 2 ratio of 1.0. With an increase in ratio, the results show the presence of artefacts due to the use of an active LSM material for the combustion of methane, and open-type gas distribution plates for the single chamber reactor.

  19. Air-turbulence and temperature gradients reduced in plant growth chambers by small-hole diffuser-walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, L. E.; Noey, J. L.; Kerr, Pat C.; Haber, A. H.

    1967-01-01

    A new, simple, and relatively inexpensive method is described for smoothly introducing into plant growth chambers the large volumes of preconditioned air necessary to maintain great uniformity of temperature and humidity. Preconditioned air from a plenum is introduced into the chamber through diffuser-walls containing numerous evenly spaced holes.

  20. Pulpal inflammation and incidence of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshipura, Kaumudi J; Pitiphat, Waranuch; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Willett, Walter C; Colditz, Graham A; Douglass, Chester W

    2006-02-01

    Pulpal inflammation is primarily caused by coronal caries, and leads to root canal therapy (RCT). Chronic inflammation has been associated with various cardiovascular diseases. This study evaluates the association between pulpal inflammation (using RCT as a surrogate) and incident coronary heart disease (CHD). We report results among males from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS), excluding participants with prior cardiovascular disease or diabetes. We obtained RCT data from the HPFS cohort (n = 34,683). Compared to men without RCT, those with >/=1 RCT had a multivariate RR of 1.21 (95% CI 1.05-1.40) for CHD. The association was limited to dentists (RR = 1.38; 95% CI 1.14-1.67). There was no association among nondentists (RR = 1.03). Dental caries was not associated with CHD. The results suggest a possible modest association between pulpal inflammation and CHD.

  1. Study of the ventilation at ATLAS cavern UX15 air velocity and temperature around the muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Vigo-Castellví, E

    2000-01-01

    The Muon Chambers of ATLAS detector cannot work under temperature differences between two opposed faces above 3 K. In addition, a low velocity of the air around the Muon Chambers is essential to avoid vibration problems. The CV group at the ST division is involved in an airflow simulation inside UX15 cavern to check air temperature and velocity profiles around the ATLAS Muon Chambers. In this paper, the status and the content of the performed theoretical studies will be explained. Three simulation models, which helped to understand the Muon Spectrometer thermal environment and the efficiency of the ventilation system at ATLAS cavern, will be presented. Besides, it will be shown how these studies support the proposal of a deeper individual Muon Chamber study.

  2. High Temperature Fission Chamber for He- and FLiBe-cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, Zane W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giuliano, Dominic R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holcomb, David Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lance, Michael J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Roger G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Warmack, Robert J. Bruce [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated candidate technologies for in-core fission chambers for high-temperature reactors to monitor power level via measurements of neutron flux from start-up through full power at up to 800°C. This research is important because there are no commercially available instruments capable of operating above 550 °C. Component materials and processes were investigated for fission chambers suitable for operation at 800 °C in reactors cooled by molten fluoride salt (FLiBe) or flowing He, with an emphasis placed on sensitivity (≥ 1 cps/nv), service lifetime (2 years at full power), and resistance to direct immersion in FLiBe. The latter gives the instrument the ability to survive accidents involving breach of a thimble. The device is envisioned to be a two-gap, three-electrode instrument constructed from concentric nickel-plated alumina cylinders and using a noble gas–nitrogen fill-gas. We report the results of measurements and calculations of the response of fill gasses, impurity migration in nickel alloy, brazing of the alumina insulator, and thermodynamic calculations.

  3. Characterization of patient’s inflammatory pulpal diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gloria Vázquez de León

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulpal diseases are the most common entities in the dentist emergency consultation. For a correct indication of the treatment, it is very important to establish an accurate diagnosis. Objective: to characterize carrier patients with inflammatory pulpal disease. Methods: a descriptive, prospective cases series study which included 222 patients who came to the dentistry emergency consultation in Area I health policlinic. Age, type of disease, cause, more implicated teeth in the disease, visits, and previous treatments were the variables included. Results: there was no difference at all regarding sex. The most affected group of age was from 35 to 59 years old. The inferior molars were the most affected teeth. The main cause was dental cavities. Obturation was the previous treatment more presented. 46% of the patients attended the dentist in more than one occasion with the same process. Acute irreversible pulpitis was the most predominant pulpal disease. Conclusions: The most common pulpal diseases in our milieu was the acute irreversible pulpitis among the ages 35 and 59 years old.

  4. Effect of Cyclosporin A on the Progression of Pulpal Lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To investigate histologically and histometrically thechanges of pulpal lesions in control and cyclosporin A(CyA) treated rats.Methods:The pulps of the first lower molars of nine normal and nine CyA treated rats were exposed and left open into the oral cavity.Three animals of each group were sacrificed after 3,7 and 14 days of the pulp exposure.The specimens were sectioned sagittally at a thickness of 5μm and evaluated histologically and histometrically.Results:Histologically,the pulpal necrosis extended gradually from the coronal part of the pulpal tissue to the apex after pulp exposure.The pulpal inflammation of CyA teated group was weaker than that of control group.Histometrically,the length of pulpal necrosis increased gradually from 3 to 14 days.The pulpal lesions were smaller in CyA treated group than those of controlled group in all studied periods,and the differences between both groups were statistically significant.Conclusion:CyA can inhibit the development of pulpal lesions in rats.%目的:观察经环孢霉素A(CyclosporinA,CyA)处理的大鼠实验性牙髓炎病程进展情况,探讨CyA对大鼠牙髓炎发展过程的影响。方法:CyA处理组大鼠与对照组大鼠双侧下颌第一磨牙人工机械露髓后旷置口腔,于术后3,7,14天分批处死动物,选取每个磨牙的近远中根管进行组织学并测量不同时期牙髓坏死长度。结果:牙髓在露髓后出现炎症反应和组织坏死,CyA处理组炎症反应稍弱。组织学测量发现术后3,7,14天,CyA处理组牙髓坏死百分率明显低于对照组。结论:免疫抑制剂CyA改变了大鼠牙髓炎病变过程。

  5. Evaluation in vitro of pulpal chamber temperature of deciduous teeth during Er:YAG laser application; Avaliacao in vitro da temperatura na camara pulpar de dentes deciduos durante aplicacao do laser de Er:YAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sznajder, Alexandre Joseph

    2001-07-01

    The Er:YAG laser technology has been thoroughly studied, since its invention, and has been increasingly recommended in Dentistry. However, its use in deciduous teeth has not been deserving the equivalent attention to its counterpart in permanent teeth, despite of the deciduous teething occur in a phase of life in which it has a far more importance than its substitutes. For that reason, this study aims to identify the suitable parameters to the clinic procedures in deciduous teeth, using the already established protocols in permanent teeth. The study was lead in a way to resemble the most the conditions of the clinical use of the laser. Five groups were analyzed using different energy densities and repetition rates. Each group was composed of 10 first superior right deciduous molars randomly selected. The energy densities and repetition rates used for each group were: 60 mJ 15 Hz, 250 mJ 2 Hz, 250 mJ 15 Hz, 400 mJ 6 Hz and 500 mJ 2 Hz. The results obtained allowed us to conclude that the use of the Er:YAG laser in Odontopediatrics is effective, safe and secure and the main reason for its recommendation is the low transfer of heat to the adjacent tissues of the applied surfaces. (author)

  6. Budget-limited thermal biology: Design, construction and performance of a large, walk-in style temperature-controlled chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Eloy; Agosta, Salvatore J

    2016-05-01

    We describe a partial redesign of the conventional air-conditioning system and apply it to the construction of a relatively large (1.87m(3) air mass), walk-in style temperature-controlled chamber (TCC) using parts easily obtained in most countries. We conducted several tests to demonstrate the performance of the TCC. Across the physiologically relevant range of 5-37°C, the TCC took 26.5-50.0min to reach the desired set point temperature. Once at set point, temperature inside the chamber was controlled with an accuracy of ±1.0°C. User-entry effects on deviations from and return times to set point temperature were minimal. Overall, performance of the TCC was sufficient to make precise physiological measurements of insect metabolic rate while controlling assay temperature. Major advantages of the TCC include its simplicity, flexibility, and low cost.

  7. An optimization of inner structures of the drying chamber of high temperature pneumatic drum drier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topić Radivoje M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an analysis of the influence of parameters of flights from inner drying chamber structure and drying chamber is given. The influence of the following parameters on dryer working process is analyzed: number, shape and width of flights, level of coverage of cross-section drying chamber by material, rpm and drying chamber diameter. In the analytical expression for determining the amount of material seized by a curved flight, depending on the current position of the flight during drum rotation, a new parameter is introduced, compared to expression for a rectilinear flight. The expanded analytical expression could be used for optimization.

  8. Different treatment protocols for different pulpal and periapical diagnoses of 72 cracked teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sin-Young; Kim, Su-Hyun; Cho, Soo-Bin; Lee, Gyung-Ok; Yang, Sung-Eun

    2013-04-01

    The treatment plan for cracked teeth depends on the extent of the crack. A tooth with an extensive crack of long duration may be more likely to require root canal treatment. The purpose of this study was to analyze the characteristics of cracked teeth and to assess the outcome of different treatment protocols depending on the pulpal and periapical diagnoses. Seventy-two of 476 crown-restored teeth were diagnosed as cracked teeth. The location of the cracked teeth, age and sex of the patients, restoration materials, a diagnosis of pulp and apex, and the periodontal probing depth were analyzed. Cracked teeth were treated by different treatment protocols depending on the pulpal and periapical diagnoses. Mandibular first molars (27.8%) were the most frequently involved teeth followed by maxillary first molars (25%), maxillary second molars (22.2%), and mandibular second molars (19.4%). The most frequently involved ages were 40-49 and 50-59 years. Cracks occurred mainly in nonbonded restorations such as gold (26.4%) and amalgam (12.5%), and 48.6% of cracks were found in intact teeth. In this study, 60 teeth (83.3%) were treated with root canal treatment before being restored with a permanent crown, and only 12 teeth (16.7%) remained vital and were restored with a permanent crown without root canal treatment. The proportion of teeth treated with root canal treatment increased along with a deep periodontal probing depth corresponding to the crack. The prognosis was less favorable in cracked teeth with a deep probing depth. In this study, the proportion of root canal treatment in the cracked teeth was higher than other studies. Many patients are referred to an endodontist in a university hospital after a long time has passed since the symptom started. Early recognition can help to avoid the propagation of a crack into the pulp chamber or subgingival level. Furthermore, it is important to investigate factors related to cracked teeth and develop different treatment protocols

  9. Achieving pulpal anesthesia with a topical anesthetic paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Carn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The efficacy of a topically applied formulation of tetracaine base (6% was investigated against benzocaine in achieving pulpal anesthesia in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study. Materials and Methods: Subjects′ baseline pulpal responses to an electric pulp tester were measured, followed by a 10 min application of either tetracaine anesthetic paste (TAP, benzocaine (20%, or placebo. Treatments were removed and pulp testing was performed at 10 min, 15 min, and 20 min postapplication. Results: TAP produced significant pulpal anesthesia at 184% ± 7.2% above baseline versus 14% ± 1.7% above baseline for benzocaine at 15 min (P < 0.03. Differences between treatments were tested with the Wilcoxon test and the Steel-Dwass test, which is the nonparametric version of the all-pairs Tukey′s honestly significant difference test. Conclusion: Achieving profound anesthesia with a topical anesthetic paste could lead to injection less procedure, improved postsurgical incisional pain management, and ameliorate pain associated with a variety of lesions.

  10. Lightweight Ultrahigh Temperature CMC-Lined C/C Combustion Chambers, Phase II Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA and DoD are seeking high-performance, lightweight liquid rocket combustion chambers with future performance goals that cannot be achieved using state-of-the-art...

  11. Modelling and simulation of double chamber microbial fuel cell. Cell voltage, power density and temperature variation with process parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar, Ravi; Mondal, Prasenjit; Chand, Shri [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttaranchal (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    In the present paper steady state models of a double chamber glucose glutamic acid microbial fuel cell (GGA-MFC) under continuous operation have been developed and solved using Matlab 2007 software. The experimental data reported in a recent literature has been used for the validation of the models. The present models give prediction on the cell voltage and cell power density with 19-44% errors, which is less (up to 20%) than the errors on the prediction of cell voltage made in some recent literature for the same MFC where the effects of the difference in pH and ionic conductivity between anodic and cathodic solutions on cell voltage were not incorporated in model equations. It also describes the changes in anodic and cathodic chamber temperature due to the increase in substrate concentration and cell current density. Temperature profile across the membrane thickness has also been studied. (orig.)

  12. Pulpal healing following acute dental trauma: clinical and radiographic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, F M

    2001-05-01

    Successful treatment of tooth luxations, crown fractures, and root fractures is often compromised by the emergency nature of the injury. Precise radiographic and clinical evaluation is required to facilitate healing and treatment selection. While traditional treatment protocols indicate that dental injuries implying pulpal ischemia require immediate endodontic therapy to avoid healing complications, the clinical investigations discussed herein suggest that a variety of etiologies for pulp survival/pulp necrosis exist. This article discusses the long-term prognosis of pulp necrosis following traumatic dental injuries, and clinical and radiographic criteria for its diagnosis.

  13. Substrate temperature and strain during sputter deposition of aluminum on cast borosilicate glass in a Gemini Observatory coating chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebag, Jacques; Andrew, John; Neill, Douglas; Warner, Michael

    2010-08-20

    Temperature and strain measurements obtained during coating of spin-cast borosilicate samples are presented here with an analysis of these results. These tests were performed for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) project to verify the possible use of sputtering deposition of optical coating on its large 8.4m diameter primary-tertiary mirror. Made of spin-cast borosilicate glass, the working stress of the mirror's nonpolished surfaces is 100 psi (0.69 MPa), resulting in a local temperature difference limit of 5 degrees C. To ensure representative environmental conditions, the tests were performed in the Gemini Observatory coating chamber located in Hawaii, whose design was utilized to develop the LSST coating chamber design. In particular, this coating chamber is equipped with linear magnetrons built with cooled heat shields directly facing the mirror surface. These measurements have demonstrated that it will be safe for the LSST to use a magnetron sputtering process for coating its borosilicate primary-tertiary mirror.

  14. Antioxidant therapy enhances pulpal healing in bleached teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Fonseca Lima

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the histopathological effects of an antioxidant therapy on the pulp tissue of rat teeth exposed to a bleaching gel with 35% hydrogen peroxide. Materials and Methods Forty rats were subjected to oral ingestion by gavage of distilled water (DW or ascorbic acid (AA 90 min before the bleaching therapy. For the bleaching treatment, the agent was applied twice for 5 min each to buccal surfaces of the first right mandibular molars. Then, the animals were sacrificed at 6 hr, 24 hr, 3 day, or 7 day post-bleaching, and the teeth were processed for microscopic evaluation of the pulp tissue. Results At 6 hr, the pulp tissue showed moderate inflammatory reactions in all teeth of both groups. In the DW and AA groups, 100% and 80% of teeth exhibited pulp tissue with significant necrosis and intense tissue disorganization, respectively. At 24 hr, the AA-treated group demonstrated a greater regenerative capability than the DW group, with less intense inflammatory reaction and new odontoblast layer formation in 60% of the teeth. For up to the 7 day period, the areas of pulpal necrosis were replaced by viable connective tissue, and the dentin was underlined by differentiated odontoblast-like cells in most teeth of both groups. Conclusions A slight reduction in initial pulpal damage during post-bleaching was promoted by AA therapy. However, the pulp tissue of AA-treated animals featured faster regenerative potential over time

  15. Temperature Estimation in the Combustion Chamber of an Internal Combustion Engine

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The mathematical model of heat transfer phenomena is considered at the combustion chamber wall in an internal combustion (IC) engine. The mathematical model of proposed phenomena is established with respect to the crank angle. An inverse heat conduction problem is derived at the cylinder wall, and this problem is investigated numerically using Alifanov's regularization method. This problem studied as an optimization problem in which a squared residual functional is minimized with the conjugat...

  16. The potential effect of differential ambient and deployment chamber temperatures on PRC derived sampling rates with polyurethane foam (PUF) passive air samplers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Karen, E-mail: k.kennedy@uq.edu.a [University of Queensland, EnTox (National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology), 39 Kessels Rd., Coopers Plains QLD 4108 (Australia); Hawker, Darryl W. [Griffith University, School of Environment, Nathan QLD 4111 (Australia); Bartkow, Michael E. [University of Queensland, EnTox (National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology), 39 Kessels Rd., Coopers Plains QLD 4108 (Australia); Carter, Steve [Queensland Health Forensic and Scientific Services, Coopers Plains QLD 4108 (Australia); Ishikawa, Yukari; Mueller, Jochen F. [University of Queensland, EnTox (National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology), 39 Kessels Rd., Coopers Plains QLD 4108 (Australia)

    2010-01-15

    Performance reference compound (PRC) derived sampling rates were determined for polyurethane foam (PUF) passive air samplers in both sub-tropical and temperate locations across Australia. These estimates were on average a factor of 2.7 times higher in summer than winter. The known effects of wind speed and temperature on mass transfer coefficients could not account for this observation. Sampling rates are often derived using ambient temperatures, not the actual temperatures within deployment chambers. If deployment chamber temperatures are in fact higher than ambient temperatures, estimated sampler-air partition coefficients would be greater than actual partition coefficients resulting in an overestimation of PRC derived sampling rates. Sampling rates determined under measured ambient temperatures and estimated deployment chamber temperatures in summer ranged from 7.1 to 10 m{sup 3} day{sup -1} and 2.2-6.8 m{sup 3} day{sup -1} respectively. These results suggest that potential differences between ambient and deployment chamber temperatures should be considered when deriving PRC-based sampling rates. - Internal deployment chamber temperatures rather than ambient temperatures may be required to accurately estimate PRC-based sampling rates.

  17. Soot temperature and KL factor for biodiesel and diesel spray combustion in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ji

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents measurements of the soot temperature and KL factor for biodiesel and diesel combustion in a constant volume chamber using a two-color technique. This technique uses a high-speed camera coupled with two narrowband filters (550. nm and 650. nm, 10. nm FWHM). After calibration, statistical analysis shows that the uncertainty of the two-color temperature is less than 5%, while it is about 50% for the KL factor. This technique is then applied to the spray combustion of biodiesel and diesel fuels under an ambient oxygen concentration of 21% and ambient temperatures of 800, 1000 and 1200. K. The heat release result shows higher energy utilization efficiency for biodiesel compared to diesel under all conditions; meanwhile, diesel shows a higher pressure increase due to its higher heating value. Biodiesel yields a lower temperature inside the flame area, a longer soot lift-off length, and a smaller soot area compared to diesel. Both the KL factor and the total soot with biodiesel are lower than with diesel throughout the entire combustion process, and this difference becomes larger as the ambient temperature decreases. Biodiesel shows approximately 50-100. K lower temperatures than diesel at the quasi-steady stage for 1000 and 1200. K ambient temperature, while diesel shows a lower temperature than biodiesel at 800. K ambient. This result may raise the question of how important the flame temperature is in explaining the higher NO. x emissions often observed during biodiesel combustion. Other factors may also play an important role in controlling NO. x emissions. Both biodiesel and diesel temperature measurements show a monotonic dependence on the ambient temperature. However, the ambient temperature appears to have a more significant effect on the soot formation and oxidation in diesel combustion, while biodiesel combustion soot characteristics shows relative insensitivity to the ambient temperature. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Temperature Estimation in the Combustion Chamber of an Internal Combustion Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Safakish

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical model of heat transfer phenomena is considered at the combustion chamber wall in an internal combustion (IC engine. The mathematical model of proposed phenomena is established with respect to the crank angle. An inverse heat conduction problem is derived at the cylinder wall, and this problem is investigated numerically using Alifanov's regularization method. This problem studied as an optimization problem in which a squared residual functional is minimized with the conjugate gradient method. To show the ability of the proposed method, some test problems are considered.

  19. 汽轮机喷嘴室温度场分析%Analysis of the Temperature Field of Steam Turbine Nozzle Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王林; 程荣新; 张宏涛; 李宇峰; 翁振宇

    2015-01-01

    Nozzle chamber is one of the key components in steam turbine , the analysis of the temperature field is important when nozzle chamber of steam turbine is designed .Aim at a 600MW sub-critical steam turbine nozzle chamber , a three-dimensional finite element model of the nozzle chamber is developed , methods for calculating the convective heat transfer coefficients of the nozzle chamber surfaces different regions are described , three-dimensional transient thermal analysis is performed on the nozzle chamber by using finite element method .Detailed temperature distributions are determined during the cold start transient operating conditions .The results show that temperature distributions of the active chambers and those of the inactive chambers are different , inner surface temperature is higher than other surfaces temperature for the active chambers, temperatures of the contact surfaces between the inner casing and the support lugs on the nozzle chamber are lowest.The used analytic methods can be applied for temperature field analysis of sub-critical, supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam turbine nozzle chamber , a basis for the cooling design and the life evaluation of steam turbine nozzle chamber is provided .%喷嘴室是汽轮机中的关键部件,在汽轮机喷嘴室的设计过程中,必须分析其温度场。针对某亚临界600MW汽轮机喷嘴室,建立了三维有限元模型,介绍了喷嘴室表面不同区域的对流换热系数计算方法,用有限元法分析了喷嘴室的三维瞬态温度场,得出了在冷态启动运行工况的详细温度分布。结果表明,喷嘴室开启的室和关闭的室温度分布不同,对于开启的室,内表面的温度明显高于其它表面,内缸和喷嘴室支承键的接触表面处温度最低。所采用的分析方法可以用于分析亚临界、超临界和超超临界汽轮机喷嘴室,为喷嘴室的冷却设计和寿命评估打下了基础。

  20. Pulpal responses to cavity preparation in aged rat molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagishi, Eriko; Nakakura-Ohshima, Kuniko; Nomura, Shuichi; Ohshima, Hayato

    2006-10-01

    The dentin-pulp complex is capable of repair after tooth injuries including dental procedures. However, few data are available concerning aged changes in pulpal reactions to such injuries. The present study aimed to clarify the capability of defense in aged pulp by investigating the responses of odontoblasts and cells positive for class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) to cavity preparation in aged rat molars (300-360 days) and by comparing the results with those in young adult rats (100 days). In untreated control teeth, immunoreactivity for intense heat-shock protein (HSP)-25 and nestin was found in odontoblasts, whereas class-II-MHC-positive cells were densely distributed in the periphery of the pulp. Cavity preparation caused two types of pulpal reactions based on the different extent of damage in the aged rats. In the case of severe damage, destruction of the odontoblast layer was conspicuous at the affected site. By 12 h after cavity preparation, numerous class-II-MHC-positive cells appeared along the pulp-dentin border but subsequently disappeared together with HSP-25-immunopositive cells, and finally newly differentiated odontoblast-like cells took the place of the degenerated odontoblasts and acquired immunoreactivity for HSP-25 and nestin by postoperative day 3. In the case of mild damage, no remarkable changes occurred in odontoblasts after operation, and some survived through the experimental stages. These findings indicate that aged pulp tissue still possesses a defense capacity, and that a variety of reactions can occur depending on the difference in the status of dentinal tubules and/or odontoblast processes in individuals.

  1. Low temperature combustion of organic coal-water fuel droplets containing petrochemicals while soaring in a combustion chamber model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiullin Timur R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the integral characteristics (minimum temperature, ignition delay times of stable combustion initiation of organic coal-water fuel droplets (initial radius is 0.3-1.5 mm in the oxidizer flow (the temperature and velocity varied in ranges 500-900 K, 0.5-3 m/s. The main components of organic coal-water fuel were: brown coal particles, filter-cakes obtained in coal processing, waste engine, and turbine oils. The different modes of soaring and ignition of organic coal-water fuel have been established. The conditions have been set under which it is possible to implement the sustainable soaring and ignition of organic coal-water fuel droplets. We have compared the ignition characteristics with those defined in the traditional approach (based on placing the droplets on a low-inertia thermocouple junction into the combustion chamber. The paper shows the scale of the influence of heat sink over the thermocouple junction on ignition inertia. An original technique for releasing organic coal-water fuel droplets to the combustion chamber was proposed and tested. The limitations of this technique and the prospects of experimental results for the optimization of energy equipment operation were also formulated.

  2. Fuzzy control for the illumination and temperature comfort in a test chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lah, Mateja Trobec; Krainer, Ales [Ljubljana Univ., Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zupancic, Borut [Ljubljana Univ., Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2005-12-01

    The paper deals with the controlled dynamic thermal and illumination response of human-built environment in real-time conditions. The aim is to harmonize the thermal and optical behavior of a building with regulated energy flows through the envelope. A control system with fuzzy elements for changeable transparent elements of the building envelope was developed. For this purpose a test chamber with an opening on the south side was built. Energy flows through the envelope are controlled with changeable geometry of the window, realized with the external roller blind, which is automatically positioned. The fuzzy controller for the corresponding positioning of the roller blind in a given combination of outside conditions as external disturbances is the subject of this paper. (Author)

  3. Refrigeration Test Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The enclosed and environmentally controlled chamber is able to test four units (single-phase) simultaneously at conditions ranging from tundra to desert temperatures...

  4. Electricity generation of single-chamber microbial fuel cells at low temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Shaoan

    2011-01-01

    Practical applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for wastewater treatment will require operation of these systems over a wide range of wastewater temperatures. MFCs at room or higher temperatures (20-35°C) are relatively well studied compared those at lower temperatures. MFC performance was examined here over a temperature range of 4-30°C in terms of startup time needed for reproducible power cycles, and performance. MFCs initially operated at 15°C or higher all attained a reproducible cycles of power generation, but the startup time to reach stable operation increased from 50h at 30°C to 210h at 15°C. At temperatures below 15°C, MFCs did not produce appreciable power even after one month of operation. If an MFC was first started up at temperature of 30°C, however, reproducible cycles of power generation could then be achieved at even the two lowest temperatures of 4°C and 10°C. Power production increased linearly with temperature at a rate of 33±4mW°C-1, from 425±2mWm-2 at 4°C to 1260±10mWm-2 at 30°C. Coulombic efficiency decreased by 45% over this same temperature range, or from CE=31% at 4°C to CE=17% at 30°C. These results demonstrate that MFCs can effectively be operated over a wide range of temperatures, but our findings have important implications for the startup of larger scale reactors where low wastewater temperatures could delay or prevent adequate startup of the system. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Characterization of evaporation rate, temperature, velocity and humidity fields in a cold chamber

    OpenAIRE

    LECOQ L.; Flick, D.; Plana Fattori, A.; Laguerre, O.

    2014-01-01

    3rd IIR International Conference on Sustainability and the Cold Chain, ICCC 2014, London, , 23-/06/2014 - 25/06/2014; International audience; In a food factory some pathogenic bacteria can grow even at low temperature, especially Listeria Monocytogenes which resists to temperature around 0°C. Currently, two ways are used to prevent bacterial growth; product treatment (pasteurization, pH decrease) and cleaning but it's not sufficient to eliminate all microorganisms. This work takes part of a f...

  6. Pulpal Thermal Changes following Er-YAG Laser Debonding of Ceramic Brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem Nalbantgil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lasers are effective in debonding ceramic brackets. Unfortunately, while reducing the adhesive bond strength, lasers are also reported to increase pulpal temperature. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strengths and temperature increase levels after debonding ceramic brackets using an Er-YAG laser with or without water-cooling. Sixty polycrystalline upper premolar ceramic brackets were placed on the labial surface of sixty human premolar teeth which were randomly divided into three groups of twenty. A laser pulse at 5 W for 9 seconds was delivered to each bracket in both study groups either with water-cooling (water group or without water-cooling (waterless group using an Er-YAG laser. Debonding was performed 45 seconds after laser exposure and shear bond strengths were measured. Data comparison revealed a statistically significant difference between the groups. Mean temperature increases of 2.41°C and 4.59°C were recorded for the water and waterless laser groups, respectively. The shear bond strength value for the control group was 22.76 MPa and 10.46 and 6.36 MPa for the water and waterless laser groups, respectively. The application of Er-YAG laser with water-cooling was an efficient and safe method of debonding ceramic brackets.

  7. Application of fuzzy logic to the control of wind tunnel settling chamber temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Humphreys, Gregory L.

    1994-01-01

    The application of Fuzzy Logic Controllers (FLC's) to the control of nonlinear processes, typically controlled by a human operator, is a topic of much study. Recent application of a microprocessor-based FLC to the control of temperature processes in several wind tunnels has proven to be very successful. The control of temperature processes in the wind tunnels requires the ability to monitor temperature feedback from several points and to accommodate varying operating conditions in the wind tunnels. The FLC has an intuitive and easily configurable structure which incorporates the flexibility required to have such an ability. The design and implementation of the FLC is presented along with process data from the wind tunnels under automatic control.

  8. DESIGN, FABRICATION, ASSEMBLY AND BENCH TESTING OF A TEXACO INFRARED RATIO PYROMETER SYSTEM FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF REACTION CHAMBER TEMPERATURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tom Leininger

    2001-03-31

    Reliable measurement of gasifier reaction chamber temperature is important for the proper operation of slagging, entrained-flow gasification processes. Historically, thermocouples have been used as the main measurement technique, with the temperature inferred from syngas methane concentration being used as a backup measurement. While these have been sufficient for plant operation in many cases, both techniques suffer from limitations. The response time of methane measurements is too slow to detect rapid upset conditions, and thermocouples are subject to long-term drift, as well as slag attack, which eventually leads to failure of the thermocouple. Texaco's Montebello Technology Center (MTC) has developed an infrared ratio pyrometer system for measuring gasifier reaction chamber temperature. This system has a faster response time than both methane and thermocouples, and has been demonstrated to provide reliable temperature measurements for longer periods of time when compared to thermocouples installed in the same MTC gasifier. In addition, the system can be applied to commercial gasifiers without any significant scale-up issues. The major equipment items, the purge system, and the safety shutdown system in a commercial plant are essentially identical to the prototypes at MTC. The desired result of this DOE program is ''a bench-scale prototype, either assembled or with critical components (laboratory) tested in a convincing manner.'' The prototype of the pyrometer system (including gasifier optical access port) that was designed, assembled and tested for this program, has had previous prototypes that have been built and successfully tested under actual coal and coke gasification conditions in three pilot units at MTC. It was the intent of the work performed under the auspices of this program to review and update the existing design, and to fabricate and bench test an updated system that can be field tested in one or more commercial gasifiers

  9. Enzymatic responses of human deciduous pulpal fibroblasts to dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chern-Chin; Chen, Robert Cheng-Shen; Huang, Shun-Te

    2002-06-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the responses of succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities of human deciduous teeth pulpal fibroblasts (HDPF) to dental restorative materials. Tested materials included Z100 (3M), Dyract (Dentsply), FujiII (GC), and FujiIILC (GC). IRM (Dentsply) and culture medium (MD) alone were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Specimens 6 mm (diameter) x 3 mm were prepared in accordance with manufacturers' instructions. For light-cured materials, specimens were light cured for 40 s on both sides under a celluloid strip. For chemical-cured materials, specimens were allowed to set at room temperature for 15 min. The specimens were immersed in 1 mL of culture medium without serum for 24 h at room temperature. The extracts were filtered through 0.22-mm filters. HDPF (10,000 cells/well) was incubated with 100 microL of extract and 20 % FBS in a 96-well plate for 24 h in a 37 degrees, 5 % CO(2) incubator. Six wells per material were prepared. Optical density (OD) of SDH and ALP of HDPF were measured by a spectrophotometer. The means were analyzed by ANOVA and then a Duncan Test. The ranking of OD of SDH was IRM IRM materials were cytotoxic to human deciduous pulpal fibroblasts. The cytotoxicity of resin-modified glass ionomer cements (FujiIILC) was stronger than that of traditional glass ionomer cements (FujiII) and composite resin (Z100), and that of compomer (Dyract) was the weakest. On the contrary, ALP activities of resin-modified glass ionomer cements (FujiIILC) and composite resin (Z100) were higher than those of traditional glass ionomer cements (FujiII), while those of compomer (Dyract) were the lowest. It is concluded that, in this study, FujiIILC was the most cytotoxic material and the least inhibitive of ALP activities, Dyract was the weakest cytotoxic material and had the highest inhibition of ALP activities. The rankings of the MTT assay and the ALP assay were not consistent.

  10. Novel management of avulsed tooth by pulpal and periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Dexton Antony; Shivashankar, Vasundara Yayathi; Maroli, Ramesh Kumar; Vidyanath, Surendran

    2013-12-01

    The avulsion of anterior teeth of young children is a tragic occurrence and often presents an unparalleled challenge for the dentist. Reimplantation is the state-of-the-art treatment but may incur several complications, particularly with inappropriate posttraumatic management. In this article we report the emergency and rehabilitation treatment of an avulsed maxillary anterior tooth by using platelet-rich fibrin. The osteoconductive and osteoinductive properties of platelet-rich fibrin were used to stimulate pulpal and periodontal regeneration. During follow-up, no clinical signs and symptoms were present. After the initial 6 months, no further bone loss and attachment loss were observed. The tooth remained functional and was aesthetically acceptable. When a tooth is avulsed, attachment damage and pulp necrosis occur. Viable periodontal ligament cells are often left on most of the root surface. If the periodontal ligament that is left attached to the root surface does not dry out, the consequences of tooth avulsion are usually minimal. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A gas-tight Cu K alpha x-ray transparent reaction chamber for high-temperature x-ray diffraction analyses of halide gas/solid reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shian, Samuel; Sandhage, Kenneth H

    2009-11-01

    An externally heated, x-ray transparent reaction chamber has been developed to enable the dynamic high temperature x-ray diffraction (HTXRD) analysis of a gas/solid [TiF(4)(g)/SiO(2)(s)] reaction involving a halide gas reactant formed at elevated temperatures (up to 350 degrees C) from a condensed source (TiF(4) powder) sealed within the chamber. The reaction chamber possessed x-ray transparent windows comprised of a thin (13 microm) internal layer of Al foil and a thicker (125 microm) external Kapton film. After sealing the SiO(2) specimens (diatom frustules or Stober spheres) above TiF(4) powder within the reaction chamber, the chamber was heated to a temperature in the range of 160-350 degrees C to allow for internal generation of TiF(4)(g). The TiF(4)(g) underwent a metathetic reaction with the SiO(2) specimen to yield a TiOF(2)(s) product. HTXRD analysis, using Cu K alpha x rays passed through the Kapton/Al windows of the chamber, was used to track the extent of SiO(2) consumption and/or TiOF(2) formation with time. The Al foil inner layer of the windows protected the Kapton film from chemical attack by TiF(4)(g), whereas the thicker, more transparent Kapton film provided the mechanical strength needed to contain this gas. By selecting an appropriate combination of x-ray transparent materials to endow such composite windows with the required thermal, chemical, and mechanical performance, this inexpensive reaction chamber design may be applied to the HTXRD analyses of a variety of gas/solid reactions.

  12. Experimental determination of temperatures of the inner wall of a boiler combustion chamber for the purpose of verification of a CFD model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Trávníček

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the non-destructive method of determination of temperatures in the boiler combustion chamber. This method proves to be significant mainly as regards CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations of combustion processes, in case of which it is subsequently advisable to verify the data calculated using CFD software application with the actually measured data. Verification of the method was based on usage of reference combustion equipment (130 kW which performs combustion of a mixture of waste sawdust and shavings originating in the course of production of wooden furniture. Measuring of temperatures inside the combustion chamber is – considering mainly the high temperature values – highly demanding and requires a special type of temperature sensors. Furthermore, as regards standard operation, it is not possible to install such sensors without performing structural alterations of the boiler. Therefore, for the purpose of determination of these temperatures a special experimental device was constructed while exploiting a thermal imaging system used for monitoring of the surface temperature of outer wall of the reference boiler. Temperatures on the wall of the boiler combustion chamber were determined on the basis of data measured using the experimental device as well as data from the thermal imaging system. These values might serve for verification of the respective CFD model of combustion equipment.

  13. The current status of fluoride salt cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) technology and its overlap with HIF target chamber concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlat, Raluca O.; Peterson, Per F.

    2014-01-01

    The fluoride salt cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) is a class of fission reactor designs that use liquid fluoride salt coolant, TRISO coated particle fuel, and graphite moderator. Heavy ion fusion (HIF) can likewise make use of liquid fluoride salts, to create thick or thin liquid layers to protect structures in the target chamber from ablation by target X-rays and damage from fusion neutron irradiation. This presentation summarizes ongoing work in support of design development and safety analysis of FHR systems. Development work for fluoride salt systems with application to both FHR and HIF includes thermal-hydraulic modeling and experimentation, salt chemistry control, tritium management, salt corrosion of metallic alloys, and development of major components (e.g., pumps, heat exchangers) and gas-Brayton cycle power conversion systems. In support of FHR development, a thermal-hydraulic experimental test bay for separate effects (SETs) and integral effect tests (IETs) was built at UC Berkeley, and a second IET facility is under design. The experiments investigate heat transfer and fluid dynamics and they make use of oils as simulant fluids at reduced scale, temperature, and power of the prototypical salt-cooled system. With direct application to HIF, vortex tube flow was investigated in scaled experiments with mineral oil. Liquid jets response to impulse loading was likewise studied using water as a simulant fluid. A set of four workshops engaging industry and national laboratory experts were completed in 2012, with the goal of developing a technology pathway to the design and licensing of a commercial FHR. The pathway will include experimental and modeling efforts at universities and national laboratories, requirements for a component test facility for reliability testing of fluoride salt equipment at prototypical conditions, requirements for an FHR test reactor, and development of a pre-conceptual design for a commercial reactor.

  14. Pulpal response to irradiation of enamel with continuous wave CO sub 2 laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, G.L.; Morton, T.H.; Larsen, A.E.

    1989-12-01

    Selected dog's teeth, in vivo, were exposed to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) laser power densities ranging from 13 to 102 J per cm{sup 2}. The teeth were extracted 48 h postlasing, fixed with 10% neutral buffered formalin, decalcified with Kristensen's solution, processed, sectioned, stained, and evaluated for pulpal damage. No pulpal damage was observed when compared with nonlased control teeth. It appears that carbon dioxide laser power densities of approximately 13 to 102 J per cm{sup 2} could be used to irradiate enamel of teeth without damage to the pulp.

  15. At-home bleaching: pulpal effects and tooth sensitivity issues, part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Edward J

    2006-01-01

    The most common side effect of at-home bleaching is transient tooth sensitivity. Despite its high frequency, this phenomenon is not well understood. This is the second of a two-part Critical Appraisal on tooth sensitivity associated with at-home bleaching. The first installment reviewed articles that focus on the incidence of sensitivity, long-term effects of bleaching, and related pulpal concerns. This installment also covers pulpal concerns, as well as the prevention of sensitivity during at-home whitening treatments.

  16. An in-vitro study to compare the temperature rise in the pulp chamber by direct method using three different provisional restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piplani, Ankita; Suresh Sajjan, M C; Ramaraju, A V; Tanwani, Tushar; Sushma, G; Ganathipathi, G; Jagdish, K; Agrawal, Anil

    2016-01-01

    The provisional restorative materials in fixed prosthodontics are basically bis-GMA resins which releases exothermic temperature while polymerization which can damage the pulp. Intrapulpal temperature exceeding 42.5°C found to result in irreversible damage to the pulp. The remaining thickness of dentine after tooth preparation control the conduction of heat released by the resins. (1) To quantify the temperature changes in the pulp chamber using different provisional restorative materials. (2) To evaluate the peak temperature time of different materials used. (3) To compare the intrapulpal temperature changes with a variation in the width of the finish line. Two intact mandibular molars were selected and designated as Specimen A and B. Tooth preparation was done to prepare a finish line of 1.2 mm and 1 mm width, respectively. Three provisional restorative materials were considered and they were grouped as Group I-Cool temp, Group II-Protemp-4, Group III-Integrity. A J thermocouple probe was placed into the pulp chamber to determine the rise in temperature. The temperature was recorded during polymerization at 30-s intervals until the peak temperature was reached. The same procedure was repeated for fabricating remaining provisional crowns. A total of 45 provisional crowns were fabricated for each specimen. Kruskal-Wallis test revealed that there was a significant difference in the temperature changes associated with the provisional restorative materials used. All the three provisional restorative materials were compared for 1.2 mm and 1 mm wide finish line. Integrity produced the highest temperature rise and the maximum temperature recorded was 40.2°C in 1.2 mm wide finish line. However, for a 1 mm wide finish line, Protemp-4 produced the highest temperature rise and the maximum temperature recorded was 40.3°C. It was observed that peak temperatures with Specimen B were more when compared with Specimen A. Cool temp showed least temperature rise in the pulp

  17. Management of pulpal floor perforation and grade II Furcation involvement using mineral trioxide aggregate and platelet rich fibrin: A clinical report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhythm Bains

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To report the management of an iatrogenic perforation of pulpal floor in the furcation of mandibular first molar, using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA and platelet rich fibrin (PRF. Unpredictable endodontic root/pulp chamber floor perforations resulting in unacceptable high rate of clinical failure has now been a lesser threat with the advent of new technologies and biocompatible materials that utilize the applications of basic research along with tissue engineering concept in clinical practice. Present case report illustrates the use of MTA and platelet rich fibrin (PRF for the repair of the perforation defect and regeneration of the lost periodontium in furcation area. Although, histologic events and reaction of MTA with PRF is not studied so far, however, the autologous and biocompatible nature of the components used for present treatment modalities seems to be beneficial for the long term clinical results obtained in our case.

  18. Effect of phytic acid used as etchant on bond strength, smear layer, and pulpal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Mohannad; Hiraishi, Noriko; Islam, Md Sofiqul; Aizawa, Mamoru; Tamura, Yukihiko; Otsuki, Masayuki; Kasugai, Shohei; Ohya, Keiichi; Tagami, Junji

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of phytic acid (IP6), used as etchant, on resin-dentin bond strength, smear layer removal, and the viability of pulpal cells. Flat dentin surfaces with smear layer were etched with 1% IP6 for 60, 30, or 15 s; in the control group 37% phosphoric acid (PA) was used. Dentin surfaces were rinsed, blot-dried, and bonded with an etch-and-rinse adhesive, followed by composite build-ups. The specimens were subjected to tensile testing after 24 h of water storage at 37°C, and failure modes were determined using scanning electron microscopy. The effectiveness of IP6 to remove the smear layer was observed using scanning electron microscopy. To evaluate the effect on pulpal cells, solutions of 0.1 and 0.01% IP6 and of 3.7 and 0.37% PA were prepared and rat pulpal cells were treated with these solutions for 6 and 24 h. Cell viability was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The results demonstrated that all application times of IP6 produced bond-strength values that were significantly higher than that of the control. Phytic acid effectively removed the smear layer and plugs, thus exposing the collagen network. Phytic acid had a minimal effect on pulpal cells, whereas PA resulted in a marked decrease in their viability.

  19. Space simulation chambers for complete satellites: High vacuum and extreme temperatures challenges; Camaras de simulacion espacial para satelites completos: los retos de alto vacio y temperaturas extremas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galan, M.; Cazador, M.

    2010-07-01

    During any satellite development phase, many operational factors can only be experimentally determined by testing under the most extreme environmental conditions that will be encountered in its life. Simulating the different temperatures, thermal loads and vacuum conditions allows analyzing the suitability of new materials, components and systems for these extreme conditions. In a space project, thermal vacuum testing reaches 70% of the total testing costs. They are the most similar conditions to the real ones that will be encountered in the outer space.In this article, the function of both the thermal and vacuum subsystems are explained and analyzed.Thermal control units are the most fundamental part in a space simulation chamber; they must cover the required extreme temperature range with the required heating and cooling speed. The vacuum subsystem must allow reaching the required operating pressure within the specified time, handling significant degassing loads both from the satellite and the large exposed surfaces inside the chamber. (Author) 6 refs.

  20. Development and application of a high-temperature sampling probe for burning chamber conditions of fluidized-bed combustion; Korkean laempoetilan naeytteenottosondin kehittaeminen ja soveltaminen leijukerrospolton tulipesaeolosuhteisiin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larjava, K.; Paerkkae, M.; Jormanainen, P.; Roine, J.; Paakkinen, K. [VTT Chemistry, Espoo (Finland); Linna, V. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    A sampling probe for the burning chamber conditions of fluidized-bed combustion will be developed in this project. The probe will be suitable for sampling vaporous heavy and alkali metals and other condensing compounds (e.g. chlorides) as well combustion gases and alternatively also flue gas particles at high temperatures. The knowledge gained with the probe will help understanding, developing and modeling combustion processes and will thus aid the manufacturers of the boilers. (author)

  1. An improved low-temperature equation of state model for integrated IFE target-chamber response simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heltemes, Thad; Moses, Gregory

    2010-11-01

    A new quotidian equation of state model (QEOS) has been developed to perform integrated inertial fusion energy (IFE) target explosion-chamber response simulations. This QEOS model employs a scaled binding energy model for the ion EOS and utilizes both n- and l-splitting for determining the ionization state and electron EOS. This QEOS model, named BADGER, can perform both local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE EOS calculations. BADGER has been integrated with the 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code BUCKY to simulate the chamber response of an exploding indirect-drive deuterium-tritium (DT) target, xenon gas-filled chamber and tungsten first-wall armor. The simulated system is a prototypical configuration for the LIFE reactor study being conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  2. spark chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    A few cosmic rays pass through your body every second of every day, no matter where you are. Look at the spark chamber to your right – every flash is the track made by a cosmic ray from outer space. The spark chamber is filled with a special gas mixture. Cosmic rays knock electrons out of the atoms in the gas. These electrons accelerate towards high voltage metal strips layered throughout the chamber, creating sparks like little bolts of lightning.

  3. spark chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    A few cosmic rays pass through your body every second of every day, no matter where you are. Look at the spark chamber to your right – every flash is the track made by a cosmic ray from outer space. The spark chamber is filled with a special gas mixture. Cosmic rays knock electrons out of the atoms in the gas. These electrons accelerate towards high voltage metal strips layered throughout the chamber, creating sparks like little bolts of lightning.

  4. An in vivo evaluation of the change in the pulpal oxygen saturation after administration of preoperative anxiolytics and local anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Shetty, Krishna; V. Satish, Sarvepalli; Kilaru, Krishnarao; Chakravarthi Ponangi, Kalyana; M. Luke, Alexander; Neshangi, Srisha

    2016-01-01

    Background. Given the influence of systemic blood pressure on pulpal blood flow, anxiolytics prescribed may alter the pulpal blood flow along with the local anesthetic solution containing a vasoconstrictor. This study evaluated the impact of preoperative anxiolytics and vasoconstrictors in local anesthetic agents on pulpal oxygen saturation. Methods. Thirty anxious young healthy individuals with a mean age of 24 years were randomly selected using the Corah’s Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS). After checking the vital signs the initial pulpal oxygen saturation (initial SpO2) was measured using a pulse oximeter. Oral midzolam was administered at a dose of 7.5 mg. After 30 min, the vital signs were monitored and the pulpal oxygen saturation (anxiolytic SpO2) was measured. A total of 1.5 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:200000 epinephrine was administered as buccal infiltration anesthesia and 10 min the final pulpal oxygen saturation (L.A SpO2) was measured. Results. The mean initial (SpO2) was 96.37% which significantly decreased to 90.76% (SpO2) after the administration of the anxiolytic agent. This drop was later accentuated to 85.17% (SpO2) after administration of local anesthetic solution. Statistical significance was set at Pcavity preparation. Therefore, maintaining optimal blood flow during restorative procedures may prevent pulpal injury. PMID:27092212

  5. A multipurpose ultra-high vacuum-compatible chamber for in situ X-ray surface scattering studies over a wide range of temperature and pressure environment conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, P.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Heyman, C.; Esteban-Betegón, F.; Castro, G. R.

    2013-03-01

    A low/high temperature (60-1000K) and pressure (10-10-3x103 mbar) "baby chamber", specially adapted to the grazing-incidence X-ray scattering station, has been designed, developed and installed at the Spanish CRG BM25 SpLine beamline at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The chamber has a cylindrical form with 100 mm of diameter, built on a 360° beryllium nipple of 150 mm height. The UHV equipment and a turbo pump are located on the upper part of the chamber to leave a wide solid angle for exploring reciprocal space. The chamber features 4 CF16 and 5 CF40 ports for electrical feed through and leak valves, ion gun, etc. The heat exchanger is a customized compact LN2 (or LHe) continuous flow cryostat. The sample is mounted on a Mo support on the heat exchanger, which has in the back side a BORALECTRIC® Heater Elements. Experiments of surfaces/interfaces/ multilayer materials, thin films or single crystals in a huge variety of environments can be performed, also in situ studies of growth or evolution of the samples. Data measurement can be collected with a punctual and a bi-dimensional detector, being possible to simultaneously use them.

  6. Variable temperature effects of Open Top Chambers at polar and alpine sites explained by irradiance and snow depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhorst, S.; Huiskes, A.; Aerts, R.; Convey, P.; Cooper, E.J.; Dalen, L.; Erschbamer, B.; Gudmundsson, J.; Hofgaard, H.; Hollister, R.D.; Johnstone, J.; Jónsdóttir, I.S.; Lebouvier, M.; Van de Vijver, B.; Wahren, C.-H.; Dorrepaal, E.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental manipulation studies are integral to determining biological consequences of climate warming. Open Top Chambers (OTCs) have been widely used to assess summer warming effects on terrestrial biota, with their effects during other seasons normally being given less attention even though cha

  7. The Mobile Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  8. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Proportional multi-wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle. Proportional wire chambers allow a much quicker reading than the optical or magnetoscriptive readout wire chambers.

  9. Study in vitro of dental enamel irradiated with a high power diode laser operating at 960 nm: morphological analysis of post-irradiation dental surface and thermal effect analysis in pulp chamber due to laser application; Estudo in vitro do esmalte dental irradiado com laser de diodo de alta potencia em 960 nm: analise morfologica da superficie dental pos-irradiada e analise do comportamento termico na camara pulpar devido a aplicacao laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinto Junior, Jose

    2001-07-01

    Objectives: This study examines the structural and thermal modifications induced in dental enamel under dye assisted diode laser irradiation. The aim of this study is to verify if this laser-assisted treatment is capable to modify the enamel surface by causing fusion of the enamel surface layer. At the same time, the pulpal temperature rise must be kept low enough in order not to cause pulpar necrosis. To achieve this target, it is necessary to determine suitable laser parameters. As is known, fusion of the enamel surface followed by re-solidification produce a more acid resistant layer. This surface treatment is being researched as a new method for caries prevention. Method and Materials: A series of fourteen identically prepared enamel samples of human teeth were irradiated with a high power diode laser operating at 960 nm and using fiber delivery. Prior to irradiation, a fine layer of cromophorous ink was applied to the enamel surface. In the first part of the experiment the best parameter for pulse duration was determined. In the second part of the experimental phase the same energy density was used but with different repetition rates. During irradiation we monitored the temperature rise in the pulpal cavity. The morphology of the treated samples was analysed under SEM. Results: The morphology of the treated samples showed a homogeneously re-solidified enamel layer. The results of the temperature analysis showed a decrease of the pulpal temperature rise with decreasing repetition rate. Conclusion: With the diode laser it is possible to cause morphological alterations of the enamel surface, which is known to increase the enamel resistance against acid attack, and still maintain the temperature rise in the pulpar chamber below damage threshold. (author)

  10. Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  11. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber.Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  12. Development and application of a high-temperature sampling probe for burning chamber conditions in fluidized-bed combustion; Korkean laempoetilan naeytteenottosondin kehittaeminen ja soveltaminen leijukerrospolton tulipesaeolosuhteisiin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larjava, K.; Paerkkae, M. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Linna, V. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Environmental Technology

    1997-10-01

    Determination of heavy and alkali metals and other condensing compounds (e.g. chlorides) in combustion chamber conditions is limited by the poor suitability of traditional methods for sampling at high temperatures. IFRF has developed a high-temperature sampling probe for sampling HCN and NH{sub 3}, which has been tested for sampling of NH{sub 3} by Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. VTT Chemical Technology and Chalmers University of Technology have in their preliminary experiments determined contents of vaporous heavy metals in the combustion chamber of a 12 MW circulating fluidized-bed boiler using this probe. According to the results, the modified probe is suitable for heavy metal determination in combustion chamber. Based on this series of experiments, modification of the probe has been started on the own financing of VTT Chemical Technology and a field measurement was performed in November 1994 to test the present version of the probe. Based on the results of that measurement, the probe has been modified further on as a part of this LIEKKI 2 project. Similar kind of a principle has been applied in the probe which has been developed by VTT Energy during 1994. The probe is built for determination of gas composition of fluidized bed in full-scale boilers. The purpose of this project is to develop and test a sampling probe for fluidized bed combustion. The main advantage of the probe is that condensation losses in sampling due to high temperature gradients can be avoided. Thus, the probe is very suitable for sampling vaporous heavy and alkali metals and other condensing species as well as burning gases and alternatively also solids at high temperatures

  13. Numerical Simulation of 3—D Temperature Distribution of the Flame Tube of the Combustion Chamber with Air Film COoling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChangHaiping; HuangTaiping; 等

    1996-01-01

    The wall temperature distribution of the flame tube of the combustion chamber is strongly affected by the combustion,radiation and flow.The interaction of these influential factors froms a coupling system.In this paper,a new method,which is different from the previous methods,has been developed for calcuating the temperature distribution of the flame tube wall together with the flow field inside and outside the flame tube,In the calculation.the combustion,heat radiation,cooling air film and injection stream mixing inside the flame tube as well as the secondary air flowing outside the flame tube have been simulated.The calculation,in this paper,uses the SIMPLE algorithm,the κ-εturbulence model and the auto-adjustable damping method .By using this method ,the 3-D temperature distribution of the floame tube wall of the combustion chamber of an aeroengine has been simulated successfully.The calculation results are compared to the experimetal data.The error of wall temperature is less than 10%.

  14. Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1986-01-01

    Two wire chambers made originally for the R807 Experiment at CERN's Intersecting Storage Rings. In 1986 they were used for the PS 201 experiment (Obelix Experiment) at LEAR, the Low Energy Antiproton Ring. The group of researchers from Turin, using the chambers at that time, changed the acquisition system using for the first time 8 bit (10 bit non linear) analog to digital conversion for incoming signals from the chambers. The acquisition system was controlled by 54 CPU and 80 digital signal processors. The power required for all the electronics was 40 kW. For the period, this system was one of the most powerful on-line apparatus in the world. The Obelix Experiment was closed in 1996. To find more about how a wire chamber works, see the description for object CERN-OBJ-DE-038.

  15. Prevalence of Referred Pain with Pulpal Origin in the Head, Face and Neck Region

    OpenAIRE

    Mardani, Siamak; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Baharvand, Maryam

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of referred pain with pulpal source in the head, face and neck region among patients referred to Dental School of Shahid Beheshti University MC, Tehran, Iran in 2004. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 100 patients (55 males and 45 females) referred to oral medicine department of Shahid Beheshti Dental School evaluated via clinical and radiographic examination to seek their pain sources and sites. Inclusion cr...

  16. Influence of orthodontic derotation and extrusion on pulpal and periodontal condition of autotransplanted immature third molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauss, Oskar; Schwestka-Polly, Rainer; Kiliaridis, Stavros

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of orthodontic treatment on the pulpal and periodontal condition of 91 transplanted immature third molars. In patients with atrophy of the alveolar process or unfavorable root morphology, transplants had to be placed in extreme rotated or infraoccluded positions. After 3 to 6 months, these transplants were derotated (45 degrees to 90 degrees) to a correct position in the dental arch (derotation group; n = 28) or extruded to the occlusal plane (extrusion group; n = 21). Finally, approximal spaces were closed in both groups. A sample of 42 transplanted third molars with no orthodontic treatment need served as the control group. All transplants were followed clinically and radiologically for a mean period of 4.0 years. With respect to pulpal and periodontal conditions, no significant differences were observed between the control and the extrusion group. In contrast, compared with the control group, transplants in the derotation group had a significantly poorer pulpal and periodontal condition. In the derotated transplants, a significant correlation was detected between pulp necrosis and orthodontic treatment of multi-rooted transplants. This study indicates that orthodontic extrusion and minor lateral movements of autotransplanted immature third molars, as well as rotation of single-rooted third-molar transplants, represent no additional risk to transplant survival. In contrast, rotation of multi-rooted transplants seems to initiate later severance of the vascular and nerval supply to the pulp.

  17. Maintenance of pulpal vitality in a tooth with deep caries: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massara, Maria Lourdes de Andrade; Tavares, Warley Luciano Fonseca; Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Deep caries can induce severe inflammatory reactions. However, inflamed pulp can heal if the demineralization process is interrupted and inactivated sufficiently early. The aim of this case report is to describe the use of stepwise excavation to treat a mature permanent tooth that exhibited deep caries and apical periodontitis. A 12-year-old girl was experiencing lingering pain lasting for a few minutes in the mandibular left second molar when drinking cold water. Clinical and radiographic examinations suggested that a conservative therapeutic approach could be successful. The tooth was anesthetized and isolated, and the unsupported enamel was removed. The remaining affected dentin was left on the pulpal floor, which was protected by a thin layer of calcium hydroxide cement. The tooth was sealed with temporary cement. Three months later, pulpal sensitivity was reduced. The pulp was found to be healthy at a 9-month follow-up examination. The cavity was definitively restored with glass ionomer cement and composite resin applied with the sandwich technique. At the 4-year follow-up, the tooth remained functional, presenting standard color and satisfactory restoration. The periodontal tissues were healthy, and radiographic images indicated that the width of the periodontal ligament space was normal. This case demonstrates that clinical diagnosis should prevail over radiographic findings, even in cases where a radiographic widening of the periodontal ligament space suggests irreversible pulpal damage.

  18. [The reaction of the pulpal blood circulation to thermal stimuli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gängler, P

    1976-01-01

    The present paper characterizes the reactions of the systemcirculation and microcirculation of the pulpa to the effects of temperature changes from--30 degrees C to +55 degrees C. In the range between 25 degrees C and 50 degrees C an increase of the blood flow rate can be observed. By long-standing action of temperatures above 40 degrees C and below 25 degrees C a dilatation of the blood vessels and a decrease of the blood flow rate are caused, thus leading to aggregations, capillary stoppage, and finally to thrombosis of entire pulpa sections. In addition to the outline of the critical initial alterations of the microcirculation in the course of inflammation the clinical conclusions towards crown and cavity preparation by means of water spray cooling, concerning thermal sensibility tests, and cryo-surgical operations are discussed.

  19. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  20. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in ISR (Intersecting Storage Ring) split field magnet experiment. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  1. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  2. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  3. Multi-use high/low-temperature and pressure compatible portable chamber for in situ grazing-incidence X-ray scattering studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Pilar; Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Heyman, Catherine; Esteban-Betegón, Fatima; Castro, Germán R

    2013-05-01

    The multipurpose portable ultra-high-vacuum-compatible chamber described in detail in this article has been designed to carry out grazing-incidence X-ray scattering techniques on the BM25-SpLine CRG beamline at the ESRF. The chamber has a cylindrical form, built on a 360° beryllium double-ended conflate flange (CF) nipple. The main advantage of this chamber design is the wide sample temperature range, which may be varied between 60 and 1000 K. Other advantages of using a cylinder are that the wall thickness is reduced to a minimum value, keeping maximal solid angle accessibility and keeping wall absorption of the incoming X-ray beam constant. The heat exchanger is a customized compact liquid-nitrogen (LN2) continuous-flow cryostat. LN2 is transferred from a storage Dewar through a vacuum-isolated transfer line to the heat exchanger. The sample is mounted on a molybdenum support on the heat exchanger, which is equipped with a BORALECTRIC heater element. The chamber versatility extends to the operating pressure, ranging from ultra-high vacuum (<10(-10) mbar) to high pressure (up to 3 × 10(3) mbar). In addition, it is equipped with several CF ports to allocate auxiliary components such as capillary gas-inlet, viewports, leak valves, ion gun, turbo pump, etc., responding to a large variety of experiment requirements. A movable slits set-up has been foreseen to reduce the background and diffuse scattering produced at the beryllium wall. Diffraction data can be recorded either with a point detector or with a bi-dimensional CCD detector, or both detectors simultaneously. The system has been designed to carry out a multitude of experiments in a large variety of environments. The system feasibility is demonstrated by showing temperature-dependence grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction and conductivity measurements on a 20 nm-thick La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 thin film grown on a SrTiO3(001) substrate.

  4. 离心-温度复合试验箱温度场模拟分析%Simulation on Temperature Fields of a Test Chamber Combined by Centrifugal Situation and Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵智忠; 孟晓风; 赵晓明

    2014-01-01

    对离心-温度复合试验箱中离心环境对温度场均匀性影响进行了模拟研究,并分析了结构条件对温度均匀性的改善效果。研究了离心-温度复合条件下的控制方程,以此为基础采用有限元分析的方法,对不同结构条件的温度场分析了温度均匀性差异,并提出了进一步改善温度均匀性的方法。结果表明,离心环境下的科氏力对空气流场轴向运动的影响会导致试验箱内温度均匀性差异,试验箱中加入风扇和导流装置能够有效改善内部温度均匀性。%The effect of centrifugal situation on temperature fields of a test chamber combined by centrifugal situation and temperature is simulated and researched. The improvement of structural modification on the evenness of temperature fields was also studied. On the basis of hy-drodynamic heat transfer equations, the condition of temperature fields in the test chamber was simulated in the condition of centrifugal accelera-tions with and without structural modification by using finite element analysis method. The differences of temperature fields evenness were ana-lyzed and the improvement methods were proposed. The results show that Coriolis component of centrifugal acceleration can affect the axial distri-bution of fluid field in the test chamber, which is responsible for the unevenness of temperature fields. The installation of convection fan and flow guiding device can effectively improve the evenness of temperature fields of the test chamber under centrifugal acceleration condition.

  5. HISTOLOGICINVESTIGATION OF PULPAL INFLAMMATION AND NECROSIS ON TRUMATIZED OPEN APEX CAT CANINE TEETH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA KHADEMI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Interoduction. Treatment of trumatized crown fractured teeth with open apex is a major problem in endodontic treatment. Long term stability of such teeth depends upon the maintainace of pulp vitality. The time period between the accident and the treatment affects the pulp vitality as well as the type of treatment and prognosis. The objective of this study was to provide a rough time table of pulpal inflammation and necrosis after the exposure of crow - fractured teeth to oral Environment. Methods. Fourty eight canine teeth in 12 young cats were used in this experiment. To make sure the teeth apecies were all open, they were checked by radiograph. The crown of all the teeth were cut 2mm from the CEJ and the pulps were left open to oral inviornment for periods of 1, 3, 7, 14, 28, 90 days. Animals were then sacrificed by vital perfusion fixation technique. Results. The mean depth of pulpal inflammation and necrosis for periods of 1, 3, 7, 14, 28 and 90 days were 1.98, 3.3, 2.39, 2.84, 3.92 and 8.57, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the time periods of 1, 7 and 14 days. Where as, time periods of 14 and 28 days showed significant difference. In 90 day time period, all the teeth showed total pulpal necrosis and was significantly different from all the other groups. Discussion. It appears that, trumatized open apex teeth exposed to oral Enviornment for less than 28 days could be well treated by apexogenesis. Considering the sufficient blood supply to open apex teeth in cases of deep inflammation and necrosis the teeth could be saved by partial pulpectomy. Only cases of total pulp necrosis should be treated by apexification technique.

  6. Observations on pulpal response to carbon dioxide laser drilling of dentine in healthy human third molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, P N R; Baltensperger, M; Luder, H U; Eyrich, G K H

    2005-01-01

    Preservation of pulpal health is the primary prerequisite for successful application of laser systems in the hard tissue management of vital teeth. The purpose of this study was to investigate the short and long-term pulpal effects to cavity preparations in healthy human teeth using carbon dioxide (CO2) laser. A total of seven, healthy, third molars that were scheduled to be removed due to space problems were used. After the laser drilling, the occlusal cavities were closed temporarily, and the teeth were extracted 7 days (n=5) and 3 months (n=2) after the operation. The specimens were fixed, decalcified, subdivided and processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. Seven days postoperatively all the five teeth that had been irradiated with the CO2 laser did not reveal any pathological changes in the pulpo-dentine complex. Three months postoperatively the two teeth that were prepared with the laser showed subtle but distinct apposition of tertiary dentine that was lined with intact odontoblasts. One of the specimens at 3 months revealed the presence of a mild, but very circumscribed, pulpal infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells subjacent to the cavity preparation. The latter is unlikely to be due to a direct effect of the laser irradiation but a possible consequence of microleakage of oral antigens and/or other tissue-irritating molecules through the temporary restoration and the remaining dentine thickness (RDT). Although these preliminary histological results suggest that the CO2 laser under investigation induced only minimal response of the dentine-pulp complex when used as a hard-tissue drilling tool, with specific energy settings, pulse duration within thermal relaxation time and emitting radiations at 9.6 microm of wavelength, larger clinical trials involving various types of teeth are necessary to reach definite conclusions for large-scale clinical application of the laser device.

  7. Variação térmica da câmara pulpar e do gel clareador bloqueador de infravermelho ativado com lâmpada halógena = Temperature changes of pulpal chamber and infrared-blocking bleaching gel activated with halogen light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Avaliar a temperatura da câmara pulpar (CP e do gel clareador bloqueador de infravermelho na superfície dental (SUP, durante a ativação com fotopolimerizadores com lâmpadas halógenas que emitem radiação na faixa do infravermelho (IV. Metodologia: Os géis clareadores Whiteness HP Maxx (com bloqueador de IV – MX e Whiteness HP (controle – CON foram aplicados em 10 incisivos centrais superiores. A ativação com luz foi realizada com os fotopolimerizadores (FP Optilight (600mW/cm2, OP e Jet Lite (1200mW/cm2, JL, sendo quatro ativações de 40s, sem intervalo (total de 3min e 20s. As temperaturas foram aferidas a cada 40s com um termômetro digital com dois termopares tipo K, um no interior da CP e outro na superfície dental (SUP. Os dados foram analisados com ANOVA a 3 fatores (tipo de gel – TG, FP e tempo de ativação e teste de Tukey. Resultados: Houve efeito significativo de TG e FP e para a interação FP/TG. As médias (DP (em graus Celsius foram: PC: [GT={MX-6,38(3,25a, CON-7,70(2,91b}, FC={OP- 5,51(2,54a, JL-8,56(2,93b}]; SUR: [GT={CON-9,85(3,89a, MX-14,21(7,76b}, FC={OP-7,32(2,50a, JL-16,74(5,82b}]. Conclusões: O gel bloqueador de IV resultou em menor aquecimento da CP e maior aquecimento do gel que o controle. O FP Jet Lite promoveu maior aquecimento que o Optilight

  8. Critical appraisal. In-office tooth whitening: pulpal effects and tooth sensitivity issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, So Ran; Swift, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    In-office bleaching is an effective method for whitening teeth.Tooth sensitivity associated with in-office whitening is reversible and may range from mild to considerable. The incidence and severity of tooth sensitivity can be reduced by pretreatment with a desensitizer such as potassium nitrate. Histologic studies and clinical studies on long-term pulpal effects are lacking to definitively support the safety of in-office tooth whitening. Future studies on the etiology of tooth sensitivity related to whitening might greatly improve the means of preventing and managing this side effect.

  9. Measurements of VOC/SVOC emission factors from burning incenses in an environmental test chamber: influence of temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoukian, A; Buiron, D; Temime-Roussel, B; Wortham, H; Quivet, E

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the influence of three environmental indoor parameters (i.e., temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rate) on the emission of 13 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) during incense burning. Experiments have been carried out using an environmental test chamber. Statistical results from a classical two-level full factorial design highlight the predominant effect of ventilation on emission factors. The higher the ventilation, the higher the emission factor. Moreover, thanks to these results, an estimation of the concentration range for the compounds under study can be calculated and allows a quick look of indoor pollution induced by incense combustion. Carcinogenic substances (i.e., benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, and formaldehyde) produced from the incense combustion would be predicted in typical living indoors conditions to reach instantaneous concentration levels close to or higher than air quality exposure threshold values.

  10. In vitro microtensile bond strength of four adhesives tested at the gingival and pulpal walls of class II restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purk, John H.; Healy, Matthew; Dusevich, Vladimir; Glaros, Alan; Eick, J. David

    2007-01-01

    Background The authors compared the microtensile bond strength of teeth restored with four adhesives at the gingival and pulpal cavity walls of Class II resin-based composite restorations. Methods Five pairs of extracted third molars received two Class II preparations/restorations in each tooth. The authors randomly assigned each preparation to one of four adhesive groups: Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Dental Adhesive (SBMP) (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.), Clearfil SE Bond (CFSE) (Kuraray America, New York City), Prime & Bond NT (PBNT) (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, Del.) and PQ1 (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah). They restored the teeth and obtained microtensile specimens from each cavity wall. Specimens were tested on a testing machine until they failed. Results The mean (± standard deviation) bond strengths (in megapascals) were as follows: SBMP (pulpal), 36.4 (17.2); SBMP (gingival), 29.7 (15.3); CFSE (pulpal), 50.8 (13.6); CFSE (gingival), 50.2 (14.0); PBNT (pulpal), 38.3 (19.2); PBNT (gingival), 38.9 (17.7); PQ1 (pulpal), 58.7 (8.7); and PQ1 (gingival), 54.5 (18.5). A two-way analysis of variance found an adhesive effect (P .05). Conclusions PQ1 and CFSE performed the best. The results showed no significant difference in microtensile bond strength at the gingival wall versus the pulpal wall. Clinical Implications Under in vitro conditions, a total-etch ethanol-based adhesive (PQ1) failed cohesively more often than did the other adhesives tested. PMID:17012721

  11. Pulsed electric field technology: Modeling of electric field and temperature distributions within continuous flow PEF treatment chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Salengke, dkk

    2012-01-01

    Innovations and technology developments in the field of food pasteurization and sterilization are continuously evolving. These include innovations in thermal processing technologies such as aseptic processing, ohmic technology, and microwave technology, as well as non-thermal processing technologies which include pulsed electric field technology and high pressure processing technology. This paper discussed the results of a study on mathematical modeling of electric field and temperature distr...

  12. Experimentally Induced Pulpal Lesion and Substance P Expression: Effect of Ketoprofen—A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Marco Abbate

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate substance P (SP and the effect of ketoprofen administration, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, on SP in the pulp of upper third molars with experimentally induced pulpal lesion. Materials and Methods. A sample of 20 young systemically healthy adults of both sexes, nonsmokers, with a healthy upper third molar to extract for orthodontic purposes, was selected. Prior to the procedure, an inflammatory process was generated by mechanical exposure of the pulp. After 15 minutes, the pulp was collected using a sterile barbed broach. SP levels were determined by using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay (ELISA kit. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups: group 1 received a dose of ketoprofen 30 minutes prior to the experimental procedure. The subjects of group 2 did not receive any kind of drug administration. The patients were asked to complete a diary on the postoperative pain. Results. No statistically significant difference could be detected in SP expression between the two groups. In group 1, pain manifestation was significantly delayed in comparison with group 2. Conclusions. Preventive administration of ketoprofen did not significantly affect the pulpal levels of SP but resulted in a significantly postponed manifestation of pain after extraction.

  13. Temperature Optimized Ammonia and Ethanol Sensing Using Ce Doped Tin Oxide Thin Films in a Novel Flow Metric Gas Sensing Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Govardhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple process of gas sensing is represented here using Ce doped tin oxide nanomaterial based thin film sensor. A novel flow metric gas chamber has been designed and utilized for gas sensing. Doping plays a vital role in enhancing the sensing properties of nanomaterials. Ce doped tin oxide was prepared by hydrothermal method and the same has been used to fabricate a thin film for sensing. The microstructure and morphology of the prepared materials were analysed by SEM, XRD, and FTIR analysis. The SEM images clearly show that doping can clamp down the growth of the large crystallites and can lead to large agglomeration spheres. Thin film gas sensors were formed from undoped pure SnO2 and Ce doped SnO2. The sensors were exposed to ammonia and ethanol gases. The responses of the sensors to different concentrations (50–500 ppm of ammonia and ethanol at different operating temperatures (225°C–500°C were studied. Results show that a good sensitivity towards ammonia was obtained with Ce doped SnO2 thin film sensor at an optimal operating temperature of 325°C. The Ce doped sensor also showed good selectivity towards ammonia when compared with ethanol. Pure SnO2 showed good sensitivity with ethanol when compared with Ce doped SnO2 thin film sensor. Response time of the sensor and its stability were also studied.

  14. Development of a generally valid model for calculating combustion chamber wall temperatures in internal combustion engines. Wall temperature model - final report; Entwicklung eines allgemeingueltigen Modells zur Berechnung der Brennraumwandtemperaturen bei Verbrennungsmotoren. Wandtemperaturmodell - Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manz, P. [Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg (Germany); Bargende, M.; Sargenti, R. [Stuttgart Univ. (DE). Inst. fuer Verbrennungsmotoren und Kraftfahrwesen (IVK)

    2004-07-01

    Starting from the literature research in the FVV-Project 722, the objective of this project was set on the development of a universally valid model for the calculation of wall temperatures in combustion engines. To reach this target, intensive research work was necessary to improve the simple zero-dimensional modeling of the in-cylinder processes. For this reason, a 2.3 l Otto-engine was fitted with thermocouples in a manner to permit accurate measurements of wall temperatures of both cylinder liner wall and cylinder head. To allow for the calculation of the thermodynamic boundary conditions of the gas phase using a pressure history analysis, the engine was indicated in all four cylinders. The parameters cooling liquid temperature and oil temperature were highly varied to examine their influence on the wall temperature. Simultaneous to the test bench measurements, the components for the numerical calculation of the wall temperature were programmed and analyzed. The modular description of the combustion chamber enables modelling of an arbitrary combustion engine. For the calculation of the influence of the gas phase heat, the working process analyses was performed by an external simulation program. The wall temperature model can be used as an independent tool as well as an integrated part of a coupled simulation. In a pressure history analysis the wall temperatures needed for the calculation of the wall heat can be determined precisely. In case of a coupling with a one-dimensional simulation tool, the wall temperature model is used for an iterative calculation of the wall temperatures and the wall heat fluxes. Due to the possibility of an arbitrary discretisation of the cylinder liner, this model can also be applied to a three-dimensional simulation for the initial calculation of the boundary conditions. (orig.)

  15. Chamber transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  16. Effects of ambient temperature and oxygen concentration on diesel spray combustion using a single-nozzle injector in a constant volume combustion chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Jing, Wei

    2013-09-02

    This work investigates the effects of ambient conditions on diesel spray combustion in an optically accessible, constant volume chamber using a single-nozzle fuel injector. The ambient O2 concentration was varied between five discrete values from 10% to 21% and three different ambient temperatures (800 K, 1000 K, and 1200 K). These conditions simulate different exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) levels and ambient temperatures in diesel engines. Both conventional diesel combustion and low temperature combustion (LTC) modes were observed under these conditions. A transient analysis and a quasi-steady state analysis are employed in this article. The transient analysis focuses on the flame development from beginning to the end, illustrating how the flame structure changes during this process; the quasi-steady state analysis focuses on the stable flame structure. The transient analysis was conducted using high-speed imaging of both OH* chemiluminescence and natural luminosity (NL). In addition, three different images were acquired using an ICCD camera, corresponding to OH* chemiluminescence, narrow-band flame emission at 430 nm (Band A) and at 470 nm (Band B), and were used to investigate the quasi-steady state combustion process. From the transient analysis, it was found that the NL signal becomes stronger and confined to narrow regions when the temperature and O2 concentration increase during the development of flame. The OH* intensity is much lower for the 10% ambient O2 and 800 K conditions compared to the higher temperatures and O2 levels. This implies the occurrence of LTC under these conditions. Results from the quasi-steady combustion stage indicate that high-temperature reactions effectively oxidize the soot in the downstream locations where only OH* signal is observed. In addition, an area was calculated for each spectral region, and results show that the area of Band A and Band B emissions in these images is larger than the area of OH* emissions at the lower O2

  17. Examination of Surface Temperature Modification by Open-Top Chambers along Moisture and Latitudinal Gradients in Arctic Alaska Using Thermal Infrared Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C. Healey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive warming manipulation methodologies, such as open-top chambers (OTCs, are a meaningful approach for interpretation of impacts of climate change on the Arctic tundra biome. The magnitude of OTC warming has been studied extensively, revealing an average plot-level warming of air temperature that ranges between 1 and 3 °C as measured by shielded resistive sensors or thermocouples. Studies have also shown that the amount of OTC warming depends in part on location climate, vegetation, and soil properties. While digital infrared thermometers have been employed in a few comparisons, most of the focus of the effectiveness of OTC warming has been on air or soil temperature rather than tissue or surface temperatures, which directly translate to metabolism. Here we used thermal infrared (TIR photography to quantify tissue and surface temperatures and their spatial variability at a previously unavailable resolution (3–6 mm2. We analyzed plots at three locations that are part of the International Tundra Experiment (ITEX-Arctic Observing Network (AON-ITEX network along both moisture and latitudinal gradients spanning from the High Arctic (Barrow, AK, USA to the Low Arctic (Toolik Lake, AK, USA. Our results show a range of OTC surface warming from 2.65 to 1.27 °C (31%–10% at our three sites. The magnitude of surface warming detected by TIR imagery in this study was comparable to increases in air temperatures previously reported for these sites. However, the thermal images revealed wide ranges of surface temperatures within the OTCs, with some surfaces well above ambient unevenly distributed within the plots under sunny conditions. We note that analyzing radiometric temperature may be an alternative for future studies that examine data acquired at the same time of day from sites that are in close geographic proximity to avoid the requirement of emissivity or atmospheric correction for validation of results. We foresee future studies using TIR

  18. In vitro Effects of Ice, Skin Refrigerant, and CO2 Snow on Intra-Pulpal Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-11

    Seltzer , Bender , and Ziontz 5 showed that both electrical pulp tests and thermal tests using ice or ethyl chloride were unreliable based upon...1968. 5. Seltzer , S.; Bender , I.B.; and Ziontz, M. The dynamics of pulp inflanuuation:correlations between diagnostic data and actual histologic findings

  19. Exposed Dentin: Influence of Cleaning Procedures and Simulated Pulpal Pressure on Bond Strength of a Universal Adhesive System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare various pre-treatments serving as cleaning procedures of dentin on the bond strength of resin composite promoted by a universal adhesive system applied either in the absence or presence of simulated pulpal pressure. Materials and Methods Prior to application of the adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal) and resin composite (Filtek Z250), ground dentin surfaces were given one of five pre-treatments either without or with simulated pulpal pressure: 1) no pre-treatment, adhesive system in “self-etch” mode, 2) phosphoric acid etching, adhesive system in “total-etch” mode, 3) polishing with pumice on prophylaxis cup, 4) air abrasion with AIR-FLOW PLUS powder, 5) air abrasion with AIR-FLOW PERIO powder; n = 20/group of pre-treatment. After storage (37°C, 100% humidity, 24 h), micro shear bond strength was measured and data analyzed with parametric ANOVA including Bonferroni-Holm correction for multiple testing followed by Student’s t tests (significance level: α = 0.05). Results The ANOVA found type of pre-treatment and simulated pulpal pressure to have no significant effect on dentin bond strength. The explorative post-hoc tests showed a negative effect of simulated pulpal pressure for phosphoric acid etching (adhesive system in “total-etch” mode; p = 0.020), but not for the other four pre-treatments (all p = 1.000). Conclusion Air abrasion with powders containing either erythritol and chlorhexidine (AIR-FLOW PLUS) or glycine (AIR-FLOW PERIO) yielded dentin bond strengths similar to no pre-treatment, phosphoric acid etching, or polishing with pumice. Simulated pulpal pressure reduced the bond strength only when the self-etch adhesive system was used in total-etch mode. PMID:28081572

  20. Pulsed Nd: YAG laser induces pulpal analgesia: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, A; Armati, P; Moorthy, A P

    2012-07-01

    This double-blind, randomized, clinical trial investigated the effectiveness and underlying mechanism of neural inhibition of pulsed Nd:YAG laser induction of pulpal analgesia compared with 5% EMLA anesthetic cream. Forty-four paired premolars from 44 orthodontic patients requiring bilateral premolar extraction from either dental arch were randomly assigned to the 'Laser plus Sham-EMLA' or 'EMLA plus Sham-Laser' treatment group. Analgesia was tested by an Electric Pulp Tester (EPT) and the cutting of a standardized cavity, which was terminated when participants reported sensitivity, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and numbness were recorded. Statistical analyses were done by paired t test, McNemar's test, and a chi-squared test (p analgesia, by suppression of intradental nerve responses to electrical and mechanical stimuli. Such a laser provides an alternative for dental pain management (ANZ-Clinical Trial Registry: N12611001099910).

  1. Human pulpal response to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA): a histologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Varghese; Kurikose, Sobha

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to study the histologic changes in the dental pulp following pulpotomy with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and Calcium hydroxide. Pulpotomies were performed on premolar teeth that were to be extracted for orthodontic reasons. The radicular pulp was capped with either MTA or Calcium hydroxide and restored with IRM. The teeth were extracted at 4 and 8 week intervals, fixed in 10% formalin and then kept in 5% nitric acid for 28 days for demineralization. Longitudinal sections were then prepared and viewed under light microscope. The pulps capped with MTA (at the end of 4 weeks and 8 weeks) showed dentin bridge formation which was more homogenous and continuous with the original dentin when compared to the pulps capped with calcium hydroxide. The pulpal inflammation was also less in the MTA group as compared to the calcium hydroxide group at the end of 4 and 8 weeks.

  2. Cytotoxicity and Osteogenic Potential of Silicate Calcium Cements as Potential Protective Materials for Pulpal Revascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, Eduardo A.; Niu, Li-na; Palani, Chithra D.; El-Awady, Ahmed R.; Hammond, Barry D.; Pei, Dan-dan; Tian, Fu-cong; Cutler, Christopher W.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In pulpal revascularization, a protective material is placed coronal to the blood clot to prevent recontamination and to facilitate osteogenic differentiation of mesenchynal stem cells to produce new dental tissues. Although mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been the material of choice for clot protection, it is easily displaced into the clot during condensation. The present study evaluated the effects of recently-introduced calcium silicate cements (Biodentine and TheraCal LC) on the viability and osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) by comparing with MTA Angelus. Methods Cell viability was assessed using XTT assay and flow cytometry. The osteogenic potential of hDPSCs exposed to calcium silicate cements was examined using qRT-PCR for osteogeic gene expressions, alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity, Alizarin red S staining and transmission electron microscopy of extracellular calcium deposits. Parametric statistical methods were employed for analyses of significant difference among groups, with α=0.05. Results The cytotoxic effects of Biodentine and TheraCal LC on hDPSCs were time- and concentration-dependent. Osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs was enhanced after exposure to Biodentine that was depleted of its cytotoxic components. This effect was less readily observed in hDPSCs exposed to TheraCal LC, although both cements supported extracelluar mineralization better than the positive control (zinc oxide-eugenol–based cement). Significance A favorable tissue response is anticipated to occur with the use of Biodentine as a blood clot-protecting material for pulpal revascularizaiton. Further investigations with the use of in vivo animal models are required to validate the potential adverse biological effects of TheraCal LC on hDPSCs. PMID:26494267

  3. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This

  4. Doriot Climatic Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Doriot Climatic Chambers are two, 60-feet long, 11-feet high, 15-feet wide chambers that are owned and operated by NSRDEC. The Doriot Climatic Chambers are among...

  5. Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber comprises a power anechoic chamber and one transverse electromagnetic cell for characterizing radiofrequency (RF) responses of...

  6. Mechanisms underlying ectopic persistent tooth-pulp pain following pulpal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Shingo; Shimizu, Kohei; Shinoda, Masamichi; Ohara, Kinuyo; Ogiso, Bunnai; Honda, Kuniya; Katagiri, Ayano; Sessle, Barry J; Urata, Kentaro; Iwata, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    In order to clarify the peripheral mechanisms of ectopic persistent pain in a tooth pulp following pulpal inflammation of an adjacent tooth, masseter muscle activity, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (pERK) and TRPV1 immunohistochemistries and satellite cell activation using glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunohistochemistry in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) were studied in the rats with molar tooth-pulp inflammation. And, Fluorogold (FG) and DiI were also used in a neuronal tracing study to analyze if some TG neurons innervate more than one tooth pulp. Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or saline was applied into the upper first molar tooth pulp (M1) in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, and capsaicin was applied into the upper second molar tooth pulp (M2) on day 3 after the CFA or saline application. Mean EMG activity elicited in the masseter muscle by capsaicin application to M2 was significantly larger in M1 CFA-applied rats compared with M1 vehicle-applied rats. The mean number of pERK-immunoreactive (IR) TG cells was significantly larger in M1 CFA-applied rats compared with M1 vehicle-applied rats. Application of the satellite cell inhibitor fluorocitrate (FC) into TG caused a significant depression of capsaicin-induced masseter muscle activity and a significant reduction of satellite cell activation. The number of TRPV1-IR TG cells innervating M2 was significantly larger in M1 CFA-applied rats compared with M1 vehicle-applied rats, and that was decreased following FC injection into TG. Furthermore, 6% of TG neurons innervating M1 and/or M2 innervated both M1 and M2. These findings suggest that satellite cell activation following tooth pulp inflammation and innervation of multiple tooth pulps by single TG neurons may be involved in the enhancement of the activity of TG neurons innervating adjacent non-inflamed teeth that also show enhancement of TRPV1 expression in TG neurons, resulting in the ectopic persistent tooth-pulp pain

  7. Mechanisms underlying ectopic persistent tooth-pulp pain following pulpal inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Matsuura

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the peripheral mechanisms of ectopic persistent pain in a tooth pulp following pulpal inflammation of an adjacent tooth, masseter muscle activity, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (pERK and TRPV1 immunohistochemistries and satellite cell activation using glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP immunohistochemistry in the trigeminal ganglion (TG were studied in the rats with molar tooth-pulp inflammation. And, Fluorogold (FG and DiI were also used in a neuronal tracing study to analyze if some TG neurons innervate more than one tooth pulp. Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA or saline was applied into the upper first molar tooth pulp (M1 in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, and capsaicin was applied into the upper second molar tooth pulp (M2 on day 3 after the CFA or saline application. Mean EMG activity elicited in the masseter muscle by capsaicin application to M2 was significantly larger in M1 CFA-applied rats compared with M1 vehicle-applied rats. The mean number of pERK-immunoreactive (IR TG cells was significantly larger in M1 CFA-applied rats compared with M1 vehicle-applied rats. Application of the satellite cell inhibitor fluorocitrate (FC into TG caused a significant depression of capsaicin-induced masseter muscle activity and a significant reduction of satellite cell activation. The number of TRPV1-IR TG cells innervating M2 was significantly larger in M1 CFA-applied rats compared with M1 vehicle-applied rats, and that was decreased following FC injection into TG. Furthermore, 6% of TG neurons innervating M1 and/or M2 innervated both M1 and M2. These findings suggest that satellite cell activation following tooth pulp inflammation and innervation of multiple tooth pulps by single TG neurons may be involved in the enhancement of the activity of TG neurons innervating adjacent non-inflamed teeth that also show enhancement of TRPV1 expression in TG neurons, resulting in the ectopic persistent tooth

  8. Studi Numerik Karakteristik Pengeringan Batubara pada Fluidized Bed Coal Dyer Terhadap Pengaruh Variasi Temperatur Air Heater dengan Tube Heater Tersusun Staggered dan Perbandingan Volume Chamber dan Volume Batubara Sebesar 50%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayu Sarah Novrizqa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia mempunyai sumber daya batubara yang cukup besar dan sebagian besar sumber daya tersebut termasuk ke dalam batubara peringkat rendah berupa lignit dan sub-bituminus yang memiliki kadar air yang tinggi. Tingginya kadar air menyebabkan rendahnya nilai kalor, sehingga pemanfaatan batubara jenis ini menjadi terbatas dan sulit untuk dipasarkan. Oleh karena itu perlu adanya teknologi pengeringan yang dapat meningkatkan nilai kalor dari batubara tersebut. Dalam proses pengeringan akan melibatkan perpindahan panas dan massa. Proses ini akan didefinisikan dalam suatu studi numerik, dimana penelitian ini dilakukan dengan metode numerik dengan software Fluent 6.3.26. Pemilihan kondisi simulasi digunakan model turbulensi k-ε realizable dan skema interpolasi first-order upwind. Serta mempelajari pengaruh temperatur inlet udara pengering yang divariasikan. Variasi temperatur adalah 316 K, 327 K, 339 K. Dari penelitian ini  dapat diketahui nilai drying rate serta pengaruh temperatur dan posisi batubara dalam proses pengeringan pada drying chamber fluidized bed coal dryer dengan tube heater tersusun staggered serta pengaruh dari perbandingan volume batubara dengan volume chamber sebesar 50%. Moisture content batubara yang paling banyak berkurang dialami oleh temperature outlet terbesar yaitu 339 K dari 0,22 hingga 0,0167. Laju pengeringan yang memiliki waktu paling cepat yaitu pada temperatur 339 K, sekitar 1100 detik, sedangkan yang memiliki waktu paling lama yaitu pada temperatur 316 K, sekitar 4600 detik.

  9. Calculation of gas temperature at the outlet of the combustion chamber and in the air-gas channel of a gas-turbine unit by data of acceptance tests in accordance with ISO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyuk, A. G.; Karpunin, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a high accuracy method enabling performance of the calculation of real values of the initial temperature of a gas turbine unit (GTU), i.e., the gas temperature at the outlet of the combustion chamber, in a situation where manufacturers do not disclose this information. The features of the definition of the initial temperature of the GTU according to ISO standards were analyzed. It is noted that the true temperatures for high-temperature GTUs is significantly higher than values determined according to ISO standards. A computational procedure for the determination of gas temperatures in the air-gas channel of the gas turbine and cooling air consumptions over blade rims is proposed. As starting equations, the heat balance equation and the flow mixing equation for the combustion chamber are assumed. Results of acceptance GTU tests according to ISO standards and statistical dependencies of required cooling air consumptions on the gas temperature and the blade metal are also used for calculations. An example of the calculation is given for one of the units. Using a developed computer program, the temperatures in the air-gas channel of certain GTUs are calculated, taking into account their design features. These calculations are performed on the previously published procedure for the detailed calculation of the cooled gas turbine subject to additional losses arising because of the presence of the cooling system. The accuracy of calculations by the computer program is confirmed by conducting verification calculations for the GTU of the Mitsubishi Comp. and comparing results with published data of the company. Calculation data for temperatures were compared with the experimental data and the characteristics of the GTU, and the error of the proposed method is estimated.

  10. ISR Intersection Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    This special vacuum chamber presenting a lateral opening at the beam crossing point is one of the many chambers specifically designed for a particular experiment. Here it is shown during assembly at the ISR mechanical worshop.

  11. "Flat-Fish" Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    The picture shows a "Flat-Fish" vacuum chamber being prepared in the ISR workshop for testing prior to installation in the Split Field Magnet (SFM) at intersection I4. The two shells of each part were hydroformed from 0.15 mm thick inconel 718 sheet (with end parts in inconel 600 for easier manual welding to the arms) and welded toghether with two strips which were attached by means of thin stainless steel sheets to the Split Field Magnet poles in order to take the vertical component of the atmospheric pressure force. This was the thinnest vacuum chamber ever made for the ISR. Inconel material was chosen for its high elastic modulus and strenght at chamber bake-out temperature. In this picture the thin sheets transferring the vertical component of the atmosferic pressure force are attached to a support frame for testing. See also 7712182, 7712179.

  12. Evaluation of temperature increase during in-office bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Francisco Lia MONDELLI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of light sources in the bleaching process reduces the time required and promotes satisfactory results. However, these light sources can cause an increase in the pulp temperature. Objective The purpose of the present study was to measure the increase in intrapulpal temperature induced by different light-activated bleaching procedures with and without the use of a bleaching gel. Material and Methods A human maxillary central incisor was sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. A K-type thermocouple probe was introduced into the pulp chamber. A 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel was applied to the vestibular tooth surface. The light units used were a conventional halogen, a hybrid light (only LED and LED/Laser, a high intensity LED, and a green LED light. Temperature increase values were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s tests (p<0.05. Results There were statistically significant differences in temperature increases between the different light sources used and between the same light sources with and without the use of a bleaching gel. The presence of a bleaching gel generated an increase in intra-pulpal temperature in groups activated with halogen light, hybrid light, and high intensity LED. Compared to the other light sources, the conventional halogen lamp applied over the bleaching gel induced a significant increase in temperature (3.83±0.41°C. The green LED unit with and without gel application did not produce any significant intrapulpal temperature variations. Conclusion In the present study, the conventional halogen lamp caused the highest increase in intrapulpal temperature, and the green LED caused the least. There was an increase in temperature with all lights tested and the maximum temperature remained below the critical level (5.5°C. The addition of a bleaching gel led to a higher increase in intrapulpal temperatures.

  13. Evaluation of temperature increase during in-office bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; SOARES, Ana Flávia; PANGRAZIO, Eugenio Gabriel Kegler; WANG, Linda; ISHIKIRIAMA, Sergio Kiyoshi; BOMBONATTI, Juliana Fraga Soares

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of light sources in the bleaching process reduces the time required and promotes satisfactory results. However, these light sources can cause an increase in the pulp temperature. Objective The purpose of the present study was to measure the increase in intrapulpal temperature induced by different light-activated bleaching procedures with and without the use of a bleaching gel. Material and Methods A human maxillary central incisor was sectioned 2 mm below the cementoenamel junction. A K-type thermocouple probe was introduced into the pulp chamber. A 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel was applied to the vestibular tooth surface. The light units used were a conventional halogen, a hybrid light (only LED and LED/Laser), a high intensity LED, and a green LED light. Temperature increase values were compared by two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s tests (p<0.05). Results There were statistically significant differences in temperature increases between the different light sources used and between the same light sources with and without the use of a bleaching gel. The presence of a bleaching gel generated an increase in intra-pulpal temperature in groups activated with halogen light, hybrid light, and high intensity LED. Compared to the other light sources, the conventional halogen lamp applied over the bleaching gel induced a significant increase in temperature (3.83±0.41°C). The green LED unit with and without gel application did not produce any significant intrapulpal temperature variations. Conclusion In the present study, the conventional halogen lamp caused the highest increase in intrapulpal temperature, and the green LED caused the least. There was an increase in temperature with all lights tested and the maximum temperature remained below the critical level (5.5°C). The addition of a bleaching gel led to a higher increase in intrapulpal temperatures. PMID:27119761

  14. Characterization of patient’s inflammatory pulpal diseases. Caracterización de pacientes con afecciones pulpares inflamatorias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Palenque Guillemí

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulpal diseases are the most common entities in the dentist emergency consultation. For a correct indication of the treatment, it is very important to establish an accurate diagnosis. Objective: to characterize carrier patients with inflammatory pulpal disease. Methods: a descriptive, prospective cases series study which included 222 patients who came to the dentistry emergency consultation in Area I health policlinic. Age, type of disease, cause, more implicated teeth in the disease, visits, and previous treatments were the variables included. Results: there was no difference at all regarding sex. The most affected group of age was from 35 to 59 years old. The inferior molars were the most affected teeth. The main cause was dental cavities. Obturation was the previous treatment more presented. 46% of the patients attended the dentist in more than one occasion with the same process. Acute irreversible pulpitis was the most predominant pulpal disease. Conclusions: The most common pulpal diseases in our milieu was the acute irreversible pulpitis among the ages 35 and 59 years old.
    Fundamento: Las afecciones pulpares son las enfermedades que más llevan a los pacientes a una consulta de urgencia estomatológica. En estos casos, para una correcta indicación de tratamiento, es de suma importancia el establecimiento de un diagnóstico preciso. Objetivo: Caracterizar pacientes portadores de afectaciones pulpares inflamatorias. Métodos: Estudio descriptivo, prospectivo de serie de casos que incluyó 222 pacientes que asistieron a consulta de urgencia estomatológica en la policlínica del Área 1. Se incluyeron las siguientes variables: edad, tipo de afectación, causa, dientes más afectados, visitas y tratamientos previos. Resultados: No hubo diferencias en cuanto al sexo, el

  15. An in vitro comparison of adhesive techniques and rotary instrumentation on shear bond strength of nanocomposite with simulated pulpal pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayshree Hegde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of composite to tooth using different adhesive techniques and rotary instruments under simulated pulpal pressure. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human molars were randomly divided into two groups of 30 samples each (group I and II, according to the adhesive technique followed (i.e. total etch and self etch groups. Each group was further divided into two sub-groups (Sub-groups A and B of 15 samples each according to the cutting instrument (diamond abrasive or carbide burs used. Class II cavities were made with diamond abrasive or carbide burs, and restored with nano-composite under positive intra-pulpal pressure. Shear bond strength of the specimens were recorded simultaneously. Results: After statistical evaluation using two-way ANOVA and t-test, the mean shear bond strength values of the groups are as follows: Group IA- 4.69 MPa, Group IB-6.15 MPa, Group IIA-4.3 MPa, and Group IIB-6.24 MPa. It was seen that group IIB showed highest bond strength followed by group IB. Group II A showed the least bond strength. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the study, diamond abrasive gave better bond strength than carbide bur with both the adhesive techniques.

  16. Streamer chamber: pion decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    The real particles produced in the decay of a positive pion can be seen in this image from a streamer chamber. Streamer chambers consist of a gas chamber through which a strong pulsed electric field is passed, creating sparks as a charged particle passes through it. A magnetic field is added to cause the decay products to follow curved paths so that their charge and momentum can be measured.

  17. Prototype multiwire proportional chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    Chambers of this type were initially developed within the Alpha project (finally not approved). They were designed such to minimize the radiation length with a view to a mass spectrometer of high resolution meant to replace the Omega detector. The chambers were clearly forerunners for the (drift) chambers later built for R606 with the novel technique of crimping the wires. See also photo 7510039X.

  18. Electromagnetic reverberation chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Besnier, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Dedicated to a complete presentation on all aspects of reverberation chambers, this book provides the physical principles behind these test systems in a very progressive manner. The detailed panorama of parameters governing the operation of electromagnetic reverberation chambers details various applications such as radiated immunity, emissivity, and shielding efficiency experiments.In addition, the reader is provided with the elements of electromagnetic theory and statistics required to take full advantage of the basic operational rules of reverberation chambers, including calibration proc

  19. DORIOT CLIMATIC CHAMBERS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Doriot Climatic Chambers reproduce environmental conditions occurring anywhere around the world. They provide an invaluable service by significantly reducing the...

  20. Cálculo de la temperatura en el interior de la cámara de combustión en motores de combustión interna. // Calculation of temperature into combustion chamber of internal combustion engines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Soto Pau

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo aquí presentado tiene como objetivo llegar a expresiones de cálculo de la temperatura en el interior de la cámarade combustión como vía de diagnostico de la combustión en motores térmicos. Este trabajo consiste en un modelo físicomatemático,el cual usa como herramientas fundamentalmente, los valores de presión medidos en el interior de la cámarade combustión, las características geométricas del motor y todos los valores normalmente medidos en el bancodinamométrico. El procesamiento teórico de este modelo consiste fundamentalmente en la determinación de la evoluciónde la combustión a partir de la curva de presión, basada en la Primera Ley de la Termodinámica, adoptando Modelo deGases Perfectos. A partir de la posición angular de cierre de la válvula de admisión es posible calcular la derivada de latemperatura en relación a la posición angular del cigüeñal para los gases quemados T&b y no quemados T&u . Teniendo estosvalores de T&u y T&b calculados, es posible integrar numéricamente las temperaturas utilizando el método de integración deEuler. Conociendo la composición química del combustible, es posible calcular la temperatura adiabática de llama, estesería el valor de temperatura inicial Tb que nos permitiría calcular un valor de entalpía específica de los gases quemados. Deigual forma con el valor de la temperatura inicial para los gases no quemados Tu se tiene el valor de temperatura inicial parael proceso de integración.Palabras claves: Proceso de combustión en motores térmicos, temperatura en el interior de la cámara decombustión, presión en el interior de la cámara de combustión.____________________________________________________________________________Abstract.This paper presents calculation expressions of the temperature inside the combustion chamber in order to diagnose thecombustion in termic engines. This analysis consists in a physical-mathematical model, which uses

  1. The effects of extraction of pulpally involved primary teeth on weight, height and BMI in underweight Filipino children: a cluster randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monse, B.; Duijster, D.; Sheiham, A.; Grijalva-Eternod, C.S.; van Palenstein Helderman, W.H.; Hobdell, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Severe dental caries and the treatment thereof are reported to affect growth and well-being of young children. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of extraction of severely decayed pulpally involved primary teeth on weight and height in underweight preschool Filipino ch

  2. DELPHI time projection chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The time projection chamber is inserted inside the central detector of the DELPHI experiment. Gas is ionised in the chamber as a charged particle passes through, producing an electric signal from which the path of the particle can be found. DELPHI, which ran from 1989 to 2000 on the LEP accelerator, was primarily concerned with particle identification.

  3. Fluidized bed combustion chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kullendorff, A.; Wikner, J.

    1985-03-25

    The chamber is confined in a pressure vessel. The lower part of the chamber has tilted parallel gutters up to the height of the fluidized bed. The slope of the gutter walls is 5 degrees-15 degrees and the top area of the gutters is 1.3 to 3 times larger than their bottom.

  4. Target chambers for gammashpere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G. [and others

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  5. Climatic chamber ergometer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Atkins, AR

    1968-01-01

    Full Text Available The design and calibration of an ergometer for exercising subjects during calorimetric studies in the climate chamber, are described. The ergometer is built into the climatic chamber and forms an integral part of the whole instrumentation system foe...

  6. BEBC bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Looking up into the interior of BEBC bubble chamber from the expansion cylinder. At the top of the chamber two fish-eye lenses are installed and three other fish-eye ports are blanked off. In the centre is a heat exchanger.

  7. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Experience Japan The Japanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry will further promote its Japan-experience program and seek cooperation with various Chinese institutions.Between early May and June 2007,the chamber organized a Chinese college student delegation to Japan with the support from its members in China.

  8. Development of electrolyte-supported intermediate-temperature single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells using Ln 0.7Sr 0.3Fe 0.8Co 0.2O 3- δ (Ln = Pr, La, Gd) cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Larramendi, I.; Lamas, D. G.; Cabezas, M. D.; Ruiz de Larramendi, J. I.; Walsöe de Reca, N. E.; Rojo, T.

    Iron-cobalt-based perovskite oxides with general formula Ln 0.7Sr 0.3Fe 0.8Co 0.2O 3- δ (where Ln = La, Pr and Gd) have been investigated for their application as intermediate-temperature cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Powdered samples of these materials were synthesized by a novel gel combustion process and then characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XPD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XPD patterns were satisfactorily indexed with an orthorhombic GdFeO 3-type structure and, for all samples, a mean particle size of less than 1 μm was estimated from the SEM data. Experimental single-chamber SOFCs using with these materials as cathodes and NiO-SDC (samaria-doped ceria) and SDC as anode and electrolyte, respectively, were evaluated at 600 °C in a methane/oxygen mixtures. Peak power densities of 65.4, 48.7 and 46.2 mW cm -2 were obtained for Ag|Ln 0.7Sr 0.3Fe 0.8Co 0.2O 3- δ|SDC|NiO-SDC|Pt cells with Ln = Pr, La and Gd, respectively. The relatively high power density obtained for the Pr compound shows that it could be an interesting material for cathode of single-chamber SOFCs.

  9. Analysis of the internal temperature of the combustion chamber of a compact system of co-generation; Analise das temperaturas internas da camara de combustao de um sistema compacto de co-geracao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Joao B.F. [Universidade de Fortaleza (UNIFOR), CE (Brazil)], email: furlan@unifor.br; Couto, Heraldo S. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Cachoeira Paulista, SP (Brazil)], email: heraldo@lcp.inpe.br; Holanda, Carlos A.M. de [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais], email: almir@metalmat.ufc.br

    2008-07-01

    Nowadays, the energy deficit represents one of the biggest governmental challenges, since there is still a great number of communities living in areas without electricity energy; and thus without access to electro-electronic equipment such as television, refrigerators, computers. The main focus of this work is to present the possibility of electricity energy generation in conjunction with the frozen or hot water production in for places without electricity transmission nets or even any type of alternative power plants. The system is based on the standard air cycle called Brayton cycle composed of a turbo-compressor model 4LGZ from BorgWarner, a combustion chamber, a power turbine, a heat exchanger, a water-ammonia chiller, a 5.0 kV A generator, and a command panel for automation and distribution of energy. This system that uses natural gas or LPG, will supply electric energy from the generator, hot water from the heat exchange with the gases of combustion, and water frozen from chiller using as the hot source the gases proceeding from the power system. The prototype is already being tested and the first results obtained are excellent. In this paper, we analyze the internal combustion chamber temperatures. (author)

  10. Intermediate temperature single-chamber methane fed SOFC based on Gd doped ceria electrolyte and La 0.5Sr 0.5CoO 3- δ as cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, M.; Piñol, S.; Segarra, M.

    Single-chamber fuel cells with electrodes supported on an electrolyte of gadolinium doped ceria Ce 1- xGd xO 2- y with x = 0.2 (CGO) 200 μm thickness has been successfully prepared and characterized. The cells were fed directly with a mixture of methane and air. Doped ceria electrolyte supports were prepared from powders obtained by the acetyl-acetonate sol-gel related method. Inks prepared from mixtures of precursor powders of NiO and CGO with different particle sizes and compositions were prepared, analysed and used to obtain optimal porous anodes thick films. Cathodes based on La 0.5Sr 0.5CoO 3 perovskites (LSCO) were also prepared and deposited on the other side of the electrolyte by inks prepared with a mixture of powders of LSCO, CGO and AgO obtained also by sol-gel related techniques. Both electrodes were deposited by dip coating at different thicknesses (20-30 μm) using a commercial resin where the electrode powders were dispersed. Finally, electrical properties were determined in a single-chamber reactor where methane, as fuel, was mixed with synthetic air below the direct combustion limit. Stable density currents were obtained in these experimental conditions. Temperature, composition and flux rate values of the carrier gas were determinants for the optimization of the electrical properties of the fuel cells.

  11. Will mineral trioxide aggregate replace calcium hydroxide in treating pulpal and periodontal healing complications subsequent to dental trauma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakland, Leif K; Andreasen, Jens O

    2012-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has over the last two decades begun to take the place of calcium hydroxide (CH) in the treatment of a variety of pulpal and periodontal healing complications following dental trauma. These conditions include teeth with: (i) exposed pulps, (ii) immature roots...... and pulp necrosis, (iii) root fractures and pulp necrosis located in the coronal part of the pulps, and (iv) external infection-related (inflammatory) root resorption. The main reasons for replacing CH with MTA in these situations have generally been the delayed effect when using CH to induce hard tissues......, the quality of such induced hard tissues, and finally the dentin weakening effect of CH, which in some instances lead to cervical root fractures in immature teeth. MTA appears, from a relatively few clinical studies, to overcome these shortcomings of CH. The lack of long-term clinical studies, however, may...

  12. Comparison of pulpal responses to pulpotomy and pulp capping with biodentine and mineral trioxide aggregate in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rossi, Andiara; Silva, Lea Assed Bezerra; Gatón-Hernández, Patrícia; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated the pulpal and periapical responses of dogs' teeth after pulpotomy and pulp capping with a new tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine) when compared with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) by radiographic, histopathologic, and histomicrobiological analyses. Sixty roots (30 teeth) of dogs were divided into 2 groups, Biodentine (n = 36 roots) and ProRoot MTA (control, n = 24 roots). Animals were killed after 120 days, and the teeth were subjected to histotechnical processing (hematoxylin-eosin and Brown and Brenn staining). Qualitative and quantitative histopathologic data were analyzed by Fisher exact and Mann-Whitney tests (α = 0.05). Radiographically, mineralized tissue bridge formation was observed in more specimens treated with Biodentine (96.8%) than with MTA (72.2%) (P = .02). Integrity of the lamina dura and absence of periapical bone rarefaction and root resorption (external and internal) were observed in all specimens. Histopathologic and histomicrobiological analyses revealed mineralized tissue bridge formation, pulpal vitality, odontoblast layer integrity, preserved periodontal ligament, and absence of bone or root resorption and microorganisms in both groups. Although the bridges formed at the amputation site had similar morphology, they were significantly thicker in the Biodentine group (P Biodentine group was related to bridge thickness because radiographic diagnosis was flawed for bridges with thickness less than 0.5 mm. Fluorescence microscopy improved the visualization of bridge structure. Biodentine presented tissue compatibility and allowed for mineralized tissue bridge formation after pulpotomy in all specimens with similar morphology and integrity to those formed with use of MTA. Periapical radiographs failed in detecting mineralized tissue bridges with thickness less than 0.5 mm. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Clinical Study on the Effect of Injection Sites on Efficacy of Anesthesia and Pulpal Blood Flow in Carious Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Q H; Hong, Q C; Zhang, L; Ye, L; Huang, D M

    2017-10-04

    This randomized clinical trial evaluated the efficiency of maxillary infiltration anesthesia in carious teeth at two different injection sites and their impact on the laser Doppler recordings of pulpal blood flow (PBF) during a caries excavation procedure. The null hypothesis tested was that there are no differences in the efficiency of anesthesia and PBF reduction between maxillary infiltrations at the two injection sites. One hundred twenty patients were divided into three groups according to the degree of carious lesion of their maxillary left central incisors (moderate caries, deep caries, or no caries). Forty patients in each group randomly received infiltrations over the root apex of maxillary left central incisors (site X) or over the midpoint of the line connecting the root apexes of both maxillary left central and lateral incisors (site Y) using 0.9 mL 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 adrenaline. Teeth were pulp tested at five-minute intervals after injection except for the period of cavity cutting, which was done 12 minutes after injection. The PBF changes after injection were monitored by laser Doppler flowmetry. The observation period in this study was 60 minutes. Success of anesthesia was defined as no or mild pain on cavity cutting by visual analog scale recordings. Deep caries group showed significantly higher baseline PBF (p0.05). Subgroups that had the injection at site Y showed significantly less reduction of PBF (pcarious anterior teeth anesthetized by infiltration further from the apex had significantly less reduction on the pulpal blood flow compared with teeth anesthetized by infiltration at the apex.

  14. Innovative Comparison of Transient Ignition Temperature at the Booster Interface, New Stainless Steel Pyrovalve Primer Chamber Assembly "V" (PCA) Design Versus the Current Aluminum "Y" PCA Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulsberry, Regor L.; McDougle, Stephen H.; Garcia,Roberto; Johnson, Kenneth L.; Sipes, William; Rickman, Steven; Hosangadi, Ashvin

    2011-01-01

    An assessment of four spacecraft pyrovalve anomalies that occurred during ground testing was conducted by the NASA Engineering & Safety Center (NESC) in 2008. In all four cases, a common aluminum (Al) primer chamber assembly (PCA) was used with dual NASA Standard Initiators (NSIs) and the nearly simultaneous (separated by less than 80 microseconds) firing of both initiators failed to ignite the booster charge. The results of the assessment and associated test program were reported in AIAA Paper AIAA-2008-4798, NESC Independent Assessment of Pyrovalve Ground Test Anomalies. As a result of the four Al PCA anomalies, and the test results and findings of the NESC assessment, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) project team decided to make changes to the PCA. The material for the PCA body was changed from aluminum (Al) to stainless steel (SS) to avoid melting, distortion, and potential leakage of the NSI flow passages when the device functioned. The flow passages, which were interconnected in a Y-shaped configuration (Y-PCA) in the original design, were changed to a V-shaped configuration (V-PCA). The V-shape was used to more efficiently transfer energy from the NSIs to the booster. Development and qualification testing of the new design clearly demonstrated faster booster ignition times compared to the legacy AL Y-PCA design. However, the final NESC assessment report recommended that the SS V-PCA be experimentally characterized and quantitatively compared to the Al Y-PCA design. This data was deemed important for properly evaluating the design options for future NASA projects. This test program has successfully quantified the improvement of the SS V-PCA over the Al Y-PCA. A phase B of the project was also conducted and evaluated the effect of firing command skew and enlargement of flame channels to further assist spacecraft applications.

  15. PS wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    A wire chamber used at CERN's Proton Synchrotron accelerator in the 1970s. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  16. OPAL Jet Chamber Prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the dirfferent parts of the tracking system. This piece is a prototype of the jet chambers

  17. Particle temperature measurements in closed chamber detonations using thermoluminescence from Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Ag,Cu, MgB{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Dy,Li and CaSO{sub 4}:Ce,Tb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukihara, E.G., E-mail: eduardo.yukihara@okstate.edu [Physics Department, Oklahoma State University, 145 Physical Sciences, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Coleman, A.C.; Bastani, S.; Gustafson, T. [Physics Department, Oklahoma State University, 145 Physical Sciences, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Talghader, J.J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Daniels, A.; Stamatis, D.; Lightstone, J. M; Milby, C.; Svingala, F.R. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division (NSWC IHEODTD), Indian Head, MD 20640 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The present work describes the procedures and results from the first temperature measurements in closed chamber detonations obtained using the thermoluminescence (TL) of particles specifically developed for temperature sensing. Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Ag,Cu (LBO), MgB{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Dy,Li (MBO) and CaSO{sub 4}:Ce,Tb (CSO) were tested separately in a total of 12 independent detonations using a closed detonation chamber at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division (NSWC IHEODTD). Detonations were carried out using two different explosives: a high temperature plastic bonded explosive (HPBX) and a low temperature plastic bonded explosive (LPBX). The LPBX and HPBX charges produced temperatures experienced by the TL particles to be between ~550–670 K and ~700–780 K, respectively, depending on the shot. The measured temperatures were reproducible and typically higher than the thermocouple temperatures. These tests demonstrate the survivability of the TL materials and the ability to obtain temperature estimates in realistic conditions, indicating that TL may represent a reliable way of estimating the temperature experienced by free-flowing particles inside an opaque post-detonation fireball. - Highlights: • TL materials were tested in closed chamber detonations. • Temperatures experienced by the particles were ~550–670 K and ~700–780 K. • TL temperatures were reproducible and higher than thermocouple measurements. • Tests demonstrate TL material survival and ability to obtain temperature estimates.

  18. ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Lippmann, C

    2013-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main device in the ALICE 'central barrel' for the tracking and identification (PID) of charged particles. It has to cope with unprecedented densities of charges particles.

  19. Vacuum chamber 'bicone'

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This chamber is now in the National Museum of History and Technology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, USA, where it was exposed in an exhibit on the History of High Energy Accelerators (1977).

  20. High rate drift chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, D.C. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Berisso, M.C. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Gutierrez, G. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Holmes, S.D. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Wehmann, A. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Avilez, C. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Felix, J. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Moreno, G. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Romero, M. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Sosa, M. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Forbush, M. (Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)); Huson, F.R. (Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)); Wightman, J.A. (Department of Physi

    1994-06-01

    Fermilab experiment 690, a study of target dissociation reactions pp[yields]pX using an 800 GeV/c proton beam and a liquid hydrogen target, collected data in late 1991. The incident beam and 600-800 GeV/c scattered protons were measured using a system of six 6 in.x4 in. and two 15 in.x8 in. pressurized drift chambers spaced over 260 m. These chambers provided precise measurements at rates above 10 MHz (2 MHz per cm of sense wire). The measurement resolution of the smaller chambers was 90 [mu]m, and the resolution of the larger chambers was 125 [mu]m. Construction details and performance results, including radiation damage, are presented. ((orig.))

  1. Toxic Test Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Hazardous material test facility Both facilities have 16,000 cubic foot chambers, equipped with 5000 CFM CBR filter systems with an air change...

  2. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  3. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, John Scott

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-cooled bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for ascent/ descent engines and reaction control systems on various NASA missions and spacecraft, such as the Mars Sample Return and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, iridium (Ir)-lined rhenium (Re) combustion chambers are the state of the art for in-space engines. NASA's Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine, a 150-lbf Ir-Re chamber produced by Plasma Processes and Aerojet Rocketdyne, recently set a hydrazine specific impulse record of 333.5 seconds. To withstand the high loads during terrestrial launch, Re chambers with improved mechanical properties are needed. Recent electrochemical forming (EL-Form"TM") results have shown considerable promise for improving Re's mechanical properties by producing a multilayered deposit composed of a tailored microstructure (i.e., Engineered Re). The Engineered Re processing techniques were optimized, and detailed characterization and mechanical properties tests were performed. The most promising techniques were selected and used to produce an Engineered Re AMBR-sized combustion chamber for testing at Aerojet Rocketdyne.

  4. DELPHI Barrel Muon Chamber Module

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The module was used as part of the muon identification system on the barrel of the DELPHI detector at LEP, and was in active use from 1989 to 2000. The module consists of 7 individual muons chambers arranged in 2 layers. Chambers in the upper layer are staggered by half a chamber width with respect to the lower layer. Each individual chamber is a drift chamber consisting of an anode wire, 47 microns in diameter, and a wrapped copper delay line. Each chamber provided 3 signal for each muon passing through the chamber, from which a 3D space-point could be reconstructed.

  5. The KLOE drift chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adinolfi, M.; Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Andryakov, A.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Anulli, F.; Bacci, C.; Bankamp, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellini, F.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Cabibbo, G.; Calcaterra, A.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Casarsa, M.; Cataldi, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervelli, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; Conticelli, S.; Lucia, E. De; Robertis, G. De; Sangro, R. De; Simone, P. De; Zorzi, G. De; Dell' Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; Domenico, A. Di; Donato, C. Di; Falco, S. Di; Doria, A.; Drago, E.; Elia, V.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franceschi, A.; Franzini, P.; Gao, M.L.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Golovatyuk, V.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grandegger, W.; Graziani, E.; Guarnaccia, P.; Hagel, U.V.; Han, H.G.; Han, S.W.; Huang, X.; Incagli, M.; Ingrosso, L.; Jang, Y.Y.; Kim, W.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lomtadze, F.; Luisi, C.; Mao, C.S.; Martemianov, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moalem, A.; Moccia, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nedosekin, A.; Panareo, M.; Pacciani, L.; Pages, P.; Palutan, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passaseo, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, G.; Picca, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Pistillo, C.; Pollack, M.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Ruggieri, F.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schwick, C.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shan, J.; Silano, P.; Spadaro, T.; Spagnolo, S.; Spiriti, E.; Stanescu, C.; Tong, G.L.; Tortora, L.; Valente, E.; Valente, P. E-mail: paolo.valente@lnf.infn.it; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, Y.G.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhou, Y

    2001-04-01

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy K{sub L} produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm{sup 2} in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm{sup 2} in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented.

  6. The KLOE drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; Ambrosino, F; Andryakov, A; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Anulli, F; Bacci, C; Bankamp, A; Barbiellini, G; Bellini, F; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Bulychjov, S A; Cabibbo, G; Calcaterra, A; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Carboni, G; Cardini, A; Casarsa, M; Cataldi, G; Ceradini, F; Cervelli, F; Cevenini, F; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; Conticelli, S; Lucia, E D; Robertis, G D; Sangro, R D; Simone, P D; Zorzi, G D; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Domenico, A D; Donato, C D; Falco, S D; Doria, A; Drago, E; Elia, V; Erriquez, O; Farilla, A; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Forti, C; Franceschi, A; Franzini, P; Gao, M L; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Golovatyuk, V; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Grandegger, W; Graziani, E; Guarnaccia, P; Von Hagel, U; Han, H G; Han, S W; Huang, X; Incagli, M; Ingrosso, L; Jang, Y Y; Kim, W; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Lomtadze, F; Luisi, C; Mao Chen Sheng; Martemyanov, M; Matsyuk, M; Mei, W; Merola, L; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moalem, A; Moccia, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nedosekin, A; Panareo, M; Pacciani, L; Pagès, P; Palutan, M; Paoluzi, L; Pasqualucci, E; Passalacqua, L; Passaseo, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, Guido; Picca, D; Pirozzi, G; Pistillo, C; Pollack, M; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Ruggieri, F; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Schamberger, R D; Schwick, C; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Shan, J; Silano, P; Spadaro, T; Spagnolo, S; Spiriti, E; Stanescu, C; Tong, G L; Tortora, L; Valente, E; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Wu, Y; Xie, Y G; Zhao, P P; Zhou, Y

    2001-01-01

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy K sub L produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm sup 2 in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm sup 2 in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented.

  7. micro strip gas chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    About 16 000 Micro Strip Gas Chambers like this one will be used in the CMS tracking detector. They will measure the tracks of charged particles to a hundredth of a millimetre precision in the region near the collision point where the density of particles is very high. Each chamber is filled with a gas mixture of argon and dimethyl ether. Charged particles passing through ionise the gas, knocking out electrons which are collected on the aluminium strips visible under the microscope. Such detectors are being used in radiography. They give higher resolution imaging and reduce the required dose of radiation.

  8. Charpak hemispherical wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    pieces. Mesures are of the largest one. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  9. Heavy liquid bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1965-01-01

    The CERN Heavy liquid bubble chamber being installed in the north experimental hall at the PS. On the left, the 1180 litre body; in the centre the magnet, which can produce a field of 26 800 gauss; on the right the expansion mechanism.

  10. OPAL Muon Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the 4 experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 to 2000. This is a slice of the outermost layer of OPAL : the muon chambers. This outside layer detects particles which are not stopped by the previous layers. These are mostly muons.

  11. LEP Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is a cut-out of a LEP vacuum chamber for dipole magnets showing the beam channel and the pumping channel with the getter (NEG) strip and its insulating supports. A water pipe connected to the cooling channel can also be seen at the back.The lead radiation shield lining is also shown. See also 8305563X.

  12. Scanning bubble chamber pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    These were taken at the 2 m hydrogen bubble chamber. The photo shows an early Shiva system where the pre-measurements needed to qualify the event were done manually (cf photo 7408136X). The scanning tables were located in bld. 12. Gilberte Saulmier sits on foreground, Inge Arents at centre.

  13. Liquid Wall Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  14. LEP vacuum chamber, prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Final prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, see 8305170 for more details. Here we see the strips of the NEG pump, providing "distributed pumping". The strips are made from a Zr-Ti-Fe alloy. By passing an electrical current, they were heated to 700 deg C.

  15. Secondary emission gas chamber

    CERN Document Server

    In'shakov, V; Skvortsov, V

    2014-01-01

    For a hadron calorimeter active element there is considered a gaseous secondary emis-sion detector (150 micron gap, 50 kV/cm). Such one-stage parallel plate chamber must be a radiation hard, fast and simple. A model of such detector has been produced, tested and some characteristics are presented.

  16. Will mineral trioxide aggregate replace calcium hydroxide in treating pulpal and periodontal healing complications subsequent to dental trauma? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakland, Leif K; Andreasen, Jens O

    2012-02-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has over the last two decades begun to take the place of calcium hydroxide (CH) in the treatment of a variety of pulpal and periodontal healing complications following dental trauma. These conditions include teeth with: (i) exposed pulps, (ii) immature roots and pulp necrosis, (iii) root fractures and pulp necrosis located in the coronal part of the pulps, and (iv) external infection-related (inflammatory) root resorption. The main reasons for replacing CH with MTA in these situations have generally been the delayed effect when using CH to induce hard tissues, the quality of such induced hard tissues, and finally the dentin weakening effect of CH, which in some instances lead to cervical root fractures in immature teeth. MTA appears, from a relatively few clinical studies, to overcome these shortcomings of CH. The lack of long-term clinical studies, however, may warrant a certain reservation in an unrestricted replacement of CH with MTA. A definite need for randomized clinical studies comparing CH and MTA in trauma healing situations is urgently needed.

  17. Heat-barrier coatings for combustion chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, H. W.

    1970-01-01

    Arc-plasma-sprayed layered coating of graded Inconel and zirconia protects film-coolant ring below injector plate of rocket engine combustion chamber. Interfacial temperature is designed for minimum buildup of stress and to avoid melting of the metal phase in the graded layers.

  18. 40 CFR 92.110 - Weighing chamber and micro-balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Weighing chamber and micro-balance. 92... Weighing chamber and micro-balance. (a) Ambient conditions—(1) Temperature. The temperature of the chamber.... (b) Weighing balance specifications. The microbalance used to determine the weights of all...

  19. The Role of Temperature in the Action of Mepivacaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabarakis, Nikolaos; Tsirlis, Anastasios; Parisis, Nikolaos; Tsoukalas, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    The role of temperature in the action of local anesthetics was studied in 20 healthy young volunteers with plain 3% mepivacaine injected periapically twice in their maxillary first premolar, the first time with the solution at a temperature of 20°C and the second time at 4°C. The pulpal response was measured with a pulp tester every minute. The onset of pulp anesthesia was found to be of no statistical difference between 20°C and 4°C. On the other hand, mepivacaine at a temperature of 4°C was found to have a statistically significant longer duration of action. Our conclusion is that the drop in temperature of mepivacaine from 20°C to 4°C provides a longer duration of pulpal anesthesia. PMID:17175822

  20. Feedback control system for baking temperature of vacuum chamber on HL-2A tokamak%HL-2A装置真空室烘烤温度反馈控制系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许婕; 董方正; 唐芳群; 田培红

    2016-01-01

    Temperature feedback control system of the HL-2A tokamak vacuum chamber baking is designed. The approximate mathematical model was adopted by experimental method, and the step response model of HL-2A baking system was established. Design analysis of system performance index was applied by the control theory, stability analysis of control system was conducted by Simulink software, and the system of hardware and software was implemented with Siemens PLC300 system.%设计了HL-2A装置主机真空室烘烤温度反馈控制系统,用实验法获得系统近似数学模型,建立了HL-2A装置烘烤系统阶跃响应模型。运用控制理论对系统性能指标进行了设计分析,利用Simulink软件对控制系统进行了稳定性分析,通过西门子PLC300系统对此控制系统进行了软硬件实现。

  1. Visual-Inspection Probe For Cryogenic Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Steve; Valenzuela, James; Yoshinaga, Jay

    1990-01-01

    Visual-inspection probe that resembles borescope enables observer at ambient temperature to view objects immersed in turbulent flow of liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen, or other cryogenic fluid. Design of probe fairly conventional, except special consideration given to selection of materials and to thermal expansion to provide for expected range of operating temperatures. Penetrates wall of cryogenic chamber to provide view of interior. Similar probe illuminates scene. View displayed on video monitor.

  2. Anechoic Radio Frequency Test Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This chamber is used for characterization test of such systems as communications gear, tanks, radar, missiles, and helicopters. The dimensions of the chamber are 114...

  3. A new plant chamber facility, PLUS, coupled to the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wegener, R.; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2016-03-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been built and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow-through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees is mixed with synthetic air and transferred to the SAPHIR chamber, where the atmospheric chemistry and the impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can be studied in detail. In PLUS all important environmental parameters (e.g., temperature, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), soil relative humidity (RH)) are well controlled. The gas exchange volume of 9.32 m3 which encloses the stem and the leaves of the plants is constructed such that gases are exposed to only fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film and other Teflon surfaces to minimize any potential losses of BVOCs in the chamber. Solar radiation is simulated using 15 light-emitting diode (LED) panels, which have an emission strength up to 800 µmol m-2 s-1. Results of the initial characterization experiments are presented in detail. Background concentrations, mixing inside the gas exchange volume, and transfer rate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) through PLUS under different humidity conditions are explored. Typical plant characteristics such as light- and temperature- dependent BVOC emissions are studied using six Quercus ilex trees and compared to previous studies. Results of an initial ozonolysis experiment of BVOC emissions from Quercus ilex at typical atmospheric concentrations inside SAPHIR are presented to demonstrate a typical experimental setup and the utility of the newly added plant chamber.

  4. A new plant chamber facility PLUS coupled to the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wegener, R.; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-11-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been build and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees are mixed with synthetic air and are transferred to the SAPHIR chamber where the atmospheric chemistry and the impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) can be studied in detail. In PLUS all important enviromental parameters (e.g. temperature, PAR, soil RH etc.) are well-controlled. The gas exchange volume of 9.32 m3 which encloses the stem and the leafes of the plants is constructed such that gases are exposed to FEP Teflon film and other Teflon surfaces only to minimize any potential losses of BVOCs in the chamber. Solar radiation is simulated using 15 LED panels which have an emission strength up to 800 μmol m-2 s-1. Results of the initial characterization experiments are presented in detail. Background concentrations, mixing inside the gas exchange volume, and transfer rate of volatile organic compounds (VOC) through PLUS under different humidity conditions are explored. Typical plant characteristics such as light and temperature dependent BVOC emissions are studied using six Quercus Ilex trees and compared to previous studies. Results of an initial ozonolysis experiment of BVOC emissions from Quercus Ilex at typical atmospheric concentrations inside SAPHIR are presented to demonstrate a typical experimental set up and the utility of the newly added plant chamber.

  5. Improved climatic chamber for desiccation simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozada Catalina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The climatic chamber at the Universidad de Los Andes was improved for modeling desiccation in soil layers. This chamber allows the measurement of different environmental variables. In this research, evaporation tests were conducted in water imposing boundary conditions for drying, and then these tests were performed in a soil layer. The soil was prepared from a slurry state and was drying controlling the temperature, the infrared radiation, the wind velocity, and the relative humidity. In the first part of this paper, a description of the climatic chamber, operation ranges and theoretical work principles of the climatic chamber are presented. Then, the second part shows the results for desiccation in water and soil. The desiccation tests performed with the climatic chamber allow simulating all environmental conditions accurately during drying coupling the effect of all environmental variables. As a result, the evaporation rate increases with infrared radiation in soil and water. The rate at the beginning of the desiccation tests in clays is the same as in water. However, this evaporation rate decreases as the soil becomes desiccated.

  6. The experimental and numerical investigation of a grooved vapor chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Ming [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation, Ministry of Education and Key Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Energy Conversion, Beijing Education Commission, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100022 (China); Liu Zhongliang [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation, Ministry of Education and Key Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Energy Conversion, Beijing Education Commission, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100022 (China)], E-mail: liuzhl@bjut.edu.cn; Ma Guoyuan [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation, Ministry of Education and Key Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Energy Conversion, Beijing Education Commission, College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100022 (China)

    2009-02-15

    An effective thermal spreader can achieve more uniform heat flux distribution and thus enhance heat dissipation of heat sinks. Vapor chamber is one of highly effective thermal spreaders. In this paper, a novel grooved vapor chamber was designed. The grooved structure of the vapor chamber can improve its axial and radial heat transfer and also can form the capillary loop between condensation and evaporation surfaces. The effect of heat flux, filling amount and gravity to the performance of this vapor chamber is studied by experiment. From experiment, we also obtained the best filling amount of this grooved vapor chamber. By comparing the thermal resistance of a solid copper plate with that of the vapor chamber, it is suggested that the critical heat flux condition should be maintained to use vapor chamber as efficient thermal spreaders for electronics cooling. A two-dimensional heat and mass transfer model for the grooved vapor chamber is developed. The numerical simulation results show the thickness distribution of liquid film in the grooves is not uniform. The temperature and velocity field in vapor chamber are obtained. The thickness of the liquid film in groove is mainly influenced by pressure of vapor and liquid beside liquid-vapor interface. The thin liquid film in heat source region can enhance the performance of vapor chamber, but if the starting point of liquid film is backward beyond the heat source region, the vapor chamber will dry out easily. The optimal filling ratio should maintain steady thin liquid film in heat source region of vapor chamber. The vapor condenses on whole condensation surface, so that the condensation surface achieves great uniform temperature distribution. By comparing the experimental results with numerical simulation results, the reliability of the numerical model can be verified.

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Microshear Bond Strength of 5(th), 6(th) and 7(th) Generation Bonding Agents to Coronal Dentin Versus Dentin at Floor of Pulp Chamber: An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, Velagala Lakshmi; Damaraju, Bhargavi; Priyadharsini, Bollu Indira; Subbarao, Vummidisetti V; Raju, K Rama Krishna

    2014-09-01

    Lack of seal and adhesion between the final restoration and tooth structure adversely affects the results of root canal treatment. Lots of adhesive bonding agents are marketed to overcome this deficiency and achieve successful restoration. So the study compares and evaluates the micro shear bond strength of coronal dentin and pulp chamber dentin using three different generation dentin bonding systems and to know clinical efficiency for clinical use. DIFFERENT GENERATION DENTIN BONDING SYSTEMS USED WERE: (1) One bottle total etch system (XP Bond-5(th) generation), (2) Two-step self-etch system (Clearfil SE Bond-6(th) generation) and (3) All-in-one system (G Bond-7(th) generation). Thirty human mandibular molars were collected out of which sixty samples were prepared by sectioning each tooth into coronal dentin and pulpal floor dentin. They were divided into two major groups. Group I: 30 Coronal dentin samples. Group II:30 Pulpal floor dentin samples. Both the groups were further subdivided depending on the bonding agent used. Subgroup Ia:XP Bond, Subgroup Ib:Clearfil SE Bond, Subgroup Ic:G Bond, Subgroup IIa:XP Bond, Subgroup IIb:Clearfil SE Bond, Subgroup IIc:G Bond. Resin composite was bonded to these samples and tested for micro-shear bond strength. The mean bond strengths and standard deviations were calculated and analyzed using one-way ANOVA test and Student's t-test (unpaired) and honestly significant difference post-hoc tests. Coronal dentin showed higher values of micro shear bond strength than the pulpal floor dentin. All-in-one system (G Bond) showed least bond strength values to both the regions coronal dentin and pulpal floor dentin. Factors affecting the shear bond strength are dependent on material (adhesive system), substrate depth and adhesive/depth interaction. Hence composition and substrate treatment should be considered for good adhesive. Chemical composition of adhesive system determines clinical successes.

  8. Vacuum Chambers for LEP sections

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The picture shows sections of the LEP vacuum chambers to be installed in the dipole magnets (left) and in the quadrupoles (right). The dipole chamber has three channels: the beam chamber, the pumping duct where the NEG (non-evaporabe getter) is installed and the water channel for cooling (on top in the picture). The pumping duct is connected to the beam chamber through holes in the separating wall. The thick lead lining to shield radiation can also be seen. These chambers were manufactured as extruded aluminium alloy profiles.

  9. Multi-anode ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Smith, Graham (Port Jefferson, NY); Mahler, George J. (Rocky Point, NY); Vanier, Peter E. (Setauket, NY)

    2010-12-28

    The present invention includes a high-energy detector having a cathode chamber, a support member, and anode segments. The cathode chamber extends along a longitudinal axis. The support member is fixed within the cathode chamber and extends from the first end of the cathode chamber to the second end of the cathode chamber. The anode segments are supported by the support member and are spaced along the longitudinal surface of the support member. The anode segments are configured to generate at least a first electrical signal in response to electrons impinging thereon.

  10. The APS ceramic chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, S.; Warner, D.

    1994-07-01

    Ceramics chambers are used in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) machines at the locations of the pulsed kicker and bumper magnets. The ceramic will be coated internally with a resistive paste. The resistance is chosen to allow the low frequency pulsed magnet field to penetrate but not the high frequency components of the circulating beam. Another design goal was to keep the power density experienced by the resistive coating to a minimum. These ceramics, their associated hardware, the coating process, and our recent experiences with them are described.

  11. Comparative Study of Pulpal Responses to Pulpotomy with ProRoot MTA, RetroMTA, and TheraCal in Dogs' Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haewon; Shin, Yooseok; Kim, Seong-Oh; Lee, Hyo-Seol; Choi, Hyung-Jun; Song, Je Seon

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate and compare pulpal responses to ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK), RetroMTA (Meta Biomed Co, Ltd, Seoul, Korea), and TheraCal (Bisco Inc, Schamburg, IL) in dog partial pulpotomy models. Partial pulpotomies were performed on 60 beagle teeth. The exposed pulp tissues were randomly capped with either ProRoot MTA (n = 15), RetroMTA (n = 15), TheraCal (n = 15), or interim restorative material as a negative control (n = 15). After 4 weeks, the teeth were extracted and processed for histologic and immunohistochemical examinations using osteocalcin and dentin sialoprotein. Calcific barrier formation, inflammatory reaction, and the odontoblastic layer were evaluated and scored in a blind manner. The areas of newly formed calcific barriers were measured for each group. In most of the ProRoot MTA and RetroMTA specimens, continuous calcific barriers were formed, and the pulps contained palisading patterns in the odontoblastic layer that were free of inflammation. However, the TheraCal specimens had lower quality calcific barrier formation, extensive inflammation, and less favorable odontoblastic layer formation. Overall, areas of newly formed calcific barrier were higher in the ProRoot MTA and RetroMTA specimens than in the TheraCal specimens. Also, immunohistochemistry revealed that osteocalcin and dentin sialoprotein were more clearly visible in the ProRoot MTA and RetroMTA specimens than in the TheraCal specimens. RetroMTA could provide an alternative to ProRoot MTA. Both materials produced favorable pulpal responses that were similar in nature, whereas TheraCal produced less favorable pulpal responses. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Council Chamber exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    To complete the revamp of CERN’s Council Chamber, a new exhibition is being installed just in time for the June Council meetings.   Panels will showcase highlights of CERN’s history, using some of the content prepared for the exhibitions marking 50 years of the PS, which were displayed in the main building last November. The previous photo exhibition in the Council Chamber stopped at the 1970s. To avoid the new panels becoming quickly out of date, photos are grouped together around specific infrastructures, rather than following a classic time-line. “We have put the focus on the accelerators – the world-class facilities that CERN has been offering researchers over the years, from the well-known large colliders to the lesser-known smaller facilities,” says Emma Sanders, who worked on the content. The new exhibition will be featured in a future issue of the Bulletin with photos and an interview with Fabienne Marcastel, designer of the exhibit...

  13. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  14. The ALICE time projection chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    This time projection chamber is part of the ALICE detector on the new LHC accelerator at CERN. Particles produced in collisions at the core of the detector will follow paths outward through the various sub-detector layers. If these particles carry a charge, they will ionise the gas contained within this chamber producing an electric signal as the ions drift in the chamber's electric field.

  15. Evaluation of temperature variation in pulp chamber after high power diode laser irradiation ({lambda}=830 nm) on dental enamel: 'in vitro' study; Avaliacao da variacao da temperatura na camara pulpar apos a irradiacao de diodo laser de alta potencia de 830 nanometros em esmalte dental: estudo 'in vitro'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macri, Rodrigo Teixeira

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the variation of temperature in the pulp chamber caused by irradiation of a commercial diode laser operating in continuous wave with wavelength 830 nm over the dental enamel. In the first part of this study, two types of tooth models were tested: 3,5 mm slice and whole tooth. In the second part, we irradiated the buccal si de of the enamel in 2 primary lower incisors from cattle with Opus 10 diode laser for 10 s with power levels of 1 W and 2 W, always using an absorber. Two thermocouples were used. The first one was inserted in the dentin wall closest to the irradiation site, while the second was inserted in the middle of the pulp chamber. It was observed that the thermocouples registered different temperatures. Always, the dentin thermocouple registered higher temperatures. Considering the dentin records, the irradiation of 1 W for 10 s can be safe for the pulp. Further studies must be developed related to the correct positioning of the thermocouples inside the pulp chamber. This was a first step of using diode laser in enamel, and in this study, we concluded that the Opus 10 diode laser shown to be safe for this use, with 1 W power for 10 S. (author)

  16. Numerical simulation of secondary vortex chamber effect on the cooling capacity enhancement of vortex tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmahmoud, Nader; Azar, Farid Sepehrian; Hassanzadeh, Amir

    2014-09-01

    A vortex tube with additional chamber is investigated by computational fluid mechanics techniques to realize the effects of additional chamber in Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube and to understand optimal length for placing the second chamber in order to have maximum cooling effect. Results show that by increasing the distance between two chambers, both minimum cold and maximum hot temperatures increase and maximum cooling effect occurs at Z/ L = 0.047 (dimensionless distance).

  17. Relevant parameters for construction of a radon controlled chamber; Parametros relevantes para construcao de uma camara controlada de radonio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, Julio J.S.; Matta, Luiz E.S.C. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Alves, Rex N. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1997-10-01

    This work intends to discuss important parameters to be considered during the construction of a controlled radon chamber. Based on the review of different chambers, it was noticed that some characteristics such as size, shape, volume, and source activity are dependent on the chamber applications. Parameters such as aerosol generation, humidity, temperature and pressure inside the chamber are also discussed. A design of a multipurpose controlled radon chamber is suggested. (author). 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. A flow chamber assay for quantitative evaluation of bacterial surface colonization used to investigate the influence of temperature and surface hydrophilicity on the biofilm forming capacity of uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Emil; Kingshott, Peter; Palarasah, Yaseelan

    2010-01-01

    We have established a simple flow chamber-based procedure which provides an accurate and reproducible way to measure the amount of biofilm formed on an implantable biomaterial surface. The method enables the side-by-side evaluation of different materials under hydrodynamic flow conditions similar...

  19. The Big European Bubble Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The 3.70 metre Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC), dismantled on 9 August 1984. During operation it was one of the biggest detectors in the world, producing direct visual recordings of particle tracks. 6.3 million photos of interactions were taken with the chamber in the course of its existence.

  20. Development of Fission Chamber Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGJinwei; ZHANGWei; SONGXianying; LIXu

    2003-01-01

    The fission chambers which are gas counters with fissile material inside chamber,provide essential information for plasma opcharacteristics. In conjunction with the neutron flux monitor system these provide time-resolved measurements of the global neutron source strength and fusion power from thermal nuclear fusion reactor as ITER for all plasma conditions for which neutrons are produced.

  1. The CLEO III drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, D; Briere, R A; Chen, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Csorna, S; Dickson, M; Dombrowski, S V; Ecklund, K M; Lyon, A; Marka, S; Meyer, T O; Patterson, J R; Sadoff, A; Thies, P; Thorndike, E H; Urner, D

    2002-01-01

    The CLEO group at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring has constructed and commissioned a new central drift chamber. With 9796 cells arranged in 47 layers ranging in radius from 13.2 to 79 cm, the new drift chamber has a smaller outer radius and fewer wires than the drift chamber it replaces, but allows the CLEO tracking system to have improved momentum resolution. Reduced scattering material in the chamber gas and in the inner skin separating the drift chamber from the silicon vertex detector provides a reduction of the multiple scattering component of the momentum resolution and an extension of the usable measurement length into the silicon. Momentum resolution is further improved through quality control in wire positioning and symmetry of the electric fields in the drift cells which have provided a reduction in the spatial resolution to 88 mu m (averaged over the full drift range).

  2. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  3. 基于场协同原理的容腔内气流场温度均匀化方法数值研究%Numerical study of temperature homogenization method for air flow field in chamber based on field-synergy principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董登峰; 孟晓风; 张卫军; 陈妮亚

    2011-01-01

    为研究场协同原理对气流场温度均匀化的适用性,设计了一个温差可控并能形成具有梯度的气流速度场与温度场的加热器,然后在加热器整流区内布置3种特殊的整流网,利用:Fluent进行三维数值模拟.结果表明.场协同原理对于提高气流场温度的均匀性是有效的,并依此原理提出了气流场温度均匀化的最佳方法.%For cognition of the essence of convective heat transfer is not unified for long time, so temperature homogenization method of air current field in chamber is shorting of uniform and effective theory to guide. In order to research the applicability of field-synergy principle, a temperature gap controlled heater is designed, which can form a temperature gradient field and velocity gradient field.At the bottom of the heater, 3 special devices are installed. For the air current field in the chamber,3D simulation is carried out by Fluent. The results show field-synergy principle is validate to enhance the temperature homogenization. Following the principle, the best way to improve temperature field homogenization is proposed.

  4. Volatility Measurements Of Reaction Chamber-Generated Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsen, D. [PSI and ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Duplissy, J.; Weingartner, E.; Alfarra, R. [University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Baltensperger, U.

    2005-03-01

    A volatility-tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) was designed to monitor the non-volatile fraction of reaction chamber-generated organic particles. Using a coiled-tube heater for particle volatilization, particle volume fraction remaining measurements were made for wall temperatures of 100, 150, and 200 C. Oligomerization of organic particles generated from irradiations of {alpha}-pinene/NO{sub x} in the reaction chamber shows a strong linear relationship with time. (author)

  5. Repairing the wooden frame of chambers in coking furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nador, Y.; Iruti, M.; Komiya, S.; Matsuno, T.; Ogavakhara, F.

    1983-02-12

    A method and device are proposed for hot repair of the door frames of coking chanbers. The repair is conducted prior to discharge of the coke from the chamber without its cooling or a reduction in temperature. After the doors are removed, a screening plate fettled with a heat insulation material on the chamber side is introduced into the frame, it is attached to the door frame and the required repair is conducted.

  6. Characterization of the Humidity Calibration Chamber by Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, J.; Sairanen, H.; Grahn, P.; Högström, R.; Lakka, A.; Heinonen, M.

    2017-07-01

    At the Centre for Metrology MIKES of VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT MIKES), we have been developing a humidity calibration apparatus for radiosondes within an EMRP Project Metrology for Essential Climate Variables. The minimum air temperature and absolute humidity are -80°C and 2.576 × 10^{-4} g\\cdot m^{-3} (corresponding the dew-point temperature -90°C), respectively. Recent developments for the apparatus extend its pressure operation range down to 7 hPa (abs). When operating in such dry conditions, the efficiency in calibration is highly limited by the time of humidity stabilization in a measurement chamber: Because the water vapor pressure is very low, the adsorption and desorption of water molecules at the chamber walls have a significant effect on the spatial and temporal humidity differences in the chamber. Inhomogeneity in humidity field inside the calibration chamber increases calibration uncertainty. In order to understand how varying parameters such as pressure, temperature, inflow speed and geometry of chamber effect on stabilization time of humidity field, computational fluid dynamics simulations were developed using Comsol software. Velocity and pressure of fluid, water vapor diffusion, temperature as well as adsorption/desorption of water molecules on the chamber walls were included in the simulations. Adsorption and desorption constants for water on the measurement chamber wall were determined experimentally. The results show that the flow speed and the surface area are the dominant parameters affecting the stabilization time of a calibration chamber. It was also discovered that more homogenous water vapor concentration field is obtained at low pressures.

  7. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) investigation of thermal uniformity in a thermal cycling based calibration chamber for MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Xulong; Luo, Xiaobing; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Micro-electrical-mechanical system (MEMS) has become important for many industries such as automotive, home appliance, portable electronics, especially with the emergence of Internet of Things. Volume testing with temperature compensation has been essential in order to provide MEMS based sensors with repeatability, consistency, reliability, and durability, but low cost. Particularly, in the temperature calibration test, temperature uniformity of thermal cycling based calibration chamber becomes more important for obtaining precision sensors, as each sensor is different before the calibration. When sensor samples are loaded into the chamber, we usually open the door of the chamber, then place fixtures into chamber and mount the samples on the fixtures. These operations may affect temperature uniformity in the chamber. In order to study the influencing factors of sample-loading on the temperature uniformity in the chamber during calibration testing, numerical simulation work was conducted first. Temperature field and flow field were simulated in empty chamber, chamber with open door, chamber with samples, and chamber with fixtures, respectively. By simulation, it was found that opening chamber door, sample size and number of fixture layers all have effects on flow field and temperature field. By experimental validation, it was found that the measured temperature value was consistent with the simulated temperature value.

  8. A Histopathological Comparison of Pulpal Response to Chitra-CPC and Formocresol used as Pulpotomy Agents in Primary Teeth: A Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Bijimol

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Preventive measures have helped to minimize the occurrence of dental caries. However, premature loss of primary teeth on account of dental caries still remains a common problem among children. The pulpotomy technique has been the choice for treating vital primary and young permanent teeth with carious, mechanical and traumatic pulp exposures. The ideal pulpotomy medicament should be bioinductive or at least biocompatible, bactericidal and harmless to the pulp and surrounding structures. It should also promote healing of the radicular pulp and prevent bacterial microleakage with the least interference in the physiological process of root resorption. Since the best criteria for judging the effectiveness of a medicament when used for vital pulp therapy is the response that it produces in the pulp. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare the response of human pulp tissue to recently developed Indian material, Sree Chitra-Calcium Phosphate Cement (Chitra-CPC) and formocresol, used as pulpotomy agent in deciduous teeth. Chitra-CPC has been compared with formocresol, taking into account that formocresol is still considered the gold standard in primary tooth pulpotomy. The study was conducted among 10 children in the age group of 8 to 12 years focusing on 20 noncarious primary canines indicated for serial extraction. Each patient received two different pulpotomy procedures—one in each of the primary canines using formocresol and the other with Chitra-CPC as pulpotomy agents. After 70 days, the teeth were extracted and subjected to histological examination. The results did not reveal statistically significant difference between the two groups. But Chitra-CPC gave more favorable results, in respect of pulpal inflammation, dentin bridge formation, quality of dentin bridge and connective tissue in dentin bridge. How to cite this article: Ratnakumari N, Thomas B. A Histopathological Comparison of Pulpal Response to Chitra- CPC and Formocresol

  9. The effects of extraction of pulpally involved primary teeth on weight, height and BMI in underweight Filipino children. A cluster randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monse Bella

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe dental caries and the treatment thereof are reported to affect growth and well-being of young children. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of extraction of severely decayed pulpally involved primary teeth on weight and height in underweight preschool Filipino children. Methods Underweight preschool Filipino children with severe dental decay had their pulpally involved primary teeth extracted during a stepped wedge cluster randomized clinical trial. Day care centers were randomly divided into two groups; children from Group A day care centers received treatment as soon as practical, whereas children from Group B day care centers were treated four months after Group A. Clinical oral examinations using WHO criteria and the pufa-index were carried out. Anthropometric measurements were done on both groups immediately before treatment of Group A and at follow-up four months later. Height and weight z-scores were calculated using 2006 and 2007 WHO Growth Standards. Multilevel analysis was used to assess the effect of dental extractions on changes in anthropometric measurements after dental treatment. Results Data on 164 children (85 in Group A and 79 in Group B, mean age 59.9 months, were analyzed. Both groups gained weight and height during the trial period. Children in Group A significantly increased their BMI (p z-scores (p  Conclusions The extraction of severely decayed primary teeth resulted in significant weight gain in underweight Filipino children. Untreated dental decay should be considered an important co-factor affecting child growth and should be considered when planning for interventions to improve child growth. Trial registration ISRCTN90779069 http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/isrctn_loa

  10. A Histopathological Comparison of Pulpal Response to Chitra-CPC and Formocresol used as Pulpotomy Agents in Primary Teeth: A Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnakumari, N; Thomas, Bijimol

    2012-01-01

    Preventive measures have helped to minimize the occurrence of dental caries. However, premature loss of primary teeth on account of dental caries still remains a common problem among children. The pulpotomy technique has been the choice for treating vital primary and young permanent teeth with carious, mechanical and traumatic pulp exposures. The ideal pulpotomy medicament should be bioinductive or at least biocompatible, bactericidal and harmless to the pulp and surrounding structures. It should also promote healing of the radicular pulp and prevent bacterial microleakage with the least interference in the physiological process of root resorption. Since the best criteria for judging the effectiveness of a medicament when used for vital pulp therapy is the response that it produces in the pulp. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare the response of human pulp tissue to recently developed Indian material, Sree Chitra-Calcium Phosphate Cement (Chitra-CPC) and formocresol, used as pulpotomy agent in deciduous teeth. Chitra-CPC has been compared with formocresol, taking into account that formocresol is still considered the gold standard in primary tooth pulpotomy. The study was conducted among 10 children in the age group of 8 to 12 years focusing on 20 noncarious primary canines indicated for serial extraction. Each patient received two different pulpotomy procedures-one in each of the primary canines using formocresol and the other with Chitra-CPC as pulpotomy agents. After 70 days, the teeth were extracted and subjected to histological examination. The results did not reveal statistically significant difference between the two groups. But Chitra-CPC gave more favorable results, in respect of pulpal inflammation, dentin bridge formation, quality of dentin bridge and connective tissue in dentin bridge. How to cite this article: Ratnakumari N, Thomas B. A Histopathological Comparison of Pulpal Response to Chitra- CPC and Formocresol used as

  11. The multigap resistive plate chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeballos, E. Cerron [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Crotty, I. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Hatzifotiadou, D. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Valverde, J. Lamas [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Univ. Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France); Neupane, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Williams, M. C. S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Zichichi, A. [Univ. of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2015-02-03

    The paper describes the multigap resistive plate chamber (RPC). This is a variant of the wide gap RPC. However it has much improved time resolution, while keeping all the other advantages of the wide gap RPC design.

  12. Cyclically controlled welding purge chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An arrangement for butt-welding cylindrical sections of large, thin-wall tanks includes a rotatable mandrel with side-by-side sets of radial position adjusters. Each set of adjusters bears on one of the tank sections adjacent the seam, to prevent the sections from sagging out-of-round. The mandrel rotates relative to the welder, so that a continuous seam is formed. A purge chamber is fixed in position behind the seam at the weld head, and is flushed with inert gas. The purge chamber includes a two-sided structure which is contiguous with the cylindrical sections and a circumferential vane to form an open-ended tube-like structure, through which the radial position adjusters pass as the mandrel and cylindrical workpiece sections rotate. The tube-like structure is formed into a chamber by a plurality of movable gates which are controlled to maintain a seal while allowing adjusters to progress through the purge chamber.

  13. The PHENIX Time Expansion Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosati, M.; Barish, K.; Botelho, S.; Chang, W.C.; Gogoi, A.L. de; Dietzsch, O.; Ferdousi, T.; Franz, A.; Fung, S.Y.; Gannon, J.; Harder, J.; Kandasamy, A.; Khomutnikov, A.; Kotchekov, D.; Lebedev, A.; Li, X.H.; Mahon, J.; Munirassimann, M.; Negrin, J.; O' Brien, E.; O' Connor, P.; Pisani, R.; Rankowitz, S.; Seto, R.; Takagui, E.M.; Wang, H.Q

    1999-12-27

    The TEC/TRD subsystem will track all charged particles and contribute to the particle identification by the measurement of energy loss. The design, construction and testing of the TEC chambers are described.

  14. The PHENIX Time Expansion Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Rosati, M; Botelho, S; Chang, W C; Gogoi, A L D; Dietzsch, O; Ferdousi, T; Franz, A; Fung, S Y; Gannon, J; Harder, J; Kandasamy, A; Khomutnikov, A; Kotchekov, D; Lebedev, A; Li, X H; Mahon, J; Munirassimann, M; Negrin, J; O'Brien, E; O'Connor, P; Pisani, R; Rankowitz, S; Seto, R; Takagui, E M; Wang, H Q

    1999-01-01

    The TEC/TRD subsystem will track all charged particles and contribute to the particle identification by the measurement of energy loss. The design, construction and testing of the TEC chambers are described.

  15. Vacuum chambers for LHC LSS

    CERN Document Server

    Costa-Pinto, P

    2004-01-01

    The approximately 6 km total length of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) warm sections consist of about 1000 chambers. Most of these chambers, of various length and cross sections, are made of copper, but different lengths in stainless steel, mumetal, aluminium and beryllium will also be used. All the chambers will be internally coated with a thin film of TiZrV, to reduce both the secondary electron yield and the photon and electron stimulated desorption, with the further advantage of providing a huge additional pumping speed. In order to cope with the tight production schedule, a new dedicated coating facility was created, which allows four chambers to be coated per working day. This coating facility and its operating mode are described, together with the TiZrV film characteristics (structure, morphology) and performance (pumping speed, ultimate pressure, discharge gas outgassing).

  16. Vaporization chambers and associated methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.; McKellar, Michael G.; Shunn, Lee P.

    2017-02-21

    A vaporization chamber may include at least one conduit and a shell. The at least one conduit may have an inlet at a first end, an outlet at a second end and a flow path therebetween. The shell may surround a portion of each conduit and define a chamber surrounding the portion of each conduit. Additionally, a plurality of discrete apertures may be positioned at longitudinal intervals in a wall of each conduit, each discrete aperture of the plurality of discrete apertures sized and configured to direct a jet of fluid into each conduit from the chamber. A liquid may be vaporized by directing a first fluid comprising a liquid into the inlet at the first end of each conduit, directing jets of a second fluid into each conduit from the chamber through discrete apertures in a wall of each conduit and transferring heat from the second fluid to the first fluid.

  17. BEBC Big European Bubble Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    A view of the dismantling of the magnet of BEBC, the 3.7 m European Bubble Chamber : iron magnetic shielding ; lower and upper parts of the vacuum enclosure of the magnet; turbo-molecular vacuum pumps for the "fish-eye" windows; the two superconducting coils; a handling platform; the two cryostats suspended from the bar of the travelling crane which has a 170 ton carrying capacity. The chamber proper, not dismantled, is inside the shielding.

  18. Convective Regimes in Crystallizing Basaltic Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, A. J.; Neufeld, J. A.; Holness, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    disaggregated crystal mush. Such disaggregation may be caused by magma chamber replenishment, depending on the relative densities and temperatures of the resident and replenishing magma. If the new magma increases the Rayleigh number of either the bulk fluid or the fluid in the mushy layer, the resultant increased convective vigour may disaggregate the crystal pile.

  19. Parametric study of thermal behavior of thrust chamber cooling channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karima E. Amori

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation is adopted for two dimensional thermal analysis of rocket thrust chamber wall (RL10, employing finite difference model with iterative scheme (implemented under relaxation factor of 0.9 for convergence to compute temperature distribution within thrust chamber wall (which is composed of Nickel and Copper layers. The analysis is conducted for different boundary conditions: only convection boundary conditions then combined radiation, convection boundary conditions also for different aspect ratio (AR of cooling channel. The results show that Utilizing cooling channels of high aspect ratio leads to decrease in temperature variation across thrust chamber wall, while no effects on heat transferred to the coolant is indicated. The radiation has a considerable effect on the computed wall temperature values.

  20. Anterior chamber depth during hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracitelli CPB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Pelegrini Barbosa Gracitelli,1 Francisco Rosa Stefanini,1 Fernando Penha,1 Miguel Ângelo Góes,2 Sérgio Antonio Draibe,2 Maria Eugênia Canziani,2 Augusto Paranhos Junior1 1Ophthalmology Department, 2Division of Nephrology, Federal University of São Paulo – UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Exacerbation of chronic glaucoma or acute glaucoma is occasionally observed in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD because of anterior chamber depth changes during this therapy. Purpose: To evaluate anterior chamber depth and axial length in patients during HD sessions. Methods: A total of 67 eyes of 35 patients were prospectively enrolled. Axial length and anterior chamber depth were measured using ultrasonic biometry, and these measures were evaluated at three different times during HD sessions. Body weight and blood pressure pre- and post-HD were also measured. Results: There was no difference in the axial length between the three measurements (P = 0.241. We observed a significantly decreased anterior chamber depth (P = 0.002 during HD sessions. Conclusion: Our results support the idea that there is a change in anterior chamber depth in HD sessions. Keywords: anterior chamber, hemodialysis, axial length, acute angle-closure glaucoma

  1. Radiation Hydrodynamic Parameter Study of Inertial Fusion Energy Reactor Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Ryan; Moses, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    Inertial fusion energy reactors present great promise for the future as they are capable of providing baseline power with no carbon footprint. Simulation work regarding the chamber response and first wall insult is performed with the 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code BUCKY. Simulation with differing chamber parameters are implemented to study the effect of gas fill, gas mixtures and chamber radii. Xenon and argon gases are of particular interest as shielding for the first wall due to their high opacity values and ready availability. Mixing of the two gases is an attempt to engineer a gas cocktail to provide the maximum amount of shielding with the least amount of cost. A parameter study of different chamber radii shows a consistent relationship with that of first wall temperature (~1/r2) and overpressure (~1/r3). This work is performed under collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  2. A hyperbaric oxygen chamber for animal experimental purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djasim, U M; Spiegelberg, L; Wolvius, E B; van der Wal, K G H

    2012-02-01

    Facilities for hyperbaric oxygen therapy that are suitable for animal experimental research are scarce. In this paper, the authors introduce a hyperbaric oxygen chamber that was developed specifically for animal experimental purposes. The hyperbaric oxygen chamber was designed to meet a number of criteria regarding safety and ease of use. The hyperbaric oxygen chamber conforms to 97/23/EC (Pressure Equipment Directive), Conformity Assessment Module G Product Group 1. It provides easy access, and can be run in manual mode, semi-automatic mode and full-automatic mode. Sensors for pressure level, oxygen level, temperature, humidity and carbon dioxide level allow full control. This state-of-the-art hyperbaric oxygen chamber for animal experimental purposes permits the investigation of the biological mechanisms through which hyperbaric oxygen therapy acts at a fundamental level.

  3. Application of HB 6783 and GB/T 5170 in the Performance Acceptance for Temperature and Humidity Test Chamber%HB 6783、GB/T 5170在温湿度试验箱性能指标验收中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宝晗

    2016-01-01

    本文简要介绍了环境与可靠性试验领域试验设备系列检定标准HB 6783、GB/T 5170。以本单位某型温湿度试验箱验收为例,详细介绍了HB 6783、GB/T 5170系列温湿度试验设备检定/检验标准在温湿度试验箱性能指标验收中的应用,通过对比应用总结,指出综合比较不同检定标准中温湿度性能指标的检定项目、方法,结合本单位产品试验需求应用,是制定温湿度试验箱性能指标验收方法的最佳途径。%This paper briefly introduces the calibration standards, HB 6783 and GB/T 5170 for temperature and humidity testing equipment in the field of the environment and reliability test. Taking the acceptance for a certain temperature and humidity test case of our company as an example, it detailedly introduces the applications of HB 6783 and GB/T 5170 series of temperature and humidity test equipment calibration / testing standards in the performance index acceptance for temperature and humidity test chamber. Through comparison and application summary, this paper points out that the comprehensive comparison of calibration items and methods for temperature and humidity performance index and their applications in different calibration standards, and combined with the test requirement and application of our company’s products, is the best way to develop the suitable temperature and humidity test chamber performance acceptance method for the test.

  4. Promoted-Combustion Chamber with Induction Heating Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Erin; Hagood, Richard; Lowery, Freida; Herald, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    An improved promoted-combustion system has been developed for studying the effects of elevated temperatures on the flammability of metals in pure oxygen. In prior promoted-combustion chambers, initial temperatures of metal specimens in experiments have been limited to the temperatures of gas supplies, usually near room temperature. Although limited elevated temperature promoted-combustion chambers have been developed using water-cooled induction coils for preheating specimens, these designs have been limited to low-pressure operation due to the hollow induction coil. In contrast, the improved promoted-combustion chamber can sustain a pressure up to 10 kpsi (69 MPa) and, through utilization of a solid induction coil, is capable of preheating a metal specimen up to its melting point [potentially in excess of 2,000 F (approximately equal to 1,100 C)]. Hence, the improved promoted combustion chamber makes a greater range of physical conditions and material properties accessible for experimentation. The chamber consists of a vertical cylindrical housing with an inner diameter of 8 in. (20.32 cm) and an inner height of 20.4 in. (51.81 cm). A threaded, sealing cover at one end of the housing can be unscrewed to gain access for installing a specimen. Inlet and outlet ports for gases are provided. Six openings arranged in a helical pattern in the chamber wall contain sealed sapphire windows for viewing an experiment in progress. The base of the chamber contains pressure-sealed electrical connectors for supplying power to the induction coil. The connectors feature a unique design that prevents induction heating of the housing and the pressure sealing surfaces; this is important because if such spurious induction heating were allowed to occur, chamber pressure could be lost. The induction coil is 10 in. (25.4 cm) long and is fitted with a specimen holder at its upper end. At its lower end, the induction coil is mounted on a ceramic base, which affords thermal insulation to

  5. The Role of Temperature in the Action of Mepivacaine

    OpenAIRE

    Dabarakis, Nikolaos; Tsirlis, Anastasios; Parisis, Nikolaos; Tsoukalas, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01

    The role of temperature in the action of local anesthetics was studied in 20 healthy young volunteers with plain 3% mepivacaine injected periapically twice in their maxillary first premolar, the first time with the solution at a temperature of 20°C and the second time at 4°C. The pulpal response was measured with a pulp tester every minute. The onset of pulp anesthesia was found to be of no statistical difference between 20°C and 4°C. On the other hand, mepivacaine at a temperature of 4°C was...

  6. In vivo temperature rise in anesthetized human pulp during exposure to a polywave LED light curing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnacles, Patrício; Arrais, Cesar Augusto Galvão; Pochapski, Marcia Thais; Dos Santos, Fábio André; Coelho, Ulisses; Gomes, João Carlos; De Goes, Mário Fernando; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel; Rueggeberg, Frederick Allen

    2015-05-01

    This in vivo study evaluated pulp temperature (PT) rise in human premolars during exposure to a light curing unit (LCU) using selected exposure modes (EMs). After local Ethics Committee approval, intact first upper premolars, requiring extraction for orthodontic reasons, from 8 volunteers, received infiltrative and intraligamental anesthesia. The teeth (n=15) were isolated using rubber dam and a minute pulp exposure was attained. A sterile probe from a wireless, NIST-traceable, temperature acquisition system was inserted directly into the coronal pulp chamber, and real time PT (°C) was continuously monitored while the buccal surface was exposed to polywave light from a LED LCU (Bluephase 20i, Ivoclar Vivadent) using selected EMs allowing a 7-min span between each exposure: 10-s either in low (10-s/L) or high (10-s/H); 5-s-turbo (5-s/T); and 60-s-high (60-s/H) intensities. Peak PT values and PT increases from baseline (ΔT) after exposure were subjected to one-way, repeated measures ANOVAs, and Bonferroni's post hoc tests (α=0.05). Linear regression analysis was performed to establish the relationship between applied radiant exposure and ΔT. All EMs produced higher peak PT than the baseline temperature (p<0.001). The 60-s/H mode generated the highest peak PT and ΔT (p<0.001), with some teeth exhibiting ΔT higher than 5.5°C. A significant, positive relationship between applied radiant exposure and ΔT (r(2)=0.916; p<0.001) was noted. Exposing intact, in vivo anesthetized human upper premolars to a polywave LED LCU increases PT, and depending on EM and the tooth, PT increase can be higher than the critical ΔT, thought to be associated with pulpal necrosis. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, J.

    1990-05-01

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

  8. Design and construction of an inexpensive homemade plant growth chamber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Katagiri

    Full Text Available Plant growth chambers produce controlled environments, which are crucial in making reproducible observations in experimental plant biology research. Commercial plant growth chambers can provide precise controls of environmental parameters, such as temperature, humidity, and light cycle, and the capability via complex programming to regulate these environmental parameters. But they are expensive. The high cost of maintaining a controlled growth environment is often a limiting factor when determining experiment size and feasibility. To overcome the limitation of commercial growth chambers, we designed and constructed an inexpensive plant growth chamber with consumer products for a material cost of $2,300. For a comparable growth space, a commercial plant growth chamber could cost $40,000 or more. Our plant growth chamber had outside dimensions of 1.5 m (W x 1.8 m (D x 2 m (H, providing a total growth area of 4.5 m2 with 40-cm high clearance. The dimensions of the growth area and height can be flexibly changed. Fluorescent lights with large reflectors provided a relatively spatially uniform photosynthetically active radiation intensity of 140-250 μmoles/m2/sec. A portable air conditioner provided an ample cooling capacity, and a cooling water mister acted as a powerful humidifier. Temperature, relative humidity, and light cycle inside the chamber were controlled via a z-wave home automation system, which allowed the environmental parameters to be monitored and programmed through the internet. In our setting, the temperature was tightly controlled: 22.2°C±0.8°C. The one-hour average relative humidity was maintained at 75%±7% with short spikes up to ±15%. Using the interaction between Arabidopsis and one of its bacterial pathogens as a test experimental system, we demonstrate that experimental results produced in our chamber were highly comparable to those obtained in a commercial growth chamber. In summary, our design of an inexpensive plant

  9. Design and construction of an inexpensive homemade plant growth chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Fumiaki; Canelon-Suarez, Dario; Griffin, Kelsey; Petersen, John; Meyer, Rachel K; Siegle, Megan; Mase, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth chambers produce controlled environments, which are crucial in making reproducible observations in experimental plant biology research. Commercial plant growth chambers can provide precise controls of environmental parameters, such as temperature, humidity, and light cycle, and the capability via complex programming to regulate these environmental parameters. But they are expensive. The high cost of maintaining a controlled growth environment is often a limiting factor when determining experiment size and feasibility. To overcome the limitation of commercial growth chambers, we designed and constructed an inexpensive plant growth chamber with consumer products for a material cost of $2,300. For a comparable growth space, a commercial plant growth chamber could cost $40,000 or more. Our plant growth chamber had outside dimensions of 1.5 m (W) x 1.8 m (D) x 2 m (H), providing a total growth area of 4.5 m2 with 40-cm high clearance. The dimensions of the growth area and height can be flexibly changed. Fluorescent lights with large reflectors provided a relatively spatially uniform photosynthetically active radiation intensity of 140-250 μmoles/m2/sec. A portable air conditioner provided an ample cooling capacity, and a cooling water mister acted as a powerful humidifier. Temperature, relative humidity, and light cycle inside the chamber were controlled via a z-wave home automation system, which allowed the environmental parameters to be monitored and programmed through the internet. In our setting, the temperature was tightly controlled: 22.2°C±0.8°C. The one-hour average relative humidity was maintained at 75%±7% with short spikes up to ±15%. Using the interaction between Arabidopsis and one of its bacterial pathogens as a test experimental system, we demonstrate that experimental results produced in our chamber were highly comparable to those obtained in a commercial growth chamber. In summary, our design of an inexpensive plant growth chamber

  10. Impedances of Laminated Vacuum Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-22

    First publications on impedance of laminated vacuum chambers are related to early 70s: those are of S. C. Snowdon [1] and of A. G. Ruggiero [2]; fifteen years later, a revision paper of R. Gluckstern appeared [3]. All the publications were presented as Fermilab preprints, and there is no surprise in that: the Fermilab Booster has its laminated magnets open to the beam. Being in a reasonable mutual agreement, these publications were all devoted to the longitudinal impedance of round vacuum chambers. The transverse impedance and the flat geometry case were addressed in more recent paper of K. Y. Ng [4]. The latest calculations of A. Macridin et al. [5] revealed some disagreement with Ref. [4]; this fact stimulated us to get our own results on that matter. Longitudinal and transverse impendances are derived for round and flat laminated vacuum chambers. Results of this paper agree with Ref. [5].

  11. The CLAS drift chamber system

    CERN Document Server

    Mestayer, M D; Asavapibhop, B; Barbosa, F J; Bonneau, P; Christo, S B; Dodge, G E; Dooling, T; Duncan, W S; Dytman, S A; Feuerbach, R; Gilfoyle, G P; Gyurjyan, V; Hicks, K H; Hicks, R S; Hyde-Wright, C E; Jacobs, G; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Kuhn, S E; Magahiz, R A; Major, R W; Martin, C; McGuckin, T; McNabb, J; Miskimen, R A; Müller, J A; Niczyporuk, B B; O'Meara, J E; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Robb, J; Roudot, F; Schumacher, R A; Tedeschi, D J; Thompson, R A; Tilles, D; Tuzel, W; Vansyoc, K; Vineyard, M F; Weinstein, L B; Wilkin, G R; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2000-01-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on the toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  12. Annular-Cross-Section CFE Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed continuous-flow-electrophoresis (CFE) chamber of annular cross section offers advantages over conventional CFE chamber, and wedge-cross-section chamber described in "Increasing Sensitivity in Continuous-Flow Electrophoresis" (MFS-26176). In comparison with wedge-shaped chamber, chamber of annular cross section virtually eliminates such wall effects as electro-osmosis and transverse gradients of velocity. Sensitivity enhanced by incorporating gradient maker and radial (collateral) flow.

  13. Ionization chambers for LET determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki

    2010-01-01

    resolution and high sensitivity are necessary. For exact dosimetry which is done using ionization chambers (ICs), the recombination taking place in the IC has to be known. Up to now, recombination is corrected phenomenologically and more practical approaches are currently used. Nevertheless, Jaff´e's theory...... of columnar recombination was designed to model the detector efficiency of an ionization chamber. Here, we have shown that despite the approximations and simplification made, the theory is correct for the LETs typically found in clinical radiotherapy employing particles from protons to carbon ions...

  14. Ionization Chamber Measures Extreme Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Robert W.

    1987-01-01

    Ionization chamber operates in nearly total photon absorption as stable, self-calibrating detector of ionizing extreme ultraviolet radiation. Working gas of instrument is neon; photoionization properties well known and readily applicable to absolute measurements. Designed for measurements of solar ultraviolet flux aboard sounding rocket, instrument used on Earth to measure ultraviolet radiation in vacuum systems. Ionization chamber collects positive neon ions and electrons produced by irradiation of neon gas by ultraviolet photons. Approximately one ion produced by each photon; consequently, photoionization current nearly proportional to photon flux.

  15. Space shuttle maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program. Task 11: Low epsilon stability test report data dump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauckert, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    The stability characteristics of the like-doublet injector were defined over the range of OME chamber pressures and mixture ratios. This was accomplished by bomb testing the injector and cavity configurations in solid wall thrust chamber hardware typical of a flight contour with fuel heated to regenerative chamber outlet temperatures. It was found that stability in the 2600-2800 Hz region depends upon injector hydraulics and on chamber acoustics.

  16. Coupled heat transfer analysis of thrust chambers with recessed shear coaxial injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiawen; Sun, Bing

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the effects of recessed lengths on combustion performance and heat loads in LOX/methane thrust chambers with shear coaxial injectors, a coupled numerical methodology is developed to solve the combustion and heat transfer in thrust chambers with regenerative cooling. In this methodology, the transcritical turbulent combustion is modeled by a validated non-adiabatic flamelet model considering real-fluid properties; turbulent flows within the thrust chamber and cooling channels are computed by a pressure-based coupled algorithm. The validation indicates that the prediction with detailed chemistry mechanism and the Chung method confirms quantitatively to literature experimental data. The results reveal that the recess causes an increase of wall heat flux in the whole thrust chamber and makes the heat flux peak in the combustion chamber moves downstream. Furthermore, both the heat flux peaks in the combustion chamber and nozzle increase first and then decrease as recessed lengths increase. Meanwhile, chamber pressure, hot-gas temperature, and the averaging heat flux of the combustion chamber wall are positively correlated with recessed lengths. However, the heat loads are more sensitive to the recessed lengths than chamber pressure and hot-gas temperature. Much attention should be paid to the protection of chamber wall.

  17. Evaluation of Impinging Stream Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Bullard, Brad; Kopicz, Charles; Michaels, Scott

    2002-01-01

    for the liquid oxygen (LOX) hydrocarbon fuel (RP-1) system has been derived from the one for the gel propellant. An unlike impinging injector was employed to deliver the propellants to the chamber. MSFC is also conducting an alternative injection scheme, called the chasing injector, associated with this vortex chamber concept. In this injection technique, both propellant jets and their impingement point are in the same chamber cross-sectional plane. Long duration tests (approximately up to 15 seconds) will be conducted on the ISVC to study the thermal effects. This paper will report the progress of the subject efforts at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Thrust chamber performance and thermal wall compatibility will be evaluated. The chamber pressures, wall temperatures, and thrust will be measured as appropriate. The test data will be used to validate CFD models, which, in turn, will be used to design the optimum vortex chambers. Measurements in the previous tests showed that the chamber pressures vary significantly with radius. This is due to the existence of the vortices in the chamber flow field. Hence, the combustion efficiency may not be easily determined from chamber pressure. For this project, measured thrust data will be collected. The performance comparison will be in terms of specific impulse efficiencies. In addition to the thrust measurements, several pressure and temperature readings at various locations on the chamber head faceplate and the chamber wall will be made. The first injector and chamber were designed and fabricated based on the available data and experience gained during gel propellant system tests by the U.S. Army. The alternate injector for the ISVC was also fabricated. Hot-fire tests of the vortex chamber are about to start and are expected to complete in February of 2003 at the TS115 facility of MSFC.

  18. Low-Cost, High-Performance Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortini, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    Ultramet designed and fabricated a lightweight, high-temperature combustion chamber for use with cryogenic LOX/CH4 propellants that can deliver a specific impulse of approx.355 seconds. This increase over the current 320-second baseline of nitrogen tetroxide/monomethylhydrazine (NTO/MMH) will result in a propellant mass decrease of 55 lb for a typical lunar mission. The material system was based on Ultramet's proven oxide-iridium/rhenium architecture, which has been hot-fire tested with stoichiometric oxygen/hydrogen for hours. Instead of rhenium, however, the structural material was a niobium or tantalum alloy that has excellent yield strength at both ambient and elevated temperatures. Phase I demonstrated alloys with yield strength-to-weight ratios more than three times that of rhenium, which will significantly reduce chamber weight. The starting materials were also two orders of magnitude less expensive than rhenium and were less expensive than the C103 niobium alloy commonly used in low-performance engines. Phase II focused on the design, fabrication, and hot-fire testing of a 12-lbf thrust class chamber with LOX/CH4, and a 100-lbf chamber for LOX/CH4. A 5-lbf chamber for NTO/MMH also was designed and fabricated.

  19. DELPHI's Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The hundreds of mirrors around this Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber reflect cones of light created by fast moving particles to a detector. The velocity of a particle can be measured by the size of the ring produced on the detector. DELPHI, which ran from 1989 to 2000 on the LEP accelerator, was primarily concerned with particle identification.

  20. A dual deformable reverberation chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank

    2010-01-01

    There is disclosed an arrangement for measuring the effectiveness of a shielding material against electromagnetic fields. The arrangement comprises a first and a second reverberation chamber sharing a common wall. The common wall is partly made of the shielding material. A first antenna is arranged

  1. Bubble chamber: colour enhanced tracks

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    This artistically-enhanced image of real particle tracks was produced in the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC). Liquid hydrogen is used to create bubbles along the paths of the particles as a piston expands the medium. A magnetic field is produced in the detector causing the particles to travel in spirals, allowing charge and momentum to be measured.

  2. Testing an hydrogen streamer chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    A 2x10 cm gap streamer chamber, 35x55 cm2 in surface, was built and tested at CERN. Good tracks of cosmic rays were obtained up to atmospheric pressure, see F. Rohrbach et al, CERN-LAL (Orsay) Collaboration, Nucl. Instr. Methods 141 (1977) 229. Michel Cathenoz stand on the center.

  3. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, HBOT is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. HBOT is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The HHC technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system to provide controlled pressurization and adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the patient and operating personnel, and physiological considerations. The simple schematic, comprised of easily acquired commercial hardware

  4. Growing and Analyzing Biofilms in Flow Chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic...... conditions, and the environment can be carefully controlled and easily changed. The protocols in this unit include construction of the flow chamber and the bubble trap, assembly and sterilization of the flow chamber system, inoculation of the flow chambers, running of the system, image capture and analysis...

  5. Chamber dynamic research with pulsed power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSON,ROBERT R.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; RENK,TIMOTHY J.; ROCHAU,GARY E.; SWEENEY,MARY ANN

    2000-05-15

    In Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), Target Chamber Dynamics (TCD) is an integral part of the target chamber design and performance. TCD includes target output deposition of target x-rays, ions and neutrons in target chamber gases and structures, vaporization and melting of target chamber materials, radiation-hydrodynamics in target chamber vapors and gases, and chamber conditions at the time of target and beam injections. Pulsed power provides a unique environment for IFE-TCD validation experiments in two important ways: they do not require the very clean conditions which lasers need and they currently provide large x-ray and ion energies.

  6. Modeling of Fuel Film Cooling on Chamber Hot Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    wall-normal Cartesian coordinate y+ = dimensionless y-spacing at wall CEA = Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (computer program) CFD ...Introduction The walls of liquid rocket engine chambers and nozzles must contain large pressures while being exposed to very high temperature gases, and...The physical and chemical phenomena involved in hydrocarbon FFC is notionally represented in Fig. 1. Hydrocarbon fuel at the fuel tank temperature

  7. 21 CFR 864.9575 - Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... to hold platelet-rich plasma within a preselected temperature range. (b) Classification. Class II... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental chamber for storage of platelet... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9575 Environmental chamber for storage of...

  8. Researches on the Neutral Gas Pressure in the Divertor Chamber of the HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGMingxu; LIBo; YANGZhigang; YANLongwen; HONGWenyu; YUANBaoshan; LIULi; CAOZeng; CUIChenghe; LIUYong; WANGEnyao; ZHANGNianman

    2003-01-01

    The neutral gas pressure in divertor chamber is a very basic and important physics parameter because it determines the temperature of charged particles, the thermal flux density onto divertor plates, the erosion of divertor plates, impurity retaining and exhausting, particle transportation and confinement performance of plasma in tokamaks. Therefore, the pressure measurement in divertor chamber is taken into account in many large tokamaks.

  9. Iloprost up-regulates vascular endothelial growth factor expression in human dental pulp cells in vitro and enhances pulpal blood flow in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limjeerajarus, Chalida Nakalekha; Osathanon, Thanaphum; Manokawinchoke, Jeeranan; Pavasant, Prasit

    2014-07-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) is a biomolecule capable of enhancing angiogenesis and cellular proliferation. We investigated the influence of a PGI2 analogue (iloprost) on dental pulp revascularization in vitro and in vivo by using human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) and a rat tooth injury model, respectively. Iloprost stimulated the human dental pulp cell mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) in a significant dose-dependent manner. This mRNA up-regulation was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with a PGI2 receptor antagonist and forskolin (a protein kinase A activator). In contrast, a protein kinase A inhibitor significantly enhanced the iloprost-induced mRNA expression of VEGF, FGF-2, and PDGF. Pretreatment with a fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitor attenuated the VEGF, FGF-2, and PDGF mRNA expression, indicating opposing regulatory mechanisms. The effect of iloprost on the dental pulp was investigated in vivo by using a rat molar pulp injury model. The iloprost-treated group exhibited a significant increase in pulpal blood flow at 72 hours compared with control. The present study indicates that iloprost may be a candidate agent to promote neovascularization in dental pulp tissue, suggesting the potential clinical use of iloprost in vital pulp therapy. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Developmental changes in pulpal sensory innervation of rat incisors and molars shown on a single injection of the fluorescent dye AM1-43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Sumio

    2007-12-01

    Developmental changes in pulpal innervation of rat incisors and molars were examined using the fluorescent styryl dye AM1-43, which labels sensory cells and nerves in vivo. From 2 to 40 days after birth, the animals were injected once with a small amount of AM1-43 solution (2 microg/g bodyweight). One day after the injection, the animals were killed and examined. In 3-day-old rats, neither incisors nor molars were innervated. In 7-day-old rats, the pulp of incisors and molars was innervated as indicated by fine intensely stained varicose sensory fibers and thicker intensely stained fibers running mostly along the blood vessels. In 15-, 27-, and 41-day-old rats, sensory nerve fibers neither passed through the odontoblast layer nor penetrated into the dentin in incisors, whereas the sensory nerve fibers penetrated into the coronal dentin through the odontoblast layers in molars. These results suggest that innervation of dental pulp is composed of two phases: (i) linear penetration of nerve fibers along blood vessels into the pulp space; and (ii) sprouting and extension of nerve fibers into coronal dentin. Innervation of the incisor pulp may stop at the first phase.

  11. In-vivo Generation of Dental Pulp-Like Tissue Using Human Pulpal Stem Cells, a Collagen Scaffold and Dentin Matrix Protein 1 Following Subcutaneous Transplantation in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Rebecca S.; Alsanea, Rajaa; Fayad, Mohamed I.; Johnson, Bradford R.; Wenckus, Christopher S.; Hao, Jianjun; John, Asha S.; George, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The presence of a perforation is known to significantly compromise the outcome of endodontic treatment. One potential use of regenerative endodontic therapy may be the repair of root canal perforations. In addition to nutrients and systemic in-situ interactions, the three main components believed to be essential for tissue regeneration are: stem cells, scaffold, and growth factors. This study investigated the role of each component of the tissue engineering triad in the organization and differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs) in a simulated furcal perforation site using a mouse model. Collagen served as the scaffold and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) was the growth factor. Materials were placed in simulated perforation sites in dentin slices. MTA was the control repair material. At six weeks, the animals were sacrificed and the perforation sites were evaluated by light microscopy and histological staining. Organization of newly derived pulp tissue was seen in the group containing the triad of DPSCs, a collagen scaffold, and DMP1. The other four groups did not demonstrate any apparent tissue organization. Under the conditions of the present study, it may be concluded that the triad of DPSCs, a collagen scaffold, and DMP1 can induce an organized matrix formation similar to that of pulpal tissue, which may lead to hard tissue formation. PMID:18358888

  12. The optical system for the Big European Bubble Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Harigel, G G

    1977-01-01

    The optical system for the new giant bubble chamber, built for the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), consists of four sets of fisheye windows, each equipped with a wide-angle lens which has an aperture angle of 108 degrees , while the fifth set has a periscope for visual observation of the chamber interior. Each of the fisheye sets is assembled from three hemispherical windows. The largest hemisphere is made from Schott BK7 glass and is exposed to the temperature of liquid hydrogen. The entire optical system has been operated successfully for the past 4 years. (13 refs).

  13. Effects of high combustion chamber pressure on rocket noise environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, S. P.

    1972-01-01

    The acoustical environment for a high combustion chamber pressure engine was examined in detail, using both conventional and advanced theoretical analysis. The influence of elevated chamber pressure on the rocket noise environment was established, based on increase in exit velocity and flame temperature, and changes in basic engine dimensions. Compared to large rocket engines, the overall sound power level is found to be 1.5 dB higher, if the thrust is the same. The peak Strouhal number shifted about one octave lower to a value near 0.01. Data on apparent sound source location and directivity patterns are also presented.

  14. COLDDIAG: A Cold Vacuum Chamber for Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Casalbuoni, S; Gerstl, S; Grau, A W; Hagelstein, M; Saez de Jauregui, D; Boffo, C; Sikler, G; Baglin, V; Cox, M P; Schouten, J C; Cimino, R; Commisso, M; Spataro, B; Mostacci, A; Wallen, E J; Weigel, R; Clarke, J; Scott, D; Bradshaw, T; Jones, R; Shinton, I

    2011-01-01

    One of the still open issues for the development of superconducting insertion devices is the understanding of the beam heat load. With the aim of measuring the beam heat load to a cold bore and the hope to gain a deeper understanding in the beam heat load mechanisms, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics is under construction. The following diagnostics will be implemented: i) retarding field analyzers to measure the electron energy and flux, ii) temperature sensors to measure the total heat load, iii) pressure gauges, iv) and mass spectrometers to measure the gas content. The inner vacuum chamber will be removable in order to test different geometries and materials. This will allow the installation of the cryostat in different synchrotron light sources. COLDDIAG will be built to fit in a short straight section at ANKA. A first installation at the synchrotron light source Diamond is foreseen in June 2011. Here we describe the technical design report of this device and the planned measurements with beam.

  15. A compact multi-chamber setup for degradation and lifetime studies of organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gevorgyan, Suren; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-01-01

    chambers with temperature and atmosphere control. The four chambers are situated at close proximity in the setup thereby allowing the solar cells to be subjected to as uniform an illumination distribution as possible for the given solar simulator employed. The cell substrates serve as the front window...... and present a tight seal. Hence no illumination correction needs to be performed due to transmission and reflection losses as otherwise seen with test chambers employing a window as a seal. The solar cells in each chamber are continuously and individually electrically monitored under biased conditions...

  16. Study of eddy current power loss in an RCS vacuum chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Shou-Yan; WANG Sheng

    2012-01-01

    In a Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS),power loss due to an eddy current on the metal vacuum chamber would cause heating of the vacuum chamber.It is important to study the effect for estimating eddy current induced power loss and temperature growth.Analytical formulas for eddy current power loss for various types of vacuum chambers are derived for dipole and quadrupole repectively.By using the prototype of dipole of CSNS/RCS,an experiment was done to test the analytical formula.The derived formulas were applied to calculating the eddy current power loss on some special structures of an RCS vacuum chamber.

  17. A portable miniature anechoic chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorthioir, Jack; Gavin, Paul

    The portable miniature anechoic chamber (PMAC), a low-cost alternative to a full-size anechoic chamber, is presented. The PMAC is a miniature, enclosed, RF-tight microwave antenna range, which approximates the performance of an indoor range over the C through Ku (G through J)-band frequencies. The small footprint, four by six feet, allows for ease of movement by one person to a test site, indoors or outdoors. The PMAC can be used at I (intermediate)-level to support the operational readiness (OR) requirements of the U.S. Army, Navy or Air Force. In conjunction with the antenna test equipment (ATE), and under TPS control, it can be used for performance verification, fault detection and fault isolation. A typical application using the PMAC in this operating mode is described.

  18. Development of multiwire proportional chambers

    CERN Multimedia

    Charpak, G

    1969-01-01

    It has happened quite often in the history of science that theoreticians, confronted with some major difficulty, have successfully gone back thirty years to look at ideas that had then been thrown overboard. But it is rare that experimentalists go back thirty years to look again at equipment which had become out-dated. This is what Charpak and his colleagues did to emerge with the 'multiwire proportional chamber' which has several new features making it a very useful addition to the armoury of particle detectors. In the 1930s, ion-chambers, Geiger- Muller counters and proportional counters, were vital pieces of equipment in nuclear physics research. Other types of detectors have since largely replaced them but now the proportional counter, in new array, is making a comeback.

  19. Actuator System with Dual Chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    (8), the lid having a shaft opening (17) for a shaft (6) coupled to the magnetic rotor (5), wherein the magnetic rotor (5), when inserted in the translator cylinder (2), is arranged to translate a linear movement of the translator cylinder (2) into a rotational movement of the magnetic rotor by using...... magnetic flux (82) interacting between the magnetic stator and the magnetic rotor, said rotational movements is being transferred through a shaft (6), the lid (8) with a shaft opening (17) arranged for receiving the shaft (6), wherein the shaft is arranged to make both the linear and the rotational...... movement in the shaft opening (17), the lid (8) being arranged for confining the second end (15) of the translator cylinder (2), the translator cylinder confined by the lid (8) forms,when divided by the magnetic rotor (5), a first chamber (TC) with a first volume and a second chamber(BC) with a second...

  20. LEP vacuum chamber, early prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    The structure of LEP, with long bending magnets and little access to the vacuum chamber between them, required distributed pumping. This is an early prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, made from extruded aluminium. The main opening is for the beam. The small channel to the right is for cooling water, to carry away the heat deposited by the synchroton radiation from the beam. The 4 slots in the channel to the left house the strip-shaped ion-getter pumps (see 7810255). The ion-getter pumps depended on the magnetic field of the bending magnets, too low at injection energy for the pumps to function well. Also, a different design was required outside the bending magnets. This design was therefore abandoned, in favour of a thermal getter pump (see 8301153 and 8305170).

  1. Actuator System with Dual Chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to an actuator system with a magnetic lead screw (50), comprises a magnetic rotor (5) and a translator cylinder (2), the translator cylinder (2) comprises a magnetic stator (16), the translator cylinder (2) has a closed first end (14) and a second end confined by a lid...... (8), the lid having a shaft opening (17) for a shaft (6) coupled to the magnetic rotor (5), wherein the magnetic rotor (5), when inserted in the translator cylinder (2), is arranged to translate a linear movement of the translator cylinder (2) into a rotational movement of the magnetic rotor by using...... movement in the shaft opening (17), the lid (8) being arranged for confining the second end (15) of the translator cylinder (2), the translator cylinder confined by the lid (8) forms,when divided by the magnetic rotor (5), a first chamber (TC) with a first volume and a second chamber(BC) with a second...

  2. MPS II drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed.

  3. GBO RF Anechoic Chamber & Antenna Test Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A shielded anechoic chamber measuring 15 by 15 by 37 feet is located in the Jansky Laboratory at Green Bank. This chamber has been outfitted as a far-field antenna...

  4. Bubble Chambers for Experiments in Nuclear Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    DiGiovine, B; Holt, R J; Rehm, K E; Raut, R; Robinson, A; Sonnenschein, A; Rusev, G; Tonchev, A P; Ugalde, C

    2015-01-01

    A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with gamma-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning temperatures are dominated by radiative captures, in this experimental scheme we measure the time-reversed processes. Such photodisintegrations allow us to compute the radiative capture cross sections when transitions to excited states of the reaction products are negligible. Due to the transformation of phase space, the photodisintegration cross sections are up to two orders of magnitude higher. The main advantage of the new target-detector system is a density several orders of magnitude higher than conventional gas tar...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5470 - Hyperbaric chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hyperbaric chamber. 868.5470 Section 868.5470 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5470 Hyperbaric chamber. (a) Identification. A hyperbaric chamber is a device that is intended to increase the environmental oxygen pressure to promote...

  6. Growing and analyzing biofilms in flow chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic cond...

  7. Growing and Analyzing Biofilms in Flow Chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic cond...

  8. Wire chamber degradation at the Argonne ZGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberichter, W.; Spinka, H.

    1986-01-01

    Experience with multiwire proportional chambers at high rates at the Argonne Zero Gradient Synchrotron is described. A buildup of silicon on the sense wires was observed where the beam passed through the chamber. Analysis of the chamber gas indicated that the density of silicon was probably less than 10 ppM.

  9. LEP vacuum chamber cross-section

    CERN Multimedia

    1987-01-01

    This diagram shows the layout of the vacuum chambers used at LEP, which was in operation at CERN between 1989 and 2000. Vacuum chambers are necessary in accelerators to prevent unwanted interactions that can destabilise the beam. The pump on the right sucks air out of the chamber allowing the beam to progress with minimal interactions.

  10. Simple Cloud Chambers Using Gel Ice Packs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Kubota, Miki

    2012-01-01

    Although cloud chambers are highly regarded as teaching aids for radiation education, school teachers have difficulty in using cloud chambers because they have to prepare dry ice or liquid nitrogen before the experiment. We developed a very simple and inexpensive cloud chamber that uses the contents of gel ice packs which can substitute for dry…

  11. Vacuum chamber at intersection I-6

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    The vacuum chamber at intersection region I-6, one of these where experiments in colliding-beam physics will be taking place. The "wheels" prevent the thin wall (1.5 mm) of the chamber from collapsing. The chamber is equipped with heating tapes and its wrapped in thermal insulation. Residual gas pressure at this and other similar regions is around 10_11.

  12. Atomic force microscope chamber for in situ studies of ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepeda, Salvador; Yeh, Yin; Orme, Christine A.

    2001-11-01

    To investigate the surface morphologies of biological systems in a controlled gaseous environment (e.g., the temperature, humidity and composition), most commercial atomic force microscopes require modification. We have designed a double-jacketed environmental chamber specifically for a Nanoscope IIIa (Digital Instruments, Santa Barbara, CA) force microscope. We use cold nitrogen and thermoelectric devices to control the temperature in the chamber; the nitrogen simultaneously serves to create an inert environment. We have also designed a temperature controlled sample stage utilizing thermoelectric devices for fine temperature regulation. A variation of this sample stage allows us to image samples in fluids at cold temperatures with an O-ringless configuration. The relative humidity within the chamber is also measured with commercially available relative humidity sensors. We investigate the surface morphology of ice Ih in its pure phase and shall extend the study to ice in the presence of biological molecules, such as antifreeze proteins. We present a detailed description of our design and our first images of polycrystalline ice and single crystals of ice grown in situ from the vapor.

  13. Ceramic Matrix Composite Combustion Chamber for HAN-Based Monopropellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultramet will design and fabricate a lightweight, high temperature 5-lbf combustion chamber. The system will be designed for use with the AF-315 family of...

  14. Cloud chamber experiments on the origin of ice crystal complexity in cirrus clouds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valery N Shcherbakov; Carl G Schmitt; Andrew J Heymsfield

    2016-01-01

    ...) cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). A new experimental procedure was applied to grow and sublimate ice particles at defined super- and subsaturated ice conditions and for temperatures in the -40 to -60-°C range...

  15. Environmental Chambers (-10°C to 50°C)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — USARIEM has environmental and biophysical evaluation chambers of various sizes that can be controlled for temperature (-10°C to 50°C), relative humidity, and wind...

  16. Low-Cost, High-Performance Combustion Chamber for LOX/CH4 Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultramet will design and fabricate a lightweight, high temperature 5-lbf combustion chamber for use with cryogenic liquid oxygen/methane (LOX/CH4) propellant that...

  17. Development of Cloud Chamber by Using Peltier Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Jong Kwan [Jae Hyun High School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Jin Young [Jeon Min High School, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Tae [Dept. of Physics Education, Kongju National University, Kongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    In this research, we developed the newly cloud chamber apparatus by using Peltier device to apply nuclear physics experiment in high school or university. We observed the cosmic rays track by using the developed apparatus and a camcorder. And we compared and analyzed the acquired data. From the results, we acquired the following conclusions and suggestions : First, it is very difficult to observe the cosmic rays track in the typical cloud chamber because of the low frequency of it. But in the newly developed cloud chamber we can observe easily the cosmic rays track owing to the high frequency of it. Second, when we do the experiment with the newly developed apparatus, we found that the cosmic rays track happens well under the condition that the temperature of the upper place of cooling plate must be below 5 degree Celsius with more than isopropanol 1.04X10{sup -5}ml.mm{sup -3}. Third, the newly developed apparatus will be improved to have better precision by controlling the temperature of cooling plate in the cloud chamber by current intensity. Therefore we think that it is very useful to use the newly developed apparatus in the nuclear physics experiment in high school or university.

  18. Loss of ions in cavity ionization chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takata, N. [Ionizing Radiation Section, NMIJ/AIST, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)]. E-mail: n.takata@aist.go.jp; Tran, N.T. [Institute for Nuclear Science and Technique, VAEC, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Kim, E. [Radiation Safety Section, NIRS, Inageku, Chiba-city 263-8555 (Japan); Marsoem, P. [P3KRBiN-BATAN, JL Cinere-Pasar Jum' at, Jakarta 12070 (Indonesia); Kurosawa, T. [Ionizing Radiation Section, NMIJ/AIST, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Koyama, Y. [Ionizing Radiation Section, NMIJ/AIST, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2005-12-01

    Ion losses due to initial recombination, volume recombination, and back diffusion were each determined by measurements and calculations for different size cylindrical ionization chambers and spherical ionization chambers. By measuring signal currents from these ionization chambers irradiated with {sup 60}Co gamma rays, two groups of ion losses were obtained. (Group 1) Ion loss due to initial recombination and diffusion, which changes proportionally to the inverse of the voltage applied to the ionization chambers; (and group 2) ion loss due to volume recombination, which changes proportionally to the inverse of the square of the applied voltage. The diffusion loss was obtained separately by computing electric field distributions in the ionization chambers. It was found that diffusion loss is larger than initial recombination loss for the cylindrical ionization chambers and vise versa for the spherical ionization chambers.

  19. Pupillary block glaucoma following implantation of a posterior chamber pseudophakos in the anterior chamber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandal Anil

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Pupillary block glaucoma is a common complication of cataract surgery, especially following anterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. We report a case of pupillary block glaucoma with a posterior chamber IOL that was implanted in the anterior chamber following a complicated extracapsular cataract extraction. The case was successfully managed by explantation of the posterior chamber lens, anterior vitrectomy, peripheral iridectomy and secondary anterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. The intraocular pressure was controlled with a single topical antiglaucoma medication.

  20. Basic Aerodynamics of Combustion Chambers,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-20

    8217, tie imnrulse foree eyuilibr-um c’ the bomd’~ leye - is 173 pv-:irJ p~76vJbK 2sO) IL !-. = Zn pT -- a , bV T. z -,,r y.re C era 3oia * ~~I" onc art-=e...heat by combustion all have very large influences on the capabilities of a combustion chamber. A yellow- colored flame represents diffusion combustion in...the wakes of fuel droplets. Blue- colored flames represent gaseous combustion of evaporated vapors which have already left the fuel droplets. The

  1. Micro acoustic resonant chambers for heating/agitating/mixing (MARCHAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Noell, Aaron C.; Fisher, Anita M.; Takano, Nobuyuki; Grunthaner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A variety of applications require the mixing and/or heating of a slurry made from a powder/fluid mixture. One of these applications, Sub Critical Water Extraction (SCWE), is a process where water and an environmental powder sample (sieved soil, drill cuttings, etc.) are heated in a sealed chamber to temperatures greater than 200 degrees Celsius by allowing the pressure to increase, but without reaching the critical point of water. At these temperatures, the ability of water to extract organics from solid particulate increases drastically. This paper describes the modeling and experimentation on the use of an acoustic resonant chamber which is part of an amino acid detection instrument called Astrobionibbler [Noell et al. 2014, 2015]. In this instrument we use acoustics to excite a fluid- solid fines mixture in different frequency/amplitude regimes to accomplish a variety of sample processing tasks. Driving the acoustic resonant chamber at lower frequencies can create circulation patterns in the fluid and mixes the liquid and fines, while driving the chamber at higher frequencies one can agitate the fluid and powder and create a suspension. If one then drives the chamber at high amplitude at resonance heating of the slurry occurs. In the mixing and agitating cell the particle levitation force depends on the relative densities and compressibility's of the particulate and fluid and on the kinetic and potential energy densities associated with the velocity and pressure fields [Glynne-Jones, Boltryk and Hill 2012] in the cell. When heating, the piezoelectric transducer and chamber is driven at high power in resonance where the solid/fines region is modelled as an acoustic transmission line with a large loss component. In this regime, heat is pumped into the solution/fines mixture and rapidly heats the sample. We have modeled the piezoelectric transducer/chamber/ sample using Mason's equivalent circuit. In order to assess the validity of the model we have built and

  2. Physicist makes muon chamber sing

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    This Monitored Drift Tube detector, consisting of argon-CO2-filled aluminium tubes with a wire down the centre of each, will track muons in ATLAS; Tiecke used a single tube from one of these detectors to create the pipes in his organ. Particle physicists can make good musicians; but did you know particle detectors can make good music? That's what NIKHEF physicist Henk Tiecke learned when he used pipes cut from the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube detector (MDT) to build his own working Dutch-style barrel organ in the autumn of 2005. 'I like to work with my hands,' said Tiecke, who worked as a senior physicist at NIKHEF, Amsterdam, on ZEUS until his retirement last summer. Tiecke had already constructed his barrel organ when he visited some colleagues in the ATLAS muon chambers production area at Nikhef in 2005. He noticed that the aluminium tubes they were using to build the chambers were about three centimetres in diameter-just the right size for a pipe in a barrel organ. 'The sound is not as nice as from wooden...

  3. Limits to Drift Chamber Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    1998-01-01

    ATLAS (A Large Toroidal LHC Apparatus) will be a general-purpose experiment at the Large Hadron Collider that will be operational at CERN in the year 2004. The ATLAS muon spectrometer aims for a momentum resolution of 10% for a transverse momentum of pT=1TeV. The precision tracking devices in the muon system will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs) with a single wire resolution of 1100 chambers covering an area of ≈ 2500m2. The high counting rates in the spectrometer as well as the aim for excellent spatial resolution and high efficiency put severe constraints on the MDT operating parameters. This work describes a detailed study of all the resolution limiting factors in the ATLAS environment. A ’full chain’ simulation of the MDT response to photons and charged particles as well as quantitative comparisons with measurements was performed. The good agreement between simulation and measurements resulted in a profound understanding of the drift chamber processes and the individual contributions to the spat...

  4. Development of electrolyte-supported intermediate-temperature single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells using Ln{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (Ln = Pr, La, Gd) cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz de Larramendi, I.; Ruiz de Larramendi, J.I.; Rojo, T. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo.644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Lamas, D.G.; Cabezas, M.D.; Walsoee de Reca, N.E. [CINSO, CONICET-CITEFA, J.B. de La Salle 4397 (B1603ALO) Villa Martelli, Pcia. de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-09-05

    Iron-cobalt-based perovskite oxides with general formula Ln{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (where Ln = La, Pr and Gd) have been investigated for their application as intermediate-temperature cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Powdered samples of these materials were synthesized by a novel gel combustion process and then characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XPD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XPD patterns were satisfactorily indexed with an orthorhombic GdFeO{sub 3}-type structure and, for all samples, a mean particle size of less than 1 {mu}m was estimated from the SEM data. Experimental single-chamber SOFCs using with these materials as cathodes and NiO-SDC (samaria-doped ceria) and SDC as anode and electrolyte, respectively, were evaluated at 600 C in a methane/oxygen mixtures. Peak power densities of 65.4, 48.7 and 46.2 mW cm{sup -2} were obtained for Ag vertical stroke Ln{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} vertical stroke SDC vertical stroke NiO-SDC vertical stroke Pt cells with Ln = Pr, La and Gd, respectively. The relatively high power density obtained for the Pr compound shows that it could be an interesting material for cathode of single-chamber SOFCs. (author)

  5. Transferring calibration coefficients from ionisation chambers used for diagnostic radiology to transmission chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    In this work, the response of a double volume transmission ionisation chamber, developed at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, was compared to that of a commercial transmission chamber. Both ionisation chambers were tested in different X-ray beam qualities using secondary standard ionisation chambers as reference dosimeters. These standard ionisation chambers were a parallel-plate and a cylindrical ionisation chambers, used for diagnostic radiology and mammography beam qualities, respectively. The response of both transmission chambers was compared to that of the secondary standard chambers to obtain coefficients of equivalence. These coefficients allow the transmission chambers to be used as reference equipment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ion distributions in plane and cylindrical chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, R; George, E P

    1975-11-01

    The ion chamber equations of Thomson include both ion recombination and space-charge terms. Neglecting the space-charge term, an exact solution is obtained for the ion densities across a plane ionization chamber. The method is extended to the cylindrical chamber, and examples are given of the expected ion distributions in both geometries. Current-voltage relationships are derived for both chambers and compared with those of other workers. If the space-charge term is retained, the ion chamber equations for both geometries are not soluble in closed form. The cylindrical chamber is considered and a computer solution is obtained for the ion distributions and current. Comparison with the nonspace-charge solution shows that while there is only a small difference in the current-voltage relationship, a significant difference can occur in the ion concentrations.

  7. A mathematical model of aerosol holding chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Madsen, J; Berg, E

    1999-01-01

    A mathematical model of aerosol delivery from holding chambers (spacers) was developed incorporating tidal volume (VT), chamber volume (Vch), apparatus dead space (VD), effect of valve insufficiency and other leaks, loss of aerosol by immediate impact on the chamber wall, and fallout of aerosol...... in the chamber with time. Four different spacers were connected via filters to a mechanical lung model, and aerosol delivery during "breathing" was determined from drug recovery from the filters. The formula correctly predicted the delivery of budesonide aerosol from the AeroChamber (Trudell Medical, London......, Ontario, Canada), NebuChamber (Astra, Södirtälje, Sweden) and Nebuhaler (Astra) adapted for babies. The dose of fluticasone proportionate delivered by the Babyhaler (Glaxco Wellcome, Oxbridge, Middlesex, UK) was 80% of that predicted, probably because of incomplete priming of this spacer. Of the above...

  8. Tests of anechoic chamber for aeroacoustics investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchikovskiy, V. V.; Bersenev, Yu. V.; Makashov, S. Yu.; Belyaev, I. V.; Korin, I. A.; Sorokin, E. V.; Khramtsov, I. V.; Kustov, O. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the results of qualification tests in the new anechoic chamber of Perm National Research Polytechnic University (PNRPU) built in 2014-2015 and evaluation of the chamber quality in aeroacoustic experiments. It describes design features of the chamber and its sound-absorption lining. The qualification tests were carried out with tonal and broadband noise sources in the frequency range 100 Hz - 20 kHz for two different cases of the source arrangement. In every case, measurements were performed in three directions by traverse microphones. Qualification tests have determined that in the chamber there is a free acoustic field within radius of 2 m for tonal noise and 3 m for broadband noise. There was also evaluated acoustic quality of the chamber by measurements of the jet noise and vortex ring noise. The results of the experiments demonstrate that PNRPU anechoic chamber allows the aeroacoustic measurements to be performed to obtain quantitative results.

  9. Chamber and target technology development for inertial fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M; Besenbruch, G; Duke, J; Forman, L; Goodin, D; Gulec, K; Hoffer, J; Khater, H; Kulcinsky, G; Latkowski, J F; Logan, B G; Margevicious, B; Meier, W R; Moir, R W; Morley, N; Nobile, A; Payne, S; Peterson, P F; Peterson, R; Petzoldt, R; Schultz, K; Steckle, W; Sviatoslavsky, L; Tillack, M; Ying, A

    1999-04-07

    Fusion chambers and high pulse-rate target systems for inertial fusion energy (IFE) must: regenerate chamber conditions suitable for target injection, laser propagation, and ignition at rates of 5 to 10 Hz; extract fusion energy at temperatures high enough for efficient conversion to electricity; breed tritium and fuel targets with minimum tritium inventory; manufacture targets at low cost; inject those targets with sufficient accuracy for high energy gain; assure adequate lifetime of the chamber and beam interface (final optics); minimize radioactive waste levels and annual volumes; and minimize radiation releases under normal operating and accident conditions. The primary goal of the US IFE program over the next four years (Phase I) is to develop the basis for a Proof-of-Performance-level driver and target chamber called the Integrated Research Experiment (IRE). The IRE will explore beam transport and focusing through prototypical chamber environment and will intercept surrogate targets at high pulse rep-rate. The IRE will not have enough driver energy to ignite targets, and it will be a non-nuclear facility. IRE options are being developed for both heavy ion and laser driven IFE. Fig. 1 shows that Phase I is prerequisite to an IRE, and the IRE plus NIF (Phase II) is prerequisite to a high-pulse rate. Engineering Test Facility and DEMO for IFE, leading to an attractive fusion power plant. This report deals with the Phase-I R&D needs for the chamber, driver/chamber interface (i.e., magnets for accelerators and optics for lasers), target fabrication, and target injection; it is meant to be part of a more comprehensive IFE development plan which will include driver technology and target design R&D. Because of limited R&D funds, especially in Phase I, it is not possible to address the critical issues for all possible chamber and target technology options for heavy ion or laser fusion. On the other hand, there is risk in addressing only one approach to each technology

  10. The CAST Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Autiero, D; Cébrian, S; Carmona, J M; Chesi, Enrico Guido; Davenport, M; Delattre, M; Di Lella, L; Formenti, F; Gomez, H; Hasinoff, M; Irastorza, I G; Lakic, B; Luzón, G; Morales, J; Musa, L; Ortiz, A; Placci, A; Rodríguez, A; Ruz, J; Villar, J A; Zioutas, K

    2007-01-01

    One of the three X-ray detectors of the CAST experiment searching for solar axions is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) as a readout structure. Its design has been optimized to provide high sensitivity to the detection of the low intensity X-ray signal expected in the CAST experiment. A low hardware threshold of 0.8 keV is safely set during normal data taking periods, and the overall efficiency for the detection of photons coming from conversion of solar axions is 62 %. Shielding has been installed around the detector, lowering the background level to 4.10 x 10^-5 counts/cm^2/s/keV between 1 and 10 keV. During phase I of the CAST experiment the TPC has provided robust and stable operation, thus contributing with a competitive result to the overall CAST limit on axion-photon coupling and mass.

  11. The ARGUS microvertex drift chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, E.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Appuhn, R. D.; Buchmüller, J.; Kolanoski, H.; Kreimeier, B.; Lange, A.; Siegmund, T.; Walther, A.; Edwards, K. W.; Fernholz, R. C.; Kapitza, H.; MacFarlane, D. B.; O'Neill, M.; Parsons, J. A.; Prentice, J. D.; Seidel, S. C.; Tsipolitis, G.; Ball, S.; Babaev, A.; Danilov, M.; Tichomirov, I.

    1989-11-01

    The ARGUS collaboration is currently building a new microvertex drift chamber (μVDC) as an upgrade of their detector. The μVDC is optimized for B-meson physics at DORIS energies. Important design features are minimal multiple scattering for low-momentum particles and three-dimensional reconstruction of decay vertices with equal resolutions in r- φ and r- z. Vertex resolutions of 15-25 μm are expected. Prototypes of the μVDC have been tested with different gas mixtures at various pressures. Spatial resolutions as small as 20 μm were obtained using CO 2/propane at 4 bar and DME at 1 bar. New readout electronics have been developed for the μVDC aiming at low thresholds for the TDC measurements. Employing a novel idea for noise and cross-talk suppression, which is based on a discrimination against short pulses, very low threshold settings are possible.

  12. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed.

  13. Vacuum Chamber for the Booster Bending Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    To minimize eddy currents, induced by the rising magnetic field, the chamber was made from thin stainless steel of high specific electric resistance. For mechanical stength, it was corrugated in a hydro-forming process. The chamber is curved, to follow the beam's orbital path. Under vacuum, the chamber tends to staighten, the ceramic spacer along half of its length keeps it in place (see also 7402458).

  14. Bubble chamber: Omega production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This image is taken from one of CERN's bubble chambers and shows the decay of a positive kaon in flight. The decay products of this kaon can be seen spiraling in the magnetic field of the chamber. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that has been heated to boiling point.

  15. Free-Flow Open-Chamber Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Free-flow open-chamber electrophoresis variant of free-flow electrophoresis performed in chamber with open ends and in which velocity of electro-osmotic flow adjusted equal to and opposite mean electrophoretic velocity of sample. Particles having electrophoretic mobilities greater than mean mobility of sample particles move toward cathode, those with mobilities less move toward anode. Technique applied to separation of components of mixtures of biologically important substances. Sensitivity enhanced by use of tapered chamber.

  16. Engineering verification of the biomass production chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M., III; Sager, J. C.; Jones, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for life support systems, both biological and physical-chemical, for long-term human attended space missions are under serious study throughout NASA. The KSC 'breadboard' project has focused on biomass production using higher plants for atmospheric regeneration and food production in a special biomass production chamber. This chamber is designed to provide information on food crop growth rate, contaminants in the chamber that alter plant growth requirements for atmospheric regeneration, carbon dioxide consumption, oxygen production, and water utilization. The shape and size, mass, and energy requirements in relation to the overall integrity of the biomass production chamber are under constant study.

  17. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.; Hayes, K.; Hoard, C.; Hower, N.; Hutchinson, D.; Jaros, J.A.; Koetke, D.; Kowalski, L.A.

    1989-03-01

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 {mu}m spatial resolution and <1000 {mu}m track-pair resolution in pressurized CO{sub 2} gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO{sub 2} mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Precision Radio Frequency Anechoic Chamber Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs measurements and calibration of antennas for satellites and aircraft or groundbased systems. The chamber is primarily used for optimizing antenna...

  19. Bicone vacuum chamber for ISR intersection

    CERN Document Server

    1975-01-01

    This is one of the bicone chambers made of titanium for experiment R 702. The central corrugated part had a very thin titanium wall (0.28 mm). The first of these chambers collapsed in its central part when baked at 300 C (August 1975). After an intensive effort to develop better quality and reproducible welds for this special material, the ISR workshop was able to build two new chambers of this type. One of them was installed at I 7 for R 702 in 1976 and worked perfectly. It was at that time the most "transparent" intersection vacuum chamber. See also 7609219, 7609221.

  20. Optimization of environmental maintenance system used in a refuge chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junling Yang; Luwei Yang; Chong Zhang; Zhentao Zhang; Xiaojiang Li

    2015-01-01

    Mine refuge chambers are used to shield miners who fail to escape from the mine when incidents occur. Environment maintaining system plays a key role in stabilizing thermal environment of a mine refuge chamber against heat emitted from metabolism and transferred from outside. The safety and comfort of refugees are closely related to the environment maintaining system design. In order to improve the comfort of refugees, optimization on the environment maintaining system has been done based on the previous work. To evaluate the environment of the chamber, eight volunteers were involved into the experiment. Under close observation and safety protection, they lived in a heat-isolated test chamber for 106 hours. The volunteers were asked to maintain low level of activities to simulate refugees’ situation. It shows that the environment maintaining system worked well and the temperature, relative humidity and emitted harmful air content such as CO2 and CO were all kept in the safety level, and no discomfort was felt by volunteers at all.

  1. Experimental Study of a Cu-Mo Alloy Vapor Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obata Daniel H.S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the thermal behavior of a vapor chamber embedded in the base of a heat sink was experimentally analyzed considering the influence of the heat source position. The vapor chamber was produced by a copper and molybdenum alloy with length of 240 mm, width of 54 mm, thickness of 3 mm, and capillary structures composed by copper screen meshes. The working fluid used was de-ionized water. The pure aluminum heat sink was cooled by air forced convection and the evaporator vapor chamber was heated using an electrical resistor simulating integrated circuit power dissipation. The experimental tests were done in a suction type wind tunnel with open return for a heat load varying from 20 to 80 W, for an airflow velocity varying from 1 to 4 m/s, and for three different heat source positions. The experimental results showed that, independently of the heat source position, the considered vapor chamber worked successfully, maintaining low operating temperature.

  2. Drift velocity and pressure monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore, the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented. Another important parameter to be monitored is the pressure inside the muon drift tube chambers. The differential pressure must not exceed a certain value and the absolute pressure has to be kept slightly above ambient pressure to prevent air from entering into the muon drift tube chambers in case of a leak. Latest drift velocity monitoring results are discussed.

  3. Drift velocity and pressure monitoring of the CMS muon drift chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The drift velocity in drift tubes of the CMS muon chambers is a key parameter for the muon track reconstruction and trigger. It needs to be monitored precisely in order to detect any deviation from its nominal value. A change in absolute pressure, a variation of the gas admixture or a contamination of the chamber gas by air affect the drift velocity. Furthermore, the temperature and magnetic field influence its value. First data, taken with a dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) built by RWTH Aachen IIIA are presented. Another important parameter to be monitored is the pressure inside the muon drift tube chambers because the drift velocity depends on it. Furthermore the differential pressure must not exceed a certain value and the absolute pressure has to be kept slightly above ambient pressure to prevent air from entering into the muon drift tube chambers in case of a leak. Latest pressure monitoring results are discussed.

  4. Low-level measurements of Ra-226/Rn-222 by pulse ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Daoushy, Fand; Garcia-Tenorio, Rafael

    1988-10-01

    Characteristics of two ionization chambers have been studied and the chambers utilized for 226Ra/ 222Rn measurements for more than ten years. The results obtained show that coating of internal surfaces with a pure and thin Ag-layer enhances the background of ionization chambers in spite of some improvements at the early stages of operation. In addition to previously known parameters influencing the accuracy in routine measurements, new correction factors are suggested. 226Ra impurities in the body of ionization chambers are found to act not only as a permanent, but also as a temperature-dependent source of background. Earlier accuracies of 226Ra/ 222Rn measurements have been considerably improved by assuring long-term mechanical and thermal stability of the ionization chambers.

  5. Fuel combustion test in constant volume combustion chamber with built-in adaptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JEONG; DongSoo; CHO; GyuBack; CHOI; SuJin; LEE; JinSoo

    2010-01-01

    Combustion tests of pre-mixture of methane and air in constant volume combustion chamber(CVCC) have been carried out by means of flame propagation photo and gas pressure measurement,the effects of CVCC body temperature,intake pressure of pre-mixture of methane and air,equivalence ratio and location of the built-in adaptor have been investigated.The whole combustion chamber can be divided into two parts,i.e.the upper combustion chamber and the lower combustion chamber,by the built-in adaptor with through hole.Owing to the built-in adaptor with through hole,jet ignition or compression ignition(auto-ignition) phenomena may occur in the lower combustion chamber,which is helpful to getting higher flame propagation velocity,higher combustion peak pressure,low cycle-to-cycle variation and more stable combustion process.

  6. Air-based coal gasification in a two-chamber gas reactor with circulating fluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinin, A. M.; Tuponogov, V. G.; Kagramanov, Y. A.

    2017-01-01

    During the bed gasification of solid fuels, the process temperature in the reaction zone is not high enough for reaching the maximum rate of the chemical efficiency factor of the gasification process. In order to increase the chemical efficiency factor, it is necessary to supply extra heat to the reaction zone to increase the reaction temperature. In this article, coal gasification in a chamber with forced fluidized bed is considered and it is proposed to supply extra heat with a circulating flow of an inert particulate heat transfer agent. Circulating inert particulate material is successively heated by coal combustion in a cone chamber with bubbling fluidized bed and in a combustion chamber with a spherical nozzle that inhibits the forced fluidized bed. After that, the heat transfer agent heated to 930-950°C enters first in a gasification chamber with bubbling bed and then in a chamber with forced fluidized bed, where it transfers the physical heat to the air fuel mixture. The experiments conducted with crushed Borodinsky coal and inert particulate heat transfer agent (electrocorundum) showed the temperature rise in a gasification chamber with from 760 to 870°C and the increase in the combustible component (CO) concentration in the gasification products by 5.5%. Based on the kinetic equations of the fuel combustion reactions and the CO2 reduction to CO and on the thermal balance equations of combustion and gasification chambers, the simulation model for the gas composition and the temperature rate calculated by the height of reaction chambers was developed. The experimental temperature rates and product gas compositions are in good agreement with the simulation results based on the proposed kinetic gasification model.

  7. Time Evolution of Thermo-Mechanically and Chemically Coupled Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozimek, C.; Karlstrom, L.; Erickson, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Complexity in the volcanic eruption cycle reflects time variation both of magma inputs to the crustal plumbing system and of crustal melt storage zones (magma chambers). These data include timing and volumes of eruptions, as well as erupted compositions. Thus models must take into account the coupled nature of physical attributes. Here we combine a thermo-mechanical model for magma chamber growth and pressurization with a chemical model for evolving chamber compositions, in the limit of rapid mixing, to study controls on eruption cycles and compositions through time. We solve for the mechanical evolution of a 1D magma chamber containing melt, crystals and bubbles, in a thermally evolving and viscoelastic crust. This pressure and temperature evolution constrains the input values of a chemical box model (Lee et al., 2013) that accounts for recharge, eruption, assimilation and fractional crystallization (REAFC) within the chamber. We plan to study the influence of melt supply, input composition, and chamber depth eruptive fluxes and compositions. Ultimately we will explore multiple chambers coupled by elastic-walled dikes. We expect that this framework will facilitate self-consistent inversion of long-term eruptive histories in terms of magma transport physics. Lee, C.-T. A., Lee, T.-C., Wu, C.-T., 2013. Modeling the compositional evolution of recharging, evacuating, and fractionating (REFC) magma chambers: Implications for differentiationof arc magmas. Geochemica Cosmochimica Acta, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2013.08.009.

  8. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  9. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  10. Raymond J. Chambers--A Personal Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffikin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper is presented as a tribute to Raymond J. Chambers. As its title suggests, it is a personal reflection through the eyes of someone who worked closely with him over a period of 10 years during a latter part of his career, and who completed a doctoral thesis with aspects of the work of Chambers as its subject. During this time, author…

  11. Results from the MAC Vertex chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-05-01

    The design, construction, and performance characteristics of a high precision gaseous drift chamber made of thin walled proportional tubes are described. The device achieved an average spatial resolution of 45 ..mu..m in use for physics analysis with the MAC detector. The B-lifetime result obtained with this chamber is discussed.

  12. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber. (a) Identification. An anaerobic chamber is a device intended for medical purposes to maintain an anaerobic...

  13. Supersonic Jet Interactions in a Plenum Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Venugopal

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding thè supersonic jet interactions in a plenum chamber is essential for thè design of hot launch systems. Static tests were conducted in a small-scale rocket motor ioaded with a typical nitramine propellaiit to produce a nozzle exit Mach number of 3. This supersonic jet is made to interact with plenum chambers having both open and closed sides. The distance between thè nozzle exit and thè back piate of plenum chamber are varied from 2. 5 to 7. 0 times thè nozzle exit diameter. The pressure rise in thè plenum chamber was measured using pressure transducers mounted at different locatìons. The pressure-time data were analysed to obtain an insight into thè flow field in thè plenum chamber. The maximum pressure exerted on thè back piate of plenum chamber is about 25-35 per cent. of thè maximum stagnation pressure developed in thè rocket motor. Ten static tests were carried out to obtain thè effect of axial distance between thè nozzle exit and thè plenum chamber back piate, and stagnation pressure in thè rocket motoron thè flow field in thè open-sided and closed-sided plenum chambers configurations.

  14. An ionization chamber with magnetic levitated electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Kawaguchi, T

    1999-01-01

    A new type of ionization chamber which has magnetically levitated electrodes has been developed. The electrodes are supplied voltages for the repelling of ions by a battery which is also levitated with the electrodes. The characteristics of this ionization chamber are investigated in this paper.

  15. ME1/1 Cathode Strip Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Erchov, Yu V; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Khabarov, Serguei; Moissenz, P V; Moissenz, K P; Movchan, Sergey; Perelygin, Victor; Vassiliev, S E; Zarubin, Anatoli; Tchekhovski, V A

    2008-01-01

    The 76 innermost ME1/1 cathode strip chambers (CSC) of the CMS Experiment were designed and produced in Dubna. The chambers have been installed in the detector and commissioning has been completed. This paper describes the design of the CSCs, their main mechanical parameters and read-out electronics, and the results of tests with cosmic-ray muons.

  16. HVAC&R Equipment Environmental Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description:Large "Truck" ChamberThe large "truck" chamber provides controlled air conditions from -7 °C (20 °F) to 65 °C (150 °F).Air-Conditioner and Heat Pump Test...

  17. The drift velocity monitoring system of the CMS barrel muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Altenhoefer, Georg Friedrich; Heidemann, Carsten Andreas; Reithler, Hans; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel Francois

    2017-01-01

    The drift velocity is a key parameter of drift chambers. Its value depends on several parameters: electric field, pressure, temperature, gas mixture, and contamination, for example, by ambient air. A dedicated Velocity Drift Chamber (VDC) with 1-L volume has been built at the III. Phys. Institute A, RWTH Aachen, in order to monitor the drift velocity of all CMS barrel muon Drift Tube chambers. A system of six VDCs was installed at CMS and has been running since January 2011. We present the VDC monitoring system, its principle of operation, and measurements performed.

  18. The SAMURAI Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Steven

    2011-10-01

    The SAMURAI Time Projection Chamber (TPC) will be used to study particle collisions by colliding a beam of particles with a stationary gas which will be contained in a field cage inside the TPC. When the beam collides with the gas, charged particles are accelerated into the pad plane by an electric field. The paths of these particles will be curved by a magnetic field created by the SAMURAI magnet at the RIKEN facility in Japan. The charged particles will then collide with the pad plane which will be located on the bottom of the TPC. The pad plane will take these collisions and create electrical signals and send them to supporting electronics where the data can be interpreted. The TPC will be used to help determine the Equation of State for asymmetric nuclear matter. Measurements of neutron, proton, 3H and 3He flow will be taken with the NEBULA array which consists of nebula scintillators. The poster will contain information on the laser calibration system and the electronics that will be used for the TPC. The electronics used are the same electronics used in the STAR TPC experiment.

  19. The CAST time projection chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autiero, D.; Beltrán, B.; Carmona, J. M.; Cebrián, S.; Chesi, E.; Davenport, M.; Delattre, M.; Di Lella, L.; Formenti, F.; Irastorza, I. G.; Gómez, H.; Hasinoff, M.; Lakic, B.; Luzón, G.; Morales, J.; Musa, L.; Ortiz, A.; Placci, A.; Rodrigurez, A.; Ruz, J.; Villar, J. A.; Zioutas, K.

    2007-06-01

    One of the three x-ray detectors of the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) experiment searching for solar axions is a time projection chamber (TPC) with a multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) as a readout structure. Its design has been optimized to provide high sensitivity to the detection of the low intensity x-ray signal expected in the CAST experiment. A low hardware threshold of 0.8 keV is set to a safe level during normal data taking periods, and the overall efficiency for the detection of photons coming from conversion of solar axions is 62%. Shielding has been installed around the detector, lowering the background level to 4.10 × 10-5 counts cm-2 s-1 keV-1 between 1 and 10 keV. During phase I of the CAST experiment the TPC has provided robust and stable operation, thus contributing with a competitive result to the overall CAST limit on axion photon coupling and mass.

  20. Method of fabricating a rocket engine combustion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); Mckechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor); Power, Christopher A. (Inventor); Daniel, Ronald L., Jr. (Inventor); Saxelby, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for making a combustion chamber for a rocket engine wherein a copper alloy in particle form is injected into a stream of heated carrier gas in plasma form which is then projected onto the inner surface of a hollow metal jacket having the configuration of a rocket engine combustion chamber is described. The particles are in the plasma stream for a sufficient length of time to heat the particles to a temperature such that the particles will flatten and adhere to previously deposited particles but will not spatter or vaporize. After a layer is formed, cooling channels are cut in the layer, then the channels are filled with a temporary filler and another layer of particles is deposited.

  1. Cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics: Instrumentation and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstl, S.; Voutta, R.; Casalbuoni, S.; Grau, A. W.; Holubek, T.; de Jauregui, D. Saez; Bartolini, R.; Cox, M. P.; Longhi, E. C.; Rehm, G.; Schouten, J. C.; Walker, R. P.; Sikler, G.; Migliorati, M.; Spataro, B.

    2014-10-01

    For a proper design of the cryogenic layout of superconducting insertion devices it is necessary to take into account the heat load from the beam to the cold beam tube. In order to measure and possibly understand the beam heat load to a cold bore, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics (COLDDIAG) has been built. COLDDIAG is designed in a flexible way, to allow its installation in different light sources. In order to study the beam heat load and the influence of the cryosorbed gas layer, the instrumentation comprises temperature sensors, pressure gauges, and mass spectrometers as well as retarding field analyzers with which it is possible to measure the beam heat load, total pressure, and gas content as well as the flux of particles hitting the chamber walls. In this paper we describe the experimental equipment, the installation of COLDDIAG in the Diamond Light Source and selected examples of the measurements performed to show the capabilities of this unique instrument.

  2. Development of Vacuum Chambers in Low Z Material

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C; Gallilee, M; Perez Espinos, J

    2013-01-01

    Highly transparent vacuum chambers are increasingly required in high energy particle physics. In particular, vacuum chambers in the experiments should be as transparent as possible to minimize the background to the detectors, whilst also reducing the material activation. Beryllium is, so far, the most performant material for this application, but it presents some drawbacks such as brittleness, manufacturing issues, toxic if broken, high cost and low availability. A development work to obtain an alternative material to beryllium with similar performance is being carried out at CERN. Three categories have been defined and considered: raw bulk material, material composites and structural composites. The main functional requirements are: vacuum compatibility (leak tightness, low outgassing rate), temperature resistance (in the range 200-230 °C), transparency, and mechanical stiffness and strength. After beryllium, carbon is the element with the lowest atomic number that is practical for this application; therefo...

  3. Monitored Drift Chambers in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Herten, G

    Monitored Drift Chambers (MDT) are used in the ATLAS Detector to measure the momentum of high energy muons. They consist of drift tubes, which are filled with an Ar-CO2 gas mixture at 3 bar gas pressure. About 1200 drift chambers are required for ATLAS. They are up to 6 m long. Nevertheless the position of every wire needs to be known with a precision of 20 µm within a chamber. In addition, optical alignment sensors are required to measure the relative position of adjacent chambers with a precision of 30µm. This gigantic task seems impossible at first instance. Indeed it took many years of R&D to invent the right tools and methods before the first chamber could be built according to specifications. Today, at the time when 50% of the chambers have been produced, we are confident that the goal for ATLAS can be reached. The mechanical precision of the chambers could be verified with the x-ray tomograph at CERN. This ingenious device, developed for the MDT system, is able to measure the wire position insid...

  4. Research on structural design and test technologies for a three-chamber launching device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Wu; Qiushi, Yan; Ling, Xiao; Tieshuan, Zhuang; Chengyu, Yang

    2016-07-01

    A three-chamber launching device with improved acceleration is proposed and developed. As indicated by the damage generated during the pill and engineering protection tests, the proposed device is applicable as a high-speed launching platform for pills of different shapes and quality levels. Specifically, it can be used to investigate kinetic energy weapons and their highly destructive effects due to the resulting large bomb fragments. In the horizontal direction of the barrel, two auxiliary chambers are set at a certain distance from the main chamber. When the pill reaches the mouth of the auxiliary chambers, the charges in the auxiliary chambers are ignited by the high-temperature, high-pressure combustible gas trailing the pill. The combustible gas in the auxiliary chambers can resist the rear pressure of the pill and thus maintain the high pressure of the pill base. In this way, the required secondary acceleration of the pill is met. The proposed device features the advantage of launching a pill with high initial velocity under low bore pressure. Key techniques are proposed in the design of the device to address the problems related to the angle between the main chamber axis and the ancillary chamber axis, the overall design of a three-chamber barrel, the structural design of auxiliary propellant charge, the high-pressure combustible gas sealing technology, and the sabot and belt design. Results from the launching test verify the reasonable design of this device and its reliable structural sealing. Additionally, the stiffness and the strength of the barrel meet design requirements. Compared with the single-chamber launching device with the same caliber, the proposed device increases the average launching velocity by approximately 15% and the amount of muzzle kinetic energy by approximately 35%. Therefore, this equipment is capable of carrying out small-caliber, high-speed pill firing tests.

  5. Research on structural design and test technologies for a three-chamber launching device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Wu; Qiushi, Yan; Ling, Xiao; Tieshuan, Zhuang; Chengyu, Yang

    2016-07-01

    A three-chamber launching device with improved acceleration is proposed and developed. As indicated by the damage generated during the pill and engineering protection tests, the proposed device is applicable as a high-speed launching platform for pills of different shapes and quality levels. Specifically, it can be used to investigate kinetic energy weapons and their highly destructive effects due to the resulting large bomb fragments. In the horizontal direction of the barrel, two auxiliary chambers are set at a certain distance from the main chamber. When the pill reaches the mouth of the auxiliary chambers, the charges in the auxiliary chambers are ignited by the high-temperature, high-pressure combustible gas trailing the pill. The combustible gas in the auxiliary chambers can resist the rear pressure of the pill and thus maintain the high pressure of the pill base. In this way, the required secondary acceleration of the pill is met. The proposed device features the advantage of launching a pill with high initial velocity under low bore pressure. Key techniques are proposed in the design of the device to address the problems related to the angle between the main chamber axis and the ancillary chamber axis, the overall design of a three-chamber barrel, the structural design of auxiliary propellant charge, the high-pressure combustible gas sealing technology, and the sabot and belt design. Results from the launching test verify the reasonable design of this device and its reliable structural sealing. Additionally, the stiffness and the strength of the barrel meet design requirements. Compared with the single-chamber launching device with the same caliber, the proposed device increases the average launching velocity by approximately 15% and the amount of muzzle kinetic energy by approximately 35%. Therefore, this equipment is capable of carrying out small-caliber, high-speed pill firing tests.

  6. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumard, B. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: shumard@phy.anl.gov; Henderson, D.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rehm, K.E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Tang, X.D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 203 H-113, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the ({alpha}, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for ({alpha}, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only ({alpha}, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. x 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the ({alpha}, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the ({alpha}, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction.

  7. Sample chambers with mother-daughter mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilk, P.A.; Gregorich, K.E.; Hoffman, D.C.

    2001-07-12

    A set of eight stand-alone sample chambers with a common interface were constructed at LBNL for improved detection of alpha and fission decay chains over currently used designs. The stainless steel chambers (see Figure 1 for a schematic and Figure 2 for a photograph of a completed chamber) were constructed to allow for low background detection of a daughter event by removal of the sample following the detection of a parent event. This mother-daughter mode of operation has been utilized successfully with our Merry-go-Round (MG) detection system [Gregorich 1994].

  8. Radiation-induced foil electret chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallone, B. G.; Podgorsak, E. B.

    1983-10-01

    Saturation current densities, extrapolated electric fields, and electret-charging and -discharging current-density profiles in an ionization electret chamber are discussed as a function of various chamber parameters, such as air-gap and polymer thickness, polarizing electrode material, exposure rate, etc. Both the saturation current density and the extrapolated electric field consist of two components; one is linear with the air-gap thickness and is attributed to primary ionization in air, and the other exhibits exponential saturation and is attributed to air ionization caused by photoelectrons backscattered into the chamber sensitive volume from the polarizing electrode.

  9. LEP vacuum chamber, cross-section

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Cross-section of the final prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber. The elliptic main-opening is for the beam. The small channel to the left is for the cooling water, to carry away the heat deposited by the synchrotron radiation. The square channel to the right houses the Non-Evaporable Getter (NEG) pump. The chamber is made from extruded aluminium. Its outside is clad with lead, to stop the synchrotron radiation emitted by the beam. For good adherence between Pb and Al, the Al chamber was coated with a thin layer of Ni. Ni being slightly magnetic, some resulting problems had to be overcome. See also 8301153.

  10. Bubble chamber: Omega production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This image is of real particle tracks taken from the CERN 2 m liquid hydrogen bubble chamber and shows the production and decay of a negative omega particle. A negative kaon enters the chamber which decays into many particles, including a negative omega that travels a short distance before decaying into more particles. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  11. A mathematical model of aerosol holding chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Madsen, J; Berg, E

    1999-01-01

    in the chamber with time. Four different spacers were connected via filters to a mechanical lung model, and aerosol delivery during "breathing" was determined from drug recovery from the filters. The formula correctly predicted the delivery of budesonide aerosol from the AeroChamber (Trudell Medical, London......, Ontario, Canada), NebuChamber (Astra, Södirtälje, Sweden) and Nebuhaler (Astra) adapted for babies. The dose of fluticasone proportionate delivered by the Babyhaler (Glaxco Wellcome, Oxbridge, Middlesex, UK) was 80% of that predicted, probably because of incomplete priming of this spacer. Of the above...

  12. Weld Development for Aluminum Fission Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, Carl Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Jesse Norris [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-16

    The Sigma welding team was approached to help fabricate a small fission chamber (roughly ½ inch dia. x ½ inch tall cylinder). These chambers are used as radiation sensors that contain small traces of radionuclides (Cf 252, U 235, and U 238) that serve to ionize gas atoms in addition to external radiation. When a voltage is applied within the chamber, the resulting ion flow can be calibrated and monitored. Aluminum has the advantage of not forming radioactive compounds when exposed to high external radiation (except from minor Na alloy content). Since aluminum has not been used before in this application, this presented an unexplored challenge.

  13. APS Storage Ring vacuum chamber fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeppner, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The 1104-m circumference Advanced Photon Source Storage Ring Vacuum System is composed of 240 individual sections, which are fabricated from a combination of aluminum extrusions and machined components. The vacuum chambers will have 3800 weld joints, each subject to strict vacuum requirements, as well as a variety of related design criteria. The vacuum criteria and chamber design are reviewed, including a discussion of the weld joint geometries. The critical fabrication process parameters for meeting the design requirements are discussed. The experiences of the prototype chamber fabrication program are presented. Finally, the required facilities preparation for construction activity is briefly described. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. 30 CFR 77.305 - Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. 77.305 Section 77.305 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY... drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. Drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and all ductwork in which coal dust may accumulate shall be equipped with...

  15. Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) for high heat flux thrust chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Christopher M.

    The last 30 years materials engineers have been under continual pressure to develop materials with a greater temperature potential or to produce configurations that can be effectively cooled or otherwise protected at elevated temperature conditions. Turbines and thrust chambers produce some of the harshest service conditions for materials which lead to the challenges engineers face in order to increase the efficiencies of current technologies due to the energy crisis that the world is facing. The key tasks for the future of gas turbines are to increase overall efficiencies to meet energy demands of a growing world population and reduce the harmful emissions to protect the environment. Airfoils or blades tend to be the limiting factor when it comes to the performance of the turbine because of their complex design making them difficult to cool as well as limitations of their thermal properties. Key tasks for space transportation it to lower costs while increasing operational efficiency and reliability of our space launchers. The important factor to take into consideration is the rocket nozzle design. The design of the rocket nozzle or thrust chamber has to take into account many constraints including external loads, heat transfer, transients, and the fluid dynamics of expanded hot gases. Turbine engines can have increased efficiencies if the inlet temperature for combustion is higher, increased compressor capacity and lighter weight materials. In order to push for higher temperatures, engineers need to come up with a way to compensate for increased temperatures because material systems that are being used are either at or near their useful properties limit. Before thermal barrier coatings were applied to hot-section components, material alloy systems were able to withstand the service conditions necessary. But, with the increased demand for performance, higher temperatures and pressures have become too much for those alloy systems. Controlled chemistry of hot

  16. Technical Note: A numerical test-bed for detailed ice nucleation studies in the AIDA cloud simulation chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Cotton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere aerosol and cloud chamber of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe can be used to test the ice forming ability of aerosols. The AIDA chamber is extensively instrumented including pressure, temperature and humidity sensors, and optical particle counters. Expansion cooling using mechanical pumps leads to ice supersaturation conditions and possible ice formation. In order to describe the evolving chamber conditions during an expansion, a parcel model was modified to account for diabatic heat and moisture interactions with the chamber walls. Model results are shown for a series of expansions where the initial chamber temperature ranged from −20°C to −60°C and which used desert dust as ice forming nuclei. During each expansion, the initial formation of ice particles was clearly observed. For the colder expansions there were two clear ice nucleation episodes. In order to test the ability of the model to represent the changing chamber conditions and to give confidence in the observations of chamber temperature and humidity, and ice particle concentration and mean size, ice particles were simply added as a function of time so as to reproduce the observations of ice crystal concentration. The time interval and chamber conditions over which ice nucleation occurs is therefore accurately known, and enables the model to be used as a test bed for different representations of ice formation.

  17. Importancia de la semiología del dolor en el diagnóstico de un proceso inflamatorio pulpar Significance of pain's Symptomatology in the diagnosis of pulpal inflammatory process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés 0 Pérez Ruiz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available El dolor es un síntoma de extraordinaria importancia en la práctica estomatológica y particularmente en lo concerniente a las alteraciones de la pulpa dentaria. Con el objetivo de profundizar en el conocimiento de las fases por las que atraviesa un proceso inflamatorio pulpar, que permiten predecir sus manifestaciones dolorosas, se realizó una revisión bibliográfica sobre el tema con un enfoque multidisciplinario y básico-clínico. Se utilizó el método documental para el análisis y tratamiento de la información ofrecida por las fuentes teóricas. El sitio en Internet Google fue empleado como fundamental motor de búsqueda y Lilacs, Hinari, Medline y PubMed fueron las bases de datos más revisadas. La clasificación del estado de inflamación pulpar, que atiende a eventos histopatológicos que no se pueden visualizar, resulta más difícil. Se podría lograr mayor precisión en un diagnóstico basado en el curso que sigue el dolor, de acuerdo a la magnitud del compromiso inflamatorio y apoyado en la rica semiología que se puede obtener si se sigue la trayectoria de las variables del estímulo nociceptivo. El incremento y profundización de los conocimientos en este campo contribuiyó significativamente a un mejor diagnóstico y tratamiento de los procesos inflamatorios pulpares.Pain is a symptom very important in the stomatologic practice and particularly in that concerning to dental pulp alterations. To deep in the knowledge of phases crossed by a pulpal inflammatory process allowing predicting its painful manifestations, authors made a bibliographic review on this subject with a multidisciplinary and basic-clinical approach, using the documentary method for analysis and management of information offered by theoretical sources. Google was used as a fundamental search tool and LILACS, HINARI, Medline and PubMed were the more reviewed databases. The classification of pulpal inflammation state, taking into account non

  18. Impact of Orthodontic Treatment on Pulpal Vitality of Traumatic Maxillary Incisors%正畸矫治对上颌外伤切牙牙髓活力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩培辉; 彭绍斌; 董辉; 周顺成; 张明烨; 丁寅

    2012-01-01

    To detect the impact of orthodontic treatment on pulpal vitality of traumatic maxillary incisors. Methods: The cases were collected from Department of orthodontics and Department of dental pulpal, Stomatological College, Fourth Military Medical University during the period 2006 to 2011, and were divided into three groups: orthodontic traumatic group, orthodontic no-traumatic group and trauma group. The pulpal necrosis probabilities of the three groups were compared with each other, respectively. Results: There was significant difference between the orthodontic traumatic group and the orthodontic no-traumatic group (P0.05). Conclusion: Orthodontic treatment of patients, with severe periodontal injury history of maxillary incisors have more chances to take pulp necrosis than those without trauma.%目的:研究正畸矫治对上颌外伤切牙牙髓活力的影响.方法:选取我院正畸科2006~2011年期间的病例60例,并按上颌切牙有无外伤史分为正畸外伤组和正畸无外伤组两组;选取我院牙体牙髓科2008-2011年期间上颌切牙有外伤但未行RCT( Root canal treatment)的病例30例,设为外伤无正畸组组.对三组间上颌切牙所患牙髓坏死的机率进行比较.结果:正畸外伤组与正畸无外伤组有显著性差别(P<0.01),正畸外伤组与外伤无正畸组亦有显著性差别(P<0.05).而正畸无外伤组与外伤无正畸组没有显著性差别(P>0.05).结论:正畸治疗患者中,有严重牙周损伤史的上颌切牙患牙髓坏死的机率要明显高于无外伤史的上颌切牙.

  19. Development of fast heating electron beam annealing setup for ultra high vacuum chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sadhan Chandra; Majumdar, Abhijit; Katiyal, Sumant; Shripathi, T.; Hippler, R.

    2014-02-01

    We report the design and development of a simple, electrically low powered and fast heating versatile electron beam annealing setup (up to 1000 °C) working with ultra high vacuum (UHV) chamber for annealing thin films and multilayer structures. The important features of the system are constant temperature control in UHV conditions for the temperature range from room temperature to 1000 °C with sufficient power of 330 W, at constant vacuum during annealing treatment. It takes approximately 6 min to reach 1000 °C from room temperature (˜10-6 mbar) and 45 min to cool down without any extra cooling. The annealing setup consists of a UHV chamber, sample holder, heating arrangement mounted on suitable UHV electrical feed-through and electronic control and feedback systems to control the temperature within ±1 °C of set value. The outside of the vacuum chamber is cooled by cold air of 20 °C of air conditioning machine used for the laboratory, so that chamber temperature does not go beyond 50 °C when target temperature is maximum. The probability of surface oxidation or surface contamination during annealing is examined by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of virgin Cu sample annealed at 1000 °C.

  20. Developing cloud chambers with high school students

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Ryo; Sato, Shoma; Zeze, Syoji

    2013-01-01

    The result and outcome of the cloud chamber project, which aims to develop a cloud chamber useful for science education is reported in detail. A project includes both three high school students and a teacher as a part of Super Science High School (SSH) program in our school. We develop a dry ice free cloud chamber using salt and ice (or snow). Technical detail of the chamber is presented. We also argue how the project affects student's cognition, motivation, academic skills and behavior. The research project had been done in very similar way to those of professional researchers, i.e., planning research, applying fund, writing a paper and giving a talk in conferences. From interviews with students, we learn that such style of scientific activity is very effective in promoting student's motivation for learning science.

  1. RADAR Anechoic Chamber/RCS Measurements Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The RF Anechoic Chamber is 56 feet long by 12 feet high by 13.5 feet wide, with an adjoining electronic computer control room. A double door entrance at one end of...

  2. High Performance Methane Thrust Chamber (HPMTC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a High-Performance Methane Thrust Chamber (HPMRE) to meet the demands of advanced chemical propulsion systems for deep-space mission...

  3. Resistive plate chambers for tomography and radiography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    C. Thomay; P. Baesso; D. Cussans; J. Davies; P. Glaysher; S. Quillin; S. Robertson; C. Steer; C. Vassallo; J. Velthuis

    2012-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are widely used in high energy physics for both tracking and triggering purposes, due to their excellent time resolution, rate capability, and good spatial resolution...

  4. MAN-IN-SIMULANT TEST (MIST) CHAMBER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The MIST chamber uses methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen) vapor as a simulant for HD agent to conduct system level evaluations of chemical protective ensembles....

  5. Aeroacoustic sound generation in simple expansion chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Emmet J; Holland, Keith R

    2010-11-01

    A method is presented for measuring the aeroacoustic source strength in ducts with flow at frequencies at which the wave motion can be considered substantially one-dimensional. The method is based on coherent power flux measurements using pairs of microphones positioned both upstream and downstream of the source region. The method is applied to a flow excited expansion chamber with aeroacoustic source measurements presented for chambers with a range of flow velocities and chamber lengths. The results indicate locked-on flow tones are generated in the chamber. The frequency of these locked-on flow tones is compared with that predicted using describing function theory applied to resonators with a grazing flow as well as that of other literature.

  6. Developing Cloud Chambers with High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Ryo; Tan, Nobuaki; Sato, Shoma; Zeze, Syoji

    The result and outcome of the cloud chamber project, which aims to develop a cloud chamber useful for science education is reported in detail. A project includes both three high school students and a teacher as a part of Super Science High School (SSH) program in our school. We develop a dry-ice-free cloud chamber using salt and ice (or snow). Technical details of the chamber are described. We also argue how the project have affected student's cognition, motivation, academic skills and behavior. The research project has taken steps of professional researchers, i.e., in planning research, applying fund, writing a paper and giving a talk in conferences. From interviews with students, we have learnt that such style of scientific activity is very effective in promoting student's motivation for learning science.

  7. Low-Cost, High-Performance Combustion Chamber for LOX/CH4 Propulsion, Phase II Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this project, Ultramet is designing and fabricating a lightweight, high temperature combustion chamber for use with cryogenic liquid oxygen/methane (LOX/CH4)...

  8. Using a ceramic chamber in kicker magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S.

    1993-05-01

    A ceramic chamber inside kicker magnets can provide the relevant field risetime. On the other hand, some metallic coating inside has to prevent static charge buildup and shield the beam from ceramic and ferrite at high frequencies to avoid possible resonances. The issues concerning the metallized ceramic chamber, such as coupling impedances and requirements on the coating, are studied to find a compromise solution for kickers of the Medium Energy Booster at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  9. The Gargamelle heavy liquid bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    This image shows the Gargamelle heavy liquid bubble chamber. It was used to detect particles in experiments at the PS between 1970 and 1976 before being moved to the SPS. In 1973, while working on the PS, it detected the first neutral current, an interaction vital to the electroweak theory. In 1978 a large fissure appeared in the body of the chamber and Gargamelle was stopped in 1979.

  10. The world's largest time projection chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Peter Glassel, the technical coordinator for the ALICE time projection chamber, is seen sitting inside the detector; the largest in the world at nearly 100 cubic metres. Thousands of wires are connected to read out electronic data produced as particles are created in lead-lead collisions at the centre of the detector. These particles will cause the medium within the time projection chamber to ionise along their tracks allowing the particle paths to be recreated.

  11. Electrostatic fields in an ionization chamber electret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallone, B. G.; Podgorsak, E. B.

    1983-09-01

    The theory of linear systems is used to derive the potential and electric field in distance space in a cylindrical polarization/depolarization electret chamber. General solutions for the near, intermediate, and far regions are given and their domains of convergence discussed. On the axis of the chamber the solutions for the electret surface are equal to those obtained from Gauss's and Kirchoff's laws, and at large distances from the surface to those obtained from the introduction of a dipole layer model.

  12. Tracking with wire chambers at high luminosities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, G.G. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (USA) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Radiation damage and rate limitations impose severe constraints on wire chambers at the SSC. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tracking systems that satisfy these constraints are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  13. A model to forecast magma chamber rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, John; Drymoni, Kyriaki; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-04-01

    An understanding of the amount of magma available to supply any given eruption is useful for determining the potential eruption magnitude and duration. Geodetic measurements and inversion techniques are often used to constrain volume changes within magma chambers, as well as constrain location and depth, but such models are incapable of calculating total magma storage. For example, during the 2012 unrest period at Santorini volcano, approximately 0.021 km3 of new magma entered a shallow chamber residing at around 4 km below the surface. This type of event is not unusual, and is in fact a necessary condition for the formation of a long-lived shallow chamber. The period of unrest ended without culminating in eruption, i.e the amount of magma which entered the chamber was insufficient to break the chamber and force magma further towards the surface. Using continuum-mechanics and fracture-mechanics principles, we present a model to calculate the amount of magma contained at shallow depth beneath active volcanoes. Here we discuss our model in the context of Santorini volcano, Greece. We demonstrate through structural analysis of dykes exposed within the Santorini caldera, previously published data on the volume of recent eruptions, and geodetic measurements of the 2011-2012 unrest period, that the measured 0.02% increase in volume of Santorini's shallow magma chamber was associated with magmatic excess pressure increase of around 1.1 MPa. This excess pressure was high enough to bring the chamber roof close to rupture and dyke injection. For volcanoes with known typical extrusion and intrusion (dyke) volumes, the new methodology presented here makes it possible to forecast the conditions for magma-chamber failure and dyke injection at any geodetically well-monitored volcano.

  14. Detection of particles with a cloud chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Esteban Muñoz, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Cloud chambers were essential devices in early nuclear and particle physics research. Superseded by more modern detectors in actual research, they still remain very interesting pedagogical apparatus. This thesis attempts to give a global view on this topic. To do so, a review of the physical foundations of the diffusion cloud chamber, in which an alcohol is supersaturated by cooling it with a thermal reservoir, is carried out. Its main results are then applied to analyse the working con...

  15. The drift chambers of the NOMAD experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anfreville, M.; Astier, P.; Authier, M.; Baldisseri, A.; Banner, M.; Besson, N.; Bouchez, J.; Castera, A.; Cloue, O.; Dumarchez, J. E-mail: jacques.dumarchez@cern.ch; Dumps, L.; Gangler, E.; Gosset, J.; Hagner, C.; Jollec, C.; Lachaud, C.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Linssen, L.; Meyer, J.-P.; Ouriet, J.-P.; Passerieux, J.-P.; Margaley, T.P.T. Pedrol; Placci, A.; Pluquet, A.; Poinsignon, J.; Popov, B.A.; Rathouit, P.; Schahmaneche, K.; Stolarczyk, T.; Uros, V.; Vannucci, F.; Vo, M.K.; Zaccone, H

    2002-04-01

    We present a detailed description of the drift chambers used as an active target and a tracking device in the NOMAD experiment at CERN. The main characteristics of these chambers are a large area (3{center_dot}3 m{sup 2}), a self-supporting structure made of light composite materials and a low cost. A spatial resolution of 150 {mu}m has been achieved with a single hit efficiency of 97%.

  16. Effect of Some Parameters on the Cast Component Properties in Hot Chamber Die Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rupinder; Singh, Harvir

    2016-04-01

    Hot chamber die casting process is designed to achieve high dimensional accuracy for small products by forcing molten metal under high pressure into reusable moulds, called dies. The present research work is aimed at study of some parameters (as a case study of spring adjuster) on cast component properties in hot chamber die casting process. Three controllable factors of the hot chamber die casting process (namely: pressure at second phase, metal pouring temperature and die opening time) were studied at three levels each by Taguchi's parametric approach and single-response optimization was conducted to identify the main factors controlling surface hardness, dimensional accuracy and weight of the casting. Castings were produced using aluminium alloy, at recommended parameters through hot chamber die casting process. Analysis shows that in hot chamber die casting process the percentage contribution of second phase pressure, die opening time, metal pouring temperature for surface hardness is 82.48, 9.24 and 6.78 % respectively. While in the case of weight of cast component the contribution of second phase pressure is 94.03 %, followed by metal pouring temperature and die opening time (4.58 and 0.35 % respectively). Further for dimensional accuracy contribution of die opening time is 76.97 %, metal pouring temperature is 20.05 % and second phase pressure is 1.56 %. Confirmation experiments were conducted at an optimal condition showed that the surface hardness, dimensional accuracy and weight of the castings were improved significantly.

  17. Improved Spin-Dependent WIMP Limits from a Bubble Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, E; Cooper, P S; Crum, K; Crisler, M; Hu, M; Levine, I; Nakazawa, D; Nguyen, H; Odom, B; Ramberg, E; Rasmussen, J; Riley, N; Sonnenschein, A; Szydagis, M; Tschirhart, R

    2008-01-01

    Bubble Chambers provided the dominant particle detection technology in accelerator experiments for several decades, eventually falling into disuse with the advent of other techniques. We report here on the first period of operation of an ultra-clean, room-temperature bubble chamber containing 1.5 kg of superheated CF$_{3}$I, a target maximally sensitive to spin-dependent and -independent Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) couplings. An exposure in excess of 250 kg-days is obtained, with a live-time fraction reaching 80\\%. This illustrates the ability to employ bubble chambers in a new realm, the search for dark matter particles. Improved limits on the spin-dependent WIMP-proton scattering cross section are extracted from this first period. An extreme intrinsic insensitivity to the backgrounds commonly limiting these experiments (a rejection factor for photon-induced electrons of $\\sim\\!10^{-10}$) has been measured in operating conditions leading to the detection of low-energy nuclear recoils such as t...

  18. Space-charge effects in liquid argon ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherfoord, J. P.; Walker, R. B.

    2015-03-01

    We have uniformly irradiated liquid argon ionization chambers with betas from high-activity 90Sr sources. The radiation environment is similar to that in the liquid argon calorimeters which are part of the ATLAS detector installed at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We measured the resulting ionization current over a wide range of applied potential for two different source activities and for three different chamber gaps. These studies provide operating experience at exceptionally high ionization rates. In particular they indicate a stability at the 0.1% level for these calorimeters over years of operation at the full LHC luminosity when operated in the normal mode at an electric field E = 1.0 kV / mm. We can operate these chambers in the normal mode or in the space-charge limited regime and thereby determine the transition point between the two. This transition point is parameterized by a positive argon ion mobility of μ+ = 0.08 ± 0.02mm2 / V s at a temperature of 88.0±0.5 K and at a pressure of 1.02±0.02 bar. In the space-charge limited regime the ionization currents are degraded and show signs of instability. At the highest electric fields in our study (6.7 kV/mm) the ionization current is still slowly rising with increasing electric field.

  19. Construction and Characterization of an Atmospheric Simulation Smog Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Currently, air pollution in Beijing has become a complex problem with two types of source pollutants:coal smoke and photochemical smog. Furthermore the maximum hourly mean concentration of O3 increases continuously, especially in the summer. In order to simulate the photochemical reaction, develop an air quality simulation model and further improve the air quality of Beijing, a precisely temperature-controlled,indoor, smog chamber facility was designed and constructed at Tsinghua University. Characterization experiments have been carried out to acquire the basic parameters of the smog chamber, such as the wall loss rates of NO2, NO, 03, C3H6 and particulate matter (PM), the intensity of ultraviolet (UV) light in the chamber, the reactivity of the purified air and the reproducibility of the experimental results. The results indicate that the facility performs up to specifications, and can meet the demands required for simulating the photochemical reaction. The effect of high primary contaminated PM on the formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is under investigation.

  20. In vitro penetration of bleaching agents into the pulp chamber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Valera, M C; Mancini, M N G

    2004-01-01

    To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures.......To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures....

  1. Chamber for Growing and Observing Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Molina, Thomas C.

    2005-01-01

    A chamber has been designed to enable growth and observation of microcolonies of fungi in isolation from the external environment. Unlike prior fungus-growing apparatuses, this chamber makes it possible to examine a fungus culture without disrupting it. Partly resembling a small picture frame, the chamber includes a metal plate having a rectangular through-thethickness opening with recesses for a top and a bottom cover glass, an inlet for air, and an inlet for water. The bottom cover glass is put in place and held there by clips, then a block of nutrient medium and a moisture pad are placed in the opening. The block is inoculated, then the top cover glass is put in place and held there by clips. Once growth is evident, the chamber can be sealed with tape. Little (if any) water evaporates past the edges of the cover glasses, and, hence there is little (if any) need to add water. A microscope can be used to observe the culture through either cover glass. Because the culture is sealed in the chamber, it is safe to examine the culture without risking contamination. The chamber can be sterilized and reused.

  2. The GODDESS ionization chamber: developing robust windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Rose; Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Pain, Steven; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Goddess Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Reaction studies of nuclei far from stability require high-efficiency arrays of detectors and the ability to identify beam-like particles, especially when the beam is a cocktail beam. The Gammasphere ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) is made up of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors for charged particles inside of the gamma-ray detector array Gammasphere. A high-rate ionization chamber is being developed to identify beam-like particles. Consisting of twenty-one alternating anode and cathode grids, the ionization chamber sits downstream of the target chamber and is used to measure the energy loss of recoiling ions. A critical component of the system is a thin and robust mylar window which serves to separate the gas-filled ionization chamber from the vacuum of the target chamber with minimal energy loss. After construction, windows were tested to assure that they would not break below the required pressure, causing harm to the wire grids. This presentation will summarize the status of the ionization chamber and the results of the first tests with beams. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  3. Expandable Purge Chambers Would Protect Cryogenic Fittings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Ivan I., III

    2004-01-01

    Expandable ice-prevention and cleanliness-preservation (EIP-CP) chambers have been proposed to prevent the accumulation of ice or airborne particles on quick-disconnect (QD) fittings, or on ducts or tubes that contain cryogenic fluids. In the original application for which the EIP-CP chambers were conceived, there is a requirement to be able to disconnect and reconnect the QD fittings in rapid succession. If ice were to form on the fittings by condensation and freezing of airborne water vapor on the cold fitting surfaces, the ice could interfere with proper mating of the fittings, making it necessary to wait an unacceptably long time for the ice to thaw before attempting reconnection. By keeping water vapor away from the cold fitting surfaces, the EIP-CP chambers would prevent accumulation of ice, preserving the ability to reconnect as soon as required. Basically, the role of an EIP-CP chamber would be to serve as an enclosure for a flow of dry nitrogen gas that would keep ambient air away from QD cryogenic fittings. An EIP-CP chamber would be an inflatable device made of a fabriclike material. The chamber would be attached to an umbilical plate holding a cryogenic QD fitting.

  4. Laser peripheral iridotomy changes anterior chamber architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theinert, Christian; Wiedemann, Peter; Unterlauft, Jan D

    2017-01-19

    The pressure gradient between anterior and posterior chamber in acute angle closure (AAC) and primary angle closure suspects is balanced by a sufficient laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI). The anterior chamber changes induced by LPI in patients with unilateral AAC were examined and compared to healthy eyes to define threshold values, which may help to discriminate between healthy and diseased eyes. Using Scheimpflug photography, anterior chamber depth (ACD), anterior chamber volume (ACV), anterior chamber angle (ACA), and central corneal thickness (CCT) were measured before and after LPI in both eyes of unilateral AAC cases. These measurements were compared to a group of healthy control eyes to determine threshold values for ACD, ACV, and ACA. The ACD, ACV, and ACA increased significantly in the 25 AAC eyes after LPI. The ACD, ACV, ACA, and CCT values in the AAC eyes obtained before LPI were compared to a control group of 59 healthy eyes with wide open chamber angles. The cutoff values revealed by receiver operating characteristic analysis were 2.1 mm for ACD, 90.5 mm2 for ACV, and 27.25° for ACA. Our results confirm the significant changes of the anterior segments architecture induced by LPI in AAC eyes. The found threshold values for ACD, ACV, and ACA may help in daily clinical routine to discriminate between healthy eyes and those in need for a prophylactic LPI.

  5. Design and implementation of mixing chambers to improve thermal decomposition of urea for NOX abatement

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Junggil

    2012-10-01

    Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) has been reported as the most promising technique for adherence to NOX emissions regulations. In the urea-SCR process, NH3 is generated by urea thermal decomposition and hydrolysis and is then used as a reductant of NOX in the SCR catalyst. Therefore, improving the NOX conversion efficiency of urea-SCR requires enhancement of thermal decomposition upstream of the SCR catalyst. In the present work, two types of mixing chambers were designed and fabricated to improve urea thermal decomposition, and experiments with and without a mixing chamber were carried out to analyze thermal-decomposition characteristics of urea in the exhaust pipe with respect to inlet velocity (4-12μm/s) and temperature (350°C-500°C). Urea thermal decomposition is greatly enhanced at higher gas temperatures. At an inlet velocity of 6μm/s in the A-type mixing chamber, NH3 concentrations generated along the exhaust pipe were about 171% and 157% greater than those without the mixing chamber for inlet temperatures of 400°C and 500°C, respectively. In the case of the B-type mixing chamber, NH3 concentrations generated at inlet temperatures of 400°C and 500°C were about 147% and 179% greater than those without the mixing chamber, respectively. Note that the implementation of mixing chambers significantly enhanced conversion of urea to NH3 because it increased the residence time of urea in the exhaust pipe and improved mixing between urea and exhaust gas. © 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  6. Design of an environmentally controlled rotating chamber for bioaerosol aging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreault, Daniel; Duchaine, Caroline; Marcoux-Voiselle, Melissa; Turgeon, Nathalie; Roy, Chad J

    2014-08-01

    A chamber was designed and built to study the long-term effects of environmental conditions on air-borne microorganisms. The system consists of a 55.5-L cylindrical chamber, which can rotate at variable speeds on its axis. The chamber is placed within an insulated temperature controlled enclosure which can be either cooled or heated with piezoelectric units. A germicidal light located at the chamber center irradiates at a 360° angle. Access ports are located on the stationary sections on both ends of the chamber. Relative humidity (RH) is controlled by passing the aerosol through meshed tubes surrounded by desiccant. Validation assay indicates that the interior temperature is stable with less than 0.5 °C in variation when set between 18 and 30 °C with the UV light having no effect of temperature during operation. RH levels set at 20%, 50% and 80% varied by 2.2%, 3.3% and 3.3%, respectively, over a 14-h period. The remaining fraction of particles after 18 h of suspension was 8.8% at 1 rotation per minute (rpm) and 2.6% at 0 rpm with the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) changing from 1.21 ± 0.04 µm to 1.30 ± 0.02 µm at 1 rpm and from 1.21 ± 0.04 µm to 0.91 ± 0.01 µm at 0 rpm within the same time period. This chamber can be used to increase the time of particle suspension in an aerosol cloud and control the temperature, RH and UV exposure; the design facilitates stationary sampling to be performed while the chamber is rotating.

  7. Proposal of a controlled radon chamber; Proposta de uma camara controlada de radonio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matta, Luiz E.S. de C.; Estrada, Julio J.S. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Alves, Rex N. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1996-07-01

    This work intends to establish the characteristics a radon chamber should have to fulfill, in the best way, the nowadays needs. Eleven radon chambers were studied, it has been observed that they are different in size and shape. Other characteristics asrandom source activity, aerosol generation control and ambient air control were also reviewed. It could be concluded that the chamber should have a parallelepiped shape and 30 M{sup 3} of volume, with an antechamber. The radon should be generated by a 400 MBq radium salt source, divided in five smaller sources to simulates environments having a wider range of radon activity concentration. Parameters such as aerosol generation, humidity, temperature and pressure, can be controlled by instruments available in the market. A radon chamber built in steps is proposed, at the end of each step, some experiments will already be possible to be made, the project could them be improved or corrected. (author)

  8. COUPP - a search for dark matter with a continuously sensitive bubble chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collar, Juan,; Crum, Keith; Mishra, Smriti; Nakazawa, Dante; Odom, Brian; Rasmussen, Julia; Riley, Nathan; Szydagis, Matthew; /Chicago U.; Behnke, Ed; Levine, Ilan; Vander Werf, Nate; /Indiana U., South Bend; Cooper, Peter; Crisler, Mike; Hu, Martin; Ramberg, Erik; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Tschirhart, Robert; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    We propose to construct and operate a 60-kg room temperature CF{sub 3}I bubble chamber as a prototype dark matter (WIMP) detector. Operating in weakly-superheated mode, the chamber will be sensitive to WIMP induced nuclear recoils above 10 keV, while rejecting background electron recoils at a level approaching 10{sup 10}. We would first commission and operate this chamber in the MINOS near detector hall with the goal to demonstrate stable operation and measure internal contamination and any other backgrounds. This chamber, or an improved version, would then be relocated to an appropriate deep underground site such as the Soudan Mine. This detector will have unique sensitivity to spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon couplings, and even in this early stage of development will attain competitive sensitivity to spin-independent couplings.

  9. Modification of a very large thermal-vacuum test chamber for ionosphere and plasmasphere simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, O. L.

    1978-01-01

    No large-volume chamber existed which could simulate the ion and electron environment of near-earth space. A very large thermal-vacuum chamber was modified to provide for the manipulation of the test volume magnetic field and for the generation and monitoring of plasma. Plasma densities of 1 million particles per cu cm were generated in the chamber where a variable magnetic flux density of up to 0.00015 T (1.5 gauss) was produced. Plasma temperature, density, composition, and visual effects were monitored, and plasma containment and control were investigated. Initial operation of the modified chamber demonstrated a capability satisfactory for a wide variety of experiments and hardware tests which require an interaction with the plasma environment. Potential for improving the quality of the simulation exists.

  10. Three-dimensional metrology inside a vacuum chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costille, Anne; Beaumont, Florent; Prieto, Eric; Carle, Michael; Fabron, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Several three dimensional coordinates systems are proposed by companies to provide accurate measurement of mechanical parts in a volume. None of them are designed to perform the metrology of a system in a vacuum chamber. In the frame of the test of NISP instrument from ESA Euclid mission, the question was raised to perform a three dimensional measurement of different parts during the thermal test of NISP instrument into ERIOS chamber done at Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM). One of the main objectives of the test campaign will be the measurement of the focus position of NISP image plane with respect to the EUCLID object plane to ensure a good focalisation of NISP instrument after integration on the payload. A Metrology Verification System (MVS) has been proposed. Its goal is to provide at operational temperature the measurement of references frames set on a EUCLID telescope simulator and NISP, the knowledge of the coordinates of the object point source provided by the telescope simulator and the measurement of the angle between the telescope simulator optical axis and NISP optical axis. The MVS concept is based on the use of a laser tracker, outside the vacuum chamber, that measures reflectors inside the vacuum chamber through a curved window. We will present preliminary results that show the possibility to perform this type of measurements and the accuracy reached in this configuration. An analysis of the contributors to the measurement error budget of the MVS is proposed, based on the current knowledge of the MVS performance and constraints during the TB/TV tests.

  11. Bioaerosols of subterraneotherapy chambers at salt mine health resort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frączek, Krzysztof; Górny, Rafał L; Ropek, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, an inhalation of naturally generated aerosols has again become a widely practiced method of balneological treatment of various respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to characterize the microbial aerosol of subterraneotherapy chambers at the Bochnia Salt Mine Health Resort in southern Poland. The measurements were carried out using a 6-stage Andersen impactor over a period of 1 year in both indoor (i.e., two subterranean chambers, where curative treatments took place) and outdoor air. The maximum bacterial aerosol concentrations in the chambers reached 11,688 cfu/m(3). In such interiors, a high-performance method of microbial contaminant reduction need be introduced, especially when large groups of young patients are medically cured. Respecting fungal aerosol, its average indoor concentration (88 cfu/m(3)) was significantly lower than outdoor level (538 cfu/m(3)). It confirms that ventilation system provides efficient barrier against this type of biologically active propagules. Among identified micro-organisms, the most prevalent indoors were Gram-positive cocci, which constituted up to 80 % of airborne microflora. As highly adapted to the diverse environments of its human host (skin, respiratory tract), they can be easily released in high quantities into the air. The number of people introduced into such subterranean chambers should be in some way limited. The analysis of microclimate parameters revealed that temperature and relative humidity influenced significantly the level of bacterial aerosol only. Hence, a constant control of these parameters should be scrupulously superintended at this type of subterranean premises.

  12. Twin sample chamber for simultaneous comparative transport measurements in a diamond anvil cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Anne Marie J.; Deemyad, Shanti

    2013-09-01

    In static high pressure experiments, performed within a diamond anvil cell (DAC), several different methods of thermometry may be employed to determine the temperature of the sample. Due to different DAC designs or particular experimental designs or goals, uncertainties in the determination of the temperature of a given sample exist. To overcome the inaccuracy in comparing the temperature dependence of transport properties of different materials at high pressure, we have used a novel design of resistivity measurement in a twin sample chamber built on an insulated gasket in a DAC. In this design, the transport properties of two samples will be measured simultaneously and therefore the two samples will always be in the same relative temperatures. The uncertainties in the temperatures of the two samples will be exactly the same and therefore their relative phase diagram will be compared precisely. The pressures of the chambers can be slightly different and is easily determined by the ruby pieces placed in each chamber. To demonstrate the feasibility of this method we have compared the superconducting properties of two YBa2Cu3O7-x (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.65) samples with slightly different superconducting transition temperatures at ambient pressure as a function of pressures up to 11 GPa. The upper limit of the pressure achieved using this design would be lower than single chamber gaskets. The highest achievable pressure, as in a conventional single hole setup, depends upon the thickness of the gasket, the culet size, the size, and symmetry of the sample chamber. For the twin chamber, it also depends upon the separation of the holes from each other as well as from the edge of the culet.

  13. How well do you know your growth chambers? Testing for chamber effect using plant traits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Porter, Amanda S; Evans-Fitz Gerald, Christiana; McElwain, Jennifer C; Yiotis, Charilaos; Elliott-Kingston, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    .... A range of techniques were used to measure differences between chamber plants, including chlorophyll fluorescence measurements, gas exchange analysis, biomass, reproductive yield, anatomical traits...

  14. Effects of variation of environmental parameters on the performance of Resistive Plate Chamber detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meghna, K.K. [INO Graduate Training Programme and Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400085 (India); Biswas, S. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Jash, A. [INO Graduate Training Programme and Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400085 (India); Chattopadhyay, S. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700064 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400085 (India); Saha, S., E-mail: satyajit.saha@saha.ac.in [Applied Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-04-21

    Performance of single gap Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detectors is investigated under variation of environmental parameters, such as temperature and relative humidity. Operational characteristics of the RPCs depend on both the environmental temperature and the relative humidity. Sensitivity to such dependence is found to be more on temperature rather than the relative humidity. Qualitative interpretation of some of the results obtained is given based on the known properties of the electrode materials and gases used in the detectors. - Highlights: • Performance of single gap bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detectors is investigated under independent variation of environmental temperature and relative humidity. • Parameters such as leakage currents, noise rates, efficiency and timing characteristics of RPCs are investigated. • Operational characteristics of the RPCs depend on both the environmental temperature and the relative humidity. • Sensitivity of the operational parameters to variation of environmental parameters is found to be more on temperature rather than the relative humidity.

  15. The Effect of Heat Treatments and Coatings on the Outgassing Rate of Stainless Steel Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamum, Md Abdullah A. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A, [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Stutzman, Marcy L. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Adderley, Philip A. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Poelker, Matthew [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The outgassing rates of four nominally identical 304L stainless steel vacuum chambers were measured to determine the effect of chamber coatings and heat treatments. One chamber was coated with titanium nitride (TiN) and one with amorphous silicon (a-Si) immediately following fabrication. One chamber remained uncoated throughout, and the last chamber was first tested without any coating, and then coated with a-Si following a series of heat treatments. The outgassing rate of each chamber was measured at room temperatures between 15 and 30 deg C following bakes at temperatures between 90 and 400 deg C. Measurements for bare steel showed a significant reduction in the outgassing rate by more than a factor of 20 after a 400 deg C heat treatment (3.5 x 10{sup 12} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} prior to heat treatment, reduced to 1.7 x 10{ sup -13} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} following heat treatment). The chambers that were coated with a-Si showed minimal change in outgassing rates with heat treatment, though an outgassing rate reduced by heat treatments prior to a-Si coating was successfully preserved throughout a series of bakes. The TiN coated chamber exhibited remarkably low outgassing rates, up to four orders of magnitude lower than the uncoated stainless steel. An evaluation of coating composition suggests the presence of elemental titanium which could provide pumping and lead to an artificially low outgassing rate. The outgassing results are discussed in terms of diffusion-limited versus recombination-limited processes.

  16. Final report for NIF chamber dynamics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, A; Peterson, P F; Scott, J M

    1998-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8 MJ, 192 laser beam facility, will have anticipated fusion yields of up to 20 MJ from D-T pellets encased in a gold hohlraum target. The energy emitted from the target in the form of x rays, neutrons, target debris kinetic energy, and target shrapnel will be contained in a 5 m. radius spherical target chamber. various diagnostics will be stationed around the target at varying distances from the target. During each shot, the target will emit x rays that will vaporize nearby target facing surfaces including those of the diagnostics, the target positioner, and other chamber structures. This ablated vapor will be transported throughout the chamber, and will eventually condense and deposit on surfaces in the chamber, including the final optics debris shields. The research at the University of California at Berkeley relates primarily to the NIF chamber dynamics. The key design issues are the ablation of the chamber structures, transport of the vapor through the chamber and the condensation or deposition processes of those vaporized materials. An understanding of these processes is essential in developing a concept for protecting the fina optics debris shields from an excessive coating (> 10 A) of target debris and ablated material, thereby prolonging their lifetime between change-outs. At Berkeley, we have studied the physical issues of the ablation process and the effects of varying materials, the condensation process of the vaporized material, and design schemes that can lower the threat posed to the debris shields by these processes. The work or portions of the work completed this year have been published in several papers and a dissertation [l-5].

  17. Conceptual Design of Vacuum Chamber for testing of high heat flux components using electron beam as a source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. S.; Swamy, Rajamannar; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Divertors Division, Prototype

    2012-11-01

    A conceptual design of vacuum chamber is proposed to study the thermal response of high heat flux components under energy depositions of the magnitude and durations expected in plasma fusion devices. It is equipped with high power electron beam with maximum beam power of 200 KW mounted in a stationary horizontal position from back side of the chamber. The electron beam is used as a heat source to evaluate the heat removal capacity, material performance under thermal loads & stresses, thermal fatigue etc on actively cooled mock - ups which are mounted on a flange system which is the front side door of the chamber. The tests mock - ups are connected to a high pressure high temperature water circulation system (HPHT-WCS) operated over a wide range of conditions. The vacuum chamber consists of different ports at different angles to view the mock -up surface available for mock -up diagnostics. The vacuum chamber is pumped with different pumps mounted on side ports of the chamber. The chamber is shielded from X - rays which are generated inside the chamber when high-energy electrons are incident on the mock-up. The design includes development of a conceptual design with theoretical calculations and CAD modelling of the system using CATIA V5. These CAD models give an outline on the complete geometry of HHF test chamber, fabrication challenges and safety issues. FEA analysis of the system has been performed to check the structural integrity when the system is subjected to structural & thermal loads.

  18. Investigation of Swirling Flows in Mixing Chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh Jian Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation analyzed the three-dimensional momentum and mass transfer characteristics arising from multiple inlets and a single outlet in micromixing chamber. The chamber consists of a right square prism, an octagonal prism, or a cylinder. Numerical results which were presented in terms of velocity vector plots and concentration distributions indicated that the swirling flows inside the chamber dominate the mixing index. Particle trajectories were utilized to demonstrate the rotational and extensional local flows which produce steady stirring, and the configuration of colored particles at the outlet section expressed at different Re represented the mixing performance qualitatively. The combination of the Taylor dispersion and the vorticity was first introduced and made the mixing successful. The effects of various geometric parameters and Reynolds numbers on the mixing characteristics were investigated. An optimal design of the cylindrical chamber with 4 inlets can be found. At larger Reynolds number, Re>15, more inertia caused the powerful swirling flows in the chamber, and more damping effect on diffusion was diminished, which then increased the mixing performance.

  19. Tuned Chamber Core Panel Acoustic Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents acoustic testing of tuned chamber core panels, which can be used to supplement the low-frequency performance of conventional acoustic treatment. The tuned chamber core concept incorporates low-frequency noise control directly within the primary structure and is applicable to sandwich constructions with a directional core, including corrugated-, truss-, and fluted-core designs. These types of sandwich structures have long, hollow channels (or chambers) in the core. By adding small holes through one of the facesheets, the hollow chambers can be utilized as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. These resonators can then be used to attenuate low-frequency noise (below 400 Hz) inside a vehicle compartment without increasing the weight or size of the structure. The results of this test program demonstrate that the tuned chamber core concept is effective when used in isolation or combined with acoustic foam treatments. Specifically, an array of acoustic resonators integrated within the core of the panels was shown to improve both the low-frequency absorption and transmission loss of the structure in targeted one-third octave bands.

  20. Heating a chemical current source which operates at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsumata, T.; Khosikhara, N.

    1983-02-14

    A chamber for catalytic ignition of hydrogen or gasoline is installed in a chemical current source. The isolated heat heats the chemical current source with a low temperature of the environment providing its optimal operational conditions. The fuel is fed into the chamber from a tank or chamber located in the body of the chemical current source.

  1. High intensity electromagnetic field gerenation using a transportable reverberation chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank

    2008-01-01

    A reverberation chamber can create very high field strength with moderate input power. Existing chambers are making use of a paddle wheel to change the resonant modes in the chamber. A transportable reverberation chamber with vibrating walls will be presented. Inside this Vibrating Intrinsic Reverbe

  2. Calibration of the borated ion chamber at NIST reactor thermal column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; Hertel, N E; Lennox, A

    2007-01-01

    In boron neutron capture therapy and boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy, the absorbed dose of tissue due to the boron neutron capture reaction is difficult to measure directly. This dose can be computed from the measured thermal neutron fluence rate and the (10)B concentration at the site of interest. A borated tissue-equivalent (TE) ion chamber can be used to directly measure the boron dose in a phantom under irradiation by a neutron beam. Fermilab has two Exradin 0.5 cm(3) Spokas thimble TE ion chambers, one loaded with boron, available for such measurements. At the Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility, these ion chambers are generally used with air as the filling gas. Since alpha particles and lithium ions from the (10)B(n,alpha)(7)Li reactions have very short ranges in air, the Bragg-Gray principle may not be satisfied for the borated TE ion chamber. A calibration method is described in this paper for the determination of boron capture dose using paired ion chambers. The two TE ion chambers were calibrated in the thermal column of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor. The borated TE ion chamber is loaded with 1,000 ppm of natural boron (184 ppm of (10)B). The NIST thermal column has a cadmium ratio of greater than 400 as determined by gold activation. The thermal neutron fluence rate during the calibration was determined using a NIST fission chamber to an accuracy of 5.1%. The chambers were calibrated at two different thermal neutron fluence rates: 5.11 x 10(6) and 4.46 x 10(7)n cm(-2) s(-1). The non-borated ion chamber reading was used to subtract collected charge not due to boron neutron capture reactions. An optically thick lithium slab was used to attenuate the thermal neutrons from the neutron beam port so the responses of the chambers could be corrected for fast neutrons and gamma rays in the beam. The calibration factor of the borated ion chamber was determined to be 1.83 x 10(9) +/- 5.5% (+/- 1sigma) n

  3. 模拟大气温度和CO2浓度升高对双季稻氮素利用的影响%Effects of Elevated Air Temperature and Carbon Dioxide Concentration on Ni-trogen Use of Double Rice (Oryza sativaL.) in Open-top Chambers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王斌; 万运帆; 郭晨; 李玉娥; 游松财; 秦晓波; 陈汇林

    2015-01-01

    Preventing 2°C of warming and restricting the CO2 level to 450 µL L–1 are the safety threshold for climate change based on the Copenhagen Consensus. It is an important reference for the security of rice yield to study the influence of elevated air temperature and CO2 concentration on the nitrogen use of rice. In this paper, a modified open-top chamber (OTC) device was used to simulate relative 60 µL L–1 CO2 concentration rise (based on CO2 background concentration of 390 µL L–1) and 2°C tempera-ture increase scenario in a double rice field experiment with Liangyou 287 and Xiangfengyou 9 as the early and late rice varieties respectively. There were five treatments with three replications: 1) UC: Paddy field without OTC cover; 2) CK: Check OTC with the similar temperature and CO2 concentration to the field environment; 3) CT: OTC with 2°C temperature increase; 4) CC: OTC with 60 µL L–1 CO2 concentration elevated; 5) CTC: OTC with 2°C temperature increase and 60 µL L–1 CO2 concentration ele-vated. The nitrogen accumulation, translocation and utilization in different treatments were explored. The results showed signifi-cant interactions between temperature increase and CO2 concentration elevated on the yield and nitrogen use. In early rice CC and CTC achieved an increase for grain yield (19.7% and 2.0%) and nitrogen accumulation (15.7% and 5.1%) compared with CK while CT presented a decrease. In late rice warming and high CO2concentration (CT, CC, and CTC) benefited the grain yield and nitrogen uptake, increasing 9.2%, 14.4%, 18.8% and 7.3%, 10.2%, 15% compared with CK respectively. Nitrogen translocation and contribution efficiency (from stem and leaf to grain) of CC and CTC was lower than that of CK in early rice, and higher than that of CK in late rice. Nitrogen recovery efficiency of CC and CTC reached to 45.7% and 48.5% in early and late rice respec-tively, achieving the highest increase of 35.3% and 33.1% compared with that of CK. CC and CTC

  4. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing for Low-Cost, High-Performance Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian E.; Arrieta, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    A document describes the low-cost manufacturing of C103 niobium alloy combustion chambers, and the use of a high-temperature, oxidation-resistant coating that is superior to the standard silicide coating. The manufacturing process involved low-temperature spray deposition of C103 on removable plastic mandrels produced by rapid prototyping. Thin, vapor-deposited platinum-indium coatings were shown to substantially improve oxidation resistance relative to the standard silicide coating. Development of different low-cost plastic thrust chamber mandrel materials and prototyping processes (selective laser sintering and stereolithography) yielded mandrels with good dimensional accuracy (within a couple of mils) for this stage of development. The feasibility of using the kinetic metallization cold-spray process for fabrication of free-standing C1O3 thrusters on removable plastic mandrels was also demonstrated. The ambient and elevated temperature mechanical properties of the material were shown to be reasonably good relative to conventionally processed C103, but the greatest potential benefit is that coldsprayed chambers require minimal post-process machining, resulting in substantially lower machining and material costs. The platinum-iridium coating was shown to provide greatly increased oxidation resistance over the silicide when evaluated through oxyacetylene torch testing to as high as 300 F (= 150 C). The iridium component minimizes reaction with the niobium alloy chamber at high temperatures, and provides the high-temperature oxidation resistance needed at the throat.

  5. Posing the first LEAR vacuum chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    The photo shows one of the four bending magnets of LEAR. They were of C-type with the opening ('mouth') to the outside of the ring (yoke to the inside). Last preparations are made before the vacuum chamber is slid through the mouth into the magnet. Stochastic cooling pickups/kickers were installed inside the chamber. One can distinguish a large number of feed-throughs on the chamber (leading to the pickup/kicker gaps). The free space in the middle of the block was left to offer room for an internal target in the magnet. This possibility was never exploited. Instead it is used here, to accommodate a pumping port for the high vacuum system. Michel Chanel (left) and Pierre Lefevre admire the mechanics at work.

  6. Rapid-Cycling Bubble-Chamber, details

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    Parts of the hydraulic expansion system of the Rapid-Cycling Bubble-Chamber (RCBC). RCBC was the largest of 3 rapid-cycling bubble-chambers (the others were LEBC and HOLEBC), used as target- and vertex-detectors within the European Hybrid Spectrometer (EHS) in the SPS North Area (EHN1). RCBC contained 250 l of liquid hydrogen and was located inside a 3 T superconducting magnet. It was designed for 30 expansions/s (100 times faster than BEBC), the system shown here allowed 50 expansions/s. RCBC operated from 1981 to 1983 for experiments NA21, NA22 and NA23 at a rate of 15 expansions/s, clocking up a total of over 4 million. In the rear, at left, is bearded Lucien Veillet; Augustin Didona is at the right. See also 8001009. The installation of the piston assembly in the RCBC chamber body is shown in the Annual Report 1980, p.65.

  7. Classification of the LHC BLM Ionization Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Stockner, M; Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang; Holzer, E B; Kramer, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The LHC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system must prevent the super conducting magnets from quenching and protect the machine components from damage. The main monitor type is an ionization chamber. About 4000 of them will be installed around the ring. The lost beam particles initiate hadronic showers through the magnets and other machine components. These shower particles are measured by the monitors installed on the outside of the accelerator equipment. For the calibration of the BLM system the signal response of the ionization chamber is simulated in GEANT4 for all relevant particle types and energies (keV to TeV range). For validation, the simulations are compared to measurements using protons, neutrons, photons and mixed radiation fields at various energies and intensities. This paper will focus on the signal response of the ionization chamber to various particle types and energies including space charge effects at high ionization densities.

  8. Thermal vacuum chamber repressurization with instrument purging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woronowicz, Michael S.

    2016-09-01

    At the conclusion of cryogenic vacuum testing of the James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Integrated Science Instrument Module (JWST-OTIS) in NASA Johnson Space Center's (JSCs) thermal vacuum (TV) Chamber A, contamination control (CC) engineers are postulating that chamber particulate material stirred up by the repressurization process may be kept from falling into the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) interior to some degree by activating instrument purge flows over some initial period before opening the chamber valves. This manuscript describes development of a series of models designed to describe this process. The models are strung together in tandem with a fictitious set of conditions to estimate overpressure evolution from which net outflow velocity behavior may be obtained. Creeping flow assumptions are then used to determine the maximum particle size that may be kept suspended above the ISIM aperture, keeping smaller particles from settling within the instrument module.

  9. Thermal Vacuum Chamber Repressurization with Instrument Purging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2017-01-01

    At the end of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) OTIS (Optical Telescope Element-OTE-Integrated Science Instrument Module-ISIM) cryogenic vacuum testing in NASA Johnson Space Centers (JSCs) thermal vacuum (TV) Chamber A, contamination control (CC) engineers are mooting the idea that chamber particulate material stirred up by the repressurization process may be kept from falling into the ISIM interior to some degree by activating instrument purge flows over some initial period before opening the chamber valves. This memo describes development of a series of models designed to describe this process. These are strung together in tandem to estimate overpressure evolution from which net outflow velocity behavior may be obtained. Creeping flow assumptions are then used to determine the maximum particle size that may be kept suspended above the ISIM aperture, keeping smaller particles from settling within the instrument module.

  10. Synchronization of the CMS Cathode Strip Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Raknessa, G; Wang, D

    2007-01-01

    The synchronization of the trigger and data acquisition systems for the Cathode Strip Chambers (CSCs) in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at CERN is described. The CSC trigger system is designed to trigger CMS on muons with high efficiency (~99% per chamber) and is able to accurately identify its 25ns proton bunch crossing. To date, asynchronous cosmic ray data have been used to define the protocol and to refine timing algorithms, allowing synchronization to be realized within and between chambers to within ±10 ns. Final synchronization of the CSCs requires timing parameters to be accurate to 2 ns. This goal will be readily achieved from the cosmic ray baseline using data taken with the synchronous beam structure of the Large Hadron Collider.

  11. Slag monitoring system for combustion chambers of steam boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taler, J.; Taler, D. [Cracow University of Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2009-07-01

    The computer-based boiler performance system presented in this article has been developed to provide a direct and quantitative assessment of furnace and convective surface cleanliness. Temperature, pressure, and flow measurements and gas analysis data are used to perform heat transfer analysis in the boiler furnace and evaporator. Power boiler efficiency is calculated using an indirect method. The on-line calculation of the exit flue gas temperature in a combustion chamber allows for an on-line heat flow rate determination, which is transferred to the boiler evaporator. Based on the energy balance for the boiler evaporator, the superheated steam mass flow rate is calculated taking into the account water flow rate in attemperators. Comparing the calculated and the measured superheated steam mass flow rate, the effectiveness of the combustion chamber water walls is determined in an on-line mode. Soot-blower sequencing can be optimized based on actual cleaning requirements rather than on fixed time cycles contributing to lowering of the medium usage in soot blowers and increasing of the water-wall lifetime.

  12. 人工环境昼夜温差对番茄营养物质和干物质分配的影响%Effect of difference between day and night temperature on nutrients and dry mass partitioning of tomato in climate chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨再强; 王学林; 彭晓丹; 赵翔; 袁小康; 韩秀君

    2014-01-01

    为了研究番茄各器官中可溶性糖和蔗糖含量、叶片中游离氨基酸和可溶性蛋白含量、不同器官干物质分配比例及番茄果实品质对昼夜温差的响应规律,该研究以番茄品种“金冠5号”(Solanum lycopersicum cv. Jinguan5)为试材,于2012年9月-2013年7月在南京信息工程大学设计日均气温为18和25℃,昼夜温差(difference between day and night temperature,DIF)为12℃(白天24℃/晚上12℃,31℃/19℃)、6℃(21℃/15℃,28℃/22℃)、0(18℃/18℃,25℃/25℃)共6个处理的人工环境控制试验,结果表明:日均气温18℃时,叶片中的游离氨基酸总量和可溶性蛋白、果实中的可溶性糖和蔗糖含量均以12℃温差处理最高,0温差处理最低;而果实中的有机酸含量以12℃温差处理最低;日均气温25℃时,果实中的可溶性糖和蔗糖含量以6℃温差处理最高。叶片中的游离氨基酸总量、幼果期和采收期叶片的可溶性蛋白含量均以6℃温差处理最高。维生素 C、可溶性蛋白和番茄红素在日均气温18℃时则与有机酸含量趋势相反。干物质在果实中的分配比例在日均气温18和25℃时,均以6℃温差处理最大,12℃温差处理最小。研究认为在日均气温18℃条件下,昼夜温差0~12℃范围内,昼夜温差越大,果实中可溶性糖、蔗糖的积累越多,游离氨基酸和可溶性蛋白含量越高,果实品质更佳,在日均气温25℃条件下,以6℃温差处理下果实内在品质最佳;相同昼夜温差,25℃日均气温处理下的果实内在品质优于18℃日均气温处理;在最适温度范围内,适当增加昼夜温差有利于可溶性糖、蔗糖和干物质向果实中转移,温差过高或过低不利于果实营养物质及干物质积累。%Tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Jinguan5) were grown in a climate chamber to determine the responses of tomato quality

  13. Calibration of a pencil ionization chamber with and without preamplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Maia, Ana Figueiredo

    2004-01-01

    The pencil ionization chamber is a cylindrical dosimeter developed for computed tomography beams. Many kinds of ionization chambers have a preamplifier connected to the chamber to make it electrically more stable, specially for field instruments. In this study, the performance of a Victoreen pencil ionization chamber with the original preamplifier and after its removal was compared. The objective of the preamplifier removal was to enable connecting the chamber to other kinds of electromete...

  14. Ultra-low mass drift chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assiro, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Cappelli, L. [Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale (Italy); Cascella, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento Matematica e Fisica, Università del Salento (Italy); De Lorenzis, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Università del Salento (Italy); Grancagnolo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Ignatov, F. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); L' Erario, A.; Maffezzoli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Università del Salento (Italy); Miccoli, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Onorato, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Università G. Marconi, Roma (Italy); Perillo, M. [EnginSoft S.p.a., Trento (Italy); Piacentino, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Università G. Marconi, Roma (Italy); Rella, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Università del Salento (Italy); Rossetti, F. [EnginSoft S.p.a., Trento (Italy); Spedicato, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Tassielli, G., E-mail: giovanni.tassielli@le.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce (Italy); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Università G. Marconi, Roma (Italy); and others

    2013-08-01

    We present a novel low mass drift chamber concept, developed in order to fulfill the stringent requirements imposed by the experiments for extremely rare processes, which require high resolutions (order of 100–200 keV/c) for particle momenta in a range (50–100 MeV/c) totally dominated by the multiple scattering contribution. We describe a geometry optimization procedure and a new wiring strategy with a feed-through-less wire anchoring system developed and tested on a drift chamber prototype under completion at INFN-Lecce.

  15. A view inside the Gargamelle bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    Gargamelle was the name given to a big bubble chamber built at the Saclay Laboratory in France during the late 1960s. It was designed principally for the detection at CERN of the elusive particles called neutrinos. A bubble chamber contains a liquid under pressure, which reveals the tracks of electrically charged particles as trails of tiny bubbles when the pressure is reduced. Neutrinos have no charge, and so leave no tracks, but the aim with Gargamelle was "see neutrinos" by making visible any charged particles set in motion by the interaction of neutrinos in the liquid

  16. Cosmic Muon Detector Using Proportional Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Varga, Dezső; Hamar, Gergő; Molnár, Janka Sára; Oláh, Éva; Pázmándi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    A set of classical multi-wire proportional chambers were designed and constructed with the main purpose of efficient cosmic muon detection. These detectors are relatively simple to construct, and at the same time are low cost, making them ideal for educational purposes. The detector layers have efficiencies above 99% for minimum ionizing cosmic muons, and their position resolution is about 1 cm, that is, particle trajectories are clearly observable. Visualization of straight tracks is possible using an LED array, with the discriminated and latched signal driving the display. Due to the exceptional operating stability of the chambers, the design can also be used for cosmic muon telescopes.

  17. The Michigan Mars Environmental Chamber: Preliminary Results and Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, E.; Martinez, G.; Elliott, H. M.; Borlina, C.; Renno, N. O.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: We have developed the Michigan Mars Environmental Chamber (MMEC) to simulate the entire range of Martian surface and shallow subsurface conditions with respect to temperature, pressure, relative humidity, solar radiation and soil wetness. Our goal is to simulate the Martian diurnal cycle for equatorial as well as polar Martian conditions and test the hypothesis that salts known to exist in the Martian regolith can deliquesce and form brine pockets or layers by freeze-thaw cycles. Motivation: Liquid water is one of the necessary ingredients for the development of life as we know it. The behavior of various liquid states of H2O such as liquid brine, undercooled liquid interfacial water, subsurface melt water and ground water has to be understood in order to understand the potential habitability of Mars for microbes and future human exploration. It has been shown that liquid brines are ubiquitous in the Martian polar regions [1, 2, 3] and microbial communities have been seen to survive under similar conditions in Antarctica's Dry Valleys [4]. Chamber Description: The MMEC is a cylindrical environmental chamber with an inside volume of 64 cm diameter by 160 cm length. The temperature range that can be simulated is 145 K to 500 K. The temperature is controlled through an automated control system using a thermal plate system with embedded cartridge heaters and a liquid nitrogen cooling loop. Furthermore, the temperature can be measured at eight variable locations inside the chamber. The pressure is controlled through an automated control system with attainable pressures ranging from 10 Pa to 105 Pa of pure CO2. Additionally, water vapor can be added to the chamber through a separate temperature and pressure controlled H2O bath to change the relative humidity. The relative humidity is determined by measuring the frost point using a chilled mirror hygrometer and the full range of relative humidity values can be achieved. The soil wetness is measured using a

  18. Technical note: Headspace analysis of explosive compounds using a novel sampling chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGreeff, Lauryn; Rogers, Duane A; Katilie, Christopher; Johnson, Kevin; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan

    2015-03-01

    The development of instruments and methods for explosive vapor detection is a continually evolving field of interest. A thorough understanding of the characteristic vapor signatures of explosive material is imperative for the development and testing of new and current detectors. In this research a headspace sampling chamber was designed to contain explosive materials for the controlled, reproducible sampling and characterization of vapors associated with these materials. In a detonation test, the chamber was shown to contain an explosion equivalent to three grams of trinitrotoluene (TNT) without damage to the chamber. The efficacy of the chamber in controlled headspace sampling was evaluated in laboratory tests with bulk explosive materials. Small quantities of TNT, triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) were separately placed in the sampling chamber, and the headspace of each material was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with online cryogenic trapping to yield characteristic vapor signatures for each explosive compound. Chamber sampling conditions, temperature and sampling time, were varied to demonstrate suitability for precise headspace analysis.

  19. Analysis of flow field characteristics in IC equipment chamber based on orthogonal design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. F.; Yang, Y. Y.; Wang, C. N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to study the influence of the configuration of processing chamber as a part of IC equipment on flow field characteristics. Four parameters, including chamber height, chamber diameter, inlet mass flow rate and outlet area, are arranged using orthogonally design method to study their influence on flow distribution in the processing chamber with the commercial software-Fluent. The velocity, pressure and temperature distribution above the holder were analysed respectively. The velocity difference value of the gas flow above the holder is defined as the evaluation criteria to evaluate the uniformity of the gas flow. The quantitative relationship between key parameters and the uniformity of gas flow was found through analysis of experimental results. According to our study, the chamber height is the most significant factor, and then follows the outlet area, chamber diameter and inlet mass flow rate. This research can provide insights into the study and design of configuration of etcher, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) equipment, and other systems with similar configuration and processing condition.

  20. Development and test of combustion chamber for Stirling engine heated by natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tie; Song, Xiange; Gui, Xiaohong; Tang, Dawei; Li, Zhigang; Cao, Wenyu

    2014-04-01

    The combustion chamber is an important component for the Stirling engine heated by natural gas. In the paper, we develop a combustion chamber for the Stirling engine which aims to generate 3˜5 kWe electric power. The combustion chamber includes three main components: combustion module, heat exchange cavity and thermal head. Its feature is that the structure can divide "combustion" process and "heat transfer" process into two apparent individual steps and make them happen one by one. Since natural gas can mix with air fully before burning, the combustion process can be easily completed without the second wind. The flame can avoid contacting the thermal head of Stirling engine, and the temperature fields can be easily controlled. The designed combustion chamber is manufactured and its performance is tested by an experiment which includes two steps. The experimental result of the first step proves that the mixture of air and natural gas can be easily ignited and the flame burns stably. In the second step of experiment, the combustion heat flux can reach 20 kW, and the energy utilization efficiency of thermal head has exceeded 0.5. These test results show that the thermal performance of combustion chamber has reached the design goal. The designed combustion chamber can be applied to a real Stirling engine heated by natural gas which is to generate 3˜5 kWe electric power.

  1. Magma Chambers, Thermal Energy, and the Unsuccessful Search for a Magma Chamber Thermostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazner, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Although the traditional concept that plutons are the frozen corpses of huge, highly liquid magma chambers ("big red blobs") is losing favor, the related notion that magma bodies can spend long periods of time (~106years) in a mushy, highly crystalline state is widely accepted. However, analysis of the thermal balance of magmatic systems indicates that it is difficult to maintain a significant portion in a simmering, mushy state, whether or not the system is eutectic-like. Magma bodies cool primarily by loss of heat to the Earth's surface. The balance between cooling via energy loss to the surface and heating via magma accretion can be denoted as M = ρLa/q, where ρ is magma density, L is latent heat of crystallization, a is the vertical rate of magma accretion, and q is surface heat flux. If M>1, then magma accretion outpaces cooling and a magma chamber forms. For reasonable values of ρ, L, and q, the rate of accretion amust be > ~15 mm/yr to form a persistent volume above the solidus. This rate is extremely high, an order of magnitude faster than estimated pluton-filling rates, and would produce a body 10 km thick in 700 ka, an order of magnitude faster than geochronology indicates. Regardless of the rate of magma supply, the proportion of crystals in the system must vary dramatically with depth at any given time owing to transfer of heat. Mechanical stirring (e.g., by convection) could serve to homogenize crystal content in a magma body, but this is unachievable in crystal-rich, locked-up magma. Without convection the lower part of the magma body becomes much hotter than the top—a process familiar to anyone who has scorched a pot of oatmeal. Thermal models that succeed in producing persistent, large bodies of magma rely on scenarios that are unrealistic (e.g., omitting heat loss to the planet's surface), self-fulfilling prophecies (e.g., setting unnaturally high temperatures as fixed boundary conditions), or physically unreasonable (e.g., magma is intruded

  2. SU-E-T-623: Polarity Effects for Small Volume Ionization Chambers in Cobalt-60 Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y; Bhatnagar, J; Huq, M Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and UPMC Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the polarity effects for small volume ionization chambers in {sup 60}Co gamma-ray beams using the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. Methods: Measurements were made for 7 small volume ionization chambers (a PTW 31016, an Exradin A14, 2 Capintec PR0-5P, and 3 Exradin A16) using a PTW UNIDOSwebline Universal Dosemeter and an ELEKTA solid water phantom with proper inserts. For each ion chamber, the temperature/pressure corrected electric charge readings were obtained for 16 voltage values (±50V, ±100V, ±200V, ±300V, ±400V, ±500V, ±600V, ±700V). For each voltage, a five-minute leakage charge reading and a series of 2-minute readings were continuously taken during irradiation until 5 stable signals (less than 0.05% variation) were obtained. The average of the 5 reading was then used for the calculation of the polarity corrections at the voltage and for generating the saturation curves. Results: The polarity effects are more pronounced at high or low voltages than at the medium voltages for all chambers studied. The voltage dependence of the 3 Exradin A16 chambers is similar in shape. The polarity corrections for the Exradin A16 chambers changes rapidly from about 1 at 500V to about 0.98 at 700V. The polarity corrections for the 7 ion chambers at 300V are in the range from 0.9925 (for the PTW31016) to 1.0035 (for an Exradin A16). Conclusion: The polarity corrections for certain micro-chambers are large even at normal operating voltage.

  3. Effects of holmium laser on dental structure in vivo: thermal evaluation and histological analysis on pulpal tissue; Efeitos in vivo do laser de holmio em estrutura dental: monitoracao termica e analise histologica do tecido pulpar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strefezza, Claudia

    2001-07-01

    Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that Ho:YLF laser is capable of inducing physical and chemical changes on dental surfaces treated for caries prevention. The temperature in the pulp chamber was in vitro evaluated to as a function of the power and frequency of the laser irradiation. The purpose of this work is to verify the occurrence of pulp inflammation after Ho:YLF laser irradiation using different parameters in rabbits' teeth. The premolars and molars of ten rabbits (NZB) were divided in two groups according to the irradiation energy values of a Ho:YLF laser prototype operating at 2.065{mu}m wave length, frequency of O,5Hz and pulse length of 250{mu}s. An group A teeth were irradiated with using ten pulses of 334mJ/pulse of a Ho:YLF laser prototype operating at O.5Hz, and group B, with 512mJ/pulse. Animals were killed by transcardiac perfusion and the samples were prepared for histopathological analysis. The in vitro temperature monitoring revealed an increase of 1 deg C for the 334mJ/pulse energy and 4.5 deg C for the 512mJ/pulse energy. SEM observations showed the occurrence of melting and resolidification in dental surface. From the in vivo analysis it can be concluded that both employed laser parameters did not induce to any inflammatory response from the pulp. (author)

  4. LIFE Chamber Chemical Equilibrium Simulations with Additive Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMuth, J A; Simon, A J

    2009-09-03

    In order to enable continuous operation of a Laser Inertial confinement Fusion Energy (LIFE) engine, the material (fill-gas and debris) in the fusion chamber must be carefully managed. The chamber chemical equilibrium compositions for post-shot mixtures are evaluated to determine what compounds will be formed at temperatures 300-5000K. It is desired to know if carbon and or lead will deposit on the walls of the chamber, and if so: at what temperature, and what elements can be added to prevent this from happening. The simulation was conducted using the chemical equilibrium solver Cantera with a Matlab front-end. Solutions were obtained by running equilibrations at constant temperature and constant specific volume over the specified range of temperatures. It was found that if nothing is done, carbon will deposit on the walls once it cools to below 2138K, and lead below 838K. Three solutions to capture the carbon were found: adding pure oxygen, hydrogen/nitrogen combo, and adding pure nitrogen. The best of these was the addition of oxygen which would readily form CO at around 4000K. To determine the temperature at which carbon would deposit on the walls, temperature solutions to evaporation rate equations needed to be found. To determine how much carbon or any species was in the chamber at a given time, chamber flushing equations needed to be developed. Major concerns are deposition of carbon and/or oxygen on the tungsten walls forming tungsten oxides or tungsten carbide which could cause embrittlement and cause failure of the first wall. Further research is needed.

  5. Mimicking Mars: a vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrado, J M; Martín-Soler, J; Martín-Gago, J A

    2014-03-01

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10(-6) mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated.

  6. Mimicking Mars: A vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobrado, J. M., E-mail: sobradovj@inta.es; Martín-Soler, J. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Martín-Gago, J. A. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-15

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10{sup −6} mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated.

  7. Anterior Chamber Live Loa loa: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagmeni, G; Cheuteu, R; Bilong, Y; Wiedemann, P

    2016-01-01

    We reported a case of unusual intraocular Loa loa in a 27-year-old patient who presented with painful red eye. Biomicroscopy revealed a living and active adult worm in the anterior chamber of the right eye. After surgical extraction under local anesthesia, parasitological identification confirmed L. loa filariasis.

  8. Liquid ionization chambers for LET determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki

    Liquid ionization chambers [1] (LICs) have have been used in the last decades as background dosemeters. Since a few years LICs are also commercially available for dosimetry and are used for measurements of dose distributions where a high spatial distribution is necessary. Also in the last decades...

  9. Precision electronics for ionization chamber measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santry, D.C.; Bowes, G.C.; Munzenmayer, K.

    1987-01-01

    By using commercially available units, an electrometer and an IBM personal computer, it was relatively inexpensive and simple to assemble a system which permits ..gamma..-ray-emitting radionuclide activities to be measured in an ionization chamber with an uncertainty of + - 0.5% and a reproducibility of + - 0.05%.

  10. Isolation of Drosophila egg chambers for imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Richard M; Vallés, Ana Maria; Dobbie, Ian M; Davis, Ilan

    2010-04-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an important model for basic research into the molecular mechanisms underlying cell function and development, as well as a major biomedical research tool. A significant advantage of Drosophila is the ability to apply live cell imaging to a variety of living tissues that can be dissected and imaged in vivo, ex vivo, or in vitro. Drosophila egg chambers, for example, have proven to be a useful model system for studying border cell migration, Golgi unit transport, the rapid movement of mRNA and protein particles, and the role of microtubules in meiosis and oocyte differentiation. A crucial first step before imaging is preparation of the experimental material to ensure physiological relevance and to achieve the best conditions for image quality. Early- to mid-stage egg chambers cannot be mounted in an aqueous-based medium, because this causes a change in microtubule organization and follicle cell morphology. Such egg chambers survive better in Halocarbon oil, which allows free diffusion of oxygen, has low viscosity, and thus prevents dehydration and hypoxia. With a refractive index similar to glycerol, Halocarbon oil also has good optical properties for imaging. It also provides a good environment for injection and is particularly useful for long-term imaging of embryos. However, unlike with aqueous solutions, changes in the medium are not possible. This protocol describes the isolation of Drosophila egg chambers.

  11. Using reverberation chambers for EM measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Reverberation chambers (RC) are being used for several decades. The main advantage is the high field strength which can be generated, with only modest power. In the last few years the use of RCs became much popular, for testing multi-path propagation for communication links, or testing the coupling

  12. Prototype Vacuum Chamber for ISR Intersection Region

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The vacuum chambers at the ISR interaction region had to be as transparent as possible to the secondary particles emerging from the collision points. Made from stainless steel or titanium, only a fraction of a millimeter thick, they were most delicate to handle.

  13. Multiphysics Nuclear Thermal Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this effort is t o develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical thrust chamber design and analysis. The current task scope is to perform multidimensional, multiphysics analysis of thrust performance and heat transfer analysis for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine including thrust chamber and nozzle. The multiphysics aspects of the model include: real fluid dynamics, chemical reactivity, turbulent flow, and conjugate heat transfer. The model will be designed to identify thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments in all flow paths and materials. This model would then be used to perform non- nuclear reproduction of the flow element failures demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA testing, investigate performance of specific configurations and assess potential issues and enhancements. A two-pronged approach will be employed in this effort: a detailed analysis of a multi-channel, flow-element, and global modeling of the entire thrust chamber assembly with a porosity modeling technique. It is expected that the detailed analysis of a single flow element would provide detailed fluid, thermal, and hydrogen environments for stress analysis, while the global thrust chamber assembly analysis would promote understanding of the effects of hydrogen dissociation and heat transfer on thrust performance. These modeling activities will be validated as much as possible by testing performed by other related efforts.

  14. Acoustical-Levitation Chamber for Metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Trinh, E.; Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Jacobi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Sample moved to different positions for heating and quenching. Acoustical levitation chamber selectively excited in fundamental and second-harmonic longitudinal modes to hold sample at one of three stable postions: A, B, or C. Levitated object quickly moved from one of these positions to another by changing modes. Object rapidly quenched at A or C after heating in furnace region at B.

  15. IKAR, a ionization chamber for WA9

    CERN Document Server

    1976-01-01

    This ionization chamber arrived at CERN from Leningrad for a high precision study of hadron elastic scattering by a CERN-Clermont-Ferrand-Leningrad-Lyon-Uppsala Collaboration in the H3 beam (WA9). G.A. Korolev (third from right) looks at the drawings.

  16. Chamber transport for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Craig L., E-mail: clolson66@msn.com

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is given of research on chamber transport for HIF (heavy ion fusion) dating from the first HIF Workshop in 1976 to the present. Chamber transport modes are categorized into ballistic transport modes and channel-like modes. Four major HIF reactor studies are summarized (HIBALL-II, HYLIFE-II, Prometheus-H, OSIRIS), with emphasis on the chamber transport environment. In general, many beams are used to provide the required symmetry and to permit focusing to the required small spots. Target parameters are then discussed, with a summary of the individual heavy ion beam parameters required for HIF. The beam parameters are then classified as to their line charge density and perveance, with special emphasis on the perveance limits for radial space charge spreading, for the space charge limiting current, and for the magnetic (Alfven) limiting current. The major experiments on ballistic transport (SFFE, Sabre beamlets, GAMBLE II, NTX, NDCX) are summarized, with specific reference to the axial electron trapping limit for charge neutralization. The major experiments on channel-like transport (GAMBLE II channel, GAMBLE II self-pinch, LBNL channels, GSI channels) are discussed. The status of current research on HIF chamber transport is summarized, and the value of future NDCX-II transport experiments for the future of HIF is noted.

  17. A large acceptance cylindrical drift chamber detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrose, D.A. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Bachman, M.G. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Coffey, W.P. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Glass, G. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); McNaughton, K.H. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Riley, P.J. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Adams, D.L. [Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Gaussiran, T.L. [Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Hungerford, E.V. [University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Lan, K.A. [University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Johnston, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); McNaughton, M.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Penttila, S.I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Supek, I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a large acceptance cylindrical drift chamber detector designed and built for the study of the np{yields}pp{pi}{sup -} reaction at neutron beam energies in the range 500-800 MeV. Details of construction, electronics, testing, and detection efficiencies and resolutions are presented. (orig.).

  18. The arrival of the CLOUD chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN AVC

    2009-01-01

    The team from the CLOUD experiment - the world’s first experiment using a high-energy particle accelerator to study the climate - were on cloud nine after the arrival of their new three-metre diameter cloud chamber. This marks the end of three years’ R&D; and design, and the start of preparations for data taking later this year.

  19. Drift Chambers detectors; Detectores de deriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, I.; Martinez laso, L.

    1989-07-01

    We present here a review of High Energy Physics detectors based on drift chambers. The ionization, drift diffusion, multiplication and detection principles are described. Most common drift media are analysed, and a classification of the detectors according to its geometry is done. Finally the standard read-out methods are displayed and the limits of the spatial resolution are discussed. (Author) 115 refs.

  20. Cloud chamber experiments on the origin of ice crystal complexity in cirrus clouds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Schnaiter; E. Järvinen; P. Vochezer; A. Abdelmonem; R. Wagner; O. Jourdan; G. Mioche; V. N. Shcherbakov; C. G. Schmitt; U. Tricoli; Z. Ulanowski; A. J. Heymsfield

    2015-01-01

    ...) cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). A new experimental procedure was applied to grow and sublimate ice particles at defined super- and subsaturated ice conditions and for temperatures in the −40 to −60 °C range...

  1. Development of Master Chamber Software for Data Acquisition of Ionization Chamber for Indus 2 RRCAT

    OpenAIRE

    Priyesh Soni; Mrs. B. Harita; Nawaz Ali Sayed

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this paper was to Develop Master control software for DAQ of ionization chamber for INDUS-2 beam lines for detection of X-ray flux by an Ionization chamber that will remotely control and monitor the ultra low current signal detection analog module precisely. This application will be useful to measure the intensity of X-ray flux through ionization chamber in a beam line of synchrotron radiation source which is mounted in INDUS-2. It is one of new technique of detection. Beam l...

  2. Buildings Research using Infrared Imaging Radiometers with Laboratory Thermal Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Brent; Arasteh, Dariush

    1999-01-12

    Infrared thermal imagers are used at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to study heat transfer through components of building thermal envelopes. Two thermal chambers maintain steady-state heat flow through test specimens under environmental conditions for winter heating design. Infrared thermography is used to map surface temperatures on the specimens' warm side. Features of the quantitative thermography process include use of external reference emitters, complex background corrections, and spatial location markers. Typical uncertainties in the data are {+-} 0.5 C and 3 mm. Temperature controlled and directly measured external reference emitters are used to correct data from each thermal image. Complex background corrections use arrays of values for background thermal radiation in calculating temperatures of self-viewing surfaces. Temperature results are used to validate computer programs that predict heat flow including Finite-Element Analysis (FEA) conduction simulations and conjugate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. Results are also used to study natural convection surface heat transfer. Example data show the distribution of temperatures down the center line of an insulated window.

  3. A retrospective study on pulpal tissue prognosis of avulsed permanent teeth in children%儿童恒牙全脱出牙髓组织预后的回顾性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白洁; 秦满; 赵玉鸣

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the pulpal prognosis of replanted permanent teeth in children and to examine the associated factors .Methods:The samples consisted of 67 children with 81 avulsed perma-nent teeth treated in Peking University Hospital of Stomatology from 2000 to 2012 .Their clinical data of the replanted teeth were collected , and the follow-up period was no less than 12 months.The pulpal prognosis was classified as pulp necrosis and pulp non-necrosis .Results: The replantation within 30 minutes after avulsion led to the most significant increase in pulpal healing (P<0.05).The dental pulp of 80% ( 4/5 ) young permanent teeth replanted within 30 minutes remained vital , while all the teeth replanted after 30 minutes developed pulp necrosis within 60 days after replantation .Conclusion: The extra-alveolar period significantly affects the prognosis of pulp in immature permanent teeth after replanta-tion.When the extra-alveolar period is more than 30 minutes, the chance of pulp revascularization after replantation is very low , therefore pulp extirpation should be performed .%目的:观察儿童恒牙全脱出后再植牙的牙髓组织预后类型,牙髓坏死出现的时间,分析影响再植牙牙髓组织预后的因素。方法:对2000年至2012年在北京大学口腔医院就诊的儿童恒牙全脱出且观察期大于12个月的病例进行回顾性研究,观察再植牙的牙髓组织预后方式,牙髓坏死、钙变出现的时间,分析影响再植牙预后的相关因素,并进行统计学分析。结果:超过30 min再植的全脱出牙再植后60 d内全部发生了牙髓坏死,且出现牙髓坏死的时间明显早于30 min内再植的全脱出牙(P<0.05);30 min内再植的牙齿80%(4/5)牙髓存活,主要表现为牙髓钙变。结论:离体时间会影响再植牙的牙髓组织预后,超过30 min再植的牙齿牙髓几乎没有存活机会,临床上应考虑施行牙髓摘除术。

  4. Anterior chamber fixation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens: A novel technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sahap Kükner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the implantation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL in the anterior chamber (AC with the haptics passing through two iridectomies to the posterior chamber. A total of 33 eyes of 33 patients with inadequate posterior capsular support due to either previous aphakia or posterior capsular rupture during cataract extraction were included in the study. A double iridectomy was performed on all patients using a vitrectomy probe on the midperiphery of the iris. IOLs were implanted in the AC, and the haptics were passed through the iridectomies to the posterior chamber. The mean follow-up time was 25.3 months. AC hemorrhage occurred in five patients during the iridectomy procedure. Corneal edema was detected in eight of 14 patients with primary IOL insertions. Haptic dislocation was detected in only one patient. This technique may be a good alternative to scleral-fixated IOL implantation in eyes with aphakia.

  5. Achievable field strength in reverberation chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Eulig

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Feldvariable Kammern (FVK, engl.: modestirred- chamber werden unter anderem für EMV-Störfestigkeitsprüfungen verwendet. Ein häufig genanntes Argument, das die Einführung dieser Kammern als normgerechte Prüfumgebung vorantreiben soll, ist eine hohe Feldstärke, die im Vergleich zu anderen Testumgebungen mit relativ moderaten HF-Leistungen erreicht werden kann. Besonders für sicherheitskritische Geräte, wie Komponenten aus der Avionik- oder KFZ-Industrie, sind heutzutage Testfeldstärken von mehreren 100 V/m notwendig. Derart hohe Feldstärken können in Umgebungen, die ein ebenes Wellenfeld erzeugen oder nachbilden, nur mit großen HFLeistungen generiert werden. Durch die Resonanzeigenschaften einer FVK können demgegenüber mit sehr viel weniger Leistung und damit Verstärkeraufwand vergleichbare Werte der Feldstärke erzeugt werden. Allerdings sinkt mit zunehmendem Volumen die erreichbare Feldstärke bei gleicher Speiseleistung. Idealerweise sollen Feldvariable Kammern bei möglichst niedrigen Frequenzen für EMVTests nutzbar sein, was jedoch ein großes Kammervolumen erfordert. Das Problem, bei niedrigen Frequenzen hohe Feldstärken erzeugen zu können, relativiert deshalb den Vorteil von FVKn gegenüber bekannten Testumgebungen bei niedrigen Testfrequenzen. Der Posterbeitrag erläutert, welche Feldstärken in verschieden großen Feldvariablen Kammern beim Einspeisen einer bestimmten hochfrequenten Leistung erreicht werden können. Anhand dieser Ergebnisse wird aufgezeigt, oberhalb welcher Grenzfrequenz eine Anwendung von FVKn nur sinnvoll erscheint. Mode-stirred chambers (MSCs can be used for radiated immunity tests in EMC testing. Advantageous compared to conventional test methods is the high field strength which can here be generated with less RF-Power. This point is often the main argument for pushing the standardization of MSCs as an other EMC testing environment. Especially for safety-critical electronic equipment like avionic or

  6. Application of Reaction-Bonded Silicon Carbide in Manufacturing of Spacecraft Combustion Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics is a good structural ceramics material, which have a lot of excellent properties such as superior high-temperature strength up to a temperature of 1 350 ℃, chemical stability, good resistance to thermal shock and high abrasion resistance. The silicon carbide ceramics material has so far been used widely for manufacturing various components such as heat exchangers, rolls, rockets combustion chamber. Sintering of ceramics structural parts have many technological method, the reac...

  7. Design and Fabrication of Power Supply to Heat the Titanium Ball in Vacuum Chamber of HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANGZhihua; RAOJun; ZHOUJun; WANGMingwei; CHENGanyu; ZHANGJingsong

    2003-01-01

    By using the physical characteristic of the titanium when it is subliming, fourteen titanium balls are fixed in the vacuum chamber to improve the background of the wall of the vacuum chamber of HL-2A. When the filaments of the balls have 40- 50 A current,temperatures of the balls is up to 1200 centigrade and the balls begin to sublime. Therefore in order to get better parameters of plasma, we fabricate fourteen power supplies to heat the balls.

  8. Ultimate pressures achieved in TiZrV sputter-coated vacuum chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuti, Cristoforo; Ruzinov, V

    2001-01-01

    Two metre long, cylindrical vacuum chambers of diameter ranging from 34 to 100 mm, coated with TiZrV getter films by sputtering, have been baked for about 24 h at temperatures from 120 to 250 degrees C. The ultimate pressures achieved after bakeout were found to correspond to the ratio of the pressure gauge degassing to the effective pumping speed provided by the chamber at the location of the gauge. The results covering a pressure range from 10/sup -11/ Torr down to 10 /sup -13/ Torr are presented and discussed. (6 refs).

  9. Design and performance testing of the read-out boards for the CMS-DT chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, C; Marin, J; Oller, J C; Willmott, C

    2002-01-01

    Read-out boards (ROB) are one of the key elements of readout system for CMS barrel muon drift chambers. To insure proper and reliable operation under all detector environmental conditions an exhaustive set of tests have been developed and performed on the 30 pre-series ROB's before production starts. These tests include operation under CMS radiation conditions to detect and estimate SEU rates, validation with real chamber signals and trigger rates, studies of time resolution and linearity, crosstalk analysis, track pattern generation for calibration and on-line tests, and temperature cycling to uncover marginal conditions. We present the status of the ROB and tests results. (5 refs).

  10. Status of COLDDIAG: A Cold Vacuum Chamber for Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Gerstl, S; Casalbuoni, S; Grau, A W; Hagelstein, M; de Jauregui, D Saez; Boffo, C; Sikler, G; Baglin, V; Cox, M P; Schouten, J C; Cimino, R; Commisso, M; Spataro, B; Mostacci, A; Wallen, E J; Weigel, R; Clarke, J; Scott, D; Bradshaw, T W; Jones, R M; Shinton, I R.R

    2010-01-01

    One of the still open issues for the development of superconducting insertion devices is the understanding of the beam heat load. With the aim of measuring the beam heat load to a cold bore and the hope to gain a deeper understanding in the beam heat load mechanisms, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics is under construction. The following diagnostics will be implemented: i) retarding field analyzers to measure the electron energy and flux, ii) temperature sensors to measure the total heat load, iii) pressure gauges, iv) and mass spectrometers to measure the gas content. The inner vacuum chamber will be removable in order to test different geometries and materials. This will allow the installation of the cryostat in different synchrotron light sources. COLDDIAG will be built to fit in a short straight section at ANKA. A first installation at the synchrotron light source Diamond is foreseen in June 2011. Here we describe the technical design report of this device and the planned measurements with beam.

  11. Experiments with a pressure-driven Stirling refrigerator with flexible chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Patrick; Suire, Jonathan; Sen, Mihir; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2014-06-01

    We report on the design and experimental testing of a Stirling refrigerator that uses air as the working fluid, and where the conventional piston-cylinder assemblies are replaced by pressure-driven flexible chambers. The two chambers are periodically compressed by pneumatic actuators resulting in airflow through the regenerator and in a net temperature difference between the chambers. An experimental setup is used to investigate the performance of the refrigerator under different operating conditions with particular attention to actuation frequencies, driving pressure differences, and phase angles between the two inputs. The time constant of the temperature difference between the two chambers is determined, and the temperature difference is measured as a function of the system parameters. The results of several tests conducted under different operating conditions show that the refrigerating effect is very robust and allows good performance even for modulated inputs. The frequency response is radically different from that of a traditional motion-driven device. This work suggests that mechanical to thermal energy conversion devices based on this principle can be successfully powered by human motion.

  12. Reproducibility of the chamber scarification test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    1996-01-01

    The chamber scarification test is a predictive human skin irritation test developed to rank the irritation potential of products and ingredients meant for repeated use on normal and diseased skin. 12 products or ingredients can be tested simultaneously on the forearm skin of each volunteer....... The test combines with the procedure scratching of the skin at each test site and subsequent closed patch tests with the products, repeated daily for 3 days. The test is performed on groups of human volunteers: a skin irritant substance or products is included in each test as a positive control......, and a compound with low irritant potential as a negative control, to obtain relative characterization of the irritant potential of the unknown products. The outcome of tests with a positive and negative control product used repeatedly in 13 chamber scarification tests over a 7-year period is reported, and shows...

  13. The KLOE drift chamber VCI 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adinolfi, M.; Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Andryakov, A.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Anulli, F.; Bacci, C.; Bankamp, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellini, F.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Cabibbo, G.; Calcaterra, A.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Casarsa, M.; Cataldi, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervell, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; Conticelli, S.; De Lucia, E. E-mail: erika.delucia@roma1.infn.it; De Robertis, G.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; De Zorzi, G.; Dell' Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Falco, S.; Doria, A.; Drago, E.; Elia, V.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franceschi, A.; Franzini, P.; Gao, M.L.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Golovatyuk, V.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grandegger, W.; Graziani, E.; Guarnaccia, P.; Hagel, U. von.; Han, H.G.; Han, S.W.; Huang, X.; Incagli, M.; Ingrosso, L.; Jang, Y.Y.; Kim, W.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lomtadze, F.; Luisi, C.; Mao, C.S.; Martemianov, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moalem, A.; Moccia, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nedosekin, A.; Panareo, M.; Pacciani, L.; Pages, P.; Palutan, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passaseo, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, G.; Picca, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Pistillo, C.; Pollack, M.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Ruggieri, F.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schwick, C.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shan, J.; Silano, P.; Spadaro, T.; Spagnolo, S.; Spiriti, E.; Stanescu, C.; Tong, G.L.; Tortora, L.; Valente, E.; Valente, P.; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, Y.G.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhou, Y

    2002-02-01

    The main goal of the KLOE experiment at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory is the study CP violation in kaon decays. The tracking device of the experiment is a drift chamber whose dimensions, 4 m of diameter and 3.3 m length, provide a large acceptance volume for the decay products of low momentum K{sub L} ({lambda}{sub L}=3.4 m). A complete stereo geometry with 12.582 cells arranged in 58 layers guarantees a high and uniform efficiency in the reconstruction of the charged K{sub L} decays. Very light materials have been chosen both for the drift medium, a helium-based gas mixture, and for the mechanical structure, made of carbon fiber, to minimize multiple scattering and conversion of low-energy photons. The design requirements, the adopted solutions together with the calibration procedure and the tracking performances of the drift chamber are discussed.

  14. The KLOE drift chamber VCI 2001

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; Ambrosino, F; Andryakov, A; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Anulli, F; Bacci, C; Bankamp, A; Barbiellini, G; Bellini, F; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Bulychjov, S A; Cabibbo, G; Calcaterra, A; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Carboni, G; Cardini, A; Casarsa, M; Cataldi, G; Ceradini, F; Cervell, F; Cevenini, F; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; Conticelli, S; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; De Sangro, R; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Falco, S; Doria, A; Drago, E; Elia, V; Erriquez, O; Farilla, A; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Forti, C; Franceschi, A; Franzini, P; Gao, M L; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Golovatyuk, V; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Grandegger, W; Graziani, E; Guarnaccia, P; Han, H G; Han, S W; Huang, X; Incagli, M; Ingrosso, L; Jang, Y Y; Kim, W; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Lomtadze, F; Luisi, C; Mao Chen Sheng; Martemyanov, M; Matsyuk, M; Mei, W; Merola, L; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moalem, A; Moccia, S; Moulson, M; Murtas, F; Müller, S; Napolitano, M; Nedosekin, A; Pacciani, L; Pagès, P; Palutan, M; Panareo, M; Paoluzi, L; Pasqualucci, E; Passalacqua, L; Passaseo, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, Guido; Picca, D; Pirozzi, G; Pistillo, C; Pollack, M; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Ruggieri, F; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Schamberger, R D; Schwick, C; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Shan, J; Silano, P; Spadaro, T; Spagnolo, S; Spiriti, E; Stanescu, C; Tong, G L; Tortora, L; Valente, E; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Von Hagel, U; Wu, Y; Xie, Y G; Zhao, P P; Zhou, Y

    2002-01-01

    The main goal of the KLOE experiment at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory is the study CP violation in kaon decays. The tracking device of the experiment is a drift chamber whose dimensions, 4 m of diameter and 3.3 m length, provide a large acceptance volume for the decay products of low momentum K sub L (lambda sub L =3.4 m). A complete stereo geometry with 12.582 cells arranged in 58 layers guarantees a high and uniform efficiency in the reconstruction of the charged K sub L decays. Very light materials have been chosen both for the drift medium, a helium-based gas mixture, and for the mechanical structure, made of carbon fiber, to minimize multiple scattering and conversion of low-energy photons. The design requirements, the adopted solutions together with the calibration procedure and the tracking performances of the drift chamber are discussed.

  15. WE-G-BRA-06: Calibrating an Ionisation Chamber: Gaining Experience Using a Dosimetry 'flight Simulator'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavis, A; Saunderson, J; Ward, J

    2012-06-01

    Recently there has been great interest in the use of simulation training, with the view to enhance safety within radiotherapy practice. We have developed a Virtual Environment for Radiotherapy Training (VERT) which facilitates this, including the simulation of a number of 'Physics practices'. One such process is the calibration of an ionisation chamber for use in Linac photon beams. The VERT system was used to provide a life sized 3D virtual environment within which we were able to simulate the calibration of a departmental chamber for 6MV and 15 MV beams following the UK 1990 Code of Practice. The characteristics of the beams are fixed parameters in the simulation, whereas default (Absorbed dose to water) correction factors of the chambers are configurable thereby dictating their response in the virtual x-ray beam. When the simulation is started, a random, realistic temperature and pressure is assigned to the bunker. Measurement and chamber positional errors are assigned to the chambers. A virtual water phantom was placed on the Linac couch and irradiated through the side using a 10 × 10 field. With a chamber at the appropriate depths and irradiated iso-centrically, the Quality Indices (QI) of the beams were obtained. The two chambers were 'inter-compared', allowing the departmental chamber calibration factor to be calculated from that of the reference chamber. For the virtual 6/15 MV beams, the QI were found to be 0.668/ 0.761 and the inter-comparison ratios 0.4408/ 0.4402 respectively. The departmental chamber calibration factors were calculated; applying these and appropriate environmental corrections allowed the output of the Linac to be confirmed. We have shown how a virtual training environment can be used to demonstrate practical processes and reinforce learning. The UK CoP was used here, however any relevant protocol could be demonstrated. Two of the authors (Beavis and Ward) are Founders of Vertual Ltd, a spin-out company created to commercialise the

  16. Angular resolution of stacked resistive plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Samuel, Deepak; Murgod, Lakshmi P

    2016-01-01

    We present here detailed derivations of mathematical expressions for the angular resolution of a set of stacked resistive plate chambers (RPCs). The expressions are validated against experimental results using data collected from the prototype detectors (without magnet) of the upcoming India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). In principle, these expressions can be used for any other detector with an architecture similar to that of RPCs.

  17. Development and progress in resistive plate chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong-Fang; WU Jian

    2004-01-01

    Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) is a robust and low cost gas detector, which is extensively used in high-energy physics, cosmic and astroparticle physics experiments. Over the past twenty years, as a particle detector,RPC has made remarkable progress. The main achievements, features and results of experiemantal tests including R&D and production of the RPCs by several Chinese groups in recent years are reported in this article.

  18. The Bern Infinitesimal Bubble Chamber (BIBC)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    The chamber body was machined from a block of aluminium. The visible volume was cylindrical with 65 mm diameter and 35 mm depth. It was filled with propane or freon. It was meant as vertex detector in the search of short-lived particles. It was also used with in-line holography resulting in 8 µm bubble size and 9 cm depth of the field. See E. Ramseyer, B. Hahn and E. Hugentobler, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 201 (1982) 335.

  19. Performance of the ATLAS resistive plate chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cattani, Giordano, E-mail: giordano.cattani@cern.ch [INFN and University of Rome & #x27; Tor Vergata& #x27; , via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2012-01-01

    An overview and results of the effort to monitor and measure the relevant quantities of the Resistive Plate Chamber detectors are presented, addressing in particular three aspects. First, the full exploitation of the high-precision tracking provided by ATLAS Monitored Drift Tubes when measuring the performance of the RPCs. Second, the use of a dedicated data stream to achieve the required statistics. Last, the central role of GRID facilities in providing the necessary computing resources.

  20. Sequential Notch activation regulates ventricular chamber development

    OpenAIRE

    D'Amato, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita, leída en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Bioquímica. Fecha de lectura: 15 de enero de 2016 Ventricular chamber morphogenesis is a beautiful example of tissue interactions orchestrating a precise gene regulatory network essential for tissue patterning, cellular proliferation and differentiation that ultimately lead to a fully compacted and functional adult ventricle. The Notch signaling pathway is a crucial regulator ...

  1. Vacuum Chamber for the Booster Bending Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    To minimise eddy currents, induced by the rising magnetic field, the chamber was made from thin stainless steel of high specific electric resistance. For mechanical strength, it was corrugated in a hydro-forming process. The cross-section was designed for maximum strength and maximum aperture. To accept particles with simultaneous large amplitudes in both planes, the cross-section approaches a rectangular shape (see also 7402463).

  2. Update on Scroll Compressor Chamber Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Ian; Groll, Eckhard; Braun, James; King, Galen

    2010-01-01

    The geometry of the scroll compressor determines the efficiency of the scroll compressor and controls all elements of its operation. It is therefore critical to be able to accurately model the volumes of the compressor over the course of a revolution. This paper proposes a novel quasi-analytic formulation of the suction, compression and discharge chambers based on a change of variables from involute angle to polar integration angle. This solution has been compared against a reference polyg...

  3. Wire chambers with their magnetostrictive readout

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    This set of wire chamber planes shaped as a cylinder sector was installed inside the magnet of a polarized spin target modified to allow as well momentum analysis of the produced particles. The experiment (S126) was set up by the CERN-Trieste Collaboration in the PS beam m9 to measure spin effects in the associated production of of a positive kaon and a positive Sigma by interaction of a positive pion with polarized protons.

  4. Improvement of a New Gas Ionization Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to identify heavier elements, we have developed a new longitudinal field gas ionization chamber (IC)with an angle of 30° of plate (as shown in Fig.1). The IC is operated in flowing iso-butane gas at a pressure of 10kPa. After testing by using a 3- component α particle source and comparing with the old longitudinal field

  5. Bubble chamber: D meson production and decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    This event shows real particle tracks from the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC), which was used to observe neutrino and hadron beams between 1973 and 1984 from the PS and SPS accelerators. In this event a neutrino interacts with a proton producing an excited D meson. A labeled diagram is seen on the right as the particles spiral in the magnetic field of the detector.

  6. RF Anechoic Chambers, Tri-Service Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In collaboration with the Navy, there are 12 RF Anechoic and static free exposure chambers located at TSRL. These chambers cover the majority of the RF spectrum and...

  7. RF Anechoic Chambers, Tri-Service Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In collaboration with the Navy, there are 12 RF Anechoic and static free exposure chambers located at TSRL. These chambers cover the majority of the RF spectrum and...

  8. Air density dependence of the response of the PTW SourceCheck 4pi ionization chamber for (125)I brachytherapy seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Del Río, J; Tornero-López, A M; Guirado, D; Pérez-Calatayud, J; Lallena, A M

    2017-06-01

    To analyze the air density dependence of the response of the new SourceCheck 4pi ionization chamber, manufactured by PTW. The air density dependence of three different SourceCheck 4pi chambers was studied by measuring (125)I sources. Measurements were taken by varying the pressure from 746.6 to 986.6hPa in a pressure chamber. Three different HDR 1000 Plus ionization chambers were also analyzed under similar conditions. A linear and a potential-like function of the air density were fitted to experimental data and their achievement in describing them was analyzed. SourceCheck 4pi chamber response showed a residual dependence on the air density once the standard pressure and temperature factor was applied. The chamber response was overestimated when the air density was below that under normal atmospheric conditions. A similar dependence was found for the HDR 1000 Plus chambers analyzed. A linear function of the air density permitted a very good description of this residual dependence, better than with a potential function. No significant variability between the different specimens of the same chamber model studied was found. The effect of overestimation observed in the chamber responses once they are corrected for the standard pressure and temperature may represent a non-negligible ∼4% overestimation in high altitude cities as ours (700m AMSL). This overestimation behaves linearly with the air density in all cases analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Determining oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point in Chanodichthys mongolicus using an improved respirometer chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Longwu; Jiang, Haifeng; Tong, Guangxiang; Xu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of oxygen consumption rates and asphyxiation points in fish is important to determine appropriate stocking and water quality management in aquaculture. The oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point in Chanodichthys mongolicus were detected under laboratory conditions using an improved respirometer chamber. The results revealed that more accurate estimates can be obtained by adjusting the volume of the respirometer chamber, which may avoid system errors caused by either repeatedly adjusting fish density or selecting different equipment specifications. The oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point of C. mongolicus increased with increasing water temperature and decreasing fish size. Changes in the C. mongolicus oxygen consumption rate were divided into three stages at water temperatures of 11-33°C: (1) a low temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was 11-19°C, (2) the optimum temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was 19-23°C, and (3) a high temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was > 27°C. The temperature quotients (Q10) obtained suggested that C. mongolicus preferred a temperature range of 19-23°C. At 19°C, C. mongolicus exhibited higher oxygen consumption rates during the day when the maximum values were observed at 10:00 and 14:00 than at night when the minimum occurred at 02:00.

  10. Measurements of a 1/4-scale model of an explosives firing chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastrnak, J.W.; Baker, C.F.; Simmons, L.F.

    1995-01-27

    In anticipation of increasingly stringent environmental regulations, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) proposes to construct a 60-kg firing chamber to provide blast-effects containment for most of its open-air, high-explosive, firing operations. Even though these operations are within current environmental limits, containment of the blast effects and hazardous debris will further drastically reduce emissions to the environment and minimize the generated hazardous waste. The major design consideration of such a chamber is its overall structural dynamic response in terms of long-term containment of all blast effects from repeated internal detonations of high explosives. Another concern is how much other portions of the facility outside the firing chamber must be hardened to ensure personnel protection in the event of an accidental detonation while the chamber door is open. To assess these concerns, a 1/4-scale replica model of the planned contained firing chamber was designed, constructed, and tested with scaled explosive charges ranging from 25 to 125% of the operational explosives limit of 60 kg. From 16 detonations of high explosives, 880 resulting strains, blast pressures, and temperatures within the model were measured to provide information for the final design. Factors of safety for dynamic yield of the firing chamber structure were calculated and compared to the design criterion of totally elastic response. The rectangular, reinforced-concrete chamber model exhibited a lightly damped vibrational response that placed the structure in alternating cycles of tension and compression. During compression, both the reinforcing steel and the concrete remained elastic.

  11. Diurnal Variation of Anterior Chamber Flare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Adam

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the ideal time and reproducibility of anterior chamber flare measurements. Materials and Methods: Anterior chamber flare measurements were performed with laser flaremetre device at 8 am to 45 volunteers and these measurements were repeated on the same day at 12 pm and 4 pm. Results: Twenty-five (55.5% of the volunteers were women and 20 (44.5% were men; mean age was 28.67±7.40 (18-49 years. The mean anterior chamber flare measurements taken following the ophthalmologic examination were 5.94±1.41 foton/msn at 8 am, 5.65±1.45 foton/msn at 12 pm, and 5.79±1.20 foton/msn at 4 pm. No statistical difference was found between the measurements (p=0.08. Subgroup analysis according to eye color, revealed no significant difference between flare measurements in brown, hazel, and green eyes (p=0.21. Correlation analysis demonstrated association between age and all flare measurements within the day (r=0.24, p=0.03; r=0.41, p=0.01, r=0.27, p=0.01. Conclusion: No significant diurnal change was detected in the flare measurements of our study subjects but positive correlation with age was observed. Hence, all flare measurements within a day are reliable and have high repeatability in healthy subjects. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2015; 45: 52-5

  12. Posterior Chamber Hemorrhage during Fluorescein Angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A. P. Vilela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the first reported case of acute posterior chamber hemorrhage during fluorescein angiography (FA. This is a case review with serial color photographs of the anterior segment. A 76-year-old male was referred for angiographic control of age-related macular degeneration. He was pseudophakic OU, BCVA 20/40 OU. He had mild hypertension, but not diabetes. He had had two previous angiograms without adverse effects. Difficulty was experienced in obtaining the images owing to a progressive reduction in the transparency of the media. A dense hemorrhage in the posterior chamber of the right eye was found, involving the visual axis. Thorough biomicroscopy, gonioscopy, and ultrasonic biomicroscopy showed that part of one of the haptics of the right intraocular lens (IOL was touching and tearing the posterior face of the iris, without any visible synechiae, iris, or angle neovascularization. Anterior segment FA and posterior ultrasonography were normal. No similar case has been described in the literature involving dense progressive bleeding located in the capsular bag and posterior chamber, without any detectable triggering ocular event other than mydriasis and fluorescein injection. Contact of the iris or sulcus with part of the intraocular lens, aggravated by the intense use of mydriatics during the FA procedure, probably caused bleeding to happen.

  13. Sperm Cell Dynamics in Shallow Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condat, Carlos; Marconi, Veronica; Guidobaldi, Alejandro; Giojalas, Laura; Silhanek, Alejandro; Jeyaram, Yogesh; Moshchalkov, Victor

    2015-03-01

    Self-propelled microorganisms are attracted to surfaces. This makes their dynamic behavior in restricted geometries very different from that observed in the bulk. Here we analyze the motion of spermatozoids confined to shallow chambers, investigating the nature of the cell trajectories and their accumulation near the side boundaries. Observed cell trajectories are composed of a succession of quasi-circular and quasi-linear segments. This suggests that the cells follow a path of intermittent trappings near the top and down surfaces separated by stretches of quasi-free motion near the center of the gap. Use of microstructured petal-shaped edges limits accumulation near the borders and contributes to increase the concentration in the chamber interior. System stabilization occurs over times of the order of minutes, which agrees well with a theoretical estimate that assumes that the cell mean-square displacement is largely due to the quasi-linear segments. Pure quasi-circular trajectories would require several hours to stabilize. Our estimates also indicate that stabilization proceeds 2.5 times faster in the rosette geometries than in the smooth-edged chambers, which is another practical reason to prefer the former.

  14. Second generation "Flat-Fish" vacuum chamber for an ISR intersection

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    The picture shows the part of the "Flat-Fish" chamber covering one side of the beam intersection region. The other side is covered by an equal part and both are welded toghether at their small end. The two shells of each part were hydroformed from 0.15 mm thick inconel 718 sheet (with end parts in inconel 600 for easier manual welding to the arms) and welded toghether with two strips which were attached by means of stainless steel strings to the Split Field Magnet poles in order to take the atmospheric pressure forces. This was the thinnest vacuum chamber made for the ISR. Inconel material was chosen for its high elastic modulus and strenght at chamber bake-out temperature.

  15. A central refrigeration system to support multiple environmental test chambers: Design, development, and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baca, R.G.; Miller, K.M.; Shipley, K.L.

    1990-11-01

    A pilot plant project was undertaken to develop a central refrigeration compressor station capable of providing the necessary cooling to a network of nine independently-controlled environmental test chambers operating at temperatures of {minus}85{degree}F to 350{degree}F. Design features of the central two-stage (cascade) vapor compression refrigeration system are described. Computer control of the central refrigeration station is a major contribution to the improved efficiency of the overall system. A second computer-control system was developed to perform the task of environmental chamber control, test management, and chamber performance monitoring. Data on performance of the Climatic Central Refrigeration System (CCRS) are presented. 7 refs., 18 figs.

  16. Development of customised environmental chambers for time-resolved in situ diffraction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styles, M. J.; Riley, D. P.

    2010-11-01

    In an effort to mitigate the expense and broaden the applicability of customised environment chambers, researchers at the University of Melbourne and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) have designed and are currently commissioning a modular reaction chamber, capable of separating the necessities of diffraction methodologies from those of the desired sample environment. The In Situ Reaction Chamber (ISRC) abstracts many of the details intrinsic to the diffractometer, allowing users to design inexpensive environmental inserts that may be readily customised to their individual needs. The first insert to be developed for use with the ISRC is a high temperature furnace capable of providing an oxidising sample environment up to 1600°C.

  17. Controlled environment fumigation chambers for the study of reactive air pollutant effects on plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, N. J.; Lucas, P. W.; Nicholas Hewitt, C.

    The design and construction of eight 1-m 3 fumigation chambers for exposing plants to reactive air pollutants at low concentrations are reported. Teflon surfaces are used where possible to minimize the adsorption, absorption, desorption and chemical reaction of the pollutants. A purified ambient air supply, to which metered quantities of gaseous pollutants are added, is used to give two air changes per minute at constant, low, pollutant concentrations. Comparative analysis of the chambers indicates that conditions may be maintained with a significant degree of precision, i.e. temperature ±0.3°C, RH ±6%, light intensity ±5 μmol m -2 s -1. Boundary layer analysis from models of cherry tree ( Prunus avium) leaves indicate that the minimum conductance value within these chambers is 2 cm s -1.

  18. Wireless transmission of biosignals for hyperbaric chamber applications

    OpenAIRE

    Perez-Vidal, Carlos; Gracia, Luis; Carmona, Cristian; Alorda, Bartomeu; Salinas, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a wireless system to send biosignals outside a hyperbaric chamber avoiding wires going through the chamber walls. Hyperbaric chambers are becoming more and more common due to new indications of hyperbaric oxygen treatments. Metallic walls physically isolate patients inside the chamber, where getting a patient?s vital signs turns into a painstaking task. The paper proposes using a ZigBee-based network to wirelessly transmit the patient's biosignals to the outside of the cha...

  19. Smart ionization chamber for gamma-ray monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Drndarević Vujo R.; Jevtić Nenad J.; Rajović Vladimir M.; Stanković Srboljub J.

    2014-01-01

    A design and implementation of a smart ionization chamber suitable for connection into gamma radiation monitoring networks is presented in this paper. The smart ionization chamber consists of air-equivalent one liter ionization chamber with associated electronics and a built-in memory for storage of electronic data specifications. Generally, operating and measurement characteristics of the used ionization chamber are written into the memory chip attached to...

  20. An immunocytochemical study of pulpal responses to cavity preparation by laser ablation in rat molars by using antibodies to heat shock protein (Hsp) 25 and class II MHC antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takeshi; Nomura, Shuichi; Maeda, Takeyasu; Ohshima, Hayato

    2004-03-01

    Initial responses of odontoblasts and immunocompetent cells to cavity preparation by laser ablation were investigated in rat molars. In untreated control teeth, intense heat shock protein (Hsp) 25 immunoreactivity was found in the cell bodies of odontoblasts, whereas cells immunopositive for the class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigen were predominantly located beneath the odontoblast layer in the dental pulp. Cavity preparation caused the destruction of the odontoblast layer and the shift of most class-II-MHC-positive cells from the pulp-dentin border toward the pulp core at the affected site. Twelve hours after cavity preparation, numerous class-II-MHC-positive cells appeared along the pulp-dentin border and extended their processes deep into the exposed dentinal tubules, but subsequently disappeared from the pulp-dentin border together with Hsp-25-immunopositive cells by 24 h after the operation. By 3-5 days postoperation, distinct abscess formation consisting of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was found in the dental pulp. The penetration of masses of oral bacteria was recognizable in the dentinal tubules beneath the prepared cavity. These findings indicate that cavity preparation by laser ablation induces remarkable inflammation by continuous bacterial infections via dentinal tubules in this experimental model, thereby delaying pulpal regeneration.

  1. Realization of a cryogenic interface to an ultracold atomic chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Aditya; Wang, Ke; Shaffer, Airlia; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Schwab, Keith; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The control and manipulation of ultracold atoms in close proximity to cryogenic material surfaces opens up novel avenues for quantum sensing with cold atoms. However, integrating cryogenics with cold atomic systems presents the dual challenges of reducing thermal radiation load while allowing optimal optical access. Here, we present the realization of a unique interface between a cryogenic system and a room-temperature ultracold atomic chamber which allows for the optical trapping of cold atoms within microns of a sub-10 K cryogenic surface. Our interface serves as a platform for a cold-atoms based precision magnetic microscope for probing exotic condensed matter systems such as correlated electronic materials, as well as a platform for the realization of hybrid quantum systems. This work is supported by the DARPA QuASAR program through a grant from the ARO.

  2. Picosecond laser-induced water condensation in a cloud chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Tian, Ye; Bai, Yafeng; Liu, Yaoxiang; Du, Shengzhe; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Tiejun; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-09-05

    We investigated water condensation in a laboratory cloud chamber induced by picosecond (ps) laser pulses at ~350 ps (800 nm/1-1000 Hz) with a maximum peak power of ~25 MW. The peak power was much lower than the critical power for self-focusing in air (~3-10 GW depending on the pulse duration). Sparks, airflow and snow formation were observed under different laser energies or repetition rates. It was found that weaker ps laser pulses can also induce water condensation by exploding and breaking down ice crystals and/or water droplets into tiny particles although there was no formation of laser filament. These tiny particles would grow until precipitation in a super-saturation zone due to laser-induced airflow in a cold region with a large temperature gradient.

  3. Conceptual Design Report for the Extreme Ecosystems Test Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Barnes; J. Beller; K. Caldwell; K. Croft; R. Cherry; W. Landman

    1998-12-01

    This conceptual design supports the creation of Extreme Ecosystems Test Chambers, which will replicate deep subsurface and subocean environments characterized by high pressure (2,000 psi) and subfreezing to high temperature (-4 to 300 degrees F) with differing chemical and saturation conditions. The design provides a system to support research and development that includes heat transfer, phase change issues in porous media, microbiology in extreme environments, and carbon sequestration and extraction. The initial system design is based on the research needs to support the commercial production of methane hydrates from subsurface sediments. The design provides for three pressure vessels: a Down Hole Test Vessel, a Vertical Multi-phase Test Vessel, and a Horizontal Multi-phase Test Vessel.

  4. Herds of methane chambers grazing bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinham, Alistair; Dunbabin, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Water to air methane emissions from freshwater reservoirs can be dominated by sediment bubbling (ebullitive) events. Previous work to quantify methane bubbling from a number of Australian sub-tropical reservoirs has shown that this can contribute as much as 95% of total emissions. These bubbling events are controlled by a variety of different factors including water depth, surface and internal waves, wind seiching, atmospheric pressure changes and water levels changes. Key to quantifying the magnitude of this emission pathway is estimating both the bubbling rate as well as the areal extent of bubbling. Both bubbling rate and areal extent are seldom constant and require persistent monitoring over extended time periods before true estimates can be generated. In this paper we present a novel system for persistent monitoring of both bubbling rate and areal extent using multiple robotic surface chambers and adaptive sampling (grazing) algorithms to automate the quantification process. Individual chambers are self-propelled and guided and communicate between each other without the need for supervised control. They can maintain station at a sampling site for a desired incubation period and continuously monitor, record and report fluxes during the incubation. To exploit the methane sensor detection capabilities, the chamber can be automatically lowered to decrease the head-space and increase concentration. The grazing algorithms assign a hierarchical order to chambers within a preselected zone. Chambers then converge on the individual recording the highest 15 minute bubbling rate. Individuals maintain a specified distance apart from each other during each sampling period before all individuals are then required to move to different locations based on a sampling algorithm (systematic or adaptive) exploiting prior measurements. This system has been field tested on a large-scale subtropical reservoir, Little Nerang Dam, and over monthly timescales. Using this technique

  5. High counting rate resistive-plate chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peskov, V.; Anderson, D. F.; Kwan, S.

    1993-05-01

    Parallel-plate avalanche chambers (PPAC) are widely used in physics experiments because they are fast (less than 1 ns) and have very simple construction: just two parallel metallic plates or mesh electrodes. Depending on the applied voltage they may work either in spark mode or avalanche mode. The advantage of the spark mode of operation is a large signal amplitude from the chamber, the disadvantage is that there is a large dead time (msec) for the entire chamber after an event. The main advantage of the avalanche mode is high rate capability 10(exp 5) counts/mm(sup 2). A resistive-plate chamber (RPC) is similar to the PPAC in construction except that one or both of the electrodes are made from high resistivity (greater than 10(exp 10) Omega(cm) materials. In practice RPC's are usually used in the spark mode. Resistive electrodes are charged by sparks, locally reducing the actual electric field in the gap. The size of the charged surface is about 10 mm(sup 2), leaving the rest of the detector unaffected. Therefore, the rate capability of such detectors in the spark mode is considerably higher than conventional spark counters. Among the different glasses tested the best results were obtained with electron type conductive glasses, which obey Ohm's law. Most of the work with such glasses was done with high pressure parallel-plate chambers (10 atm) for time-of-flight measurements. Resistive glasses have been expensive and produced only in small quantities. Now resistive glasses are commercially available, although they are still expensive in small scale production. From the positive experience of different groups working with the resistive glasses, it was decided to review the old idea to use this glass for the RPC. This work has investigated the possibility of using the RPC at 1 atm and in the avalanche mode. This has several advantages: simplicity of construction, high rate capability, low voltage operation, and the ability to work with non-flammable gases.

  6. An automatic flux chamber for investigating gas flux at water - air interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc, N. T.; Silverstein, S.; Lundmark, L.; Reyier, H.; Crill, P. M.; Bastviken, D.

    2011-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are major sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) and representative measurements of GHG fluxes from aquatic ecosystems to the atmosphere are vital in climate related biogeochemistry. One of the most important fluxes, ebullition (bubble flux) of methane (CH4) is episodic, with large fluxes during short time periods. To properly capture such fluxes long term measurement approaches are necessary which is labor intensive for manual flux chamber based methods, or require expensive equipment with e.g. eddy correlation methods. An inexpensive and easily mobile automatic flux chamber for long-term measurements has been designed to approach these drawbacks. This device includes a flux chamber, with a controller/datalogger, valves, a pump, a 12 V battery and a solar cell. Sensors used so far record CH4 concentration in the chamber headspace, temperature in water and air, barometric pressure. Other sensors for e.g. CO2 and weather variables can be attached. The unit can be programmed to measure in situ accumulation of gas in the chamber and also to collect gas samples in an array of sample bottles for subsequent analysis in the laboratory. Simultaneous deployment of many such units represent a cost efficient and easily managed solution for local long term flux monitoring.

  7. Aging studies of resistive bulk Micromegas chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, Katie Louise

    2017-01-01

    A long-term operation study is presented as a probe of the aging properties of two bulk-resistive Micromegas chambers installed at the GIF$^{++}$ Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. Trends in the instantaneous chamber current, recorded over $\\approx$ 500 days of sustained exposure to the GIF$^{++}$ high intensity photon source, are analysed as a function of time in order to identify any signs of detector aging. As part of the study, additional variations in the current due to the changing external conditions of the chambers must be corrected for in order to isolate any aging effects. These include the changing chamber positions with respect to the photon source and the temperature and pressure fluctuations of the detector gas medium. Due to a number of subsets of the total irradiation period in which the exact detector positions are unknown, the aging study at the present time remains inconclusive. As a result, an alternative long-term aging study utilising the instantaneous chamber dark currents is suggested...

  8. Thermal isolation of microchip reaction chambers for rapid non-contact DNA amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Christopher J.; Humphrey, Joseph A. C.; Landers, James P.

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes further optimization of a non-contact, infrared-mediated system for microchip DNA amplification via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The optimization is focused on heat transfer modeling and subsequent fabrication of thermally isolated reaction chambers in glass devices that are uniquely compatible with non-contact thermal control. With a thermal conductivity approximately an order of magnitude higher than many plastics, glass is not the obvious substrate of choice for rapid thermal cycling in microfluidic chambers, yet it is preferable in terms of optical clarity, solvent compatibility and chemical inertness. Based on predictions of a lumped capacity heat transfer analysis, it is shown here that post-bonding, patterned etching of surrounding glass from microfluidic reaction chambers provides enhancements as high as 3.6- and 7.5-fold in cooling and heating rates, respectively, over control devices with the same chamber designs. These devices are then proven functional for rapid DNA amplification via PCR, in which 25 thermal cycles are completed in only 5 min in thermally isolated PCR chambers of 270 nL volume, representing the fastest static PCR in glass devices reported to date. Amplification of the 500-base pair fragment of λ-DNA was confirmed by capillary gel electrophoresis. In addition to rapid temperature control, the fabrication scheme presented, which is compatible with standard photolithography and wet etching techniques, provides a simple alternative for general thermal management in glass microfluidic devices without metallization.

  9. Installation and Commissioning of the new GLM Implantation Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Summer student report about the work with the new implantation chamber for the GLM branch of ISOLDE. In the context of this project an API for the vacuum system of the new chamber was developed and implemented in web application that will be used to control the new implantation chamber at some point.

  10. Engineering analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers for GEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, J.A.; Belser, F.C.; Pratuch, S.M.; Wuest, C.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mitselmakher, G. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Gordeev, A. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Johnson, C.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Polychronakos, V.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Golutvin, I.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1993-10-21

    Structural analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers performed up to the date of this publication are documented. Mechanical property data for typical chamber materials are included. This information, originally intended to be an appendix to the {open_quotes}CSC Structural Design Bible,{close_quotes} is presented as a guide for future designers of large chambers.

  11. Anechoic chamber in industrial plants. [construction materials and structural design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpert, E.; Juncu, O.; Lorian, R.; Marfievici, D.; Mararu, I.

    1974-01-01

    A light anechoic chamber for routine acoustical measurements in the machine building industry is reported. The outer housing of the chamber consists of modules cast in glass fiber reinforced polyester resin; the inner housing consists of pyramidal modules cut out of sound absorbing slates. The parameters of this anechoic chamber facilitate acoustical measurements according to ISO and CAEM recommendations.

  12. Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Dissipation within a Euthanasia Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoufack-Momo, Shelly M; Amparan, Ashlee A; Grunden, Beverly; Boivin, Gregory P

    2014-01-01

    CO2 euthanasia is used widely for small laboratory animals, such as rodents. A common necessity in many animal research facilities is to euthanize mice in sequential batches. We assessed the effects of several variables on the time it took for CO2 to dissipate within a chamber. Using standard euthanasia time, changes in flow rate were compared between a slow 15% fill rate for 7 min, and a slow 15% followed by a rapid 50% filling for a total of 5 min. Additional variables assessed included the effects of opening the lid after the completion of chamber filling, turning the chamber over after completion of filling, and the use and removal of a cage from within the chamber. For all trials, CO2 levels in the chambers peaked between 50% and 80%. After the gas was turned off, the concentration of CO2 dropped to below 10% CO2 within 2 min, except when the lid was left on the chamber, where concentration levels remained above 10% after 20 min. CO2 dissipation was significantly faster when the chamber was turned upside down after filling. Significant interaction effects occurred among the factors of cage presence within the chamber, flow rate, and chamber position. Only leaving the lid on the chamber had any practical implication for delaying CO2 dissipation. We recommend that users allow 2 min for CO2 to clear from the chamber before subsequent euthanasia procedures, unless the chamber is manipulated to increase the dissipation rate. PMID:25199098

  13. Characterization of a homemade ionization chamber for radiotherapy beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Lucio P; Perini, Ana P; dos Santos, Gelson P; Xavier, Marcos; Khoury, Helen J; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    A homemade cylindrical ionization chamber was studied for routine use in therapy beams of (60)Co and X-rays. Several characterization tests were performed: leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, stability, stabilization time, chamber orientation and energy dependence. All results obtained were within international recommendations. Therefore the homemade ionization chamber presents usefulness for routine dosimetric procedures in radiotherapy beams.

  14. Anechoic chamber in industrial plants. [construction materials and structural design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpert, E.; Juncu, O.; Lorian, R.; Marfievici, D.; Mararu, I.

    1974-01-01

    A light anechoic chamber for routine acoustical measurements in the machine building industry is reported. The outer housing of the chamber consists of modules cast in glass fiber reinforced polyester resin; the inner housing consists of pyramidal modules cut out of sound absorbing slates. The parameters of this anechoic chamber facilitate acoustical measurements according to ISO and CAEM recommendations.

  15. A cylindrical drift chamber with azimuthal and axial position readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar-Yam, Z.; Cummings, J.P.; Dowd, J.P.; Eugenio, P.; Hayek, M.; Kern, W.; King, E.; Shenhav, N.; Chung, S.U.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Olchanski, C.; Weygand, D.P.; Willutzki, H.J.; Brabson, B.B.; Crittenden, R.R.; Dzierba, A.R.; Gunter, J.; Lindenbusch, R.; Rust, D.R.; Scott, E.; Smith, P.T.; Sulanke, T.; Teige, S.; Denisov, S.; Dushkin, A.; Kochetkov, V.; Lipaev, V.; Popov, A.; Shein, I.; Soldatov, A.; Anoshina, E.V.; Bodyagin, V.A.; Demianov, A.I.; Gribushin, A.M.; Kodolova, O.L.; Korotkikh, V.L.; Kostin, M.A.; Ostrovidov, A.I.; Sarycheva, L.I.; Sinev, N.B.; Vardanyan, I.N.; Yershov, A.A.; Adams, T.; Bishop, J.M.; Cason, N.M.; Sanjari, A.H.; LoSecco, J.M.; Manak, J.J.; Shephard, W.D.; Stienike, D.L.; Taegar, S.A.; Thompson, D.R.; Brown, D.S.; Pedlar, T.; Seth, K.K.; Wise, J.; Zhao, D.; Adams, G.S.; Napolitano, J.; Nozar, M.; Smith, J.A.; Witkowski, M. [Massachusetts Univ., North Dartmouth, MA (United States)]|[Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, L.I., NY 11973 (United States)]|[Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)]|[Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation)]|[Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)]|[Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)]|[Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    1997-02-21

    A cylindrical multiwire drift chamber with axial charge-division has been constructed and used in experiment E852 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It serves as a trigger element and as a tracking device for recoil protons in {pi}{sup -}p interactions. We describe the chamber`s design considerations, details of its construction, electronics, and performance characteristics. (orig.).

  16. Evaluation of carbon dioxide dissipation within a euthanasia chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoufack-Momo, Shelly M; Amparan, Ashlee A; Grunden, Beverly; Boivin, Gregory P-

    2014-07-01

    CO₂ euthanasia is used widely for small laboratory animals, such as rodents. A common necessity in many animal research facilities is to euthanize mice in sequential batches. We assessed the effects of several variables on the time it took for CO₂ to dissipate within a chamber. Using standard euthanasia time, changes in flow rate were compared between a slow 15% fill rate for 7 min, and a slow 15% followed by a rapid 50% filling for a total of 5 min. Additional variables assessed included the effects of opening the lid after the completion of chamber filling, turning the chamber over after completion of filling, and the use and removal of a cage from within the chamber. For all trials, CO₂ levels in the chambers peaked between 50% and 80%. After the gas was turned off, the concentration of CO₂ dropped to below 10% COv within 2 min, except when the lid was left on the chamber, where concentration levels remained above 10% after 20 min. CO₂ dissipation was significantly faster when the chamber was turned upside down after filling. Significant interaction effects occurred among the factors of cage presence within the chamber, flow rate, and chamber position. Only leaving the lid on the chamber had any practical implication for delaying CO₂ dissipation. We recommend that users allow 2 min for CO₂ to clear from the chamber before subsequent euthanasia procedures, unless the chamber is manipulated to increase the dissipation rate.

  17. Bi-cone vacuum chamber in the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The "bi-cone" vacuum chamber in ISR intersection I-7, for experiment R702. Made from 0.28 mm thick titanium, it was at its time the most transparent chamber ever built. Ian Wilson is standing next to the chamber. See also 7609219.

  18. Test of an undulated vacuum chamber for the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    This picture shows mechanical tests of an undulated vacuum chamber for downstream arms of ISR intersections. This chamber, made of 0.3 mm thick inconel, had inner dimensions of 150 mm by 50 mm. The deflection under vacuum is measured by dial gauges. On the left one sees the large vessel where vacuum chambers were tested at pressures above atmospheric pressure.

  19. 30 CFR 57.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flushing the combustion chamber. 57.7807... and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber of a jet drill stem which has been sitting unoperated in a drill hole shall be...

  20. 30 CFR 56.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flushing the combustion chamber. 56.7807 Section 56.7807 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber...

  1. Simulation of Enhanced-Explosive Devices in Chambers and Tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, J B; Kuhl, A L; Beckner, V E

    2007-06-05

    Introduction: Shock-dispersed fuel (SDF) explosives use a small chemical charge to disperse a combustible fuel that burns in the post-detonation environment. The energy released in the combustion process has the potential for generating higher pressures and temperatures than conventional explosives. However, the development of these types of novel explosive systems requires a detailed understanding of all of the modes of energy release. Objective: The objective of this project is develop a simulation capability for predicting explosion and combustion phase of SDF charges and apply that capability to quantifying the behavior of these types of explosives. Methodology: We approximate the dynamics of an SDF charge using high Reynolds number, fast chemistry model that effectively captures the thermodynamic behavior of SDF charges and accurately models the key modes of energy release. The overall computational model is combined with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) , implemented in a parallel adaptive framework suited to the massively parallel computer systems. Results: We have developed a multiphase version of the model and used it to simulate an SDF charge in which the dispersed fuel is aluminum flakes. Flow visualizations show that the combustion field is turbulent for the chamber and tunnel cases studied. During the 3 milli-seconds of simulation, over 90% of the Al fuel was consumed for the chamber case, while about 40% was consumed in the tunnel case in agreement with Al-SDF experiments. Significance to DoD: DoD has a requirement to develop enhanced energetic materials to support future military systems. The SDF charges described here utilize the combustion mechanism to increase energy per gram of fuel by a factor of 7 to 10 over conventional (detonating) charges, and increase the temperature of the explosion cloud to 2,000-4,000 K (depending on the SDF fuel). Accurate numerical simulation of such SDF explosions allows one to understand the energy release mechanism

  2. A novel non invasive measurement of hemodynamic parameters: Comparison of single-chamber ventricular and dual-chamber pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid M. Pardede

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We carried out a cross sectional study to analyze hemodynamic parameters of single-chamber ventricular pacemaker compared with dual-chamber pacemaker by using thoracic electrical bioimpedance monitoring method (Physio Flow™ - a novel simple non-invasive measurement. A total of 48 consecutive outpatients comprised of 27 single chamber pacemaker and 21 dual chamber were analyzed. We measured cardiac parameters: heart rate, stroke volume index, cardiac output index, estimated ejection fraction, end diastolic volume, early diastolic function ratio, thoracic fluid index, and systemic parameters: left cardiac work index and systemic vascular resistance index. Baseline characteristic and pacemaker indication were similar in both groups. Cardiac parameters assessment revealed no significant difference between single-chamber pacemaker and dual-chamber pacemaker in heart rate, stroke volume index, cardiac index, estimated ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, thoracic fluid index. There was significantly higher early diastolic function ratio in single-chamber pacemaker compared to dual-chamber pacemaker: 92% (10.2-187.7% vs. 100.6% (48.7-403.2%; p=0.006. Systemic parameters assessment revealed significantly higher left cardiac work index in single-chamber group than dual-chamber group 4.9 kg.m/m² (2.8-7.6 kg.m/m² vs. 4.3 kg.m/m² (2.9-7.2 kg.m/m²; p=0.004. There was no significant difference on systemic vascular resistance in single-chamber compared to dual-chamber pacemaker. Single-chamber ventricular pacemaker provides similar stroke volume, cardiac output and left cardiac work, compared to dual-chamber pacemaker. A non-invasive hemodynamic measurement using thoracic electrical bioimpedance is feasible for permanent pacemaker outpatients. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 25-32Keywords: Permanent pacemaker, single chamber, dual chamber, thoracic electrical bioimpedance, hemodynamic parameter

  3. Thermo-optical characterization of a low-background infrared chamber and wideband infrared scene projector (WISP) array for hardware-in-the-loop testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Jack R.; Flynn, David S.; Jones, Lawrence E.; Kircher, James R.

    1999-07-01

    The KHILS Vacuum Cold Chamber (KVACC) provides the capability of testing IR seekers with scenes involving a `cold' background, more closely simulating a high altitude/exoatmospheric engagement. During the past year, a gaseous helium refrigeration system has been installed to simplify the logistics of cooling the chamber. An antechamber has also been installed to serve as a chamber for the sensor under test. A WISP array was installed in the Source Chamber. A thermal control system was developed by connecting the array to a cold surface by way of a thermal choke, then actively controlling the temperature with heating elements. This made it possible to operate the array at user selected, stable substrate temperatures ranging from ambient temperature to below 150 K. This capability makes it possible to select the infrared background level that the array operates at, and to operate with background levels that are adequate for testing the high altitude/exoatmospheric engagements. WISP arrays were designed for room temperature operation, but predicted performance at reduced temperatures appears acceptable. Tests were performed with a Phase I prototype WISP array inside the KVACC Source Chamber. Data on this array's radiometric response at various substrate temperatures are presented. It is demonstrated that the arrays can be operated at substrate temperatures as low as 145 K. Currently two Phase 3 WISP arrays and a dichroic beam combiner are being installed in the Source Chamber for 2- color testing.

  4. Growth Chambers on the International Space Station for Large Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Gioia D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Morrow, Robert C.; Levine, Howard G.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) now has platforms for conducting research on horticultural plant species under LED (Light Emitting Diodes) lighting, and those capabilities continue to expand. The Veggie vegetable production system was deployed to the ISS as an applied research platform for food production in space. Veggie is capable of growing a wide array of horticultural crops. It was designed for low power usage, low launch mass and stowage volume, and minimal crew time requirements. The Veggie flight hardware consists of a light cap containing red (630 nanometers), blue, (455 nanometers) and green (530 nanometers) LEDs. Interfacing with the light cap is an extendable bellowsbaseplate for enclosing the plant canopy. A second large plant growth chamber, the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH), is will fly to the ISS in 2017. APH will be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. APH will control light (quality, level, and timing), temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing any cabin or plant-derived ethylene and other volatile organic compounds. Additional capabilities include sensing of leaf temperature and root zone moisture, root zone temperature, and oxygen concentration. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs (4100K). There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations. Veggie and APH are available for research proposals.

  5. Influence of high rotational speeds on heat transfer and oil film thickness in aero-engine bearing chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, S.; Glahn, A.; Himmelsbach, J.

    1994-04-01

    Increasing the thermal loading of bearing chambers in modern aero-engines requires advanced techniques for the determination of heat transfer characteristics. In the present study, film thickness and heat transfer measurements have been carried out for the complex two-phase oil/air flow in bearing chambers. In order to ensure real engine conditions, a new test facility has been built up, designed for rotational speeds up to n = 16,000 rpm and maximum flow temperatures of T(sub max) = 473 K. Sealing air and lubrication oil flow can be varied nearly in the whole range of aero-engine applications. Special interest is directed toward the development of an ultrasonic oil film thickness measuring technique, which can be used without any reaction on the flow inside the chamber. The determination of local heat transfer at the bearing chamber housing is based on a well-known temperature gradient method using surface temperature measurements and a finite element code to determine temperature distributions within the bearing chamber housing. The influence of high rotational speed on the local heat transfer and the oil film thickness is discussed.

  6. Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulation for Coherent Flamelet Model in a Swirl Chamber Diesel Engine%涡流室式柴油机相关火焰微元燃烧模型的三维数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏兴兰; 李德桃; 董刚; 杨文明

    1998-01-01

    The combustion in the swirl chamber is broken into three phases: low temperature ignition kinetics, high temperature premixed kinetics burn and diffusion burn phase.While the burn in the main chamber is considered as diffusion combustion. The shell ignition model, global Arrhenius equation and coherent flamelet model are used to model low temperature ignition, high temperature premixed burn and diffusion burn respectively. Three-dimensional numerical calculation code is developed. The change of temperature fields in the swirl chamber is studied. The pressure and the heat release rate predicted by the model are coincided with the results derived from experiments.

  7. Wireless transmission of biosignals for hyperbaric chamber applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Vidal, Carlos; Gracia, Luis; Carmona, Cristian; Alorda, Bartomeu; Salinas, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a wireless system to send biosignals outside a hyperbaric chamber avoiding wires going through the chamber walls. Hyperbaric chambers are becoming more and more common due to new indications of hyperbaric oxygen treatments. Metallic walls physically isolate patients inside the chamber, where getting a patient's vital signs turns into a painstaking task. The paper proposes using a ZigBee-based network to wirelessly transmit the patient's biosignals to the outside of the chamber. In particular, a wearable battery supported device has been designed, implemented and tested. Although the implementation has been conducted to transmit the electrocardiography signal, the device can be easily adapted to consider other biosignals.

  8. Advanced Modified High Performance Synthetic Jet Actuator with Curved Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The advanced modified high performance synthetic jet actuator with optimized curvature shape chamber (ASJA-M) is a synthetic jet actuator (SJA) with a lower volume reservoir or chamber. A curved chamber is used, instead of the conventional cylinder chamber, to reduce the dead volume of the jet chamber and increase the efficiency of the synthetic jet actuator. The shape of the curvature corresponds to the maximum displacement (deformation) profile of the electroactive diaphragm. The jet velocity and mass flow rate for the ASJA-M will be several times higher than conventional piezoelectric actuators.

  9. Creating the Thermal Environment for Safely Testing the James Webb Space Telescope at the Johnson Space Center's Chamber A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Jonathan L.; Lauterbach, John; Garcia, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center and is one of the largest space environment chambers in the world. The chamber is 19.8 m (65 ft) in diameter and 36.6 m (120 ft) tall and is equipped with cryogenic liquid nitrogen panels (shrouds) and gaseous helium shrouds to create a simulated space environment. The chamber was originally built to support testing of the Apollo Service and Command Module for lunar missions, but underwent major modifications to be able to test the James Webb Space Telescope in a simulated deep space environment. To date seven tests have been performed in preparation of testing the flight optics for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Each test has had a uniquie thermal profile and set of thermal requirements for cooling down and warming up, controlling contamination, and releasing condensed air. These range from temperatures from 335K to 15K, with tight uniformity and controllability for maintining thermal stability and pressure control. One unique requirement for two test was structurally proof loading hardware by creating thermal gradients at specific temperatures. This paper will discuss the thermal requirements and goals of the tests, the original requirements of the chamber thermal systems for planned operation, and how the new requirements were met by the team using the hardware, system flexiblilty, and engineering creativity. It will also discuss the mistakes and successes to meet the unique goals, especially when meeting the thermal proof load.

  10. The relative roles of boundary layer fractionation and homogeneous fractionation in cooling basaltic magma chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritani, Takeshi

    2009-06-01

    In a cooling magma chamber, magmatic differentiation can proceed both by fractionation of crystals from the main molten part of the magma body (homogeneous fractionation) and by mixing of the main magma with fractionated melt derived from low-temperature mush zones (boundary layer fractionation). In this study, the relative roles of boundary layer fractionation and homogeneous fractionation in basaltic magma bodies were examined using a thermodynamics-based mass balance model. Model calculations show that boundary layer fractionation cannot be a dominant fractionation mechanism when magma chambers are located at low pressures (magmatic evolution. On the other hand, boundary layer fractionation can occur effectively when magmas are hydrous (> ~ 2 wt.%), such as arc basalt, and the magma chambers are located at depth (> ~ 100 MPa). Because the melt derived from mush zones is enriched in alkalis and H 2O, crystallization from the main magma is suppressed by mixing with the mush melt as a consequence of depression of the liquidus temperature. Therefore, homogeneous fractionation is more effectively suppressed in magma chambers in which boundary layer fractionation is more active. If magmatic differentiation proceeds primarily by boundary layer fractionation, magmas can remain free of crystals for long periods during magmatic evolution.

  11. The Evolution and Development of Cephalopod Chambers and Their Shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemanis, Robert; Korn, Dieter; Zachow, Stefan; Rybacki, Erik; Hoffmann, René

    2016-01-01

    The Ammonoidea is a group of extinct cephalopods ideal to study evolution through deep time. The evolution of the planispiral shell and complexly folded septa in ammonoids has been thought to have increased the functional surface area of the chambers permitting enhanced metabolic functions such as: chamber emptying, rate of mineralization and increased growth rates throughout ontogeny. Using nano-computed tomography and synchrotron radiation based micro-computed tomography, we present the first study of ontogenetic changes in surface area to volume ratios in the phragmocone chambers of several phylogenetically distant ammonoids and extant cephalopods. Contrary to the initial hypothesis, ammonoids do not possess a persistently high relative chamber surface area. Instead, the functional surface area of the chambers is higher in earliest ontogeny when compared to Spirula spirula. The higher the functional surface area the quicker the potential emptying rate of the chamber; quicker chamber emptying rates would theoretically permit faster growth. This is supported by the persistently higher siphuncular surface area to chamber volume ratio we collected for the ammonite Amauroceras sp. compared to either S. spirula or nautilids. We demonstrate that the curvature of the surface of the chamber increases with greater septal complexity increasing the potential refilling rates. We further show a unique relationship between ammonoid chamber shape and size that does not exist in S. spirula or nautilids. This view of chamber function also has implications for the evolution of the internal shell of coleoids, relating this event to the decoupling of soft-body growth and shell growth.

  12. Liquid rocket combustion chamber acoustic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândido Magno de Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 40 years, many solid and liquid rocket motors have experienced combustion instabilities. Among other causes, there is the interaction of acoustic modes with the combustion and/or fluid dynamic processes inside the combustion chamber. Studies have been showing that, even if less than 1% of the available energy is diverted to an acoustic mode, combustion instability can be generated. On one hand, this instability can lead to ballistic pressure changes, couple with other propulsion systems such as guidance or thrust vector control, and in the worst case, cause motor structural failure. In this case, measures, applying acoustic techniques, must be taken to correct/minimize these influences on the combustion. The combustion chamber acoustic behavior in operating conditions can be estimated by considering its behavior in room conditions. In this way, acoustic tests can be easily performed, thus identifying the cavity modes. This paper describes the procedures to characterize the acoustic behavior in the inner cavity of four different configurations of a combustion chamber. Simple analytical models are used to calculate the acoustic resonance frequencies and these results are compared with acoustic natural frequencies measured at room conditions. Some comments about the measurement procedures are done, as well as the next steps for the continuity of this research. The analytical and experimental procedures results showed good agreement. However, limitations on high frequency band as well as in the identification of specific kinds of modes indicate that numerical methods able to model the real cavity geometry and an acoustic experimental modal analysis may be necessary for a more complete analysis. Future works shall also consider the presence of passive acoustic devices such as baffles and resonators capable of introducing damping and avoiding or limiting acoustic instabilities.

  13. Dynamic consideration of smog chamber experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. K. Chuang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of the α-pinene + ozone reaction that address particle nucleation show relatively high molar yields of highly oxidized multifunctional organic molecules with very low saturation concentrations that can form and grow new particles on their own. However, numerous smog-chamber experiments addressing secondary organic aerosol (SOA mass yields, interpreted via equilibrium partitioning theory, suggest that the vast majority of SOA from α-pinene is semivolatile. We explore this paradox by employing a dynamic volatility basis set (VBS model that reproduces the new-particle growth rates observed in the CLOUD experiment at CERN and then modeling SOA mass yield experiments conducted at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU. We find that the base-case simulations do overpredict observed SOA mass but by much less than an equilibrium analysis would suggest; this is because delayed condensation of vapors suppresses the apparent mass yields early in the chamber experiments. We further find that a second VBS model featuring substantial oligomerization of semivolatile monomers can match the CLOUD growth rates with substantially lower SOA mass yields; this is because the lighter monomers have a higher velocity and thus a higher condensation rate for a given mass concentration. The oligomerization simulations are a closer match to the CMU experiments than the base-case simulations, though they overpredict the observations somewhat. However, we also find that if the chemical conditions in CLOUD and the CMU chamber were identical, substantial nucleation would have occurred in the CMU experiments when in fact none occurred. This suggests that the chemical mechanisms differed in the two experiments, perhaps because the high oxidation rates in the SOA formation experiments led to rapid termination of peroxy radical chemistry.

  14. Finite Element Analysis of Reverberation Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Charles F.; Nguyen, Duc T.

    2000-01-01

    The primary motivating factor behind the initiation of this work was to provide a deterministic means of establishing the validity of the statistical methods that are recommended for the determination of fields that interact in -an avionics system. The application of finite element analysis to reverberation chambers is the initial step required to establish a reasonable course of inquiry in this particularly data-intensive study. The use of computational electromagnetics provides a high degree of control of the "experimental" parameters that can be utilized in a simulation of reverberating structures. As the work evolved there were four primary focus areas they are: 1. The eigenvalue problem for the source free problem. 2. The development of a complex efficient eigensolver. 3. The application of a source for the TE and TM fields for statistical characterization. 4. The examination of shielding effectiveness in a reverberating environment. One early purpose of this work was to establish the utility of finite element techniques in the development of an extended low frequency statistical model for reverberation phenomena. By employing finite element techniques, structures of arbitrary complexity can be analyzed due to the use of triangular shape functions in the spatial discretization. The effects of both frequency stirring and mechanical stirring are presented. It is suggested that for the low frequency operation the typical tuner size is inadequate to provide a sufficiently random field and that frequency stirring should be used. The results of the finite element analysis of the reverberation chamber illustrate io-W the potential utility of a 2D representation for enhancing the basic statistical characteristics of the chamber when operating in a low frequency regime. The basic field statistics are verified for frequency stirring over a wide range of frequencies. Mechanical stirring is shown to provide an effective frequency deviation.

  15. Golden Jubilee photos: The first CERN bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    In the 1950s and 1960s, bubble and spark chambers were the dominant experimental tools in high-energy physics. While spark chambers were usually built and fitted to specific experiments, bubble chambers were constructed as general purpose devices that could be used for a variety of experiments. At CERN, the bubble chamber programme started under Charles Peyrou in the late 1950s. The first of CERN's bubble chambers, a 30 cm hydrogen chamber, is seen here being inserted into its vacuum tank. The HBC30, as it was called, took its first beam from the SC in 1959. One of the first pictures taken, of a positive pion-proton interaction, began a long series of pretty images for which bubble chambers would become famous. When it stopped operating in spring 1962, the HBC30 had consumed 150 km of film in its 3 years of operation.

  16. A new ring-shaped graphite monitor ionization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizumi, M. T.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2010-07-01

    A ring-shaped monitor ionization chamber was developed at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. This ionization chamber presents an entrance window of aluminized polyester foil. The guard ring and collecting electrode are made of graphite coated Lucite plates. The main difference between this new ionization chamber and commercial monitor chambers is its ring-shaped design. The new monitor chamber has a central hole, allowing the passage of the direct radiation beam without attenuation; only the penumbra radiation is measured by the sensitive volume. This kind of ionization chamber design has already been tested, but using aluminium electrodes. By changing the electrode material from aluminium to a graphite coating, an improvement in the chamber response stability was expected. The pre-operational tests, as saturation curve, recombination loss and polarity effect showed satisfactory results. The repeatability and the long-term stability tests were also evaluated, showing good agreement with international recommendations.

  17. Design and commissioning of a semi-confined blast chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.M. SNYMAN; F.J. MOSTERT; W. GRUNDLING

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design, test and analysis of a scaled cylindrical blast chamber. The blast chamber is a one-fifth dimensional size replica of the full-scale blast chamber (Emily). The blast chamber is semi-confined as one end is open. The scaled blast chamber is used to test concepts for closing the open end and allows the gas to vent at the same time. ANSYS AUTODYN calculated the pressure time histories for different closure scenarios. Comparing the results suggested a viable scenario, namely a structure consisting of a circular disc and a frame positioned at the open end of the blast chamber. The structure and cylindrical blast chamber were subjected to scaled blast tests and the pressure results are presented and discussed.

  18. Smart ionization chamber for gamma-ray monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drndarević Vujo R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A design and implementation of a smart ionization chamber suitable for connection into gamma radiation monitoring networks is presented in this paper. The smart ionization chamber consists of air-equivalent one liter ionization chamber with associated electronics and a built-in memory for storage of electronic data specifications. Generally, operating and measurement characteristics of the used ionization chamber are written into the memory chip attached to the chamber. A microcontroller-based data acquisition system with a mixed-mode interface has been implemented for the purpose of reading electronic data specifications from the memory chip, and for configuration and interfacing of the ionization chamber to the monitoring network using plug-and-play concept. The details of smart ionization chamber implementation and test results are included in the paper. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR36047 i br. TR32043

  19. A new ring-shaped graphite monitor ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizumi, M.T., E-mail: mairaty@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN - CNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil); Caldas, L.V.E., E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares IPEN - CNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-21

    A ring-shaped monitor ionization chamber was developed at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. This ionization chamber presents an entrance window of aluminized polyester foil. The guard ring and collecting electrode are made of graphite coated Lucite plates. The main difference between this new ionization chamber and commercial monitor chambers is its ring-shaped design. The new monitor chamber has a central hole, allowing the passage of the direct radiation beam without attenuation; only the penumbra radiation is measured by the sensitive volume. This kind of ionization chamber design has already been tested, but using aluminium electrodes. By changing the electrode material from aluminium to a graphite coating, an improvement in the chamber response stability was expected. The pre-operational tests, as saturation curve, recombination loss and polarity effect showed satisfactory results. The repeatability and the long-term stability tests were also evaluated, showing good agreement with international recommendations.

  20. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornero-López, Ana M.; Guirado, Damián; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, E-18012 Granada (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Servicio de Radioterapia, Unidad de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, E-46026 Valencia (Spain); Simancas, Fernando; Lallena, Antonio M. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Gazdic-Santic, Maja [Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Safety, Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University, 71000 Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Air-communicating well ionization chambers are commonly used to assess air kerma strength of sources used in brachytherapy. The signal produced is supposed to be proportional to the air density within the chamber and, therefore, a density-independent air kerma strength is obtained when the measurement is corrected to standard atmospheric conditions using the usual temperature and pressure correction factor. Nevertheless, when assessing low energy sources, the ionization chambers may not fulfill that condition and a residual density dependence still remains after correction. In this work, the authors examined the behavior of the PTW 34051 SourceCheck ionization chamber when measuring the air kerma strength of {sup 125}I seeds.Methods: Four different SourceCheck chambers were analyzed. With each one of them, two series of measurements of the air kerma strength for {sup 125}I selectSeed{sup TM} brachytherapy sources were performed inside a pressure chamber and varying the pressure in a range from 747 to 1040 hPa (560 to 780 mm Hg). The temperature and relative humidity were kept basically constant. An analogous experiment was performed by taking measurements at different altitudes above sea level.Results: Contrary to other well-known ionization chambers, like the HDR1000 PLUS, in which the temperature-pressure correction factor overcorrects the measurements, in the SourceCheck ionization chamber they are undercorrected. At a typical atmospheric situation of 933 hPa (700 mm Hg) and 20 °C, this undercorrection turns out to be 1.5%. Corrected measurements show a residual linear dependence on the density and, as a consequence, an additional density dependent correction must be applied. The slope of this residual linear density dependence is different for each SourceCheck chamber investigated. The results obtained by taking measurements at different altitudes are compatible with those obtained with the pressure chamber.Conclusions: Variations of the altitude and